What does Simon mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
σίμων Peter was one of the apostles. / Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites. / Simon 35
σίμωνος Peter was one of the apostles. / Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites. / Simon 15
σίμωνα Peter was one of the apostles. / Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites. / Simon 14
σίμωνι Peter was one of the apostles. / Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites. / Simon 7
σίμωνά Peter was one of the apostles. / Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites. / Simon 2
συμεὼν the second son of Jacob by Leah. 1

Definitions Related to Simon

G4613


   1 Peter was one of the apostles.
   2 Simon called Zelotes or the Kanaites.
   3 Simon, father of Judas who betrayed Jesus.
   4 Simon Magus, the Samaritan wizard.
   5 Simon the tanner, Ac. 10.
   6 Simon the Pharisee, Luke 7:40–44.
   7 Simon of Cyrene who carried the cross of Christ.
   8 Simon the cousin of Jesus, the son of Cleophas.
   9 Simon the leper, so called to distinguish him from others of the same name.
   Additional Information: Peter = “a rock or stone”.
   

G4826


   1 the second son of Jacob by Leah.
   2 one of Abraham’s descendants.
   3 the one who took the infant Jesus in his arms in the temple.
   4 a teacher at the church of Antioch.
   5 the original name of Peter the apostle.
   Additional Information: Simon = “harkening”.
   

Frequency of Simon (original languages)

Frequency of Simon (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Magus, Simon
According to the testimony of Saint Justin, a native of Gitta, he was converted by the preaching of Philip in Samana and was baptized. When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter. He begged the Apostles to pray for him (Acts 9). According to legend Simon came to Rome and won many adherents by his magic. Another version makes him the chief antagonist of Saint Peter. By magic he rose into the air, but the prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to fall, a scene depicted in the attached image. In the traditions of the 2century he was regarded as head of an heretical sect called Simonans.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Langham, Simon
Cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor of England; born Langham, England; died Avignon, France, 1376. Prior of Westminster Abbey, 1349, Bishop of Ely, 1362, and Archbishop of Canterbury, 1366, in 1368 he was made Cardinal of Saint Sixtus. Because he accepted this dignity without the king's permission, Edward III seized his revenues and declared his see forfeited. Langham resigned the archbishopric, joined Pope Gregory at Avignon, and in 1373 was made Cardinal-Bishop of Palestrina. In 1374 he was re-elected to the See of Canterbury, but did not receive permission to return to England until 1376, when he died.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Laplace, Pierre Simon
Catholic mathematical and physical astronomer, born Beaumont-en-Auge, March 23, 1749; died Paris, France, March 5, 1827. Known as "the Newton of France," and the great master in celestial mechanics. Made valuable contributions to the theory of ellipsoidal attraction and the theory of probability. In his honor spherical harmonics are called "Laplace's coefficients." His "System of the World," and "The Mechanics of the Heavens," containing explanations of his theories and discoveries in astronomy, secured his admission to the French Academy of Sciences (1785). He was one of the founders of the Bureau of Longitudes, and was made a member of the principal academies of Europe.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Maillard, Antoine Simon
French missionary among the Acadians and Micmacs, died Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1762. His influence over the Indians was so great that the English allowed him to remain with them and gave him a pension and church in Halifax with religious liberty for his flock. He was the first white man to master the Micmac tongue, and composed an alphabet, grammar, and dictionary of the language in addition to writing several devotional works in it.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ohm, Georg Simon
Physicist. Born 1787; died 1854. Made valuable research concerning galvanic currents. Discovered the famous "Ohm's Law" which is one of the fundamental principles of the mathematical theory of electricity. The unit of electrical resistance was named the ohm in his honor.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Magus, Simon
See Simon Magus.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Simon
SIMON (a Greek form of Simeon ). 1 . Simon Chosameus, who was found to have a ‘strange’ wife ( Esther 9:32 Esther 9:32 = Ezra 10:31 Sam imeon ). 2 . The subject of the encomium in Sir 50:1 ff., ‘son of Onias, the great (or high) priest.’ It is doubtful if Simon I. or Simon II. (both 3rd cent. b.c.) is meant. 3 . The Maccabæan high priest and ethnarch, son of Mattathias, slain by his son-in-law Ptolemy, b.c. 135 ( 1Ma 16:16 ; See Maccabees, 4 ). 4 . A Benjamite, guardian of the Temple in the time of Onias III., who suggested to Apollonius, the governor, to plunder it ( 2M Malachi 3:4 ). 5 . See Peter. 6 . See Simon Magus. 7 . Simon the Cananæan, one of the Twelve ( Matthew 10:4 , Mark 3:13 ). The surname is an Aramaic equivalent of ‘Zealot’ ( Luke 6:15 , Acts 1:13 ). 8 . See Brethren of the Lord. 9 . Simon the Leper, our Lord’s host at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 ; cf. John 12:2 ), possibly husband or father of Martha, doubtless cured of his leprosy at some time before the anointing by Mary (cf. Mary, 2 ). 10 . The Pharisee who was our Lord’s host when the sinful woman anointed Him ( Luke 7:40 ). The contradictions between these two stories are so great that it is difficult to suppose that they relate the same event in different versions. Two such incidents may well have happened, and one may have suggested the other (cf. Mary, 2 ). 11 . Father, or brother, of Judas Iscariot, himself surnamed Iscariot ( John 6:71 ; John 13:26 ‘Judas of Simon Iscariot,’ John 13:2 ‘Judas Iscariot of Simon’). 12 . The Cyrenian who bore our Lord’s cross ( Matthew 27:32 , Mark 15:21 , Luke 23:26 ); See Alexander and Rufus. The followers of Basilides in the 2nd cent. said that Simon was crucified instead of Jesus. 13 . The tanner, Peter’s host at Joppa ( Acts 9:43 ).
A. J. Maclean
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Simon Magus
SIMON MAGUS . Mentioned in Acts 8:9-24 , and described as using sorcery in Samaria and thereby amazing the people. He claimed to be ‘some great one,’ and was regarded by all as ‘that power of God which is called Great.’ When Philip reached Samaria, and, preaching the gospel, gathered many into the Church, Simon also fell under the influence of his message. We are told that he ‘believed,’ which cannot mean less than that he recognized that the Evangelist exerted, in the name of Jesus Christ, powers the reality of which he could not deny, and the efficacy of which ‘amazed’ him. He therefore sought baptism, and, being baptized, continued with Philip. The Apostles Peter and John came down to Samaria to establish the work begun by Philip, and by the laying on of their hands gave the Holy Ghost to the converts. This was no doubt evidenced by the miraculous gifts which were vouchsafed by God to His Church during its early years. The shallowness of Simon’s belief was now shown, for he offered to buy from the Apostles the power of conferring the Holy Ghost. Peter rebuked him in language of such sternness as to lead him to beg of the Apostle to pray that the judgment of God might not fall upon him for his sin.
Simon holds the unenviable position of being the one outstanding heretic in the NT: and from then until now his character has been held in particular odium. Ignatius, the earliest of the Fathers, calls him ‘the firstborn of Satan’: Irenæus marks him out as the first of all heretics: and later centuries have shown their sense of the greatness of his sin by using the word simony to indicate the crime of procuring a spiritual office by purchase. Justin Martyr mentions three times in his Apology , and once in his Dialogue , a Simon as a leader of an heretical sect. He states that Gitta, a village in Samaria, was his birthplace, and speaks of him as visiting Rome, and being so successful in his magical impostures as to have secured worship for himself as God, and to have been honoured with a statue, which bore the inscription Simoni Deo Sancto (‘to Simon the Holy God’). He further mentions that ‘almost all the Samaritans, and even a few of other nations,’ worshipped him as ‘first God’ (cf. Acts 8:10 ‘this man is that power of God which is called Great’). He also adds that Helena, a fallen woman who accompanied him, was ‘the first idea generated by him.’ Justin does not specifically identify this Simon with the Simon of the Acts, but there can be no reasonable doubt that he held them to be one and the same.
There was discovered in Rome in 1574 the base of a statue bearing the inscription ‘Semoni Sanco Deo fidio sacrum Sex. Pompejus … donum dedit.’ It is therefore generally assumed’ and no doubt correctly, that Justin, being shown by the Simonians at Rome this statue of the Sabine deity Semo Sancus, was led to believe erroneously that it had been erected in honour of Simon. But this error of his regarding what had occurred in Rome need not invalidate his statements regarding Simon himself in Samaria and the progress and tenets of his sect, for he himself was a Samaritan and thus cognizant of the facts. Irenæus deals more fully with Simon and his followers, though there is good reason for assuming that he is really indebted to a lost work of Justin for his information. He directly identifies him with the Simon of Acts 8:1-40 , places him first in his list of heretics, and makes him the father of Gnosticism. From the account he gives of the doctrines of the Simonians, it is clear that by his time they had developed into a system of Gnosticism; but it is very doubtful whether he is right in making the Simon of the NT the first setter forth of Gnostic myths. The beginning of Gnosticism is very obscure, but we may be fairly certain that it had not arisen as early as the scenes described in Acts 8:1-40 . The Simonian doctrines as given by Irenæus are therefore doubtless developments of the heretical teaching of Simon, which, even from the short account in the Acts, would seem to have lent itself readily to Gnostic accretions. As time went on many fanciful additions were made to his history, until in the 4th cent. the legend reached its completeness. Throughout these romances Simon is found travelling about from place to place in constant opposition to Peter, uttering calumnies against the Apostle; but being pursued by Peter he is ultimately vanquished and discredited. The earlier forms of the story lay the scene of the travels chiefly in Asia Minor, and describe the final conflict as taking place at Antioch. The later forms, however, make Rome, in the days of Nero, the ultimate goal of the journeyings. Here Simon is said to have met his death through his conflict with Peter or with Peter and Paul. By one tradition the magician, seeing his influence waning, desired his followers to bury him in a grave, promising to rise again the third day. They obeyed, and he perished, for, as Hippolytus adds,’ he was not the Christ.’ By another tradition Simon is depicted as deciding to give to the Emperor a crowning proof of his magical powers by attempting to fly off to God. He is reported to have flown for a certain distance over Rome, but, through Peter’s prayers, to have fallen and broken his leg, and to have been ultimately stoned to death by the populace. Another form of the tradition represented Paul as a companion of Peter in the contest, and as praying while Peter adjured the demons that supported Simon in his flight, in the name of God and of Jesus Christ, to uphold him no longer. Simon thereupon fell to the earth and perished.
Renewed interest in the history of Simon was aroused in modern times by Baur’s maintaining that in the Clementine literature, where the most developed form of the legend occurs, Simon is intended to represent not the actual Simon of the Acts, but rather Paul, whom he (Baur) conceived to have been fiercely opposed theologically to Peter. Full information on this theory may be found in Hastings’ DB [1] iv. 523f., where its unsoundness is shown. It may be said to be now generally rejected.
It should be added that Hippolytus ascribes a work entitled ‘The Great Revelation’ to Simon, and quotes largely from it; and that the sect of the Simonians did not long survive, for Origeo states that he did not believe that there were in his day thirty of them in existence.
Charles T. P. Grierson.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Simon
The abbreviated form of Simeon.
One of the twelve apostles, called the Canaanite (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ). This word "Canaanite" does not mean a native of Canaan, but is derived from the Syriac word Kanean or Kaneniah, which was the name of a Jewish sect. The Revised Version has "Cananaean;" marg., "or Zealot" He is also called "Zelotes" (Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ; RSV, "the Zealot"), because previous to his call to the apostleship he had been a member of the fanatical sect of the Zealots. There is no record regarding him.
The father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71 ; 13:2,26 ).
One of the brothers of our Lord (Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 ).
A Pharisee in whose house "a woman of the city which was a sinner" anointed our Lord's feet with ointment (Luke 7:36-38 ).
A leper of Bethany, in whose house Mary anointed our Lord's head with ointment "as he sat at meat" (Matthew 26:6-13 ; Mark 14:3-9 ).
A Jew of Cyrene, in North Africa, then a province of Libya. A hundred thousand Jews from Palestine had been settled in this province by Ptolemy Soter (B.C. 323-285), where by this time they had greatly increased in number. They had a synagogue in Jerusalem for such of their number as went thither to the annual feasts. Simon was seized by the soldiers as the procession wended its way to the place of crucifixion as he was passing by, and the heavy cross which Christ from failing strength could no longer bear was laid on his shoulders. Perhaps they seized him because he showed sympathy with Jesus. He was the "father of Alexander and Rufus" (Matthew 27:32 ). Possibly this Simon may have been one of the "men of Cyrene" who preached the word to the Greeks (Acts 11:20 ).
A sorcerer of great repute for his magical arts among the Samaritans (Acts 8:9-11 ). He afterwards became a professed convert to the faith under the preaching of Philip the deacon and evangelist (12,13). His profession was, however, soon found to be hollow. His conduct called forth from Peter a stern rebuke (8:18-23). From this moment he disappears from the Church's history. The term "Simony," as denoting the purchase for money of spiritual offices, is derived from him.
A Christian at Joppa, a tanner by trade, with whom Peter on one occasion lodged (Acts 9:43 ).
Simon Peter (Matthew 4:18 ). See PETER .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Simon
The name ‘Simon’ in the New Testament is the equivalent of ‘Simeon’ in the Old Testament (see SIMEON). Two of Jesus’ disciples were named Simon. The first was better known as Peter (Matthew 10:2; see PETER). The other was known either by an Aramaic word transliterated ‘Cananaean’ or by the equivalent Greek word transliterated ‘Zealot’ (Matthew 10:4; Luke 6:15; Acts 1:13). The name may have indicated his enthusiastic nature, or it may have referred to his association with the party of anti-Rome Jews known as the Zealots, or Patriots (see ZEALOT).
Five other people named Simon are mentioned in the Gospels. The first was a younger brother of Jesus (Matthew 13:55). The second was a Pharisee who invited Jesus to his home but received Jesus’ rebuke for his self-righteousness (Luke 7:36-50). The third was the owner of a house where a woman anointed Jesus just before his death (Matthew 26:6). (For the suggestion that this man was the father or husband of Martha see MARTHA.) The fourth was a man from Cyrene in Africa who helped carry Jesus’ cross to the crucifixion site (Mark 15:21). (He is possibly the person called Simeon in Acts 13:1.) The fifth was the father of Judas Iscariot (John 13:2; John 13:26).
Two more people named Simon feature in the book of Acts. One was a sorcerer in Samaria who believed Philip’s preaching and was baptized. But he was still a sorcerer at heart, and thought that by paying the right amount of money, he could receive the Holy Spirit’s power and so perform wonders. He was terrified when Peter announced a horrible judgment upon him, and asked Peter to pray on his behalf for God’s mercy (Acts 8:9-24).
The other Simon was a tanner in Joppa, on the Mediterranean coast. Peter on one occasion stayed in Simon’s house, and while there he had a vision that prepared him to visit Cornelius and other Gentiles in Caesarea (Acts 9:43; Acts 10:1-23).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - le Moyne, Simon
Jesuit missionary, born Beauvais, France, 1604; died near Three Rivers, 1665. Sent to Canada in 1638, he acquired a thorough knowledge of the Huron-Iroquois language, and the Indian character, and diplomacy. He was the first European to penetrate among the Onondagas. While on an embassy to the Cayuga Iroquois, he was seized and tortured, barely escaping death to which he had been sentenced.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Simon
(ssih' muhn) Greek personal name meaning, “flat-nosed.” Used in New Testament as Greek alternative for Hebrew, “Simeon.” 1. The father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71 ). 2 . One of Jesus' disciples; a son of Jonah (Matthew 16:17 ) and brother of Andrew. After he confessed Jesus as the Christ, the Lord changed his name to Peter (Matthew 16:18 ). See Peter ; Simeon .
3. A Pharisee who hosted Jesus at a dinner (Luke 7:36-40 ). Simon learned valuable lessons about love, courtesy, and forgiveness after a sinful woman anointed Jesus at this event. 4. A native of Cyrene who was forced to carry Jesus' cross to Golgotha (Mark 15:21 ). See Acts 9:43 ) and there received a visionary message from God declaring all foods to be fit for consumption (Acts 10:9-16 ).
6. Jesus' disciple also called “the Canaanite” (Matthew 10:4 ) or the Zealot (Luke 6:15 ). 7 . Brother of Jesus (Matthew 13:55 ). 8 . A leper who hosted Jesus and saw a woman anoint Jesus with costly ointment (Matthew 26:6-13 ; compare 3. above).
9. A magician from Samaria who believed Philip's preaching, was baptized, and then tried to buy the power of laying on hands and giving the Holy Spirit to people (Acts 8:9-24 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Simon Magus
1. The NT account.-Acts 8:9-24 gives the story of ‘a certain man, Simon by name,’ who ‘used sorcery, and amazed the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one (λέγων εἷναί τινα ἑαντὸν μέγαν): to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is that power of God which is called Great (ἡ δύναμις τοῦ θεοῦ ἡ καλουμένη μεγάλη).… But when they believed Philip preaching good tidings concerning the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. And Simon also himself believed: and being baptized, he continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great miracles wrought, he was amazed.’ The news of the movement in Samaria brought Peter and John from Jerusalem, and through their prayers and the laying on of their hands, the believers received the Holy Spirit. Seeing this, Simon offered the apostles money, saying, ‘Give me also this power, that on whomscever I lay my hands, he may receive the Holy Ghost. But Peter said unto him, Thy silver perish with thee, because thou hast thought to obtain the gift of God with money. Thou hast neither part nor lot in this matter: for thy heart is not right before God. Repent therefore of this thy wickedness, and pray the Lord if perhaps the thought of thy heart shall be forgiven thee. For I see that thou art in the gall of bitterness and in the bond of iniquity. And Simon answered and said, Pray ye for me to the Lord, that none of the things which ye have spoken come upon me.’
These verses tell all that is known definitely about this particular Simon. But in subsequent Christian literature the name became very prominent. A Simon Magus was described as an arch-heretic who was the antagonist of Simon Peter. Accounts of his teaching are given in heresiological works. An elaborate legend became current about his conflict with the Apostle. In modern times fresh importance has attached to this legend because the Tübingen school have tried to show that the oldest accounts are those in which Simon Magus is represented as a caricature of the apostle Paul, and the opponent of the apostle Peter. This has been used as a basis for their reconstruction of early Church history from the point of view that Peter and Paul were in conflict, and that the Acts of the Apostles was a conciliatory compromise. The question of the identity of this legendary Simon Magus-the disguised Paul-with the Simon of Acts 8 can be discussed best after some inquiry into the legend and into the references to Simon in Patristic literature.
2. The Simonian legend.-There are two chief sources of this legend. (a) The Clementine Homilies and Recognitions. These are two forms of an early Christian romance, the Homilies in Greek, the Recognitions in Latin. They relate the story of Clement’s search for truth until his reunion with the long-lost members of his family. According to the Homilies, in the course of his wanderings Clement met Peter at Caesarea in Palestine. The Apostle was to dispute next day with Simon of Gitta. The story of Simon is then related by two of his pupils: that his father’s name was Antonius, his mother’s Rachel; that he was a Samaritan of the village of Gitta, six miles from Samaria; that he was educated at Alexandria, and was skilled in the wisdom of the Greeks and in magic. Peter disputed with him for three days, after which Simon fled by night to Tyre. Peter followed him to Tyre and to Sidon and to Tripolis, whence Simon escaped to Syria. They met again in Laodicea, where the disputes were renewed. Simon managed to escape by changing the face of Faustus, Clement’s father, and making it like his own. This device, however, led to Faustus exposing Simon’s impostures. Meanwhile Simon reached Judaea .
In the Recognitions only one dispute is described-in Caesarea. But there is reference to a visit of Simon to Rome, where he is to be honoured with statues. It is probable that these versions are independent re-castings of a common original. The question in doubt is whether the original story told only of a conflict between Simon and Peter in Syria, or whether it related an earlier conflict in Syria and a later one in Rome.
(b) The legendary Acts of Peter and Paul. These tell the story of contests between Simon and Peter; but they place the scene in Rome. There are two forms of the story. (a) The Gnostic Acts (Actus Petri cum Simone) tell that after Paul left Rome, a stir arose in the city about a Simon who worked miracles and called himself the Great Power of God. He came to the city flying in smoke, and created a great sensation. Therefore Peter was bidden by Christ to go to Rome. The Apostle found Simon installed in the house of a Roman senator, and he attacked the Magian as a ravening wolf. When Simon refused him admittance, Peter sent a message by a dog, whose speech brought the traitor to the Apostle’s feet. By the aid of further miracles Peter silenced Simon till a public controversy was arranged before all Rome. Peter raised the dead, and exposed Simon’s attempts to work similar miracles. Simon then promised to fly to God. But in answer to Peter’s prayers he fell, broke his thigh, and was taken to Terracina, where he died.
(β) The Acta Petri et Pauli gives another form of the story. Paul is the companion of Peter in Rome. The success of their preaching made the Jews stir up Simon against Peter. He convinced Nero of his claims, and Peter and Paul were summoned to appear before the Emperor. After long discussion, Simon undertook to fly from a high tower. Paul was distressed, and prayed. But Peter adjured the angels of Satan not to help Simon, who fell to the ground and died.
The Apostolic Constitutions contains the whole story of a conflict in Syria and a conflict in Rome. Probably this is a piecing together of two stories, originally independent. It does not settle the question whether the Clementines and the Petrine Acts depend upon independent documents, as G. Salmon thinks (DCB [1] , article ‘Simon Magus’), or whether they severally elaborate two parts of one common history-an Ebionite Acts of Peter-which is Lipsius’ theory.
The substance of the story as it concerns Simon is that he travelled in Syria and as far as Rome, deceiving people by his magic and winning widespread adherence for his claims to Divine power; that he was opposed by Simon Peter, who exposed his deceit and brought to naught his efforts to impose on the people.
3. The Simonian system.-In addition to these legendary accounts of the contest between Simon Magus and Simon Peter, there are references to Simon in Patristic literature which give more trustworthy accounts of his life and teaching, (a) The earliest reference is in Justin Martyr’s Apology (i. 26, 56). He says: ‘After Christ’s ascension into heaven the devils put forward certain men who said that they themselves were gods; and they were not only not persecuted by you, but even deemed worthy of honours. There was a Samaritan, Simon, a native of the village called Gitta, who in the reign of Claudius Caesar, and in your royal city of Rome, did mighty acts of magic, by virtue of the art of the devils operating in him. He was considered a god, and as a god was honoured by you with a statue, which statue was erected on the river Tiber, between the two bridges, and bore this inscription, in the language of Rome: “Simoni Deo Sancto,” “To Simon the holy God.” And almost all the Samaritans, and a few even of other nations, worship him, and acknowledge him as the first god; and a woman, Helena, who went about with him at that time, and had formerly been a prostitute, they say is the first idea generated by him. And a man, Menander, also a Samaritan, of the town Capparetaea, a disciple of Simon, and inspired by devils, we know to have deceived many while he was in Antioch by his magical art’ (26). In 56 is another reference: ‘But the evil spirits were not satisfied with saying, before Christ’s appearance, that those who were said to be sons or Jupiter were born of him; but after He had appeared and been born among men, and when they learned how He had been foretold by the prophets, and knew that He should be believed on and looked for by every nation, they again, as was said before, put forward other men, the Samaritans Simon and Menander, who did many mighty works by magic, and deceived many, and still keep them deceived. For even among yourselves, as we said before, Simon was in the royal city Rome in the reign of Claudius Caesar, and so greatly astonished the sacred senate and people of the Romans, that he was considered a god, and honoured, like the others whom you honour as gods, with a statue.’ (b) Later Patristic literature seems to gather its accounts of Simon’s teaching from some common ground-probably a lost treatise by Justin. Simon is said to have taught that he was the highest power-the Supreme God Himself, who descended to the lower world because its rulers ruled it all. He passed through its regions, appearing in every form necessary for the restoration of the lost harmony. Among Jews he manifested himself as the Son, in Samaria as the Father, and among other motions as the Holy Spirit. Helena (whom he had purchased in a brothel in Tyre) was his πρώτη ἔννοια, mother of all, by whom he had called the angels and archangels into being. She had been laid under bonds by her own children, but after many transmigrations had been rescued at last by the Supreme God-Simon-who came down to deliver her and to bring salvation to all men through the knowledge of himself. He liberated the world and those who were his from the rule of those who had made the world. Those who had hope in him and in Helena might freely do as they would, for men were saved according to his grace and not according to good works.
Such a system is obviously an amalgam of paganism and Christianity. It contains a good deal that is common to almost all the forms of Gnostic myths, and it borrows some of its ideas and not a little of its phraseology from Christianity.
4. The historical value of the story.-(a) One explanation of this tradition is that it is the legendary development of the story in Acts 8, under the influence of a continued conflict between Christianity and the Simonian Gnosis. The Tübingen school, however, explained it in a different way. According to Baur and his followers, the Ebionite Clementine literature contains a caricature of the apostle Paul. Instead of the Simon of the tradition being treated as a historical character, the name is to be interpreted as a term of reproach for Paul. Whenever Simon Magus is mentioned in ancient documents, Paul is meant. The contest between Simon Magus and Simon Peter really represents the conflict between Paul and Peter. So the Simon of Acts 8 was no real character but only a presentation of Paul. Thus, Peter’s refusal to give Simon Magus the power of the Holy Spirit is a covert account of the refusal of the elder Apostle to admit Paul’s claims to rank with them, backed though the claim was by a gift of money for the poor saints in Jerusalem. Starting from this standpoint, Baur’s school reconstructed the story of early Christianity with the conflict between Paul and Peter as the key. The Acts of the Apostles was interpreted as a compromise, a book written in a conciliatory interest but resting upon Jewish Christian myths only partly understood. The journeys of Peter and his visit to Rome are merely an ecclesiastical tradition reflecting the journeys of Paul, and expressing the belief of the Church that the great Apostle, who had withstood the Simon-Paul everywhere else, must have followed up his victory in the capital. This theory, ingeniously applied to Patristic and Clementine literature, and worked out with much skill, won many adherents for a time, despite the fact that it proved the presence of biased and fabricated history within primitive Christianity. But a reaction soon set in. In Encyclopaedia Britannica 9 (xxii. 79) A. Harnack wrote, ‘On no other point are the proofs of the Tübingen school weaker than in this.’ In Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 (xxv. 126) St. George Stock’s conclusion is, ‘The idea that Simon Magus is merely a distortion of St. Paul is absurd.’ It is not denied that the Clementine literature is marked by hostility to St. Paul. ‘The Clementine writings were produced in Rome, early in the third century, by members of the Elkesaite sect.… One of the characteristics of these heretics was hostility to Paul, whom they refused to recognize as an apostle’ (G. Salmon in Smith-Wace, DCB [1] , London, 1877-87, iv. 687). But, though P. W. Schmiedel (in Encyclopaedia Biblica , article ‘Simon Magus’) defends a modified position of the Tübingen school, most modern scholars would probably accept St. George Stock’s summing up in Encyclopaedia Britannica 11: ‘In conclusion, there are of course some grounds for the Tübingen view, but they are wholly inadequate to bear the structure that has been raised upon them. St. Paul was a hard hitter, and Jewish Christians, who still clung to James and Peter as the only true pillars of the Church, are not likely to have cherished any love for his memory. This is enough to account for the hostility displayed against St. Paul in the Clementines. But to push the equation of St. Paul with Simon Magus further than we are forced to by the facts of the case is to lose sight of the real character of the Clementines as the counterblast of Jewish to Samaritan Gnosticism and to obscure the greatness of Simon of Gitta, who was really the father of all heresy.’ As F. H. Chase puts it in discussing Lipsius’ theory that the Simonian legend originated the story of Peter’s visit to Rome: ‘Lipsius’ theory is really an off-shoot of the Tübingen theory of the apostolic age. The main trunk is now seen to be lifeless. The branch cannot but share its decay’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii. 777b). [3] 348 n.]
(b) If the Tübingen theory be recognized as ‘lifeless,’ there are three questions of importance bearing on the historical value of the Simonian legend.
(1) Is the Simon of the legends a historical person? Salmon’s answer may be accepted at once: ‘It cannot reasonably be doubted that Simon of Gitta is a historical personage. The heretical sect which claimed him for its founder was regarded by Justin Martyr as most formidable.… He speaks of it as predominant in Samaria, and not unknown elsewhere; that is to say, probably, he had met members of the sect at Rome. The existence of the sect is testified by Hegesippus and Clement of Alexandria’ (op. cit., p. 687 f.). There is nothing to throw doubt upon the definite statements of Justin Martyr about the Simon who is mentioned alongside of Menander and Marcion as the founder of a sect and the object of veneration.
There is less certainty about the details of his life. With regard to his birthplace-Gitta-Justin was a Samaritan and a good witness; and the statements of Hegesippus about his father and his mother, and his being trained at Alexandria, are quite possibly good tradition. Also the general ascription to him of magical powers probably reflects a claim he made. The persistent story of his journeys, coupled with the existence of Simonians outside Palestine, favours the view that he travelled, though considerable haziness hangs over the whole subject of his alleged visit to Rome.
(2) Is the Simon of Acts 8 a historical person? This question also may be answered unhesitatingly in the affirmative. ‘The Simon of the Acts is also a real person’ (Salmon, op. cit., p. 688). With the break-down of the Tübingen theory, and the re habilitation of Luke as a historian, all reasons for doubting the essential accuracy of the narrative in Acts have disappeared. That narrative relates to times of which Luke had no firsthand knowledge; therefore it may be coloured by later feeling. But Luke related it because it occurred, and because he had reasons for relating it. What those reasons were, and whether we know very much about Simon, can be discussed best when another question has been answered:
(3) Is Simon of Gitta the same as the Simon of Acts 8? This identity was generally assumed until Salmon questioned it in the article referred to above. He believes that Justin Martyr confused Simon of Gitta with Simon of Acts, and that the confusion has dominated all subsequent references to them. His chief argument is that the Simonian doctrine, being a variant of 2nd cent. Gnosticism, could not have been propounded by a Simon who lived in Samaria c. [4] a.d. 40. In support of his theory he adds: ‘If Simon had been really the inventor of the Gnostic myths, it is not credible that they should pass into so many systems which did not care to retain any memory of his name. On the other hand, if this mythology had been in Simon’s time already current, it is intelligible that he might make use of it in order to justify to his disciples his relations with a fallen woman.’ Salmon thinks that ‘the Simon described by Justin was not, as he supposed, the father of Gnosticism, but had found at the time of his teaching a Gnostic system already developed. It follows, then, that Justin’s Simon could not be identical with the contemporary of the Apostles; and the name Simon is so common a one, that the supposition of two Simons presents no difficulty.’ His conclusion is that ‘the Simon described by Justin was his elder only by a generation; that he was a Gnostic teacher who had gained some followers at Samaria; and that Justin rashly identified him with the magician told of in the Acts of the Apostles’ (ib., p. 683). This conclusion is supported generally by St. George Stock in Encyclopaedia Britannica 11 (xxv. 126), who says that ‘Dr. George Salmon brought light into darkness by distinguishing between Simon of Gitta and the original Simon Magus.’ His conclusions are: ‘(1) That all we know of the original Simon Magus is contained in Acts; (2) that from very early times he has been confused with another Simon’; and he adds: ‘Before such an amalgam of paganism and Christianity could be propounded, it is evident that Christianity must have been for some little time before the world, and that the system cannot possibly be traced back to Simon Magus. Is it not this early struggle between Jewish and Samaritan universalism, involving as it did a struggle of religion against magic, that is really symbolized under the wild traditions of the contest between Peter and Simon?’ (ib., p. 127). ‘Justin Martyr was decidedly weak in history, and it is not unreasonable to suppose that he may have confused the Simon of Acts with a heretical leader of the same name who lived much nearer to his own time, especially as this other Simon also had a great reputation for magic. A full century must nave elapsed between the conversion of Simon Magus to Christianity and the earliest date possible … for the composition of Justin Martyr’s First Apology’ (circa, about a.d. 152) (ib., p. 126). F. H. Chase also accepts this theory, saying, in reference to the Simonian legend, ‘the most probable account of its genesis is that it grew out of a mistaken identity’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii. 778).
(c) Before this modification of the view held so long as to the identification of the two Simons can be accepted, regard must be had to the following points.
(1) Are the references of Justin Martyr historically explicable on the theory that Simon of Gitta was a 2nd cent. Gnostic? Even if Justin was decidedly ‘weak in history’ (Stock), he must have acted ‘rashly,’ as Salmon allows (loc. cit.), if he identified two men who lived nearly a century apart, in a public Apology in defence of Christianity. His reference to a statue to Simon in Rome is generally regarded as a mistake, because in 1574 the base of a statue was dug up in the island in the Tiber to which he refers, with the inscription ‘Semoni Sanco Deo Fidio.’ It is supposed, therefore, that Justin mistook a statue dedicated to a Sabine deity for one erected to Simon. There is considerable force, however, in the plea of the editors of the ‘Ante-Nicene Christian Library’ that this is ‘very slight evidence on which to reject so precise a statement as Justin here makes; a statement which he would scarcely have hazarded in an apology addressed to Rome, where every person had the means of ascertaining its accuracy. If, as is supposed, he made a mistake, it must have been at once exposed, and other writers would not have so frequently repeated the story as they have done’ (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, ii. [5] 29 n. [6] ).
It has also to be considered whether Justin could repeat (chs. 26 and 56) such a flagrant error as bringing Simon to Rome in the reign of Claudius and ascribing public honours to him, if the man Simon was not a generation older than himself, as Salmon’s theory suggests. Would such a tradition have grown up in the Roman community about a man who was almost their contemporary? And, if there was no tradition, was Justin likely to have made such a statement, even adding the plea, ‘As for the statue, if you please destroy it’ (56)? At any rate, would the story have been left unrefuted so that it could be accepted and repeated by later writers? If Simon of Gitta was a 2nd cent. Gnostic teacher, either he had not been in Rome, in which ease it is difficult to understand why Justin’s fallacious reference was not exposed, or he had been in Rome so recently as to make it difficult to understand why Justin pushed back the event for nearly a century.
(2) Further, it has to be noted that there is a real parallelism between the Simonian system and the slight account in Acts of the teaching of Simon Magus. The magical element is prominent in both. Simon in Samaria ‘used sorcery, and amazed the people,’ a trait very characteristic of the legendary Simon. Acts (Acts 8:10-11) says Simon gave out ‘that himself was some great one: to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is that power of God which is called Great (ἡ δύναμις τοῦ θεοῦ ἡ καλουμένη μεγάλη).’ And Simon is said to have been specially struck with the ‘signs and great miracles’ wrought by Philip (Acts 8:13). Now, in the Simonian system, Simon is said to have taught that he was the highest God, τὴν ὑπὲρ πάντα δύναμιν. He called himself ὁ ἑστώς, ὁ στάς, ὁ στησόμενος, implying his pre-existence and his immortality.
It would seem, therefore, that if the two Simons are different, the 3rd cent. Simon taught doctrines whose elements were taught by the earlier Simon; also that both were distinguished for sorcery and for magical powers.
The amalgam of paganism and Christianity which was characteristic of Gnosticism, and which was specially obvious in the Simonian system, is readily explicable in the teaching of Simon Magus, who, according to the story in Acts, was brought into intimate contact with Christian teaching without becoming a genuine believer.
