What does Sinai mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
סִינַ֔י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 9
סִינָֽי the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 8
סִינָ֑י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 6
סִינַ֖י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 5
σινᾶ a mountain or rather a mountainous region in the peninsula of Arabia Petraea 4
סִינַי֙ the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 2
מִסִּינַ֥י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 1
: סִינָֽי the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 1
סִ֠ינַי the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 1
סִינַ֑י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 1
סִינַ֥י the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown. 1

Definitions Related to Sinai

H5514


   1 the mountain where Moses received the Law from Jehovah; located at the southern end of the Sinai peninsula between the horns of the Red Sea; exact site unknown.
   Additional Information: Sinai = “thorny”.
   

G4614


   1 a mountain or rather a mountainous region in the peninsula of Arabia Petraea, made famous by the giving of the Mosaic law.
   Additional Information: Sinai = “thorny”.
   

Frequency of Sinai (original languages)

Frequency of Sinai (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sinai
SINAI (Mountain). A holy mountain in the Sinaitic peninsula (whose name is said to be derived from that of Sin, the moon-god). It is called Horeb by E [1] and D [2] , whereas J [3] and P [4] employ the name ‘Sinai.’ Here Moses was granted the vision of the burning bush ( Exodus 3:1 ), whereby he first received a call to lead the Israelites to adopt Jahweh as their covenanted God; and here took place the tremendous theophany which is the central event of the Pentateuch, wherein the covenant was ratified.
The identification of Mt. Sinai is a matter of some difficulty, and various attempts to discover it have been made from time to time. The traditional site is Jebel Mûsa , ‘the mountain of Moses,’ almost in the centre of the triangle; here there has been a convent ever since at least a.d. 385, about which date it was visited by St. Silvia of Aquitaine whose account of her pilgrimage still survives in part. This identification has therefore the warrant of antiquity. It is not, however, wholly free from difficulty, principally connected with questions of the route of the Exodus; but it is possible that with further study and discovery these difficulties may be found to he evanescent.
In recent years the tradition has been questioned, and two suggestions have been made calling for notice. The first is that originally suggested by Lepsius, who would place Sinai at Mount Serbal , some distance northwest of Jebel Mûsa. This theory has been championed, with a good deal of force, by the latest investigator, Professor Petrie’s assistant, Mr. C. T. Currelly (see Petrle, Researches in Sinai , ch. xvii.). The region appears more suitable for the occupation of a large host than the neighbourhood of Jebel Mûsa, and it accords better with the probable site of Rephidim.
The second view would place the mountain out of the peninsula altogether, unless it can be proved that the Land of Midian included that region. And, indeed, the close connexion evident between Sinai or Horeb and Midian, which appears, for example, in Exodus 3:1-22 , makes this a theory worth consideration. But we are still in the dark as to the limits of Midian: all we can say is that it is not known whether Midian extended west of the Gulf of ‘Akabah, and that therefore it is not known whether Sinai was west of ‘Akabah. It must, however, be freely granted that to place Sinai east or north of ‘Akabah would entirely disjoint all identifications of places along the line of the itinerary of the Exodus.
For the allegorical use of ‘Sinai’ in Galatians 4:25 , see art. Hagar.
R. A. S. Macalister.
SINAI (Peninsula). The triangular tongue of land intercepted between the limestone plateau of the Tih desert in the north, and the Gulfs of Suez and ‘Akabah, at the head of the Red Sea, on the south-west and south-east. It is a rugged and waste region, little watered, and full of wild and impressive mountain scenery. Except at some places on the coast, such as Tor, there is but little of a settled population.
This region was always, and still is, under Egyptian Influence, if not actually in Egyptian territory. From a very early period it was visited by emissaries from Egyptian kings in search of turquoise, which is yielded by the mines of the Wady Magharah. There sculptured steles were left, and scenes engraved in the rock, from the time of Semerkhet of the first dynasty, and Sneferu of the third dated by Professor Petrie in the fifth and sixth millennia b.c. These sculptures remained almost intact till recent years; till a party of English speculators, who came to attempt to re-work the old mines, wantonly destroyed many of them (see Petrie, Researches in Sinai , p. 46). What these vandais left was cut from the rock and removed for safety, under Professor Petrie’s direction, to the Cairo Museum. A remarkable temple, dedicated to Hathor, but adapted, it would appear, rather to Semitic forms of worship, exists at Serabîl el-Khadem , not far from these mines. It was probably erected partly for the benefit of the parties who visited the mines from time to time.
Geologically, Sinai is composed of rocks of the oldest (Archæan) period. These rocks are granite of a red and grey colour, and gneiss, with schists of various kinds hornbiende, talcose, and chioritic overlying them. Many later, but still ancient, dykes of diorite, basalt, etc., penetrate these primeval rocks. Vegetation is practically confined to the valleys, especially in the neighbourhood of water-springs.
R. A. S. Macalister.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Sinai
The "mountain of God" (Exodus 3) situated in the desert of Sinai between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akabah, on which the Law was given to Moses (Exodus 31). The Old Testament speaks of Mount Sinai and Mount Horeb as synonymous; some writers say they are two mountains of the same range. God appeared to Moses at Horeb, from a burning bush, and told him He wouid deliver the Israelites from the Egyptians (Exodus 3); after the Exodus, Moses smote water from a rock in Horeb (Exodus 17). Mount Sinai, however, is most famous as the places where Moses recieived the tablets of the Law and spent 40 days and 40 nights with God (Exodus 19).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sinai
Of Sin (the moon god), called also Horeb, the name of the mountain district which was reached by the Hebrews in the third month after the Exodus. Here they remained encamped for about a whole year. Their journey from the Red Sea to this encampment, including all the windings of the route, was about 150 miles. The last twenty-two chapters of Exodus, together with the whole of Leviticus and Nu ch. 1-11, contain a record of all the transactions which occurred while they were here. From Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-13 ) the Israelites journeyed forward through the Wady Solaf and Wady esh-Sheikh into the plain of er-Rahah, "the desert of Sinai," about 2 miles long and half a mile broad, and encamped there "before the mountain." The part of the mountain range, a protruding lower bluff, known as the Ras Sasafeh (Sufsafeh), rises almost perpendicularly from this plain, and is in all probability the Sinai of history. Dean Stanley thus describes the scene:, "The plain itself is not broken and uneven and narrowly shut in, like almost all others in the range, but presents a long retiring sweep, within which the people could remove and stand afar off. The cliff, rising like a huge altar in front of the whole congregation, and visible against the sky in lonely grandeur from end to end of the whole plain, is the very image of the 'mount that might be touched,' and from which the voice of God might be heard far and wide over the plain below." This was the scene of the giving of the law. From the Ras Sufsafeh the law was proclaimed to the people encamped below in the plain of er-Rahah. During the lengthened period of their encampment here the Israelites passed through a very memorable experience. An immense change passed over them. They are now an organized nation, bound by covenant engagement to serve the Lord their God, their ever-present divine Leader and Protector. At length, in the second month of the second year of the Exodus, they move their camp and march forward according to a prescribed order. After three days they reach the "wilderness of Paran," the "et-Tih", i.e., "the desert", and here they make their first encampment. At this time a spirit of discontent broke out amongst them, and the Lord manifested his displeasure by a fire which fell on the encampment and inflicted injury on them. Moses called the place Taberah (q.v.), Numbers 11:1-3 . The journey between Sinai and the southern boundary of the Promised Land (about 150 miles) at Kadesh was accomplished in about a year. (See MAP facing page 204.)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Sinai
The Sinai Peninsular is the dry region that lies south of Palestine between the two northern arms of the Red Sea. Within it are the semi-desert regions known as the Wilderness of Shur in the north and the Wilderness of Paran in the north-east. (For map see SHUR.)
In the biblical record the Sinai region’s chief importance is as the location of the mountain in the south known as Horeb, or Mount Sinai. This was the place where God first met Moses and where he later established his covenant with the travelling Israelites (Exodus 3:1; Exodus 3:12; Acts 7:30). Through that covenant God formally made them his people and gave them this law (Exodus 19; Exodus 24:16; Exodus 34:1-4; Exodus 34:29; Leviticus 7:37-38; Leviticus 27:34; Deuteronomy 1:6; Deuteronomy 1:19; Deuteronomy 5:1-2; 1 Kings 8:9; Acts 7:38).
For about one year the people of Israel camped at Mt Sinai, organizing themselves for the new life that lay ahead in Canaan (Exodus 19:1; Numbers 10:11). But because of their disobedience, they took about forty years to reach Canaan. They spent much of this time in the wilderness regions of the Sinai Peninsular, where the older generation passed away and a new generation grew up. It was this new generation that entered Canaan (Numbers 1:19; Numbers 10:12; Numbers 14:31-34; Numbers 26:63-65).
Several hundred years later, when the prophet Elijah felt that God’s covenant people were a total failure, God brought him to Mt Sinai to reassure him. Though God would punish Israel, he would preserve the faithful minority and through them fulfil his covenant promises (1 Kings 19:8-18).
To Israelites, the covenant was inseparably linked with Sinai. But it was a covenant that was limited by time and restricted to one nation. The new covenant, by contrast, has no such limitations or restrictions. It comes into being through Jesus Christ and is identified not with Sinai but with heaven (Galatians 4:24-27; Hebrews 12:18-29; see COVENANT).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mount Sinai
(mownt ssi' nay i) Mountain in the south central part of a peninsula in the northwestern end of Arabia. God made many significant revelations of Himself and His purposes to Israel there. The meaning of the name is unclear; but it probably means “shining” and was likely derived from the word sin , a Babylonian moon god. The suggestion that it means “clayey” does not in any way fit the nature of the terrain.
The entire peninsula takes the shape of an inverted triangle whose base Isaiah 150 miles long and is bounded on the east by the north end of the Red Sea and on the west by the Gulf of Aqaba. The Gaza strip lies directly north. This peninsula contains 23,442 square miles and has a population of approximately 140,000 at time of publication. The central and southern parts are extremely mountainous, ranging from 5000 to about 9000 feet, and the land today is valued for its oil fields and manganese deposits.
The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire wilderness area ( Leviticus 7:38 ). Sometimes Sinai is called “the mount” (Exodus 19:2 ); sometimes “the mountain of God” (Exodus 3:1 ); sometimes “the mount of the Lord” (Numbers 10:33 ).
The term Horeb is often used to refer to Sinai in such a way as to make the names synonymous ( Exodus 3:1 ). Since Horeb means “waste” or “wilderness area,” it seems best to think of Horeb as the general term for the area and Sinai as the specific peak where God manifested Himself to Moses.
The modern name for the traditional site of Sinai is Jebel Musa (the mount of Moses). Jebel is the Arabic word hill , sometimes written Jabal or Gabel (French has Djebel).
Jebel Musa (7500 ft.) is one of three granite peaks near the southern tip of the peninsula. The highest peak, Jebel Katarin (Mount Catherine, 8,652 ft.), lies immediately on the southwest, and Ras es-Safsafeh (6,540 ft.) on the north, northeast of Jebel Musa. Many explorers think Ras es-Safsafeh is the biblical Sinai because it has a plain, er Rahah , on its northwest base, which is two miles long and about two thirds of a mile wide. This plain was certainly large enough to accommodate the camp of the Israelites.
Another suggested location for Mount Sinai is far north and east of Jebel Musa, near the top of the Gulf of Aqaba. The major argument for this view is that Sinai's phenomena indicate volcanic action—fire, smoke, quaking earth (Exodus 19:16-18 )—and no volcano is found in the Sinaitic peninsula. The nearest volcano lies far east of the Gulf. However, the phenomena that appeared at Sinai were undoubtedly supernatural in origin, for they were accompanied by the sounds of a trumpet and the voice of God (Exodus 19:19 ).
Another location for Sinai is sought far north of Jebel Musa, primarily because of historical references such as the battle with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-16 ). The Amalekites lived in Canaan proper (Numbers 14:42-45 ) and would not, it is claimed, have met the Israelites in the Sinaitic peninsula. However, the Amalekites could have followed the recently delivered Israelites to the south of their territory for the purpose of preying on the poorly organized refugees (Deuteronomy 25:17-19 ). See Palestine ; Exodus, Wilderness Journey
J. Travis
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sinai
The peninsula between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akabah; also one of the high peaks there. The peninsula is usually called in Scripture ‘the desert (or wilderness) of Sinai.’ St. Stephen (Acts 7:30) recalls how an angel of the Lord appeared to Moses ‘in the wilderness of mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush.’ Mount Sinai was a sacred mountain from very early times, being possibly connected with the worship of the Babylonian moon-god Sin. In the Jewish tradition it was sacred to Jahweh, and was memorable as the place where God gave to Moses the ‘lively oracles’ (Acts 7:38). See, further, Mount, Mountain. For Galatians 4:24 f. see Hagar.
J. W. Duncan.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sinai
See Mount Sinai
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sinai
(See EXODUS.) The peninsula of Sinai is a triangular tract, bounded on the W. by the gulf of Suez, on the E. by the gulf of Akabah, and on the N. by a line drawn from Gaza through Beersheba to the S. of the Dead Sea. There are three divisions:
(1) the southernmost, the neighbourhood of Sinai;
(2) the desert of et Tih, the scene of Israel's wanderings;
(3) the Νegeb , or "south country", the dwelling of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
Near 'Αin Ηudherah ("Hazeroth") Mr. Palmer (Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, January, 1871) discovered Erweis el Ebeirig, which he believed to be the remains of an Israelite camp. The tombs outside he identified as the Κibroth Ηattaavah , "graves of lust" (Numbers 11:31); the extensive remains betoken a large assemblage of people. Farther on the stone huts scattered over the hills and country, Arabic Νawamis ("mosquitos"), were probably Amalekite dwellings. Proceeding N. the explorers reached 'Ain Gadis or Kadesh, with a wady of the same name running from it beside a large plain. 'Ain Gadis is on the frontier of the Negeb or south country, which is now waste through neglect of the water supply, but bears traces of former cultivation arid ruins of many cities. Eshcol, where the spies went, lay not far off from Kadesh in the vine abounding district on the way to Hebron; the hill sides are covered with small stone heaps, on which the vines were trained.
To the north stand el Μeshrifeh or Ζephath "the watchtower," and Sbaita, all built of stone, without timber, "the city of the Zephath," afterward called Hormah (Judges 1:17). The route lies then through the Amorite hills to Ruhaibeh, with the remains of an old well, the troughs being of great size and antiquity, the Rehoboth well of Isaac; near it Shutnet, or Sitnah. Then Beersheba with three wells, one dry, the other two full of water. Sinai stands in the center of the peninsula which lies between the two horns of the Red Sea. It is a wedge shaped mass of granite and porphyry platonic rocks, rising almost 9,000 ft. above the sea. On the S.W. lies a wide alluvial plain, coasting the gulf of Suez; on the E. side, coasting the Akabah gulf, the plain is narrow. There are three chief masses:
(1) The N.W. cluster, including five-peaked Serbal, 6,342 ft. above the sea.
(2) The E. and central mass, jebel Katherin its highest point, 8,063 ft. above the sea; jebel Musa, at the south end, about 7,000 ft.
(3) The S.E. close to (2), Um Shaumer its highest point. Ras Sufsafeh, the northern end of (2), with the vast plain er Rahab ("the wilderness of Sinai") for Israel below, is the Mount Sinai of the law.
Horeb is the N. part of the Sinaitic range. At the foot of Ras Sufsafeh are alluvial mounds, which exactly correspond to the "bounds" set to restrain the people. In the long retiring sweep of er Rahab the people could "remove and stand afar off," for it extends into the side valleys. Moses, coming through one of the oblique gullies at the side of Res Sufsafeh on the N. and S., might not see the camp, though hearing the noise, until he emerged from the wady ed Deir or the wady Leja on the plain (Exodus 32:15-19).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sina, Sinai
This name is applied to both a mountain and to a wilderness. They lie between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akaba.The mountain is really a range of high hills and is sometimes called HOREB, which may be a more general name for the whole of the range. Mount Sinai is especially connected with the giving of the law. Moses and the elders went up into the mountain, and Moses there received the Ten Commandments written on two stones. The Israelites were located in the wilderness of Sinai, which must have been a large place capable of holding two million people. By comparing Exodus 19:1 with Numbers 10:11 , it will be seen that they continued there nearly a year.
The mountains in the locality have been surveyed in modern days, and a plain has been found, about two miles long and half a mile wide, affording ample room for the people to assemble, and where they could hear the thunder, and see the fire and smoke issuing from the mount. The plain is now called er Rahah. Adjoining this is a precipitous granite rock called Jebel Musa (Ras Sufsafeh) which is so formed that the elders who accompanied Moses part of the way up, could remain there while Moses proceeded to the summit, which cannot be seen from the plain. Exodus 19:1-23 , etc.; Psalm 68:8,17 ; Nehemiah 9:13 ; Acts 7:30,38 .
The term Sinai is frequently employed as representing 'the law,' and is used by Paul as a symbol of 'bondage,' for law and bondage cannot be separated, and stand in strong contrast to the 'liberty' wherewith Christ makes the believer free. Galatians 4:24,25 , compare with Galatians 5:1 .
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Sinai
Galatians 4:25 (a) This mountain represents the stern realities of the law. GOD appeared there in thunder and fire and thick darkness, for the law demands absolute obedience, or else punishment. It is in contrast with Calvary, where GOD appeared in human form, in tender loving kindness, and in love. The condition of Jerusalem at that time, with its wickedness, sin and the destruction wrought by its enemies was just a plain evidence of the tragedy that follows the broken laws of Sinai. (See Exodus 19:18).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sinai
a famous mountain of Arabia Petraea, on which God gave the law to Moses, Exodus 19:1 ; Exodus 24:16 ; Exodus 31:18 ; Exodus 34:2 ; Exodus 34:4 , &c; Leviticus 25:1 ; Leviticus 26:46 . It stands in a kind of peninsula, formed by the two arms of the Red Sea; one extending north, called the Gulf of Kolsom; the other extending east, called the Gulf of Elan. The Arabs call Mount Sinai by the name of Tor, that is, the mountain, by way of excellence; or Gibel Mousa, "the mountain of Moses." It is two hundred and sixty miles from Cairo, which is a journey of ten days. The wilderness of Sinai, where the Israelites continued encamped almost a year, and where Moses erected the tabernacle of the covenant, is considerably elevated above the rest of the country; the ascent to it is very craggy, the greater part cut out of the rock; then one comes to a large space of ground, which is a plain surrounded on all sides by rocks and eminences, whose length is nearly twelve miles. Toward the extremity of this plain, on the north, two high mountains appear; the highest is called Sinai, the other Horeb. They are of very steep ascent, and do not stand on much ground in comparison to their extraordinary height. Sinai is at least one third part higher than the other, and its ascent more upright and difficult. The top of the mountain terminates in an uneven and rugged space, which might contain about sixty persons. On this eminence is built a little chapel, called St. Catherine's, where it is thought the body of this saint rested for three hundred and sixty years; but afterward it was removed into a church at the foot of the mountain. Near this chapel issues a fountain of very good fresh water: it is looked upon as miraculous, it not being conceivable how water can flow from the brow of so high and so barren a mountain. Mount Horeb stands west of Sinai; so that at sun-rising the shadow of Sinai covers Horeb. Beside the little fountain at the top of Sinai, there is another at the foot of Horeb, which supplies the monastery of St. Catherine. Five or six paces from thence they show a stone, whose height is four or five feet, and breadth about three, which they say is the very stone from whence Moses caused the water to gush out. Its colour is of a spotted grey; and it is, as it were, set in a kind of earth, where no other rock appears. This stone has twelve holes or channels, which are about a foot wide, from whence they say the water issued which the Israelites drank.
"Sinai," says Sandys, "has three tops of a marvellous height; that on the west side, where God appeared to Moses in a bush, fruitful in pasturage, far lower than the middlemost, and shadowed when the sun riseth thereon; which is that whereon God gave the law to Moses, and which is now called the Mount of Moses, at the foot of which stands the monastery called St. Catherine's, from which there were steps formerly up to the very top of the mountain, and were computed fourteen thousand in number. At present some of them are broken, but those that remain are well made, and easy to go up and down. There are, in several places of the ascent, good cisterns; and especially near the top, a fair and good one. The third or most easterly summit is called by the religious in those parts, Mount Catherine; on the top of which there is a dome, under which they say was interred the body of this saint, brought thither by angels after she was beheaded at Alexandria." One may judge of the height of St. Catherine's Mount, which certainly is not so high as that of Moses by a third part, from this circumstance, that Thevenot found much snow on both when he was there, which was in February. The monastery of St. Catherine is from Cairo some eight days' journey over the deserts.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mount Sinai
So called from Senah, bush. This place will be always memorable, from the law having been delivered from it accompanied with thunderings and lightnings, and all the other awful demonstrations of the divine presence. Horeb, and Sinai, are not exactly one and the same, for they are evidently two distinct mountains. And as Sinai is at the east, and Horeb lies west, at sunrise (we are told by travellers) the right is very magnificent. Sinai is all shining, from the sun's beams, and yet forming a shade on Horeb; so that the one is bright, and the other dark. Mount Sinai hath been always considered figurative of the blackness, and darkness, and terror of that dispensation which issued from it. And what the apostle, by commission from the Holy Ghost, said of it, Hebrews 7:18-21, plainly sets forth the cause. It was a mount, Paul saith, that "burned, with fire, and blackness, and darkness, and tempest intimating the dread which must ever fill the soul at the delivery of the law, when the soul is filled with a conscious sense of having broken that law, and stands under the conviction of it, as yet unconscious of Christ. Moses himself tells us, that he exceedingly feared and quaked. There can be no enduring that which was commanded. Hence the apostle Paul (to the Galatian church, who seemed ignorant of this trembling of soul, who seemed ignorant from not having been sufficiently humbled under a sense of sin; and were running back to a covenant of works for justification,) cries out, "Tell me, ye that desire to be under the law, do ye not hear the law?" (Galatians 4:21.) As if he had said, do ye not hear the awful threatenings to disobedience, and the total impossibility of being justified by the law? Such was, and is, and ever must be, mount Sinai in the church. What a blessedness that we are not come to it; but delivered from it, by the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all!"
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sinai
Sinai (sî'nâi, or sî'naî, or sî'na-î), broken or deft rocks? The name of a district, a range of mountains and a mountain peak. The district is in the peninsula lying between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akaba, and the mountains in the district are celebrated as the place where the Mosaic law was given. Exodus 16:1; Exodus 19:2-25; Exodus 24:12; Exodus 24:18; Exodus 25:40; Exodus 34:2-35; Leviticus 7:38; Leviticus 25:1; Leviticus 26:46; Leviticus 27:34; Deuteronomy 33:2; Judges 5:5; Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 12:18-21. The "peak" where the law was given is now generally believed to be identical with Ras Sufsafeh, the northern portion of Jebel Musa.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Sinai
A bush; enmity
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sinai
A mountain, or mountain range, in Arabia Petraea, in the peninsula formed by the two arms of the Red Sea, and rendered memorable as the spot where the law was given to Israel through Moses, Exodus 19:1 -Nu 19:1-10:33 . As this mountain has been almost unknown in modern times, until recently, and is of such importance in Scripture history, we shall enter into some details respecting it.
The upper region of Sinai forms an irregular circle of thirty or forty miles in diameter, possessing numerous sources of water, a temperate climate, and a soil capable of supporting animal and vegetable life; for which reason it is the refuge of all the Bedaweens when the low country is parched up. This, therefore, was the part of the peninsula best adapted to the residence of nearly a year, during which the Israelites were numbered, and received their laws from the Most High. In the highest and central part of this region, seven thousand feet above the level of the sea, rises the sacred summit of Horeb or Sinai. The two names are used almost indiscriminately in the Bible, the former predominating in Deuteronomy. Some have thought there were two adjacent summits, called, in the time of Moses, Horeb and Sinai; and indeed the monks give these names to the northern and southern heights of the same ridge, three miles long. But the comparison of all the Scripture passages rather shows that HOREB was the general name for the group, and SINAI the name of the sacred summit.
In approaching this elevated region from the northwest, Burckhardt writes, "We now approached the central summits of Mount Sinai, which we had had in view for several days. Abrupt cliffs of granite, from six to eight hundred feet in height, whose surface is blackened by the sun, surround the avenues leading to the elevated region to which the name of Sinai is specifically applied. These cliffs inclose the holy mountain on three sides, leaving the east and northeast sides only, towards the Gulf of Akaba, more open to the view. At the end of three hours, we entered these cliffs by a narrow defile about forty feet in breadth, with perpendicular granite rocks on both sides. The ground is covered with sand and pebbles, brought down by the torrent which rushes from the upper region in the winter time."
The general approach to Sinai from the same quarter is thus described by Mr. Carne: "A few hours more, and we got sight of the mountains round Sinai. Their appearance was magnificent. When we drew near, and emerged out of a deep pass, the scenery was infinitely striking; and on the right extended a vast range of mountains, as far as the eye could reach, from the vicinity of Sinai down to Tor, on the Gulf of Suez. They were perfectly bar, but of grand and singular form. We had hoped to reach the convent by daylight; but the moon had risen some time when we entered the mouth of a narrow pass, where our conductors advised us to dismount. A gentle yet perpetual ascent led on, mile after mile, up this mournful valley, whose aspect was terrific, yet ever varying. It was not above two hundred yards in width, and the mountains rose to an immense height on each side. The road wound at their feet along the edge of a precipice, and amid masses of rock that had fallen from above. It was a toilsome path, generally over stones place like steps, probably by the Arabs; and the moonlight was of little service to us in this deep valley, as it only rested on the frowning summits above. Where is Mount Sinai? Was the inquiry of everyone."
"The Arabs pointed before to Jebel Moosa, the Mount of Moses, as it is called; but we could not distinguish it. Again and again point after point was turned, and we saw but the same stern scenery. But what had the beauty and softness of nature to do here? Mount Sinai required an approach like this, where all seemed to proclaim the land of miracles, and to have been visited by the terrors of the Lord. The scenes, as you gazed around, had an unearthly character, suited to the sound of the fearful trumpet that was heard there. We entered at last on the more open valley, about half a mile wide, and drew near this famous mountain."
