What does Solitude mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Corruptions: Seen Even in Solitude
George Shadfoed wrote:: 'One day a friend took me to see a hermit in the woods. After some difficulty we found his hermitage, which was a little place like a hog-sty, built of several pieces of wood, covered with bark of trees, and his bed consisted of dry leaves. There was a narrow beaten path about twenty or thirty yards in length by the side of it, where he frequently walked to meditate.'
'If one offered him food, he would take it, but if money was offered him, he would be angry. If anything was spoken which he did not like, he broke out into a violent passion. He had lived in this cell seven cold winters, and after all his prayers, counting his beads, and separating from the rest of mankind, still corrupt nature was all alive within him.'
Alas! alas! what will it avail us whether we are in England or Ireland, Scotland or America; whether we live amongst mankind, or retire into a hermitage, if we still carry with us our own hell, our corrupt evil tempers? Without a new heart and a right spirit, no condition can deliver a man from the thraldom of his sins. Neither publicity nor solitude avails anything until grace prevails with us. The devil can tempt in the wilderness as well as in the crowd. We war not hermitages but heavenly-mindedness.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Solitude
SOLITUDE.—We may infer from the phrase used in Luke 5:18 (ἧν ὑποχωρῶν, see Bengel’s note, ad loc.) that our Lord frequently sought solitude during the period of His ministry. Sometimes He retired from the multitude, but did not seclude Himself from His disciples (e.g. Matthew 14:13; Matthew 17:1). At other times His solitude was absolute, and He only returned to His disciples or was rejoined by them after an interval (e.g. Matthew 14:23, Mark 1:35, Luke 5:16; Luke 6:12). It is this latter complete solitude that is of importance to the student of our Lord’s Person and work.
1. We observe that He sought solitude, or, if the phrase is permissible, was forced into solitude, at certain critical times of special trial. The battle of the Temptation (Matthew 4:1 ff., Mark 1:12 ff., Luke 4:1 ff.) was fought out in solitude. No human being was within call, and only after the victory was won did angels come to minister to Him. The final struggle against the weakness inherent in the flesh took place in solitude (Matthew 26:41, Luke 22:39). Although He yearned for human sympathy, He deliberately withdrew Himself from the companionship of His disciples. The account of the supreme crisis of His work of redemption witnesses to a solitude too complete and awful for our understanding (Matthew 27:46). We ought perhaps to class the solitude which He sought after the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:23, Mark 6:46, John 6:15) with the three instances just mentioned. The people wished to make Him a king, and may well have suggested a temptation similar to that recorded in Matthew 4:8.
2. Our Lord sought solitude in order to obtain spiritual help for specially important work (Luke 6:12), and spiritual refreshment after periods of exhausting labour (Mark 1:35; Mark 1:45, cf. Luke 5:16). We may suppose that on these occasions, as on another, ‘virtue had gone out of him,’ and that in a literal sense ‘Himself took our infirmities and bare our sicknesses’ (Matthew 8:17), thereby coming to feel the need for fresh intercourse with the Father unvexed with human companionship.
A very curious and suggestive commentary on this twofold use of solitude in our Lord’s life is afforded by the experience of the earliest monks, those Egyptian recluses whom we shall not be wrong in regarding as specialists in the spiritual life. They believed that in solitude a man is exposed to the full fury of the powers of evil, that temptation is not completely conquered because not met in its utmost strength except by him who ventures to meet it alone (Cass. Coll. vii. 23; Athanas. Vita Anton. xiii.). Their thought would explain our Lord’s ‘being led up of the Spirit into the wilderness, to be tempted of the devil’ (Matthew 4:1). It was, no doubt, necessary (cf. the general conception of Milton’s Paradise Regained) that He should be exposed to the utmost strength of the Tempter. Therefore He faced the Evil One in solitude.
The hermits also believed that spiritual communion with God and the graces which flow from it are attainable best in solitude. The abbot Allois sums up their teaching in his deeply suggestive word, ‘Except a man say in his heart, “I and God are alone in the world,” he cannot have peace’ (Verba Seniorum, ap. Rosweyd. Interpr. Pelagio, x. 5; see also Cass. Coll. xix. 5, xxiv. 4). In this respect their experience fits in with our Lord’s retirements in search of refreshment and strength.
