What does Sheba mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
שֶׁ֥בַע Benjamite 5
שְׁבָ֗א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 4
שְׁבָ֥א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 4
שְׁבָ֖א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 3
מִשְּׁבָ֣א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 2
שְׁבָֽא son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 2
שְׁבָ֔א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 2
וְ֠שֶׁבַע Benjamite 1
שֶׁ֤בַע Benjamite 1
שֶׁ֧בַע Benjamite 1
שֶׁ֣בַע Benjamite 1
אַחֲרָֽיו after the following part 1
שְׁ֫בָ֥א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 1
שְׁ֝בָ֗א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 1
שְׁבָ֡א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 1
שְׁבָ֑א son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 1
שְׁבָא֙ son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth. / son of Raamah 1
וְשֶׁ֖בַע Benjamite 1

Definitions Related to Sheba

H7652


   1 Benjamite, son of Bichri and one who led a rebellion against David.
   2 Gadite, brother of Michael, Meshullam, Jorai, Jachan, Zia, and Heber.
   3 a town in Simeon.
   Additional Information: Sheba = “seven”.
   

H7614


   1 son of Joktan and a descendant of Seth.
   2 son of Raamah, grandson of Cush, and a descendant of Ham.
   3 son of Jokshan, the son of Abraham by Keturah.
   4 a nation in southern Arabia.
   Additional Information: Sheba = “seven” or “an oath”.
   

H310


   1 after the following part, behind (of place), hinder, afterwards (of time).
      1a as an adverb.
         1a1 behind (of place).
         1a2 afterwards (of time).
      1b as a preposition.
         1b1 behind, after (of place).
         1b2 after (of time).
         1b3 besides.
      1c as a conjunction.
      1c after that.
      1d as a substantive.
         1d1 hinder part.
      1e with other prepositions. 1e1 from behind. 1e2 from following after.
         

Frequency of Sheba (original languages)

Frequency of Sheba (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Sheba
(sshee' buh) 1. See Sabeans. 2. Personal name meaning, “fullness, completeness.” Name of a Benjaminite who led a revolt against David (2 Samuel 20:1 ) and of a member of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:13 ). 3 . Personal name spelled in Hebrew like the nation of 1. above. The name of a son of Joktan (Genesis 10:28 ) and of Jokshan (Genesis 25:3 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sheba
An oath, seven.
Heb. shebha, the son of Raamah (Genesis 10:7 ), whose descendants settled with those of Dedan on the Persian Gulf.
Heb. id. A son of Joktan (Genesis 10:28 ), probably the founder of the Sabeans.
Heb. id. A son of Jokshan, who was a son of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:3 ).
Heb. id. A kingdom in Arabia Felix. Sheba, in fact, was Saba in Southern Arabia, the Sabaeans of classical geography, who carried on the trade in spices with the other peoples of the ancient world. They were Semites, speaking one of the two main dialects of Himyaritic or South Arabic. Sheba had become a monarchy before the days of Solomon. Its queen brought him gold, spices, and precious stones (1 Kings 10:1-13 ). She is called by our Lord the "queen of the south" (Matthew 12:42 ).
Heb. shebha', "seven" or "an oak." A town of Simeon (Joshua 19:2 ).
Heb. id. A "son of Bichri," of the family of Becher, the son of Benjamin, and thus of the stem from which Saul was descended (2 Samuel 20:1-22 ). When David was returning to Jerusalem after the defeat of Absalom, a strife arose between the ten tribes and the tribe of Judah, because the latter took the lead in bringing back the king. Sheba took advantage of this state of things, and raised the standard of revolt, proclaiming, "We have no part in David." With his followers he proceeded northward. David seeing it necessary to check this revolt, ordered Abishai to take the gibborim, "mighty men," and the body-guard and such troops as he could gather, and pursue Sheba. Joab joined the expedition, and having treacherously put Amasa to death, assumed the command of the army. Sheba took refuge in Abel-Bethmaachah, a fortified town some miles north of Lake Merom. While Joab was engaged in laying siege to this city, Sheba's head was, at the instigation of a "wise woman" who had held a parley with him from the city walls, thrown over the wall to the besiegers, and thus the revolt came to an end.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Bath-Sheba
Daughter of the oath, or of seven, called also Bath-shu'a (1 Chronicles 3:5 ), was the daughter of Eliam (2 Samuel 11:3 ) or Ammiel (1 Chronicles 3:5 ), and wife of Uriah the Hittite. David committed adultery with her (2 Samuel 11:4,5 ; Psalm 51:1 ). The child born in adultery died (2 Samuel 12:15-19 ). After her husband was slain (11:15) she was married to David (11:27), and became the mother of (Song of Solomon 12:24 ; 1 Kings 1:11 ; 2:13 ). She took a prominent part in securing the succession of Solomon to the throne (1 Kings 1:11,16-21 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Sheba
In south-western Arabia was the land known in Bible times as Sheba. It was located in the region of present-day Yemen and was occupied by a tribal group known as the Sabeans. Like people of other Arab tribal groups, those of Sheba were merchants and traders. They travelled widely throughout the East, dealing in gold, precious stones, cloth, spices and other merchandise (1 Kings 10:1-2; Psalms 72:15; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:22). They even engaged in slave trade (Joel 3:8) and, like other Arab nomads, they raided farms and villages (Job 1:15). When their queen on one occasion visited Israel’s king Solomon, the two monarchs took the opportunity to have some useful trade exchanges (1 Kings 10:10; 1 Kings 10:13). (Some African legends have connected this queen with Ethiopia.)
Sheba was also the name of a number of individuals mentioned in the Old Testament. The best known of these was the Benjaminite who tried unsuccessfully to lead the northern tribes to break away from the rule of David (2 Samuel 20:1-22).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Queen of Sheba
See Sabean .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sheba
SHEBA . 1 . The OT name for the people and country of the Sabæans in S.W. Arabia, the modern Yemen. In Gen. and Chron. the racial relationships of the people are diversely given. Genesis 10:7 (P [1] ) and 1 Chronicles 1:9 make them Hamites, Genesis 10:28 (J [2] ) Semites. Again, whilst Genesis 10:28 has Joktan as the immediate ancestor of Sheba, Genesis 25:3 has Jokshan . These discrepancies are sufficiently accounted for by the extensive commerce of the Sabæans, the number of their settlements in distant regions, and the connexions which they were thus led to form. The language and script of Abyssinia, for instance, prove that a Sabæan colony was established there; hence the genealogy in Genesis 10:7 .
The following are the salient points in the information which the OT gives us. The country was rich in gold (Psalms 72:15 ) and incense ( Jeremiah 6:20 ); the people were great traders ( Ezekiel 27:22 f.), dealing in costly wares ( Ezekiel 38:13 ); their caravans were well known throughout the East ( Job 6:19 ); they were given to raiding ( Job 1:15 ), possibly uniting trade and robbery, when convenient (cf. Odyss . xv. 415 ff.); and they were not averse to the slave-trade ( Joel 3:8 ); eventually, it was hoped, they would become tributaries of Israel ( Isaiah 60:6 , Psalms 72:10 ).
The notices in Greek and Latin authors correspond with the Biblical statements. Strabo, e.g. , mentions myrrh, incense, cinnamon, balsam, amongst the products of the land, and states that their commerce made them exceedingly wealthy; that they had abundant furniture of gold and silver, beds, tables, bowls, cups, in costly houses. The panels, walls, and ceilings were adorned with ivory, gold, silver, mosaics. He affirms that they frequently laid waste the Syrian desert.
The Sabæans are also mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions. Tiglath-pileser iii. (b.c. 745 727) enumerates the articles which he received from them in tribute: ‘gold, silver, camels, female camels, spices of all sorts.’ In an inscription of b.c. 707, Sargon declares that he ‘received the tribute of Pir’u, king of the land of Musuru (Egypt), Samsç, queen of the land of Aribu (Arabia), It’amara, king of the land of the Saba’aa (Sabæans), gold, products of the mountains, horses, camels.’
During the 19th century a few European travellers succeeded in penetrating Yemen and bringing back a moderately full account of its natural features, and a large amount of material for reconstructing its history. It is incomparably superior to the rest of Arabia, both in climate and in soil. The central district is a highland region, with mountains some 8000 ft. above the sea level. Fertile valleys branch out from the hills, ‘well timbered in places, and threaded by silvery streams of dancing waters; sloping fields, gay with crops and wild flowers; terraced or jungle-covered slopes.’ Here are grown the hest vines that Arabia produces. The air is pure and comparatively cool. The present capital is Sana, a town of about 20,000 inhabitants, on the southernmost of three great plateaux. The ancient capital, Marib, N.E. of Sana, lies between the rich valleys of the west and the ‘wadys of Hadramant, which were the sources of Arabian gum.’ Inscriptions relating to the Sabæan kingdom have been found in various parts of the Arabian peninsula. They are written in a dialect which closely resembles Ethiopic, but there are no vowel letters, or modifications of the consonants, to indicate vowel sounds. Many come from the vicinity of Marib, where the ruins are of astonishing extent. The remains of its great dam, in particular, are very striking: a gigantic wall, two miles long and 175 paces wide, was built to connect two hills, and the water was run off for irrigation purposes by dykes which were cut at different levels. The construction of this work lies back in remote antiquity, b.c. 1700 being the date given by one authority, and b.c. 700 by another. About a.d. 100 it seems to have burst, and the streams which it once served to retain are now wasted in the sands. The Koran ( Sura 34) adduces this event as an instance of the punishment of disobedient ingratitude. In addition to the inscriptions, coins have been found and the names of the kings whose monograms they bear have been determined. From these two sources forty-five royal names have become known, six kings having been called It’amara (see Sargon’s list of tributaries). From some of the records it appears that two kings reigned contemporaneously (cf. Psalms 72:10 ), and this has been explained by the fact that the prince next in age to the king was designated as his successor, sometimes to the temporary exclusion of the king’s son.
Experts have differed with respect to the number of periods into which the history of the Sabæan kingdom falls. All recognize three such divisions: (1) That of the mâkarib or priest-kings; (2) that of the kings of Sheba; (3) that of the kings of Sheba and Dhû-Raidân. Glaser ( Skizze der Gesch. Arabiens ) prefixes to the first of these a Minæan empire, and adds a fifth period, during which the dated inscriptions supply a more exact chronology. These five ages cover the time from about b.c. 2000 to the conquest by Abyssinia in the 6th cent. a.d. Many of the statements which have been copied from the rocks and slabs relate to war and agriculture. They bring before us a set of traders disposing of the products of their own country, and also carrying goods from India and Africa to the great emporium Tyre and the powerful empires of Mesopotamia. They give us a glimpse of the life led by a class of powerful nobles who dwelt on their estates in castles and towers. And they furnish a considerable amount of information respecting the Sab¿an religion, its offerings of incense and animals, its pilgrimages to certain shrines, its special month for pilgrimage, Dhu Hijjatân. The heavenly bodies were worshipped, the sun as a female, the moon as a male, deity. Many other divinities were recognized: a male Athtar (cf. the female Ashtoreth), Almakah, Ta’lab, Sami‘, Kawim, Bashir, Haubas. The precise significance of some of these titles is open to doubt. But the cognate Heb. words justify us in saying that Sami‘ is ‘the Hearer,’ Kawim , ‘the Sustainer,’ Bashir , ‘the Tidings-bringer’; and the Arabic word of the same form indicates that Ta’lab is a spirit of the trees. Three other names, Wadd (‘Love’), Jaghuth (‘He helps’), and Nasr (‘Vulture’ or ‘Eagle’), are spoken of in the Koran ( Sura 72) as though they were antedilnvian idols. On inscriptions which date from the 4th and 5th centuries of our era, Rahman (‘the Merciful’) appears. This is due to Jewish influence, and it is interesting to observe that the Jews now living in Yemen have a tradition that their ancestors left Palestine before the Christian era. Cf. also art. Seba.
2 . A worthless adventurer, who snatched at what he thought was a chance of winning the sovereignty of Northern Israel ( 2 Samuel 20:1 ff.). His appeal was addressed to the deep-seated inter-tribal jealousy. David took a serious view of the situation thus created ( 2 Samuel 20:4 ff.), but his rival lacked the personal qualities which might have rendered him formidable. He traversed the entire centre of the country seeking adherents in vain. Knowing that Joab and Abishai were on his heels, he shut himself up in Abel-beth-maacah (modern Abil ), a town in the extreme north. There, according to a probable emendation of the text ( 2 Samuel 20:14 ), he was supported by his clansmen the Bichriles (not Berites , cf. ‘son of Bichri ,’ 2 Samuel 20:1 ). The place would speedily have been carried by assault had not a woman, whose judgment was highly esteemed by the inhabitants, persuaded them to throw Sheba’s head over the wall to Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:16-22 ). 3 . A Gadite, ( 1 Chronicles 5:13 ). 4 . The Sheba of Joshua 19:2 is out of place after Beer-sheba. Joshua 19:6 shows that we ought to find thirteen, not fourteen, names. The LXX [3] retains that number by omitting Sharuhen from the list. Sharuhen, however, should not be dropped, for it is identical with the Shilhim of Joshua 15:32 . Some Heb. MSS leave out Sheba, as does also the parallel passage 1 Chronicles 4:28 . The Shema of the LXX [3] is from the list of 1 Chronicles 15:26 . There can be little doubt that Shema , inserted by mistake in the Heb. text and transliterated by the LXX [3] , was subsequently changed to Sheba .
