What does Scripture mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
γραφὴ a writing 16
γραφή a writing 6
γραφὴν a writing 3
γραφῆς a writing 3
γραφῇ a writing 2
ἀναγνώσει knowing. 1
γραφήν a writing 1
בִּכְתָ֖ב a writing 1

Definitions Related to Scripture

G1124


   1 a writing, thing written.
   2 the Scripture, used to denote either the book itself, or its contents.
   3 a certain portion or section of the Holy Scripture.
   

H3791


   1 a writing, document, edict.
      1a register, enrolment, roll.
      1b mode of writing, character, letter.
      1c letter, document, a writing.
      1d a written edict.
         1d1 of royal enactment.
         1d2 of divine authority.
         

G320


   1 knowing.
      1a a knowing again, owning.
      1b reading.
      

Frequency of Scripture (original languages)

Frequency of Scripture (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fool in Scripture
The atheist: "The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God" (Psalms 13:52).
The rich fool: "But God said to him, Thou fool, this night they require thy soul of thee and whose shall those things by which thou hast provided?" (Luke 12).
A penalty: "And whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hellfire" (Matthew 5). Those who hear the word of God and do not keep it are like "the fool that built his house upon the sand" (Matthew 7).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Scripture
SCRIPTURE . 1 . The word ‘Scripture’ (Lat. scriptura , ‘a writing,’ ‘something written’) is used for the Bible as a whole, more often in the plural form ‘Scriptures,’ and also more properly for a passage of the Bible. It appears as tr. [1] of the Greek graphç , which is used in the singular for a portion of the OT ( e.g. Mark 12:10 ), and also for the whole OT ( Galatians 3:22 ), and more frequently in the plural ( haigraphai ). The specific idea of Scripture contains an element of sanctity and authority. Thus it becomes usual to refer to Holy Scripture, or the Holy Scriptures ( en graphais hagiais , Romans 1:2 ).
2 . This specific conception of Scripture as distinguished from ordinary writing is due to the reception of it as a record of the word of God, and is therefore associated with inspiration. The earliest reference to any such record is in the narrative of the finding of the Book of the Law by Hilkiah the scribe in the time of Josiah ( 2 Kings 22:3 ff.). Since this book is now known to have been Deuteronomy or part of it, we must reckon that this was the first book treated as Scripture. Still greater sanctity was given to the enlarged and more developed Law in the time of Ezra and Nehemiah, and from that time the whole Pentateuch, regarded as the Law given by God to Moses, is treated as especially sacred and authoritative. The special function of the scribes in guarding and teaching the Law rested on this Scriptural character attached to it, and in turn rendered it the more venerable as Scripture. Later the reception of the Hagiographa and the Prophets into the Canon led to those collections being regarded also as Scripture, though never with quite the authority attached to the Law.
The Rabbis cherished great veneration for Scripture, and ascribed to it a mechanical inspiration which extended to every word and letter. Philo also accepted plenary inspiration, finding his freedom from the bondage of the letter in allegorical interpretations.
Unlike the Jerusalem Rabbis, in this respect followed by most of the NT writers, who quote the various OT authors by name, Philo quotes Scripture as the immediate word of God, and in so doing is followed by the author of Hebrews. Thus, while St. Mark says, ‘as it is written in Isaiah, the prophet’ (Mark 1:2 ), and St. Paul ‘David saith’ ( Romans 11:9 ), in Hebrews we read, ‘He ( i.e. God) saith’ ( Hebrews 1:7 ), ‘the Holy Ghost saith’ ( Hebrews 3:7 ), or, more indefinitely, ‘it is said’ ( Hebrews 3:15 ), which is quite in the manner of Philo. Still, the technical expression ‘It is written’ ( gegraptai ) is very common both in the Gospels and in St. Paul’s Epistles. As a Greek perfect, it has the peculiar force of a present state resulting from a past action. Thus it always conveys the thought that Scripture, although it was written long ago, does not belong to the past, but is in existence to-day, and its inherent present authority is thus emphasized as that of a law now in force. The impersonal character of the passive verb also adds dignity to the citation thus introduced, as something weighty on its own account.
3. No NT writings during the Apostolic age are treated as Scripture a title, with its associated authority, always reserved by the Apostles for the OT. There is an apparent exception in 2 Peter 3:15-16 , where the Epistles of ‘our beloved brother Paul’ are associated with ‘the other scriptures’; but this is a strong argument in favour of assigning 2Peter to a late period in the second century. Apart from this, we first meet with the technical phrase ‘It is written’ attached to a NT passage in Barn. iv. 4; but here it is a Gospel citation of a saying of Christ: ‘As it is written. Many are called but few chosen.’ Thus the authority of Christ’s words leads to the record of them being cited as Scripture. In Polycarp ( Phil . xii. 1) we have the title ‘Scripture’ applied to the source of a NT quotation, but only in the Latin tr. [1] ( his scripturis ). In 2 Clem. ii. 4 a saying of Christ is cited as Scripture. But, apart from these rare instances, no writer previous to the second half of the second century appeals to the NT as technically Scripture. Clement of Rome, Barnahas (with the one exception referred to), Hermas, and even Justin Martyr use the title for the OT only. Theophilus of Antioch ( c [3] . 180) cites passages from St. Paul as ‘the Divine word’ ( ad Autol . iii. 14). Irenæus (180), on the other hand, constantly treats NT passages as the word of God and authoritative Scripture. For an explanation of this remarkable development, see Canon of NT.
W. F. Adeney.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Inspiration of Scripture
See Bible, Inspiration of the
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Diversity And Unity of Scripture
See Scripture, Unity and Diversity of
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Scripture, Unity And Diversity of
Study of the nature of the relationship of the sixty-six canonical books of the Bible. The unity of Scripture claims that the Bible presents a noncontradictory and consistent message concerning God and redemptive history. The fact of diversity is observed in comparing the individual authors' presentations of God and history.
Foundational Issues . The foundation of the unity of the Bible is the belief that the sixty-six books of the Bible encode God's self-disclosure of himself and his will to his creation. God's method of conveying this revelation includes the diversity of time, culture, authors, literary genre, and the theological themes that address the special needs in the progress of that revelation.
The self-witness of the Bible to its inspiration demands a commitment to its unity. The ultimate basis for unity is contained in the claim of divine inspiration in 2 Timothy 3:16 , that "all Scripture is given by inspiration [theopneustos [ 2 Peter 1:19-21 ; 3:15-16 ). Peter's discussion of earth history in 2 Peter 3 assumes the unity of God's control of history. It is obvious that he would also assume a unity in the biblical record of that control. The statements of Paul and Peter model a belief in the unity of Scripture on a priori grounds.
This approach to the unity of Scripture is often attacked on the basis that it is circular reasoning, using the source (the Bible) as a testimony to itself. Modern liberal scholars claim to reject such a procedure, denying unity by highlighting the diversity of the data within the Bible. We have noted, however, that ultimately our commitment to Scripture is an issue of faith. All ultimate beliefs appeal to a circle of reasoning for their support, even the beliefs of liberal biblical critics. At the same time, while it is not within the purpose of the present article to prove the point, it can be argued vigorously and with intellectual integrity that the phenomena of Scripture support a belief in its unity.
The Unity of Scripture . The Bible has one heart beat. It is an organic unity because an infinite God orchestrated its production. God normally accomplished this task through human instrumentality without violating the integrity of those individuals. Such a process cannot be studied in a test tube; it can only be proclaimed. This is exactly how Peter and Paul described it. Therefore, the organic unity of Scripture is ultimately a theological proposition that reflects a presupposition concerning the nature of God. Although this unity is a deductive proposition, it is inductively illustrated from the phenomena. We do not have a unity of Scripture because we can prove it from the phenomena, but we have phenomenological unity because it exists. The phenomenological study of Scripture serves several purposes: (1) to explicate the beauty of the product of Scripture; (2) to answer the critics who would demean its divine origin and unity; (3) to expose the diversity that is a part of God's plan as represented by its presence in the biblical record.
The unity of Scripture is observed in numerous categories. The normative nature of moral biblical teaching over a period of thousands of years as recorded from Genesis to Revelation is most striking. While the narrative structures make their own contextually specific points, there is a thread of continuity in regard to the larger moral expectations of God. It is as if the Bible reads us rather than us reading the Bible. It is a mirror in which we see ourselves, whether observing the struggles of the first family, the patriarchs, David and the kings, the prophets, or Jesus and the apostles. The Ten Commandments, the Sermon on the Mount, James, and 1John present a harmonious voice for what constitutes godly character.
The interdependence of the Old Testament and New Testament requires a view of unity. The Old Testament is incomplete without the next chapter, the New Testament. The New Testament is not understandable without the Old Testament as a prolegomena. Jesus as Messiah brings both together and presents not only a unity but provides information for the final chapter—the eschaton. The use of the Old Testament in the Old Testament (e.g., the call narrative of Jeremiah 1 reflects Deuteronomy 18 ) and the Old Testament in the New Testament illustrates this interdependence. The naturalness of this relationship is noted in that the New Testament uses the Old Testament as proof texts, showing continuity with the Old Testament in theological assertions, analogies in redemptive history (e.g., Matthew 2:17-18 ), and typological fulfillment. The use of the Old Testament in the New Testament as direct predictive prophecy is much less frequent than the above categories, but the fact of prophetic fulfillment argues strongly for the unity of the Bible. Prophetic fulfillment within the Old Testament and especially during the earthly messianic era demonstrates God's sovereign control over history and the resultant unity of the redemptive record.
The preaching of John the Baptist and Jesus did not totally take Israel by surprise because it was in concord with the Old Testament prophets. Paul presented promise and fulfillment themes from the perspective that his teaching is identical with the Old Testament promises (cf. Romans 1:2 ; 4:14 ; Galatians 4:18 ). The Book of Revelation does not contain one formal quote from the Old Testament, yet it cannot be understood without a thorough knowledge of all biblical revelation that preceded it.
The historical and ethnic details illustrate continuity. The genealogies of Jesus rehearse ethnic origins and God's plan. Abraham is still a father model for those who believe when Romans and Galatians are read. Jesus and Paul go to the "Jews first." Paul argues that Israel is still important to God even though the Gentiles are now grafted into his plan (Romans 9-11 ). The Book of Revelation ends where Genesis began, in an edenic garden.
A permeating theological continuity exists throughout Scripture. The development of a complete Christian worldview requires an understanding of the biblical story line from Genesis to Revelation. Genesis provides the nesting place for redemptive history. Revelation forecasts the culmination with abundant allusions to Genesis motifs. It is also interesting that the Gospel authored by the apostle John (assuming he also authored Revelation) focuses on the creation motif in its prologue.
The Scriptures present a singular view regarding sin and salvation. The Bible opens in Genesis 1-3 with a narrative on creation, fall, and redemption. The Scriptures then proceed to develop these themes. All subsequent passages depend upon these established motifs until the consummation in the Apocalypse delivers humankind and places them in an eternal utopia like the Garden of Eden. The New Testament illustrates this dependence. The classic text of Romans 3 defines sin by stringing Old Testament quotes together. When Peter engages his own sinfulness, it seems that he does so in Isaianic imagery (cf. Isaiah 6:5 ; with Luke 5:8 ). From Abraham to Paul, salvation is by faith and faith alone. From Abraham to James, righteousness by faith is functional (a point also noted by Paul in Ephesians 2:10 ; Titus 3:3-8 ).