The elevated valley or plain Er-Rahah, here and above referred to, is now generally believed to be the place where the Hebrews assembled to witness the giving of the law. Its is two miles long from northwest to southeast, and on an average half a mile wide. The square mile thus afforded is nearly doubled by the addition of those portions of side valleys, particularly Esh-Sheikh towards the northnortheast, from which the summit Tas-Sufsafeh can be seen. This summit, which Dr. Robinson takes to be the true Sinai, rises abruptly on the south side of the plain some fifteen hundred feet. It is the termination of a ridge running three miles southeast, the southern and highest point of which is called by the Arabs Jebel Musa, or Moses' Mount. Separated from this ridge by deep and steep ravines, are two parallel ridges, of which the eastern is called the Mountain of the Cross, and the western, Jebel Humr. The convent of St. Catharine lies in the ravine east of the true Sinai; while Mount Catharine is the south peak of the western ridge, lying southwest of Jebel Musa and rising more than one thousand feet higher. From the convent, Dr. Robinson ascended the central and sacred mountain, and the steep peak Ras-Sufsafeh. "The extreme difficulty," he says, "and even danger of the ascent, was well rewarded by the prospect that now opened before us. The whole plain Er-Rahah lay spread out beneath our feet; while Wady Esh Sheikh on the right and a recess on the left, both connected with the opening broadly from Er-Rahah, presented an area which serves nearly to double that of the plain. Our conviction was strengthened that here, or on some one of the adjacent cliffs, was the spot where the Lord descended in fire and proclaimed the law. Here lay the plain where the whole congregation might be assembled; here was the mount which might be approached and touched; and here the mountain brow where alone the lightnings and the thick cloud would be visible, and the thunders and the voice of the trump be heard, when the Lord came down in the sight of all the people upon Mount Sinai. We gave ourselves up to the impressions of the awful scene; and read with a feeling which will never be forgotten the sublime account of the transaction and the commandments there promulgated, in the original words as recorded by the great Hebrew legislator."
The plain Er-Rahah is supposed to have been reached by the Hebrews from the shore of the Red Sea, south of the desert of Sin, by a series of wadys or broad ravines winding up among the mountains in an easterly direction, chiefly Wady Feiran and Wady Ehs-Sheikh. The former commences near the Red Sea, and opens into the latter, which making a circuit to the north of Sinai enters the plain at its foot from the north-northeast. For several miles from its termination here, this valley is half a mile wide. By the same northern entrance most travellers have approached the sacred mountain. Its south side is less known. To the spectator on Jebel Musa, it presents to trace of any plain, valley, or level ground to be compared with that on the north; yet some writers maintain that the Hebrews received the law at the southern foot of Sinai. See map, in the article EXODUS .
In many of the western Sinaite valleys, and most of all in ElMukatteb, which enters Wady Feiran from the northwest, the more accessible parts of the rocky sides are covered by thousands of inscriptions, usually short, and rudely carved in spots where travellers would naturally stop to rest at noon; frequently accompanied by a cross and mingled with representations of animals. The inscriptions are in an unknown character, but were at first ascribed to the ancient Israelites on their way from Egypt to Sinai; and afterwards to Christian pilgrims of the fourth century. Recently, however, many of them have been deciphered by Prof. Beer of Leipzig, who regards them as the only known remains of the language and characters once peculiar to the Nabathaeans of Arabia Petraea. Those thus far deciphered are simply proper names, neither Jewish nor Christian, preceded by some such words as "peace," "blessed," "in memory of."
The giving of the law upon Mount Sinai made it one of the most memorable spots on the globe. Here, moreover, God appeared to Moses in the burning bush, Exodus 3:1-22 and Exodus 4:1-31 ; and six centuries later, sublimely revealed himself to the prophet Elijah when fleeing from the fury of Jezebel, 1 Kings 19:1-21 . There are frequent allusions in Scripture to the glorious and awful delivery of the Law, Judges 5:5 Psalm 68:8,17 Habakkuk 3:3 . In the New Testament, the dispensation proclaimed on Sinai is contrasted with the gospel of the grace of God, Galatians 4:24,25 Hebrews 12:18-29 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sinai, Mount
The "mountain of God" (Exodus 3) situated in the desert of Sinai between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akabah, on which the Law was given to Moses (Exodus 31). The Old Testament speaks of Mount Sinai and Mount Horeb as synonymous; some writers say they are two mountains of the same range. God appeared to Moses at Horeb, from a burning bush, and told him He wouid deliver the Israelites from the Egyptians (Exodus 3); after the Exodus, Moses smote water from a rock in Horeb (Exodus 17). Mount Sinai, however, is most famous as the places where Moses recieived the tablets of the Law and spent 40 days and 40 nights with God (Exodus 19).
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Joannes (504), Abbat of mt. Sinai
Joannes (504), surnamed Climacus, Scholasticus, or Sinaita. At the age of 16 he entered the monastery of Mount Sinai, subsequently became an anchoret, and at 75 abbat of Mount. Sinai. At the entreaty of John abbat of Raïthu he now composed his works, the Scala Paradisi and the Liber ad Pastorem; from the title ( κλῖμαξ ) of the first of these he gained his name of Climacus (Climakos). It contains his experiences in the spiritual life, with instructions for the attainment of a higher degree of holiness, and is dedicated to the abbat of Raïthu who afterwards wrote a commentary upon it (Patr. Gk. lxxxviii.1211–1248). Returning into solitude, John died at an advanced age early in the 7th cent. Boll: Acta SS. Mart. iii. 834: Migne, u.s. 631–1210; a new ed. of the Gk. text of his works was pub. in 1883 at Constantinople by Sophronius Eremites; Surius, de Probatis Sanct. Historiis, Mar 30.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Nilus, an Ascetic of Sinai
Nilus (3), a famous ascetic of Sinai, probably born in Galatia, as he speaks of St. Plato martyr of Ancyra as his countryman. He became prefect at Constantinople, married, and had two children, when he determined c. 390 to retire to Sinai with his son Theodulus. His epistles are very curious, detailing assaults by demons, and replying to various queries, doctrinal, disciplinary, and even political. Gainas, the Gothic general, discussed with him the Arian controversy, but without changing his opinions ( Epp. lib. i. 70, 79, 114). Nilus boldly took the side of St. Chrysostom when banished from Constantinople in 404. The story of his ordination is a curious one. The Saracens invaded the desert of Sinai and captured some of the solitaries, including Nilus and Theodulus. They dismissed Nilus and the older men but retained the young men, intending to offer them next day as sacrifices to the Morning Star. They overslept themselves, however, and then, as the propitious time was past, sold Theodulus, who fell into the hands of a neighbouring bishop. There he was found by his father. The piety of both so struck the bishop that he compelled them to accept ordination. They returned to Sinai, and distinguished themselves by a yet severer piety. Nilus died c. 430. His writings throw much light on monasticism and Christian society generally at the end of 4th cent. Epp. 61 and 62, lib. iv., most interestingly illustrate the church life at that period. Olympiodorus, an eparch, desired to erect a church and to decorate it with images of saints in the sanctuary, together with hunting scenes, birds, and animals in mosaic, and numerous crosses in the nave and on the floor—a scheme of decoration which we find carried out some time later in the churches of Central Syria, depicted in De Voguë's Civil and Ecclesiastical Architecture of Syria . Nilus condemns the mosaics as mere trifling and unworthy a manly Christian soul. He rejects numerous crosses in the nave, but orders the erection of one cross at the east end of the sanctuary, "Inasmuch as by the cross man was delivered from spiritual slavery, and hope has been shed on the nations." Good pictures from O. and N. T. meet with his approval. They serve as books for the unlearned; teach them Scripture history, and remind them of God's mercies. The church was to have numerous chapels. Each chapel may have a cross erected therein. Ep. 62 proves that his prohibition of mosaics only extended to hunting scenes and probably did not include the images of saints. It was written to exalt the fame of his favourite martyr, Plato of Ancyra, and conclusively proves that the invocation of saints was then practised in the East [1]. Nilus did not approve of the extraordinary forms which monasticism was assuming. Epp. 114 and 115, lib. ii. are addressed to one Nicander, a Stylite, who must have set the fashion which St. Simeon followed. Nilus tells him his lofty position is due simply to pride, and shall find a fulfilment of the words " He that exalts himself shall be abased." In the second epistle he charges him with light and amorous conversation with women. Monastic discipline seems to have been then very relaxed, as the charges are repeated in his letters and works. We often find in them the peculiar practices of the monks or of the early church explained with mystical references. Cf. Fessler-Jungmann, Inst. Patrol. (1896), ii. 2, p. 108.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Silvanus, Solitary of Sinai
Silvanus (12) , solitary of Sinai, a native of Palestine. "He founded at Geraris near the great torrent a very extensive establishment for holy men, over which the excellent Zachariah subsequently presided" (Soz. H. E. vi. 32). He trained his followers to industrial pursuits. A wandering ascetic seeing all the brethren working very diligently said to them, "Labour not for the meat which perisheth; Mary chose the better part." Silvanus over-hearing this said, "Give a book to the brother and lead him to an empty cell." When the ninth hour came, no one came to call the stranger to eat. At last, wearied and hungry, he sought Silvanus, and said, "Father, the brethren have not eaten to-day." "Oh yes," replied the abbat, "they have eaten." "And why," said the other, "did you not send for me?" "Because," responded Silvanus, "thou art a spiritual man, and dost not require food; but we are carnal and wish to eat, and therefore are compelled to work. Thou, however, hast chosen the better part and continuest in study the whole day, nor art willing to consume carnal food." The stranger confessed his fault and was forgiven, Silvanus playfully saying, "Martha is evidently necessary to Mary." Cotelerius tells stories of his prolonged trances. On one occasion he awoke very sad because he had been in the eternal world and seen many monks going to hell and many secular persons to heaven ( Monument , t. i. p. 679).
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Sentence search

Horeb - Mount Horeb is another name for Mount Sinai. (For details see Sinai
Sinaitic - ) Of or pertaining to Mount Sinai; given or made at Mount Sinai; as, the Sinaitic law
Horeb - An alternative name for Mount Sinai (Exodus 3:1-12 ; Exodus 17:6-7 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 5:2 ; 1 Kings 19:8 ). See Sinai, Mount
Horeb - An alternative name for Mount Sinai (Exodus 3:1-12 ; Exodus 17:6-7 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; Deuteronomy 5:2 ; 1 Kings 19:8 ). See Sinai, Mount
Horeb - ) The designation of the northern part of the Sinaitic range, so Rephidim is made to be situated in it (Exodus 17:6). Sinai was the central mass of mountains including the particular peak from which the law was given. So the name "Sinai" is most used from Exodus 19:11 to Numbers 3:1, where Israel is described as at or about the scene of the giving of the law. Sinai means "sharp pointed," "toothed" (Knobel), the point Ras Sufsafeh. (See EXODUS; Sinai
Sin, Wilderness of - (ssihn) Barren region somewhere west of the Sinai plateau on the Sinai peninsula. The place sometimes has been confused with the Wilderness of Zin, which is located on the northwestern side of Sinai
Rephidim - An encampment of the Israelites between the wilderness of Sin and mount Sinai, where the people murmured, and God gave them water from the rock. It is thought to have been in the valley now called esh-Sheikh, a day's march northwest of Sinai, and near the western border of the Horeb group of mountains. SEE Sinai
Horeb - The special application of Horeb and Sinai in the Old Testament has been much discussed. Robinson and Hengstenberg think that Horeb is the name for the whole range—Sinai for a particular peak; Gesenius and others hold precisely the opposite view. In Leviticus and Numbers Sinai is exclusively used of the scene of the giving of the Law. In Deuteronomy Horeb is substituted for Sinai. See Sinai and Palestine, p. The mountain of Sinai and its wilderness are distinguished as the theatre of events that took place in the district of Horeb and the whole of Horeb is called "the mountain of God. Hence, sometimes "Sinai" alone is spoken of. But frequently "Horeb" alone is named, and the same events are spoken of as occurring on Horeb which are described as taking place on Sinai. , "Horeb," 1 Kings 8:9; 1 Kings 19:8; 2 Chronicles 5:10; Psalms 106:19; Malachi 4:4; "Sinai," Judges 6:5; Psalms 68:8; Psalms 68:17
Horeb - See Sinai
Horeb - See Sinai
Sinai - See Mount Sinai...
John Climacus, Saint - 525;died on Mount Sinai, 605. The name Climacus was given to him from the title of his book "The Ladder (Climax) of Paradise," but he is also known as Scholasticus, or the Sinaita. He lived for many years as a solitary at the foot of Mount Sinai, and in 600 acceded to the request of the monks on Sinai to rule them as abbot, resigning this charge after four years
Paran - Wilderness area south of Judah, west of Edom, and north of Sinai. Israel camped there after leaving Sinai during the Exodus and sent spies to scout out the Promised Land from Kadesh, a location in Paran (Numbers 10:11-12 ; Numbers 13:3 ,Numbers 13:3,13:26 ). Mount Paran appears as a poetic parallel to Mount Sinai (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; compare Habakkuk 3:3 ) as the place of revelation. If not the same place as Sinai, the location is not known
Horeb - A mount closely connected with Sinai, and supposed to embrace the range of mountains lying about 28 30' N, between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akaba, whereas Sinai is one of the mountain peaks. See Sinai
Giving of the torah - Giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai
Matan torah - Giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai
si'na, Mount, - the Greek form of the well-known name Sinai
Sinai - The Sinai Peninsular is the dry region that lies south of Palestine between the two northern arms of the Red Sea. )...
In the biblical record the Sinai region’s chief importance is as the location of the mountain in the south known as Horeb, or Mount Sinai. ...
For about one year the people of Israel camped at Mt Sinai, organizing themselves for the new life that lay ahead in Canaan (Exodus 19:1; Numbers 10:11). They spent much of this time in the wilderness regions of the Sinai Peninsular, where the older generation passed away and a new generation grew up. ...
Several hundred years later, when the prophet Elijah felt that God’s covenant people were a total failure, God brought him to Mt Sinai to reassure him. ...
To Israelites, the covenant was inseparably linked with Sinai. It comes into being through Jesus Christ and is identified not with Sinai but with heaven (Galatians 4:24-27; Hebrews 12:18-29; see COVENANT)
Mount Sinai - The "mountain of God" (Exodus 3) situated in the desert of Sinai between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akabah, on which the Law was given to Moses (Exodus 31). The Old Testament speaks of Mount Sinai and Mount Horeb as synonymous; some writers say they are two mountains of the same range. Mount Sinai, however, is most famous as the places where Moses recieived the tablets of the Law and spent 40 days and 40 nights with God (Exodus 19)
Sinai, Mount - The "mountain of God" (Exodus 3) situated in the desert of Sinai between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Akabah, on which the Law was given to Moses (Exodus 31). The Old Testament speaks of Mount Sinai and Mount Horeb as synonymous; some writers say they are two mountains of the same range. Mount Sinai, however, is most famous as the places where Moses recieived the tablets of the Law and spent 40 days and 40 nights with God (Exodus 19)
Reph'Idim - The place lies in the march of the Israelites from Egypt to Sinai. Its site is not certain, but it is perhaps Wady Feiran , a rather broad valley about 25 miles from Jebel Musa (Mount Sinai). Others place it in Wady es Sheikh , an eastern continuation of Feiran, and about 12 miles from Sinai
Shloshet yemei hagbalah - the �three days of separation� in preparation for the Giving of the Torah at Sinai...
Kibroth-Hattaavah - The march from Taberah ( Numbers 11:3 ) is not mentioned in 1618452498_7 , but Kibroth-hattaavah was one day’s journey from the wilderness of Sinai. of Naqb el-Hawa (‘mountain path of the wind’), which leads to the plain below the traditional Sinai
Sinai - The peninsula is usually called in Scripture ‘the desert (or wilderness) of Sinai. Stephen (Acts 7:30) recalls how an angel of the Lord appeared to Moses ‘in the wilderness of mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush. ’ Mount Sinai was a sacred mountain from very early times, being possibly connected with the worship of the Babylonian moon-god Sin
Golden calf - The: the idol made by the Jews when it appeared to them that Moses would not be coming down from Mount Sinai ...
Decalogue - ) The Ten Commandments or precepts given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, and originally written on two tables of stone
a'Lush - (a crowd of men ) one of the stations of the Israelites on their journey to Sinai, the last before Rephidim
Horeb - Desert or mountain of the dried-up ground, a general name for the whole mountain range of which Sinai was one of the summits (Exodus 3:1 ; 17:6 ; 33:6 ; Psalm 106:19 , etc. (See Sinai
Mount Horeb - Horeb was situated so near mount Sinai, that it appears to be but one and the same place, only that Sinai is east and Horeb west
Tophel - Lime, a place in the wilderness of Sinai (Deuteronomy 1:1 ), now identified with Tafyleh or Tufileh, on the west side of the Edomitish mountains
Dizahab - Region of gold, a place in the desert of Sinai, on the western shore of the Elanitic gulf (Deuteronomy 1:1 )
Sin, Wilderness of - The district lying between the Red Sea and Sinai, in some part of which the Israelites encamped
Nether - Lower; as the lower stone of a handmill, Deuteronomy 24:6 ; the foot of Sinai, Exodus 19:17 ; the regions of the dead, Ezekiel 32:18
Zurishaddai - Rock of the Almighty, the father of Shelumiel, who was chief of the tribe of Simeon when Israel was encamped at Sinai (Numbers 1:6 ; 2:12 )
Mount Sinai - ...
The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire wilderness area ( Leviticus 7:38 ). Sometimes Sinai is called “the mount” (Exodus 19:2 ); sometimes “the mountain of God” (Exodus 3:1 ); sometimes “the mount of the Lord” (Numbers 10:33 ). ...
The term Horeb is often used to refer to Sinai in such a way as to make the names synonymous ( Exodus 3:1 ). Since Horeb means “waste” or “wilderness area,” it seems best to think of Horeb as the general term for the area and Sinai as the specific peak where God manifested Himself to Moses. ...
The modern name for the traditional site of Sinai is Jebel Musa (the mount of Moses). Many explorers think Ras es-Safsafeh is the biblical Sinai because it has a plain, er Rahah , on its northwest base, which is two miles long and about two thirds of a mile wide. ...
Another suggested location for Mount Sinai is far north and east of Jebel Musa, near the top of the Gulf of Aqaba. The major argument for this view is that Sinai's phenomena indicate volcanic action—fire, smoke, quaking earth (Exodus 19:16-18 )—and no volcano is found in the Sinaitic peninsula. However, the phenomena that appeared at Sinai were undoubtedly supernatural in origin, for they were accompanied by the sounds of a trumpet and the voice of God (Exodus 19:19 ). ...
Another location for Sinai is sought far north of Jebel Musa, primarily because of historical references such as the battle with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-16 ). The Amalekites lived in Canaan proper (Numbers 14:42-45 ) and would not, it is claimed, have met the Israelites in the Sinaitic peninsula
Sinai - Sinai (Mountain). A holy mountain in the Sinaitic peninsula (whose name is said to be derived from that of Sin, the moon-god). ]'>[4] employ the name ‘Sinai. Sinai is a matter of some difficulty, and various attempts to discover it have been made from time to time. The first is that originally suggested by Lepsius, who would place Sinai at Mount Serbal , some distance northwest of Jebel Mûsa. Currelly (see Petrle, Researches in Sinai , ch. And, indeed, the close connexion evident between Sinai or Horeb and Midian, which appears, for example, in Exodus 3:1-22 , makes this a theory worth consideration. But we are still in the dark as to the limits of Midian: all we can say is that it is not known whether Midian extended west of the Gulf of ‘Akabah, and that therefore it is not known whether Sinai was west of ‘Akabah. It must, however, be freely granted that to place Sinai east or north of ‘Akabah would entirely disjoint all identifications of places along the line of the itinerary of the Exodus. ...
For the allegorical use of ‘Sinai’ in Galatians 4:25 , see art. ...
Sinai (Peninsula). These sculptures remained almost intact till recent years; till a party of English speculators, who came to attempt to re-work the old mines, wantonly destroyed many of them (see Petrie, Researches in Sinai , p. ...
Geologically, Sinai is composed of rocks of the oldest (Archæan) period
e'Nan - Ahira ben-Enan was "prince" of the tribe of Naphtali at the time of the numbering of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai
Exodus - (Greek: ex, out; odos, way) ...
The second book of the Bible, thus named because it relates the departure of the Jews from Egypt and a part of their wanderings through the wilderness, as far as Mount Sinai. The most convenient division is the following: ...
events preceding the going out of Egypt (1-12)
the going out of Egypt and the journey to Mount Sinai (13-18)
the promulgation of the first instalments of the Mosaic Law (19-31)
the apostasy of the Jews (the golden calf), reconciliation, and renewal of the Covenant (32-34)
construction of the Tabernacle (35-40)
Alush - The last station before Rephidim, of Israel's journey to Sinai (Numbers 33:18; Numbers 33:14)
Haze'Roth - (villages ), ( Numbers 11:35 ; 12:16 ; 33:17 ; 1:1) a station of the Israelites in the desert, and perhaps recognizable in the Arabic Ain Hudhera , forty miles northeast of Sinai
Alush - One of the places, the last before Rephidim, at which the Hebrews rested on their way to Sinai (Numbers 33:13,14 )
Halacha lemoshe misinai - "the law of Moses from Sinai"); a halachic tradition whose source is not from a verse or from an interpretation of a verse, but rather was transmitted orally by G-d to Moses...
Mount Sinai - Horeb, and Sinai, are not exactly one and the same, for they are evidently two distinct mountains. And as Sinai is at the east, and Horeb lies west, at sunrise (we are told by travellers) the right is very magnificent. Sinai is all shining, from the sun's beams, and yet forming a shade on Horeb; so that the one is bright, and the other dark. Mount Sinai hath been always considered figurative of the blackness, and darkness, and terror of that dispensation which issued from it. ) As if he had said, do ye not hear the awful threatenings to disobedience, and the total impossibility of being justified by the law? Such was, and is, and ever must be, mount Sinai in the church
Sin, Wilderness of - Sinai. Sinai must be located somewhere in the Negeb, the wilderness of Sin was on the more direct route from Egypt to Kadesh, near to if not identical with the desert of Zin ( Numbers 13:21 ; Numbers 20:1 ; Numbers 27:14 ; Numbers 33:36 ; Numbers 34:3 , Deuteronomy 32:51 , Joshua 15:1-3 )
Paran - Abounding in foliage, or abounding in caverns, (Genesis 21:21 ), a desert tract forming the north-eastern division of the peninsula of Sinai, lying between the 'Arabah on the east and the wilderness of Shur on the west. " This district, through which the children of Israel wandered, lay three days' march from Sinai (Numbers 10:12,33 )
Encampment by the Sea - Sinai: and if Mt. Sinai be really in the so-called Sinaitic peninsula, the camp can be located within a half-mile
Hur - A chief man among the Hebrews in the desert, associated with Aaron in upholding the hands of Moses at Rephidim, and in supplying his place while on the summit of Sinai, Exodus 17:10 ; 24:14
Arabia Petraea - , also the peninsula of Mount Sinai and the land of Midian. " In this "great and terrible wilderness," from Mount Sinai to the promised land, the Hebrews spent their forty years of wanderings
Dathan - Leaders of a revolt against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16) which took place probably at Cades, shortly after the Israelites left Sinai
Abiron - Leaders of a revolt against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16) which took place probably at Cades, shortly after the Israelites left Sinai
Eliz'Aphan -
A Levite, son of Uzziel, chief of the house of the Kohathites at the time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai
Eli'Asaph -
Head of the tribe of Dan at the time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai
Mount, Mountain - " is employed for both single eminences more or less isolated, such as Sinai
Paran - DESERT OF, a "great and terrible wilderness" which the children of Israel entered after leaving Mount Sinai, Numbers 10:12 ; Deuteronomy 1:19 ; and in which thirty-eight of their forty years of wandering were spent. It extended from Mount Sinai on the south, to the southern border of the land of Canaan on the north; having the desert of Shur, with its subdivisions, the deserts of Etham and Sin, on the west, and the eastern branch of the Red Sea, the desert of Zin and Mount Seir, on the east
Wilderness - In general it may be identified with the peninsula of Sinai, the triangular region between the Gulf of Akabah, on the east, and the Gulf of Suez and Egypt on the west. See Sinai. What is known distinctively as the "wilderness of the Wandering" is the great central limestone plateau between the granite region of Sinai on the south, the sandy desert on the north, and the valley of the Arabah on the east
Juda, Tribe of - In the Desert of Sinai it numbered 74,600 fighting men (Numbers 1), and in the plains of Moab, 76,500 (Numbers 26)
Tribe of Juda - In the Desert of Sinai it numbered 74,600 fighting men (Numbers 1), and in the plains of Moab, 76,500 (Numbers 26)
Mount of the Beatitudes - The reference to Jesus' ascending the mountain is perhaps meant to recall the story of Moses at Sinai (Exodus 19:3 ,Exodus 19:3,19:20 )
Hazeroth - A station of the Israelites, about five days' journey from mount Sinai, Numbers 11:35
Wanderings of the Israelites - The "great and terrible wilderness" between mount Sinai and Palestine is still known by the Arabs as Et-Tyh, or the Wanderings
Sinai - ...
The upper region of Sinai forms an irregular circle of thirty or forty miles in diameter, possessing numerous sources of water, a temperate climate, and a soil capable of supporting animal and vegetable life; for which reason it is the refuge of all the Bedaweens when the low country is parched up. In the highest and central part of this region, seven thousand feet above the level of the sea, rises the sacred summit of Horeb or Sinai. Some have thought there were two adjacent summits, called, in the time of Moses, Horeb and Sinai; and indeed the monks give these names to the northern and southern heights of the same ridge, three miles long. But the comparison of all the Scripture passages rather shows that HOREB was the general name for the group, and Sinai the name of the sacred summit. ...
In approaching this elevated region from the northwest, Burckhardt writes, "We now approached the central summits of Mount Sinai, which we had had in view for several days. Abrupt cliffs of granite, from six to eight hundred feet in height, whose surface is blackened by the sun, surround the avenues leading to the elevated region to which the name of Sinai is specifically applied. " ...
