What does Sidon mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
צִיד֑וֹן ancient Phoenician city 4
σιδῶνι an ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia 4
σιδῶνος an ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia 3
σιδῶνα an ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia 2
וְצִיד֔וֹן ancient Phoenician city 2
צִיד֔וֹן ancient Phoenician city 2
צִיד֥וֹן ancient Phoenician city 2
לְצִיד֔וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִידֽוֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִידוֹן֙ ancient Phoenician city 1
σιδωνίας an inhabitant of Sidon 1
צִידֹ֥ן ancient Phoenician city 1
מִצִּידֹ֔ן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִידֹֽן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִיד֛וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִיד֗וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
וּלְצִיד֔וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
σιδῶνος) an ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia 1
צִיד֣וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
צִיד֜וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1
מִצִּיד֗וֹן ancient Phoenician city 1

Definitions Related to Sidon

G4605


   1 an ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia, on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea, less than 20 miles (30 km) north of Tyre.
   Additional Information: Sidon or Zidon = “hunting”.
   

H6721


   1 ancient Phoenician city, on Mediterranean coast north of Tyre.
   Additional Information: Sidon = “hunting”.
   

Frequency of Sidon (original languages)

Frequency of Sidon (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sidon
SIDON . See Zidon.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sidon
Fishing; fishery, Genesis 10:15,19 (A.V. marg., Tzidon; RSV, Zidon); Matthew 11:21,22 ; Luke 6:17 . (See ZIDON .)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Sidon
The Mediterranean seaports of Tyre and Sidon were the two most important towns of Phoenicia. The Bible frequently mentions the two towns together as a way of referring to Phoenicia in general (Ezra 3:7; Isaiah 23:1; Isaiah 23:4; Zechariah 9:2; Mark 7:24). Sometimes mention of only one of the towns is sufficient. For example, Tyre, being the larger and more prosperous port, may have symbolized the greed and arrogance that Phoenicia as a whole developed because of its international shipping activity (Isaiah 23:1; Isaiah 23:8; Isaiah 23:17; Ezekiel 27:3; Ezekiel 27:25; Ezekiel 28:5; Ezekiel 28:9; Ezekiel 28:16). In the same way Sidon, being a dominant religious centre, fittingly symbolized the corrupt Phoenician religion that at times troubled Israel (Judges 10:6; 1 Kings 16:31-33). (For details of Sidon’s commerce, religion and history see PHOENICIA.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sidon And Tyre
(ssi' dahn, teere) Phoenician cities located on the coastal plain between the mountains of Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea (Genesis 10:15 ). Sidon and Tyre were ancient cities, having been founded long before the Israelites entered the land of Canaan. Extrabiblical sources first mention Sidon before 2000 B.C. and Tyre just after 2000 B.C. While Sidon seems to have been the most dominant of the two cities during the early part of their histories, Tyre assumed this role in the latter times. Both cities were known for their maritime exploits and as centers of trade. One of Tyre's most coveted exports was purple dye. Joshua could not conquer the territory (Joshua 13:3-4 ).
Israel had relations with the two cities, but especially with Tyre. David employed Tyrian stonemasons and carpenters and used cedars from that area in building a palace. (2 Samuel 5:11 ). The construction of the Temple in Jerusalem during Solomon's reign depended heavily on the materials and craftsmen from Tyre. About 870 B.C., Ahab married Jezebel, the daughter of the Phoenician king, bringing Baal worship to Israel's court. Ezekiel 28:1 characterizes the king of Tyre as the ultimate example of pride. Under Roman rule, the two cities were important ports of trade, but they did not enjoy the dominance they previously held. Jesus spent time in Tyre and Sidon and in contrast to the prophets' attitude toward the cities, He contrasted them with the Jews as examples of faith ( Matthew 11:20-22 ). Paul spent seven days in Tyre after his third missionary journey (Acts 21:3-4 ). See Phoenicia .
Scott Langston
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sidon
(Σιδών, ethnic Σιδώνιοι)
Sidon, called ‘Great Zidon’ (Joshua 11:8), was one of the maritime cities of Phcenicia, about 25 miles N. of Tyre, its ‘rival in magnitude, fame, and antiquity’ (Strabo, xvi. ii. 22). After the coming of Alexander the Great, whom Sidon rapturously welcomed and Tyre frantically opposed, the two cities shared the same political fortunes, being for two centuries bones of contention between the Greek kings of Syria in the north and Egypt in the south. So long, however, as their civic autonomy was secure, their factories busy, their overseas traffic prosperous, the quarrels of their alternate overlords did not greatly trouble them. And, while their wealth was apparently almost as great as ever, they added a new interest to life by learning the language and assimilating the culture of Greece. They were not now a mere race of merchant princes or pedlars, wholly absorbed in getting and spending. Strabo says that in his time-the beginning of our era-the Sidonians not only ‘cultivate science and study astronomy and arithmetic, to which they are led by the application of numbers and night sailing, each of which concerns the merchant and seaman,’ but there are ‘distinguished philosophers, natives of Sidon, as Bcethus, with whom I studied the philosophy of Aristotle, and Diodotus his brother’ (xvi. ii. 24).
The two sister cities now consistently advocated a policy of peace with all their neighbours. Not possessing a fraction of the army and navy with which they once defied empires, they could no longer assert themselves even when they were in the right. When Herod Agrippa was ‘highly displeased with the Tyrians and Sidonians’ (Acts 12:20), they indulged in no useless heroies. Raising no question as to whether the king’s displeasure was just or not, and facing the plain fact that ‘their country was fed from the king’s country,’ they looked about for a friend at Court and humbly asked for peace. If there was any thought of peace with honour, it was suppressed. Dependents could not afford to be angry, and the king could do no wrong. To this had great Sidon and proud Tyre now come.
No details are given of our Lord’s visit to Sidon, though it is definitely stated that He came through it, or at least its surrounding territory (reading διά not καί in Mark 7:31, with the best Manuscripts ), on His way to Decapolis, which He probably reached by the highway over the Lebanon to Damascus (see H. J. Holtzmann, Die Synoptiker3, 1901 [1], and A. B. Bruce, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Mark,’ 1897, in loc). Nothing is known of the actual introduction of Christianity into Sidon. One of its bishops attended the Council of Nicaea in a.d. 325.
‘Sidonian’ was originally an ethnic name like ‘Hittite,’ Sidon and Heth being named together as sons of Canaan in Genesis 10:15. In Homer ‘Sidonia’ is equivalent to Phcenicia and ‘Sidonian’ to Phcenician. In the Latin poets, too, when the adjective qualifies such words as ‘Dido’ (Virg. aen. xi. 74), ‘nautae,’ ‘rates,’ ‘murex,’ ‘vestis,’ ‘chlamys,’ it means Phcenician. The modern town, called by the Arabs Saida, has about 15,000 inhabitants. Some very remarkable sarcophagi have been found in the necropolis to the S.E. of the town.
Literature.-E. Robinson, Biblical Researches in Palestine2, 3 vols., 1856, ii. 478 ff.; O. Hamdy-Bey and T. Reinach, La Nécropole royale de Sidon, 1892-96; C. Baedeker, Palestine and Syria2, 1894.
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sidon (2)
SIDON (for much of common reference, see Tyre).—A narrow, rocky district as well as a once famous city in Phœnicia, the city being 30 miles S. of Beirût and 26 miles slightly N. by E. of Tyre, and 60 miles N. of Capernaum. Like nearly all settlements on the east coast of the Mediterranean, Sidon owed its location to certain prominent rocks in the sea, which at first served as a breakwater, and then, through gradual connexion with the land, produced a northern and a southern harbour, the latter now filled with sand.
Sidon is so ancient that all certainty as to the origin of its name has vanished. Some have deemed it ‘fishing’-town, others the seat of the worship of a deity Sid. Sidon and the Sidonians are heard of earlier and more influentially than Tyre, which finally distanced its northern rival. All the Phœnician cities seem to have known little but rivalry down to the appearance of such world-powers as Assyria, Babylonia, Persia, Greece, and Rome, which made them all, sooner or later, subject and abject. Each had its ‘king,’ its ‘god,’ its colonies, its coinage. Each sent its trading vessels seaward to the Mediterranean world; landward, each was in touch with the markets of Damascus and the East by means of those caravans of ‘ships of the desert’; each sat as queen over a semicircular domain with a radius of some 15 to 20 miles. Through faction in the 8th cent. b.c. Sidon lost many of her merchants, chiefly to Tyre. At length her limited territory, her merely commercial aim, her being sapped by colonization and dissension, her final surrender of leadership to Tyre, combined with her conquests by the world-powers, left her under the Romans in the days of Christ a merely provincial capital, richer in the vices of ancient paganism than in its virtues. Some from Sidon were in the multitude that thronged Jesus at the Sea of Galilee (Mark 3:8), and Sidon was pronounced more excusable in the day of judgment than the more favoured cities of Jesus’ own country and race (Matthew 11:21 f.). The present Saida has about 10,000 inhabitants, and is surrounded by delightful orange groves, beneath which lie archaeological treasures. Beirût, with its Damascus railway and improved harbour, has robbed Sidon of its last vestiges of commerce.
In a sense Sidon was, and in another sense was not, within the limits of the Holy Land. In the ideal distribution of Canaan recorded in Joshua the lot of Asher would seem to have included about all of Phœnicia, extending ‘even unto great Sidon’ (Joshua 19:28). The coast cities and their daughter villages, however, remained utterly unconscious of their assignment, while Asher became so assimilated thereto as to retain in Israelitish history little more than a name.
The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 declares that Jesus ‘came through Sidon,’ a distinct and exact statement unknown to the Authorized Version ; and thereon depends our conception whether or not Jesus Himself, from choice, ever went into the way of the Gentiles. Many points as to the primariness, structure, and transmission of the Gospels are illustrated by this case.