The concept of covenant provides a major framework for unity and diversity within the record of God's redemptive work. The Old Testament presents the relationship between God and humankind in terms of a series of covenants. Covenant forms are presented to Adam, Noah, Abraham, and Moses; then the promise of a new covenant appears in the prophets. Old Testament theology forms many of its concepts around covenantal terminology. Common terms such as "know, " "lovingkindness, " and "love" bear special meaning in many contexts. The statement in Romans 9:13 , "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated, " is best understood in terms of an established covenant with Jacob and not with Esau. The New Testament reflects the continuing presence of a covenant consciousness in Zechariah's hymn of praise (Luke 1:67-79 ) and the Epistle of Hebrews.
The christological continuity of the Testaments is undeniable. The New Testament correlates with the Old Testament concerning Jesus' place of birth, family line, forerunner, suffering, death, and future kingdom. Matthew is so conscious of this correlation that he creates a quotation from the Old Testament on a very broad analogy of Jesus as the rejected one in order to justify Jesus being raised in Nazareth (Matthew 2:23 ). The baptism of Jesus marks him as the anointed servant of the Lord. Jesus adopts a particularly messianic title"son of man"from Daniel 7 as his favorite way of referring to himself. All Bible students wish Luke would have recorded more than a mere reference of Jesus' exposition of himself from the Old Testament (24:25-27; 24:44). The correlation of Jesus with the Passover Lamb at the beginning and end of his earthly ministry presents a most prominent Jewish imagery of salvation.
The Diversity of Scripture . The focus of skepticism in relation to Scripture as a unified divine revelation has been on what it views as irreconcilable diversity within the phenomena of the biblical text. Several issues need to be considered as one evaluates diverse data. One major flaw in evaluating what constitutes unity is to assume that unity means unanimity. The New Testament's record of disagreements between Peter and Paul, Paul and Barnabas, and many other items, does not reflect irreconcilable differences but reveals the struggle of the christological transition. Jesus warned about a variety of tensions that accompany times of transition when he described old and new wine, old and new cloth, family members turning against each other, and many other aspects of conflict over the revelation of God's developing program.
Another problem in evaluating diversity relates, once again, to the matter of presuppositions. An example by analogy is the matter of Luke's record of the Quirinius census at the time of Jesus' birth. If a scholar assumes that the biblical authors are only correct when clear external collaborating evidence is present, then Luke will not be viewed as accurate. If Luke, however, is given the benefit of the doubt as a historian, then one can build a strong case of probability on behalf of his accuracy. The same principle applies when evaluating diverse material in the Bible. If Scripture is viewed for what it claims to be, reasonable explanations for diversity can usually be provided or merely allow the tension to stand. On the other hand, if Scripture is viewed as nothing more than a composite body of literature that records a varied history of religion, no amount of explanation will satisfy.
A failure to accept diversity can often be another problem. The unity and diversity of Scripture must ultimately be described by the evidence in the biblical text. What exists in the text is, by our own evangelical presupposition, what God intended for us to have and it is inerrant. If we fail to assimilate into our overall biblical worldview the diversity God has created, we will miss an important aspect of God's character and plan. Diversity itself is complementary and not contradictory! Therefore, diversity as well as unity must be taken into account. The technical development of exegesis among evangelical biblical scholars over the past several decades provides us with an adequate tool chest to accomplish this task. The work of evangelical scholars in relation to accounting for the diversity that exists in the Synoptic Gospels provides some helpful principles in accounting for other areas of diversity within Scripture.
The old liberal presentation of negative diversity in the Bible was based upon certain controlling presuppositions. Examples include composite authors who were attached to rival sects (e.g., the JEDP theory), assumed antitheses between Jesus and Paul, and discontinuity between the historical Jesus and the kerygmatic Christ (which means the Christ preached by the early church without any necessary connection with what Jesus of Nazareth actually said). This article will cite the more positive examples of diversity, which should be viewed from the human perspective as God-ordained diversity.
The New Testament writers use a great variety of semantic domains to describe the same issues. One striking example occurs between Paul and John's description of gospel proclamation. Paul uses the euangel- word-group ("proclaim the gospel/good news") to image his proclamation of the gospel and thereby has made the term "gospel" a household word among Christians. John never uses any form of this term in his Gospel or epistles (the occurrences in Revelation 10:7 and Revelation 14:6 ; are merely good news in general ). John utilizes the martur- word-group ("witness") and thereby images his proclamation of the gospel as a "witness." Since John's Gospel was probably written after Paul's influential mission, does this mean that he disagreed with Paul? No, he merely chose another term to suit his purposes. Another aspect of semantics concerns the definition a writer gives to a term. Paul views the concept of righteousness almost exclusively as a forensic issue. Most other biblical writers use the terms for righteousness in functional ways, reflecting the evidences of one's legal standing with God. Jesus and Paul and James and Paul do not contradict one another; they merely provide a variety of perspectives upon a larger issue.
Apparent theological diversity provides many difficult areas to explain. How do you resolve the dilemma of the divine will and human responsibility? The "problem of evil" question"If God is ultimate good, and God has ultimate power, then how can he allow evil to exist?"challenges each new generation of Christian theologians. The Acts of Yahweh in the Old Testament (Joshua 6:15-21 ), and the teaching of the God-Man (Luke 9:54-55 ) in the New Testament appear on opposite ends of a continuum to many. How God can hate sin and love sinners, save some and consign others to eternal punishment, defies explanation in the minds of many sensitive people. Yet, these are all expressions of diversity Scripture upholds without providing the reader with a systematic theology footnote to ease the tension. Biblical diversity is not to be rejected or simply explained away. It must be incorporated into our total world and life view.
Gary T. Meadors
See also Bible, Authority of the ; Bible, Inspiration of the ; Old Testament in the New Testament, the
Bibliography . D. L. Baker, Two Testaments, One Bible ; J. Barr, The Bible in the Modern World and Fundamentalism ; J. D. G. Dunn, Unity and Diversity in the New Testament ; W. Eichrodt, Theology of the Old Testament ; D. P. Fuller, The Unity of the Bible ; F. Gaebelein, "The Unity of the Bible, " inRevelation and the Bible ; N. Geisler, ed., Inerrancy ; J. Goldingay, VT 34 (1984):153-68; J. Grier, GTJ 1ns (1980); C. F. H. Henry, God, Revelation and Authority, vol. 4; L. J. Kuyper, The Scripture Unbroken ; G. Maier, The End of the Historical-Critical Method ; R. Nash, The Word of God and the Mind of Man ; J. I. Packer, JETS 25 (1982):409-14; V. Poythress, Symphonic Theology ; H. H. Rowley, The Unity of the Bible ; F. Schaeffer, Escape From Reason ; J. Walvoord, ed., Inspiration and Interpretation .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Canon of Scripture
(See BIBLE.) The collection of sacred books constituting the Christian church's authoritative RULE (Greek canon) of faith and practice. The word occurs in Galatians 6:16; 2 Corinthians 10:13-16. The law, i.e. the Pentateuch or five books of Moses, is the groundwork of the whole. The after written sacred books rest on it. The Psalms, divided into five books to correspond with it, begin, "Blessed is the man" whose "delight is in the law of the Lord; and in His law will he meditate day and night." In Joshua (Joshua 1:8) similarly the Lord saith, "this book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth, but thou shalt meditate therein day and night." Moses directed the Levites, "Take this book of the law, and put it in the side of the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God" (Deuteronomy 31:25-26). "The testimony," or Decalogue written by God's finger on the tables of stone, was put into the ark (Exodus 25:16; Exodus 40:20; 1 Kings 8:9).
Hilkiah "found the book of the law in the house of the Lord," where it had lain neglected during the reigns that preceded godly Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:8; 2 Chronicles 34:14), "the law of the Lord by (the hand of) Moses." Joshua under inspiration added his record, "writing these words in the book of the law of God" (Joshua 24:26). Samuel further wrote "the manner of the kingdom in a book" (1 Samuel 10:25). Isaiah (Isaiah 8:20) as representative of the prophets makes the law the standard of appeal: "to the law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them." The earlier sacred writings by his time seem to have been gathered into one whole, called "the book of the Lord": "seek ye out of the book of the Lord" (Isaiah 33:16; Isaiah 29:18). Just as our Lord saith" Search the Scriptures" (John 5:39).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Scripture
1: γραφή (Strong's #1124 — Noun Feminine — graphe — graf-ay' ) akin to grapho, "to write" (Eng., "graph," "graphic," etc.), primarily denotes "a drawing, painting;" then "a writing," (a) of the OT Scriptures, (1) in the plural, the whole, e.g., Matthew 21:42 ; 22:29 ; John 5:39 ; Acts 17:11 ; 18:24 ; Romans 1:2 , where "the prophets" comprises the OT writers in general; 15:4; 16:26, lit., "prophetic writings," expressing the character of all the Scriptures; (2) in the singular in reference to a particular passage, e.g., Mark 12:10 ; Luke 4:21 ; John 2:22 ; 10:35 (though applicable to all); 19:24,28,36,37; 20:9; Acts 1:16 ; 8:32,35 ; Romans 4:3 ; 9:17 ; 10:11 ; 11:2 ; Galatians 3:8,22 ; 4:30 ; 1 Timothy 5:18 , where the 2nd quotation is from Luke 10:7 , from which it may be inferred that the Apostle included Luke's Gospel as "Scripture" alike with Deuteronomy, from which the first quotation is taken; in reference to the whole, e.g., James 4:5 (see RV , a separate rhetorical question from the one which follows); in 2 Peter 1:20 , "no prophecy of Scripture," a description of all, with special application to the OT in the next verse; (b) of the OT Scriptures (those accepted by the Jews as canonical) and all those of the NT which were to be accepted by Christians as authoritative, 2 Timothy 3:16 ; these latter were to be discriminated from the many forged epistles and other religious "writings" already produced and circulated in Timothy's time. Such discrimination would be directed by the fact that "every Scripture," characterized by inspiration of God, would be profitable for the purposes mentioned; so the RV. The AV states truth concerning the completed Canon of Scripture, but that was not complete when the Apostle wrote to Timothy.
The Scriptures are frequently personified by the NT writers (as by the Jews, John 7:42 ), (a) as speaking with Divine authority, e.g., John 19:37 ; Romans 4:3 ; 9:17 , where the Scripture is said to speak to Pharaoh, giving the message actually sent previously by God to him through Moses; James 4:5 (see above); (b) as possessed of the sentient quality of foresight, and the active power of preaching. Galatians 3:8 , where the Scripture mentioned was written more than four centuries after the words were spoken. The Scripture, in such a case, stands for its Divine Author with an intimation that it remains perpetually characterized as the living voice of God. This Divine agency is again illustrated in Galatians 3:22 (cp. Galatians 3:10 ; Matthew 11:13 ).
2: γράμμα (Strong's #1121 — Noun Neuter — gramma — gram'-mah ) "a letter of the alphabet," etc. is used of the Holy Scriptures in 2 Timothy 3:15 . For the various uses of this word see LETTER.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Scripture
Invariably in the New Testament denotes that definite collection of sacred books, regarded as given by inspiration of God, which we usually call the Old Testament (2 Timothy 3:15,16 ; John 20:9 ; Galatians 3:22 ; 2 Peter 1:20 ). It was God's purpose thus to perpetuate his revealed will. From time to time he raised up men to commit to writing in an infallible record the revelation he gave. The "Scripture," or collection of sacred writings, was thus enlarged from time to time as God saw necessary. We have now a completed "Scripture," consisting of the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament canon in the time of our Lord was precisely the same as that which we now possess under that name. He placed the seal of his own authority on this collection of writings, as all equally given by inspiration (Matthew 5:17 ; 7:12 ; 22:40 ; Luke 16:29,31 ). (See BIBLE; CANON .)