The general approach to Sinai from the same quarter is thus described by Mr. Carne: "A few hours more, and we got sight of the mountains round Sinai. When we drew near, and emerged out of a deep pass, the scenery was infinitely striking; and on the right extended a vast range of mountains, as far as the eye could reach, from the vicinity of Sinai down to Tor, on the Gulf of Suez. Where is Mount Sinai? Was the inquiry of everyone. But what had the beauty and softness of nature to do here? Mount Sinai required an approach like this, where all seemed to proclaim the land of miracles, and to have been visited by the terrors of the Lord. Robinson takes to be the true Sinai, rises abruptly on the south side of the plain some fifteen hundred feet. Catharine lies in the ravine east of the true Sinai; while Mount Catharine is the south peak of the western ridge, lying southwest of Jebel Musa and rising more than one thousand feet higher. Here lay the plain where the whole congregation might be assembled; here was the mount which might be approached and touched; and here the mountain brow where alone the lightnings and the thick cloud would be visible, and the thunders and the voice of the trump be heard, when the Lord came down in the sight of all the people upon Mount Sinai. The former commences near the Red Sea, and opens into the latter, which making a circuit to the north of Sinai enters the plain at its foot from the north-northeast. To the spectator on Jebel Musa, it presents to trace of any plain, valley, or level ground to be compared with that on the north; yet some writers maintain that the Hebrews received the law at the southern foot of Sinai. ...
In many of the western Sinaite valleys, and most of all in ElMukatteb, which enters Wady Feiran from the northwest, the more accessible parts of the rocky sides are covered by thousands of inscriptions, usually short, and rudely carved in spots where travellers would naturally stop to rest at noon; frequently accompanied by a cross and mingled with representations of animals. The inscriptions are in an unknown character, but were at first ascribed to the ancient Israelites on their way from Egypt to Sinai; and afterwards to Christian pilgrims of the fourth century. " ...
The giving of the law upon Mount Sinai made it one of the most memorable spots on the globe. In the New Testament, the dispensation proclaimed on Sinai is contrasted with the gospel of the grace of God, Galatians 4:24,25 Hebrews 12:18-29
Elim - A station of the Israelites, on their way to mount Sinai, Exodus 15:27 ; 16:1 ; Numbers 33:9 , generally taken to be the present Wady Ghurundel, a broad valley running southwest of Suez
de'Uel, - (invocation of God ), father of Eliasaph, the "captain" of the tribe of Gad at the time of the numbering of the people at Sinai
Catherine of Alexandria, Saint - She was beheaded and an angel carried her body to Mount Sinai where a church and monastery were dedicated to her. Relics in monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Elim - Sinai be correct, the likeliest place for Elim is the Wady Gharandel , where there is a good deal of vegetation, especially stunted palms, and a number of water-holes in the sand; but some travellers have pushed the site of Elim farther on, and placed it almost a day’s journey nearer to Sinai, in the Wady Tayibeh , where there are again palm trees and a scanty supply of brackish water
Alexandria, Catherine of, Saint - She was beheaded and an angel carried her body to Mount Sinai where a church and monastery were dedicated to her. Relics in monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Dizahab - (Deuteronomy 1:1) ("where gold is abundant"): an early stage of Israel's march after Sinai
Hazeroth - A camping-ground of Israel, the second station northward in the journey from Sinai ( Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ; Numbers 33:17 f
Shofar - Ram�s horn sounded during the month of Elul, on Rosh HaShanah and at the close of Yom Kippur; reminiscent of the ram �tangled in the bush by its horns� during the Binding of Isaac (Genesis 22), the shofar sounded at Sinai (Exodus 19) and the shofar of Moshiach (Isaiah 27:13, etc
Sinai - The Arabs call Mount Sinai by the name of Tor, that is, the mountain, by way of excellence; or Gibel Mousa, "the mountain of Moses. The wilderness of Sinai, where the Israelites continued encamped almost a year, and where Moses erected the tabernacle of the covenant, is considerably elevated above the rest of the country; the ascent to it is very craggy, the greater part cut out of the rock; then one comes to a large space of ground, which is a plain surrounded on all sides by rocks and eminences, whose length is nearly twelve miles. Toward the extremity of this plain, on the north, two high mountains appear; the highest is called Sinai, the other Horeb. Sinai is at least one third part higher than the other, and its ascent more upright and difficult. Mount Horeb stands west of Sinai; so that at sun-rising the shadow of Sinai covers Horeb. Beside the little fountain at the top of Sinai, there is another at the foot of Horeb, which supplies the monastery of St. ...
"Sinai," says Sandys, "has three tops of a marvellous height; that on the west side, where God appeared to Moses in a bush, fruitful in pasturage, far lower than the middlemost, and shadowed when the sun riseth thereon; which is that whereon God gave the law to Moses, and which is now called the Mount of Moses, at the foot of which stands the monastery called St
Commandment - ) One of the ten laws or precepts given by God to the Israelites at Mount Sinai
Brook of Egypt - It is usually identified with the Wadi el-Arish, which flows from the middle of the Sinai Peninsula to the Mediterranean Sea
Hazeroth - Such like enclosures abound in the wilderness of Paran, which the Israelites entered after leaving Sinai (Numbers 11:35 ; 12:16 ; 33:17,18 ). This third encampment of the Israelites has been identified with the modern 'Ain el-Hudhera, some 40 miles north-east of Sinai
Numbers - ...
The Hebrews prepare to depart from Mount Sinai (1-10):
the census (1-4)
some supplementary laws
last events before the departure (7-10)
From Mount Sinai to Cades (10,11-12)
Cades (13-20):
the spying of the Promised Land, revolt, and chastisement (13- 14)
revolt of Core, Dathan, and Abiron (15-17)
the waters of contradiction (20)
From Cades to the Plains of Moab (22-34):
Balaam's oracles (22-24)
idolatry and impurity (25)
new census and new laws concerning the sacrifices (26-30)
punishment of the Madianites and first division of the conquered territory (31-35)
The last chapter deals with the Levitical cities and the cities of refuge
Amalekite - Descendants of Amalek, the grandson of Esau (Genesis 36:12 ), they inhabited the desolate wasteland of the northeast Sinai peninsula and the Negeb. Israel won the initial battle (Exodus 17:8-16 ), but later was driven back into the Sinai wilderness by a coalition of Amalekites and Canaanites (Numbers 14:39-45 )
Paran, or el-Paran - It extended on the south to within three days' journey of Sinai, Numbers 10:12,33 12:16 , if not to Sinai itself, Deuteronomy 33:2 Hebrews 3:3
Rephidim - A stage in the Wanderings, between the wilderness of Sin and the wilderness of Sinai ( Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 17:8 ; Exodus 19:2 ; cf. If the scholars who place Sinai east of the Gulf of ‘Akabah, identifying Elath and Elim, are right, then Rephidim must be sought somewhere in that district
Joannes (504), Abbat of mt. Sinai - Joannes (504), surnamed Climacus, Scholasticus, or Sinaita. At the age of 16 he entered the monastery of Mount Sinai, subsequently became an anchoret, and at 75 abbat of Mount. Sinai
Negeb - Much of southern Palestine between the Dead Sea and the Sinai desert was dry semi-barren country to which the Hebrews gave the name negeb (meaning ‘dry’)
Bush - " ( Exodus 3:2,3,4 ; 33:16) It is quite impossible to say what kind of thorn bush is intended; but it was probably the acacia a small variety of the shittim tree found in the Sinai region
Paran - Paran was a barren region in the Sinai Peninsular
Rephidim - A station of the Hebrews before reaching Sinai
Jethro - When the Hebrews were at mount Sinai, he visited Moses, gave him some wise counsel as to the government of the tribes, and then returned to his own people
Kib'Roth-Hatta-Avah, - It is about three days journey from Sinai, and near the Gulf of Akabah and the Wady el Hudherah (Hazeroth
Aaron - ...
Pre-Sinai . ...
Third, like Moses he was moved by the Spirit of God and was used to effect miracles a number of times on the way to Sinai. ...
At Sinai . God graciously granted both Moses and Aaron new revelation during Israel's encampment at Sinai. Moses and Aaron were allowed to enter into God's holy presence on Sinai (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-10 ). ...
Third, Yahweh delivered specific instructions to Aaron and Moses at Sinai about how they were to lead Israel to become his holy nation and kingdom of priests. Aaron was directly responsible for a grave offense against God when Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the written law of Israel (Exodus 32:1-10 )
Faith: the Summary of Virtue - The Jews in the Talmud have the saying, 'The whole law was given to Moses at Sinai, in six hundred and thirteen precepts
Marah - Katherine (the traditional Sinai), is a suitable identification
Soap - Many plants yielding alkalies exist in Palestine and around: hubeibet (Salsola kali ) with glass-like leaves near the Dead Sea; ajram near Sinai, pounded for use as soap; the gilloo or soap plant of Egypt; and the heaths near Joppa
Abihu - Second son of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 , Numbers 3:2 ; Numbers 26:60 , 1 Chronicles 6:3 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1 ); accompanied Moses to the top of Sinai ( Exodus 24:1 ; Exodus 24:9 ); admitted to the priest’s office ( Exodus 28:1 ); slain along with his brother Nadab for offering strange fire ( Leviticus 10:1-2 , Numbers 3:4 ; Numbers 26:61 , 1 Chronicles 24:2 )
Zin - ...
The close similarity between the events recorded in Exodus 17:1-16 and Numbers 20:1-29 , and other points of resemblance between occurrences before and after Sinai, suggest the question whether Sin and Zin, the Sin of the pre-Sinai and the Zin of the post-Sinai narrative, may be variations developed in the course of tradition
Sina, Sinai - Mount Sinai is especially connected with the giving of the law. The Israelites were located in the wilderness of Sinai, which must have been a large place capable of holding two million people. ...
The term Sinai is frequently employed as representing 'the law,' and is used by Paul as a symbol of 'bondage,' for law and bondage cannot be separated, and stand in strong contrast to the 'liberty' wherewith Christ makes the believer free
Kibroth-Hattaavah - ” The first stopping place of the Israelites after they left Sinai (Numbers 33:16 )
Marah - The site is typical of pools in the Sinai pennisula, having undrinkable water
Samaritan Pentateuch - The canon or “Bible” of the Samaritans, who revere the Torah as God's revelation to Moses on Mount Sinai and do not regard the rest of the Hebrew Bible as canon
Reu'el - ) ...
Father of Eliasaph, the leader of the tribe of Gad at the time of the census at Sinai
Bitter Herbs - " (Exodus 12:8 ) These "bitter herbs" consisted of such plants as chicory, bitter cresses, hawkweeds, sow-thistles and wild lettuces, which grow abundantly in the peninsula of Sinai, in Palestine and in Egypt
Juniper - Abundant in the desert of Sinai
Wanderings in the Wilderness - Only three established trade routes across the northern Sinai were viable options for the movement of such a large contingent of people and livestock. This route is identified with Marah (Exodus 15:23 ), Elim (Exodus 15:27 ), the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16:1 ), Rephidim (Exodus 17:1 ), the Wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 18:5 ; Exodus 19:1 ), Sinai (Exodus 19:2 ), the wilderness of Paran (Numbers 10:12 ), Taberah (Numbers 11:3 ) or Kibroth-hattaavah (“the cemetery of the lusters,” Numbers 11:34 ), Hazeroth (“corrals,” Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ) where the mention of enclosures for the livestock and a series of events in the biblical account suggest an extended stay, and, ultimately, Kadesh (Numbers 20:1 ). A later reference to the distance between Mount Sinai (Horeb) and Kadesh-barnea (Deuteronomy 1:2 ) seems to suggest that the early itinerary took them basically along the major trade route used by the Amalekites between modern Suez at the northern end of the Gulf of Suez and the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba (Elath and Ezion-geber) and then northward into the extensive clustering of oases at Kadesh that would become their tribal center and the location of the tabernacle during the next 38 years. ...
The negative response to an immediate conquest following the spies' report resulted in the additional 38 years in the Sinai wilderness. Many scholars therefore conclude that Numbers 33:1 is a combined compilation of place names that are related to pre-Mosaic infiltration from Egypt to Canaan by way of the King's Highway, the place along the second route around Edomite-Moabite territory followed by the Moses/Joshua-led contingent and all those places visited by the Israelites during those 38 punitive years of desert wanderings when like the nomads of every generation they sought water and pasturage for their flocks within that hostile arid environment of the Sinai. See Exodus ; Kadesh ; Moses ; Sinai
Chamois - The animal intended is probably the wild sheep (Ovis tragelephus), which is still found in Sinai and in the broken ridges of Stony Arabia
Numbers, the Book of - The rest of the book contains an account of the breaking up of the Israelites from Sinai, and their subsequent wanderings in the desert, until their arrival on the borders of Moab
Sinai - ) The peninsula of Sinai is a triangular tract, bounded on the W. There are three divisions:...
(1) the southernmost, the neighbourhood of Sinai;...
(2) the desert of et Tih, the scene of Israel's wanderings;...
(3) the Νegeb , or "south country", the dwelling of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Sinai stands in the center of the peninsula which lies between the two horns of the Red Sea. Ras Sufsafeh, the northern end of (2), with the vast plain er Rahab ("the wilderness of Sinai") for Israel below, is the Mount Sinai of the law. part of the Sinaitic range
Paran - of the wilderness of Sinai. by the great sand belt sweeping across the peninsula in a concave northward line from gulf to gulf, and forming the demarcation between it and Sinai; on the E. Not so wild looking as the Arabah, nor yet relieved by such fertile valleys as lie amidst the granite mountains of Sinai. "Mount Paran" in Deuteronomy 33:2 is the range forming the northern boundary of the desert of Sinai. Seir (Edom and Teman), Sinai, and Paran are comparatively adjacent, and therefore are associated together in God's giving the law (Habakkuk 3:3), as in Deuteronomy 33:2
Abihu - With Aaron, Nadab, and the 70 elders, he accompanied Moses up Sinai to a limited distance (Exodus 24:1)
Commandment - By way of eminence, a precept of the decalogue, or moral law, written on tables of stone, at Mount Sinai one of the ten commandments
Bush - The number of these bushes in this region seems to have given the name to the mountain Sinai
Indicopleustes, Cosmas - On retiring from his travels he entered the monastery of Raithu on the Peninsula of Sinai
Tamarisk - (ta' muh rihssk)A shrublike tree (Tamarix syriaca ) common to the Sinai and southern Palestine with small white or pink flowers
Decalogue - (Greek: deka, ten; logos, word) ...
An extra-biblical term which is a literal translation of the phrase "ten words" (Exodus 34); it designates the Ten Commandments which God imposed on His people in the desert of Sinai
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Bush - The ‘burning bush’ has traditionally been supposed to be a kind of bramble ( Rubus ), of which Palestine has several varieties, but one of the thorny shrubs of Sinai of the acacia family would seem more probable
Sinai - The condition of Jerusalem at that time, with its wickedness, sin and the destruction wrought by its enemies was just a plain evidence of the tragedy that follows the broken laws of Sinai
Exodus - It comprehends the history of about a hundred and forty-five years; and the principal events contained in it are, the bondage of the Israelites in Egypt, and their miraculous deliverance by the hand of Moses; their entrance into the wilderness of Sinai; the promulgation of the law, and the building of the tabernacle
Libnah - The fifth station at which Israel encamped on their journey from Sinai; situated between Rimmon-parez and Rissah, Numbers 33:20-21, but not yet identified
Rephidim - (rehf' ih dihm) Site in the wilderness where the Hebrews stopped on their way to Canaan just prior to reaching Sinai (Exodus 17:1 ; Exodus 19:2 )
Kadesh-Barnea - ” The site where the Hebrews stayed for most of thirty-eight years after leaving Mount Sinai and before entering the Promised Land. Both of these sites are in the northern part of the Sinai Peninsula, and both have a spring. Most scholars today accept Ein el-Qudeirat because of its abundance of water (the largest springs and oasis in northern Sinai)
Sin, Wilderness of - Lying between Elim and Sinai (Exodus 16:1 ; Compare Numbers 33:11,12 )
Massah - ” Stopping place during the wilderness wandering near the base of Mount Horeb (Sinai)
Juniper - ]'>[1] ratam , a species of broom very common in desert places in Palestine and Sinai
Minaeans - became a powerful nation with a dominion stretching north to the peninsula of Sinai
Moses - Sinai
Publication - ) The act of publishing or making known; notification to the people at large, either by words, writing, or printing; proclamation; divulgation; promulgation; as, the publication of the law at Mount Sinai; the publication of the gospel; the publication of statutes or edicts
Zin - The wilderness of Zin should be distinguished from the wilderness of Sin which embraces the western Sinai plateau
Numbers Book of - 1-10:10, an account is given of the preparations for the departure from Sinai. 14, contains an account of the journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan
Num'Bers, - --The book may be said to contain generally the history of the Israelites from the time of their leaving Sinai, in the second year after the exodus till their arrival at the borders of the Promised land in the fortieth year of their journeyings It consists of the following principal divisions: 1, The Preparations for the departure from Sinai. ( Numbers 1:1 ; Numbers 10:10 )
The journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan
Snail - This was probably the sand-lizard, of which there are many species in the wilderness of Judea and the Sinai peninsula
Manasses - At the time of the census taken in the Desert of Sinai, the tribe numbered 32,200 men "that were able to go forth to war" (Numbers 1), the smallest number among all the tribes; but at the second census, taken in the Plains of Moab, 52,700 men "twenty years old and upward" are recorded (Numbers 26)
Sin, Wilderness of, - (Numbers 33:11,23 ) Their next halting-place, (Exodus 16:1 ; 17:1 ) was Rephidim, probably the Wady Feiran [1]; on which supposition it would follow that Sin must lie between that way and the coast of the Gulf of Suez, and of course west of Sinai
Shittah-Tree - " Stanley's Sinai, etc
Paran - Paran is now called et Tih, it lies between Kadesh and Sinai
Gamaliel - Son of Pedahzur; prince or captain of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai, Numbers 1:10; Numbers 2:20; Numbers 7:54; Numbers 7:59, and at starting on the inarch through the wilderness
si'na-i, - These mountains may be divided into two great masses-that of Jebel Serbal (8759 feet high), in the northwest above Wady Feiran , and the central group, roughly denoted by the general name of Sinai. --These mountains are called Horeb, and sometimes Sinai. Some think that Horeb is the name of the whole range, and Sinai the name of a particular mountain; others, that Sinai is the range and Horeb the particular mountain; while Stanley suggests that the distinction is one of usage, and that both names are applied to the same place
Rephidim - But Holland (Canon Cook's essay on Exodus 16; 17; 19; Speaker's Commentary) places Rephidim after Israel traversed the wady es Sheikh at the pass el Watiyeh shut in by perpendicular rocks on either side; a choice position for Amalek as it commands the entrance to the wadies round the central group of Sinai. into the "wilderness of Sinai", Ras Sufsafeh before the open er Rahah or "desert of Sinai" being the true Mount Sinai, not Serbal
Nilus, an Ascetic of Sinai - Nilus (3), a famous ascetic of Sinai, probably born in Galatia, as he speaks of St. 390 to retire to Sinai with his son Theodulus. The Saracens invaded the desert of Sinai and captured some of the solitaries, including Nilus and Theodulus. They returned to Sinai, and distinguished themselves by a yet severer piety
Thunder - Thunder accompanied the giving of the law at Sinai (Exodus 19:16 )
Hebron (1) - The Hebronites are mentioned at the census taken in the wilderness of Sinai ( Numbers 3:27 ), and appear again at the later census in the plains of Moab (26:53); cf
Mountain - Both single heights, as Sinai, Zion, etc
Lead - The rocks in the neighborhood of Sinai yielded it in large quantities, and it was found in Egypt
Clouds - They betokened the presence of Jehovah, as on mount Sinai, ...
Exodus 19:9 24:12-18 ; in the temple, Exodus 40:34 1 Kings 8:10 ; in the cloudy pillar, and on the mount of Transfiguration
Meribah - A station of the Israelites between the Red Sea and Mount Sinai, where they murmured against the Lord, and a fountain gushed from the rock for their use, Exodus 17:1-7
Gama'Liel -
Son of Pedahzur; prince or captain of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai, (Numbers 1:10 ; 20:20 ; 7:54,59 ) and at starting on the march through the wilderness
Pen'Tecost, - The Pentecost is the only one of the three great feasts which is not mentioned as the memorial of events in the history of the Jews; but such a significance has been found in the fact that the law was given from Sinai on the fiftieth day after the deliverance from Egypt. In the exodus the people were offered to God as living first fruits; at Sinai their consecration to him as a nation was completed. Just as the appearance of God on Sinai was the birthday of the Jewish nation, so was the Pentecost the birthday of the Christian Church
Geology of Palestine - The land of Palestine (using the name in its widest sense to include the trans-Jordanic plateau and the Sinai Peninsula) is divided by its configuration and by natural boundary lines into five strongly contrasted divisions. These are (1) the Coast Plain, (2) the Western Table-land, (3) the Ghôr, (4) the Eastern Table-land, (5) the Sinai Peninsula. The Western Table-land extends from Lebanon to the northern border of Sinai: the headland of Carmel is an intrusion from this division on to the preceding. The Sinai Peninsula is composed of Archæan rocks, which form bare mountains of very striking outline. The Sinai Peninsula is characterized by its barrenness, vegetation being found only in the valleys. ): the oldest rocks in this region, found only among the mountains of Sinai and Edom
Paran - Israel’s first march from Sinai brought them to this wilderness ( Numbers 10:12 ). of Judah to the mountains of Sinai, having the Arabah on the E
Mount Mountain - ...
In apostolic history four conspicuous mountains are especially referred to: the Mount of Olives, Sinai, Zion, and ‘the Mount’ (of Transfiguration). Mount Sinai (Σινᾶ, Acts 7:30; Acts 7:33, Galatians 4:24-25, Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 12:18; Hebrews 12:20). Mount Sinai is usually identified with Jebel Musa (circa, about 7,000 ft. of the former, both being located in the southern portion of the Sinai Peninsula. In the other passage from Hebrews (Hebrews 12:18-24) the terrors of the Old Covenant, given at Sinai, are contrasted with the glories of the New. The Apostle paints the theophany of Sinai (Exodus 19) vividly, in order to appeal his readers with the awful sanctity of the mountain where God proclaimed His Law. -Over against Sinai, which quaked at the giving of the Law, the Apostle places Zion, using it, however, in a spiritual sense: ‘But ye are come unto mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem,’ etc. The contrast between the two Dispensations is thus emphasized: Sinai, sensible, provisional, and accompanied by the physical phenomena of the world; Zion, ideal, super-sensible, abiding, final, and pertaining to the world above
Mount Mountain - ...
In apostolic history four conspicuous mountains are especially referred to: the Mount of Olives, Sinai, Zion, and ‘the Mount’ (of Transfiguration). Mount Sinai (Σινᾶ, Acts 7:30; Acts 7:33, Galatians 4:24-25, Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 12:18; Hebrews 12:20). Mount Sinai is usually identified with Jebel Musa (circa, about 7,000 ft. of the former, both being located in the southern portion of the Sinai Peninsula. In the other passage from Hebrews (Hebrews 12:18-24) the terrors of the Old Covenant, given at Sinai, are contrasted with the glories of the New. The Apostle paints the theophany of Sinai (Exodus 19) vividly, in order to appeal his readers with the awful sanctity of the mountain where God proclaimed His Law. -Over against Sinai, which quaked at the giving of the Law, the Apostle places Zion, using it, however, in a spiritual sense: ‘But ye are come unto mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem,’ etc. The contrast between the two Dispensations is thus emphasized: Sinai, sensible, provisional, and accompanied by the physical phenomena of the world; Zion, ideal, super-sensible, abiding, final, and pertaining to the world above
Sin, Wilderness of - direction between the limestone district of et Tih and the granite of the central formation, Sinai
Arabia - Western Arabia, the same as the ancient Arabia Petraea, embraces Sinai and the desert of Petra, extending from Egypt and the Red Sea to about Petra
Hagarenes - But some writers think Hagarene imports south, conformably to the Arabic; hence Hagar, that is, the southern woman; and Mount Sinai is called Hagar, that is, the southern mountain, Galatians 4:25
Sinai - Sinai (sî'nâi, or sî'naî, or sî'na-î), broken or deft rocks? The name of a district, a range of mountains and a mountain peak
Shittah And Shittim - " It is thought he means the black acacia, the Acacia Seyal, which is found in the deserts of Arabia, and the wood of which is very common about Mount Sinai and the mountains which border on the Red Sea, and is so hard and solid as to be almost incorruptible
Hobab - When the Hebrews were about leaving mount Sinai, Moses requested him to cast in his lot with the people of God, both for his own sake and because his knowledge of the desert its inhabitants might often be of service to the Jews
Elish'Ama -
The "prince" or "captain" of the tribe of Ephraim in the wilderness of Sinai
Wilderness of the Wandering, - (The region in which the Israelites spent nearly 38 years of their existence after they had left Egypt, and spent a year before Mount Sinai. The wilderness of the wandering was the great central limestone plateau of the Sinaitic peninsula. On the south and south west were the granite mountains of Sinai and on the north the Mediterranean Sea and the mountainous region south of Judea
Horeb - Horeb, and mount Sinai, were so close to each other, that they both, at a distance, appeared but as one mountain. ...
See Sinai...
Testimony - ” The 83 occurrences of this word are scattered throughout all types of biblical literature and all periods (although not before the giving of the law at Mount Sinai). In particular, it represents those commandments as written on the tablets and existing as a reminder and “testimony” of Israel’s relationship and responsibility to God: “And he gave unto Moses, when he had made an end of communing with him upon Mount Sinai, two tables of testimony, tables of stone, written with the finger of God” ( Sinai - From Rephidim (Exodus 17:8-13 ) the Israelites journeyed forward through the Wady Solaf and Wady esh-Sheikh into the plain of er-Rahah, "the desert of Sinai," about 2 miles long and half a mile broad, and encamped there "before the mountain. " The part of the mountain range, a protruding lower bluff, known as the Ras Sasafeh (Sufsafeh), rises almost perpendicularly from this plain, and is in all probability the Sinai of history. The journey between Sinai and the southern boundary of the Promised Land (about 150 miles) at Kadesh was accomplished in about a year
Glory - The word occurs frequently in Holy Writ to denote a visible, physical phenomenon: "And the glory of the Lord dwelt upon Sinai" (Exodus 24)
Kenite - A tribe of Midian, between Palestine and Sinai, and east of the Gulf of Akabah
Catharine, Martyr of Alexandria - the monks on Mount Sinai disinterred the body, as they were eager to believe, of one of those Christian martyrs whose memory they cherished. It was easy to identify the corpse as that of the anonymous sufferer, to invent a name for it, and to bridge over the distance between Alexandria and Mount Sinai. Catharine's martyrdom, with horrible details of her tortures, an exact report of her dispute in public with the philosophers of the city and of the learned oration by which she converted them and the empress Faustina and many of the court, and how her corpse was transported to Mount Sinai by angels (Martin, Vies des Saints, tom. 25; the discovery ("invention") of her body on Mount Sinai on May 13 in the French Martyrology (Baillet, u. A semi-monastic order, the Knights of Mount Sinai or of Jerusalem, instituted in Europe a
Agag - ...