Matthew 15:21 ff. Authorized Version
Mark 7:24 ff. Authorized Version
Matthew 15:21 Then Jesus went thence, and departed into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon. Matthew 15:22 And, behold, a woman of Canaan came out of the same coasts, etc.
Mark 7:24 And from thence he arose, and went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and entered into an house, and would have no man know it: but he could not be hid. For a certain woman, etc. [1].
Matthew 15:29 And Jesus departed from thence, and came nigh unto the sea of Galilee; and went up into a mountain, and sat down there.
Mark 7:31 And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. [2].
After the Revisers’ most conscientious work, with their better evidence, this is the form in which we read the same:
And Jesus went out thence, and withdrew into the parts of Tyre and Sidon. And, behold, a Canaanitish woman came out from those borders, etc.
And from thence he arose, and went away into the borders of Tyre and Sidon. And he entered into an house, and would have no man know it: and he could not be hid. But straightway a woman, etc. [1].
 
Marg. ‘Some ancient authorities omit and Sidon.’
And Jesus departed thence, and came nigh unto the sea of Galilee; and he went up into the mountain, and sat there.
And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis.
B. Weiss sides completely with the ‘some ancient authorities’ of (Revised Version margin) , and reads: Jesus ‘went away into the borders of Tyre.… And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee,’ etc. Thus the primary Gospel of Mark, the more ancient Sinaitic and Vatican Manuscripts , Professor Weiss, and the Revisers do not hesitate to depict Jesus as entering Gentile territory (twice), entering a (probably) heathen house, and dispensing blessings upon a pagan woman, going then yet farther ‘through Sidon’ and Decapolis. The more theological First Evangelist, however, and the judicious transcribers disliked so to state the case. So Edersheim: the ‘house in which Jesus sought shelter and privacy would, of course, be a Jewish home’; and ‘by “through Sidon” I do not understand the town of that name, which would have been quite outside the Saviour’s route, but the territory of Sidon’ (Life and Times, ii. 38, 44).
Anything like a direct ‘route’ from the Israelitish borders of Tyre, or of Tyre and Sidon,—for Edersheim emphasizes Matthew’s indication that the woman came from her territory to that of Jesus,—would take one in a south-easterly direction, and therefore away from Sidon. Accordingly, Jesus’ choice to go in a northerly direction, ‘through Sidon,’ shows that He was not taking any near and direct and usual ‘route,’ but for a reason was seeking travel into heathen territory. Mk.’s connexion indicates that Jesus journeyed into the Gentile land with His disciples, on the occasion of the abolition of the Levitical distinctions as to the ceremonially clean and unclean, so as to give to His followers an example and object lesson as to the same. Sidon on the far north was for this reason included, as was the hog-herding Decapolis. It was at Caesarea, a similar Gentile city almost 100 miles nearer Jerusalem, that St. Peter received his fuller lesson on the same subject.
Wilbur Fletcher Steele.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sidon
SIDON or ZIDON. A fishing town made memorable from our Lord's occasional visits there. Some derive it from the word Tzada, to fish. It was an antient place. (See Joshua 11:8; Matthew 15:21)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sidon, Sidonians
See ZIDON and ZIDONIANS.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sidon
("fishing town"); SIDON or ZIDON. Genesis 10:9; Genesis 10:15; Joshua 11:8; Joshua 19:28; Judges 1:31. Sidon was in Asher (Isaiah 23:2; Isaiah 23:4; Isaiah 23:12). An ancient mercantile city of Phoenicia, in the narrow plain between Lebanon and the Mediterranean, where the mountains recede two miles from the sea; 20 miles N. of Tyre. Now Saida. Old Sidon stands on the northern slope of a promontory projecting a few hundred yards into the sea, having thus "a fine naturally formed harbour" (Strabo). The citadel occupies the hill behind on the south. Sidon is called (Genesis 10:15) the firstborn of Canaan, and "great Sidon" or the metropolis (Joshua 11:8). Sidonians is the generic name of the Phoenicians or Canaanites (Joshua 13:6; Judges 18:7); in Judges 18:28 Laish is said to be "far from Sidon," whereas Tyre, 20 miles nearer, would have been specified if it had then been a city of leading importance. (See TYRE.) So in Homer Sidon is named, but not Tyre.
Justin Martyr makes (Judges 18:3) Tyre a colony planted by Sidon when the king of Ascalon took Sidon the year before the fall of Troy. Tyre is first mentioned in Scripture in Joshua 19:29 as "the strong city," the "daughter of Sidon" (Isaiah 23:12.) Sidon and Sidonians are names often subsequently used for Tyre, Tyrians. Thus Ethbaal, king of the Sidonians (1 Kings 16:31), is called by Menander in Josephus (Ezekiel 28:22-24 section 2) king of the Tyrians. By the time of Zechariah (Zechariah 9:2) Tyre has the precedency, "Tyrus and Sidon." Sidon revolted from the yoke of Tyre when Shalmaneser's invasion gave the opportunity. Rivalry with Tyre influenced Sidon to submit without resistance to Nebuchadnezzar. Its rebellion against the Persian Artaxerxes Ochus entailed great havoc on its citizens, Tennes its king proving traitor. Its fleet helped Alexander the Great against Tyre (Arrian, Anab. Al., 2:15).
Augustus took away its liberties. Its population is now 5,000. Its trade and navigation have left it for Beirut. It was famed for elaborate embroidery, working of metals artistically, glass, the blowpipe, lathe, and graver, and cast mirrors. (Pliny 36:26, H. N. 5:17; 1 Kings 5:6, "not any can skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians".) Their seafaring is alluded to (Isaiah 23:2). Self indulgent ease followed in the train of their wealth, so that "the manner of the Sidonians" was proverbial (Judges 18:7).. Sidon had her own king (Jeremiah 25:22; Jeremiah 27:3). Sidonian women in Solomon's harem seduced him to worship Ashtoreth "the goddess of the Sidonians" (1 Kings 11:1; 1 Kings 11:4; 2 Kings 23:13).
Joel reproves Sidon and Tyre for selling children of Judah and Jerusalem to the Grecians, and threatens them with a like fate, Judah selling their sons and daughters to the Sabeans. So Ezekiel (Ant. 8:13,) threatens Sidon with pestilence and blood in her streets, so that she shall be no more a pricking brier unto Israel. Jesus went once to the coasts of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). Paul touched at Sidon on his voyage from Caesarea to Rome (Acts 27:3); by Julius' courteous permission Paul there "went unto his friends to refresh himself." Tyre and Sidon's doom shall be more tolerable in the day of judgment than that of those who witnessed Christ's works and teaching, yet repented not (Matthew 11:21-22). On a coin of the age of Antiochus IV Tyre claims to be "mother of the Sidonians," being at that time the capital city.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Zidon, Sidon
Eldest son of Canaan, son of Ham, and the city in Phoenicia founded by his descendants. Genesis 10:15,19 . In scripture Tyre is nearly always mentioned first, though it is probable that in early days Zidon had the supremacy, which led to the district of Phoenicia being called Sidon, and the people thereof Zidonians. In Joshua 11:8 ; Joshua 19:28 , it is called 'great Zidon.' It fell to the lot of Asher, but they did not drive out the inhabitants, which led to the Israelites serving the gods of the place. Judges 1:31 ; Judges 10:6 . Solomon also loved some of their women, and imitated their form of idolatry. 1 Kings 11:1,33 .
Zidon is denounced by the prophets for destruction. It is charged with being a 'pricking brier' to the house of Israel, and a 'grieving thorn' around them. Ezekiel 28:21-24 . Jehovah says of Zidon, in conjunction with Tyre, that they had taken His gold and silver and pleasant things, and carried them into their heathen temples, and had also sold the children of Judah unto the Grecians, to remove them far from their border. Joel 3:4-8 . A warning message from Jeremiah was sent to the king of Zidon and neighbouring kings, exhorting them to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, who was Jehovah's servant. Jeremiah 27:3 . We do not read that Nebuchadnezzar took Zidon, indeed his lengthy siege of Tyre probably enriched Zidon. The city is mentioned in Genesis 49:13 ; Isaiah 23:2-12 ; Jeremiah 25:22 ; Jeremiah 47:4 ; Ezekiel 27:8 ; Zechariah 9:2 , etc.
The Lord Jesus visited its coasts, and said that it should be more tolerable in the day of judgement for Tyre and Sidon than for the cities in which He had done his mighty works. Matthew 11:21,22 ; Matthew 15:21 ; Acts 12:28 ; Acts 27:3 .
The destruction of Zidon was remarkable. They revolted from the Persians, but Tennes their king turned traitor and betrayed them. When the place was besieged, many of the citizens went out in submission, but were cruelly butchered. They had burnt their ships that none might escape, and seeing no effectual means of defence, in despair they shut themselves up in their houses, set them on fire, and perished in the flames. This was in B.C. 351. It gradually recovered from this destruction and became again a flourishing town. It is now called Saida, 33 34' N, there are many ruins.