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Scripture
Is a word derived from the Latin scriptura, and in its original sense is of the same import with writing, signifying "any thing written." It is, however, commonly used to denote the writings of the Old and New Testaments, which are called sometimes the Scriptures, sometimes the sacred or holy Scriptures, and sometimes canonical Scriptures. These books are called the Scriptures by way of eminence, as they are the most important of all writings.
They are said to be holy or sacred on account of the sacred doctrines which they teach; and they are termed canonical, because, when their number and authenticity were ascertained, their names were inserted in ecclesiastical canons, to distinguish them from other books, which, being of no authority, were kept out of sight, and therefore styled apocryphal.
See APOCRYPHA. Among other arguments for the divine authority of the Scriptures, the following may be considered as worthy of our attention: "
1. The sacred penmen, the prophets and apostles, were holy, excellent men, and would not artless, illiterate men, and therefore could not, lay the horrible scheme of deluding mankind. The hope of gain did not influence them, for they were self-denying men, that left all to follow a Master who had not where to lay his head; and whose grand initiating maxim was, Except a man forsake all that he hath, he cannot be my disciple.
They were so disinterested, that they secured nothing on earth but hunger and nakedness, stocks and prisons, racks and tortures; which, indeed, was all that they could or did expect, in consequence of Christ's express declarations. Neither was a desire of honour the motive of their actions; for their Lord himself was treated with the utmost contempt, and had more than once assured them that they should certainly share the same fate: above working as mechanics for a coarse maintenance; and so little desirous of human regard, that they exposed to the world the meanness of their birth and occupations, their great ignorance and scandalous falls. Add to this that they were so many, and lived at such distance of time and place from each other, that, had they been impostors, it would have been impracticable for them to contrive and carry on a forgery without being detected. And, as they neither would nor could deceive the world, so they either could nor would be deceived themselves; for they were days, months, and years, eye and ear-witnesses of the things which they relate; and, when they had not the fullest evidence of important facts, they insisted upon new proofs, and even upon sensible demonstrations; as, for instance, Thomas, in the matter of our Lord's resurrection, John 20:25 ; and to leave us no room to question their sincerity, most of them joyfully sealed the truth of their doctrines with their own blood. Did so many and such marks of veracity ever meet in any other authors? "
2. But even while they lived, they confirmed their testimony by a variety of miracles wrought in divers places, and for a number of years, sometimes before thousands of their enemies, as the miracles of Christ and his disciples; sometimes before hundreds of thousands, as those of Moses. (
See MIRACLE.) "
3. Reason itself dictates, that nothing but the plainest matter of fact could induce so many thousands of prejudiced and persecuting Jews to embrace the humbling self-denying doctrine of the cross, which they so much despised and abhorred. Nothing but the clearest evidence arising from undoubted truth could make multitudes of lawless, luxurious heathens receive, follow, and transmit to posterity, the doctrine and writings of the apostles; expecially at a time when the vanity of their pretensions to miracles and the gift of tongues, could be so easily discovered, had they been impostors; and when the profession of Christianity exposed persons of all ranks to the greatest contempt and most imminent danger. "
4. When the authenticity of the miracles was attested by thousands of living witnesses, religious rites were instituted and performed by hundreds of thousands, agreeable to Scripture injunctions, in order to perpetuate that authenticity: and these solemn ceremonies have ever since been kept up in all parts of the world; the Passover by the Jews, in remembrance of Moses's miracles in Egypt; and the Eucharist by Christians, as a memorial of Christ's death, and the miracles that accompanied it, some of which are recorded by Phlegon the Trallian, an heathen historian. "
5. The Scriptures have not only the external sanction of miracles, but the eternal stamp of the omniscient God by a variety of prophecies, some of which have already been most exactly confirmed by the event predicted. (
See PROPHECY.) "
6. The scattered, despised people, the Jews, the irreconcileable enemies of the Christians, keep with amazing care the Old Testament, full of the prophetic history of Jesus Christ, and by that means afford the world a striking proof that the New Testament is true; and Christians, in their turn, show that the Old Testament is abundantly confirmed and explained by the New. (
See JEWS, &4) "
7. To say nothing of the harmony, venerable antiquity, and wonderful preservation of those books, some of which are by far the most ancient in the world; to pass over the inimitable simplicity and true sublimity of their style; the testimony of the fathers and the primitive Christians; they carry with them such characters of truth, as command the respect of every unprejudiced reader. "They open to us the mystery of the creation; the nature of God, angels, and man; the immortality of the soul; the end for which we were made; the origin and connexion of moral and natural evil; the vanity of this world, and the glory of the next. There we see inspired shepherds, tradesmen, and fishermen, surpassing as much the greatest philosophers, as these did the herd of mankind, both in meekness of wisdom and sublimity of doctrine.
There we admire the purest morality in the world, agreeable to the dictates of sound reason, confirmed by the witness which God has placed for himself in our breast, and exemplified in the lives of men of like passions with ourselves.
There we discover a vein of ecclesiastical history and theological truth consistently running through a collection of sixty-six different books, wtitten by various authors, in different languages, during the space of above 1500 years.
There we find, as in a deep and pure spring, all the genuine drops and streams of spiritual knowledge which can possibly be met within the largest libraries.
There the workings of the human heart are described in a manner that demonstrate the inspiration of the Searcher of hearts.
There we have a particular account of all our spiritual maladies, with their various symptoms, and the method of a certain cure; a cure that has been witnessed by multitudes of martyrs and departed saints, and is now enjoyed by thousands of good men, who would account it an honour to seal the truth of the Scriptures with their own blood.
There you meet with the noblest strains of penitential and joyous devotion, adapted to the dispositions and states of all travellers to Sion.
And there you read those awful threatenings and cheering promises which are daily fulfilled in the consciences of men, to the admiration of believers, and the astonishment of attentive infidels. "8. The wonderful efficacy of the Scriptures is another proof that they are of God. When they are faithfully opened by his ministers, and powerfully applied by his Spirit, they wound and heal, they kill and make alive; they alarm the careless, direct the lost, support the tempted, strengthen the weak, comfort mourners, and nourish pious souls. "
9. To conclude: It is exceedingly remarkable, that the more humble and holy people are, the more they read, admire, and value the Scriptures: and, on the contrary, the more self-conceited, worldly- minded, and wicked, the more they neglect, despise, and asperse them. "As for the objections which are raised against their perspicuity and consistency, those who are both pious and learned, know that they are generally founded on prepossession, and the want of understanding in spiritual things; or on our ignorance of several customs, idioms, and circumstances, which were perfectly known when those books were written.
Frequently, also, the immaterial error arises merely from a wrong punctuation, or a mistake of copiers, printers, or translators; as the daily discoveries of pious critics, of ingenious confessions of unprejudiced enquirers, abundantly prove." To understand the Scriptures, says Dr. Campbell, we should,
1. Get acquainted with each writer's style.
2. Inquire carefully into the character, the situation, and the office of the writer; the time, the place, the occasion of his writing; and the people for whose immediate use he originally intended his work.
3. Consider the principal scope of the book, and the particulars chiefly observable in the method by which the writer has purposed to execute his design.
4. Where the phrase is obscure, the context must be consulted. This, however, will not always answer.
5. If it do not, consider whether the phrase be any of the writer's peculiarities: if so, it must be inquired what is the acceptation in which he employs it in other places.
6. If this be not sufficient, recourse should be had to the parallel passages, if there be any such, in the other sacred writers.
7. If this throws no light, consult the New Testament and the Septuagint, where the word may be used.
8. If the term be only once used in Scripture, then recur to the ordinary acceptation of the term in classical authors.
9. Sometimes reference may be had to the fathers.
10. The ancient versions, as well as modern scholiasts, annotators, and translators, may be consulted.
11. The analogy of faith, and the etymology of the word, must be used with caution. Above all, let the reader unite prayer with his endeavours, that his understanding may be illuminated, and his heart impressed with the great truths which the sacred Scriptures contain. As to the public reading of the Scriptures, it may be remarked, that this is a very laudable and necessary practice. "One circumstance, " as a writer observes, "why this should be attended to in congregations is, that numbers of the hearers, in many places, cannot read them themselves, and not a few of them never hear them read in the families where they reside. It is strange that this has not long ago struck every person of the least reflection in all our churches, and especially the ministers, as a most conclusive and irresistible argument for the adoption of this practice. "
It surely would be better to abridge the preaching and singing, and even the prayers, to one half of their length or more, than to neglect the public reading of the Scriptures. Let these things, therefore, be daly considered, together with the following reasons and observations, and let the reader judge and determine the case, or the matter, for himself. "Remember that God no sooner caused any part of his will, or word, to be written, than he also commanded the same to be read, not only in the family, but also in the congregation, and that even when all Israel were assembled together (the men, women, and children, and even the strangers that were within their gates;) and the end was, that they might hear, and that they might learn, and fear the Lord their God, and observe to do all the words of his law, Deuteronomy 31:12 . "Afterward, when synagogues were erected in the land of Israel, that the people might every Sabbath meet to worship God, it is well known that the public reading of the Scripture was a main part of the service there performed: so much so, that no less than three-fourths of the time ws generally employed, it seems, in reading and expounding the Scriptures. Even the prayers and songs used on those occasions appear to have been all subservient to that particular and principal employment or service, the reading of the law. "This work, or practice, of reading the Scripture in the congregation, is warranted, and recommended in the New Testament, as well as in the Old. As Christians, it is fit and necessary that we should first of all look unto Jesus, who is the author and finisher of our faith. His example, as well as his precepts, is full of precious and most important instruction; and it is a remarkable circumstance, which ought never to be forgotten, that he began his public ministry, in the synagogue of Nazareth, by reading a portion of Scripture out of the book of the prophet Isaiah; Luke 4:15 ; Luke 4:19 .
This alone, one would think, might be deemed quite sufficient to justify the practice among his disciples through all succeeding ages, and even inspire them with zeal for its constant observance. "The apostle Paul, in pointing out to Timothy his ministerial duties, particularly mentions reading, 1 Timothy 4:13 . Give attendance (says he) to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine, evidently distinguishing reading as one of the public duties incumbent upon Timothy. there can be no reason for separating these three, as if the former was only a private duty, and the others public ones; the most natural and consistent idea is, that they were all three public duties; and that the reading here spoken of, was no other than the reading of the Scriptures in those Christian assemblies where Timothy was concerned, and which the apostle would have him by no means to neglect. If the public reading of the Scriptures was so necessary and important in those religious assemblies which had Timothy for their minister, how much more must it be in our assemblies, and even in those which enjoy the labours of our most able and eminent ministers!"
On the subject of the Scriptures, we must refer the reader to the articles BIBLE, CANON, INSPIRATION, PROPHECY, and REVELATION.
See also Brown's Introduction to his Bible; Dr. Campbell's Preliminary Dissertations to his Transl. of the Gospels; Fletcher's Appeal; Simon's Critical History of the Old and New Test.; Ostervald's Arguments of the Books and Characters of the Old and New Test.; Cosins's Scholastic Hist. of the Canon of Scrip.; Warden's System of Revealed Religion; Wells's Geography of the Old and New Test.; The Use of Sacred History, especially as illustrating and confirming the Doctrine of Revelation, by Dr. Jamieson; Dick on Inspiration; Blackwell's Sacred Classics; Michael's Introduction to the New Test.; Melmoth's Sublime and Beautiful of the Scriptures; Dwight's Dissertation on the Poetry, History, and Eloquence of the Bible; Edwards on the Authority, Style, and Perfection of Scripture; Stackhouse's History of the Bible; Kennicott's State of the Hebrew Text.; Jones on the figurative Language of Scripture; and books under articles BIBLE, COMMENTARY, CHRISTIANITY, and REVELATION.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Inspiration of Scripture
The actions of God leading to the writing, preservation, and collection of His words to His people into the Bible. The English word inspiration comes from the Latin word in spiro which mean “to breath in.” Inspiration, then, is the influence of the Holy Spirit upon individuals for the purpose of producing an authoritative record of persons, teaching and events. Sometimes the inspiration is declared explicitly in biblical assertions. Jeremiah began his prophecy by writing, “The word of the Lord came” (Jeremiah 1:2 ); throughout his book the formula is used to emphasize his experience of inspiration. At other times, the inspiration is evident in the pervading mood of the scriptural record. The Bible summarizes this by saying, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God” (2 Timothy 3:16 ). Often the inspiration is a revelation of that which goes beyond normal human cognitive and experiential knowledge. When this is true, then it is most obvious that the information is divinely inspired. Concerning this, the Bible says, “For no prophecy was ever made by an act of human will, but men moved by the Holy Spirit spoke from God” (2 Peter 1:21 NAS).