Old Testament Agag, whose name means “fiery one,” was king of the Amalekites, a tribal people living in the Negev and in the Sinai peninsula
am'Alekites, - a nomadic tribe of uncertain origin, which occupied the peninsula of Sinai and the wilderness intervening between the southern hill-ranges of Palestine and the border of Egypt
Hagar - ...
If the words ‘Now this Hagar is mount Sinai in Arabia’ are retained, they allude to the historical connexion of the Hagarenes (Psalms 83:6) or Hagarites (1 Chronicles 5:10), the Ἀγραῖοι of Eratosthenes (ap. Sinai, and that St. Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, new ed. He had lived long under the shadow of Sinai in Arabia, the land of bondmen, before he became a free citizen of the ideal commonwealth-Hierusalem quœ sursum est-the mother of all Christians
Marah - ) A fountain in the desert of Shur, between the Red Sea and Sinai; Israel reached Marah three days after crossing to the Arabian side (Exodus 15:23; Numbers 33:8)
Nadab - The eldest son of Aaron ( Exodus 6:23 , Numbers 3:2 ; Numbers 26:60 , 1 Chronicles 6:3 ; 1 Chronicles 24:1 ); accompanied Moses to Sinai ( Exodus 24:1 ; Exodus 24:9 f
Hur - He was also left with Aaron in charge of the camp when Moses ascended mount Sinai
Tradition - ) An unwritten code of law represented to have been given by God to Moses on Sinai
Iron - The Egyptians wrought it at Sinai before the Exodus
Eliab - Son of Helon, and leader of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census being taken at Sinai
Sinaiticus Codex - Catherine, on Mount Sinai, in 1859, it was discovered by Dr. , which he was convinced were still to be found in the Sinai convent. It is shown by Tischendorf that this codex was written in the fourth century, and is thus of about the same age as the Vatican codex; but while the latter wants the greater part of Matthew and sundry leaves here and there besides, the Sinaiticus is the only copy of the New Testament in uncial characters which is complete. Both the Vatican and the Sinai codices were probably written in Egypt
Exodus, Book of - ...
Their journeyings from Egypt to Sinai ((12:37-19:2)
Scorpion - Common in the Sinai wilderness, typifying Satan and his malicious agents against the Lord's people (Deuteronomy 8:15; Ezekiel 2:6; Luke 10:19)
Census -
In the fourth month after the Exodus, when the people were encamped at Sinai
Curse - CURSE and CURSES...
We cannot be too attentive to those terms, as they refer to the original curse pronounced on the fall of our first parents, and those curses again proclaimed at the giving of the law on mount Sinai, as the penalty of disobedience
is'Sachar - (Genesis 46:13 ; Numbers 26:23,25 ; 1 Chronicles 7:1 ) The number of the fighting men of Issachar, when taken in the census at Sinai, was 54,400
Eli'ab -
Son of Helon and leader of the tribe of Zebulun at the time of the census in the wilderness of Sinai
Jethro - While the Israelites were encamped at Sinai, and soon after their victory over Amalek, Jethro came to meet Moses, bringing with him Zipporah and her two sons
Moses - Only a few can be enumerated here: The Passage of the Red Sea and the Canticle of Moses (Exodus 14-15); the Manna (16); the promulgation of the Law on Mount Sinai (19-31); the many revolts of the people, who are saved each time by the intervention of their leader (Exodus 16; Numbers 13-14,21); the march from Mount Sinai to Cades, and the stay at Cades for 38 years during which the present generation is condemned never to enter the Promised Land (Numbers 10-20); Moses himself is excluded from it because of his lack of confidence at the "Waters of Contradiction" (ib
Numbers, Book of - The numbering of the people at Sinai, and preparations for their resuming their march ((1-10:10). An account of the journey from Sinai to Moab, the sending out of the spies and the report they brought back, and the murmurings (eight times) of the people at the hardships by the way ((10:11-21:20)
Wilderness - ...
Geographically, the wilderness lay south, east, and southwest of the inhabited land of Israel in the Negeb, Transjordan, and the Sinai. He had led them in the wilderness, and revealed Himself and His covenant laws to them at Sinai/Horeb, the mountain of revelation. There were several specific wilderness areas mentioned, such as those of Sin, Shur, Sinai, Paran, and Zin on the way of wilderness wanderings. See Desert ; Paran ; Shur, Wilderness of ; Sin, Wilderness of ; Sinai; Wanderings
Exodus, the - Thence to Ras Selima or Zenimeh, a headland on the Red Sea (Numbers 33:10): Next the wilderness of Sin (Debbet er Ramleh) between Elim and Sinai. Next the wilderness of Sinai. Fifteen days elapsed between the encampment in the wilderness of Sin and their arrival at Sinai mount (Exodus 16:1; compare Exodus 19:1). ...
The wady er Rahah is the "wilderness of Sinai," where the assembled people heard the law proclaimed from Ras Sufsafeh, a bold granite cliff 2,000 ft. point of the Sinai range. The surveyors of the wilderness of Sinai, Captain Wilson and Captain Palmer, accompanied by F. They make the battle with Amalek at the ancient city of Feiran, but this would make" the mount of God" to be mount Serbal, which is rather one of the Sinai range; and the palmgroves of Feiran could hardly be called a "wilderness. "...
Rephidim is probably at the pass el Watiyeh, shut in by perpendicular rocks, to Amalek a capital point for attack on Israel, commanding the entrance to the wadies surrounding the central Sinai. But the Ordnance Survey of Sinai by Captain Palmer and Captain Wilson identifies Rephidim with the part of wady Feiran N. point of the Sinai range, excludes it from being the summit from which the law was proclaimed. end of the Sinai range Ras Sufsafeh has the wady ed Deir to the N. This peculiar feature afforded Israel the needful security during their long stay at Sinai
Consecrate - The Meanings of qds in the Sinai Legislation . In the Sinai material (Exodus 19:1 -nu; 10:10 ) qds [1], which is translated "consecrate/sanctify/make holy, " means separation with relationship to God. ...
Separation is particularly clear in the bounds set around Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:23 ; see also the wall around Ezekiel's temple, Ezekiel 42:20 ) and in the veil setting off the Holy of Holies (Exodus 26:33 ). ...
Holy Persons, Objects, and Times in the Sinai Material . One step removed is to make washing a metaphor for riddance of sina step approached most nearly in the Sinai material in the ordeal for a wife suspected of adultery (Numbers 5:17,27-28 ). Whereas in the Sinai legislation uncleanness is more contagious than holiness, this appears to be reversed in 1 Corinthians 7:14 the unbelieving husband being sanctified by his wife
Orthodox Church - ...
Church of Cyprus
Church of Greece (Modern)
Church of Mount Sinai
Greek Church in Australia
Greek Church in Western Europe (headquarters in London)
Greek Orthodox Church in the United States
Independent Greek Orthodox Church in America
Patriarchate of Alexandria (Egypt)
Patriarchate of Antioch (Syria)
Patriarchate of Constantinople
Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Patriarchate of Moscow (Russia; largest of all Eastern Churches)
Patriarchate of Poland
Patriarchate of Rumania
Patriarchate of Serbia
Russian Church (Czarist: headquarters in Serbia)
The Living Church (Russia; new)
The majority of them have become national churches, governed by a Holy Directing Synod and absolutely independent upon the state
Elim - The water is in most seasons good, and even the best on the journey from Cairo to Sinai
Gamaliel -
A chief of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:20 ; 7:54,59 )
Hinnom, Valley of - ) "The son of Hinnom" was some ancient hero who encamped there (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, 172)
Calves, Golden - As Moses was on Mount Sinai, Aaron formed a golden calf to use in a “feast to Yahweh” (Exodus 32:4-5 )
Midian - One clan, the Kenites, dwelt near Mount Sinai, and to it Moses fled from Pharaoh (Exodus 2:15)
Jethro - An Arab sheik and priest of the Sinaitic Peninsula, the father-in-law of Moses; referred to by this name in Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 4:18 ; Exodus 18:1-2 ff. He welcomed Moses and received him into his family ( Exodus 2:21 ), and many years later visited him at Sinai ( Exodus 18:1 ff
Ten Commandments - They were proclaimed from Sinai, amid mighty thunderings and lightnings, Exodus 20:1-22, and were graven on tablets of stone by the finger of God
Scorpion - Scorpions are abundant in Palestine, and are especially common about Mount Sinai
Naph'Tali - His birth and the bestowal of his name are recorded in ( Genesis 30:8 ) When the census was taken at Mount Sinai the tribe of Naphtali numbered no less than 53,400 fighting men, (Numbers 1:43 ; 2:50 ) but when the borders of the promised land were reached, its numbers were reduced to, 45,400
Issachar - This tribe contained 54,400 fighting men when the census was taken at Sinai
Desert - Not meaning a barren, burning, sandy waste, in the case of Sinai and Palestine. Sand is the exception, not the rule, in the peninsula of Sinai
Law of Christ - In Galatians, Paul argues vigorously that the law given at Sinai makes no claim on those who believe in Christ, whether Gentile or Jew (2:15-21; 3:10-14,23-26; 4:4-5; 4:21-5:6). ...
It seems fairly clear from these two texts that Paul uses the phrase to mean something other than the law given to Israel at Sinai and considered by most Jews to be their special possession. ...
Jesus' teaching, although standing in continuity with the law given at Sinai, nevertheless sovereignly fashions a new law. Like Isaiah, he believed that this covenant included the Gentiles (1618452498_5 ), and like Jeremiah he believed that it offered Israel a remedy for the curse that the old Sinaitic covenant pronounced on Israel's disobedience (Galatians 3:10-13 )
Hagar - ]'>[4] ; in which case the meaning is that Sinai is a mountain in Arabia, the land of bondmen and the country of Hagar’s descendants. ‘This Hagar of the allegory is or represents Sinai, because Sinai is in Arabia, where Hagar and her descendants dwelt
Exodus - ) The narration of various miracles wrought in behalf of the people during their journeyings towards Sinai, Exodus 15:1-17:16 . ) The promulgation of the law on mount Sinai. From their breaking up at Rameses, to their arrival on the confines of the promised land, there was an interval of forty years, during which one whole generation passed away, and the whole Mosaic law was given, and sanctioned by the thunders and lightnings of Sinai. Their course was southeast as far as Etham; but then, instead of keeping on directly to Sinai, they turned to the south, Exodus 14:2 , on the west side of the Red Sea, which they reached three days after starting, probably near Suez. ...
Having offered thanksgiving to God for their wonderful deliverance, the Israelites advanced along the eastern shore of the Red Sea and through the valleys and desert to Mount Sinai. They arrived at Mount Sinai in the third month, or June, probably about the middle of it, having been two months on their journey. ...
Breaking up at this time from Sinai, they marched northwards through the desert of Paran, or perhaps along the eastern arm of the Red Sea and north through El-Arabah, to Kadesh-barnea, near the southeast border of Canaan. Rephidim near Mount Sinai, and Taberah, Kibroth-hattaaveh, and Hazerorh, on their journey north, were the scenes of incidents, which may be found, described under their several heads
Nadab - With Aaron and Abihu and 70 elders he had the privilege of nearer access to Jehovah at Sinai than the mass of the people, but not so near as Moses (Exodus 24:1)
Zebulun, Tribe of - Numbered at Sinai (Numbers 1:31 ) and before entering Canaan (26:27)
Trees - The tabernacle, along with its furniture, was constructed of acacia wood, a timber that was readily available in the Sinai region
Scorpion - The wilderness of Sinai is especially alluded to as being inhabited by scorpions at the time of the exodus, and to this day these animals are common in the same district, as well as in some parts of Palestine
Brass - From very early times copper was largely worked by the Egyptians in the Sinaitic peninsula, where traces of the mining and smelting are still to be seen. A full account of these operations and their remains is given in Flinders Petrie’s Researches in Sinai
Shittah - Many acacia trees grow on Sinai; they grow to the size of a mulberry tree
Veil - ...
2: κάλυμμα (Strong's #2571 — Noun Neuter — kalumma — kal'-oo-mah ) "a covering," is used (a) of the "veil" which Moses put over his face when descending Mount Sinai, thus preventing Israel from beholding the glory, 2 Corinthians 3:13 ; (b) metaphorically of the spiritually darkened vision suffered retributively by Israel, until the conversion on the nation to their Messiah takes place, 2 Corinthians 3:14-16
na'Dab - ) He, his father and brother, and seventy old men of Israel were led out from the midst of the assembled people, (Exodus 24:1 ) and were commended to stay and worship God "afar off," below the lofty summit of Sinai, where Moses alone was to come near to the Lord
Mount, Mountain - ‘Mountain,’ as well as its cognate ‘mount,’ is used both of isolated elevations and of extensive districts of lofty ground such as Sinai, Horeb, Carmel on the one hand, Mount Seir or the Mountain of Gilead on the other. Sinai, Horeb, Carmel occur to the memory at once as mountains consecrated by a theophany
Red Sea - Sinai in the peninsula between the two gulfs, either at Mt. ) as far as Tor , and then through the mountain wadys to Sinai
Aaron - Cooperating with his brother in the exodus from Egypt, Exodus 4:1-16:36 , he held up his hands in the battle with Amalek, Exodus 17:1-16 ; and ascended Mount Sinai with him to see the glory of God, Exodus 24:1,2,9-11 . Yet he fell sometimes into grievous sins: he made the golden calf at Sinai, Exodus 32:1-22 ; he joined Miriam in sedition against Moses, Numbers 12:1-16 ; and with Moses disobeyed God at Kadesh, Numbers 20:8-12
Mountain - ...
After the Exodus, God commanded Moses to gather the people at Mount Sinai (probably identical to Horeb). ...
Some of the more famous biblical mountains with their feet elevations are: Ebal (3,084), Gehyrezim (2,890), Gilboa (1,630), Hermon (9,230), Nebo (2,630), Tabor (1,930), Sinai (7,500)
Aaron - On the way to Mount Sinai, during the battle with Amalek, Aaron with Hur stayed up the weary hands of Moses when they were lifted up for the victory of Israel. Left, on Moses' departure into Sinai, to guide the people, Aaron is tried for a moment on his own responsibility, and he fails from a weak inability to withstand the demand of the people for visible "gods to go before them," by making an image of Jehovah, in the well-known form of Egyptian idolatry (Apis or Mnevis)
Glory - The glory of God in the writings of Moses, denotes, generally, the divine presence; as when he appeared on Mount Sinai; or, the bright cloud which declared his presence, and descended on the tabernacle of the congregation, Exodus 24:9-10 ; Exodus 24:16-17 . Moses, with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and seventy elders of Israel, went up to Mount Sinai, and "saw the glory of the Lord
Exodus - ...
Between the Red Sea and Sinai the names of some halting places are given (Exodus 16:1-3 , Exodus 17:1 a, Exodus 19:2 a). But the mention of the Tabernacle in Exodus 16:34 proves the story to belong to a later date than the stay at Sinai, since the Tabernacle was not in existence before Sinai. ...
On the arrival at Sinai, Jahweh’s glory appears in a fiery cloud on the mountain. The condition of the account of the journey between the Red Sea and Sinai, and the fact that events of a later date have certainly come into P [4] had very little on this stage, the account of which was amplified with material from the wilderness journey after Sinai. At Sinai [here the accounts are exceptionally difficult to disentangle, a
Wanderings of the Israelites - There are few parts of the Sinai Peninsula that do not show signs of vegetation. The numerous valleys of the Sinaitic group of mountains are full of shrubs and grass. ...
The second part of their journey was from the Red Sea to Mount Sinai, on the east side of the Gulf of Suez. The wilderness of Sin, Mount Sinai, and Horeb are in the main identified. ...
Desert of Sinai, Exodus 19:1 , in the | Desert of Sinai, Numbers 33:15 . |...
In the wilderness of Sinai the Israelites remained until the second month of the second year, during which period the law was given. ...
The third part of their journey was from Sinai to Kadesh-barnea, some eighty miles farther north
Juniper - "The Bedawin of Sinai still burn this very plant into a charcoal which throws out the most intense heat
Shittah Tree, Shittim - seyal is very common in some parts of the peninsula of Sinai
Hur - Again with Aaron had charge of the People in Moses' absence on mount Sinai, as his representative (Exodus 24:14)
Seeing - It is said in Exodus 20:18 , that the Israelites saw voices, thunder, lightning, the sounding of the trumpet, and the whole mountain of Sinai covered with clouds, or smoke
Kadesh or Kadesh-Barnea - Kadesh was twice visited by the Israelites in their wanderings; once soon after they left mount Sinai, and again thirty-eight years after
Hup'Pim - (Exodus 24:14 ) as being, with Aaron, left in charge of the people by Moses during his ascent of Sinai
Ken'Ite, the, - and Ken'ites ( smiths ), The, inhabited the rocky and desert region between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai, east of the Gulf of Akabah
Impute - " This principle is there applied to the fact that between Adam's trangression and the giving of the Law at Sinai, sin, though it was in the world, did not partake of the character of transgression; for there was no law
Mount, Mountain - 3); John 4:20 ; (b) of "the Mount of Transfiguration," Matthew 17:1,9 ; Mark 9:2,9 ; Luke 9:28,37 (AV, "hill"); 2 Peter 1:18 ; (c) of "Zion," Hebrews 12:22 ; Revelation 14:1 ; (d) of "Sinai," Acts 7:30,38 ; Galatians 4:24,25 ; Hebrews 8:5 ; 12:20 ; (e) of "the Mount of Olives," Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; Luke 19:29,37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; Acts 1:12 ; (f) of "the hill districts as distinct from the lowlands," especially of the hills above the Sea of Galilee, e
Law - It was promulgated at Sinai
Eliab - The representative, or ‘prince,’ of the tribe of Zebulun, who assisted Moses and Aaron in numbering the children of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai ( Numbers 1:1 ff
Feast - Sinai
Elath - The fortress of Akaba, near by, now often visited by travelers from Mount Sinai to Palestine, is only important for the protection of pilgrims to Mecca
pa'Ran, el-pa'Ran - (peace of caverns ), a desert or wilderness, bounded on the north by Palestine, on the east by the valley of Arabah, on the south by the desert of Sinai, and on the west by the wilderness of Etham, which separated it from the Gulf of Suez and Egypt. ) "Mount" Paran occurs only in two poetic passages, (33:2); Habb 3:3 It probably denotes the northwestern member of the Sinaitic mountain group which lies adjacent to the Wady Teiran
ex'Odus - (Exodus 19:40 ; 38:1 ) ...
The first part contains an account of the following particulars: the great increase of Jacob's posterity in the land of Egypt, and their oppression under a new dynasty, which occupied the throne after the death of Joseph; the birth, education, flight and return of Moses; the ineffectual attempts to prevail upon Pharaoh to let the Israelites go; the successive signs and wonders, ending in the death of the first-born, by means of which the deliverance of Israel from the land of bondage is at length accomplished, and the institution of the Passover; finally the departure out of Egypt and the arrival of the Israelites at Mount Sinai
Honey - (Ezekiel 27:17 ) A third kind has been described by some writers as a "vegetable" honey, by which is meant the exudations of certain trees and shrubs, such as the Tamarix mannifera , found in the peninsula of Sinai, or the stunted oaks of Luristan and Mesopotamia
Amalekites - They were a race of wild desert nomads who were scattered in an area extending from the far south of Canaan across the Sinai peninsular
Arabia - The Sinaitic peninsula is a small triangular region in the northwestern part, or corner, of Arabia. See Sinai. See Sinai
Clouds - In the tent of revelation during the wilderness period (Exodus 40:34-38 ), in the Jerusalem Temple (1 Kings 8:10-11 ), on Mount Sinai (Exodus 34:5 ), and in His direction and protection by means of the clouds and the pillar of fire, Israel experienced that God came to them (Exodus 33:7-11 ) but still remained wholly other (Leviticus 16:2 ,Leviticus 16:2,16:13 ) even when he came as the Son of Man (Daniel 7:13 ). As God on Sinai was glorified and concealed in the clouds, so was Jesus on the mountain of transfiguration and in His ascension to heaven (Mark 9:7 ; Acts 1:9 ). The clouds into which Jesus entered with Moses and Elijah as Moses had once entered on Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:18 ), are “light” but at the same time concealing
Calf, Golden - Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32)
Midian - The territory of Midian extended, according to some scholars, from the Elanitic Gulf to Moab and Mount Sinai; or, according to others, from the Sinaitic peninsula to the desert and the banks of the Euphrates
Golden Calf - Image of God made by Aaron at the foot of Mount Sinai, pursuant to the request of the Hebrews wearied by the protracted stay of Moses on the mountain (Exodus 32)
Depart - Indeed, the word is used almost 90 times in the Book of Numbers alone, since this book records the “journeying” of the people of Israel from Sinai to Canaan
Mid'Ian - The "land of Midian," the place to which Moses fled after having killed the Egyptian, ( Exodus 2:15,21 ) or the portion of it specially referred to, was probably the peninsula of Sinai
Jethro - The occurrence induced him to send her back and his sons, and not take them to Egypt; Jethro brought them to him after Israel's arrival at Sinai
Trump, Trumpet - A — 1: σάλπιγξ (Strong's #4536 — Noun Feminine — salpinx — sal'-pinx ) is used (1) of the natural instrument, 1 Corinthians 14:8 ; (2) of the supernatural accompaniment of Divine interpositions, (a) at Sinai, Hebrews 12:19 ; (b) of the acts of angels at the Second Advent of Christ, Matthew 24:31 ; (c) of their acts in the period of Divine judgments preceding this, Revelation 8:2,6,13 ; 9:14 ; (d) of a summons to John to the presence of God, Revelation 1:10 ; 4:1 ; (e) of the act of the Lord in raising from the dead the saints who have fallen asleep and changing the bodies of those who are living, at the Rapture of all to meet Him in the air, 1 Corinthians 15:52 , where "the last trump" is a military allusion, familiar to Greek readers, and has no connection with the series in Revelation 8:6 to 11:15; there is a possible allusion to Numbers 10:2-6 , with reference to the same event, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 , "the (lit
Silvanus, Solitary of Sinai - Silvanus (12) , solitary of Sinai, a native of Palestine
Libnah - A station of Israel between Sinai and Kadesh, the fifth after Sinai
Firstborn - 22) contrasted both to Mount Sinai where the Law was given (vv. The hosts of angels are in festal array, reminiscent of their task of worshiping the Son brought into the world for human redemption (1:6), rather than as the mediators of the Law during the awesome display at Mount Sinai
Fire - Similar to this is Yahweh's descent upon Mount Sinai "in fire" (Exodus 19:18 ; cf. For example, to the Israelites at Sinai "the glory of the Lord looked like a consuming fire" (Exodus 24:17 ; cf. One of the earliest and clearest of these ways is his appearance in a pillar of fire that led the people of Israel out of Egypt and through the Sinai deserts. At Taberah in the Sinai desert Yahweh's "anger was aroused" and "fire from the Lord burned among" the people (Numbers 11:1 )
Ara'Bia - --Arabia may be divided into Arabia Proper , containing the whole peninsula as far as the limits of the northern deserts; Northern Arabia (Arabia Deserta), constituting the great desert of Arabia; and Western Arabia , the desert of Petra and the peninsula of Sinai, or the country that has been called Arabia Petraea , I. Western Arabia includes the peninsula of Sinai [1] and the desert of Petra; corresponding generally with the limits of Arabia Petraea
Smoking - There must be the fire of GOD's cleansing judgment at Sinai when He was giving the law to a disobedient people
Pentecost - The feast of pentecost was instituted among the Israelites, first to oblige them to repair to the temple of the Lord, there to acknowledge his absolute dominion over the whole country, by offering him the first fruits of the harvest; and, secondly, to commemorate and give thanks to God for the law which he had given them from Sinai, on the fiftieth day after their coming out of Egypt
Calf - ...
THE GOLDEN CALF worshipped by the Jews at mount Sinai, while Moses was absent in the mount, was cast by Aaron from the earrings of the people
Hobab - Moreover, Hobab is not Jethro (Exodus 18:27), for Jethro left the Israelites for his own land Midian before they reached Sinai, whereas Hobab accompanied them and settled in Canaan (Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). We do not hear of Jethro after his departure from Israel before Sinai
Amalek, Amalekites - A tribe which roamed, from the days of the Exodus till the time of king Saul, over the region from the southern boundary of Judah to the Egyptian frontier and the peninsula of Sinai. ’...
Israel first met with the Amalekites in the region near Sinai, when Amalek naturally tried to prevent the entrance of a new tribe into the region (cf
Wilderness of the Wanderings - (On Israel's route from Rameses to Sinai. of the wilderness of Paran was the wilderness of Sinai between the gulfs of Akabah and Suez. The early encampment at Rithmah (Numbers 33:18-19) took place in midsummer in the second year after the Exodus (for Israel left Sinai the 20th day of the second month, Numbers 10:11, i. of Sinai, now bare, is described by a traveler in the 16th century as a "vast green plain. According to some they were the writers of the Sinaitic inscriptions in the wady Mokatteb, deciphered by Forster as recording events in their history at that time. The giving of the law at Sinai, and its being written by the finger of God on stone tables, typify the writing of the gospel law on the heart by the Holy Spirit. ...
Israel's Sinaitic Pentecost answers to the Christian church's one, 50 days after Passover, our Good Friday and Easter (Acts 2; 2 Corinthians 3:2-7). Sinai with its fire marks that stage in the believer's life when, after having believed, he is brought nearer to God than before, being sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, the earnest of his coming inheritance (1618452498_39). Then follows a miserable, irregular course, at one time toward Canaan, then back toward the Egypt of the world or to the Sinai of legalism; a spiritual blank, marked only by the Sabbath breaking case and the Korah rebellion against spiritual authority. of this lies the desert proper, a limestone plateau, projecting wedge-like into the Sinai peninsula, just as Sinai itself projects into the Red Sea
Pharisees - The principle of the Pharisees, common to them with all orthodox modern Jews, is that by the side of the written law there was an oral law to complete and to explain the written law, given to Moses on Mount Sinai and transmitted by him by word of mouth
Commandments, the Ten - These commandments were first given in their written form to the people of Israel when they were encamped at Sinai, about fifty days after they came out of Egypt (Exodus 19:10-25 )
Kenites - Smiths, the name of a tribe inhabiting the desert lying between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai
New - ...