The literature of early Western monasticism and much of the teaching of the later Mystics on the subject of solitude fall into line with the recorded experience of the Egyptians, and form a further commentary on the recorded facts of our Lord’s solitude. On the one hand, there is an evident dread of the extreme temptations of solitude, and a feeling that they ought not to be faced except by those far advanced in the spiritual life. On the other hand, there is a recognition of the possibilities of spiritual advancement which solitude affords (see, besides books cited below, Cass. Inst. v. 4; Basil, Reg. Fus. Tract.; Reg. Brev. Tract.; Bened. Reg. i.; Joann. Clim. Grad. iv. etc.; Basil, Epp. ii., xxiii., xlii.; Bened. Reg. iv., xlviii. etc.).
Literature.—Works quoted; Martin Crugott, Der Christ in der Einsamkcit (1761); I. G. Zimmermann, Die Einsamkeit (1784); R. W. Emerson, Society and Solitude (1862); P. Zingerle, Reden des hl. Ephraem über Selbstverleugnung und einsame Lebensweise, aus dem. Syr. [1] übersetzt. (1871); H. D. Thoreau, Walden (repr. 1886); T. T. Lynch, Letters to the Scattered, 522; F. W. Robertson, Serm. i. 220; Martineau, Endeavours, 159; Rendel Harris, Memor. Sacra, 135.
J. O. Hannay.

Sentence search

Jeshimon - Solitude; desolation
Loneness - ) Solitude; seclusion
Horeb - Desert; Solitude; destruction
Loneliness - ) Love of retirement; disposition to Solitude. ) The condition of being lonely; Solitude; seclusion
Solitude - SOLITUDE. ) that our Lord frequently sought Solitude during the period of His ministry. At other times His Solitude was absolute, and He only returned to His disciples or was rejoined by them after an interval (e. It is this latter complete Solitude that is of importance to the student of our Lord’s Person and work. We observe that He sought Solitude, or, if the phrase is permissible, was forced into Solitude, at certain critical times of special trial. ) was fought out in Solitude. The final struggle against the weakness inherent in the flesh took place in Solitude (Matthew 26:41, Luke 22:39). The account of the supreme crisis of His work of redemption witnesses to a Solitude too complete and awful for our understanding (Matthew 27:46). We ought perhaps to class the Solitude which He sought after the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:23, Mark 6:46, John 6:15) with the three instances just mentioned. Our Lord sought Solitude in order to obtain spiritual help for specially important work (Luke 6:12), and spiritual refreshment after periods of exhausting labour (Mark 1:35; Mark 1:45, cf. ...
A very curious and suggestive commentary on this twofold use of Solitude in our Lord’s life is afforded by the experience of the earliest monks, those Egyptian recluses whom we shall not be wrong in regarding as specialists in the spiritual life. They believed that in Solitude a man is exposed to the full fury of the powers of evil, that temptation is not completely conquered because not met in its utmost strength except by him who ventures to meet it alone (Cass. Therefore He faced the Evil One in Solitude. ...
The hermits also believed that spiritual communion with God and the graces which flow from it are attainable best in Solitude. ...