(3) Is it not possible to find a mediating theory? First of all, we must think of the Simon of Acts as a convert whose conversion was sincere as far as it went, but was very superficial. He is not represented as resenting Peter’s rebuke. It abashed him, and made him penitent to the extent of asking humbly for the Apostle’s prayers. There is no contest between Simon and Peter in Acts. But is it not likely that, when Simon was brought face to face with the deeper meanings of Christianity, he failed to respond? Instead of advancing in Christian knowledge, he seceded from a community with which his connexion had been anomalous. This view is put forward also by W. M. Ramsay in Expositor , 8th ser., v. 348. Discussing the term ‘believe,’ he writes, ‘The example of Simon Magus seems conclusive. Simon believed (Acts 8:13), and was baptized. Yet it is hard to suppose that he became in the final sense a Christian, although for the time he was a member of the Church. The language of Luke, on the whole, suggests the opposite. Simon, it is true, after baptism, “continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great wonders wrought, he was amazed” (ἐζίστατο). Yet no word is said to mitigate the final condemnation pronounced on him by Peter: “thou hast neither part nor lot in this matter; for thy heart is not right.” He is described, not as repenting, but only as asking in fear of the future that Peter should pray for him.
It seems beyond question that Luke knew the reputation which Simon acquired, and that he regarded the subsequent history of Simon as the natural result of what occurred at the beginning of his connexion with the Christians.’
But it need not be supposed that when Simon broke with the Christians he renounced all he had learned. It is more probable that he carried some of the Christian ideas with him and that he wove these into a system of his own. This system did contain some of the germs of later Gnosticism. Thus he became the leader of a retrograde sect, perhaps nominally Christian and certainly using some of the Christian terminology, but in reality anti-Christian and exalting Simon himself to the central position which Christianity was giving to Jesus Christ. The separation between Simon and the Christians would probably be widened by the departure of Philip soon after the apostles left Samaria. Philip had been the agent of the Christian movement, and it is not unlikely that on his withdrawal many Samaritans might easily fall again under the spell of Simon, especially if he were offering himself as a Christian leader.
Now if Simon was a pervert who originated an apostate sect-an anti-Christian sect, though a sect claiming Christian connexion-is it not comprehensible that two results happened? (a) Simon became the arch-heretic in the eyes of the Christians, and tradition was sure to be busy with his name. (b) The sect he founded became absorbed in later Gnosticism, but also contributed something to it. Gnosticism did not enter the 2nd cent, fully grown. A. C. Headlam (article ‘Gnosticism’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 188) remarks that ‘the developed Gnostic heresies of the 2nd cent, presuppose the NT,’ and that ‘the embryo Gnosticism of the NT takes its proper place in the history of religious development.’ [7] May not Simon have been one of the forerunners of Gnosticism; not, perhaps, its father, as tradition has supposed, but one source of some of its ramifications? A. C. McGiffert refers to this: ‘His effort to rival and surpass Jesus very likely began after his contact with the Christians which Luke records. His religious system was apparently a syncretism of Jewish and Oriental elements, and resembled very closely some forms of second century Gnosticism, if it did not indeed give rise to them’ (A History of Christianity in the Apostolic Age, pp. 99-100). Without ascribing to Simon such prominence as is demanded by tradition, it is permissible to believe that he gave his name to a sect which became Gnostic but which retained a historical connexion with him, though its doctrines were modified largely in process of time.
In such circumstances we may find a historical basis for much of the Simonian tradition, whilst recognizing that tradition had been busy embellishing the story of Simon even long before the time of Justin Martyr. It may be assumed that he was born in the Samaritan village of Gitta; that he was a man of unusual attainments; that he received some training in Alexandrian philosophy; that he startled Samaria with his powers; that he was, for a time, nominally a Christian, but that he broke away from the Christian Church; that his knowledge of Christian truth was very shallow, and that he carried some Christian ideas over with him, but in confusion; and that his subsequent teaching was an amalgam of this crude Christian precipitate with Alexandrian speculation and with magic. It is probable that he travelled, preaching his new doctrines, practising his magical arts, and winning for himself and for his teaching something of the devotion with which he was regarded in Samaria. Whether he ever exhibited his skill in Rome, we have no means of determining; but at all events he was brought to Rome by popular legend and was represented as winning an extraordinary success in the imperial city. His disciples became a sect which bore his name and which persisted long after the death of the original members. Simon’s teaching contained some of the germs of 2nd cent. Gnosticism, which it may have done something to evolve and with which the Simonian sect became impregnated, though it still retained many of its early magico-Christian elements. Beyond this it seems impossible to go. What was actually taught by Simon cannot now be distinguished from what was taught by his followers. The story of Helena may be a Simonian doctrine rather than a fact. It cannot be said whether Simon Magus and Simon Peter ever met again after their encounter in Samaria; the record of their conflict is probably the romance which tradition has woven round the name of one who was known to have been a Christian once but was rebuked by Peter for his ignorance of Christian truth and who became subsequently an apostate.
(4) Coming back to the story in Acts 8, there seems no reason for doubting its essential accuracy (see 4 (b) (2)).
(
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Simon (the Tanner)
A dweller in the town of Joppa or Jaffa; in his house St. Peter lodged during his sojourn there after the raising of Dorcas (see article Dorcas), and from it he was summoned to visit the Roman centurion Cornelius (Acts 9:43; Acts 10:6; Acts 17:32). The fact that Simon’s occupation was that of a tanner has given rise to several interesting suggestions with regard to the Apostle’s state of mind at this period. The trade of Simon, owing to his constant contact with dead bodies, was regarded by the Jews as unclean (cf. Edersheim, Jewish Social Life, 1908, p. 158). The Apostle’s scruples as to ceremonial uncleanness were not so pronounced as to prevent him from lodging with Simon, and perhaps his contact with the tanner, probably a Christian believer, may have helped to prepare his mind for receiving the message of Cornelius. We may admit that the reference to the tanner is meant to introduce the ‘universalism’ of the following chapter without in any way suggesting that the passage is unhistorical (cf. Knowling, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Acts,’ 1900, in loco).
W. F. Boyd.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Simon Peter
See Peter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Simon
SIMON.—The form Simon is not a transcription of שִׁמְעו̇ן, but is either a contraction for Simeon or an independent Greek name. The latter view is much the more probable. In the NT the name is frequent. The Gospels mention—1. Simon the brother of our Lord (Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3). 2. Simon the Zealot (see Cananaean), one of the twelve Apostles (Mark 3:18 ||). 3. Simon of Cyrene, who was impressed to bear our Lord’s cross (Matthew 27:32 ||). 4. Simon ‘the leper,’ in whose house the anointing of our Lord by Mary of Bethany took place (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3). 5. Simon the Pharisee, in whose house the penitent woman anointed our Lord’s head and feet (Luke 7:36 ff.). See Anointing. 6. Simon the father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71; John 13:2; John 13:26). 7. Simon Peter. See Peter.
W. Patrick.
Webster's Dictionary - Simon-Pure
(a.) Genuine; true; real; authentic; - a term alluding to the comedy character Simon Pure, who is impersonated by another and is obliged to prove himself to be the "real Simon Pure."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Simon
(See SIMEON.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Simon
1. Simon Peter. See PETER.
2. Simon the Canaanite, or rather Cananite, or Zealot, and therefore called SIMON ZELOTES; one of the twelve apostles, of whom nothing is specially recorded. Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 .
3. Simon, one of the brethren of the Lord. Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 .
4. Simon the Leper, at whose house 'a woman' anointed the head of the Lord. Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 . By comparing these passages with John 12:1-3 it seems evident that Martha and Mary lived in Simon's house (they were perhaps in some way related to him), and that Mary was the woman alluded to. There is no authority for associating this anointing of the Lord with that recorded in Luke 7:36-50 , described as being by 'a sinner.'
5. Simon the Cyrenian, father of Alexander and Rufus: he was made to carry the Lord's cross. Matthew 27:32 ; Mark 15:21 ; Luke 23:26 .
6. Simon the Pharisee, who invited the Lord to his house, where a woman 'who was a sinner' anointed the feet of the Lord. The Pharisee judged that the Lord could not be a prophet, or He would have known that the woman was a sinner; but he was rebuked, and the woman was forgiven. Luke 7:36-50 . There is no authority for supposing that this woman was Mary Magdalene.
7. Simon, father of Judas Iscariot. John 6:71 , etc.
8. Simon the Tanner, at whose house Peter was lodging at Joppa when sent for by Cornelius. Acts 9:43 ; Acts 10:6,17,32 .
9. Simon Magus, so called because he was a magician or sorcerer. He had misled the people at Samaria by his magical arts, but he professed to believe at the preaching of Philip. Subsequently he offered money to the apostles that he might purchase the power of imparting the gift of the Holy Spirit (from which has arisen the word 'simony'); but he was denounced by Peter. Acts 8:9-24 . Historians relate that he did much mischief among the saints.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Simon Magus
BUT who, to begin with, was Simon Magus? And how did it come about that he believed, and was actually baptized by Philip the evangelist; and then was detected, denounced and utterly reprobated by the Apostle Peter? How did all that come about?
Well, you must know that Samaria, where Simon Magus lived and carried on his astounding impositions, was a half-Hebrew, half-heathen country. Samaria had just enough of the Hebrew blood in its veins to make it full of the very worst qualities of that blood, mixed up with some of the very worst qualities of the heathen blood of that day also. And Simon Magus was at once the natural product, and the divine punishment, of that apostate land in which we find him living in such mountebank prosperity. Simon Magus was a very clever man, and he was at the same time a very bad man; till, by his tremendous pretensions, he had the whole of Samaria at his feet There was something positively sublime about the impudence and charlatanry of Simon Magus, till he was actually feared and obeyed and worshipped as nothing short of some divinity who had condescended to come and take up his abode in Samaria. But the whole man and the whole situation is best set before us in the two or three strokes of the sacred writer. "There was a certain man called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one. To whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is the great power of God. And to him they had regard, because that of long time he had bewitched them with sorceries. But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done."
Philip had extraordinary success in his evangelising mission to Samaria. It was like New England, or Cambuslang, or 1859-60, or Moody and Sankey's first visit to Scotland. For the people with one accord gave heed unto those things that Philip spake, hearing and seeing the miracles which he did. And there was great joy in that city. 'The very devil himself has been converted and has been baptized by me,' Philip telegraphed to Jerusalem. 'I actually have the name of Simon Magus on my communion-roll.' At the hearing of that, the apostles sent two of their foremost men down to Samaria to superintend the great movement, and God sent the Holy Ghost with them, till the whole of Samaria seemed to have turned to God and to the name of Jesus Christ. Only, Simon Magus was all the time such an impostor that in his conversion and baptism he had completely deceived Philip. Nay, I think it but fair to Simon Magus to say that he had completely deceived himself as well as Philip. I think so. I am bound in charity to think so. When Simon Magus came up out of the water, had a voice from heaven spoken at that moment, it would surely have been heard to say, 'This is an arch-deceiver, deceiving, but, at the same time, being deceived.' some men have far more self-discernment than other men, and self-discernment is the highest and rarest science of all the sciences on the face of the earth. And, usually, there is united with great self-discernment, and as a reward and a premium put by God upon its exercise, the power of deeply discerning other men's spirits also. Now, though Philip was a prince of evangelistic preachers, and a good and an able man, at the same time he was far too easily satisfied with his converts. Philip was far better at preaching than he was at catechising. And thus it was that it fell to Peter and John to purge Philip's communion-roll of Simon Magus immediately on their arrival in Samaria. At the same time, this must be said, that Simon Magus had never come out in his true colours till after Peter's arrival, and till after all the true converts had received the Holy Ghost.
The circumstances were these: It was part of the Pentecostal equipment of the apostles to possess for a time some of the miracle-working powers that their Divine Master had exercised in order to arrest attention to His advent, and to secure a hearing to His ministry. And thus it is that we find the apostles speaking with tongues, healing the sick, opening the eyes of the blind, casting out devils, and many suchlike miracles and signs. Now, Simon Magus, like everybody else in Samaria, was immensely impressed with all that he saw and heard. No man was more impressed than Simon Magus, or more convinced of the divine mission of the apostles. But, with all his wonder and with all his conviction, he was never truly converted. The love of money, and the still more intoxicating love of notoriety, had taken such absolute possession of Simon Magus that he simply could not live out of the eyes of men. He must be in men's mouths. He must have a crowd around him. Themistocles could not sleep because of the huzzas that filled the streets of Athens when Miltiades walked abroad; and the crowds that followed Peter and John were gall and wormwood to Simon Magus. For, still greater crowds used to take him up and carry him on their shoulders in the days of his great power before Philip came to Samaria. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your miracles like you, I have plenty of money, and I know where there is plenty more.' The sight of the bag, and the blasphemous proposal of the owner of the bag, nearly drove Peter beside himself. And the old fisherman so blazed out at the poor mountebank that the page burns red to this day with Peter's denunciation. "Thy money perish with thee, for I perceive thou art still in the gall of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity!"
"Giving out that himself was some great one." That is our first lesson from this Holy Scripture about Simon Magus. Let those take the lesson to heart who specially need it, and who will humble themselves to receive it. It may be in sorcery and witchcraft like that of Simon Magus; it may be in the honours of the kingdom of Heaven like the sons of Zebedee; it may be in preaching sermons; it may be in making speeches or writing books; it may be in anything you like, down to your child's possessions and performances; but we all, to begin with, give ourselves out to be some great one. Simon Magus was but an exaggerated specimen of every popularity-hunter among us. There is an element and first principle of Simon Magus, the Samaritan mountebank, in all public men. There is still a certain residuum of Simon left in order to his last sanctification in every minister. But the most Simon Maguslike of all sanctified ministers I know is Thomas Shepard, and that just because he is the most self-discerning, the most honest, and the most outspoken about himself of us all. Popularity was the very breath of life to that charlatan of Samaria. He could not work, he could not live, he could not be converted and baptized, without popularity. And there is not one public man in a thousand, politician or preacher, who will go on living and working and praying out of sight, and all the time with sweetness, and contentment, and good-will, and a quiet heart. All Samaria must give heed to Simon Magus from the least to the greatest. And so still with his successors. A despairing missionary to the drunken navvies on a new railway, complained to me the other day that one of our great preachers, who was holidaying in the neighbourhood, would not give an idle Sabbath afternoon hour to the men loitering about the bothy door. It was the dregs of Simon Magus in the city orator; he could not kindle but to a crowd. "Seek obscurity" was Fénelon's motto. Whether he lived up to his motto or no, the day will declare; if he did, there will not be many wearing the same crown with him on that day. But Richard Baxter will be one of them. "I am much less regardful of the approbation of men, and set much lighter by contempt or applause, than I did long ago. All worldly things appear most vain and unsatisfactory when we have tried them most. But though I feel that this hath some hand in the effect, yet the knowledge of man's nothingness, and of God's transcendent greatness, with whom it is that I have most to do, and the sense of the brevity of human things, and the nearness of eternity, are the principal causes of this effect, and not self-conceitedness and morosity, as some suppose." These things will help to do it, but above all these things a completely broken heart will alone cast Simon Magus out of us ministers. A heart broken beyond all mollification or binding up in this world; but not even a broken heart, unless it is daily broken. Nothing will root the mountebank out of us ministers but constant self-detection, constant self-contempt, constant self-denunciation, and constant self-destruction. Oh, my friends, you do not know, and you are not fit to be told, the tremendous price of a minister's salvation. It is this that makes our crucified Master say to us ministers continually, "Few of you there be that find it."
You will not know what a "law-work" is; but Simon Magus was simply lost for want of a law-work. You never nowadays hear the once universal pulpit word. The Romans and the Galatians are full of the law-work, and so have all our greatest preachers been. Those two great evangelical Epistles were not yet written, but there was enough of their contents in the Pentecostal air, if Simon Magus had had any taste for such soul-searching matters. I must not allow myself to say a single word as to Philip's mismanagement of his catechumens' and young communicants' classes. Only, the sorcerer must have sadly bewitched the evangelist before Philip put Simon Magus's name down on his communion-roll. Philip knew his business and his own heart. I dare not doubt that. Only, somehow or other, he let Simon Magus slip through his hands much too easily. Believing, baptism, communiontable and all, Simon Magus had neither part nor lot in this matter of the work of the law. I would not keep either a young communicant or an old convert away from the table because he was not deeply learned in all the Pauline doctrines; but I could not undertake to recommend his name to the kirk-session unless he gave me some evidence of what the masters of our science call the law-work. He might never have heard the word, and I would never mention it to him unless, indeed, he was a man of some mind. But it is mocking God, and deluding men, to crowd the table with communicants like Simon Magus, who do not know the first principles either of sin or of salvation. The best law-work comes to us long after conversion and admission to the table; but neither before his so-called conversion, nor after it, did this arch-impostor know anything about it-"for thy heart," said Peter, tearing it open to its very core, "is not right in the sight of God."
"Fictus," that is to say, a living and breathing fiction, was the name given to such converts as Simon Magus in those early days. Ignorance, Temporary, Pliable, and Turnaway, were some of their names in later days. Now, you are not an impostor by profession like Simon Magus. You do not make your living by deluding other people. But there may very easily be an element of fiction, of self-delusion and self-imposition, in your supposed conversion, as there was in his. Calvin's moderation, saneness of judgment, and spiritual insight, carry me with him here also. "I am not of their mind," he says, "who think that Simon Magus made only a semblance of religion. There is a middle ground between saving faith and sheer dissimulation. Simon Magus saw that the apostles, doctrine was true, and he received the same so far; but the groundwork was all along wanting; that is to say, his denial of himself was all along wanting." Just so. I see and feel Calvin's point. Your religion is not all a sham on your part. You are not a pure and unmixed hypocrite. But neither is your religion of the right kind. It is not saving your soul. It is not making you every day a new and another man. Your heart is not right in the sight of God. It is not, and it never will be, till, as Calvin says, and as Christ says, you deny yourself daily. And that, every day, to your heart's blood, and in the matter of the sin that so easily besets you. With Simon Magus it was the praise of men, and their crowding round him, and their adulation of him. Now, what he should have done, and what Philip should have insisted on him to do, was to discover to himself and to confess to himself his besetting sin, and every day to drive another nail of self-crucifixion into it. Another new nail every day, till it gave up the ghost. Instead of that the poor impostor tried to get Peter to share his apostolic popularity with him for thirty pieces of silver! If you are a platform, or a pulpit, or any other kind of mountebank, seek obscurity, for your soul's salvation lies there. If you are a popular preacher, flee from crowded churches, and hold services in bothies, and in poorhouses, and in barns, and in kitchens. Never search the papers to see what they are saying about you. Starve the self-seeking quack that is still within you. Beat him black and blue, as Paul tells us he did, and as Thomas Shepard tells us he did, every time he shows his self-admiring face.
Simon Magus put the thought of his heart into the form of a money-proposal to Peter. But, bad as the proposal was, it was not so much the proposal that Peter so struck at as the heart of the proposer. "If perhaps the thought of thine heart may he forgiven thee." Now, answer this, as we shall all answer it one day-What about the thoughts of your heart? Are the self-seeking, self-exalting thoughts of your heart dwelt on and indulged, or are they the greatest shame to you, and the greatest torment to you, of your life? Do you hate your own heart as you would hate hell itself, if you were about to be cast down into it? Do you beat your breast and cry out, Oh, wretched man that I am! Has the law entered, and is the law-work deep enough, and spiritual enough, to make all the Simon Magus-like thoughts of your hearts to be an inward pain and shame to you past all knowledge, and past all belief about you, of mortal man? His thoughts, that is, of self-advertisement, self-exaltation, and self-congratulation? Does the praise of men puff you up, and make you very happy? And is their silence, or their absence, something you cannot get over? Is he a good man who follows you about, and believes in you, and applauds you: and is he an unpardonably bad man who prefers Philip, and Peter, and John to Simon Magus? Then, be not deceived, God is not mocked, and neither are the self-discerning men round about you. Both your happiness and your sadness: both your love and your hatred of men; are quite naked and open to those with whom you have to do. "For I perceive that thou art still in the gall of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity." "We may conjecture," says Calvin, "that Simon Magus repented." Whereas Bengel leaves it to the last day to discover that and to declare that.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Helena, Companion of Simon Magus
Helena (1), said to have been the companion of SIMON Magus. According to Justin Martyr ( Apol. i. 26) and Irenaeus (i. 23, p. 99), who possibly makes use of a lost work of Justin's, she was a prostitute whom Simon had purchased from a brothel at Tyre and led about, holding her up to the veneration of his disciples. Giving himself out to be the Supreme Power and the Father above all, he taught, says Irenaeus, that "she was the first conception of his mind, the mother of all things, by whom in the beginning he conceived the thought of making the angels and archangels; for that this Conception proceeded forth from him and, knowing her father's wishes, descended to the lower world, and produced the angels and powers, by whom also he said that this world was made. But after she had produced them, she was detained by them through envy . . . and . . . confined in a human body, and for ages passed into other female bodies, as if from one vessel into another. He said, also, that she was that Helen on account of whom the Trojan war was fought; . . . that after passing from one body to another, and constantly meeting with insult, at last she became a public prostitute, and that she was 'the lost sheep.' On this account he had come that he might first of all reclaim her and free her from her chains, and then give salvation to men through the knowledge of himself." The same story is told by Hippolytus ( Ref. vi. 19, p. 174), Tertullian ( de Anima , 34), Epiphanius (Haer. 21), Philaster ( Haer. 29), Theodoret ( Haer. Fab. i. 1). Tertullian evidently knows no more than he read in Irenaeus; but Hippolytus, who had read the Μεγάλη Ἀποφάσις , gives some additional particulars, e.g. that Simon allegorized the story of the wooden horse and of Helen and her torch. The wooden horse must also have been mentioned in the earlier treatise against heresies, used by Epiphanius and Philaster, both of whom state that Simon expounded it as representing the ignorance of the nations. Epiphanius, then, it may be believed, did not invent some other particulars, in which he differs from or goes beyond Irenaeus. He states that Simon called this conception (Ennoea) Prunicus and Holy Spirit; and he gives a different account, in some respects, of the reasons for her descent into the lower world. According to this account, she was sent in order to rob the Archons, the framers of this world, of their power, by enticing them to desire her beauty, and setting them in hostility to one another.
The honour paid to Helena by the followers of Simon was known to Celsus, who says (v. 62) that certain Simonians were also called Heleniani, from Helena, or else from a teacher Helenus. We are told also by Irenaeus and Hippolytus that the Simonians had images of Simon as Jupiter and of Helen as Minerva, which they honoured, calling the former lord, the latter lady. This adaptation of the myth of Athene springing from the head of Zeus to the alleged relation of Ennoea to the first Father is of a piece with the appropriation of other Grecian myths by these heretics.
The doctrine thus attributed to Simon has close amity with that of other Gnostic systems, more especially that of the Ophites, described at the end of bk. i. of Irenaeus, except that in the Simonian system one female personage fills parts which in other systems are distributed among more than one. But in several systems we have the association with the First Cause of a female principle, his thought or conception; and we have the myth of the descent of a Sophia into the lower material regions, her sufferings from the hostility of the powers who rule there, her struggles with them, and her ultimate redemption. Peculiar to Simon is his doctrine of the transmigration of souls and his identification, by means of it, of himself and his female companion with the two principal personages of the Gnostic mythology. Simon, moreover, persuaded his followers not only to condone his connexion with a degraded person, but to accept the fact of her degradation fully admitted as only a greater proof of his redemptive power. We find it easier to believe, therefore, that the story had a foundation in fact than that it was imagined without any. On the other hand, it does not seem likely that Simon could have been the first Gnostic, it being more credible that he turned to his account a mythology already current than that he could have obtained acceptance for his tale of Ennoea, if invented for the first time for his own justification.
Baur has suggested (Christliche Gnosis , p. 308) that Justin in his account of the honours paid at Samaria to Simon and Helena may have been misled by the honours there paid to Phoenician sun and moon divinities of similar names. On this and other cognate questions see SIMON. Suffice it here to say that one strong fact in support of his theory, viz. that in the Clementine Recognitions (ii. 14, preserved in the Latin of Rufinus) the companion of Simon is called Luna, may have originated in an early error of transcription. She is Helena in the corresponding passage of the Clementine Homilies, ii. 23; and we find elsewhere the false reading Selene for Helene, e.g. in Augustine ( de Haer. 1).
[1]
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Simon Maccabaeus
surnamed Thossi, son of Mattathias, and brother of Judas and Jonathan. He was chief prince and pontiff of the Jews from A.M. 3860 to 3869, and was succeeded by John Hyrcanus. For the particulars of his life and transactions, see 1Ma_2:65 ; 1Ma_5:17 ; 1Ma_10:74-82 ; 1Ma_12:33 , &c; 1Ma_13:1 , &c; 1Ma_14:4 , &c; 1Ma_15:1 . &c.
2. SIMON, the Canaanite, an Apostle of Jesus Christ. It is doubtful whether the name of Canaanite was derived to him from the city Cana in Galilee, or whether it should not be taken according to its signification in the Hebrew, by deriving it from the root kana, "to be zealous," and this is the opinion of some learned men. See Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 , where he is surnamed Zelotes; see also Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 .
3. SIMON, brother of our Lord, Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 ; that is to say, his cousin-german, being son of Mary, sister to the holy virgin. He is thought to be the same with Simeon, bishop of Jerusalem, and son of Cleopas.
4. SIMON MAGUS. Of this heretic, or rather father of heresy, Dr. Burton gives the following account:—Justin Martyr, about A.D. 140, presented a defence of Christianity to the emperor Antoninus Pius, in which he mentions, as a well known fact, that Simon, a native of Gittum, a village in Samaria, came to Rome in the reign of Claudius, was looked upon there as a god, and had a statue erected to him, with a Latin inscription, in the river Tiber, between the two bridges. Justin adds, that nearly all the Samaritans, and a few also in other nations, acknowledged and worshipped him as the supreme God. There is in this passage such a minute detail, such a confident appeal to the emperor's own knowledge of what the apologist was saying, that we can hardly suppose the story to be false, when not only the emperor, but every person in Rome would have been able to detect it. I would observe, also, that Justin Martyr was himself a native of Samaria; hence he was able to name the very place where Simon was born; and when he says, in his second defence, which was presented a few years later, "I have despised the impious and false doctrine of Simon which is in my country;" when we see the shame which he felt at the name of Christian being assumed by the followers of that impostor; we can never believe that he would have countenanced the story, if the truth of it had not been notorious, much less would he have given to his own country the disgrace of originating the evil. Simon Magus was a native of Gittum, a town in Samaria; and it is stated in a suspicious document of ancient though doubtful date, that he studied for some time at Alexandria. Concerning the time of his birth, and of his first rising into notice, little can now be known. The only contemporary document which mentions him is the Acts of the Apostles; and we there read, that, when Philip the deacon preached the Gospel in Samaria after the death of Stephen, "there was a certain man, called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one; to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is the great power of God. And to him they had regard, because that of long time he had bewitched them with sorceries," Acts 8:9-11 . According to my calculation, the death of Stephen happened in the same year with the crucifixion of our Lord; and it appears from the passage now quoted, that Simon's celebrity had begun some time before. We are then told that "Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done," Acts 8:13 . I need not mention how he shortly fell away from the faith which he had embraced, and how St. Peter rebuked him for thinking that the gift of God might be purchased for money, Acts 8:20 ; but I would observe that some of those persons who insist upon the fact that Simon was not a Christian appear to have forgotten that he was actually baptized. For a time, at least, he believed in Jesus Christ; and part of this belief he appears always to have retained; that is, he always believed that Jesus Christ was a being more than human, who came from God. If these events happened, as I have supposed, within a short time of our Lord's ascension, the fathers had good reason to call Simon Magus the parent of all heresies; for he must then have been among the first persons, beyond the limits of Jerusalem, who embraced the Gospel; and we might hope that there was no one before him who perverted the faith which he had professed.
From the detailed account which we have of Simon in the Acts of the Apostles, I should be inclined to infer these two things:
1. That St. Luke knew no earlier instance of apostasy from the Gospel; and he mentions this because it was the first: and
2. That when St. Luke wrote the Acts of the Apostles the heresy of Simon was widely spread; and therefore he tells his readers how it had begun. Concerning the remainder of Simon's life we know little, and in that little it is difficult to separate truth from fiction. I should be inclined, for the reasons given above, to believe the account of Justin Martyr, who says that Simon Magus went to Rome in the reign of Claudius, and attracted numerous followers. Eusebius quotes this passage of Justin Martyr; but he adds, upon some other authority, which he does not name, that St. Peter came to Rome at the same time; and that, in consequence of his preaching, the popularity of the impostor was entirely destroyed. This would be a most interesting and important fact, if we were certain of its being true; but Eusebius contradicts himself in his account of Simon Magus going to Rome; and later writers have so embellished the story of this meeting, and made the death of Simon so astonishingly miraculous, that criticism is at a loss to know what to believe. The account which we have of Simon's death is, in a few words, as follows: St. Peter and St. Paul being both at Rome, Simon Magus gave out that he was Christ; and, in proof of his assertion, he undertook to raise himself aloft into the air. The attempt at first appeared as if it would succeed; but the two Apostles addressing themselves in prayer to God, the impostor fell to the ground, and his death ensued shortly after. It is difficult to give this marvellous narration, without forgetting that we are treating of a grave and sacred subject; and the question for us to consider is, whether we are to look upon the whole as a fiction, or whether, as is most probable, it contains a basis and groundwork of truth. I must observe, in the first place, that Arnobius, who did not write till the fourth century, is the first person who says any thing of Simon's death at all approaching to this story; nor does he by any means give it all the particulars which later writers have supplied. It will be observed, also, that Eusebius, who wrote after Arnobius, does not say any thing of Simon's extraordinary end; but merely states that his credit and influence were extinguished, as soon as St. Peter began to preach in Rome. It is probable, therefore, that no Greek writer before the time of Eusebius, had mentioned this story; but, on the other hand, there is such a host of evidence, that the death of Simon Magus was in some way or other connected with the presence of St. Peter and St. Paul at Rome, that we might be carrying our skepticism too far if we rejected it.
With respect to the doctrines of Simon Magus, we know for certain that Christ held a conspicuous place in the philosophy which he taught; but to define with accuracy the various points of this philosophy, is a difficult, if not impossible, task. The fathers perhaps may be suspected of laying too many impieties to the charge of this heretic; and some of their accounts cannot be reconciled with each other. Still, however, we may extract from their writings an outline of the truth; and in this instance, as before, I would attach particular weight to the authority of Justin Martyr. That writer says that nearly all the inhabitants of Samaria, and a few persons in other countries, acknowledged and worshipped Simon Magus as the first or supreme God; and in another place he says that they styled him God, above all dominion and authority and power. Later writers have increased the blasphemy of this doctrine, and said that Simon declared himself to the Samaritans as the Father, to the Jews as the Son, and to the rest of the world as the Holy Ghost. But I cannot bring myself to believe that he ever advanced so far in wickedness or absurdity. The true state of the case may perhaps be collected from the words of St. Luke, who tells us that Simon gave himself out to be "some great one," and that the people said of him, "This man is the great power of God," Acts 8:10 . Such is the title which he bore before he had heard of Christ; and there is no reason to think that he afterward raised his pretensions, and identified himself with God. He gave himself out as "the great power of God," that is, a person in whom divine power resided: and, after he had heard the Apostles, he seems to have so far enlarged his doctrine, as to have said, that the God whose minister he was, and who had always been worshipped in Samaria, had revealed himself to the Jews by his Son, and to the rest of the world by the Holy Ghost. There is reason to believe that he declared himself to be the Christ who appeared to the Jews; or rather, he said that the same spirit which descended upon Jesus had descended afterward upon himself; for he did not believe that Jesus had a real body, but he taught that he was only a phantom. To this he added, that the Holy Ghost, by which God was revealed to the Gentiles, resided in himself: and this I take to be the real origin of the story, that he was the God who revealed himself as the Father to the Samaritans, as the Son to the Jews, and as the Holy Ghost to the rest of the world.
Another charge, which is equally difficult to believe, relates to a female companion, whom he is said to have declared to be the first idea, or conception, which he, as God, put forth from his mind. By another mental process, in which this first idea was a partner, he produced the angels, and they created the world. All this was highly mystical, and writers have had recourse to different allegories, by which the absurdity may be explained. That Simon never identified a real living person with an idea emanating from the mind of God, may, I think, be assumed as certain. But we see, in this story, evident traces of the Gnostic doctrines. Valentinus, in the second century, made the first cause, or Bythus, act upon Σιγη , or ‘Εννοια , that is, upon his own mind, and produce the first pair of aeons. This then was the doctrine of Simon: the supreme God, by a mental process, produced different orders of angels, and they created the world. It was this same God, whose first or principal power resided in Simon Magus. But when later writers had said that he actually proclaimed himself as God, it followed that it was he, who, by an operation of his own mind, produced the angels. If I have argued rightly, I have freed the doctrine of Simon Magus from some of its impieties; but there is still much which is absurd, and much which is impious; for he believed that the world was created, not by the supreme God, but by inferior beings: he taught also, that Christ was one of those successive generations of aeons which were derived from God; not the aeon which created the world; but he was sent from God to rescue mankind from the tyranny of the demiurgus, or creative aeon.
Simon was also inventor of the strange notion, that the Jesus who was said to be born and crucified had not a material body, but was only a phantom. His other doctrines were, that the writers of the Old Testament were not inspired by the supreme God, the Fountain of good, but by those inferior beings who created the world, and who were the authors of evil. He denied a general resurrection; and the lives of himself and his followers are said to have been a continued course of impure and vicious conduct.
Such was the doctrine and the practice of Simon Magus, from whom all the pseudo-Christian or Gnostic heresies were said to be derived. Simon himself seems to have been one of those Jews who, as we learn from the Acts of the Apostles, travelled about the country, exorcising evil spirits. But he was also a man of speculative mind; and, having studied the doctrines of Plato, he entered into the questions which were then so commonly agitated, concerning the eternity of matter, and the origin of evil. Hence we find him embracing the opinion, that the world was created by angels, who were themselves produced from God. This was a corrupted Platonism. Plato imagined that the ideas which were in the mind of the Deity created intellectual beings: Simon taught that the supreme God by an operation of his own mind produced the angels. The first intelligences of Plato were employed by God to create the world: Simon also taught that the angels, or aeons, created the world; but in one respect the Gnostics had totally changed the philosophy of Plato; for they taught that the angel, or angels, who created the world, acted contrary to the wishes of the Supreme God.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Simon
Simon (sî'mon), a hearing, contracted from Simeon, a sorcerer, who professed to be a convert to the Christian faith, and was baptized by Philip at Samaria, but was severely rebuked by Peter as a hypocrite, because he desired to buy the gift of the Spirit. Acts 8:9. Hence the buying and selling of ecclesiastical rights, benefits, or privileges is called simony, a high offence against the purity and integrity of the Christian faith. 2. Simon Peter. Matthew 4:18. See Peter. 3. Simon the Canaanite, Matthew 10:4, or Simon Zelotes, or the zealous, one of the twelve apostles; was one of the party called Zealots, hence his name. The epithet "Canaanite" is properly "Kananite," the Chaldee for "zeal," and has no reference to locality. 4. The brother of our Lord, Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:5; not to be confounded with the preceding, nor with Symeon, who succeeded James as bishop of the church in Jerusalem. 5. A Pharisee. Luke 7:36; Luke 7:40. 6. A leper. Matthew 26:6. 7. The father of Judas Iscariot. John 6:71. 8. The man of Cyrene who was compelled to bear our Saviour's cross. Matthew 27:32; Mark 15:21; Luke 23:26. 9. The tanner at Joppa with whom Peter lodged. Acts 9:43.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon Peter
(Greek: petra, rock)
Peter, originally Simon, son of Jona, was a fisherman of Bethsaida, a town on Lake Genesareth. He was a disciple of Saint John the Baptist, at whose bidding he followed Jesus from the beginning of His ministry. Because of his faith, fidelity, enthusiasm, and love, although he was somewhat irresolute of character, Jesus showered him with many favors; He gave him the name Peter, cured his mother-in-law, appointed him chief of the Apostolic band, made him head of the Church, chose him as one of the witnesses of the raising of Jairus's daughter from the dead, and of the Transfiguration, and of the Agony in the Garden; and after the Resurrection, lest Peter's denial make him lose prestige, Our Lord renewed his commission as chief pastor of the flock. After the Ascension Peter, by virtue of this commission, repeatedly acted as spokesman and head of the infant Church. After his deliverance from prison by an angel he left Jerusalem and began his Apostolic journeys. His first see was at Antioch. Just when he established himself at Rome is disputed, but that be did go to Rome and make it the center of the Church is too evident from tradition, from his first Epistle (1 Peter 5), and from data found in the catacombs and ancient churches of Rome, to bear successful contradiction. He died a martyr's death at Rome during the persecution of Nero by being crucified head downwards, according to legend. He was buried at the foot of the Vatican Hill near the Via Cornelia; at the beginning of the Valerian persecution (c.258) his remains were placed with those of Saint Paul in a catacomb on the Appian Way, where the Church of Saint Sebastian now stands; they were restored to their original place of burial by Constantine the Great, who built a basilica over the grave at the foot of the Vatican Hill; this basilica was replaced by the present Saint Peter's, where one half of his body now rests; the other half is in the Church of Saint Paul on the Ostian Way; his head is in the Lateran Church. Patron of Rome. Emblems: a boat, keys, and a cock. Feast, June 29,. The dedication of his chair at Rome is celebrated January 18,; at Antioch, February 22,. Representations of Saint Peter are found in Christian art as early as the 2century. He is shown as a man of energy, with short curly hair. and beard, receiving the scroll of the Law, with veiled hands. He is the only Apostle represented with a wand or staff, and in the 5th century he is shown wIth the keys, which afterward became customary. The famous bronze statue in Rome is not earlier than the 5th or 6th century.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon
(Hebrew: desert)
Name of several people mentioned in the Bible.
