What does Song Of Solomon mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Song of Solomon
Collection of romantic poetry comprising the twenty-second book of the English Old Testament. The Hebrew title, “Solomon's Song of Songs,” means that this is the best of songs and that it in some way concerns Solomon.
Author and Date While the title appears to name Solomon as the author, the Hebrew phrase can also mean for or about Solomon. Solomon or “king” is mentioned in the book several times (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1 ,Song of Song of Solomon 1:4-5 ,Song of Song of Solomon 1:12 ; Song of Song of Solomon 3:7 ,Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 ,Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:11-12 ), but scholars remain uncertain about its author. An ancient rabbinic tradition (Baba Bathra 15a) attributes the Song to Hezekiah and his scribes (compare Proverbs 25:1 ).
Similarly, it is hard to establish the date of the book from internal evidence. Some scholars argue on linguistic grounds for authorship much later than Solomon. Such grounds include the use of expressions akin to Aramaic and the presence of certain foreign loan-words (Persian: pardes “orchard,” Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 ; appiryon from Greek phoreion “carriage” or [1] “canopied bed,” Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 ). Others argue that such linguistic usages and borrowings can go back to the time of Solomon or merely reflect the date of the book's final editing.
Canon and Interpretation Because of its erotic language and the difficulty of its interpretation, the rabbis questioned the place of the Song of Solomon in the canon. The positive resolution of that debate is reflected in the famous declaration of Rabbi Akiva, “The whole world is not worth the day on which the Song of Songs was given to Israel; all the Writings are holy, but the Song of Songs is the holy of holies.”
The problems of the book's place in the canon and its interpretation are closely related. Under the influence of Greek views, which denigrated the body, and with the loss of a biblical view of the created goodness of the body and human love, many interpreters felt compelled to find in the Song an allegory of sacred love between God and Israel, Christ and the church, or Christ and the soul. With few exceptions, allegorical readings of the Song have prevailed for most of church history.
In the modern period, most scholars have returned to a literal reading of the Song. Conflict remains even about the literal sense of the text. Some compare Egyptian and Mesopotamian poems and see the Song as a mere collection of secular love ditties. Another view tries to see it as an adaptation of pagan fertility rituals. (This view is in reality a modern allegorical reading.) Others see the Song as a drama in which the pure love of the Shulammite maid and her shepherd prevails over Solomon's callous attempt to bring the girl into his harem. This view tries to do justice to the alteration of speakers in the Song in its various dialogues. (These shifts are indicated in Hebrew by shifts in grammatical person and number.)
A recent, promising approach is aware of parallels to Egyptian love poetry but shows that the Song itself gives expression to a uniquely biblical perspective on sexual love. While containing a number of smaller love poems, the Song is unified by patterns of dialogue, repetition, the use of catch words, and above all, a consistent vision of love. Like Genesis 2:23-25 , the Song celebrates God's gift of bodily love between man and woman. Here the Creator's wisdom and bounty are displayed. Thus, the Song is best taken as an example of Israel's wisdom poetry (compare Proverbs 5:15-20 ; Proverbs 6:24-29 ; Proverbs 7:6-27 ; Proverbs 30:18-20 ). Like many Psalms which praise God and also teach, the Song's main purpose is to celebrate rather than to instruct. Like music, it tends to joy rather than learning. Yet one can overhear in it biblical wisdom on love. “Love is as strong as death. Many waters cannot quench love. If one were to give all the wealth of his house for love, it would be utterly scorned” (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6-7 NIV). Moreover, there is a right time and place for love: “Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires” (Song of Song of Solomon 3:5 NIV). In these poems love is portrayed in its power and splendor, its freshness and devotion to the beloved. Love in all its variety parades before us: moments of union and separation, ecstasy and anguish, longing and fulfillment.
Finally, a certain validity remains in the long history of interpretation, which saw in the pure love of the Song a reflection of divine-human love (compare Ephesians 5:21-32 ; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6-11 ; and the messianic typology of Psalm 45:1 .) Nonetheless, this parallel should not be pushed to the point of allegorizing details of the poem. See Allegory, Wisdom.
Outline
I. Longing Is a Part of Love (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1-8 ).
II. Love Will Not Be Silent (Song of Song of Solomon 1:9-2:7 ).
III. Spring and Love Go Together (Song of Song of Solomon 2:8-17 ).
IV. Love Is Exclusive (Song of Song of Solomon 3:1-5 ).
V. Love Is Enhanced by Friendship (Song of Song of Solomon 3:6-11 ).
VI. Love Sees Only the Beautiful (Song of Song of Solomon 4:1-7 ).
VII. Love Involves Giving and Receiving (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8-5:1 ).
VIII. Love Means Risking the Possibility of Pain (Song of Song of Solomon 5:2-6:3 ).
IX. Words Fail for Expressing Love (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4-7:9 ).
X. Love Must Be Given Freely (Song of Song of Solomon 7:10-13 ).
XI. True Love Is Priceless (Song of Song of Solomon 8:1-14 ).
Raymond C. Van Leeuwen
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Canticles; the Song of Solomon
"The song of songs," i.e. the most excellent of songs; even as the antitypical Solomon, its subject and its author (by His Spirit), is King of kings, i.e. the greatest of kings (so the heaven of heavens means the highest heaven, Deuteronomy 10:14). The fourth of the hagiographa (chethubim, "writings") or the third division of the Old Testament (See CANON) and (See BIBLE.) Its divine canonicity and authority are certain, as it is found in all Hebrew manuscripts of Scripture; also in the Greek Septuagint version; in the catalogues of Melito, bishop of Sardis A.D. 170 (Eusebius, H. E., 4:26), and others. The literalists explain it as displaying "the victory of humble and constant love over the temptations of wealth and royalty": Solomon tempting a Shulamite shepherdess, who, in spite of the fascinations of his splendid court, pines for her shepherd lover from whom she has been severed.
But had it been a representation of merely human love, it would have been positively indelicate and never would have been inserted in the holy canon (see Song of Solomon 5:2-6; Song of Solomon 7:2-3). The sudden transitions from the court to the grove are inexplicable on the literal interpretation. Nor is the other literal interpretation tenable, namely, that the love of Solomon and Pharaoh's daughter is the subject. "Pharaoh's chariots" (Song of Solomon 1:9) allude not to this, but to the Old Testament church's miraculous deliverance from Pharaoh's hosts at the Red Sea. A shepherdess (Song of Solomon 1:7) would have been an abomination to the Egyptians; nor do Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 3:4; Song of Solomon 4:8; Song of Solomon 5:7 suit this view. Origen and Theodover compare Solomon's teaching to a ladder with three steps; Ecclesiastes, natural (sensible things naturally vain); Proverbs, moral; Canticles, mystical, figuring the union of Christ and the church.
Proverbs, said the rabbis, are the outer court of Solomon's temple; Ecclesiastes, the holy place; Cantitles, the holy of holies. See the treatise Yadaim in the Mishna: "all the chethubim are holy, but the Canticles are holy of holies." Shulamith (Song of Solomon 6:13), i.e. the daughter of peace, is fitly the bride of Solomon, "the prince of peace." Taken allegorically there is nothing incongruous in what would be, if literally taken, inexplicable; she by turns being a vinedresser, shepherdess, midnight inquirer, prince's consort, and at the same time daughter; just as under the same image in Psalms 45:9-10; Psalms 45:13-14, the church is at once the Lord's bride and daughter; as Psalm 45, "a song of loves," answers to Canticles, so Psalm 37 to Proverbs, and Psalm 39; Psalm 73 to Job.
As Ecclesiastes sets forth them vanity of the love of the creature, so Canticles the all satisfying love which unites the church and her Lord. Love in man was created as the transcript of the divine love. This song portrays the latter in imagery from the former. The union of Christ and His church was the original fact in the mind of God, on which human marriage is based (Ephesians 5:23-32). This idea pervades all Scripture, from the original Eden (Genesis 2:21-24) down to the restored paradise (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9-10; Revelation 22:17). Israel was the Old Testament wife of Jehovah (Isaiah 54:5; Isaiah 62:5; Jeremiah 3:1, etc.; Hosea 1; 2; 3; Ezekiel 16; 23). To her as His destined earthly bride the song primarily refers; secondarily to the spiritual and heavenly bride, the elect church, of all ages and countries (Matthew 9:15; Matthew 22:2; Matthew 25:1; John 3:29; 2 Corinthians 11:2).
"The experimental knowledge of Christ's loveliness, and the believer's love, is the best commentary on this allegorical song" (Leighton). The name of God does not occur, because throughout the allegory, to the exclusion of everything literal, is maintained, and Solomon throughout represents Messiah JEHOVAH, whose love is the grand theme. Love to Christ is the most intense, as it is the purest, of human passions, and therefore is expressed in the most intenselyardent language. The details of the imagery are not to be strained in the interpretation. Many lovely natural objects, not always mutually congruous if pressed literally, are combined, to bring out the varied, and often seemingly opposite, beauties which meet in the Lord Jesus. The significance of the name Solomon, "the peace giver," appears at the outset (Song of Solomon 1:3), "thy name is as ointment poured forth, diffusing peace and love (John 14:27); the same image as in Psalm 133.
Not until toward the close does the bride receive her name Shulamith (Song of Solomon 6:13), "the peace receiver," and so the "prince's daughter" (Song of Solomon 7:1; compare Matthew 5:9). She explains her name (Song of Solomon 8:10) as expressing "one that found peace" (Song of Solomon 8:10 margin). Not until her union with Solomon had been effected did she find peace, and received her name accordingly (Romans 5:1). Shulamith is passive in meaning, the reconciled one (Ephesians 2:14; 2 Corinthians 5:19-20). Her becoming sensible of His being the king, in whose presence is peace and fullness of joy (Song of Solomon 1:2; Song of Solomon 1:4; Song of Solomon 1:7) leads her to seek in Him peace, and finally to find it.
Driven from the vineyard of paradise which was once her own into the wilderness (Song of Solomon 3:6), and to keep very different vineyards (Satan's and the world's), she became black with affliction, though still beautiful (Song of Solomon 1:5-6; compare Lamentations 4:7-8; Psalms 120:5-6): in contrast to His countenance, "white and ruddy" (Song of Solomon 5:10). But He at the close brings her up from the wilderness of affliction (Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 12:6), and restores her her own vineyard (Song of Solomon 8:12), where He desires to hear her voice. If we view the bride as Israel (the primary sense), Hosea 2:14-16 is exactly parallel to the whole song.
Five parts are to be traced: Song of Solomon 1:1-2:7; Song of Solomon 2:8-3:5, both parts ending "I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem," etc.; Song of Songs 3:6 - 6:9; Song of Songs 6:10 - 8:4; Song of Solomon 8:5-14, these three parts beginning severally with "Who is this?" etc. In the song's Israelite aspect the third or central part probably refers to the sealing of the union between Jehovah and the Old Testament church by Solomon's erection of the temple (Song of Solomon 3:6-11). "The daughter of Zion was at that time openly married to Jehovah; for it is thenceforth that the prophets in reproving Israel's sin speak of it as a breach of her marriage covenant.
The songs heretofore sung by her were the preparatory hymns of her childhood; the last and crowning 'song of songs' was prepared for the now mature maiden against the day of her marriage to the King of kings" (Origen: see Moody Stuart's admirable commentary). Her wilderness state then gave place to peaceful and prosperous settlement in manifested union with her God; "the day of Solomon's espousals" (Song of Solomon 3:11). But a further marriage is intended, that of the individual soul to the Lord, for Christ "loves one, as if that one were all"; and finally the yet future marriage of the whole elect church (Revelation 19:7-8; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9). In the individual soul we have
(1) its longing for Christ's manifestation to it, and the various alternations in its experience of His manifestation (Song of Solomon 1:2-4; Song of Solomon 2:8; Song of Solomon 3:1; Song of Solomon 3:4; Song of Solomon 3:6-7);
(2) the abundant enjoyment of His sensible consolations, which is withdrawn through the bride's carelessness (Song of Solomon 5:1-3), and her longings after Him and reconciliation (Song of Solomon 5:8-16; Song of Solomon 6:3, etc.; Song of Solomon 7:1, etc.);
(3) effects of Christ's manifestation on the believer, assurance, labors of love, anxiety for the salvation of the impenitent, eagerness for His second coming. In the church aspect her longing for His first advent appears in the beginning (Song of Solomon 1:2); joyful anticipation of His advent (Song of Solomon 2:8-13; Song of Solomon 2:17); His stay with her during the one only whole day in the allegory (there are but two nights, Song of Solomon 2:17; Daniel 12:1-3), answering to His sojourn here with His disciples, the last supper, the pledge of His return to her (Song of Songs 3:6 - 4:5); His death in figurative language, and ascension to the heavenly mount where still He is to be met with spiritually in prayer until the everlasting daybreak when we shall see face to face (Song of Solomon 4:6; Song of Solomon 4:8; Song of Solomon 4:15). "My sister, ... My spouse, excludes carnal ideas of love.
As Eve was formed from Adam, so Christ took our flesh to be brother and also husband (compare Hebrews 2:11; Mark 3:35). In Song of Solomon 5:1 "I am come into My garden" is the central point of the whole, the bridegroom and bride are one; the Spirit, answering to the awakening N. wind and the softly blowing S. wind, having been shed on the church at Pentecost, to make the spiritual union complete (Song of Solomon 4:10). "Eat, O friends," etc., follows immediately (Isaiah 55:1), the gospel being thenceforth preached in all its grace to all (Acts 2:38; Acts 3:19). Then succeeds the period of declension and the consequent withdrawing of the grieved Spirit (Song of Solomon 5:2-6). Then her earnest search for Him and praises of Him to others, wherein she regains her own assurance, "I am my Beloved's" (Song of Solomon 6:3).
Here Israel's sighing after Messiah, and finding Him hereafter as one united nation, combining "Tirzah" the northern capital and. "Jerusalem" the southern capital, is hinted at (Song of Solomon 6:4); she the queen, and the attendant Gentile churches" threescore queens and fourscore concubines" (Song of Solomon 6:8; Psalms 45:9-15). Then Shulamith having found Solomon, i.e. Israel," made like the chariots of Amminadib" ("My willing people") instead of as heretofore "Lo-ammi," not My people (Hosea 1:9-10), shall "look forth as, the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, terrible as an army with banners" (Song of Solomon 4:6; Revelation 12:1; Revelation 19:14). The nations shall then admire and flow unto her (Song of Solomon 6:13; Song of Solomon 7:1, etc., answering to Isaiah 52:7-10). The "return, return, O Shulamite" answers to "when the Lord shall bring again Zion" through the instrumentality of the nations who shall then long to "look upon" her as the source of spiritual blessing to them (Micah 5:7; Zechariah 8:13).
The daughters of Jerusalem, i.e. the nations (a phrase drawn by Jesus from the song, Luke 23:28, Galilean women standing in the same relation to the Jews as Gentiles afterward did), become united to Christ through the instrumentality of the bride, and they also appropriate her words, "I am my Beloved's," etc. (Song of Solomon 7:10). At the close of this part (Song of Solomon 8:4) is restored Israel's charge to the Gentile converted nations not to interrupt the millennial rest of Christ with His worldwide church, "I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up ... My love;" for an apostasy succeeds, as one precedes, the millennium (Revelation 20:4-9).
Then the elect church from Jews and Gentiles, now being gathered, is described, Song of Solomon 8:5-14, which is chronologically before the millennial church just described, but fitly brought in as the closing subject ("make haste, My beloved," etc.) to remind us our position is to be "hasting unto the coming of the day of God" (2 Peter 3:12; Revelation 22:20). The "little sister" having "no breasts" (neither faith nor love, the springs of spiritual nourishment, 1 Thessalonians 5:8; compare in connection with breasts, Luke 11:27-28) answers to the Gentile church admitted to be a "wall" in Zion founded on Christ; "spoken for," i.e. sought in marriage by Him. No "stubble" of Jewish rites is to be built on her (1 Corinthians 3:11-12), but a "palace of silver," i.e. the highest privileges of church fellowship (Galatians 2:11-18; Ephesians 2:11-22). The "door" is that of faith opened to the Gentiles, implying universal accessibleness (1 Corinthians 16:9), but safely enclosed with fragrant enduring "cedar," lest it should be corrupted by latitudinarianism.
The bride's joyous anticipation and desires at the beginning (Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 1:12, e
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Song of Solomon, Theology of
At first reading it seems impossible to describe a theology of the Song of Songs. After all, the name of God may appear only one time in the book, and that is debated (8:6). Moreover, God is not the only surprising absence in the book; we look in vain for a reference to Israel, the covenant, worship institutions, or anything explicitly religious. How then could Rabbi Akiba call this book the Bible's "Holy of Holies"?
The way chosen by many during the history of interpretation was to suppress the obviously sexual language of human love in the book by allegorizing it. Jewish interpreters, as represented by the Targum of the book (ca. seventh century a.d.), thought that the lover of the Song was Yahweh and the beloved Israel. Thus, when the woman pleads with the king to take her into his chamber (1:4), this has nothing to do with human lovemaking but rather describes the exodus from Egypt, God's bedroom being the land of Palestine. Early Christian interpreters also desexed the Song in this way, but, of course, identified the main characters with Jesus Christ and the church and/or the individual Christians. Hippolytus (ca. a.d. 200) was the first known Christian to allegorize the Song. From fragments of his commentary we learn that he takes the statement in 1:4 to mean that Christ has brought the worthy ones whom he has wedded into the church. The Targum and Hippolytus are just examples of an interpretive tendency that was dominant from early times until the nineteenth century and still is occasionally found today.
The allegorical method, however, lacks any external justification. The Song gives no indication that it should be read in any but a straightforward way. The discovery and publication of formally similar love poetry from modern Arabic literature as well as ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia signaled the end of the allegorical approach to the text, but left the church with a number of questions about the theological meaning of the Song.
The Song serves an important canonical function with its explicit language of love. Allegorization in early times arose from the belief that such a subject was unsuitable for the Holy Scriptures. The church and the synagogue had been influenced by foreign philosophy (Neo-Platonism) to the point where bodily functions were seen in opposition to the things of the Spirit and thus to be avoided. The same attitudes and beliefs that motivated the monastic movement led to the allegorization of the Song. The Song, however, stands against such attempts and tells the church that sexuality within the context of marriage is something God created for the pleasure of his human creatures. Thus, the woman delights in the physical beauty of the man (5:10-16) and vice versa (4:1-15), and this physical attraction culminates in passionate lovemaking (5:1-2). God endowed humans at creation with sexuality as a blessing, not as a curse.
Indeed, the Song must be read in the context of the garden of Eden, where human sexuality is first introduced. The pervasive garden theme in the Song evokes memories of the garden before the fall. Since Adam had no suitable partner, God created Eve, and the man and the woman stood naked in the garden and felt no shame (Genesis 2:25 ), exulting in one another's "flesh" (Genesis 2:23-24 ).
This perfect harmony between the male and female tragically ended at the fall. Eve, then Adam, rebelled against God and a horrible distance grew between the sinful human race and their holy God. This separation between the divine and the human had repercussions in the human sphere as well. Now Adam and Eve were naked and they felt shame and fled from one another (Genesis 3:7,10 ). The sin of Adam and Eve was not a specifically sexual sin, but the alienation that resulted from the sin is recounted in sexual terms.
The Song of Songs, then, describes a lover and his beloved rejoicing in each other's sexuality in a garden. They feel no shame. The Song is as the story of sexuality redeemed.
Nonetheless, this reading does not exhaust the theological meaning of the Song. When read in the context of the canon as a whole, the book forcefully communicates the intensely intimate relationship that Israel enjoys with God. In many Old Testament Scriptures, marriage is an underlying metaphor for Israel's relationship with God. Unfortunately, due to Israel's lack of trust, the metaphor often appears in a negative context, and Israel is pictured as a whore in its relationship with God (Jeremiah 2:20 ; 3:1 ; Ezekiel 16,23 ). One of the most memorable scenes in the Old Testament is when God commands his prophet Hosea to marry a prostitute to symbolize his love for a faithless Israel. In spite of the predominantly negative use of the image, we must not lose sight of the fact that Israel was the bride of God, and so as the Song celebrates the intimacy between human lovers, we learn about our relationship with God.
So we come full circle, reaching similar conclusions to the early allegorical approaches to the Song. The difference, though, is obvious. We do not deny the primary and natural reading of the book, which highlights human love, and we do not arbitrarily posit the analogy between the Song's lovers and God and Israel. Rather, we read it in the light of the pervasive marriage metaphor of the Old Testament.
From a New Testament Perspective . The New Testament also uses human relationships as metaphors of the divine-human relationship, and none clearer than marriage. According to Ephesians 5:22-23 , the church is the bride of Christ (see also Revelation 19:7 ; 21:2,9 ; 22:17 ). So Christians should read the Song in the light of Ephesians and rejoice in the intimate relationship that they enjoy with Jesus Christ.
Tremper Longman Iii
Bibliography . G. L. Carr, Song of Solomon ; F. Delitzsch, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs ; M. Falk, Love Lyrics from the Bible ; W. G. Lambert, JSS 4 (1959): 1-15; M. H. Popoe, Song of Songs ; P. Trible, God and the Rhetoric of Sexuality ; J. B. White, A Study of the Language of Love in the Song of Songs and Ancient Near Eastern Poetry .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Song of Solomon, the
(See SOLOMON.)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Song of Solomon, the Book of
(See SOLOMON.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Song of Solomon
This is also called "the Song of Songs, or The Canticles," though it is one poem, and not a collection of poems. The first verse states that it is by Solomon. The book stands alone, and has been variously interpreted. A favourite theory of German theologians and of many English is that it is literally a love story: that Solomon sought to draw away a lowly maiden from a shepherd, to whom she was betrothed; but to whom she remained faithful. That such a poem, with no higher teaching than this, should find a place in holy scripture, is impossible for the Christian who believes in inspiration to accept. With others it is held to represent 'the pure love and mystical union and marriage of Christ and His church,' which will be seen to be the idea in the headings of the chapters in the A.V. Passages in the N.T. that refer to the union of Christ and the church are referred to as bearing out this interpretation.
But a great deal of damage has been done to the right understanding of the O.T. by supposing that wherever blessing is there spoken of, it must refer to the church. God has blessed and will bless others besides the church, especially His ancient people Israel. He uses also endearing terms to Israel. He says to her, "I will betroth thee unto me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto me in righteousness, and in judgement, and in loving-kindness, and in mercies." This declaration is associated with a day when she will call Jehovah Ishi (that is, husband), and shall no more call Him Baali (that is, master). Hosea 2:16,19 . This is doubtless the key to the Song of Solomon. This is the union spoken of, with which the words of affection, that pass between Christ as Jehovah and the remnant of Israel that will be brought into blessing, are in accord. The song is prophetic, but does not reach to Christ and the church, though, when its right interpretation is seen, the Christian can apply some of its language as his own to the same Lord, who will also be manifested as the Bridegroom of the church. There is however this important difference: in the Canticles the result is more in anticipation, while with the Christian there is present realisation of relationship: in other words, more of desire than of satisfaction.
From the above it will be seen that the bride is not simply a person, but symbolic of the earthly Jerusalem and the remnant whose names are registered as connected with God's foundation, embracing all the faithful of Israel, looked upon as 'the daughters of Jerusalem,' which represents the whole nation. This agrees with the language in many parts: for instance, "Draw me, we will run after thee. The king hath brought me into his chambers; we will be glad . . . . the upright [1] love thee." Song of Solomon 1:4 . Further, it is helpful to see who is the speaker in the various parts of the Song. As far as the bridegroom and the bride are concerned this is pointed out by the gender in the Hebrew. It seems evident too that a company, usually called virgins, also take part in the Song. The heart of Jerusalem is now being turned to the One they once refused: comp. Matthew 23:37 .
Song of Solomon 1:2 . BRIDE AND VIRGINS. They value the love of the bridegroom more than wine. The bride owns that she is dark, but she is comely: the rays of affliction have scorched her like the sun: cf. Isaiah 3:24 . She has been keeping the vineyards of the nations, not her own.
Song of Solomon 1:8 . BRIDEGROOM. He delights in her, and esteems her as the fairest among women.
Song of Solomon 1:12 . BRIDE. The bridegroom is 'the king:' her spikenard sends forth a perfume: cf. John 12:1-8 .
Song of Solomon 1:15 . BRIDEGROOM. He acknowledges her beauty: cf. Ezekiel 16:14 .
Song of Solomon 1:16 . BRIDE. She admires her Lord, and appreciates her relationship: she says, 'our house.'
Song of Solomon 2:1 . BRIDE. She is a rose of Sharon, and a lily of the valleys.
Song of Solomon 2:2 . BRIDEGROOM. His loved one is as a lily among thorns.
Song of Solomon 2:3 . BRIDE. She calls him 'my beloved,' and charges the daughters of Jerusalem not to disturb her loved one until he please. 'Behold he cometh:' she does not yet possess him.
Song of Solomon 2:10 . BRIDEGROOM. He invites her to partake of the pleasant fruits. The foxes must be caught that spoil the tender fruit. The joy must be full.
Song of Solomon 2:16 . BRIDE. She is conscious of the relationship. He is hers, and she is his.
Song of Solomon 3 . BRIDE. She is aloneand in darkness; she seeks her beloved, but does not find him. She questions the watchmen, and as soon as she passes them she finds him. King Solomon is described, his bed, his chariot, etc.: it is he who will bring in peace.
Song of Solomon 4:1 . BRIDEGROOM. He declares what she is in hissight. She is the garden of his delights. He calls upon the north and thesouth winds to cause the fragrance to come forth. (Some believe Song of Solomon 4:6 to be the language of the bride.)
Song of Solomon 4:16 . BRIDE. She responds, "Let my beloved come into his garden, and eat his pleasant fruits."
Song of Solomon 5:1 . BRIDEGROOM. He has come into his garden and tasted its delights: he calls his friends to share his joys: cf. John 3 :29.
Song of Solomon 5:2 . BRIDE. She has slept, and he is outside.
Song of Solomon 5:2 . BRIDEGROOM. He asks to be admitted: his locks are wet with the drops of the night.
Song of Solomon 5:3 . BRIDE. She is slothful and makes excuses. When she opens the door she finds he is gone. She goes about the city in search of him, and is smitten and shamed. She charges the daughters of Jerusalem that if they find him they will tell him that she is 'sick of love.' They ask her what her beloved is more than another. She declares that he is "the chiefest among ten thousand;" "yea, he is altogether lovely."
Song of Solomon 6:1 . The bride is asked whither he is gone: they willseek him with her.
Song of Solomon 6:2 . BRIDE. She says he is gone into his garden. She declares her confidence that she is her beloved's, and her beloved is hers.
Song of Solomon 6:4 . BRIDEGROOM.He describes her as beautiful and undefiled: she exceeds all; she is the only one of her mother.
When Israel is thus brought into blessing she will be, as the virgins say in Song of Solomon 6:10 , "terrible as an army with banners."
Song of Solomon 6:11 . BRIDEGROOM. He goes to look for the fruits, and before he is aware he is carried up on the chariots of Ammi-nadib, 'my willing people: ' cf. Psalm 110:3 .
In Song of Solomon 6:13 the bride is called upon to return under the name of Shulamite, 'peaceable' (the feminine of Shalom, from which is also Solomon); and in the Shulamite they see, as it were, the company of two armies, doubtless alluding to the union in a future day of Judah and Israel.
