What does Shimei mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
שִׁמְעִ֥י a Benjamite 4
שִׁמְעִ֖י a Benjamite 4
שִׁמְעִֽי a Benjamite 4
שִׁמְעִ֗י a Benjamite 3
וְשִׁמְעִ֣י a Benjamite 3
וְשִׁמְעִֽי a Benjamite 3
שִׁמְעִ֤י a Benjamite 2
שִׁמְעִ֔י a Benjamite 2
וְשִׁמְעִ֑י a Benjamite 2
לְשִׁמְעִ֔י a Benjamite 2
שִׁמְעִ֣י a Benjamite 1
וְשִׁמְעִ֗י a Benjamite 1
וְשִׁמְעִ֖י a Benjamite 1
שִׁמְעִ֛י a Benjamite 1
שִׁמְעִ֑י a Benjamite 1
וְשִׁמְעִ֡י a Benjamite 1
וִֽ֠ישַׁעְיָהוּ the major prophet 1
וְשִׁמְעִ֥י a Benjamite 1
לְשִׁמְעִ֗י a Benjamite 1
שִׁמְעִ֧י a Benjamite 1
לְשִׁמְעִי֙ a Benjamite 1
שִֽׁמְעִ֨י a Benjamite 1
וּלְשִׁמְעִ֞י a Benjamite 1
הַשִּׁמְעִי֙ descendants of Shimei or Shimi. 1

Definitions Related to Shimei

H8096


   1 a Benjamite, son of Gera of the house of Saul in the time of David.
   2 a Benjamite, son of Elah and commissariat officer in the time of Solomon.
   3 the Ramathite in charge of the vineyards of David.
   4 son of Gershon and grandson of Levi.
   5 a Levite, son of Jeduthun and chief of the 10th division of singers in the time of David.
   6 a Levite of the sons of Heman who took part in the purification of the temple in the time of king Hezekiah of Judah.
   7 a Levite, brother of Cononiah in charge of receiving the tithes and offerings in the reign of king Hezekiah of Judah.
   8 a Levite who had a foreign wife in the time of Ezra.
   9 a Judaite, son of Pedaiah and brother of Zerubbabel.
      10 a Simeonite, son of Zacchur.
      11 a Reubenite, son of Gog and father of Micah.
      12 one of the sons of Hashum who had a foreign wife in the time of Ezra.
      13 one of the sons of Bani who had a foreign wife in the time of Ezra.
      14 a Benjamite, son of Kish, father of Jair, and grandfather of Mordecai in the time of Esther.
      15 a Levite, son of Jahath, grandson of Gershon, and great grandson of Levi.
      16 Benjamite, father of Adaiah, Beraiah, and Shimrath.
      Spelled ‘Shimhi’.
      Additional Information: Shimei or Shimhi or Shimi or Shimea = “renowned”.
      

H3470


   1 the major prophet, son of Amoz, who prophesied concerning Judah and Jerusalem during the days of kings Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah; author of the prophetic book by his name; tradition has it that he was sawn asunder in the trunk of a carob tree by king Manasseh and that this is the incident referred to in Heb 11:37.
   2 son of Hananiah, brother of Pelatiah, and grandson of Zerubbabel.
   3 a Benjamite.
   4 one of the 6 sons of Jeduthun.
   5 son of Rehabiah, a descendant of Moses through Gershom, and an ancestor of a Levite treasurer in the time of David.
   6 son of Athaliah and chief of the house of Elam who returned with Ezra.
   7 a chief of the descendants of Merari who returned with Ezra.
   Additional Information: Isaiah or Jesaiah or Jeshaiah = “Jehovah has saved”.
   

H8097


   1 descendants of Shimei or Shimi.
   Additional Information: Shimites = see Shimei “renowned”.
   

Frequency of Shimei (original languages)

Frequency of Shimei (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Shimei, Shimeites
SHIMEI, SHIMEITES . Shimei was a popular name among the Hebrews, being especially common in Levitical circles. Of most of the persons bearing it, absolutely nothing except the name is known. 1 . The personage of this designation, of whom the historian has given us some details, is a Benjamite of the clan of Saul. On account of his tribal and family connexions, it is quite natural for him to be David’s bitter enemy. As the latter is fleeing before Absalom, Shimei meets him and heaps curses and insults on the fugitive monarch. David’s triumphant return, however, brings him in abject penitence to the feet of his sovereign, who pardons him ( 2 Samuel 16:5 ff; 2 Samuel 19:17 ff.). Nevertheless, David in his dying charge is represented as enjoining Solomon to ‘bring his hoar head to Sheol with blood.’ After this Shimei is not permitted to go beyond the walls of Jerusalem on pain of death; but presuming three years later to go to Gath in quest of fugitive slaves, he is executed by Benaiah at the command of the king ( 1Ki 2:8 ff., 1 Kings 2:36 ff.). 2 . In the court intrigues connected with the royal succession, a courtier, Shimei (cf. art. Rei) by name, espoused the cause of Solomon ( 1 Kings 1:8 ). The official at the head of one of the prefectures which were erected by this monarch, is probably identical with him ( 1 Kings 4:18 ). 3 . A master of the vineyards under David ( 1 Chronicles 27:27 ). 4 . A prince of the Judæan royal house, a brother of Zerubbabel ( 1 Chronicles 3:18 ). 5 . The name occurs in the tribal genealogies of both Simeon and Reuben ( 1 Chronicles 4:26-27 ; 1 Chronicles 5:4 [1]). 6 . The grandson of Levi ( Exodus 6:17 , Numbers 3:18 ; Numbers 3:21 , 1Ch 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 23:7 ; 1 Chronicles 23:9 ). 7 . A son of Merari ( 1 Chronicles 6:29 ). 8 . In the genealogy of Asaph ( 1 Chronicles 6:42 ). 9 . The tenth course of Levitical singers who were appointed by David ( 1 Chronicles 25:17 ). 10 . A Levite who took part in the cleansing of the Temple under Hezekiah, probably identical with one mentioned later as having charge of the tithes and oblations ( 2 Chronicles 29:14 ; 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 ). 11 . In post-exilic times the name appears among those who had married foreign wives ( Ezra 10:23 [2] 33. [1]5 38 [4]). The individuals referred to in 1Es 9:33 ; 1Es 9:38 belong to the laity. In Zechariah 12:13 the family of the Shimeites are mentioned as participants in the mourning for national guilt; they appear in this connexion as representatives of the Levites. 12 . The name occurs in the genealogy of Mordecai ( Esther 2:5 [5]). 13 . Shammah, the brother of David, appears as Shimei in 2 Samuel 21:21 . 2 Samuel 21:14 . 1 Chronicles 8:21 = Shema of v. 18. James A. Kelso.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Shimei
Famous.