J. Taylor.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sheba, Queen of
SHEBA, QUEEN OF . 1 Kings 10:1-13 narrates a visit of the contemporary queen of Sheba to king Solomon. At the present day there is a strong tendency to regard this as a legendary addition made by the later editor for the purpose of emphasizing Solomon’s wealth and wisdom. The reasons adduced are not quite conclusive. It is no doubt true that the Inscriptions hitherto discovered fail to mention any queen of the Sabæans. But the names are given of queens who reigned over other Arabian countries, and, curiously enough, in Sargon’s inscription, quoted on p. 842 b , Samsç, queen of Aribu, immediately precedes It’amara, king of Sheba. It must be admitted, however, that the narrative in 1 Kings 10:1-29 is not free from difficulties. We cannot satisfactorily explain the words ‘concerning the name of the Lord’ (v. 1): the LXX [1] ‘ and ’ etc. being an obvious attempt to evade the difficulty, and the Chronicler ( 2 Chronicles 9:1 ) omitting all the words. It is hard to believe that the monarch of a highly civilized and exceedingly wealthy State would be dumbfounded by the luxury of the court of Jerusalem ( 2 Chronicles 9:5 ); that reads as though the chieftain of a petty tribe of Arabs was in question. Moreover, it is likely enough that the motive of the visit was other than our author supposed. Riddles, proverbs, apologues, and stories supply much of the material for the leisured conversation of the Arabs, but the queen of Sheba would visit her brother monarch with a more practical object than these. Commercial intercourse between the two countries was of extreme importance for the prosperity of both: Kittel ( Die Bücher der Könige , p. 89) is justified in suggesting that she wished to promote this.
The fantastic legends which gathered round this journey may be conveniently read in Sura 27 of the Koran, and the notes on that chapter from Mohammedan sources which Sale has collected. Mohammed himself no doubt derived his account from Jewish sources. A lengthy history of queen Bilkis, from Ta‘labi’s Lives of the Prophets , may be found in Brünnow’s Arabic Chrestomathy . Solomon marries the queen, and the Abyssinians, to whom the story passed from the Arabs, call her Makeda, and trace from this marriage the lineage of all their kings. In this connexion two facts should be noted. First, that Abyssinia was undoubtedly colonized by the Sabæans. Second, that Jos. [2] ( Ant. II. x. 2) speaks of ‘Saba, a royal city of Ethiopia,’ and (VIII. vi. 5 f.), without naming Sheba, gives an account of the visit to Solomon of a woman who was queen of Egypt and Ethiopia.’ He is mistaken as to the locality, but it is interesting to observe the tradition which he reports, ‘that we possess the root of that balsam which our country still bears by this woman’s gift.
J. Taylor.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Beer-Sheba
(bee' uhr-sshee' baw) Beer-sheba and its surrounding area factors significantly in the Old Testament from the earliest sojourns of the patriarchs (Genesis 21:1 ; Genesis 22:1 ; Genesis 26:1 ) to the return of the Hebrew exiles with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 ). Since it was an important crossroad to Egypt in the geographic center of the dry, semi-desert region known as the Negeb, Beersheba also served as the administrative center of the region. Settlement of the Beersheba area began before 3000 B.C.
Abraham and a nearby king, Abimelech, swore to protect Abraham's right to the water of this region (Genesis 21:22-33 ). Abraham then named the place “Beer-sheba,” meaning “well of the oath” or preferably “well of the seven,” referring to seven lambs involved in the agreement. Here he called on the Lord (Genesis 21:33 ) and lived for some time (Genesis 22:19 ). The Lord confirmed His promises with Isaac at Beer-sheba (Genesis 26:23-25 ), where Isaac renamed his father's well “Shibah.” A well is found today outside the ruins of biblical Beer-sheba (Tell es-Sabaspgr), however, it cannot be the patriarchal well since it is dated much later, around the twelfth century. Isaac also lived in the area of Beer-sheba, and his son Jacob left there for Haran to seek a wife (Genesis 28:10 ). A crossroad to Egypt, Beer-sheba was a stopping place for Jacob many years later when he was encouraged by the Lord to continue on to Egypt where Joseph was awaiting him (Genesis 46:1-5 ). Because of these patriarchal events at Beer-sheba, it is thought that the city eventually and unfortunately became a pilgrimage destination for idolatry later during the monarchy (Amos 5:5 ; Amos 8:14 ).
Joshua gave Beer-sheba to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:28 ), and then to the tribe of Simeon whose territory lay within Judah's boundaries (Joshua 19:1-2 ,Joshua 19:1-2,19:9 ). Samuel's sons Joel and Abiah were unfair judges in Beer-sheba right before the monarchy began with Saul (1 Samuel 8:1-3 ).
Beer-sheba is mentioned idiomatically twelve times to indicate the northern and southern extremes of Israel, “Dan to Beersheba” (2 Samuel 24:2 , 1 Kings 4:25 ). This type of phrase served to speak of Israel in its entirety and its unity; for instance, in its resolve to punish the tribe of Benjamin (Judges 20:1 ) and its recognition of Samuel as a true prophet (1 Samuel 3:20 ). This idiom also served to show the extent of the reforms of three southern kings: Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:4 , “Beer-sheba to mount Ephraim”), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:5 , “Beer-sheba even to Dan”), and Josiah (2 Kings 23:8 , “from Geba to Beer-sheba”).
Archaeology has shown Beer-sheba to be the administrative center of the Negeb by uncovering its large commercial storerooms and fortifications which were superior to the lesser cities in the area. The fortifications were inadequate, however, against the Assyrians who sacked the city and left in ruins until the Persian period. After the punitive Exile of Judah, the people returned to Beer-sheba and its surrounding satellite towns with Nehemiah in the fifth century (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 ).
As the “gateway to the desert,” Beer-sheba was in a precarious place climatically, which is the backdrop of two person's prayers concerning death. Hagar pleads at a distance not to see her son die (Genesis 21:14-16 ), and Elijah prays for death in the desert rather than at the order of Queen Jezebel (1 Kings 19:3-4 ).
Daniel C. Fredericks
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Beer-Sheba
Genesis 21:31 (b) The meaning of this name is "the well of the oath." It is a type of the refreshing certainty of GOD's loving care and sufficient promises. (See also Genesis 22:19; Genesis 26:33; Genesis 46:1).
Amos 8:14 (b) Israel is represented as committing the sin of presumption in believing that GOD will not punish them for their idolatry because of the oath that he made at the well of Beer- Sheba.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sheba
The memorable queen of Sheba renders this name familiar to the lover of the Bible. See her history, (1 Kings 10:1, etc.) Our Lord's honourable mention of her we have, Matthew 12:42. Sheba signifies captivity, from Shaba.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sheba
1. Son of Raamah, a son of Cush. Genesis 10:7 ; 1 Chronicles 1:9 . His descendants are generally held to have settled on the shores of the Persian Gulf.
2. Son of Joktan, a descendant of Shem. Genesis 10:28 ; 1 Chronicles 1:22 . His descendants have been traced to Southern Arabia, or Arabia Felix. The metropolis of the district was at or near the modern Mareb, about 15 45' N, 45 35' E .
3. Son of Jokshan, a son of Abraham and Keturah. Genesis 25:3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 . Some judge his descendants to have settled 'far north'; others place them 'somewhere in Arabia.' (The name 'Sheba' occurs also in Job 6:19 ; Psalm 72:10,15 ; Isaiah 60:6 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Ezekiel 27:22,23 ; Ezekiel 38:13 ; but it is uncertain to which of the above three races each passage refers.)
4. The country from whence the queen came who visited Solomon. She brought gold, precious stones, and a great store of spices. The Lord spoke of her as 'the queen of the south.' 1 Kings 10:1-13 ; 2 Chronicles 9:1,3,9,12 ; Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 . The 'south' well agrees with the locality of the descendants of Sheba, the son of Joktan.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Queen of Sheba
THE QUEEN OF THE SOUTH SHALL RISE UP IN THE JUDGMENT WITH THE MEN OF THIS GENERATION, AND CONDEMN THEM
I SHALL take up somewhat high ground with you concerning the Queen of Sheba. For, so far as I have seen, that wonderful woman has never had adequate justice done to her. As I see her, the Queen of Sheba came to Jerusalem on the very highest of errands. She was moved to undertake her journey by the very strongest and the very loftiest of motives. And she saw and heard and took home in her heart far more than her very highest expectations. And while the sacred writer has told us her story in his very best manner, at the same time, it is our Lord's acknowledgment and confession of her in the judgment-it is this that lifts her up in my eyes till I see her among the foremost of those who shall come from the east, and the west, and the north, and the south, and who shall hear the wisdom, and taste the grace, and share the glory of a greater than Solomon in the Jerusalem which is above, and which is the mother of us all.
The first thing that is told us concerning the Queen of Sheba is this, that she had heard in Sheba concerning the Name of the Lord. It may very well be that this has bribed my eyes and perverted my judgment in the matter of the Queen of Sheba. The Name of the Lord so construes and so glorifies the whole of the Old Testament to me that the more I read the Old Testament the more I find nothing else in it worth its ink but the Name of the Lord. If I once find the Name of the Lord in the life of any Old Testament man or woman, I can never again forget that man or that woman. And, on the other hand, however great, and good, and wise, and famous any man is, if the Name of the Lord is not his strong tower, I fear I do not do that man full justice. If this sacred writer means nothing more by it but a sonorous and a stately turn of expression when he mentions the Name of the Lord as the motive of the Queen of Sheba's mission to Jerusalem; if he means as little by it as the run of the commentators say that he means, then, all I can say is that he has set a trap for my feet in the text. You all know the Name of the Lord, and I hope you all feel about that Name with me. You remember it, and never an hour of any day can you forget it. The Name of the Lord is written all over Moses and David and Isaiah in letters of gold, a finger deep. For the Name of the Lord is 'The Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in goodness and truth, keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin.'
Well, it had all come about under the good hand of God somewhat in this way. It simply must have all come about somewhat in this way. Some of those merchantmen who went down to the Red Sea in ships, and did business for Solomon all along its shores in gold, and silver, and ivory, and apes, and peacocks, and almug-trees, and what not, one of their ships on one occasion was driven in for want of fresh water near the summer palace of the Queen of Sheba. And as the seamen of Israel filled their water-pots, it was an ordinance that they should sing, saying, Spring up, O well; in the Name of the Lord, spring up! When, who should pass by but the Queen of Sheba herself with her maidens with her? Sing still another of the songs of Zion, she said to Solomon's sailors. At which they sang a psalm that a prophet who was in their ship had taught them to sing on the occasion of a great tempest they had just passed through. 'These see,' they sang, 'the works of the Lord, and His wonders in the deep. For He commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind, which lifteth up the waves thereof. They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths; their soul is melted because of trouble. Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble, and He bringeth them out of their distresses. Oh that men would praise the Lord for His goodness, and for His wonderful works to the children of men!' And, then, at the Name of the Lord, and without being told to do it, all the seamen standing on the shore lifted up their hands to heaven and proclaimed the Name of the Lord, and worshipped, saying, 'The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious.' And ever after that day the Queen of Sheba watched at her window for the ships of Solomon, till, above all else, the Name of the Lord took entire hold of her heart. The Queen of Sheba had lords many and gods many of her own. She and her people had their gods of the sea and their gods of the land; their gods of war and their gods of wine; their gods of the night and their gods of the day, and many more. But there was no name of any god given in Sheba that took such hold of the Queen of Sheba's heart as did the Name of the God of Israel. Till she took a very great train, with camels that bare spices, and very much gold, and precious stones, there came no such abundance of spices as these which the Queen of Sheba brought to Jerusalem, because of the Name of the Lord.
Even Homer himself was sometimes seen to nod. And that is the explanation of Matthew Henry's unaccountable slander that some of the Queen of Sheba's questions that she put to Solomon, some were frivolous, some were captious, and some were over-curious. I do not see what business the best of commentators has to say that, unless it be to teach us always to read our Bible with our own eyes and with our own hearts for ourselves. And when I read with my own eyes all I can find about the Queen of Sheba, I see neither caption, nor frivolity, nor idle curiosity about her. And I cannot think there could have been, since our Lord sets His seal upon her, and takes her and her questions as His accusation and condemnation of the Pharisees of His day. The sacred writer knew far more about the Queen of Sheba than the minister of Chester did; and what he says about her questions is this, that they were hard to Solomon to answer; especially when she went deep down into her heart for her questions. 'All that was in her heart.' I suppose the sacred writer means all matters, or, at least, very many matters connected with the throne and the state of Sheba. Affairs of state, as we would say: her anxieties about her treaties of war and peace; her seat of judgment and justice over her own people; royal-family matters also, no doubt; and matters, maybe, still nearer her heart. The Queen of Sheba had heard in the south country all about Solomon's dream at Gibeon. She had it all read to her when her royal cares would not let her sleep. And, ever since, she had kept all these things in her heart against her long-intended visit to Jerusalem. But from the day when she first heard the Name of the Lord, from that day her heart had grown every day and every night deeper and fuller of hard questions; questions so hard that I doubt if she broke them all even to Solomon. At the same time, her heart in Sheba at its fullest of hard questions was not a New Testament heart, and could not in Sheba be. Of no New Testament heart does the New Testament ever say that its owner ever told to any man all that was in her heart; unless it was to our New Testament Solomon. And, then, He is such a Solomon that He does not need that communication to be made to Him. For He is wiser in men's hearts than all men; than Ethan the Ezrahite, and Heman and Chalcol and Darda, the sons of Mahol; and His fame is now in all the nations round about. Only, in His wisdom He will have it that we come, if it is from the uttermost part of the earth, and tell Him as if He did not already know all the hard questions of our hearts; and then there will not be anything hid from the King that He will not tell us. Oh no, sacred writer! you do not really mean us to understand that the Queen of Sheba told to any man all that was in her heart. We quite well understand what you mean. She told Solomon so much about herself and about her people, and got so much help and advice from Solomon, that 'all that was in her heart' is just your hyperbolical and impressive way of putting her before us in your great regard for her, and in your great admiration of him.