As indicated in the biblical explanation, inspiration is a divine-human encounter whereby God reveals truth. It is a message from God and of God, as well as through persons and for persons. The Bible is divine in its inception. It is a record of God's self-disclosure as Truth and as the source of all truth. Its special revelation is a disclosure of truth that humans could not comprehend through ordinary thought process. Also the Bible is human in its mediation. God revealed Himself to persons He chose. They declared God's attitude toward, His relations with, and His purposes for His people and His world. Inspiration came in the experiences of real men and women with real personalities and problems. A climax to that divine-human encounter is the fact that the Scripture is focused on the divine-human person of Jesus Christ.
The evidences of divine inspiration are found internally in the record of God's revelation. Some biblical writers claimed they were verbally inspired. Repeatedly, the prophets have attested of this experience. Isaiah interjected into his report, “But I am the Lord thy God. And I have put my words into thy mouth” (Isaiah 51:15-16 ). Likewise, Jeremiah wrote, “And the Lord said unto me, Behold, I have put my words in thy mouth” (Jeremiah 1:9 ).
In addition to the specific statements in the Scriptures, an abundance of internal evidences show divine inspiration from its content in general. Although the Bible is a collection of books written by at least 40 writers over a period of about 1400 years, it has a unity of subject, structure, and spirit. It contains a consistent system of doctrinal and moral utterances. Its unparalleled treatment of certain themes such as the holy, the true, the good, and the future, are mysterious, authoritative, and practical. This witness of its inspiration is attested by countless thousands of testimonies from individuals who have been transformed by the reading of this Book.
Likewise, many external evidences point to divine inspiration of the Bible. The fact that the Bible is the most widely translated and circulated Book in the world is a testimony of God's providence. This is an amazing record because its early translators were killed, and many of its early readers were imprisoned. Although the Bible has been in existence for almost nineteen centuries, it is still relevant today. Both its quotations and its motifs are found in our literature, oratory, art, music, politics, law, and ethics.
The expressions of human inspiration are a part of the biblical record. Repeatedly, the biblical writers felt compelled to preface their remarks by identifying God as the sole source of their information. Ezekiel informs us that God had said to him, “You must speak my words to them, whether they listen or fail to listen, for they are rebellious” (Ezekiel 2:7 NIV). Luke affirmed that his inspiration was tied to his experience of researching the facts about Christ. He explained, “Therefore, since I myself have carefully investigated everything from the beginning, it seemed good also to me to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theopilus” ( Luke 1:3 NIV). Even more surprising is the fact that Paul identified his inspiration as a strong inner impression. With honesty, he said, “Now concerning virgins, I have no command of the Lord, but I give my opinion as one who by the Lord's mercy is trustworthy” ( 1 Corinthians 7:25 NRSV). On other occasions, the inspiration came through dreams. Matthew wrote, “He had resolved on this, when an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home with you to be your wife'“ ( Matthew 1:20 REB). At times the inspiration came through visions ( Genesis 15:1 ; Numbers 12:6 ; 1 Samuel 3:1 , Isaiah 1:1 ; Ezekiel 1:1 ; Daniel 2:19 ; Obadiah 1:1 ; Nahum 1:1 ; Habakkuk 2:2 ). Inspiration also came through historical situations. Paul's letter to the Corinthians is an example of this: “Now for the matters you wrote about” (1 Corinthians 7:1 NIV).
These many different expressions of inspiration show that God is resourceful. His unlimited power has used a variety of techniques to reveal Himself and to communicate His message. Regardless of the method God used to inspire the individual writers, the result is the same. They wrote the Word of God. This is evident both in the content of each book and also in the preservation of all the books in the canon of the Bible.
The explanations of biblical inspiration are numerous. This is partly due to the fact that the Bible has no theory of inspiration. It simply affirms that the Bible is the inspired Word of God. Actually no theory of inspiration is necessary. For the Bible, like Jesus, must be accepted by faith as the inspired Word of God. When this is done, then the choice of a theory of inspiration is incidental.
According to the natural intuition theory, inspiration is but a higher development of that natural insight into truth which all persons possess to some degree. The biblical writers were inspired as other great genuises are inspired. This view is very subjective, making all works equally inspired, in spite of the fact that they may be contradictory. It makes the Bible a human, or natural book, rather than a supernatural Book.
By contrast, the mechanical dictation theory claims that God literally dictated the words of the Bible to the biblical writers. They were used as secretaries or passive instruments. The primary objection to the view is that it is not consistent with God's way of relating to persons. Also, it implies that all of the Bible should have the same literary style.
The general Christian theory of inspiration is simply that the illumination of the Holy Spirit is experienced by all believers. This is based on the truth that all believers experience the Spirit. Its weakness is that it overlooks the problem of opposing viewpoints among believers and that it reduces biblical writers to the level of all Christian interpretation and proclamation.
According to the partial inspiration theory, inspiration is limited to certain parts of the Bible. What the writers would have known naturally is not necessarily inspired. Likewise, incidental matters are not regarded as being inspired. This contradicts the statements of Scripture that all Scripture is inspired.
The levels of inspiration theory claims that God used different levels of control at different times in the process of inspiration. Sometimes God used superintendence. At other times, God used evaluation, direction, or suggestion. This view holds that particular passages of Scripture carry various degrees of inspiration. In such a theory, the level of inspiration may be rather arbitrary, based on human judgment not divine actions.
The infallible theory states that the Bible as a whole is without any errors because it is in its entirety the Word of God. Usually those who hold to this view are careful to distinguish between the original manuscripts and the present form of the Bible. However, some claim that this also applies to the current translations because the biblical writers never intended to mislead or deceive. Each of the differences that may be found in parallel passages are harmonized by some type of explanation.
The verbal inspiration theory states that the Holy Spirit inspired the biblical writers to choose the exact words to convey the message of God. As indicated previously, there are many passages of Scripture that support the idea of verbal inspiration. Nevertheless, some have discredited this view because it does not relate to the differences in the personalities of the biblical writers.
On the other hand, the dynamic inspiration theory suggests that the Holy Spirit had control over the process of inspiration, but He allowed the individuals to express their personalities in communicating God's message. Those who criticize this view do so on the basis that the view does not guarantee inerrancy in nonreligious matters.
There are elements of truth in all of the views, and there are also weaknesses in each of the theories. Therefore, some have attempted to splice together ideas from two or more of the theories to develop an eclectic theory. Such an approach is feasible because there is only a slight difference in some of the theories. This might be indicative of the fact that the whole process of developing a theory of inspiration is quite difficult. Phrasing a theory is really secondary to the more important fact that the Bible is the authoritative Word of God and to the calling of obeying that Word. The Bible, itself, takes this position because it has no theory of inspiration. Nevertheless, it emphatically declares itself to be the authoritative record of God's revelation. See Bible; Revelation, Doctrine of.
Donald R. Potts
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Scripture
[1]
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Scripture
1. Terms.-The general designation for ‘Scripture’ is γραφή or plur. γραφαί, the former occurring some 30 times in the NT (Gospels 14, Acts 3, Paul 9, Catholic Epistles 5), the latter about 20 times (Gospels 10, Acts 4, Paul 5, Catholic Epistles 2). The terms are almost invariably preceded by the definite article, the only exceptions being in John 19:37, 2 Timothy 3:16, where the article before γραφή is replaced by ἑτέρα and πᾶσα respectively, 1 Peter 2:6, 2 Peter 1:20, where γραφή has become a real proper name, and Romans 1:2; Romans 16:26, where the Scriptures are more explicitly characterized as γραφαί ἅγιαι and γραφαί προφητικαί, ‘holy Scriptures’ and ‘prophetic Scriptures.’ In one text, 2 Timothy 3:15, another designation is used, viz. ἱερὰ γράμματα, ‘sacred writings’ (a direct translation of the Hebrew phrase בִּתָבֵי חַקֹּדָשׁ), which we find also in Philo and Josephus.
2. Connotation of terms.-Both γραφή and γράμμα are derived from the verb γράφω, ‘draw,’ ‘inscribe,’ or ‘write,’ and thus suggest writing in the most general sense. Classical Greek shows the transition in each case from the rudimentary conception of written characters, or the art of alphabetic writing, to the higher thought of real literature. In the NT γράμμα alone shows any such variety of meaning. Here the word is applied, not merely to the ‘letter’ of the Law as contrasted with the living, life-giving spirit (Romans 2:27 ff., 2 Corinthians 3:6 f.), but in its plural form γράμματα to the elements of penmanship (Galatians 6:11), literature as a subject of study (John 7:15, Acts 26:24), and documents of various kinds, such as the debtors’ bills reduced by the unjust steward (Luke 16:6 f.), letters of commendation or the reverse (Acts 28:21), the writings of Moses (John 5:47), as well as the Sacred Scriptures (in the phrase cited from 2 Timothy 3:15). The parallel term γραφή is used only in the last sense. The question has been widely canvassed whether the singular γραφή applies to the Scriptures as a unified whole, or to some single section or ‘passage’ of Scripture. In his famous note on Galatians 3:22 Lightfoot lays down the principle that ‘the singular γραφή in the NT always means a particular passage of Scripture,’ though in a subsequent comment on Romans 4:3, while insisting that St. Paul’s practice ‘is absolute and uniform,’ he admits a doubt as to St. John’s usage. On the other hand, Warfield maintains that the prevailing classical application of γραφή to entire documents, carrying with it ‘a general implication of completeness,’ extends also to the NT,-that ‘in its more common reference’ the term ‘designates the OT, to which it is applied in its completeness as a unitary whole’ (Dict. of Christ and the Gospels ii. 586). In the present writer’s judgment the former contention vindicates itself, even in the Fourth Gospel and in the crucial text Galatians 3:22 (the Apostle having in mind the passages of Scripture adduced either in Galatians 2:16, Galatians 3:10 or in the longer argument of Romans 3:9 ff.). The only clear instances of γραφή applied to the Scriptures as a whole appear to be found in 1 Peter 2:6 and 2 Peter 1:20, where the word is already a proper name, the full development of the personifying tendency observable in Galatians 3:8. As regards the significance of the plural γραφαί there is general agreement. Where the term is qualified by the adjectives ἅγιαι and προφητικαί (cf. above), the reference is to the character, not the scope, of the Scriptures. In 2 Peter 3:16 αἱ λοιπαὶ γραφαί are most probably to be understood of apostolic writings. But the technical phrase αἱ γραφαί undoubtedly denotes the body of Scriptural writings as an organic unity, with a spirit and character of its own.