A son of Gershon, and grandson of Levi (Numbers 3:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:17,29 ); called Shimi in Exodus 6:17 .
A Benjamite of the house of Saul, who stoned and cursed David when he reached Bahurim in his flight from Jerusalem on the occasion of the rebellion of Absalom (2 Samuel 16:5-13 ). After the defeat of Absalom he "came cringing to the king, humbly suing for pardon, bringing with him a thousand of his Benjamite tribesmen, and representing that he was heartily sorry for his crime, and had hurried the first of all the house of Israel to offer homage to the king" (19:16-23). David forgave him; but on his death-bed he gave Solomon special instructions regarding Shimei, of whose fidelity he seems to have been in doubt (1 Kings 2:8,9 ). He was put to death at the command of Solomon, because he had violated his word by leaving Jerusalem and going to Gath to recover two of his servants who had escaped (36-46).
One of David's mighty men who refused to acknowledge Adonijah as David's successor (1 Kings 1:8 ). He is probably the same person who is called elsewhere (4:18) "the son of Elah."
A son of Pedaiah, the brother of Zerubbabel (1 Chronicles 3:19 ).
A Simeonite (1 Chronicles 4:26,27 ).
A Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:4 ).
A Levite of the family of Gershon (1 Chronicles 6:42 ).
A Ramathite who was "over the vineyards" of David (1 Chronicles 27:27 ).
One of the sons of Heman, who assisted in the purification of the temple (2 Chronicles 29:14 ).
A Levite (2 Chronicles 31:12,13 ).
Another Levite (Ezra 10:23 ). "The family of Shimei" (Zechariah 12:13 ; RSV, "the family of the Shimeites") were the descendants of Shimei (1).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Shimei
(sshih meh' i) Personal name meaning, “my being heard.” 1. Grandson of Levi and head of Levitical family (Exodus 6:17 ; Numbers 3:18 ; compare 1 Chronicles 6:42 ). 2 . A Levite (1 Chronicles 23:9 if the text does not represent duplication in copying as some commentators suggest; compare 1 Chronicles 23:10 ). 3 . Relative of King Saul who cursed and opposed David as he fled from Absalom (2 Samuel 16:1 ). When David returned after Absalom's death, Shimei met him and pleaded for forgiveness and mercy, which David granted because of the festive occasion (2 Samuel 19:1 ). Solomon followed David's advice and had Shimei slain (1 Kings 2:1 ).
4. Court personality who refused to support Adonijah against Solomon (1 Kings 1:8 ). 5 . District supervisor in territory of Benjamin responsible for supplying Solomon's court one month each year (1 Kings 4:18 ); he could be identical with 4. above. 6. Ancestor of Mordecai, the cousin of Esther (Esther 2:5 ). 7 . Brother of Zerubbabel (1 Chronicles 3:19 ). 8 . Member of tribe of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:26 ). 9 . Member of tribe of Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:4 ). 10 . A Levite (1 Chronicles 6:29 ). 11 . A Benjaminite (1 Chronicles 8:21 ; apparently identical with Shema in 1 Chronicles 8:13 ). 12 . Temple musician under David (1 Chronicles 25:17 ; perhaps also in 1 Chronicles 25:3 with a Hebrew manuscript and some Greek manuscripts as in NRSV, REB, NAS, NIV, TEV). 13. Supervisor of David's vineyards ( 1 Chronicles 27:27 ). 14 . and 15. Two Levites under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14 ; 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 ). 16 . Levite married to a foreign woman under Ezra (Ezra 10:23 ). 17 . and 18. Two Jews married to foreign women under Ezra (Ezra 10:33 ,Ezra 10:33,10:38 ).
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Shimei
There were several of this name in the Old Testament. (2 Samuel 16:5, etc. 1 Kings 1:8; 1 Chronicles 4:27, etc.) The name seems to be derived from Shamaah, fame—and the post-fix pronoun makes it, my fame.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Shimei
1. Son of Gershon, the son of Levi. Numbers 3:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 23:7,9,10 . Called SHIMI in Exodus 6:17 .
2. Son of Gera, a Benjamite, of the house of Saul: he cursed David, calling him 'a man of Belial,' and threw stones and dust at him, when he was hastening from Jerusalem at the rebellion of Absalom; but made submission on David's return, and was not then punished. David at his death reminded Solomon of Shimei's wickedness, for he had cursed the Lord's anointed king. Solomon promised Shimei his life on the condition that he did not go out of Jerusalem; but he broke the compact and was put to death. 2 Samuel 16:5-13 ; 2 Samuel 19:18-23 ; 1 Kings 2:8-46 .
3. Officer of David who kept aloof from Adonijah on his usurpation. 1 Kings 1:8 .
4. Son of Elah and one of Solomon's commissariat officers. 1 Kings 4:18 .
5. Son of Pedaiah, a son of Jeconiah. 1 Chronicles 3:19 .
6. Son of Zacchur, of the tribe of Simeon. 1 Chronicles 4:26 27 .
7. Son of Gog, of the tribe of Reuben. 1 Chronicles 5:4 .
8. Son of Libni, a Merarite. 1 Chronicles 6:29 .
9. Son of Jahath, a son of Gershon. 1 Chronicles 6:42 .
10. Chief of the tenth course in the service of song. 1 Chronicles 25:17 .
11. The Ramathite who was over the vineyards of David. 1 Chronicles 27:27 .
12. Son of Heman: he took part in the purification of the temple. 2 Chronicles 29:14 .
13. Levite who had charge of the offerings. 2 Chronicles 31:12,13 .
14. Levite who had married a strange wife. Ezra 10:23 .
15,16. Two who had married strange wives. Ezra 10:33,38 .
17. Son of Kish, a Benjamite, and grandfather of Mordecai. Esther 2:5 .
18. A family who will mourn apart on the repentance of Jerusalem. Zechariah 12:13 . This is by some associated with No. 1; but SIMEONis read in the margin, and in the LXX, the Arabic and Syriac versions. See under ZECHARIAH, Zechariah 12 .