Matthew Henry is more like himself when he goes on to say that we may be sure that Solomon gave the inquiring Queen a rationale of the temple and all its offices and all its services. That is a handsome retractation and apology for what he had said so rashly and so censoriously about the frivolity and the captiousness of the Queen's questions. You could not possibly give a rationale of the communion services of this house on a communion Sabbath-day to a frivolous and captious-minded man. Now, the temple was just the Lord's Supper already in type and prophecy. And when you try it, there is no subject in heaven or earth more impossible to rationalise to a frivolous or a captious mind than just what lies behind the Lord's Supper the substitution and the propitiation made for sinners by the blood of Christ. The Queen of Sheba was like one of those children in Israel who asked their fathers at every passover supper, What mean ye by this service? Only, she was not a child, but a woman of a strong understanding and a deep heart, and both Solomon and the high priest and the prophet, all three together, were at their wits' end; it took them all their might to open up all the parts of the temple and its sacrifices to her satisfaction: the reason of this, and the reason of that; the use of this, and the use of that; the antitype of this, and the antitype of that-she both hearing them and asking them questions. Till, when they had taken her through it all, there was no more spirit left in her to ask any more. I can believe it. For to this day nothing more completely subdues the spirit than the hard questions of the heart when they are honestly put and fully met and answered in the house of the Lord, and at His table. Nothing satisfies and silences the heart like the rationale, that is to say, the revelation of the truth and the grace of God to the heart that is hungry both for His truth as it is in Jesus, and for His grace as it is in Jesus also, and in Jesus alone.
No; there was neither captiousness nor frivolity in the Queen of Sheba when she came out of her own country, and neither was there detraction, nor depreciation, nor envy when she returned home. What say you? Had I been in her place, I do not feel guilty that I would have been either captious or frivolous in the house of God or in Solomon's own house. But I would have had things in my heart worse than captiousness or frivolousness; things that I would never have told to Solomon, or to Nathan, or even to the high priest over the scapegoat. Had I been a king, and had I been shown through Solomon's temple, and through his palace, and through all that the Queen of Sheba saw in Jerusalem, I know only too well what would have been in my heart. Ay, even when I was being taken over the Lord's house and was being instructed in its sacrifices. Bishop Lancelot Andrewes has no more private devotion than that is where we come upon him praying to God to be delivered from his envy of another man's grace. Oh, where will that sin of sins, that so besetting sin, not intrude itself! If all this good queen's appreciation, and admiration, and congratulation was absolutely sincere and without offence in the sight of God who seeth the heart, well does she deserve all the honour that both the Old Testament and our Lord bestow upon her. Only, Blessed be His name, even if you are sick till you have no spirit left in you at the sight of other men's great houses, and great riches, and wise words, and fame, and great happiness-even so, Blessed be his name, He will not despise you nor spit upon you. He will only take you all that the more and all that the deeper into His temple, and will show you all that the more the riches of His grace, till He has given to you all you desire. And, Lord Jesus, all our desire in this matter is before Thee and is not hidden from Thee. It was a true report, she said, that I heard in mine own land, of thy acts and thy wisdom. Happy are thy men, happy are these thy servants, which stand continually before thee, and that hear thy wisdom. Only, had she known it, and seen the end of it, she was far more happy herself; as much more happy as it is to be faithful over a few things, and to admire rather than to be admired, and to bless than to be blessed, and to give than to receive.
Returning toward the same south a thousand years after the Queen of Sheba, the Ethiopian eunuch sat in his chariot and read Esaias the prophet. Esaias had not yet risen in the day of the Queen of Sheba; but she had the best reading of her day in her hand as she rode south. She had Solomon's prayer at the dedication of the temple in her hand. And the place in the prayer which she reads and prays all the way from Jerusalem to the south is this-'Moreover, concerning a stranger, that is not of Thy people Israel, but cometh out of a far country for Thy Name's sake. For they shall hear of Thy great Name, and of Thy strong hand, and of Thy stretched-out hand. When the stranger shall come and pray toward this house, hear Thou in heaven Thy dwelling-place, and do according to all that the stranger calleth to Thee for, that all people of the earth may know Thy Name, to fear Thee, as do Thy people Israel.' All Ethiopia and all the south has not yet been explored. And who can tell but that the foundations of a long-lost temple may yet be laid bare in that ancient and honourable land; a temple, too, with no middle wall of partition with its excluding inscription engraven upon it; but in room of that an open door with this evangelical writing in gold of Ophir over it: 'Doubtless Thou art our Father, though Abraham be ignorant of us, and though Israel acknowledge us not. Thou art our Father. Thou, O Lord, art our Redeemer. Thy Name is from everlasting.' And then this beside it in the same gold from a Psalm for Solomon: 'The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents; the kings of Sheba and Seba shall offer gifts. And He shall live, and to Him shall be given of the gold of Sheba: and blessed be His glorious Name for ever; and let the whole earth be filled with His glory.'
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Sheba
Captivity; old man; repose; oath
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sheba (1)
1. Son of Bichri a Benjamite, a man of Belial (2 Samuel 20:1-22). The tribe of Benjamin through Sheba sought to regain the ascendancy which it lost at Saul's fall. Judah alone remained faithful to David "from Jordan even to Jerusalem"; the rest of Israel followed Sheba. The division between Israel and Judah already had shown itself under Ishbosheth (2 Samuel 2:4-9), again at the close of Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 19:41-43), David felt the greatness of the crisis, "now shall Sheba do us more harm than did Absalom." Sheba traversed the country gathering followers, and finally aimed at fortifying himself in Abel Beth Maachah in the far N., which was probably connected with Absalom's rebellion through Maacah his mother, and was famed for worldly wisdom. (See ABEL BETH MAACHAH.) A woman in it saved the city by cutting off and casting Sheba's head to Joab (see Ecclesiastes 9:14-15). (See AMASA; JOAB.)
2. 1 Chronicles 5:13.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sheba (2)
from whom the country derives its name.
1. Grandson of Cush and son of Raamah (Genesis 10:7).
2. Son of Joktan (Genesis 10:28).
3. Grandson of Abraham by Keturah; son of Jokshan (Genesis 25:3). This is an instance of the intermingling of the early descendants of Shem and Ham. SHEBA was a wealthy region of Arabia Felix or Yemen (1 Kings 10:1; Psalms 72:10; Psalms 72:15, where "Sheba" is Joktanite, "SEBA" Cushite ; Job 1:15, the Keturahite Sheba, Job 6:19; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:22, it was the Sheba son of Raamah and grandson of Cush that carried on the Indian traffic with Palestine in conjunction with the Keturahite Sheba (Joel 3:8). The Sabeans were famed for myrrh, frankincense, and cinnamon, their chief city being Mariaba (Strabo 16:777), named also Seba, the one being the city the other the fortress (near the famous dyke el 'Arim, built to store water and avert mountain torrents.)
This was afterward the celebrated Himyeritic Arab kingdom, called from the ruling family of Himyer. The Cushite Sheba and his brother Dedan settled along the Persian gulf, but afterward were combined with the Joktanite Sabean kingdom. (See RAAMAH.) The buildings of Mariaba or Seba are of massive masonry, and evidently of Cushite origin. The Joktanites (Semitics) were the early colonists of southern Arabia. The Himyerites Strabo first mentions in the expedition of A. Gellius (24 B.C.); the Arabs however place Himyer high in their list. Himyer may mean "the red man," related to the "Red Sea" and "Phoenician." The kingdom probably was called "Sheba" (Seba means "turned red"), its reigning family Himyer; the old name was preserved until the founding of the modern Himyeritic kingdom about a century B.C.
"The queen of Sheba" (1 Kings 10:1-2; 1 Kings 10:10) ruled in Arabia, not Ethiopia, as the Abyssinian church allege; Sheba being in the extreme Sheba of Arabia, "she came (a distance of nearly a thousand miles) from the uttermost parts of the earth," as then known, to hear the wisdom of Solomon (Matthew 12:42; Luke 11:31). Four principal Arab peoples are named: the Sabeans, Atramitae or Hadramaut, Katabeni or Kahtan or Joktan, and the Mimaei. SHEBA. A town of Simeon (Joshua 19:2). Possibly the SHEMA of Joshua 15:26. Now Saawe (Knobel). Or Sheba is a transcriber's error, repeating the end of Βeer-sheba ; for the number of names in Joshua 19:2-6 including Sheba is 14, whereas 13 is the number stated, and in 1 Chronicles 4:28 Sheba is omitted in the list of Simeon. But Conder (Palestine Exploration, January 1875) identifies Sheba with Tell el Seba, two miles of Beersheba, and on the line to Moladah (Joshua 19:2); its well is a quarter of a mile W. of it.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Beer-Sheba
The well of an oath; So called, because here it was that Abraham made a covenant with Abimelech. (Genesis 26:33) The word is a compound of Beer, well; and Shabah, swearing.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sheba
Of "the queen of Sheba," mention is made 1 Kings 10:1-2 , &c; 2 Chronicles 9:1-2 , &c; Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 . She is called "queen of the south," and was, according to some, a queen of Arabia; and, according to others, a queen of Ethiopia. Josephus says, that Sheba was the ancient name of the city of Meroe, before Cambyses gave it that of his sister; and that it was from thence the queen came of whom we are speaking. This opinion has much prevailed. The Abyssinians at this day, maintain, that this princess was of their country, and that her posterity reigned there a long time. They preserve a catalogue of them, their names and successions.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bath-Sheba
Bath-sheba (bâth-shç'bah or bath'she-bah), daughter of the oath. The wife of Uriah the Hittite, an officer in David's army. She is called Bath-shua in 1 Chronicles 3:5. David first committed adultery with her, then caused her husband to be slain, and afterwards took her to wife. Bath-sheba was the mother of Solomon, whose succession to the throne she took pains to secure, 1 Kings 1:15-31, and of three other sons, 1 Chronicles 3:5. She is afterwards mentioned in the history of Adonijah, 1 Kings 2:13, in the title of Psalms 51:1-19, and among the ancestors of Christ. Matthew 1:6.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Beer-Sheba
Beer-sheba (bç'er-shç'bah, or be-er'she-bah) well of the oath. An old place in Palestine which formed the southern limit of the country. There are two accounts of the origin of the name. According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given, Genesis 21:31; the other narrative ascribes the origin of the name to Isaac instead of Abraham. Genesis 25:31-33. Beersheba was given to Judah, Joshua 15:28, and then to Simeon, Joshua 19:2; 1 Chronicles 4:28. In the often-quoted "from Dan even to Beersheba," Judges 2:1, it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as San the northern. In the time of Jerome it was still a considerable place. There are at present on the spot two principal wells and five smaller ones. One well is twelve feet in diameter and 44 feet deep to the water; the other well is five feet in diameter, and was 42 feet to the water. The curbstones around the mouths of both wells are worn into deep grooves by the action of the ropes used in drawing the water for many centuries. These wells are in constant use today.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sheba
Sheba (shç'ba), seven or an oath. 1. A wealthy region in Arabia bordering on the Bed Sea. The queen of Sheba visited Solomon, coming "to Jerusalem with a very great train, with camels that bear spices, and very much gold, and precious stones." 1 Kings 10:1-13; 2 Chronicles 9:1-12. Many ancient writers noted the abundance of spices in the Yemen or Sabæan country. Strabo asserts that the enormous profits of the spice trade made the Sabæans one of the wealthiest nations on the face of the earth. They used gold and silver most lavishly in their furniture, their utensils, and even on the doors and roofs of their houses. 2. A town in Simeon, mentioned between Beer-sheba and Moladah. Joshua 19:2. Shema is named next to Moladah in Joshua 15:26, and is probably identical with this Sheba.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sheba
1. Son of Raamah, Genesis 10:7 . His posterity is supposed to have settled near the head of the Persian Gulf. See CUSH and RAAMAH .
2. Son of Joktan, of the race of Shem, Genesis 10:28 . See SABEANS 2.
3. Son of Jokshan, and grandson of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:3 . He is supposed to have settled in Arabia Deserta.