New Relationships God acted in the past to establish relationships, notably with the descendants of Abraham and the people of Israel at Sinai
Banner - When the Israelites left Sinai for the land of Canaan, they marched under the banner of four major tribes: Judah, Reuben, Ephraim, and Dan (Numbers 10:1 )
Codex - The oldest and most complete is Codex Sinaiticus now in the British Museum. It was discovered accidentally in 1844 by a Russian scholar in a monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Cloud - On Mount Sinai God appeared in a dark cloud (Exodus 19:9 ; Exodus 24:15 ; Exodus 40:34 ; compare Job 26:8-97 ; Isaiah 4:5 ; Matthew 17:5 )
Posthumianus, of Aquitania - He penetrated into the Sinaitic peninsula, saw the Red Sea, and ascended Mount Sinai
Korah - The institution of the Aaronic priesthood and the Levitical service at Sinai was a great religious revolution
Darkness - " ...
On Mount Sinai, Moses (Exodus 20:21 ) "drew near unto the thick darkness where God was
Deuteronomy - The second address, Deuteronomy 5:1 to Deu_26:19, contains a recapitulation, with a few additions and alterations, of the law given on Sinai
Tables of the Law - Those that were given to Moses upon Mount Sinai were written by the finger of God, and contained the decalogue or ten commandments of the law, as they are rehearsed in Exodus 20
Goat - This is doubtless the Ibex, or mountain goat, a large and vigorous animal still found in the mountains in the peninsula of Sinai, and east and south of the Dead Sea
Fire - In Scripture, is often connected with the presence of Jehovah; as in the burning bush, and on Mount Sinai, Exodus 3:2 19:18 Psalm 18:1-50 Habakkuk 1:1-3:19
Pentecost - Secondly, to commemorate, and to render thanks to God for the law given from Mount Sinai, on the fiftieth day after their coming out of Egypt
Manna - Burckhardt says, that in the valleys around Sinai a species of manna is still found, dropping from the sprigs of several trees, but principally from the tamarisk, in the month of June. By these last three peculiarities God miraculously attested the sanctity of the Sabbath, as dating from the creation and not from Mount Sinai
Sabbath - Those who worshipped God seem to have kept the Sabbath from the first, and there are tokens of this in the brief sketch the Bible contains of the ages before the giving of the law at Mount Sinai. The week was an established division of time in Mesopotamia and Arabia, Genesis 29:27 ; and traces of it have been found in many nations of antiquity, so remote from each other and of such diverse origin as to forbid the idea of their having received it from Sinai and the Hebrews. ...
The REENACTMENT of the Sabbath on Mount Sinai, among the Commandments of the Moral Law, was also designed not for the Jews alone, but for all whom should receive the word of God, and ultimately for all mankind. ...
The CHRISTIAN SABBATH is the original day of rest established in the Garden of the Eden and reenacted on Sinai, without those requirements, which were peculiar to Judaism, but with all its original moral force and with the new sanctions of Christianity
Haggadah, Halakah - ...
Halakah according to the early rabbis goes back to oral law given to Moses at Sinai along with the written law (Torah ) embodied in the Bible primarily found in the Pentateuch
Heavenly City, the - The Christian goal is, however, not something that can be touched and sensed like Israel's Sinai experience (Hebrews 12:18 )
Arabia - This country is, however, divided by modern geographers into (1) Arabia Proper, or the Arabian Peninsula; (2) Northern Arabia, or the Arabian Desert; and (3) Western Arabia, which includes the peninsula of Sinai and the Desert of Petra, originally inhabited by the Horites (Genesis 14:6 , etc
Reuben, Tribe of - Stanley's Sinai and Palestine
Testament, New - ...
the Jewish economy, and the Christian: mount Sinai, in Arabia, where the law was promulgated; and mount Zion in Jerusalem, where the Gospel was first published
Hor - It "rises like a huge castellated building from a lower base" (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, 86)
Cloud - Jehovah came down upon Sinai in a cloud (Exodus 19:9 ); and the cloud filled the court around the tabernacle in the wilderness so that Moses could not enter it (Exodus 40:34,35 )
Fire - On Mount Sinai "the sight of the glory of the Lord was like devouring fire
Table - The Table of the Lord, the Table of Shew-bread, the Tables of the Law given to Moses on Mount Sinai, are all of them very different to each other, both in their office and design
Bush - ‘Bush’), ‘Rubus has not been found wild in Sinai, which is south of its range, and climatically unsuited to it
Token - Sinai
ju'Dah - The numbers of the tribe at the census at Sinai were 74,600
the Angel of the Lord - " The same JEHOVAH went before the Israelites by day in a pillar of cloud, and by night in a pillar of fire; and by Him the law was given amidst terrible displays of power and majesty from mount Sinai. Stephen, in alluding to this part of the history of Moses, in his speech before the council, says, "There appeared to Moses in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, an Angel of the Lord in a flame of fire," showing that that phraseology was in use among the Jews in his day, and that this Angel and Jehovah were regarded as the same being; for he adds, "Moses was in the church in the wilderness with the Angel which spoke unto him in Mount Sinai
Exodus, Book of - After three months journey they settled for a time at Mt Sinai. The book of Numbers goes on to record how the people, after almost one year at Sinai, resumed their journey to Canaan (cf. ...
The events of the exodus from Egypt and the establishment of the covenant at Sinai are therefore the main issues of the book of Exodus. Moses was brought up in the Egyptian palace, but after forty years in Egypt he renounced his Egyptian status and spent the next forty years in the barren regions of the Sinai Peninsular (2:1-25)
Tal'Mud - The classical subject is the following in the Mishna on this wing: "Moses received the (oral) law from Sinai, and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the prophets and the prophets to the men of the Great Synagogue
Sure - ...
A — 2: βέβαιος (Strong's #949 — Adjective — bebaios — beb'-ah-yos ) "firm, steadfast," is used of (a) God's promise to Abraham, Romans 4:16 ; (b) the believer's hope, Hebrews 6:19 , "steadfast;" (c) the hope of spiritual leaders regarding the welfare of converts, 2 Corinthians 1:7 , "steadfast;" (d) the glorying of the hope, Hebrews 3:6 , "firm;" (e) the beginning of our confidence, Hebrews 3:14 , RV, "firm" (AV, "steadfast"); (f) the Law given at Sinai, Hebrews 2:2 , "steadfast;" (g) the testament (or covenant) fulfilled after a death, Hebrews 9:17 , "of force;" (h) the calling and election of believers, 2 Peter 1:10 , to be made "sure" by the fulfillment of the injunctions in 2 Peter 1:5-7 ; (i) the word of prophecy, "made more sure," 2 Peter 1:19 , RV, AV, "a more sure (word of prophecy);" what is meant is not a comparison between the prophecies of the OT and NT, but that the former have been confirmed in the person of Christ (2 Peter 1:16-18 )
Migdol - Both may have been part of a line of border fortresses or migdols designed to provide protection for Egypt against invasion from the Sinai
Dwelling - References which focus on God's drawing near to speak, listen, and fellowship include the following references to God's dwelling place: in the bush at Sinai (Deuteronomy 33:16 ); in the tabernacle (Exodus 25:8 ; Exodus 29:45-46 ; 2 Samuel 7:2 ); at Shiloh (Psalm 78:60 ); in the land of Israel (Numbers 35:34 ); in the Temple (Psalm 26:8 ; Psalm 43:3 ; Psalm 135:2 ; Matthew 23:21 ); on Mount Zion (Psalm 9:11 ; Psalm 20:3 ; Psalm 132:14 ),; and in Jerusalem (Psalm 76:2 ; Psalm 135:21 ; Ezra 7:15 )
Stone - The most obvious example is the writing of the Ten Commandments on stone by the Spirit of God when Moses went up on Mount Sinai
Mount - We apply it to Mount Blanc, in Switzerland, to Mount Tom and Mount Holyoke, in Massachusetts, and it is applied in Scripture to the small hillocks on which sacrifice was offered as well as to Mount Sinai
Census - ...
Moses took a census of Israel at Mount Sinai and assessed a half-shekel tax to each male over twenty to support the tabernacle (Exodus 30:13-16 )
Wilderness - ...
The rest were not in Palestine proper, but were the deserts through which the Israelites passed or were located in their wanderings: namely, ETHAM, KADESH, PARAN, SIN, Sinai, and ZIN
Mount Paran - ) Here Israel, after leaving mount Sinai, arrived and encamped, being so directed by the resting of the cloud
Midianites - But they appear to have spread themselves northward, probably along the desert east of Mount Seir, to the vicinity of the Moabites; and on the other side, also, they covered a territory extending to the neighborhood of Mount Sinai
Deuteronomy - (5:1-26) 19 And contains a recapitulation, with some modifications and additions of the law already given on Mount Sinai
Theodosius, a Monophysite Monk - Finally, the emperor Marcian interposed, and issued orders to Dorotheus to apprehend Theodosius, who, however, managed to escape to the mountain fastnesses of Sinai (Labbe, iv
Desert - This entire southern desert region can be called the wilderness of Sinai (Exodus 19:1 ) above which rises Mount Sinai
Cloud - He, our Redeemer and Advocate, the Lord who is our Brother, is now within the cloud that covers Sinai, that leads through the wilderness, that shines above the Mercy-seat; that is to say—in all that by which God draws near to man (in His law as in Sinai, in His providences as in the shepherding of Israel, in religious life and worship as in the Holiest of all), Christ is present, and the love which He has made known, bestowed and sealed
Month - The children of Israel came into the wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month, after their departing out of the land of Egypt. So again, Exodus 19:1) In the third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the land of Egypt, the same day came they unto the wilderness of Sinai
Cloud - He, our Redeemer and Advocate, the Lord who is our Brother, is now within the cloud that covers Sinai, that leads through the wilderness, that shines above the Mercy-seat; that is to say—in all that by which God draws near to man (in His law as in Sinai, in His providences as in the shepherding of Israel, in religious life and worship as in the Holiest of all), Christ is present, and the love which He has made known, bestowed and sealed
Numbers, the Book of - It narrates Israel's stay in the desert from the law giving at Sinai (Leviticus 27:34) to their mustering in Moab's plains before entering Canaan. The parts are four:...
(1) Preparations for breaking up the camp at Sinai to march to Canaan (Numbers 1 - 10:10). ...
(2) March from Sinai to Canaan's border; repulse by the Amorites (Numbers 10:11-14:45). During the year's stay at Sinai the people would disperse to seek food: so also during the 38 years' wandering. Leviticus completed the Sinai legislation, but the stay in tents in the wilderness required supplementary directions not originally provided, as Numbers 19:14, also Numbers 5; Numbers 9:6-14; Numbers 19 (Numbers 19:11 the plague after Korah's rebellion necessitating ordinances concerning defilement by contact with the dead), Numbers 30; Numbers 36, the law of heiresses marrying in their tribe, being at the suit of the Machirite chiefs, as the law of their inheriting was issued on the suit of Zelophehad's daughters (Numbers 27), and that was due to Jehovah's command to divide the land according to the number of names, by lot (Numbers 26:52-56). Formerly, the forests in Arabia attracted rain, and so the Sinai desert afforded food more than now
Paul in Arabia - But, somehow, Sinai seems to have drawn Paul to her awful solitudes with an irresistible attraction and strength. I must see Sinai, he also said at the beginning of his life. Just to give us a single Sabbath out of Paul's hundred and fifty Sabbaths at Sinai-what a revelation to us that would be! It would be something like this, only a thousand times better. And so on, till to have spent a single Sabbath-day with Paul at Sinai would have been almost as good as to have walked that evening hour to Emmaus. Paul was never out of the Psalms on those days that he observed so solemnly at Sinai. And till, on the rocks of Sinai the shepherds would sometimes come on somewhat the same sweat of blood that the gardeners came on in the Garden of Gethsemane
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Moses recounted the events of Israel's history from the time of their departure from Sinai to the time of their arrival in the land east of the Jordan. Behind that recitation lay the covenant-making procedures at Sinai, covered by Moses in Deuteronomy 5-11 . ...
Israel's Exodus from Egypt and the covenant at Sinai were the stages of Israel's birth as a nation. God's covenant with Israel at Sinai was in part a renewal of earlier covenants made with the patriarchs. Deuteronomy is a call to repentance, a plea for God's disobedient people to mend their ways and renew the covenant God made with them at Sinai
Moses - ” The Old Testament depicts Moses as the leader of the Israelites in their Exodus from Egyptian slavery and oppression, their journey through the wilderness with its threats in the form of hunger, thirst, and unpredictable enemies, and finally in their audience with God at Mount Sinai/Horeb where the distinctive covenant bonding Israel and God in a special treaty became a reality. ...
The center of the Moses traditions emerges with clarity in the events at Mount Sinai/Horeb. The law at Sinai/Horeb constitutes God's gift for Israel. The law at Sinai/Horeb showed each new generation how to follow Moses' teaching in a new setting in the life of the people
Leviticus - The laws "which the Lord commanded Moses in Mount Sinai, in the day that he commanded the children of Israel to offer their oblations unto the Lord in the wilderness of Sinai" (Leviticus 7:38). Given between the setting up of the tabernacle and its departure from Sinai, i
Arabia - ), Stanley (Sinai and Palestine, Lond. Sinai, with which he seems to show some acquaintance in the same Epistle (Galatians 4:25). Besides, the peninsula of Sinai was about 400 miles from Damascus; and, as military operations were being actively carried on by the legate of Syria against Aretas in a
Book - It contains a series of laws, civil, social, and religious, given to Moses at Sinai immediately after the delivery of the decalogue
Bow - The cloud was the token of God's presence in Israel's wilderness journey and in the holiest place of the temple; and on Mount Sinai at the giving of the law; and at the Lord's ascension (Acts 1:9), and at His coming again (Revelation 1:7)
Priests - On Mount Sinai, God gave Moses instructions to build the tabernacle
Marriage - The laws of Sinai produced a few followers, but the love of Calvary has produced a multitude of followers
Altar - ”)At Sinai, God directed Israel to fashion altars of valuable woods and metals
Midian - It farther passed to the south of the land of Edom, into the peninsula of Mount Sinai, where Moses met with the daughter of Jethro, the priest of Midian, whom he married
Mediator - The Israelites evinced this feeling at the Mount Sinai, Deuteronomy 5:23-31 ; and God was pleased to constitute Moses a mediator between himself and them, to receive and transmit the law on the one had, and their vows of obedience on the other
Ishmael - ) Ishmael settled in the land of Paran, a region lying between Canaan and the mountains of Sinai; and "God was with him, and he became a great archer" ( Genesis 21:9-21 )
Handle - , "handle not, nor taste, nor touch;" "touch" is the appropriate rendering; in Hebrews 12:20 it is said of a beast's touching Mount Sinai; (b) "to touch by way of injuring," Hebrews 11:28
Nain - 477; Stanley, SP Obedience - ...
Obedience was a main concern during the time of the encampment of the people of Israel at the base of Mount Sinai, to which God directed Moses to lead them after their deliverance from the Egyptians. At Mount Sinai God established a special covenant relationship between himself and the people of Israel
Deuteronomy - After receiving the law at Mt Sinai, Israel spent almost forty years in the wilderness region between Sinai and Canaan
mo'Ses - He was compelled to leave Egypt when the slaying of the Egyptian became known, and he fled to the land of Midian, in the southern and southeastern part of the Sinai peninsula. (1) As a leader, his life divides itself into the three epochs --the march to Sinai; the march from Sinai to Kadesh; and the conquest of the transjordanic kingdoms. (Exodus 3:2-6 ) (b) In the giving of the law from Mount Sinai, the outward form of the revelation was a thick darkness as of a thunder-cloud, out of which proceeded a voice. (Exodus 24:18 ; 34:28 ) (c) It was nearly at the close of these communications in the mountains of Sinai that an especial revelation of God was made to him personally
Wilderness - This word is used of the wilderness of Beersheba (Genesis 21:14 ), on the southern border of Palestine; the wilderness of the Red Sea (Exodus 13:18 ); of Shur (15:22), a portion of the Sinaitic peninsula; of Sin (17:1), Sinai (Leviticus 7:38 ), Moab (Deuteronomy 2:8 ), Judah (Judges 1:16 ), Ziph, Maon, En-gedi (1 Samuel 23:14,24 ; 24:1 ), Jeruel and Tekoa (2 Chronicles 20:16,20 ), Kadesh (Psalm 29:8 ). The wilderness region in the Sinaitic peninsula through which for forty years the Hebrews wandered is generally styled "the wilderness of the wanderings
Copper - ...
Cyprus was the chief source of copper in the Mediterranean world, but Egypt probably secured some from the Sinai peninsula
Sim'Eon - (Genesis 42:19,24,36 ; 43:23 ) The chief families of the tribe of Simeon are mentioned int he lists of (Genesis 46:10 ) At the census of Sinai Simeon numbered 59,300 fighting men
Manna - The manna of the Sinaitic peninsula is an exudation from the "manna-tamarisk" tree (Tamarix mannifera), the el-tarfah of the Arabs. This tree is found at the present day in certain well-watered valleys in the peninsula of Sinai
Meribah - ) The designation which Moses gave the place at Rephidim where Israel, just before they reached Sinai in the second year after leaving Egypt, did chide with Moses, "give us water that we may drink," and tempted (from whence came the other name Massah) Jehovah, saying "is Jehovah among us or not?" (Exodus 17:7; compare as to the sin, Matthew 4:7
Moses - See Sinai
Hormah - ...
Twenty miles' further march would have brought them to Arad royal city (Numbers 21:1); but before they could reach it the king drove them back to Hormah Numbers 15-19 belong to the dreary period of the 38 years' wandering after a year spent at Sinai; Numbers 20 presents them at the same point they started from 38 years before, Kadesh, in the 40th year; Numbers 21 introduces Arad assailing Israel and taking prisoners, then defeated by Israel in answer to prayer, and Hormah utterly destroyed
Trumpets, Feast of - ...
As the sound of the cornet signalized Jehovah's descent on Sinai to take Israel into covenant, so the same sound at the close of the day of atonement announced the year which restored Israel to the freedom and blessings of the covenant (Exodus 19:16-49)
Mount (And Forms) - ...
Galatians 4:24 (a) Sinai was the place where the law was given to Moses
Surety - Now, as in this passage a comparison is stated between Jesus, as a high priest, and the Levitical high priests; and as the latter were considered by the Apostle to be the mediators of the Sinai covenant, because through their mediation the Israelites worshipped God with sacrifices; it is evident that the Apostle in this passage terms Jesus the High Priest or Mediator of the better covenant, because, through his mediation, or in virtue of the sacrifice which he offered of himself to God, believers receive all the blessings of the new covenant
Camp - Wilderness of Sinai...
13
Incense - Thus; so called by the dealers of drugs in Egypt from thur, or thor, the name of a harbour in the north bay of the Red Sea, near Mount Sinai; thereby distinguishing it from the gum arabic, which is brought from Suez, another port in the Red Sea, not far from Cairo
Tradition - The Jews had numerous unwritten traditions, which they affirmed to have been delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai, and by him transmitted to Joshua, the judges, and the prophets
Tradition (2) - In the Talmud it was written that ‘Moses received the oral Law from Sinai and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua delivered it to the elders, and the elders to the prophets, and the prophets to the men of the Great Joannes (520), Monk And Author - There are recorded also visits to the Thebaid cities of Antinous and Lycus (44, 143, 161), to the laura of Raythu (115, 116, 119) on the Red Sea shore (120, 121), and to Mount Sinai (122, 123). The Elogium relates how on his deathbed at Rome he delivered his book to Sophronius, requesting to be buried if possible at Mount Sinai or at the laura of St. Sophronius and 12 fellow-disciples sailed with the body to Palestine, but, hearing at Ascalon that Sinai was beset by Arabs, took it up to Jerusalem (in the beginning of the eighth indiction, e
Numbers, Book of - The Book of Numbers forms the sequel to the Book of Exodus; it carries on the history of the Israelites from the stay at Sinai till the arrival at the borders of Moab. Although the narrative begins at Sinai and ends in Moab, the period of the 40 years’ wanderings is a blank, and the events are confined to the two periods before and after it. Ordinances at Sinai. The rest cover the last 19 days ( Numbers 1:1 , Numbers 10:11 ) spent at Sinai. From Sinai to the desert W
Eldad - The 70 elders appointed by Jethro's advice at Sinai (Exodus 18) to help Moses in judging are distinct from the 70 here endowed with the Spirit to help hint as his executive court, to govern the rebellious people, and establish his authority, shaken by the people's murmurings against Jehovah and himself because of the want of flesh
Covenant - ...
The covenant with the children of Israel at Sinai, on the other hand, was conditional: if they were obedient and kept the law they would be blessed; but if disobedient they would be cursed
Seir, Mount - Seir and Sinai are not in Deuteronomy 33:2 grouped together geographically, but in reference to their being both alike scenes of God's glory manifested in behalf of His people
Asher - ]'>[2] ’s census, there were 41,500 males ‘twenty years old and upward’ at Sinai, and when they arrived in the plains of Moab they had increased to 53,400 ( Numbers 1:41 ; Numbers 26:47 )
Command - 25:22) and from His “commands” at Sinai ( Judaism - With Abraham Judaism may be said in some sense, to have begun; but it was not till the promulgation of the law upon Mount Sinai, that the Jewish economy was established, and that to his posterity was committed a dispensation which was to distinguish them ever after from every other people on earth
Manger - He says (SP Midianite - The peninsula of Sinai was the pasture-ground for their flocks
Kibroth Hattaavah - The second was at Kibroth Hattaavah in the second year after the camp had removed from its 12 months' stay at Sinai
Nebaioth - Many think the rock inscriptions of Sinai to be Nabatean, and to belong to the centuries immediately before and after Christ
Asher - ...
From being more numerous at mount Sinai than Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, in David's time they had become so few that Asher's name is omitted from the chief rulers (1 Chronicles 27:16-22)
Scorpion - They are common in all warm climates, and are especially ubiquitous in the wilderness of Sinai (cf
Ordinance - This included ordinances given at Mount Sinai and those given during the forty years that Israel wandered in the wilderness
Anastasius Sinaita - Anastasius Sinaita ( Ἀναστάσιος Σιναίτης ). Two were patriarchs of Antioch; and it has been reasonably questioned whether they were ever monks of Mount Sinai, and whether the title "Sinaita" has not been given to them from a confusion with the one who really was so, and who falls, outside our period (see Smith's D
Abbreviations - ...
SP Sinai and Palestine
Kedar - Hence mount Sinai covenant is represented as a dispensation, like the mount itself, of blackness and darkness and terror; because it set forth that dread of conscience which filled the mind when under a conscious sense of having broken it
Aaron - While Moses was absent in Mount Sinai receiving the law, Aaron weakly yielded to the people's demand to have some image of a deity for them to worship
Covenant - The first covenant with the Hebrews was made when the Lord chose Abraham and his posterity for his people; a second covenant, or a solemn renewal of the former, was made at Sinai, comprehending all who observe the law of Moses
Reu'Ben - (Genesis 46:9 ; 1 Chronicles 5:3 ) The census at Mount Sinai, (Numbers 1:20,21 ; 2:11 ) shows that at the exodus the men of the tribe above twenty years of age and fit for active warlike service numbered 46,600
Foreigner - ...
When Israel was constituted as a nation at Sinai (Exodus 19-24 ), a concern for resident aliens was etched into the legal system. ...
After Sinai and the wilderness wanderings, Israel received the gift of the promised land
King, Kingship - To do this also denies the close relationship that exists between the establishment of the Sinai covenant and the acknowledgment of Yahweh's kingship over Israel. Parallels in literary structure between the Sinai covenant and certain international treaties drawn up by the kings of the Hittite Empire in the fourteenth century b. show that in the Sinai covenant Yahweh assumes the role of the Great King, and Israel, that of his vassal. For these scholars the establishment of the monarchy represented a return to the social model of the old Bronze Age paganism of the Canaanites, and a rejection of religious foundations derived from the Mosaic formulations of the Sinai covenant
Law - The most common usage of the term, however, concerns the law of God given to Israel through Moses at Mt Sinai (Exodus 24:12; Deuteronomy 4:44; Ezra 7:6; John 1:17; Galatians 3:17; Romans 7:12-14). At Mt Sinai God confirmed the covenant made previously with Abraham, this time making it with Abraham’s descendants, the nation Israel (Exodus 24:7-8; see COVENANT). ...
The law that God gave to the people of Israel at Sinai laid down his requirements for them. ...
Jesus’ attitude to the law...
The covenant made with Israel at Sinai and the law that belonged to that covenant were not intended to be permanent
Desert - It is rendered "desert" only in Psalm 102:6 , Isaiah 48:21 , and Ezekiel 13:4 , where it means the wilderness of Sinai
Levite - At Sinai the first change in this ancient practice was made
Thorns - As the bramble is not found on Horeb (Sinai), it has been thought by some that the ‘bush’ was a kind of acacia
Allegory - ...
In Galatians 4:21-31Paul uses the story of the children of Sarah (Isaac) and Hagar (Ishmael) and the images of Jerusalem above and Mount Sinai as a double allegory, both pairs contrasting the covenant of freedom and the covenant of slavery
Issachar - ]'>[8] ’s census at Sinai gives the tribe 54,400 (Numbers 1:29 ), and at Moab 64,300 (26:25); cf
Ark of the Covenant - ...
The origin of the ark goes back to Moses at Sinai. It was planned during Moses' first sojourn on Sinai and built after all the tabernacle specifications had been communicated and completed
Deuteronomy, Theology of - The fifth book of the Pentateuch is not merely a recasting of the Sinai covenant text and all its derivative materials, but a new and fresh statement of Yahweh's covenant purposes to a new generation in a new place with new prospects. The nation with whom the Sinai covenant had been made had died in the wilderness and so was no longer on the scene (Numbers 14:26-35 ). By this name he encountered Moses at Sinai and it is in this name that he constantly commands his people to keep the covenant made there. This is clear from the frequent references to the original Sinai (or Horeb) covenant setting (1:6; 4:1-2,5, 10,15, 23,33-40) and the change in language in Deuteronomy vis-a-vis Exodus due to the changed circumstances (5:12-15; cf. Moreover, Deuteronomy is a greatly expanded and more detailed rendition of the covenant text, for the complexities of life and expectation in the land of promise raise issues that were of little or no consequence in the wilderness of Sinai. ...