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Simon
1. One of the twelve apostles. See PETER .
2. The Canaanite, or Zelotes, one of the twelve apostles. See ZELOTES .
3. One of the "brethren" of Jesus, Matthew 13:55 Mark 6:3 . He is by some supposed to be the same with the preceding Simon Zelotes. See JAMES 3.
4. The Cyrenian, who was compelled to aid in bearing the cross of Jesus, Matthew 27:32 , probably on account of his known attachment to His cause. He was "the father of Alexander and Rufus," Mark 15:21 ; and from the cordial salutation of Paul, Romans 16:13 , it would seem that the family afterwards resided at Rome, and that their labor of love was not forgotten by God.
5. A Pharisee, probably at Capernaum, who invited Jesus to dinner at his house, Luke 7:36-50 .
6. The leper; that is, who had been a leper; a resident of Bethany, with whom also Jesus supped, Matthew 26:6 Mark 14:3 . Compare John 12:1-11 .
7. The tanner; a disciple who dwelt at Joppa, and in whose house Peter lodged, Acts 9:43 10:6,17,32
8. The sorcerer of Samaria; often called Simon Magus, that is, the Magician. See Acts 8:9-24 . There are various doubtful traditions as to his subsequent course. The sin of trafficking in spiritual things, called Simony after him, was more odious to Peter than to many whom claimed to be his especial followers.
9. The father of Judas Iscariot, John 6:71 13:2,26 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon of Cyrene
A resident of Cyrene in Libya, the father of Alexander and Rufus; he was forced to carry the Cross of Our Saviour for part of the journey to Calvary (Matthew 27; Mark 15).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon Magus
According to the testimony of Saint Justin, a native of Gitta, he was converted by the preaching of Philip in Samana and was baptized. When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter. He begged the Apostles to pray for him (Acts 9). According to legend Simon came to Rome and won many adherents by his magic. Another version makes him the chief antagonist of Saint Peter. By magic he rose into the air, but the prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to fall, a scene depicted in the attached image. In the traditions of the 2century he was regarded as head of an heretical sect called Simonans.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon Stock, Saint
Also known as Saint Simon the Englishman. Confessor; general of the Carmelite Order. Born in Kent, England c.1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak tree, whence he was called Simon Stock. He later joined the Carmelite Order, traveled to Rome and Mount Carmel, and in 1247 was elected sixth general of the Order. Under his rule it spread rapidly in England and throughout southern and western Europe. He established communities in the university cities of Cambridge in 1248, Oxford in 1253, Paris and Bologna in 1260, and revised the Rule, making it more adaptable to European conditions. Later legends relate how the Mother of God appeared to him during a period of great oppression of the Order, and invested him in the scapular, granting the privilege that anyone who dies wearing the scapular is not eternally lost. The antiphonies of Saint Simon, Flos Carmeli and Ave Stella Matutina show his particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin. Represented receiving the scapular from the Blessed Virgin. Relics in the cathedral at Bordeaux. Feast, May 16,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Stock, Simon, Saint
Also known as Saint Simon the Englishman. Confessor; general of the Carmelite Order. Born in Kent, England c.1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak tree, whence he was called Simon Stock. He later joined the Carmelite Order, traveled to Rome and Mount Carmel, and in 1247 was elected sixth general of the Order. Under his rule it spread rapidly in England and throughout southern and western Europe. He established communities in the university cities of Cambridge in 1248, Oxford in 1253, Paris and Bologna in 1260, and revised the Rule, making it more adaptable to European conditions. Later legends relate how the Mother of God appeared to him during a period of great oppression of the Order, and invested him in the scapular, granting the privilege that anyone who dies wearing the scapular is not eternally lost. The antiphonies of Saint Simon, Flos Carmeli and Ave Stella Matutina show his particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin. Represented receiving the scapular from the Blessed Virgin. Relics in the cathedral at Bordeaux. Feast, May 16,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon the Apostle, Saint
Apostle. Called the Cananean, Kananaios or Kananites (Matthew 10; Mark 3) and the Zealot or Zealotes (Luke 6; Acts 1) because he had zeal for the Jewish law, and to distinguish him from Saint Peter; he was not from Cana as has been stated by some authors, nor a member of the Zealot party. His name occurs in all lists of the Apostles in the Gospels and Acts. After his conversion and call to the apostleship, Simon directed his zeal and fidelity to the service of Christ. Details concerning Simon's later life are uncertain and often confused. The Greeks, Copts, and Ethiopians identify him with Nathanael of Cana; the Abyssinians relate that he suffered crucifixion as Bishop of Jerusalem, after he had preached the gospel in Samaria, confusing him with Simeon, Bishop of Jerusalem; according to the Greeks he preached on the Black Sea, and in Egypt, Northern Africa, and even in Britain; the Latin and Armenian traditions hold that he labored in Persia. The manner and place of his death are likewise obscure; he may have died in peace at Edessa; the Latins claim that he was martyred at Suanir in Colchis; the Armenians believed that he was martyred at Weriosphora in Iberia. A cross with a saw is usually his atttribute, with reference to his manner of martyrdom. No record of his tomb remains. Relics in Saint Peter's, Rome, and at Toulouse, France. He is regarded as the patron of tanners. In the West he is venerated with Saint Jude (Thaddaeus) on October 28,; in the East separately on May 10,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon Islip
Archbishop of Canterbury, born Islip, near Oxford, England; died Mayfield, 1366. After holding several important ecclesiastical posts he entered the service of Edward III as one of the royal chaplains, and enjoyed the confidence of the king in diplomatic and political matters. Made Archbishop of Canterbury, 1349, he did not hesitate to resist the royal exactions, despite his intimacy with the king, and addressed to Edward a vigorous protest on the subject. He was a munificent benefactor of Oxford and founded a college which was subsequently absorbed by Cardinal Wolsey in his foundation of Christ Church.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon Langham
Cardinal, Archbishop of Canterbury, and chancellor of England; born Langham, England; died Avignon, France, 1376. Prior of Westminster Abbey, 1349, Bishop of Ely, 1362, and Archbishop of Canterbury, 1366, in 1368 he was made Cardinal of Saint Sixtus. Because he accepted this dignity without the king's permission, Edward III seized his revenues and declared his see forfeited. Langham resigned the archbishopric, joined Pope Gregory at Avignon, and in 1373 was made Cardinal-Bishop of Palestrina. In 1374 he was re-elected to the See of Canterbury, but did not receive permission to return to England until 1376, when he died.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Simon de Brie
Reigned from 1281 to 1285. Born in Montpensier, France; died in 1285 in Perugia, Italy. He was a cardinal-priest, chancellor of France, and later papal legate to that country where he carried out needed disciplinary reforms. After his election at Viterbo he was unable to go to Rome for his coronation because of the anti-French spirit there. Later, by supporting Charles of Anjou against Emperor Michael Palreologus, he broke the union of the Eastern and Western Churches effected in 1274. To save Sicily for France after the Sicilian Vespers he excommunicated Pedro III of Aragon, whom the Sicilians had elected king.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Simon
That hears; that obeys
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Simon (st.) And Saint Jude's Day
A festival of the Church observedon October 28th. The union of these two Apostles on this day ofcommemoration is intended to teach, as we learn from the Collect,a lesson of Christian love and that oneness or unity of the Churchfor which our Lord prayed. St. Simon was called to be an Apostleand he is mentioned in Holy Scripture as the "Canaanite" and"Zelotes," both words meaning a zealot. He is supposed to havelabored in Egypt and parts of Africa adjacent. One tradition hasit that he suffered martyrdom by being sawn asunder in Persia, atthe same time with St. Jude who ministered in that country and whowas martyred by the Magi. For this reason St. Simon is usuallyrepresented in Ecclesiastical art with a saw in his hand. Fornotice of St. Jude, see Jude, Saint.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Simon Magus
Simon (1) Magus, the subject of many legends and much speculation. It is important to discriminate carefully what is told of him by the different primary authorities.
The Simon of the Acts of the Apostles.—Behind all stories concerning Simon lies what is related Act_8:9-24 where we see Simon as a magician who exercised sorcery in Samaria with such success that the people universally accepted his claim to be "some great one," and accounted him "that power of God which is called great." We are further told that he was so impressed by the miracles wrought by Philip that he asked and obtained admission to Christian baptism; but that he subsequently betrayed the hollowness of his conversion by offering money to Peter to obtain the power of conferring the gift of the Holy Ghost. All subsequent accounts represent him as possessing magical power and coming personally into collision with Peter. The Acts say nothing as to his being a teacher of heretical doctrine; nor do they tell whether or not he broke off all connexion with the Christian society after his exposure by Peter.
The Simon of Justin Martyr .—When Justin Martyr wrote his Apology the Simonian sect appears to have been formidable, for he speaks four times of their founder Simon (Apol. i. 26, 56; ii. 15; Dial. 20), and undoubtedly identified him with the Simon of Acts. He states that he was a Samaritan, born at a village called Gitta; he describes him as a formidable magician, who came to Rome in the days of Claudius Caesar and made such an impression by his magical powers that he was honoured as a god, a statue being erected to him on the Tiber, between the two bridges, bearing the inscription "Simoni deo Sancto." Now in 1574 there was dug up in the place indicated by Justin, viz. the island in the Tiber, a marble fragment, apparently the base of a statue, bearing the inscription, "Semoni Santo Deo Fidio," with the name of the dedicator (see Gruter, Inscrip. Antiq. i. p. 95, n. 5). The coincidence is too remarkable to admit of any satisfactory explanation other than that Justin imagined a statue really dedicated to a Sabine deity (Ovid. Fasti , vi. 214) to have been in honour of the heretic Simon.
Justin further states that almost all the Samaritans, and some even of other nations, worshipped Simon, and acknowledged him as "the first God" ("above all principality, power, and dominion," Dial. 120), and that they held that a woman named Helena, formerly a prostitute, who went about with him, was his "first conception" ( ἔννοια πρώτη ). In connexion with Simon, Justin speaks of another Samaritan heretic, MENANDER, and states that he (Justin) had published a treatise against heresies. When Irenaeus (Haer. i. 23) deals with Simon and Menander, his coincidences with Justin are too numerous and striking to leave any doubt that he here uses the work of Justin as his authority, and we get the following additional particulars: Simon claimed to be himself the highest power, that is to say, the Father who is over all; he taught that he was the same who among the Jews appeared as Son, in Samaria descended as Father, in other nations had walked as the Holy Spirit. He was content to be called by whatever name men chose to assign to him. Helen was a prostitute whom he had redeemed at Tyre and led about with him, saying that she was the first conception of his mind, the mother of all, by whom he had in the beginning conceived the making of angels and archangels. Knowing thus his will, she had leaped away from him, descended to the lower regions, and generated angels and powers by whom this world was made. But this "Ennoea" was detained in these lower regions by her offspring, and not suffered to return to the Father of whom they were ignorant. In this account of Simon there is a large portion common to almost all forms of Gnostic myths, together with something special to this form. They have in common the place in the work of creation assigned to the female principle, the conception of the Deity; the ignorance of the rulers of this lower world with regard to the Supreme Power; the descent of the female ( Sophia ) into the lower regions, and her inability to return. Special to the Simonian tale is the identification of Simon himself with the Supreme, and of his consort Helena with the female principle, together with the doctrine of transmigration of souls, necessary to give these identifications a chance of acceptance, it not being credible that the male and female Supreme principles should first appear in the world at so late a stage in history.
It is possible that Justin's Simon was not identical with the contemporary of the Apostles, the name Simon being very common, and the Simon of the Acts being a century older than Justin. Moreover, Justin's Simon could hardly have carried his doctrine of transmigration of souls to the point of pretending that it was he himself who had appeared as Jesus of Nazareth, unless he had been born after our Lord's death. Hence it is the writer's opinion that the Simon described by Justin was his elder only by a generation; that he was a Gnostic teacher who had gained some followers at Samaria; and that Justin rashly identified him with the magician of the Acts of the Apostles.
The section on Simon in the Refutation of all Heresies , by Hippolytus, divides itself into two parts; the larger portion is founded on a work ascribed to Simon called the μεγάλη ἀπόφασις , which we do not hear of through any other source than Hippolytus. But towards the close of the art. on Simon there is a section which can be explained on the supposition that Hippolytus is drawing directly from the source used by Irenaeus, viz. the anti-heretical treatise of Justin. In connexion with this section must be considered the treatment of Simon in the lost earlier treatise of Hippolytus, which may be conjecturally gathered from the use made of it by Philaster and Epiphanius. Between these two there are verbal coincidences which prove that they are drawing from a common source. When this common matter is compared with the section in the Refutation , it is clear that Hippolytus was that source.
But one thing common to them was apparently not taken from Hippolytus. Both speak of the death of Simon, but apart from the section which contains the matter common to them and Hippolytus, and here they have no verbal coincidences. Both, however, know the story which became the received account of his death, viz. that to give the emperor a crowning proof of his magical skill he attempted to fly through the air, and, through the efficacy of the apostle's prayers, the demons who bore him were compelled to let him go, whereupon he perished miserably.
We may conclude that the story known to Philaster and Epiphanius, though earlier than the end of the 4th cent. when they wrote, is of later origin than the beginning of the 3rd cent. when Hippolytus wrote. That Hippolytus did not find his account of Simon's death in Justin may be concluded from the place it occupies in his narrative, where it is in a kind of appendix to what is borrowed from Justin; and also because this form of the story is unknown to all other writers.
The Simon of the Clementines .—The Clementines, like Justin, identify Simon of Gitta with the Simon of Acts ; but there is every reason to believe that they were merely following Justin. Justin has evidently direct knowledge of the Simonians, and regards them as formidable heretics; but in the Clementines the doctrines which Justin gives as Simonian have no prominence; and the introduction of Simon is merely a literary contrivance to bring in the theological discussions in which the author is interested.
The Simon of 19th Cent. Criticism.—The Clementine writings were produced in Rome early in 3rd cent. by members of the Elkesaite sect one characteristic of which was hostility to Paul whom they refused to recognize as an apostle. Baur first drew attention to this characteristic in the Clementines and pointed out that in the disputations between Simon and Peter some of the claims Simon is represented as making (e.g. that of having seen our Lord though not in his lifetime yet subsequently in vision) were really the claims of Paul; and urged that Peter's refutation of Simon was in some places intended as a polemic against Paul. The passages are found only in the Clementine Homilies which may be regarded as one of the latest forms which these forgeries assumed. In the Clementine Recognitions there is abundance of anti-Paulism; but the idea does not appear to have occurred to the writer to dress up Paul under the mask of Simon. The idea started by Baur was pressed by his followers into the shape that wherever in ancient documents Simon Magus is mentioned Paul is meant. We are asked to believe that the Simon of Acts 8 was no real character but only a presentation of Paul. Simon claimed to be the power of God which is called Great; and Paul calls his gospel the power of God (Rom_1:16; 1Co_1:18) and claims that the power of Christ rested in himself (2Co_12:9) and that he lived by the power of God (13:4). In Acts 8 the power of bestowing the Holy Ghost which Philip does not appear to have exercised is clearly represented as the special prerogative of the apostles. When therefore Simon offered money for the power of conferring the Holy Ghost it was really to obtain the rank of apostle. We are therefore asked to detect here a covert account of the refusal of the elder apostles to admit Paul's claim to rank with them backed though it was by a gift of money for the poor saints in Jerusalem. Peter tells him that he has no lot in the matter i.e. no part in the lot of apostleship (see Act_1:17; Act_1:25); that he is still in the "gall of bitterness and bond of iniquity"—i.e. full of bitter hatred against Peter (Gal_2:11) and not observant of the Mosaic Law. We are not to be surprised that St. Luke Paulist though he was should assert in his history this libel on his master. He knew the story to be current among the Jewish disciples and wished to take the sting out of it by telling it in such a way as to represent Simon as a real person distinct from Paul. So having begun to speak of Paul in the beginning of c. viii. he interpolates the episode of Philip's adventures and does not return to speak of Paul until his reader's attention has been drawn off so as not to be likely to recognize Paul under the mask of Simon.
It is not necessary to spend much time in pulling to pieces speculations exhibiting so much ingenuity, but so wanting in common sense. If, by way of nickname, a public character is called by a name not his own, common sense tells us that that must be a name to which discreditable associations are already known to attach. If a revolutionary agitator is called Catiline, that is because the name of Catiline is already associated with reckless and treasonable designs. It would be silly to conclude from the modern use of the nickname that there never had been such a person as Catiline, and that the traditional story of him must be so interpreted as best to describe the modern character. Further, while obscure 3rd-cent. heretics, fearing the odium of assailing directly one held in veneration through the rest of the Christian world, might resort to disguise, Paul's opponents, in his lifetime, had no temptation to resort to oblique attacks: they could say what they pleased against Paul of Tarsus without needing to risk being unintelligible by speaking of Simon of Gitta.
Lipsius, whose account of his predecessors' speculations we have abridged from his art. "Simon," in Schenkel's Bibel-Lexikon, exercises his own ingenuity in dealing with the legendary history of Simon. The ingenuity which discovers Paul in the Simon of the Acts has, of course, a much easier task in finding him in the Simon of the legends. But since the history, as it has come down to us, leaves much to be desired as an intentional libel on Paul, we must modify the legends so as best to adapt them to this object, and must then believe we have thus recovered the original form of the legend. Thus, the Homilies represent the final disputation between Peter and Simon to have occurred at Laodicea; but we must believe that the original form laid it at Antioch, where took place the collision between Peter and Paul (Galatians 2 ). The Clementines represent Simon as going voluntarily to Rome; but the original must surely have represented him as taken there as a prisoner by the Roman authorities, and so on. It is needless to examine minutely speculations vitiated by such methods of investigation. The chronological order is—the historical personage comes first; then legends arise about him; then the use made of his name. The proper order of investigation is, therefore, first to ascertain what is historical about Simon before discussing his legends. Now, it cannot reasonably be doubted that Simon of Gitta is an historical personage. The heretical sect which claimed him for its founder was regarded by Justin Martyr as most formidable; he speaks of it as predominant in Samaria and not unknown elsewhere; probably he had met members of it at Rome. Its existence is testified by Hegesippus (Eus. iv. 22); Celsus (Orig. adv. Cels. v. 62), who states that some of them were called Heleniani; and Clement of Alexandria ( Strom. vii. 17), who states that one branch was called Eutychitae. It had become almost extinct in Origen's time, who doubts ( adv. Cels. i. 57) whether there were then 30 Simonians in the world; but we need not doubt its existence in Justin's time, nor the fact that it claimed Simon of Gitta as its founder. Writings in his name were in circulation, teste the Clementine Recognitions, and Epiphanius as confirming Hippolytus. The Simon of Acts is also a real person. If we read Acts 8 , which relates, the preaching of Philip, in connexion with c. xxi., which tells of several days spent by Luke in Philip's house, we have the simple explanation of the insertion of the former chapter, that Luke gladly included in his history a narrative of the early preaching of the gospel communicated by an eye-witness. We need not ascribe to Luke any more recondite motive for relating the incident than that he believed it had occurred. There is no evidence that this Samaritan magician had obtained elsewhere any great notoriety; and there is every reason to think that all later writers derive their knowledge from the Acts of the Apostles. We have already said that we believe Justin mistaken in identifying Simon of the Acts with Simon of Gitta, whom we take to have been a 2nd-cent. Gnostic teacher; but this identification is followed in the Clementines. In any case, we see that the whole manufacture of the latter story is later than Simon of Gitta, if not, as we believe, later than Justin Martyr. The anti-Paulists, therefore, who dressed Paul in the disguise of Simon, are more than a century later than any opponents Paul had in his lifetime, who, if they wished to fix a nickname on the apostle, were not likely to go to the Acts of the Apostles to look for one.
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Sentence search

Zelo'Tes, - the epithet given to the apostle Simon to distinguish him from Simon Peter. (Luke 6:15 ) [1]
Simon - SIMON. —The form Simon is not a transcription of שִׁמְעו̇ן, but is either a contraction for Simeon or an independent Greek name. Simon the brother of our Lord (Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3). Simon the Zealot (see Cananaean), one of the twelve Apostles (Mark 3:18 ||). Simon of Cyrene, who was impressed to bear our Lord’s cross (Matthew 27:32 ||). Simon ‘the leper,’ in whose house the anointing of our Lord by Mary of Bethany took place (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3). Simon the Pharisee, in whose house the penitent woman anointed our Lord’s head and feet (Luke 7:36 ff. Simon the father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71; John 13:2; John 13:26). Simon Peter
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Canaanite - A name given to the apostle Simon (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ). Hence he is called elsewhere (Luke 6:15 ) "Simon Zelotes;" i. , Simon of the sect of the Zealots. (See Simon
Cananaean - (cay nuh' uhn) One of the twelve apostles is identified(Mark 3:18 RSV) as Simon the Cananaean (KJV renders “Simon the Canaanite”). In some other New Testament references this individual is called Simon the Zealot
Sym'Eon - (The Jewish form of the name Simon, used in the Revised Version of (Acts 15:14 ) and referring to Simon Peter
Simon-Pure - ) Genuine; true; real; authentic; - a term alluding to the comedy character Simon Pure, who is impersonated by another and is obliged to prove himself to be the "real Simon Pure
Great - A title claimed by the Samaritan magician Simon (Acts 8:9-10 ). Justin Martyr held that the Samaritans revered Simon as the highest god of the Canaanite pantheon. Others have argued that Simon claimed to be a lesser god who represented the power of the high god, such as Baal Zebul or Athena
Simon - Simon (a Greek form of Simeon ). Simon Chosameus, who was found to have a ‘strange’ wife ( Esther 9:32 Esther 9:32 = Ezra 10:31 Sam imeon ). ’ It is doubtful if Simon I. or Simon II. See Simon Magus. Simon the Cananæan, one of the Twelve ( Matthew 10:4 , Mark 3:13 ). Simon the Leper, our Lord’s host at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 ; cf. Father, or brother, of Judas Iscariot, himself surnamed Iscariot ( John 6:71 ; John 13:26 ‘Judas of Simon Iscariot,’ John 13:2 ‘Judas Iscariot of Simon’). said that Simon was crucified instead of Jesus
Magus, Simon - See Simon Magus
Magus - See Simon Magus
Simon - Simon Peter. Simon the Canaanite, or rather Cananite, or Zealot, and therefore called Simon ZELOTES; one of the twelve apostles, of whom nothing is specially recorded. Simon, one of the brethren of the Lord. Simon the Leper, at whose house 'a woman' anointed the head of the Lord. By comparing these passages with John 12:1-3 it seems evident that Martha and Mary lived in Simon's house (they were perhaps in some way related to him), and that Mary was the woman alluded to. Simon the Cyrenian, father of Alexander and Rufus: he was made to carry the Lord's cross. Simon the Pharisee, who invited the Lord to his house, where a woman 'who was a sinner' anointed the feet of the Lord. Simon, father of Judas Iscariot. Simon the Tanner, at whose house Peter was lodging at Joppa when sent for by Cornelius. Simon Magus, so called because he was a magician or sorcerer. Subsequently he offered money to the apostles that he might purchase the power of imparting the gift of the Holy Spirit (from which has arisen the word 'simony'); but he was denounced by Peter
Cyrene - (ci ree' nee) The home of a certain Simon who was compelled to carry Jesus' cross to the place of crucifixion (Matthew 27:32 ). Simon of Cyrene may have belonged to the rather large population of Greek-speaking Jews who resided in the city during the first part of the first century A. See Simon of Cyrene
Tanner - See Simon (the Tanner)
Zelotes - See Simon; ZEALOTS
Athenobius - He was sent to Jerusalem to remonstrate with Simon Maccabæus for the occupation of Joppa, Gazara, the citadel of Jerusalem, and certain places outside Judæa. Simon refused the terms proposed, and Athenobius was obliged to return in indignation to the king
Magus - See Bar-Jesus, Magi, Magic, and Simon Magus
Jona - Father of Simon Peter (John 1:42)
Simon Magus - -Acts 8:9-24 gives the story of ‘a certain man, Simon by name,’ who ‘used sorcery, and amazed the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one (λέγων εἷναί τινα ἑαντὸν μέγαν): to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is that power of God which is called Great (ἡ δύναμις τοῦ θεοῦ ἡ καλουμένη μεγάλη). And Simon also himself believed: and being baptized, he continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great miracles wrought, he was amazed. Seeing this, Simon offered the apostles money, saying, ‘Give me also this power, that on whomscever I lay my hands, he may receive the Holy Ghost. And Simon answered and said, Pray ye for me to the Lord, that none of the things which ye have spoken come upon me. ’...
These verses tell all that is known definitely about this particular Simon. A Simon Magus was described as an arch-heretic who was the antagonist of Simon Peter. In modern times fresh importance has attached to this legend because the Tübingen school have tried to show that the oldest accounts are those in which Simon Magus is represented as a caricature of the apostle Paul, and the opponent of the apostle Peter. The question of the identity of this legendary Simon Magus-the disguised Paul-with the Simon of Acts 8 can be discussed best after some inquiry into the legend and into the references to Simon in Patristic literature. The Simonian legend. The Apostle was to dispute next day with Simon of Gitta. The story of Simon is then related by two of his pupils: that his father’s name was Antonius, his mother’s Rachel; that he was a Samaritan of the village of Gitta, six miles from Samaria; that he was educated at Alexandria, and was skilled in the wisdom of the Greeks and in magic. Peter disputed with him for three days, after which Simon fled by night to Tyre. Peter followed him to Tyre and to Sidon and to Tripolis, whence Simon escaped to Syria. Simon managed to escape by changing the face of Faustus, Clement’s father, and making it like his own. This device, however, led to Faustus exposing Simon’s impostures. Meanwhile Simon reached Judaea . But there is reference to a visit of Simon to Rome, where he is to be honoured with statues. The question in doubt is whether the original story told only of a conflict between Simon and Peter in Syria, or whether it related an earlier conflict in Syria and a later one in Rome. These tell the story of contests between Simon and Peter; but they place the scene in Rome. (a) The Gnostic Acts (Actus Petri cum Simone) tell that after Paul left Rome, a stir arose in the city about a Simon who worked miracles and called himself the Great Power of God. The Apostle found Simon installed in the house of a Roman senator, and he attacked the Magian as a ravening wolf. When Simon refused him admittance, Peter sent a message by a dog, whose speech brought the traitor to the Apostle’s feet. By the aid of further miracles Peter silenced Simon till a public controversy was arranged before all Rome. Peter raised the dead, and exposed Simon’s attempts to work similar miracles. Simon then promised to fly to God. The success of their preaching made the Jews stir up Simon against Peter. After long discussion, Simon undertook to fly from a high tower. But Peter adjured the angels of Satan not to help Simon, who fell to the ground and died. ]'>[1] , article ‘Simon Magus’), or whether they severally elaborate two parts of one common history-an Ebionite Acts of Peter-which is Lipsius’ theory. ...
The substance of the story as it concerns Simon is that he travelled in Syria and as far as Rome, deceiving people by his magic and winning widespread adherence for his claims to Divine power; that he was opposed by Simon Peter, who exposed his deceit and brought to naught his efforts to impose on the people. The Simonian system. -In addition to these legendary accounts of the contest between Simon Magus and Simon Peter, there are references to Simon in Patristic literature which give more trustworthy accounts of his life and teaching, (a) The earliest reference is in Justin Martyr’s Apology (i. There was a Samaritan, Simon, a native of the village called Gitta, who in the reign of Claudius Caesar, and in your royal city of Rome, did mighty acts of magic, by virtue of the art of the devils operating in him. He was considered a god, and as a god was honoured by you with a statue, which statue was erected on the river Tiber, between the two bridges, and bore this inscription, in the language of Rome: “Simoni Deo Sancto,” “To Simon the holy God. And a man, Menander, also a Samaritan, of the town Capparetaea, a disciple of Simon, and inspired by devils, we know to have deceived many while he was in Antioch by his magical art’ (26). In 56 is another reference: ‘But the evil spirits were not satisfied with saying, before Christ’s appearance, that those who were said to be sons or Jupiter were born of him; but after He had appeared and been born among men, and when they learned how He had been foretold by the prophets, and knew that He should be believed on and looked for by every nation, they again, as was said before, put forward other men, the Samaritans Simon and Menander, who did many mighty works by magic, and deceived many, and still keep them deceived. For even among yourselves, as we said before, Simon was in the royal city Rome in the reign of Claudius Caesar, and so greatly astonished the sacred senate and people of the Romans, that he was considered a god, and honoured, like the others whom you honour as gods, with a statue. ’ (b) Later Patristic literature seems to gather its accounts of Simon’s teaching from some common ground-probably a lost treatise by Justin. Simon is said to have taught that he was the highest power-the Supreme God Himself, who descended to the lower world because its rulers ruled it all. She had been laid under bonds by her own children, but after many transmigrations had been rescued at last by the Supreme God-Simon-who came down to deliver her and to bring salvation to all men through the knowledge of himself. -(a) One explanation of this tradition is that it is the legendary development of the story in Acts 8, under the influence of a continued conflict between Christianity and the Simonian Gnosis. Instead of the Simon of the tradition being treated as a historical character, the name is to be interpreted as a term of reproach for Paul. Whenever Simon Magus is mentioned in ancient documents, Paul is meant. The contest between Simon Magus and Simon Peter really represents the conflict between Paul and Peter. So the Simon of Acts 8 was no real character but only a presentation of Paul. Thus, Peter’s refusal to give Simon Magus the power of the Holy Spirit is a covert account of the refusal of the elder Apostle to admit Paul’s claims to rank with them, backed though the claim was by a gift of money for the poor saints in Jerusalem. The journeys of Peter and his visit to Rome are merely an ecclesiastical tradition reflecting the journeys of Paul, and expressing the belief of the Church that the great Apostle, who had withstood the Simon-Paul everywhere else, must have followed up his victory in the capital. George Stock’s conclusion is, ‘The idea that Simon Magus is merely a distortion of St. Schmiedel (in Encyclopaedia Biblica , article ‘Simon Magus’) defends a modified position of the Tübingen school, most modern scholars would probably accept St. Paul with Simon Magus further than we are forced to by the facts of the case is to lose sight of the real character of the Clementines as the counterblast of Jewish to Samaritan Gnosticism and to obscure the greatness of Simon of Gitta, who was really the father of all heresy. Chase puts it in discussing Lipsius’ theory that the Simonian legend originated the story of Peter’s visit to Rome: ‘Lipsius’ theory is really an off-shoot of the Tübingen theory of the apostolic age. ] ...
(b) If the Tübingen theory be recognized as ‘lifeless,’ there are three questions of importance bearing on the historical value of the Simonian legend. ...
(1) Is the Simon of the legends a historical person? Salmon’s answer may be accepted at once: ‘It cannot reasonably be doubted that Simon of Gitta is a historical personage. There is nothing to throw doubt upon the definite statements of Justin Martyr about the Simon who is mentioned alongside of Menander and Marcion as the founder of a sect and the object of veneration. The persistent story of his journeys, coupled with the existence of Simonians outside Palestine, favours the view that he travelled, though considerable haziness hangs over the whole subject of his alleged visit to Rome. ...
(2) Is the Simon of Acts 8 a historical person? This question also may be answered unhesitatingly in the affirmative. ‘The Simon of the Acts is also a real person’ (Salmon, op. What those reasons were, and whether we know very much about Simon, can be discussed best when another question has been answered:...
(3) Is Simon of Gitta the same as the Simon of Acts 8? This identity was generally assumed until Salmon questioned it in the article referred to above. He believes that Justin Martyr confused Simon of Gitta with Simon of Acts, and that the confusion has dominated all subsequent references to them. His chief argument is that the Simonian doctrine, being a variant of 2nd cent. Gnosticism, could not have been propounded by a Simon who lived in Samaria c. In support of his theory he adds: ‘If Simon had been really the inventor of the Gnostic myths, it is not credible that they should pass into so many systems which did not care to retain any memory of his name. On the other hand, if this mythology had been in Simon’s time already current, it is intelligible that he might make use of it in order to justify to his disciples his relations with a fallen woman. ’ Salmon thinks that ‘the Simon described by Justin was not, as he supposed, the father of Gnosticism, but had found at the time of his teaching a Gnostic system already developed. It follows, then, that Justin’s Simon could not be identical with the contemporary of the Apostles; and the name Simon is so common a one, that the supposition of two Simons presents no difficulty. ’ His conclusion is that ‘the Simon described by Justin was his elder only by a generation; that he was a Gnostic teacher who had gained some followers at Samaria; and that Justin rashly identified him with the magician told of in the Acts of the Apostles’ (ib. George Salmon brought light into darkness by distinguishing between Simon of Gitta and the original Simon Magus. ’ His conclusions are: ‘(1) That all we know of the original Simon Magus is contained in Acts; (2) that from very early times he has been confused with another Simon’; and he adds: ‘Before such an amalgam of paganism and Christianity could be propounded, it is evident that Christianity must have been for some little time before the world, and that the system cannot possibly be traced back to Simon Magus. Is it not this early struggle between Jewish and Samaritan universalism, involving as it did a struggle of religion against magic, that is really symbolized under the wild traditions of the contest between Peter and Simon?’ (ib. ‘Justin Martyr was decidedly weak in history, and it is not unreasonable to suppose that he may have confused the Simon of Acts with a heretical leader of the same name who lived much nearer to his own time, especially as this other Simon also had a great reputation for magic. A full century must nave elapsed between the conversion of Simon Magus to Christianity and the earliest date possible … for the composition of Justin Martyr’s First Apology’ (circa, about a. Chase also accepts this theory, saying, in reference to the Simonian legend, ‘the most probable account of its genesis is that it grew out of a mistaken identity’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii. ...
(c) Before this modification of the view held so long as to the identification of the two Simons can be accepted, regard must be had to the following points. ...