4. A turbulent Benjamite, who after the death of Absalom made a fruitless effort to excite a rebellion in Israel against David. Being pursued, and besieged in Abel-beth-maachah, near the southern part of Lebanon, he was beheaded by the people of the city, 2 Samuel 20:1-26 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sheba, Queen of
See SABEANS 2.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Beer-Sheba
The well of the oath, Genesis 21:31 ; 26:31,33 , a city twenty-eight miles southwest of Hebron, at the southern extremity of the Holy Land. Dan lay at the northern extremity; so that the phrase, "from Dan to Beersheba," means, the whole length of the land, Judges 20:1 . At Beersheba, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob often dwelt, Genesis 21:31 ; 22:19 ; 26:33 ; 28:10 ; 46:1 . The town that afterwards rose here was first assigned to Judah, and then to Simeon, Joshua 15:28 ; 19:2 . Here Samuel established his sons as judges, 1 Samuel 8:2 . Elijah rested here on his way to Horeb, 1 Kings 19:3 . It was a seat of idolatry in the time of Uzziah, Amos 5:5 ; 8:14 . After the captivity, it was repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:27,30 , and continued a large village many centuries after the coming of Christ. Dr. Robinson found its site at Bir-es-Seba, on the border of the great desert south of Canaan-the ruins of a small straggling city, and two deep stone wells of excellent water, surrounded by stone troughs, and bearing the marks of great antiquity.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Bath-Sheba
The wife of Uriah, and probably granddaughter of Atithophel which see. David first committed adultery with her, then caused her husband to be slain, and afterwards took her to wife. These sins displeased Jehovah, who sent the prophet Nathan to David, with the parable of the ewe lamb, 2 Samuel 12:1 . David bitterly repented, but was yet punished, 2 Samuel 11:12 . Bath-sheba was the mother of Solomon, whose succession to the throne she took pains to secure, 1 Kings 1:15 . She is afterwards mentioned in the history of Adonijah, 1 Kings 2:13 , in the title of Psalm 51:1 , and among the ancestors of Christ, Matthew 1:6 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Bath'-Sheba,
(daughter of the oath ), ( 2 Samuel 11:3 ) etc., also called Bath-shua in (1 Chronicles 3:5 ) the daughter of Eliam, (2 Samuel 11:3 ) or Ammiel, (1 Chronicles 3:5 ) the son of Ahithophel, (2 Samuel 23:34 ) and wife of Uriah the Hittite. (B.C. 1035.) The child which was the fruit of her adulterous intercourse with David died; but after marriage she became the mother of four sons, Solomon, (Matthew 1:6 ) Shimea, Shobab and Nathan. When Adonijah attempted to set aside the succession promised to Solomon, Bath-sheba informed the king of the conspiracy. (1 Kings 1:11,15,23 ) After the accession of Solomon, she, as queen-mother, requested permission of her son for Adonijah to take in marriage Abishag the Shunammite. (1 Kings 2:21-25 )
Smith's Bible Dictionary - be-er'-Sheba,
(well of the oath ), the name of one of the old places in Palestine which formed the southern limit of the country. There are two accounts of the origin of the name. According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given to Judah, ( Joshua 15:28 ) and then to Simeon, (Joshua 19:2 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) In the often-quoted "from Dan even unto Beersheba," (Judges 20:1 ) it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as Dan the northern. In the time of Jerome it was still a considerable place, and still retains its ancient name --Bir es-Seba . There are at present on the spot two principal wells and five smaller ones. The two principal wells are on or close to the northern bank of the Wady es-Seba . The larger of the two, which lies to the east, is, according to Dr. Robinson, 12 1/2 feet in diameter, and at the time of his visit (April 12) was 44 1/2 feet to the surface of the water. The masonry which encloses the well extends downward 28 1/2 feet. The other well Isaiah 5 feet in diameter, and was 42 feet to the water. The curb-stones around the mouth of both wells are worn into deep grooves by the action of the ropes of so many centures. These wells are in constant use today. The five lesser wells are in a group in the bed of the wady. On some low hills north of the large wells are scattered the foundations and ruins of a town of moderate size.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sheba
1. Son of Raamah, a son of Cush. Genesis 10:7 ; 1 Chronicles 1:9 . His descendants are generally held to have settled on the shores of the Persian Gulf.
2. Son of Joktan, a descendant of Shem. Genesis 10:28 ; 1 Chronicles 1:22 . His descendants have been traced to Southern Arabia, or Arabia Felix. The metropolis of the district was at or near the modern Mareb, about 15 45' N, 45 35' E .
3. Son of Jokshan, a son of Abraham and Keturah. Genesis 25:3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 . Some judge his descendants to have settled 'far north'; others place them 'somewhere in Arabia.' (The name 'Sheba' occurs also in Job 6:19 ; Psalm 72:10,15 ; Isaiah 60:6 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Ezekiel 27:22,23 ; Ezekiel 38:13 ; but it is uncertain to which of the above three races each passage refers.)
4. The country from whence the queen came who visited Solomon. She brought gold, precious stones, and a great store of spices. The Lord spoke of her as 'the queen of the south.' 1 Kings 10:1-13 ; 2 Chronicles 9:1,3,9,12 ; Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 . The 'south' well agrees with the locality of the descendants of Sheba, the son of Joktan.

Sentence search

Shebah - ” Name Isaac gave Beer-sheba (Genesis 26:33 ). See Beer-Sheba
Bichri - ‘Sheba the son of Bichri’ ( 2 Samuel 20:1 ) should rather be ‘Sheba the Bichrite,’ i
Sheba (2) - Sheba was a wealthy region of Arabia Felix or Yemen (1 Kings 10:1; Psalms 72:10; Psalms 72:15, where "Sheba" is Joktanite, "SEBA" Cushite ; Job 1:15, the Keturahite Sheba, Job 6:19; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:22, it was the Sheba son of Raamah and grandson of Cush that carried on the Indian traffic with Palestine in conjunction with the Keturahite Sheba (Joel 3:8). The Cushite Sheba and his brother Dedan settled along the Persian gulf, but afterward were combined with the Joktanite Sabean kingdom. " The kingdom probably was called "Sheba" (Seba means "turned red"), its reigning family Himyer; the old name was preserved until the founding of the modern Himyeritic kingdom about a century B. ...
"The queen of Sheba" (1 Kings 10:1-2; 1 Kings 10:10) ruled in Arabia, not Ethiopia, as the Abyssinian church allege; Sheba being in the extreme Sheba of Arabia, "she came (a distance of nearly a thousand miles) from the uttermost parts of the earth," as then known, to hear the wisdom of Solomon (Matthew 12:42; Luke 11:31). Sheba. Or Sheba is a transcriber's error, repeating the end of Βeer-sheba ; for the number of names in Joshua 19:2-6 including Sheba is 14, whereas 13 is the number stated, and in 1 Chronicles 4:28 Sheba is omitted in the list of Simeon. But Conder (Palestine Exploration, January 1875) identifies Sheba with Tell el Seba, two miles of Beersheba, and on the line to Moladah (Joshua 19:2); its well is a quarter of a mile W
She'ba - The occasion seized by Sheba was the emulation between the northern and southern tribes on David's return. (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
She'ba - The occasion seized by Sheba was the emulation between the northern and southern tribes on David's return. (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
She'ba - The occasion seized by Sheba was the emulation between the northern and southern tribes on David's return. (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
Sheba - The memorable queen of Sheba renders this name familiar to the lover of the Bible. Sheba signifies captivity, from Shaba
Sabaeans - See Sheba
Beer-Sheba - (bee' uhr-sshee' baw) Beer-sheba and its surrounding area factors significantly in the Old Testament from the earliest sojourns of the patriarchs (Genesis 21:1 ; Genesis 22:1 ; Genesis 26:1 ) to the return of the Hebrew exiles with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 ). Since it was an important crossroad to Egypt in the geographic center of the dry, semi-desert region known as the Negeb, Beersheba also served as the administrative center of the region. Settlement of the Beersheba area began before 3000 B. Abraham then named the place “Beer-sheba,” meaning “well of the oath” or preferably “well of the seven,” referring to seven lambs involved in the agreement. The Lord confirmed His promises with Isaac at Beer-sheba (Genesis 26:23-25 ), where Isaac renamed his father's well “Shibah. ” A well is found today outside the ruins of biblical Beer-sheba (Tell es-Sabaspgr), however, it cannot be the patriarchal well since it is dated much later, around the twelfth century. Isaac also lived in the area of Beer-sheba, and his son Jacob left there for Haran to seek a wife (Genesis 28:10 ). A crossroad to Egypt, Beer-sheba was a stopping place for Jacob many years later when he was encouraged by the Lord to continue on to Egypt where Joseph was awaiting him (Genesis 46:1-5 ). Because of these patriarchal events at Beer-sheba, it is thought that the city eventually and unfortunately became a pilgrimage destination for idolatry later during the monarchy (Amos 5:5 ; Amos 8:14 ). ...
Joshua gave Beer-sheba to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:28 ), and then to the tribe of Simeon whose territory lay within Judah's boundaries (Joshua 19:1-2 ,Joshua 19:1-2,19:9 ). Samuel's sons Joel and Abiah were unfair judges in Beer-sheba right before the monarchy began with Saul (1 Samuel 8:1-3 ). ...
Beer-sheba is mentioned idiomatically twelve times to indicate the northern and southern extremes of Israel, “Dan to Beersheba” (2 Samuel 24:2 , 1 Kings 4:25 ). This idiom also served to show the extent of the reforms of three southern kings: Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:4 , “Beer-sheba to mount Ephraim”), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:5 , “Beer-sheba even to Dan”), and Josiah (2 Kings 23:8 , “from Geba to Beer-sheba”). ...
Archaeology has shown Beer-sheba to be the administrative center of the Negeb by uncovering its large commercial storerooms and fortifications which were superior to the lesser cities in the area. After the punitive Exile of Judah, the people returned to Beer-sheba and its surrounding satellite towns with Nehemiah in the fifth century (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 ). ...
As the “gateway to the desert,” Beer-sheba was in a precarious place climatically, which is the backdrop of two person's prayers concerning death
Raamah - RAAMAH is called ( Genesis 10:7 = 1 Chronicles 1:9 [1]) a son of Cush, and father of Sheba and Dedan ( Genesis 10:28 ). of the ancient Sheba. Raamah is also associated with Sheba in Ezekiel 27:22 as trading with Tyre
Sabeans - Sheba, grandson of Cush. Sheba, descendant of Joktan. Sheba, son of Jokshan. For their localities see SEBA and Sheba
Sheba - Sheba (shç'ba), seven or an oath. The queen of Sheba visited Solomon, coming "to Jerusalem with a very great train, with camels that bear spices, and very much gold, and precious stones. A town in Simeon, mentioned between Beer-sheba and Moladah. Shema is named next to Moladah in Joshua 15:26, and is probably identical with this Sheba
Shibah - (sshih' buh) Modern translation spelling of Sheba (Genesis 26:33 )
Bich'ri - (first-born ), ( 2 Samuel 20:1 ) an ancestor of Sheba
Raama(h) - (ray' uh maw) Son of Cush (Genesis 10:7 ) and ancestor of Sheba and Dedan Arab tribes occupying southwest and west-central Arabia (1 Chronicles 1:9 ). Raamah and Sheba were trading partners of Tyre (Ezekiel 27:22 )
Sheba (1) - The tribe of Benjamin through Sheba sought to regain the ascendancy which it lost at Saul's fall. Judah alone remained faithful to David "from Jordan even to Jerusalem"; the rest of Israel followed Sheba. The division between Israel and Judah already had shown itself under Ishbosheth (2 Samuel 2:4-9), again at the close of Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 19:41-43), David felt the greatness of the crisis, "now shall Sheba do us more harm than did Absalom. " Sheba traversed the country gathering followers, and finally aimed at fortifying himself in Abel Beth Maachah in the far N. ) A woman in it saved the city by cutting off and casting Sheba's head to Joab (see Ecclesiastes 9:14-15)
Bichri - (Sheba: 2 Samuel 20:1
Bichri - Father of Sheba who rose against David
Dedan - Son of Raamah, son of Cush (Genesis 10:7), brother of Sheba. A second Dedan is son of Jokshan, son of Keturah (Genesis 25:3), and is brother of a second Sheba. the Semitic or Edomite Dedan, yet also connected with the Cushite "Sheba and Raamah" (Ezekiel 27:22) on the Persian gulf. The Semitic Sabeans, descended from Sheba tenth son of Joktan, dwelt in S. Ezekiel thus recounts the two channels of merchandise, Raamah on the Persian gulf, and Sheba on the Red Sea in Arabia
Chilmad - Unknown place associated with Sheba and Asshur, whose merchants traded with Tyre
Chil'Mad - (enclosure ), a place or country mentioned in conjunction with Sheba and Asshur
Seba - Its inhabitants are mentioned with Sheba. The inhabitants of both Sheba and Seba were called Sabæans by Greek and Latin writers, but the Hebrew words are distinct
Chilmad - A place or country unknown which, along with Sheba and Asshur, traded with Tyre (Ezekiel 27:23 )
Sabeans - Sabeans, descendants from Sheba, son of Cush. ]'>[1] Several are of opinion, that from them came the queen of Sheba, 1 Kings 10:1-2 ; and that of these Sabeans the psalmist speaks, Psalms 72:10 , "The kings of Arabia and Sheba shall give gifts;" and Jeremiah 6:20 : "What are the perfumes of Sheba to me?" and Isaiah 60:6 : "All who come from Sheba shall offer gold and perfumes. Sabeans, sons of Shebah, son of Reumah. Josephus brings the queen of Sheba from thence, and pretends that it had the name of Sheba, or Saba, before that of Meroe
Shebah - A well, dug by the servants of Isaac, and named Shebah, signifying 'an oath. See BEER-SHEBA
Jok'Shan - (fowler ), a son of Abraham and Keturah, ( Genesis 25:2,3 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) whose sons were Sheba and Dedan
Retinue - NAS, REB, NRSV, REB term for the attendants of the queen of Sheba (1 Kings 10:2 ; KJV, train; NIV, caravan)
Eli'am -
Father of Bath-sheba, the wife of David
Sabean - Descendants of Sheba, the son of Raamah (Genesis 10:7 ) or Joktan (Genesis 10:28 ; compare Genesis 25:3 ). The rich queen of Sheba visited Solomon (1 Kings 10:1 ). Some scholars think this is too far south and seek biblical Sheba in northern Arabia near Medina on the wadi esh-Shaba. Sheba in southern Arabia gained riches through trade with nearby Africa and with India, whose goods they transported and sold to the empires to the north. Sheba produced and traded incense
Seven - ) The Semitic has the word in common with the Indo-European languages; Hebrew Sheba answering to Latin septem , Greek hepta
Queen - No explicit mention of queens is made till we read of the "queen of Sheba. In Psalm 45:9 , the Hebrew for "queen" is not Malkah , One actually ruling like the Queen of Sheba, but Shegal , Which simply means the king's wife. , Southern Arabia, Sheba (Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 ) and the "queen of the Ethiopians" (Acts 8:27 ), Candace
Seba - The eldest son of Cush in Genesis 10:7 ( 1 Chronicles 1:9 ), named along with Sheba in Psalms 72:10 , and with Egypt and Cush in Isaiah 43:8 ; Isaiah 45:14 . This location, nearly opposite the ancient Sheba, gives some colour to the hypothesis that Seba is an African differentiation of Sheba (wh
Bichri - ” Father of Sheba, who led revolt against David after Absalom's revolt (2 Samuel 20:1 )
Agate - Hebrew Sheba (from Sheba whence it came to Tyre), Exodus 28:19; Exodus 39:12, is rightly translated "agate," a semi-transparent uncrystallized quartz, mainly silica, with concentric layers of various tints; the second stone of the third row on the high priest's breast-plate
Amasa - Upon the revolt of Sheba, the son of Bichri, David gave orders to Amasa to assemble all Judah and march against Sheba. Amasa not being able to form his army in the time prescribed, David directed Abishai to pursue Sheba with the guards
Chilmad - Named with Sheba and Asshur (Ezekiel 27:23)
Eliam - Father of Bath-sheba, or Bathshua
Berites - Palestine, visited by Joab in pursuing Sheba, son of Bichri (2 Samuel 20:14), "all the Berites
Jokshan - Son of Abraham and Keturah (Genesis 25:2-3; 1 Chronicles 1:32); father of Sheba and Dedan
Jokshan - Son of Abraham and Keturah, and father of Sheba (Saba) and Dedan ( Genesis 25:2 , 1 Chronicles 1:32 )
Sheba - In south-western Arabia was the land known in Bible times as Sheba. Like people of other Arab tribal groups, those of Sheba were merchants and traders. )...