Song of Solomon 7:1 . BRIDEGROOM. He now describes his beloved as what she is to him.
Song of Solomon 7:9 . "And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine." . . . .
BRIDE(interposing). "That goeth down smoothly for my beloved, and stealeth over the lips of them that are asleep." (N.T.)
Song of Solomon 7:10 . BRIDE. The bride's experience has advanced: she responds, "I am my beloved's, and his desire is toward me." She invites him to come forth among the pleasant fruits — mutual enjoyment.
Song of Solomon 8:1 . This is a recapitulation of the whole book. The bride speaks as if she was only longing after him.
Song of Solomon 8:5 . The virgins ask who it is that comes up from the wilderness leaning upon her beloved.
Song of Solomon 8:5 . BRIDEGROOM. He raised her up under the apple tree (which the bridegroom is called in Song of Solomon 2:3 ). The remnant will be recovered under Christ under the new covenant.
Song of Solomon 8:6 . BRIDE.She asks to be set as a seal upon his heart and upon his arm: his love and his power will be for her.
Song of Solomon 8:8 . The virgins speak of their 'little sister:' what shall be done for her? This is doubtless an allusion to the ten tribes, who did not have to do with Christ when on earth, and who will be dealt with differently from the two tribes; but will be brought into the land and blessed there.
Song of Solomon 8:9 . BRIDE. If the little sister be a wall, she shall be built upon; if a door, she shall be enclosed; but the bride is a wall, and is grown to maturity. She has a vineyard of her own, but Solomon must have a vineyard, from which he will receive fruit: not like Israel of old, which yielded no fruit.
Song of Solomon 8:13 . BRIDEGROOM. He desires to hear the voice of her that walks in the gardens.
Song of Solomon 8:14 . BRIDE. She responds, and bids her beloved to come without delay.
The whole Song has been otherwise divided into six parts, beginning at Song of Solomon 1:1 ; Song of Solomon 2:8 ; Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Song of Solomon 5:2 ; Song of Solomon 6:13 ; and Song of Solomon 8:5 .
It is worthy of remark that whereas the bridegroom describes the bride to herself, the bride describes the bridegroom, not to himself, but to others. This is surely becoming of her. He tells her plainly of her preciousness in his sight, and of the perfection he beholds in her. This calls forth her assurance, and she declares his preciousness in her eyes. As said above, the interpretation of the book is that it embraces the union of Christ and the Jewish remnant in a future day. But it is the same Christ that loves the church, and His love demands the deepest affection in return. He cares for her love, and in Revelation 2:4,5 , reproaches the Ephesian assembly that they had left their first love.
As a matter of interest it may be added that in the Alexandrian copy of the LXX some of the above divisions are made, and the speaker pointed out. In the Codex Sinaiticus these intimations are much more numerous than in the Alexandrian copy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Song of Solomon
The 24th book of the Old Testament as found in the Catholic Bible. It is an allegorical poem which expresses: basically, the predilection of the Lord for the Chosen People; prophetically, the betrothal of Christ with His Church; universally, the love of God for a devoted soul; accommodatively, in the liturgy of the Church, the delight of God in the soul of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Protestant versions call it Song of Solomon or Song of Songs. But Catholics name it "Canticle" rather than "Song" to distinguish it as a liturgical song, and Canticle of Canticles to describe it as the superlative song. It was adapted to choral recitation, and was read in the Jewish liturgy on the octave day of the Passover. The contents are as follows: The Spouse, languishing for her Lover (chapter 1), is suffused with the delight of Him (2), pursues Him and finds Him, and exults in His grandeur (3); He praises her incomparable beauty (4); the Lover comes, but, before the Spouse opens the bolt of the door, "He had turned aside and was gone"; she delights in the thought of His all-loveliness (5); the Lover dwells on the regal radiance of the Spouse (6); she is mighty and fruitful (7); the Spouse sings the greatness, joy, and abandon of union with her Lover (8). The Canticle of Canticles was composed by Solomon, in Jerusalem, under Divine inspiration. The earlier interpreters all agreed with the traditional view that Solomon wrote it; and the familiar acquaintance with matters of natural science and with the geographical features of Palestine accords well with the genius of Solomon. No other name could be suggested to replace his. Some philological difficulties raised by late critics are so few and so shadowy that they confirm the older position by their jejuneness. They deride the idea of Solomon parading his amours in such fashion; but Solomon is not parading himself or his wives or his amours. He sings, in allegory, of Divine love and human souls. As to the inspiration of the book, it was not disputed by the Jews, as Rabbi Akiba (1century) has observed in sweeping rabbinical phrase: "No one in Israel has ever doubted that the Canticle of Canticles 'defiles the hands.'" All Christian lists of the canonical Scriptures have it noted. Some critics interpret the book as an erotic poem, composed by some Palestinian to celebrate the pursuit by Solomon of a shy Shulemite shepherdess. The imagery thus becomes distorted and the thought grotesque.

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Myrrh - מור , Exodus 30:23 ; Esther 2:19 ; Psalms 45:8 ; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 1:13 ; Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Song of Solomon 4:6 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; Song of Solomon 5:5 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 ; σμυρνα , Sir_24:15 ; Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 15:23 ; John 19:39 ; a precious kind of gum issuing by incision, and sometimes spontaneously, from the trunk and larger branches of a tree growing in Egypt, Arabia, and Abyssinia
Song of Songs - ]'>[1] show how keenly this defect was felt; to each longer or shorter section they prefix ‘The Bridegroom,’ ‘The Bride,’ ‘A second time the Bride adjures the maidens,’ or the like, and one MS (23) runs to the following length, before Song of Solomon 5:7 , ‘Not having found the bridegroom, the bride went out, and, as one found by the city-watchmen in the night, she is wounded and the keepers of the wall take her veil. ’...
And how is it that there is, within the poem itself, no movement towards a climax, no knot united or cut, no dénouement? Matters are as far advanced at Song of Solomon 1:4 ; Song of Solomon 2:4 as at Song of Solomon 8:5 . Some of these ditties, especially those which enumerate the charms of the bride, ate of exactly the same character as certain sections of Canticles, and Song of Solomon 7:1 ff. 3, ‘Brothers of the Bride,’ which is made up of Song of Solomon 1:3-49 , Song of Solomon 7:11 , Song of Solomon 2:1 , Song of Solomon 1:5-6 , Song of Solomon 8:8-10 , Song of Solomon 8:1-2 . The recurrence of certain phrases ( Song of Solomon 2:7 , Song of Solomon 3:6 , Song of Solomon 8:4 ; Song of Solomon 2:17 , Song of Solomon 4:6 , Song of Solomon 8:14 ) is meant to indicate connexions and transitions of thought, and there is no overwhelming reason against our ascribing them to the original writer. Song of Solomon 2:5 , Song of Solomon 5:8 ; Song of Solomon 1:16 , Song of Solomon 4:1 ; Song of Solomon 4:2 , Song of Solomon 6:6 ; Song of Solomon 2:16 , Song of Solomon 6:3 ; Song of Solomon 6:4 , Song of Solomon 6:10 ; Song of Solomon 2:9 , Song of Solomon 8:14 ). A few of the smaller parts have probably been removed from their intended place, and it hardly admits of doubt that Song of Solomon 4:8 is a belated fragment, unintelligible where it now stands. ( Song of Solomon 1:2 to Song of Solomon 2:7 ): in Song of Solomon 1:2-4 the bride declares her affection; In Song of Solomon 1:6 f. deprecates unfavourable criticism; in Song of Solomon 1:7 f. In Song of Solomon 1:9 to Song of Solomon 2:8 we have their praise of each other; in Song of Solomon 2:4-7 her experience of love. ( Song of Solomon 2:8 to Song of Solomon 2:17 ): Song of Solomon 2:8-14 a spring visit, Song of Solomon 2:16 the foxes, Song of Solomon 2:16 f. ( Song of Solomon 3:1 to Song of Solomon 3:11 ): Song of Solomon 3:1-5 a dream, Song of Solomon 3:6-11 interlude. ( Song of Solomon 4:1 to Song of Solomon 5:1 ): in Song of Solomon 4:1-7 he sets forth her charms; Song of Solomon 4:8 a fragment, Song of Solomon 4:9-11 his ecstasy of love, Song of Solomon 4:12 to Song of Solomon 5:1 a ‘garden. ( Song of Solomon 5:2 to Song of Solomon 6:9 ): Song of Solomon 5:2-8 a dream, Song of Solomon 5:8 to Song of Solomon 6:8 wasf sung by bride; Song of Solomon 5:4-9 his praise of her. ( Song of Solomon 6:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4 ): Song of Solomon 6:10 inquiry by women, Song of Solomon 6:11 f. her rapture, Song of Solomon 6:13 to Song of Solomon 7:10 wasf sung during sword-dance (‘dance of camps,’ Song of Solomon 7:1 ), Song of Solomon 7:11 to Song of Solomon 8:4 songs of the bride. ( Song of Solomon 8:5-14 ): Song of Solomon 8:6 a reminiscence, Song of Solomon 8:6 f. the power of love, Song of Solomon 8:8-10 the solicitude of the brothers, Song of Solomon 8:11 f. an apologue, Song of Solomon 8:13 f. The title ( Song of Solomon 1:1 ), according to which Solomon was the poet, is entirely destitute of authority. The ascription of the authorship to the famous king is due partly to his being mentioned in Song of Solomon 1:5 , Song of Solomon 8:12 ( Song of Solomon 3:7 ; Song of Solomon 3:11 are doubtful), and partly to his reputation as the typically wise man, the composer of songs a thousand and five ( 1 Kings 4:32 ). There are many passages where our view of the interpretation suggests alterations ( Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Solomon 1:4 ; Song of Solomon 1:8-9 ; Song of Solomon 2:9 ; Song of Solomon 3:10 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Song of Solomon 4:16 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; Song of Solomon 5:6 ; Song of Solomon 6:2 ; Song of Solomon 6:6 ; Song of Solomon 6:8 ; Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Solomon 7:13 ), but it is obviously easy to allow ourselves too much licence. Bearing in mind what might be advanced on both sides, who shall determine whether Nergal is to be substituted for nidhgaloth (‘banners’) at Song of Solomon 6:10 ? The Versions, especially LXX Pomegranate - , Exodus 39:24-26 , Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 , Deuteronomy 8:8 , 1 Samuel 14:2 ; 1 Samuel 14:1 k 7:18, 20, 42, 2 Kings 25:17 , 2Ch 3:16 ; 2 Chronicles 4:13 , Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Song of Solomon 6:7 ; Song of Solomon 7:12 ; Song of Solomon 8:2 , Jeremiah 52:22 f. The pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) is one of the familiar fruit trees of the OT; it is usually a shrub, hut may attain the height of a tree ( 1 Samuel 14:2 ); it was much admired for its beauty ( Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 6:11 ), and its flower was copied in ornamentation ( Exodus 28:33 , 1 Kings 7:13 ). Its dark green leaves and brilliant scarlet blossom make it a peculiarly attractive object, especially when growing in orchards ( Song of Solomon 4:13 ), mixed with trees of other shades of green; its buds develop with the tender grapes ( Song of Solomon 7:12 ), and the round, reddish fruit, with its hrilliant crimson, juicy seeds, ripens at the time of the vintage
Camphire - KJV translation in Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - ...
But had it been a representation of merely human love, it would have been positively indelicate and never would have been inserted in the holy canon (see Song of Solomon 5:2-6; Song of Solomon 7:2-3). "Pharaoh's chariots" (Song of Solomon 1:9) allude not to this, but to the Old Testament church's miraculous deliverance from Pharaoh's hosts at the Red Sea. A shepherdess (Song of Solomon 1:7) would have been an abomination to the Egyptians; nor do Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 3:4; Song of Solomon 4:8; Song of Solomon 5:7 suit this view. " Shulamith (Song of Solomon 6:13), i. The significance of the name Solomon, "the peace giver," appears at the outset (Song of Solomon 1:3), "thy name is as ointment poured forth, diffusing peace and love (John 14:27); the same image as in Psalm 133. ...
Not until toward the close does the bride receive her name Shulamith (Song of Solomon 6:13), "the peace receiver," and so the "prince's daughter" (Song of Solomon 7:1; compare Matthew 5:9). She explains her name (Song of Solomon 8:10) as expressing "one that found peace" (Song of Solomon 8:10 margin). Her becoming sensible of His being the king, in whose presence is peace and fullness of joy (Song of Solomon 1:2; Song of Solomon 1:4; Song of Solomon 1:7) leads her to seek in Him peace, and finally to find it. ...
Driven from the vineyard of paradise which was once her own into the wilderness (Song of Solomon 3:6), and to keep very different vineyards (Satan's and the world's), she became black with affliction, though still beautiful (Song of Solomon 1:5-6; compare Lamentations 4:7-8; Psalms 120:5-6): in contrast to His countenance, "white and ruddy" (Song of Solomon 5:10). But He at the close brings her up from the wilderness of affliction (Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 12:6), and restores her her own vineyard (Song of Solomon 8:12), where He desires to hear her voice. ...
Five parts are to be traced: Song of Solomon 1:1-2:7; Song of Solomon 2:8-3:5, both parts ending "I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem," etc. ; Song of Songs 3:6 - 6:9; Song of Songs 6:10 - 8:4; Song of Solomon 8:5-14, these three parts beginning severally with "Who is this?" etc. In the song's Israelite aspect the third or central part probably refers to the sealing of the union between Jehovah and the Old Testament church by Solomon's erection of the temple (Song of Solomon 3:6-11). Her wilderness state then gave place to peaceful and prosperous settlement in manifested union with her God; "the day of Solomon's espousals" (Song of Solomon 3:11). In the individual soul we have...
(1) its longing for Christ's manifestation to it, and the various alternations in its experience of His manifestation (Song of Solomon 1:2-4; Song of Solomon 2:8; Song of Solomon 3:1; Song of Solomon 3:4; Song of Solomon 3:6-7);...
(2) the abundant enjoyment of His sensible consolations, which is withdrawn through the bride's carelessness (Song of Solomon 5:1-3), and her longings after Him and reconciliation (Song of Solomon 5:8-16; Song of Solomon 6:3, etc. ; Song of Solomon 7:1, etc. In the church aspect her longing for His first advent appears in the beginning (Song of Solomon 1:2); joyful anticipation of His advent (Song of Solomon 2:8-13; Song of Solomon 2:17); His stay with her during the one only whole day in the allegory (there are but two nights, Song of Solomon 2:17; Song of Solomon 4:6), answering to His sojourn here with His disciples, the last supper, the pledge of His return to her (Song of Songs 3:6 - 4:5); His death in figurative language, and ascension to the heavenly mount where still He is to be met with spiritually in prayer until the everlasting daybreak when we shall see face to face (Song of Solomon 4:6; Song of Solomon 4:8; Song of Solomon 4:15). In Song of Solomon 5:1 "I am come into My garden" is the central point of the whole, the bridegroom and bride are one; the Spirit, answering to the awakening N. wind, having been shed on the church at Pentecost, to make the spiritual union complete (Song of Solomon 4:10). Then succeeds the period of declension and the consequent withdrawing of the grieved Spirit (Song of Solomon 5:2-6). Then her earnest search for Him and praises of Him to others, wherein she regains her own assurance, "I am my Beloved's" (Song of Solomon 6:3). "Jerusalem" the southern capital, is hinted at (Song of Solomon 6:4); she the queen, and the attendant Gentile churches" threescore queens and fourscore concubines" (Song of Solomon 6:8; Psalms 45:9-15). The nations shall then admire and flow unto her (Song of Solomon 6:13; Song of Solomon 7:1, etc. (Song of Solomon 7:10). At the close of this part (Song of Solomon 8:4) is restored Israel's charge to the Gentile converted nations not to interrupt the millennial rest of Christ with His worldwide church, "I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, that ye stir not up . ...
Then the elect church from Jews and Gentiles, now being gathered, is described, Song of Solomon 8:5-14, which is chronologically before the millennial church just described, but fitly brought in as the closing subject ("make haste, My beloved," etc. ...
The bride's joyous anticipation and desires at the beginning (Song of Solomon 1:6; Song of Solomon 1:12, e
Dove - The most noticeable are: the wood pigeons or ring-doves ( Columba palumbus ), which fly in great flocks all over the land; the turtle-dove ( Turtur communis ), a harbinger of spring, arriving in the land in April ( Jeremiah 8:7 , Song of Solomon 2:12 ); and the palm turtle-dove ( Turtur senegalensis ), which is common in a semi-domesticated state in the streets and courts of Jerusalem. ‘Dove’ is a favourite name of affection ( Song of Solomon 1:15 ; Song of Solomon 4:1 ; Song of Solomon 5:2 ; Song of Solomon 5:12 ; Song of Solomon 6:9 ), and to-day it is one of the commonest names given to girls by Eastern Jewish parents
Crocus - The flower mentioned in the Bible (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ) has been identified as either the narcissus (N. The Hebrew word is sometimes translated “rose” (see KJV in Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 and NRSV, REB, NAS, NIV Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 )
Lily - It was of gorgeous beauty, Matthew 6:28-29, growing near the place where the Sermon on the Mount was delivered, luxuriant and probably rapid in its growth, Hosea 14:5; it was found in the valleys among thorns and on pasture land, Song of Solomon 2:1-2; Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 6:3; still, whether it was scarlet, or emitted a fragrant odor, we cannot gather with certainty from Song of Solomon 5:13, as critics differ in their interpretation of this verse
Camphire - Song of Solomon 1:14 (c) CHRIST and His love toward the Church are compared to the sweet perfume of camphire. See also Song of Solomon 4:13 where our love for CHRIST is to Him as the fragrance of camphire
Canticles - See Song of Solomon
Canticles - See Song of Solomon
Lilly - More commonly it is applied to the bride and her various perfections: Song of Solomon 2:1,2 , where the bride speaks, Song of Solomon 2:1 , the bridegroom answers, Song of Solomon 2:2 , and the bride again responds, Song of Solomon 2:3 . The bridegroom's lips are compared to lilies in Song of Solomon 5:13 , and he is described as feeding among the lilies, Song of Solomon 2:16; 6:3 ; which typically represents Christ as delighting himself with the graces of his people. We must be careful not to confound the lily of the valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 , which means simply the lily growing in valleys, with our "lily of the valley," which belongs to another class of flowers
Song of Solomon - Solomon or “king” is mentioned in the book several times (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1 ,Song of Song of Solomon 1:4-5 ,Song of Song of Solomon 1:12 ; Song of Song of Solomon 3:7 ,Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 ,Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:11-12 ), but scholars remain uncertain about its author. Such grounds include the use of expressions akin to Aramaic and the presence of certain foreign loan-words (Persian: pardes “orchard,” Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 ; appiryon from Greek phoreion “carriage” or [1] “canopied bed,” Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 ). ...
Canon and Interpretation Because of its erotic language and the difficulty of its interpretation, the rabbis questioned the place of the Song of Solomon in the canon. If one were to give all the wealth of his house for love, it would be utterly scorned” (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6-7 NIV). Moreover, there is a right time and place for love: “Daughters of Jerusalem, I charge you Do not arouse or awaken love until it so desires” (Song of Song of Solomon 3:5 NIV). ...
Finally, a certain validity remains in the long history of interpretation, which saw in the pure love of the Song a reflection of divine-human love (compare Ephesians 5:21-32 ; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6-11 ; and the messianic typology of Psalm 45:1 . Longing Is a Part of Love (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1-8 ). Love Will Not Be Silent (Song of Song of Solomon 1:9-2:7 ). Spring and Love Go Together (Song of Song of Solomon 2:8-17 ). Love Is Exclusive (Song of Song of Solomon 3:1-5 ). Love Is Enhanced by Friendship (Song of Song of Solomon 3:6-11 ). Love Sees Only the Beautiful (Song of Song of Solomon 4:1-7 ). Love Involves Giving and Receiving (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8-5:1 ). Love Means Risking the Possibility of Pain (Song of Song of Solomon 5:2-6:3 ). Words Fail for Expressing Love (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4-7:9 ). Love Must Be Given Freely (Song of Song of Solomon 7:10-13 ). True Love Is Priceless (Song of Song of Solomon 8:1-14 )
Song of Solomon - This is doubtless the key to the Song of Solomon. " Song of Solomon 1:4 . ...
Song of Solomon 1:2 . ...
Song of Solomon 1:8 . ...
Song of Solomon 1:12 . ...
Song of Solomon 1:15 . ...
Song of Solomon 1:16 . '...
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Song of Solomon 4:1 . (Some believe Song of Solomon 4:6 to be the language of the bride. )...
Song of Solomon 4:16 . "...
Song of Solomon 5:1 . ...
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Song of Solomon 5:2 . ...
Song of Solomon 5:3 . "...
Song of Solomon 6:1 . ...
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Song of Solomon 6:4 . ...
When Israel is thus brought into blessing she will be, as the virgins say in Song of Solomon 6:10 , "terrible as an army with banners. "...
Song of Solomon 6:11 . ...
In Song of Solomon 6:13 the bride is called upon to return under the name of Shulamite, 'peaceable' (the feminine of Shalom, from which is also Solomon); and in the Shulamite they see, as it were, the company of two armies, doubtless alluding to the union in a future day of Judah and Israel. ...
Song of Solomon 7:1 . ...
Song of Solomon 7:9 . )...
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Song of Solomon 8:5 . ...
Song of Solomon 8:5 . He raised her up under the apple tree (which the bridegroom is called in Song of Solomon 2:3 ). ...
Song of Solomon 8:6 . ...
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Song of Solomon 8:9 . ...
Song of Solomon 8:13 . ...
Song of Solomon 8:14 . ...
The whole Song has been otherwise divided into six parts, beginning at Song of Solomon 1:1 ; Song of Solomon 2:8 ; Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Song of Solomon 5:2 ; Song of Solomon 6:13 ; and Song of Solomon 8:5
Goblet - Basin, bowl: used metaphorically in Song of Solomon 7:2
Cheek - The seat of health and beauty ( Song of Solomon 1:10 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 )
Balsam - Balsam is also a translation of basam in the NAS, where other versions have “spice” and “spices” (Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 ,Song of Song of Solomon 5:13 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:2 )
Roe - Slender, graceful, shy, and timid; the image of feminine loveliness (Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 2:9; Song of Solomon 2:17; Song of Solomon 8:14)
Flowers - The most commonly mentioned are those of the lily family (Song of Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 6:2; Hosea 14:5; Matthew 6:28). A kind of wild rose is also mentioned (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1; Isaiah 35:1). The flower of the mandrake plant had a strong smell that people believed could excite sexual passion (Genesis 30:14-16; Song of Song of Solomon 7:13)
Litter - A covered and curtained couch with shafts so that it can be carried by porters (Song of Song of Solomon 3:7 NRSV, REB; Isaiah 66:20 , KJV, NAS, NRSV). The NIV takes the term at Song of Song of Solomon 3:7 in this sense as well (carriage)
Baal-Hamon - The unknown site of Solomon’s vineyard ( Song of Solomon 8:11 )
Galleries - Song of Solomon 1:17, "rafters (galleries margin) of fir"; the crossbeams, the carved ceiling, fretted work: rachit . In Song of Solomon 7:5 translated "the king is held bound with the flowing ringlets"; compare Song of Solomon 6:5
Goblet - KJV term for a bowl-shaped drinking vessel without handles (Song of Song of Solomon 7:2 ). Modern translations are divided over the reference in Song of Solomon: bowl (RSV, TEV), goblet (NAS, NIV, REB)
Ornament - ) Song of Solomon 1:10-11; "thy cheeks are comely with rows" (of pearls), torim , alluding to torah the law (Ezekiel 16:11). See Song of Solomon 7:1, "the rounding ("graceful curve") of thy thighs is like (the rounding of) the knobs of a necklace
Bether - Dissection or separation, certain mountains mentioned in Song of Solomon 2:17 ; probably near Lebanon
Powders, Fragrant - Pulverized spices used as a fragrance (Song of Song of Solomon 3:6 )
Garden, Gardener - ...
The garden was also looked upon as a place of delights, and is often used figuratively in this sense in the Canticles; Song of Solomon 4:12-16 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; Song of Solomon 6:2,11 ; Song of Solomon 8:13 . Genesis 3:19 ; Song of Solomon 1:6 ; and in Eden, before the curse, Adam was placed in the garden 'to dress it and to keep it
Myrrh - It has a pleasant, though faint, smell ( Psalms 45:8 , Proverbs 7:17 , Song of Solomon 1:13 ; Song of Solomon 3:5 ). Exodus 30:23 and Song of Solomon 5:5 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 , where the ‘myrrh’ appears to have been liquid, support this view
Spices - Some spices were grown locally, but many were imported from the East, bringing wealth to traders and to the governments who taxed them (Genesis 37:25; 1 Kings 10:2; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:17; Revelation 18:11-13). Among these spices were frankincense, myrrh, galbanum, stacte, onycha, cassia, aloes, cummin, dill, cinnamon, mint, rue, mustard, balm, sweet cane, henna, nard, saffron and calumus (Genesis 37:25; Exodus 30:23-24; Exodus 30:34; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 4:13-14; Jeremiah 6:20; Matthew 23:23; Luke 11:42; Luke 13:19). ...
Spices came from the gum of certain trees and from plants and herbs (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14). People used spices in preparing food and drinks (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2; Ezekiel 24:10; Matthew 23:23), and in making a variety of oils, medicines, cosmetics, deodorants and disinfectants (Esther 2:12; Psalms 45:8; Proverbs 7:17; Song of Song of Solomon 4:10; Song of Solomon 4:14; Song of Solomon 5:13; Jeremiah 8:22; Jeremiah 51:8; Luke 7:46; John 12:3; John 19:39)
Shenir - (sshee' nuhr) KJV alternate spelling of Senir (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 )
Lebanon, Tower of - Only mentioned symbolically in Song of Solomon 7:4 : it is supposed to refer to mount Hermon
Shenir - =Senir, (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ), the name given to Mount Hermon (q
Cylinder - Song of Solomon 5:14 RVm Garden - The gardens of the Hebrews were planted with flowers and aromatic shrubs, Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 4:16, besides olives, fig trees, nuts or walnuts, Song of Solomon 6:11, pomegranates, and others for domestic use
Apple Tree - A tree known in the Old Testament for its fruit, shade, beauty, and fragrance (Joel 1:12 ; Proverbs 25:11 ; Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:5 )
Lock - The Hebrew term which the KJV translated locks at Song of Song of Solomon 4:1 ,Song of Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:7 ; and Isaiah 47:2 is rendered veil by modern translations. In the Old Testament period, door locks were bolts with holes into which small iron or wooden pins would drop to secure the bolt ( Nehemiah 3:3 ,Nehemiah 3:3,3:6 ,Nehemiah 3:6,3:13 ,Nehemiah 3:13,3:15 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:5 ; compare Judges 3:23-24 )
Apple - Apple tree is named in the English Versions in Song of Solomon 2:3; Song of Solomon 8:5, and Joel 1:12, The fruit of this tree is alluded to in Proverbs 25:11 and Song of Solomon 2:5; Song of Solomon 7:8
Handles - (Literally hands) The thumb pieces or knobs of the bolt or latch of a door (Song of Song of Solomon 5:5 )
David, Tower of - Doubtless part of the castle in Zion, wherein armour was stored: it is mentioned only symbolically in Song of Solomon 4:4
Baal-Hamon - ” Location of Solomon's vineyard according to Song of Song of Solomon 8:11
Banqueting House - 'house of wine,' Song of Solomon 2:4 ; used figuratively for the house of delights to which the Bridegroom brings the bride
Senir - Wrongly changed to Shenir in Deuteronomy 3:9-10; Song of Solomon 4:8
be'Ther - ( Song of Solomon 2:17 ) There is no clue to guide us as to what mountains are intended here
Spouse - (Song of Solomon 4:8-12 ; Hosea 4:13,14 ) may denote either husband or wife, but in the Scriptures it denotes only the latter
Shulamite - The same, as some think, with "Shunammite," from "Shunem:" otherwise, the import of the word is uncertain (Song of Solomon 6:13 ; RSV, "Shulammite")
King - Song of Solomon 1:4 (c) In this way we see the Lord JESUS CHRIST in His glory as the sovereign ruler of His church
Bether - ” A mountain range used as an emotional image in Song of Song of Solomon 2:17
Amana - ” Mountain peak in Anti-lebanon mountains where lovers meet and then descend (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 )
Gallery - rahit (Song of Solomon 1:17 ), translated "rafters," marg
Ruddy - Having a healthy, reddish color (1 Samuel 16:12 ; 1 Samuel 17:42 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:10 ; Lamentations 4:7 ; compare Genesis 25:25 )
Pomegranate - This is of the size of an orange, flattened at the ends like an apple, is of a beautiful brown-red color, Song of Solomon 4:3; Song of Solomon 6:7, has a hard rind and is filled with pulp of a highly grateful flavor. The abundant juice was made into wine, Song of Solomon 8:2, and used for a cooling drink
Camphire - Song of Solomon 1:14 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 . ...