After tracing the course of events from Sinai (1:6-3:29) to the present site of covenant renewal in Moab, Moses urged the people to obedience as a precondition to blessing (4:1,6, 40)
Moon - ...
Mount Sinai is supposed to have derived its name from the moon-god Sin , to whom worship was paid there
Asher, Aser - ...
When numbered at Sinai there were 41,500 able to go forth to war, and when near the promised land they were 53,400; but when the rulers of the tribes are mentioned in the time of David, Asher is omitted
Joshua - He became Moses' minister or servant, and accompanied him part of the way when he ascended Mount Sinai to receive the two tables (Exodus 32:17 )
Midian - The oases of Sinai too were included in their "land," because they had pasturage stations there
Manna - Europe) exudes a ‘manna’ (used in medicine); and a species of tamarisk found in the Sinai peninsula yields a substance containing sugar
Glory - ) Still, for the Old Testament, the greatest revelation of divine glory came on Sinai (Deuteronomy 5:24 )
Anthropomorphism - God enters into an agreement (covenant) with Israel at Sinai (Exodus 19:5-6 ), an outgrowth of an earlier covenant he had made with Abraham (Genesis 17:1-18 )
Tower - 18; Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, 421)
Midian, Mtdianites - They roamed about Sinai ( Exodus 3:1 ff
Gilead - , and resemble a massive wall along the horizon; but when ascended they present a" wide table land tossed about in wild confusion of undulating downs, clothed with rich grass and magnificent forests, and broken by three deep defiles, those of the Jarmuk, Jabbok, and Arnon" (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine)...
The high Arabian plateau makes them look low from the E
Census - At Sinai in the second month of the second year when they declared their pedigree after their families; there were 603,550, Exodus 38:26 ; Numbers 1:1-46 (stated in round numbers as 600,000 in Exodus 12:37 )
Saints - Thus Moses, describing the descent of the Lord upon mount Sinai, saith, "He came with ten thousands of saints
Answer - 19:18, where we read that God reacted to the situation at Sinai with a sound (of thunder)
Arabia - ...
Old Testament The Arabian peninsula, together with the adjoining lands which were home to the biblical Arabs, includes all of present-day Saudi Arabia, the two Yemens (San'a' and Aden), Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Kuwait, as well as parts of Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and the Sinai Peninsula
Gate - 32:26 speaks of an opening (“gate”) in the barrier surrounding Israel’s temporary camp at the foot of Sinai
Elijah - In Mount Sinai the downcast man of God was witness of Jehovah's strength and experienced Jehovah's tenderness in a very remarkable vision
Cloud - The Lord appeared at Sinai in the midst of a cloud, Exodus 19:9 ; Exodus 24:5 ; and after Moses had built and consecrated the tabernacle, the cloud filled the court around it, so that neither Moses nor the priests could enter, Exodus 40:34-35
Mishna - Their opinion of it is, that all the particulars which it contains were dictated by God himself to Moses upon Mount Sinai, as well as the written word itself; and, consequently, that it must be of the same divine authority, and ought to be as religiously observed
Damascus - " Sinai and Palestine, p
Law - It was more fully taught to the Hebrews, especially at Mount Sinai, in the Ten Commandments, and is summed up by Christ in loving God supremely and our neighbor as ourselves, Matthew 22:37-40
Ptolemais - Ritter, The Comparative Geography of Palestine and the Sinaitic Peninsula, 1866, iv. Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, new ed
Exodus, Theology of - Geographically, the first part takes place in Egypt, while the second part begins and ends at Mount Sinai in the wilderness. ...
God continues to provide for them as they march toward Mount Sinai. At last, they arrive at Mount Sinai and experience the presence of the Lord in a theophany of lightning and storm (chap. At Mount Sinai, the glory of the Lord came as smoke enveloped the mountain (24:16). Israel witnesses God's presence in the storm at Mount Sinai
God - ...
Sinai . Sinai was a summing up of his work that preceded it and that aimed to make Israel Yahweh's special people and shape them into a community loyal to him. Sinai was the place where God revealed himself to Israel. The covenant he made with Abraham was activated on a national level at Sinai and designed with particulars that formalized the relationship between Israel and Yahweh. ...
The Sinai covenant had a dual purpose, stipulating how God would relate to Israel and how Israel should relate to God and the world. The Sinai legislation provides no more distinctive concept of God than God as holy. "...
Thus, at Sinai God spells out his holy and loving character toward Israel and calls Israel to the same kind of holy living and loving loyalty toward him and toward their neighbors
Feasts - To perpetuate the memory of great events; so, the Sabbath commemorated the creation of the world; the passover, the departure out of Egypt; the pentecost, the law given at Sinai, &c. ...
The feast of pentecost was celebrated on the fiftieth day after the passover, in memory of the law being given to Moses on Mount Sinai, fifty days after the departure out of Egypt
Talmud - The classical passage on this subject runs: ‘Moses received the (oral) law from Sinai, and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the prophets, and the prophets to the men of the Great Synagogue’ ( Pirqe Aboth , l. It is true that in the Talmud itself the letter of Scripture is always clearly differentiated from the rest; but, in the first place, the comments and explanations declare what Scripture means, and without this official explanation the Scriptural passage would lose much of its practical value for the Jew; and, in the second place, it is firmly believed that the oral laws preserved in the Talmud were delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai. The eighth principle of the Jewish creed runs: ‘I firmly believe that the Law which we possess now is the same which has been given to Moses on Mount Sinai. Those oral laws which were revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai are called “Laws given to Moses on Mount Sinai” ’ (M
Elisha - On his way from Sinai to Damascus he found Elisha at his native place engaged in the labours of the field, ploughing with twelve yoke of oxen
Encampment - , represents Judah taking the lead in the march out of the wilderness of Sinai, Reuben was next, Ephraim was next, and Dan was rearward
Ark - In the early accounts of the ark only the Mount Sinai covenant tablets are so protected, giving rise to the common epithet, the "ark of the covenant" (Exodus 25:16 ; 1 Kings 8:9 ), or a variant, "ark of the Lord's covenant" (Numbers 14:44 )
Michael - (1) In Acts 7:38 he is probably to be identified with the angel who spoke to Moses in Mount Sinai
Gehenna (2) - ; Stanley, SP Cana - 288; Stanley, SP Pentecost - Pentecost commemorated the giving of the law on Sinai (Exodus 12:2; Exodus 12:19), the 50th day after the Exodus, 50th from "the morrow after the sabbath" (i
Morning - Thus, Moses “rose up early in the morning” and went up to Mount Sinai; he arose before daybreak so he could appear before God in the “morning” as God had commanded ( Tent - The “tent” outside the camp persisted as a living institution for only a short period after the construction of the tabernacle and before the departure from Sinai ( Fire - God hath often appeared in fire, and encompassed with fire, as when he showed himself in the burning bush; and descended on Mount Sinai, in the midst of flames, thunderings, and lightning, Exodus 3:2 ; Exodus 19:18
Calf - The "golden calf" was an idol set up and worshipped by the Israelites at the foot of mount Sinai in their passage through the wilderness to the land of Canaan
Edom, Edomites - At times their territory seems to have included the region to the Red Sea and Sinai ( 1 Kings 9:26 , Judges 5:4 )
Exodus - It was preceded by God’s judgment on Egypt through a number of plagues (Exodus 1; Exodus 2; Exodus 3; Exodus 4; Exodus 5; Exodus 6; Exodus 7; Exodus 8; Exodus 9; Exodus 10; Exodus 11; see PLAGUE); it came about through the decisive judgment on Passover night and the subsequent crossing of the Red Sea (Exodus 12; Exodus 13; Exodus 14; Exodus 15; see PASSOVER; RED SEA); and it was followed by the covenant ceremony at Mt Sinai, where God formally established Israel as his people (Exodus 16; Exodus 17; Exodus 18; Exodus 19; Exodus 20; Exodus 21; Exodus 22; Exodus 23; Exodus 24; see COVENANT)
Gennesaret, Land of - Stanley’s ‘Note’ in refutation, SP Passover (ii. in Relation to Lord's Supper). - —(b) But further, the Passover was a covenant-meal based on the fact of the covenant made by sacrifice at Sinai (Exodus 24:3-8). One of the special merits of recent critical investigations into the nature of the sacrament is that they have brought fully into view the connexion between our Lord’s words about the New Covenant (Matthew 26:28 ||) and the story of the covenant at Sinai, taken along with the great prophetic anticipations (Jeremiah 32:40, Ezekiel 34:25; Ezekiel 37:26, Isaiah 55:3) of what the author of Hebrews calls ‘a better covenant established upon better promises’ (Hebrews 8:6). On the contrary, the narrative of the first Passover in Egypt appears to anticipate that of the covenant made at Sinai, while apart from the former the latter would have no historical explanation. The Passover was a renewal on the part of the OT Church of the covenant with God that had been made at Sinai; and every Supper is a renewal by the Christian people of the covenant made for them upon the Cross
Arabia - The desert of mount Sinai (Burr et tur Sinai), where Israel wandered, Kadesh Barnea, Pharan, Rephidim, Ezion Geber, Rithmah, Oboth, Arad, Heshbon, were in it
Fire - Sinai (Exodus 19:18 ; Exodus 24:17 ), are well known illustrations of such
Theophany - Yet the record is unmistakable that people did see God, such as Moses and others at Sinai (Exodus 24:9-10 ); the Lord's rebuke of Aaron and Miriam (Numbers 12:4-8 ); and the majestic vision to Isaiah (Isaiah 6:1 ,Isaiah 6:1,6:5 )
Tyre - Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, new ed
Verily - ]'>[1] When a Rabbi would add impressiveness to a doctrine, he prefaced it with Amen, ‘Verily,’ signifying that it was a tradition received by Moses on Sinai
Gaza - It was ‘the frontier city of Syria and the Desert, on the south-west, as Damascus on the north-east’ (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, London, 1877, p
Ishmael - At first he was located in the wilderness of Beer-sheba and afterwards at Paran, a region between Canaan and mount Sinai
Masora - Accordingly they say, that, when God gave the law to Moses at Mount Sinai, he taught him first the true reading of it; and, secondly, its true interpretation; and that both these were handed down by oral tradition from generation to generation, till at length they were committed to writing
Fable - It was said that an oral law, ‘the law that is on the lip,’ supplementary to the written law, had also been given on Sinai, and handed down by teachers from Moses through the centuries
Drink - Sinai “saw God, and did eat and drink” ( Festivals - ...
Later tradition associated the feast of weeks with the giving of the law at Sinai. Some thought that Deuteronomy 16:12 may have connected the Sinai event and the festival, but Scripture does not indicate any definite link between Sinai and Pentecost
Ten Commandments - In the midst of the cloud and the darkness and the flashing lightning and the fiery smoke and the thunder like the voice of a trumpet, Moses was called to Mount Sinai to receive the law without which the people would cease to be a holy nation
Naphtali - At the census of Sinai Naphtali's tribe numbered 53,400 able for war (Numbers 1:43)
Tabernacle - First, after the sin of the golden calf at Mount Sinai the “provisional” tabernacle was established outside the camp and called the “tent of meeting” (Exodus 33:7 ). Second, the “Sinaitic” tabernacle was built in accordance with directions given to Moses by God (Exodus 25-40 ). It apparently formed the headquarters of the camp until the building of the “Sinaitic” tabernacle
Magnificat - and the Sinai Palimpsest render ‘with Elisabeth
Trump Trumpet - ...
‘The sound of a trumpet’ (Hebrews 12:19) occurs in the description of the scene at Sinai, and is illustrative of the awe-inspiring character of the Jewish dispensation
Horse - Their early possession of the desert of Sinai makes it certain they knew and must have used the camel there, "the ship of the desert," but they avoid mentioning it as being unclean
Prepare - 19:11 “And be ready against the third day: for the third day the Lord will come down in the sight of all the people upon mount Sinai
Pentecost, Feast of - It always retained its agricultural character in Biblical ages, but some later Rabbinical writers treated it also as a commemoration of the delivery of the Law on Sinai an event which was supposed to have taken place 50 days after the Exodus (Exodus 19:1 ), though this idea is not found in Philo or Josephus; and the fact that the reading of the Law in the Sabbatical year took place at the Feast of Tabernacles and not at Pentecost, points to the late origin of this tradition
Leviticus - After three months they arrived at Mt Sinai, and there God established his covenant with them
Numbers, Book of - The arrangements for the departure of the people from Sinai; Numbers 1 — Numbers 9 ...
2. The journey from Sinai to the borders of Canaan; Numbers 10 — Numbers 14 . Before Israel started on their journey from Sinai, they were to keep the passover, the memorial of their redemption from Egypt
Exodus - Directed by God, Moses procured a miraculous supply of water from the "rock in Horeb," one of the hills of the Sinai group (17:1-7); and shortly afterwards the children of Israel here fought their first battle with the Amalekites, whom they smote with the edge of the sword. " Here they encamped for more than a year (Numbers 1:1 ; 10:11 ) before Sinai (q
Moses - The final stage involves him liberating the enslaved Hebrews, establishing God's covenant with them in the Sinai desert and leading them to the borders of the promised land. ...
Dramatic though the crossing of the Re(e)d Sea is for the destiny of the Hebrews, the peak of Moses' career is attained on Mount Sinai, when God appears to him and delivers the celebrated Ten Commandments as the basis of Israel's covenant law
Shekinah - It was so in nature ( Psalms 18:10 ), on Sinai ( Exodus 24:16 ), in the wilderness and in the Tabernacle ( Exodus 16:7 ; Exodus 29:43 ; Exodus 40:34 , Numbers 14:10 ), in the Temple ( 1 Kings 8:11 ); cf
Hagar - ...
Paul expounds Hagar to answer to Sinai and the law, which generates a spirit of "bondage," as Hagar was a bond-woman, and that this must give place to the gospel dispensation and the church of grace, the "Jerusalem which is above
Tabor, Mount - ]'>[2] 364; Stanley, SP Pharisees - A famous sect of the Jews who distinguished themselves by their zeal for the traditions of the idlers, which they derived from the same fountain with the written word itself; pretending that both were delivered to Moses from Mount Sinai, and were therefore both of equal authority
Roads - ]'>[2] ; Stanley, SP Witness - ...
The law of Israel...
When God established his covenant with Israel at Mt Sinai, he gave the Ten Commandments as the basis of the covenant requirements laid upon his people
Numbers, Book of - This outline is simply stated:...
Numbers 1:1-10:10 What happened at Sinai;...
Numbers 10:11-20:13 What happened in the wilderness; and...
Numbers 20:14-36:13 What happened from Kadesh to Moab
Theophany - Although the most common verb for the manifestation of the glory of the Lord is "appeared" (Leviticus 9:23 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ), God's glory also "settled" on Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:16 )
Jacob's Well - ; Stanley, SP Jericho - —Stanley, SP Amalekites - " A nomadic tribe, occupying the peninsula of Sinai and the wilderness between Palestine and Egypt (Numbers 13:29; 1 Samuel 15:7; 1 Samuel 27:8)
Glory - It is frequently applied to God, as in 'the God of glory,' Psalm 29:3 ; to Jehovah as 'the King of glory,' Psalm 24:7-9 ; 'the glory of Jehovah' that appeared on Mount Sinai, and that filled the tabernacle, Exodus 24:16,17 ; Exodus 40:34,35 , and will fill the future temple, Ezekiel 43:2-5 ; also the glory pertaining to Israel, and to the Gentiles in the past and the future
Gregorius Theopolitanus, Bishop of Antioch - to preside over the monastery of Mount Sinai (Evagr
Hagar - " And surely, the bond-woman and her son cannot be heir with the son of the free-woman; for all of the Hagar, the mount Sinai covenant, are in bondage
Luke, Gospel of - ...
After the transfiguration ( Luke 9 ), which is recounted earlier, as to the contents of the gospel, than by the other evangelists, we find the judgement of those who rejected the Lord, and the heavenly character of the grace which, because it is grace, addresses itself to the nations, to sinners, without any particular reference to the Jews, overturning the legal principles according to which the latter pretended to be, and as to their external standing were originally called at Sinai to be, in connection with God
Answer - Thus in Titus 2:9 slaves are enjoined not to ‘answer again’ (Authorized Version ; Revised Version ‘gainsay,’ ἀντιλέγω); in Galatians 4:25 ‘this Hagar is Mount Sinai in Arabia and answereth to (i
Joshua - When Moses ascended Mount Sinai to receive the law of the Lord, and remained there forty days and forty nights without eating or drinking, Joshua remained with him, though, in all probability, not in the same place, nor with the same abstinence, Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 32:17
Feasts - God appointed several festivals, or days of rest and worship, among the Jews, to perpetuate the memory of great events wrought in favor of them: the Sabbath commemorated the creation of the world; the Passover, the departure out of Egypt; the Pentecost, the law given at Sinai, etc
Jericho - —Stanley, SP Joshua the Son of Nun - ...
As Moses’ chief assistant, Joshua kept watch when Moses entered God’s presence on Mt Sinai (Exodus 24:13) and when Moses spoke face to face with God in his tent (Exodus 33:11)
Elijah - ...
God directed Elijah south to Mt Sinai, the place where, centuries earlier, he had established his covenant with Israel
Manuscripts - Greek Manuscripts :...
(a) Uncials:—...
א (= δ 2, von Soden), Codex Sinaiticus (of the 4th or 5th cent. Sinai, in 1844, consists of 346½ (NT 147½) leaves of fine parchment, measuring 48 × 37. Mark seems to form part of a larger family of which the most certain members are fam13 [8] 22, 28, 565, 700; (2) this larger family seems to represent a local text or local texts which were current in a comparatively limited region in the East; (3) the only definite localities which there is any reason to suggest are Jerusalem and Sinai, and even for these the evidence is insufficient to justify confident assertion’ (p. Sinai, Monastery of St. ]'>[12] 30, Codex Palimpsestus Sinaiticus (Burkitt’s S). Sinai, Monastery of St. Sinai, Monastery of St
Israel, History of - The Exodus and the Wilderness Sojourn (Exodus 1–24 ; 32–34 ; Numbers 10–14 ) Israel is a product of the Sinaitic experience, begun when God called the “renegade” Moses to return to Egypt and deliver His people. Moving from Goshen in Egypt through God's leadership in the miracle at the sea to the Sinai peninsula under Moses' leadership, the Hebrews at Sinai ratified a covenant with the God Yahweh (Exodus 24:1 ), and thus Israel as a landless people came into being. ...
For a period of eleven months they remained at Sinai. Regardless, Israel departed Sinai as a covenant people who would continually struggle with God
Ebla - If its political control ever reached the extent of its commercial influence, Ebla dictated terms to vassals from the Sinai peninsula on the border of Egypt in the south to Kanish and Hatti-land in the north, and from the Zagros mountains on the eastern fringe of Mesopotamia to Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea. Biblical place names such as Salim, Hazor, Lachish, Megiddo, Gaza, Dor, Sinai, Ashtaroth, and Joppa seemingly appear repeatedly in the Ebla texts
Covenant - Of still greater significance was the covenant at Horeb or Sinai ( Exodus 19:5 ; Exodus 34:10 ; Exodus 34:27 f. ...
Whilst the Sinaitic covenant is rightly regarded as the charter of the Jewish dispensation, the establishment by God of a new constitution was contemplated by a series of prophets (Jeremiah 31:31 ; Jeremiah 31:33 ; Jeremiah 32:40 ; Jeremiah 50:5 , Isaiah 55:3 ; Isaiah 59:21 ; Isaiah 61:8 , Ezekiel 16:60 ; Ezekiel 16:62 ; Ezekiel 20:37 ; Ezekiel 34:25 ). The Sinaitic covenant is thus transformed, and, whilst continuing as a note of racial separation until the period for the Incarnation was come, gave way then to a new dispensation with increased emphasis on personal religion and the provision of means adequate to ensure it ( Hebrews 8:6-13 ). ); and Sinai is but a stage ( Galatians 3:15 ff
New Creation - Similarly, Jubilee 1:29, which casts this message of hope in the form of a revelation from God to Moses on Mount Sinai, speaks of "the day of the new creation, when heaven and earth will be renewed. " In 4:26 the term "new creation" appears to have become a technical term within the vocabulary of this stream of Jewish eschatology ("the Garden of Eden, and the Mount of the East, Mount Sinai, and Mount Zion will be sanctified in the new creation"); connected with the concept are the ideas of the purification of the earth and God's people from sin
Promise - ...
God's promises to Abraham's descendants took definite shape in the Sinai covenant (Exodus 19-20,24 ), which resembled a Hittite vassal treaty in form. This proposition was ratified in a formal ceremony at Sinai (Exodus 24:3-8 ), and thereafter the sons of Jacob became the chosen people of God
Pentecost - The feast itself was appointed perhaps with a double view; first, to commemorate the giving of the law on mount Sinai, which was on the fiftieth day after the children of Israel had left Egypt; and, secondly, and for which it was enjoined as a feast, to testify that Israel's Lord was the rightful owner of all Israel's property, and they as tenants holding those possessions during the pleasure of their almighty landlord, and thus they were called upon cheerfully to pay their high rent in offering to him the first fruits of all their increase. ...
The modern Jews of the present hour, holding by tradition the festival as chiefly referring to the giving of the law on mount Sinai, of which they are very tenacious, and not knowing that it is the ministration of condemnation, they celebrate this festival for two days with great attention
Ebla - If its political control ever reached the extent of its commercial influence, Ebla dictated terms to vassals from the Sinai peninsula on the border of Egypt in the south to Kanish and Hatti-land in the north, and from the Zagros mountains on the eastern fringe of Mesopotamia to Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea. Biblical place names such as Salim, Hazor, Lachish, Megiddo, Gaza, Dor, Sinai, Ashtaroth, and Joppa seemingly appear repeatedly in the Ebla texts
Judah - The tribe outnumbered all the others under Moses: 74,600 at Sinai (Numbers 1:26-27); :76,500 before entering Canaan (Numbers 26:22); outnumbering Dan at Sinai by 11,900
Covenant - It is also called the Sinaitic covenant, after Mt Sinai, where the ceremony took place. Blood was linked with release from the penalty of sin; therefore, the blood ritual at Sinai was an indication to Israel that it began its formal existence as God’s covenant people in a condition of ceremonial purity (Hebrews 9:19-22; see BLOOD). The Abrahamic covenant led to the Sinaitic covenant, which in turn led to the Davidic covenant, which led finally to Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world (1618452498_99; Luke 1:72-73; Acts 13:17-23)
Intercession - At Sinai the people asked Moses to represent them before God since they feared to approach the awesome God (Exodus 20:19 )
Mines - ...
Relics of most ancient Egyptian copper mines are found in the peninsula of Sinai, at the wady Magharah, "the valley of the cave
Shur - Shur was a desert region in the north of the Sinai Peninsular
Naphtali - These four have developed into ‘families’ at the time of the Exodus, and their numher is given as 53,400 in the Sinai census ( Numbers 1:42 )
Heaven - This was the model Moses was shown on Sinai (Hebrews 7:1-6)
Torah - These traditions became for them the oral Torah, considered given to Moses at Mount Sinai to accompany the written law
Judah - ]'>[2] ’s Sinai census (Numbers 1:27 ) gives 74,600, and that of the Wilderness 76,500 ( Numbers 26:22 )
Justice - According to the Sinai covenant, judges are to uphold the Mosaic law by acquitting the innocent and condemning the guilty
Responsibility - For example, at Sinai, the Lord commanded the people not to make an idol to worship
Obadiah, Theology of - This intimacy was expanded through the covenant that Yahweh made through Moses with Abram's descendants at Mount Sinai (Exodus 19-24 )
Ark of God - ...
In thefirst journey of the children of Israel from Mount Sinai the ark of the covenant went before them to "search out a resting place for them," type of God's tender care for them
Fire - Again the same symbol appeared in the pillar of cloud and fire (Exodus 13:21-22), in His giving the law on Sinai (Exodus 19:18); so at His second advent (Daniel 7:9-10; Malachi 3:2; Malachi 4:1; 2 Peter 3:7; 2 Peter 3:10)
Aaron - ...
At Sinai, Aaron and his two older sons, Nadab and Abihu, were called to go up the mountain with Moses and seventy elders (Exodus 24:9 )
Offer - At Sinai they drew near to receive God’s law ( Mountains - Mount Sinai asserts the terrors of the divine law
Moses - Moved by fear, Moses fled from Egypt, and betook himself to the land of Midian, the southern part of the peninsula of Sinai, probably by much the same route as that by which, forty years afterwards, he led the Israelites to Sinai
Wilderness (2) - Besides those local denominations, others occur which apply to peripheric regions: wildernesses of Shur, of Sin, of Sinai, of Paran, of Ẓin, of Kadesh, of Ethan (or Yam-Suph), of Maon, of Ziph, of Beersheba, of Engedi, of Jeruel, of Beth-aven, of Edom, of Moab, of Kedemoth. Schriften, 1883; Pierre Loti, Le Désert 6, 1895 [7], and other [8] books of travels in the Sinai-Peninsula; Bönhoff,’ Die Wanderung Israels in der Wüste’ in SK Law - ]'>[1] ...