Sheba was also the name of a number of individuals mentioned in the Old Testament
Bath-Sheba - Bath-sheba (bâth-shç'bah or bath'she-bah), daughter of the oath. Bath-sheba was the mother of Solomon, whose succession to the throne she took pains to secure, 1 Kings 1:15-31, and of three other sons, 1 Chronicles 3:5
ra'Amah - (horse's mane ), a son of Cush and father of the Cushite Sheba and Dedan
Sho'Bab -
Son of David by Bath-sheba
Sheba - Sheba, in fact, was Saba in Southern Arabia, the Sabaeans of classical geography, who carried on the trade in spices with the other peoples of the ancient world. Sheba had become a monarchy before the days of Solomon. Sheba took advantage of this state of things, and raised the standard of revolt, proclaiming, "We have no part in David. David seeing it necessary to check this revolt, ordered Abishai to take the gibborim, "mighty men," and the body-guard and such troops as he could gather, and pursue Sheba. Sheba took refuge in Abel-Bethmaachah, a fortified town some miles north of Lake Merom. While Joab was engaged in laying siege to this city, Sheba's head was, at the instigation of a "wise woman" who had held a parley with him from the city walls, thrown over the wall to the besiegers, and thus the revolt came to an end
Shema - ...
...
A town in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:26 ); the same as Sheba (ver
Queen - 1: βασίλισσα (Strong's #938 — Noun Feminine — basilissa — bas-il'-is-sah ) the feminine of basileus, "a king," is used (a) of the "Queen of Sheba," Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 ; of "Candace," Acts 8:27 ; (b) metaphorically, of "Babylon," Revelation 18:7
Sheba - Of "the queen of Sheba," mention is made 1 Kings 10:1-2 , &c; 2 Chronicles 9:1-2 , &c; Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 . Josephus says, that Sheba was the ancient name of the city of Meroe, before Cambyses gave it that of his sister; and that it was from thence the queen came of whom we are speaking
Seba - The kings of Sheba and Seba are mentioned together in Psalm 72:10
Raamah - Sheba and Dedan are Raamah's sons (Ezekiel 27:22)
Zephath - The site is identified with khirbet Masas on the main road from Beer-sheba to the Arabah valley
Abel (of) Beth-Maacah - Where Sheba took refuge from Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:14-18 ); it was captured by Ben-hadad ( 1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser ( 2 Kings 15:29 ); corresponding to the modern Abil , west of Tell el-Kadi , and north of Lake Huleh
Raamah - He was father of Sheba and Dedan, whose descendants are supposed to have settled along the shores of the Persian Gulf
Gold - Several places axe mentioned by the sacred writers as abounding in gold; such as Ophir, Job 28:16; Parvaim, 2 Chronicles 3:6; Sheba and Raamah, Ezekiel 27:22
Beersheba - It became a part of Simeon's lot, Joshua 19:1,2 ; and after the settlement of the land it is constantly referred to as the most southern part of the land possessed, as Dan is pointed to as the most northern; thus 'from Dan to Beer-sheba' was the common expression for the whole territory even in the days of Solomon. ...
The prophet Amos warns the people not to trust in any places of renown or of former blessing, as Bethel, Gilgal, nor Beersheba; the glory of all had faded: they must seek Jehovah, and they should live. On the return of the exiles some of them dwelt at Beer-sheba, and from thence northward to the valley of Hinnom. Beer-sheba is identified with Bir es Seba, 31 15' N, 34 48' E
Queen (2) - —A title occurring only once in the Gospels (Matthew 12:42, Luke 11:31), in our Lord’s reference to the queen of Sheba as ‘the queen of the south. ’ The visit of the queen of Sheba to king Solomon is related in 1 Kings 10:1-13 and in 2 Chronicles 9:1-9, and the chief object of her journey was to satisfy herself as to his great wisdom, the report of which had reached her, although she was also attracted by the accounts which had been brought to her of his riches and magnificence. ’...
The connexion between the case of the Ninevites and that of the queen of Sheba does not lie on the surface. ...
Abyssinian legend has many strange tales of the queen of Sheba, declaring that she came from Ethiopia, that her name was Maqueda, and that she had a son by Solomon. Conti Rossini; Legend of the Queen of Sheba, ed. All this, however, probably rests on a confusion between Seba (סְבָא) and Sheba (עְבָא), cf. that Sheba was in South Arabia; her land was accordingly more than a thousand miles from Jerusalem, a fact which justifies our Lord’s words, ἐκ τῶν περάτων τῆς γῆς (cf
Seba - (See Sheba. Seba is distinct from Sheba , which is Semitic; Seba is Hamitic
Telaim - Suggested sites include khirbet Umm es-Salafeh southwest of Kurnub and khirbet Abu Tulul twelve miles southeast of Beer-Sheba
Queen - This is applied, as now, to one reigning in her own right, as the queen of Sheba, 2 Chronicles 9:1-12 ; and Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, Acts 8:27 . The title was also given to the consort of a reigning sovereign, as queen Esther; and to the queen-mother, who often had great influence at court, as Bathsheba, Jezebel, etc
Parvaim - It was possibly from this place that the ‘gold of Sheba’ ( Psalms 72:15 ; cf
Bethzur - It commanded the road from Beer-sheba to Jerusalem, and is often referred to in the Wars of the Maccabees
Sabeans - In Joel 3:8 the descendants of Sheba, son of Joktan, are meant
Sheba, Queen of - Sheba, QUEEN OF . 1 Kings 10:1-13 narrates a visit of the contemporary queen of Sheba to king Solomon. 842 b , Samsç, queen of Aribu, immediately precedes It’amara, king of Sheba. Riddles, proverbs, apologues, and stories supply much of the material for the leisured conversation of the Arabs, but the queen of Sheba would visit her brother monarch with a more practical object than these. ), without naming Sheba, gives an account of the visit to Solomon of a woman who was queen of Egypt and Ethiopia
Sabeans - And it is very probable that by the men of Sheba is meant the same. It is a blessed thought however, what is said, Psalms 72:1-20 throughout, concerning the ultimate extension and prosperity of the Redeemer's kingdom "when the kings of Sheba and of Seba shall offer gifts; yea, when all kings shall fall down before him, all nations shall serve him
Adonijah - But David, being informed by Bath-sheba and Nathan, immediately ordered Solomon to be anointed king; and the intelligence of this broke up the conspiracy. He did not remain quiet, but, after David's death, persuaded Bath-sheba to ask for him Abishag, a woman of bis father's harem
Ephah - This tribe appears in Isaiah 60:6 as engaged in the transport of gold and frankincense from Sheba
Queen - It is applied to a ruling queen, as the queen of Sheba, 1 Kings 10:1; and to Athaliah, 2 Kings 11:1-21; to the wives of the king, Esther 1:9; Esther 7:1; and to the queen-mother, as Bathsheba, Maachah, 1 Kings 2:19; 1 Kings 15:13; and to Jezebel, 2 Kings 10:13
am'mi-el - (2 Samuel 9:4 ; 17:27 ) ...
Father of Bath-sheba, (1 Chronicles 3:5 ) called 2 Samuel 11:3 ) ...
The sixth son of Obed-edom, (1 Chronicles 26:5 ) and one of the doorkeepers of the temple
Riddle, - The riddles which the queen of Sheba came to ask of Solomon, (1 Kings 10:1 ; 2 Chronicles 9:1 ) were rather "hard questions" referring to profound inquiries
the Queen of Sheba - THE QUEEN OF THE SOUTH SHALL RISE UP IN THE JUDGMENT WITH THE MEN OF THIS GENERATION, AND CONDEMN THEM...
I SHALL take up somewhat high ground with you concerning the Queen of Sheba. As I see her, the Queen of Sheba came to Jerusalem on the very highest of errands. ...
The first thing that is told us concerning the Queen of Sheba is this, that she had heard in Sheba concerning the Name of the Lord. It may very well be that this has bribed my eyes and perverted my judgment in the matter of the Queen of Sheba. If this sacred writer means nothing more by it but a sonorous and a stately turn of expression when he mentions the Name of the Lord as the motive of the Queen of Sheba's mission to Jerusalem; if he means as little by it as the run of the commentators say that he means, then, all I can say is that he has set a trap for my feet in the text. Some of those merchantmen who went down to the Red Sea in ships, and did business for Solomon all along its shores in gold, and silver, and ivory, and apes, and peacocks, and almug-trees, and what not, one of their ships on one occasion was driven in for want of fresh water near the summer palace of the Queen of Sheba. And as the seamen of Israel filled their water-pots, it was an ordinance that they should sing, saying, Spring up, O well; in the Name of the Lord, spring up! When, who should pass by but the Queen of Sheba herself with her maidens with her? Sing still another of the songs of Zion, she said to Solomon's sailors. ' And ever after that day the Queen of Sheba watched at her window for the ships of Solomon, till, above all else, the Name of the Lord took entire hold of her heart. The Queen of Sheba had lords many and gods many of her own. But there was no name of any god given in Sheba that took such hold of the Queen of Sheba's heart as did the Name of the God of Israel. Till she took a very great train, with camels that bare spices, and very much gold, and precious stones, there came no such abundance of spices as these which the Queen of Sheba brought to Jerusalem, because of the Name of the Lord. And that is the explanation of Matthew Henry's unaccountable slander that some of the Queen of Sheba's questions that she put to Solomon, some were frivolous, some were captious, and some were over-curious. And when I read with my own eyes all I can find about the Queen of Sheba, I see neither caption, nor frivolity, nor idle curiosity about her. The sacred writer knew far more about the Queen of Sheba than the minister of Chester did; and what he says about her questions is this, that they were hard to Solomon to answer; especially when she went deep down into her heart for her questions. ' I suppose the sacred writer means all matters, or, at least, very many matters connected with the throne and the state of Sheba. The Queen of Sheba had heard in the south country all about Solomon's dream at Gibeon. At the same time, her heart in Sheba at its fullest of hard questions was not a New Testament heart, and could not in Sheba be. Oh no, sacred writer! you do not really mean us to understand that the Queen of Sheba told to any man all that was in her heart. The Queen of Sheba was like one of those children in Israel who asked their fathers at every passover supper, What mean ye by this service? Only, she was not a child, but a woman of a strong understanding and a deep heart, and both Solomon and the high priest and the prophet, all three together, were at their wits' end; it took them all their might to open up all the parts of the temple and its sacrifices to her satisfaction: the reason of this, and the reason of that; the use of this, and the use of that; the antitype of this, and the antitype of that-she both hearing them and asking them questions. ...