In the Song of Solomon, the bride is described as saying, "My beloved is unto me as a cluster of camphire in the vineyards of Engedi," Song of Solomon 1:14 ; and again, "Thy plants are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant fruits, camphire with spikenard," Song of Solomon 4:13
Amana - ) A mountain near Lebanon, perhaps the southern top of Antilibanus (Song of Solomon 4:8)
Fishpools - Song of Solomon 7:4 (b) This is a poetic figure of the enticing beauty of the clear, deep eyes of the lover, so full of expression and passion
Winter - Winter is also the rainy season for that land (Song of Song of Solomon 2:11 )
Lily - The plant must have been a conspicuous object on the shores of the Lake of Gennesaret, ( Matthew 6:28 ; Luke 12:27 ) it must have flourished in the deep broad valleys of Palestine, (Song of Solomon 2:1 ) among the thorny shrubs, ib. (Song of Solomon 2:2 ) and pastures of the desert, ib. (Song of Solomon 2:16 ; 4:5 ; 6:3 ) and must have been remarkable for its rapid and luxuriant growth. That its flowers were brilliant in color would seem to be indicated in (Matthew 6:28 ) where it is compared with the gorgeous robes of Solomon; and that this color was scarlet or purple is implied in (Song of Solomon 5:13 ) There appears to be no species of lily which so completely answers all these requirements as the Lilium chalcedonicum , or scarlet martagon, which grows in profusing in the Levant
Amana - The southern part or summit of Anti-Lebanon, adjacent to and north of Hermon, from which the river Amana or Abana poured down towards Damascus, Song of Song of Solomon 4:8
Goblet - In Song of Solomon 7:2 , a bowl or drinking vessel, a bowl for mixing wine; in Exodus 24:6 , a sacrificial basin
Bath-Rabbim - The name of a gate of Heshbon, near which were pools, to which the Shulammite’s eyes are compared ( Song of Solomon 7:4 )
Apple Tree - תפוח , Proverbs 25:11 ; Song of Solomon 2:3 ; Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Solomon 7:8 ; Song of Solomon 8:5 ; Joel 1:12 . ...
There are five places, beside this in Joel, in which the word occurs; and from them we learn that it was thought the noblest of the trees of the wood, and that its fruit was very sweet or pleasant, Song of Solomon 2:3 ; of the colour of gold, Proverbs 25:11 ; extremely fragrant, Song of Solomon 7:8 ; and proper for those to smell that were ready to faint, Song of Solomon 2:5 . ...
The exhilarating effects of the fruit are mentioned Song of Solomon 2:5 , "Comfort me with citrons
Myrrh - It was an ingredient in the holy anointing oil, Exodus 30:23; it was used in perfumes, Psalms 45:8; Proverbs 7:17; Song of Solomon 1:13; Song of Solomon 8:6; in unguents, Esther 2:12; Song of Solomon 5:5; for strengthening wine, Mark 15:23; also in embalming, John 19:30
Flowers - nizzân , only Song of Solomon 2:12 . Song of Solomon 2:2 . Flowers are one of the attractive features of Palestine: they come in the early spring ( Song of Solomon 2:12 ), but fade all too soon, the brilliant display being a matter of but a few short weeks
Amminadib - A person mentioned in Song of Solomon 6:12 , whose chariots were famed for their swiftness
Armoury - ' In Song of Solomon 4:4 it is talpiyyoth, 'armoury' or heap of swords
Palanquin - (pa lan' quihn) REB, RSV term for an enclosed seat or couch carried on servants' shoulders (Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 )
Spikenard - SPIKENARD ( nçrd , Song of Solomon 1:12 ; Song of Solomon 4:13-14 ; also Gr
Flowers - Their beauty is often alluded to (Song of Solomon 2:12 ; Matthew 6:28 ). Gardens containing flowers and fragrant herbs are spoken of (Song of Solomon 4:16 ; 6:2 )
Camphire - Song of Solomon 1:14; "My beloved is unto Me as a cluster of camphire" (Song of Solomon 4:13)
Ring - In Song of Solomon 5:14 RVm Fish-Pools - (Song of Solomon 7:4 ) should be simply "pools," as in the Revised Version
am'Ana - ( Song of Solomon 4:8 ) It is commonly assumed that this is the mountain in which the river Abana, (2 Kings 5:12 ) has its source
Hart - Or STAG, a species of deer, clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15 , and celebrated for its elegance, agility, and grace, Song of Song of Solomon 2:9 Isaiah 35:6
Baal-Hamon - of Samaria (compare Isaiah 28:1; Song of Solomon 8:11)
Wean - Among the Hebrews children (whom it was customary for the mothers to nurse, Exodus 2:7-9 ; 1 Samuel 1:23 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ) were not generally weaned till they were three or four years old
Necklace - An ornament worn around the neck (Song of Song of Solomon 1:10 ; Ezekiel 16:11 )
Black - Often used to denote the color of physical objects: hair (Leviticus 13:31 ,Leviticus 13:31,13:37 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:11 ), skin (Job 30:30 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:5-6 ; Lamentations 4:8 ), the sky as a sign of rain (1 Kings 18:45 ), and animals (Genesis 30:32-43 ; Zechariah 6:2 ,Zechariah 6:2,6:6 ; Revelation 6:5 )
Pomegranate - It is frequently mentioned in the Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 4:3,13 , etc
Camphire - CAMPHIRE ( kôpher , Song of Solomon 1:14 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ) is the henna plant ( Lawsonia alba ), a small shrub which may still be found at Engedi
Sister - Sister was also used of people held in special esteem as a counterpart to brotherly affection (Song of Song of Solomon 4:9 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:8 )
Pomegranate - (See Song of Solomon 4:13). ...
Song of Solomon 4:3 (c) Solomon is describing the beauty of the church and indicates that the thoughts in the minds of GOD's people would be beautiful ones and fruitful ones
Laver - In the Septuagint כִּיוֹר, ‘a layer,’ is always rendered by λουτήρ, while λουτρόν is used for רַהְצָה, ‘washing,’ in Song of Solomon 4:2; Song of Solomon 6:6, Sirach 31:30
Ammi-Nadib - (am' mih-nuh' dihb) The KJV takes these words as a personal name in Song of Song of Solomon 6:12 . The NRSV takes the words in Song of Song of Solomon 6:12 as coming from the maiden who spoke about her fancy (perhaps her imagination) setting her in a chariot beside her prince
Flowers - ...
(3) Calamus leaves (Exodus 30:23 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Isaiah 43:24 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Ezekiel 27:19 ). ...
(4) Camphire flowers (sometimes referred to as Henna) (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:11 —see REB). ...
(7) Crocus (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ) was a spring flowering herb with a long yellow floral tube tinged with purple specks or stripes. ...
(10) Lily (1Kings Numbers 7:19 ,Numbers 7:19,7:22 ,Numbers 7:22,7:26 ; 2 Chronicles 4:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 2:1-2 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:16 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:13 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:2-3 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:2 ; Hosea 14:5 ). The lily mentioned in Song of Song of Solomon 5:13 refers to a rare variety of lily that had a bloom similar to a glowing flame. The “lily of the valley” (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1-2 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:16 ) is known as the Easter lily. ...
(11) Mandrake (Genesis 30:14-16 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:13 ). ...
(15) Rose (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ). ...
(16) Saffron (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ). The type meant in Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 may be an exotic plant imported from India. The flowers of spring (Song of Song of Solomon 2:12 ) signify renewal
Bath-Rabbim - Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 uses its beauty as comparison for the beauty of the beloved lady's eyes
Banquet - Song of Solomon 2:4 (c) A type of the happy condition of the heart of one who sits in the presence of GOD to feast on the precious truths of His Word, and to enjoy the blessings of His ministry
Spikenard - Song of Solomon 1:12 (c) The worship of the heart to our Lord, and the fragrant love of the devoted follower of the Saviour, is a sweet-smelling savour to the GOD of Heaven
Amminadib - This occurs in Song of Solomon 6:12
Jealousy - Suspicion of a wife's purity, one of the strongest passions (Numbers 5:14 ; Proverbs 6:34 ; Song of Solomon 8:6 ); also an intense interest for another's honour or prosperity (Psalm 79:5 ; 1 Corinthians 10:22 ; Zechariah 1:14 )
Shulam(m)Ite - (sshuh' lam ite) Description of woman in Song of Song of Solomon 6:13 either as from Shunem through a copying change; from Shulam, an otherwise unknown town; Solomonite, referring to a relationship to Solomon; or a common noun meaning, “the replaced one
Frankincense - Arabia ( Isaiah 60:6 , Jeremiah 6:20 ); it was a constituent of incense ( Exodus 30:34 ); it is often associated with myrrh ( Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Song of Solomon 4:6 , Matthew 2:11 ); it was offered with the shewbread ( Leviticus 24:7 )
Cluster - ...
Song of Solomon 1:14 (a) The Lord by this illustration reveals to us the great abundance of love that exists between the Saviour and His Church. (See also Song of Solomon 7:7)
Sick - ...
Song of Solomon 2:5 (b) The wise man is telling us by this expression that his whole soul and being is given up to love and loving, so that nothing else in the world matters. (See also Song of Solomon 5:8)
Hart - It was clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 14:5, and the grace and agility of its motions are alluded to in Song of Solomon 2:9; Isaiah 35:6. The instinctive affection of the hart and hind is alluded to, Proverbs 5:18-19, and Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5
Pomegranate - the upper part of the cheek near the temples) of the bride are "like a piece of pomegranate within her locks" (Song of Solomon 4:3). The church's blush of modesty is not on the surface but within, which Christ sees into (Song of Solomon 4:13). Her "plants are an orchard of pomegranates with pleasant fruits," not merely flowers (John 15:8); Song of Solomon 8:2, "spied wine of the juice of my pomegranate. "Spices" are only introduced in the Song of Solomon when he is present, not in his absence
Orchard - Song of Solomon 4:13 (c) We may understand this to be a sweet expression which describes the various groups of GOD's people
Song of Songs - The book contains a number of references to the splendour of Solomon and his court, and is sometimes called the Song of Solomon (Song of Song of Solomon 1:1; Song of Solomon 1:5; Song of Solomon 3:7-11; Song of Solomon 8:11-12). Always, however, the love is in the context of a relationship where a man and a woman commit themselves to each other in marriage, to the exclusion of all others (Song of Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 6:3; Song of Solomon 7:10)
Engedi - We read of the vineyards of Engedi Song of Song of Solomon 1:14
Perfumes - Were used in religious worship, and for personal and domestic enjoyment (Exodus 30:35-37 ; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 3:6 ; Isaiah 57:9 ); and also in embalming the dead, and in other funeral ceremonies (Mark 14:8 ; Luke 24:1 ; John 19:39 )
Amana - ...
...
A mountain ( Song of Solomon 4:8 ), probably the southern summit of Anti-Libanus, at the base of which are the sources of the Abana
Leopard - namer ) is invariably given by the Authorized Version as the translation of the Hebrew word, which occurs in the seven following passages: ( Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Isaiah 11:6 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; 13:23 ; Daniel 7:6 ; Hosea 13:7 ); Habb 1:8 Leopard occurs also in Sirach 28:23 and in ( Revelation 13:2 ) From (Song of Solomon 4:8 ) we learn that the hilly ranges of Lebanon were in ancient times frequented by these animals
Lattice - eshuwab , sebakah , charakkim (Judges 5:28; 2 Kings 1:2; Proverbs 7:6, "casement"; Song of Solomon 2:9)
Baal-Hamon - Place of a multitude, a place where Solomon had an extensive vineyard (Song of Solomon 8:11 )
Senir - Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 may indicate that Senir was a different peak than Hermon in the Antilebanon range or that it indicated the entire range (compare 1 Chronicles 5:23 )
Banquet - Thus Song of Solomon 2:4 ‘He brought me to the banqueting house’ (Heb
Stones, Precious - They are figuratively introduced to denote value, beauty, durability (Song of Solomon 5:14 ; Isaiah 54:11,12 ; Lamentations 4:7 )
Saffron - The common Crocus Sativus, a small bluish flower, whose yellow, thread-like stigmata yield an agreeable aromatic odor; and also the Indian saffron, Song of Song of Solomon 4:14
Gilead - Hence the hill upon which it was erected, was called Mount Gilead, Song of Solomon 4:1 ; Song of Solomon 6:5 ; Jeremiah 50:19
Shalamite - Caught up in chariot like flight by her Lord to sit with Him in heavenly places (Ephesians 2:6), she is entreated by the daughters of Jerusalem "Return, return, O Shulamite" (Song of Solomon 6:13). " (Μahanaim , "two camps") to be seen in the Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13) are Christ's family in heaven and that on earth conjoined in Him, the one militant the other at rest. Not until toward the close does the bride receive her name Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13), "the peace receiver. " In Song of Solomon 8:10 margin she explains her name, "one that, found peace
Canticle - ) The Song of Songs or Song of Solomon, one of the books of the Old Testament
Banners - On festal occasions banners are often carried in choirprocessionals "to signify yet more clearly the progress and futuretriumph of the Church, according to that description of herin the Song of Solomon: 'Who is she that looketh forth as themorning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as anarmy with banners?'"...
Cheek - Song of Solomon 5:13 (c) Solomon is pouring out his love and praise to his Lord
Fir - The Hebrew word often seems to mean the Ezekiel 27:5 ; for musical instruments, 2 Samuel 6:5 ; for beams and rafters of houses, 1 Kings 5:8,10 9:11 Song of Song of Solomon 1:17
Honey - ya'ar, occurs only 1 Samuel 14:25,27,29 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 , where it denotes the honey of bees. ...
...
Nopheth, honey that drops (Psalm 19:10 ; Proverbs 5:3 ; Song of Solomon 4:11 ). Honey and milk also are put for sweet discourse (Song of Solomon 4:11 )
Hart - The hart is frequently alluded to in the poetical and prophetical books (Isaiah 35:6 ; Song of Solomon 2:8,9 ; Lamentations 1:6 ; Psalm 42:1 )
Sharon - Its wildflowers were typical of the Palestinian plains (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1)
Cane - Or CALAMUS, SWEET, Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 , an aromatic reed mentioned among the drugs of which the sacred perfumes were compounded, Exodus 30:23
Camphire - The whole shrub is from four to six feet high, ( Song of Solomon 4:13 )
Frankincense - , "white"), an odorous resin imported from Arabia (Isaiah 60:6 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ), yet also growing in Palestine (Song of Solomon 4:14 ). When burnt it emitted a fragrant odour, and hence the incense became a symbol of the Divine name (Malachi 1:11 ; Song of Solomon 1:3 ) and an emblem of prayer (Psalm 141:2 ; Luke 1:10 ; Revelation 5:8 ; 8:3 )
Honey - Its "dropping" symbolizes speech, sweet, loving, and profitable (Song of Solomon 4:11). As wine and meat express strong spiritual nourishment in faith, so honey and milk sometimes symbolize incipient faith (Song of Solomon 5:1)
Rose - Song of Solomon 2:1; Isaiah 35:1; the autumn crocus, the meadow saffron of a white and violet color, Colchicum autumnale (Gesenius). The narcissus is very fragrant, and therefore more likely than the crocus; the lily is associated with it in the Song of Solomon
Banner, Ensign, Standard - Psalms 74:4 where the reference is probably to the standards of Antiochus’ army) of the ‘fathers’ houses,’ and the standards (the banner of Song of Solomon 2:4 ; cf. Song of Solomon 6:4 ; cf. Song of Solomon 6:10 ) of the four great divisions of the Hebrew tribes in the wilderness, according to the artificial theory of the priestly writer
Calamus - An ingredient in the holy anointing oil (Song of Solomon 4:14; Ezekiel 27:19), an import to Tyre
Litter - Solomon's chariot, Song of Song of Solomon 3:9 , or bed, is supposed to have been an elegant mule-litter
Rose - Song of Solomon 2:1 (c) Some, because of its beauty and fragrance, believe it is a type of the Lord JESUS
Stairs - Song of Solomon 2:14 (c) It may be that this is a picture of those sweet experiences that the child of GOD has with His Lord
Lattice - Song of Solomon 2:9 (c) It may be that this indicates an obscured vision of the Lord
Foxes - (Song of Song of Solomon 2:15) The Lord Jesus makes application of the name to Herod
Aloes, Lign Aloes - Ahalim, Ahaloth ), The name of a costly and sweet-smelling wood which is mentioned in ( Numbers 24:6 ; Psalm 45:8 ; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; John 19:39 ) It is usually identified with the Aquilaria agollochum , an aromatic wood much valued in India
Hair - Song of Solomon 5:11, the bridegroom's locks are "bushy" (curled), betokening headship; Song of Solomon 4:1, the hair of goats in the East being fine like silk and flowing, the token of the bride's subjection; Song of Solomon 1:5; Song of Solomon 7:5, "purple," i. "...
In Song of Solomon 7:5, for "galleries" translated "the king is held (fascinated) with the flowing ringlets
Lily - —The lily (שׁוּשַׁן, שׁוֹשַׁנָּה, κρίνον) is mentioned by various OT writers (1 Kings 7:19, 2 Chronicles 4:5, Song of Solomon 2:1 etc. Song of Solomon 5:13)
Lip - Only rarely are the lips referred to from the point of view of description of physical beauty and charm ( Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 4:11 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 ). Once they are associated with kissing ( Proverbs 24:26 ), once with drinking ( Song of Solomon 7:9 , with which cf
Leopard - namer, so called because spotted, Song of Solomon 4:8 ), was that great spotted feline which anciently infested the mountains of Syria, more appropriately called a panther (Felis pardus)
Lock - The key with its pins raises the sliding pins of the lock so that the bolt can be drawn back (Judges 3:23; Judges 3:25; Song of Solomon 5:5; Nehemiah 3:3)
Towers - Of Babel (Genesis 11:4 ), Edar (Genesis 35:21 ), Penuel (Judges 8:9,17 ), Shechem (9:46), David (Song of Solomon 4:4 ), Lebanon (7:4), Syene (Ezekiel 29:10 ), Hananeel (Zechariah 14:10 ), Siloam (Luke 13:4 )
Bundle - A bundle of money is spoken of in Genesis 42:35 , of myrrh in Song of Solomon 1:13 , of life in 1 Samuel 25:29 (on wh
Carmel - ...
Song of Solomon 7:5 (b) This indicates that the beauty of GOD's people is as great, colorful, delightful, and attractive as this wonderful mountain
Embrace - Song of Solomon 2:6 (c) This is typical of the close fellowship which the Lord JESUS has with those whom He loves and who have learned to trust Him
Saffron - Hebrew carcom , Latin crocus (Song of Solomon 4:14)
Abana - See Song of Song of Solomon 4:8
Veil - ) The mitpachath (Ruth 3:15), tsaiph (Genesis 24:65; Genesis 38:14; Genesis 38:19), and radial (Song of Solomon 5:7; Isaiah 3:23). Tzammah, translated "locks" (Song of Solomon 4:1; Song of Solomon 4:3), the bride's veil, a mark of modesty and subjection to her lord
Amminadab - "The Chariots of Amminadib," Song of Song of Solomon 6:12 , were very light and swift, in allusion perhaps to some noted charioteer of that day
Sharon, Saron - The "rose of Sharon" is celebrated (Song of Solomon 2:1 )
Hind - It is referred to as an emblem of activity (Genesis 49:21 ), gentleness (Proverbs 5:19 ), feminine modesty (Song of Solomon 2:7 ; 3:5 ), earnest longing (Psalm 42:1 ), timidity (Psalm 29:9 )
Bowels - In the KJV, “bowels” is also used to refer to the sexual reproductive system (2 Samuel 16:11 ; Psalm 71:6 ) and, figuratively, to strong emotions (Job 30:27 ), especially love (Song of Song of Solomon 5:4 ) and compassion (Colossians 3:12 )
Shu'Lamite, the, - one of the personages in the poem of Solomon's (Song of Solomon 6:13 ) The name denotes a woman belonging to a place called Shulem, which is probably the same as Shunem
Marble - Song of Solomon 5:15 (c) This beautiful stone is a symbol of strength, vigor, stamina and symmetry
Amminadib - ]'>[2] of a very obscure passage, Song of Solomon 6:12 , ‘my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib
Nuts - (Song of Song of Solomon 6:11) The word rendered nuts in this passage is never used elsewhere in the Bible
Mandrakes - Hebrew Dudaim, Genesis 30:14-16 Song of Song of Solomon 7:13 , a plant to which was attributed, probably without reason, the power of rendering barren women fruitful
Tirzah - Pleasant, Song of Song of Solomon 6:4 , a city of the Canaanites, Joshua 12:24 , and afterwards of the tribe of Manasseh or Ephraism; and the royal seat of the kings of Israel from the time of Jeroboam to the reign of Omri, who built the city of Samaria, which then became the capital of this kingdom, 1 Kings 15:21,33 16:6,23 2 Kings 15:14,16
Ammin'Adib - (Song of Solomon 6:12 ) It is uncertain whether we ought to read here AMMINADIB, with the Authorized Version, or my willing people , as in the margin
Apple-Trees - Mentioned in Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 8:5 Joel 1:12
Nard - The term appears twice in the Song of Solomon (Romans 1:12 ; Romans 4:13-14 ) and in two of the gospel accounts of the woman anointing Jesus at Simon's house in Bethany (Mark 14:3 ; John 12:3 ; “spikenard,” KJV)
Beam - ]'>[1] , Song of Solomon 1:17 ) and gilded ( 2 Chronicles 3:7 )
Gallery - Song of Solomon 7:5 is better translated "The king is held by the tresses" of the 'hair' mentioned in the line before
Amminadab - The chariots of Amminadab are mentioned, Song of Solomon 6:12 , as being extremely light
Kedar - They were nomads, living in black hair-tents, Song of Solomon 1:5, as the modern Bedouins do, or in villages, Isaiah 42:11, and were rich in flocks and herds, and noted as archers and mighty men
Flagon, - a word employed in the Authorized Version to render two distinct Hebrew terms:
Ashishah , ( 2 Samuel 6:19 ; 1 Chronicles 16:3 ; Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Hosea 3:1 ) It really means a cake of pressed raisins
Lily - שושן , 1 Kings 7:19 ; 1 Kings 7:22 ; 1 Kings 7:26 ; 2 Chronicles 4:5 ; Song of Solomon 2:2 ; Song of Solomon 2:16 ; Song of Solomon 4:5 ; Song of Solomon 5:13 ; Song of Solomon 6:2-3 ; Song of Solomon 7:2 ; Hosea 14:5 ; κρινον , Matthew 6:28 ; Luke 12:27 ; a well known sweet and beautiful flower, which furnished Solomon with a variety of charming images in his Song, and with graceful ornaments in the fabric and furniture of the temple. By "the lily of the valley," Song of Solomon 2:2 , we are not to understand the humble flower, generally so called, with us, the lilium convallium, but the noble flower which ornaments our gardens, and which in Palestine grows wild in the fields, and especially in the valleys. ...
As, in Song of Solomon 5:13 , the lips are compared to the lily, Bishop Patrick supposes the lily here instanced to be the same which, on account of its deep red colour, is particularly called by Pliny rubens lilium, and which, he tells us, was much esteemed in Syria
Lattice - harakim, the network or lattice of a window (Song of Solomon 2:9 )
Chains - As ornaments: they were placed on parts of the temple; were worn on the neck, and found among the spoils of war: Exodus 28:14 ; Numbers 31:50 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5,16 ; Song of Solomon 1:10
Calamus - Calamus, Song of Solomon 4:14; Ezekiel 27:19, or Sweet Calamus, Exodus 30:23, or Sweet Cane, Isaiah 43:24; Jeremiah 6:20
Cinnamon - One of the ingredients in the perfumed oil with which the tabernacle and its vessels were anointed, Exodus 30:23 Proverbs 7:17 Song of Song of Solomon 4:14
Kedar - Their black camel's hair tents are a picturesque feature in a landscape, Song of Song of Solomon 1:5
Rose - in (Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ) There is much difference of opinion as to what particular flower is here denoted; but it appears to us most probable that the narcissus is intended
Apple - It is true that the tree in size and foliage would answer to the reference in Song of Solomon 8:5 , Joel 1:12 ; the fruit too in its sweetness ( Song of Solomon 2:3 ) and its smell ( Song of Solomon 7:8 ) is very appropriate
Bether - In Song of Song of Solomon 2:17, the word is retained in its original, Berber; but in Song of Song of Solomon 8:14, it is translated "mountains of spices. " (Song of Song of Solomon 2:17; Son 8:14)...
Hair - The usual and favorite color of the hair was black, (Song of Solomon 5:11 ) as is indicated in the comparisons in (Song of Solomon 1:5 ; 4:1 ) a similar hue is probably intended by the purple of ( Song of Solomon 7:6 ) Pure white hair was deemed characteristic of the divine Majesty
Dove - In their wild state doves generally build their nests in the clefts of rocks, but when domesticated "dove-cots" are prepared for them (Song of Solomon 2:14 ; Jeremiah 48:28 ; Isaiah 60:8 ). It is a symbol of the Holy Spirit (Genesis 1:2 ; Matthew 3:16 ; Mark 1:10 ; Luke 3:22 ; John 1:32 ); also of tender and devoted affection (Song of Solomon 1:15 ; 2:14 )
Amminadab - Song of Solomon 6:12; "My soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib," one noted for swift driving; compare Song of Solomon 1:9
Banner - ...
Song of Solomon 2:4 (c) This banner represents the leadership of the Lord in the lives of His people. ...