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Shimei
AND DAVID SAID, LET HIM ALONE, LET HIM CURSE
SHIMEI was a reptile of the royal house of Saul. When Shimei saw David escaping for his life out of Jerusalem, Satan entered into Shimei, and he came forth and cursed at David as he passed by. And he cast stones at David, and cried, Thou bloody man, thou man of Belial, he cried. The Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul. Behold, thou art taken in thy wickedness, because thou art a bloody man. Why should that dead dog curse the king in that way? said Abishai to David. Let me go over and take off his head. But the king answered to Abishai, So let him curse, because the Lord hath said unto him, Curse David. Let him alone, and let him curse, for the Lord hath bidden him. And still as David went on his way, Shimei also went along on the hillside over against David, and he cursed as he went, and he threw stones at David and cast dust. But David held his peace; for David had said to Abishai, It is the Lord.
Political and ecclesiastical party spirit turn us all, on occasion, into reptiles like Shimei. Shimei knew as well as you do that David had never shed a single drop of Saul's blood. So far from that, David's men were astonished and offended at David that he had let Saul go scot-free again and again when he had him in his power. And Shimei knew that quite well. But Shimei hated the truth that he knew. It was not Shimei's interest to admit the truth that he knew. He would not let the truth light on his mind for one moment, especially about David. Nothing was right that David did. Everything was wrong that David had any hand in. If you had a word to say for David, Shimei would follow you about also with curses and stones and dust. Shimei had everything to expect from Saul, and he knew that he had nothing to expect from David; and, therefore, David was a bloody man and a son of Belial. You know Shimei. At any rate, all who know you intimately know Shimei. Charity seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth. But you never yet knew a fierce political or ecclesiastical partisan who had charity. When our political and ecclesiastical partisans begin to have charity we shall no longer need to offer the Lord's prayer every day, and say, Thy kingdom come.
Abishai looked up and saw a dead dog barking and biting out of his own kennel-door in Bahurim that day. But it was the Lord to David. David had nothing to do with the fall of Saul on Mount Gilboa; but the fall of Uriah in the front of the battle before Rabbah was ever before David, and never more so than it was that day as he crossed the Kedron, and passed through Gethsemane, and descended upon Bahurim. So let him curse, for the Lord hath said to him, Curse David. To such a divine use was Shimei put of God that greatest day of David's life. For Shimei that day perfected the good work on David that Absalom and Ahithophel had so well begun. Shimei was David's crowning means of grace that day. That day adorns and seals all David's psalms, and it was Shimei that did it. David had only to point with his finger to the hillside, and Shimei's insult and injury would have ceased for ever. But what profit would Shimei's blood have been to David? David had more sense. David had more grace. David knew himself better than that. And he knew God better than that. There is a Shimei that you wish he were dead. He is such a trial and torment to you. He so hampers and hinders you. He is such a rival to you. He is such a thorn in your pillow, and such a crook in your lot, and such a cross on which you are crucified, and are to be crucified, every day you live. You count up how old he is, and you promise yourself to have so many years of relief and enjoyment after he is in his grave. Oh no! Oh no! Let him live. Let his doctor lengthen his days. Let his bow long abide in its strength. Let him see all the days of his fathers. Let him close your eyes. Let him stand over your grave. Let him inherit your substance. Let him live long after you and rejoice in your portion. For it is the Lord. It is your salvation. And who, then, shall say to the Lord, Why hast Thou done this? Shall the thing formed say to Him that formed it, Why hast Thou made me thus? O the depth both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments, and His ways past finding out! For who hath known the mind of the Lord. Or who hath been His counsellor?
Now, what is true of bad men is equally true of all our other bad surroundings, and all our other adverse circumstances, as we call them. For they also are all set of God, and kept of God, and made of God to operate on us for a good use. God sets to each one of us all the special surroundings, good and evil, of our several lives. It is too high for us to attain to and to understand. How He can do that to you, and to me, and to all other men, as much as to you and me, that surpasses us. But over-work and difficulty and impossibility are only true of men; they are not true of God. The Divine Nature is not like human nature; at least, not in things like that. God is everywhere, and He is wholly everywhere; and all His power, and all His wisdom, and all His grace, and all His truth, are with, and for, and around, and within every man. And thus it is that He sets every man's circumstances to him, good and bad, as much and as well as if He had no other man on His hand in earth or in heaven. When Almighty God creates another soul; when He elects to eternal life another new sinner; when He regenerates and begins to sanctify another new saint, He, from that moment, besets him behind and before, and lays His hand upon him. And when we awake to all that, we fall in with it all with unceasing wonder and with unceasing thanksgiving. O Lord, Thou hast searched me, and known me. Thou compassest my path and my lying down, and art acquainted with all my ways. Whither shall I flee from Thy Spirit? How precious, also, are Thy thoughts unto me, O God! How great is the sum of them! He believes nothing who does not believe that. He knows nothing who does not know that. He has not begun to live who lives not always under that. And he will soon come to see God in everything that befalls him; and not God only, but God his Sanctifier and his Saviour. And then he will not let one atom of his most adverse circumstances be altered, lest he should thereby lose something of his full salvation. And when any of his friends, for his protection, or for his peace, or for his comfort would fain remove out of his life aught that tempts and tries him; aught that tramples on him and humbles him; aught that plagues him and vexes him and leads him into sin, like David to Abishai at Bahurim he says to him, Let it alone, for it is the Lord. You say to me rare things about design, and adaptation, and environment, and means to ends, and final causes, and what not; and you both astonish and edify me. But if you fear God, and come, I will tell you how He environs my soul, and how He adapts you and all you say and do, to the good of my soul. If you could see and study my soul, even as I see it and study it, you would see something to make a science out of it. You would see a design and an end and a final cause, the greatest and the best-your soul under sanctification and mine-a final cause and an end next to God Himself. You would see all things in my world and in my generation, all working together upon me for my good. And all so secretly, so exquisitely, so intricately, so surely, and so infallibly working together of God. No. If you love my soul and its salvation, you must not alter by a single hair's breadth any single thing of all my circumstances; not, at least, till you are sure that I have got its divine end and design out of it. Especially not my trying, and tempting, and searching, and sifting, and sanctifying circumstances. And least of all Absalom and Ahithophel and Shimei. Every hour of every day; every man I meet; every word that enters my ear; every sight that enters my eye; all my thoughts within me that like a case of knives wounds my heart-it is all the Lord! If this life were all, then, I admit, it might be different. If you denied the resurrection of the body and the immortality of the soul, then I could understand you. But I cannot understand a man who believes in the sanctification and the eternal life of his own soul escaping the only and sure path of life like that. It is the Lord, and He is set upon my salvation. He is set upon my humility, my submissiveness, my meekness, my gentleness, my resignation, my contentment, my detachment, my self-denial, my cross, my death to sin, my death to myself, my unearthliness, my heavenly-mindedness, my conformity to Christ, and my acceptance of Him-and what a splendid use is all that to which to put all the things that otherwise would be so much against me! And David said to Abishai, and to all his servants, Let this Benjamite alone, and let him curse; for the Lord hath bidden him. It may be that the Lord will look upon mine affliction. And as David and his men went by the way, Shimei went on the hill's side over against David, and cursed David, and threw stones at him, and cast dust.