The literature of early Western monasticism and much of the teaching of the later Mystics on the subject of Solitude fall into line with the recorded experience of the Egyptians, and form a further commentary on the recorded facts of our Lord’s Solitude. On the one hand, there is an evident dread of the extreme temptations of Solitude, and a feeling that they ought not to be faced except by those far advanced in the spiritual life. On the other hand, there is a recognition of the possibilities of spiritual advancement which Solitude affords (see, besides books cited below, Cass. Emerson, Society and Solitude (1862); P
Dreariness - ) Dismalness; gloomy Solitude
Drear - ) Dismal; gloomy with Solitude
Eremitical - ) Of or pertaining to an eremite; hermitical; living in Solitude
Apanthropy - ) An aversion to the company of men; a love of Solitude
Jeshimom - The name means Solitude
Monkish - ) Like a monk, or pertaining to monks; monastic; as, monkish manners; monkish dress; monkish Solitude
Cenobite - ) One of a religious order, dwelling in a convent, or a community, in opposition to an anchoret, or hermit, who lives in Solitude
Lonesome - ) Conscious of, and somewhat depressed by, Solitude; as, to feel lonesome
Wasteness - A desolate state Solitude
Lion - Being emblematic of Solitude, it is sometimes shown in pictures of hermit saints
Retirement - To him "the hour of Solitude is the hour of meditation. Solitude is the hallowed ground which religion in every age has adopted as its own. 1:; Bates's Rural Philosophy; Brewster's Recluse; Zimmerman on Solitude
Hermit - A person who retires into Solitude for the purpose of devotion
Hermit - ) A person who retires from society and lives in Solitude; a recluse; an anchoret; especially, one who so lives from religious motives
Privacy - ) A place of seclusion from company or observation; retreat; Solitude; retirement
Ascetic - When the monks came in fashion, this title was bestowed upon them, especially such as lived in Solitude
Coenobite - One who lives in a convent, or in community, under a certain rule; in opposition to a hermit, who lives in Solitude. Fleury speaks of three kinds of monks in Egypt; anachorets, who live in Solitude; coenobites, who continue to live in community; and sarabaites, who are a kind of monks-errant, that stroll from place to place
Kevin, Saint - After founding his monastery he retired into Solitude, returning only at the urgent entreaties of his monks
Fintan, Saint - In 550 he retired to the Solitude of Slieve Bloom Mountains, Leix County, where he attracted numerous followers (among them Saint Comgall of Bangor), for whom he composed an austere rule
Mary of Egypt, Saint - Retiring into the Arabian desert, she passed her remaining 47 years in penance and Solitude
Egypt, Mary of, Saint - Retiring into the Arabian desert, she passed her remaining 47 years in penance and Solitude
Patmos - Its rocky Solitude well suited the sublime nature of the Revelation
Owl - Psalm 102:6 (a) This bird represents the Lord JESUS in His Solitude and loneliness
Groote, Gerard - He taught theology at Cologne and after spending some years in Solitude and prayer in Munnikhuizen monastery was ordained a deacon and preached at Utrecht
Gerard Groote - He taught theology at Cologne and after spending some years in Solitude and prayer in Munnikhuizen monastery was ordained a deacon and preached at Utrecht
Bittern - But in the passages noted the kippod is associated with birds, with pools of water, and with Solitude and desolation
Celestine v, Saint, Pope - He was a Benedictine, lived a life of Solitude, and founded the Benedictine Celestines
Humility - Michael Angelo was found by the Cardinal Earnese walking in Solitude amid the ruins of the Coliseum, and when he expressed his surprise, the great artist answered, 'I go yet to school that I may continue to learn
Berengarius of Tours - He finally submitted after 1080, and retired into Solitude on the island of Saint Cosme near Tours, and died reconciled to the Church
Beatus, Saint - Another version states that he was an Irish monk who accompanied Saint Columban to Switzerland, and lived in Solitude in a cave above the Lake of Thun
Tours, Berengarius of - He finally submitted after 1080, and retired into Solitude on the island of Saint Cosme near Tours, and died reconciled to the Church
Metz, Arnulf of, Saint - After being chief adviser of the young King Dagobert, he resigned all his offices and ended his life in monastic Solitude
Arnulf of Metz, Saint - After being chief adviser of the young King Dagobert, he resigned all his offices and ended his life in monastic Solitude
Dunkards - After spending several years in Solitude, he came forth and began to attack the evils of the clergy
Didacus, Saint - He returned to Spain and spent the remaining years of his life in Solitude and prayer at Alcala
Patmos - " The rocky Solitude suited the sublime nature of the Revelation
Consecration - Travelers have said that they have discovered gardens of Solomon, which were of old enclosed as private places wherein the king walked in Solitude; and they have also found wells of a most deliciously cold water, dexterously covered, so that no person unacquainted with the stone in the wall, which either revolved or slid away with a touch, could have found the entrance to the spring
Cheerfulness - The man who is possessed of this excellent frame of mind is not only easy in his thoughts, but a perfect master of all the powers and faculties of his soul; his imagination is always clear, and his judgment undisturbed; his temper is even and unruffled, whether in action or in Solitude
Dragon - reads "jackals," and also in Psalms 44:19 and Jeremiah 9:11, in which passages Solitude and desolation are illustrated
Retreat - (Latin: retrahere, to withdraw) ...
Withdrawal from the usual surroundings and business distractions to a place set apart for Solitude, meditation, self-examination, and amendment of life
Joannes (504), Abbat of mt. Sinai - Returning into Solitude, John died at an advanced age early in the 7th cent
Desert - A — 1: ἐρημία (Strong's #2047 — Noun Feminine — eremia — er-ay-mee'-ah ) primarily "a Solitude, an uninhabited place," in contrast to a town or village, is translated "deserts" in Hebrews 11:38 ; "the wilderness" in Matthew 15:33 , AV, "a desert place," RV; so in Mark 8:4 ; "wilderness" in 2 Corinthians 11:26
Anthony, Saint - Later he withdrew to Der el Memun, a mountain on the east bank of the Nile, and lived there in Solitude for 20 years
Hilarion, Saint - He returned to Egypt, 360, to seek greater Solitude, journeyed to Sicily and for some time lived as an anchorite near Pachinum; but his disciples discovered his retreat and again surrounded him
Bury - To withdraw or conceal in retirement as, to bury one's self in a monastery or in Solitude
Paphnutius, Surnamed Bubalus - He seems to have fled twice from the Scetic into Syria for greater Solitude and perfection ( Cass
Pelican - Its posture with bill resting on its breast suggests the idea of melancholy Solitude (Psalms 102:6; Isaiah 34:11, where ka'ath is "pelican" not "cormorant"
Retreat - ) A special season of Solitude and silence to engage in religious exercises
Jeanne Marie Bouvier de la Motte Guyon - She spent the remainder of her life in silence and Solitude and in the composition of religious poetry
Senochus, Saint - He consented, at Gregory's persuasion, to forego his absolute Solitude, that the sick might be healed by his virtues
Corruptions: Seen Even in Solitude - Neither publicity nor Solitude avails anything until grace prevails with us
Desert - An uninhabited tract of land a region in its natural state a wilderness a Solitude particularly, a vast sandy plain, as the deserts of Arabia and Africa
Order, Carthusian - Desirous of a more complete Solitude than his chancellorship in the Diocese of Rheims afforded, Saint Bruno with seven companions had retired to the Alps of Dauphine in 1084
Carthusian Order - Desirous of a more complete Solitude than his chancellorship in the Diocese of Rheims afforded, Saint Bruno with seven companions had retired to the Alps of Dauphine in 1084
Sar'Dis, - Travellers describe the appearance of the locality as that of complete Solitude
Mysteries - Besides the Egyptians were a gloomy race of men; they delighted in darkness and Solitude
Abbey - Monasteries were at first nothing more than religious houses, whither persons retired from the bustle of the world to spend their time in Solitude and devotion: but they soon degenerated from their original institution, and procured large privileges, exemptions, and riches
Communion of the Saints - ...
Communion is strength, Solitude is weakness
Hor - " Moses' death was in Solitude, but with Gilead's heights, and Benjamin's hills, and the rich Jordan valley in view; whereas Aaron's last looks rested on rugged Edom, and chalky mount Seir, and the red sandstone rocks round Petra, and the dreary Arabah
Edge - Silence and Solitude set an edge on the genius
Evening - In the latter case, Jesus, after seeing His disciples off (John 6:15), evidently sought the mountain Solitude, as He did on other occasions, to spend much of the night in prayer (Matthew 14:25)
Zoaras - Mennas and his synod repeated the condemnation, and Justinian banished Zoaras from Constantinople and its vicinity, and from all the chief cities of the empire, charging him to live in Solitude
Monk - Anciently denoted, "a person who retired from the world to give himself wholly to God, and to live in Solitude and abstinence. We may also add, that the mystic theology, which gained ground towards the close of the third century, contributed to produce the same effect, and to drive men into Solitude for the purposes of devotion. Martin, the celebrated bishop of Tours, erected the first monasteries in Gaul, and recommended this religious Solitude with such power and efficacy both by his instructions and his example, that his funeral is said to have been attended by no less than two thousand monks
Monk - anciently denoted a person who retired from the world to give himself up wholly to God, and to live in Solitude and abstinence. We may also add, that the mystic theology, which gained ground toward the close of the third century, contributed to produce the same effect, and to drive men into Solitude, for the purposes of devotion. Martin, the celebrated bishop of Tours, erected the first monasteries in Gaul, and recommended this religious Solitude with such power and efficacy, both by his instruction and example, that his funeral is said to have been attended by no less than two thousand monks
Bible: How to Hear - ...
Reader, to which do you belong?–the butterflies or bees? Do you search the Scriptures, or do you only skim them? Do you dwell on a passage till you bring out some meaning, or till you can carry away some memorable truth or immediate lesson? or do you flit along on heedless wing, only on the look-out for novelty, and too frivolous to explore or ponder the Scriptures? Does the Word of God dwell in you so richly, that in the vigils of a restless night, or in the bookless Solitude of a sick room, or in the winter of old age or exclusion from ordinances, its treasured truths would perpetuate summer round you, and give you meat to eat which the world knows not of?–James Hamilton, D
Heliodorus, Bishop of Altinum - Returning to Antioch, he found Jerome resolved to go into the Solitude of the desert of Chalcis
Andreas Samosatensis of Samosata - Andreas deplored the recognition of Cyril's orthodoxy by so many bishops, and desired to bury himself in some Solitude where he might weep ( ib
Desolation - And to the bitter memory of bygone devastation we have to add the apprehension of what might at any time happen if the country were swept by the Romans, of whose methods their own historian wrote, ‘they make a Solitude and call it peace’ (Tac
Apries - He therefore prophesies that Egypt should be reduced to a Solitude, and that God would send against it the sword, which would destroy in it man and beast, Ezekiel 29
Loneliness - Solitude for the purposes of prayer, meditation, and rest. The opposite reason for Solitude and concealment is given in John 6:15 (‘perceiving that they were about to come and take him by force, to make him king’)
Desert - It is a symbol of temptation, Solitude, and persecution ( Isaiah 27:10 , Midbar_; 33:9, _arabah )
Tabor - 4:1, section 8, and 1 Chronicles 6:77) are inconsistent, with the Solitude "apart" of which the narrative (Matthew 17:1-2) speaks
Grove - Their shade, Solitude, and solemn stillness suggested this use
Friends Friendship - ’...
But he would be quick to add:...
‘Yet not in Solitude if Christ anear me...
Waketh him workers for the great employ,...
Oh not in Solitude, if souls that hear me...
Catch from my joyaunce the surprise of Joy
Ravels - That Ahab sought Elijah with avidity, and took an oath of every people, no doubt, also, in his dominions, that he was not concealed among its inhabitants; his situation, therefore, required the utmost privacy, even to Solitude. ...
The raven, it is well known, delights in Solitude
Grave - The Hebrews apparently envisioned a “shade” existence in death and preferred proximity to ancestors over Solitude for the placement of their loved ones' remains
Ararat - On the side of the greater is a chasm, probably once the crater of the volcano; silence and Solitude reign all around; Arguri, the only village on the descent, is the traditional site of Noah's vine
Fratricelli - a permission to live in Solitude after the manner of hermits, and to observe the rule of St
Therapeutae - Six days of the week were, in this manner, passed in Solitude
Garden - As a guarded and protected place (Song of Song of Solomon 4:12 ), persons could retreat there for prayer (Matthew 26:36-46 ), for quiet or Solitude (Esther 7:7 ), or even for bathing (Susanna 1:15 )
Axe - Jesus had been tempered by waiting, in Solitude and temptation
Paul in Arabia - But, somehow, Sinai seems to have drawn Paul to her awful Solitudes with an irresistible attraction and strength. That Solitude, the most complete and not short Solitude, was the one thing that Paul determined to secure for himself immediately after his conversion and his baptism. "One day"-sings concerning Him one of His servants who loved seclusion also, and put it to some purpose-...