In the Hebrew the name is Tzidon, as in the margin of Genesis 10:15 . Sidon is the Greek form of the name.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sidon
or ZIDON, a celebrated city and port of Phenicia, and one of the most ancient cities in the world; as it is supposed to have been founded by Sidon, the eldest son of Canaan, which will carry it up to above two thousand years before Christ. But if it was founded by Sidon, his descendants were driven out by a body of Phenician colonists, or Cushim from the east; who are supposed either to have given it its name, or to have retained the old one in compliment to their god Siton, or Dagon. Its inhabitants appear to have early acquired a preeminence in arts, manufactures, and commerce; and from their superior skill in hewing timber, by which must be understood their cutting it out and preparing it for building, as well as the mere act of felling it, Sidonian workmen were hired by Solomon to prepare the wood for the building of his temple. The Sidonians are said to have been the first manufacturers of glass; and Homer often speaks of them as excelling in many useful and ingenious arts, giving them the title of Πολυδαιδαλοι . Add to this, they were, if not the first shipwrights and navigators, the first who ventured beyond their own coasts, and in those early ages engrossed the greatest part of the then commerce of the world. The natural result of these exclusive advantages to the inhabitants of Sidon was, a high degree of wealth and prosperity; and content with the riches which their trade and manufactures brought them, they lived in ease and luxury, trusting the defence of their city and property, like the Tyrians after them, to hired troops; so that to live in ease and security, is said in Scripture to be after the manner of the Sidonians. In all these respects, however, Sidon was totally eclipsed by her neighbour and rival, Tyre; whose more enterprising inhabitants pushed their commercial dealings to the extremities of the known world, raised their city to a rank in power and opulence unknown before, and converted it into a luxurious metropolis, and the emporium of the produce of all nations. After the subversion of the Grecian empire by the Romans, Sidon fell into the hands of the latter; who, to put an end to the frequent revolt of the inhabitants, deprived it of its freedom. It then fell successively under the power of the Saracens, the Seljukian Turks, and the sultans of Egypt; who, in 1289, that they might never more afford shelter to the Christians, destroyed both it and Tyre. But it again somewhat revived, and has ever since been in the possession of the Ottoman Turks.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sidon
Sidon. Genesis 10:15, A.V. See Zidon.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sidon
Ancient Phenician seaport, 67 miles from Caesarea, between Mount Lebanon and the Mediterranean, where Saint Paul stopped on his voyage to Rome (Acts 27). The modern port, Saida, is west of Sidon.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Sidon
Hunting; fishing; venison
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sidon
In the Old Testament Genesis 49:13 , and is believed to have been founded by Zidon, the eldest son of Canaan, Genesis 10:15 49:13 . In the time of Homer, the Zidonians were eminent for their trade and commerce, their wealth and prosperity, their skill in navigation, astronomy, architecture, and for their manufactures of glass, etc. They had then a commodious harbor, now choked with sand and inaccessible to any but the smallest vessels. Upon the division of Canaan among the tribes by Joshua, Great Zidon fell to the lot of Asher, Joshua 11:8 19:28 ; but that tribe never succeeded in obtaining possession, Judges 1:31 3:3 10:12 .
The Zidonians continued long under their own government and kings, though sometimes tributary to the kings of Tyre. They were subdued successively by the Babyloniaus, Egyptians, Seleucidae, and Romans the latter of whom deprived them of their freedom. Many of the inhabitants of Sidon became followers of our Savior, Mark 3:8 , and he himself visited their freedom. Many of them also resorted to him in Galilee, Luke 6:17 . The gospel was proclaimed to the Jews at Sidon after the martyrdom of Stephen, Acts 11:19 , and there was a Christian church there, when Paul visited it on his voyage to Rome, Acts 27:3 .
It is at present, like most of the other Turkish towns in Syria, dirty and full of ruins, thought it still retains a little coasting trade, and has five thousand inhabitants. It incurred the judgments of God for its sins, Ezekiel 28:21-24 , though less ruinously than Tyre. Our Savior refers to both cities, in reproaching the Jews as more highly favored and less excusable than they, Matthew 11:22 . Saida occupies an elevated promontory, projecting into the sea, and defended by walls. Its environs watered by a stream from their beautiful gardens, and fruit trees of every kind.

Sentence search

Sidon - ("fishing town"); Sidon or ZIDON. Sidon was in Asher (Isaiah 23:2; Isaiah 23:4; Isaiah 23:12). Old Sidon stands on the northern slope of a promontory projecting a few hundred yards into the sea, having thus "a fine naturally formed harbour" (Strabo). Sidon is called (Genesis 10:15) the firstborn of Canaan, and "great Sidon" or the metropolis (Genesis 10:9). Sidonians is the generic name of the Phoenicians or Canaanites (Joshua 13:6; Judges 18:7); in Judges 18:28 Laish is said to be "far from Sidon," whereas Tyre, 20 miles nearer, would have been specified if it had then been a city of leading importance. ) So in Homer Sidon is named, but not Tyre. ...
Justin Martyr makes (Judges 18:3) Tyre a colony planted by Sidon when the king of Ascalon took Sidon the year before the fall of Troy. Tyre is first mentioned in Scripture in Joshua 19:29 as "the strong city," the "daughter of Sidon" (Isaiah 23:12. ) Sidon and Sidonians are names often subsequently used for Tyre, Tyrians. Thus Ethbaal, king of the Sidonians (1 Kings 16:31), is called by Menander in Josephus (Zechariah 9:2) Tyre has the precedency, "Tyrus and Sidon. " Sidon revolted from the yoke of Tyre when Shalmaneser's invasion gave the opportunity. Rivalry with Tyre influenced Sidon to submit without resistance to Nebuchadnezzar. 5:17; 1 Kings 5:6, "not any can skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians". Self indulgent ease followed in the train of their wealth, so that "the manner of the Sidonians" was proverbial (Judges 18:7). Sidon had her own king (Jeremiah 25:22; Jeremiah 27:3). Sidonian women in Solomon's harem seduced him to worship Ashtoreth "the goddess of the Sidonians" (1 Kings 11:1; 1 Kings 11:4; 2 Kings 23:13). ...
Joel reproves Sidon and Tyre for selling children of Judah and Jerusalem to the Grecians, and threatens them with a like fate, Judah selling their sons and daughters to the Sabeans. So Ezekiel (Ezekiel 28:22-24) threatens Sidon with pestilence and blood in her streets, so that she shall be no more a pricking brier unto Israel. Jesus went once to the coasts of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). Paul touched at Sidon on his voyage from Caesarea to Rome (Acts 27:3); by Julius' courteous permission Paul there "went unto his friends to refresh himself. " Tyre and Sidon's doom shall be more tolerable in the day of judgment than that of those who witnessed Christ's works and teaching, yet repented not (1618455531_5). On a coin of the age of Antiochus IV Tyre claims to be "mother of the Sidonians," being at that time the capital city
Zidon - (See Sidon
Zidon - See Sidon...
Mearah - This may be the cave of Jezzin in Lebanon, 10 miles east of Sidon, on the Damascus road; or probably, as others think, Mogheirizeh, north-east of Sidon
Sidon - Sidon
Tyre - (teere) See Sidon and Tyre
Sidon (2) - SIDON (for much of common reference, see Tyre). Like nearly all settlements on the east coast of the Mediterranean, Sidon owed its location to certain prominent rocks in the sea, which at first served as a breakwater, and then, through gradual connexion with the land, produced a northern and a southern harbour, the latter now filled with sand. ...
Sidon is so ancient that all certainty as to the origin of its name has vanished. Sidon and the Sidonians are heard of earlier and more influentially than Tyre, which finally distanced its northern rival. Sidon lost many of her merchants, chiefly to Tyre. Some from Sidon were in the multitude that thronged Jesus at the Sea of Galilee (Mark 3:8), and Sidon was pronounced more excusable in the day of judgment than the more favoured cities of Jesus’ own country and race (Matthew 11:21 f. Beirût, with its Damascus railway and improved harbour, has robbed Sidon of its last vestiges of commerce. ...
In a sense Sidon was, and in another sense was not, within the limits of the Holy Land. In the ideal distribution of Canaan recorded in Joshua the lot of Asher would seem to have included about all of Phœnicia, extending ‘even unto great Sidon’ (Joshua 19:28). ...
The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 declares that Jesus ‘came through Sidon,’ a distinct and exact statement unknown to the Authorized Version ; and thereon depends our conception whether or not Jesus Himself, from choice, ever went into the way of the Gentiles. Authorized Version ...
Matthew 15:21 Then Jesus went thence, and departed into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon. ...
Mark 7:24 And from thence he arose, and went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon, and entered into an house, and would have no man know it: but he could not be hid. ...
Mark 7:31 And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. ...
After the Revisers’ most conscientious work, with their better evidence, this is the form in which we read the same:...
And Jesus went out thence, and withdrew into the parts of Tyre and Sidon. ...
And from thence he arose, and went away into the borders of Tyre and Sidon. ‘Some ancient authorities omit and Sidon. ...
And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis. … And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee,’ etc. Thus the primary Gospel of Mark, the more ancient Sinaitic and Vatican Manuscripts , Professor Weiss, and the Revisers do not hesitate to depict Jesus as entering Gentile territory (twice), entering a (probably) heathen house, and dispensing blessings upon a pagan woman, going then yet farther ‘through Sidon’ and Decapolis. So Edersheim: the ‘house in which Jesus sought shelter and privacy would, of course, be a Jewish home’; and ‘by “through Sidon” I do not understand the town of that name, which would have been quite outside the Saviour’s route, but the territory of Sidon’ (Life and Times, ii. ...
Anything like a direct ‘route’ from the Israelitish borders of Tyre, or of Tyre and Sidon,—for Edersheim emphasizes Matthew’s indication that the woman came from her territory to that of Jesus,—would take one in a south-easterly direction, and therefore away from Sidon. Accordingly, Jesus’ choice to go in a northerly direction, ‘through Sidon,’ shows that He was not taking any near and direct and usual ‘route,’ but for a reason was seeking travel into heathen territory. Sidon on the far north was for this reason included, as was the hog-herding Decapolis
Sidon - Sidon
Helbah - A town of Asher, not far from Sidon (Judges 1:31)
Zidon, Zidonians - (zi' duhn, zi' doh' nih uhnss) KJV alternate forms of Sidon and Sidonians
Ethbaal - King of Sidon, and father of Jezebel wife of Ahab
Mis'Rephoth-ma'im - Thomson treats Misrephoth-maim as identical with a collection of springs called Ain-Musheirifeh , on the seashore close under the Ras en-Nakhura ; but this has the disadvantage of being very far from Sidon. May it not rather be the place with which we are familiar in the later history as Zarephat, near Sidon?