The magnificent use to which God puts the greatest of all His people's evils must not be attempted before a common congregation. Had we an elect-enough and a sympathetic-enough audience, this would make a splendid subject for the evening of the Lord's day. But we would need to have before us only the heavenly-minded, and the much-exercised, and the teachable, and the child-like; while all the frivolous and the captious, and all those given to disputes and debates about divine things should stay at home. There are plenty of materials for this great head of our subject lying scattered over the whole face of Holy Scripture. And the great masters have sometimes taken up this subject, after Holy Scripture. Samuel Rutherford, for example, comes often upon it in his Letters and in all his books. But after he has said all that it is possible to say upon it, he exclaims, Oh! what a deep is here, that created wit cannot take up! Jonathan Edwards takes it up with all his matchless wit in his fine letter to Thomas Gillespie of Carnock, and elsewhere in his golden works. And what do you say to Shakespeare himself?
O benefit of ill! now I find trueThat better is by evil still made better!And ruined love, when it is built anew,Grows fairer than at first, more strong, far greater.So I return rebuked to my content,And gain by ill thrice more than I have spent.And then, of death, the wages of sin. Can any good be said of death? Yes; by the proper man.Death,' says Thomas Shepard, 'is the very best of all our gospel ordinances. For in all His other ordinances Christ comes, on occasion, to us; but in a believer's death Christ takes us to be for ever with Him.' A fair specimen of Shepard. And, to bind up this bold anthology with George Herbert:
Death, thou wert once an uncouth, hideous thing,Nothing but bones.But since our Saviour's death did put some bloodInto thy face;Thou art grown fair and full of grace,Much in request, much sought for as a good.This brings us to David's deathbed; and David's deathbed has never been without its own difficulties to thoughtful and reverential readers. For Shimei with all his good and all his bad uses comes back again to David's deathbed to tempt and to try David, and to discover what is in David's dying heart. The deathbed sayings of God's saints have a special interest and a delightful edification to us; but David's last words to Solomon about Shimei-we would pass them by if we could. Three or four several explanations of those terrible words of David have been offered to the distressed reader by able men and men of authority in such matters. I shall only mention some of those offered explanations, and leave you to judge for yourselves. Well, some students of the Old Testament are bold to take David's dreadful words about Shimei out of David's mouth altogether, and to put them into the mouth of the prophet who has preserved to us David's life and death. Those awful words, they say, are that righteous prophet's explanation and vindication of the too late execution of Shimei by Solomon after his reprieve had come to an end with the death of David. Others, again, and they, too, some of our most conservative and orthodox scholars, say to us that the text should run in English in this way: 'Hold him not guiltless; at the same time bring not his hoar head down to the grave with blood.' You will blame me for my too open ear to such bold scholarship; and you will think it very wrong in me to listen to such bad men. But the heart has its reasons, as Pascal says, and my heart would stretch a considerable point in textual criticism to get Shimei's blood wiped off David's deathbed. Another interpretation is to take the text as it stands, and to hear David judicially charging Solomon about a case of too long delayed justice against a blasphemer of God and the king. And then the last explanation is the most painful one of all, and it is this, that David had never really and truly, and at the bottom of his heart, forgiven Shimei for his brutality and malignity at Bahurim. And that all David's long-suppressed revenge rushed out of his heart against his old enemy when he lay on his bed and went back on the day on which he had fled from Jerusalem. You can choose your own way of looking at David's deathbed. But, in any case, it is Bahurim that we shall all carry home, and carry for ever henceforth, in our hearts. We shall have, God helping us, David's Bahurim-mind always in us henceforth amid all those who insult and injure us, and say all manner of evil against us falsely; and amid all manner of adverse and sore circumstances, so as to see the Lord in it all, and so as to work out our salvation amid it all. And the Lord will look upon our affliction also, and will requite us good for all this evil, if only we wisely and silently and adoringly submit ourselves to it.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Shimei
1. Son of Gershom, son of Levi (1 Chronicles 23:7; 1 Chronicles 23:9-10; 1 Chronicles 6:17; 1 Chronicles 6:29; Numbers 3:18; Zechariah 12:13). (See SHELOMITH (5).) SHIMI in Exodus 6:17.
2. Son of Gera, a Benjamite, of Saul's house; at Bahurim, a marked spot on the way from the Jordan valley to Jerusalem, just within Benjamin; to this point Phaltiel followed Michal (2 Samuel 3:16). When David, fleeing from Absalom, reached the edge of the valley, between the road and Shimei's house, Shimei ran along the ridge over against the road, cursing and throwing stones and dust at him and his mighty men still as he went; and saying, "Come out, come out, thou bloody man and thou man of Belial the Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul (referring to his hanging up Saul's sons for the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21, which in time preceded this; also to his general engagement in wars, 1 Chronicles 22:8), and the Lord hath delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom thy son, and behold thou art taken in thy mischief because thou art a bloody man" (2 Samuel 16:5-13). Abishai would have "taken off his head" then and there, as a "dead dog" presuming to "curse the king."
But David felt it was Jehovah's doing: "let him curse, for the Lord hath bidden him; it may be that the Lord will look on shine affliction, and requite me good for his cursing." An undesigned coincidence between David's language in the history and in the independent psalms, a mark of genuineness (Psalms 109:17; Psalms 109:28, "let them curse, but bless Thou"; Psalms 25:18, "look upon mine affliction," etc.). Shimei wisely was the "first of the house of Joseph" to meet David on his victorious return over Jordan (compare spiritually our wisdom, Luke 14:32). A thousand Benjamites, and Ziba with his 15 sons and 20 servants, were with him. He fell down before the king, confessing his sin and begging David not to "impute iniquity" to him, or remember and take to heart his perversity; spiritually compare Matthew 5:25; Psalms 32:1-6. Again Abishai would have slain Shimei, but David felt his day of restoration to the kingdom was no day for avenging wrongs, and said "thou shalt not die."