Song of Solomon 6:4 (c) In a war where the army is composed of many allies, each nation carries its own banner, thus displaying the great resources behind the forces
Pomegranate - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:3) And the church, speaking of the glories of her Husband, saith, "I would lead thee, and bring thee into my mother's house; I would cause thee to drink of spiced wine of the juice of my pomegranate. " (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2) The sense is, the church would treat Jesus with her best fare
Turtle - תזו , τρυγων , Genesis 15:9 ; Leviticus 1:14 ; Leviticus 5:7 ; Leviticus 5:11 ; Leviticus 12:6 ; Leviticus 12:8 ; Leviticus 14:22 ; Leviticus 14:30 ; Leviticus 15:14 ; Leviticus 15:29 ; Numbers 6:10 ; Psalms 74:19 ; Song of Solomon 2:12 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ; τρυγων , Luke 2:24 . Thus Solomon, Song of Solomon 2:12 , mentions the return of this bird as one of the indications of spring: "The voice of the turtle is heard in the land
Garden - The gardens of the Hebrews were planted with flowers and aromatic shrubs, (Song of Solomon 6:2 ; 4:16 ) besides olives, fig trees, nuts or walnuts, (Song of Solomon 6:12 ) pomegranates, and others for domestic use
Colour - Another Hebrew word so rendered is applied to marble (Esther 1:6 ), and a cognate word to the lily (Song of Solomon 2:16 ). A different term, meaning "dazzling," is applied to the countenance (Song of Solomon 5:10 ). ...
Black, applied to the hair (Leviticus 13:31 ; Song of Solomon 5:11 ), the complexion (Song of Solomon 1:5 ), and to horses (Zechariah 6:2,6 ). ...
Red, applied to blood (2 Kings 322;22 ), a heifer (Numbers 19:2 ), pottage of lentils (Genesis 25:30 ), a horse (Zechariah 1:8 ), wine (Proverbs 23:31 ), the complexion (Genesis 25:25 ; Song of Solomon 5:10 ). With this colour was associated the idea of royalty and majesty (Judges 8:26 ; Song of Solomon 3:10 ; 7:5 ; Daniel 5:7,16,29 ). The only natural object to which this colour is applied in Scripture is the lips, which are likened to a scarlet thread (Song of Solomon 4:3 )
Hart - Resorting to the mountains (Song of Solomon 8:14); sure-footed there (2 Samuel 22:34; Habakkuk 3:19). "...
Easily agitated (Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5), so that the hunter must advance on them with breathless caution if he would take them; an emblem of the resting (Zephaniah 3:17) but easily grieved Holy Spirit (Ezekiel 16:43; Matthew 18:7; Ephesians 4:30). The hind is emblematic of the grace, innocence, and loveliness (Song of Solomon 2:9) of the Antitype to Joseph (Genesis 49:23-24)
Flagon - ashishah, (2 Samuel 6:19 ; 1 Chronicles 16:3 ; Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Hosea 3:1 ), meaning properly "a cake of pressed raisins
Uphaz - (Song of Song of Solomon 5:11) And John's account of the Lord Jesus Christ is much to the same amount
Armlet - The signet was sometimes a jewel on the armlet; which explains, "Set me as a seal upon thine arm" (Song of Solomon 8:6)
Saffron - , "yellow"), mentioned only in Song of Solomon 4:13,14 ; the Crocus sativus
Beryl - The beloved man of Song of Song of Solomon 5:14 had beryl in his gold rings
Lily - The Song of Solomon uses it to beautify the writer's description of love (1 Kings 2:1 ; 1 Kings 4:5 )
Sharon - Its excellency is spoken of, and the bride in Song of Solomon 2:1 calls herself a 'rose of Sharon
Baal-Hamon - I am inclined to think that this was not an idol, but a place; for the church, celebrating the glories of her Solomon, saith, that he had a vineyard at Baal-hamon (Song of Song of Solomon 8:11) Hamon, is people, multitudes, or riches
Hind, - It is frequently noticed in the poetical parts of Scripture as emblematic of activity, ( Genesis 49:21 ; Psalm 18:33 ) gentleness, (Proverbs 5:19 ) feminine modesty, (Song of Solomon 2:7 ; 3:5 ) earnest longing, (Psalm 42:1 ) and maternal affection
Bramble - ...
...
Hebrew Hoah , Isaiah 34:13 (RSV "thistles"); "thickets" in 1 Samuel 13:6 ; "thistles" in 2Kings 2 Kings 25:18 , Job 31:40 ; "thorns" in 2 Chronicles 33:11 , Song of Solomon 2:2 , Hosea 9:6
Black - It is a different word which is rendered "black" in Leviticus 13:31,37 ; Song of Solomon 1:5 ; 5:11 ; and Zechariah 6:2,6
Kedar - They lived in black hair-tents (Song of Solomon 1:5 )
Bether - BETHER (‘mountains of cutting’ or ‘of divisions,’ Song of Solomon 2:17 )
Aloe - The beloved's garden includes aloe (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 )
Winter - Song of Solomon 2:11 (c) We may use this type as a picture of the long life of hardship, sorrow, darkness and difficulty which one may live on this earth
Black - Under the figure of a bride the remnant of Israel says, I am 'black,' describing herself as having become dark or swarthy by the rays of the sun; the scorching effect of affliction, Song of Solomon 1:5,6 : 'burning instead of beauty
Engedi - Engedi was first called Hazazon-tamar, Genesis 14:7; 2 Chronicles 20:2; it was David's hiding-place from Saul, 1 Samuel 23:29; 1 Samuel 24:1; and where David cut off the skirt of Saul's robe, 24:4; its vineyards are mentioned, Song of Solomon 1:14; now called ʾAin Jidy
Leopard - Beth-nimrah, Numbers 32:36, means the house of the leopards; and in Song of Solomon 4:8, are mentioned the mountains of the leopards
Engedi - See cut in Song of Song of Solomon 1:14
Collar - This word is used to translate various Hebrew words and may describe (1) the opening for the head in a garment (Exodus 28:32 NIV; Job 30:18 ; Psalm 133:2 NIV), (2) a decorative ornament around the necks of the Midianite Kings (NRSV) or their camels ( Judges 8:26 ; see Proverbs 1:9 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:9 ), (3) stocks or a pillory used to restrain a person (Jeremiah 29:26 NRSV, NAS), and (4) a shackle of iron placed around the neck of a prisoner ( Psalm 105:18 NRSV, REB, TEV)
Ointments - Were much used by the ancient Hebrews, not chiefly for medical purposes as among us, but as a luxury, Ruth 3:3 Psalm 104:15 Song of Song of Solomon 1:2 Matthew 6:17 Luke 7:46
Banner - These standards, of which there were four, were worked with embroidery and beautifully ornamented (Numbers 1:52 ; 2:2,3,10,18,25 ; Song of Solomon 2:4 ; 6:4,10 ). ) ...
God's setting up or giving a banner (Psalm 20:5 ; 60:4 ; Song of Solomon 2:4 ) imports his presence and protection and aid extended to his people
Spice, Spices - In ( Song of Solomon 5:1 ) "I have gathered my myrrh with my spice," the word points apparently to some definite substance. In the other places, with the exception perhaps of (Song of Solomon 1:13 ; 6:2 ) the words refer more generally to sweet aromatic odors, the principal of which was that of the balsam or balm of Gilead; the tree which yields this substance is now generally admitted to be the Balsam-odendron opobalsamum
Thigh - Sometimes the reference is simply physical (Judges 3:16 ; Psalm 45:3 ; Song of Song of Solomon 3:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:1 )
Flagon - ]'>[1] gives ‘flagons’ ( 2 Samuel 6:19 , 1 Chronicles 16:3 , Hosea 3:1 , Song of Solomon 2:5 ), the meaning of the Heb. ]'>[1] ‘flagon [14],’ in Hosea 3:1 ‘cakes of raisins’ for ‘flagons of wine,’ and in Song of Solomon 2:5 ‘raisins’ (RVm Kiss - The kiss was a token of love ( Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ), of homage and submission ( Genesis 41:40 , Job 31:27 , Psalms 2:12 ), and was also an act of idolatrous worship ( 1 Kings 19:18 , Hosea 13:2 )
Vine - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) And evidently on this account, because Jesus is not one blessing, but every one and all. Song of Song of Solomon 7:8-12, etc
Spices - , but aromatic woods, seeds, or gums (Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 5:1)
Apple Tree, Apple - Mention of the apple tree occurs in the Authorized Version in ( Song of Solomon 2:3 ; 8:5 ) and Joel 1:12 The fruit of this tree is alluded to in ( Proverbs 25:11 ) and Song of Solomon 2:5 ; 7:8 It is a difficult matter to say what is the specific tree denoted by the Hebrew word tappuach
Hagiographa - The hagiographa in their Hebrew order include: Psalms, Proverbs, and Job; the “five scrolls” (Megilloth ) read at major festivals, namely, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther; Daniel; and Ezra-Nehemiah and Chronicles
Heshbon - There are reservoirs in this district, which are probably the "fishpools" referred to in Song of Solomon 7:4
Mandrakes - The odor of the plant seems to be enjoyed by Orientals, Song of Solomon 7:13, and by some Occidentals
Cabul - ” Apparently, the “gift” expected a gift in return, according to Near Eastern etiquette, for Hiram gave Song of Solomon 120 talents of gold ( 1 Kings 9:10-14 )
Lattice - Lattices were used as window covering to allow some light to penetrate while keeping heat and rain to a minimum (Judges 5:28 ; 2 Kings 1:2 ; Proverbs 7:6 , KJV casement; Song of Song of Solomon 2:9 )
Bundle - ...
Song of Solomon 1:13 (c) All of GOD's gracious loving kindnesses and mercies are grouped by the Psalmist, as a bundle is wrapped together
Chamber - ...
Song of Solomon 1:4 (c) The different experiences of blessing in the Christian life are compared to chambers in the palace of the king
Moon - Song of Solomon 6:10 (c) This orb is probably a type of the church
Wall - (Song of Song of Solomon 2:9)...
Sockets - ...
Song of Solomon 5:15 (c) The legs support the body and strong legs are necessary to success for the runner, the wrestler, the prize fighter, and all of those who use the legs constantly in their vocations
Spice - ...
Song of Solomon 4:14 (c) We may take this to represent the sweet fragrance to GOD of the worship and godly living of His people
Tirzah - In Song of Solomon 6:4 it is referred to as being 'beautiful,' but the LXX and the Vulgate do not in this passage regard it as a proper name
Cinnamon - It is mentioned, Exodus 30:23 , among the materials in the composition of the holy anointing oil; and in Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Sir_24:15 ; and Revelation 18:13 , among the richest perfumes
Camphire - In Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 4:13 , is not the gum Camphor of our apothecaries, but the Cyprus-flower, as it is sometimes called, the Athena of the Arabs, a whitish fragrant flower, hanging in clusters like grapes
Rose - The "rose of Sharon," sacredly associated with the heavenly Bridegroom, Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 Isaiah 35:1 , appears from the derivation of its Hebrew name to have been a bulbous plant; and is generally believed, in accordance with the ancient versions, to denote a plant of the narcissus family, perhaps the meadow-saffron, which grows in rich profusion on the plain of Sharon
Washing - , Song of Song of Solomon 4:2 ; 6:6
Spice, Spices - bâsâm , Song of Solomon 5:2 , RVm Garden - Flowers were cultivated ( Song of Solomon 6:2 ), and doubtless, as in modern times, crops of grain or vegetables were grown in the spaces between the trees. at Jenîn ( Song of Solomon 4:15 ). ’ The cool shade of the trees, the music of the stream, and the delightful variety of fruits in their season, make the gardens a favourite place of resort ( Esther 7:7 , Song of Solomon 4:16 etc
Beautiful - it is very frequent, and especially in Genesis and the Song of Solomon. It is used five times in the Song of Solomon, Song of Solomon 1:16 ; 2:14 ; 4:3 ; 6:3,5
Raven - Its glossy plumage is referred to in Song of Solomon 5:11 ; it often dwells in the wilderness ( Isaiah 34:11 ), and yet God cares for and watches over it ( Job 38:41 , Psalms 147:8 , Luke 12:24 )
Senir - The name of Hermon among the Amorites, according to Deuteronomy 3:9 , but in Song of Solomon 4:8 and 1 Chronicles 5:23 distinguished from Hermon
Curtains - Song of Solomon 1:5; "the curtains of Solomon" mean the hangings and veil of Solomon's temple, typifying Christ's righteousness, the covering of saints who together constitute the living temple of the antitypical Solomon (Isaiah 61:10; Revelation 19:8; 1 Corinthians 3:16)
Bath-Sheba - After her husband was slain (11:15) she was married to David (11:27), and became the mother of (Song of Solomon 12:24 ; 1 Kings 1:11 ; 2:13 )
Saffron - ( Song of Solomon 4:14 ) Saffron has front the earliest times been in high esteem as a perfume
Window - (Judges 5:28 ; Proverbs 7:6 ) Authorized Version "casement;" (Ecclesiastes 12:3 ) Authorized Version "window;" (Song of Solomon 2:9 ; Hosea 13:3 ) Authorized Version "chimney
Nut - ...
(2) Εgowz ; Song of Solomon 6:11, "the garden of nuts
Gallery - ]'>[1] in Song of Solomon 7:6 reads ‘The king is held in the galleries
Coat - The tunic worn like the shirt next the skin (Leviticus 16:4 ; Song of Solomon 5:3 ; 2 Samuel 15:32 ; Exodus 28:4 ; 29:5 )
Flagon - In Song of Solomon 2:5 it is simply 'flagons
Jeshimon - of the Dead Sea and east of the river (so apparently in Numbers), or to the eastern part of the hill-country of Judah on the western shore of the Dead Sea ( Song of Solomon 1:1-17 Samam
Chains - Thus Christ speaks of his church; (Song of Song of Solomon 1:10; Son 4:9) and again, by way of shewing Christ's property in his church, "I put bracelets upon thine hands, and a chain on thy neck
Armies - (Song of Song of Solomon 6:10) And in allusion to the same, the Lord himself is called the Lord of hosts
Mount Carmel - (See Isaiah 35:2; Amos 1:2) Hence Christ, when describing his church's beauty, saith, "Thine head upon thee is like Carmel:" (Song of Song of Solomon 7:5
Brother - nephew, (Genesis 13:8 ; 14:16 ) husband, (Song of Solomon 4:9 ) ...
One of the same tribe
Two Hundred - 1: διακόσιοι (Strong's #1250 — Adjective — diakosioi — dee-ak-os'-ee-oy ) occurs in Mark 6:37 ; John 6:7 ; 21:8 ; Acts 23:23 (twice); 27:37, "two hundred (threescore and sixteen);" Revelation 11:3 , "(a thousand) two hundred (and threescore);" Song of Solomon 12:6
Myrrh - An ingredient of the holy anointing oil (Exodus 30:23), typical of Messiah's graces (Psalms 45:8) as well as the church's through Him (Song of Solomon). In Song of Solomon 1:13 translated "a scent box of myrrh
Wine - (Isaiah 25:6) But the sweetest commendation of Jesus and his gospel, is that which under the similitude of wine is given by the spouse, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:2) where she desires to be kissed with the kisses of Jesus's mouth, for, said she, thy love is better than wine. His language is: "Eat, O friends: drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved!" (Song of Song of Solomon 5:1)...
Garden - Biblical references include cedar, cypress, and fruit trees (Ecclesiastes 2:5 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ); vegetables (KJV “herbs”; Deuteronomy 11:10 ); fragrant spices such as myrrh and balsam (Song of Song of Solomon 4:16 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 );...
flowers such as lilies (Song of Song of Solomon 6:2 ); and a wide variety of other plants—mint, rue (Luke 11:42 ), dill, cummin (Matthew 23:23 ), and mustard (Luke 13:19 ). As a guarded and protected place (Song of Song of Solomon 4:12 ), persons could retreat there for prayer (Matthew 26:36-46 ), for quiet or solitude (Esther 7:7 ), or even for bathing (Susanna 1:15 )
Arden - ...
Song of Solomon 4:12 (c) We may take the expression as a picture of the Church in which GOD's people are the flowers, and their worship is the fragrance. (See also Song of Solomon 5:1; Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 6:11)
Graving - ...
...
Pathah refers to intaglio work, the cutting and engraving of precious stones (Exodus 28:9-11,21 ; Zechariah 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 1:10,11 )
Ivory - The ‘tower of ivory’ ( Song of Solomon 7:4 ) may also have been a building decorated with ivory
Cinnamon - It is mentioned elsewhere only in Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Revelation 18:13
Blow - ...
Song of Solomon 4:16 (b) This is symbolical of the ministry of the Spirit in giving or withholding or in providing what is needed to make the garden fruitful
Street - Shuq like chuts is seemingly "the narrow street" distinguished from "the broad way," rechob , in Song of Solomon 3:2
Tirzah - 772, 2 Kings 15:14; 2 Kings 15:16, and its fame for beauty appears from Song of Solomon 6:4
Perfumes - (Exodus 30:22-38 ) Nor were they less used in private life; not only were they applied to the person, but to garment, (Psalm 45:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:11 ) and to articles of furniture, such as beds
Lebanon - In the recesses of the range wild beasts as of old still abound (2 Kings 14:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ). The scenes of the Lebanon are remarkable for their grandeur and beauty, and supplied the sacred writers with many expressive similes (Psalm 29:5,6 ; 72:16 ; 104:16-18 ; Song of Solomon 4:15 ; Isaiah 2:13 ; 35:2 ; 60:13 ; Hosea 14:5 ). It is famous for its cedars (Song of Solomon 5:15 ), its wines (Hosea 14:7 ), and its cool waters (Jeremiah 18:14 )
Black - ...
Song of Solomon 1:5 (c) This probably represents the Saviour as He appears to unsaved people. ...
Song of Solomon 5:11 (c) This black hair is probably a type of the eternal youth, vigor and strength of our Lord as a young king thirty-three and a half years old. (See also Song of Solomon 7:5; Revelation 1:14)
Tent - mishcan (Song of Solomon 1:8 ), used also of a dwelling (Job 18:21 ; Psalm 87:2 ), the grave (Isaiah 22:16 ; comp 14:18), the temple (Psalm 46:4 ; 84:2 ; 132:5 ), and of the tabernacle (Exodus 25:9 ; 26:1 ; 40:9 ; Numbers 1:50,53 ; 10:11 ). Tents have always occupied a prominent place in Eastern life (1 Samuel 17:54 ; 2 Kings 7:7 ; Psalm 120:5 ; Song of Solomon 1:5 )
Engedi - The Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 1:14) celebrates Engedi's vineyards and clusters of "camphire," i
Thistle - " It is also rendered "thorn" in 2 Chronicles 33:11 ; Proverbs 26:9 ; Song of Solomon 2:2 ; "brambles" in Isaiah 34:13
Mandrakes - , "love-plants", occurs only in Genesis 30:14-16 and Song of Solomon 7:13
Kedar - Representing the Arabs in general, with flocks, and goat's or camel's hair tents, black as their own complexion (Song of Solomon 1:5; Psalms 120:5)
Brier - " The wicked are often so called (2 Samuel 23:6; Song of Solomon 2:2)
Shoe - ...
Song of Solomon 7:1 (c) This indicates that the natural walk represented by natural feet is not beautiful nor acceptable to GOD unless affected and covered by those graces which He supplies for the work
Kedar - The bride in Song of Solomon 1:5 was black, or dark, like the black tents of Kedar
Paradise - (par' uh disse) Old Persian term which means literally “enclosure” or “wooded park,” used in the Old Testament to speak of King Artaxerxes' forest (Nehemiah 2:8 ), and twice of orchards (Ecclesiastes 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 )
ba'Asha - Baasha died in the 24th year of his reign, and was buried in Tirzah, (Song of Solomon 6:4 ) which he had made his capital
Valley - ...
...
'Emek, "deep;" "a long, low plain" (Job 39:10,21 ; Psalm 65:13 ; Song of Solomon 2:1 ), such as the plain of Esdraelon; the "valley of giants" (Joshua 15:8 ), usually translated "valley of Rephaim" (2 Samuel 5:18 ); of Elah (1 Samuel 17:2 ), of Berachah (2 Chronicles 20:26 ); the king's "dale" (Genesis 14:17 ); of Jehoshaphat (Joel 3:2,12 ), of Achor (Joshua 7:24 ; Isaiah 65:10 ), Succoth (Psalm 60:6 ), Ajalon (Joshua 10:12 ), Jezreel (Hosea 1:5 ). nahal, a wady or water-course (Genesis 26:19 ; Song of Solomon 6:11 )
Eye - ]'>[1] ], Song of Solomon 1:15 ; Song of Solomon 5:12 , and the name Dorcas in Acts 9:36 ; in Genesis 29:17 the reference seems to be to Leah’s weak eyes (so Driver, ad loc
Chariot - (2 Kings 2:12) So again, in the book of the Songs, (Song of Song of Solomon 3:9) Solomon is said to have made a chariot of the wood of Lebanon; the pillars silver, the bottom of gold, the covering purple, and the midst thereof paved with love, for the daughters of Jerusalem. Hence, the church in return, feeling all her affections awakened by grace, to the love of Jesus, cries out in an holy rapture of joy and delight," Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Ammi-nadib?' (Song of Song of Solomon 6:12)...
See Amminadib...
Leopard - נמר Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Isaiah 11:6 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Jeremiah 13:23 ; Hosea 13:7 ; Habakkuk 1:8 ; Daniel 7:6 ; παρδαλις , Revelation 13:2 ; Sir_28:23 . Probably, these animals were numerous in Palestine; as we find places with a name intimating their having been the haunts of leopards: Nimrah, Numbers 32:3 ; Beth-Nimrah, Numbers 32:36 ; Joshua 13:27 ; and "waters of Nimrim," Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ; and "mountains of leopards," Song of Solomon 4:8
Dove (Turtle) - ...
Song of Solomon 2:14 (a) Some believe that the church is referred to in this passage, and others believe that it is the Lord JESUS. (See also Song of Solomon 5:2; Song of Solomon 6:9)
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Lebanon - ) Odorous flowers and aromatic shrubs and vines still yield" the smell of Lebanon" wafted by the mountain breeze (Song of Solomon 4:11). Hyaenas, panthers, jackals, wolves, and bears still haunt its glens and peaks (compare Song of Solomon 4:8; 2 Kings 14:9). Antilibanus is less peopled than Lebanon, and has more wild beasts: Song of Solomon 4:8, "look from the top of Amana, from . "The tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus" is Hermon (Song of Solomon 7:4)
Breast - ...
Song of Solomon 1:13 (b) Here is a picture of the perfect love, sweetness and satisfaction which exists between the Lord and His bride, the children of GOD. ...
Song of Solomon 4:5 (b) This will remind us of the sufficiency, devotion and activity of the love of the children of GOD for the Lord JESUS CHRIST. (See also Song of Solomon 7:7-8). ...
Song of Solomon 8:8 (b) This peculiar picture will remind us that the Christian may lose his love and affection for the bridegroom, the Saviour
Spices - Cassia, aloes, and spikenard were some of the spices used in the preparation of cosmetics (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Mark 14:3 ; John 12:3 ). Henna A plant used as a cosmetic; its leaves produced a dye women used (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 ). When mixed with oil, it was used as medicine and perfume (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ). Spikenard (Nardos tacs jatamansi ) A very expensive fragrant oil used in the manufacture of perfumes and ointments (Song of Song of Solomon 1:12 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Mark 14:3 ; John 12:3 )
Bracelet - Bracelets were worn by men as well as by women (Song of Solomon 5:14 , RSV)
Spikenard - nerd), a much-valued perfume (Song of Solomon 1:12 ; 4:13,14 )
Roe - ghazal), permitted for food (Deuteronomy 14:5 ; Compare Deuteronomy 12:15,22 ; 15:22 ; 1 Kings 4:23 ), noted for its swiftness and beauty and grace of form (2 Samuel 2:18 ; 1 Chronicles 12:8 ; Song of Solomon 2:9 ; 7:3 ; 8:14 )
Rose - In Song of Solomon 2:1 and Isaiah 35:1 the Hebrew word Habatstseleth (found only in these passages), rendered "rose" (RSV marg
River - " (Psalms 46:4) God the Father is thus described, Jeremiah 2:13; Psalms 65:9; God the Son is thus described, Song of Song of Solomon 4:15; Zechariah 13:1; and God the Holy Ghost, John 7:38 and John 4:14
Engedi - The vineyards of En-gedi are spoken of in Song of Solomon 1:14
Paradise - There are three places in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament where this word is found, namely, Nehemiah 2:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Ecclesiastes 2:5
Spikenard - Song of Song of Solomon 1:12 4:13,14 , a highly perfumed ointment prepared from a plant in India growing in short spikes
Flagon - The Hebrew word everywhere rendered in the English version flagon, 2 Samuel 6:19 1 Chronicles 16:3 Song of Song of Solomon 2:5 Hosea 3:1 , means rather a cake, especially of dried grapes or raisins, pressed into a particular form
Dove - The dove's rapidity of flight is alluded to in (Psalm 55:6 ) the beauty of its plumage in (Psalm 68:13 ) its dwelling int he rocks and valleys in (Jeremiah 48:28 ) and Ezekiel 7:16 Its mournful voice in ( Isaiah 38:14 ; 59:11 ; Nahum 2:7 ) its harmlessness in (Matthew 10:16 ) its simplicity in (Hosea 7:11 ) and its amativeness in (Song of Solomon 1:15 ; 2:14 ) Doves are kept in a domesticated state in many parts of the East
Tirzah - The doubtful reference in Song of Solomon 6:4 compares the Shulammite to Tirzah in beauty
Queen - In Song of Solomon 6:8,9 , the king's wives are styled "queens" (Heb
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Aloes - 'ahalim), a fragrant wood (Numbers 24:6 ; Psalm 45:8 ; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Solomon 4:14 ), the Aquilaria agallochum of botanists, or, as some suppose, the costly gum or perfume extracted from the wood
Raven - 'orebh, from a root meaning "to be black" (Compare Song of Solomon 5:11 ); first mentioned as "sent forth" by Noah from the ark (Genesis 8:7 )
Of - ‘of’), as Mark 11:8 ‘Others cut down branches of the trees,’ John 15:15 ‘All things that I have heard of my Father,’ John 16:13 ‘He shall not speak of himself’; (2) concerning , as Acts 5:24 ‘They doubted of them, whereunto this would grow,’ Matthew 18:13 ‘He rejoiceth more of that sheep than of the ninety and nine,’ John 2:17 ‘The zeal of thine house’; (3) with , Song of Solomon 2:5 ‘I am sick of love
Navel - Ezekiel 16:4 graphically portrays Jerusalem's hopeless state before God's adoption in the image of a child whose navel string (umbilical cord) is not cut (See Job 40:16 ; Proverbs 3:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:2 )
Perfume - ...
Song of Solomon 3:6 (c) This no doubt refers to the loveliness of the Lord JESUS CHRIST who is admired by His people, and whose Name is as ointment poured forth
Aloe - An image for all that is lovely, fragrant, flourishing, and incorruptible (Numbers 24:6; Song of Solomon 4:14)
Chariot - Except in Song of Solomon 3:9 , where the word is appiryon and signifies 'sedan, portable couch,' the chariots were vehicles with two wheels, used either for travelling or for war: they are often seen portrayed on Egyptian and Assyrian monuments
Footsteps - ...