Blastus - A chamberlain of Herod Agrippa, bribed to favor the men of Tyre and Sidon, Acts 12:20
Zidon - See Sidon
Hel'Bah - (fertile ), a town of Asher, probably on the plain of Phoenicia not far from Sidon
Hammon - A city in Asher near great Sidon (Joshua 19:28)
Blastus - Herod Agrippa I's chamberlain; mediator between him and the people of Tyre and Sidon, who made him their friend (Acts 12:20)
Blastus - , through whose intervention the people of Tyre and Sidon secured a hearing at Cæsarea ( Acts 12:20 )
Zarephath - ) Elijah's residence during the drought (1 Kings 17:9-10); belonging to Sidon. Now Surafend, a tell or hill, with a small village, seven or eight miles from Sidon, near the Zaharain river
Mearah - The site is perhaps the caves called Mughar Jezzin located east of Sidon (Joshua 13:4 )
Sidon - The modern port, Saida, is west of Sidon
Asher - The province allotted to this tribe was a maritime one, stretching along the coast from Sidon on the north to Mount Carmel on the south; including the cities Abdon, Achshaph, Accho, Achzib, Sarepta, Sidon, and Tyre
Sidon - Sidon or ZIDON
Sidon - (Σιδών, ethnic Σιδώνιοι)...
Sidon, called ‘Great Zidon’ (Joshua 11:8), was one of the maritime cities of Phcenicia, about 25 miles N. After the coming of Alexander the Great, whom Sidon rapturously welcomed and Tyre frantically opposed, the two cities shared the same political fortunes, being for two centuries bones of contention between the Greek kings of Syria in the north and Egypt in the south. Strabo says that in his time-the beginning of our era-the Sidonians not only ‘cultivate science and study astronomy and arithmetic, to which they are led by the application of numbers and night sailing, each of which concerns the merchant and seaman,’ but there are ‘distinguished philosophers, natives of Sidon, as Bcethus, with whom I studied the philosophy of Aristotle, and Diodotus his brother’ (xvi. When Herod Agrippa was ‘highly displeased with the Tyrians and Sidonians’ (Acts 12:20), they indulged in no useless heroies. To this had great Sidon and proud Tyre now come. ...
No details are given of our Lord’s visit to Sidon, though it is definitely stated that He came through it, or at least its surrounding territory (reading διά not καί in Mark 7:31, with the best Manuscripts ), on His way to Decapolis, which He probably reached by the highway over the Lebanon to Damascus (see H. Nothing is known of the actual introduction of Christianity into Sidon. ...
‘Sidonian’ was originally an ethnic name like ‘Hittite,’ Sidon and Heth being named together as sons of Canaan in Genesis 10:15. In Homer ‘Sidonia’ is equivalent to Phcenicia and ‘Sidonian’ to Phcenician. Reinach, La Nécropole royale de Sidon, 1892-96; C
Sidon And Tyre - Sidon and Tyre were ancient cities, having been founded long before the Israelites entered the land of Canaan. Extrabiblical sources first mention Sidon before 2000 B. While Sidon seems to have been the most dominant of the two cities during the early part of their histories, Tyre assumed this role in the latter times. Jesus spent time in Tyre and Sidon and in contrast to the prophets' attitude toward the cities, He contrasted them with the Jews as examples of faith ( Matthew 11:20-22 )
Eth-Baal - ” King of Sidon and father of Jezebel (1 Kings 16:31 ), who married Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753 B
Sarepta - Identified with Sarafend, 33 27' N, 35 18' E : it is near the sea, about midway between Tyre and Sidon
Ethbaal - Ithobalus ("Baal with him") in Menander (Josephus, Apion 1:18), king of Sidon, Jezebel's father (1 Kings 16:31)
Zarephath - In Luke 4:26 it is again called a city of Sidon (RV [2] ‘in the land of Sidon’)
Misrephoth Maim - To this place, somewhere near Sidon, Joshua pursued the kings whom he conquered at the waters of Merom (Joshua 11:8; Joshua 13:6)
Blastus - Won over by citizens of Tyre and Sidon, he tried to help them make peace with Herod
Sidon - The Mediterranean seaports of Tyre and Sidon were the two most important towns of Phoenicia. In the same way Sidon, being a dominant religious centre, fittingly symbolized the corrupt Phoenician religion that at times troubled Israel (Judges 10:6; 1 Kings 16:31-33). (For details of Sidon’s commerce, religion and history see PHOENICIA
Astaroth - (Phenician: Ashtoret; Astarte) ...
A Syro-Phenician female deity worshipped at Sidon and Tyre, in Carthage, Cyprus, and even Britain. In 4Kings 28, she is described as the "idol of the Sidonians
Astarte - (Phenician: Ashtoret; Astarte) ...
A Syro-Phenician female deity worshipped at Sidon and Tyre, in Carthage, Cyprus, and even Britain. In 4Kings 28, she is described as the "idol of the Sidonians
Ashtoret - (Phenician: Ashtoret; Astarte) ...
A Syro-Phenician female deity worshipped at Sidon and Tyre, in Carthage, Cyprus, and even Britain. In 4Kings 28, she is described as the "idol of the Sidonians
Lasha - bound (Sidon), the S. Laish moreover was connected with Canaanite Sidon, though far from it (Judges 18:7; Judges 18:28)
Tripolis - It was divided into three parts, originating in colonies from Tyre, Sidon, and Arvad hence the name
Arkite - They apparently centered around Arqa, modern Tell Arqa in Syria 80 miles north of Sidon
Ethba'al - (with Baal ), king of Sidon and father of Jezebel. ( 1 Kings 16:31 ) Josephus represents him as a king of the Tyrians as well as of the Sidonians
Sidon - or ZIDON, a celebrated city and port of Phenicia, and one of the most ancient cities in the world; as it is supposed to have been founded by Sidon, the eldest son of Canaan, which will carry it up to above two thousand years before Christ. But if it was founded by Sidon, his descendants were driven out by a body of Phenician colonists, or Cushim from the east; who are supposed either to have given it its name, or to have retained the old one in compliment to their god Siton, or Dagon. Its inhabitants appear to have early acquired a preeminence in arts, manufactures, and commerce; and from their superior skill in hewing timber, by which must be understood their cutting it out and preparing it for building, as well as the mere act of felling it, Sidonian workmen were hired by Solomon to prepare the wood for the building of his temple. The Sidonians are said to have been the first manufacturers of glass; and Homer often speaks of them as excelling in many useful and ingenious arts, giving them the title of Πολυδαιδαλοι . The natural result of these exclusive advantages to the inhabitants of Sidon was, a high degree of wealth and prosperity; and content with the riches which their trade and manufactures brought them, they lived in ease and luxury, trusting the defence of their city and property, like the Tyrians after them, to hired troops; so that to live in ease and security, is said in Scripture to be after the manner of the Sidonians. In all these respects, however, Sidon was totally eclipsed by her neighbour and rival, Tyre; whose more enterprising inhabitants pushed their commercial dealings to the extremities of the known world, raised their city to a rank in power and opulence unknown before, and converted it into a luxurious metropolis, and the emporium of the produce of all nations. After the subversion of the Grecian empire by the Romans, Sidon fell into the hands of the latter; who, to put an end to the frequent revolt of the inhabitants, deprived it of its freedom
Kanah - of Sidon (Saida)
Julius - He allowed Paul to go ashore at Sidon to visit with friends
Ocina - Taking the towns mentioned in order as fearing the advance of Holofernes ( Jdt 2:28 ), Sidon and Tyre are well known
Julius - He suffered him to land at Sidon, and to visit his friends there; and in a subsequent part of the voyage he opposed the violence of the soldiers, directed against the prisoners generally, in order to save the apostle, Acts 27:1-44
Zarephath - of Sidon, 17 miles N. ...
While, in the theoretical division of the Holy Land among the twelve tribes by Joshua, Zarephath fell into the lot of Asher, going down, as that did, ‘even unto great Sidon,’ ‘and to the fortified city of Tyre’ (Joshua 19:28 f. Luke’s report of Christ’s sermon at Nazareth distinctly connects Zarephath with Sidon, as do the LXX Septuagint and Massoretic Text in the account of Elijah’s sustenance by the widow there
Eth-Baal - With Baal, a king of Sidon (B
Mearah - A town "beside (rather "belonging to") the Sidonians, which Israel failed to take possession of. of Sidon, in the steep of Lebanon, a hiding place of the Druses at the present time
Zarephath - Smelting-shop, "a workshop for the refining and smelting of metals", a small Phoenician town, now Surafend, about a mile from the coast, almost midway on the road between Tyre and Sidon
Grecians - The children of Israel had been sold to them by Tyre and Sidon
Zarephath - A town of Phœnicia, on the Mediterranean, between Tyre and Sidon
Rehob (2) - A town allotted to Asher (Joshua 19:28), near Sidon
Harosheth of the Gentiles - a city supposed to be situated near Hazor, in the northern parts of Canaan, called afterward Upper Galilee, or Galilee of the Gentiles, for the same reason that this place probably obtained that title, namely, from being less inhabited by Jews, and being near the great resorts of the Gentiles, Tyre and Sidon
Syria - "From the historic annals now accessible to us, the history of Syria may be divided into three periods: The first, the period when the power of the Pharaohs was dominant over the fertile fields or plains of Syria and the merchant cities of Tyre and Sidon, and when such mighty conquerors as Thothmes III. Second, this was followed by a short period of independence, when the Jewish nation in the south was growing in power, until it reached its early zenith in the golden days of Solomon; and when Tyre and Sidon were rich cities, sending their traders far and wide, over land and sea, as missionaries of civilization, while in the north the confederate tribes of the Hittites held back the armies of the kings of Assyria. The third, and to us most interesting, period is that during which the kings of Assyria were dominant over the plains of Syria; when Tyre, Sidon, Ashdod, and Jerusalem bowed beneath the conquering armies of Shalmaneser, Sargon, and Sennacherib; and when at last Memphis and Thebes yielded to the power of the rulers of Nineveh and Babylon, and the kings of Assyria completed with terrible fulness the bruising of the reed of Egypt so clearly foretold by the Hebrew prophets
Phoenicia - Leading cities were Tyre, Sidon, Byblos (Gebal), and Berytos (Beirut). ...