(1) Are the references of Justin Martyr historically explicable on the theory that Simon of Gitta was a 2nd cent. His reference to a statue to Simon in Rome is generally regarded as a mistake, because in 1574 the base of a statue was dug up in the island in the Tiber to which he refers, with the inscription ‘Semoni Sanco Deo Fidio. ’ It is supposed, therefore, that Justin mistook a statue dedicated to a Sabine deity for one erected to Simon. 26 and 56) such a flagrant error as bringing Simon to Rome in the reign of Claudius and ascribing public honours to him, if the man Simon was not a generation older than himself, as Salmon’s theory suggests. Would such a tradition have grown up in the Roman community about a man who was almost their contemporary? And, if there was no tradition, was Justin likely to have made such a statement, even adding the plea, ‘As for the statue, if you please destroy it’ (56)? At any rate, would the story have been left unrefuted so that it could be accepted and repeated by later writers? If Simon of Gitta was a 2nd cent. ...
(2) Further, it has to be noted that there is a real parallelism between the Simonian system and the slight account in Acts of the teaching of Simon Magus. Simon in Samaria ‘used sorcery, and amazed the people,’ a trait very characteristic of the legendary Simon. Acts (Acts 8:10-11) says Simon gave out ‘that himself was some great one: to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is that power of God which is called Great (ἡ δύναμις τοῦ θεοῦ ἡ καλουμένη μεγάλη). ’ And Simon is said to have been specially struck with the ‘signs and great miracles’ wrought by Philip (Acts 8:13). Now, in the Simonian system, Simon is said to have taught that he was the highest God, τὴν ὑπὲρ πάντα δύναμιν. ...
It would seem, therefore, that if the two Simons are different, the 3rd cent. Simon taught doctrines whose elements were taught by the earlier Simon; also that both were distinguished for sorcery and for magical powers. ...
The amalgam of paganism and Christianity which was characteristic of Gnosticism, and which was specially obvious in the Simonian system, is readily explicable in the teaching of Simon Magus, who, according to the story in Acts, was brought into intimate contact with Christian teaching without becoming a genuine believer. ...
(3) Is it not possible to find a mediating theory? First of all, we must think of the Simon of Acts as a convert whose conversion was sincere as far as it went, but was very superficial. There is no contest between Simon and Peter in Acts. But is it not likely that, when Simon was brought face to face with the deeper meanings of Christianity, he failed to respond? Instead of advancing in Christian knowledge, he seceded from a community with which his connexion had been anomalous. Discussing the term ‘believe,’ he writes, ‘The example of Simon Magus seems conclusive. Simon believed (Acts 8:13), and was baptized. Simon, it is true, after baptism, “continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great wonders wrought, he was amazed” (ἐζίστατο). ...
It seems beyond question that Luke knew the reputation which Simon acquired, and that he regarded the subsequent history of Simon as the natural result of what occurred at the beginning of his connexion with the Christians. ’...
But it need not be supposed that when Simon broke with the Christians he renounced all he had learned. Thus he became the leader of a retrograde sect, perhaps nominally Christian and certainly using some of the Christian terminology, but in reality anti-Christian and exalting Simon himself to the central position which Christianity was giving to Jesus Christ. The separation between Simon and the Christians would probably be widened by the departure of Philip soon after the apostles left Samaria. Philip had been the agent of the Christian movement, and it is not unlikely that on his withdrawal many Samaritans might easily fall again under the spell of Simon, especially if he were offering himself as a Christian leader. ...
Now if Simon was a pervert who originated an apostate sect-an anti-Christian sect, though a sect claiming Christian connexion-is it not comprehensible that two results happened? (a) Simon became the arch-heretic in the eyes of the Christians, and tradition was sure to be busy with his name. ]'>[7] May not Simon have been one of the forerunners of Gnosticism; not, perhaps, its father, as tradition has supposed, but one source of some of its ramifications? A. Without ascribing to Simon such prominence as is demanded by tradition, it is permissible to believe that he gave his name to a sect which became Gnostic but which retained a historical connexion with him, though its doctrines were modified largely in process of time. ...
In such circumstances we may find a historical basis for much of the Simonian tradition, whilst recognizing that tradition had been busy embellishing the story of Simon even long before the time of Justin Martyr. Simon’s teaching contained some of the germs of 2nd cent. Gnosticism, which it may have done something to evolve and with which the Simonian sect became impregnated, though it still retained many of its early magico-Christian elements. What was actually taught by Simon cannot now be distinguished from what was taught by his followers. The story of Helena may be a Simonian doctrine rather than a fact. It cannot be said whether Simon Magus and Simon Peter ever met again after their encounter in Samaria; the record of their conflict is probably the romance which tradition has woven round the name of one who was known to have been a Christian once but was rebuked by Peter for his ignorance of Christian truth and who became subsequently an apostate
Simon Magus - Simon (1) Magus, the subject of many legends and much speculation. ...
The Simon of the Acts of the Apostles. —Behind all stories concerning Simon lies what is related Act_8:9-24 where we see Simon as a magician who exercised sorcery in Samaria with such success that the people universally accepted his claim to be "some great one," and accounted him "that power of God which is called great. ...
The Simon of Justin Martyr . —When Justin Martyr wrote his Apology the Simonian sect appears to have been formidable, for he speaks four times of their founder Simon (Apol. 20), and undoubtedly identified him with the Simon of Acts. He states that he was a Samaritan, born at a village called Gitta; he describes him as a formidable magician, who came to Rome in the days of Claudius Caesar and made such an impression by his magical powers that he was honoured as a god, a statue being erected to him on the Tiber, between the two bridges, bearing the inscription "Simoni deo Sancto. 214) to have been in honour of the heretic Simon. ...
Justin further states that almost all the Samaritans, and some even of other nations, worshipped Simon, and acknowledged him as "the first God" ("above all principality, power, and dominion," Dial. In connexion with Simon, Justin speaks of another Samaritan heretic, MENANDER, and states that he (Justin) had published a treatise against heresies. 23) deals with Simon and Menander, his coincidences with Justin are too numerous and striking to leave any doubt that he here uses the work of Justin as his authority, and we get the following additional particulars: Simon claimed to be himself the highest power, that is to say, the Father who is over all; he taught that he was the same who among the Jews appeared as Son, in Samaria descended as Father, in other nations had walked as the Holy Spirit. In this account of Simon there is a large portion common to almost all forms of Gnostic myths, together with something special to this form. Special to the Simonian tale is the identification of Simon himself with the Supreme, and of his consort Helena with the female principle, together with the doctrine of transmigration of souls, necessary to give these identifications a chance of acceptance, it not being credible that the male and female Supreme principles should first appear in the world at so late a stage in history. ...
It is possible that Justin's Simon was not identical with the contemporary of the Apostles, the name Simon being very common, and the Simon of the Acts being a century older than Justin. Moreover, Justin's Simon could hardly have carried his doctrine of transmigration of souls to the point of pretending that it was he himself who had appeared as Jesus of Nazareth, unless he had been born after our Lord's death. Hence it is the writer's opinion that the Simon described by Justin was his elder only by a generation; that he was a Gnostic teacher who had gained some followers at Samaria; and that Justin rashly identified him with the magician of the Acts of the Apostles. ...
The section on Simon in the Refutation of all Heresies , by Hippolytus, divides itself into two parts; the larger portion is founded on a work ascribed to Simon called the μεγάλη ἀπόφασις , which we do not hear of through any other source than Hippolytus. on Simon there is a section which can be explained on the supposition that Hippolytus is drawing directly from the source used by Irenaeus, viz. In connexion with this section must be considered the treatment of Simon in the lost earlier treatise of Hippolytus, which may be conjecturally gathered from the use made of it by Philaster and Epiphanius. Both speak of the death of Simon, but apart from the section which contains the matter common to them and Hippolytus, and here they have no verbal coincidences. That Hippolytus did not find his account of Simon's death in Justin may be concluded from the place it occupies in his narrative, where it is in a kind of appendix to what is borrowed from Justin; and also because this form of the story is unknown to all other writers. ...
The Simon of the Clementines . —The Clementines, like Justin, identify Simon of Gitta with the Simon of Acts ; but there is every reason to believe that they were merely following Justin. Justin has evidently direct knowledge of the Simonians, and regards them as formidable heretics; but in the Clementines the doctrines which Justin gives as Simonian have no prominence; and the introduction of Simon is merely a literary contrivance to bring in the theological discussions in which the author is interested. ...
The Simon of 19th Cent. Baur first drew attention to this characteristic in the Clementines and pointed out that in the disputations between Simon and Peter some of the claims Simon is represented as making (e. that of having seen our Lord though not in his lifetime yet subsequently in vision) were really the claims of Paul; and urged that Peter's refutation of Simon was in some places intended as a polemic against Paul. In the Clementine Recognitions there is abundance of anti-Paulism; but the idea does not appear to have occurred to the writer to dress up Paul under the mask of Simon. The idea started by Baur was pressed by his followers into the shape that wherever in ancient documents Simon Magus is mentioned Paul is meant. We are asked to believe that the Simon of Acts 8 was no real character but only a presentation of Paul. Simon claimed to be the power of God which is called Great; and Paul calls his gospel the power of God (Rom_1:16; 1Co_1:18) and claims that the power of Christ rested in himself (2Co_12:9) and that he lived by the power of God (13:4). When therefore Simon offered money for the power of conferring the Holy Ghost it was really to obtain the rank of apostle. He knew the story to be current among the Jewish disciples and wished to take the sting out of it by telling it in such a way as to represent Simon as a real person distinct from Paul. he interpolates the episode of Philip's adventures and does not return to speak of Paul until his reader's attention has been drawn off so as not to be likely to recognize Paul under the mask of Simon. heretics, fearing the odium of assailing directly one held in veneration through the rest of the Christian world, might resort to disguise, Paul's opponents, in his lifetime, had no temptation to resort to oblique attacks: they could say what they pleased against Paul of Tarsus without needing to risk being unintelligible by speaking of Simon of Gitta. "Simon," in Schenkel's Bibel-Lexikon, exercises his own ingenuity in dealing with the legendary history of Simon. The ingenuity which discovers Paul in the Simon of the Acts has, of course, a much easier task in finding him in the Simon of the legends. Thus, the Homilies represent the final disputation between Peter and Simon to have occurred at Laodicea; but we must believe that the original form laid it at Antioch, where took place the collision between Peter and Paul (Galatians 2 ). The Clementines represent Simon as going voluntarily to Rome; but the original must surely have represented him as taken there as a prisoner by the Roman authorities, and so on. The proper order of investigation is, therefore, first to ascertain what is historical about Simon before discussing his legends. Now, it cannot reasonably be doubted that Simon of Gitta is an historical personage. 57) whether there were then 30 Simonians in the world; but we need not doubt its existence in Justin's time, nor the fact that it claimed Simon of Gitta as its founder. The Simon of Acts is also a real person. We have already said that we believe Justin mistaken in identifying Simon of the Acts with Simon of Gitta, whom we take to have been a 2nd-cent. In any case, we see that the whole manufacture of the latter story is later than Simon of Gitta, if not, as we believe, later than Justin Martyr. The anti-Paulists, therefore, who dressed Paul in the disguise of Simon, are more than a century later than any opponents Paul had in his lifetime, who, if they wished to fix a nickname on the apostle, were not likely to go to the Acts of the Apostles to look for one
Simon Magus - Simon MAGUS . ’ When Philip reached Samaria, and, preaching the gospel, gathered many into the Church, Simon also fell under the influence of his message. The shallowness of Simon’s belief was now shown, for he offered to buy from the Apostles the power of conferring the Holy Ghost. ...
Simon holds the unenviable position of being the one outstanding heretic in the NT: and from then until now his character has been held in particular odium. Ignatius, the earliest of the Fathers, calls him ‘the firstborn of Satan’: Irenæus marks him out as the first of all heretics: and later centuries have shown their sense of the greatness of his sin by using the word Simony to indicate the crime of procuring a spiritual office by purchase. Justin Martyr mentions three times in his Apology , and once in his Dialogue , a Simon as a leader of an heretical sect. He states that Gitta, a village in Samaria, was his birthplace, and speaks of him as visiting Rome, and being so successful in his magical impostures as to have secured worship for himself as God, and to have been honoured with a statue, which bore the inscription Simoni Deo Sancto (‘to Simon the Holy God’). ’ Justin does not specifically identify this Simon with the Simon of the Acts, but there can be no reasonable doubt that he held them to be one and the same. ’ It is therefore generally assumed’ and no doubt correctly, that Justin, being shown by the Simonians at Rome this statue of the Sabine deity Semo Sancus, was led to believe erroneously that it had been erected in honour of Simon. But this error of his regarding what had occurred in Rome need not invalidate his statements regarding Simon himself in Samaria and the progress and tenets of his sect, for he himself was a Samaritan and thus cognizant of the facts. Irenæus deals more fully with Simon and his followers, though there is good reason for assuming that he is really indebted to a lost work of Justin for his information. He directly identifies him with the Simon of Acts 8:1-40 , places him first in his list of heretics, and makes him the father of Gnosticism. From the account he gives of the doctrines of the Simonians, it is clear that by his time they had developed into a system of Gnosticism; but it is very doubtful whether he is right in making the Simon of the NT the first setter forth of Gnostic myths. The Simonian doctrines as given by Irenæus are therefore doubtless developments of the heretical teaching of Simon, which, even from the short account in the Acts, would seem to have lent itself readily to Gnostic accretions. Throughout these romances Simon is found travelling about from place to place in constant opposition to Peter, uttering calumnies against the Apostle; but being pursued by Peter he is ultimately vanquished and discredited. Here Simon is said to have met his death through his conflict with Peter or with Peter and Paul. ’ By another tradition Simon is depicted as deciding to give to the Emperor a crowning proof of his magical powers by attempting to fly off to God. Another form of the tradition represented Paul as a companion of Peter in the contest, and as praying while Peter adjured the demons that supported Simon in his flight, in the name of God and of Jesus Christ, to uphold him no longer. Simon thereupon fell to the earth and perished. ...
Renewed interest in the history of Simon was aroused in modern times by Baur’s maintaining that in the Clementine literature, where the most developed form of the legend occurs, Simon is intended to represent not the actual Simon of the Acts, but rather Paul, whom he (Baur) conceived to have been fiercely opposed theologically to Peter. ...
It should be added that Hippolytus ascribes a work entitled ‘The Great Revelation’ to Simon, and quotes largely from it; and that the sect of the Simonians did not long survive, for Origeo states that he did not believe that there were in his day thirty of them in existence
Abubus - Father of Ptolemy the murderer of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 16:11 ; 1Ma 16:15 )
si'Mon - ) ...
Simon the brother of Jesus. The only undoubted notice of this Simon occurs in (Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 ) He has been identified by some writers with Simon the Canaanite, and still more generally with Symeon who became bishop of Jerusalem after the death of James, A. ...
Simon the Canaanite, one of the twelve apostles, (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ) otherwise described as Simon Zelotes, (Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ) (A. [1] Each of these equally points out Simon as belonging to the faction of the Zealots, who were conspicuous for their fierce advocacy of the Mosaic ritual. ...
Simon of Cyrene, a Hellenistic Jew, born at Cyrene, on the north coast of Africa, who was present at Jerusalem at the time of the crucifixion of Jesus, either as an attendant at the feast, (Acts 2:10 ) or as one of the numerous settlers at Jerusalem from that place. ...
Simon, a resident at Bethany, distinguished as "the leper. ...
Simon Magus, a Samaritan living in the apostolic age, distinguished as a sorcerer or "magician," from his practice of magical arts. The motive and the means were equally to be reprobated; and his proposition met with a severe denunciation from Peter, followed by a petition on the part of Simon, the tenor of which bespeaks terror, but not penitence. (Acts 8:9-24 ) The memory of his peculiar guilt has been perpetuated in the word Simony , as applied to all traffic in spiritual offices. Simon's history, subsequent to his meeting with Peter, is involved in difficulties. According to Hippolytus, the earliest authority on the subject, Simon was buried alive at his own request, in the confident assurance that he would rise on the third day. ...
Simon Peter. [3] ...
Simon, a Pharisee, in whose house a penitent woman anointed the head and feet of Jesus. (Luke 7:40 ) ...
Simon the tanner, a Christian convert living at Joppa, at whose house Peter lodged. ) ...
Simon the father of Judas Iscariot
ca'Naanite, the, - the designation of the apostle Simon, otherwise known as "Simon Zelotes
Bar-Jona - (bahr-joh' nuh) The surname of Simon Peter (Matthew 16:17 )
Canaanite, the - Used to designate Simon Zelotes, one of the twelve apostles; this name Κανανίτης, Canaanite, is not the same as that of an inhabitant of Canaan, which in the LXX is Καναναῖος. That respecting Simon occurs in Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ; by the other two Evangelists he is styled 'Zelotes,' and Κανανίτης (in some copies Καναναῖος) is held to be from the Aramaic qana , 'to be zealous:' cf
Drusilla - , and is said to have been persuaded by one Simon (? Simon Magus) to desert her first husband, Azizus king of Emesa, for Felix
Simonian - ) One of the followers of Simon Magus; also, an adherent of certain heretical sects in the early Christian church
Zelotes - "Zealot" applied to Simon (Luke 6:15; Matthew 10:4)
Jona - ” Father of Simon Peter (John 1:42 ; compare John 21:15-17 )
John (2) - —The father of Simon Peter (John 1:42; John 21:15-17, Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885; Authorized Version Jonas)
Cephas - A Syriac surname given by Christ to Simon (John 1:42 ), meaning "rock
Adida - 5) fortified by Simon the Hasmonæan ( 1Ma 12:38 ; 1Ma 13:13 )
Apostles - Their names are as follows (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6): ...
Andrew
Bartholomew
James the Greater
James the Lesser
John
Matthew
Matthias (elected in place of Judas)
Philip
Simon Peter
Simon
Thaddeus or Jude
Thomas
Though not one of the twelve Apostles, Saint Paul is numbered as an Apostle of the first rank
Saramel - An expression, ‘in Asaramel,’ in 1Ma 14:28 in the inscription upon the memorial pillar of Simon Maccabæus. title of Simon, additional to ‘the high-priest,’ meaning ‘prince of the people of God’ ( Sar-‘am-’çl )
Love - John 21:15, "Simon, lovest (agapas , esteemest) thou Me?" Αgapas sounds too cold to Peter, now burning with love; so he replies, "Thou knowest that I LOVE (philo ) Thee. " "Simon, esteemest thou (agapas ) Me? . "Simon, LOVEST (phileis ) thou Me?" Love to one another is the proof to the world of discipleship (John 13:35)
Andrew - One of the twelve Apostles, Simon Peter’s brother ( John 1:40 ). He belonged to Bethsaida of Galilee ( John 1:44 ), the harbour-town of Capernaum (see Bethsaida), and was a fisherman on the lake in company with Simon ( Matthew 4:18 = Mark 1:16 ), whose home he also shared ( Mark 1:29 ). He brought his brother Simon to the newly found Messiah ( John 1:41 ), thus earning the distinction of being the first missionary of the Kingdom of heaven; and it seems that, like the favoured three, he enjoyed a special intimacy with the Master ( Mark 13:3 )
Simon Magus - BUT who, to begin with, was Simon Magus? And how did it come about that he believed, and was actually baptized by Philip the evangelist; and then was detected, denounced and utterly reprobated by the Apostle Peter? How did all that come about?...
Well, you must know that Samaria, where Simon Magus lived and carried on his astounding impositions, was a half-Hebrew, half-heathen country. And Simon Magus was at once the natural product, and the divine punishment, of that apostate land in which we find him living in such mountebank prosperity. Simon Magus was a very clever man, and he was at the same time a very bad man; till, by his tremendous pretensions, he had the whole of Samaria at his feet There was something positively sublime about the impudence and charlatanry of Simon Magus, till he was actually feared and obeyed and worshipped as nothing short of some divinity who had condescended to come and take up his abode in Samaria. "There was a certain man called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one. Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done. 'I actually have the name of Simon Magus on my communion-roll. Only, Simon Magus was all the time such an impostor that in his conversion and baptism he had completely deceived Philip. Nay, I think it but fair to Simon Magus to say that he had completely deceived himself as well as Philip. When Simon Magus came up out of the water, had a voice from heaven spoken at that moment, it would surely have been heard to say, 'This is an arch-deceiver, deceiving, but, at the same time, being deceived. And thus it was that it fell to Peter and John to purge Philip's communion-roll of Simon Magus immediately on their arrival in Samaria. At the same time, this must be said, that Simon Magus had never come out in his true colours till after Peter's arrival, and till after all the true converts had received the Holy Ghost. Now, Simon Magus, like everybody else in Samaria, was immensely impressed with all that he saw and heard. No man was more impressed than Simon Magus, or more convinced of the divine mission of the apostles. The love of money, and the still more intoxicating love of notoriety, had taken such absolute possession of Simon Magus that he simply could not live out of the eyes of men. Themistocles could not sleep because of the huzzas that filled the streets of Athens when Miltiades walked abroad; and the crowds that followed Peter and John were gall and wormwood to Simon Magus. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your miracles like you, I have plenty of money, and I know where there is plenty more. " That is our first lesson from this Holy Scripture about Simon Magus. It may be in sorcery and witchcraft like that of Simon Magus; it may be in the honours of the kingdom of Heaven like the sons of Zebedee; it may be in preaching sermons; it may be in making speeches or writing books; it may be in anything you like, down to your child's possessions and performances; but we all, to begin with, give ourselves out to be some great one. Simon Magus was but an exaggerated specimen of every popularity-hunter among us. There is an element and first principle of Simon Magus, the Samaritan mountebank, in all public men. There is still a certain residuum of Simon left in order to his last sanctification in every minister. But the most Simon Maguslike of all sanctified ministers I know is Thomas Shepard, and that just because he is the most self-discerning, the most honest, and the most outspoken about himself of us all. All Samaria must give heed to Simon Magus from the least to the greatest. It was the dregs of Simon Magus in the city orator; he could not kindle but to a crowd. " These things will help to do it, but above all these things a completely broken heart will alone cast Simon Magus out of us ministers. "...
You will not know what a "law-work" is; but Simon Magus was simply lost for want of a law-work. Those two great evangelical Epistles were not yet written, but there was enough of their contents in the Pentecostal air, if Simon Magus had had any taste for such soul-searching matters. Only, the sorcerer must have sadly bewitched the evangelist before Philip put Simon Magus's name down on his communion-roll. Only, somehow or other, he let Simon Magus slip through his hands much too easily. Believing, baptism, communiontable and all, Simon Magus had neither part nor lot in this matter of the work of the law. But it is mocking God, and deluding men, to crowd the table with communicants like Simon Magus, who do not know the first principles either of sin or of salvation. "...
"Fictus," that is to say, a living and breathing fiction, was the name given to such converts as Simon Magus in those early days. Now, you are not an impostor by profession like Simon Magus. "I am not of their mind," he says, "who think that Simon Magus made only a semblance of religion. Simon Magus saw that the apostles, doctrine was true, and he received the same so far; but the groundwork was all along wanting; that is to say, his denial of himself was all along wanting. With Simon Magus it was the praise of men, and their crowding round him, and their adulation of him. ...
Simon Magus put the thought of his heart into the form of a money-proposal to Peter. " Now, answer this, as we shall all answer it one day-What about the thoughts of your heart? Are the self-seeking, self-exalting thoughts of your heart dwelt on and indulged, or are they the greatest shame to you, and the greatest torment to you, of your life? Do you hate your own heart as you would hate hell itself, if you were about to be cast down into it? Do you beat your breast and cry out, Oh, wretched man that I am! Has the law entered, and is the law-work deep enough, and spiritual enough, to make all the Simon Magus-like thoughts of your hearts to be an inward pain and shame to you past all knowledge, and past all belief about you, of mortal man? His thoughts, that is, of self-advertisement, self-exaltation, and self-congratulation? Does the praise of men puff you up, and make you very happy? And is their silence, or their absence, something you cannot get over? Is he a good man who follows you about, and believes in you, and applauds you: and is he an unpardonably bad man who prefers Philip, and Peter, and John to Simon Magus? Then, be not deceived, God is not mocked, and neither are the self-discerning men round about you. " "We may conjecture," says Calvin, "that Simon Magus repented
Rufus - Son of Simon the Cyrenian who bore Christ's cross. Now if "Rufus (whom Paul salutes as at Rome) chosen in the Lord" (Romans 16:13) be the same Rufus as Mark mentions in writing a Gospel for the Romans, the undesigned coincidence will account for what otherwise would be gratuitous information to his readers, that Simon was "father of Rufus," which the other evangelists omit, and which Mark himself seemingly turns to no advantage. ...
Rufus according to Paul was a disciple of note at Rome; how natural then to designate Simon, who was unknown, to the Romans by his fatherhood to one whom they well knew, Rufus! Mark gives the Romans whom he addresses a reference for the truth of the narrative of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection to one who was accessible to them all, and who could attest the facts on the authority of his own father, the reluctant bearer of the Lord's cross (Luke 23:26). The "compelling" of him to bear the cross issued in his voluntarily taking up his own cross to follow Jesus; then through Simon followed his wife's conversion, and that of Rufus whose mother by nature she was, as she was Paul's mother by kindnesses bestowed for Christ's sake
Simon - Simon (sî'mon), a hearing, contracted from Simeon, a sorcerer, who professed to be a convert to the Christian faith, and was baptized by Philip at Samaria, but was severely rebuked by Peter as a hypocrite, because he desired to buy the gift of the Spirit. Hence the buying and selling of ecclesiastical rights, benefits, or privileges is called Simony, a high offence against the purity and integrity of the Christian faith. Simon Peter. Simon the Canaanite, Matthew 10:4, or Simon Zelotes, or the zealous, one of the twelve apostles; was one of the party called Zealots, hence his name
Thassi - The surname of Simon the Maccabes ( 1M Malachi 2:3 )
Helena, Companion of Simon Magus - Helena (1), said to have been the companion of Simon Magus. 99), who possibly makes use of a lost work of Justin's, she was a prostitute whom Simon had purchased from a brothel at Tyre and led about, holding her up to the veneration of his disciples. that Simon allegorized the story of the wooden horse and of Helen and her torch. The wooden horse must also have been mentioned in the earlier treatise against heresies, used by Epiphanius and Philaster, both of whom state that Simon expounded it as representing the ignorance of the nations. He states that Simon called this conception (Ennoea) Prunicus and Holy Spirit; and he gives a different account, in some respects, of the reasons for her descent into the lower world. ...
The honour paid to Helena by the followers of Simon was known to Celsus, who says (v. 62) that certain Simonians were also called Heleniani, from Helena, or else from a teacher Helenus. We are told also by Irenaeus and Hippolytus that the Simonians had images of Simon as Jupiter and of Helen as Minerva, which they honoured, calling the former lord, the latter lady. ...
The doctrine thus attributed to Simon has close amity with that of other Gnostic systems, more especially that of the Ophites, described at the end of bk. of Irenaeus, except that in the Simonian system one female personage fills parts which in other systems are distributed among more than one. Peculiar to Simon is his doctrine of the transmigration of souls and his identification, by means of it, of himself and his female companion with the two principal personages of the Gnostic mythology. Simon, moreover, persuaded his followers not only to condone his connexion with a degraded person, but to accept the fact of her degradation fully admitted as only a greater proof of his redemptive power. On the other hand, it does not seem likely that Simon could have been the first Gnostic, it being more credible that he turned to his account a mythology already current than that he could have obtained acceptance for his tale of Ennoea, if invented for the first time for his own justification. 308) that Justin in his account of the honours paid at Samaria to Simon and Helena may have been misled by the honours there paid to Phoenician sun and moon divinities of similar names. On this and other cognate questions see Simon. 14, preserved in the Latin of Rufinus) the companion of Simon is called Luna, may have originated in an early error of transcription
Cephas - A Syriac surname given to Simon, which in the Greek is rendered Petros, and in the Latin Petrus, both signifying "a rock
jo'na - (a dove ) (Greek form of Jonah), the father of the apostle Peter, ( John 1:42 ) who is hence addressed as Simon Barjona (i
Fourth Crusade - (1198-1204) Instituted, 1198 by Pope Innocent III and under the leadership of Simon de Montfort, Baldwin of Flanders, and Boniface of Montferrat, it culminated in the conquest of Constantinople, 1204
Symeon - Acts 15:14 = Simon Peter (see Peter)
Carpocratians - A branch of the ancient Gnostics, so called from Carpocrates, who in the second century revised and improved upon the errors of Simon Magus, Menender, Saturnius, and other Gnostics
Simeon - Indeed it is a common name, Simeon, or Simon
Lance - Emblem in art associated with ...
Saint Longinus, the centurion who pierced the side of Christ with his lance
Saint Matthew, due to his martyrdom
Saint Simon the Apostle
Saint Thomas, due to his martyrdom
Cephas - An Aramaic name, signifying 'a stone,' equivalent to 'Peter,' given to Simon
an'Drew - (manly ), one of the apostles of our Lord, ( John 1:40 ; Matthew 4:18 ) brother of Simon Peter. By his means his brother Simon was brought to Jesus
Saint-Simonism - ) A system of socialism in which the state owns all the property and the laborer is entitled to share according to the quality and amount of his work, founded by Saint Simon (1760-1825)
Nadabath - An unidentified town (?), east of the Jordan, in the neighbourhood of which a wedding party of the sons of Jambri was attacked, and many of them slain, by Jonathan and Simon ( 1Ma 9:37 ff
Zohar - ) A Jewish cabalistic book attributed by tradition to Rabbi Simon ben Yochi, who lived about the end of the 1st century, a
Attalus - He was one of the kings to whom the Roman Senate is said to have written in support of the Jews in the time of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 15:22 )
Simon Stock, Saint - Also known as Saint Simon the Englishman. 1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak tree, whence he was called Simon Stock. The antiphonies of Saint Simon, Flos Carmeli and Ave Stella Matutina show his particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin
Stock, Simon, Saint - Also known as Saint Simon the Englishman. 1165;died Bordeaux, France, c1265 According to tradition, from the age of 12 he lived as a hermit in the hollow trunk of an oak tree, whence he was called Simon Stock. The antiphonies of Saint Simon, Flos Carmeli and Ave Stella Matutina show his particular devotion to the Blessed Virgin
Onias - was son of Jaddua and father of Simon the Just ( Sir 50:1 , where, however, the Heb. was son of Simon the Just. was son of Simon II. A dispute arose between him and a man named Simon
Jambri - The outrage was avenged by Jonathan and Simon, who waylaid and slaughtered a large party of the ‘sons of Jambri’ ( 1Ma 9:35-42 )
Simon - The name ‘Simon’ in the New Testament is the equivalent of ‘Simeon’ in the Old Testament (see SIMEON). Two of Jesus’ disciples were named Simon. ...
Five other people named Simon are mentioned in the Gospels. ...
Two more people named Simon feature in the book of Acts. ...
The other Simon was a tanner in Joppa, on the Mediterranean coast. Peter on one occasion stayed in Simon’s house, and while there he had a vision that prepared him to visit Cornelius and other Gentiles in Caesarea (Acts 9:43; Acts 10:1-23)
Simon Maccabaeus - Simon, the Canaanite, an Apostle of Jesus Christ. Simon, brother of our Lord, Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 ; that is to say, his cousin-german, being son of Mary, sister to the holy virgin. Simon MAGUS. 140, presented a defence of Christianity to the emperor Antoninus Pius, in which he mentions, as a well known fact, that Simon, a native of Gittum, a village in Samaria, came to Rome in the reign of Claudius, was looked upon there as a god, and had a statue erected to him, with a Latin inscription, in the river Tiber, between the two bridges. I would observe, also, that Justin Martyr was himself a native of Samaria; hence he was able to name the very place where Simon was born; and when he says, in his second defence, which was presented a few years later, "I have despised the impious and false doctrine of Simon which is in my country;" when we see the shame which he felt at the name of Christian being assumed by the followers of that impostor; we can never believe that he would have countenanced the story, if the truth of it had not been notorious, much less would he have given to his own country the disgrace of originating the evil. Simon Magus was a native of Gittum, a town in Samaria; and it is stated in a suspicious document of ancient though doubtful date, that he studied for some time at Alexandria. The only contemporary document which mentions him is the Acts of the Apostles; and we there read, that, when Philip the deacon preached the Gospel in Samaria after the death of Stephen, "there was a certain man, called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one; to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is the great power of God. According to my calculation, the death of Stephen happened in the same year with the crucifixion of our Lord; and it appears from the passage now quoted, that Simon's celebrity had begun some time before. We are then told that "Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done," Acts 8:13 . Peter rebuked him for thinking that the gift of God might be purchased for money, Acts 8:20 ; but I would observe that some of those persons who insist upon the fact that Simon was not a Christian appear to have forgotten that he was actually baptized. If these events happened, as I have supposed, within a short time of our Lord's ascension, the fathers had good reason to call Simon Magus the parent of all heresies; for he must then have been among the first persons, beyond the limits of Jerusalem, who embraced the Gospel; and we might hope that there was no one before him who perverted the faith which he had professed. ...
From the detailed account which we have of Simon in the Acts of the Apostles, I should be inclined to infer these two things:...
1. Luke wrote the Acts of the Apostles the heresy of Simon was widely spread; and therefore he tells his readers how it had begun. Concerning the remainder of Simon's life we know little, and in that little it is difficult to separate truth from fiction. I should be inclined, for the reasons given above, to believe the account of Justin Martyr, who says that Simon Magus went to Rome in the reign of Claudius, and attracted numerous followers. This would be a most interesting and important fact, if we were certain of its being true; but Eusebius contradicts himself in his account of Simon Magus going to Rome; and later writers have so embellished the story of this meeting, and made the death of Simon so astonishingly miraculous, that criticism is at a loss to know what to believe. The account which we have of Simon's death is, in a few words, as follows: St. Paul being both at Rome, Simon Magus gave out that he was Christ; and, in proof of his assertion, he undertook to raise himself aloft into the air. I must observe, in the first place, that Arnobius, who did not write till the fourth century, is the first person who says any thing of Simon's death at all approaching to this story; nor does he by any means give it all the particulars which later writers have supplied. It will be observed, also, that Eusebius, who wrote after Arnobius, does not say any thing of Simon's extraordinary end; but merely states that his credit and influence were extinguished, as soon as St. It is probable, therefore, that no Greek writer before the time of Eusebius, had mentioned this story; but, on the other hand, there is such a host of evidence, that the death of Simon Magus was in some way or other connected with the presence of St. ...
With respect to the doctrines of Simon Magus, we know for certain that Christ held a conspicuous place in the philosophy which he taught; but to define with accuracy the various points of this philosophy, is a difficult, if not impossible, task. That writer says that nearly all the inhabitants of Samaria, and a few persons in other countries, acknowledged and worshipped Simon Magus as the first or supreme God; and in another place he says that they styled him God, above all dominion and authority and power. Later writers have increased the blasphemy of this doctrine, and said that Simon declared himself to the Samaritans as the Father, to the Jews as the Son, and to the rest of the world as the Holy Ghost. Luke, who tells us that Simon gave himself out to be "some great one," and that the people said of him, "This man is the great power of God," Acts 8:10 . That Simon never identified a real living person with an idea emanating from the mind of God, may, I think, be assumed as certain. This then was the doctrine of Simon: the supreme God, by a mental process, produced different orders of angels, and they created the world. It was this same God, whose first or principal power resided in Simon Magus. If I have argued rightly, I have freed the doctrine of Simon Magus from some of its impieties; but there is still much which is absurd, and much which is impious; for he believed that the world was created, not by the supreme God, but by inferior beings: he taught also, that Christ was one of those successive generations of aeons which were derived from God; not the aeon which created the world; but he was sent from God to rescue mankind from the tyranny of the demiurgus, or creative aeon. ...