Song of Solomon 1:8 (c) This is probably a call for Christians to walk together in happy fellowship
Flagon - "dried by heat") "a cake of pressed dried grapes"; so 1 Chronicles 16:3; Song of Solomon 2:5; Hosea 3:1 margin; such were offered to idols (Jeremiah 7:18)
Calamus - The Latin for cane, Hebrew Kaneh , Mentioned ( Exodus 30:23 ) as one of the ingredients in the holy anointing oil, one of the sweet scents (Song of Solomon 4:14 ), and among the articles sold in the markets of Tyre (Ezekiel 27:19 )
Turtle-Dove - It is a bird of passage, Jeremiah 8:7 , leaving Palestine for a short trip to the south, and returning early in spring, Song of Song of Solomon 2:12
Cave - Petra, in Idumea, was a city of caves, Numbers 24:21 Song of Song of Solomon 2:14 Jeremiah 49:16 Obadiah 1:3
Thigh - Warriors wore their swords upon the left thigh, unless left-handed in readiness for use, Judges 3:15-21 Psalm 45:3 Song of Song of Solomon 3:8 ; so too they may have borne their names and titles, not only on their shields, but on their swords, or on the rove or mailed coat covering the thigh, Revelation 19:16
Dew - Maundrell tells us that the tents of his company, when pitched on Tabor and Hermon, "were as wet with dew as if it had rained on them all night," Judges 6:38 Song of Song of Solomon 5:2
Gold - (1 Kings 6:22 ) 10 passim ; ( Esther 1:6 ; Song of Solomon 3:9,10 ; Jeremiah 10:9 ) The chief countries mentioned as producing gold are Arabia, Sheba and Ophir
Mahanaim - Solomon's bride, the church, is compared to "the company of two armies" (margin, "Mahanaim," Song of Solomon 6:13). Though "one" (Song of Solomon 6:9) she is nevertheless "two," the family of Jesus Christ in heaven and that on earth, that militant and that triumphant
Spikenard - (Song of Song of Solomon 1:12) —And the woman who anointed the head of Jesus before his sufferings, is said to have done it with the ointment of spikenard. What so humble, low, despised, and overlooked as Jesus, though the plant of renown? (Ezekiel 34:29) "There was no beauty that we should desire him"—and yet what fragrancy, like the sweet incense of his blood and righteousness, to perfume the persons and offerings of his people? So his church; what more contemptible in the eyes of the great ones of the earth?—or his gospel, what more despised and set at nought? Yet how lovely, and how fragrant, in the view of Jesus! Hear what Jesus saith,"How fair is thy love, my sister, my spouse; how much better is thy love than wine, and the smell of thine ointments than all spices!" (Song of Song of Solomon 4:10) Oh, for grace to echo back to such matchless grace—While the king sitteth at his table—while his grace and the influences of his Holy Spirit, are calling forth into lively exercise those blessed principles he himself hath planted in my heart—"my spikenard sendeth forth the smell thereof
Lebanon - Olives, figs, and mulberries also abound, and a number of aromatic shrubs, which perfume the air, as alluded to in Song of Solomon 4:11 . 2 Kings 14:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Habakkuk 2:17
Ensign - In Song of Solomon 2:4 it is rendered "banner
Mahanaim - Mahanaim was the seat of one of Solomon's commissariat officers, 1 Kings 4:14, and it is alluded to in his Song of Solomon 6:13
Spikenard - in ( Song of Solomon 1:12 ; 4:13,14 ) The ointment with which our Lord was anointed as he sat at meat in Simon's house at Bethany consisted of this precious substance, the costliness of which may be inferred from the indignant surprise manifested by some of the witnesses of the transaction
Tirza - Solomon refers to its beauty (Song of Solomon 6:4 )
Veil - In ancient times the veil was adopted only in exceptional cases, either as an article of ornamental dress, (Song of Solomon 4:1,3 ; 6:7 ) or by betrothed maidens in the presence of their future husbands, especially at the time of the wedding, (Genesis 24:65 ) or lastly, by women of loose character for purposes of concealment
Laish (2) - shall leap from Bashan"; also Song of Solomon 4:8)
Doors - They were fastened by a lock (Judges 3:23,25 ; Song of Solomon 5:5 ) or by a bar (Judges 16:3 ; Job 38:10 )
Drink, Strong - Strong drink was extracted from other fruit also, as the pomegranate (Song of Solomon 8:2)
Forest - ]'>[1] ‘orchards,’ Song of Solomon 4:13 , Ecclesiastes 2:5 , RV Lily - LILY ( shûshan , 1 Kings 7:10 ; shôshannah , 2 Chronicles 4:5 , Song of Solomon 2:1 , Hosea 14:5 )
Shushan - Jesus calls his church by this name, Song of Song of Solomon 2:2
Cinnamon - It was known to the Hebrews (Exodus 30:23, Proverbs 7:17, Song of Solomon 4:14); and Hero dotus (iii
Camphire - copher), mentioned in Song of Solomon 1:14 (RSV, "henna-flowers"); 4:13 (RSV, "henna"), is the al-henna of the Arabs, a native of Egypt, producing clusters of small white and yellow odoriferous flowers, whence is made the Oleum Cyprineum
Mount Amana - It was from hence Christ called his Spouse the church--"Come with me from Lebanon, (my spouse) with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' den, from the mountains of the leopards;" (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8
Fountain - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:15)...
Ensign - (nes ; in the Authorized Version generally "ensign," sometimes "standard;" degel , "standard," with the exception of ( Song of Solomon 2:4 ) "banner;" oth , "ensign")
Hair - ...
Song of Solomon 4:1 (a) The mixture of white hair with dark hair as age progresses is compared to the white goats and dark goats mingled together on the hillside as seen from afar. ...
Song of Solomon 5:11 (b) The black hair of our wonderful Lord JESUS was an indication of his youthful character, His power, vigor, vision and activity as a rich young king. ...
Song of Solomon 7:5 (b) The purple hair of our Lord JESUS is a picture of His royal character, being the Son of GOD, in the royal family, and with all the royal prerogatives of the living GOD
Ointment - Dry perfumes were kept in bags (Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 ) and in perfume boxes (Isaiah 3:20 NRSV; NIV: “perfume bottles”; KJV: “tablets”). Matthew 4:13-14 ; Mark 14:3 ; KJV: “spikenard”), frankincense (KJV: “incense”; Isaiah 60:6 ; Matthew 2:11 ); balsam or balm (Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ); cassia (Exodus 30:24 ; Ezekiel 27:19 ), calamus (Exodus 30:23 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ; NRSV: “aromatic cane”), cinnamon (Exodus 30:23 ; Revelation 18:13 ), stacte (Exodus 30:34 ), and onycha (Exodus 30:34 ). The breath was perfumed (Song of Song of Solomon 7:8 ), probably with spiced wine (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2 ). The garments of the king were perfumed with myrrh, aloes , and cassia (Psalm 45:8 ), or myrrh, frankincense, and “with all powders of the merchant” (Song of Song of Solomon 3:6 ). Perfumes were used inside the clothes (Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 ) and by women who desired to be attractive to men (Esther 2:12 )
Basin - aggan') for washing (Exodus 24:6 ); rendered also "goblet" (Song of Solomon 7:2 ) and "cups" (Isaiah 22:24 )
Kedar - They may best be described as nomadic, living in tents (Psalm 120:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 ) and raising sheep and goats (Isaiah 60:7 ; Jeremiah 49:28-29 ,Jeremiah 49:28-29,49:32 ), as well as camels, which they sold as far away as Tyre (Ezekiel 27:21 )
en-Gedi - The Shulammite compares her beloved to henna flowers in En-gedi ( Song of Solomon 1:14 ); and in Ezekiel’s idealistic vision of the healing of the Dead Sea waters, a picture is drawn of fishers here spreading their nets ( Ezekiel 47:10 )
Leopard - ‘the leopards,’ Song of Solomon 4:8 )
Gold - Ρaz , "native gold" (Job 28:17; Song of Solomon 5:15)
Sapphire - Ezekiel 1:26; Ezekiel 10:1; Job 28:6; Job 28:16; Song of Solomon 5:14, sapphire, sparkling in the girdle round Him; Isaiah 54:11; Lamentations 4:7, "their polishing was of sapphire," they were like beautifully cut and polished sapphires
Chain - ...
...
It was used as an ornament (Proverbs 1:9 ; Song of Solomon 1:10 )
Hermon - 1 Chronicles 5:23 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Ezekiel 27:5 ); and once it was called SION
Lip - Thus JEHOVAH takes to himself the sovereignty of this work, when he saith, (Isaiah 57:19) "I create the fruit of the lips" Hence the church is represented as speaking the effusions of the heart, when she saith; "So will we render thee the claves of our lips" (Hosea 14:2) And hence, when commending the beauties of Jesus, she saith; "his lips are like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh:" (Song of Song of Solomon 5:13) meaning, that so sweet and fragrant are Christ's words, his gospel of salvation, and his tokens of grace, so refreshing to the soul of a poor sinner conscious of the want of it; that as lilies, they charm and afford a sweet smelling savour, by which all the spiritual senses are ravished and made glad
Tent - mishkan , rightly translated 'tabernacle' but is 'tent' in Song of Solomon 1:8
Kiss - A few Scriptures are given herewith to show the many ways in which the word "kiss" is used in the Scriptures:...
Genesis 27:26 (c) Kiss of devotion...
Genesis 45:15 (c) Kiss of reconciliation...
Genesis 50:1 (c) The farewell kiss...
Ruth 1:14 (c) Kiss of desertion...
1 Samuel 10:1 (c) Kiss of honor...
1 Samuel 20:41 (c) Kiss of confidence...
2 Samuel 15:5 (c) Kiss of treason...
2 Samuel 20:9 (c) Kiss of hypocrisy...
Job 31:27 (c) Kiss of connivance...
Psalm 2:12 (c) Kiss of trust...
Psalm 85:10 (c) Kiss of justice...
Proverbs 7:13 (c) Kiss of impudence...
Proverbs 27:6 (c) The enemy's kiss...
Song of Solomon 1:2 (c)Kiss of affection...
Luke 7:45 (c) Kiss of gratitude...
Luke 22:48 (c) Kiss of betrayal...
Acts 20:37 (c) Kiss of sorrow...
Romans 16:16 (c) Holy kiss of saints...
Daughter - (Psalms 45:9-10; Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) How frequently do we find the Lord speaking of his church under the endeared character of daughter
Earring - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:11)...
Amminadib - We meet with this word in Song of Song of Solomon 6:12
Nose - " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:4) It is a beautiful metaphor, intimating the quickness of discernment by smell of all that is fragrant in Jesus, and his redemption in mount Lebanon, his gospel church
Marble - שיש , 1 Chronicles 29:2 ; Esther 1:6 ; Song of Solomon 5:15 ; a valuable kind of stone, of a texture so hard and compact, and of a grain so fine, as readily to take a beautiful polish
Bed - (Esther 1:6 ; Song of Solomon 3:9,10 ) The ordinary furniture of a bedchamber in private life is given in (2 Kings 4:10 )
Pillar - Lastly, the figurative use of the term "pillar," in reference to the cloud and fire accompanying the Israelites on their march or as in (Song of Solomon 3:6 ) and Reve 10:1 Is plainly derived from the notion of an isolated column not supporting a roof
Ring - Song of Solomon 5:14, "his hands" bent are compared to "rings" in which "beryls" are set, as the nails in the fingers; compare as to our names being "sealed" upon His heart, Song of Solomon 8:6, and palms, Isaiah 49:16
Pillar - ...
Song of Solomon 3:6 (c) This peculiar figure may represent the case and the certainty of the presence of GOD in one's life. ...
Song of Solomon 5:15 (a) It is said that athletes must have firm, substantial legs in order to endure whether it be in wrestling or prize fighting or on the track
Shulamite - (Song of Song of Solomon 6:13) It hath been variously accounted for. (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4)...
Frankincense - Song of Solomon 3:6, "Who is this that cometh out of the wilderness, like pillars of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and frankincense?" Israel, with Jehovah's pillar of smoke by day and fire by night, and smoke from the altars of incense and atonement, was the type. The bride too comes up with Him from the wilderness, exhaling frankincense-like graces, faith, love, joy, peace, prayer, praise; of her too it is asked, "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved?" (Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 7:13-17
Jewel - ...
Song of Solomon 1:10 (c) This is a lover's comment on the beauty and the sweetness of the one to whom he is attracted. (See also Song of Solomon 7:1; Isaiah 61:10)
Veil - " To lift or remove one's veil was to insult and degrade her, Genesis 24:65 Song of Song of Solomon 5:7 1 Corinthians 11:5,10 . The other veil, to be worn in the street, is a large mantle or sheet, of black silk, linen, or some coarse material, so ample as to envelope the whole person and dress, leaving but one of the eyes exposed, Song of Song of Solomon 4:9
Incense - ...
Spices used in the making of incense came from the gum of certain trees and from various plants and herbs (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14). Some of these were grown locally, but many were imported from the east and were an important source of income for ancient traders (Genesis 37:25; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20)
Gallery - " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:5) The proper idea of the gallery in the eastern buildings is necessary, in order to enter into the sense of this passage. " (Song of Song of Solomon 3:4)...
That this is the sense of the expression of "holding the king in the galleries" seems plain, from another consideration; namely, that the word held signifies being bound as a prisoner with chains and fetters. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:9)...
The reader will indulge me, I hope, with barely adding, that if such was the sweet result of Jesus being held by the church in the galleries of old, surely, believers now ought to take confidence and delight to detain the Lord in the galleries of ordinances; from whence, while they hold him fast by the lively actings of faith and prayer, like the wrestlings of their father Jacob of old, (See Genesis 32:26) they may be led by him into the chambers of rich communion, in the high privilege of near and familiar enjoyment of all covenant blessings. " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:4) For there Jesus manifesteth himself to his people otherwise than he doeth to the world
Hair - Black hair was greatly admired by the Hebrews ( Song of Solomon 4:1 ; Song of Solomon 5:11 ; Song of Solomon 7:5 ). rules for priests, Ezekiel 44:20 ), but men seem to have worn the hair longer than is seemly among us ( Song of Solomon 5:2 ; Song of Solomon 5:11 )
Garden - " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) The Jerusalem which is above, and which is the mother of us all, knows but of one church, of which Jesus is the Head; for both Jew and Gentile will ultimately be brought into one fold. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:15)...
And while we eye Jesus as the source of life and fruitfulness to his garden the church, it is blessed to see how very lovely the similitude of a garden, corresponds to the state of Christ's church. (Song of Song of Solomon 4:12; Isaiah 5:1-2) Secondly, a garden is the property of some owner; it is not alike common or open to all: so is the church. " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:2) And elsewhere she invites Jesus to come into his garden, and to eat of his pleasant fruits. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:16; Son 5:1) Sixthly, a garden requires much care in dressing, and pruning, and weeding, and the like; so the church of Jesus hath the constant care of her Lord
Curtain - “Curtain” is often used synonymously with “tent” (Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 ; Isaiah 54:2 ; Jeremiah 4:20 ; Jeremiah 10:20 ; Jeremiah 49:29 ; Habakkuk 3:7 )
Dates - ...
The NAS of Song of Song of Solomon 5:11 describes the hair of the king as “like a cluster of dates,” perhaps a reference to a full head of hair
Moon - yareah, from its paleness (Ezra 6:15 ), and lebanah, the "white" (Song of Solomon 6:10 ; Isaiah 24:23 ), was appointed by the Creator to be with the sun "for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years" (Genesis 1:14-16 )
Ecclesiastes - The writer represents himself implicitly as ( Song of Solomon 1:12 )
Leopard - "The mountains of the leopard" (Song of Solomon 4:8), namely, Lebanon and Hermon, where still they are found; "the mountains of prey" (Psalms 76:4), symbolizing the rapacious world kingdoms
Nathan - He was charged with the education of (Song of Solomon 12:25 ), at whose inauguration to the throne he took a prominent part (1 Kings 1:8,10,11,22-45 )
Rain - " The heavy winter rain is mentioned in Genesis 7:12 ; Ezra 10:9 ; Song of Solomon 2:11
Tirzah - Originally a Canaanite city noted for its beauty (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4 ) but captured in the conquest of the Promised Land (Joshua 12:24 )
Allegory - ) not that the history is unreal as to the literal meaning, (such as is the Song of Solomon, a continued allegory); but, besides the literal historical fact, these events have another and a spiritual significance, the historical truths are types of the antitypical truths; the child of the promise, Isaac, is type of the gospel child of God who is free to love and serve his Father in Christ; the child of the bondwoman, Ishmael, is type of those legalists who, seeking justification by the law, are ever ill the spirit of bondage
Mandrakes - (Song of Song of Solomon 7:13) The original name is Dudaim, and is only mentioned in the instance of Reuben finding them in the field, and bringing them to his mother, (See Genesis 30:14-18) and in this place of the Canticles
Tirzah - "Thou art beautiful, O my love, as"Tirzah, said the Redeemer, "comely as Jerusalem and terrible as an army with banners," (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4) And is not the church all this when beautiful, in his salvation and comely in the comeliness which he hath put upon her? And what an awe do Jesus's little ones strike even now upon the ungodly, when they behold them living in his faith, and fear and love? And who, will dare to oppose them, by and by, when they shall see the Lord Jesus come to be "glorified in his saints, and admired in all them that believe?"...
Skip - ...
Song of Solomon 2:8 (b) Again we understand this to represent the feelings of the bride about the poet-King whom she loves so much
Ephod - Hence the church, in allusion to it, vehemently urgeth Christ in that request, "Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm;" (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6) meaning, that she might be always in his remembrance, to live in his heart, and to be always looked upon as a seal, or signet, on the arm
Breastplate - (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6) And hence, in allusion to the same, the apostle exhorts the church to put on "the breastplate of faith and love;" meaning, a steadfast looking unto Christ in the exercise of those graces, by relying wholly on him for mercy and salvation
Chariots - " In Song of Solomon 3:9, chariot seems to mean a portable sedan or palanquin, as it is translated in the R
Reed - The reed of spice, or good reed, (English version, "sweet calamus," Exodus 30:23 , "sweet cane" Jeremiah 6:20 ) also called simply reed, (English version, "calamus" or "sweet cane,") Isaiah 43:24 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ; Ezekiel 27:19 , is the sweet flag of India, calamus odoratus
Horses - Horses were common in Egypt, Genesis 47:17 50:9 Song of Song of Solomon 1:9 ; but the Jews were at first forbidden to go there for them, Deuteronomy 17:16 , or the keep any large number, Joshua 11:6 2 Samuel 8:4
Mandrakes - dudraim ) are mentioned in ( Genesis 30:14,16 ) and in Song of Solomon 7:13 The mandrake, Atropa mandragora , is closely allied to the well-known deadly nightshade, A
Shadow - In the evening cool, shadows disappear (Song of Song of Solomon 2:17 ). ...
Powerful people offer the shadow of protection and security (Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 )
Kiss - With the exception of three occurrences (Proverbs 7:13 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:1 ), the term is used without any erotic overtones
Hind - " (Song of Song of Solomon 2:17) And who shall speak of the earnestness of the Lord Jesus to come over the mountains of sin, and hills of corruption, in our nature, when he came to seek and save that which was lost? Who shall describe those numberless anticipations which we find in the Old Testament of Jesus, in appearing sometimes as an angel, and sometimes in an human from? as if to say, how much he longed for the time to come, when he should openly appear, in the substance of our flesh, as "the hind of the morning!"...
And there is another beautiful resemblance in the hind, or roe, to Christ, in the loveliness as well as swiftness of this beautiful creature. " (Song of Song of Solomon 8:14)...
Cluster - First, when the spies went up to search the promised land, and brought back the cluster of the rich fruit of Eshcol, (Numbers 13:23) And again, the church, in the book of the Songs, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) where she commends her beloved, under the sweet similitude of the same, "My beloved is unto me as a cluster of camphire in the vineyards of Engedi. ...
In the other instance, in direct allusion to Christ, in the church's commendation of him, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) there in an uncommon degree of beauty in the similitude. I leave the reader to his own observation upon the subject, with only remarking, that on the supposition the Hebrew Doctors were right, what a lovely Scripture this is in the Songs, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) when the church so sings of Christ
Plants in the Bible - ...
Lily and Rose Red lips of Song of Song of Solomon 5:13 indicate a red-flowered “lily,” such as scarlet tulip or anemone. Other references, such as Song of Song of Solomon 2:1-2 , may refer to the actual white madonna lily (Lilium candidum ), now very rare in the area, or wild hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis ) wild crocus (Croccus species ), the rose of Isaiah 35:1-2 (see NAS). The “rose of Sharon” (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ) has been equated with anemone, rockrose, narcissus, tulip, and crocus. Henna ( Lawsonia inermis ) leaves were crushed and used both as a perfume (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 NIV) and as a yellow dye for skin, nails, and hair. Spikenard or nard , an expensive perfumed oil (Song of Song of Solomon 4:13-14 ; John 12:3 ), obtained either from the leaves of a desert grass (Cymbopogon schoenanthus ) or, traditionally, the valerian relative Nardostachys jatamansi from the Himalayas. ...
Saffron ( Crocus sativus ), a yellow powder prepared from the stigmas, is used as a subtle flavor (Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ) and also as a food coloring and a medicine. The balm of Gilead or opohybalsam is yielded by Commiphora gileadensis , a non-spiny shrub of dry country in Southern Arabia and said to have been cultivated by Solomon at En-Gedi near the Dead Sea (Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 , “spice”). Pomegranate bushes were often grown in gardens and beside houses (Deuteronomy 8:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:11 ). ...
Another questionable fruit is that referred to as “apple ” (Song of Song of Solomon 2:3 ,Song of Song of Solomon 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8 ), although some versions translate the word as “apricot. However, it is possible that Solomon grew it in his garden (Song of Song of Solomon 6:11 )
Balm - It is rendered "spice" ( Song of Solomon 5:1,13 ; 6:2 ; margin of Revised Version, "balsam;" Exodus 35:28 ; 1 Kings 10:10 ), and denotes fragrance in general
Palm Tree - It is described as "flourishing" (Psalm 92:12 ), tall (Song of Solomon 7:7 ), "upright" (Jeremiah 10:5 )
Fox - It burrows, is silent and solitary in its habits, is destructive to vineyards, being a plunderer of ripe grapes (Song of Solomon 2:15 )
Spikenard - , Song of Song of Solomon 1:12 ; 4:13,14
Corn - The sheaves in harvest used to be decorated with the lilies of the field, which illustrates Song of Solomon 7:2
Pool - Pools are also used as an illustration of God's power to transform the barren into something fruitful (Isaiah 41:18 ), judgment (Isaiah 42:15 ), and the beauty of a woman's eyes (Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 )
Rizpah - ) A striking instance of motherly devotion, stronger than death, and clinging at all costs with desperate tenacity even to the lifeless remains of the loved ones (Song of Solomon 8:6; Isaiah 49:15)
Signet - The signet could be worn on a chain around the neck (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6 )
Valley - " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:11) What an endearing representation this is of Jesus, coming down into time valley of our world, and taking notice of his own graces given by himself to his own people
Kedar - The name is also supposed to refer to the black tents made of felt, which are still in use; and Song of Solomon 1:5 , is quoted in support of this usage of the word: "I...
am black, but comely as the tents of Kedar
Leopard - " The spouse in the Canticles speaks of the mountains of the leopards, Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 ; that is to say, such as Lebanon and Hermon, where wild beasts dwelt
Watchmen - Jerusalem and other cities had regular guards night and day, Song of Song of Solomon 3:1-3 5:7 , to whose hourly cries Isaiah refers in illustration of the vigilance required by God in his ministers, Isaiah 21:8,11,12 62:6
Hair - The color of the hair was generally black, Song of Solomon 5:11; but the gray hairs of age were regarded as especially venerable, Proverbs 16:31; on this account, perhaps, the hairs of the Ancient of Days are likened to "pure wool. Thus "the chain of the neck," Song of Solomon 4:9, might be a long lock or curl falling down upon the neck; and the "galleries," R
Honey - It is therefore improperly rendered "honeycomb," 1 Samuel 14:27 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; in both which places it means the honey that has distilled from the trees, as distinguished from the domestic, which was eaten with the comb. So butter and honey are several times mentioned in Scripture as among the most delicious refreshments, 2 Samuel 17:29 ; Job 20:17 ; Song of Solomon 4:11 ; Isaiah 7:15
Heshbon - East of the city are the remains of water-courses and an enormous cistern, or "fish-pond," which illustrates Song of Solomon 7:4
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Vine - The vineyards of En-gedi (Song of Solomon 1:14 ), Heshbon, Sibmah, Jazer, Elealeh (Isaiah 16:8-10 ; Jeremiah 48:32,34 ), and Helbon (Ezekiel 27:18 ), as well as of Eshcol, were celebrated
Kiss - The customary salutation in the East as a mark of respect or affection (Genesis 27:26; Song of Solomon 1:2; Luke 7:45); hence the token used by the hypocrite to pretend love (2 Samuel 15:5 Absalom; Matthew 26:48 Judas)
Tirzah (2) - ...
Celebrated for beauty (Song of Solomon 6:4); some derive Tirzah from ratsah , "pleasant
Fish - The ‘ fish -pools’ of Song of Solomon 7:4 and the ‘ponds for fish ’ in Isaiah 19:10 are both mistranslations
Mouth - Synonymn for lips (1 Kings 19:18 ; 2 Kings 4:34 ; Job 31:27 ; Proverbs 30:20 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:2 ); 2
Ring - Song of Solomon 5:14 (a) This is a type of the pure and perfect care which our Lord exercises over His bride because of the intimate relationship between them
Honeycomb - The sweetness and the attractiveness of the Word of GOD are revealed in this passage, and the Song of Solomon 4:11
Sister - Song of Solomon 4:9 (b) In this verse, as well as in the rest of this beautiful, poetical book, this word is used to represent the church
Flood - " (Song of Song of Solomon 8:7)...