"One day forth walked alone, the Spirit leading,And His deep thoughts, the better to converseWith Solitude; till far from track of man,Thought following thought, and step on step led on,He entered now the bordering desert-wild,And, with dark shades and rocks environ'd round,His holy meditations thus pursued. "And thus it is that Holy Scripture is everywhere so full of apartness and aloneness and Solitude: of lodges in the wilderness, and of shut doors in the city: of early mornings, and late nights, and lonely night-watches: of Sabbath-days and holidays, and all such asylums of spiritual retreat
Wilderness (2) - Immediately there rises in our memory the view of a desert of sand, stretching itself out of sight in a complete Solitude, and giving to the caravans of travellers scarcely any other choice but death from thirst, or burial under the moving soil blown up by some terrible windstorm. In fact, the Hebrew word which is usually translation ‘desert’ or ‘wilderness’ (midbâr) does not in the least convey the idea of Solitude or desolation; on the contrary, it belongs to a root which means ‘to pasture,’ and therefore, etymologically,’ feeding-ground’ or ‘pasture-land’ would seem to be the most exact translation. His youth, according to Luke 1:80, was spent ‘in the deserts’; that is, certainly, with the keepers of herds, away from towns or villages, in Solitude and contemplation
Tiberius (2) - 6 he retired to Rhodes, and remained there eight years in Solitude, while his young stepsons received advancement in the State
Arsenius - His love of Solitude became intense; the inward voice had seemed to bid him "be silent, be quiet," if he would keep innocency
Domnus ii, Bishop of Antioch - Euthymius counselled him to remain where he was, telling him that God could take care of his uncle without him; that Solitude was safer for him than the world; that his design would not turn out to his ultimate advantage; that he might not improbably succeed to his uncle's dignity, but would become the victim of clever and unprincipled men, who would avail themselves of his simplicity, and then accomplish his ruin; but the old man's counsels were thrown away
Fame - To Jesus it was often a relief to find a place of Solitude for meditation and prayer
Isaacus Ninivita, Anchorite And Bishop - Watching fasting silence and Solitude are means to self-mastery
Evagrius Ponticus, Anchoret And Writer - Evagrius went to Egypt, where, after two years spent in great austerities in the Nitrian desert, he plunged still deeper into the Solitude, and practised severer mortifications in the cells of Scetis
Fig - Under its appropriate covert Nathanael found that Solitude and shade which suited his earnest communion with God (John 1:48)
Hilarion (1), a Hermit of Palestine - He again set forth in search of Solitude; but wherever he went his miracles betrayed him
Agony - First of all, then, we note Jesus’ sense of Solitude. He sought this outward isolation because He felt this inner Solitude. He craved sympathy, not only because He felt solitary, but because this Solitude was due to His love for man
Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - In reference to this last he exclaims, "O laus magna deserti, ut diabolus, qui vicerat in Paradiso, in Eremo vinceretur"; and notices the withdrawal of Christ to Solitude for prayer, and the fact of the Transfiguration taking place on a mountain
Sela - Yet the prophets of God foretold its downfall, and its abandonment to Solitude and desolation, in terms which strikingly agree with the facts
Nazareth - He loved Solitude, and the words ‘in secret’ (ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6) were dear to Him; yet He was destined for society, and His early years were passed in no backwater, but in the full current of the events of His time
Nazareth - He loved Solitude, and the words ‘in secret’ (ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6) were dear to Him; yet He was destined for society, and His early years were passed in no backwater, but in the full current of the events of His time
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - He lived in Solitude for 50 years, his followers numbering 3150
le'Vites - --There is no trace of the consecrated character of the Levites till the institution of a hereditary priesthood in the family of Aaron, during the first withdrawal of Moses to the Solitude of Sinai
Arabia - 50), and others conjecture that he sought the Solitude of Mt
Night (2) - ...
In the neighbourhood of the Lake, night was the only time of Solitude. ...
There is no reason to doubt the preference of Jesus for an abode where He would be sure of mountain Solitude; we have no record that He entered Tiberias, which was a walled city (HGHL Simplicius, Bishop of Rome - ...