3. Authority of Scripture.-The peculiar quality of the Scriptures is indicated by the three defining adjectives, ἅγιαι, ἰεραί, and προφητικαί, the notions of ‘holiness’ and ‘sacredness’ bringing the Books into direct relationship with God, and that of ‘prophecy’ leading forward to the revelation of the mystery of God in Christ. The high Jewish theory of the inspiration of Scripture is fully accepted in the NT. The term θεόπνευστος, ‘God-inspired’ (cf. Heb. בִּרוּחַ הַקֹּדָשׁ), applied to Scripture in all its parts (πᾶσα γραφή), is found indeed only in 2 Timothy 3:16; but the theory underlies the whole attitude of the NT writers to the older revelation. ‘No prophecy ever came by the will of man: but men spake from God, being moved by the Holy Spirit (2 Peter 1:21). Thus the words of Moses, David, Isaiah, and the other prophets may be attributed directly to God (Romans 9:25, Hebrews 1:5 ff; Hebrews 5:5 f.), or the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:16, Hebrews 3:7 ff; Hebrews 10:15 ff.), or God speaking through the Holy Spirit (Acts 4:25 f., Hebrews 4:3 ff; Hebrews 8:8 ff.), or even the Messiah (Hebrews 2:12 f., 10:5ff.), As the ‘living oracles’ of God, then, the Scriptures are the final norm alike of faith and of conduct. The true servant of God believes ‘all things which are according to the law, and which are written in the prophets’ (Acts 24:14), and sets an example to others not, even in their estimate of the apostles, to go ‘beyond the things which are written’ (1 Corinthians 4:6). The appeal to ‘what is written’ (καθὼς γέγραπται or γεγραμμένον ἐστίν, the Christian rendering of the Rabbinic formula שָׁבָּאֱמַר or דִּבְתִיכ) is decisive, not merely in clinching a theological argument (esp. in Romans and Galatians), but in interpreting the mission and person of Christ, and the significance of His death, resurrection, and ascension (Acts 2:25 ff., 1 Corinthians 15:4, Hebrews 2:6 ff.), with the subsequent outpouring of the Spirit, the persecution of the Church, the rejection of the Jews and mission to the Gentiles, the resurrection of the body, and the final salvation (Acts 1:16 ff., Romans 2:24; Romans 8:36; Romans 9:25 ff., 1 Corinthians 1:18 f., 1 Corinthians 15:45 ff., etc.), and equally as the authoritative guide to Christian conduct (cf. Acts 23:5, Romans 12:19, 1 Corinthians 9:9, 2 Corinthians 4:13; 2 Corinthians 6:17 f., 2 Corinthians 8:15, Ephesians 6:2 f., 1 Peter 1:16; 1 Peter 3:10 ff.); for ‘whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that through patience and through comfort of the scriptures we might have hope’ (Romans 15:4), while the very quality of their ‘inspiration’ is tested by their helpfulness for teaching, for reproof, ‘for correction, for discipline which is in righteousness’ (2 Timothy 3:16). It must be admitted, however, that the new spirit of Christianity can move freely within the limits of the older Scriptures only by a frequent straining, and even ‘wresting,’ of their natural sense (see article Old Testament).
4. Extent of Scripture.-The canon of the NT writers was that inherited from the Jewish Church, and thus corresponded to our OT. There is frequent reference to the canonical groups of the ‘Law’ and the ‘Prophets.’ Of the Hagiographa, the Books of Psalms, Proverbs, and Job (in 1 Corinthians 3:19) are explicitly cited as Scripture, while a phrase front Ecclesiastes 7:20 is introduced in the remarkable conflate of OT texts in Romans 3:10 ff., with the formula καθὼς γέγραπται. Though the remaining books are passed over in silence, there is no real reason to doubt that the writers knew and recognized the full Jewish canon. In the NT, too, there is no such sense of the inferiority of the Hagiographa as haunted the Jewish Rabbis. The whole book is of God, and bears witness to Him and His salvation. In addition to OT texts there are numerous allusions to apocryphal literature, such as the Wisdom of Ben Sira, the Wisdom of Solomon, 1 and 2 Maccabees, the Book of Enoch, the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and the Assumption of Moses (see article Quotations). It is remarkable, however, that the usual formula of Scriptural quotation is nowhere attached to apocryphal texts, the only approach to such canonical recognition being found in the ‘prophesying’ of Enoch in Judges 1:14. Though the NT writers follow the Septuagint , they apparently regard the Palestinian canon as alone authoritative in the full sense of the term. Naturally their own writings have not yet attained to the dignity of Scripture; but a true feeling for the spiritual value of apostolic letters is already evident in 2 Peter 3:15 f., and the application to these writings of the technical term γραφαί shows how easy and inevitable was the extension of the Canon to cover both the OT and the NT.
Literature.-On the usage and significance of the terms, cf. the NT Dictionaries and Commentaries, esp. J. B. Lightfoot, Galatians, 1890, p. 147 f.; F. J. A. Hort, The First Epistle of St. Peter, I. 1-II. 17, 1898, p. 114 ff.; B. F. Westcott, Hebrews, 1889, p. 474 ff.; also D. M. Turpie, The New Testament View of the Old, 1872; G. A. Deissmann, Bible Studies, Eng. translation , 1901, pp. 112 ff., 249 f.; B. B. Warfield, article ‘Scripture,’ in Dict. of Christ and the Gospels ii. 584 ff., with literature. On the formation of the Canon see F. Buhl, Kanon und Text des AT [1] , 1891 (Eng. translation , 1892); G. Wildebcer, Het outstaan van den Kanon des Ouden Verbonds4, 1908 (Germ. translation , 1891, Eng. translation , 1895); H. E. Ryle, The Canon of the OT, 1892; K. Budde, article ‘Canon (OT),’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica ; F. H. Woods, article ‘OT Canon,’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) . On Jewish theories of Inspiration, cf. F. Weber, Jüd. Theologie, 1897, p. 80 ff., and E. Schrüer, GJV [2] 4 ii. [3] 363 ff. (HJP [4] II. i. [5] 306 ff.).
A. R. Gordon.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Theology: Ought Not to be Petrified Scripture
Petrarch's works are said to have laid so long in the roof of St. Mark's, at Venice, that they became turned into stone; by what process deponent sayeth not. To many men it might well seem that the Word of God had become petrified, for they receive it as a hard, lifeless creed, a stone upon which to sharpen the daggers of controversy, a stumbling-block for young beginners, a millstone with which to break opponents' heads, after the manner experienced by Abimelech at Thebez. A man must have a stout digestion to feed upon some men's theology; no sap, no sweetness, no life, but all stern accuracy, and fleshless definition. Proclaimed without tenderness, and argued without affection, the gospel from such men rather resembles a missile from a catapult than bread from a Father's table. Teeth are needlessly broken over the grit of systematic theology, while souls are famishing. To turn stones into bread was a temptation of our Master, but how many of his servants yield readily to the far worse temptation to turn bread into stone! Go thy way, metaphysical divine, to the stone-yard, and break granite for McAdam, but stand not in the way of loving spirits who would feed the family of God with living bread. The inspired Word is to us spirit and life, and we cannot afford to have it hardened into a huge monolith, or a spiritual Stonehenge: sublime, but cold, majestic, but lifeless; far rather would we have it as our own household book, our bosom companion, the poor man's counselor and friend.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Scripture (2)
SCRIPTURE.—The scope of this article does not permit the discussion in it of the employment of Scripture, or of the estimate put upon Scripture, by either our Lord or the Evangelists. It is strictly limited to the use of the term ‘Scripture’ in the NT, particularly in the Gospels: and to the immediate implications of that use.
1. The use of this term in the NT was an inheritance, not an invention. The idea of a ‘canon’ of ‘Sacred Scriptures’ (and with the idea the thing) was handed down to Christianity from Judaism. The Jews possessed a body of writings, consisting of ‘Law, Prophets, and (other) Scriptures (Kethûbhîm),’ though they were often called, for brevity’s sake, merely ‘the Law and the Prophets’ or simply ‘the Law.’ These ‘Sacred Scriptures,’ or this ‘Scripture’ (הכתיב) as it was frequently called, or these ‘Books,’ or simply this ‘Book’ (הספר), they looked upon as originating in Divine inspiration, and as therefore possessed everywhere of Divine authority. Whatever stood written in these Scriptures was a word of God, and was therefore referred to indifferently as something which ‘Scripture says’ (אמר קרא, or אמר הבתיב, or כתיב קּרא), or ‘the All-Merciful says’ (אמר רחמנא), or even simply ‘He says’ (וכן הוא אומר or merely ואומר); that God is the Speaker in the Scriptural word being too fully understood to require explicit expression. Every precept or dogma was supposed to be grounded in Scriptural teaching, and possessed authority only as buttressed by a Scripture passage, introduced commonly by one or the other of the formulas ‘for it is said’ (שׁנאמר) or ‘as it is written’ (רכתיב or כדכתיב), though, of course, a great variety of more or less frequently occurring formulas of adduction are found. Greek-speaking Jews naturally tended merely to reproduce in their new language the designations and forms of adduction of their sacred books current among their people. This process was no doubt facilitated by the existence among the Greeks of a pregnant legislative use of γράφω, γραφή, γράμμα, by which these terms were freighted with an implication of authority. But it is very easy to make too much of this. In Josephus, and even more plainly in the LXX Septuagint , the influence of the Greek usage may be traced; but in a writer like Philo, Jewish habits of thought appear to be absolutely determinative. The fact of importance is that there was nothing left for Christianity to invent here. It merely took over in their entirety the established usages of the Synagogue, and the NT evinces itself in this matter at least a thoroughly Jewish book. The several terms it employs are made use of, to be sure, with some sensitiveness to their inherent implications as Greek words, and the Greek legislative use of some of them gave them, no doubt, peculiar fitness for the service asked of them. But the application made of them by the NT writers had its roots set in Jewish thought, and from it they derive a fuller and deeper meaning than the most pregnant classical usage could impart to them.
2. To the NT writers, as to other Jews, the sacred books of what was now called by them ‘the old covenant’ (2 Corinthians 3:14), described according to their contents as ‘the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms’ (Luke 24:44), or more briefly as ‘the Law and the Prophets’ (Matthew 7:12, Luke 16:16; cf. Acts 28:23, Luke 16:29; Luke 16:31), or merely as ‘the Law’ (John 10:34, 1 Corinthians 14:21), or even, perhaps, ‘the Prophets’ (Matthew 2:23; Matthew 11:13; Matthew 26:56, Luke 1:70; Luke 18:31; Luke 24:25; Luke 24:27, Acts 3:24; Acts 13:27, Romans 1:2; Romans 16:26), were, when thought of according to their nature, a body of ‘sacred scriptures’ (Romans 1:2, 2 Timothy 3:16), or, with the omission of the unnecessary, because well-understood adjective, simply by way of eminence, ‘the Scriptures,’ ‘Scripture.’ For employment in this designation either of the substantives γραφή or γράμμα offered itself, although, of course, each brought with it its own suggestions arising from the implication of the form and the general usage of the word. The more usual of the two in this application, in Philo and Josephus, is γράμμα, or more exactly γράμματα; for, although it is sometimes so employed in the singular (but apparently only late, e.g. Callimachus, Epigr. xxiv. 4, and the Church Fathers, passim), it is in the plural that this form more properly denotes that congeries of alphabetical signs which constitutes a book. In the NT, on the other hand, this form is rare. The complete phrase ἱερὰ γράμματα, found also both in Josephus and in Philo, occurs in 2 Timothy 3:15 as the current title of the sacred books, freighted with all its implications as such. Elsewhere in the NT, however, γράμματα is scarcely used as a designation of Scripture (cf. John 5:47; John 7:15). Practically, therefore, γραφή, in its varied uses, remains the sole form employed in the NT in the sense of ‘Scripture,’ ‘Scriptures.’