...
No; there was neither captiousness nor frivolity in the Queen of Sheba when she came out of her own country, and neither was there detraction, nor depreciation, nor envy when she returned home. Had I been a king, and had I been shown through Solomon's temple, and through his palace, and through all that the Queen of Sheba saw in Jerusalem, I know only too well what would have been in my heart. ...
Returning toward the same south a thousand years after the Queen of Sheba, the Ethiopian eunuch sat in his chariot and read Esaias the prophet. Esaias had not yet risen in the day of the Queen of Sheba; but she had the best reading of her day in her hand as she rode south. ' And then this beside it in the same gold from a Psalm for Solomon: 'The kings of Tarshish and of the isles shall bring presents; the kings of Sheba and Seba shall offer gifts. And He shall live, and to Him shall be given of the gold of Sheba: and blessed be His glorious Name for ever; and let the whole earth be filled with His glory
Abelbethmaachah - It was besieged in the rebellion of Sheba, 2 Samuel 20:13-22 ; eighty years afterwards it was taken by Ben- hadad, 1 Kings 15:20 , and again, after 200 years, by Tiglathpileser, 2 Kings 15:29
Bethzur - Its ruins are still seen on a hill which bears the name of Beit-Sur, and which commands the road from Beer-sheba and Hebron to Jerusalem from the south
Beer - For example, Beer-sheba means “well of seven
Beer-Sheba - ...
Amos 8:14 (b) Israel is represented as committing the sin of presumption in believing that GOD will not punish them for their idolatry because of the oath that he made at the well of Beer- Sheba
Moriah - On the third day after leaving Beer-sheba, Abraham saw the mount afar off, and it was doubtless some lonely spot suitable for such an incident
Mother - The king's mother, as appears in the case of Bath-sheba, was treated with special honor
Sheba - ' (The name 'Sheba' occurs also in Job 6:19 ; Psalm 72:10,15 ; Isaiah 60:6 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Ezekiel 27:22,23 ; Ezekiel 38:13 ; but it is uncertain to which of the above three races each passage refers. The 'south' well agrees with the locality of the descendants of Sheba, the son of Joktan
Sheba - ' (The name 'Sheba' occurs also in Job 6:19 ; Psalm 72:10,15 ; Isaiah 60:6 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Ezekiel 27:22,23 ; Ezekiel 38:13 ; but it is uncertain to which of the above three races each passage refers. The 'south' well agrees with the locality of the descendants of Sheba, the son of Joktan
Agate - This may be the agate properly so called, a semi-transparent crystallized quartz, probably brought from Sheba, whence its name
Tamarisk - Abraham planted a tamarisk at Beer-sheba (Genesis 21:33 ), and Saul was buried beneath one at Jabesh-gilead (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Shema - also Sheba, 4
Seba - It is, however, believed by some that this tribe first settled near the Persian Gulf (probably along with the descendants of Sheba, another descendant of Ham), and afterwards migrated into Africa
Agate - Its Hebrew name is, perhaps, derived from the country whence the Jews imported it; for the merchants of Sheba brought to the market of Tyre all kinds of precious stones, Ezekiel 27:22
am'Asa - (2 Samuel 19:13 ) Joab afterwards, when they were both in pursuit of the rebel Sheba, pretending to salute Amasa stabbed him with his sword
Sabeans - This word represents two distinct people, who, in accordance with the original Hebrew, might have been more properly called Sebaeans and Shebaeans. ...
The queen of Sheba, who visited Solomon, 1 Kings 10:1-29 2 Chronicles 9:1-31 Matthew 12:42 , and made him presents of gold, ivory, and costly spices, was probably the mistress of this region; indeed, the Sabeans were celebrated, on account of their important commerce in these very products, among the Greeks also, Job 6:19 Isaiah 60:6 Jeremiah 6:20 Ezekiel 27:22 38:13 Psalm 72:10,15 Joel 3:8 . The tradition of this visit of the queen of Sheba to Solomon has maintained itself among the Arabs, who call her Balkis, and affirm that she became the wife of Solomon. It is possible that these descendants of the Ethiopian Sheba may have had their residence in Africa; but the question of these two Shebas is obscure and difficult to determine. The Sebaeans and Shebaeans are both mentioned in the same prophecy, Psalm 72:10 , as coming to lay their offerings at the feet of Christ
Uzal - The capital of the Yemen (Arabia Felix) was originally Awzal (now San'a), anciently the most flourishing of Arab communities, its rivals being Sheba and Sephar
Keturah - ]'>[1] and the Chronicler in the passages referred to; said to be the ancestress of sixteen tribes, several of which are distinctly Arabian Midian, Sheba, Dedan
Minaeans - Arabian people dwelling north of the Sabæans (Sheba), who in the 9th and 8th cents
Lorrain, Claude de - He left a large number of canvases, among the best-known being "The Embarcation of the Queen of Sheba," and the "Nuptials of Isaac and Rebecca," both in the National Gallery in London, and "The Village Dance" in the Louvre
Abelbethmaachah - It was here that Sheba took shelter from Joab, but was put to death by the inhabitants
Bath-Sheba - Bath-sheba was the mother of Solomon, whose succession to the throne she took pains to secure, 1 Kings 1:15
Cherethites - They were fiercely loyal to David through the rebellions of Absalom and Sheba, and they supported David’s chosen successor, Solomon, when there was an attempted coup against him (2 Samuel 15:18; 2 Samuel 20:7; 1 Kings 1:38)
Abel-Beth-Maacha - Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David, 80 years before the Syrian invasion under Benhadad, Asa's ally, was here besieged by Joab; and the city was saved by the proverbial shrewdness of its inhabitants, who hearkened to their fellow townswoman's wise advice to sacrifice the one man Sheba to the safety of the whole inhabitants
Seven - Sheba' (which is akin to saba', signifying "to be full, abundant"), sometimes used as an expression of fullness, e
Nathan - Third son of David by Bath-sheba ( 2 Samuel 5:14 , but note 2 Samuel 12:24 ). The next appearance of Nathan is in connexion with the parable of the ewe lamb, by which David was self-convicted of his sin with Bath-sheba ( 2 Samuel 12:1-15 )
Questions - Agreeably to this custom, the queen of Sheba came to prove Solomon with hard questions, 1 Kings 10:1
Gold - A well-known valuable metal, found in many parts of the world, and obtained anciently in Ophir, Job 28:16 ; Parvaim, 2 Chronicles 3:6 ; Sheba, and Raamah, Ezekiel 27:22
Bath'-Sheba, - When Adonijah attempted to set aside the succession promised to Solomon, Bath-sheba informed the king of the conspiracy
Shibah - A name given to a well dug by Isaac ( Genesis 26:33 ), which gave its name to the town Beersheba (wh. The word means, according to the writer, ‘an oath’; and Beersheba is ‘the well of the oath,’ so named from the swearing of the oath of friendship between Isaac and Abimelech ( Genesis 26:31 ). There is also a play on the word shĕbû‘ah , ‘oath’ and Sheba ‘, ‘seven,’ as a sacrifice of seven lambs was offered
Samuel - The places to which he is said to have gone on circuit were all in the south of Palestine, 1 Samuel 7:1-17; and when he appointed his sons to office it was in Beer-sheba, the extreme south
Gold - (1 Kings 6:22 ) 10 passim ; ( Esther 1:6 ; Song of Solomon 3:9,10 ; Jeremiah 10:9 ) The chief countries mentioned as producing gold are Arabia, Sheba and Ophir
Sheba - Sheba . Again, whilst Genesis 10:28 has Joktan as the immediate ancestor of Sheba, Genesis 25:3 has Jokshan . All recognize three such divisions: (1) That of the mâkarib or priest-kings; (2) that of the kings of Sheba; (3) that of the kings of Sheba and Dhû-Raidân. The place would speedily have been carried by assault had not a woman, whose judgment was highly esteemed by the inhabitants, persuaded them to throw Sheba’s head over the wall to Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:16-22 ). The Sheba of Joshua 19:2 is out of place after Beer-sheba. MSS leave out Sheba, as does also the parallel passage 1 Chronicles 4:28 . ]'>[3] , was subsequently changed to Sheba
Riddle - The Queen of Sheba tested Solomon with “hard questions” or riddles ( 1 Kings 10:1-13 )
Seba, Sabeans - ...
The queen of Saba (Sheba) traveled to Jerusalem (about 1,500 miles) during Solomon's reign to strike trade agreements with the thriving Israelites (1 Kings 10:1-10 )
Gold - Arabia, Sheba, and Ophir, Uphaz, and Parvaim (used for "gold" in Job 22:24), were the gold producing countries
Abishai - He commanded forces against Sheba, who led a northern rebellion against David (2 Samuel 20:1 )
Gold - "The gold of Sheba," Psalms 72:15 , is, in the Septuagint and Arabic versions, "the gold of Arabia. " Sheba was the ancient name of Arabia Felix
Stones, Precious - (Ezekiel 27:16 ) The merchants of Sheba and Raamah in south Arabia, and doubtless India and Ceylon supplied the markets of Tyre with various precious stones
Hazor - " It is supposed to have been the home of Judas Iscariot, the man of Kerioth, Matthew 10:4; Conder suggested Kheshram, north of Beer-sheba, as the site of this Hazor
Abishai - He broke through their host around Bethlehem, and lifted up his spear against 300, and slew them, 2 Samuel 23:14-18 : and was with David in the matters of Shimei, Absalom, and Sheba
Tarshish - kings of Sheba," i. and Sheba in the S
Balm - There is an Arab tradition that the tree yielding this balm was brought by the queen of Sheba as a present to Solomon, and that he planted it in his gardens at Jericho
Border - Sheba and Raamah border the Persian gulf
Beersheba - Beersheba means "well of the oath". : "from Dan to Beersheba" (compare in David's census, 1 Chronicles 21:2; 2 Samuel 24:2-7) comprehends the whole. Called so from the oath of peace between Abraham and Abimelech, king of the Philistines (Genesis 21:31), else from the seven (sheba' ) ewe lambs slain there: indeed Sheba' , an oath, is from the custom of binding one's self by seven things, as Abraham made the seven ewe lambs a pledge of his covenant with Abimelech. Seven (sheba' which also may explain the name) wells are at the place, so that a different one may have been named by Isaac from that named by Abraham. Beersheba was given to Simeon, in the extreme S. ...
"From Geba to Beersheba" or "from Beersheba to mount Ephraim" was the formula comprehending the southern kingdom of Judah after the severance of Israel's ten tribes (2 Kings 23:8; 2 Chronicles 19:4), and on the return from Babylon still narrower, "from Beersheba to the valley of Hinnom" (Nehemiah 11:30). Ahaziah's wife, Zibiah, mother of Joash, was of Beersheba (2 Kings 12:1. ) It became seat of an idolatry akin to that of Bethel or Gilgal, so that it was a formula of superstition, "the manner (cultus, or religion, as in Acts 9:2 the new religion of Christ is designated "this way") of Beersheba liveth" (Amos 5:5; Amos 8:14)
Races - ), (3) Midianites; ( b ) South Arabs (Sheba)
Cupbearer - The cupbearers among the officers of king Solomon’s household ( 1 Kings 10:5 ) impressed the queen of Sheba, and they are mentioned among other indications of the grandeur of his court, which was modelled upon courts of other Oriental kings
Ahithophel - Some have endeavored to account for Ahithophel's treason by the supposition that, as it seems likely he was Bath-sheba's grandfather, he wished to revenge on David the evil done to her. The success of Absalom would probably have been fatal to Bath-sheba; it would certainly have barred Solomon, Ahithophel's great-grandson, from the throne
Beer-Sheba - Beer-sheba (bç'er-shç'bah, or be-er'she-bah) well of the oath. Beersheba was given to Judah, Joshua 15:28, and then to Simeon, Joshua 19:2; 1 Chronicles 4:28. In the often-quoted "from Dan even to Beersheba," Judges 2:1, it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as San the northern
Uri'ah - He married Bath-sheba a woman of extraordinary beauty, the daughter of Eliam--possibly the same as the son of Ahithophel, and one of his brother officers, (2 Samuel 23:34 ) and hence, perhaps, Uriah's first acquaintance with Bath-sheba
Gold - It was found in Arabia, Sheba, and Ophir (1 Kings 9:28 ; 10:1 ; Job 28:16 ), but not in Palestine
Gifts - When Solomon reigned supreme, 'all the earth' sought to Solomon to hear his wisdom, and brought presents, as did the queen of Sheba
Cush - ...
|...
|¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯|...
Sheba DEDAN
Dedan - Here as in Genesis 10:27 , Dedan's brother is Sheba
Well - Beer also occurs in several place names indicating the location of important wells: Beer ( Numbers 21:16 ); Beer-elim (Isaiah 15:8 ); Beeroth (Deuteronomy 10:6 ); Beer-lahai-roi (Genesis 16:14 ); Beer-sheba (Genesis 21:31 )
Blessed - ” At least, the Queen of Sheba flatteringly told Solomon that this was the case (1 Kings 10:8)
Kadesh - It was 40 to 50 miles directly south of Beer-sheba
Sarah - She died in the valley of Hebron, and Abraham came to Beer-sheba to mourn for her, after which he bought a field of Ephron the Hittite, wherein was a cave hewn in the rock, called Machpelah, where Sarah was buried, Genesis 23:9
Ophir - Placed between Sheba and Havilah, Ophir must be in Arabia. The Ishmaelites abounded in gold: Numbers 31:22; Judges 8:24-26; Psalms 72:15 "gold of Sheba (Arabia)
Abimelech - It was confirmed by a mutual oath at Beer-sheba (Genesis 21:22-34 ). Abimelech afterwards visited him when he was encamped at Beer-sheba, and expressed a desire to renew the covenant which had been entered into between their fathers (Genesis 26:26-31 )
Cherethims - The Cherethites and Pelethites were called out from attending the king's person only on extraordinary emergencies, as the rebellion of Sheba (2 Samuel 20:6-7)
South - The queen of Sheba was referred to as the queen of the South (Matthew 12:42)
Adoni'Jah - " (1 Kings 1:52 ) The death of David quickly followed on these events; and Adonijah begged Bath-sheba to procure Solomon's consent to his marriage with Abishag, who had been the wife of David in his old age
Queen - Female regents were known in the ancient Near East (1 Kings 10:1-13 , the queen of Sheba; Acts 8:27 , the Ethiopian Candace). Nathan enlisted Bathsheba rather than Solomon in his plan to have Solomon confirmed as king (1 Kings 1:11-40 )
Solomon - ” Tenth son of David and the second son of Bathsheba, Solomon became the third king of Israel and reigned forty years about 1000 B. ...
Old Testament Solomon was born to David and Bathsheba after the death of their first son (2 Samuel 12:24 ). See 1 Kings 3:16 ) and by the visit of the queen of Sheba (1 Kings 10:1 ). Jesus noted that the queen of Sheba came a long way to see Solomon and that “something greater than Solomon is here” (Matthew 12:42 ; Luke 11:31 )
Solomon - Son of David and Bathsheba. [1] He reigned forty years over the united kingdom from B. The queen of Sheba came also
Becher - From Becher came also Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David (2 Samuel 20); also Shimei, son of Gera of Bahurim (2 Samuel 17:5), "of the house of Saul
Balm - The queen of Sheba, according to Josephus, brought "the root of the balsam" as a present to Solomon ( Camel - This may be a prophecy of Isaiah 60:6 which describes camel riders from Sheba coming to bring gold, incense, and praises of the Lord
Grove - Abraham planted a memorial tree in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of Jehovah
Trumpet - Joab sounded the trumpet, to give the signal of retreat to his soldiers, in the battle against those of Abner's party, and in that against Absalom; and lastly, in the pursuit of Sheba the son of Bichri
God - ...
The name 'êl ‛ôlâm was associated predominantly with Beer-sheba (
Abraham planted a commemorative tree in Beer-sheba and invoked the name of the Lord as 'êl ‛ôlâm. Although Beer-sheba may have been a place where the Canaanites worshiped originally, the area later became associated with the veneration of the God of Abraham. ...
At a subsequent period, Jacob journeyed to Beer-sheba and offered sacrifices to the God of Isaac his father. He did not offer sacrifices to 'êl ‛ôlâm by name, however; and although he saw a visionary manifestation of God, he received no revelation that this was the God Abraham had venerated at Beer-sheba
Add - ” The Queen of Sheba told Solomon, “Thy wisdom and prosperity exceedeth the fame which I heard,” or literally, “You add [5] wisdom and prosperity to the report which I heard” (1 Kings 10:7)
Allotment - Simeon received land within the southernmost portion of Judah's territory, including Beer-sheba and Ziklag
Wilderness - ...
The wilderness of DAMASCUS was far north, and that of BEER-SHEBA far south; and that of SHUR, still farther south-west
Gentile - The Psalmist says, that the Lord would give the Gentiles to the Messiah for his inheritance; that Egypt and Babylon shall know him; that Ethiopia shall hasten to bring him presents; that the kings of Tarshish, and of the isles, the kings of Arabia and Sheba, shall be tributary to him, Psalms 2:8 ; Psalms 67:4 ; Psalms 72:9-10
Tarshish (1) - If Sheba and Dedan stand for the commerce of the East, Tarshish may stand for that of the West ( Ezekiel 38:13 )
Arabia Felix - The queen of Sheba, who visited Solomon, 1 Kings 10:1 , was probably queen of part of Arabia Felix
Ophir - A region most probably in Arabia (as it is mentioned between Sheba and Havilah in Genesis 10:29 ), famous for the excellence of its gold, which was brought to Solomon by his Red Sea navy ( 1 Kings 9:28 )
Japheth - , the Ethiopians; 'Mizraim,' the people of Egypt; 'Sheba and Dedan,' or certain of the Southern Arabs; and 'Nimrod,' or the ancient people of Babylon, four races between which the latest linguistic researches have established a close affinity" (Rawlinson's Hist
Cush (2) - Oldest son of Ham; his descendants were Seba, Havilah, Sabtah, Raamah, Sabtechah; Raamah's sons, Sheba and Dedan; Nimrod, mentioned after the rest as Cush's son, was probably a more remote descendant: Cush ethnologically includes not only Ethiopia (meaning the sunburnt, Nubia and N
Gibeon - ) Here immediately at "the great stone in Gibeon," some old landmark, Joab pursuing the Benjamite rebel Sheba among the towns of his tribe met and treacherously murdered Amasa (2 Samuel 20:5-10)
Generation - Also it rightly classifies under the "sons of Ham" Cash (Ethiopians), Mizraim (Egyptians), Sheba and Dedan (certain southern Arabs), and Nimrod (i
Arabia - Sheba answers to Yemen (Psalms 72:10), whose queen visited Solomon (1 Kings 10:1). There was a Cushite or Ethiopian Sheba, as well as a Shemitic Sheba (Genesis 10:7; Genesis 10:28)
Gold - ...
“Gold” was bought and sold as an object of merchandise: “The merchants of Sheba and Raamah, they were thy merchants: they [1] with chief of all spices, and with all precious stones, and gold” ( Spices - The land of Sheba, present day Yemen, had an extensive commerce in spices. The queen of Sheba made a long journey of 1,200 miles because she was afraid that her caravan spice business would be hurt by Solomon's merchant fleet
Gog - ...
Sheba, Dedan, Tarshish, mercantile peoples, though not openly joining his invasion of Israel, yet from selfish love of gain, sympathize with it secretly (Ezekiel 38:13; Ezekiel 39:6, "the isles"); they shall therefore share antichrist's doom, the robber shall be robbed in righteous retribution, the spoiler spoiled, and the slayer slain
Abijah - His conduct, along with that of his brother, as a judge in Beer-sheba, to which office his father had appointed him, led to popular discontent, and ultimately provoked the people to demand a royal form of government
Joseph - ) has been variously explained as ‘child of the Sabbath,’ ‘son of Sheba,’ ‘warrior,’ or ‘old man’s son
Tree (2) - By and by the queen of Sheba came with her gifts and offerings
Abraham - At different times he lived in Shechem, Bethel, Hebron, and Beer-sheba
Joab - ...
Above all, Joab was a skilled general ; this is seen by the number of victories he gained, namely, over the army of Ishbosheth under the leadership of Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:12-32 ); over the Jebusites ( 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 ); over the Syrians and Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-29 ); over Absalom ( 2 Samuel 18:5-17 ); over Sheba ( 2 Samuel 20:4-22 )
Camel - The queen of Sheba came with a caravan of camels when she came to see the wisdom of Solomon (1 Kings 10:2 ; 2 Chronicles 9:1 )
Find - The idea is that Sheba would “find,” enter, and defend himself in fortified cities
Abyssinian Church - Some of them claim relation to the Israelites, through the queen of Sheba, so far back as the reign of Solomon
Armor - (e) Sheba, means a rod or staff, used once only to denote a weapon
Arms - (e) Sheba, means a rod or staff, used once only to denote a weapon
Sol'Omon - (2 Samuel 14:13 ; 15:1-6 ) The death of Absalom when Solomon was about ten years old left the place vacant, and David pledged his word in secret to Bath-sheba that he, and no other, should be the heir. Nothing that we know of Bath-sheba lends us to think of her as likely to mould her son's mind and heart to the higher forms of goodness. The journey of the queen of Sheba, though from its circumstances the most conspicuous, did not stand alone
Abram - His residence was now at Beer-sheba. The sacrifice was stayed by the angel of Jehovah, the promises were again confirmed to him, the spiritual blessings in them being prominently exhibited; and, with gratitude which even the sacred historian does not attempt to describe, Abraham returned to Beer-sheba. He seems to have removed from Beer-sheba to Kirjath-arba or Hebron; and there Sarah died when he was 137
Metals - ) Gold was imported from Ophir, Sheba, Parvaim, and Uphaz (1 Kings 9:27-28; 1 Kings 10:2; 1 Kings 10:10; 2 Chronicles 3:6; Jeremiah 10:9)
Greatness - The queen of Sheba attested to the great wisdom of Solomon (2 Chronicles 9:6 )
Mining And Metals - While it figured in the history of Israel from the beginning (see the spoils of Egypt [5], Midian [6], and Jericho [7]), it became specially plentiful in Palestine in the time of Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:14 ; 1 Kings 10:21 ), the main sources of it being Ophir ( 1 Kings 9:28 ; 1 Kings 10:11 ), Tarshish ( 1 Kings 10:22 ), and Sheba ( 1 Kings 11:2 , Psalms 72:15 ). Of these localities Havilah and Sheba were Arabian
Oaths - ...
There are two words in Hebrew for an oath; (1) shĕbû‘ah , which comes from the same root as the word for ‘seven’ ( Sheba’ ); the Heb
Oath - "Shaba," from Sheba' "seven" the sacred number, is the general word "swear"; compare the seven ewe lambs given by Abraham to Abimelech in covenanting (Genesis 21:30)
Ishmael - At first he was located in the wilderness of Beer-sheba and afterwards at Paran, a region between Canaan and mount Sinai
Camel - Rebekah came to Isaac riding upon a camel, Genesis 24:64 ; the queen of Sheba brought them to Solomon, and Hazael to Elisha, laden with the choicest gifts, 1 Kings 10:2 ; 2 Kings 8:9 ; and they were even made serviceable in war, 1 Samuel 30:17
David - ...
David, now at his ease instead of fighting the Lord's battles, falls into great sin respecting Bath-sheba and Uriah. The revolt of Sheba followed, and David feared it might be worse than that of Absalom; but by the wisdom of a woman Sheba alone was destroyed
Isaac - He submitted and removed to Beer-sheba
Strength - The Queen of Sheba was accompanied by a large escort of upperclass people from her homeland: “And she came to Jerusalem with a very great train …” (1 Kings 10:2)
Part - Sheba said, we have no part in David
Abraham - These years of peace and happiness were spent at Beer-sheba. " The promises made to Abraham were again confirmed (and this was the last recorded word of God to the patriarch); and he descended the mount with his son, and returned to his home at Beer-sheba (Genesis 22:19 ), where he resided for some years, and then moved northward to Hebron
Benjamin - Benjamin, under Sheba, a kinsman of Saul, led in the revolt against David when the quarrel provoked by David’s partisanship broke out between Judah and the northern tribes ( 2 Samuel 20:1 ff
Rehoboam - )...
With the same watchword of revolt as under Sheba (2 Samuel 19:43; 2 Samuel 20:1), Israel forsook Rehoboam (1 Kings 12:16), "what portion have we in David? To your tents, O Israel
Spirit - The queen of Sheba was left breathless when she saw the wisdom and wealth of Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:5 )
Samuel, Second Book of - Hanun, king of the Ammonites, by insulting the ambassadors sent to him in kindness by David, drew upon the Ammonites sore punishment, and upon the Syrians who went to their aid: a vivid illustration of the solemn fact that those who refuse grace will be dealt with in judgement...
2 Samuel 11 ; 2 Samuel 12 record the sad story of David's sin respecting Bathsheba, and the way he brought about the death of her husband. A smaller revolt by Sheba is crushed by his death
Covenant - 21:32): “Thus they made a covenant at Beer-sheba
Arabia - Among the better known tribal groups were Joktam and Sheba in the south (Genesis 10:25-29; 1 Kings 10:1-13; Psalms 72:10; Psalms 72:15; Isaiah 60:6) and Dedan and Kedar in the north (Isaiah 21:13-17; Isaiah 42:11; Jeremiah 25:23-24; Jeremiah 49:28; Ezekiel 25:13; Ezekiel 27:21)
Ointment - Solomon received an annual payment of perfume as tribute from his subjects (1 Kings 10:25 ); the queen of Sheba brought many costly spices as gifts to Solomon (1 Kings 10:2 ); Hezekiah, king of Judah, included valuable perfumed ointment and spices as part of his treasure (2 Kings 20:13 ; Isaiah 39:2 )
Spirit; Breath - Astonishment may take away one’s “breath”: “And when the queen of Sheba had seen all Solomon’s wisdom, and the home that he had built, And the meat of his table, … there was no more spirit in her [4]” (1 Kings 10:4-5)
Agur - In the names Eve, Cain, Seth, Noah, &c, before alluded to; in the appellation Nabal; in the enigmatical names in the first chapter of Hosea; in the descriptive names given to places, as Beer-sheba, Jehovah-jireh, Peniel, Bethel, Gilgal; and in many other instances, the meaning of the terms is either explained, or the circumstances are mentioned which led to their selection
David - His crimes in the case of Uriah and Bathsheba were heinous indeed; but on awaking from his dream of folly, he repented in dust and ashes, meekly submitted to reproof and punishment, and sought and found mercy from God. The rebellions of Absalom, Sheba, and Adonijah, the famine and plague that afflicted his people, the crimes of Joab, etc
Wells And Springs - Hence BEER , the Hebrew name for a well or spring, forms a part of many names of places, as Beeroth, Beer-sheba
Book(s) - ...
The Book of the Acts of Solomon Probably a biographical document that included such stories as Solomon's judgment between the two harlots (1 Kings 3:16-28 ), Solomon's administrative arrangements (1 Kings 4:1-19 ), and the visit of the Queen of Sheba (1 Kings 10:1-13 )
Cosmopolitanism - ‘the men of Nineveh … the queen of Sheba shall rise up in the judgment with this generation and shall condemn it’; Matthew 8:11 f
Zacharias - Here we need only note in it an evident allusion to his own name (signifying ‘Remembered by Jehovah’) and his wife’s (Elisabeth = Eli-sheba = ‘the oath of God’)—‘to remember his holy covenant; the oath which he sware to our father Abraham’ (Luke 1:72-73)
Solomon - Solomon was the son of David and Bathsheba ( 2 Samuel 12:24-25 ), presumably their eldest surviving child; his position in the lists of 2 Samuel 5:14 , 1 Chronicles 3:5 ; 1 Chronicles 14:4 is strange, perhaps due to emphasis. 1 Kings 1:13 implies a previous promise to Bathsheba, perhaps a ‘court secret’; the public proclamation of 1 Chronicles 22:2-19 , if at all historical, must be misplaced. He was easily foiled by the prompt action of Nathan and Bathsheba; Solomon himself was evidently young, though soon able to assert himself. His request to Bathsheba ( 1 Kings 2:13 ) may have been part of a renewed attempt on the kingdom (as heir he claims his father’s wives), or may have been due to real affection. Arabia; hence no doubt the visit of the queen of Sheba ( 1 Kings 10:1 ); the ‘presents’ exchanged would be really of the nature of barter, as illustrated by the Tell el-Amarna tablets. Later tradition added much; the solving of ‘riddles’ held a large place in the wisdom of the East, and we hear of the ‘hard questions’ of the queen of Sheba ( Psalms 10:1 ), and of a contest between Solomon and Hiram (Jos
Palestine - To the south, Palestine extends en to fifteen miles beyond Beer-sheba. Central Hill Country The second strip of land is the mountainous ridge beginning just north of Beer-sheba and extending through all of Judea and Samaria into upper Galilee
Jewels, Jewelry - The Queen of Sheba brought them to Solomon (1Kings 10:2,1 Kings 10:10 )
Solomon - Shelomoh), David's second son by Bathsheba, i. His elevation to the throne took place before his father's death, and was hastened on mainly by Nathan and Bathsheba, in consequence of the rebellion of Adonijah (1 Kings 1:5-40 ). " Among others thus attracted to Jerusalem was "the queen of the south" (Matthew 12:42 ), the queen of Sheba, a country in Arabia Felix
Gentiles (2) - On the other hand, the evil generation of whom the Pharisees were representatives, He declared should be condemned in the judgment by Gentiles, the men of Nineveh and the queen of Sheba (Matthew 12:41 f
Great, To Be; Heavy - The same phrase bears a different sense in 1 Kings 10:10, where it seems to be almost a substantive: “There came no more such abundance of spices as these which the queen of Sheba gave to king Solomon
Solomon - or SALOMON, son of David and Bathsheba, was born A. About the same time, the queen of Sheba came to Jerusalem, attracted by the great fame of the king
David - ...
Bathsheba became his wife after Uriah's death. The personal respect for David was sadly lowered by the incident of Bathsheba. Sheba, a Benjamite, headed a revolt of the men of Israel. After the suppression of the rebellion of Absalom and that of Sheba, ten comparatively peaceful years of David's life passed away
Solomon - Second child of David by Bathsheba. ...
Accordingly David swore to Bathsheba that her son should succeed. " The queen of Sheba's (Arabian tradition calls her Βalkis ) visit illustrates the impression made by his fame, which led "all the earth to seek to hear his wisdom which God had put in his heart"; she "hearing of his fame concerning the name of Jehovah" (i. (See Sheba. ...
The queen of Sheba confessed that she believed not the report until her own eyes saw its truth, yet that half was not told her, his wisdom and prosperity exceeded the fame which she had heard (compare spiritually John 1:46; 2 Chronicles 8:7-8)
Joab - David therefore, when Sheba's rebellion broke out, had to send Abishai to pursue the rebel at once, with Joab's men and all the mighty men. Joab so effectively besieged Abel of Beth Maachah that the townsmen were glad to save their town by sacrificing Sheba, throwing his head, at the suggestion of a wise woman in the town, over the wall to Joab
da'Vid - Underneath the splendor of his last glorious campaign against the Ammonites was a dark story, known probably at that time only to a very few --the double crime of adultery with Bath-sheba and the virtual murder of Uriah
Jacob - At Beer-sheba Jacob received further assurance of God's favor (Genesis 46:1-4 )
Elijah - Jehovah’s successful champion loses heart, and flees to Beer-sheba on the extreme south of Judah
Games - The questions put by the queen of Sheba to Solomon probably belong to the same category ( 1 Kings 10:1 ; 1 Kings 10:3 )
David - And then occurred those shameful deeds, the adultery with Bath-sheba, and the murder of Uriah, which at first, it seems, did not touch his conscience, but which, when charged home upon him by the prophet Nathan, humbled the guilty monarch in the dust. There was the defilement of Tamar, and the murder of his first-born Amnon, 2 Samuel 13:1-39; and then Absalom's unnatural rebellion and death, 2 Samuel 15:1-37; 2 Samuel 18:1-33; and Sheba's insurrection, 2 Samuel 20:1-26; and the plague for the numbering of the people, 2 Samuel 24:1-25; and Adonijah's seizure of the government, when the most long-tried counsellors of David deserted him, a movement that could be crushed only by the aged monarch's devolving his crown upon Solomon, 1 Kings 1:1-53; with various other griefs
David - In his first role as king, David acquires the kingdom and assures his tenure in office (the accounts about David and Saul, the rebellions of Absalom and Sheba) and founds a dynasty (the birth of Solomon, the rebellion of Adonijah, the elimination of other contenders and factions). These narratives are intertwined with the theme of David as a man: a husband and father (Michal, Bathsheba, Amnon, Absalom, Solomon, Adonijah). Sexuality is a motif in the accounts of the sin with Bathsheba, the death of the child from an adulterous union, one son's rape of a daughter, the competition for the father's bedmate Abishag, Uriah's refusal to visit his wife, the seizure of David's concubines, and the childlessness of Saul's daughter Michal. The account of David's relationship with Bathsheba not only prepares for the eventual accession of Solomon, but it also sets in motion a curse that will dog the remainder of David's life: death and sexual outrage will follow, and "the sword will never depart from [2] house" (2 Samuel 12:10 ). For example, the king who will not seize the kingdom from Saul (2 Samuel 2-5 ) is nevertheless willing to seize a woman who is the object of his desire (Bathsheba); she who is seemingly passive in her seduction will later seize the kingdom for Solomon. He omits any account of the rebellion of Absalom and Adonijah and the actions of Amnon and Shimei; he makes no mention of David's sins in connection with Bathsheba and Uriah. Instead of an aged, bed-ridden David who only saves the kingdom for Solomon at the last minute due to the promptings of Bathsheba and Nathan (1 Kings 1 ), the Chronicler shows a smooth transition of power without a ripple of dissent (1 Chronicles 21,28-29 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ) Canaanite religion was appropriated by the people of Judah from Geba to Beer-sheba (2 Kings 16:4-14 )
Jonah - Those who maintain the historicity of the Book of Jonah, and who hold that it contains a record of facts, find no special difficulties in our Lord’s allusions to it,—He referred to Jonah and to facts in his history, just as He referred to other historical personages and to facts in their history, as to Abraham, for instance, to Moses, or to the queen of Sheba; for such persons the only difficulties are the subordinate ones belonging to the exegesis and application of the passages in question. that our Lord would not naturally have said of persons whom a fiction represented as repentant, that they would rise up in the Judgment; nor would He have put as a parallel case to a fiction the facts of the queen of Sheba’s visit to Solomon
Meals - Saul and his mess-mates sat upon ‘seats’ ( 1 Samuel 20:25 ), the precise form of which is not specified, as did Solomon and the high officials of his court ( 1 Kings 10:5 , where the queen of Sheba admires the ‘sitting,’ i
Job - Ezekiel, Amos, and Obadiah, Jeremiah 49:7 ; Jeremiah 49:20 ; Ezekiel 25:13 ; Amos 1:11-12 ; Obadiah 1:8-9 , formed a principal part of Idumea; Bildad, of Shuah, who is always mentioned in conjunction with Sheba and Dedan, the first of whom was probably named after one of the brothers of Joktan or Kahtan, and the two last from two of his sons, all of them being uniformly placed in the vicinity of Idumea, Genesis 25:2-3 ; Jeremiah 49:8 ; Zophar of Naama, a city importing pleasantness, which is also stated by Joshua, Joshua 15:21 ; Joshua 15:41 , to have been situate in Idumea, and to have lain in a southern direction toward its coast, on the shores of the Red Sea; and Elihu, of Buz, which, as the name of a place, occurs only once in Sacred Writ, Jeremiah 25:23 , but is there mentioned in conjunction with Temen and Dedan; and hence necessarily, like them, a border city upon Uz or Idumea
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people
Division of the Earth - Of Cush's sons, Seba, Havilah, Sabtah, Sabtacha, and Raamah; and the sons of Raamah, Sheba, and Dedan, seem to have settled in Idumea and Arabia, from the similar names of places there; and of his descendants, Nimrod, the mighty hunter, first founded the kingdom of Babylon, and afterward of Assyria, invading the settlements of the Shemites, contrary to the divine decree
Pronunciation of Proper Names - ]'>[1] Abia′saph Ab′ia′saph Abl′asaph Abia′saph Abina′dab Ab′ina′dab Abin′adab Abina′dab Ad′ramme′lech Adram′melech Adram′melech Adramme′lech Antipat′ris Antipat′ris Antip′atris Antipa′tris Ba′al-pera′zim Ba′al-per′azim Ba′al Per′azim Ba′al-pera′zim Chedor′lao′mer Che′dorlao′mer Chedorla′omer Chedorlao′mer Debo′rah Deb′orah Deb′orah Debo′rah Deda′nim De′danim De′danim Deda′nim Em′maus Emma′us Emma′us Em′maus Eph′ratah Ephra′tah Eph′ratah Ephra′tah Habak′kuk Habak′kuk Habak′kuk and Hab′akkuk Habak′kuk Hav′ilah Hav′ilah Havi′lah Havil′ah Haza′el Haz′ael Ha′zael Haza′el Ich′abod I′chabod Ich′abod I′chabod Ja′haziel′ Jaha′ziel Jahaz′iel Mahalal′eel Mahalal′eel Maha′laleel Mahalale′el Mattath′ias Mattathi′as Mattathi′as Mat′tathi′as Meri′bah Meri′bah Mer′ibah Meri′bah Nazarene′ Nazare′ne Naz′arene Naz′arene Sennache′rib Sennach′erib Sennach′erib Sennach′erib Tir′hakah Tirha′kah Tir′hakah Tirha′kah Zeru′iah Zerui′ah Zer′uiah Zerui′ah Zohe′leth Zo′heleth Zohel′eth Zohe′leth These examples might be greatly multiplied, particularly in the case of what might be termed more familiar names in regard to which there are two ruling modes of accentuation, as Aga′bus and Ag′abus, Ahime′lech and Ahim′elech, Bahu′rim and Bah′urim, Bath′sheba and Bathshe′ba, Ced′ron and Ce′dron, Mag′dalene and Magdale′ne, Peni′el and Pen′iel, Rehob′oam and Rehobo′am, Thaddae′us and Thad′daeus
Kings, the Books of - Our Lord thrice refers to the book, speaking of Solomon, the queen of Sheba, and the widow of Sarepta and Naaman (Matthew 6:29; Matthew 12:42; Luke 4:25-27)
David - ...
One of the darker traits of David’s character is illustrated by the detailed account of the Bathsheba episode (2 Samuel 11:2 ; 2 Samuel 12:25 ); so far from seeking to curb his passion for her on hearing that she is married, he finds ways and means of ridding himself of the husband, after whose death Bathsheba becomes his queen. A second rebellion, of a much less serious character, was that of Sheba, who sought to draw the northern tribes from their allegiance; it was, however, easily quelled by Joab (ch
Abram - About the same time, Abimelech came with Phicol, his general, to conclude an alliance with Abraham, who made that prince a present of seven ewe lambs out of his flock, in confirmation that a well he had opened should be his own property; and they called the place Beer-sheba, or "the well of swearing," because of the covenant there ratified with oaths
Arabia - This is also supposed to have been the country of the queen of Sheba