During these troubles under Basiliscus Simplicius seems to have had no opportunity of exercising influence; but as soon as he heard of the restitution of Zeno he wrote to that emperor, exhorting him to follow the steps of his predecessors Marcian and Leo, to allow no tampering with the decisions of Chalcedon, to drive all Eutychian bishops from the sees they had usurped, and especially to send Aelurus into Solitude
Truth - Paul in his special experience learned on the way to Damascus and in the Solitude of the desert that the gospel came to him through no human means but through revelation of Jesus Christ (Galatians 1:12)
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - 14, 15), and that he was wont to cheer his Solitude by brief and rare interviews with his beloved sister, Scholastica, herself a recluse at no great distance ( ib
Lamentations - The first elegy (Lamentations 1) strikes the keynote, the Solitude of the city once so full! Her grievous sin is the cause
Essenes - From the account given of the doctrines and institutions of this sect by Philo and Josephus, we learn that they believed in the immortality of the soul; that they were absolute predestinarians; that they observed the seventh day with peculiar strictness; that they held the Scriptures in the highest reverence, but considered them as mystic writings, and expounded them allegorically; that they sent gifts to the temple, but offered no sacrifices; that they admitted no one into their society till after a probation of three years; that they lived in a state of perfect equality, except that they paid respect to the aged, and to their priests; that they considered all secular employment as unlawful, except that of agriculture; that they had all things in common, and were industrious, quiet, and free from every species of vice; that they held celibacy and Solitude in high esteem; that they allowed no change of raiment till necessity required it; that they abstained from wine; that they were not permitted to eat but with their own sect; and that a certain portion of food was allotted to each person, of which they partook together, after solemn ablutions
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - It was peopled by hermits, who lived mainly in Solitude, but had frequent intercourse among themselves and a little with the world. ) on the Praises of the Desert, chiding him for not having embraced the perfect life of Solitude. We do not read of any special austerities beyond the fact of his seclusion from the world, which he speaks of as a living in the fields and in Solitude, that he might mourn for his sins and gain Christ's mercy ( cont
Isaac - Solitude and prayer suit best the wounded spirit
Imitation - The first ascetics were hermits, living in Solitude; but the social instinct, guided by the sagacity of Church rulers, crept after the solitaries, drew them into union, placed them under rule, and in many cases set them to useful work
City - But it is becoming more and more realized that Jesus lived His life in a crowd, that He was so seldom alone that occasions when He sought Solitude are specially noted, and that it was the sight of great masses of people that most powerfully touched His emotions (Matthew 14:14, Luke 19:41)
Herod - At times he would fly from the sight of men, and on his return from Solitude, which was ill suited to a mind conscious of the most ferocious deeds, he became more brutal than ever, and in fits of fury spared neither foes nor friends
David - The songs which cheered the Solitude of the desert caves of Engedi, or resounded from the voice of the Hebrew people as they wound along the glens or the hill sides of Judea, have been repeated for ages in almost every part of the habitable world, in the remotest islands of the ocean, among the forests of America or the sands of Africa
Creation - 8, 9, 15 17); the forming of beasts and birds to relieve his Solitude and awake his craving for a nobler companionship (vv
House - We found this way of sleeping extremely agreeable; as we thereby enjoyed the cool air, above the reach of gnats and vapors, without any other covering than the canopy of heaven, which unavoidably presents itself in different pleasing forms, upon every interruption of rest, when silence and Solitude strongly dispose the mid to contemplation, Acts 10:9
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - On his journey homeward, which he commenced on the day after his communion, he sat down in the vast Solitude of a forest, near the village of Andethanna, and again debated with himself whether he had acted aright or not
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - He must have been very young when the example and the entreaties of his friend and kinsman Honoratus of Arles induced him to renounce all secular society for the Solitude of the isle of Lérins
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - There the king remained in Solitude and great asceticism; and the year of his death is unknown
Babylon - " "Babylon is now a silent scene, a sublime Solitude. ...