(b) of a force or influence impelling to action, Romans 7:21,23 (1st part), "a different law," RV; (c) of the Mosaic Law, the "law" of Sinai, (1) with the definite article, e. 3), is used in Romans 2:12 (twice), where "(have sinned) without law" means in the absence of some specifically revealed "law," like the "law" of Sinai; "(shall perish) without law" predicates that the absence of such a "law" will not prevent their doom; the "law" of conscience is not in view here
Israel - The Israelites appear to have been compelled to move on to the less fertile steppe to the south, between Beersheba and Egypt, roaming at times as far as Sinai. 3000), the Egyptians had been penetrating into the Sinaitic Peninsula on account of the mines in the Wadi Maghara (cf. ]'>[10] , at Horeb or Sinai, Jahweh’s holy mount, Moses first learned to worship Jahweh, who, he believed, sent him to deliver from Egypt his oppressed brethren. Moses then led them to Sinai, where, according to both J Rock - Stanley, SP Simeon - ]'>[8] ’s census of the tribes ascribes 59,300 fighting men to Simeon at Sinai ( Numbers 1:23 )
Covenant - We have an account of God's covernant with Abraham (Genesis 17 , Compare Leviticus 26:42 ), of the covenant of the priesthood (Numbers 25:12,13 ; Deuteronomy 33:9 ; Nehemiah 13:29 ), and of the covenant of Sinai (Exodus 34:27,28 ; Leviticus 26:15 ), which was afterwards renewed at different times in the history of Israel (Deuteronomy 29 ; Joshua 1:24 ; 2 Chronicles 15 ; 23 ; 29 ; 34 ; Ezra 10 ; Nehemiah 9 )
Sabbath - It is next referred to in connection with the gift of manna to the children of Israel in the wilderness (Exodus 16:23 ); and afterwards, when the law was given from Sinai (20:11), the people were solemnly charged to "remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy
Deborah - It begins with a reference to Jehovah's original, grand, and awful manifestation at Sinai (Exodus 19; Deuteronomy 33:2), the sealing of the covenant with Israel, and the ground of all His subsequent interpositions for them
Red Sea - When the Bible speaks of the Red Sea, it refers only to the northern part where the sea divides into two arms, between which lies the Sinai Peninsular
Age, Old (the Aged) - During the time of Moses, "the elders of Israel" were an important group of leaders who accompanied him on his first meeting with Pharaoh (Exodus 3:18 ), served as intermediaries with the nation (Exodus 19:7 ), assisted Moses at the ratification of the Sinai covenant (Exodus 24:1 ), and assisted Moses in many other ways throughout his lifetime (Exodus 17:5 ; Numbers 11:16-17 )
Reuben - At the Sinai census (Numbers 1:20-21; Numbers 2:11) Reuben numbered 46,500 men above 20 years of age, fit for service, and was sixth on the list: at the borders of Canaan (Numbers 26:7) - 43,730
Sanctuary - They were to stand in awe and fear of this (Leviticus 19:30 ) as when they "trembled" at the Lord's appearance on Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:16 )
Glory - Thus, God's glory is seen in the plagues and other miracles (Numbers 14:22 ), in the cloudy pillar (Exodus 16:10 ), in the theophany at Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 5:24 ), in the tabernacle (Exodus 29:43 ; 40:34-35 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ), in the fire initiating the sacrificial system (Leviticus 9:23 ), and in the ark of the covenant (Isaiah 40:5 ) and the temple of Solomon (1 Kings 8:11 ; 2 Chronicles 7:1-3 )
Gilgal - And the rule of divine grace is first to give, then to require; so first He showed His grace to Abraham by leading him to Canaan and giving the promises, then enjoined circumcision; also He did not give the law to Israel at Sinai until first He had redeemed them from Egypt, and thereby made them willing to promise obedience
Remember - The promise “to remember” was repeated in the covenant at Sinai ( Phar'Isees, -
The fundamental principle all of the of the Pharisees, common to them with all orthodox modern Jews, is that by the side of the written law regarded as a summary of the principles and general laws of the Hebrew people there was on oral law to complete and to explain the written law, given to Moses on Mount Sinai and transmitted by him by word of mouth
Ten Commandments - The portion of Scripture known as the "Ten Commandments" (Exodus 20:3-17 ; Deuteronomy 5:7-21 ) is a key segment of the Sinai covenant, which was entered into by God and the people of Israel. All these treaties followed the same basic format, which the Sinai covenant, both in Exodus and in its restatement in Deuteronomy, also adheres to closely. Thus, even though the Sinai covenant is not binding on Christians, the moral truths revealed in it are
Israel, Israelite - The covenant at Sinai (Exodus 24:1-11; Exodus 34:10-28) opens the second stage of the history. In the Gospels, with the exception of Luke 1:72, where the Abrahamic covenant is referred to, the only occurrence of the word is at the Last Supper (Matthew 26:28 || Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20); our Lord uses Jeremiah’s term, ‘the new covenant,’ but at the same time the words ‘This is my blood’ refer to the covenant at Sinai (Exodus 24:4-8)
Samaria - Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, p. Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, new ed
Idol, Idolatry - Israel, however, quickly succumbed to idolatry by worshiping a golden calf at Mount Sinai (Exodus 32 ). Deuteronomy 4:15-19 states that Israel saw no form of God at Sinai; therefore they were not to make any images of him or any other object of creation
Feasts - ...
(2) Pentecost marked the giving of the law on Sinai, the second grand era in the history of the elect nation. ...
(2) Pentecost points to our Whitsuntide (Acts 2) when the Holy Spirit descending on Christ's disciples confirms Christ's covenant of grace in the heart more effectually than the law of Sinai written on stone (2 Corinthians 3:3-18)
Red Sea - At Ras Mohammed, on the north, the Red Sea is split by the granitic peninsula of Sinai into two gulfs; the westernmost, or Gulf of Suez, is now about 150 miles in length, with an average width of about 20, though it contracts to less than 10 miles; the easternmost or Gulf of el-'Akabeh, is about 100 miles long, from the Straits of Tiran to the 'Akabeh, and 15 miles wide. Journeying southward from Suez, on our left is the peninsula of Sinai; on the right is the desert coast of Egypt, of limestone formation like the greater part of the Nile valley in Egypt, the cliff's on the sea margin stretching landward in a great rocky plateau while more inland a chain of volcanic mountains, beginning about lat
Zebulun - ...
At the time of the Sinai census the male Zebulunites from 20 years old and upwards numbered 57,400, and their lot on the march was cast on the east of the Tabernacle, with Judah and Issachar ( Numbers 1:31 f
Manasseh - According to the census taken at Sinai, this tribe then numbered 32,200 (Numbers 1:10,35 ; 2:20,21 )
Covenant - The covenant alluded to in Hosea 6:7 margin is not with Adam (KJV "men" is better, compare Psalms 82:7), for nowhere else is the expression "covenant" applied to Adam's relation to God, though the thing is implied in Mark 9:49; 1 Corinthians 15:22; but the Sinaitic covenant which Israel transgressed as lightly as "men" break their every day covenants with their fellow men, or else they have transgressed like other "men," though distinguished above all men by extraordinary spiritual privileges. "...
The legal covenant of Sinai came in as a parenthesis (pareiselthee ; Romans 5:20) between the promise to Abraham and its fulfillment in his promised seed, Christ
Palestine - The natural boundaries of the land were the Mediterranean Sea in the west, the Jordan River in the east, the Lebanon Range in the north and the Sinai Desert in the south
Mediator, Mediation - It is different in the covenant with Israel at Sinai, where Moses is throughout (by God’s appointment and the people’s own desire, Exodus 19:10-25 ; Job 9:33 ) the mediator between God and the people ( Galatians 3:19 , point of contrast between law and promise)
Midian - They inhabited the dry barren lands on the western edge of the Arabian desert, extending around the Gulf of Aqabah and into the Sinai Peninsular
Ephraim - ]'>[5] ’s Sinai census gives 40,500 men of war (Numbers 1:33 ), but this is reduced at the Plains of Moab to 32,500 (26:37), which is less than any of the tribes except Simeon, which ‘hardly existed except in name’ (Sayce, Hist
Come - ...
The Lord will come down on mount Sinai
Aaron - ...
Afterwards, when encamped before Sinai, and when Moses at the command of God ascended the mount to receive the tables of the law, Aaron and his two sons, Nadab and Abihu, along with seventy of the elders of Israel, were permitted to accompany him part of the way, and to behold afar off the manifestation of the glory of Israel's God (Exodus 19:24 ; 24:9-11 )
Law - It was most solemnly proclaimed by God himself at Sinai, to confirm the original law of nature, and correct men's mistakes concerning the demands of it
Go Down - This verb may also be used to express coming down from the top of a mountain, as Moses did when he “descended” from Sinai ( Nazareth - Stanley, Sinai and Palestine23, 1912; V
Nazareth - Stanley, Sinai and Palestine23, 1912; V
Immorality, Sexual - ...
When God entered into a covenant relationship with the Israelites on Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:1-11 ), his intent was to assemble and foster a select group of human beings who would be obedient to him, worship him as their one and only true God, and live under his direction in community as a priestly kingdom and a holy nation (Exodus 19:6 ). ...
The pronouncements on sexuality given to Moses while the Israelites are encamped at Mount Sinai occur in two separate places in Leviticus (18:6-23; 20:10-21). The prophets use the term figuratively to describe the covenant people's lack of fidelity to the high ideals of Mount Sinai
Nehemiah, Theology of - He is their lawgiver from Mount Sinai and their preserver and sustainer in the wilderness. On Mount Sinai Yahweh gave commands, decrees, and laws (9:14)
Exodus, Book of - There, God called him at the burning bush of Mount Horeb/Sinai and sent him back to rescue Israel from Egypt (Exodus 2-4 ). Then Israel came to Sinai, where God called them to become His covenant people, a holy nation to carry out Abraham's mission of blessing the nations
Census - The objection of rationalists that the peninsula of Sinai could not have sustained such a number is answered by the consideration (1) that Israel was sustained by a miracle, (2) the peninsula yielded much more anciently than at present. The inscriptions of Sinai, Serbal, and the wady Mokatteb, and other valleys prove that formerly a numerous population lived there
Manasseh (1) - At Sinai Manasseh numbered 32,200 (Numbers 1:10; Numbers 1:35; Numbers 2:20-21; Numbers 7:54-59), Ephraim 40,500
Slave - ...
The law given to Israel at Sinai was not a program for the ideal society, but a legal system designed to maintain order and administer justice among a people whose way of life was already well established
Sychar - 133; Stanley, SP Manna - The region wady Gharandel (Elim) and Sinai, the wady Sheich, and some other parts of the peninsula, are the places where it is found
Gentiles - ...
The doctrine of election in which Israel became a holy nation (Exodus 19:16 ; Leviticus 19:2 ) among the nations by the covenant at Sinai draws attention to the fact that no other nation has such a God or such laws
Elder - Similarly, seventy of the elders participated with Moses at the covenant meal at Sinai (Exodus 24:9-11 )
Truth - The great confession given by Ezra after the Jews returned from bondage in Babylon emphasized God's nature as truth (faithfulness) in what He did in creation, election, redemption, and the giving of the law: “You came down also upon Mount Sinai, and spoke with them from heaven and gave them right ordinances and true laws, good statutes and commandments, and you made known your holy sabbath to them and gave them commandments and statutes and a law through your servant Moses” (Nehemiah 9:13-14 NRSV)
Tradition - Thus the idea grew up that the traditional Law also was given to Moses on Sinai, and was delivered by him to Joshua, and by him to the elders, and by them to the prophets, and by them to the men of the Great Synagogue, and thence to the present generation (Pirḳe Aboth, i
Gad - In the Sinai census P Haggai, Theology of - ...
The reference to the Holy Spirit and the Sinai covenant in 2:5 serve as a reminder that Moses and the seventy elders were empowered by the Spirit as they led Israel out of Egypt and through the wilderness (Numbers 11:16-17,25 )
Gerizim - —Stanley, SP Colours - The revelation at Sinai was made in ‘blackness (γνόφος, gloom) and mist and tempest’ (Hebrews 12:18)
Desert, Wilderness - ...
The best-known desert of the Bible is the Wilderness of Sinai, where the tribes of Israel wandered before settling in Canaan
Zephaniah, Theology of - It was correct in that followers of God would be blessed but wrong since just because Israel had entered into a covenant relationhip with God at Sinai, their position as blessed people was not henceforth inviolable
Bethabara - The form ‘Bethabara,’ on the other hand, is found in a few extant manuscripts of the Greek text, both uncial and cursive, and in the Curetonian and Sinaitic Syriac. 496; Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, p
Fasting (2) - Sinai on a Thursday and to have returned on a Monday
Law - The moral law is summarily contained in the decalogue or ten commandments, written by the finger of God on two tables of stone, and delivered to Moses on mount Sinai
Tabernacle - The first ordinance given to Moses, after the proclamation of the outline of the law from Sinai, related to the ordering of the tabernacle, its furniture and its service as the type which was to be followed when the people came to their own home and "found a place" for the abode of God. During the forty days of Moses' first retirement with God in Sinai, an exact pattern of the whole was shown him, and all was made according to it
Egypt - ...
Geography Egypt lies at the northeastern corner of Africa, separated from Palestine by the Sinai Wilderness. The Delta was the entryway to Egypt for travelers coming from the Fertile Crescent across the Sinai
High Place, Sanctuary - From OT the names of Horeb (or Sinai), the ‘mountain of God’ ( Exodus 3:1 ), of Ebal and Gerizim, of Carmel and Tabor ( Hosea 5:1 ), at once suggest themselves as sanctuaries where the Hebrews worshipped their God. Still another type of Semitic sanctuary with temple, presenting many features of interest, is minutely described and illustrated by Flinders Petrie in his Researches in Sinai , 1906, chs
Priest, Priesthood - Jethro, Moses' father-in-law and the priest of Midian, was also recognized as non-Israelite priest of the true God of Sinai by Moses, Aaron, and the elders of Israel (Exodus 2:16 ; 3:1 ; 18:1,10-12 ). One of the foundational principles of the Israelite covenant with God at Sinai was that the nation as a whole would become "a kingdom of priests" (Exodus 19:6 a)
Tabernacle - The book contains three segments: chapters 1-15, the account of the deliverance from Egypt, culminating in the Red Sea crossing; chapters 16-24, the account of the journey to Sinai, culminating in the sealing of the covenant; and chapters 25-40, the account of the building of the tabernacle, culminating in its being filled with the glory of God. Kiene, The Tabernacle of God in the Wilderness of Sinai ; M
Reuben - ]'>[2] in his Sinai census (Numbers 1:21 ; Numbers 2:11 ) enumerates the tribe at 46,500 fighting men
le'Vites - --There is no trace of the consecrated character of the Levites till the institution of a hereditary priesthood in the family of Aaron, during the first withdrawal of Moses to the solitude of Sinai
Building - This "sacred geography" includes Eden ( Micah 4:1-26 ), Bethel (Genesis 28:10-22 ), Sinai (Exodus 3:5-6 ; 19:18-20 ; 24:16 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:12 ; 5:24 ; Psalm 68:8 ; cf
Book(s) - Several books are mentioned in the Bible:...
The Book of the Covenant Moses read from this book during the making of the covenant between God and Israel on Mount Sinai (1 Kings 8:12-139 )
Hosea - On his marriage to Gomer, Henderson thinks that there is no hint of its being in vision, and that she fell into lewdness after her union with Hosea, thus fitly symbolizing Israel who lapsed into spiritual whoredom after the marriage contract with God on Sinai
Touch - On the one hand, God's holiness was severe: upon the threat of immediate death, no one was to touch Mount Sinai while God's glory was upon it (Exodus 19:12 ) or the sacred furnishings of the tabernacle except Aaron and his sons (Numbers 4:15 ; cf
Know, Knowledge - Moses demands that those who had stood at Mount Sinai and entered into covenant with the Lord acknowledge that agreement and live by it (Deuteronomy 11:1-25 )
Magdala - 159) turns Megiddo into Magdalum, so some Manuscripts in Matthew 15:39 turn Magdala into Magadan’ (SP Aaron - Sinai ( Exodus 19:24 ; Exodus 24:9 )
Feasts - The feast of Pentecost, the fifteenth day from the Passover, in commemoration of the giving of the Law on mount Sinai, fifty days after the people left Egypt
bi'Ble - (3) The Sinaitic (codex Sinaiticus ) so called from the convent of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai, there it was discovered by or Tichendorf in 1844
Temple - God appears to the newly created covenantal community, a community formed by the exodus and, now at Sinai (which parallels Jerusalem as a place par excellence for "visions" of God), given an identity, including instructions where Yahweh's presencewith the full implication of both blessing and dangerwould be manifest (Exodus 24-26 ; 33:12-17 ). Levenson, Sinai and Zion ; J
Aaron - ...
On the way to Sinai, in the battle with Amalek, Aaron, in company with Hur, supported Moses' weary hands, which uplifted the miracle-working rod of God (Exodus 17:9-13); and so Israel prevailed. Whereas Moses ascended Sinai, and there received the tables of the law direct from God, as the mediator (Galatians 3:19), Aaron has only the privilege of a more distant approach with Nadab and Abihu and the seventy elders, near enough indeed to see Jehovah's glory, but not to have access to His immediate presence
Mining And Metals - Deuteronomy 33:25 ), though inapplicable to Palestine proper, may hold good of the Lebanon district or (as has been suggested by some) of the Sinaitic region. Its ores are found in the Lebanon district, in the region of Sinai, and sparsely in Egypt
Elisha - Elisha could be as stern as Elijah: at Bethel he treats the mocking youth in the spirit of Sinai (2 Kings 2:23 ), and no touch of pity can be detected in the sentence that falls on Gehazi ( 2 Kings 5:27 )
Gods - Sinai and received the law (τρὁς οὕς ὁ λογος τοῦ θεοῦ ἐγένετο, John 10:35)
Agriculture - Egypt was renowned for its rich harvests of wheat and vegetables which were missed by the Israelites fleeing the country via the desert of Sinai
Scribes - The scribes, therefore, who lived after the time of Simon the Just, in order to give weight to their various interpretations of the law, at first pretended that they also were founded upon tradition, and added them to the opinions which Ezra had established as authentic; and in process of time it came to be asserted, that when Moses was forty days on Mount Sinai, he received from God two laws, the one in writing, the other oral; that this oral law was communicated by Moses to Aaron and Joshua, and that it passed unimpaired and uncorrupted from generation to generation, by the tradition of the elders, or great national council, established in the time of Moses; and that this oral law was to be considered as supplemental and explanatory of the written law, which was represented as being in many places obscure, scanty, and defective
Pantaenus, of Alexandria - " Anastasius of Sinai (7th cent
Bible - His intention was to lead them to a new homeland in Canaan, but first he took them to Mt Sinai, where they formally became God’s people in a covenant ceremony
Moses - of it lies the Sinai region with good pasturage and water. ...
He came to "the mountain of God" (Sinai, called so by anticipation of God's giving the law there) on his way toward Horeb. On his last descent from Sinai "his face shone"; and he put on a veil as the people "could not steadfastly behold the face of Moses for the glory of his countenance, which glory was to be done away," a type of the transitory dispensation which he represented, in contrast to the abiding Christian dispensation (Exodus 34:30; Exodus 34:38; 2 Corinthians 3:13-14; 2 Corinthians 3:7; 2 Corinthians 3:11)
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - ...
The dominating theological "point of view" in all of the books from Joshua to 2Kings, including 1-2Samuel, is that which found its fullest expression in the Sinai covenant. He had delivered them out of Egypt and brought them to Sinai where he entered into covenant with them. The king was required to submit to both the laws of the Sinai covenant and the word of the prophet
Pentecost - Afterwards, however, and at a late date, Pentecost was supplied with one notable historical association, and it became the festival at which the giving of the Law on Sinai was commemorated. At the same time, it is impossible not to see a close parallel to the circumstances which had heralded the giving of the Law from Sinai, which, as we have seen, was commemorated at Pentecost. ) and had added such particulars as that at Sinai all nations had heard God’s voice in their own language and that voice could be heard as well by those farthest away as by those nearest the mount (see Midrash on Psalms 68:11, and Philo, de Decalogo)
Pentecost - Afterwards, however, and at a late date, Pentecost was supplied with one notable historical association, and it became the festival at which the giving of the Law on Sinai was commemorated. At the same time, it is impossible not to see a close parallel to the circumstances which had heralded the giving of the Law from Sinai, which, as we have seen, was commemorated at Pentecost. ) and had added such particulars as that at Sinai all nations had heard God’s voice in their own language and that voice could be heard as well by those farthest away as by those nearest the mount (see Midrash on Psalms 68:11, and Philo, de Decalogo)
Exodus, the Book of - There are two distinct parts: (1) Exodus 1-19, the history of Israel's deliverance from the beginning of their Egyptian bondage to their arrival at Sinai; (2) Exodus 20-40, the giving of the law and Israel's organization as "a kingdom of priests and an holy nation. Again, Exodus was evidently written by one minutely acquainted at once with Egypt and the Sinaitic peninsula. ...
None but one in Moses' circumstances could have described the wanderings in the wilderness of Sinai with such a peculiarly local coloring
Entry Into Jerusalem - Stanley also (SP Pentateuch - Numbers begins with preparation for leaving Sinai, and Deuteronomy stands out sharply from the end of Numbers in that Deuteronomy 1:1 begins the great speech of Moses which covers thirty chapters ( Deuteronomy 1-30 ). A division of the Pentateuch based on the contents may be outlined as: Genesis 1-11 , Primeval history, from Creation to Abraham; Genesis 12-36 , Patriarchal history; Genesis 37-50 , Joseph stories; Exodus 1-18 , The Exodus; Exodus 19:1Numbers 19:1—10:10 , Israel at Sinai; Numbers 10:11-21:35 , Israel in the Wilderness; Numbers 22:1Deuteronomy 22:1—34:1 , Israel in the Plains of Moab
Mishnah - ...
Development According to the Mishnah itself, oral tradition and its teachings goes all the way back to Moses himself who received the halakah from God on Sinai and passed it on to subsequent generations
Moses - The narratives attached to the delivery of the laws of Sinai are in an extraordinarily confused state, but with a few exceptions the parts which are due to J False Prophet - They stressed the permanence of David's dynasty, the temple, and the covenantas a guarantee that operated for every generation! They were overly dependent on promises made at Sinai that God would be Israel's God and Israel would be his peoplethereby allowing more leeway than one would ordinarily think permissible. ...
The theology of the false prophets was characterized by the following: (1) a selective appeal to the Davidic/Zion and Sinaitic covenants as a type of fire insurance against any threatened calamity; (2) an exclusive teaching of hope/salvation with no attention given to any potential adversities for lack of obedience to God's Word; and (3) a constant appeal to what the masses wanted to hear as a basis for promoting their own power and the status quo
Drink - Israel eats and drinks before God at Sinai in a covenant meal celebrating the sealing of the Mosaic covenant (Exodus 24:11 )
Ephraim (1) - " Ephraim's numbers in the wilderness of Sinai census were 40,500, Manasseh's 32,200
Moses - To save his life he fled from Egypt to live among the Midianites, a nomadic people who inhabited a barren region that spread from the Sinai Peninsular around the Gulf of Aqabah into the western part of the Arabian Desert
Malachi, Theology of - At Mount Sinai the nation of Israel became God's "treasured possession" (Exodus 19:5 ), a term used in Malachi 3:17 also
Arabia, Arabs - We shall have to understand by this name the great desert region not only of Syria, but also of Mesopotamia as well as the peninsula of Sinai. The Apostle Paul ( Galatians 4:25 ), like profane writers, reckons the Sinaitic peninsula, which was part of the Nahatæan kingdom, as belonging to Arabia
Commerce - The two principal routes from Palestine into Egypt were, the one along the shores of the Mediterranean from Gaza to Pelusium, and the other from Gaza by the way of Mount Sinai and the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea
Priest - In the solemnity of the covenant made by the Lord with his people, at the foot of Mount Sinai, Moses performed the office of mediator, and young men were chosen from among Israel to perform the office of priests, Exodus 24:5
King - This was well illustrated in the covenant that God made with Israel at Mt Sinai
Covenant - Some say that the idea of covenant arose initially in the minds of the Israelites after they had been at Mount Sinai. ...
The actual process of confirming the covenant with Israel took place at Mount Sinai. ...
Sixth, the Israelites had to consecrate themselves to Yahweh while keeping a distance from Mount Sinai (19:10-15)
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - The “brook of Egypt” mostly is a reference to Wadi el-Arish, the drainage system of the central Sinai. ...
In the north the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Elath (Aqaba) form the western and eastern arms making up the shorelines of the Sinai Peninsula
Cherub (1) - Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:14; they, with the flaming sword, were the forerunners of the sanctuary, where the Cherub on either side of the bright Shekinah cloud (from which, as on Sinai, the flame might at any moment dart) looked down on the blood-sprinkled mercy-seat of the ark, God's meeting place in reconciliation with sinners by the stoning blood; mercy and justice meeting together in man's redemption
Issachar - The tribe's number at Sinai was 54,400 (Numbers 1:29); at the close of the wilderness march it reached 64,300, inferior to Judah and Dan alone
Tongues, Gift of - The Alexandrinus manuscript confirms Mark 16:9-20; The Sinaiticus and Vaticanus manuscripts, omit it; "they shall speak with "new" ("not known before", kainais ) tongues"; this promise is not restricted to apostles; "these signs shall follow them that believe. The "tongues like as of fire" in the establishing of the New Testament church answer to Exodus 19:18, at the giving of the Old Testament law on Sinai, and Ezekiel 1:4 "a fire enfolding itself"; compare 1 John 4:2-3; Luke 24:32. Probably Paul did so in Lycaonia (Acts 14:11; Acts 14:15; he says (1 Corinthians 14:18) "I speak with tongues (the Vaticanus manuscript, but the Sinaiticus and the Alexandrinus manuscripts 'with a tongue') more than ye all
Law, Ten Commandments, Torah - The covenant agreement between God and His people at Mount Sinai provided the foundation for all of Israel's laws
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Thus all the adults who had rebelled against God at Sinai died during the forty years of the Wilderness Wandering period
Glory (2) - So the ‘glory’ appeared to Israel at Sinai (Exodus 24:16-17), at the door of the Tent (Leviticus 9:23, Numbers 14:10; Numbers 16:19), at the dedication of Solomon’s Temple (1 Kings 8:10-11), in the visions of Isaiah (Isaiah 6:1-3) and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 1:28; Ezekiel 3:23; Ezekiel 8:4)
Triumphs - These words are a quotation from the sixty-eighth Psalm, where David in spirit describes the ascension of Messiah in very glowing colours: "The chariots of God are twenty thousand, even thousands of angels: the Lord is among them, as in Sinai, in the holy place
Clean, Cleanness - Because God's priests were to be clothed with righteousness (Psalm 132:9 ), the entire nation was involved in manifesting the priesthood of all who believed sincerely in the covenant relationship with God that had been forged on Mount Sinai
Poetry of the Hebrews - Lowth thinks, to the history of God's descent upon Mount Sinai; yet it seems more probable that the figures were taken directly from those commotions of nature with which the author was acquainted, and which suggested stronger and nobler images than those which now occur to us. " Figurative allusions, too, we frequently find to the rites and ceremonies of their religion, to the legal distinctions of things clean and unclean, to the mode of their temple service, to the dress of their priests, and to the most noted incidents recorded in their sacred history; as, to the destruction of Sodom, the descent of God upon Mount Sinai, and the miraculous passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea
Aaron - The crossing of the Red Sea also, Mount Sinai, and the giving of the tabernacle and the law-it has certainly been by some one who could both speak well and write well also that all that wonderful piece has been put into our hands. Little did the penitents in Israel think how much of his high priesthood Aaron had put on under Sinai and on the scene of that idolatrous and licentious revelry
Containers And Vessels - Copper mines in the Sinai were used by the Egyptians, who developed a sophisticated smelting process
Time - In the Old Testament, on the basis of Israel's redemption from Egypt, every succeeding generation was to respond in loving obedience to the laws issued at Sinai by God their Savior (Deuteronomy 11 ; 104:19 )
Blood - ...
Almost as dramatic as the Passover was the ceremony at the dedication of the covenant treaty at Sinai between Yahweh and His covenant people, the Israelites (Exodus 24:1-8 )
Minerals And Metals - Turquoise Sky-blue to bluish-green base phosphate of copper and aluminum was mined in the Sinai by the Egyptians and was a highly valued stone in antiquity
Mines And Mining - In the Arabah and Sinai, mining settlements were founded
God, Name of - "Glory" is the form of the divine appearance in the dramatic events of redemptive historyat the exodus, at Sinai, at the dedication of the tabernacle and temple
Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ - It was he who made a covenant with the patriarchs, who appeared to Moses in the burning bush, who redeemed the Israelites from Egypt, who conducted them through the wilderness, who gave the law at Sinai, and transacted the affairs of the ancient church
Stephen - His speech is not the unconnected narrative that many suppose, but a covert argument which carries his hearers unconsciously along with him until at the close he unveils the drift of the whole, namely, to show:...
(1) That in Israel's past history God's revelation of Himself was not confined to the holy land and the temple, that Abraham had enjoyed God's revelations in Mesopotamia, Haran, and Canaan before he possessed a foot of the promised land; so also Israel and Moses in the strange land of Egypt, and in Midian and Sinai, which was therefore "holy ground" (Acts 7:33), and in the wilderness 40 years
Government - This concept took dramatic shape when, under Moses, the twelve tribes pledged allegiance to God at Mount Sinai, and among other privileges received a gift of land, from which they were instructed to drive out the inhabitants. The pledge to God (Exodus 24:7 ) made a theocratic society out of tribes who had normally followed a casual and unregulated life, and the constitution given to them in the Sinai covenant contained specific laws that they were required to obey if they were to become a holy nation (Exodus 19:6 )
Bethlehem - ’ (Sinai and Palestine, p. 82; Cunningham Geikie, The Holy Land and the Bible; Stanley, Sinai and Palestine; Kelman, The Holy Land; Sanday, Sacred Sites of the Gospels; G
Ten Commandments - Sinai, and written by Him on two stones, and given to Moses ( Exodus 24:12 ; Exodus 31:13 ; Exodus 32:15-16 ; cf
New Covenant - The former produced slavery to the law (represented by Mount Sinai/present Jerusalem), whereas the latter produced freedom from the law and correlatively life in the Spirit (represented by Jerusalem above)
Sermon on the Mount - The sermon introduces Jesus sitting on the mountain (5:1-2), reminding the reader of Moses' giving of the law at Sinai
Judaea - —Stanley, SP Tabernacle - The remarkable and costly structure thus described was erected in the wilderness of Sinai, on the first day of the first month of the second year, after the Israelites left Egypt, Exodus 40
Judaea - —Stanley, SP Priest (2) - Apart from foreign priesthoods like those of Egypt and Midian (Genesis 47, Exodus 3), the first mention of priesthood in Israel is at Sinai. At Sinai they were to realize for the first time their true relation to God and God’s relation to them as dwelling among them (Exodus 19:4-6; Exodus 25:1-8)
Joshua, Theology of - When he reappears in Exodus 24:13 , Joshua climbs Mount Sinai alongside Moses
Sabbath - Some argue from the silence concerning its observance by the patriarchs that no sabbatic ordinance was actually given before the Sinaitic law, and that Genesis 2:3 is not historical but anticipatory. Further, before the Sinaitic law was given the sabbath law is recognized in the double manna promised on the sixth day, that none might be gathered on the sabbath (Exodus 16:5; Exodus 16:23). The Decalogue was proclaimed with peculiar solemnity from Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:16-24); it was written on tables of stone, and deposited in the ark (representing Himself) covered by the mercy-seat on which rested the Shekinah cloud of His glory; Moses significantly states "these vows the Lord spoke, and He added no more
Simeon - At the census at Sinai Simeon numbered 59,300 (Numbers 1:23); it was then the most numerous after Judah and Daniel At Shittim it had become the smallest, numbering 22,200. Sinaiticus and Alexandrinus manuscripts read "Symeon" (2 Peter 1:1), but Vaticanus "Simon. The Samaritan who practiced magic, "bewitching the people of Samaria, giving out that he himself was some great one," so that all said "this is the power of God which is called great" (so the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus manuscripts)
Pharisees - "Moses received the oral law from Sinai, and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua to the elders, and these to the prophets, and these to the men of the great synagogue" (Ρirke Αboth ("The Sayings of the [1] Fathers"), 1)
Cabbala - Accordingly, the Jews believe that God gave to Moses on Mount Sinai, not only the law, but also the explication of that law; and that Moses, after his coming down, retiring to his tent, rehearsed to Aaron both the one and the other
Biblical Theology - ...
While knowledge of God's moral character and will was not unknown among God's people prior to Moses, it is revealed in fuller and more definite form, and in a more discrete social context, at Mount Sinai (chap. They then submit to circumcision (Joshua 5 ), a reaffirmation of submission to the Lord revealed at Sinai in contrast to their parents' chronic disbelief (1 Corinthians 10:5 ; Hebrews 3:19 )
Offerings And Sacrifices - Even before the revelation to Moses at Sinai, offerings and sacrifices were a key part of the practice of relationship with God from Cain and Abel, to Noah, to the patriarchs, to Jethro the priest of Median, to the ratification of the Mosaic covenant by sacrifice before the tabernacle was built. " Finally, all three terms appear together in Exodus 24:4-5 in the ritual for the ratification of the covenant at Mount Sinai: "He [3] got up early the next morning and built an [4] altar at the foot of the mountain Then he sent young Israelite men, and they offered burnt offerings and sacrificed young bulls as fellowship offerings to the Lord" (here the NIV translates the apposition "sacrifices, fellowship offerings" simply as "fellowship offerings"; both terms are there in Hebrew)
Work - ...
Sinai . At Mount Sinai Israel becomes a nation and is given a constitution and law (Exodus 19-24 )
Barnabas, Epistle of - ...
Our author does not cut Christianity away from all historic connexion with the Jewish past; on the contrary, he denies a place of privilege to the Jews after Mount Sinai, in order to show that that place really belonged to the Christians. His animus is against the Jews, not against the Jewish religion; from Sinai onwards they have in reality stood outside that religion; its privileges were always the peculiar property of the Christians, held in reserve for them until the coming of the Messiah. ; and, since it is found in Codex Sinaiticus beginning on the leaf where Revelation ends, one may conclude that it was once read in churches. -Until the discovery of the famous Codex Sinaiticus (א) in 1862, this Epistle was known only in a Latin translation and in eight Greek Manuscripts
Daniel, Theology of - Daniel, like other Old Testament prophets, is concerned with the Sinai covenant (9:11,13, 15) and with the basic social message of the other prophets (4:27)
Levites - The Levites marching from Sinai round the tabernacle were the heavenly King's royal guard; none else was to approach it on pain of death (Numbers 1:51; Numbers 18:22; Numbers 4:3-30)
Pottery in Bible Times - The Nabataeans who controlled the trade routes of the Negev/Sinai and the Transjordan produced the finest local varieties, emulating the skills and export products of the Roman potters of the period
Ishmael - , and from Sinai on the S
Glory - At Sinai the זַיו was restored to the children of Israel, but was immediately lost again by their unfaithfulness (ib
Magnificat - ‘The Peshitta as well as the Sinai Palimpsest renders, “Now Mary remained with Elisabeth
God - ...
In the early Mosaic era, the new redemptive name of “God” and the formulation of the Sinai covenant made 'êl shadday largely obsolete as a designation of deity
Elijah - He was a Mount-Sinai of a man, with a heart like a thunderstorm
Houses - This incident proves the necessity of the law which was graciously dictated from Sinai, and furnishes a beautiful example of God's paternal care and goodness; for the terrace was a place where many offices of the family were performed, and business of no little importance was occasionally transacted
Sea - Between these gulfs lies the celebrated peninsula of Mount Sinai
Ethics - ...
In giving his law to Israel at Mt Sinai, God’s purpose was not that as Israelites kept it they could earn the right to become his people
Vicarious Sacrifice - In the discourse of the Last Supper the symbolism used is not drawn from the Paschal lamb, but rather from Exodus 24, where the sacrifice established to celebrate the new covenant between Jahweh and Israel at Mount Sinai is described. As the offering at Sinai sealed the Old Covenant, so Jesus, when about to die, looked upon Himself as the victim whose blood would seal the New Covenant which He had established in inaugurating the Kingdom of God
Law - Very frequently it is used to signify the decalogue, or ten precepts which were delivered to the Israelites from Mount Sinai. Hence the unity of God is inculcated with perpetual solicitude; it stands at the head of the system of moral law promulgated to the Jews from Sinai by the divine voice, heard by the assembled nation, and issuing from the divine glory, with every circumstance which could impress the deepest awe upon even the dullest minds: "I am the Lord thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage; thou shalt have no others gods beside me," Exodus 20:2-3
Arabia - Through a considerable part of this region, the Israelites wandered after they had escaped from Egypt; and in it were situated the mountains Horeb and Sinai. The greater part of this district consists of naked rocks and sandy and flinty plains; but it contained also some fertile spots, particularly in the peninsula of Mount Sinai, and through the long range of Mount Seir
Moses - " For when, in the excess of his zeal to redress their grievances, he had slain an Egyptian, who injured one of them, in which he probably went beyond his commission, and afterward endeavoured to reconcile two of them that were at variance, they rejected his mediation; and "the man who had done wrong said, Who made thee a judge and a ruler over us? Intendest thou to kill me, as thou killedst the Egyptian yesterday?" So Moses, finding it was known, and that Pharaoh sought to slay him, fled for his life to the land of Midian, in Arabia Petraea, where he married Zipporah, the daughter of Jethro, or Reuel, prince and priest of Midian; and, as a shepherd, kept his flocks in the vicinity of Mount Horeb, or Sinai, for forty years, Exodus 2:11-21 ; Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 18:5 ; Numbers 10:29 ; Acts 7:23-30 . ...
At Mount Sinai the Lord was pleased to make Moses, the redeemer of Israel, an eminent type of the Redeemer of the world
Bible, Authority of the - In Exodus this narrative leads to the giving of the law on Sinai, and alongside the Ten Commandments, written by the finger of God, we read the mass of first-person instruction that became the basis of the civil and ceremonial practice of the Hebrews
Olives, Mount of - of the central ascension hill and forming part of it with a slight depression between, is probably that cave where according to Eusebius Jesus taught mysteries to His disciples (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, 453)
Time, Meaning of - ...
God gave them His law from Sinai, and ever thereafter they strove imperfectly to be God's people and to keep His law
Election - 1618452499_32 ) till Israel is grown, and prepared for the national covenant at Sinai
Galatians, Theology of - ...
Flesh Spirit Works of the law...
Faith, promise...
Curse...
Blessing, inheritance...
Slavery...
Freedom, sonship...
Sin and death...
Justification and life...
Hagar the slave woman...
[1] the free woman...
Sinai and present Jerusalem...
Jerusalem from above...
Ishmael...
Isaac...
Persecutor...
Persecuted...
Cast away...
Heir...
Being under law...
Being led by the Spirit...
Works of the flesh...
Fruit of the Spirit...
The last two sets of items occur in the hortatory section, particularly in 5:13-26
Wages - ...
When Israel is formally constituted as a nation at Sinai, some of the laws given to her are specifically concerned with wages
Joel, Theology of - ...
It is true that Joel does not dwell on specific great Acts of God in the past associated with the patriarchs, the bondage in Egypt, the exodus, the theophany at Mount Sinai, and the conquest of Canaan
Sanctify - Moses acknowledges to God that “the people cannot come up to mount Sinai: for thou chargedst us, saying, Set bounds about the mount, and sanctify it” ( Priest - In the solemnity of the covenant that the Lord made with his people at the foot of Mount Sinai, Moses performed the office of mediator, Exodus 24:5-6 ; and young men were chosen from among the children of Israel to perform the office of priests
Joannes Presbyter - Anastasius of Sinai (Gebhardt, No
Mount of Olives - (1838); Stanley, SP Text of the New Testament - Codex Sinaiticus , originally a complete codex of the Greek Bible. Catherine at Sinai in 1844, and acquired by him for the University Library at Leipzig; while the remainder (156 leaves of the OT, and the entire NT, with the Epistle of Barnabas and part of the ‘Shepherd’ of Hermas, on 148 leaves) were found by him in the same place in 1859, and eventually secured for the Imperial Library at St. Catherine at Sinai a palimpsest MS, which was subsequently recognized from their photographs as containing a text closely akin to the Curetonian. Comparison of the two showed that they represented different recensions of the same version, the Lewis or Sinaitic MS (Syr
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
A different generation had sprung up from that to which the law at Sinai had been addressed. Herein Deuteronomy, "the second law," is the preparation for the gospel law; and Moses, in the very act of founding the Sinaitic law, prepares for its giving place to the higher law which is its end and fulfillment
Baptism - ...
As circumcision was the painful entrance into the yoke of bondage, the law of Sinai, so baptism is the easy entrance into the light yoke of Christ, the law of liberty and love
Paul as a Believing Man - The blasts of divine wrath that blew off the bleak sides of Sinai struck with such shocks against Paul's faith in Christ, that, like the trees on the wind-swept sides of the Tay, it became just by reason of that wind so rooted and grounded in Christ crucified, that however the rain might descend, and the floods come, and the winds blow and beat upon Paul's faith, it fell not, for it had struck its roots, with every new storm, deeper and deeper into the Cross of Christ
Law - Thus, Israel was to be "a kingdom of priests," each subject a priest (though their exercise of the sacrificial functions was delegated to one family as their representative), and God was at once civil and spiritual king; therefore all the theocratic ordinances of the Sinaitic legislation were designed to minister toward holiness, which is His supreme law. The comparative smallness of that portion of the Sinaitic law which concerns the political constitution harmonizes with the alleged time of its promulgation, when as yet the form of government was not permanently settled. The Sinai law in its sacrifices was the bud, the gospel was the flower and the ripened fruit
Law - ...
The Decalog was given at Mount Sinai (Exodus 20:1-17 ) and repeated in Moses' sermon over forty years later (Deuteronomy 5:6-21 )
Hebrews, Theology of - Here the contrast is between the fiery blackness of earthly Mount Sinai on the one hand, and the radiant glory of the heavenly Jerusalem on the other
Advent (2) - This blighter outlook for fallen humanity was confirmed by the assurance given to Abraham that in the line of his descendants the original promise was destined to be fulfilled (Genesis 12:2-3),—an assurance which was further strengthened when, under Moses, Israel was formed into a nation and entered at Sinai into covenant with Jehovah as His chosen people (Exodus 20-24)
Canaanites - Sina or Sini was another son of Canaan, whose settlement is not so precisely ascertained; but some authors infer, from the affinity of the names, that the Desert of Sin, and Mount Sinai, were the places of his abode, and that they were so called from him
New Testament - Sinait . Here those only can be briefly noticed which are of primary importance, the first place being given to the latest-discovered and most complete Codex Sinaiticus --the Cod. Catherine, Mount Sinai, in 1859
Sin - The Sinaitic Law . The next great critical point in the evolution of human consciousness of sin is reached in the promulgation of the Law from Sinai
Sacrifices - In both these places attention is drawn to the covenant at Sinai
Joshua - Sinai ( Exodus 32:17 f
Leviticus, Theology of - On the contrary, when the Israelites first arrived at Sinai one of the main features of the Lord's proposal of covenant in Exodus 19:3-6 was that Israel would become "a kingdom of priests" (v
Dispersion - It was conceived as consisting simply in the observance of a definite code of laws as to worship and life, given by God on Mount Sinai
Word - They say, for example, that it was the Memra, or the Word, which created the world, which appeared to Moses on Mount Sinai, which gave him the law, which spoke to him face to face, which brought Israel out of Egypt, which marched before the people, and which wrought all those miracles that are recorded in Exodus
Passover (i.) - This involved a recital of the national history from the Patriarchal times to the deliverance out of Egypt, and the constitution of the emancipated people by means of the covenant at Sinai
Dispersion - It was conceived as consisting simply in the observance of a definite code of laws as to worship and life, given by God on Mount Sinai
Paul - ...
Immediately after his conversion he retired into the solitudes of Arabia (Galatians 1:17 ), perhaps of "Sinai in Arabia," for the purpose, probably, of devout study and meditation on the marvellous revelation that had been made to him
Ham - Only, ever after that terrible day, with what watchfulness did those two brothers go out and come in! With what wistfulness did they look at their father as he ate and drank! With what solicitude, and with what prayer, and not for their father only, did Shem and Japheth lie down at night and rise up in the morning! It brought Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth back again to Moses' mind when he received and read and transcribed the Fifth Commandment on Mount Sinai: Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee
Tribes of Israel, the - During the journey from Mount Sinai to Canaan the tribe of Issachar followed the tribe of Judah, that is, it was a part of the first cluster of tribes located on the east side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:5 )
Leadership - At Sinai the Law and the tabernacle instructions were given to Moses to pass along to the people
Jeremiah, Theology of - By his initiative God sets in place a covenant both like and unlike the earlier Sinai covenant
Word - In the Old Testament, the words God had given Moses at Sinai became written law (Exodus 24:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:10-14 ; 27:3 ; 31:24-29 )
Tabernacle - ]'>[1] more correctly ‘ tent of meeting ,’ see below), is usually understood the elaborate portable sanctuary which Moses erected at Sinai, in accordance with Divine instructions, as the place of worship for the Hebrew tribes during and after the wilderness wanderings
Temple of Jerusalem - The quaking and smoke of the Lord's presence at Sinai were now manifested in Zion (Isaiah 6:4 )
Gods, Pagan - Archaeological evidence of such syncretism can be seen in the recent discovery in the Sinai of a jar inscribed with prayer to “Yahweh of Samaria and his Asherah
Holy, Holiness - Sinai, the tabernacle, Israel's two camps, (one for the clean and one for the unclean), and ultimately the temple, each with their accompanying physical elements and human ministers, point to one goal: the possibility of dwelling with the Holy One (cf
Forgiveness - At Mount Sinai the people agreed to do everything that was written in the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 24:1-8 )
Red Sea - But whosoever should suppose that the multitude of the Israelites could be able to cross it here without a prodigy would deceive himself; for, even in our days, no caravan passes that way to go from Cairo to Mount Sinai, although it would considerably shorten the journey
Sabbath - The seventh day was hallowed at the close of the creation; its sanctity was afterward marked by the withholding of the manna on that day, and the provision of a double supply on the sixth, and that previous to the giving of the law from Sinai: it was then made a part of that great epitome of religious and moral duty, which God wrote with his own finger on tables of stone; it was a part of the public political law of the only people to whom almighty God ever made himself a political Head and Ruler; its observance is connected throughout the prophetic age with the highest promises, its violations with the severest maledictions; it was among the Jews in our Lord's time a day of solemn religious assembling, and was so observed by him; when changed to the first day of the week, it was the day on which the first Christians assembled; it was called, by way of eminence, "the Lord's day;" and we have inspired authority to say, that both under the Old and New Testament dispensations, it is used as an expressive type of the heavenly and eternal rest
Organization (2) - He points to one, possibly as indicating all, and says that upon him, upon the living rock of human faith and enthusiasm, and not upon the dead heights of Sinai or rock of Zion, will He build
Transfiguration (2) - The legend was constructed skilfully from OT figures and analogies (especially from the parallel illumination of Moses’ countenance on Sinai), and from the prophecies as to the appearance of the Messiah and His forerunner (Malachi 4:5) Elijah
Sin - At Sinai Israel learned that sin is transgression of God's law; it is behavior that trespasses onto forbidden territory (Romans 4:15 )
Sanctification - He sanctified a common bush in the Sinai desert from which to commission a man to lead Israel out of bondage
Jerusalem - " Sinai and Palestine, 170, 1
Government of the Hebrews - God promulgated, from the clouds of Mount Sinai, the prominent laws for the government of his people, considered as a religious community, Exodus 20
Palestine - Under the red sandstone are the archæan granitic rocks which form a large part of the Sinai Peninsula
Law of Moses - In Exodus 20-23 , in direct connection with the revelation from Mount Sinai, that which may be called the rough outline of the Mosaic law is given by God, solemnly recorded by Moses, and accepted by the people
Paul - " Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Sinaiticus manuscripts read "and" before "at Jerusalem") was at Jerusalem "at the feet of Gamaliel, taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers" (Acts 22:3). "It is hard for thee to kick against the goads" (not in Acts 9:5 the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Alexandrinus manuscripts, but only in Acts 26:14), which, as in the case of oxen being driven, only makes the goad pierce the deeper (Matthew 21:44; Proverbs 8:36). His familiarity with Mount Sinai in Arabia, the scene of the giving of the law, appears in Galatians 4:24-25; Hebrews 12:18; here he was completely severed from his former legalism
Fire - In contrast with the material fire that manifested His presence at Sinai, God is Himself in His very essence what that consuming fire denoted-immaculate purity which destroys everything incompatible with it (Hebrews 12:20; cf
Fire - In contrast with the material fire that manifested His presence at Sinai, God is Himself in His very essence what that consuming fire denoted-immaculate purity which destroys everything incompatible with it (Hebrews 12:20; cf
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - Trumpets are associated with the theophany on Sinai (Exodus 19:16,19 )
Bible - the Curetonian, edited by Cureton, and the Sinaitic, found in a MS at the monastery of St. Catherine on Mount Sinai. While it is admitted that a primitive text underlying the Peshitta may be as ancient as any of these versions, scholars are fairly agreed that the Peshitta, as we know it, is considerably more recent than Tatian and the Sinaitic Gospels, both of which may be assigned to the 2nd cent
Hebrews Epistle to the - As the glories of the heavenly Sion eclipse the terrors of Sinai, so is our responsibility greater than that of Israel of old
Mediator - As the Israelites were received into a unique relation with God at Sinai by being sprinkled with sacrificial blood, so by the blood shed on Calvary, a new elect race is dedicated to God
Palesti'na - On the south it is no less enclosed by the arid and inhospitable deserts of the upper pert of the peninsula of Sinai
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - He is called by Anastasius of Sinai ὁ πάνυ and ὁ πολύς , and passed in the church as an authority of the highest rank
Elijah - The lonely wilderness and awful rocks of Sinai were best fitted to draw the spirit off from the depressing influences of man's world and to raise it up to near communion with God. A John the Baptist, Elijah's antitype, the last representative of the Sinaitic law, must be followed by the Messiah and His Spirit speaking in the winning tones of Matthew 11:29
New Testament - But the oldest MSS, existing, Codex Sinaiticus ('aleph) Codex Vaticanus (B), Codex Alexandrinus (A), are not older than the fourth century. ...
Tischendorf has added to our Greek manuscripts Codex Sinaiticus ('aleph), which he found on Mount Sinai in 1844 and rescued from papers intended to light the stove in the convent of Catherine. Codex Sinaiticus ('aleph) puts Hebrew after 2 Thessalonians, Acts after Philemon, the universal (general) epistles after Paul's letters and the Book of Acts. Codex Sinaiticus ('aleph), see above
Atonement - ’ The reference is obviously to the solemn ratification by blood-sprinkling of the covenant of Sinai (Exodus 24:8)
Sacrifice (2) - ’ In the Sacrament thus instituted there is a twofold reference to the ritual of the Jews—(1) to the Passover, in the breaking of bread, the symbol of His broken body; (2) to the sacrifice of the covenant at Sinai, to which the giving of the cup with the words—‘This is my blood of the new covenant’ clearly alludes. As to the institution of the cup and its reference to the ratification of the Sinaitic covenant, the idea here is that of purification on entering into communion with God
Egypt - But it is certain Egypt was master of much of the Sinai Peninsula long before this, and must have had camels, "the ships of the desert," for keeping up communications. Tablets in the Sinaitic peninsula record the Egyptian conquest of Asiatic nomads there
Law - This the prophets do not deny; but they do deny that the distinctive feature of the Sinaitic legislation lay in anything but its moral excellence. Having already cited the prophets in disproof of the Mosaic authorship of the Levitical legislation, on the ground that the latter is essentially ritualistic (and therefore does not correspond to the prophets’ view of the Law of Moses), it is monstrously unfair to deny the Sinaitic origin of what is left in conformity with the prophetical standard, on the ground that it ought to be ‘essentially ritualistic’ also, and is not. It is possible that the original code may have been promulgated at Sinai; but if so, it has received considerable expansions to suit the agricultural requirements, which first became part of Israel’s daily life in the early years of the occupation of Canaan
Messiah - The glory of the restored kingdom was to he enhanced by a New Covenant to replace the broken covenant of Sinai
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Moses spoke directly with God on Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:3-24 )
Psalms, Theology of - As in the oracles of the prophets, the emphasis in these psalms is on integrity and moral purity as defined by the Sinai covenant rather than merely on ritual purity and sacrifices
Jerusalem - ” It stands above the vault of the traditional Tomb of David, and we can hardly suppose that any residence, at the time of the Christian era, could have stood within the precincts of the Royal Sepulchre’ (Sinai and Palestine, new ed
Freedom of the Will - It is like preferring the state of the handmaid to that of the wife, Hagar to Sarah; or leaving Jerusalem, our mother, for the barren heights of Sinai (Genesis 4:24-26)
New Jerusalem - And again also I showed it to Moses on Mount Sinai when I showed to him the likeness of the tabernacle and all its vessels
Pharisees (2) - Obedience to God’s Law under the awful Categorical Imperative of Sinai, as applied by scribes and Pharisees, was the dominant principle, the yoke upon the neck of the Jews, when Christ appeared (Mark 9:12-31 Galatians 5:1)
Worship - The first fruits of harvest in the kingdom of nature; the first fruits of harvest in the kingdom of grace; the law of the letter from Mount Sinai—the law of the spirit from the heavenly Jerusalem
Egypt - to the copper and turquoise mines in the peninsula of Sinai, and cedar wood was probably then already obtained from Lebanon by sea