New Testament Jesus' ministry reached Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21 ). See Tyre ; Sidon
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
The extent of the country may be roughly determined by its chief cities Arvad or Arados, on the island now called Ruad, eighty miles north of Sidon, Simyra, Arka, Gebal or Byblos, Biruta on the site of the modern Beyrout, Sidon, Sarepta, Tyre, Achzib, and Acco. ...
For some reason Sidon so excelled the other cities in the eyes of Israelites and Greeks, that in the OT and Homer the Phœnicians are frequently called ‘Sidonians,’ even when, as in the case of Ahab’s marriage, Tyrians are really referred to (cf. Rib-Adda was vassal king of Gebal, Ammunira of Biruta, Zimrida of Sidon, and Abimilki of Tyre. It is probably because of this long Egyptian vassalage that Genesis 10:15 traces the descent of Sidon from Ham. 884 860) had made a raid to the Mediterranean coast and exacted tribute from Tyre, Sidon, and Gebal ( KIB
In the Persian period (how Phœnicia became subject to Persia our sources do not tell) Sidon again became the leading city, Tyre taking a second place. ...
Sidon furnished the best ships for the fleet of Xerxes, Tyre the next best (Diod. Straton (Abd-Ashtart?) of Sidon in the next century effected Greek civilization (Ælian, Var. About 350 his successor Tennes (Tabnith?) joined in an unsuccessful revolt against Persia, and Sidon was again besieged (Diod. During the next century, under the Ptolemys, a native dynasty flourished at Sidon, from which a number of inscriptions survive (cf. Bod-Ashtart built a temple near Sidon, which has recently been excavated. 193 211) performed a similar service for Tyre, and Elagabalus (218 222) for Sidon
Zarephath - ” A town on the Mediterranean seacoast just south of Sidon
Oration - The word occurs in the NT only in connexion with Herod Agrippa, who, at Caesarea, ‘made an oration’ (δημηγορέω) from the throne (or judgment-seat [1]) to the embassy from Tyre and Sidon (Acts 12:21)
Tin - It is the general opinion that the Phoenicians of Tyre and Sidon obtained their supplies of tin from the British Isles
Chamberlain - The importance of the position is indicated by the fact that the people of Tyre and Sidon sought the favor of Herod Agrippa through the mediation of Blastus, Acts 12:20
Snow - It was "carried to Tyre, Sidon, and Damascus as a luxury, and labourers sweltering in the hot harvest-fields used it for the purpose of cooling the water which they drank (Proverbs 25:13 ; Jeremiah 18:14 )
Palestina, Palestine - ' In Joel 3:4 , Tyre and Sidon are not included in the term
Arvad - Throughout antiquity it was a place of renown for trade and general enterprise, ranking next to Tyre and Sidon
Zidon, Sidon - In scripture Tyre is nearly always mentioned first, though it is probable that in early days Zidon had the supremacy, which led to the district of Phoenicia being called Sidon, and the people thereof Zidonians. ...
The Lord Jesus visited its coasts, and said that it should be more tolerable in the day of judgement for Tyre and Sidon than for the cities in which He had done his mighty works. Sidon is the Greek form of the name
Daughter - Tyre is in this sense called the daughter of Sidon (Isaiah 23:12 )
Blastus - , is mentioned in Acts 12:20 in connexion with an embassy which the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon sent to Herod at Caesarea in order to obtain terms of peace
Asher - In the division of Canaan under Joshua, this tribe received the coastal plain from Mt Carmel north to the Phoenician cities of Tyre and Sidon (Joshua 19:24-31; Judges 5:17)
Zidon - Tsidon. "Sidon," the Greek form, is found in Genesis 10:15; Genesis 10:19, in the Apocrypha generally, and in the New Testament. In New Testament times Zidon (called "Sidon") was visited by Jesus, Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24; Luke 4:26, although the "coasts" of Tyre and Sidon denoted the adjacent region as well as the cities themselves, and some think that the Saviour did not enter the cities
Sennacherib - punished Sidon, made Tyre, Arad, and other Phoenician cities, as also Edom and Ashdod, tributary. 198), Sennacherib attacked Lulia of Sidon, then took Sidon, Zarephath, etc. The kings of Palestine mentioned as submitting to Sennacherib are Menahem of Samaria, Tubal of Sidon, Kemosh Natbi of Moab, etc
Julius - He treated Paul with great courtesy, allowing him to visit his friends at Sidon and refresh himself
Thais - 344 by Paphnutius of Sidon
Chamberlain - In NT at Acts 12:20 it is said that the people of Tyre and Sidon sought the favour of Herod Agrippa through the mediation of Blastus ‘the king’s chamberlain,’ showing that the office was one of considerable influence
Phenice, Phenicia - The same as PHOENICE, the coast of Northern Syria, extending south of Tyre, and north of Sidon, being a narrow strip of land in the south, but reaching to the Lebanon range in the N
Zidon - Our Lord visited the "coasts" of Tyre and Zidon = Sidon (q. From Sidon, at which the ship put in after leaving Caesarea, Paul finally sailed for Rome (Acts 27:3,4 ). From a Phoenician inscription on its lid, it appears that he was a "king of the Sidonians," probably in the third century B. , and that his mother was a priestess of Ashtoreth, "the goddess of the Sidonians. " In this inscription Baal is mentioned as the chief god of the Sidonians
Sidon - Many of the inhabitants of Sidon became followers of our Savior, Mark 3:8 , and he himself visited their freedom. The gospel was proclaimed to the Jews at Sidon after the martyrdom of Stephen, Acts 11:19 , and there was a Christian church there, when Paul visited it on his voyage to Rome, Acts 27:3
Phoenicia - The OT (like Homer) styles them ‘Sidonians,’ from the name of their principal town (Judges 3:3, Deuteronomy 3:9, etc. He did not, however, deprive of autonomy the ancient cities of Tyre and Sidon, or the recently founded Tripolis. Paul sailed for Phcenicia and spent a week among ‘the disciples’ of Tyre (Acts 21:2-6; see Tyre and Sidon). It should not be forgotten that many Phcenicians had come to Galilee to hear Christ Himself (Mark 3:8), that He returned their visit by going into ‘the borders of Tyre and Sidon’ (Mark 7:24), and that He expressed the conviction that the people of this country could have been more easily moved to repentance than those of the most highly favoured cities of His native land (Matthew 11:21)
Canaan - His eldest son, Zidon, was the father of the Sidonians and Phoenicians. The name as first used by the Phoenicians denoted only the maritime plain on which Sidon was built
Ashes (2) - To this custom Christ referred when He said of Tyre and Sidon, ‘They would have repented long ago, sitting in sackcloth and ashes’ (Luke 10:13; cf
Anti-Libanus - The western part of these mountains was called Libanus; the eastern was called Antilibanus; the former reached along the Mediterranean, from Sidon, almost to Arada, or Symira
Aphek - A city of Asher, Joshua 19:30, in the north of Palestine, near Sidon, Joshua 13:4; supposed to be the same as Aphik, Judges 1:31, and the classical Aphaca, noted in later history for its temple of Venus; now Afka, near Lebanon
Joppa - ...
When timber was brought from Lebanon to be used in the construction of Solomon’s temple, it was floated down from Tyre and Sidon in rafts, received at Joppa, and then taken to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 2:16)
Fish - Sidon is the oldest fishing establishment known in history
Watchmen - Those of Sidon also do the same
Phoenice - of Sidon, 28 miles in all, and from one to two miles broad, a small land to have wielded so mighty an influence. Sidon in the N. of Sidon. ...
Tyre and Sidon were havens sufficient in water depth for the requirements of ancient ships; and Lebanon adjoining supplied timber abundant for shipbuilding. Thus Tyre is Hebrew tsor , "rock"; Sidon tsidon , "fishing"; Carthage karthada , "new town"; Byrsa botsrah , "citadel," Bozrah Isaiah 63:1. Under Solomon Phoenice is noted for nautical skill, extensive commerce, mechanical and ornamental art (1 Kings 5:6): "none can skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians"; "cunning to work in gold, silver, brass, iron, purple, blue, and crimson," and "grave grayings" (2 Chronicles 2:7). Hence arose compromises, as Solomon's sacrificing to his wives' deities, Ashtoreth of Sidon, etc
Zebulun - " Jacob's blessing (Genesis 49:13) was, "Zebulun shall dwell at the haven of the sea, and he shall be for an haven of ships, and his border shall be unto Sidon. Its most westerly point reached to Mount Carmel, which brought it nigh Zidonia, the territory of Tyre and Sidon. ...