Behold - (Isaiah 42:1; Zechariah 3:8; Malachi 3:1) Sometimes, the word is used as a note of admiration, as when Jesus speaks of the loveliness of his church, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:15) or when the angels announced the birth of Christ
Paradise - The Hebrew word GAN, garden, issued in a similar way, Nehemiah 2:8 Ecclesiastes 2:5 Song of Song of Solomon 4:13
Pomegranate - The value of the fruit and the beauty of the flower made the pomegranate welcome in gardens, Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 6:7,11 8:2 Joel 1:12
Crown - Newly-married persons of both sexes wore crowns on their wedding-day, Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 Ezekiel 16:12
Palms - The palm was a symbol of both beauty (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7 ) and prosperity (Psalm 92:12 )
Winds - wind was coldest (Song of Solomon 4:16). wind is first invoked (Song of Solomon 4:16) to clear the air (Job 37:22); then the warm S
Lebanon - Moses longed to enter the Holy Land, that he might "see that goodly mountain and Lebanon," Deuteronomy 3:24,25 ; and Solomon says of the Beloved, the type of Christ, "his countenance is as Lebanon," Song of Song of Solomon 5:15 . "The tower of Lebanon which looketh towards Damascus," Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 , is brought to recollection by the accounts given by modern travelers of the ruins of ancient temples, built of stones of vast size
Colours - White as the colour of snow in Isaiah 1:18 , of the teeth described as milk-white ( Genesis 49:12 ), and of horses ( Zechariah 1:8 ; Zechariah 6:3 ; Zechariah 6:6 ); also of wool ( Revelation 1:14 ) the prevailing colour of the Palestinian sheep being white (see Song of Solomon 4:2 ; Song of Solomon 6:6 ) and of garments ( Ecclesiastes 9:8 , Mark 9:3 ). Black is the colour of hair ( Song of Solomon 5:11 ‘black as a raven’), of horses ( Zechariah 6:2 ; Zechariah 6:6 , Revelation 6:5 ), and of ink ( 2 Corinthians 3:3 ). In Song of Solomon 1:5 the same Heb
Engedi - The vineyards of Engedi were celebrated in Solomon's time (Song of Solomon 1:4 )
Dove - (Song of Song of Solomon 2:14) And the comparison is certainly very just; for as the dove in nature is a very beautiful, and clean, and affectionate creature, so the church in grace, when washed in Christ's blood, and justified in Christ's righteousness, and made comely from the comeliness her Lord hath put upon her, is all-glorious within, and hath no spot, or blemish, but is without blame before Jesus in love
Banner - His love displayed is the "banner" under which His people rally for almighty protection and unspeakable comfort (Song of Solomon 2:4)
Mahanaim - There is apparently a reference to Mahanaim in Song of Solomon 6:13 (see RV Lebanon - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:15) And the idea is as beautiful as the figure is just and correct: for as the cold flowing waters which descend from the mountain of Lebanon refresh the earth, and cool the hot climate, and are very copious, and run with rapidity; so the grace of God in Christ Jesus, like the water of life, runs freely, graciously, and abundantly, to make "glad the city of God
Board - "...
Song of Solomon 8:9 (b) The board here represents a type of all believers standing together "fitly joined together," Ephesians 4:16, in order to make a Church which is GOD's dwelling place
Raven - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:11) And to those who know Christ, and eye him as the Head of his body the church, he is all this, and infinitely more
Apostolici - Song of Solomon 1), written in 375, when Epiphanius had begun and not completed his work
Seal - Judah probably wore his suspended from the neck over the breast (Genesis 38:18; Song of Solomon 8:6; Job 38:14)
Aloes - ALOES ( ’ahâlim , Proverbs 7:17 , Numbers 24:6 [1]; ’ahâloth , Psalms 45:8 , Song of Solomon 4:14 ; also alǒç , John 19:39 )
Pomegranate - Mention is made in ( Song of Solomon 8:2 ) of spiced wine of the juice of the pomegranate
Oil - ...
People used oils in the preparation of food (Exodus 29:2; Leviticus 2:4; 1 Kings 17:12-14), as fuels for lamps (Exodus 27:20; Zechariah 4:2-3; Zechariah 4:12; Matthew 25:3-4), as medicines and ointments (Isaiah 1:6; Luke 10:34), as cosmetics (2 Samuel 14:2; Esther 2:12; Psalms 104:15; Song of Song of Solomon 1:12; Song of Solomon 5:5) and for rubbing on the body to bring soothing and refreshment (Ruth 3:3; 2 Samuel 12:20; Amos 6:6; Luke 7:37-38; John 12:3)
Kedar - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:5) And the whole doctrine is blessedly explained Ezekiel 16:1-14. " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4)...
Horse - The bride is compared to "a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariots" (Song of Solomon 1:9), namely, in ardor and beauty (Song of Solomon 1:4, "run"; Song of Solomon 1:5, "comely"), and in forming "a company" militant, orderly, and numerous (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:14)
Flock - (Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) though scattered in various parts of the earth, and divided into several folds. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8)...
There is another great feature of Jesus's flock, and this is, in the present life, compared to the world, they are but small and inconsiderable in number. " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4; Son 4:2)...
Aloes - Or more properly, ALOE, and East Indian tree, that grows about eight or ten feet high, and yields a rich perfume, Psalm 45:8 Proverbs 7:17 Song of Song of Solomon 4:14
Thigh - On the thigh the sword was girded ( Exodus 32:27 , Psalms 45:3 , Song of Solomon 3:8 ); Ehud’s on the right thigh because he was left-handed ( Judges 3:16 ; Judges 3:21 )
Mandrake - , Song of Solomon 7:13 ; RVm Well - Elsewhere it is used as a metaphor for sexual pleasure (Proverbs 5:15 ; see Song of Song of Solomon 4:15 )
Polyglot - It contains the Hebrew and Greek originals, with Montanus's interlineary version; the Chaldee paraphrases, the Septuagint, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Syrian and Arabic Bibles, the Persian Pentateuch and Gospels, the Ethiopian Psalms, Song of Solomon, and New Testament, with their respective Latin translations; together with the Latin Vulgate, and a large volume of various readings, to which is ordinarily joined Castel's Heptaglot Lexicon
Feet (Wash) - ...
Song of Solomon 5:3 (c) In this passage we may see the utter devotion of the child of GOD to his Lord
Snow - It is in contrast to the black hair described in the Song of Solomon 5:11
Scarlet - ...
Song of Solomon 4:3 (a) The smooth, pretty lips of the bride are compared to the scarlet line
Spoil - ...
(NOUN)...
Song of Solomon 2:15 (a) The picture presented here represents those little sins, habits and conditions which are called "foxes," and which hinder the Christian from growing in grace and from bearing fruit for GOD
Myrrh - It was used as a perfume, Psalm 45:8 , where the language is symbolic of the graces of the Messiah; Proverbs 7:17 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 ; 5:5 ; it was one of the ingredients of the "holy anointing oil" for the priests, Exodus 30:23 (RV, "flowing myrrh"); it was used also for the purification of women, Esther 2:12 ; for embalming, John 19:39 ; as an anodyne see B); it was one of the gifts of the Magi, Matthew 2:11
Tent - Song of Solomon 1:5 ‘I am black as the tents of Kedar’). The tent, then as now, was probably divided into two parts by hanging a curtain from the three middle poles along the length of the tent the front division open and free to all, the back closed and reserved for the women and the privacy of domestic life ( Judges 15:1 , Song of Solomon 3:4 ; cf
Milk - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:12) Perhaps both images were meant to set forth the Redeemer, in that sweetness and loveliness of character, as blending the tender affections of his heart towards his people, like the softness of milk flowing in upon the souls of his redeemed, with a fulness of pity and compassion. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:11) There is a great beauty as well as tenderness in our Lord's expression
Bag - A cloth tied up in a bundle is translated as bag (Job 14:17 ; Proverbs 7:20 ; Haggai 1:6 ) or bundle (Genesis 42:35 ; 1 Samuel 25:29 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 ). This type of bag was used to hold money (Genesis 42:35 ; Proverbs 7:20 ; Haggai 1:6 ; see 2 Kings 12:10 where the verb form, “to tie up in bags,” is used) or something loose such as myrrh (Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 )
Palace - Terms designating a strongly fortified section of the king's residence often replaced palace: citadel (1 Kings 16:18 ; 2 Kings 15:25 ); tower (Psalm 122:7 NRSV; Song of Song of Solomon 8:9 NIV); stronghold ( Isaiah 34:13 ; Amos 1:4 NRSV); fortress ( Amos 1:4 NIV); battlement (Song of Song of Solomon 8:9 NRSV; parapet, REB)
Garden - Compare Song of Solomon 4:15, "a fountain of gardens," 'Αyin ganim , Jenin now, i. The ripe grain in harvest joy was decorated with lilies; Song of Solomon 7:2, "thy bodice (of amber color) is a heap of wheat set about with lilies" (white or scarlet, answering to her scarf round her person). ...
Solomon's gardens and orchards with all kinds of fruits and pools of water for irrigation (1618541524_38) doubtless suggested the imagery Song of Solomon 4:12-15
Gold - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:11) "His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl. " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:14) And the Lord Jesus, speaking of his church, made comely in his comeliness, saith, "Thy cheeks are comely with rows of jewels; thy neck with Chains of gold. " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:10-11) As gold is the richest and most valued of all metals, so by this figure is meant to say, that the Headship of Christ is every thing that is rich, valuable and glorious to his body the church
Shunem - Shunammite is applied (1) to Abishag ( 1 Kings 1:2 ), who is perhaps the original of the Shulammite of Song of Solomon 6:13 , the interchange of t and n being exemplified in the modern Solam = Shunem; (2) to the unnamed friend of Elisha in 2 Kings 4:8 ff; 2 Kings 8:1-6
Hermon - The Sidonians called it Sirion, and the Amorites Shenir (Deuteronomy 3:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 )
Myrrh - The "bundle of myrrh" in Song of Solomon 1:13 is rather a "bag" of myrrh or a scent-bag
Nest - ...
So the bride in the clefts of Christ, the smitten Rock (Song of Solomon 2:14; Psalms 27:5; Isaiah 33:16)
Heshbon - The pools in Heshbon, mentioned in Song of Solomon 7:4 , were perhaps pools near the spring which rises 600 feet below the city, and in the neighbourhood of which are traces of ancient conduits
Ointment - ...
Song of Solomon 1:3 (a) This beautiful picture represents the soothing and blessed effects of the name of the Lord upon the hungry, weary heart of that one who trusts in CHRIST
Ethiopians - As 'Ham' signifies 'black,' he was probably a dark man, and it is implied in Song of Solomon 1:6 that the sun causes the complexion to be black or dark, therefore the farther south in Africa (to the Equator), the darker would be the skin
Paradise - ) From Sanskrit paradesa , "a foreign ornamental garden" attached to a mansion (Nehemiah 2:8; Ecclesiastes 2:5 "gardens," Song of Solomon 4:13 "orchard," pardes )
City - (See Psalms 46:4; Psa 48:1; Psa 48:8; Psa 87:3; Song of Song of Solomon 3:2-3 and also Hebrews 12:22; Revelation 3:12; Rev 21:2-10; Rev 22:19) The city of God in his church upon earth, and in heaven, is one and the same
Sharon - It contains some sandy tracts, but the soil is in general highly productive, and the plain was of old famous for its beauty and fertility, 1 Chronicles 27:29 Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 Isaiah 33:9 35:2 65:10
Eating - Joshua 9:14 ; Psalm 41:9 ; Song of Solomon 5:1 ; John 13:18 ; and such an expression of intimacy is forbidden towards those walking disorderly
Vine, - (Song of Solomon 1:14 ) From the abundance and excellence of the vines, it may readily be understood how frequently this plant is the subject of metaphor in the Holy Scriptures. (Numbers 22:24 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 2:15 ; Ezekiel 13:4,5 ; Matthew 21:33 ) Within the vineyard was one or more towers of stone in which the vine-dressers lived
Tree (2) - It suggested a reference to the Cross in Song of Solomon 2:3; Song of Solomon 2:5, which runs thus in the Vulgate: ‘Sicut malus inter ligna silvarum, sic dilectus meus inter filios
Nard - The word is found in the OT (Song of Solomon 1:12; Song of Solomon 4:13-14) and twice in the Gospels (Mark 14:3-5, John 12:3-5), occurring in both cases in the account of the anointing of our Lord, in a house at Bethany, by a woman whom St
Virgin, Virgin Birth - It is translated virgin four times in KJV (Genesis 24:43 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:3 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:8 ; Isaiah 7:14 ). Only one of these is translated virgin (Isaiah 7:14 ) in NAS, and two, in NIV (Song of Song of Solomon 6:8 ; Isaiah 7:14 )
Lily - LILY, LILY OF THE VALLEYS...
(Song of Song of Solomon 2:1-2) Those are fragrant flowers, well known by name in this our climate; but there is reason to suppose, that what are distinguished by those names in Scripture very far excel in beauty, fragrancy, and medicinal use, the lilies of those colder countries like ours. Some have said, that this is the Persian lily, or the crown imperial; but it is evident, that what the church saith of Christ, Song of Song of Solomon 5:13. (See Ezekiel 34:29) And if we consider the lily of the vallies also, (as Jesus speaks of himself, Song of Song of Solomon 2:1) There is no less the same striking resemblance in every view
Veil, Vail - ...
...
Radhidh (Song of Solomon 5:7 , RSV "mantle;" Isaiah 3:23 )
Poetry - There are five so-called poetical books in the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon
Drag - , Song of Song of Solomon 1:4 ; Jeremiah 31:3 , "with lovingkindness have I drawn thee
Engedi - Both biblical and extra-biblical sources describe Engedi as a source of fine dates, aromatic plants used in perfumes, and medicinal plants (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14 )
Pool - Mention is made of the pool of Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:13 ); the pool of Hebron (4:12); the upper pool at Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17 ; 20:20 ); the pool of Samaria (1 Kings 22:38 ); the king's pool (Nehemiah 2:14 ); the pool of Siloah (Nehemiah 3:15 ; Ecclesiastes 2:6 ); the fishpools of Heshbon (Song of Solomon 7:4 ); the "lower pool," and the "old pool" (Isaiah 22:9,11 )
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - The regular migration of the turtle-dove and its return in the spring are alluded to in ( Jeremiah 8:7 ) and Song of Solomon 2:11,12 It is from its plaintive note doubtless that David in ( Psalm 74:19 ) pouring forth his lament to God, compares himself to a turtle-dove
Kedar - In Psalms 120:5 Kedar is used as the type of barbarous unfeeling people, and in Song of Solomon 1:5 their tents are used as a symbol of blackness
Bathing - Lambs were washed at shearing time (Song of Song of Solomon 4:2 ), babies after birth (Ezekiel 16:4 ), and bodies in preparation for burial (Acts 9:37 )
Water - (Zechariah 13:1; Song of Song of Solomon 4:15) And God the Holy Ghost as a fountain, filling the hearts of the redeemed, and causing them to overflow in the day of Christ
Sharon - 1 Chronicles 5:16; Isaiah 33:9, "the excellency (beauty) of Sharon" (Isaiah 35:2), Isaiah 65:10; Song of Solomon 2:1, "the rose (narcissus) of Sharon," famous for flowers and for pasture; Acts 9:35
Kiss - (Genesis 29:11 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ) Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of salutation has at all times been customary in the East, and can hardly be said to be extinct even in Europe
Vine - Vineyards were sometimes rented for a share of their produce, Matthew 28:20 ; and from other passages we may perhaps infer that a good vineyard consisted of a thousand vines, and produced a rent of a thousand silverlings, or shekels of silver, Isaiah 7:23 , and that it required two hundred more to pay the dressers, Song of Song of Solomon 8:11-12 . They formed a distinct class among cultivators of the ground, and their task was sometimes laborious and regarded as menial, 2 Kings 25:12 2 Chronicles 26:10 Song of Song of Solomon 1:6 Isaiah 61:5 . Scripture alludes to the fragrance of the "vines with the tender grapes," Song of Song of Solomon 2:13 , and draws from the vineyard many illustrations and parables, Judges 9:12 Matthew 20:1 21:28 . The deserted hut or tower, in which a watchman kept guard during, the season of ripe grapes, Psalm 80:12-13 Song of Song of Solomon 2:15 , becomes, when all are gathered, an apt image of desolation, Isaiah 1:8
Wind - ; they do much to temper the heat of summer ( Song of Solomon 4:16 , Job 37:9 )
Cedar - It was stately (Ezekiel 31:3-5 ), long-branched (Psalm 80:10 ; 92:12 ; Ezekiel 31:6-9 ), odoriferous (Song of Solomon 4:11 ; Hosea 14:6 ), durable, and therefore much used for boards, pillars, and ceilings (1 Kings 6:9,10 ; 7:2 ; Jeremiah 22:14 ), for masts (Ezekiel 27:5 ), and for carved images (Isaiah 44:14 )
Tent - An Arab tent is called beit , "house;" its covering consists of stuff, about three quarters of a yard broad, made of black goat's-hair, ( Song of Solomon 1:5 ) laid parallel with the tent's length
Hadarezer - After Joab's first repulse of Ammon and their Syrian allies Hadarezer, undaunted by defeat twice (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5), sent a host under the command of Shophach to assist his kinsmen of Maachah, Rehob, and Ishtob; David in person routed them completely at Helam; thus, the Syrian confederacy was overthrown, Hadarezer's subordinate princes submitted to David who dedicated to Jehovah the 1000 "shields" or "weapons (shelet ) of gold" taken in the first war; these were long known as king David's (Song of Solomon 4:4; 2 Chronicles 23:9)
Washing - The sandals, without stockings, could not keep out dust from the feet; hence washing them was usual before either dining or sleeping (Song of Solomon 5:3)
Desire - Song of Song of Solomon 7
Goat - In Song of Solomon 4:1 the hair of the bride is said to be "as a flock of goats that appear from mount Gilead," alluding to the fine silky hair of some breeds of goat, the angora and others
Hear - Song of Song of Solomon 2
Tents - ...
Song of Solomon 1:5 (c) The two-fold aspect of CHRIST is found in this passage
Banner - " (Song of Song of Solomon 6:4; Son 6:10) It is very blessed to eye Christ in this most glorious character, as JEHOVAH'S banner to his people, for their waging war with sin, death, and hell
Friend - " Well might the spouse in the Canticles, in the contemplation of such unheard of unexampled love, exclaim, "This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem!" (Song of Song of Solomon 5:16)...
Honey - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:11) We may well suppose the figure is just, as well as beautiful, because Christ himself useth it
Sister - The usage is rare in the poetic literature with the exception of the Song of Solomon (7 times)
Gardens - In other places reservoirs were provided, from which the water was distributed in various ways, as occasion required, Proverbs 21:1 Song of Song of Solomon 4:12-16 Isaiah 58:11
Valerius - Song of Solomon 8 , Bruns, Conc
Hermon, Mount - The latter name appears twice in the Old Testament, seemingly as the name of a peak adjacent to Hermon (1 Chronicles 5:23 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 ). The biblical record praises: the dew of Hermon (Psalm 133:3 ), its lions (Song of Song of Solomon 4:8 ) and its cypresses (Ezekiel 27:5 )
Hermon - " Shenir and Hermon are mentioned distinctly, Song of Solomon 4:8. The part held by the Sidonians was "Sirion," that by the Amorites Shenir, infested by devouring "lions" and swift though stealthy "leopards," in contrast to "the mountain of myrrh" (Song of Solomon 5:6), the mountain of the Lord's house (Isaiah 2:2), the good land (Isaiah 35:9)
Solomon - Thus, it is not surprising that Proverbs and Song of Solomon in the Bible are attributed to Solomon. (Proverbs 1:1 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:1 ) as are several apocryphal and pseudepigraphal books
Cedar Tree - (Song of Song of Solomon 1:17) And the state of individual believers in the church is more than once spoken of, as resembled by the flourishing nature of the cedar of Lebanon. (Song of Song of Solomon 2:2) Do any trees out-top the Cedar of Lebanon, spread wider, or cast their branches with more luxuriancy farther than this fair one? Neither do any grow more upright, extend their usefulness in equal direction for general good, as the disciples of the Lord
Lions - They had their lairs in the forests (Jeremiah 5:6 ; 12:8 ; Amos 3:4 ), in the caves of the mountains (Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Nahum 2:12 ), and in the canebrakes on the banks of the Jordan (Jeremiah 49:19 ; 50:44 ; Zechariah 11:3 )
Seal - Seals are frequently mentioned in Jewish history (Deuteronomy 32:34 ; Nehemiah 9:38 ; 10:1 ; Esther 3:12 ; Song of Solomon 8:6 ; Isaiah 8:16 ; Jeremiah 22:24 ; 32:44 , etc
Forerunner - This sense is seen in the Septuagint or earliest Greek translation of the Old Testament once (Wisdom of Song of Solomon 12:8 ) where wasps were the forerunners of the armies of Israel
Bride - The Song of Solomon is a collection of love poems in which the bride describes her love for her bridegroom
Winds - (Ezekiel 37:9 ; Daniel 8:8 ; Zechariah 2:6 ; Matthew 24:31 ) The north wind, or, as it was usually called "the north," was naturally the coldest of the four, Sirach 43:20 and its presence is hence invoked as favorable to vegetation in ( Song of Solomon 4:16 ) It is described in (Proverbs 25:23 ) as bringing rain; in this case we must understand the northwest wind
Raven - The glossy steel-blue black of the raven is the image of the bridegroom's locks (Song of Solomon 5:11)
Heshbon - On the southern base of the hill is an ancient reservoir; compare Song of Solomon 7:4, "thine eyes are like the fish pools in Heshbon (deep, quiet, full, reflecting the bridegroom's image) by the gate of Bathrabbim" (daughter of of a multitude; a crowded thoroughfare of Heshbon)
Jealousy - In Song of Song of Solomon 8:6 jealousy is described as being as "unyielding as the grave
Vineyard - ...
Song of Solomon 1:6 (c) In this strange passage, probably there is some irony
Seal - " (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6) Some have thought that this is the desire of Christ, to be set as a seal upon the arm and in the heart of the church, and for the same reasons
Carmel - In Song of Solomon 7:5 the head of the bride is compared to Carmel
Cave - ...
Caves were frequently used as dwelling-places (Numbers 24:21 ; Song of Solomon 2:14 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ; Obadiah 1:3 )
Tower - ...
Song of Solomon 7:4 (a) Ivory is very valuable and beautiful
Leg - ...
Song of Solomon 5:15 (b) In the world of sports the leg and its strength and power to endure are prime requisites for success
Unction - Now, as Christ the Messiah could not have been Christ, that is, anointed, but by the Holy Ghost's anointing, so neither could the church have been his church, his spouse, his beloved, and the only one, of her mother, (Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) but by the anointing also of God the Holy Ghost
Mercy-Seat - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) If, as it is believed, that it is Christ she is then praising, with an eye to his propitiation, when she thus expressed herself, it is very striking and beautiful
Engedi - Solomon speaks of the "vineyards of Engedi," Song of Solomon 1:14
Solomon - Some of his proverbs and songs probably exist in the Book of Proverbs, in Song of Solomon, and in the Psalms
City - They were also provided with watchmen, Psalm 127:1 Song of Song of Solomon 5:7
Fox - He is fond of grapes, and does much harm in vineyards, Song of Song of Solomon 2:15
Banquets - "Spiced wine" was often used (Song of Solomon 8:2). In Song of Solomon 2:4 the heavenly Bridegroom's "banqueting house" (house of wine) is the church in its public ordinances for refreshing the soul, the ministry of the word, joint prayer, and the Lord's supper (compare Psalms 36:8)
Gilead - Its fitness for pasture is celebrated in the Song of Songs: the Shulammite’s hair is twice compared to ‘goats that lie along the side of Mount Gilead’ ( Song of Solomon 4:6 ; Song of Solomon 6:5 )
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - Some passages truly value sex and celebrate it joyously (Genesis 18:12 ; Genesis 26:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:1-16 ); others call for times of abstaining from sexual activity (Exodus 19:15 ; 1 Samuel 21:4-5 ); still others raise the life without sex above the normal marital relationship (1Corinthians 7:1-9,1 Corinthians 7:37-38 ; Revelation 14:4 ). It is silent on physical techniques of sexual intercourse, referring only to marital rights or enjoyment (Exodus 21:10 ), erotic caresses (Song of Song of Solomon 2:6 ; Song of Song of Solomon 7:1-9 ), fondling (Genesis 26:8 ), and pleasure in conceiving (Genesis 18:12 )
Honey - , Proverbs 25:16; Proverbs 25:27, Song of Solomon 4:11; Song of Solomon 5:1, Ezekiel 3:3, Sirach 24:20; Sirach 49:1). , which forbids the use of honey (probably because easily subject to fermentation) in any kind of sacrifice; that of the allegorical interpretation of Song of Solomon 5:1 (especially in the LXX Septuagint version) applied to Christ; an ascetic tendency to proscribe sweet foods; the possible intervention of the Valentinians with their Veritatis Evangelium; and, finally, the proneness to polemize against the Gnostics, who made large use of honey in their solemn ‘mysteries’ (cf
Honey - , Proverbs 25:16; Proverbs 25:27, Song of Solomon 4:11; Song of Solomon 5:1, Ezekiel 3:3, Sirach 24:20; Sirach 49:1). , which forbids the use of honey (probably because easily subject to fermentation) in any kind of sacrifice; that of the allegorical interpretation of Song of Solomon 5:1 (especially in the LXX Septuagint version) applied to Christ; an ascetic tendency to proscribe sweet foods; the possible intervention of the Valentinians with their Veritatis Evangelium; and, finally, the proneness to polemize against the Gnostics, who made large use of honey in their solemn ‘mysteries’ (cf
Crown - They were worn at marriages (Song of Solomon 3:11 ; Isaiah 61:10 , "ornaments;" RSV, "a garland"), and at feasts and public festivals
Heshbon - Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 , describing a maiden's beauty, proclaims “thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon
Fig - ...
The fig-tree of Palestine (Ficus carica) produces two and sometimes three crops of figs in a year, (1) the bikkurah, or "early-ripe fig" (Micah 7:1 ; Isaiah 28:4 ; Hosea 9:10 , RSV), which is ripe about the end of June, dropping off as soon as it is ripe (Nahum 3:12 ); (2) the kermus, or "summer fig," then begins to be formed, and is ripe about August; and (3) the pag (plural "green figs," Song of Solomon 2:13 ; Gr
Resurrection - 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 : Song of Solomon 12: 2
Rain - The departure of winter was marked by the cessation of rain (Song of Solomon 2:11-13)
Banquet - Wine was also an important part of the feasts, so that they were sometimes called “a house of drinking” in the Hebrew (KJV, “banqueting house,” Song of Song of Solomon 2:4 ) or “drinkings” in the Greek (KJV, “banquetings,” 1 Peter 4:3 )
Comfort - Sense ( a ) appears in Genesis 18:6 , Judges 19:5 ; Judges 19:8 , Song of Solomon 2:5 ; ( c ) elsewhere in OT
Jackal - Both animals have a weakness for grapes ( Song of Solomon 2:15 )
Omri - For six years he reigned at the beautiful Tirzah (Song of Solomon 6:4)
Sharon - It was admired by prophets and poets for the richness of its vegetation and the beauty of its wild flowers-‘the excellency of Sharon’ (Isaiah 35:2), ‘the rose of Sharon’ (Song of Solomon 2:1)
Valley - ...
Song of Solomon 2:1 (c) No doubt this is descriptive of the deeply distressing experiences of life into which the Lord brings the fragrance of His presence, the comfort of His words, and the sweetness of His fellowship to His own people
Lily - Song of Solomon 2:1 (b) This flower is a type of CHRIST in His beauty and loveliness
Plane Tree - " (Song of Song of Solomon 2:3) Hence the prophet describes Jesus as "a strength to the poor, a strength to the needy in distress, a refuge from the storm, a shadow from the heat, when the blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the wall
Taste - ...
Song of Solomon 2:3 (c) Here is described the complete satisfaction of the believer's heart when he appropriates GOD's provisions for his life
Spring - ...
...
Song of Solomon 4:12 (a) It is quite evident that the church of GOD is under consideration in this passage
Dew - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:2) Hence, the resurrection of his people by grace, as hereafter to glory, is said to be "as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out her dead
Seal - The spouse in the Song of Solomon 8:6 , wishes that his spouse would wear him as a signet on her arm
Dance - Song of Solomon 6:13; where Ginsberg translates "like a dance to double choirs
Seal, Sealing - , guarded it from being opened clandestinely, Song of Song of Solomon 4:12 Daniel 6:17 Matthew 27:66
Teeth - ...