But Babylon was to be visited with a far greater desolation, and to become unfit or unsuited even for such a purpose; and that neither a tent would be pitched there, even by an Arab, nor a fold made by a shepherd, implies the last degree of Solitude and desolation
Gennesaret, Land of - As a rule, Solitude reigns except near the village of Magdala and at Khân Minyeh
Henoticon, the - Zeno and Acacius had "made a Solitude and called it peace
the Ethiopian Eunuch - By this means time, even in Solitude, is happily got rid of, without the pain of attention
Jesuits - In the Solitude and silence of the cloister, the monk is called to work out his salvation by extraordinary acts of mortification and piety
Hannah - Surely the thought of that should make us all walk softly and speak seldom and seek Solitude and circumspection
Self-Control - He entered upon His Agony with bitter forebodings, which in Solitude became almost unendurable (Luke 22:44); absolute acceptance of the Father’s will (Mark 14:36) enabled Him to press down any reluctance to die (Hebrews 5:7 ff
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - There, too, we have the one standing in moral Solitude over against the whole nation, in bitterness of soul because he knows that none will listen to his message. There, too, we have the one standing in moral Solitude over against the whole nation, in bitterness of soul because he knows that none will listen to his message. There, too, we have the one standing in moral Solitude over against the whole nation, in bitterness of soul because he knows that none will listen to his message
Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs - This last instance clearly shows how firmly embedded in popular imagination was this belief in evil powers of the Solitude
Cures - It involved a deep expenditure of nervous, physical, and spiritual energy, and often in the Gospels we read of the spent, tired worker seeking refreshment in rest and in Solitude, and most of all in fellowship with God
John the Baptist - Though consecrated from the womb to the ministerial office, John did not enter upon it in the heat of youth, but after several years spent in Solitude and a course of self-denial
Asceticism (2) - (2) Secondly, there was a class of hermit ascetics who fled away from the allurements and temptations of society, and gave themselves up to a life of rigid self-discipline in the Solitude of the wilderness
Moses - ...
An interval of Solitude is needed especially by men of fervor and vehemence; so Paul in Arabia (Acts 24:27; Galatians 1:17)
Religion (2) - Jesus presented to a world much given to religiosity the problem of One who reserved His devotions for the Solitude of night, and filled His days, including the Sabbaths, with helping the needy and the outcast
John the Baptist - But spiritual instincts and powers which had long been unknown in Israel began to make themselves felt in the young man’s heart, and this son of a priest went forth into the deserts to be shaped in Solitude into a prophet mightier than Elijah or Isaiah. ] ...
How long John remained in ‘the deserts,’ by which is doubtless meant the awful Solitudes of the Wilderness of Judaea, and how he grew into the full sense of the precise nature of his prophetic vocation as the forerunner and herald of the Messiah, we cannot tell
Arabia - Their horses and camels, who in eight or ten days can perform a march of four or five hundred miles, disappear before the conqueror; the secret waters of the desert elude his search; and his victorious troops are consumed with thirst, hunger, and fatigue, in the pursuit of an invisible foe, who scorns his efforts, and safely reposes in the heart of the burning Solitude
Christianity - They were in such great numbers in the empire, that, as Tertullian expresses it, if they had retired into another country, they would have left the Romans only a frightful Solitude
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - After two years thus spent Basil was summoned from his Solitude in 359 to accompany Basil of Ancyra and Eustathius of Sebaste, who had been delegated by the council of Seleucia to communicate the conclusions of that assembly to Constantius at Constantinople
Character of Christ - Only in Solitude and obscurity can such qualities be developed
Worship - Although, in order to meet the wants of human nature generally, consisting as it does of sense as well as soul, and those of a large body of Christians in particular, who were only in a state of education, and were to be brought up to the ripeness of Christian manhood, men soon selected definite times [2] for religious admonitions, and to consecrate them to a fuller occupation with religious things, as well as to public devotion, with the intention, that the influence of these definite times should animate and sanctify the rest of their lives, and that Christians who withdrew themselves from the distractions of business on these days, and collected their hearts before God in the stillness of Solitude, as well as in public devotion, might make these seasons of service to the other parts of their life; yet this was in itself, and of itself, nothing unevangelical
Justinianus i, Emperor - Great part of the country, once the most productive part of the Roman dominions, relapsed into Solitude and neglect; the Christians there were still divided by the mutual jealousies of Donatists, Arians, and orthodox
Palestine - The relief He sought in it was not wholly that of Solitude
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - The Solitude, silence, and stupor as of a dead world would fill you with fear