But on his deathbed David felt, though he forgave Shimei the personal wrong, yet that public justice required his punishment in some form, for David was not likely, in going to appear before God, to cherish revenge after having spared him twice when he might justly have slain him. To Solomon he committed the fulfillment of the duty unfulfilled by himself; "thou knowest what thou oughtest to do unto him." The impunity of Shimei as of Joab had brought the law into discredit, for Shimei was living in court favor at Jerusalem, "thou hast with thee Shimei" (1 Kings 2:8). Anticipating from Shimei's restless spirit that he would attempt some fresh lawlessness, David says, "his hoar head bring thou down to the grave with blood." However, as Solomon did not put him to death but gave him a chance of life, some understand "not" after "bring thou down," taken from the former clause "hold him not guiltless," and "bring not down his hoar head," etc.
So in 1 Samuel 2:3, where two prohibitions come together, the negative is expressed only in the first clause and understood in the second. Solomon bound him on pain of death to build a house, and stay at Jerusalem, and not cross the Kedron which separated him from the road to his old abode at Bahurim. After the lapse of three years Shimei went after two slaves of his, who had fled to Achish of Gath. His breach of his own oath brought on him the king's threatened penalty; he was slain by Benaiah. Thus he brought, "on his own head" his wickedness towards David which David had left unavenged; justice had its course so by "taking away the wicked from before the king, his throne was established in righteousness" (Proverbs 25:5; 1 Kings 2:36-46; Psalms 7:16; Ezekiel 17:19).
3. Faithful to Solomon in Adonijah's rebellion (1 Kings 1:8); identified with Shimei son of Elah (1 Kings 4:18), Solomon's commissariat officer in Benjamin; or with Shimei or Shammah, David's brother, or Shammah the Ararite (2 Samuel 23:11).
4. Son of Pedaiah, Zerubbabel's brother (1 Chronicles 3:19).
5. Son of Zacchur, a Simeonite (1 Chronicles 4:26-27); he had 16 sons and six daughters.
6. Son of Gog a Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:4).
7. A Gershonite Levite, son of Jahath (1 Chronicles 6:42).
8. Son of Jeduthun, chief of the tenth division of singers (1 Chronicles 25:17).
9. The Ramathite, over David's vineyards (1 Chronicles 27:27).
10. A Levite, of the sons of Heman; took part in the purification of the temple under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14).
11. The Levite, Cononiah's brother, having charge of the offerings, etc., under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:12-13). 2 Chronicles 31:12. A Levite in Ezra's time (Ezra 10:23), married a foreign wife; also SEMIS.
13. Of the Hashum family, put away his foreign wife (Ezra 10:33).
14. Son of Bani, put away his foreign wife (Ezra 10:38).
15. Ancestor of Mordecai, son of Kish, of Benjamin (Esther 2:5).
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Shimei
Shimi

Sentence search

Sem'ei - (the Greek form of Shimei).
SHIMEI , 14. ...
SHIMEI , 16
Shimi - (sshih' mi) KJV spelling of Shimei (Exodus 6:17 ). See Shimei 1
Shimhi - (sshihm' hi) Alternate English transliteration of Shimei (1 Chronicles 8:21 ). See Shimei 11
Shelomith - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite (1 Chronicles 23:9). The Gershonites numbered nine fathers' houses, six named after Laadan, and three after Shimei. The three sons of Laadan (1 Chronicles 23:8) and the three of Shimei (1 Chronicles 23:9, descended from Libni and not elsewhere named) were heads of the fathers' houses of Laadan. The Shimei in 1 Chronicles 23:9 is distinct from the Shimei in 1 Chronicles 23:7. The sons of the Shimei in 1 Chronicles 23:7 are not enumerated until 1 Chronicles 23:10. Laadan and Shimei are not named in 1 Chronicles 23:7 as being sons of Gershon, but as founders of the two chief lilies of the Gershonites
Shimi - See Shimei No
Shi'mi - = Shimei , 1
Semei - SEMEI ( 1Es 9:33 ) = Shimei , Ezra 10:33
Someis - SOMEIS ( 1Es 9:34 ) = Shimei , Ezra 10:38
Semeias - Est 11:2) = Shimei , Esther 2:5
Semeis - SEMEIS ( 1E Esther 9:23 ) = Shimei , Ezra 10:23
Shimites - Family of Shimei, son of Gershon
Haziel - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Zina - Ornament, one of the sons of Shimei (1 Chronicles 23:10 )
Shim'Ites, the, - the descendants of Shimei the son of Gershon
Zacchur - Father of Shimei
Ramathite - The designation given to Shimei, the manager of David's vineyard (1 Chronicles 27:27 )
Zina - Second son of Shimei (1 Chronicles 23:10; 1 Chronicles 23:11)
Zina - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Ramathite - Designation of Shimei as an inhabitant of some place named Ramah
Shimeites - (sshih' mee itess) Members of the clan descending from Shimei (Numbers 3:21 ; Zechariah 12:13 )
Zizah - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
zi'Zah, - a Gershonite Levite, second son of Shimei, (1 Chronicles 23:11 ) called 1 Chronicles 23:10 )
zi'na - (abundance ); Zizah, the second son of Shimei the Gershonite
Jesim'Iel - (whom God makes ), a Simeonite chief of the family of Shimei
Gera - Father of Shimei, who cursed David (2 Samuel 16:5 ). See Shimei
Jeshoha'Iah - (whom Jehovah casts down ), a chief of the Simeonites, descended from Shimei
Igeal - Hervey, son of Shimei, brother to Zerubbabel
ra'Mathite, the - Shimei the Ramathite, i
Bahurim - Here Shimei resided, who poured forth vile abuse against David, and flung dust and stones at him and his party when they were making their way down the eastern slopes of Olivet toward Jordan (16:5); and here Jonathan and Ahimaaz hid themselves (17:18). With the exception of Shimei, Azmaveth, one of David's heroes, is the only other native of the place who is mentioned (2 Samuel 23:31 ; 1 Chronicles 11:33 )
Ismachiah - ” Priest and administrator in the Temple under Cononiah and Shimei when Hezekiah was king of Judah (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Zimmah - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Rei - Ewald makes Rei as Shimei, David's brother
Hararite - and Chronicles "Jonathan, son of Shammah (David's brother Shimei) the Hararite
Gera - ...
...