Song of Solomon 4:2 (b) The bridegroom seems to be describing the beauty of his lover, and by means of this type describes the usefulness and attractiveness of his bride. (See also Song of Solomon 6:6)
Face - While there is a dark type of comeliness (Song of Solomon 1:5), yet, as might be expected among a people accustomed to olive and sunburnt tones of complexion, it is the exceptional characteristic of a fair and lustrous face that marks the highest form of beauty. In the poetry of the Arabs, when beauty of face is referred to, the usual and ever-sufficient simile is that of the full moon (Song of Solomon 6:10), and in the descriptions of Paradise in the Koran the female attendants of the ‘faithful’ are called houris, ‘the white-faced ones
Head - ...
Song of Solomon 2:6 (c) A figure of the tender love of the Lord JESUS for His church. (See also Song of Solomon 8:3). ...
Song of Solomon 5:2 (c) This probably is a picture of the diligence and constancy of the Lord JESUS in serving His people, the Church, all day and night. ...
Song of Solomon 5:11 (c) The beautiful purity of CHRIST, as well as His supreme value, are represented in this picture. ...
Song of Solomon 7:5 (c) Here CHRIST JESUS is represented as being the supreme authority and power, having the ascendancy over all others
Vine - ...
Sibmah, Heshbon, and Elealeh (Isaiah 16:8-10; Jeremiah 48:31) and Engedi (Song of Solomon 1:14) were famous for their vines. (Psalms 80:13; Song of Solomon 2:15). The people leave the towns and live in lodges and tents among the vineyards (Judges 9:27); sometimes even before the vintage (Song of Solomon 7:11-12)
Crown - Occasionally the word referred to a festive wreath of leaves or flowers (Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 )
Hair - Beautiful hair has always been desirable for both women and men (Song of Song of Solomon 5:11 )
Lily - ), or lotus (Song of Solomon 2:1,2 ; 2:16 ; 4:5 ; 5:13 ; 6:2,3 ; 7:2 )
Forest - " The same Hebrew word is used Ecclesiastes 2:5 , where it is rendered in the plural "orchards" (RSV, "parks"), and Song of Solomon 4 :: 13 , rendered "orchard" (RSV marg
Paradise - " Its three uses in the Hebrew Bible (Nehemiah 2:8 ; Ecclesiastes 2:5 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ) retain this meaning
Drunk - ...
Song of Solomon 5:1 (a) Solomon is expressing by this means the exquisite pleasure he had in reveling in all the good things of life which he had so abundantly
Weighing - " (Song of Song of Solomon 3:6)...
Spot - ...
Song of Solomon 4:7 (c) This may be taken as a statement by the Lord concerning His church, or His bride, for He sees no fault nor sin in His people who are washed in the Blood of the Lamb
Chamber - Thus the church saith, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:4) "The King hath brought me into his chambers
Gilead - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:1) Perhaps the fairness so often repeated by the Lord concerning the spouse, is to shew how lovely she is in his eyes, from the comeliness he hath put upon her and the high value he hath for her
Dove - The liquid full soft eye is the emblem of the heavenly bride's eye, through which the soul beams out (Song of Solomon 1:15). The dove's timidity answers to the believer fleeing from sin, self, and wrath, to the refuge in the cleft Rock of ages (Song of Solomon 2:14; Jeremiah 48:28; Isaiah 26:4, margin)
Palmtree - In Song of Solomon 7:8 the "daughters of Jerusalem," no longer content with admiring, resolve, in spite of the height of the fruit at the utmost top of the palm, and the difficulty of climbing the stem, bore for a great height, to "take hold of the boughs" with their crown of fruit (Psalms 34:8)
Turtle - The church calls herself, the Lord's turtle dove, (Psalms 74:19) and begs the Lord as such to keep her from her enemies; and Jesus calls the church his dove, (Song of Song of Solomon 2:14) as if in answer to this cry, and bids her see her security, for that she is in the cliffs of the rock—perhaps, meaning the secret decrees of JEHOVAH, or, in Christ, the rock of ages, or probably both. ...
But some have supposed that by the turtle is meant God the Holy Ghost, whose voice is said, (Song of Song of Solomon 2:12) after the long winter of the Jewish dispensation, to be heard in our land
Veil - This is the reason why the spouse so feelingly complains; "They took away my veil, רדד , from me," Song of Solomon 5:7 . This is perhaps alluded to by the bridegroom in these words: "Thou hast ravished my heart with one of thine eyes,"...
Song of Solomon 4:9
Aloe - ...
The LIGN-ALOE ...
or agallochum, Numbers 24:6 ; Psalms 45:9 ; and Song of Solomon 4:14 . This wood, mentioned Song of Solomon 4:14 , in conjunction with several other odoriferous plants there referred to, was in high esteem among the Hebrews for its exquisite exhalations
Wine - Song of Solomon 8:2. The wine "mingled with myrrh," given to Jesus, was designed to deaden pain, Mark 15:23, and the spiced pomegranate wine prepared by the bride, Song of Solomon 8:2, may well have been of a mild character
Birds - Because of the gentleness of the dove and because of its faithfulness to its mate, this bird is used as a descriptive title of one's beloved in the Song of Solomon (Song of Song of Solomon 2:14 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:2 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:9 ). The turtledove also signified the arrival of spring (Song of Song of Solomon 2:12 ; Jeremiah 8:7 )
Hannah - Her gladness of heart then found vent in that remarkable prophetic (Song of Solomon 2:1-10 ; Compare Luke 1:46-55 ) which contains the first designation of the Messiah under that name (1 Samuel 2:10 , "Annointed" = "Messiah")
Canticle of Canticles - Protestant versions call it Song of Solomon or Song of Songs
Turtle (Dove) - Christ in inviting His people to gospel hopes from past legalism ("the winter is past": Matthew 4:16; 1 John 2:8; also past estrangement through sin, Isaiah 44:22; Jeremiah 50:20; 2 Corinthians 5:17) says "the voice of the turtle is heard in the land" (Song of Solomon 2:11-12)
Veil - The same Hebrew term is rendered, “shawl” (NAS), “cloak” (NIV, REB), and “mantle” (KJV, NRSV) at Song of Song of Solomon 5:7
Carmel - The head of the Shulammite is compared to Carmel ( Song of Solomon 7:5 )
Nose - ...
Song of Solomon 7:4 (a) Solomon is exalting the Person of CHRIST in some Scriptures and in others He is exalting the Church
Palace - ...
Song of Solomon 8:9 (b) Probably the wall represents the church, which is solid, substantial, strong and immovable
Tower - The church is beautifully compared by Christ to a tower in one of the Songs, Song of Song of Solomon 4:4 "Thy neck (said Jesus) is like the tower of David, builded for an armoury; whereon there hang a thousand bucklers, all shields of mighty men
Tree - For as the church of Jesus, though but one, and the only one of her mother, (Song of Song of Solomon 6:9) is in both worlds, the river of Jordan only separating in place, but not in union; Jesus is equally the life of both, and gives blessedness to the body below as well as happiness to the society above
Fox - ...
Fond of grapes; (Song of Solomon 2:15) "take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines
Poetry - The Books of Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and various parts of the Prophets are poetical
Aloes - ) discusses references of Arab writers to many varieties of aghâlûji found in India and Ceylon which gave off, when burned, a sweet fragrance, and which were used as a perfume for the very same purposes as those which ‘aloes’ served among the Jews (Psalms 45:8, Proverbs 7:17, Song of Solomon 4:14)
Palm Tree - The palm tree is referred to ( Psalms 92:12 ) as a sign of prosperity and ( Song of Solomon 7:7-8 ) of beauty
Solomon, Song of - Protestant versions call it Song of Solomon or Song of Songs
Song of Solomon - Protestant versions call it Song of Solomon or Song of Songs
Marriage - The companions of the bridegrooms are expressly mentioned in the history of Samson, Judges 14:11,20 Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 8:13 Matthew 9:14 ; also the companions of the bride, Psalm 45:9,14 Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 2:7 3:5 8:4 . Compare Isaiah 61:10 Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 , "Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold King Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother, crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart
Food - Some of the better known fruits were figs, grapes, olives, pomegranates, apples, dates, sycamore, pistachio nuts and almonds (Genesis 43:11; Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 34:3; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8; Song of Solomon 8:5; Amos 7:14; Matthew 7:16; see FIGS; GRAPES; OLIVES). Pomegranate juice made another kind of popular drink (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2)
Dancing - Dances were performed in honor of the bride (Song of Song of Solomon 6:13 )
Poetry - In the Hebrew scriptures there are found three distinct kinds of poetry, (1) that of the Book of Job and the Song of Solomon, which is dramatic; (2) that of the Book of Psalms, which is lyrical; and (3) that of the Book of Ecclesiastes, which is didactic and sententious
Well - Song of Solomon 4:12; in Palestine wells are excavated in the limestone, with steps descending to them (Genesis 24:16)
Lattice - " (Song of Song of Solomon 2:9) The manner in which the church introduceth her observation, with a note of admiration, behold! speaks the high sense
Carmel - The head of the bride in Song of Solomon 7:5 is compared to Carmel
Fig - " Its leaves come so late in the spring as to justify the words of Christ, "Ye know that summer is nigh," Matthew 24:32 Song of Song of Solomon 2:13
Vine - ...
Stone walls and/or hedges were usually built around the vineyard to protect the grapes from thirsty animals and from thieves (Song of Song of Solomon 2:15 ; Jeremiah 49:9 ). Vineyards were cultivated by their owners, hired laborers (Matthew 20:1-16 ), or rented out to others (Song of Song of Solomon 8:11 ; Matthew 21:33-43 )
Marriage - The Bible encourages a healthy enjoyment of sex within marriage (Proverbs 5:18-19; Ecclesiastes 9:9; Song of Song of Solomon 1:12-13; Song of Solomon 7:6-13; Song of Solomon 8:1-3), but it forbids sexual relations before marriage or with any person other than one’s marriage partner (Leviticus 18:6-18; Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:20-22; Malachi 2:14; Mark 6:18; Romans 7:2; cf
Marriage - As Adam gave Eve a new name, 'ishah , "woman" or "wife" the counterpart of iysh , "man" or "husband," so Christ gives the church His new name; He, Solomon, she, the Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13; Revelation 2:17; Revelation 3:12). He had a nuptial garland or crown (Song of Solomon 3:11, "the crown wherewith His mother (the human race; for He is the Son of man, not merely Son of Mary) crowned Him in the day of His espousals"); and was richly perfumed (Song of Solomon 3:6). Song of Solomon 3:11; the feast lasted for seven or even 14 days, and was enlivened by riddles, etc
Reed - The "sweet reed from a far country" is possibly the Αndropogon calamus aromaticus of central India; keneh bosem (Exodus 30:23 "sweet calamus") or hatob (Jeremiah 6:20); or it may be rather the lemon grass (Αndropogon schoenanthus ) of India (Isaiah 43:24; Song of Solomon 4:14; Ezekiel 27:19)
Sandals - ...
The sandals of females were frequently much ornamented, Song of Song of Solomon 7:1 , and probably resembled the slippers or light shoes of modern orientals, which cover the upper part of the foot, and are often made of morocco, or of embroidered work wrought with silk, silver, and gold, Ezekiel 16:10
Cedar - Every thing about this tree has a strong balsamic odor; and hence the whole grove is so pleasant and fragrant, that it is delightful to walk in it, Song of Song of Solomon 4:11 Hosea 14:6
Paradise - While the word pardçs occurs only 3 times in the OT ( Song of Solomon 4:12 , Ecclesiastes 2:5 , Nehemiah 2:3 ), and then with no reference to the Garden of Eden , it is unquestionable that Eden serves as the basis for the later conception
Perceive - " ...
6: νοέω (Strong's #3539 — Verb — noeo — noy-eh'-o ) "to perceive with the mind, to understand," is translated "to perceive" in Matthew 15:17 , RV (AV, "understand"); Song of Solomon 16:9,11 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 1:20 ; Ephesians 3:4 ; in Mark 7:18 ; 8:17 , AV and RV, "perceive
Moon - The church is "fair as the moon, clear as the sun" (Song of Solomon 6:10)
Rapes - ...
Song of Solomon 2:15 (b) This is typical of the delicate and delightful fruits of a human life such as kindness, love, patience, etc
Gentleness - Gentleness is suggested by the waters of a stream (Isaiah 8:6 ) or by wine flowing over lips and teeth (Song of Solomon 7:9 )
Ignorant, Ignorance - of Song of Solomon 14:22 , ; "Err about the knowledge of God … live in great strife due to ignorance" )
Sandal - Often ornamentally inlaid with gold, silver, jewels, and silk (Song of Solomon 7:1)
Stream - ...
Song of Solomon 4:15 (c) Here we see a type of the rich and refreshing influence of the church of GOD
Hell - Sheôl is represented as in the depths of the earth, Job 11:8; Proverbs 9:18; Isaiah 38:10, all-devouring, Proverbs 1:12, destitute of God's presence, Psalms 88:10-12, a state of forgetfulness, Psalms 6:5, insatiable, Isaiah 5:14, remorseless, Song of Solomon 8:6, and a place of silence, Ecclesiastes 9:10
Desire - " This term is found only three times in the Old Testament: Genesis 3:16,4:7 , and Song of Song of Solomon 7:10 . In the Song of Solomon the term is positive in nature, in the context of joy and love, referring to the bridegroom's desire for his bride
Magi - Their presents, "gold, frankincense, and myrrh," were the usual gifts of subject nations (Psalms 72:15; 1 Kings 10:2; 1 Kings 10:10; 2 Chronicles 9:24; Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 4:14)
Wine - (Song of Solomon 8:2 ) In Palestine the vintage takes place in September, and is celebrated with great rejoicing. (Proverbs 23:30 ; Isaiah 5:22 ) At the same time strength was not the sole object sought; the wine "mingled with myrrh," given to Jesus, was designed to deaden pain, (Mark 15:23 ) and the spiced pomegranate wine prepared by the bride, (Song of Solomon 8:2 ) may well have been of a mild character
Oil - ...
Oil was regarded as a symbol of honor (Judges 9:9 ), while virtue was compared to perfumed oil (Song of Song of Solomon 1:3 ; Ecclesiastes 7:1 )
Dance - In Song of Solomon 6:13 allusion possibly is made in the "two armies" to two rows of female dancers vis-avis in performing; but the spiritual sense refers to the two parts of the one church army, the militant and the triumphant
Bed - ...
Royal beds (Song of Solomon 3:9-10 margin) had pillars of marble or silver, the bottom gold, the covering of purple and divers colors, hangings fastened to the pillarsupported canopy, the beds of gold upon a tesselated pavement (Esther 1:6); compare Amos 6:4, "beds of ivory
Beauty - The writer of the Song of Solomon portrays his love for his bride as beautiful
Redeemer - Our Boaz has not "left off His kindness to the living and to the dead" (Ruth 2:20); translated Job 19:25-27 "I know that my Redeemer (vindicator, avenger; redressing my wrongs on Satan their inflicter) liveth, and that He shall arise the Last (1 Corinthians 15:45; Revelation 1:17) above the dust (with which is mingled man's crumbling body: 1 Corinthians 15:20; 1 Corinthians 15:23; Romans 8:23; Ephesians 1:14), and though after my skin (is destroyed) this (body) is destroyed, yet from my flesh (mibesari ; as from a window, Song of Solomon 2:9) shall I see God, whom I shall see for myself (on my side), no longer estranged" (zar ) from me
Mary - Some of them were joyful; and some were very grievous; but she learned them thoroughly, fill she loved the Lord Jesus as her Saviour far more than as her Song of Solomon 2:1-17
Oil - The oil of gladness shall be in the fullest sense His "in the day of His espousals, in the day of the gladness of His heart" (Song of Solomon 3:11; Revelation 19:7)
Scriptures - (Song of Song of Solomon 4:5)...
And it is most blessed to see what a beautiful harmony there is between them
White - ...
Song of Solomon 5:10 (c) In this way we may understand the sinless character of the Lord JESUS CHRIST in all His perfection
Build - ...
Song of Solomon 4:4 (c) This may represent or describe the firm conviction of the church, her stamina, and her purpose of heart to serve GOD only
Preparation - How blessedly the church sings to this note of praise, for the preparing and disposing grace of the Spirit, when she cried out: "Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib!" (Song of Song of Solomon 6:12) As if she had said, before I had the least apprehension of the mercy, my Lord my Husband made me willing, by the swift manifestations of his love, and the awakenings of his grace in my heart, as rapid as the chariot wheels of a princely people
Gregorius, Bishop of Merida - "How many have been admitted to the priesthood who, like Rufinus and Gregory, have after baptism practised in the law courts ? How many soldiers who, in obedience to authority, have been obliged to execute harsh orders (severa praecepta)? How many curiales who, in obedience also, have done whatever was commanded them? How many who have given amusements and spectacles to the people (voluptates et editiones populo celebrarunt) have become bishops?" (See Gams's comments on Song of Solomon 2 of council of Eliberi
Thorn - ...
Song of Solomon 2:2 (c) Probably this means that the church is in GOD's sight like a beautiful lady, while everything else outside the people of GOD is of no more value to Him than thorns would be
Pillars - In Song of Solomon 3:10 the pillars support the canopy over the chariot at the four corners
Sing - The book that is commonly designated “The Song of Solomon” actually has the title “The Song of Songs” in Hebrew
Wine - " "Spiced wine," Song of Solomon 8:2 , was wine rendered more palatable and fragrant with aromatics
Palm-Tree - The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which render it comparatively easy to climb to the top for the fruit, Song of Song of Solomon 7:7,8
Carmel - Those who visit mount Carmel in the last part of the dry season, find every thing parched and brown; yet enough remains to show how just were the allusions of ancient writers to its exceeding beauty, Isaiah 35:2 , its verdure of drapery and grace of outline, Song of Song of Solomon 7:5 , and its rich pastures, Isaiah 33:9 Jeremiah 50:19 Amos 1:2
House - Windows were usually covered with lattice for security (Song of Song of Solomon 2:9)
Solomon - People made collections of his proverbs and songs, and some of these are preserved in the Bible (1 Kings 4:32; Psalms 72; Psalms 127; Proverbs 1:1; Proverbs 10:1; Proverbs 25:1; Song of Song of Solomon 1:1). In spite of the hardship of the common people (1 Kings 12:4), Solomon spent extravagantly on himself (1 Kings 10:16-21; 1 Kings 10:25; 1 Kings 10:27; Song of Song of Solomon 3:7-10; cf
Lebanon - Many passages refer to its beauty, particularly in relation to its cedars and other trees (see Psalms 72:16 , Song of Solomon 4:11 , Hosea 14:5 ; Hosea 14:7 ). In Song of Solomon 7:4 it is referred to as ‘the tower of Lebanon that looketh towards Damascus
Christ, Christology - The Song of Solomon, written in the period 70-40 B. The prayer runs: “See, O Lord, and raise up for them their king, the Son of David [1] their king is the Lord's anointed” (Song of Song of Solomon 17:21 ,Song of Song of Solomon 17:32 ; compare Song of Song of Solomon 18:7 ). The term “Messiah,” where it is found, relates to a human figure who, as a member of David's family, would usher in the restored kingdom and promote Israel's interests in the world, usually implying a triumph over Israel's enemies in a war of liberation (Song of Solomon), or in the creation of a purified people (as in the hope entertained by the sect of the Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran)
Nail - In Christ's person "nailed to the cross," the law (Romans 3:21; Song of Solomon 4:4; Colossians 2:14) and the old serpent (John 3:14; John 12:31-32) were nailed to it
Fish, Fishing - Two Old Testament texts (Song of Song of Solomon 7:4 ; Isaiah 19:10 ) speak of fishpools and fish ponds, possibly an indication of commercially raised fish or of fish farming
Baasha - Baasha reigned 24 years, and had the beautiful city Tirzah for his capital (Song of Solomon 6:4)
Foot - ...
Washing the feet stained with the dust of the road was part of the regular duty of hospitality ( Genesis 18:4 , Exo 30:19 , 2 Samuel 11:8 , Song of Solomon 5:3 , Luke 7:44 )
Allegory - For example, interpreting the Song of Solomon as an allegory of God's love for Israel rather than as a collection of romantic love songs may have played a role in the acceptance of that book into the Old Testament canon
Vinyard - It has also been suggested that the “vineyard” in the Song of Solomon is better understood metaphorically as “person”: “Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother’s children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept” (Song of Tent - ...
Tents are of various colors; black, as tents of Kedar, Psalm 120:5 Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 ; red, as of scarlet cloth; yellow, as of gold shining brilliantly; white, as of canvas
Canon of the Old Testament - the FIVE of MOSES; THIRTEEN prophetical books, namely,...
(1) Joshua,...
(2) Judges and Ruth,...
(3) the two of Samuel,...
(4) the two of Kings...
(5) the two of Chronicles,...
(6) Ezra and Nehemiah,...
(7) Esther,...
(8) Isaiah,...
(9) Jeremiah and Lamentations,...
(10) Ezekiel,...
(11) Daniel,...
(12) the twelve minor prophets,...
(13) Job; and FOUR remaining, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon: the 22 thus being made to answer to the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. " The warnings: "add thou not to His words, lest He reprove thee and thou be found a liar" (Proverbs 30:6), "neither shall ye diminish ought from it" (Deuteronomy 4:2; Deuteronomy 12:32), fenced in the Old Testament canon as Revelation 22:18-19 fences in the New Testament The Lord and His apostles quote all the books of the Old Testament except Ruth, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, the Song of Solomon, Lamentations, and Ezekiel
Thorns, Thistles, Etc - chôach ( 2 Kings 14:9 , 2 Chronicles 25:18 , and Job 31:40 ‘thistle’; 2 Chronicles 33:11 , Song of Solomon 2:2 , and Hosea 9:6 ‘thorns’; Isaiah 34:13 AV Lion - Lions haunted dens in Lebanon and Hermon (Song of Solomon 4:8)
Holy Ghost - It is no less evident that the Holy Ghost is a divine person equal in power and glory with the Father and Song of Solomon 1:1-17
Hand, Right Hand - If the lover's "hand" in Song of Song of Solomon 5:4 is a sexual metaphor, it avoids altogether the additional ritual associations of this phallic image in Ugaritic (and presumably Canaanite) religion
Companion - ” Ra’yah occurs many times in the Song of Solomon: 1:9, 15; 2:2, 10, 13; 4:1, 7; 5:2; 6:4
Ornaments - The ‘ chains ’ of Proverbs 1:9 , Song of Solomon 4:9 are clearly necklaces; the same word is used of the chains hung as amulets about the necks of the Midianite camels ( Judges 8:26 ). The ‘strings of jewels’ of Song of Solomon 1:10 RV Poetry - Nor is the drama; though dramatic elements occur in Job, the Song of Solomon, and some psalms, as Psalm 32, where occur transitions, without introduction, from speaking of God to speaking to God; Psalms 132:8-10; Psalms 132:14, where the psalmist's prayer and God's answer beautifully correspond. Proverbs, and the Song of Solomon
Vine, Vineyard - These last included foxes (or jackals) ( Song of Solomon 2:15 ) and boars ( Psalms 80:13 )
Shepherd - (1 Samuel 17:40 ; Psalm 23:4 ; Zechariah 11:7 ) If the shepherd was at a distance from his home, he was provided with a light tent, (Song of Solomon 1:8 ; Jeremiah 35:7 ) the removal of which was easily effected
Fig - They are the paggim (‘green figs’) of Song of Solomon 2:13 , and the olynthoi (‘untimely figs’) of Revelation 6:13
Fig - The unripe fig (pag ) hangs through the winter and ripens in the spring about Easter (Song of Solomon 2:13)
Smoke - ...
Song of Solomon 3:6 (c) Poetic license permits the use of words which may have various meanings
Shepherd - The shepherd, when far from home, had his light tent (Song of Solomon 1:8), easily taken down and shifted (Isaiah 38:12)
Moon - )...
We have a lovely description in the Canticles of such a view of the church, where Jesus himself is beholding her in this blessed state, and exclaiming with delight," Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?" (Song of Song of Solomon 6:10
Name - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:3) And when a poor sinner, sensible of the loathsomeness of his own person, hath found Jesus, and what is contained for all the purposes of salvation in the person and glory of Christ, then is the name of Jesus more fragrant than all the costly perfume of the sanctuary
Church - And it is by many supposed that the Song of Solomon is a highly figurative and poetical illustration of the mutual love of Christ and the people of his church in all ages
Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
Camphire, Song of Solomon 1:14—refers to cypress, or to "henna-flowers. Song of Solomon 2:12—a dove; the turtle-dove
Wine - 'asis , from a root to "tread," the grape juice newly expressed (Song of Solomon 8:2); "sweet wine" (Isaiah 49:26; Amos 9:13); "new wine" (Joel 1:5; Joel 3:18). Μezeg (Song of Solomon 8:2), "spiced
Bible, - The Poetical Books, Job to theend of Song of Solomon. The Writings (Kethubim, or Hagiographa, 'holy writings'), including ...
a, the Psalms, Proverbs, Job; ...
b, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther; ...
c, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, 1 and 2Chronicles
Proverbs, the Book of - ) gives the order, Ruth, Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Daniel, Esther, Ezra (including Nehemiah), Chronicles. The Jews assign the composition of the Song of Solomon to Solomon's youth, Proverbs to his manhood, and Ecclesiastes to his old age
Dress - The "coat" was common to both sexes (Song of Solomon 5:3 )
Seal - The bridegroom refers to his bride as a sealed (chaste) garden spring (Song of Solomon 4:12 )
Virgin - In some contexts the word may imply virginity, but in other contexts the question of virginity is irrelevant (Genesis 24:43; Exodus 2:8; Psalms 68:25; Proverbs 30:19; Song of Song of Solomon 1:3; cf
Joy - sama [ Song of Solomon 1:4 ), to marriage (Proverbs 5:18 ), the birth of children (Psalm 113:9 ), the gathering of the harvest, military victory (Isaiah 9:3 ), and drinking wine (Psalm 126:5-62 )
Adultery - As He is the true Solomon (Prince of peace), so she the Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13)
Leb'Anon, - (2 Kings 14:9 ; Song of Solomon 4:8 ); Joshua 13:2-64 Along the base of Lebanon runs the irregular plain of Phoenicia --nowhere more than two miles wide, and often interrupted by bold rocky spurs that dip into the sea
Medicine - Jere 2:22 The mention of "the apothecary," (Exodus 30:35 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1 ) and of the merchant in "powders," (Song of Solomon 3:6 ) shows that a distinct and important branch of trade was set up in these wares, in which, as at a modern druggist's, articles of luxury, etc
Poetry, Hebrew - About one third of the Old Testament is poetry in the Hebrew --a large part of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Solomon, besides a great part of the prophets
Wine - Spiced wine, made stronger and more inviting to the taste by the admixture of spices and other drugs, Song of Song of Solomon 8:2 5
Poetry of the Hebrews - While the historical books and legislative writings of Moses are evidently prosaic compositions, the book of Job, the Psalms of David, the Song of Solomon, the Lamentations of Jeremiah, a great part of the prophetical writings, and several passages scattered occasionally through the historical books, carry the most plain and distinguishing marks of poetical writing. "His countenance is as Lebanon," says Solomon, speaking of the dignity of a man's appearance; but when he describes female beauty, "Thine head is like Mount Carmel,"...