3. This term occurs in the NT about fifty times (Gospels 23, Acts 7, Catholic Epistles 6, Paul 14); and in every case it bears that technical sense in which it designates the Scriptures by way of eminence, the Scriptures of the OT. It is true there are a few instances in which passages adduced as γραφή are not easily identified in the OT text; but there is no reason to doubt that OT passages were intended (cf. Hühn, Die alttest. Citate, 270; and Mayor on James 4:5, Lightfoot on 1 Corinthians 2:9, Westcott on John 7:38, and Godet on Luke 11:49). We need to note in modification of the broad statement, therefore, only that it is apparent from 2 Peter 3:16 (cf. 1 Timothy 5:18) that the NT writers were well aware that the category ‘Scripture,’ in the high sense, included also the writings they were producing, as along with the books of the OT constituting the complete ‘Scripture’ or authoritative Word of God. In 20 out of the 50 instances in which γραφή occurs in the NT, it is the plural form which is used, and in all but two of these cases the article is present—αἱ γραφαί, the well-known Scriptures of the Jewish people; and the two exceptions are exceptions only in appearance, since adjectival definitions are present (γραφαὶ ἅγιαι, Romans 1:2, here first in extant literature; γραφαὶ προφητικαί, Romans 16:26). The singular form occurs some 30 times, all but four of which have the article; and here again the exceptions are only apparent, the term being definite in every case (John 19:37 ‘another Scripture’; 1 Peter 2:6, 2 Peter 1:20, 2 Timothy 3:16, used as a proper name). The distribution of the singular and plural forms is perhaps worth noting. In Acts the singular (3 times) and plural (4) occur almost equally frequently: the plural prevails in the Synoptics (Mt. plural only; Mk. two to one; Lk. three to one), and the singular in the rest of the NT (John 11-1, James 3 to 0, Peter 2 to 1, Paul 2 to 5). In the Gospels the plural form occurs exclusively in Mt., prevailingly in Mk. and Lk., and rarely in Jn., of which the singular is characteristic. No distinction seems to be traceable between the usage of the Evangelists in their own persons and that of our Lord as reported by them. Mt. and Mk. do not on their own account use the term at all; in Lk. and Jn., on the other hand, it occurs not only in reports of our Lord’s sayings and of the sayings of others, but also in the narrative itself. To our Lord is ascribed the use indifferently of the plural (Matthew 21:42; Matthew 22:44; Matthew 26:54; Matthew 26:56, Mark 12:24; Mark 14:9, John 5:39) and the singular (Mark 12:10, Luke 4:21, John 7:38; John 7:42; John 10:35; John 13:18; John 17:12).
4. The history of γραφή, γραφαί, as applied to literary documents, does not seem to have been exactly the same as that of its congener γράμμα, γράμματα. The latter appears to have been current first as the appropriate appellation of an alphabetical character, and to have grown gradually upward from that lowly employment to designate documents of less or greater extent, as ultimately made up of alphabetical characters. Although, therefore, the singular τὸ γράμμα is used of any written thing, it is apparently, when applied to ‘writings,’ most naturally employed of brief pieces like short inseriptions or proverbs, or of the shorter portions of documents such as clauses—though it is also used of those larger sections of works which are more commonly designated as ‘books.’ It is rather the plural, τὰ γράμματα, which seems to have suggested itself not only for extended treatises, but indeed for documents of all kinds. When so employed, the plural form is not to be pressed. Such a phrase as ‘Moses’ γράμματα’ (John 5:47), for example, probably ascribes to Moses only a single book—what we call the Pentateuch; and such a phrase as ἱερὰ γράμματα (2 Timothy 3:15) does not suggest to us a ‘Divine library,’ but brings the OT before us as a unitary whole. On the other hand, γραφή, in its application to literary products, seems to have sprung lightly across the intermediate steps to designate which γράμμα is most appropriately used, and to have been carried over at once from the ‘writing’ in the sense of the script to the ‘writing’ in the sense of the Scripture. Kindred with γράμμα as it is, its true synonymy in its literary application is rather with such words as βίβλος (βιβλίον) and λόγος, in common with which it most naturally designates a complete literary piece, whether ‘treatise’ or ‘book.’ Where thought of from the material point of view as so much paper, so to speak, a literary work was apt to be called a βίβλος (βιβλίον); when thought of as a rational product, thought presented in words, it was apt to be spoken of as a λόγος: intermediate between the two stood γραφή (γράμμα), which was apt to come to the lips when the ‘web of words’ itself was in mind. In a word, βίβλος (βιβλίον) was the most exact word for the ‘book,’ γραφή (γράμμα) for the ‘document’ inscribed in the ‘book,’ λόγος for the ‘treatise’ which the ‘document’ records; while as between γραφή and γράμμα, γράμμα, preserving the stronger material flavour, gravitates somewhat towards βίβλος (βιβλίον), and γραφή looks upward somewhat toward λόγος. When, in the development of the publisher’s trade, the system of making books in great rolls gave way to the ‘small-roll system,’ and long works came to be broken up into ‘books,’ each of which was inscribed in a ‘volume,’ these separate ‘books’ attached to themselves this whole series of designations, each with its appropriate implication. Smaller sections were properly called περιοχαί, τόποι, χωρία, γράμματα (the last of which is the proper term for ‘clauses’), but very seldom, if ever, in classical Greek, γραφαἱ.
5. The current senses of these several terms are, of course, more or less reflected in their NT use. But we are struck at once with the fact that γραφή occurs in the NT solely in its pregnant technical usage as a designation of the Sacred Scriptures. There seems no intrinsic reason why it should not, like γράμματα, be freely used for non-sacred ‘writings.’ In point of fact, however, throughout the NT γραφή is ever something ‘which the Holy Ghost has spoken through the mouth ‘of its human authors (Acts 1:16), and which is therefore of indefectible, because Divine, authority. It is perhaps even more remarkable that even on this high plane of technical reference it never occurs, in accordance with its most natural, and in the classics its most frequent, sense of ‘treatise,’ as a term to describe the several books of which the OT is composed. It is tempting, no doubt, to seek to give it such a sense in some of the passages where, occurring in the singular, it yet does not seem to designate the Scriptures in their entirety, and Dr. Hort appears for a moment almost inclined to yield to the temptation (on 1 Peter 2:6, note the ‘probable’). It is more tempting still to assume that behind the common use of the plural αἱ γραφαί to designate the Scriptures as a whole, there lies a previous current usage by which each book which enters into the composition of these ‘Scriptures’ was designated by the singular ἡ γραφή. But in no single passage where ἡ γραφή occurs does it seem possible to give it a reference to the ‘treatise’ to which the appeal is made; and the common employment in profane Greek of γραφαί (in the plural) for a single document, discourages the assumption that (like τὰ βιβλία) when applied to the Scriptures it has reference to their composite character. The truth seems to be that whether the plural αἱ γραφαί or the singular ἡ γραφἡ is employed, the application of the term to the OT writings by the writers of the NT is based upon the conception of these OT writings as a unitary whole, and designates this body of writings in their entirety as the one well-known authoritative documentation of the Divine word. This is the fundamental fact with respect to the use of these terms in the NT from which all the other facts of their usage flow.
6. It is true that in one unique passage, 2 Peter 3:16 (on the meaning of which see Bigg, in loc.), αἱ γραφαί does occur with a plural signification. But the units of which this plural is made up, as the grammatical construction suggests, appear to be not ‘treatises’ (Huther, Kühl), but ‘passages’ (de Wette). Peter seems to say that the unlearned and unstable of course wrested the hard sayings of Paul’s letters as they were accustomed to wrest τὰς λοιπὰς γραφάς, i.e. the other Scripture statements (cf. Eurip. Hipp. 1311; Philo, de Praem. et Paen. § 11 near end)—the implication being that no part of Scripture was safe in their hands. This is a sufficiently remarkable use of the plural, no other example of which occurs in the NT; but it is an entirely legitimate one for the NT, and in its context a perfectly natural one. In the Church Fathers the plural αἱ γραφαί is formed freely upon ἡ γραφή both in the sense of ‘book’ of Scripture and in the sense of ‘passage’ of Scripture. But in the NT, apart from the present passage, there is in no instance of the use of αἱ γραφαί the slightest hint of a series whether of ‘treatises’ or of ‘passages’ underlying it. Even a passage like Luke 24:27 forms no exception; for if γραφαί is employed in a singular sense of a single document, then πᾶσαι αἱ γραφαί remains just the whole of that document, and is the exact equivalent of πᾶσα ἡ γραφή, or (if γραφή) has acquired standing as a quasi-proper name) as πᾶσα γραφή (2 Timothy 3:16). Similarly αἱ γραφαἱ τῶν προφητῶν (Matthew 26:56), γραφαὶ προφητικαί (Romans 16:26) appear to refer not to particular passages deemed prophetic, or to the special section of the OT called ‘the Prophets,’ but to the entire OT conceived as prophetic in character (cf. 2 Peter 1:20, Acts 2:30, 2 Peter 3:16).
7. In Scripture: Versus System
The late William Jay, in his 'Practical Illustrations of Character,' says, 'What a difference must a Christian and a minister feel, between the trammels of some systems of divinity and the advantage of Scripture freedom, the glorious liberty of the sons of God. The one is the horse standing in the street in harness, feeding indeed, but on the contents of a bag tossed up and down; the other, the same animal in a large, fine meadow, where he lies down in green pastures, and feeds beside the still waters.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Scripture
(sscrihp tyoore) Historic Judaeo-Christian name for the specific literature that the church receives as divine instruction. Scripture means “a writing” rendering the Latin scriptura and the Greek graphe . The term is used some fifty times in the New Testament for some or all of the Old Testament.
In the history of the church, the divine character of Scripture has been the great presupposition for the whole of Christian preaching and theology. This is apparent in the way the New Testament speaks about the Old Testament. New Testament writers often used formulas like “God says” and “the Holy Spirit says” to introduce Old Testament passages. For the New Testament authors, Scripture was the record of God speaking and revealing Himself to His people. Thus Scripture and God are so closely joined together that these writers could speak of Scripture doing what it records God as doing (
Galatians 3:8 ; Romans 9:17 ).
Because of their belief in the Scriptures' divine origin and content, the New Testament writers described it as “sure” (2 Peter 1:19 ), trustworthy “of all acceptation” (1 Timothy 1:15 ), and “confirmed” (Hebrews 2:3 ). Its word “endureth forever” (1 Peter 1:24-25 ). Those who build their lives on Scripture “will not be disappointed” (Romans 9:33 NAS). The Bible was written for “instruction” and “encouragement” ( Romans 15:4 NAS), to lead to saving faith ( 2 Timothy 3:15 ), to guide people toward godliness (2 Timothy 3:16 ), and to equip believers for good works (2 Timothy 3:17 ).
The purpose of Scripture is to place men and women in a right standing before God and to enable believers to seek God's glory in all of life's activities and efforts. It is above all a book of redemptive history.
Scripture is not only a divine Book, but a divine-human Book. It is important to recognize that the biblical writers employed the linguistic resources available to them as they wrote to specific people with particular needs at particular times. The human authors were not lifted out of their culture or removed from their contexts. They functioned as members of believing communities, aware of God's leadership in their lives.
Scripture, comprised of 66 books, written by over 40 authors spanning almost 1,500 years, reveals to God's people the unifying history of His redeeming words and acts. The ultimate focus of Scripture is the incarnation and redemptive work of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is the center to which everything in Scripture is united and bound together—beginning and end, creation and redemption, humanity, the world, the fall, history, and future. See Bible, Formation and Canon; Inspiration.