The father of Shimei, who so grossly abused David (2 Samuel 16:5 ; 19:16,18 )
Bahurim - The place where Paltiel, son of Laish, was ordered to relinquish Michal ( 2 Samuel 3:16 ); where Shimei dwelt, who cursed David in his flight ( 2 Samuel 16:5 ); where Ahimaaz and Jonathan hid in the well from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:18-19 ); and the home of Azmaveth, one of David’s mighty men ( 1Ch 11:33 , 2 Samuel 23:31 , where Barhumite is written for Baharumite ). the passages relating to Shimei),’ and the account of David’s flight, which supplies the only topographical indications, accords with the traditional identification with Almit , N
Beriah - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Shema (2) - Of Benjamin: a head of the fathers of the inhabitants of Aijalon, who drove away the men of Gath (1 Chronicles 8:13; 1 Chronicles 8:21); the same as Shimei and Shimhi
Rei - He is mentioned along with Shimei , and was likely an officer in the royal guard. 4) reads ‘Shimei, the friend of David,’ and thus gets rid of Rei as a personal name (so Lucian)
Haran - Son of Shimei a Gershonite
Haran - Son of Shimei a Gershonite
ge'ra - ( Genesis 46:21 ) Gera, who is named, (Judges 3:15 ) as the ancestor of Ehud, and in (2 Samuel 16:5 ) as the ancestor of Shimei who cursed David, is probably also the same person (though some consider them different persons)
Jeush - ...
...
A Levite, one of the sons of Shimei (1 Chronicles 23:10,11 )
Jahath -
A son of Shimei, and grandson of Gershom (1 Chronicles 23:10 )
Zimmah - Another, son of Shimei (1 Chronicles 6:42; compare 1)
Shimei, Shimeites - Shimei, ShimeiTES . Shimei was a popular name among the Hebrews, being especially common in Levitical circles. As the latter is fleeing before Absalom, Shimei meets him and heaps curses and insults on the fugitive monarch. ’ After this Shimei is not permitted to go beyond the walls of Jerusalem on pain of death; but presuming three years later to go to Gath in quest of fugitive slaves, he is executed by Benaiah at the command of the king ( 1Ki 2:8 ff. In the court intrigues connected with the royal succession, a courtier, Shimei (cf. In Zechariah 12:13 the family of the Shimeites are mentioned as participants in the mourning for national guilt; they appear in this connexion as representatives of the Levites. Shammah, the brother of David, appears as Shimei in 2 Samuel 21:21
Jahath - A son of Shimei ( 1 Chronicles 23:10 )
Bahurim - of Jerusalem, the abode, of Shimei, son of Gera (2 Samuel 16:5; 2 Samuel 17:18; 1 Kings 2:8). When David left the summit of Olivet behind and was descending the eastern slopes to the Jordan valley below, in his flight front Absalom, Shimei came forth from Bahurim and ran along the side ("rib") of the hill, abusing David and flinging stones and dust, in a manner common in the East in the case of fallen greatness
je'Ush - (1 Chronicles 7:10,11 ) ...
A Gershonite Levite, of the house of Shimei
Jahath - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Shimei - When David, fleeing from Absalom, reached the edge of the valley, between the road and Shimei's house, Shimei ran along the ridge over against the road, cursing and throwing stones and dust at him and his mighty men still as he went; and saying, "Come out, come out, thou bloody man and thou man of Belial the Lord hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul (referring to his hanging up Saul's sons for the Gibeonites, 2 Samuel 21, which in time preceded this; also to his general engagement in wars, 1 Chronicles 22:8), and the Lord hath delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom thy son, and behold thou art taken in thy mischief because thou art a bloody man" (2 Samuel 16:5-13). Shimei wisely was the "first of the house of Joseph" to meet David on his victorious return over Jordan (compare spiritually our wisdom, Luke 14:32). Again Abishai would have slain Shimei, but David felt his day of restoration to the kingdom was no day for avenging wrongs, and said "thou shalt not die. "...
But on his deathbed David felt, though he forgave Shimei the personal wrong, yet that public justice required his punishment in some form, for David was not likely, in going to appear before God, to cherish revenge after having spared him twice when he might justly have slain him. " The impunity of Shimei as of Joab had brought the law into discredit, for Shimei was living in court favor at Jerusalem, "thou hast with thee Shimei" (1 Kings 2:8). Anticipating from Shimei's restless spirit that he would attempt some fresh lawlessness, David says, "his hoar head bring thou down to the grave with blood. After the lapse of three years Shimei went after two slaves of his, who had fled to Achish of Gath. Faithful to Solomon in Adonijah's rebellion (1 Kings 1:8); identified with Shimei son of Elah (1 Kings 4:18), Solomon's commissariat officer in Benjamin; or with Shimei or Shammah, David's brother, or Shammah the Ararite (2 Samuel 23:11)
Achish - ...
Another king of Gath, probably grandson of the foregoing, to whom the two servants of Shimei fled. This led Shimei to go to Gath in pursuit of them, and the consequence was that Solomon put him to death (1Kings 2:39-46)
Bahurim - When David fled from his son Absalom, a kinsman of Saul named Shimei met him at Bahurim, cursed him, and threw stones at his party. Solomon followed David's orders and had Shimei of Bahurim killed (1Kings 2:8-9,1 Kings 2:36-46 )
Ziza - Son of Shimei, a Levite from Gershon, following some manuscript and early translation evidence (1 Chronicles 23:10 )
a'di-el -
A prince of the tribe of Simeon, descended from the prosperous family of Shimei
Zim'Mah - ) ...
Another Gershonite, son of Shimei, (1 Chronicles 6:42 ) possibly the same as the preceding
Shimei - David forgave him; but on his death-bed he gave Solomon special instructions regarding Shimei, of whose fidelity he seems to have been in doubt (1 Kings 2:8,9 ). "The family of Shimei" (Zechariah 12:13 ; RSV, "the family of the Shimeites") were the descendants of Shimei (1)
Shimei - AND DAVID SAID, LET HIM ALONE, LET HIM CURSE...
SHIMEI was a reptile of the royal house of Saul. When Shimei saw David escaping for his life out of Jerusalem, Satan entered into Shimei, and he came forth and cursed at David as he passed by. And still as David went on his way, Shimei also went along on the hillside over against David, and he cursed as he went, and he threw stones at David and cast dust. ...