Simon was also inventor of the strange notion, that the Jesus who was said to be born and crucified had not a material body, but was only a phantom. ...
Such was the doctrine and the practice of Simon Magus, from whom all the pseudo-Christian or Gnostic heresies were said to be derived. Simon himself seems to have been one of those Jews who, as we learn from the Acts of the Apostles, travelled about the country, exorcising evil spirits. Plato imagined that the ideas which were in the mind of the Deity created intellectual beings: Simon taught that the supreme God by an operation of his own mind produced the angels. The first intelligences of Plato were employed by God to create the world: Simon also taught that the angels, or aeons, created the world; but in one respect the Gnostics had totally changed the philosophy of Plato; for they taught that the angel, or angels, who created the world, acted contrary to the wishes of the Supreme God
Herod Philip i. - (Mark 6:17 ), the son of Herod the Great by Mariamne, the daughter of Simon, the high priest
Apostle - The twelve apostles of Jesus were Simon Peter, Andrew, James the son of Zebedee, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot
Asphar - A pool in the desert of Tekoa, or Jeshimon, where Jonathan and Simon the Maccabees encamped
Simon (st.) And Saint Jude's Day - Simon was called to be an Apostleand he is mentioned in Holy Scripture as the "Canaanite" and"Zelotes," both words meaning a zealot. Simon is usuallyrepresented in Ecclesiastical art with a saw in his hand
Alexander - (al ehx an' dehr) names five New Testament men including the son of Simon of Cyrene (Mark 15:21 ), a relative of Annas (Acts 4:6 ), a Jew of Ephesus (Acts 19:33 ), a false teacher (1 Timothy 1:19-20 ), and a coppersmith (2 Timothy 4:14 )
Saint-Simonian - Simon, who died in 1825, and who maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just division of the fruits of common labor among the members of society, are the true remedy for the social evils which exist
ru'Fus - (red ) is mentioned in ( Mark 15:21 ) as a son of Simon the Cyrenian
Magus, Simon - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter. According to legend Simon came to Rome and won many adherents by his magic. In the traditions of the 2century he was regarded as head of an heretical sect called Simonans
Simonans - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter. According to legend Simon came to Rome and won many adherents by his magic. In the traditions of the 2century he was regarded as head of an heretical sect called Simonans
Simon Magus - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter. According to legend Simon came to Rome and won many adherents by his magic. In the traditions of the 2century he was regarded as head of an heretical sect called Simonans
Dositheans - Followers of Dositheus, a Samaritan who is said to have formed a Gnostic-Judaistic sect previous to Simon Magus; Dositheus is often classed as the first heretic
Alexander - The son of Simon
Kidron - A place fortified by Cendebæus ( 1Ma 15:39 ; 1Ma 15:41 ), and the point to which he was pursued after his defeat by the sons of Simon the Maccabee (16:9)
Michel le Tellier - Scientific history is now revising the calumnious portrait of him left by Saint-Simon. Le Tellier was not responsible for the destruction of Port-Royal; nor was he relentlessly opposed to all clerics suspected of Jansenism in advising episcopal nominations; his views on the levying of tithes were legitimate considering the dire necessity of the state; equally exaggerated is Saint-Simon's account of his conduct towards De Noailles, Quesnel, and the Oratorians. Louis XIV's will selected Le Tellier as spiritual director of the youthful Louis XV, but through the influence of Saint-Simon and the Jansenists Le Tellier was requested by the regent to withdraw from Paris
le Tellier, Michel - Scientific history is now revising the calumnious portrait of him left by Saint-Simon. Le Tellier was not responsible for the destruction of Port-Royal; nor was he relentlessly opposed to all clerics suspected of Jansenism in advising episcopal nominations; his views on the levying of tithes were legitimate considering the dire necessity of the state; equally exaggerated is Saint-Simon's account of his conduct towards De Noailles, Quesnel, and the Oratorians. Louis XIV's will selected Le Tellier as spiritual director of the youthful Louis XV, but through the influence of Saint-Simon and the Jansenists Le Tellier was requested by the regent to withdraw from Paris
Andrew - (an' dreew) A disciple of John the Baptist who became one of Jesus' first disciples and led his brother Simon to Jesus. Subsequently Andrew brought his brother Simon to Jesus (John 1:40-41 )
Cerdonians - A sect, in the first century, who espoused most of the opinions of Simon Magus and the Manichaeans
Zealot - Jesus called a zealot, Simon, as one of His twelve disciples (Luke 6:15 )
Simeon - Alternate form in Greek for Simon, original Greek name of Peter. See Peter ; Simon
Andrew - One of the apostles, the brother—whether older or younger is not known—of Simon Peter, with whom it would seem he lived. He was of Bethsaida, and became one of the disciples of John the Baptist, at whose word he followed Jesus, and afterwards brought his brother Simon
Ethnarch - It is used also of Simon the high priest ( 1Ma 14:47 ; 1Ma 15:1-2 )
Leper - 1: λεπρός (Strong's #3015 — Adjective — lepros — lep-ros' ) an adjective, primarily used of "psoriasis," characterized by an eruption of rough, scaly patches; later, "leprous," but chiefly used as a noun, "a leper," Matthew 8:2 ; 10:8 ; 11:5 ; Mark 1:40 ; Luke 4:27 ; 7:22 ; 17:12 ; especially of Simon, mentioned in Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3
Jesus Ben Sirach - He is judged, from his description of the High-Priest Simon, son of Onias II (Sirach 50), to be his contemporary, c
Jesus, Son of Sirach - He is judged, from his description of the High-Priest Simon, son of Onias II (Sirach 50), to be his contemporary, c
Marcites - This doctrine they borrowed from Simon Magus, who however was not their chief; for they were called Marcites from one Marcus, who conferred the priesthood, and the administration of the sacraments, on women
Menandrians - The most ancient branch of Gnostics; thus called from Menander their chief, said by some, without sufficient foundation, to have been a disciple of Simon Magus, and himself a reputed magician. As this doctrine was built upon the same foundation with that of Simon Magus, the ancient writers looked upon him as the instructor of Menander. ...
See SimonIANS
Zelotes - As the germ of this body seems to have existed in our Lord's day, some suppose that the apostle Simon Zelotes was so called from his having once belonged to it. Little more is known respecting Simon
Cyrene - Many of these became Christians, as Simon and his sons (doubtless), Mark 15:21 ; Lucius, Acts 13:1 ; and those in Acts 11:20 who preached to the ‘Greeks’ ( v
Rufus - Red, the son of Simon the Cyrenian (Mark 15:21 ), whom the Roman soldiers compelled to carry the cross on which our Lord was crucified
Drusilla - The fair but loose daughter of Herod Agrippa I and Cypros (Acts 12); sister of Herod Agrippa II; married to Azizus, king of Emesa, on his becoming a Jew; seduced by Felix, procurator of Judea, through Simon the Cyprian sorcerer (Josephus, Debtors, the Two - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Our Lord makes the application in the following verses, in which He contrasts the cold attitude of Simon, and the conduct of the sinner who has so generously made up for the lack of courtesy of His host
Simon (the Tanner) - The fact that Simon’s occupation was that of a tanner has given rise to several interesting suggestions with regard to the Apostle’s state of mind at this period. The trade of Simon, owing to his constant contact with dead bodies, was regarded by the Jews as unclean (cf. The Apostle’s scruples as to ceremonial uncleanness were not so pronounced as to prevent him from lodging with Simon, and perhaps his contact with the tanner, probably a Christian believer, may have helped to prepare his mind for receiving the message of Cornelius
Andrew - Native of Bethsaida, brother of Simon Peter, and a fisherman: he became one of the twelve apostles. He, at once found his brother Simon and told him that he had found the Messiah
ma'ry - The names of the daughters are unknown to us; those of the sons are, James, Joses, Jude and Simon, two of whom became enrolled among the twelve apostles [1], and a third [2] may have succeeded his brother ill charge of the church of Jerusalem
Two Debtors, the - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Our Lord makes the application in the following verses, in which He contrasts the cold attitude of Simon, and the conduct of the sinner who has so generously made up for the lack of courtesy of His host
ma'ry - The names of the daughters are unknown to us; those of the sons are, James, Joses, Jude and Simon, two of whom became enrolled among the twelve apostles [1], and a third [2] may have succeeded his brother ill charge of the church of Jerusalem
Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel - It was assigned to July 16, the traditional date on which the Blessed Mother appeared to Saint Simon Stock and gave him the brown scapular (1251)
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Feast of - It was assigned to July 16, the traditional date on which the Blessed Mother appeared to Saint Simon Stock and gave him the brown scapular (1251)
Mount Carmel, Feast of Our Lady of - It was assigned to July 16, the traditional date on which the Blessed Mother appeared to Saint Simon Stock and gave him the brown scapular (1251)
Barachias - Campbell thinks, with Father Simon, that Jehoiada had two names, Barachias and Jehoiada
Apostle - It will be seen by the lists that follow that Lebbaeus, Thaddaeus and Judas are the same person; and that Simon the Canaanite (Cananaean) and Simon Zelotes are the same; Peter is also called Simon; and Matthew is calledLevi. 1 Simon. 11 Simon Zelotes. 11 Simon Z. ...
11 Simon the Cana- 11 Simon C. Bartholomew and Simon Zelotes are not mentioned after their appointment except in Acts1
Cendebaeus - Sidetes, who was given the command of the sea-coast, and sent with an army into Palestine in order to enforce the claims of Antiochus against Simon Maccabæus
Joppa - Here too on the housetop of Simon the tanner (tradition still points out the house?) Simon the tanner by the seaside, Peter, in full view of the Mediterranean washing the Gentile lands of the W. (See Simon THE TANNER
Peter - Originally called Simon (=Simeon ,i. There the four youths, Simon, Andrew, James, and John, spent their boyhood and early manhood in constant fellowship. Simon and his brother doubtless enjoyed all the advantages of a religious training, and were early instructed in an acquaintance with the Scriptures and with the great prophecies regarding the coming of the Messiah. "Simon was a Galilean, and he was that out and out. In all these respects, in bluntness, impetuosity, headiness, and simplicity, Simon was a genuine Galilean. The Galilean accent stuck to Simon all through his career. " It would seem that Simon was married before he became an apostle. They were convinced, by his gracious words and by the authority with which he spoke, that he was the Messiah (Luke 4:22 ; Matthew 7:29 ); and Andrew went forth and found Simon and brought him to Jesus (John 1:41 ). ...
Jesus at once recognized Simon, and declared that hereafter he would be called Cephas, an Aramaic name corresponding to the Greek Petros, which means "a mass of rock detached from the living rock. " The Aramaic name does not occur again, but the name Peter gradually displaces the old name Simon, though our Lord himself always uses the name Simon when addressing him (Matthew 17:25 ; Mark 14:37 ; Luke 22:31 , comp 21:15-17). We are not told what impression the first interview with Jesus produced on the mind of Simon. There the four (Simon and Andrew, James and John) had had an unsuccessful night's fishing. Jesus appeared suddenly, and entering into Simon's boat, bade him launch forth and let down the nets. This was plainly a miracle wrought before Simon's eyes. Simon responded at once to the call to become a disciple, and after this we find him in constant attendance on our Lord. We next read of our Lord's singular interview with Peter on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, where he thrice asked him, "Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me?" (John 21:1-19 ). And now that he is become Cephas indeed, we hear almost nothing of the name Simon (only in Acts 10:5,32 ; 15:14 ), and he is known to us finally as Peter
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - WE will sometimes ourselves be like Simon the Pharisee. Now it was something not unlike that with Simon the Pharisee that night. Such exactly was Simon's case. But when He came at the hour appointed, Simon was wholly occupied with looking after much more important people. But Simon's neglected Guest was quite accustomed to that kind of treatment. And thus it was that He went in and sat down at Simon's supper-table that night, with a quiet mind and an affable manner, and was the best of neighbours to all who sat near Him. 'I have made a great mistake,' said Simon within himself. '...
Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. Tell Me, therefore, which of them will love him most? Simon answered, and said, I suppose that he to whom be forgave most. And He turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for My feet: but she hath washed My feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. ...
From that scene, then, at Simon's supper-table, we are to learn this tonight. Simon, being neither a publican nor a sinner, had needed so little forgiveness that he had not love enough to provide his Saviour with a bason and water wherewith to wash His feet. Simon had neither love enough, nor anything else enough, to teach him good manners. I am afraid for Simon. For, even a very little forgiveness, even fifty pence forgiven, even five pence, even five farthings, would surely have taught Simon at least ordinary civility. Would you have a true gentleman for a friend, or for a lover, or for a husband, or for a son? Then manage, somehow, to have him brought to Simon's Guest for a great forgiveness, and the thing is done. ...
This, then, was the whole of Simon's case. In other words, Simon had been forgiven by our Lord very little, if any at all. Simon did not need much forgiveness, if any at all, and in that measure Simon's case was hopeless. Simon, in short, was a Pharisee, and that explains everything concerning Simon. I know nothing more about Simon than I read in this chapter. But, blameless or no, I am sure of this about Simon, that the holy law of God had never once entered Simon's heart. All Simon's shameful treatment of our Lord, and all his deep disgust at that woman, and all his speeches to himself within himself, all arose from the fact that the holy law of God against all kinds of sin and sinners, and especially against himself, had not yet begun to enter Simon's hard heart. No mere man, as the Catechism says, but that Man only who sat that night at Simon's supper-table and said to him,-"Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. Till, when He spoke out, and told the story of the creditor and his two debtors, and then wound up the story with such a home-thrust at Simon, they wished themselves seated at another table. Up till tonight a Pharisee like Simon; or up till tonight a harlot like this woman; equally come
Mount Carmel, Scapular of - It owes its origin to Saint Simon Stock, an English Carmelite
Zebedee - Based at Capernaum on the north shore of the sea, Zebedee ran a considerable fishing business which included several hired servants, Simon Peter, and Andrew (Luke 5:10 )
Drusilla - Soon after, Felix, the Roman procurator, persuaded her, by means of the Cyprian sorcerer Simon, to leave her husband and marry him
Scapular of Mount Carmel - It owes its origin to Saint Simon Stock, an English Carmelite
Drusil'la - Soon after, Felix, procurator of Judea, brought about her seduction by means of the Cyprian sorcerer Simon, and took her as his wife
Rufus - The brother of Alexander and son of Simon of Cyrene ( Mark 15:21 only). ’ It has been conjectured that these two are the same person, that Simon’s widow (?) had emigrated to Rome with her two sons, where they became people of eminence in the Church, and that this is the reason why the brothers are mentioned by St
Iscariot - ” Surname of both the disciple Judas who betrayed Jesus (Mark 3:19 ) and of his father Simon (John 6:71 )
Leather - We read of Simon a tanner in Acts 9:43 ; Acts 10:6,32 ; and the monuments show that the art of tanning was practised in Egypt, so that without doubt it was also known to the Israelites
Bethany - It was the home of Simon, Mark 14:3, the place where Lazarus was raised from the dead
Jop'pa, - " Here, on the house-top of Simon the tanner, "by the seaside," St
Magi - In Acts 8:9 the related verb describes Simon as practicing sorcery, with a bad connotation. Paul blinded Simon, showing God's power over the magic arts
John - One of the sons of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 16:2 ), commonly known as John Hyrcanus, and described as ‘a (valiant) man’ ( 1Ma 13:53 ). The father of Simon Peter ( John 1:42 ; John 21:15-17 RV Nicolaitanes, a Heretical Sect - Irenaeus in writing his great work used a treatise against heresies by Justin Martyr; and that Justin's list began with Simon Magus and made no mention of Nicolaitanes may be conjectured from the order in which Irenaeus discusses the heresies viz. Simon Menander Saturninus Basilides Carpocrates Cerinthus the Ebionites the Nicolaitanes. In his earlier treatise as we gather from comparing the lists of Epiphanius Philaster and Pseudo-Tertullian he brings them into an earlier though still too late a place in his list his order being Simon Menander Saturninus Basilides Nicolaitanes; and he ascribes to them the tenets of a fully developed Ophite system
Albanel, Charles d' - He joined the Canadian Mission, 1649; spent four winters among the Montagnais Indians; accompanied De Tracy's expedition against the Iroquois, 1666; and accompanied Saint Simon to Hudson Bay, 1671-72, to take possession for the French King, his "Journal" of this expedition being in the "Jesuit Relations" (1672)
Bewitch - ...
2: ἐξίστημι (Strong's #1839 — Verb — existemi — ex-is'-tay-mee ) is rendered "bewitch" in Acts 8:9,11 , AV, concerning Simon the sorcerer; it does not mean "to bewitch," as in the case of the preceding verb, but "to confuse, amaze" (RV)
Andrew - He was of Bethsaida in Galilee (John 1:44 ), and was the brother of Simon Peter (Matthew 4:18 ; 10:2 ). After he had been led to recognize Jesus as the Messiah, his first care was to bring also his brother Simon to Jesus
Theudas - ...
Or Luke's Theudas may be Josephus' Simon, one of the three whom, he names in the turbulent year of Herod's death (B. Thus, Theudas would be his name, long borne, and so best known to Gamaliel and the Sanhedrin at Jerusalem; Simon the name wherewith he set up as king, and so given by Josephus writing for Romans
Alexander And Rufus - —The Synoptists all record that the Saviour’s cross was borne by one Simon of Cyrene. This information as to the two sons of Simon being Alexander and Rufus, is also found in the Gospel of Nicodemus (Mark 4). And if this is so, it tells us that not only the sons of Simon of Cyrene, but his wife also, were members of the Church. Mark wrote especially for the Romana; and if so, it is worth remarking that he alone of the Evangelists describes Simon of Cyrene as the “father of Alexander and Rufus” (15:21)
Names - Frequently one person was distinguished from another of the same name by the adding of the father’s name, joined by the Aramaic word bar (בַּר), ‘son of,’ as in Simon bar-Jona (Matthew 16:17), and also in such names as Bartholomew, ‘son of Tolmai,’ and Barabbas, ‘son of a father. ’ The Greek idiom is frequently followed, however, as in John 21:17 ‘Simon of Jonas’; or, written more fully with υἱός, ‘son,’ ‘Simon son of Jonas’ (John 1:42). see), Mark 3:19; or from the party to which one belonged: Simon the Zealot (Ζηλωτής), Luke 6:15
Alexander - Son of Simon of Cyrene; like his brother Rufus, evidently a well-known man ( Mark 15:21 only)
Apostle - ...
9 Simon the Canaanite
Alexander - Son of Simon, the Cyrenian who was compelled to carry the cross of the Lord
Cyrene - From hence came Simon the Cyrenian, father of Alexander and Rufus, on whom the Roman soldiers laid a part of our Savior's cross, Matthew 27:32 Luke 23:26
Samos - The Romans wrote to the governor in favor of the Jews in the time of Simon Maccabaeus
Simon - He is by some supposed to be the same with the preceding Simon Zelotes. The sorcerer of Samaria; often called Simon Magus, that is, the Magician. The sin of trafficking in spiritual things, called Simony after him, was more odious to Peter than to many whom claimed to be his especial followers
Jude, Saint - Simon and St. Jude so strongly contends, as thesetwo Apostles ministered and suffered together, (See Simon, ST
Fish - " It is also one of the symbols for ...
Saint Andrew the Apostle because of his profession
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Simon the Apostle
Icthus - " It is also one of the symbols for ...
Saint Andrew the Apostle because of his profession
Saint Francis of Assisi
Saint Simon the Apostle
Niger - Some have conjectured that Simeon Niger was identical to Simon of Cyrene ( Mark 15:21 )
Annas - In the reign of Tiberius he was deposed, and was followed at short intervals by Ismael, Eleasar son of Ananus or Annas, Simon, and Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of Annas
Acra - Josephus says, that this eminence was semicircular, and that Simon Maccabaeus, having expelled the Syrians, who had seized Acra, demolished it, and spent three years in levelling the mountain on which it stood; that no situation in future should command the temple
Phygelus - The pseudo-Dorotheus of Tyre makes both Phygelus and Hermogenes to belong to the seventy disciples, and the former to be a follower of Simon Magus and afterwards bishop of Ephesus, and the latter bishop of Megara
Simon - Simon was seized by the soldiers as the procession wended its way to the place of crucifixion as he was passing by, and the heavy cross which Christ from failing strength could no longer bear was laid on his shoulders. Possibly this Simon may have been one of the "men of Cyrene" who preached the word to the Greeks (Acts 11:20 ). The term "Simony," as denoting the purchase for money of spiritual offices, is derived from him. ...
...
Simon Peter (Matthew 4:18 )
Jude, the Lord's Brother - The list of the Lord’s brothers is given in Mark 6:3 as ‘James, and Joses, and Judas [1], and Simon,’ in Matthew 13:55 as ‘James, and Joseph, and Simon, and Judas. He seems to have taken no very prominent position in the Church, being overshadowed, like Joses and Simon, by James
Mac'Cabees - 144, and was succeeded by Simon the last remaining brother of the Maccabaean family, who died B. On the death of Simon, Johannes Hyrcanus, one of his sons, at once assumed the government, B. 105-101, was the first who assumed the kingly title, though Simon had enjoyed the fullness of the kingly power
Theophilus - Theophilus (13) a Christian who discussed Christianity with Simon a Jew in a treatise published by a Gallic writer named EVAGRIUS in 5th cent. 51 is Altercatio Simonis Judaei et Theophili Christiani. " Simon replies that the virgin was the daughter of Jerusalem whom Isaiah represents as despising Shalmanezer while the angel who smote the Assyrians is the fulfilment of the prophecy contained in the name Emmanuel since he was for them indeed "Nobiscum Deus. Simon then raises the favourite difficulty of the Jews from 2nd cent
Love - This word seems to require explanation only in the case of its use by our Lord in his interview with "Simon, the son of Jonas," after his resurrection (John 21:16,17 ). When our Lord says, "Lovest thou me?" he uses the Greek word Agapas ; And when Simon answers, he uses the Greek word Philo , I. " This is the usage in the first and second questions put by our Lord; but in the third our Lord uses Simon's word
Bitterness - There is an echo of this saying in Hebrews 12:15, where any member of the Church who introduces wrong doctrines or practices, and so leads others astray, becomes a ‘root of bitterness springing up’ (ῥίζα πικρίας ἄνω φύουσα); and there may be another echo of it in Acts 8:23 (Revised Version margin), where Peter predicts that Simon Magus will ‘become gall (or a gall root) of bitterness’ (εἰς χολὴν πικρίας ὁρῶ σε ὄντα) by his evil influence over others, if he remains as he now is. But χολὴν πικρίας may be a genitive of apposition and the Apostle may mean that Simon is even now ‘in Bitterkeit, Bosheit, Feindseligkeit, wie in Galle’ (H
Anointing (2) - The anointing in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50). 39, Simon thought Jesus might be the prophet who should arise and herald the Messiah. ]'>[1] Simon bade Him to his table, inviting also a party of his friends. The anointing in the house of Simon the Leper (John 12:1-11 = Mark 14:3-9 = Matthew 26:6-13). One of the principal men of the village, named Simon, made a banquet in His honour. The notion that his house was the scene of the banquet has occasioned speculations about Simon. ...
There are several points of difference between John’s and Matthew-Mark’s accounts of the anointing: (1) Matthew and Mark say that it happened in the house of Simon the Leper, and make no mention of Lazarus and his sisters. ), who apparently identified the anointing in the house of Simon the Leper (Mt. ) with that in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Lk. § 77) held that there were in all three anointings: (a) in the house of Simon the Leper (Mt. ); (b) in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Lk. ’...
It hardly admits of reasonable doubt that there were two anointings, one in the house of Simon the Pharisee, and the other by Mary in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany
Martha - Some have imagined that she was the wife or widow of Simon the leper; which would account for the place where Mary anointed Christ being termed his house
Cyrene - In profane writers, it is mentioned as the birthplace of Eratosthenes the mathematician, and Callimachus the poet; and in holy writ, of Simon, whom the Jews compelled to bear our Saviour's cross, Matthew 27:32 ; Luke 23:26
Nathan'Ael - If was Philip who first brought Nathanael to Jesus, just as Andrew had brought his brother Simon
Apostle - The names of the twelve are, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James, the son of Zebedee, called also "the greater;" John, his brother; Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew, or Levi; Simon the Canaanite; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, also called Judas or Jude; James, "the less," the son of Alphaeus; and Judas Iscariot, Matthew 10:2-4 Mark 3:16 Luke 6:14
Joppa - At her death the Christians of Joppa called for Simon Peter, who with the command “Tabitha, arise,” restored her to life (Acts 9:36-41 ). ...
Simon Peter remained in Joppa at the home of Simon the Tanner. At noon, while Simon Peter waited for a meal to be prepared, he prayed on the flat roof of the tanner's house
Cornelius - After an angel appeared to this pious soldier, he sent to Joppa for Simon Peter, who came to him with the message of forgiveness of sins through faith in the crucified and risen Christ
Mathematics - ...
CATHOLICS ...
Balzano, Berhard
Binet, Jacques Philippe Marie
Cauchy, Augustin Louis
Clavius, Christopher
Descartes, Rene
Dupin, Charles
Hermite, Charles
Laplace, Pierre Simon
Oresme, Nicole
Pascal, Blaise
Vieta, Francois
OTHER CHRISTIAN MATHEMATICIANS ...
Barrow, Isaac
Chasles, Michel
Euler, Leonhard
Gauss, Karl
Grassman, Herman
Leibnitz, Gottfried
Pfaff, Johann
Riemann, Georg
Taylor, Booth
Exorcist - Many of these professional exorcists were disreputable Jews, like Simon in Samaria and Elymas in Cyprus (8:9; 13:6)
Joppa - Here, on the housetop of Simon, the tanner, "by the seaside," Peter had his vision that led him to preach the gospel to Gentiles
Martha, Saint 29 Jul - She also served Him in the house of Simon the Leper, and because of her solicitous care for His physical comfort she is taken as the example of the practical religious life
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Cananaean - CANANÆAN or CANAANITE occurs in Matthew 10:4 and Mark 3:18 as a designation of Simon, one of the disciples of Jesus
Compel - ...
And they compel one Simon--to bear his cross
Clementine Literature - is some four centuries later, and contains only the first three books of the Recognitions , the note at the end being "the ninth of Clemens who accompanied Simon Cephas is ended. There he finds Barnabas again and is introduced by him to Peter, who had arrived at Caesarea on the same day, and who was on the next to hold a discussion with Simon the Samaritan. We are next told that Simon postponed the appointed discussion with Peter, who uses the interval thus gained to give Clement a continuous exposition of the faith, in which God's dealings are declared from the commencement of the world to the then present time. At Jericho, James hears from Zacchaeus of the mischief being done by Simon at Caesarea, and sends Peter thither to refute him, ordering him to report to him annually, but more particularly every seven years. ...
We are next introduced to two disciples of Peter, Nicetas and Aquila, who had been disciples of Simon. These give an account of the history of Simon and of his magical powers, stating that Simon supposed himself to perform his wonders by the aid of the soul of a murdered boy, whose likeness was preserved in Simon's bed-chamber. Prepared with this information, Peter enters into a public discussion with Simon which lasts for three days, the main subject in debate being whether the difficulty of reconciling the existence of evil with the goodness and power of the Creator does not force us to believe in the existence of a God different from the Creator of the world. For Peter offers to settle the question by proceeding to Simon's bed-chamber, and interrogating the soul of the murdered boy, whose likeness was there preserved. On finding his secret known to Peter, Simon humbles himself, but retracts his repentance on Peter's acknowledging that he had this knowledge, not by prophetic power, but from associates of Simon. The multitude, however, are filled with indignation, and drive Simon away in disgrace. Simon departs, informing his disciples that divine honours await him at Rome. Peter resolves to follow him among the Gentiles and expose his wickedness; and having remained three months at Caesarea for the establishment of the church, he ordains Zacchaeus as its bishop, and sets out for Tripolis, now the centre of Simon's operations. On Peter's arrival at Tripolis he finds that Simon, hearing of his coming, had fled by night to Syria. After this Simon is again brought on the stage. One of Peter's emissaries, in order to drive him to flight, prevails on Cornelius the centurion, who had been sent on public business to Caesarea, to give out that he had been commissioned to seek out and destroy Simon, in accordance with an edict of the emperor for the destruction of sorcerers at Rome and in the provinces. Tidings of this are brought to Simon by a pretended friend, who is in reality a Christian spy. Simon, in alarm, flees to Laodicea, and there meeting Faustinianus, who had come to visit their common friends, Apion (or, as our author spells it, Appion) and Anubion, transforms by his magic the features of Faustinianus into his own, that Faustinianus may be arrested in his stead. But Peter, not being deceived by the transformation, turns it to the greater discomfiture of Simon. For he sends Faustinianus to Antioch, who, pretending to be Simon, whose form he bore, makes a public confession of imposture, and testifies to the divine mission of Peter. After this, when Simon attempts again to get a hearing in Antioch, he is driven away in disgrace. as far as the end of Peter's disputation with Simon at Caesarea; but both Peter's preliminary instructions to Clement and the disputation itself are different. Peter prepares Clement by teaching him his secret doctrine concerning difficulties likely to be raised by Simon, the true solution of which he could not produce before the multitude. Simon would bring forward texts which seemed to speak of a plurality of Gods, or which imputed imperfection to God, or spoke of Him as changing His purpose or hardening men's hearts and so forth; or, again, which laid crimes to the charge of the just men of the law, Adam and Noah, Abraham, Jacob, and Moses. Although this doctrine is represented as strictly esoteric, it is reproduced in the public discussion with Simon which immediately follows. is very short, the main conflict between Peter and Simon being reserved for a later stage of the story. , Simon, vanquished in the disputation, flies to Tyre, and Nicetas, Aquila, and Clement are sent forward by Peter to prepare the way for him. On Peter's arrival at Tyre, Simon flies on to Tripolis, and thence also to Syria on Peter's continuing the pursuit. , the main disputation between Peter and Simon takes place after the recognitions, and is held at Laodicea, Clement's father (whose name according to H. The last homily contains explanations given by Peter to his company after the flight of Simon; and concludes with an account similar to that in R. , but only as a silent character; and it is urged that the original form is more likely to be that in which this well-known adversary of Judaism conducts a disputation, than that in which he is but an insignificant companion of Simon
Zealot - He names such leaders as Eleazer son of Simon and John of Gischala. ...
Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; and Acts 1:13 term one of the apostles "Simon the Zealot. " The distinct revolutionary faction developed only later; the title must describe either Simon's pious zeal or participation in the revolutionary spirit
Peter - ” Four names are used in the New Testament to refer to Peter: the Hebrew name Simeon ( Acts 15:14 ); the Greek equivalent Simon (nearly fifty times in the Gospels and Acts); Cephas , most frequently used by Paul (1 Corinthians 1:12 ; 1 Corinthians 3:22 ; 1 Corinthians 9:5 ; 1 Corinthians 15:5 ; Galatians 1:18 ; Galatians 2:9 ,Galatians 2:9,2:11 ,Galatians 2:11,2:14 ) and occurring only once outside his writings (John 1:42 ). Simon is often found in combination with Peter , reminding the reader that Simon was the earlier name and that Peter was a name given later by Jesus. Simon is the son of Jona or John (Matthew 16:17 ; John 1:42 )
Dositheus (1), Leader of Jewish Sect - He is there placed next after Simon and Cleobius. 24) agree in making Simon Magus a disciple of Dositheus, and the Recognitions would lead us to suppose that Dositheus was clearly the elder. They represent him as already recognised as the prophet like unto Moses, whom Jehovah was to raise up; when Simon with difficulty and entreaty obtained election among his 30 disciples. The Homilies make Simon and Dositheus fellow disciples of John the Baptist, to whom in several places the author shews hostility. On John's death Simon was absent studying magic in Egypt, and so Dositheus was put over his head into the chief place, an arrangement in which Simon on his return thought it prudent to acquiesce. 57) or 30 Simonians. Recognitions and Homilies agree that Simon after his enrolment among the disciples of Dositheus, by his disparagement among his fellow-disciples of their master's pretensions, provoked Dositheus to smite him with a staff, which through Simon's magical art passed through his body as if it had been smoke. Dositheus in amazement thereat, and conscious that he himself was not the Standing one as he pretended to be, inquired if Simon claimed that dignity for himself, and, being answered in the affirmative, resigned his chief place to him and became his worshipper. Probably the Dositheans were a Jewish or Samaritan ascetic sect, something akin to the Essenes, existing from before our Lord's time, and the stories connecting their founder with Simon Magus and with John the Baptist may be dismissed as merely mythical
Cyrene - Simon, who bore our Lord's cross, was a native of this place (Matthew 27:32 ; Mark 15:21 )
Alexander - ...
...
A man whose father, Simon the Cyrenian, bore the cross of Christ (Mark 15:21 )
Bedlam - (contraction of Bethlehem) Famous asylum, London, originally on the site of the present Liverpool Street railway station; founded, 1247, by Simon FitzMary, sheriff of London, for the Order of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, as a general hospital for the poor, with the special duty of entertaining the bishops and canons of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, as often as they might come to England
Annas - Eleazar, son of Annas, followed Ismael; then Simon; then Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of Annas (John 18:13
Money - 140, granted permission to Simon Maccabeus to coin Jewish money
Gezer - Simon Maccabæus besieged and captured it, and built for himself a dwelling-place ( 1Ma 13:43-53 Gazara RV Joppa - Peter raised Dorcas from the dead, and resided many days in the house of one Simon, a tanner, Acts 9:36-43 ; and it was from this place that the Prophet Jonah embarked for Tarshish
Simony - The word is derived from the name Simon Magus, a converted magician, who tried to buy the Gifts of the Holy Ghost from Saint Peter, in the first years of the church (Acts 8). Simony is the sacrilegious vice of purchasing ecclesiastical offices and benefices to which spiritual jurisdiction is attached
Monoimus - But there is a common source of this language in the Ἀπόφασις μεγάλη of Simon, this passage also being clearly the original of the description given by Monoimus of the contradictory attributes of his first principle. Further traces of the obligations of Monoimus to Simon are found in the reference to the six powers instrumental in creation, which answer to Simon's six "roots," while a similar indebtedness to Simon on the part of the Naassene writer in Hippolytus is found on comparing the anatomical speculations connected with the name Eden (v
Judas Thaddeus, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles
Jude, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles
Tryphon - His rapacity led Simon to appeal to Demetrius ( 1Ma 13:34 )
Simony - It is so called from the resemblance it is said to bear to the sin of Simon Magus, though the purchasing of holy orders seems to approach nearer to this offence. It was by the canon law a very grievous crime; and is so much the more odious, because, as Sir Edward Coke observes, it is ever accompanied with perjury; for the presentee is sworn to have committed no Simony. But as these did not affect the Simonical patron, nor were efficacious enough to repel the notorious practice of the thing, divers acts of parliament have been made to restrain it, by means of civil forfeitures, which the modern prevailing usage with regard to spiritual preferments calls aloud to be put in execution
Gold - Simon Maccabeus (1 Maccabees 15) was the first who coined Jewish money
Ptol'Emee, - ...
The son of Abuhus, who married the daughter of Simon the Maccabee
Thaddeus, Judas, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles
Machabees, the - The captaincy of the armies of Israel then fell to Simon, the second son of Mathathias. After Simon the race of the Machabees quickly degenerated
Zeal (2) - ...
From this term is derived the name of one of the Jewish parties, the Zealots (which see), to which, as his surname indicates, Simon the disciple (Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13) had belonged. The zeal of Jesus for the Temple may have been what drew Simon to Him
Cananaean - Mark (Mark 3:18) in their lists of the Twelve to the second of the two Apostolic Simons, who is thus distinguished from Simon Peter. Luke, on the two occasions on which he gives a list of the Apostles (Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13), employs ὁ Ζηλωτής, instead of ὁ Καναναῖος, to describe Simon—which seems to show that the two epithets are synonymous. from the fact that Simon, as a quondam zealot, ‘bore the surname קַנִאָני, ζηλωτής, a name which was correctly interpreted by Luke; but, according to another tradition, was erroneously derived from the name of a place, and accordingly came to be rendered ὁ Καναναῖος
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Jason - ...
(3) Brother of the high-priest Onias III and son of Simon II
Sorcery - 2, of Simon Magnus
Simeon - It has been supposed that this was the Simon of Cyrene who bore Christ's cross
Gall - Simon the magician was described as full of the gall of bitterness (Acts 8:23 ) because he wanted to prostitute the gift of the Holy Spirit
Mattathias - A son of Simon the high priest, who was murdered, together with his father and brother Judas, at a banquet at Dok, by Ptolemy the son of Abubus ( 1Ma 16:14-16 )
Mark (2) - Mark introduces several Latin terms; he even substitutes Roman money for Greek, 12:42, which Luke does not, and notices that Simon of Cyrene was the father of Alexander and Rufus, 15:21, who probably were Christians in Rome
Bethany - Here also He was entertained by Simon the leper, at the feast where the woman made her offering of ointment ( Matthew 26:6 , Mark 14:3 )
Menelaus - Brother of Simon the Benjamite ( 2M Malachi 3:4 ), or, according to Josephus ( Ant
Martha - Martha was probably the widow of Simon a leper (comp
Alabaster - ...
In Matthew 26:6-7 , we read that Jesus being at table in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper, a woman came thither and poured an alabaster box of ointment on his head
Gall - Simon the magician was described as full of the gall of bitterness (Acts 8:23 ) because he wanted to prostitute the gift of the Holy Spirit
Peter (2) - —The use of the names Simon and Simon Peter in the Gospels is instructive. , when he first mentions the Apostle, calls him ‘Simon who is called Peter’ (Matthew 4:18); he uses the same language in his list of the Apostles (Matthew 10:2). Again, with most obvious appropriateness he calls him ‘Simon Peter’ at the time of his celebrated confession (Matthew 16:16), while on the two occasions on which our Lord addresses the disciple directly, he is ‘Simon bar-Jona’ (Matthew 16:17) and ‘Simon’ (Matthew 17:25). the name ‘Simon’ is employed up to the selection of the Twelve, and thereafter ‘Peter’ is used; but when our Lord accosts him in Gethsemane, He names him ‘Simon’ (Mark 14:7). also he is designated ‘Simon’ with a single exception (Luke 5:8) till the choice of the Apostles, after which he becomes ‘Peter’; but when our Lord speaks to him he is ‘Simon, Simon,’ which is softened to ‘Peter’ (Luke 22:31; Luke 22:34). Before Peter appears on the scene at all, his brother Andrew is described as ‘the brother of Simon Peter’ (John 1:41). At the same time, he indicates clearly that the Apostle’s original name was ‘Simon’ (John 1:42), and he places this name on the lips of Jesus just as the other Evangelists do (John 1:43). —Simon Peter was the son of a man called Jonas (Matthew 16:17) or John (John 1:42), or possibly Jonas John, a fisherman on the Sea of Galilee
Simeon - Some have thought he might have been the man elsewhere called Simon of Cyrene, a place in North Africa (Mark 15:21). (See also Simon
Peter - ‘Simon,’ standing alone, occurs less frequently (twice in Matthew , 5 times in Mark , 10 times in Lk. ‘Simon’ and ‘Peter’ sometimes stand in conjunction with one another (3 times in Mt. (2 Peter 1:1), where ‘Symeon’ rather than ‘Simon’ is, however, the better attested reading). Of the various names, ‘Symeon’ (‘Simeon’) and ‘Cephas’ are Semitic in origin, while ‘Simon’ and ‘Peter’ are Greek. In these two instances the usage, if not accidental, may have been designed to add solemnity and force to the narrative, and was made all the easier because the Greek ‘Simon’ (Σίμων), the name by which Peter probably had been known from childhood, was so like the Hebrew in sound. Some examples of Jews with the Greek name are Simon the Maccabaean, although his great-grandfather was called ‘Symeon’ (1 Maccabees 2:3); Simon the son of Onias (Sirach 50:1); a certain Benjamite (2 Maccabees 3:4); and Simon Chosameus (1 Esdras 9:32). In Josephus’ writings Jewish persons are very frequently called ‘Simon,’ less often ‘Symeon. ’ Both names seem to have been employed, and usually with discrimination, by Jews in the Hellenistic period; but ‘Simon’ was the more common, and this in all probability was the Apostle’s original name. According to Mark 3:16, Luke 6:14, early in his Galilaean ministry Jesus set apart the Twelve to be His helpers and gave Simon the surname Peter (καὶ ἐπέθηκεν ὄνομα τῷ Σίμωνι Πἐτρον) In referring to the same incident, Matthew (Matthew 10:2) speaks of ‘the so-called Peter’ (ὁ λεγόμενος Πέτρος), but seemingly intends to make the Apostle’s famous confession at Caesarea Philippi the occasion for the Messiah to bestow upon him the name ‘Peter’ and to designate him formal head of the Church (Matthew 16:17-19). In the Gospel of John, when Simon was first brought to Jesus, the latter exclaimed, ‘Thou art to be called Cephas’ (σὺ κληθήσῃ Κηφᾶς [3]), probably meaning from this time forth, since John does not recur to this subject and henceforth always (except in 21) uses ‘Peter’ either alone (16 times) or in conjunction with ‘Simon’ (18 times). Finally, there are intimations, though these are very vague, that the special recognition of Simon’s supremacy may at one time have rested upon his early belief in Jesus’ resurrection. There is here no statement that Simon received his surname on this occasion-indeed, he is already known as ‘Peter’ (or ‘Cephas’) in this connexion-but it is possible that his initial vision, which made him the corner-stone of the new community, established, if not for the first time, at least more completely, the custom of referring to him as ‘Peter. ’ The infrequency of the word as a proper name at that time, and the fact that ‘Simon’ would readily have served all ordinary needs either in Jewish or in Christian circles, make it still more evident that the designation ‘Cephas’ (Peter) was called forth by special circumstances, uncertain though some of the details may be at present. He, with his brother Andrew, is the first to answer Jesus’ call to discipleship (Mark 1:16); they entertain Him at their home in Capernaum, where He heals Simon’s mother-in-law (Mark 1:29 f. ); and the company of the disciples is now known as ‘Simon and those with him’ (Mark 1:36). Matthew omits the paragraph in which ‘Simon and those with him’ seek Jesus to tell Him that the people of Capernaum desire His return to the city (Mark 1:36), nothing is said of Peter’s accompanying Jesus when the latter raised the daughter of Jairus (Mark 5:37), and Peter’s name is expunged from the instructions given to the women by the angel at the tomb of Jesus (Mark 16:7). But Andrew is each time identified as the ‘brother of Simon Peter,’ thus implying that the latter was really the better known. In the so-called appendix to John (21) Simon Peter is the chief actor, but the beloved disciple standing in the background is certainly a formidable rival for the honour of first place
Modin - Simon here built an elaborate monument with seven pyramids, commemorative of his father, mother, and four brethren, with great pillars around, and bas-reliefs of military and naval triumphs
Bartholomew - The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Annas - He succeeded Joazar, the son of Simon, enjoyed the high priesthood eleven years, and was succeeded by Ishmael, the son of Phabi
Sorcerer - Of this class appears to have been Simon the sorcerer, mentioned in Acts 8:9,11
mo'Din, - At Modin the Maccabean armies encamped on the eves of two of their most memorable victories --that of Judas over Antiochus Eupator, 2 Maccabees 13:14 , and that of Simon over Cendebeus
Peter, Festival of Saint - His original name was Simon or Simeon, which was changedinto Cephas, which in the Syrian language, signifies a stone orrock; from this it was derived into the Greek Petros, and sotermed by us Peter
Peter - Simon , surnamed Peter, was ‘the coryphœus of the Apostle choir’ (Chrysostom). ...
Simon first met with Jesus at Bethany beyond Jordan (John 1:28 RV Simeon - Some think he was Simon the Cyrenian; but there is no proof of this. The apostle Peter is also called Simeon in Acts 15:14 , but elsewhere Simon
Alexander - Son of Simon the Cyrenian, Mark 15:21 , apparently one of the more prominent early Christians
Feasts or Festivals - Simon and St
Alabaster - Occurs only in the New Testament in connection with the box of "ointment of spikenard very precious," with the contents of which a woman anointed the head of Jesus as he sat at supper in the house of Simon the leper (Matthew 26:7 ; Mark 14:3 ; Luke 7:37 )
Murder, Ritual - In a report to that body Pope Clement XIV declared that only two cases of so-called ritual murder had ever been proved, those of Andrew of Rinn in 1462 and Simon of Trent in 1475, and these had been motivated by hatred of Christianity, not by ritual requirements
Simon - Simon learned valuable lessons about love, courtesy, and forgiveness after a sinful woman anointed Jesus at this event
Compel - ...
2: ἀγγαρεύω (Strong's #29 — Verb — angareuo — ang-ar-yew'-o ) "to dispatch as an angaros (a Persian courier kept at regular stages with power of impressing men into service)," and hence, in general, "to impress into service," is used of "compelling" a person to go a mile, Matthew 5:41 ; of the impressing of Simon to bear Christ's cross, Matthew 27:32 ; Mark 15:21
Ritual Murder - In a report to that body Pope Clement XIV declared that only two cases of so-called ritual murder had ever been proved, those of Andrew of Rinn in 1462 and Simon of Trent in 1475, and these had been motivated by hatred of Christianity, not by ritual requirements
Palsy - The healings by Philip brought to an end the practice of sorcery by Simon and led to his conversion; the healing of aeneas showed anew the power which resided in ‘the name of Jesus’ (cf
Andrew - One of the first two called of the apostles; who in his turn called his brother Simon to Jesus (John 1:35-41). ...
When we admire the foremost apostle through whom 3000 were added to the church on Pentecost, let us not forget that, without Andrew, Simon would never have become Peter
Armenian Church - Simon, is little more than a dispute about terms; few of them being able to enter into the subtilties of polemics. Simon
Simeon - SIMON. Simon PETER . The Hebrew form of the Greek Simon used by James; the most Hebraistic of the twelve (Acts 15:14). Sinaiticus and Alexandrinus manuscripts read "Symeon" (2 Peter 1:1), but Vaticanus "Simon. " Christ shinned His own knowledge by answering Simon's unexpressed thought; His holiness, by not only being undefiled by her touch, but also sanctifying her by His touch; His judicial power, as One more than "a prophet," by justifying her and condemning him (Luke 7:36-50; Luke 18:9-14). Simon THE TANNER with whom Simon lodged at Joppa (Acts 9:43; Acts 10:6; Acts 10:32). In cutting a gate through a water battery at an angle of the sea wall built by Vespasian, and directly in front of the reputed house of Simon the tanner on the rocky bluff above, the men came on three oval shaped tanner vats hewn out of the natural rock and lined with Roman cement, down near the sea, and similar to those in use 18 centuries ago. Probably no more than one tanner would be living in so small a place as Joppa; so that the tradition is confirmed that here was the house of Simon with whom Peter lodged when he received the call of Cornelius. Simeon, subsequently seeing extraordinary powers of the Holy Spirit conferred through laying on of Peter's and John's hands on those already baptized, and supposing that their bestowal was by the outward act independently of the inward disposition, desired to buy the power of conferring such gifts (from whence comes our term "simony"); evidently Simeon himself had not received the gifts, not having yet presented himself
Matthew - His original name was Levi, Mark 2:14; Luke 5:27; Luke 5:29, which, like that of Simon and of Saul, was changed on his being called to the apostleship
Bath, Bathing - Recently a remarkable series of bath-chambers have been discovered at Gezer in connexion with a building, which is supposed to be the palace built by Simon Maccabæus (illust
Golgotha - ...
"Without the gate" (Hebrews 13:12); "nigh to the city" (John 19:20); near a thoroughfare where "they that passed by reviled Him" (Matthew 27:39), and where "Simon a Cyrenian who passed by, coming out of the country," was compelled to bear His cross (Mark 15:21)
Bethany - (Example Simon, the leper) He would have them remember that only He Himself should occupy the heart's affections rather than the service which we render, (Example Martha who was cumbered)
Zealot - ζηλωτής) occurs in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13 as the designation of Simon, one of the Twelve. Simon’s zealotry, purified by the knowledge of Jesus, might readily become true loyalty to the Kingdom of God. ) that Simon may have been called ζηλωτής ‘because of his personal character either before or after his call,’ as St
Ethnarch - The earliest instance of an ethnarch known to us is that of Simon Maccabaeus. In 1 Maccabees 14:47 Simon accepts from the people the following offices-ἀρχιερατεῦσαι καὶ εἶναι στρατηγὸς καὶ ἐθνάρχης τῶν Ἰουδαίων καὶ ἰερέων καὶ τοῦ προστατῆσαι πάντων (‘to be high priest and to be general and ethnarch of the Jews and their priests and to rule over all’); and in 1 Maccabees 15:2 a letter of King Antiochus of Syria is addressed to him as ἱερεῖ μεγάλῳ καὶ ἐθνάρχῃ (‘great priest and ethnarch’)
Peter - " Simon his original name means "hearer"; by it he is designated in Christ's early ministry and between Christ's death and resurrection. "Thou art Simon son of Jona (so the Alexandrinus manuscript but Vaticanus and Sinaiticus 'John'), thou shalt be called Cephas" (John 1:41-42). As "Simon" he was but an hearer; as Peter or Cephas he became an apostle and so a foundation stone of the church, by union to the one only Foundation Rock (Ephesians 2:20; 1 Corinthians 3:11). Left to nature, Simon, though bold and stubborn, was impulsive and fickle, but joined to Christ lie became at last unshaken and firm. The miraculous draught of fish overwhelmed Simon with awe at Jesus' presence; He who at creation said, "let the waters bring forth abundantly" (Genesis 1:20), now said, "let down your nets for a draught. "...
Simon, when the net which they had spread in vain all night now broke with the multitude of fish, exclaimed, "depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord!" He forgot Hosea 9:12 end; our sin is just the reason why we should beg Christ to come, not depart. Peter and Andrew were first called; then Christ entered Peter's boat, then wrought the miracle, then called James and John; Jesus next healed of fever Simon's mother-in-law. Simon stands foremost in the list, and for the rest of Christ's ministry is mostly called "Peter. So in John 6:66-69, when others went back (2 Timothy 4:10), to Jesus' testing question, "will ye also go away?" Simon replied, "Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life, and we believe and are sure that Thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God. Then Jesus said: "blessed art thou, Simon Barjona, for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee (John 1:13; Acts 4:19-20) but My Father in heaven, and . " Simon in anxious affection asked, "Lord, where guest Thou?" when Jesus said, cf6 "where I go, ye cannot come. "Simon" is resumed until at the supper (John 21) Jesus reinstates him as Peter, that being now "converted" he may "feed the lambs and sheep" and "strengthen his brethren. ) As he opened the gospel door to penitent believers (Acts 2:37-38), so he closed it against hypocrites as Ananias, Sapphira, and Simon Magus (Acts 8). Ecclesiastes, 1) makes Peter bishop of Antioch, then to have preached in Pontus (from 1 Peter 1:1), then to have gone to Rome to refute Simon Magus (from Justin's story of a statue found at Rome to Semosanctus, the Sabine Hercules, which was confounded with Simon Magus), and to have been bishop there for 25 years (!) and to have been crucified with head downward, declaring himself unworthy to be crucified as his Lord, and buried in the Vatican near the triumphal way
Magic - Simon, a magician, was found by Philip at Samaria ( Acts 8:9-24 ); and Paul and Barnabas encountered Elymas, a Jewish sorcerer, at Paphos (13:6-12)
Jabneel - Judas is said to have burned its harbour; it was captured by Simon from the Syrians
Drusilla - Employing as his emissary one Simon, a Cypriote, he persuaded her to leave her husband and to join him as his third wife-and third queen (‘trium reginarum maritum,’ writes Suetonius of Felix Thompson, William -
heat, which treats of the effects produced by the force of the form of energy known as heat
optics, which treats of all connected with the phenomena of sight
electricity and magnetism, which treat of the agency of electricity and phenomena caused by it, and of the laws of magnetic force
Among those who have made important contributions to the science are: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Ampere, Andre Marie
Babinet, Jacques
Beccaria, Giovanni Battista
Becquerel, Antoine Cesar
Becquerel, Antoine Henri
Branley, Edward
Coulomb, Charles Augustin
Delany, Patrick Bernard
Fizeau, Armand Hippolyte Louis
Foucault, Jean Bernard Leon
Fraunhofer, Joseph van
Fresnel, Augustin-Jean
Galilei, Galileo
Galvani, Luigi
Gramme, Zenobe Theophile
Grimaldi, Francesco Maria
Haüy, René Just
Mariotte, Edme
Matteucci, Carlo
Melloni, Macedonio
Nobili, Leopoldo
Regnault, Victor
Torricelli, Evangelista
Volta, Alessandro
OTHER CHRISTIAN PHYSICISTS ...
Boyle, Robert
Brewster, David
Faraday, Michael
Helmholtz, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand van
Hertz, Heinrich Rudolf
Huygens, Christian
Joule, James Prescott
Maxwell, James Clerk
Mayer, Julius Robert
Newton, Isaac
Oersted, Hans Christian
Ohm, Georg Simon
Rankine, W
William Thompson -
heat, which treats of the effects produced by the force of the form of energy known as heat
optics, which treats of all connected with the phenomena of sight
electricity and magnetism, which treat of the agency of electricity and phenomena caused by it, and of the laws of magnetic force
Among those who have made important contributions to the science are: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Ampere, Andre Marie
Babinet, Jacques
Beccaria, Giovanni Battista
Becquerel, Antoine Cesar
Becquerel, Antoine Henri
Branley, Edward
Coulomb, Charles Augustin
Delany, Patrick Bernard
Fizeau, Armand Hippolyte Louis
Foucault, Jean Bernard Leon
Fraunhofer, Joseph van
Fresnel, Augustin-Jean
Galilei, Galileo
Galvani, Luigi
Gramme, Zenobe Theophile
Grimaldi, Francesco Maria
Haüy, René Just
Mariotte, Edme
Matteucci, Carlo
Melloni, Macedonio
Nobili, Leopoldo
Regnault, Victor
Torricelli, Evangelista
Volta, Alessandro
OTHER CHRISTIAN PHYSICISTS ...
Boyle, Robert
Brewster, David
Faraday, Michael
Helmholtz, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand van
Hertz, Heinrich Rudolf
Huygens, Christian
Joule, James Prescott
Maxwell, James Clerk
Mayer, Julius Robert
Newton, Isaac
Oersted, Hans Christian
Ohm, Georg Simon
Rankine, W
Amaze, Amazement - , in the case of Simon Magus (for AV, "bewitched"), Acts 8:9,11 . It is used, in the Passive Voice, of Simon himself in Acts 8:13 , RV, "he was amazed," for AV, "wondered
Philip - A son of Herod the Great by Mariamne the daughter of Simon the high priest
Jacques Bossuet - He is ultra-conservative in his dispute with Richard Simon on the critical study of the Scriptures
Salome - But he had not anticipated for his guests the rare luxury of seeing a princess, his own niece, a grand-daughter of Herod the Great and of Mariamne, a descendant, therefore, of Simon the high priest and the great line of Maccabean princes, a princess who afterwards became the wife of a tetrarch [1] and the mother of a king, honouring them by degrading herself into a scenic dancer
Martha - Some interpreters identify Martha as the wife (widow) or daughter of Simon the leper on the basis of harmonization with Matthew 26:6-13 and Mark 14:3-9
Arizona - Catholic influence on place-names in Arizona appears in the following: ...
Christmas
Saint David
Saint Johns
Saint Michaels
San Carlos
San Simon
Ecclesiastical divisions include the following dioceses: ...
Phoenix
Tucson
See also, ...
patron saints index
Architecture - Macalister claims to have discovered, with much else of architectural interest, the palace of Simon Maccabæus ( 1Ma 13:48 ), Taanach, and Megiddo are finished and the results published in final form, and still more when other historical sites, such as Samaria (cf
Simon the Apostle, Saint - After his conversion and call to the apostleship, Simon directed his zeal and fidelity to the service of Christ. Details concerning Simon's later life are uncertain and often confused
Peter - His name was originally Simon, and apparently at his first interview with the Lord he received from Him the surname CEPHAS. (In Acts 10:5 he is called "Simon, whose surname is Peter
Mischna - According to Prideaux's account, they passed from Jeremiah to Baruch, from him to Ezra, and from Ezra to the men of the great synagogue, the last of whom was Simon the Just, who delivered them to Antigonus of Cocho: and from him they came down in regular succession to Simeon, who took our Saviour in his arms; to Gamaliel, at whose feet Paul was educated; and last of all, to Rabbi Judah the Holy, who committed them to writing in the Mischina. Prideaux, rejecting the Jewish fiction, observes, that after the death of Simon the Just, about 299 years before Christ, the Mischnical doctors arose, who by their comments and conclusions added to the number of those traditions which had been received and allowed by Ezra and the men of the great synagogue; so that towards the middle of the second century after Christ, under the empire of Antoninus Pius, it was found necessary to commit these traditions to writing; more especially as their country had considerably suffered under Adria, and many of their schools had been dissolved, and their learned men cut off; and therefore the usual method of preserving their traditions had failed
Mishna - Prideaux, they passed from Jeremiah to Baruch, from him to Ezra, and from Ezra to the men of the great synagogue, the last of whom was Simon the Just, who delivered them to Antigonus of Socho. Prideaux, rejecting this Jewish fiction, observes, that after the death of Simon the Just, about B
Apostle - " These twelve were arranged in three groups, Simon Peter and his brother Andrew, with James and John, the two sons of Zebedee; then Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, and Matthew; and, lastly, James, the son of Alpheus, Lebbeus (called Thaddeus, Judas, and Jude), Simon Zelotes or the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot
Disciple (2) - ...
 ...
Simon. ...
 ...
Simon. ...
 ...
Simon. ...
 ...
Simon the Zealot. ...
 ...
Simon the Zealot. ...
 ...
Simon the Cananæan. ...
 ...
Simon the Cananæan. Within the groups the order of the names varies, save as regards the first name of each of the three groups, which in all the lists is the same—the first, fifth, and ninth places being occupied in all by Simon (Peter), Philip, and James of Alphaeus respectively
Hasmonean - Although Judas and Jonathan played important leadership roles, the Hasmonean dynasty clearly emerged under Simon, who was widely recognized as secular and religious leader of homeland Judaism. Indeed, it was Simon who initially assumed the office of high priest and combined it with his role as governor/general of Judea. ...
His son, John Hyrcanus I, succeeded Simon and continued to hold dual offices of governor and high priest
Joppa - At Joppa, in the house of Simon the tanner, "by the sea-side," Peter resided "many days," and here, "on the house-top," he had his "vision of tolerance" (Acts 9:36-43 )
Money - gave permission to Simon the Maccabee to coin Jewish money
Catholic Latin Literature - The drama, an outgrowth of Church liturgy, included such writers as ...
Andreas Fabricius
Beccadelli
Bruni
Cornelius Crocus
Cornelius Laurimanus
Dati
De Loches
Filelfo
Hannardus Gamerius
Holonius
Jacob Locher
Johann von Kitzcher
Levin Brecht
Mussato
Poggio
Reuchlin
Wimpfeling
Among the poets of this period may be mentioned: ...
Adam Widl
Famian Strada
Hieronymus Petrucci
Hosschius
Jacob Masen
Johannes Dantiscus
John Bissel
John Salmon
Nicola Avancini
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Bellarmine
Sarbiewski
Simon Rettenbacher
Tarquinius Galuzzi
Vida
The writers of the neo-Latin epic included: ...
Saint Alcuin
Saint Aldhelm
Saint Boniface
Saint Columbanus
Saint Thomas More
Venerable Bede
Balde
Dante Alighieri
Flodoard
Hildebert of Tours
Hroswitha
John of Salisbury
Maffeo Vegio
Marbod
Petrarch
Sadolet
Theodulf the Goth
Venantius Fortunatus
Walafrid Strabo
the five Ekkehards
the four Notkers
Herodians - Simon, in his notes on the 22d chapter of Matthew, advances a more probable opinion: the name Herodian he imagines to have been given to such as adhered to Herod's party and interest, and were for preserving the government in his family, about which were great divisions among the Jews
Caiaphas, Joseph - Appointed high priest (after Simon ben Camith) by the procurator Valerius Gratus, under Tiberius
Penitence - By virtue of a brief of pope Alexander, Simon, bishop of Paris, in 1497, drew them up a body of statutes, and gave them the rule of St
Brothers, Jesus - Jesus' Nazareth critics listed them in Mark 6:3 as James, Joses, Juda, and Simon
Andrew - Andrew then introduced his brother Simon, and they went with him to the marriage in Cana, but afterward returned to their ordinary occupation, not expecting, perhaps, to be farther employed in his service
Philip - Herod Philip, another son of Herod the Great by Mariamne the daughter of Simon, not his favorite Mariamne
Divination - Hence the lucrative trade of such men as Simon Magus, (Acts 8:9 ) Bar-jesus, (Acts 13:6 ) the slave with the spirit of Python, (Acts 16:16 ) the vagabond jews, exorcists, (Luke 11:19 ; Acts 19:13 ) and others, (2 Timothy 3:13 ; Revelation 19:20 ) etc
Brother - The arguments for the "brethren" of Jesus (James, Joses, Simon, and Judas) mentioned in Matthew 13:56 being literally His brothers, born of Joseph and Mary, are:...
(1) their names are always connected with Mary, "His brethren" is the phrase found nine times in the Gospels, once in Acts (Acts 1:14);...
(2) nothing is said to imply that the phrase is not to be taken literally. In Acts 1:14 His "brethren," as distinct from the apostles, may refer to Simon and Joses and other near relatives
Martha - Jesus commenced His reply with ‘Martha, Martha,’ repeating the name as He did on another occasion of loving correction (‘Simon, Simon,’ Luke 22:31 ), and blamed her for her outward agitation (‘troubled’) and inward anxiety
Antiochus - He also received Jonathan into the number of his friends, sent him vessels of gold, permitted him to use a gold cup, to wear purple, and a golden buckle; and he gave his brother, Simon Maccabaeus, the command of all his troops on the coast of the Mediterranean, from Tyre to Egypt. However, Simon, Jonathan's brother, headed the troops of Judea, and opposed Tryphon, who. He came into Syria, and wrote to Simon Maccabaeus, to engage him against Tryphon, 1Ma_15:1-3 , &c. He confirmed the privileges which the king of Syria had granted to Simon, permitted him to coin money with his own stamp, declared Jerusalem and the temple exempt from royal jurisdiction, and promised other favours as soon as he should obtain peaceable possession of the kingdom which had belonged to his ancestors. Simon Maccabaeus sent Antiochus two thousand chosen men, but the latter refused them, and revoked all his promises. He also sent Athenobius to Jerusalem to oblige Simon to restore to him Gazara and Joppa, with the citadel of Jerusalem; and to demand of him five hundred talents more, as reparation for injuries the king had suffered, and as tribute for his own cities. Simon showed Athenobius all the lustre of his wealth and power, told him he had in his possession no place which belonged to Antiochus, and said that the cities of Gazara and Joppa had greatly injured his people, and he would give the king for the property of them one hundred talents. Athenobius returned with great indignation to Antiochus, who was extremely offended at Simon's answer. John Hircanus, son of Simon Maccabaeus, was then at Gaza, and gave notice to his father of the coming of Cendebeus. Simon furnished his sons, John Hircanus and Judas, with troops, and sent them against Cendebeus, whom they routed in the plain and pursued to Azotus. Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, being treacherously murdered by Ptolemy, his son-in-law, in the castle of Docus, near Jericho, the murderer immediately sent to Antiochus Sidetes to demand troops, that he might recover for him the country and cities of the Jews
Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelite Order - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Carmelites - ...
Carmelite saints include ...
Albert of Jerusalem
Albert of Sicily
Andrew Corsini
Angelus of Jerusalem
Anne of Saint Bartholomew
Cyril of Constantinople
Denis of the Nativity
Elizabeth of the Trinity
Jacobinus de Canepaci
Jane of Toulouse
Joaquina Vedruna de Mas
John Baptist Spagnuolo
John of the Cross
John Soreth
Maria Lopez of Jesus
Marie of the Incarnation
Mary Fontanella
Mary Magdalen of Pazzi
Nuno Alveres Pereira
Peter Thomas
Raphael Kalinowski
Redemptorus of the Cross
Romeo of Limoges
Rose Chretien
Simon Stock
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross
Teresa Margaret Redi
Teresa Maria of the Cross
Teresa of Avila
Teresa of the Andes
Theresa of Lisieux
Debtor - 1), is found in Luke 7:41 , of the two "debtors" mentioned in the Lord's parable addressed to Simon the Pharisee, and in Luke 16:5 , of the "debtors" in the parable of the unrighteous steward
Malice - Only once is the wider meaning unquestionable: the κακία of which Simon the Magian is urged to repent is no specific fault, but the deep-seated wickedness of a man who is still in the gall of bitterness (Acts 8:22-23)
Believe - ...
In theology, to believe sometimes expresses a mere assent of the understanding to the truths of the gospel as in the case of Simon
Joppa - The traditional sites of Tabitha’s tomb and Simon the tanner’s house are shown to tourists and to pilgrims, but are of course without authority
Ointment (2) - Luke mentions it in connexion with the anointing of Christ by the unnamed woman in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:46), and again (Luke 23:56) as one of the things prepared by the women for the intended completion of the burial of the Master
Philip the Evangelist - Here he encountered a famous magician resident in the city, named Simon. This Simon subsequently became the founder of one of those religio-philosophical sects, resulting partly from the break-up of the old religions, partly from the contact of the older religious faiths or philosophies with Judaism, which are known by the general name of Gnosticism. ...
The conversions of Simon and his fellow-Samaritans represented a great step in advance in the widening of the Christian Church
Lord, Brethren of the - ...
 ...
Simon or Simeon is merely mentioned as the third of the four brothers (Matthew 13; Mark 6)
Martha - (If the anointing by Mary referred to above was the same as that recorded in Matthew 26:6-13, the person called Simon the leper was possibly Martha’s father or husband
Brethren of the Lord - Jesus was Mary’s first-born ( Luke 2:7 ), and she subsequently (according to the view accepted in the present article) bore to Joseph four sons, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon, and several daughters ( Matthew 13:55-56 = Mark 6:3 )
Apion - In the Clementine Homilies he appears in company with Anubion and Athenodorus among the satellites of Simon Magus, the arch-enemy of St
Copts - Scaliger and Father Simon derive the name from Coptos, once a celebrated town of Egypt, and the metropolis of the Thebaid; but Volney and others are of opinion, that the name Copts is only an abbreviation of the Greek word Aigouptios, "an Egyptian
Phil'ip the Evangelist - The scene which brings Philip and Simon the sorcerer into contact with each other, (Acts 8:9-13 ) which the magician has to acknowledge a power over nature greater than his own, is interesting
James - Like his brother, James worked with Zebedee in partnership with Simon and Andrew ( Luke 5:10 ), and he was busy with boat and nets when Jesus called him to leave all and follow Him ( Matthew 4:21-22 = Mark 1:19-20 ). They got from Jesus the same appellation, ‘the Sons of Thunder’ (see Boanerges), and they stood, with Simon Peter, on terms of special intimacy with Him
Hymenaeus - It came from the masters of Gnosticism, who from Simon Magus onwards had taught the inferior or evil character of matter, in opposition to the fathers of the Catholic Church, who assigned to the world a sacramental character. 2), the followers of Simon and Carpocrates taught that ‘the resurrection from the dead was simply an acquaintance with that truth which they proclaimed
Peter - Peter was one of the twelve apostles, and was also called Simon, Matthew 16:17 , and Simeon, Acts 15:14 . We find him afterwards denouncing the judgment of God on a guilty couple who had dared to lie to the Holy Ghost, Acts 5:1-11 ; visiting Samaria, and rebuking Simon the magician, Acts 8:5-24 ; healing Eneas and raising Dorcas to life at Lydda, Acts 9:32-43 ; seeing at Joppa a vision which prepared him to preach the gospel to the gentile Cornelius, Acts 10:1-48 ; imprisoned by Herod Agrippa, and delivered by an angel, Acts 12:3-19 ; and taking a part in the council at Jerusalem, Acts 15:7-11
Name, Names - When we read such a list as this: Hillel, Simon, Gamaliel, Simon, Gamaliel, Simon, Judah, Gamaliel, Judah , we get the impression that the grandfather’s name was more often adopted than the father’s (cf. Double names were now frequent: Judas Maccabœus, Simon Zelotes , etc. Non-Jewish names were substituted for Jewish: Jason for Jesus; Simon for Simeon (Deissmann, Bible Studies , p
pe'Ter - The original name of this disciple was Simon, i. See (Matthew 10:2-4 ; Mark 3:13-19 ) (the most detailed account); Luke 6:13 They appear to have then first received formally the name of apostles, and from that time Simon bore publicly, and as it would seem all but exclusively, the name Peter, which had hitherto been used rather as a characteristic appellation than as a proper name. It is observable; however, that on that occasion he is called by his original name, Simon not Peter; the higher designation was not restored until he had been publicly reinstituted, so to speak, by his Master
Brethren of the Lord (2) - ]'>[2] and Simon, and Judas? And his sisters, are they not all†
As developed by subsequent writers, the Hieronymian theory affirms in addition—...
(d) That Simon the Zealot and Judas ‘not Iscariot’ were also brethren of the Lord. ...
(4) The names of James, Simon, and Jude occur together, and in the same division, in all the Apostolic lists. We conclude, therefore, that James was certainly not the brother of Jude, and there is no evidence that he was the brother of Simon. The coincidence of three such common names as James, Simon, and Jude in the list of brethren and in the list of Apostles proves nothing. If it could be shown that James, Simon, and Jude, Apostles, were also brothers, the coincidence would be worth considering; but since they were not, the coincidence is without significance. ’ James is called ‘of Alphaeus,’ perhaps also ‘the Little’; Simon is called the Cananaean,’ and ‘the Zealot’; Jude receives no less than four distinguishing titles, ‘not Iscariot,’ ‘of James,’ ‘Thaddaeus,’ and ‘Lebbaeus’ (
Matthew 10:3, Western Text). Accordingly James and Joses (and consequently also Simon and Jude), the Lord’s ‘brethren,’ were really His cousins on His mother’s side
Rainbow - In Sir 43:11 the rainbow is one of the wonderful works of God; in Sir 50:7 it is a type of the glory of Simon
Judas - ...
...
Son of Simon (John 6:71 ; 13:2,26 ), surnamed Iscariot, i
Martha - ) Theophylact made her daughter of Simon the leper, others his wife or widow
Ammonius Saccas - 342; Jules Simon, Hist
Joppa - Here, too, Peter raised Dorcas from the dead; and in the house of Simon the tanner, by the seaside, was taught by a heavenly vision that salvation was for Gentiles as well as Jews, Acts 9:1-11:30
Judas Iscariot - Son of Simon and one of the twelve apostles
Bethany - and Lazarus where He raised Lazarus froth the dead; from whence He made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem; His nightly abode each of the six nights preceding His betrayal; where at the house of Simon the leper He was anointed by Mary (Mark 14:3); and where, most of all, we are introduced to the home circle of His private life. The house and tomb of Lazarus, and the house of Simon the leper, exhibited here, are of very doubtful genuineness
Sergius Paulus - Acts 8:13, ‘Simon believed’ (though Simon became a pervert), and John 12:42, ‘the rulers believed … but did not confess,’ and especially John 20:8
Mary of Cleophas - ...
Mary was probably the Virgin's older sister or half-sister; she married Cleophas and by him had four sons, James (the apostle), Joses ("Joseph" Vaticanus manuscript, "John" Sinaiticus manuscript), Jude (the apostle), and Simon, and three daughters
Introduction, Biblical - The Oratorian, Richard Simon (died 1712) applied to the subject the critico-historical method
Biblical Introduction - The Oratorian, Richard Simon (died 1712) applied to the subject the critico-historical method
Divination - This superstition widely spread, and in the time of the apostles there were "vagabond Jews, exorcists" (Acts 19:13 ), and men like Simon Magus (Acts 8:9 ), Bar-jesus (13:6,8), and other jugglers and impostors (19:19; 2 Timothy 3:13 )
Bethany - ...
Another significant event in Jesus' life occurred in Bethany at the home of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 )
Gezer - the Jewish leader Simon Maccabeus captured Gazara and built himself a home there
Brothers - Among the disciples, Simon and Andrew are siblings (Mark 1:16 ); so also are James and John (Mark 1:19 )
Simeon - Name by which Simon Peter is called by James in Acts 15:14
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
High Priest - Herod appointed no less than five high priests himself, and one of them, Simon, as the price of his daughter in marriage
Absalom - It is perhaps the same Absalom whose son Jonathan was sent by Simon to secure Joppa ( 1Ma 13:11 = Jos
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
141...
Simon Maccabæus frees the Jews
Caiaphas - high priest of the Jews, succeeded Simon, son of Camith; and after possessing this dignity nine years, from A
Peraea - From Peræa, Simon made his ill-starred raid upon Jericho (XVII
James - By referring to ( Matthew 13:55 ) and Mark 6:3 We find that a James the Less and Joses, with two other brethren called Jude and Simon, and at least three sisters, were sisters with the Virgin Mary at Nazareth by referring to ( Luke 6:16 ) and Acts 1:13 We find that there were two brethren named James and Jude among the apostles
Hair - Regarding the latter (a) it is used to signify the minutest detail, as that which illustrates the exceeding care and protection bestowed by God upon His children, Matthew 10:30 ; Luke 12:7 ; 21:18 ; Acts 27:34 ; (b) as the Jews swore by the "hair," the Lord used the natural inability to make one "hair" white or black, as one of the reasons for abstinence from oaths, Matthew 5:36 ; (c) while long "hair" is a glory to a woman (see B), and to wear it loose or dishevelled is a dishonor, yet the woman who wiped Christ's feet with her "hair" (in place of the towel which Simon the Pharisee omitted to provide), despised the shame in her penitent devotion to the Lord (slaves were accustomed to wipe their masters' feet), Luke 7:38,44 (RV, "hair"); see also John 11:2 ; 12:3 ; (d) the dazzling whiteness of the head and "hair" of the Son of Man in the vision of Revelation 1:14 is suggestive of the holiness and wisdom of "the Ancient of Days;" (e) the long "hair" of the spirit-beings described as locusts in Revelation 9:8 is perhaps indicative of their subjection of their satanic master (cp
Feet (2) - Neglectful of the courtesies of a host, Simon the Pharisee gave Him no water to refresh His feet (Luke 7:44); but a sinful woman on the same occasion wet His feet with her tears, wiped them with the hair of her head, kissed them, and anointed them with ointment (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:44 ff. Those feet which were dust-stained in the house of Simon the Pharisee, and weary by the well of Sychar (John 4:6), and pierced with nails on the cross of Calvary, are now ‘like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace’ (Revelation 1:15; cf
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - He is sometimes called "the son of Simon," ( John 6:71 ; 13:2,26 ) but more commonly ISCARIOTES. What was Judas' motive in betraying Christ? -- (1) Anger at the public rebuke given him by Christ at the supper in the house of Simon the leper
School - Simon ben Shetah, the leader of the Pharisees, founded schools for boys of sixteen and seventeen to promote the study of the Scriptures
Canaanitish - * Baptism - Among the instances of baptism mentioned in apostolic times are: 3000 at Pentecost, Acts 2:41, men and women, including Simon the Sorcerer at Samaria; the Ethiopian Eunuch, 8:12, 13, 38; Saul; Cornelius and his Gentile company, 10:47; Lydia and "her household," 16:15; the Philippian jailer "and all his," 16:33; and "the household of Stephanas," 1 Corinthians 1:16
Simon Peter - (Greek: petra, rock) ...
Peter, originally Simon, son of Jona, was a fisherman of Bethsaida, a town on Lake Genesareth
James - The gospels repeatedly mention James, Joses, Juda, and Simon, as "brothers" of our Lord, and speak in the same connection of his "mother" and his "sisters," Matthew 12:46 13:56, Mark 3:31, 6:3, Luke 8:19 ; moreover, the inspired writers expressly distinguish the brothers of Christ from the apostles both James the Less and Jude, John 2:12 7:3-10 Acts 1:13,14 , thus furnishing strong reasons, as many believe, for the opinion that James the Just was literally a brother of our Lord
Guest-Chamber - the anointing, in the house of Simon the Pharisee, by the woman who was a sinner (Luke 7:36 ff. ); the later anointing by Mary of Bethany in the house of Simon the Leper (John 12:1 ff
Conversion - He told Simon Peter, “When thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren” (Luke 22:32 ). They then experienced a radical change in their lives: Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1 ), the woman at the well at Sychar (John 4:1 ), the sinful woman in the house of Simon (Luke 7:1 ), and Nicodemus (John 3:1 ). The truth of the gospel causes concern and leads people to ask the question asked of Simon Peter after his Pentecost sermon, “Men and brethren, what shall we do?” (Acts 2:37 )
Lazarus - Curiously, Ganneau found close to Bethany a tomb, probably of the first century, containing the names all together of Simon, Martha, and Lazarus. Moreover, the house is called that of Simon the leper (Matthew 26:6; Mark 14:3); who was probably therefore their father, but either by death or leprosy no longer with them, though possibly he too, as a leper healed by Jesus, was then one of that happy family. Plumptre (Smith's Dictionary) identifies Simon the leper with Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-40); Martha had the Pharisees' belief in the resurrection (John 11:24); Mary's gift of the ointment was after the example of the sinful woman in Simon's house; the leprosy came on subsequently
Docetism - 23) that according to the system of Simon the Redeemer (who however is not Jesus but Simon himself) "had appeared among men as man though he was not a man and was thought to have suffered in Judea though he did not suffer. 24) Christ or Nous is not distinguished from Jesus but is said to be an incorporeal power who transfigured Himself as He willed; that He appeared on earth as man and worked miracles but that He did not suffer; that it was Simon of Cyrene who being transfigured into the form of Jesus was crucified while Jesus Himself in the form of Simon standing by laughed at His persecutors and then incapable of being held by them ascended up to Him Who had sent Him invisible to them all
Cyrene - ...
Simon of Cyrene (the father of Alexander and Rufus Money - The first regular coinage among the Jews is supposed to have been in the time of Simon Maccabaeus, less than a century and a half before Christ
Power Powers - -We find ‘the power of God’ in 1 Corinthians 1:18; 1 Corinthians 1:24; 1 Corinthians 2:5, 2 Corinthians 6:7; ‘the power of our Lord Jesus’ in 1 Corinthians 5:4; ‘the power of the Holy Ghost’ in Romans 15:13; Romans 15:19 in Acts 8:10 ‘that power of God which is called Great’ is a title given to Simon Magus
Impostors - The Bible foretells them and warns against them in numerous instances, as in Matthew 7; Mark 13; 1 John 4; the fulfilment of such prophecies being attested to in the "Didache" (the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles) and by Justin Martyr c150 Apart from such pseudo-Messiases as John of Gischala and Simon Bar-Giora, the first notorious impostor of Christian church history was Simon Magus, the sorcerer, of whom we read in Acts 8
Martha - ]'>[1] She appears in the Gospel-story on three occasions: (1) when she entertained Jesus on His way to Jerusalem at the season of the Feast of Tabernacles (Luke 10:38-42); (2) when Lazarus died and was revived by Jesus (John 11:1-46); and (3) when Jesus, on His way to the Passover from His retreat at Ephraim (John 11:54), was honoured with a public entertainment at Bethany in the house of a leading man named Simon the Leper (John 12:1-11 = Matthew 26:6-13 = Mark 14:3-9). ...
The idea that the scene of this entertainment was Martha’s house has given rise to the unfortunate surmise that Martha was a widow, Simon the Leper being her deceased husband
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - Jesus went with his twelve disciples, and on arriving near the place said: ‘Who of you will go and announce to the people of this place my arrival?’ James and Thomas and Simon Peter went. When near the place, Simon told the other two to go on and give the news, and he would wait; so that if evil should fall on one of them he might make some plan. Simon then came and sought the audience of the king, and begged to be allowed to interrogate Thomas. Simon said: ‘Doctors do this; what other proof have you?’ ‘Jesus knows what people eat, and drink, and say in their houses. ’ Simon said: ‘This too can be done by intelligence and hearing: give another proof. ’ Simon said: ‘This is simply magic: give another proof. ’ Simon then said to the king: ‘If this is so, it is advisable that your honour should send for Jesus, and see whether what Thomas says is right: if he raises the dead he is a true prophet. ’ The king approved, and sent for Jesus, to whom Simon told all that had passed. Simon said to heal the hands and feet of Thomas; then to state what each one in the assembly had eaten, and what stores he had; then to make mud birds fly. Simon, on seeing this, said: ‘This is heavenly food. ’ He then added: ‘Now I make Simon my Khalifa (successor), all of you obey him
Sanhedrin - Again, during the Second Temple, after the men of the Great Synagogue from Ezra to Simon the Just ii. ), whose triumph over the Sadducean Sanhedrin in the reign of queen Alexandra Salome and under the leadership, of Simon b. Peraḥya and Nittai of Arbela-the second; Simon b. 15a, Hillel’s successor as Nâsî was his son Simon, and he was followed by his son Gamaliel I. , and he again by his own son Simon, the last president of the Sanhedrin before the destruction of the Temple. Tabbai above Simon b. (Acts 5:34) and Simon b. Jcezer, Simon b
Maccabees - For a year and a half he waged war on his enemies on the east of the Jordan, while his brother Simon brought the Jews scattered throughout Galilee back to Judæa for safety. Simon (b. Simon’s first step was to make the recognition of the independence of Judæa a condition of an alliance with Demetrius ii. The need of that monarch was too great to warrant his refusal of Simon’s hard terms, and the political independence of Judæa was achieved (b. ’ That is to say, the high-priestly office became hereditary in Simon’s family. Following the policy of his house, Simon re-established the treaty with Rome, although he became involved in a strenuous struggle with Syria, in which the Syrian general was defeated by his son, John Hyrcanus. Like his brothers, however, Simon met a violent death, being killed by his son-in-law at a banquet ( 1Ma 13:1-53 ; 1Ma 14:1-49 ; 1Ma 15:1-41 ; 1Ma 16:1-16 ). Under this son of Simon, the Jewish State reached its greatest prosperity. She maintained the general foreign policy of her house, defending her kingdom against various foreign enemies, but particularly devoted herself, under the guidance of her brother Simon ben-Shetach, to the inner development of Judæa along lines of Pharisaic policy
James - The words Andrew "first findeth his own brother Simon" imply that John secondly found and called his own brother James to Jesus, or vice versa. ...
The next call was after an unsuccessful night's fishing, when the fishermen had gone out of their ships and had washed (Luke 5:2, Vaticanus and Cambridge manuscripts read eplunon , "were washing"; the Sinaiticus and Paris manuscripts have epifainoo ) their nets; Jesus entering one of the ships, Simon's, prayed him to thrust out a little from land, and preached. Then rewarding his loan of the ship, He desired Simon, Launch out into the deep, and do ye let down your nets for a draught. Astonished at the miracle, yet encouraged by His further promise to Simon, "henceforth thou shalt catch men," the three forsook not merely their "nets" as before, but "all," and followed Him. Clopas (Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts, John 19:25) or Cleophas (Sinaiticus manuscript) is the Hebrew, Alphaeus the Greek, of the same name: he married Mary, sister of the Virgin Mary, and had by her James, Joses, Jude, and Simon, and three daughters (Mary is sometimes designated "mother of James and Joses," Matthew 27:56, as these were the two oldest); he died before our Lord's ministry began, and his widow went to live with her sister the Virgin Mary, a widow also herself (for Joseph's name never occurs after Luke 2), at Nazareth (Matthew 13:55), Capernaum (John 2:12), and Jerusalem (Acts 1:14). "...
The theory that denies any of the Lord's brethren to have place among the apostles involves the improbability that there were two sets of four first cousins, named James, Joses, Jude, Simon, without anything to show which is son of Clopas and which his cousin
James - In each list he stands at the bead of the third group along with Simon Zelotes (with whom he is coupled by St. He is the eldest of four brothers, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon (Simon and Judas, Matthew 13:55). The names of the four brothers, James, Joseph, Simon (= Simeon), and Jude (= Judah), are those of patriarchs
Samaritans - ...
This temple was destroyed by John Hyrcanus, son of Simon Maccabaeus, about B
Captivities of Israel - The Samaritan Chronicle asserts that in the thirty-fifth year of the pontificate of Abdelus, three thousand Israelites, by permission of King Sauredius, returned from captivity, under the conduct of Adus, son of Simon
Tribute - Peter: "What thinkest thou, Simon? of whom do the kings of the earth take custom or tribute? of their own children, or of strangers?" Matthew 17:25 , meaning, that as he was the Son of God, he ought to be exempt from this capitation tax
Jer'Icho - Soon afterward the palace was burnt and the town plundered by one Simon, slave to Herod; but Archelaus rebuilt the former sumptuously, and founded a new town on the plain, that bore his own name; and, most important of all, diverted water from a village called Neaera to irrigate the plain which he had planted with palms
Mac'Cabees, Books of -
THE FIRST BOOK OF MACCABEES contains a history of the patriotic struggle of the Jews in resisting the oppressions of the Syrian kings, from the first resistance of Mattathias to the settled sovereignty and death of Simon, a period of thirty-three years--B
Antichrist - ...
( e ) The myth of Simon Magus, or that of the false prophet . This myth seems to have been common in Christian circles, and Simon Magus (wh
Antiochus - Simon partially won his favour by presents and by furnishing auxiliary troops, but at last refused to meet his excessive demands for permitting such independence as Judæa had come to enjoy under the weak predecessor of Antiochus. Thereupon Antiochus sent his generals into Judæa, but they were defeated by the sons of Simon ( 1Ma 15:1-41 ; 1Ma 16:1-24 )
Maccabees - It is supposed to have been written by John Hyrcanus, the son of Simon, who was prince and high priest of the Jews near thirty years, and began his government at the time where this history ends. It contains the history of forty years, from the reign of Antiochus Epiphanes to the death of Simon, the high priest; that is, from the year of the world 3829 to the year 3869, B
Thaddaeus - ’...
In all four lists Thaddæus (or Judas) comes next to Simon the Cananæan or Zealot, and may not improbably have been his brother or intimate friend (cf
Footwashing - Customarily, a host provided guests with water for washing their own feet (Judges 19:21 ; Luke 7:44 , where the complaint was that Simon had not provided water)
Nets - This accounts for Simon Peter’s condition ( John 21:7 )
Naming - ...
The patronymic pracice whereby a child received the name of a relative, especially the grandfather (Simon Bar-Jona is “son of Jona”) was common by the Christian era
Judas - A son, probably the eldest, of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 16:2 )
Ecclesiasticus - From the prologue to the Greek version composed by a nephew of the author we learn that the latter was Jesus or Josua (Yeshua), son of Sirach of Jerusalem, who seems to have been a contemporary of Simon II, son of Onias the high priest between 220-205 B
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - 451); his hands were not clear of Simoniacal gain, which he employed in building a splendid church (i. 10), Simon, and Chaeremon (v. Cyril with excommunication, but returned and imputed to Cyril himself a participation in Simony
Mary, the Mother of Jesus - The crowds said, "Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us?" Mark 6:3 , etc
Names - He altered the names of some persons: Abram was changed to Abraham; Sarai to Sarah; Jacob to Israel; and He gave reasons why they were altered; and the Lord Jesus gave Simon the name of Peter
Money - Sidetes granted Simon Maccabaeus the license to coin money, B
Cross - Our Savior was loaded with his cross, and as he sunk under the burden, Simon the Cyrenian was constrained to bear it after him and with him, Mark 15:21
Ptolemais - There Simon routed the Syrian Greeks (1 Maccabees 5:15), and there Jonathan was treacherously captured by Trypho (1 Maccabees 12:45-48)
Judas - )...
Judas Iscariot...
Judas the betrayer was commonly known as Iscariot (meaning ‘man of Kerioth’), after the home town of his father, Simon (Matthew 10:4; John 6:71)
Saturninus - The first two are the Samaritan heretics Simon and Menander; the next as having derived their doctrines from these Saturninus and Basilides who taught the former in the Syrian Antioch the latter in Egypt
Mary - Others believe, with greater probability, that she was wife of Cleophas, as our version of the New Testament makes her, by supplying the word wife, John 19:25 , and mother of James the less, and of Simon, brethren of our Lord. It is thought she was the sister of the Virgin Mary, and that she was the mother of James the less, of Joses, of Simon, and of Judas, who in the Gospel are named the brethren of Jesus Christ, Matthew 13:55 ; Matthew 27:56 ; Mark 6:3 ; that is, his cousin-germans. Six days before the passover, after having raised Lazarus from the dead, he came to Bethany with his disciples, and was invited to sup with Simon the leper, John 12:1 , &c; Matthew 26:6 , &c; Mark 14:3 , &c. Luke, and called in the English translation "a sinner," had formerly been a Heathen; but whether subsequently a proselyte to Judaism or not, is uncertain; and that, having been brought to the knowledge of Christian truth, and having found mercy from the Redeemer, she pressed into Simon's house, and gave the strongest proofs of her gratitude and veneration by anointing the Saviour's feet, bedewing them with her tears, and wiping them with the hairs of her head:—that by a wilful and malicious misrepresentation, the Jews confounded Mary Magdalene with Mary the mother of Jesus, and represented her as an infamous character;—and that, from the blasphemous calumny of the Jews, a stigma of infamy has been affixed to the name of Mary Magdalene, and caused her to be regarded in the false light of a penitent prostitute
Jealousy (2) - —This word is not used in the Gospels, though John 2:17 has ὅ ζῆλος τοῦ οἴκου σου = קנִאַת בֵּיתף (Psalms 69:10) = ‘jealousy for thy house’; and one of Jesus’ disciples was Simon ὁ ζηλωτής (Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13) = Simon ὅ Καναναῖος (Mark 3:18), a man who had belonged to that party in the Jewish State which was so jealous for the sole sovereignty of God in Israel that it regarded the recognition of any other (
Twelve - Simon: hearing with acceptance. Simon: (Zelotes, also Simon the Canaanite)
Murmur, Murmuring - ’ Hostile murmuring is found in the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:11), and in the story of the Anointing in the house of Simon the leper (Mark 14:5)
Toleration, Tolerance - Persons of diverse views, habits, temperaments, were attracted to Him, so that Petrine and Johannine minds, the tax-gatherer Matthew and the tax-hater Simon, Nicodemus and Zacchaeus, Martha and Mary, found in Him what they needed
Kidron (1) - side of the valley are the so-called ‘Tombs of the Kings,’ and on the East the reputed tomb of ‘Simon the Just,’ much venerated by the Jews
Jannes And Jambres - [1] 268) makes the two apostles warn Nero against Simon Magus by the example of Pharaoh, who was drowned in the Red Sea through listening to Jannes and Jambres
Jonathan - Son of Absalom, in the time of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 13:11 )
Bartholomew - ’ Bartholomew may be either a genuine patronymic used in addition to a proper name, like Simon Bar-jona; or it may have become an independent proper name, like Barnabas
Alexander - The son of Simon of Cyrene, who bore the cross to Calvary (Mark 15:21), and the brother of Rufus
Power - By similar usage Simon the sorcerer was called ‘the power of God which is called Great’ ( Acts 8:10 ), i
Philip - If Andrew was the first missionary of the Kingdom of heaven, bringing his brother Simon to Jesus ( John 1:40-42 )
Apostle - In Matt, hew and Mark Thaddaeus (or Lebbaeus) precedes Simon Zelotes (Hebrew "Canaanite," i. But in Luke and Acts Simon Zelotes precedes Jude (Thaddaeus) the brother of James
Money - ...
Antiochus VII granted Simon the Maccabee permission to coin money with his own stamp, the first recorded coining of Jewish money (1 Maccabees 15:6; 140 B. In copper, on one side a palmtree with the name "Simon"; the reverse, a vine leaf, with the legend "for the freedom of Jerusalem
Sirach - -The person who bore this name was the father of a Jesus, author of a Hebrew work of which the original is lost, but which is preserved in a Greek translation called Σοφία Ἰησοῦ υἱοῦ Σειράχ, a Syriac translation called The Words of Jesus son of Simon called son of Asira (i. ...
In the colophon (Sirach 50:27) some Greek Manuscripts give the grandfather’s name as Eleazar, and, as has been seen, the Syriac gives the father’s as Simon, supposing Asira to be an Aramaic sobriquet. The author in the Greek translation calls himself in the colophon (Sirach 50:27) ‘of Jerusalem,’ according to some Manuscripts ‘a priest of Jerusalem’; and the list of eminent Israelites with which the book closes ends with an encomium on the high priest Simon son of Onias (‘Nathania’ of the Syriac is a corruption to be explained from the Syriac script). If this personage is to be identified with the Simon the Just of Josephus, his period of office appears to have been from 300 to 287 b. , and the words of Ben-Sira imply, though they do not distinctly state, that he had seen this Simon officiate. The last portion is clearly marked off from the rest and occupies the final chapters 44-50, being a record of the great men mentioned in the OT, to whom the high priest Simon is added; it is preceded by a description of the wonders of Nature occupying ch
Peter - His original name was "Simon" or "Simeon
Cleopas - The story may have been received by the Evangelist from Cleopas himself: it bears marks of its early origin in the primitive Messianic ideas it preserves, and in the use of the name Simon for St
Army - The first mention of regular pay is in connexion with the army of Simon Maccabæus ( 1Ma 14:32 )
Philip the Evangelist - Even Simon Magus believed and was baptized, and continued with Philip wondering at the miracles and signs which were done
Mennonites - a society of Baptists in Holland, so called from Menno Simon of Friesland, who lived in the sixteenth century
Offer, Offering - , Matthew 8:4 ; Mark 1:44 ; Acts 7:42 ; 21:26 ; Hebrews 5:1,3 ; 8:3 ; 9:7,9 ; 10:1,2,8,11 ; (c) of "offerings" previous to the Law, Hebrews 11:4,17 (of Isaac by Abraham); (d) of gifts "offered" to Christ, Matthew 2:11 , RV, "offered" (AV, "presented unto"); (e) of prayers "offered" by Christ, Hebrews 5:7 ; (f) of the vinegar "offered" to Him in mockery by the soldiers at the cross, Luke 23:36 ; (g) of the slaughter of disciples by persecutors, who think they are "offering" service to God, John 16:2 , RV (AV, "doeth"); (h) of money "offered" by Simon the sorcerer, Acts 8:18
Pilgrim (2) - In estimating the rapid progress of the Christian faith, especially amongst the Dispersion, it must be remembered that many strangers, such as Simon of Cyrene (Luke 23:26), would be at the feast, and would carry away some knowledge to prepare their minds for the Apostolic message
Peter - His original name was Simon or Simeon, which his divine Master, when he called him to the Apostleship, changed for that of Cephas, a Syriac word signifying a stone or rock; in Latin, petra, from whence is derived the term Peter. "Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world;" and, meeting Simon shortly afterward, said, "We have found the Messiah," and then brought him to Jesus, John 1:41 . When Jesus in private asked his disciples, first, what opinion the people entertained of him; next, what was their own opinion: "Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God," Matthew 16:16
Home (2) - We see the common domestic shadows of sickness and death beclouding the home of Simon Peter (Mark 1:30), of Jairus (Mark 5:22), of the Roman officer (Matthew 8:5-6), of Lazarus and his sisters (John 11), and of others. Hospitality and entertaining are again exemplified in the ease of Levi (Luke 5:29) and of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36)
New York, State of - The Onondagas having requested missionaries in 1654, Father Simon le Moyne, S
Judas the Galilaean - Of these, two-Jacob and Simon-were crucified by Tiberius Alexander the procurator (a
Acrostic - Common though it is in other literatures and with such mediæval Jewish poets as Ibn Ezra, no decisive instance of the type of acrostic in which the initial letters compose a name, has been found in the OT, though some have detected the name Simeon (or Simon) thus given in Psalms 110:1-7 , Psalms 25:1-22 ; Psalms 34:1-22 contain each an additional strophe at the close of the alphabetic strophes; in each case the first word of the verse is a part of the Hebrew verb pâdâh , ‘to redeem,’ and it has been suggested that the author or a copyist has thus left us a clue to his name Pedahel ; but interesting as this suggestion is, it is for several reasons doubtful
Herodians - Simon, in his notes on the twenty-second chapter of St
Add - , "He added the name Peter to Simon," "He added to them the name Boanerges," and Revelation 22:18 , where the word is set in contrast to "take away from" (ver
Continue, Continuance - , "to be strong towards" (pros, "towards," used intensively, and kartereo, "to be strong"), "to endure in, or persevere in, to be continually steadfast with a person or thing," is used of "continuing" in prayer with others, Acts 1:14 ; Romans 12:12 ; Colossians 4:2 ; in the Apostles' teaching, Acts 2:42 ; in the Temple, Acts 2:46 ("continuing steadfastly," RV), the adverb representing the intensive preposition; in prayer and the ministry, Acts 6:4 (RV, "will continue steadfastly"); of Simon Magus with Philip, Acts 8:13
Occupation (2) - He rebuked Simon, haughtily hospitable, and commended the kindly woman, whose love exceeded her pride (Luke 7:44 ff
Priest, Christ as - Jesus left the temple and went out of the city to Bethany, the village of Simon the Leper (Mark 14:3 ) and the resurrected Lazarus (John 11:1 ; 12:2 ). Jesus warned Simon Peter of his approaching trial by Satan, and comforted him with the assurance of his priestly intercession on his behalf (Luke 22:31-32 )
Capernaum - Simon Peter and Andrew belonged to Capernaum (Mark 1:21-29), and perhaps received Jesus' call at the adjoining sea beach (Mark 1:16-17). He healed the centurion's servant there, and Simon's wife's mother (Matthew 8:5; Matthew 8:14), the paralytic (Matthew 9:1), the unclean demon-possessed man (Luke 4:33)
Laying on of Hands - That this endowment does not mean the essential gift of spiritual life, but some kind of ‘manifestation’ ( 1 Corinthians 12:7 ), is proved when Acts 9:17 (‘filled with the Holy Ghost’) is compared with Acts 2:4 , and when Acts 8:15 ; Acts 8:17 is read in the light of the request of Simon Magus ( Acts 8:18 ff
Matthew - He is also called Levi (Mark 2:14, Luke 5:29), and many have supposed that he received the name Matthew after his call by Jesus, just as Simon became Peter
Jericho - This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant
Clean, Unclean, Common - In the NT it may be seen in the case of Simon Peter; he combined Christian beliefs and Jewish distinctions without at first being willing to perceive their variance
Aristeas - ) in the famous Latin Bible of Sueynheim and Pannartz; first edition of the Greek text by Simon Schard, Basle, 1561; all subsequent editions superseded by that of (Mendelssohn-) Wendland (Lipsiae, Teubner, 1900), and that of H
Jericho - This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant
Surname - ]'>[7] occupied a similar position in the town in which he lived, while Simon’s designation, βυρσεύς,8 [16] Simon who was, but is not surnamed, Φαρισαῖος
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - His opinions upon two of these points, as preserved in existing works, support the usual view, that Cerinthus rather than Simon Magus is to be regarded as the predecessor of Judaeo-Christian Gnosticism. ...
Unlike Simon Magus and Menander, Cerinthus did not claim a sacred and mystic power
Apostles - It is not quite clear whether each started to find his brother; but Andrew, at anyrate, brought his brother Simon to Jesus. Walking along the shore of the Sea of Galilee, He saw the brothers Simon and Andrew, who were fishermen, engaged in casting their net. Simon, Andrew, James, John, Philip, and Levi or Matthew are already known to us. The remaining five names—Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, Judas or Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and Judas Iscariot are new. The third is formed of James the son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, Judas or Thaddaeus, and Judas Iscariot. Matthew (Matthew 10:2) writes: ‘Now the names of the twelve apostles are these; the first, Simon
Peter - In so early designating the son of Jonas a rock, his Master was but antedating some of Simon's coming and most characteristic graces. His Divine Master saw in Simon latent qualities of courage, and fidelity, and endurance, and evangelical humility that never as yet had fully unfolded themselves amid the untoward influences round about his life. Whatever, then, may be the true and full explanation, suffice it to us to know that our Lord thus saluted Simon, and said to him, Simon, son of Jonas, thou shalt be called Cephas, which is, by interpretation, a rock
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - 14, 18: ‘We now assembled, Peter and Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus who is surnamed Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, and Matthias who instead of Judas was numbered with us, and James the brother of our Lord and bishop of Jerusalem, and Paul … and have written to you this catholic doctrine [1] we have sent by our fellow-minister Clement. ) about Simon Magus, who, to recommend his heresies, flew in the air in a Roman theatre supported by demons, till Peter exorcized them and Simon fell and broke his legs, whereupon the people cried out: ‘There is only one God, and Peter rightly preaches the truth
Apostle - Their names were, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the greater, the son of Zebedee; and John his brother, who was the beloved disciple; Philip of Bethsaida; Bartholomew; Thomas, called Didymus, as having a twin brother; Matthew or Levi, who had been a publican; James, the son of Alpheus, called James the less; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, and who was also called Judas or Jude, the brother of James; Simon, the Canaanite, so called, as some have thought, because he was a native of Cana, or, as Dr. Of these, Simon, Andrew, James the greater, and John, were fishermen; Matthew, and James the son of Alpheus, were publicans; and the other six were probably fishermen, though their occupation is not distinctly specified
Council - Dominic was the apostle, the count of Toulouse the victim, and Simon, count of Montfort, the conductor or chief
Mary - ...
The children born to Mary and Joseph after Jesus were James, Joseph, Simon, Judas and at least two daughters (Matthew 13:55-56; Mark 6:3)
Virgin, Virgin Birth - ...
Some believe the New Testament teaches that Mary remained a virgin, but it appears that she and Joseph had several children after the birth of Jesus: James, Joses, Judas, Simon, and sisters (Mark 6:3 )
Joppa - Each of them attempted to capture Joppa, and Simon succeeded
Gentleness (2) - His ‘O ye of little faith’ (Matthew 8:26), ‘Can ye drink the cup that I drink of?’ (Mark 10:38), ‘Martha, Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things’ (Luke 10:41), ‘Could ye not watch with me one hour?’ (Matthew 26:40), ‘Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me?’ (John 21:15 ff
Armour - Probably, therefore, none of the disciples ever wore armour, or, with the possible exception of Simon the Zealot, became skilled in the use of weapons
False Christs - Acts 21:38), as in the case of Simon son of Gioras, or the inner chambers, as in the case of John of Giscala (cf
Apostles - They taught Simon, one of the Samaritans, that apostolic power could not be purchased with money (Acts 8:20 ). Simon, James, John, Andrew, and Philip with differing orders compose the first five in all lists
High Priest - Simon Maccabee was, likewise, confirmed in his high priesthood and made a “friend” of the Seleucid King Demetrius II (1 Maccabees 14:38 ). Temple and state were combined in the person of Simon who was both high priest and ethnarch (1 Maccabees 15:1-2 )
Debt, Debtor (2) - ...
The story of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:36-50) shows the vital contrast of the matter in the persons of the Woman who was a Sinner—truly gracious in her doings, because full now of penitence and faith and love—and Simon, hide-bound and censorious like his class, with no disciplined sense of having been humbled like her before God. From the scanty graciousness of Simon, on the other hand, one inferred just as truly a heart imperfectly attuned to goodness, and knowing little of the joy of pardon
Cross - Jesus bore His own cross toward Golgotha outside the city (Hebrews 13:12; so Stephen, Acts 7:58), but sinking exhausted probably He was relieved, and it was transferred to Simon of Cyrene; prefigured in Isaac carrying the wood (Genesis 22:6; contrast Isaiah 9:6, "the government shall be upon His shoulder"
Sadducees - Simon, The Jewish Sects at the Time of Jesus ; S
Mary - In 6:1-6a Jesus is identified as "the son of Mary, a brother [1] of James, Joseph, Judas and Simon, " and he is said to have "sisters
Galilee, Sea of - As Asia, Africa, and Europe respectively were represented at Christ's cross by the Jews, Simon of Cyrene, and the Romans respectively, so the Asiatic, African, and European fish in the sea of Galilee represent the various races of mankind gathered by the spiritual fishermen into the one gospel net
Elijah (2) - Only one, Simon, saw in the work of Jesus the consummation, rather than the postponement, of their Messianic hope
Ambrosiaster, or Pseudo-Ambrosius - From certain expressions which appear favourable to Pelagianism the work has been assigned by some to Julian of Aeclanum; but as Richard Simon has naïvely remarked "if the writer does not always appear orthodox to those who profess to follow the doctrine of St
Antichrist - Some have held that the Jews are to be reputed as Antichrist; others Caligula; others Mahomet; others Simon Magus; others infidelity; and others, that the devil himself is the Antichrist
James And John, the Sons of Zebedee - After the call of Andrew and Simon and their immediate response, Jesus goes on further and sees the two brothers James and John in their boat, mending their nets. Mark’s Gospel the four are represented as going with Jesus to Capernaum, and the same Evangelist also notices the presence of the sons of Zebedee in the house of Simon, on the occasion of the healing of his wife’s mother. After the imposition of hands, and the episode of Simon, their return to Jerusalem is recorded. And the natural interpretation of the passage is that Andrew first finds his (own) brother Simon, and next day, when wishing to return home to Galilee, Philip, to whom Jesus says, ‘Follow me
Judas Iscariot (2) - Eight of these passages refer to Judas; in two (John 6:71; John 13:26) his father Simon is called Iscariot; once (John 14:22) his fellow-Apostle is distinguished from his more famous namesake as ‘not the Iscariot. ’ Only in John 13:2 does the full phrase occur—‘Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. 189, 240, 283)...
Two facts already mentioned have an important bearing on the interpretation of Ἰακαριώτης: (1) the true reading, ‘Simon Iscariot,’ shows that the epithet was equally applicable to the father and the son, and this twofold use of the word suggests that it is a local name; (2) the paraphrase ἀπὸ Καριώτου confirms the view that Judas is named after his place of abode (cf. Now he spake of Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot; for it was he that was about to betray him—one of the twelve’ (Joshua 15:25)
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - Simon of Cyrene, identified as an African, was considered heroic for helping Jesus carry the cross (Mark 15:21 )
Jewish Parties in the New Testament - Simon, one of the disciples, is called Zealot (Luke 6:15 )
Resurrection of Christ - ) ...
...
To Simon Peter alone on the day of the resurrection
Theudas - He has been identified with the Simon who is found among the disturbers arising soon after the death of Herod the Great (Ant
Carmel - Edward I of England was a brother of the order; Simon Stokes of Kent was one of its famous generals
Gamaliel - Son of Simon and grandson of Hillel, a ‘pharisee, a doctor of the law, had in honour of all the people,’ and a member of the Sanhedrin, who intervened in the trial of St
Home - Simon the tanner entertains St
Matthew (2) - ]'>[2] Levi, according to the analogy of Simon and Peter, may have been the original name and Matthew the acquired; though, according to Edersheim (Life and Times, i
Barabbas - ‘Simon Bar-jona’)
John - Their father was sufficiently prosperous to have “hired servants” (Mark 1:20 ), and Luke 5:10 states that James and John were “partners with Simon” Peter. ...
Paul mentioned John only once: “James, Cephas [1], and John, who seemed to be pillars” of the church agreed that Paul and Barnabas would go to the Gentiles, while they would work among the Jews (Galatians 2:9 )
Zebedee - Like his sons, he was a fisherman, and he and they were partners with Simon (Luke 5:10). He was with James and John in a boat when they were summoned by Jesus (Matthew 4:21), and their call as disciples left him with the hired servants (Mark 1:20), and broke up the partnership with Simon
Education (2) - ]'>[7] The establishment of this system of education was ascribed to the celebrated Simon ben Shetach, brother of Salome Alexandra, the queen of Alexander Jannaeus (b. ]'>[7] summarily dismisses the tradition with the remark that ‘this Simon ben Shetach is a meeting-place for all kinds of myths
Arts - The tanner has been brought into prominence by one instance (Simon Banquet - The Jews welcomed a stranger to their house in the same way; for our Lord complains to Simon, that he had given him no kiss, had welcomed him to his table with none of the accustomed tokens of respect. To these customary marks of respect, to which a traveller, or one who had no house of his own, was entitled, our Lord alludes in his defence of Mary: "And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house; thou gavest me no water for my feet, but she hath washed my feet with her tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. Our Saviour was in the circumstances of a traveller; he had no home to wash and anoint himself in, before he went to Simon's house; and, therefore, had a right to complain that his entertainer had failed in the respect that was due to him as a stranger, at a distance from the usual place of his residence
Magi - In the sense "magician" Simon Magus at Samaria is an instance (Acts 8:9-10); also Elymas the Jewish sorcerer and false prophet who with
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - The two returned to Jerusalem to tell the disciples and heard that Simon had seen the risen Lord
Water (2) - Jesus said to Simon the Pharisee, ‘I entered into thy house, thou gavest me no water for my feet’ (Luke 7:44)
Goodness - Such conceptions would be born of the goodness within Himself, that breathed out in the intense sympathy of the story of the woman taken in sin (John 7:53 to John 8:11), or the defence of Mary Magdalene in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36 ff
Lebbaeus - Simon and Jude App
Look - ’ More individual instances of this look are when Jesus ‘beheld’ (ἐμβλέψας) Peter, and said, ‘Thou art Simon … thou shalt be called Cephas’ (John 1:42)—a look sealing the new name upon Peter’s heart; or when He ‘beheld’ (ἐμβλέψας) the chief priests and scribes, ‘and said, What is this then that is written?’ (Luke 20:17)—a grave look of reproach, ‘to add solemnity to His reference to their own Scriptures
Sadducees - 1105) states that Antigonus of Socho (mentioned in the Mishna, Avoth 1, as having received the oral law from Simon the Just, last of the great synagogue)
Andrew - Andrew was a native of Bethsaida (John 1:44), but afterwards shared the same house (Mark 1:29) at Capernaum (Mark 1:21) with his better known brother Simon Peter
Agur - Simon, in his lexicon, says it may perhaps denote "him who applies to the study of wisdom; " an interpretation very suitable to the royal philosopher, but not supported by adequate authority; and in his Onomasticon he explains it in a different manner
Tongues, Gift of - : ‘Simon saw that … the Holy Ghost was given’)
Mary - On the occasion of our Lord's last visit to Bethany, Mary brought "a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus" as he reclined at table in the house of one Simon, who had been a leper (Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3 ; John 12:2,3 )
Crucifixion - If it was only the patibulum that Jesus carried, the probable failure of His strength by the way, leading to the incident of Simon the Cyrenian ( Matthew 27:32 ||), must be attributed not to the weight of His burden, but to sheer physical exhaustion aggravated by loss of blood through scourging, as well as to the anguish that pressed upon His soul
Judas Iscariot - One of the Twelve, son of Simon Iscariot ( John 6:71 ; John 13:26 RV Lazarus - He was honoured with a banquet in the house of one of the leading men of the village, Simon, who had been a leper and had probably been healed by Jesus ( John 12:2-11 = Matthew 26:6-13 = Mark 14:3-9 )
Calendars - ”...
Simon J
Peter, Second, Theology of - ...
The author identifies himself as "Simon Peter, " a combination of names that occurs only here in the New Testament and early Christian literature
Alexander - Son of Simon of Cyrene (Mark 15:21)
Mary - ...
Mary appears a third time six days before the Passover, when Jesus was entertained in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany, and she came in during the feast and anointed His feet (John 12:1-11; cf
Cosmopolitanism - Traces of a cosmopolitan atmosphere may be detected in Mark 15:21 (‘Simon, father of Alexander and Rufus’), in the Greek names of two of the disciples (Andrew and Philip), and the trilingual ‘title’ on the cross (John 19:20)
Blindness (2) - ‘Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven’ (Matthew 16:17)
Samaritans - Simon has inserted a French translation in the first edition of "Ceremonies et Coutumes des Juifs," in the manner of a supplement to Leo de Modena
Cerinthians - The Gnostics, like their leader, Simon Magus, had all of them been Docetae and denied the real humanity; but Cerinthus is said to have maintained that Jesus had a real body, and was the son of human parents, Joseph and Mary
Linus (1) - Peter and Simon Magus, his imprisonments and other sufferings and labours, and then proceeds at once to the closing scenes
Mary - ...
Mary appears a third time six days before the Passover, when Jesus was entertained in the house of Simon the Leper at Bethany, and she came in during the feast and anointed His feet (John 12:1-11; cf
Jews - Antiochus IV (Epiphanes), King of Syria, made a violent attempt to hellenize the Jews; but a priest of Modin named Mattathias, and his sons, Judas Machabeus, Jonathan, and Simon, carried on a long and successful struggle against the armies of Syria, and at length, in 143 BC, gained complete independence for Judea. Its territory was greatly extended by the conquests of John Hyrcanus, Simon's son and successor; then once more dissension and intrigue in the ruling family precipitated a civilwar, whereupon Rome interfered
Hallel - 33, note n) remarks: ‘that the recitation of the Hallel on these occasions [5] goes back to Simon can hardly be doubted
Sorcery - ]'>[2] In Acts 8:9; Acts 8:11 Simon of Samaria is spoken of as μαγεύων, and the art which he practised is named μαγείαι
Denial - Such disavowal must be deliberate and persistent, and is to be distinguished from a momentary lapse of personal weakness, like that of Simon Peter, which by timely repentance became the means of strengthening his character, and enabling him to strengthen others (Luke 22:32)
Forsaking All - ‘Come after me,’ He said to Simon and Andrew when He called them on the shore of the Lake of Galilee, ‘and I will make you fishers of men
Sanhedrim - Simon strengthens and defends their proofs, and M
Scribes - The scribes, therefore, who lived after the time of Simon the Just, in order to give weight to their various interpretations of the law, at first pretended that they also were founded upon tradition, and added them to the opinions which Ezra had established as authentic; and in process of time it came to be asserted, that when Moses was forty days on Mount Sinai, he received from God two laws, the one in writing, the other oral; that this oral law was communicated by Moses to Aaron and Joshua, and that it passed unimpaired and uncorrupted from generation to generation, by the tradition of the elders, or great national council, established in the time of Moses; and that this oral law was to be considered as supplemental and explanatory of the written law, which was represented as being in many places obscure, scanty, and defective
Money - 139 138 Antiochus Sidetes granted to Simon Maccabæus the right to coin money (see 1Ma 15:5 f. ‘The thorniest question of all Jewish numismatics,’ as it has been called, is the question whether and to what extent Simon availed himself of this privilege. Either they belong to the governorship of Simon Maccabæus who died b. It is not a point in his favour, however, that he is compelled to assign the shekels of the year 5 to John Hyrcanus, Simon’s son and successor. No silver coins, it may be added, were struck by any of Simon’s successors, or even by the more powerful and wealthier Herod
Gnosticism - The Simonians and Carpocratians first used images of Christ and others (see Church Histories of Schaff, Kurtz, etc. , and from which sprang the system of Simon Magus (with his predecessor Dositheus, and his successor Menander), who is distinguished by the Fathers as the parent of Gnosticism; (3) Alexandrian, represented mainly by Philo, who produced an amalgam of Judaism with Greek philosophy. ...
(1) We note regarding Simon Magus (" translation="">Acts 8:9 f. ’ For this alone he may well be named the father of the Gnostics (see article Simon Magus)
Confession (of Christ) - Peter just before He warned him of the sifting trial which was near at hand, ‘Simon, Simon, behold Satan asked to have you that he might sift you as wheat: but I made supplication for thee that thy faith fail not’ (Luke 22:31-32)
Antichrist - It is most probable that the false prophet represents the Imperial priesthood as propagandists of the Caesar-cult, but it seems not unlikely that elements in the representation are taken from the legend that had grown up around the name of Simon Magus (cf. To the early Church, Simon with his magic arts and false miracles was the arch-heretic and the father of all heresy, and suggestions of his legendary figure loom out from the description of the second beast (Revelation 13:13-15), even while the author attributes to it functions and powers that belong more properly to the ministers of the Emperor-worship (Revelation 13:12)
Heresy - Such was that Simon in Samaria, Acts 8:10 , who was there considered as a higher being of the spiritual class. ]'>[2] Justin Martyr, the fellow countryman of Simon, has preserved to us some technical expressions of his followers
Tears - —The only two passages in Authorized and Revised Versions of the Gospels where tears are mentioned are Mark 9:24, where the father of the epileptic lad is said in Authorized Version to have cried out with tears, ‘Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief’ [1]; and Luke 7:38-44, where, in Simon the Pharisee’s house, the penitent harlot washed with her tears the Saviour’s feet
Cross - After this manner, we find Christ was compelled to bear his cross; and as he sunk under the burden, Simon the Cyrenian was constrained to bear it after him and with him
Magic - Although Simon the magician (Gk
Learning - 75, Simon ben Shetach, a scribe and Pharisee, is said to have carried a law requiring boys to attend ‘the elementary school
American Martyrology - , killed by Yamassee Indians at Saint Simon's Island, September 15, 1597
Pedro Martinez, first Jesuit martyr in the U.
Simon de Jesus, O
Proselytes - Simon ben Gamaliel said: "when a pagan comes to enter the covenant we ought to stretch out, our hand to him and bring him under the wings of God" (Jost, Matthew - On the other hand, Grotius, Du Pin, Simon, Walton, Cave, Hammond, Mill, Michaelis, Owen, and Campbell have supported the opinion of the ancients
Commerce - prince Simon rendered the port at Joppa more convenient than it had hitherto been
Gospels, Apocryphal - Simon, His disciple, said to Him, “Seven times in the day?” The Lord answered and said to him, “Yea, I say unto thee, until seventy times even; for with the prophets also, after they were anointed with the Holy Spirit, there was found sinful speech” ’ (Jerome, adv. And He turned and said to Simon His disciple, who was sitting by Him: Simon, son of John, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of heaven” ’ (Origen, in Matthew 15:14 )
Jews - Mattathias, the priest, with his sons, chiefly Judas, Jonathan, and Simon, who were called Maccabees, bravely fought for their religion and liberties. After his death, Jonathan and Simon, his brethren, successively succeeded him; and both wisely and bravely promoted the welfare of the church and state. ...
Simon was succeeded by his son Hircanus, who subdued Idumea, and reduced the Samaritans
War, Holy War - ...
Simon and Levi lose their rights among the firstborn because their swords are weapons of violence. Simon and Levi are rebuked for their slaughter of Canaanites at Shechem (Genesis 34 ; 49:5-7 )
Peter, the Epistles of - "Simon Peter a servant and an apostle of Jesus Christ" stands at its heading. He reminds us at the close of his life that he is the Peter who was originally "Simon" before his call
Biblical Criticism - In 1678 Richard Simon, a French priest, arguing from variations in style and from the lack of harmony in parallel passages in the Pentateuch, suggested that these books could not have been the work of Moses alone
Peter - Simon Peter was one of the earliest believers in Jesus
Pharisees - Simon, The Jewish Sects at the Time of Jesus
Mennonites - They had their rise in 1536, when Menno Simon, a native of Friesland, who had been a Romish priest, and a notorious profligate, resigned his rank and office in the Romish church, and publicly embraced the communion of the Anabaptists
Church of England - Paul; and Baronius affirms, on the authority of an ancient manuscript in the Vatican Library, that the Gospel was planted in Britain by Simon Zelotes, the Apostle, and Joseph of Arimathea; and that the latter came over A
Samaria - There it was that Simon Magus resided, and thither Peter and John went to communicate the gifts of the Holy Spirit
Premeditation - The immediacy of an intuition is seen in His use of the opportunity given Him by the woman at the well (John 4:7), or in the call of Nathanael (John 1:28), or in the treatment of the woman taken in sin (John 8:1-7), or in the scene at Simon the Pharisee’s (Matthew 26:6-13 || Mark 14:3-9, Luke 7:36-50, John 12:1-8), or the freeing of the Sabbath from Rabbinic tyranny (Matthew 12:3 || Mark 2:25, Luke 6:3)
Scribes - Simon the Just (300-290 B
Synagogue - Their motto, preserved by Simon high-priest, was "set a hedge about the law
Gnosticism - Simon Magus occupies a prominent place in the thoughts of many 2nd and 3rd cent
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - It may be that this traffic extended as far as Jerusalem; some have supposed that it was in this way that one of Jesus’ disciples, the companion of Simon Peter, was known to the high priest (John 18:15 f. The genus Chromis has the richest representation of species: Niloticus, Tiberiadis, Andreœ, Simonis, Microstomus, Flavii Josephi, Magdalenœ; belonging to a genus near of kin is Hemichromis Sacra
Education - 75), Simon ben-Shetach, brother of Queen Alexandra, is said to have got a law passed ordaining that ‘the children shall attend the elementary school
Promise (2) - ...
Generally the promises of Jesus to His disciples may be classified as follows: (a) particular assurances to individuals: to the thief on the cross (Luke 23:43), to the woman in the house of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26:13 = Mark 14:9), to Nathanael (John 1:51), to Peter (John 14:13-14, = Mark 9:1 = Luke 9:27, cf
Gnosticism - He calls them "multitudo Gnosticorum," tracing their origin to Simon Magus, and counting them as progenitors of the Valentinians. If the beginnings of Gnosticism were thus in apostolic times we need not be surprised that the notices of its origin given by Irenaeus more than a century afterwards are so scanty; and that the teachers to whom its origin has been ascribed Simon Menander Nicolas Cerinthus remain shadowy or legendary characters. The birthplace of Gnosticism may be said to be Syria if we include in that Palestine and Samaria where church tradition places the activity of those whom it regards as its founders Simon and Menander
Money (2) - Until lately it has been usual for numismatologists to assign to Simon Meccabaeus certain silver shekels and half-shekels struck on the Phœnician standard, and bearing the inscription in Hebrew, ‘Jerusalem the Holy’ (Madden, Coins of the Jews, 65–71; Head, Hist. The only coins then current in Palestine which answered exactly to the ‘shekel of the sanctuary’—leaving out of account the shekels commonly but probably erroneously assigned to Simon Maccabaeus (see above)—were those which had for long been coined in the Phœnician cities; and the Temple tax, along with other sacred dues, was paid in this currency
Anger - Could Peter well have been calm with Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1), and later, with the commercially-minded, religious adventurer, Simon Magus (Acts 8:20 f. Simon, Redemption of Prayer of Manasseh 1:2, do
Divination - Of dealings in magic in the New Testament instances occur: Simon Magus (Acts 8:9-11); Elymas Bar Jesus (Acts 13:6; Acts 13:8); the pythoness (Acts 16:16's margin); the vagabond Jews, exorcists (Acts 19:13; Acts 19:19), the Ephesian books treating of "curious arts"; Galatians 5:20, "witchcraft"; Revelation 9:21, "sorceries
Genealogy - In the same way Josephus, in the opening chapter of his Life , sets out his genealogy as vouched for by the public records, though only as far hack as his grandfather Simon
Discourse - To this class belong: the discourse on Forgiveness, with the parable of the Two Debtors, given at the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50); the beginning of the discourse on Tradition (eating with unwashen hands), though later ‘he called the multitudes,’ ‘and the disciples came unto him’ (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-20); the Denunciation of the Pharisees and Lawyers at the house of a chief Pharisee (Luke 11:37-54); the discourse at another Pharisee’s house, where He discussed Modesty, Giving Feasts, and spoke the parable of the Great Feast and Excuses (Luke 14:1-24); finally, the discourse at the house of Zaccbaeus, with the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:1-27)
Money - They were still less able under the Chaldeans, during the Babylonish captivity; or afterward under the Grecians, to whom they were subject till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, to whom Antiochus Sidetes, king of Syria, granted the privilege of coining money in Judea, 1Ma_15:6
Pharisees - Simon the Pharisee), and that, on the other hand, certain of the Pharisees (e
Caesarea Philippi - ...
Addressing Peter as Simon Bar-Jona,* Mark, the Gospel According to - ...
He names Bartimaeus (Mark 10:46), states that "Jesus would not suffer any to carry any vessel through the temple" (Mark 11:16), that Simon of Cyrene was father of Alexander and Rufus (Mark 15:21)
Sea - (a) The first recounts how Cornelius sent to Joppa to fetch Peter, who lodged with one Simon, a tanner, ‘whose house is by the sea side’ (Acts 10:6; Acts 10:32). Simon’s house, which doubtless was a very humble abode, was by the sea because there he would have easy access to water; and it was outside the city, at least 50 cubits, because tanning was held to be an ‘unclean’ employment, bringing one constantly into contact with dead animals
Esther - ...
The last of the great synagogue was Simon the Just, high priest 310-291 B
House - Simon became the "rock" by identifying himself with Him; but when he identified himself with "Satan" in his dislike of the cross, Jesus called him so (Matthew 16:16-19; Matthew 16:22-23)
Government - 142, Simon is declared to be ‘high priest, captain, and governor for ever’ ( 1Ma 14:27-47 )
John the Apostle - Youngest of the twelve, probably of Bethsaida upon the sea of Galilee (John 1:44; Luke 5:10), the town of their partners Simon and Andrew
Turning - In the ministry of our Lord Himself we have manifest cases of conversion in the sinful woman in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:47 ff. When a young heart replies, like Simon Peter of old (John 6:67 f
Apocalyptic Literature - Simon b. Simon b
Balaam - Making "godliness a source of gain" is the damning sin of all such as Balaam and Simon Magus: 1 Timothy 6:5 (Greek)
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
the Penitent Thief - Nay, for anything we know, this man may at one time have been one of our Lord's disciples, quite as well as Simon Zelotes and Judas Iscariot
Revelation of God - Jesus explained to Peter: “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by man, but by my Father in heaven” ( Matthew 16:17 NIV)
Dominicans - The first convent was founded at Thoulouse, by the bishop thereof and Simon de Montfort
Reconciliation - Simon, Reconciliation by Incarnation; Cambridge Theol
Touch - —Here four instances are to be noted: the arresting touch laid upon the bier of the widow of Nain’s son (Luke 7:14 ἥψατο τῆς σοροῦ); the upholding touch or grasp offered to Simon Peter upon the sea (Matthew 14:31 ἐκτείνας τὴν χεῖρα ἐπελάβετο αὐτοῦ); the encouraging touch laid upon the disciples after the Transfiguration, when ‘he touched them, and said, Arise, and be not afraid’ (Matthew 17:7 ἥψατο αὐτῶν; cf. With these may be associated the act of the woman in Simon’s house, who washed Christ’s feet with tears, and anointed them with ointment, and of whom the Pharisee said later, ‘This man, if he were a prophet, would have perceived who and what manner of woman this is which toucheth him’ (Luke 7:39)
Woman (2) - Simon was right in feeling that a prophet who knew the character of the woman who had intruded into his house would never have allowed her such close fellowship as the Saviour allowed
Salvation - Simon, Theology of Salvation ; G
Heart - Even a correctly decorous Pharisee like Simon did not stand so high in the Divine estimation as the frail woman who had erred sadly, because, while he was proud and self-satisfied in his moral respectability, she, amid all her failings, was melted into heartfelt penitence and gratitude (Luke 7:36-39)
Majesty (2) - It was the feeling of Simon Peter when he cried, ‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (Luke 5:8)
Divination - , besides the case referred to of the damsel possessed by a spirit of Python, we read of others, such as Simon who used sorcery and bewitched the people of Samaria for a long time, Acts 8:9-11 ; and Elymas the sorcerer, a Jew who was met with in Cyprus, who perverted the right ways of the Lord
Baptism - , Acts 8:16 (Samaritans, men and women, and Simon), Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38 (the Ethiopian eunuch), Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16 (Saul), Acts 10:47 f
Heart - Even a correctly decorous Pharisee like Simon did not stand so high in the Divine estimation as the frail woman who had erred sadly, because, while he was proud and self-satisfied in his moral respectability, she, amid all her failings, was melted into heartfelt penitence and gratitude (Luke 7:36-39)
Reconciliation - Simon, Reconciliation by Incarnation; Cambridge Theol
Vincentius Lirinensis - Pelagius (with his disciple Coelestius) Arius Sabellius Novatian Simon Magus were all introducers of novelties (cc
Gospels - , Judas Iscariot and his father Simon Iscariot ( John 6:71 RV [4]9 ), probably natives of Kerioth in Judæa; Joseph of Arimathæa, ‘a city of the Jews’ ( Luke 23:51 ); the household at Bethany; and Simon the leper ( Mark 14:3 )
Prophet - At once He saw the guilelessness of Nathanael (John 1:47) and the strength of Peter (John 1:42), and was able to read the thoughts of Simon the Pharisee while Simon was misreading His (Luke 7:39-40)
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - When He taught in Nazareth, the townspeople asked, “Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us?” (Mark 6:3 ; compare Luke 4:22 )
Luke, the Gospel According to - Peter is often called "Simon," which he never is by Paul, who uses only the apostolic name Peter, a proof that some of Luke's materials were independent of and earlier than Paul
Time, Meaning of - ...
Simon J
Lots - 862; Acts 1:17), and his successor was to take not τὸν κλῆρον (א C3E), but only his τόπον, ‘place’ (ABC*D; Acts 1:25), while in it Simon Magus had neither μερὶς οὐδὲ κλῆρος, neither a share, a limited portion, nor an allotment (Acts 8:21)
Galilee (2) - About the year 164, Simon the brother of Judas Maccabaeus pursued the Syrians to Ptolemais, and on his way back brought the Galilaean Jews and their property to Judaea (1 Maccabees 5:21-23)
Session - 727), thinks the primary reference was to a Maccabaean priest-prince, possibly Simon, who in the year 141 b
Sepulchre - The practice of raising monuments over their tombs was first inaugurated by Simon the Maccabee (1 Maccabees 13:27 ff
Cross, Cross-Bearing - Many of the followers of Judas and Simon in Galilee had been crucified (Josephus Ant
Apocrypha, New Testament - ...
The Acts of Peter is a late second-century writing that tells of Peter defending the Church from a heretic named Simon Magus by public preaching
Apocrypha - Less attention is given to Simon, although emphasis is placed upon his being acclaimed leader and high priest forever
Mount of Olives - ...
To these incidents where the Mount of Olives is expressly mentioned may be added the scene in the house of Martha and Mary (Luke 10:38-42), the raising of Lazarus (John 11), and the feast at the house of Simon (Matthew 26:6-13, Mark 14:3-9, John 12:1-19); for, as has been shown, Bethany was certainly a part of the Mount of Olives
Christ in Jewish Literature - One of the latter, Simon Kepha, undertook to solve the problem by completely separating the Christians from the Jews. After his death another Christian teacher arose in Rome, who annulled the laws given by Simon Kepha, and gave new ones, instituting baptism instead of circumcision, and the Sunday in place of the Sabbath
Bible - The interpolations in these passages are ascribed by Prideaux to Ezra; and others which were afterward added, he attributes to Simon the Just. Prideaux supposes the canon was completed by Simon the Just, about one hundred and fifty years after Malachi: but, as his opinion is rounded merely on a few proper names at the end of the two genealogies, 1 Chronicles 3:19 ; Nehemiah 12:22 , which few names might very easily be added by a transcriber afterward, it is more probable, as Kennicott thinks, that the canon was finished by the last of the prophets, about four hundred years before Christ
Ships And Boats - Finally, in the time of the Maccabees we read that Simon, the brother of Judas, made Joppa a seaport ( 1Ma 14:5 )
Sympathy - One is the feast in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36 ff
Croisade, or Crusade - Those engaged in it made fruitless efforts for the recovery of the holy land: for, though John de Neule, who commanded the fleet equipped in Flanders, arrived at Ptolemais a little after Simon of Montfort, Renard of Dampierre, and others, yet the plague destroying many of them, and the rest either returning, or engaging in the petty quarrels of the Christian princes, there was nothing done; so that the sultan of Aleppo easily defeated their troops in 1204
Satan (2) - ...
Again, Jesus warns Peter on one occasion that Satan has asked and obtained the Divine permission to sift the disciples as wheat; and indicates that their only hope lies in the intercession of Christ Himself, who has prayed for Simon that his ‘faith fail not’ (Luke 22:31)
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - The fisherman, and fishing, is mentioned often in Scripture, most notably as a metaphor, as in Mark 1:17 when Jesus challenged Simon and Andrew to become “fishers of men
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - Simon, Heaven in the Christian Tradition ; W
Money - It is this confusion of market value with spiritual value that irritates Peter when Simon Magus offers to pay money in return for the power of the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:18-24 )
Jews, Judaism - He helped pillage the Shechemites after his brothers, Simon and Levi, had slain the men of the city (Genesis 34:27 )
Lazarus - They honoured Him with a banquet in the house of Simon, one of their leading men, who had been a leper, and had perhaps been healed by Jesus (see art. ...
It might be expected that Lazarus of all men should have stood by Jesus during the last dread ordeal; but he never appears after the banquet in Simon’s house
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - And Joseph, and Mary, and Jesus, and James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas, and their sisters, all bowed their heads and sang the Hundred and Thirteenth and the Hundred and Fourteenth Psalms
Call, Calling - John, Christ’s first disciples were Galilaeans who, like Himself, had visited the Jordan in order to be baptized by John: Andrew, John, Simon Peter, Philip, Nathanael (presumably = Bartholomew; see art
Crucifixion - The soldiers relieved Him of His burden, and, impressing Simon of Cyrene, laid it on his shoulders
Wealth - Philip rebukes Simon Magus for thinking the power of the Holy Spirit could be bought (8:18-20)
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - Like Andrew and Simon the sons of Jonas, and like John the son of Zebedee, Matthias was a disciple of the Baptist at that time, confessing his sins
War - We suppose that this way of making war prevailed also under Joshua, the Judges, Saul, David at the beginning of his reign, the kings of Judah and Israel who were successors to Rehoboam and Jeroboam, and under the Maccabees, till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, who had mercenary troops, that is, soldiers who received pay, 1Ma_14:32
New Testament - In 1543, Simon Deuteronomy Colines: (Colinaeus) published a Greek text of the New Testament, corrected in about 150 places on fresh MS
Matthew, Gospel According to - The Baptist’s preaching, Jesus’ baptism and temptation, the early ministry, and the calling of Simon, Andrew, James, and John (chs
Entry Into Jerusalem - In Zechariah 9:9, Judas Maccabaeus is welcomed with similar acclamations and ‘branches and fair boughs and palms,’ and in 1 Maccabees 13:51 Simon
Baptism - , Acts 8:16 (Samaritans, men and women, and Simon), Acts 8:36; Acts 8:38 (the Ethiopian eunuch), Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16 (Saul), Acts 10:47 f
Prayer - Matthew 6:14 ; Matthew 18:21-22 ), national prayer against foe ( Sir 36:1-17 ), thanksgiving, led by Simon ( Sir 50:21-24 ), author’s closing prayer ( Sir 51:1-12 )
Peter, Second Epistle of - The Epistle opens with a salutation from Simon Peter to readers who, through the righteousness of God, have been admitted to the full privileges of the Apostolic faith
Lots - 862; Acts 1:17), and his successor was to take not τὸν κλῆρον (א C3E), but only his τόπον, ‘place’ (ABC*D; Acts 1:25), while in it Simon Magus had neither μερὶς οὐδὲ κλῆρος, neither a share, a limited portion, nor an allotment (Acts 8:21)
Talmud - Jose to elucidate it; remarks on the position of one who is in doubt whether he has read the Shema‘ ; another passage from a baraitha , designating the appearance of the stars as an indication of the time in question; further explanations and passages on the appearance of the stars as bearing on the ritual; other Rabbinical sayings; a baraitha on the division between day and night, and other passages bearing on the same subject; discussion of other baraithas , and further quotations from important Rabbis; a sentence of Tannaitic origin in no way related to the preceding matters, namely, ‘One who prays standing must bold his feet straight,’ and the controversy on this subject between Rabbis Levi and Simon, the one adding, ‘like the angels,’ the other, ‘like the priests’; comments on these two comparisons; further discussion concerning the beginning of the day; Haggadic statements concerning the dawn; a conversation between two Rabbis; cosmological comments; dimensions of the firmament, and more Haggadic comments in abundance; a discussion on the night-watches; Haggadic material concerning David and his harp
Time - The Era of Simon (1 Maccabees 13:42; 1 Maccabees 14:27) was proposed, but never extensively adopted
Influence - And this growth of personality is what we see even in the brief records of the NT: Simon becomes Peter; Levi, Matthew; Bartholomew, Nathanael; Joseph, Barnabas; and Saul, Paul
Messiah - The epithets are referred to Simon the Maccabee
Alpha And Omega (2) - , show the early prevalence of this interpretation of Daniel 10:21 ‘I shall show thee what is marked upon the writing of truth (בכחב אמת), as the signum of God; for, says Simon hen Lakish, “א is the first, מ the middle, and ח the last letter of the alphabet
Ideal - The sinful woman in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50), Zacchaeus, the grasping publican of Jericho (Luke 19:1-10), Matthew, leaving the receipt of custom to become an Apostle (Matthew 9:9 ||), may serve as examples
Leprosy - ...
Of lepers mentioned in the NT we have but one named, Simon of Bethany (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3), probably a grateful recipient of the Saviour’s mercy
John the Apostle - Nothing is said of Andrew; Peter is the principal figure in the scene of the miraculous draught of fishes, while James and John are mentioned only incidentally as ‘partners with Simon
Abraham - The women of Galilee who ministered to Him of their substance will be brought forward; Martha will be brought forward, and the woman at the well; the owner of the ass's colt, and the owner of the upper room, and the owner of Gethsemane; Simon the Cyrenian also, who helped Him to carry His cross; the soldier also who gave Him some of his vinegar to drink; and Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus, and the women with their spices, and the angel who rolled away the stone
Philo - Simon, Der Logos, do
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - The Mishna shows the presence of a very strong tendency to occult sciences, and in the NT we find examples of Jews who practised them in Simon Magus ( Acts 8:9 ) and Elymas ( Acts 13:8 )
High Priest - Simon the Just, second after Jaddua, was reputed the last of the Great Synagogue and the finisher of the Old Testament canon
Palestine - The conquest of Joppa, under the auspices of Simon Maccabæus, son of Mattathias ( 1Ma 13:11 ), was the first capture of a seaport in S
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - It taught the existence of two gods—an evil one, the God of the Jews, having Simon Magus as his minister, and a good one, from Whom Christ came
Propitiation - Simon, The Redemption of Prayer of Manasseh 1:2, London, 1906, p
Miracles - The effect of Philip's ministry on the Samaritans, in opposition to Simon Magus (Acts 8), proves this
Fortification And Siegecraft - ) At the siege of Gezer (such is the best reading, 1Ma 13:45 ) Simon is even said to have used effectively a piece of the most formidable siege-artillery then known, the helepolis (lit
Holiness - ’ In Mark 1:24 = Luke 4:34 the man with an unclean spirit calls Christ ‘the Holy One of God,’ and according to the true text Simon Peter uses the same title (John 6:69)
Lord's Prayer (ii) - Jesus Himself prayed for Simon that in the hour of Satan’s sifting his faith might not fail (Luke 22:31 f
Childhood - Simon the Cananaean as a boy is nigh to death through having been bitten by a serpent
Paul - Peter's smiting Simon Magus (Acts 8), who sought spiritual powers for gain, corresponds
Wandering Stars - One of His disciples, Simon, had originally belonged to that party, but Jesus evidently had offered him a nobler outlet for his enthusiasm
Logos - 405–431); Simon, Der Logos (1902); Meyer, Der Prolog des Johannesevang
Magi - 210), and the same may be said of the passages in the NT (other than Matthew 2) in which magi are referred to (Acts 8:9; Acts 8:11 Simon Magus, Acts 13:6; Acts 13:8 Elymas)
Complacency - As He showed pleasure in the faith of His immediate disciples, so also He welcomed that of others, as when He spoke with signal approbation of the devotion of Mary of Bethany (Luke 10:42), who had ‘chosen the good part,’ and of whose offering of gratitude at the supper in the house of Simon the leper He said that she had wrought a good work upon Him which could not be forgotten (Matthew 26:12 || 1618831335_94 || John 12:3-5)
Beatitude - ...
‘Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven
Personality - Simon Peter only half knew himself when he cried to Christ, ‘Depart from me: for I am a sinful man, O Lord’ (Luke 5:8)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ‘priest of the Most High God’), apparently first assumed by Simon, but also ‘a prophet of the Most High’ (Test
Bible - ...
It is probable the two books of Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Ester, and Malachi, were adopted into the Bible in the time of Simon the Just, the last of the men of the great synagogue
Samaria, Samaritans - 1); as it also led Simon Magus to give himself out as some great one (Acts 8:9)
Sea of Galilee - ‘It is easier,’ saith Rabbi Eliezer ben Simon, ‘to nourish a legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up one child in the land of Israel’ (Ber
Education - They are said to have been first established by Simon bên-Shetach in the 1st cent
Christianity - Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
Jerusalem (2) - ’ He narrates how Simon Maccabaeus, after capturing the fortress which stood there, set his followers to work night and day for three years levelling the mountain, so that it should no longer be able to support a fortress which could overlook the Temple
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - 26) to the founders of heretical sects, naming first the earliest, Simon and Menander, followers of whom were still alive; and then apparently the latest, Marcion, himself still alive
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - 26, 58) mentions Simon and Menander as having been instigated by demons to introduce heresy into the church, and goes on to speak of Marcion as still living, evidently regarding him as the most formidable heretic of the day
Perfection (of Jesus) - And the woman who bathed His feet in Simon’s house, and Zacchaeus who lodged Him for the night, and Peter who listened to Him in the boat, all bear witness how, in His gracious presence, the sincere soul felt the evil of sin and the inflexible order of righteousness as it had never felt them before. He was equally at home in Simon the Pharisee’s house and at the table of Levi or Zacchaeus, with their different clientèle; in private talk with Nicodemus, a master in Israel, and at the wayside well with the woman of Samaria
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - You erect (at Rome) a statue to Simon MAGUS and give him as inscription the title of sanctus deus (see Kaye's Tertull