David S. Dockery
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Scripture
See Bible, Authority of the ; Bible, Canon of the ; Bible, Inspiration of the
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Altar in Scripture
Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e.g., those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Canon of Scripture
The word κανών signified a rod or rule by which things were tested. It is thus used by Paul in Galatians 6:16 ; Philippians 3:16 . As to the scriptures the expression refers to what books should be included: thus the 'canon' of scripture is often spoken of, and the books are called 'canonical' or 'uncanonical.' Happily most Christians are not troubled with such questions. In christian simplicity they believe that in the Bible they have nothing but what God caused to be written, and that it contains all that He intended to form a part of His book. Still, as everything is now challenged it may be well to examine the subject a little.
In the first place, the Church of Rome boldly declared that it was only 'thechurch' that could decide what books were canonical: as early as the Council of Carthage (about A.D. 400) lists of the books were made out, and at the Council of Trent they dogmatically settled what books constituted the scripture. They decided to include the books now known as the APOCRYPHA (q.v. ), as may be seen in the Latin Vulgate, which is the version used by that church. Now the scripture informs us that to the Jews were committed the oracles of God, Romans 3:2 , and as is well known they most carefully guarded the O.T. scriptures for centuries before there was any christian church. The books were written in the Jews' language — the Hebrew — with which the Apocrypha never had a place. They were written in Greek, and were first added to the LXX. The above principle — that the scriptures require to be accredited by the church — is false. Surely God could make a revelation that would in no wise need to have the seal of a body of men placed upon it, be they ever so holy. But the Church of Rome was not holy, nor was it universal, so that even if the alleged principle were correct, that corrupt section of the church would be the last to be taken as an authoritative guide.
The N.T. has also had its perils. With the Greek MSS apocryphal books are found, parts of which were read in the churches in early days. Later on several of the Fathers of the church so called had their doubts respecting some of the Epistles. Even as late as the Reformers it was the same. Luther spoke disrespectfully of the Hebrews, James, Jude, and the Revelation, and set them apart at the end of his version. Calvin doubted the authenticity of James, 2Peter, and Jude. In modern times many portions of books in the O.T. and N.T. are being called in question. But the Bible needs not to be accredited by man. It carries its own credentials to the heart and conscience of the Christian in the power of the Holy Spirit. The natural man is not competent to judge of such a question. The Bible has the stamp of God upon it, and the more it is studied by the Christian the more perfect it is found to be — no part redundant, and no part lacking.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Scripture
This word occurs but once in the Old Testament, where an angel speaks of 'the scripture of truth.' Daniel 10:21 . In the New Testament the various parts of the Old Testament are referred to as 'the scriptures'; they are the 'holy scriptures,' 2 Timothy 3:15 ; they must needs be fulfilled; they cannot be broken. John 10:35 ; Acts 17:2,11 . Some erred because they did not know the scriptures. Matthew 22:29 . And 'all scripture' is God-inspired, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, or complete, fully fitted to every good work. 2 Timothy 3:16,17 . It is in short a God-inspired and infallible revelation to man, and especially to those who are by grace in relationship with Him. As in a nation 'the records' are referred to as authority, so in the church, it is 'the scriptures' that bind the conscience, and should be an end of all controversy. To understand them the teaching of the Holy Spirit is needed, for "the letter killeth, but the Spirit giveth life."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Versions of the Scripture, English
Bede relates that Caedmon embodied a history of the Bible in Anglo-Saxon poetry; Aldhelm, Bishop of Sherborne, translated the Psalms in the seventh century; and Bede translated the Gospel of John; he finished dictating it as he breathed his last, A.D. 735. King Alfred translated Exodus 20 — Exodus 23 as the groundwork of his legislation: he desired indeed that "all the free-born youth of his kingdom should be able to read the English scriptures."
There is also an Anglo-Saxon MS of a version of the Gospels interlinear with the Latin Vulgate in the British Museum (cir. A.D. 680); also another (cir. 900) in a different translation at Oxford. There was also a translation of the Psalms. These and other portions were the first sparks of light that created the longing for the full light of God's word in English.
1. WYCLIFFE was the first to give to England a translation of the whole of the New Testament. He completed the four Gospels first, with a commentary, saying in his preface that he did it "so that pore Cristen men may some dele know the text of the Gospel with the comyn sentence of olde holie doctores."
The Old Testament was undertaken by his coadjutor, Nicholas de Hereford. He had proceeded as far as the middle of Baruch (following the order of the Vulgate) when he was in A.D. 1382 cited before Archbishop Arundel. Others followed to revise and increase the copies. All these were translations of the Latin.
Wycliffe's version must have been well circulated, for though Arundel destroyed many copies there are about 150 manuscripts of it still existing.
WYCLIFFE — John 1:1 .
In the bigynnynge was the word and the word was at god, and god was the word.
Succeeding translations have "with God." Coverdale and Cranmer have "God was the word."
2. TYNDALE. This man made the translation of the scriptures the work of his life. He said he would cause "a boy that driveth the plough" to know more of scripture than the great body of the clergy then knew. In his workthere was a great advance inasmuch as after study he was able to translate from both the Hebrew and the Greek. He had to carry on his work abroad, and to change his abode frequently in order to baffle those who sought his life.
Edition followed edition, which were smuggled into England in various ways, and were there readily bought and circulated. On one occasion his enemies purchased a large portion of an edition to destroy it, and the money thus obtained furnished the funds for bringing out a revised issue.
To show the opposition of the Papists to these copies of the scripture being brought into England, Sir Thomas More may be quoted: " . . . . which books, albeit that they neither can be there printed without great cost, nor here sold without great adventure and peril: yet cease they not with money sent from hence, to print them there, and send them hither, by the whole vatts-full at once. And, in some places, looking for no lucre, cast them abroad by night; so great a pestilent pleasure have some devilish people caught, with the labour, travel, cost, charge, peril, harm, and hurt of themselves, to seek the destruction of others."
Through God's intervention neither Wolsey nor the king, neither More nor Cromwell, with all their agents, were able to arrest the supposed culprit. Other plans, however, were at last successful: Henry Philips and Gabriel Dunne with subtilty entrapped him, the former passing as a gentleman, and the latter as his servant. Philips by mixing with the merchants discovered Tyndale's retreat, made his acquaintance, and professed great friendship for him, but only first to rob him under the plea of a loan, and then to betray him into the hands of his enemies. He lingered in prison several months and then suffered martyrdom in 1536.
His translation of the New Testament appeared in A.D. 1525, and he translated portions of the O.T. before his death. The New Testament was reprinted many times abroad and once in London.
TYNDALE — John 10:16 .
And other shepe I have, which are not of this folde. Them also must I bringe, that they maye heare my voyce, and that ther maye be one flocke and one shepeherde.
Both Wycliffe and Coverdale agree with the "one flock," so that if the translators of the A.V. had made the best use of the translations that preceded them, they would not have put "one fold."
3. COVERDALE. This translation was produced under a somewhat different spirit from that possessed by Tyndale. As we have seen Tyndale's was his life's work and a labour of love, but Coverdale could say that he "sought it not, neither desired it," but accepted it as work assigned him. Yet he attempted to do his best, and with good will. The people in England began generally to desire the scriptures. Tyndale's prefaces and notes had given so much offence, that there was no prospect of the king giving his sanction to that translation being reprinted. But through the influence of Cranmer and Cromwell all difficulties were removed as to Coverdale's, and the work was completed. The king sent copies to the bishops, who were in no hurry to give their judgement. They were at length requested to give their opinion as to its merits. They declared that there were many faults therein. "Well," said king Henry, "but are there any heresies maintained thereby?" They replied that there were no heresies. "Then if there are no heresies," said the king, "in God's name let it go abroad among the people."
The edition was issued in 1535, but it is not now known where it was printed. Coverdale placed the Apocrypha at the end of the O.T., instead of mixing it with the canonical books, as in the Vulgate.
It is curious to notice that on the title page it says "faithfully translated out of Douche and Latyn." One would have naturally expected that it should have been from the Hebrew and Greek; but it has been remarked that in those troublous times the 'Douche' would be pleasing to those who held Luther's name in honour, whereas the 'Latyn' would conciliate Gardiner and his party. Coverdale apparently alludes to having Tyndale's translation before him, but also speaks of five others: these were probably the Vulgate, Luther's, the German Swiss, the Latin of Pagninus, and perhaps Wycliffe's.
COVERDALE — Psalm 26 : (27) 14.
O tary thou the LORDES leysure, be stronge, let thine hert be of good comforte and wayte thou still for the LORDE.
4. MATTHEW. This has been judged to have been the translation of Rogers, of Cambridge, the name of Matthew being assumed to conceal the translator. Rogers, when indicted in the days of Mary, is called Joannes Rogers, alias Matthew, and his martyrdom followed. It was probably printed abroad, and published in England by Grafton and Whitchurch, who wanted not only the king's sanction but a monopoly for five years. This the king would not grant. They then asked that every incumbent should purchase a copy and that every abbey should take six copies. The result was that the king ordered by royal proclamation that a copy should be set up in every church, the cost being divided between the clergy and the people.
This was therefore the first "Authorised Version," and for it to be in every church was a great advance in the circulation of the scriptures in England. Its date is A.D. 1537.
5. CRANMER'S (passing over TAVERNER'S Edition, 1539, as a reprint of Matthew's, with the notes altered and some omitted) takes precedence of all that had yet been attempted as to detail of interpretation. Words not in the original were in a different type. It was pointed out, at least partially, where the Vulgate differed from the Hebrew, and where the Chaldee and Hebrew differed. It had marginal references, but no notes.
It appended the Preface to the Apocrypha that had appeared in Matthew's Bible, but, curiously enough, in order to avoid giving offence to the Romish party by the name of Apocrypha, they sought for some other word, and adopted the inaccurate statement that the "Books were called Hagiographa ,' because "they were read in secret and apart"! This term, which signifies 'holy writings,' is applied to some of the canonical books, of the O.T. See BIBLE.
The first edition was in 1539 or 40, and in 1541 an edition appeared as "authorised" to be used and frequented in every church in the kingdom.
CRANMER — 1 John 3:4 .
Whosoeuer commytteth synne, committeth vnryghteousnes also, and synne is vnryghteousnes.
Tyndale and Coverdale agree with Cranmer; Wycliffe has "synne is wickidnesse," and the Rheims Version has "sinne is iniquitie" — there were thus five early witnesses against the A.V.'s translation of "sin is the transgression of the law".
6. GENEVA. Cranmer's edition did not give general satisfaction. Some thought the English might be improved, and its bulk in folio and its expense were against its circulation. It, however, held its ground until Queen Mary ascended the throne, when a stop was put to all Bible-printing in England. The persecution drove many away, and among other exiles the following took refuge at Geneva: Whittingham, Gilby, Goodman, Sampson, and Coverdale, the last-named having laboured on Cranmer's edition. These men zealously set to work on a new translation, and laboured for two years or more "night and day."
In A.D. 1557 the New Testament was ready, and in 1560 the whole Bible. It was largely imported in the reign of Elizabeth, and was reprinted in England. Being smaller and cheaper it found favour, and held its ground for about 60 years — partly owing no doubt to a monopoly being given to James Bodleigh. This was transferred to Barker whose family held the right of printing Bibles for more than a century.
This edition was printed in Roman type instead of the black letter which had formerly been employed. It was also divided into verses, and was the first English Bible that entirely omitted the Apocrypha.
GENEVA — Romans 5:11 .
And not only so , but we also reioyse in God by the meanes of our Lord Iesus Christe, by whom we haue now receaued the atonement.
Wycliffe and the Rheims version have "reconciliation," the right translation.
7. THE BISHOPS' BIBLE. Fault being found with the Geneva version, especially by the clergy, Archbishop Parker was very desirous for a new translation. Some eight bishops with deans and professors proceeded with the work, and in A.D. 1568 a folio Bible was issued. It was sought to make it attractive: finer woodcuts were inserted, also a map of Palestine, and genealogical tables.