Zebulun was far from Sidon yet bordering toward it
Races - North Semites : ( a ) Babylonians (Shinar, Accad, Bahel, Erech); ( b ) Assyrians (Asshur, Nineveh, Calah); ( c ) Aramæans (Syrians); ( d ) Canaanitish peoples (1) Ammonites, (2) Amorites, (3) Canaanites, (4) Edomites, (5) Hivites, (6) Israelites, (7) Jebusites, (8) Moabites, (9) Phœnicians (Tyre, Sidon, Arvad, etc
Canaanites, the - They were "spread abroad, and the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza: as thou goest unto Sodom and Gomorrha, and Admah, and Zeboim, even unto Lasha
Ham - The first great empires of Assyria and Egypt were founded by them; and the republics of Tyre, Sidon, and Carthage, were early distinguished for their commerce: but they sooner also fell to decay; and Egypt, which was one of the first, became the last and "basest of the kingdoms," Ezekiel 29:15 ; and has been successively in subjection to the Shemites, and Japhethites; as have also the settlements of the other branches of the Hamites
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
Tour to borders of Tyre and Sidon
Canaanitish - The word is used to describe the woman who came out of the borders of Tyre and Sidon, desiring to have her daughter healed who was grievously vexed with a devil. A Canaanite, signifying properly ‘dweller in the lowland,’ is used in a wider or a narrower meaning in the OT, Canaan being a name applied either to the strip of seacoast from Gaza to Sidon, or, more loosely, to the whole possession of Israel, or that part which lay west of Jordan (Genesis 10:19; cf
Phoeni'ce, Phoenic'ia - (land of palm trees ) a tract of country, of which Tyre and Sidon were the principal cities, to the north of Palestine, along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea bounded by that sea on the west, and by the mountain range of Lebanon on the east.
What may be termed Phoenicia proper was a narrow undulating plain, extending from the pass of Ras el-Beyad or Abyad , the Promontorium Album of the ancients, about six miles south of Tyre, to the Nahr el-Auly , the ancient Bostrenus, two miles north of Sidon. Its average breadth is about a mile; but near Sidon the mountains retreat to a distance of two miles, and near Tyre to a distance of five miles. The havens of Tyre and Sidon afforded water of sufficient depth for all the requirements of ancient navigation, and the neighboring range of the Lebanon, in its extensive forests, furnished what then seemed a nearly inexhaustible supply of timber for ship-building
Children And Dogs - (Matthew 15; Mark 7) Parable addressed to a Canaanite woman who, taking advantage of Jesus' presence near Tyre and Sidon, besought Him to cast a devil out of her daughter
Coney - Conies are very plentiful along the rocky shores of the Dead Sea, and also in the Lebanon, especially above Sidon; they can, however, be seen as a rule only between sunset and sunrise
Merom, Waters of - ...
Another objection to Reland's view is the difficulty of a flight and pursuit across a country so rugged and intersected with ravines as that between Huleh and Sidon. The pursuit to Sidon is then intelligible
Jezebel - ), who brought the worship of Baal from Sidon, where her father Ethbaal was king (1 Kings 16:31 )
Treasures - But a few years since, some workmen digging in a garden at Sidon, discovered several copper pots, filled with gold coin from the mint of Philip of Macedon and his son Alexander, unmixed with any of later date
Adramyttium - Luke sailed from Caesarea by Sidon and under the lee (to the east) of Cyprus to Myra in Lycia, where they joined a corn-ship of Alexandria bound for Italy (Acts 27:2-6)
Serapion, Surnamed Sindonites - The Greeks honoured his memory on May 21, the Menaea erroneously calling him ὁ ἀπὸ Σείδονος , belonging to Sidon
Sennacherib - 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, attacked Sidon, and finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah
Assyria - ), a great ruler who conquered Egypt and destroyed Sidon; and Asshur-bani-pal (668-626 B
Phenicia - ...
The chief cities of Phenicia were Sidon, Tyre, Ptolemais, Ecdippe, Sarepta, Berythe, Biblos, Tripoli, Orthosia, Simira, Aradus
Tyre - ’ Isaiah ( Isaiah 23:2 ; Isaiah 23:12 ) calls her ‘daughter of Sidon ’ (cf. Genesis 10:15 ); Homer mentions ‘Sidonian wares,’ but ignores Tyre. Justin says Sidon suffered so severely at the hands of Ascalon that her trade passed to her daughter Tyre. came against the city, but, having no ships, could not reach the island fortress till he had bribed Sidon to furnish 60 vessels. The Assyrians held the shore, and captured Sidon, but Tyre again escaped. Sidon disappeared in flame and torrents of blood
Decapolis - ” Mark 7:31 states that after Jesus went to the region of Tyre and Sidon he went “through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis
Javan - In Joel 3:3; Joel 3:6, God reproves the nations because "they have given a boy for (as price for prostitution of) an harlot, and sold a girl for wine," especially Tyre and Sidon; "the children of Judah and Jerusalem have ye sold unto the Grecians (sons of Javan), that ye might remove them far from their border
Hor - of Sidon to the entering in of Hamath (Kalat el Husn close to Hums, i
Asher - Asher's territorial allotment was in Phoenicia in the far northwest reaching to Tyre and Sidon on the Mediterranean coast (Joshua 19:24-31 )
Engedi - Maundrell, near Sidon, which contained two hundred smaller caverns
Maternus, Julius Firmicus - A contemporary pagan Julius Firmicus Maternus, usually styled junior, wrote a work (between 330 and 360) on judicial astrology, mentioned by Sidon
Allotment - Asher inhabited the northernmost corner of Canaan, claiming much seacoast and reaching as far as Sidon the Great
Famine (2) - ) In order to illustrate the truth that no prophet is best received in his own country, He reminds His hearers that Elijah was at that time sent not to one of the many widows in Israel, but to the widow of Sarepta in the territory of Sidon
Interim - Julius Phlug, bishop of Naumberg; Michael Helding, titular bishop of Sidon; and John Agricola, preacher to the elector of Brandenburgh; who drew up a project, consisting of 26 articles, concerning the points of religion in dispute between the Catholics and Protestants
Phenicia - They were a Canaanite branch of the race of Ham, and are frequently called Sidonians, from their principal city of Sidon. None could "skill to hew timber like unto the Sidonians" ( 1 Kings 5:6 ). Among the chief Phoenician cities were Tyre and Sidon, Gebal north of Beirut, Arvad or Arados and Zemar
Sennach'Erib, - 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, chastised Sidon, and, having probably concluded a convention with his chief enemy finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah
Boundary - ...
Gebûl represents the territory within certain boundaries: “And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah, and Admah, and Zeboim, even unto Lasha” ( Garden - The orange and lemon groves of Jaffa and Sidon are famous; and the orchards around Damascus form one of the main attractions of that ‘earthly paradise
Caves - And Maundrell assures us, that "three hours distant from Sidon, about a mile from the sea, there runs along a high rocky mountain, in the sides of which are hewn a multitude of grottoes, all very little differing from each other
Sennacherib - The king of Tyre fied to Cyprus, Sidon and the rest of Phœnicia were taken or submitted, and placed under a king Ethbaal
Ezekiel, Book of - ) ...
Prophecies against various surrounding nations: against the Ammonites (Ezekiel 25:1-7 ), the Moabites (8-11), the Edomites (12-14), the Philistines (15-17), Tyre and Sidon (26-28), and against Egypt (29-32)
Mediterranean Sea, the - Paul's work involved such Mediterranean cities as Caesarea, Antioch, Troas, Corinth, Tyre, Sidon, Syracuse, Rome, and Ephesus
City - Next, we have a record of the cities of the Canaanites, Sidon, Gaza, Sodom, etc
Cyprus - In sailing from Sidon on their way to Rome they went N
Glass - Pliny's story may have originated in the suitability of the sand at the mouth of the Syrian river Belus for making glass, for which accordingly it was exported to Sidon and Alexandria, the centers of that manufacture
Canaanites - Tyre and Sidon, their famous cities, were the centres of great commercial activity; and hence the name "Canaanite" came to signify a "trader" or "merchant" (Job 41:6 ; Proverbs 31:24 , lit
Canaan - Sidon, Area, Arvad, and Zemara or Simra (Genesis 15:19-21) originally were Canaanite; afterward they fell under the Phoenicians, who were immigrants into Syria from the shores of the Persian gulf, peaceable traffickers, skillful in navigation and the arts, and unwar-like except by sea. Contrast Israel and the Ishmaelite Arabs with the Hamitic Egypt, Babylon, Sidon, etc. ) The Canaanites' first settlement in Palestine was on the Mediterranean, in the region of Tyre and Sidon; thence they spread throughout the land. ; the plain of Sharon and seashore between Jaffa and Carmel; that of Esdraelon, or Jezreel, behind the bay of Acta; that of Phoenicia containing Tyre and Sidon (Numbers 13:29). ...
So too, Genesis 10:18-20, the border of the Canaanites was the seashore from Sidon on the N. So we find them in the upper Jordan valley at Bethshean, Esdraelon (Jezreel), Taanach, Ibleam, Megiddo, the Sharon plain, Dor, the Phoenician Accho and Sidon (Joshua 17:16; Judges 1:19; Judges 4:3
Ship - North of Mt Carmel, however, there were good harbours at Tyre and Sidon
Friends Friendship - Paul in an hour of peril at Ephesus, Acts 27:3 friends of the same Apostle at Sidon; Acts 12:20 reveals Blastus in the character of ‘a friend at court. The ‘friends’ at Sidon whom St
Rama - On Asher's boundary between Tyre and Sidon; a Rama is still three miles E
Tower - A good representation of one in the neighbourhood of Sidon is given in the Polychrome Bible (‘Judges,’ p
Mirror - Glass mirrors coated with tin, of which there was a manufactory at Sidon (Pliny, Historia Naturalis (Pliny) xxxvi
zi'Don, - Its Hebrew name, Tsidon , signifies fishing or fishery . From a biblical point of view this city is inferior in interest to its neighbor Tyre; though in early times Sidon was the more influential of the two cities
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal, or Ithobal, king of Sidon and priest of Astarte, who had murdered Phelles his predecessor (Josephus contra Apion, 1:18) and restored order in Tyre after a period of anarchy
Portion - the ‘parts’ or districts (τὰ μέρη) belonging to Galilee (Matthew 2:22), of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21), of Caesarea (Matthew 16:13), of Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10)
Cosmopolitanism - The presence of foreigners, however, is seldom mentioned in the Gospels, save for a few references to centurions (Matthew 8:5, Luke 7:2; Luke 23:47), strangers from Tyre and Sidon (Mark 3:8), a short journey to Decapolis (Mark 7:31, where, strangely enough, the Aramaic word ‘Ephphatha’ finds special place in the text), and the notice of the Greeks who sought for Jesus at the feast—though no account of His interview with them is given (John 12:20). , Luke 13:29 ‘many shall come from the east and the west … but the sons of the kingdom shall be cast forth’; and Matthew 11:21, Luke 10:13, where the unrepentant Bethsaida and Chorazin are contrasted with Tyre and Sidon)
Cyprus - Tyre and Sidon were the center of Phoenician trade, and the Old Testament underscores the connection between these cities and Cyprus in several passages (Isaiah 23:1-2 , Isaiah 23:12 ; Ezekiel 27:4-9 )
Fish, Fishing - Fish caught in the Mediterranean were brought to ports such as Tyre and Sidon
Hananiah - Judah already had designed a league with Edom, Ammon, Moab, Tyre, and Sidon against Babylon
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - The enemies Tyre, Sidon, the Philistines, Edom, and Egypt (Joel 3:4; Joel 3:19), are types of the last confederacy under antichrist (Revelation 16; Revelation 17; Revelation 19), which shall assail restored Israel and shall be judged by Jehovah
Ashtaroth - In addition to her worship by the Canaanites, the Old Testament mentions the people of Sidon (1 Kings 11:5 ) and the Philistines (1 Samuel 31:10 ) as reverencing her
Tyre - But, along with the sister-city of Sidon, it still retained its commercial prosperity, though they had now a very formidable rival in Alexandria
Lebanon - Along with the older port of Sidon, it was one of the centers of Phoenician civilization
Fierceness - They are a ‘faithless and perverse generation,’ or ‘a wicked and adulterous generation’ seeking after a visible and tangible sign of spiritual things (Matthew 16:4); they shall lose the Kingdom of God (Matthew 21:43); the heathen of Nineveh shall show themselves better judges of eternal realities (Luke 11:32); there is more hope for Tyre and Sidon (Luke 10:14) or for Sodom and Gomorrah than for the spiritually blind (Matthew 10:15); ‘Ye are of your father the devil’ (John 8:44)
Ezekiel - From the beginning of the twenty-fifth to the end of the thirty- second chapter, the prophet foretels the conquest and ruin of many nations and cities, which had insulted the Jews in their affliction; of the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Edomites, and Philistines; of Tyre, of Sidon, and Egypt; all of which were to be punished by the same mighty instrument of God's wrath against the wickedness of man; and in these prophecies he not only predicts events which were soon to take place, but he also describes the condition of these several countries in the remote periods of the world
Month - "Bul" is mentioned on a sarcophagus found near Sidon in 1855
Hebrew Language - The choice of essentially the same language as that of commercial Sidon and Tyre for the divine revelation was a providential arrangement for diffusing the knowledge of His law widely among the Gentiles
Sodom - The two former He compares with Tyre and Sidon; and to the latter He uses somewhat similar language in referring to Sodom: ‘for if in Sodom had been done the mighty works (δυνάμεις) which are being done in thee [2], it would be remaining until to-day
Decapolis - When our Lord returned from Tyre and Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, He crossed the upper Jordan and passed south through the district governed by the tetrarch Philip to the eastern shore of the Lake
Canaan; Canaanite - And the border of the Canaanites was from Sidon, as thou comest to Gerar, unto Gaza; as thou goest, unto Sodom, and Gomorrah,
Division of the Earth - Its western border, along the Mediterranean Sea, extended from Sidon, Southward, to Gaza; its southern border from thence, eastward, to Sodom and Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboim, the cities of the plain, afterward covered by the Dead Sea, or Asphaltite Lake; its eastern border extending from thence northward, to Laish, Dan, or the springs of the Jordan; and its northern border, from thence to Sidon, westward. Of Canaan's sons, Sidon, the eldest, occupied the north-west corner, and built the town of that name, so early celebrated for her luxury and commerce in Scripture, Judges 18:7 ; 1 Kings 5:6 ; and by Homer, who calls the Sidonians, πολυδαιδαλοι , skilled in many arts. And Tyre, so flourishing afterward, though boasting of her own antiquity, Isaiah 23:7 , is styled, "a daughter of Sidon," or a colony from thence, Isaiah 5:12
Assyria - He also brought under tribute Jehu, and the cities of Tyre and Sidon
Crowd - Jerusalem, Judaea, Idumaea, and from the district round Tyre and Sidon; the whole country was moved (Matthew 4:25, Mark 3:7-9, Luke 6:17-19)
Touch - ...
The next day we touched at Sidon
Zedeki'ah - Jerusalem seems to have taken the lead, since in the fourth year of Zedekiah's reign we find ambassadors from all the neighboring kingdoms --Tyre, Sidon, Edom and Moab --at his court to consult as to the steps to be taken
Elijah - Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Sidon and Tyre (1 Kings 16:31 ), was Ahab's wife and Israel's queen
Caesarea - ...
Because of the lack of natural harbor between Sidon and Egypt, a Sidonian king, Abdashtart established an anchorage in the 4th century B
Mark, Gospel by - For Himself ( Mark 7 ) He retired to the north-west into the district of Tyre and Sidon, and healed the daughter of the Syrophenician woman — His grace thus going out to the Gentiles
Jezebel - She was daughter of the king-priest of the Phoenician cities Tyre and Sidon, and set out to make Phoenician Baalism the official religion of Israel
Lebanon - It ran parallel to the coast, leaving only a narrow coastal plain for the Phoenician cities, most important of which were Tyre and Sidon (see PHOENICIA)
Zebulun - Jacob’s Song, however, uses the same expression ( Genesis 49:13 ) as is used of Asher in Judges 5:17 , and apparently extends the border to Sidon
Phoenicia - Today the land falls largely within the country known as Lebanon, though the Bible most commonly refers to it by the names of its chief towns, Tyre and Sidon (Ezra 3:7)
Ezekiel - ...
After recording a number of judgments against foreign nations – Ammon, Moab, Edom, Philistia (25:1-17), Tyre (26:1-28:19), Sidon (28:20-26), Egypt (29:1-32:32) – Ezekiel spoke of a new phase in his work, namely, the building up of the people in preparation for the return from exile (33:1-20)
Canaan - The territory stretched along the Mediterranean coast from Phoenicia (Sidon) in the north to Philistia (Gaza) in the south, and extended inland to the hills of Syria and the valley of the Jordan River (Genesis 10:15-19)
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - He then went on to Sidon. ...
(4) In Sidon. -On the road to Sidon there is an incident connected with a heathen altar, and the power of Christians over the demons or heathen gods, but there is unfortunately a large lacuna in the text. In Sidon there is an incident which apparently is concerned with unnatural vice, and Paul and other Christians were shut up in the temple of Apollo
Damascus - Standing 2300 feet above sea level, it lay northeast of Mount Hermon and about 60 miles east of Sidon, the Mediterranean port city
Zidon - ZIDON (NT Sidon )
Pharaoh - He took Gaza of the Philistines (Jeremiah 47:1), and made himself master of Philistia and most of Phoenicia; attacked Sidon, and fought by sea with Tyre; and "so firmly did he think himself established in his kingdom that he believed not even a god could east hint down" (Herodotus ii
Agrippa - Here the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon waited on him to sue for peace. The rising sun darted his golden beams thereon, and gave it such a lustre as dazzled the eyes of the spectators; and when the king began his speech to the Tyrians and Sidonians, the parasites around him began to say, it was "the voice of a god and not of man
Philistines - The Sidonian king Eshmunazar claims that Dor and Joppa were added to the dominions of Sidon
Obadiah - ...
Expanding southward, westward, eastward, and northward, they shall acquire additionally Edom, Philistia, and northern Canaan to Zarephath (Sarepta near Sidon)
Lebanon - Jackals, gazelles, hyænas, wolves, bears, and panthers (in order of commonness) are found and, inland from Sidon, the coney ( Hyrax ) abounds
Ptolemae'us, - "So the king of the north [1] came, and cast up a mount, and took the most fenced city [2], and the arms of the south did not withstand" Joel - The freshness of style, the absence of allusion to the great empires Assyria and Babylon, and the mention of Tyre, Sidon, and the Philistines (Joel 3:4) as God's executioners of judgment on Israel, accord with an early date, probably Uzziah's reign or even Joash's reign
Caesarea Philippi - The decision which led to the retirement into the region of Tyre and Sidon must have been confirmed by His experience on returning to Galilee. ...
Jesus’ first retirement is into the region of Tyre and Sidon, part of the Roman province of Syria. They had seen opposition arise and develop into bitter hostility; but when Jesus withdrew into the region of Tyre and Sidon, and again into the region of Caesarea Philippi, they still companied with Him
Galilee - Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the north; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south
Joshua, the Book of - The only Phoenicians mentioned are the Sidonians, reckoned with the Canaanites as doomed to destruction; but in David's time Tyre takes the lead of Sidon, and is in treaty with David (Joshua 13:4-6; 2 Samuel 5:11)
Philoxenus, a Monophysite Leader - This synod of about 80 bishops met at Sidon early in 512, under the joint presidency of Philoxenus and Soterichus of the Cappadocian Caesarea
Canaan - His eldest son, Sidon, founded the city of Sidon, and was father of the Sidonians and Phenicians. The territory of Tyre and Sidon was its ancient border on the north-west; the range of the Libanus and Anti-libanus forms a natural boundary on the north and north-east; while in the south it is pressed upon by the Syrian and Arabian deserts
Palestine - ...
From an early period the land was inhabited by the descendants of Canaan, who retained possession of the whole land "from Sidon to Gaza" till the time of the conquest by Joshua, when it was occupied by the twelve tribes
Gentiles (2) - Moreover, it was in the same Gentile-infected Galilee that the most important part of His ministry was carried on, and He even went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon (Mark 7:24), and also taught and healed those who came to Him from thence, together with those who sought Him from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25), and from Idumaea, and from beyond Jordan (Mark 3:8); nor did He disdain to remain on one occasion for two days among the Samaritans at their request (John 4:40)
Zedekiah - of the reign of Zedekiah") The kings of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Sidon sent ambassadors in his fourth year to urge Zedekiah to conspire with them against Nebuchadnezzar
Commerce - The first metropolis of the Phenicians was Sidon; afterward Tyre became the principal city
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - His decision for some nations, such as Tyre, Sidon, Moab, Philistia, and Assyria, will be punishment (Joel 3:4-13 ; cf. Joel graphically depicts a roll call of Tyre, Sidon, and Philistia
Ministry - (d) Into Phœnicia, ‘the region of Tyre and Sidon,’ He went at least once (Matthew 15:21, Mark 7:24). Tyre and Sidon
Herod - The latter is more detailed, and yet omits to mention the deputation from Tyre and Sidon who sought reconciliation with King Agrippa through the good offices of his chamberlain
Judea - The portion of Asher comprehended the maritime tract between Mount Carmel, as far as Sidon. Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district
Euric, King of Toulouse - Beside his Vandalic auxiliaries in Gaul, Euric also had the support of a certain party among the provincials themselves, as is shewn by the evidence given at the trial of Arvandus, prefect of the Gauls, for treasonable correspondence with the Goths (Sidon. of Clermont, Sidonius Apollinaris (Sid. The history of this dramatic struggle, preserved in the letters of Sidonius, throws valuable light on the politics of the 5th cent. After besieging Clermont in 474, Euric withdrew into winter quarters, while Sidonius and Ecdicius, in the midst of devastated country, organized fresh resistance. Glycerius, fearful for Italy, and hoping to purchase a renewal of the foedus, had in 473 formally ceded the country to Euric, a compact rejected by Ecdicius and Sidonius; and now Nepos, for the same reasons, sent legates to Euric, amongst them the famous Epiphanius of Pavia (Ennod. 5), Ecdicius and Sidonius were ordered to submit, and the district was given over to the revenge of the Goths. Ecdicius fled to the Burgundians, while Sidonius (see Ep. 9, Sidonius has left us a brilliant picture of the Gothic king, surrounded by barbarian envoys, Roman legates, and even Persian ambassadors. Even his bitterest enemy, Sidonius, speaks of his courage and capacity with unwilling admiration. "Pre-eminent in war, of fiery courage and vigorous youth," says Sidonius ("armis potens, acer animis, alacer annis," Ep. The letter of Sidonius quoted above throws great light upon Euric's relation to the Catholic church, and upon the state of the church under his government. Finally, Sidonius implores the aid of Basilius, the position of whose bishopric made him diplomatically important ("per vos mala foederum currunt, per vos regni utriusque pacta conditionesque portantur") towards obtaining for the Catholics from the Gothic government the right of ordaining bishops, that "so we may keep our hold upon the people of the Gauls, if not ex foedere , at least ex fide . echoed and exaggerated the account of Sidonius, and all succeeding Catholic writers have accused Euric of the same intolerant persecution of the church
Dead - " Our Lord alludes to the same custom, in that denunciation: "Wo unto thee, Chorazin! wo unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon
City - To the north of Galilee again lay the Phœnician cities of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21)
Commerce - The Phoenician seaports of Tyre and Sidon also had their resident alien communities, adding to the cosmopolitan nature of these cities and facilitating the transmission of culture and ideas
Judgment, Day of - He himself had a similar message for the people of Chorazin and Bethsaida: It will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon on judgment day than for them (Matthew 11:22 ; Luke 10:14 )
Trade And Commerce - The purple dyes of Tyre and Sidon are constantly referred to in ancient literature (cf. 139, ‘qua pretiosa Tyros rubeat, qua purpura suco Sidoniis iterata cadis,’ and especially Mayor on Juvenal, Sat. Artistic work in glass was also associated with Sidon, and throughout Syria fine linen (Luke 16:19, Revelation 18:12; Revelation 18:16; Revelation 19:8; Revelation 19:14) was woven from the flax of the country
Seventy (2) - By the time, however, that the Seventy were sent forth, Christ Himself had gone into ‘the borders of Tyre and Sidon’ (in addition to His earlier visit to Samaria), and had healed the Syrophœnician’s daughter (Mark 7:24)
Zebedee - It is described as πόλις ἀνδρῶν, and was said to have houses like those of Tyre, Sidon, and Berytus, and to possess all sorts of good things (BJ ii
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - In the same connexion He makes reference to the fate of Tyre and Sidon. Another reference to the history of the same prophet is-that to his visit to the widow of Sidon in the time of the great famine (Luke 4:25 f
Transportation And Travel - As a result, an additional journey overland was required to transport agricultural and other trade goods to and from the ports of Ezion-geber (1 Kings 9:26-28 ) on the Red Sea and the Phoenician ports of Tyre and Sidon to the cities of Israel
Nineveh - " His son Shalmaneser II took tribute from Tyre and Sidon and fought Benhadad and Hazael
Tongues, Confusion of - The ethnological character of the genealogy (Genesis 10) appears in such gentilie forms as Ludim, Jebusite, and geographical and local names as Mizraim, Sidon; as also from the formula "after their families, after their tongues, in their countries, and in their nations" (Genesis 10:5; Genesis 10:20; Genesis 10:31)
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ...
The Book of Kings recounts that Jezebel used the plan of the Baal temple in Sidon for the construction of a similar temple in Samaria
Abraham - Tyre and Sidon were never conquered; therefore the complete fulfillment remains for the millennial state, when "the meek shall inherit the land," and Psalms 72:8-10 shall be realized; compare Luke 20:37
Assyria, History And Religion of - Carmel received tribute from Tyre, Sidon, and King Jehu of Israel
Palestine - But, so far as we know, Jesus visited it only once, when He retreated to the coasts of Tyre and Sidon from the Pharisees who had followed Him from Jerusalem. It was natural that the part of the sea-coast to which He went for concealment should have been that of Tyre and Sidon
Judges, the Book of - Tyre on the contrary took the lead in David's time; moreover Tyre and Sidon were his allies, not enemies
Greece, Religion And Society of - During this era the Greeks established trade colonies on the shores of the Black Sea, the region of the Dardanelles, on the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea, the islands of Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Sidon and Tyre, Naucratis in the Nile delta, Italy, Sicily, and Spain
Man (2) - Had Tyre and Sidon seen the things which they had seen, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes (Matthew 11:21)
Palestine - Coastal plain This very fertile plain begins ten to twelve miles south of Gaza, just north of the Egyptian border, and stretches northward to the Sidon-Tyre area
Tribes of Israel, the - The blessing of Jacob speaks of Zebulun's territory including “the shore of the sea,” presumably the Mediterranean Sea, and “his border shall be at Sidon,” (Genesis 49:13 NRSV) a city on the coast north of Mount Carmel
Canaan, History And Religion of - Genesis 10:15-20 clarifies the implications of this Hamitic descent in the sons of Canaan: Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgasites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Si-nites, the Arvadites, and Zemarites, and the Hamathites
War, Holy War - ...
Practices of Jezebel, Ahab's wife from Sidon, shows what happens when just one Canaanite occupies a place of authority
Persecution - The bishops of Nicomedia, of Tyre, of Sidon, of Emesa, several matrons and virgins of the purest character, and a nameless number of plebeians, arrived at immortality through the flames of martyrdom
Redemption (2) - He does not hesitate to speak of the fire of Gehenna (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:29-30, and of God, who is able to destroy both soul and body in Gehenna (Matthew 10:28); of the worm that dieth not, and the fire that is not quenched (Mark 9:44; Mark 9:46; Mark 9:48); of the judgment, less tolerable than that upon Tyre and Sidon, or even Sodom, which awaits cities like Capernaum (Matthew 11:20-24); of a blasphemy against the Holy Spirit which shall not be forgiven, either in this world, or in that to come (Matthew 12:31-32 ||)
Money (2) - The supply of silver from the mints at Tyre and Sidon, which continued to issue tetradrachms and didrachms under the Emperors,* Palestine - ( a ) The first of these is the Maritime Plain running along the coast of the Mediterranean from the neighbourhood of Sidon and Tyre southward, and disappearing only at the promontory of Carmel
Herod - The authorities of Tyre and Sidon offended him, "but came with one accord and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace because their country" was dependent on the king's country for grain, etc
Money - ’...
In this period, however, the wealthy commercial cities on the Phœnician seaboard Aradus, Sidon, Tyre, and others acquired the right of issuing silver coins, which they naturally did on the native standard
Temple - where the foundations rest on the rock itself, are pronounced by Deutseh to have been cut or painted when the stones were first laid in their present places, and to be Phoenician letters, numerals, and masons' quarry signs; some are well known Phoenician characters, others such as occur in the primitive substructions of the Sidon harbour
Elijah - The brook having dried up after a year's stay he retreated next to Zarephath or Sarepta, between Tyre and Sidon, where least of all, in Jezebel's native region, his enemies would have suspected him to lie hid
Roads And Travel - from Damascus there was a road passing through Caesarea Paneas to Tyre, and another to Sidon
Simon Magus - Peter followed him to Tyre and to Sidon and to Tripolis, whence Simon escaped to Syria