Song of Solomon 5:15 ; Song of Solomon 7:5 . The Song of Solomon affords us a high exemplification of pastoral poetry
Sun - Song of Solomon 1:6 ), and even causes death
Tent - They were among the earliest kinds of human dwelling places (Genesis 4:20; Genesis 9:21; Genesis 12:8; Genesis 18:1; Genesis 26:25; Song of Song of Solomon 1:8; Isaiah 38:12; Jeremiah 49:28-29)
Agriculture - With regard to occupancy, a tenant might pay a fixed money rent, ( Song of Solomon 8:11 ) or a stipulated share of the fruits
Sol'Omon - They tell of one who was, in the eyes of the men of his own time, "fairer than the children of men," the face "bright, and ruddy" as his father's, (Song of Solomon 5:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:42 ) bushy locks, dark as the raven's wing, yet not without a golden glow, the eyes soft as "the eyes of cloves," the "countenance as Lebanon excellent as the cedars," "the chiefest among ten thousand, the altogether lovely. " (Song of Solomon 5:13-18 ) Add to this all gifts of a noble, far-reaching intellect large and ready sympathies, a playful and genial humor, the lips "full of grace," and the soul "anointed" as "with the oil of gladness," (Psalm 45:1 )
Hell - It does use “grave” one time as a translation of Sheol (Song of Song of Solomon 8:6 )
Ruth - But the Hebrew canon puts Ruth in the hagiographa among the five megilloth (Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther), read in the synagogue at the feast of weeks
Fruit - ...
Song of Solomon 2:3 (b) This is a symbol of the precious fellowship and the gracious results which come from feeding on CHRIST and His Word
Fig (Tree) - ...
Song of Solomon 2:13 (a) This is a type of the prosperity of Israel as a nation
Beam And Mote - The word δοκός is common in classical writers for a beam of wood, and is used in the LXX Septuagint (Genesis 19:8, 1 Kings 6:2, Song of Solomon 1:17) to translate קוֹרִה, a beam used in the roof of a house
House - So the heavenly spouse is called "a fountain sealed" (Song of Solomon 4:12). showing Himself through the lattice," the types and prophecies were lattice glimpses of Him to the Old Testament congregation (Song of Solomon 2:9; John 8:56)
John the Apostle - He and Peter followed Jesus when apprehended, while the rest fled (John 18:15), even as they had both together been sent to prepare the Passover (Luke 22:8) the evening before, and as it was to John reclining in Jesus' bosom (compare Song of Solomon 8:3; Song of Solomon 8:6) that Peter at the supper made eager signs to get him to ask our Lord who should be the traitor (John 13:24)
Cosmetics - ...
Perfumes mentioned in the Bible include aloes (Numbers 24:6 ); balm (Ezekiel 27:17 ); cinnamon (Proverbs 7:17 ); frankincense (Isaiah 43:23 ; Matthew 2:11 ); myrrh (Song of Song of Solomon 5:5 ; Matthew 2:11 ); and spikenard (John 12:3 )
Carmel - ) Hence it is the image of the bride's head with luxuriant tresses (Song of Solomon 7:5)
Wisdom And Wise Men - However, certain of the other “writings” such as the Psalms, the Song of Solomon, and Lamentations contain figures of speech and stylized forms reflective of the wisdom tradition
House - Across these were laid smaller rafters ( Song of Solomon 1:17 ), then brushwood, reeds, and the like, above which was a layer of earth several inches thick, while on the top of all came a thick plaster of clay or of clay and lime. The wood for the roof-beams was furnished mostly by the common sycamore, cypress ( Song of Solomon 1:17 ) and cedar ( 1 Kings 6:9 ) being reserved for the homes of the wealthy. This consists of a short upright piece of wood, fastened on the inside of the door, through which a square wooden bolt ( Song of Solomon 5:5 , Nehemiah 3:3 RV Wine And Strong Drink - The only wine, other than ‘the fruit of the vine,’ mentioned by name in OT is the ‘sweet wine’ of pomegranates ( Song of Solomon 8:2 RVm Poetry - No doubt many readers will conjure images of the so-called poetic books in the Old Testament (Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon) upon hearing the term "biblical poetry. With love poetry such as the Song of Solomon, lovers express much of the deep emotions they hold for each other
Kiss - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:2) And as those kisses of Jesus are meant to imply every thing in Christ, and with Christ, Jesus in his person, and Jesus in his fulness, suitableness, and all-sufficiency, so on our part the kiss of grace implies every thing that can denote love, adoration, faith, dependance, homage, subjection, and praise
Esther - It, along with four others small books—Song of Solomon, Ruth, Ecclesiastes, and Lamentations, was placed on one scroll called the “Meghilloth” and was used for festival readings
Nazarite - Similarly, Daniel (Daniel 1:8-15); David (1 Samuel 16:12; 1 Samuel 17:42), type of Messiah (Song of Solomon 5:10)
Poetry - ...
Poetry in the Old Testament...
Genesis 2:23 ; Genesis 3:14-19 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Ezekiel 32:2-817 ; Genesis 9:25-27 ; Genesis 14:19-20 ; Genesis 16:11-12 ; Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:27-29 ,Genesis 27:27-29,27:39-40 ; Genesis 48:15-16 ; Genesis 49:2-27 ...
Exodus 15:1-18 ,Exodus 15:1-18,15:21 ...
Leviticus 10:3 ...
Numbers 6:24-27 ; Numbers 10:35-36 ; Numbers 12:6-8 ; Numbers 21:14-15 ; Numbers 21:17-18 ,Numbers 21:17-18,21:27-30 ; Numbers 23:7-10 ; Numbers 23:18-24 ; Numbers 24:3-9 ,Numbers 24:3-9,24:15-24 ...
Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ; Deuteronomy 33:2-29 ...
Joshua 10:12-13 ...
Judges 5:2-31 ; 2 Kings 19:21-285 ,Judges 14:14,14:18 ; Judges 15:16 ...
Ruth 1:16-17 ,Ruth 1:16-17,1:20-21 ...
1 Samuel 2:1-10 ; 1Samuel 15:22-23,1 Samuel 15:33 ; 1 Samuel 18:7 ; 2 Samuel 22:2-518 ; 1 Samuel 29:5 ...
2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ; 1618541524_56 ; 2 Samuel 23:1-7 ...
1 Kings 8:12-13 ; 1 Kings 12:16 ...
1618541524_64 ...
1 Chronicles 16:8-36 ...
2 Chronicles 5:13 ; 2 Chronicles 6:41-42 ; 2 Chronicles 7:3 ; 2 Chronicles 10:16 ; 2 Chronicles 20:21 ...
Ezra 3:11 ...
Job 3:2-42:6 ...
Psalm 1-150 ...
Proverbs 1-31 ...
Ecclesiastes 1:2-11 ,Ecclesiastes 1:2-11,1:15 ,Ecclesiastes 1:15,1:18 ; Ecclesiastes 3:2-9 ; Ecclesiastes 7:1-13 ; Ecclesiastes 8:1 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1-4 ,Ecclesiastes 10:1-4,10:8-20 ; Ecclesiastes 11:1-4 ...
Song of Song of Solomon 1-8 ...
Isaiah—largely poetry...
Jeremiah—poetic selections throughout except for 32–45...
Lamentations 1-5 ...
Ezekiel 19:2-14 ; Ezekiel 23:32-34 ; Ezekiel 24:3-5 ; Ezekiel 26:17-18 ; Ezekiel 27:3-9 ; Ezekiel 27:25-36 ; Ezekiel 28:1-10 ; Ezekiel 28:12-19 ; Ezekiel 28:22-23 ; Ezekiel 29:3-5 ; Ezekiel 30:2-4 ; Ezekiel 30:6-8 ; Ezekiel 30:10-19 ; Ezekiel 31:2-9 ; 1618541524_9 ; Ezekiel 32:12-15 ; Ezekiel 32:19 ...
Daniel 2:20-23 ; Daniel 4:3 ; Daniel 4:34-35 ; Daniel 6:26-27 ; Daniel 7:9-10 ; Daniel 7:13-14 ; 7:23-27 Hosea—all poetry except for 1; Daniel 2:16-20 ; Daniel 3:1-5 ...
Joel—all poetry except for Daniel 2:30-3:8 ...
Amos—largely poetry...
Obadiah 1:1 ...
Jonah 2:2-9 ...
Micah 1-7 ...
Nahum 1-3 ...
Habakkuk 1-3 ...
Zephaniah 1-3 ...
Zechariah 9-11:3 ; Zechariah 11:17 ; Zechariah 13:7-9 ...
Parallelism The predominant feature of Hebrew poetry is parallelism
City - During the night the watchmen mounted guard on the ramparts, or went ‘about the city’ ( Song of Solomon 3:3 , Isaiah 62:6 ; cf
Hell - ...
Sheol comes from a root "to make hollow," the common receptacle of the dead below the earth (Numbers 16:30; Deuteronomy 32:22), deep (Job 11:8), insatiable (Isaiah 5:14; Song of Solomon 8:6)
Scorn - The word is found, it is true, in the masculine gender in Song of Solomon 2:15, but it is generally found in the feminine, e
Song of Solomon, Theology of - Carr, Song of Solomon ; F
Trees - ...
Song of Solomon 2:3 (a) CHRIST is the apple tree in this verse
Cities - To this custom Solomon refers in these words: "The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the wall took away my veil from me,"...
Song of Solomon 5:7
Ravels - עורב , in Chaldee, orba, in Syriac, croac, in Latin, corvus, Genesis 8:7 ; Leviticus 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 ; 1 Kings 17:4 ; 1 Kings 17:6 ; Job 38:41 ; Psalms 147:9 ; Proverbs 30:17 ; Song of Solomon 5:11 ; Isaiah 34:11 ; κοραξ , Luke 12:24 ; a well known bird of prey
Palm Tree - And for erect stature and slenderness of form, the spouse, in Song of Solomon 7:7 , is compared to this tree:—...
How framed, O my love, for delights! Lo, thy stature is like a palm tree, And thy bosom like clusters of dates
Dress - (Song of Solomon 5:3 ) Among their distinctive robes we find a kind of shawl, (Ruth 3:15 ; Isaiah 3:22 ) light summer dresses of handsome appearance and ample dimensions,a nd gay holiday dresses
Old Testament - Jacob, a Babylonian Jew, having collated manuscripts in the 11th century, mention 864 different readings of vowels, accents, and makkeph , and (Song of Solomon 8:6) the division of a word. Synagogue rolls contain separately the Pentateuch, the haphtaroth (literally, "dismissals," being read just before the congregations departed) or sections of the prophets, and the megilloth , namely, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther: all without vowels, accents, and sophpasuks. , applied to God; allegory, having no outward reality, as the Song of Solomon is nevertheless the vehicle of representing the historical being, the heavenly Bridegroom, and His church the bride
Solomon - On Lebanon he built lofty towers (2 Chronicles 8:6; Song of Solomon 7:4) "looking toward Damascus" (1 Kings 9:19). Of his 3,000 proverbs we have a sample in the Book of Proverbs; of his 1,005 songs we have only the Song of Solomon (its five divisions probably are referred to in the odd five), and Psalm 72 and Psalm 127. As the Song of Solomon represents his first love to Jehovah in youth, so Proverbs his matured experience in middle age, Ecclesiastes the sad retrospect of old age
Incense - The incense consisted of four aromatic ingredients (representing God's perfections diffused throughout the four quarters of the world): stacte (Hebrew nataph , "a drop," the gum that drops from the storax tree, Styrax officinalis , found in Syria; the benzoin, or gum benjamin, is from Java and Sumatra; the liquid storax of commerce is from a different tree, the Liquidambar Syraciflua ), onycha (Hebrew: shecheleth , probably the cap of the wing shell, strombus , abounding in the Red Sea, used for making perfumes), galbanum (a yellowish brown gum, imported from Persia, India, and Africa), and pure frankincense (the chief of the aromatic gums: Song of Solomon 3:6; Matthew 2:11; obtained from India through the Sabeans of S
Arms - In 2 Samuel 8:7 "shields" of gold taken by David from Hadadezer king of Zobah, and dedicated in the temple, used in proclaiming, Joash king (2 Kings 11:10), compare Song of Solomon 4:4)
Travel (2) - In the morning the traveller started on his journey, and continued it till noon-day, when he took refuge for an hour or two under some kindly shade from the scorching rays of the sun, and then resumed his course (Song of Solomon 1:7)
Damascus - The writer of Canticles, in his appreciation of the sensuous beauty of scenery, has not forgotten Damascus: the nose of the Shulammite is compared to the ‘tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus’ ( Song of Solomon 7:4 )
Servant - " (Song of Song of Solomon 2:17)...
Veil - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:7) If the reader enters into the full apprehension of the custom of the vail, he will consider the spouse of Christ as here clothed with her Radid, her marriage vail, shewing who she was, and that she was in subjection to her own husband, (Ephesians 5:23-24) seeking him in the ordinances, which are here called the streets of the city, were she ought to seek him; and the watchmen, the ministers of the gospel, found her in this enquiry, but instead comforting her with some new and sweet view of her Lord, speaking to her in her then dispirit case and circumstances, in shewing her the safety of a soul justified in Christ's blood and righteousness, however dark and uncomfortable in herself; instead of this, time keepers took away her vail, her covering in Christ, treated her as if a strumpet, as though she was not married to Jesus, and had no right to the Radid, or marriage vail
Church - ...
Companions, Psalms 45:14; Song of Song of Solomon 1:7...
Complete in Christ, Colossians 2:10
Lebanon - The rains which fall in the lower regions of Lebanon, and the melting of the snow in the upper ones, furnish an abundance of perennial streams, which are alluded to by Solomon, Song of Solomon 4:15
Flies - The application of this proverbial expression to a person's good name, which is elsewhere compared to sweet ointment, Ecclesiastes 7:1 ; Song of Solomon 1:3 , is remarkably significant
Palm Tree - " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)...
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the palm tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of palm trees
Olympias, the Younger - Among these Palladius enumerates Amphilochius, Optimus, the two brothers of Basil, Gregory Nyssen (who dedicated to her the Commentary on a portion of the Song of Solomon, which he had written at her request, Greg
Devil - On the contrary, the roes and the hinds of the field ( Song of Solomon 2:7 ; Song of Solomon 3:5 ) seem to have been thought of as faun-like spirits, for whose aid a lover might hopefully plead
Mining And Metals - Marble supplies a simile in Song of Solomon 5:15 , and is mentioned among the merchandise of ‘Babylon’ in Revelation 18:12
Arabia - Their tents are of goats' hair cloth, black or brown (Song of Solomon 1:5), arranged in a ring, enclosing their cattle, each about 25 feet long and 7 high
Gestures - Kissing is an act that expresses the warmth of a friendly greeting (Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ), the affection of one for another (Song of Song of Solomon 8:1 ), the sorrow of one who dearly cares for another (Ruth 1:14 ; Acts 20:37 ), the deceit of one who hides true intentions (Proverbs 27:6 ; Matthew 26:48 ), the submission of the weak to the strong (Psalm 2:12 ), and the seduction of a foolish man by a loose woman (Proverbs 7:5-23 )
Head, Headship - ...
The head is a site where beauty is displayed (Song of Solomon 5:11 ; 7:5 )
Games - , if so be that I may lay hold on the prize for obtaining which I was laid hold on by Christ at conversion (Song of Solomon 1:4; 1 Corinthians 13:12)
Feet - ...
Song of Solomon 7:1 (a) By this we are taught that our walk must be made safe and comfortable, as well as beautiful and attractive through the death of our Saviour
Ate - ...
Song of Solomon 7:4 (b) This gate is the entrance to Heshbon
Live - The Song of Solomon uses the word in a figure of speech describing one’s wife; she is “a well of living waters” (4:15)
Scripture - , Ruth, Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Daniel, Esther, Ezra with 1618541524_9 and 2 Chronicles. , Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, then Daniel, Ezra with Nehemiah 1:1-11 and 2 Chronicles
Jewels, Jewelry - ...
Necklaces and pendants were popular (Song of Song of Solomon 1:10 )
Pseudepigrapha - Psalms of Song of Solomon 17,18 are of special importance because of their references to the Messiah
Body - An entire book of the Bible rejoices over this reality—the Song of Solomon
Jehoiachin - ) But God's oath made this impossible: "as I live, though Coniah were the signet (ring seal, Song of Solomon 8:6; Haggai 2:23) upon My right hand, yet would I pluck thee thence
Holy Spirit, the - " Song of Solomon 4:16, the Heavenly Bridegroom calls for (John 14:16) the Holy Spirit first as the" N
Red Heifer - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:10)...
Secondly, this red heifer was to be without spot, and wherein there was no blemish
Marriage - (Psalm 45:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:10,11 ) The bride was veiled
Cloth, Clothing - The woman also wore a headcloth of brightly colored or patterned material which could be used as a wrapped support for carrying loads (Isaiah 3:22 ), a veil (Genesis 24:65 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:7 ) or a hanging protective garment against the hot sun
Bible - ...
The Hagio-grapha, or "sacred writings" (kethubim , from kathab , to write), include (1) Psalms, Proverbs, Job; (2) The Song of Solomon of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther; (3) Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, 1 and 2 Chronicles. ...
To the histories succeed the epistles of Paul the apostle of faith, Peter of hope, and John of love, unfolding the gospel facts and truths more in detail; just as in the Old Testament the histories come first, then the inspired teachings based on and intimately connected with them, in Psalms, Proverbs, the Song of Solomon of Solomon, and the Prophets
Armour, Arms - ...
An armoury for the storage of material of war is mentioned by Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 3:19 ), but that this was built by David can scarcely be inferred from the difficult text of Song of Solomon 4:4
Hold - Song of Song of Solomon 3 ...
24
Love - It may apply to God’s love for people (Deuteronomy 7:12-13; John 3:16), people’s devotion to God (Psalms 91:14; 1 Corinthians 8:3), pure sexual love between a man and a woman (Proverbs 5:18-19; Song of Song of Solomon 2:4-5), impure sexual activity such as in prostitution (Jeremiah 4:30; Hosea 2:12-13), love between members of a family where sexual feelings are not involved (Genesis 22:2; Ruth 4:15), an attitude of kindness towards others, whether friends or enemies (Leviticus 19:17-18; 1 Samuel 18:1; 1 Samuel 18:16; Matthew 5:43-46; John 11:3), or the desire for things that brings pleasure or satisfaction (Proverbs 20:13; 1 Timothy 6:10)
Maximus Magnus, Christian Emperor in the West - 401, Song of Solomon 6, Hefele, Councils , § 113), St
Living (2) - Song of Solomon 8:7 LXX Septuagint , ἐὰν δῷ ἀνὴρ πάντα τὸν βίον αὐτοῦ ἐν τῇ ἀγάπῃ, ἐξουδενώσει ἐξουδενώσουσιν αὐτόν, forms a suggestive parallel. It is the מַיִם חַוִּים of the OT (Genesis 26:19 [5], Leviticus 14:5-6; Leviticus 14:50-52, Song of Solomon 4:15, Jeremiah 2:13; Jeremiah 17:13, Zechariah 14:8 : also LXX Septuagint Genesis 21:19, Numbers 5:17)
Satan - of Wisdom ( Wis 2:24 : ‘by the envy of the devil death entered into the world’) we already meet with the identification of the Serpent of Genesis 3:1-24 with Satan, which afterwards became a fixed element in belief, and an allusion to the same idea may be detected in the Psalms of Song of Solomon 4:11 , where the prosperous wicked man is said to be ‘like a serpent, to pervert wisdom, speaking with the words of transgressors
Proverbs, Book of - In Israel, wisdom was considered Solomonic almost by definition (see articles on Song of Solomon , and Ecclesiastes, as well as the apochryphal work, Wisdom of Solomon)
Commentary - Ainsworth on the Pentateuch, Psalms, and Song of Solomon
Draw - Song of Song of Solomon 1
Vessels And Utensils - Large mixing and serving bowls or basins (Exodus 24:6 NRSV, “basins”; Song of Song of Solomon 7:2 NIV, “goblet”; Isaiah 22:24 NRSV, “cups”), called kraters by archaeologists, generally had handles in the Israelite period
Minerals And Metals - Alabaster may be mentioned once in the Song of Solomon (Exodus 5:15 NRSV, NAS; “marble” in KJV, REB, NIV)
Brother - " (Song of Song of Solomon 8:1) And, indeed, Jesus in his human nature is the nearest and dearest of all brothers; and in his person is centered a comprehension of all relations
Judah - The wine is the inspiring Spirit in believers as milk is the nourishing spiritual food (Song of Solomon 5:1; Isaiah 55:1; Ephesians 5:18; 1 Peter 2:2)
Leander (2) - Its laudation of the celibate life and depreciation of marriage are quite in the taste of the time, and, to judge from Song of Solomon 5 of C
Suffering - ’ The author may also have had in mind the description of the Bride in Song of Solomon 6:10, ‘clear as the sun
Animals - So in the Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 4:1) the locks of the beloved are compared to ‘a flock of goats that appear from Mt
Proverbs - Rabbinical comment on Song of Solomon 2:14 ‘Deus dixit Israelitis: “Erga me sunt integri sicut columbae, sed erga gentes astuti sunt sicut serpentes” ’; see Wetstein). Song of Solomon 5:2)
Esther - The absence of the name of GOD is unique to this book; the Song of Solomon similarly has no express mention of GOD
Pottery in Bible Times - ...
The Bible specifically identifies only two vessels as pottery: earthen pitchers (Lamentations 4:2 ) and earthen bottles (Jeremiah 19:1 ), but an additional series of vessels probably came from the potter's workshop: “jar” for water (Genesis 24:14 NRSV); “pot” ( Exodus 16:3 ); “bowl” (Numbers 7:85 ); “bowl” (Judges 6:38 ); “vial” (1 Samuel 10:1 ); “cruse” for oil and “jar” for flour (1 Kings 17:14 NRSV); another type of “jar” ( 2 Kings 4:2 NRSV); “bowl” and “cup” (Song of Song of Solomon 7:2 ; Isaiah 22:24 ); “cup” (Isaiah 51:17 ,Isaiah 51:17,51:22 ); and “cup” and “pitcher” (Jeremiah 35:5 NRSV)
Lord - Thus the Books of Esther, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon do not use the name: Yahweh
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - It only remains for you to say that your heart within you is as the chariots of Amminadib in the Song of Solomon, and your marriage is consummated, or will be consummated immediately
Bible - ...
The Hagiographia consists of –...
1, The Psalms;-...
2, The Proverbs;-...
3, Ecclesiastes;-...
4, The Song of Solomon. And the Hagiographia consists of the Psalms, the Proverbs, Job, the Song of Solomon, Ruth, the Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, the Chronicles
Possession - _ Thus, when the Shunammite solemnly conjures the daughters of Jerusalem by the àÇéÀiåÉú and the öáÈàåÉú (Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5) she was doubtless referring to the faun-like spirits of the wild
Ezekiel - In observance of this divine purpose has led the Jews to place his book among the "treasures" (genazin ), which, like the early chapters of Genesis and Song of Solomon, are not to be read until the age of 30 (Jerome's Ep
Lazarus - ]'>[3] on Song of Solomon 4:2 ‘Non possunt ingredi Paradisum nisi justi, quorum animae eo feruntur per angelos
Fig-Tree - ὄλυνθοι, Song of Solomon 2:13 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘green figs’) which are the flower-fruit buds, and together with the leaf-bud, which expands shortly after and soon overshadows the pag, or fruit rudiment, serve as the herald of the coming summer (Matthew 24:32 and ||)
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - After this, the African bishops resolved no longer to allow appeals to Rome from their country; and when Celestine, apparently in 426, wrote to them in behalf of the priest Apiarius, a general council of Africa sent a reply begging Celestine to observe the Nicene rule (Song of Solomon 5) and not receive to communion those excommunicated by them
Night (2) - At certain seasons in late summer Jesus would be exposed in His nightly vigils to the dense chilly clouds of mist of which the Song of Songs (Song of Solomon 5:2) speaks: ‘For my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night
Beda, Historian - 3 books; the Building of the Temple, 2 books; on Kings, 30 questions dedicated to Nothelm; Proverbs 3 books; Song of Solomon , 7 books; on Isa
Dress - In this case the upper tunic, the kuttoneth proper, would be taken off at night ( Song of Solomon 5:3 )
Word - Jesus also promised to send the Spirit to assist the apostles' accurate recollection and assessment of his life and teaching (John 14:26 ; 16:14-15 ; Song of Solomon 2:22 )
Dead Sea Scrolls - The songs seem to follow a certain progression over the thirteen-week cycle: songs 1-5 focus on the earthly worshiping community; songs 6-8 shift the attention to the heavenly worship, highlighting the number seven, which is developed elaborately in Song of Solomon 7 in seven calls to praise directed to the seven angelic priesthoods; and songs 9-13 center on the features of the heavenly sanctuary and the participants in the heavenly worship
Ephesians Epistle to the - If this is Song of Solomon 3:5, though certainly unique, is not unnatural
Versions - Targum on the five megilloth, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Esther, Ecclesiastes
Death of Christ - Song of Solomon 1 pe 3:18 speaks of Christ dying for us "to bring [1] to God
Marriage - ‘60 mighty men’ of Song of Solomon 3:7 ) going, often by night, to fetch the bride and her attendants; in Judges 14:11 ; Judges 14:15 ; Judges 14:20 Samson’s comrades are necessarily taken from the bride’s people
High Priest - The names of Israel's twelve tribes on the high priest's shoulders and breast, as a memorial before the Lord continually, imply that the weight of our salvation is upon His shoulders, and our names on His heart before God (Song of Solomon 8:6), not one name is wanting (Isaiah 49:16; John 10:3; Revelation 2:17; Revelation 3:12)
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - 220 and Chalcedon Song of Solomon 4)
Bible - There were reckoned to be 8 books of the Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Minor Prophets) and 11 of the Hagiographa (Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, and Chronicles)
Sexuality, Human - ...
The canonization of the Song of Solomon caused some ancient rabbis no end of concern because of its frankly erotic dialogue between a man and a woman, presumably the man's wife
Psalms - ...
Other scriptures of the Old Testament have corresponding scriptures in the New Testament The Pentateuch and Old Testament histories answer to the Gospels and Acts; Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the prophets to the epistles; the Song of Solomon and Daniel to Revelation
Ordination - by the Council of Nicaea (Song of Solomon 8), Eusebius (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc
Education - Origen lefts of the scruples of the Jewish teachers in regard to the reading of the Song of Solomon by the young (Harnack, Bible Reading in the Early Church, 1912, p
Christ in Art - The Star (Revelation 22:16) and the Sun (Malachi 4:2) were also used; the Rose and Lily (Song of Solomon 2:1) were very favourite subjects of decative art after the 13th cent
Jews - We shall here present the reader with as comprehensive a view of this singular people as we Song of Solomon 1:1-17
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - ), as well as the Syriac fragment of an exposition of the Song of Solomon ( Fr
Bible - the Pentateuch or five books of Moses, called Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth , 1 & 2 Samuel , 1 & 2 Kings , 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Solomon, the prophecies of Isaiah, Jeremiah with his Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi