What does Sennacherib mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
סַנְחֵרִ֣יב son of Sargon 3
סַנְחֵרִ֖יב son of Sargon 2
סַנְחֵרִ֤יב son of Sargon 2
סַנְחֵרִ֔יב son of Sargon 2
סַנְחֵרִ֑יב son of Sargon 1
סַנְחֵרִ֨יב son of Sargon 1
סַנְחֵרִ֥יב son of Sargon 1
סַנְחֵרִ֥ב son of Sargon 1

Definitions Related to Sennacherib

H5576


   1 son of Sargon, father of Esarhaddon, and king of Assyria from 705–681 BC; attacked Judah during the reign of king Hezekiah and Judah was delivered when in response to the prayer of Hezekiah an angel smote 185,000 Assyrian soldiers.
   Additional Information: Sennacherib = “Sin multiplied brothers” (Sin = the moon).
   

Frequency of Sennacherib (original languages)

Frequency of Sennacherib (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sennacherib
SENNACHERIB (Assyr. [1] Sin-akhç-erba, i.e. ‘Sin [2] has increased the brothers’), son of Sargon, succeeded him on the throne of Assyria, on the 12th of Ab, b.c. 705. He was at once faced by troubles in Babylon, where Merodach-baladan had re-established himself. Sennacherib expelled him and placed Bçlibni of the Babylonian seed royal on the throne as a vassal king. After wars against the Kassites and Elamites in b.c. 701, Sennacherib set out to reduce the West to order. The king of Tyre fied to Cyprus, Sidon and the rest of Phœnicia were taken or submitted, and placed under a king Ethbaal. Ashdod, Ammon, Moab, Edom sent tribute. Ashkelon and Ekron were captured, and Hezekiah had to restore Padi to the throne of Ekron after keeping him some time in prison. The Egyptians and their allies who had moved to support Hezekiah were defeated at Eltekeh. Then Sennacherib devastated Judæa, capturing 46 cities and 200,150 prisoners. Hezekiah seems to have attempted to bribe him to retreat, sending immense tribute to Sennacherib while he was besieging Lachish. Lachish fell, and the Tartan, the Rab-sbakeh and Rab-saris were sent to demand the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 19:8 ff.). The miraculous dispersion of his army compelled Sennacherib to retreat without accomplishing the capture of Jerusalem. There is some reason to think that the Biblical accounts refer partly to a second campaign of Sennacherib after b.c. 690. His annals, however, do not extend so far. Troubles in Babylonia led him to recall Bçl-ibni and set his own son Ashur-nâdin-shum on the throne. He then had once more to expel Merodach-baladan from Lower Babylonia. Building a fleet on the Tigris and Euphrates, he pursued the Chald¿an to the mouth of the Eul¿us, and there captured and destroyed the Chald¿an stronghold, thus invading Lower Elam. He was too far from his base, and the Elamites fell on his rear and captured Babylon, carried off Ashur-nâdin-shum to Elam, making a Chald¿an Nergal-ushçzib king in his stead; b.c. 694. The Assyrians soon re-asserted their supremacy, but a fresh rebellion placed a Babylonian on the throne of Babylon. In b.c. 691Samennacherib brought both Elamites and Babylonians to bay at Khalule. Two years later he invaded Elam. In b.c. 689 Babylon was captured and razed to the ground. From that time till b.c. 681, when Sennacherib was murdered ( 2 Kings 19:37 ), we have no history of his reign. His great achievement was the creation of Nineveh as a metropolis of the Empire. He built the great palace of Kouyunjik and the great wall of Nineveh. Cf. Adrammelech.
C. H. W. Johns.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Sennacherib
Sin (the god) sends many brothers, son of Sargon, whom he succeeded on the throne of Assyria (B.C. 705), in the 23year of Hezekiah. "Like the Persian Xerxes, he was weak and vainglorious, cowardly under reverse, and cruel and boastful in success." He first set himself to break up the powerful combination of princes who were in league against him. Among these was Hezekiah, who had entered into an alliance with Egypt against Assyria. He accordingly led a very powerful army of at least 200,000 men into Judea, and devastated the land on every side, taking and destroying many cities (2 Kings 18:13-16 ; Compare Isaiah 222429,24,29 , and 2 Chronicles 32:1-8 ). His own account of this invasion, as given in the Assyrian annals, is in these words: "Because Hezekiah, king of Judah, would not submit to my yoke, I came up against him, and by force of arms and by the might of my power I took forty-six of his strong fenced cities; and of the smaller towns which were scattered about, I took and plundered a countless number. From these places I took and carried off 200,156 persons, old and young, male and female, together with horses and mules, asses and camels, oxen and sheep, a countless multitude; and Hezekiah himself I shut up in Jerusalem, his capital city, like a bird in a cage, building towers round the city to hem him in, and raising banks of earth against the gates, so as to prevent escape...Then upon Hezekiah there fell the fear of the power of my arms, and he sent out to me the chiefs and the elders of Jerusalem with 30 talents of gold and 800 talents of silver, and divers treasures, a rich and immense booty...All these things were brought to me at Nineveh, the seat of my government." (Compare Isaiah 22:1-13 for description of the feelings of the inhabitants of Jerusalem at such a crisis.) Hezekiah was not disposed to become an Assyrian feudatory. He accordingly at once sought help from Egypt ( 2 Kings 18:20-24 ). Sennacherib, hearing of this, marched a second time into Palestine (2 Kings 18:17,37 ; 19 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9-23 ; Isaiah 36:2-22 . Isaiah 37:25 should be rendered "dried up all the Nile-arms of Matsor," i.e., of Egypt, so called from the "Matsor" or great fortification across the isthmus of Suez, which protected it from invasions from the east). Sennacherib sent envoys to try to persuade Hezekiah to surrender, but in vain. (See TIRHAKAH .) He next sent a threatening letter ( 2 Kings 19:10-14 ), which Hezekiah carried into the temple and spread before the Lord. Isaiah again brought an encouraging message to the pious king (2 Kings 19:20-34 ). "In that night" the angel of the Lord went forth and smote the camp of the Assyrians. In the morning, "behold, they were all dead corpses." The Assyrian army was annihilated.
This great disaster is not, as was to be expected, taken notice of in the Assyrian annals.
Though Sennacherib survived this disaster some twenty years, he never again renewed his attempt against Jerusalem. He was murdered by two of his own sons (Adrammelech and Sharezer), and was succeeded by another son, Esarhaddon (B.C. 681), after a reign of twenty-four years.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Sennacherib
(d. 548 BCE) King of Assyria, he conquered all the areas surrounding Judea. He then threatened to conquer Judea and asked for its surrender—while blaspheming G-d. King Hezekiah prayed for deliverance, and that night all the Assyrian soldiers – hundreds of thousands of them – were killed by an angel of G-d. Defeated and shamed, Sennacherib returned to his capital Nineveh where he was slain by his own sons.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sennacherib
(sseen nak' uhr ihb) Assyrian royal name meaning, “Sin (the god) has replaced my brother.” King of Assyria (704-681 BC). See Assyria; Israel .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sennacherib
A well-known enemy of the Church of the living God, We have his history, as far as relates to the church, 2 Kings 18:13. His name it should seem is a compound of Sennah, the sword; and Charab, to destroy.
Though I should not have thought it worth the record of even inserting this man's name in a work of this kind, neither would his name have been remembered in history, had it not been for being connected with the church's history, yet as that part of his history which relates to the church opens a beautiful lesson, for instruction, I hope the Reader will indulge me with adding a few lines more before that we dismiss the recollection of the impious character of Sennacherib.
We are told that in the Lord's delivering the church from the threatenings and slaughter of this man, the "angel of the Lord went out that night, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred, four-score, and five thousand; and when they arose in the morning, behold they were all dead corpses." (2 Kings 19:35) By the angel of the Lord we may suppose is meant the messenger of the Lord, for so the word is. It is not necessary to connect the meaning of the passage, as if it was one of those beings of light which are called angels. Some have thought that this visitation from the Lord was by pestilence, or one of those fatal winds which are known to visit those climates, which, wheresoever they come they sweep off with the besom of destruction. And they who have construed the passage in this sense have observed that it is said by the Lord, before the judgment took place. "Behold, I will send a blast upon him." See the parallel history, Isaiah 37:1-38. And as it was by night, and the Assyrian camp unprepared for so unexpected a judgment, this blast, like a devouring, fire, entered the camp, commissioned by the Lord, and destroyed them. One circumstance is related which seems very striking—in the morning they were all dead corpses. Those who have witnessed the injury done by this pestilential meteor, or fiery wind, or blast, relate that the bodies so destroyed are quickly after reduced to ashes as if calcined or burnt in an oven. When we consider what is said of the Siroc winds of the warm though milder climates than Africa, I mean Sicily and Malta, we may easily conceive how fatal the Semyel, or Simoon as they are called, of those pestilential climates may be, especially when commissioned by the Lord. And the slaughter of such an army in one night carried with it the fullest and most decided testimony that it was indeed effected by the messenger, the angel of the Lord.
I have introduced this observation of the Lord's judgment on Sennacherib's army by way of introducing another; namely, what safety are the people of the Lord brought into when all the creation of God waits as ministering servants to execute the divine judgments on their enemies! "Winds and storms fulfilling his word," sickness and the word, angels and messengers, all wait to execute the Lord's commands. "Are they not all (saith the Scripture) ministering spirits, seat forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?" (Hebrews 1:14) Hence with an eye to Christ, and to his people secured in him, the Lord's promise runs—"He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust his truth shall be thy shield and buckler. Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night, nor for the arrow that flieth by day, nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness nor for the destruction that wasteth at noon day. A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand, but it shall not come nigh thee." (Psalms 91:1-16 throughout.) First spoken to Christ, and then to all the seed of Christ everlastingly secured in him.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Sennacherib
On the monuments Τzin-akki-irib , "Sin (the "moon goddess") increases brothers," implying Sennacherib was not the firstborn; or else "thanking the god for the gift." Sargon's son and successor. Ascended the throne 704 B.C., crushed the revolt of Babylon, and drove away Merodach Baladan, made Belibus his officer viceroy, ravaged the Aramaean lands on the Tigris and Euphrates, and carried off 200,000 captives. In 701 B.C. warred with the tribes on Mount Zagros, and reduced the part of Media previously independent. In 700 B.C. punished Sidon, made Tyre, Arad, and other Phoenician cities, as also Edom and Ashdod, tributary. Took Ashkelon, warred with Egypt, took Libnah and Lachish on the frontier; and having made treaty with Sabacus or So (the clay seal of So found in Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik was probably attached to this treaty), he marched against Hezekaih of Judah who had thrown off tribute and intermeddled in the politics of Philistine cities against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13). (See HEZEKIAH: ASSYRIA; NINEVEH.)
Hezekiah's sickness was in his 14th year, but Sennacherib's expedition in his 27th, which ought to be substituted for the copyist's error "fourteenth." On his way, according to inscriptions (G. Smith, in Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, October 1872, p. 198), Sennacherib attacked Lulia of Sidon, then took Sidon, Zarephath, etc. The kings of Palestine mentioned as submitting to Sennacherib are Menahem of Samaria, Tubal of Sidon, Kemosh Natbi of Moab, etc. He took Ekron, which had submitted to Hezekiah and had delivered its king Padi up to him; Sennacherib reseated Padi on his throne. Sennacherib defeated the kings of Egypt and Ethiopia at Eltekeh. Sennacherib took 46 of Judah's fenced cities including Lachish, the storming of which, is depicted on his palace walls. He shut up Hezekiah, (building towers round Jerusalem), who then submitted and paid 30 talents of gold and 800 of silver.
Sennacherib gave part of Judah's territory to Ashdod, Ekron, Gaza, and Ashkelon. It was at his second expedition that the overthrow of his host by Jehovah's Angel took place (2 Kings 18:17-37; 2 Kings 18:2 Kings 19). This was probably two years after the first, but late in his reign Sennacherib speaks of an expedition to Palestine apparently. "After this," in 2 Chronicles 32:9; 2 Chronicles 32:17 years after his disaster, in 681 B.C., his two sons Adrammelech and Sharezer assassinated him after a reign of 22 years, and Esarhaddon ascended the throne 680 B.C. Esarhaddon's inscription, stating that he was at war with his half brothers, after his accession, agrees with the Bible account of Sennacherib's assassination. Moses of Chorene confirms the escape of the brothers to Armenia, and says that part was peopled by their descendants.
Sennacherib's second invasion of Babylon was apparently in 699 B.C.; he defeated a Chaldaean chief who headed an army in support of Merodach Baladan. Sennacherib put one of his own sons on the throne instead of Belibus. Sennacherib was the first who made Nineveh the seat of government. The grand palace at Koyunjik was his, covering more than eight acres. He embanked with brick the Tigris, restored the aqueducts of Nineveh, and repaired a second palace at Nineveh on the mound of Nebi Yunns. Its halls were ranged about three courts, one 154 ft. by 125 ft., another 124 ft. by 90 ft. One hall was 180 ft. long by 40 ft. broad; 60 ft. small rooms have been opened. He erected memorial tablet at the mouth of the nahr el Kelb on the Syrian coast, beside an inscription recording Rameses the Great's conquests six hundred years before; this answers to his boast that "he had come up to the height of the mountains, to the sides of Lebanon."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Sennacherib
Son and successor of Sargon, king of Assyria. He invaded Syria and Palestine in the fourteenth year of Hezekiah's reign. Hezekiah owned that he had offended, and paid to him a tribute of three hundred talents of silver and thirty talents of gold. Sennacherib has left an account of this on a clay tablet. He says he captured forty-six fenced cities, and the fortresses and villages round about them belonging to Hezekiah the Jew, and carried away 200,150 souls, and horses, mules, asses, camels, oxen, and sheep without number, etc. He shut up Hezekiah in his house at Jerusalem like a bird in a cage. Cf. 2 Kings 18:13-16 ; 2 Chronicles 32:1-8 .
On Sennacherib's second invasion, he sent insulting and impious messages to Hezekiah, who apparently was again trusting in Egypt. But an angel of God destroyed the Assyrian army. Of course the monuments say nothing of this. The king returned to Assyria, and did not venture to invade Palestine again. He was eventually murdered by two of his sons, and Esar-haddon, another son, succeeded him. 2 Kings 18:17-37 ; 2 Kings 19:1-37 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9-22 ; Isaiah 36 ; Isaiah 37 . Apparently Sennacherib was co-regent with Sargon in B.C. 714 when he invaded Judaea the first time; he reigned alone from B.C. 705 to 681.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Sennacherib
Bramble of destruction
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sennacherib
king of Assyria, son and successor of Shalmaneser. He began his reign A.M. 3290, and reigned only four years. Hezekiah, king of Judah, having refused to pay him tribute, though he afterward submitted, he invaded Judea with a great army, took several forts, and after repeated, insolent, and blasphemous messages, besieged Jerusalem; but his army being suddenly smitten with a pestilence, which cut off a hundred and eighty-five thousand in a single night, he returned to Nineveh, where he was murdered in the temple of Nisroch by his sons Adrammelech and Sharezer, and was succeeded by his other son, Esar-haddon, 2 Kings 19:7 ; 2 Kings 19:13 ; 2 Kings 19:37 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sennacherib
Sennacherib (sen-nak'e-rĭb, or sĕn-na-kç'-rib), sin, the moon, increases brothers, was the son and successor of Sargon. In the third year of his reign, b.c. 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, attacked Sidon, and finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah. "Sennacherib came up against all the fenced cities of Judah, and took them." 2 Kings 18:13. There can be no doubt that the record which he has left of his campaign against "Hiskiah" in his third year is the war with Hezekiah so briefly touched in 2 Kings 18:13-16. In the following year. b.c. 699, Sennacherib made his second expedition into Palestine. Hezekiah had revolted, and claimed the protection of Egypt. Sennacherib therefore attacked Egypt, and from his camp at Lachish and Libnah he sent an insulting letter to Hezekiah at Jerusalem. 2 Kings 19:14. In answer to Hezekiah's prayer the Assyrians lost, in a single night, by some awful manifestation of divine power, 185,000 men! The camp immediately broke up; the king fled. 2 Kings 19:35-37. Sennacherib reached his capital in safety, engaged in other wars, though he seems to have carefully avoided Palestine, and was slain by two of his sons, 15 or 20 years after his flight from Jerusalem. Isaiah 37:38. He reigned 22 years, and was succeeded by Esar-haddon, b.c. 680. Sennacherib was one of the most magnificent of the Assyrian kings. He seems to have been the first who fixed the seat of government permanently at Nineveh, which he carefully repaired and adorned with palaces and splendid buildings.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sennacherib
(Assyrian: the Moon God increases the brothers)
One of the greatest kings of Assyria, warrior, and builder (705-681. B.C.), mentioned in the Bible in connection with Ezechias (4Kings 18-19; Isaiah 36-37). He invaded Palestine twice; during his second invasion, the bulk of his army was miraculously destroyed, the rest fleeing with him. Shortly afterwards he was assassinated (4Kings 19).
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Sennacherib
King of Assyria, son and successor of Shalmaneser, began to reign B. C. 710, and reigned but a few years. Hezekiah king of Judah having shaken off the yoke of the Assyrians, by which Ahaz his father had suffered under Tigloth-pileser, Sennacherib marched an army against him, and took all the strong cities of Judah. Hezekiah, seeing he had nothing left but Jerusalem, which he perhaps found it difficult to preserve, sent ambassadors to Sennacherib, then besieging and destroying Lachish, to make submission. Sennacherib accepted his tribute, but refused to depart, and sent Rabshakeh with an insolent message to Jerusalem. Hezekiah entreated the Lord, who sent a destroying angel against the Assyrian army, and slew in one night 185,000 men. Sennacherib returned with all speed to Nineveh, and turned his arms against the nations south of Assyria, and afterwards towards the north. But his career was not long; within two or three years from his return from Jerusalem, while he was paying adorations to his god Nisroch, in the temple, his two sons Adrammelech and Sharezer slew him and fled into Armenia. Esar-haddon his son reigned in his stead, 2 Kings 18:1-19:37 2 Chronicles 32:33 .
A most remarkable confirmation of the above Bible history has been found in the long buried ruins of ancient Nineveh. The mound called Kouyunijik, opposite Mosul, has been to a good degree explored, and its ruins prove to be those of a palace erected by this powerful monarch. The huge stone tablets which formed the walls of its various apartments are covered with bas-reliefs and inscriptions; and though large portions of these have perished by violence and time, the fragments that remain are full of interest. One series of tablets recounts the warlike exploits of Sennacherib, who calls himself "the subduer of kings from the upper sea of the setting sun to the lower sea of the rising sun," that is, from the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf.
The most important of these mural pages to Bible readers, are those recounting the history of his war against Syria and the Jews, in the third year of his reign. Crossing the upper part of Mount Lebanon, he appears to have conquered Tyre and all the cities south of it on the seacoast to Askelon. In this region he came in conflict with an Egyptian army, sent in aid of King Hezekiah; this host he defeated and drove back. See 2 Kings 19:9 Isaiah 37:1-38 . The inscription then proceeds to say, "Hezekiah king of Judah, who had not submitted to my authority, forty-six of his principal cities, and fortresses and villages dependant upon them, of which I took no account, I captured, and carried away their spoil. The fortified towns, and the rest of his towns which I spoiled, I severed from his country, and gave to the kings of Askelon, Ekron, and Gaza, so as to make his country small. In addition to the former tribute imposed upon their countries, I added a tribute the nature of which I fixed." Compare 2 Kings 18:13 Isaiah 36:1 . He does not profess to have taken Jerusalem itself, but to have carried away Hezekiah's family, servants, and treasures, with a tribute of thirty talents of gold and eight hundred talents of silver. The amount of gold is the same mentioned in the Bible narrative. The three hundred talents of silver mentioned in Scripture may have been all that was given in money, and the five hundred additional claimed in the Ninevite record may include the temple and palace treasures, given by Hezekiah as the price of peace.
In another apartment of the same palace was found a series of wellpreserved bas-reliefs, representing the siege and capture by the Assyrians of a large and strong city. It was doubly fortified, and the assault and the defense were both fierce. Part of the city is represented as already taken, while elsewhere the battle rages still in all its fury. Meanwhile captives are seen flayed, impaled, and put to the sword; and from one of the gates of the city a long procession of prisoners is brought before the king, who is gorgeously arrayed and seated on his throne upon a mound or low hill. They are presented by the general in command, very possibly Rabshakeh, with other chief officers. Two eunuchs stand behind the king, holding fans and napkins. Above his head is an inscription, which is thus translated: "Sennacherib the mighty king, king of the country of Assyria, sitting on the throne of judging at the gate of the city Lachisa; I give permission for its slaughter." The captives are stripped of their armor, ornaments, and much of their clothing, and are evidently Jews.
Little did Sennacherib then anticipate the utter of his ruin of his own proud metropolis, and still less that the ruins of his palace should preserve to this remote age the tablets containing his own history, and the image of his god Nisroch so incapable of defending him, to bear witness for the God whom he blasphemed and defied. See NINEVEH, NISROCH, SHALMANESER, and SO .

Sentence search

Hena - City Sennacherib, king of Assyria, captured prior to threatening Hezekiah and Jerusalem in 701 B. Sennacherib used the historical example to brag and to persuade Hezekiah not to rely on God for protection against Sennacherib
Rab-Shakeh - Chief butler or cup-bearer, an officer sent from Lachish by Sennacherib king of Assyria, to summon Hezekiah to surrender; which message he delivered in a most audacious and insolent manner. See NINEVEH and Sennacherib
Sennacherib - Sennacherib (sen-nak'e-rĭb, or sĕn-na-kç'-rib), sin, the moon, increases brothers, was the son and successor of Sargon. 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, attacked Sidon, and finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah. "Sennacherib came up against all the fenced cities of Judah, and took them. 699, Sennacherib made his second expedition into Palestine. Sennacherib therefore attacked Egypt, and from his camp at Lachish and Libnah he sent an insulting letter to Hezekiah at Jerusalem. Sennacherib reached his capital in safety, engaged in other wars, though he seems to have carefully avoided Palestine, and was slain by two of his sons, 15 or 20 years after his flight from Jerusalem. Sennacherib was one of the most magnificent of the Assyrian kings
Sennach'Erib, - Sennacherib mounted the throne B. 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, chastised Sidon, and, having probably concluded a convention with his chief enemy finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah. It was at this time that "Sennacherib came up against all the fenced cities of Judah, and took them. 699) Sennacherib made his second expedition into Palestine. Sennacherib therefore attacked Egypt, and from his camp at Lachish and Libnah he sent an insulting letter to Hezekiah at Jerusalem. Sennacherib reached his capital in safety, and was not deterred by the terrible disaster which had befallen his arms from engaging in other wars, though he seems thenceforward to have carefully avoided Palestine. Sennacherib reigned 22 years and was succeeded by Esar-haddon, B. Sennacherib was one of the most magnificent of the Assyrian kings. Of the death of Sennacherib nothing is known beyond the brief statement of Scripture that "as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god, Adrammelech and Sharezer his sons smote him with the sword and escaped into the land of Armenia
Lachish - A city in the southwest part of Judah, Joshua 10:3,5,31 ; fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:9 , and strong enough to resist for a time the whole army of Sennacherib, 2 Kings 18:17 19:8 2 Chronicles 32:1,9,21 Micah 1:13 . For a wonderful confirmation of the truth of Scripture, see Sennacherib
Sharezer - Son of Sennacherib and one of his murderers
Sennacherib - On the monuments Τzin-akki-irib , "Sin (the "moon goddess") increases brothers," implying Sennacherib was not the firstborn; or else "thanking the god for the gift. Took Ashkelon, warred with Egypt, took Libnah and Lachish on the frontier; and having made treaty with Sabacus or So (the clay seal of So found in Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik was probably attached to this treaty), he marched against Hezekaih of Judah who had thrown off tribute and intermeddled in the politics of Philistine cities against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13). )...
Hezekiah's sickness was in his 14th year, but Sennacherib's expedition in his 27th, which ought to be substituted for the copyist's error "fourteenth. 198), Sennacherib attacked Lulia of Sidon, then took Sidon, Zarephath, etc. The kings of Palestine mentioned as submitting to Sennacherib are Menahem of Samaria, Tubal of Sidon, Kemosh Natbi of Moab, etc. He took Ekron, which had submitted to Hezekiah and had delivered its king Padi up to him; Sennacherib reseated Padi on his throne. Sennacherib defeated the kings of Egypt and Ethiopia at Eltekeh. Sennacherib took 46 of Judah's fenced cities including Lachish, the storming of which, is depicted on his palace walls. ...
Sennacherib gave part of Judah's territory to Ashdod, Ekron, Gaza, and Ashkelon. This was probably two years after the first, but late in his reign Sennacherib speaks of an expedition to Palestine apparently. Esarhaddon's inscription, stating that he was at war with his half brothers, after his accession, agrees with the Bible account of Sennacherib's assassination. ...
Sennacherib's second invasion of Babylon was apparently in 699 B. Sennacherib put one of his own sons on the throne instead of Belibus. Sennacherib was the first who made Nineveh the seat of government
Rezeph - Solid; a stone, (2 Kings 19:12 ; Isaiah 37:12 ), a fortress near Haran, probably on the west of the Euphrates, conquered by Sennacherib
Share'Zer - (prince of fire ) was a son of Sennacherib, whom, In conjunction with his brother Adrammelech, he murdered
Sennacherib - Sennacherib (Assyr. Sennacherib expelled him and placed Bçlibni of the Babylonian seed royal on the throne as a vassal king. 701, Sennacherib set out to reduce the West to order. Then Sennacherib devastated Judæa, capturing 46 cities and 200,150 prisoners. Hezekiah seems to have attempted to bribe him to retreat, sending immense tribute to Sennacherib while he was besieging Lachish. The miraculous dispersion of his army compelled Sennacherib to retreat without accomplishing the capture of Jerusalem. There is some reason to think that the Biblical accounts refer partly to a second campaign of Sennacherib after b. 681, when Sennacherib was murdered ( 2 Kings 19:37 ), we have no history of his reign
Arpad - It fell before Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:34; Isaiah 10:9)
Rabsaris - Chief of the Heads, one of the three officers whom Sennacherib sent from Lachish with a threatening message to Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:3,13 )
Nisroch - Nisroch (nĭsrŏch), great eagle? An Assyrian deity in whose temple at Nineveh Sennacherib was murdered by his sons, Adrammelech and Sharezer
Madme'Nah - (dunghill ), one of the, Benjamite villages north of Jerusalem the inhabitants of which were frightened away by the approach of Sennacherib along the northern road
Tartan - An Assyrian general, sent to Jerusalem with Rabshakeh, by Sennacherib, 2 Kings 18:17 ; and perhaps the same who captured Ashdod in the reign of Sargon, Isaiah 20:1
Tirhakah - ) who supported Hezekiah's revolt against the Assyrian king Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:8-9 ; Isaiah 37:9 )
re'Zeph - (a hot stone ), one of the places which Sennacherib mentions, in his taunting message to Hezekiah, as having been destroyed by his predecessor
Sharezer - (God) protect the king!, a son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria
Rezeph - ) A fortress conquered by Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:12), probably on the western side of Euphrates; joined with Haran
Hena - One of the cities of Mesopotamia destroyed by Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:13 )
Hezekiah - when Sennacherib became king of Assyria. From Hezekiah, Sennacherib obtained a heavy tribute of silver and gold. ...
In the meantime, Sennacherib had besieged Lachish. Aware that Hezekiah had trusted God for deliverance, Sennacherib sent messengers to the Jerusalem wall to urge the people to surrender. Sennacherib boasted of having conquered 46 walled cities and having taken 200,000 captives. Sennacherib's messengers taunted that God would not come to Judah's defense. Isaiah announced that Sennacherib would “hear a rumour” and return to his own land where he would die by the sword (2 Kings 19:7 ). ...
Sennacherib destroyed the city of Babylon in 689 B. Hoping to ward off any interference from Judah, Sennacherib sent letters to Hezekiah ordering him to surrender (Isaiah 37:9-38 ). From Isaiah came the message that Sennacherib would not prevail. In fact, Sennacherib's army was destroyed in a miraculous way (2 Kings 19:35-37 ). , Sennacherib was killed by two of his sons as had been predicted by Isaiah in 701 B
Kuyunjik - It existed as early as 1800 and in the time of Sennacherib (7th century) was the capital of the empire, the center of the worship of Ishtar, and well known in the Old Testament in connection with the prophets, especially as the theater of Jonas's mission. It was abandoned by Sargon; beautified by Sennacherib, who built a magnificent temple which vas completed by Esarhaddon and Asurbanipal
Ninive - It existed as early as 1800 and in the time of Sennacherib (7th century) was the capital of the empire, the center of the worship of Ishtar, and well known in the Old Testament in connection with the prophets, especially as the theater of Jonas's mission. It was abandoned by Sargon; beautified by Sennacherib, who built a magnificent temple which vas completed by Esarhaddon and Asurbanipal
Nisroch - Sennacherib was killed in the temple of this idol ( 2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38 )
Nisroch - Sennacherib was killed by two of his sons, while he was paying his adorations in the temple of this deity, 2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38
Nineveh - It was early an important city, and is frequently referred to in the royal inscriptions, but Sennacherib first raised it to the position of capital of Assyria. The mound of Kouyunjik is separated from the mound of Nebi Yunus by the Khoser, and overlies the palaces of Sennacherib to the S. The southern mound, Nebi Yunus, covers palaces of Sennacherib and Esarhaddon. The Nineveh of Sennacherib’s day lay largely outside this area, and included the Rebit Ninûa , or Rehoboth-ir, which extended as far as Khorsa bad, where Sargon built a great city, Dûr-Sargon. 2 Kings 19:36 and Isaiah 37:37 know it as the city of Sennacherib
Adrammelech - ...
A son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria (2Kings 19:37; Isaiah 37:38 )
Madmenah - Isaiah perhaps refers to the invasion of Sennacherib in 701 B
Rabshakeh - Rabshakeh was sent by Sennacherib, king of Assyria, to summon Hezekiah to surrender Jerusalem, 2 Kings 18:17-18 ; 2 Kings 19:4 ; Isaiah 36
Lachish - Sennacherib besieged Lachish, but did not make himself master of it
Merodach-Baladan - Two years later Sennacherib laid his ill-fated siege to the Holy City. See Babylon ; Hezekiah ; Sargon ; Sennacherib
Arpad - The Rab-shakeh, representing Sennacherib, Assyria's king, taunted the people of Judah in 701 B. He reminded the people walled up in Jerusalem that the gods of Arpad did not save it from Sennacherib
Eliakim - See Sennacherib
Bene-Berak - Sennacherib, king of Assyria, in 701 B
Nisroch - (nihss' rahch) God worshiped by the Assyrian king Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38 )
Gal'Lim - The name occurs again in the catalogue of places terrified at the approach of Sennacherib
Sharezer - It is given 2 Kings 19:37 = Isaiah 37:38 as the name of a son of Sennacherib who with Adrammelech (which see) murdered his father. Shar-etir-Ashur was the name of a son of Sennacherib, who in a fragmentary letter is addressed as monarch, about the time of Esarhaddon’s reign
Esar-Haddon - son of Sennacherib, and his successor in the kingdom of Assyria: called Sargon, or Saragon, Isaiah 20:1 . He made war with the Philistines, and took Azoth, by Tartan, his general: he attacked Egypt, Cush, and Edom, Isaiah 20, 34; designing, probably, to avenge the affront Sennacherib his father had received from Tirhakah, king of Cush, and the king of Egypt, who had been Hezekiah's confederates
Tirhakah - Naturally he helped Hezekiah of Judah against their common enemy Sennacherib, who threatened, Egypt. 10:1-3) represent Sennacherib to have advanced to Pelusium; here Tirhakah, the ally of Sethos, the king priest of Lower Egypt, and of Hezekiah, forced Sennacherib to retire, His acquisition of the throne of Egypt seems subsequent to his accession to the Ethiopian throne, and to the diversion which he made in favor of Hezekiah against Sennacherib. ...
But Memphite jealousy hid his share in Sennacherib's overthrow (at the time of his second invasion of Judah), and attributed Setho's deliverance to divinely sent mice, which gnawed the enemy's bowstrings. Isaiah (Isaiah 17:12-18;Isaiah 17:7) announces Sennacherib's overthrow, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, now in Jerusalem, having arrived from Meroe, the island between "the river of Ethiopia," the Nile, and the Astaboras, in "vessels of bulrushes"' or pitchcovered papyrus canoes, to bring word to their own nation (not "woe," but "ho!" calling the Ethiopians' attention to his prophetic announcement of the fall of Judah's and their common foe; Vulgate translated "the land of the clanging sound of wings," i
Telas'Ear - (Assyrian hill ) is mentioned in ( 2 Kings 19:12 ) and in Isai 37:12 As a city inhabited by "the children of Eden," --which had been conquered and was held in the time of Sennacherib, by the Assyrians
he'na - (troubling ), a city the Assyrian kings had reduced shortly before the time of Sennacherib
Hezekiah - On the death of Sargon and the accession of his son Sennacherib to the throne of Assyria, Hezekiah refused to pay the tribute which his father had paid, and "rebelled against the king of Assyria, and served him not," but entered into a league with Egypt (Isaiah 30 ; 31 ; 36:6-9 ). This led to the invasion of Judah by Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13-16 ), who took forty cities, and besieged Jerusalem with mounds. ...
But Sennacherib dealt treacherously with Hezekiah (Isaiah 33:1 ), and a second time within two years invaded his kingdom (2 Kings 18:17 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9 ; Isaiah 36 ). This invasion issued in the destruction of Sennacherib's army. " Sennacherib fled with the shattered remnant of his forces to Nineveh, where, seventeen years after, he was assassinated by his sons Adrammelech and Sharezer (2 Kings 19:37 ). (See Sennacherib
Sharezer - A son of Sennacherib, who assisted in slaying his father, Isaiah 37:38
Mouse - Herodotus, the Greek historian, accounts for the destruction of the army of Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:35 ) by saying that in the night thousands of mice invaded the camp and gnawed through the bow-strings, quivers, and shields, and thus left the Assyrians helpless. (See Sennacherib
Tir'Hakah, - (exalted? ) king of Ethiopia (Cush), the opponent of Sennacherib
Rabsaris - Sent by Sennacherib with Tartan and Rabshakeh against Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17)
Boot - Assyrian reliefs from the period of Sennacherib depict soldiers wearing leather boots laced up to the knee which is in contrast to the sandals worn by the Israelite soldier of the period
Nis'Roch - (the great eagle ) an idol of Nineveh, in whose temple Sennacherib was worshipping when assassinated by his sons, Adrammelech and Shizrezer
Lachish - Sennacherib was at Lachish when Hezekiah begged peace. The strength of Lachish as a fortress is implied in 2 Chronicles 32:9, "Sennacherib laid siege against Lachish and all his power with him. Sennacherib's siege of Lachish is still to be seen at Koyunjik represented on the slabs of his palace walls as successful, with the inscription "Sennacherib, the mighty king of Assyria, sitting on the throne of judgment before the city of Lachish, I give permission for its slaughter. His boasted success is doubtful from 2 Chronicles 32:1, "Sennacherib encamped against the fenced cities, and thought to win them for himself"; 2 Kings 19:8; Jeremiah 34:7. Hence, Micah (Micah 1:13) warned the inhabitants of Lachish to flee on the swift beast (there's a play of like sounds between Lachish and rechesh ), Sennacherib being about to make it his head quarters, for "she is the beginning of the sin to the daughter of Zion, for the transgressions of Israel were found in thee. Now Um Lakis, on a low round swell, with a few columns and fragments; in the middle of the plain, on Sennacherib's road to Egypt, where he was marching, according to Robinson
Nahum - The best interpreters adopt Jerome's opinion, that he foretold the destruction of Nineveh in the time of Hezekiah, after the war of Sennacherib in Egypt mentioned by Berosus. Nahum speaks of the taking of shakeh, and of the defeat of Sennacherib, as things that were past
Rab-Shakeh - ]'>[1] officer, who with the Tartan and the Rab-saris was sent by Sennacherib to Hezekiah to demand the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:1-37 f
Sennacherib - Defeated and shamed, Sennacherib returned to his capital Nineveh where he was slain by his own sons
Adrammelech - One of the sons of Sennacherib who smote his father with the sword and then fled to the land of Armenia
Armenia - in 2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38 , as the place to which two sons of Sennacherib fled after killing their father; but in both these passages the Hebrew word is Ararat
Sargon - An Assyrian king, successor of Shalmaneser and father of Sennacherib
Libnah - ...
After Lachish Sennacherib besieged Libnah, and there heard of what alarmed him, Tirhakah's advance (2 Kings 19:8; Isaiah 37:8). Rawlinson thinks the miraculous destruction of the Assyrian army took place: not at Jerusalem; so Jehovah's promise (Isaiah 37:33), "Sennacherib shall not come into this city, nor shoot an arrow there, nor come before it with shields "; then verse 36 will mean, "when they (Sennacherib and the surviving Assyrians) arose early in the morning, behold they (the smitten Assyrians) were all dead corpses. 141) gives the Egyptian story, that Sennacherib retreated from Pelusium, the Egyptian gods having sent field mice which gnawed their bowstrings and shield straps, a corruption of Jehovah's promise above. of Gaza, near the northern bank of wady Sheriah, a good point from which Sennacherib could watch Tirhakah's advance from the Egyptian quarter
Esarhaddon - He was the favorite son of Sennacherib, who he succeeded as king. Sennacherib was assassinated in 681 by two other sons (2 Kings 19:36-37 ) as part of a civil war
Esarhaddon - Son of Sennacherib and grandson of Sargon. He succeeded Sennacherib as king of Assyria
Libnah - Afterwards it was besieged by Sennacherib, but apparently was not taken
Esar-Haddon - Esar-haddon (ç'sar-kăd'don), son and successor of Sennacherib, king of Assyria, and one of the greatest of her kings
Tartan - ]'>[1] officers, one of whom was sent by Sargon to Ashdod ( Isaiah 20:1 ), while the other, with the Rab-saris and the Rab-shakeh , was sent by Sennacherib to demand from Hezekiah the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 )
Sherezer - The name is really Persian and is identical with that of Sharezer, son of Sennacherib in 2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38
Tirhakah - When Sennacherib heard of his coming he demanded the immediate surrender of Jerusalem
Nisroch - The god of Nineveh, in whose temple Sennacherib was assassinated by his sons (2 Kings 19:37; Isaiah 37:38). Rawlinson says "Asshur had no temple in Nineveh in which Sennacherib could have been worshipping
Elteke - Sennacherib of Assyria met an Egyptian army there about 701 B
Adrammelech - the son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria
Adrammelech - A son of Sennacherib, who aided in slaying his father
Sargon - There is some doubt whether he is or is not to be identified with one of the kings elsewhere mentioned in Scripture; and some regard him as having reigned for about three years between Shalmaneser and Sennacherib
Esar-Haddon - Son of Sennacherib, and his successor as king of Assyria, 2 Kings 19:37 ; Isaiah 37:38 ; B
Libnah - Sennacherib laid siege to it (2 Kings 19:8 ; Isaiah 37:8 )
Libnah - A city of Canaan, in the lowland of Judah, was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:29-32; Joshua 10:39; Joshua 12:15, and assigned to the priests, Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13; 1 Chronicles 6:57; revolted against Joram, 2 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 21:10; was besieged by Sennacherib, 2 Kings 19:8; Isaiah 37:8
Sennacherib - Sennacherib has left an account of this on a clay tablet. ...
On Sennacherib's second invasion, he sent insulting and impious messages to Hezekiah, who apparently was again trusting in Egypt. Apparently Sennacherib was co-regent with Sargon in B
Sennacherib - Hezekiah king of Judah having shaken off the yoke of the Assyrians, by which Ahaz his father had suffered under Tigloth-pileser, Sennacherib marched an army against him, and took all the strong cities of Judah. Hezekiah, seeing he had nothing left but Jerusalem, which he perhaps found it difficult to preserve, sent ambassadors to Sennacherib, then besieging and destroying Lachish, to make submission. Sennacherib accepted his tribute, but refused to depart, and sent Rabshakeh with an insolent message to Jerusalem. Sennacherib returned with all speed to Nineveh, and turned his arms against the nations south of Assyria, and afterwards towards the north. One series of tablets recounts the warlike exploits of Sennacherib, who calls himself "the subduer of kings from the upper sea of the setting sun to the lower sea of the rising sun," that is, from the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf. Above his head is an inscription, which is thus translated: "Sennacherib the mighty king, king of the country of Assyria, sitting on the throne of judging at the gate of the city Lachisa; I give permission for its slaughter. ...
Little did Sennacherib then anticipate the utter of his ruin of his own proud metropolis, and still less that the ruins of his palace should preserve to this remote age the tablets containing his own history, and the image of his god Nisroch so incapable of defending him, to bear witness for the God whom he blasphemed and defied
Adrammelech - Son and murderer of Sennacherib in Nisroch's temple at Nineveh
Merodach Baladan - Warred with Sargon and Sennacherib successively, having thrown off allegiance to them; so naturally drawn to Hezekiah who also had cast off the Assyrian yoke. Sennacherib says in his first year he drove him out (Merodach Baladan fleeing to Nagitiraggus, an island in the sea: Isaiah 20:6), setting up Belib. ...
His sons, supported by the king of Elam, continued the struggle against Assyria under Esarhaddon, Sennacherib's son, and his grandsons against Asshur-bani-pal, Esarhaddon's son. Hincks suggests reasonably that "Sennacherib" should be omitted after "king of Assyria" (2 Kings 18:13), Sargon reigning "in the 14th year of Hezekiah
Rezeph - A city mentioned in the message of the Rabshakeh of Sennacherib to Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 19:12 , Isaiah 37:12 )
Adram'Melech - ...
Son of the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who, with his brother Sharezer, murdered their father in the temple of Nisroch at Nineveh, after the failure of the Assyrian attack on Jerusalem
Michmash - It was a strong position and lay on the north side of a deep valley; for which reasons perhaps Sennacherib, on his way to Jerusalem, left his heavy equipage there, Isaiah 10:28,29
Hoof - ...
2 Kings 19:28 (a) This type is used by the Lord to describe His power and ability to return Sennacherib back to his own land, and the ease with which He would do it. It is as though GOD put a bridle on Sennacherib and directed him back to his own land
Adrammelech - Son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria, Isaiah 37:38 ; 2 Kings 19:37 , who, upon returning to Nineveh after his fatal expedition against Hezekiah, was killed by his two sons, Adrammelech and Sharezer, through fear, according to Jewish tradition, of being sacrificed to his idol Nisroch
Togarmah - Sennacherib, who again captured Til-garimmu and destroyed it, speaks of it as being on the borders of Tabal (Tubal [1])
Sepharva'im - (the two Sipparas ) is mentioned by Sennacherib in his letter to Hezekiah as a city whose king had been unable to resist the Assyrians
Ekron - 702, when Sennacherib set free its king, imprisoned by Hezekiah in Jerusalem, according to the Assyrian record
Michmas - Isaiah refers to it in connection with the invasion of Sennacherib in the reign of Hezekiah
Ivory - ‘Beds of ivory,’ such as are mentioned in Amos 6:4 , were, according to a cuneiform inscription, included in the tribute paid by Hezekiah to Sennacherib
Nisroch - A god of the Assyrians, in whose temple, and in the very act of idolatry, Sennacherib was slain by his own sons, 2 Kings 19:37
Sin, - Herodotus relates that Sennacherib advanced against Pelusium, and that near Pelusium Cambyses defeated Psammenitus
Hezekiah - Assyrian annals of Sennacherib discovered at Nineveh agree with this account. A second invasion seems to have followed when Sennacherib, Isaiah 30:1-7, returned, Isaiah 33:1. Then came Sennacherib's letters from Lachish and Libnah, the destruction of a great part of his army, and the retreat of the rest to Assyria, in answer to Hezekiah's prayer
Lachish - It was taken by Sennacherib, and among the slabs discovered at Nineveh is one representing the king sitting on his throne, with captives from Lachish kneeling before him, while his troops, passing in review, show the spoils they have taken. The inscription reads, "Sennacherib, king of multitudes, king of Assyria, sitteth upon a lofty throne, and the spoil of the city of Lachish passeth before him
Sharezer - ” Son of Sennacherib who helped murder his father (2 Kings 19:37 )
Rab-Saris - ]'>[1] official who was sent by Sennacherib to Hezekiah to demand the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 )
Dumah - Sennacherib conquered Dumah
Lachish - Lachish was besieged by Sennacherib and perhaps taken
Zarephath - Zarephath is included in the list of towns captured by Sennacherib when he invaded Phœnicia in b
Timnah - The city fell to the Assyrian king Sennacherib in 701 B
Ivah - Sennacherib boasts that the gods of Sepharvaim, Hena, and Ivah, were powerless to resist him
Siege - Judah suffered siege from Sennacherib ( 2 Kings 18-19 ) and from Nebuchadrezzar (2 Kings 24-25 )
Rabshakeh - This is a title, signifying 'chief cup-bearer,' borne by an officer who was sent by Sennacherib with the Tartan (general) and a Rab-saris to Jerusalem
Isaiah - Sennacherib (B. But after a brief interval war broke out again, and again Sennacherib (q. Isaiah on that occasion encouraged Hezekiah to resist the Assyrians (37:1-7), whereupon Sennacherib sent a threatening letter to Hezekiah, which he "spread before the Lord" (37:14). "Like Xerxes in Greece, Sennacherib never recovered from the shock of the disaster in Judah
Resen - Resen seemingly represents the Assyrian place-name Rçsh-çni , ‘fountain-head,’ but is probably not to be confused with the Rçsh-çni mentioned by Sennacherib in the Bavian inscription, which is regarded as being the modern Räs el-‘Ain a little N
Anathoth - It suffered greatly from the army of Sennacherib, and only 128 men returned to it from the Exile (Nehemiah 7:27 ; Ezra 2:23 )
Libnah - It was besieged by Sennacherib ( 2 Kings 19:8 = Isaiah 37:8 )
Dromedary - The animal is governed by a bridle, which, being usually fastened to a ring fixed in the nose, may very well illustrate the expression, 2 Kings 19:28 , of turning back Sennacherib by putting a hook into his nose; and may farther indicate his swift retreat
Babylon - After being destroyed by Sennacherib, 689 B
Hezeki'ah - (2 Kings 20:17 ) The two invasions of Sennacherib occupy the greater part of the scripture records concerning the reign of Hezekiah. The first of these took place in the third year of Sennacherib, B. Sennacherib sent against Jerusalem an army under two officers and his cupbearer, the orator Rabshakeh, with a blasphemous and insulting summons to surrender; but Isaiah assures the king he need not fear, promising to disperse the enemy
Tirhakah - TIRHAKAH , king of Cush ( 2 Kings 19:9 , Isaiah 37:9 ), marched out from Egypt against Sennacherib shortly before the mysterious destruction of the Assyrian army│(? b. The chronology of the reign is not clear: Tirhakah was not king at the time of Sennacherib’s expedition, but he may have commanded the army opposing it
Sin (1) - A Sallier papyrus records a great battle at Sin between Rameses and the Sheta; here too was the alleged deliverance of Sethos from Sennacherib, mice gnawing by night the Assyrians' bowstrings and shield straps
Adrammelech - Murderer of Sennacherib, king of Assyria, during the king's worship in the temple of Nisroch (2 Kings 19:37 ). One reading of the Hebrew manuscripts describes this Adrammelech as Sennacherib's son (KJV, NIV, RSV)
Lachish - It was assaulted and probably taken by Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:14,17 ; 19:8 ; Isaiah 36:2 ). The inscription has been deciphered as follows:, "Sennacherib, the mighty king, king of the country of Assyria, sitting on the throne of judgment before the city of Lachish: I gave permission for its slaughter
Sennacherib - Sennacherib, hearing of this, marched a second time into Palestine (2 Kings 18:17,37 ; 19 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9-23 ; Isaiah 36:2-22 . Sennacherib sent envoys to try to persuade Hezekiah to surrender, but in vain. ...
Though Sennacherib survived this disaster some twenty years, he never again renewed his attempt against Jerusalem
Nineveh - When Nineveh became the capital of Assyria is not definitely known, but it is generally believed it was during the reign of Sennacherib. Nineveh was the capital of Assyria during the height of the grandeur of that empire, and in the time of Sennacherib, Esar-haddon, and Assur-bani-pal. A palace of another ruler, restored by Sennacherib and Esar-haddon. The southwest palace of Sennacherib
Hezekiah - The assertions that Samaria was destroyed in his sixth year and that Sennacherib’s invasion came in his fourteenth year are inconsistent ( 2 Kings 18:10 ; 2 Kings 18:13 ). The latter has probability on its side, and as we know that Sennacherib invaded Palestine in 701 the calculation is easily made. Hezekiah seems to have remained faithful to the suzerain for some years after his accession, but when, about the time of Sennacherib’s accession (705), a coalition was formed against the oppressor he joined it. In 701 Sennacherib appeared on the scene, and there was no possibility of serious resistance. Sennacherib was detained at Lachish by the stubborn resistance of that fortress, and could send only a detachment of his troops to Jerusalem. Whether Sennacherib was not satisfied with the submission of Hezekiah, or whether a second campaign was made which the historian has confused with this one, is not yet certainly known. There was a second expedition of Sennacherib’s to the west some years later than the one we have been considering
Libnah - It lay on the invasion route to Jerusalem followed by Sennacherib about 701 B
Ambassador - ...
Men of high rank usually; as Sennacherib sent his chief captain, Chief cupbearer, and chief eunuch, Tartan, Rabsaris, Rabshakeh, whom Hezekiah's chief men of the kingdom, Eliakim over the household, Shebna the secretary, and Joab the recorder, met (2 Kings 18:17-18; Isaiah 30:4; Isaiah 33:7; compare Isaiah 18:2)
e'Sar-Had'Don - (victor ), one of the greatest of the kings of Assyria, was the son of Sennacherib, ( 2 Kings 19:37 ) and the grandson of Sargon, who succeeded Shalmaneser
Ivory - Hezekiah was credited with giving Sennacherib tribute in 701 B. Sennacherib's account of the tribute included couches and chairs inlaid with ivory
Tophet - It was not the agency employed in the destruction of Sennacherib, mentioned in Isaiah 30:33
So - Smith's deciphering) married the sister of Tirhakah who helped Hezekiah against Sennacherib; at Sabaku's death Tirhakah succeeded, Sabaku's son being set aside
Mich'Mas - In the invasion of Sennacherib in the reign of Hezekiah, it is mentioned by Isaiah
la'Chish - (2 Chronicles 11:9 ) In the reign of Hezekiah it was one of the cities taken by Sennacherib
Nergal - Pul sacrificed to Nergal in Cutha, and Sennacherib built a temple to him in Tarbisa near Nineveh
Osnappar - 668 626), the son of Esarhaddon, and grandson of Sennacherib
Arme'Nia - (1) ARARAT is mentioned as the place whither the sons of Sennacherib fled
Hezekiah - Light years subsequent to Samaria's fall, in Hezekiah's fourteenth year, Sennacherib, in the third year of his reign according to Assyrian records, undertook his first expedition against Judah. ) Sennacherib undertook two expeditions against Judah. " The patriotism of the Hebrew historian (2 Kings 18) suppresses the ravages, advance on the capital, and the siege; but Isaiah (2 Kings 10:28-32; 2 Kings 22:1-14; 2 Kings 22:2 Kings 24; 2 Kings 29) more vividly than even Sennacherib's annalist, notices all. ...
Sennacherib recovered Padi from Jerusalem and seated him again on the throne. Hezekiah's sickness must have occurred just before Sennacherib's expedition, for God assures him (Isaiah 38:6), "I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria, and I will defend this city," in the 14th year of Hezekiah's reign. Sennacherib's object in his second expedition was Egypt, Hezekiah's ally. The Assyrian annals are silent as to Sennacherib's second expedition in the fifth year of his reign, which began by his "treacherously" (Isaiah 33:1) attacking Lachish, and which ended in the destruction recorded in 2 Kings 19:35; for, unlike the faithful Jewish historians, they never record any of their monarch's disasters. )...
But the disaster is tacitly deducible in the Assyrian records from the discontinuance subsequently of expeditions by Sennacherib westward further than Cilicia. Moreover the Egyptian priests told Herodotus, from their records, that, a century and a half before Cambyses, Sennacherib led a host of Assyrians and Arabs to the Egyptian border where king Sethos met them near Pelusium on the E. ...
Sennacherib, according to Assyrian inscriptions, which mention the 22nd year of his reign, lived about 17 years after the invasion and was slain by his two sons. To Ethiopia Isaiah announces the overthrow of Sennacherib the common foe, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, then at Jerusalem, to carry the tidings to their people. See TIRHAKAH'S coming forth to encounter Sennacherib created a diversion in favor of Judaea. In the former invasion Sennacherib in his first, expedition inflicted a decisive blow on the united forces of Egypt and Ethiopia at Altagu (possibly the Eltekon of Joshua 15:59); but now he was forced to raise the siege of Pelusium by Tirhakah, and send an imperious letter to Hezekiah by Rabshakeh, whose sneers at his religious reforms in removing the high places (2 Kings 18:22-32) and flattering promises in fluent Hebrew to the people favor the idea that he was a renegade Jew. ) In this second expedition, according to Jehovah's word, Sennacherib did not "come before the city with shields, nor cast a bank against it" (Isaiah 37:33); whereas in the first he shut Hezekiah up as a "bird in a cage" also "raising banks of earth against the gates. ...
In Sennacherib's account of his wars with Hezekiah, inscribed with cuneiform characters in the hall of the palace of Koyunjik built by him (140 ft. On returning to Nineveh Sennacherib, according to Tobit 1:18, revenged himself on the Jews then in his power; but that apocryphal book makes him die 55 days afterward, whereas 17 years elapsed: see above. The Assyrian inscriptions say he reigned twice, and that Sennacherib in his first year expelled him and set up Belib in his stead. Probably he recovered the Babylonian kingdom when Sennacherib was weakened by his disaster in Judea, and sent the embassy not merely to congratulate Hezekiah on his recovery but mainly to court Hezekiah's alliance, as having like himself cast off the Assyrian yoke
Assyria - '...
Sennacherib succeeded Sargon his father, B. Hezekiah had been tributary; but on his revolting Sennacherib took the fenced cities of Judah, and then Hezekiah sent him the treasures of his own house and the house of the Lord. Sennacherib returned to his land and was eventually murdered by two of his sons. In Sennacherib's own account he says, "Hezekiah himself I shut up like a bird in a cage in Jerusalem, his royal city . " The above date would clash with the date of Hezekiah, but it is probable that Sennacherib was co-regent with his father some nine years before he reigned alone. ...
A tablet shows Sennacherib sitting on a throne to receive the spoils of the city of Lachish. 727...
Sargon, usurper 722...
Sennacherib of Khabigal, his son 705...
Esar-haddon, his son 681...
Assur-bani-pal (Sardanapalus) his son 668...
Assur-etil-ili-yukinni, his son ? 626...
Esar-haddon II
Nahum, Book of - 709), where he witnessed the invasion of Sennacherib and the destruction of his host (2 Kings 19:35 )
Hook - So the last antichrist shall fare, of whom Sennacherib is type (Ezekiel 38:4)
Geba - So in Isaiah 10:28-32, "he (Sennacherib) hath laid up his carriages at Michmash," i
Ararat - Genesis 8:4; (2) as the refuge of the sons of Sennacherib, 2 Kings 19:37, R
Shalmaneser - King of Assyria between Tiglath-pileser and Sennacherib
Sargon - He is not mentioned in the Scripture histories nor the classics; but Assyrian inscriptions show he succeeded Shalmaneser, and was father of Sennacherib, and took Ashdod as Isaiah says; he finished the siege of Samaria (721 B. , when Sennacherib succeeded
Sargon - 705) in his palace at Khorsabad, after a reign of sixteen years, and was succeeded by his son Sennacherib
Lachish - In the reign of Hezekiah, Sennacherib took Lachish, and while he was quartered there Hezekiah sent messengers to him to make terms ( 2 Kings 18:13-17 ). Sennacherib’s Lachish campaign is commemorated by a sculpture from Nineveh, now in the British Museum
Ai - " The name AIATH still belonged to the locality when Sennacherib marched against Jerusalem (Isaiah 10:28)
Tarsus - Rawlinson thinks Tarshish in Genesis 10:4 can scarcely designate Tartessus, founded not until after Moses, but Tarsus in Cilicia; though said to be founded by Sennacherib, an old settlement doubtless preceded his colony
Rabshakeh - Sent by Sennacherib with Tartan who probably had chief command (first in 2 Kings 18:17; Isaiah 20:1) of an army to induce Jerusalem by threats and promises to surrender
Cistern - ...
Hezekiah stopped the water supply outside Jerusalem at the invasion of Sennacherib, while within there was abundant water (2 Chronicles 32:3-4)
Bridle - ...
Isaiah 37:29 (a) This indicates GOD's warning to Sennacherib that He would take charge of the affairs of this king in such a way that he would be forced to turn away from Jerusalem and return to his own land
Assyria - ), who conquered Samaria and destroyed Israel; Sennacherib (705-681 B
Hezekiah, King of Judah - Sennacherib required complete submission, and the Assyrians came with a great host against Jerusalem. Of the Assyrians 185,000 were slain in one night: Sennacherib returned to Nineveh and was subsequently killedby two of his own sons
Sargon - The father of Sennacherib and successor of Shalmaneser iv
Syria - The third, and to us most interesting, period is that during which the kings of Assyria were dominant over the plains of Syria; when Tyre, Sidon, Ashdod, and Jerusalem bowed beneath the conquering armies of Shalmaneser, Sargon, and Sennacherib; and when at last Memphis and Thebes yielded to the power of the rulers of Nineveh and Babylon, and the kings of Assyria completed with terrible fulness the bruising of the reed of Egypt so clearly foretold by the Hebrew prophets
Medes - But Media was not incorporated with Assyria, although Sargon, and afterward Sennacherib, subdued its people and exacted tribute
Cush - Within this period falls the attempt of Tirhakah, king of Cush, to defeat Sennacherib of Assyria in Palestine ( 2 Kings 19:9 )
Sepharvaim - Rabshakeh and Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:34; 2 Kings 19:13) boastingly refer to Assyria's conquest of Sepharvaim as showing the hopelessness of Samaria's resistance (Isaiah 36:19): "where are the gods of Hamath
Babylon, Kingdom of - ...
Under Sennacherib, Babylonia revolted from Assyria several times, with the help of the Elamites, and after one of these revolts Babylon was destroyed by Sennacherib, B
Philistines - At the beginning of the reign of Sennacherib another effort was made to shake off the Assyrian yoke. In this Hezekiah of Judah took part by imprisoning Padi, the Philistine king of Ekron, who remained faithful to Sennacherib. ), and the siege of Jerusalem by Sennacherib was the result ( 2 Kings 18:1-37 ; 2 Kings 19:1-37 )
Tribute - The heavy tribute paid by Hezekiah to Sennacherib about 701 B
Ethiopia - Ethiopia had sent her ambassadors to Jerusalem where they now were (Isaiah 18:2), Tirhakah their king shortly afterward being the ally whose diversion in that city's favor saved it from Sennacherib (Isaiah 36:37). Isaiah announces Sennacherib's coming overthrow to the Ethiopian ambassadors and desires them to carry the tidings to their own land (compare Isaiah 17:12-14; not "woe" but "ho," calling attention (Isaiah 18:1-2); go, take back the tidings of what God is about, to do against Assyria, the common foe of both Ethiopia and Judah. of Palestine, and Tirhakah the Ethiopian who advanced toward Judah against Sennacherib, were doubtless rulers of Upper Egypt and Ethiopia combined
Micah, Book of - Hezekiah, king of Judah, instituted many reforms that caused the Assyrian king, Sennacherib, to respond with force. The annals of Sennacherib boast that he laid siege to 46 cities and countless small villages. As for Hezekiah, Sennacherib says, “Himself I made a prisoner in Jerusalem, his royal residence, like a bird in a cage
Michmash - Sennacherib long after, advancing from the N
Forest - (Isaiah 10:19,33,34 ) likens the Assyrian host under Sennacherib (q
Vale - If Sennacherib invaded Judaea from the E
Alliance - Sennacherib assumes that this will be the policy of Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:21 ; 2 Kings 18:24 )
Gihon - On the occasion of the approach of the Assyrian army under Sennacherib, Hezekiah, in order to prevent the besiegers from finding water, "stopped the upper water course of Gihon, and brought it straight down to the west side of the city of David" ( 2 Chronicles 32:30 ; 33:14 )
Cedar - Sennacherib had desired to "go up to the sides of Lebanon and cut down the tall cedars thereof" (2 Kings 19:23), but was baffled by the interposition of Jehovah
Captivities of the Jews - --Sennacherib (B
Nineveh - ) Sennacherib after his host's destruction "went and dwelt at Nineveh" (2 Kings 19:36). ...
Sennacherib first made Nineveh the capital. In a chamber at Koyunjik was found among other seals now in British Museum the seal of So or Sabacho and that of Sennacherib affixed to a treaty between them, of which the parchment has perished. Sennacherib his son succeeded 704 B. (See Sennacherib. He built a palace at Koyunjik, near Sennacherib's. Sennacherib's inscription concerning Hezekiah, on two man-headed bulls from Koyunjik, is the most interesting
Assyria, History And Religion of - Sennacherib (704-681 B. After subduing Babylon, Sennacherib turned his attentions westward. Sennacherib's own account of the invasion provides a remarkable supplement to the biblical version (2 Kings 18:13-19:36 ). Sennacherib's conquest of Lachish is shown in graphic detail in carved panels from his palace at Nineveh. ” Three of Sennacherib's dignitaries attempted to negotiate the surrender of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-37 ), but Hezekiah continued to hold out with the encouragement of Isaiah (2Kings 19:1-7,2 Kings 19:20-35 ). Certainly, Sennacherib suffered a major setback, for Hezekiah was the only ruler of the revolt to keep his throne. ...
On a more peaceful front, Sennacherib conducted some major building projects in Assyria. An enraged Sennacherib razed the sacred city in 689 B
Assyria - The Assyrian governor gradually enlarged the boundaries of his kingdom, and was succeeded by Tiglath-pileser, Salmanasar, and Sennacherib, who asserted and maintained their independence. After the death of Assar-haddon, the brother and successor of Sennacherib. Shalmaneser was succeeded by Sennacherib, B. 711 the Medes revolted from the Assyrians; Sennacherib was slain, and he was succeeded by his son Esar-Haddon, Asser-haddon, Asordan, Assaradin, or Sarchedon, by which names he is called by different writers. "In the reign of Sennacherib and Asser-Hadon," says Sir I
Ethiopia - The most influential of these Ethiopian pharaohs was Taharqa (biblical Tirhakah), who rendered aid to Hezekiah of Judah during the Assyrian invasion of Sennacherib in 701 B
Lachish - at the hands of the Assyrian King Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:1 ; 2 Chronicles 32:1 ; Isaiah 36:1 ). ...
The biblical account of Sennacherib's conquest of Lachish in 701 B. is supported and amplified by Assyrian records of King Sennacherib's campaign (2 Kings 18:1 ; 2 Chronicles 32:1 ; Isaiah 36:1 )
Hosea - The principal predictions contained in this book, are the captivity and dispersion of the kingdom of Israel; the deliverance of Judah from Sennacherib; the present state of the Jews; their future restoration, and union with the Gentiles in the kingdom of the Messiah; the call of our Saviour out of Egypt, and his resurrection on the third day
Nineveh - , and of various cities in Judea and Syria; but we discover Sennacherib's own account of his invasion of Palestine, and of the amount of tribute which king Hezekiah was forced to pay him; also pictures representing his capture of Lachish, 2 Kings 18:14 , and his officers, perhaps the railing Rabshakeh himself, presenting Jewish captives to the king, etc. (See cut and details in Sennacherib . For other cuts see NISROCH, Sennacherib, SHALMANEZER, and WAR
Isaiah - His activity extended at least down to the invasion of Sennacherib in 701, and some years later, if the theory be correct that chs. 36 39 refer to two invasions of Sennacherib, of which that in 701 was the first. 20); and of the invasion of Sennacherib in b
Gaza - Sennacherib reinforced his control of Gaza as a vassal state as he invaded Judah in 701 B
a'Arat - ( Genesis 8:4 ) (2) As the asylum of the sons of Sennacherib
Pray - Sometimes prayer is made to Yahweh that He would act against an enemy: “That which thou hast prayed to me against Sennacherib king of Assyria I have heard” (2 Kings 19:20)
Zidon - They are mentioned together in the inscription of Sennacherib at a later period (Schrader, KAT Nahum (2) - His graphic description of Sennacherib and his army (2 Chronicles 1:9-12) makes it likely he was near or in Jerusalem at the time. Nisroch) thy grave," foretells Sennacherib's murder 20 years after his return from Palestine, "as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god" (Isaiah 37:38). The correspondence of sentiments in Nahum with those of Isaiah and Hezekiah implies he wrote when Sennacherib was still besieging and demanding the surrender of Jerusalem (Nahum 1:2 ff, with 2 Kings 19:14-15; Nahum 1:7 with 2 Kings 18:22; 2 Kings 19:19; 2 Kings 19:31; 2 Chronicles 32:7-8; Nahum 1:9; Nahum 1:11 with 2 Kings 19:22; 2 Kings 19:27-28; Nahum 1:14 with 2 Kings 19:6-7; Nahum 1:15 and Nahum 2:1-2 with 2 Kings 19:32-33; Nahum 2:13, "the voice of thy messengers shall no more be heard," namely, Rabshakeh the bearer of Sennacherib's haughty message, with 2 Kings 19:22-23). As Nahum refers in part prophetically to Sennacherib's (Sargon's successor) last attempt on Judah ending in his host's destruction, in part as matter of history (Nahum 1:9-13; Nahum 2:13), he must have prophesied about 713-710 B
Exaltation - Sennacherib of Assyria threatened Hezekiah and the God of Judah (2 Kings 19:22 ), but God humiliated Sennacherib by destroying most of his army
Pha'Raoh, - ( 1 Kings 9:16 ) ...
Pharaoh, the opponent of Sennacherib . --This Pharaoh, ( Isaiah 36:6 ) can only be the Sethos whom Herodotus mentions as the opponent of Sennacherib and who may reasonably be supposed to be the Zet of Manetho
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh to whom king Hezekiah was allied in his war with Sennacherib
Assyria - Sennacherib of Assyria come into Judah with a powerful army in the reign of Hezekiah, but was miraculously defeated
Alliances - Hezekiah was tempted to lean on Egypt against the Assyrian Sennacherib (Isaiah 30:2), and Tirhakah of Ethiopia did make a diversion in his favor (2 Kings 19:9)
Media - After several centuries of subjugation under Assyria, the Medes rebelled under Arbaces in the time of Sardanapalus, and again in the time of Sennacherib, about 700 B
Pharaoh - In the time of Sennacherib and Hezekiah, Tirhakah or some earlier king of the Ethiopian Dynasty would be on the throne
Nineveh - ...
One of the most remarkable of recent discoveries is that of the library of King Assur-bani-pal, or, as the Greek historians call him, Sardanapalos, the grandson of Sennacherib (q. Sargon has taken what remained to the Hittites; Sennacherib overcame Chaldea, and the treasures of Babylon were transferred to his coffers; Esarhaddon and Assur-bani-pal himself have pillaged Egypt and her great cities, Sais, Memphis, and Thebes of the hundred gates
Joppa - Sennacherib occupied the city; then, in turn, the Babylonians and the Persians
Nineveh - Layard later returned in 1849 to Quyundjiq and discovered Sennacherib's palace there. ...
Palaces Sennacherib (704-681 B. Sennacherib's city was enclosed by eight miles of walls with fifteen gates
Ptolemais - , the Assyrian Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal, and several of the Ptolemys engaged in its conquest or defence
Edom, Edomites - , Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal, kings of Assyria (cf
Gaza - they carried all away and left none; see 2 Chronicles 21:17; 2 Chronicles 28:18) to deliver them up to Edom (the Philistines of Gaza, instead of hospitably sheltering the Jewish refugees fleeing before Sennacherib and other Assyrian, invaders, sold them as captives to their bitter foes, the Edomites; compare Isaiah 16:4)
Sennacherib - ...
Though I should not have thought it worth the record of even inserting this man's name in a work of this kind, neither would his name have been remembered in history, had it not been for being connected with the church's history, yet as that part of his history which relates to the church opens a beautiful lesson, for instruction, I hope the Reader will indulge me with adding a few lines more before that we dismiss the recollection of the impious character of Sennacherib. ...
I have introduced this observation of the Lord's judgment on Sennacherib's army by way of introducing another; namely, what safety are the people of the Lord brought into when all the creation of God waits as ministering servants to execute the divine judgments on their enemies! "Winds and storms fulfilling his word," sickness and the word, angels and messengers, all wait to execute the Lord's commands
Nahum - 714, when Sennacherib invaded Judaea
Hezekiah - But Hezekiah was not deterred by this alarming example from refusing to pay that tribute to the Assyrians which had been imposed on Ahaz: this brought on the invasion of Sennacherib, in the fourteenth year of the reign of Hezekiah, of which we have a very particular account in the writings of the Prophet Isaiah, who was then living, Isaiah 36
Assyria - Mention is next made of Sennacherib (B
Gate - Thus the Persian satrap in the Lycian Xanthus monument sits at the gate dictating terms to the Greek ambassadors, and Sennacherib, at his tent door, gives judgment on the Jews taken at Lachish (British Museum, 59)
Babylon - It was sacked by Sennacherib in b
Egypt - Sennacherib was attacking Libnah when he heard that the king of Ethiopia had come out to fight against him. Sennacherib sent a second threatening letter to Hezekiah; but God miraculously destroyed his army in the night. Tirhakah was afterwards defeated by Sennacherib and again at the conquest of Egypt by Esar-haddon. ) Shabataka, defeated by Sennacherib
Damascus - It was taken and plundered, also, by Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, the generals of Alexander the Great, Judas Maccabeus, and at length by the Romans in the war conducted by Pompey against Tigranes, in the year before Christ, 65
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - Sargon's son Sennacherib became the most famous of the Assyrian kings
Nin'Eveh - Sennacherib was slain there when worshipping in the temple of Nisroch his god. The most important inscription hitherto discovered in connection with biblical history is that upon a pair of colossal human-headed bulls from Kouyunjik, now in the British Museum, containing the records of Sennacherib, and describing, among other events, his wars with Hezekiah
Deliver - Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 3:15,28 ), Pharaoh (Exodus 5:2 ), and Sennacherib (2 Chronicles 32:10-15 ) railed against Israel for trusting in God's deliverance
Mizpah - Sennacherib at Nob first caught the full view of "the house of Zion and hill of Jerusalem"; Nob therefore is probably Mizpah
Nineveh - ...
Nineveh is next mentioned in 2 Kings 19:36 ; Isaiah 37:37 , when Sennacherib, after the destruction of his army by God, retired to Nineveh, where he was slain by two of his sons
Isaiah - A series of vigorous successors succeeded him: Shalmaneser V (726-722), Sargon II (721-705), Sennacherib (704-681), and Esarhaddon (680-669). That same resolute policy assured Isaiah that Jerusalem would not fall to Sennacherib in 701 B. Isaiah soundly castigated Hezekiah for entertaining the seditious Babylonian princelet whose real purpose was to secure military aid for a rebellion in south Babylonia in an effort to overthrow Sennacherib (Isaiah 39:1 )
Babylon, History And Religion of - , the new Assyrian king, Sennacherib, attacked Babylon. , Sennacherib destroyed the sacred city of Babylon in retaliation. ...
Esarhaddon, Sennacherib's son, immediately began the rebuilding of Babylon to win the allegiance of the populace
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Thus Moab and Moabite kings are mentioned in the records of Tiglath-Pileser III, Sargon II, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon
Medes - Sennacherib and his successor Esarhaddon both profess to conquer Media, which shows it was still unconquered when they came to the throne
Ammon, Ammonites - , and Sennacherib call them Beth-Ammon, placing the determinative for ‘man’ before Ammon
Ammonites - Ammonite kings paid tribute to Tiglath-pileser III, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon
Prophets - Nahum, in the latter part of the reign of Hezekiah, and after the expedition of Sennacherib
Assur - (Tiglath Pileser's successor), and father of Sennacherib, and grandfather of Esarhaddon. The magnificent palace of Sennacherib (the assailant of (See HEZEKIA) at Nineveh, as also the buildings erected by Sargon and Esarhaddon (the carrier away of Manasseh to Babylon, 2 Chronicles 33:11) show the power and wealth of Assyria at this period
Moab, Moabites - Sennacherib, about b
Existence of God - "The existence of God farther appears from the fearful punishments which have been inflicted upon persons, and especially upon nations, when their immoralities became excessive, and that by very unexpected means and instruments; as in the drowning of the old world; destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah; plagues of Pharaoh and his servants; overthrow of Sennacherib and his army; miseries and ruin of the Canaanites, Jews, Syrians, Assyrians, Chaldeans, Persians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, Saracens, Tartars, and others
Proselytes - ) Hezekiah's triumph over Sennacherib was followed by many bringing gifts: unto Jehovah to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 32:23); this suggested the prophecy in Psalm 87 that Rahab (Egypt) and Babylon (whose king Merodach Baladan had sent a friendly embassy to Hezekiah), Philistia, Tyre, and Ethiopia should be spiritually born (Psalms 51:5; Psalms 51:10; Psalms 22:31; Isaiah 66:8; John 3:3; John 3:5; both Old and New Testament teach the need of the new birth) in Jerusalem as proselytes
Judah, Kingdom of - ) The repulse of Sennacherib and the religious revival under these two kings averted the evil day
Babel - ...
During the first year of Sennacherib his sons and grandsons were at war with Esarhaddon and his successor. Then one Acises reigned a month, and Merodach Baladan held the throne six months, and was then supplanted by Belibus whom Sennacherib made his viceroy for three years and then placed his oldest son Aparanadius on the throne. of Sennacherib
Tyre - At the next attack, under Sennacherib, Elulæus, the king, fled in despair to Cyprus, the Assyrians appointing a tributary king, Tubaal, in his stead (b
Isaiah, Book of - treat of Hezekiah and Sennacherib
Philistia - Sennacherib took Ashkelon, and gave part of Hezekiah's land as a reward to Ashdod, Gaza, and Ekron for their submission (Rawlinson 1:477)
Archaeology And Biblical Study - One can demonstrate from archaeological materials that Sennacherib invaded Judah in the time of Hezekiah, but that he was a tool in the hand of the Lord can only be known from biblical assertion. The huge palace of the Assyrian king, Sennacherib (704-681 B. Although Sennacherib does not claim to have captured Jerusalem, he makes no mention of the calamity suffered by his troops as described in the biblical account
Captivity - ...
Sennacherib (713 B
Babylon - by the Assyrian King Sennacherib, who destroyed much of it. Due largely to Sennacherib's deliberate destruction of the city, very little of pre-Sargonid Babylon (before 721 B
Philistim - ...
Esar-haddon, successor to Sennacherib, besieged Ashdod, or Azoth, and took it by the arms of his general, Thasthan, or Tartan
Deuteronomy - The deliverance of Jerusalem from Sennacherib threw a glory round the sanctuary of which Jahweh had so signally vindicated the inviolability
Phoenicia, phNicians - Sennacherib (705 681) records the submission of Sidon, Sarepta, Achzib, and Acco ( KIB Pharaoh - ...
...
Pharaoh, in whom Hezekiah put his trust in his war against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:21 )
Jerusalem - the Assyrian general Sennacherib destroyed most of the cities of Judah and shut up King Hezekiah “like a bird in a cage
Jerusalem - By another gift from the apparently inexhaustible royal and sacred treasures, Hezekiah endeavoured to keep Sennacherib from an attack on the capital ( 2 Kings 18:13 ); but the attack, threatened by insulting words from the emissaries of Sennacherib, was finally averted by a mysterious calamity that befell the Assyrian army ( 2 Kings 19:35 )
Ships And Boats - There are figures of such ships, with sharp beaks for ramming, in Layard’s History of Nineveh , and Sennacherib in his expedition against Merodach-baladan had ships manned by Tyrians
War - In the later times of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, we observe their kings bearing the shock of the greatest powers of Asia, of the kings of Assyria and Chaldea, Shalmaneser, Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Nebuchadnezzar, who made the whole east tremble
Music, Instruments, Dancing - An Assyrian inscription, praising the victory of the Assyrian king Sennacherib over King Hezekiah of Judah, lists male and female musicians as part of the tribute carried off to Nineveh
Scripture - Neither was it likely that Sennacherib would record the fatal overthrow of his vast army at Jerusalem
Temple - After this period it underwent sundry profanities and pillages from Hazael, Tiglath-pileser, Sennacherib, etc
Dress - ]'>[7] ‘tunic’ A familiar Assyrian sculpture, representing the siege and capture of Lachish by Sennacherib, shows the Jewish captives, male and female alike, dressed in a moderately tight garment fitting close to the neck (cf
Bible - Pharaoh, Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus while doing their own will, appear in the Bible as God's instruments, overruled to carry out His purposes
Isaiah - ...
(8) The historical section (Isaiah 36-39) as to Sennacherib, Assyria, and Babylon, forms the fitting appendix to the prophecies concerning Assyria mainly, and the preface to the latter portion of the book, concerning the deliverance from Babylon
Jerusalem - ...
The idea that Jerusalem was inviolable persisted, however, no doubt strengthened in part by the deliverance of the city from the siege of Sennacherib (2 Kings 19:20-36 )
Egypt - Tehrak or Tirhakah fought Sennacherib in support of Hezekiah
Israel, History of - In 711 he warned against an Egyptian-led revolt against Assyria (Isaiah 20:1 ), and in 701 he was—Yahweh's spokesman when Sennacherib of Assyria laid siege to Jerusalem (Isaiah 36-37 ; see also 2 Kings 18-19 )
Kings, the Books of - The names of Omri, Mesha, Jehu, Menahem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, are deciphered in inscriptions of campaigns of Tiglath Pileser, Sargon, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon
Temple of Jerusalem - Good King Hezekiah raised a hugh tribute for Sennacherib, king of Assyria, in his 701 B
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - 61), he gives a statement of his method as follows: "Though the prophet is speaking of Sennacherib he has a covert reference to Satan
Money - On the other hand, where gold is concerned, as in the case of the 30 talents which Sennacherib ‘appointed unto Hezekiah’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ), we may with some confidence assume the gold standard common to Palestine and Assyria
Book - The letters which Rabshakeh delivered from Sennacherib to Hezekiah, are called a book
Jews - Judah was invaded by Sennacherib; but Hezekiah's piety, and Isaiah's prayer, were the means of their preservation: but under Manasseh, the Jews abandoned themselves to horrid impiety: for which they were punished by Esarhaddon, king of Assyria, who invaded and reduced the kingdom, and carried Manasseh prisoner to Babylon