Political and ecclesiastical party spirit turn us all, on occasion, into reptiles like Shimei. Shimei knew as well as you do that David had never shed a single drop of Saul's blood. And Shimei knew that quite well. But Shimei hated the truth that he knew. It was not Shimei's interest to admit the truth that he knew. If you had a word to say for David, Shimei would follow you about also with curses and stones and dust. Shimei had everything to expect from Saul, and he knew that he had nothing to expect from David; and, therefore, David was a bloody man and a son of Belial. You know Shimei. At any rate, all who know you intimately know Shimei. To such a divine use was Shimei put of God that greatest day of David's life. For Shimei that day perfected the good work on David that Absalom and Ahithophel had so well begun. Shimei was David's crowning means of grace that day. That day adorns and seals all David's psalms, and it was Shimei that did it. David had only to point with his finger to the hillside, and Shimei's insult and injury would have ceased for ever. But what profit would Shimei's blood have been to David? David had more sense. There is a Shimei that you wish he were dead. And least of all Absalom and Ahithophel and Shimei. And as David and his men went by the way, Shimei went on the hill's side over against David, and cursed David, and threw stones at him, and cast dust. For Shimei with all his good and all his bad uses comes back again to David's deathbed to tempt and to try David, and to discover what is in David's dying heart. The deathbed sayings of God's saints have a special interest and a delightful edification to us; but David's last words to Solomon about Shimei-we would pass them by if we could. Well, some students of the Old Testament are bold to take David's dreadful words about Shimei out of David's mouth altogether, and to put them into the mouth of the prophet who has preserved to us David's life and death. Those awful words, they say, are that righteous prophet's explanation and vindication of the too late execution of Shimei by Solomon after his reprieve had come to an end with the death of David. But the heart has its reasons, as Pascal says, and my heart would stretch a considerable point in textual criticism to get Shimei's blood wiped off David's deathbed. And then the last explanation is the most painful one of all, and it is this, that David had never really and truly, and at the bottom of his heart, forgiven Shimei for his brutality and malignity at Bahurim
Elioenai - In the seventh generation from Zerubbabel, contemporary with Alexander the Great, but the Hebrew (1 Chronicles 3:23-24) is probably an error, and Shemaiah, grandfather of Elioenai and father of Neariah, Elioenai's father, is probably Shimei, Zerubbabel's brother
ja'Hath - ) ...
Head of a later house in the family of Gershom, being the eldest son of Shimei, the son of Laadan
Hattush - Hervey identifies Shemaiah with Shimei, Zerubbabel's brother
Shema - See Shimei, No
Gone - It was told Solomon that Shimei had gone from ...
Jerusalem to Gath
Shammah - He is the same as Shimeah , father of Jonadab ( 2 Samuel 13:3 ), the Shimea of 1 Chronicles 2:16 , and the Shimei , father of Jonathan who slew the giant ( 2 Samuel 21:21 ). ’ Shimei , son of Ela ( 1 Kings 4:18 ), should also appear here if we accept Lucian’s reading of ‘Ela’ for ‘Agee’ ( 2 Samuel 23:11 )
Beriah - Son of the Levite Shimei ( 1 Chronicles 23:10 f
Uzza, Uzzah - Son of Shimei, a Merarite
Mor'Deca-i - [1] Three things are predicated of Mordecai in the book of Esther: (1) That he lived in Shushan; (2) That his name was Mordecai, son of Jair, son of Shimei, son of Kish the Benjamite who was taken captive with Jehoiachin; (3) That he brought up Esther
Elah - Father of Shimei, one of Solomon's commissariat officers
uz'za - Perhaps he is the same as Zina or Zizah the son of Shimei
uz'za - Perhaps he is the same as Zina or Zizah the son of Shimei
Shelomith - Son of Shimei, a Gershonite
Shimel - Shimei gave his parole never to leave Jerusalem; but broke it by pursuing his fugitive servants to Gath, and was put to death on returning, 2 Samuel 16:5-14 ; 19:16-23 ; 1 Kings 2:8,9,36-46
Achish - King of Gath to whom Shimei went to retrieve his servants but in so doing violated his agreement with Solomon and lost his life (1 Kings 2:36-46 )
Shimei - When David returned after Absalom's death, Shimei met him and pleaded for forgiveness and mercy, which David granted because of the festive occasion (2 Samuel 19:1 ). Solomon followed David's advice and had Shimei slain (1 Kings 2:1 )
Abishai - He lifted up his spear against three hundred, and slew them, 2 Samuel 23:18 ; and was with David in the affairs of Shimei, Absalom, and Sheb, 2 Samuel 16:9 18:2 20:6,7
Abishai - In his zeal for David he asked permission to slay Shimei
Achish - At a later period Shimei went to Achish in pursuit of his servants; but it is doubtful whether this was the same king
Bethuel - A town where the children of Shimei lived (1 Chronicles 4:30 )
Swallow - Balaam could not curse Israel whom God had blessed (Deuteronomy 23:5), nor Shimei David, nay God requited David good instead (2 Samuel 16:5-12; Psalms 109:28)
Adaiah - A son of Shimei (in v
Elah - Father of Shimei, Solomon's commissariat officer in Benjamin (1 Kings 4:18)
Abishai - He sought to kill Shimei for cursing David, but the king restrained him (2 Samuel 16:1 ; 2 Samuel 19:21 )
Haran - Son of Shimei and a Levite (1 Chronicles 23:9 )
Kidron Valley - Solomon warned Shimei not to cross it or he would die (1 Kings 2:37 )
Abishai - He broke through their host around Bethlehem, and lifted up his spear against 300, and slew them, 2 Samuel 23:14-18 : and was with David in the matters of Shimei, Absalom, and Sheba
Curse - Shimei--who cured me with a grievous curse
Achish - Another king of Gath, to whom the servants of Shimei fled, which led to Shimei's death
Achish - Achish, or his son, is again mentioned (1 Kings 2:40) as the receiver of Shimei when he left Jerusalem contrary to Solomon's command
Cush - Some consider that Shimei is referred to, as intimated in the margin , 2 Samuel 16:5
ha'Ran - (Genesis 11:28 ) ...
A Gershonite Levite in the time of David, one of the family of Shimei
Gog -
A Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:4 ), the father of Shimei
Abishai - We find the consistency of character maintained throughout the history; the same spirit prompting the request at Hachilah," Let me smite Saul" (1 Samuel 26:8), as subsequently at Bahurim, when Shimei cursed David, prompted his exclamation "Why should this dead dog curse my Lord the king? let me take off his head" (2 Samuel 16:9)
Becher - From Becher came also Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David (2 Samuel 20); also Shimei, son of Gera of Bahurim (2 Samuel 17:5), "of the house of Saul
Micah - Son of Shimei, a descendant of Reuben
Shimei - David at his death reminded Solomon of Shimei's wickedness, for he had cursed the Lord's anointed king. Solomon promised Shimei his life on the condition that he did not go out of Jerusalem; but he broke the compact and was put to death
Esther - The Persian name of Hadassah, daughter of Abihail, son of Shimei, son of Kish, a Benjamite
Nathan - Nathan, along with Zadok, the priest, Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, Shimei, Rei, and David's mighty men, opposed Adonijah
Shemaiah - A Simeonite ( 1 Chronicles 4:37 ), perhaps Shimei of 1 Chronicles 4:26 ; 1 Chronicles 27:5
Adonijah - ...
Nathan the prophet, Zadok (Eleazar's descendant, and so of the older line of priesthood), Benaiah son of Jehoiada, captain of the king's guard, Shimei and Rei (or Shimma, Raddai), David's own brothers, supported Solomon
Gershon, Gershonites - They were subdivided into two groups, the Libnites and the Shimeites ( Numbers 3:21 ; Numbers 26:58 ), each being traced to a ‘son’ of Gershon ( Exodus 6:17 , Numbers 3:18 , 1Ch 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 6:20 [2])
Mephibosheth - And Shimei, who had cursed and stoned David on the day of his flight from Jerusalem, hasted first and came down to meet King David. And Shimei fell down before the king and said, Let not my lord impute iniquity unto me, neither do thou remember that which thy servant did perversely the day that my lord the king went out of Jerusalem, that the king should take it to his heart. And the king said to Shimei, Thou shalt not die. And Mephibosheth was at the Jordan all the way from Jerusalem almost as soon as Shimei himself. And then to see him in his hurry to get to Jordan, where he arrives by a sport of providence just at the same moment with Shimei
David - in His Races - David might have put Joab, and Shimei, and all the rest of his tutors and governors, in the front of the battle as he put Uriah; but he could not cast a piece of a millstone on his Maker from the walls of Rabbah, and he would not now if he could. But for many years now, and more and more of late years, my Bible opens of itself to me at the place where Shimei casts stones and dirt at David, till David says, So let him curse, because the Lord hath said to him, Curse David. My children still read Goliath on Sabbath evenings, but I am on the watch to see how soon I can safely introduce them to Shimei. Shimei is the man for me and mine! Only, may I endure my schoolmaster to the bitter end better than even David did. Let me take insults, and injuries, and slights, and slings from men, and God's hand itself, as David that day took Shimei's curses. David held back his bad passions at Saul, and at Shimei, and at Joab, occasion after occasion, till we were almost worshipping David
Ramah - This town was probably the home of Shimei, the Ramathite , David’s vine-dresser ( 1 Chronicles 27:27 )
Nathan - ) "The family of the house of David and the family of the house of Nathan" represent the highest and lowest of the royal order; as "the family of the house of Levi and the family of Shimei" represent the highest and lowest of the priestly order (Zechariah 12:12-13)
Impute - Thus Shimei intreated David, that he would not "impute iniquity to him" for some former transaction
Joab - ...
I have been sorely tempted to take up the mystical interpretation of Shimei and Joab. Shimei cursing and throwing stones. O sacred chronicler, look well to your laurels! If once we take pen in hand, where would you be-Shimei, and Joab, and Absalom, and Ahithophel and all! O Lord, open Thou my lips, and I will show forth Thy praise
Benjamin - This and the fact that Shimei, a Benjamitc, claims ( 2 Samuel 19:20 ) to be’ of the house of Joseph,’ suggest that the tribe was an offshoot of the latter
Ephraim - Benjamin) it is plain that Shimei still regarded himself as of the house of Joseph; and, despite the traditional indications of a late formation of Benjamin (wh
David - He bore the curses of Shimei, saying in his piety, "The Lord hath bidden him. He returned to Jerusalem and pardoned Shimei
David - His charge to Solomon respecting the forfeited lives of Joab and Shimei, was the voice of justice and not of revenge
Reuben - Moreover, Shimei is a Reubenite 1 Chronicles 5:4 , a Simeonite 1 Chronicles 4:27 , and a Levite Exodus 6:17
Solomon - After this he executed Shimei, a relative of Saul who had always been hostile to the house of David (1 Kings 2:36-46; cf
Zechariah, Prophecy of - Each family will mourn apart and their wives apart: the king (David), the prophet (Nathan), and the priest (Levi), with whom is associated Shimei. Genesis 49:7 ; or possibly Shimei, the enemy of David, as representing the basest of the people, may be referred to
Solomon - ) By the interposition of Nathan the prophet, Zadok the priest, Benaiah, Shimei, and Rei, David's mighty men, Solomon was at David's command taken on the king's own mule to Gihon, anointed, and proclaimed king. Shimei fell by breaking his own engagement on oath
Slave, Slavery - the experiences of the churl Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:10 ), of the passionate Shimei ( 1 Kings 2:39 ), and of Sarah ( Genesis 16:6 ); the implications as to the frequency of such cases in the law of Deuteronomy 23:15 ff
David - When forced by it to depart from Jerusalem, a circumstance most pathetically described by the sacred historian, he prevented the just punishment of Shimei, a wretch who cursed and stoned him
Simeon - Five hundred Simeonites undertook a second expedition under four chiefs, sons of Shimei, against the remnant of Amalek that had escaped from Saul and David (1 Samuel 14:48; 1 Samuel 15:7; 2 Samuel 8:12) to the mountains of Idumea; they smote them utterly, and dwelt in their place, and were there at the date of the composition of 1 Chronicles, i
David - He omits any account of the rebellion of Absalom and Adonijah and the actions of Amnon and Shimei; he makes no mention of David's sins in connection with Bathsheba and Uriah
Olives, Mount of - ...
Shimei, scrambling along the overhanging hill, flung down the stones and dust of the rough and parched descent
Satan (2) - In other passages it is applied, with no sinister meaning, to David, who, as the Philistines feared, might desert Achish and turn against them in battle (1 Samuel 29:4); to Abishai when he opposed David’s purpose of clemency towards Shimei (2 Samuel 19:22); and again to a foreign enemy in general (1 Kings 5:4); and to Hadad and Rezon in connexion with their revolt against Solomon (1 Kings 11:14; 1 Kings 11:23; 1 Kings 11:25)
Absalom - David and his wives and concubines and mixed-up children, Tamar and her half-brother Amnon, Absalom and Jonadab, Joab and the wise woman of Tekoa, Ittai and Shimei, Ahithophel and Hushai, and the righteousness and the grace of God reigning over them all
Solomon - The deposition of Abiathar, and the execution of Joab and Shimei, were natural consequences; and in the case of the two last, Solomon was only following the advice of his father ( 1 Kings 2:5 ; 1 Kings 2:8 )