A novelty was introduced by classifying the books as legal, historical, sapiential, and prophetic. The Gospels, the Catholic Epistles, Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews were grouped as legal; Paul's other Epistles as sapiential; the Acts as historical; and the Revelation as prophetical. Some passages were marked to be omitted when read in the service of the church.
Opinions were divided as to the translation: some extolled it highly, but it did not commend itself to scholars generally. On the whole it had but little success.
8. RHEIMS AND DOUAY. The Romanists had often pointed a finger of scorn at the different English translations as not exhibiting unity; and, as they could not hinder the circulation of Bibles in England, they determined to have a translation of their own. The Protestant refugees had produced the Geneva Edition, and now some Romanists, who had resorted to the continent, set to work at Rheims. The principal persons engaged in it were William Allen, Gregory Martin, and Richard Bristow.
As the title states it was a translation from "the authentic Latin, according to the best corrected copies of the same, diligently conferred with the Greek and other editions in divers languages." They gave various reasons why the Latin was chosen, such as that it agreed with the Greek, or where it did not, it was better than the Greek. The New Testament was issued in A.D. 1582; and the Old Testament, printed at Douay, in 1609. We give a specimen.
The RHEIMS Edition — Luke 15:7 .
I say to you, that euen so there shall be ioy in heauen vpon one sinner that doth penance, then vpon ninetie nine iust that neede not penance.
It is remarkable that Wycliffe also used the word "penance" in this and other passages.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Accommodation of Scripture
Is the application of it, not to its literal meaning, but to something analogous to it. Thus a prophecy is said to be fulfilled properly when a thing foretold comes to pass; and, by way of accommodation, when an event happens to any place or people similar to what fell out some time before to another. Thus the words of Isaiah, spoken to those of his own time, are said to be fulfilled in those who lived in our Saviour's, "Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy, " &c: which same words St. Paul afterwards accommodates to the Jews of his time, Is. 39: 14. Matthew 15:8 . Acts 13:41 . Great care, however, should be taken by preachers who are fond of accommodating texts, that they first clearly state the literal sense of the passage.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Versions of the Scripture, Ancient
It is very gratifying to find in history how in many places, as the gospel was disseminated and souls were saved, they naturally felt a need for the scriptures, and how that need was by the providence of God supplied. This blessing would doubtless have been vouchsafed everywhere, and continually without a break, had not apostate Rome extended its influence and wickedly suppressed the knowledge of the scriptures in order that its own assumption might have full sway.
Though Christianity entered into the British Isles at a very early date, it was not till the year 1380 that the English New Testament was issued, in spite of Rome, only however to be collected and burnt by the clergy so far as they could.
Under the article VARIOUS READINGS it is shown that early translations of the New Testament are used as evidence of what was in the primitive Greek text, and we now proceed to name the principal of these versions. They are important, as some of them are of an earlier date than any existing Greek Manuscript.
1. THE AETHIOPIC VERSION. The date of this is not known: some place it in the fourth century, but it was probably later. The introduction of Christianity into that part of Africa is remarkable. Meropius, a philosopher of Tyre, determined to visit that region, which ecclesiastical historians termed 'India.' On landing at a port, the whole party was attacked, peace having been broken previously between these 'Indians' and Rome: all were massacred except two young relatives of Meropius, named Frumentius and AEdesius, who were carried to the king. He set them at liberty and employed them, and on his death, they were appointed ministers of the young king. They began to teach the Christian religion to the Abyssinians, and a place was set apart for the worship of the true God. Frumentius was afterwards appointed Bishop of that district by Athanasius. It has been judged that the version was made from the Greek, but by one who did not well understand that language.
The AEthiopic New Testament was printed at Rome in the years 1548-9, but it was incorrect, the printers being altogether ignorant of the language. It was reprinted in Walton's Polyglott, with (says Ludolf) the same and additional errors; but it had now a Latin translation, which enabled the Editors of the Greek Testament to quote the AEthiopic as an evidence for or against certain readings. The value of its testimony was enhanced by C. A. Bode, who furnished a more correct text and a better Latin translation. (Brunswick, 1753.) The fact of the MSS being of different recensions lessens their critical value.
2. ARABIC VERSIONS. There have been five printed Editions of the Arabic New Testament. The Gospels issued at Rome in 1590-1; one at Leyden in 1616, called the Erpenian Arabic; the Arabic in the Paris Polyglott in 1645; the same in Walton's Polyglott in 1657; and one at Rome in 1703, called the Carshuni. It is known that in the eighth century John, Bishop of Seville, translated the holy scriptures into Arabic but it is not known whether he translated from the Greek or the Latin, nor what other translations were made. The Arabic is seldom quoted by the Editors, as it is judged to be of little value as evidence.
3. ARMENIAN VERSION. In the fifth century arose a desire to have an Armenian alphabet, the Syrian having been previously used. Miesrob invented an alphabet for his nation, and appears to have regarded it as a gift from heaven. He laboured to instruct the Armenians, being warmly aided by Isaac the patriarch. They then became eager to have the scriptures in their own tongue, and an effort was made to translate from the Syriac. This was, however, abandoned, and Miesrob, with two or three others, resorted to Alexandria to learn more perfectly the Greek language. The Old Testament was translated from the LXX, and the New Testament from the Greek.
In the seventeenth century MS copies of the Armenian Bible being very scarce, a bishop named Oscan or Uscan was sent to Europe to get it printed. After vainly trying to get it done at Rome, he proceeded to Amsterdam and there it was printed in 1666. Not having, however, any Latin interpretation, it was not readily available to Editors of the Greek Testament, though some of its readings were furnished to Mill, Griesbach, and Scholz. Dr. Tregelles at length succeeded, by the aid of Dr. C. Rieu, in ascertaining its readings more generally.
4. EGYPTIAN VERSIONS. Of these there are two, probably being both dialects of the Ancient Egyptian language. When only one was known it was called the Coptic , but another recension being discovered, the first-named is now called the MEMPHITIC or BOHAIRIC. The translation is assigned to the second century: though there are no MSS of so early a date.
The first printed edition appeared, in 1716, at Oxford, but badly collated from various MSS by Wilkins, with a Latin interpretation. A better edition of the four Gospels was edited by Schwartze in 1846-8. And the Acts and Epistles were issued by Boetticher of Halle later. Thus the Memphitic Version became available to the Editors of the Greek Testament, and is often quoted by them.
4.2. THE THEBAIC VERSION. This has been also called the Sahidic. It is assigned to the second century, some MSS being judged to be of the fifth century and others of the sixth century. Fragments of this recension were issued from time to time, and Ford attempted to gather up the fragments in one edition as an Appendix to the Codex Alexandrinus in 1799. Griesbach and succeeding Editors quoted this version.
There are now accounted to be three other dialects of ancient Egyptian, of which fragments of the New Testament have been found. They are called, 1. The Fayoumic or Bashmuric. 2. Middle Egyptian or Coptic, or Lower Sahidic. 3. Akhmimic.
5. GOTHIC VERSION. This was made by Ulphilas, about A.D. 348. The Goths from Scandinavia had invaded the Roman territory, and carried away a number of captives. These by their intercourse with the barbarians brought a number of them to embrace the true faith, at least nominally. Theophilus was their first bishop: he was present at the Council of Nice and subscribed the Nicene creed. Ulphilas, a Cappadocian, a descendant of some of the captives, became his successor, but the Arian error was at that time dominant in the empire and he subscribed the Arian creed,and this the Goths then generally held. Except in one passage (Philippians 2:6 ) it is not apparent that the Arian heresy influenced Ulphilas in his translation: the Arians maintained their creed more by interpretation. It was made in the fourth century. The Old Testament was also translated, but curiously enough the four books of Kings were omitted, being "prudently suppressed," says Gibbon, "as they might tend to irritate the fierce and sanguinary spirit of the barbarians."
5.2. A remarkably beautiful copy of the Gothic Gospels is called the CODEX ARGENTEUS, being written in silver, with the initial words in gold. It is assigned to the fifth or early in the sixth century. Queen Christina gave it her librarian, Isaac Vossius, and from him it was purchased about 1662 by the Swedish nation, and deposited at Upsal. The Gospels are in the Western or Latin order, Matthew, John, Luke and Mark. There are 187 leaves (out of 330) of purple vellum, 4to.
5.3. CODICES AMBROSIANI, being five manuscripts, now in the Ambrosian Library ofMilan. They contain the Epistles to the Romans, Corinthians, Ephesians, and to Timothy almost entire, and fragments of Philippians, Colossians, Titus, and Philemon. They were discovered and rescued from palimpsests. These are not unlike the Codex Carolinus.
5.4. CODEX CAROLINUS. This contains about forty verses of the Epistle to the Romans. It is also a palimpsest, and is accompanied by a Latin version. It has been traced to Mayence and Prague, and was purchased by a duke of Brunswick in 1689.
6. LATIN VERSIONS. For these see VULGATE.
7. SLAVONIC VERSION. A portion of the Slavonic race had settled in a district bounded by the Danube and in Great Moravia. The production of the version bearing this name is interesting. A missionary from Thessalonica, named Cyril, visited these tribes, learnt their language, and then invented an alphabet that he might translate into their vernacular tongue the word of God. He commenced his labours there, with his brother Methodius, A.D. 862. The version is assigned to the ninth century, though the oldest known MS belongs to the year 1056. The four Gospels were published in 1512, and in 1581 the whole Bible. It has been quoted by Wetstein, Griesbach, etc.
8. SYRIAC VERSIONS. It is generally admitted that as early as the second century a Syriac New Testament was in existence. Eusebius speaks of quotat ions being made from the Syriac, but the origin of the version is not known. It is clear that as far back as the fifth century the scriptures were in use among the Syrian Christians. Unhappily there was an early division among them, that has never been healed; but the Nestorians, Monophysites (those who believed there was but one nature in Christ, the Word), and those claiming to be orthodox, all use the same recension of the scriptures.
This version became known by being brought into Europe in 1552 for the purpose of being printed. It was finished in 1555. It did not include the Catholic Epistles nor the Revelation. John 8:1-11 was also wanting. (These portions have been found in other Syriac translations.) It found a place in the various Polyglots, and has been highly valued as a faithful record of the Greek text. It is commonly called the Peshito, 'or Simple.'
8.2. THE CURETONIAN SYRIAC. This takes its name from Dr. Wm. Cureton, who observed, bound up with other Syriac MSS in the British Museum, some leaves containing a large part of the four Gospels in a recension different from the Peshito. Its early date is undoubted, and it is highly valued. It has been published with an English translation.
8.3. THE PHILOXENIAN SYRIAC. This embraces the whole New Testament except the Revelation. It was professedly made by Polycarp, 'Rural-bishop,' about A.D. 508, for Xenaias of Mabug, who is also called Philoxenus (whence the name of the version) in 616. It having been revised and modified by one called Thomas of Harkel, very little of the original translation is left, except in one copy at Rome uncollated. Still the translation from the Greek is so literal that it leaves no doubt as to what the Greek copy contained. It is also called the HARKLEIAN from Thomas of Harkel.
8.4. THE PALESTINIAN or JERUSALEM SYRIAC consisting of fragments; and
8.5. THE KARKAPHLENSIAN SYRIAC,being of much later date, do not need to be referred to here.
All these versions, as they became available, were consulted by the various Editors of the Greek New Testament: some Editors attaching more importance to certain of them than was done by others.
Some of the versions included the Old Testament or portions of it.
All these various translations into different languages are a marked contrast to the policy of Rome with regard to the scriptures. The Dark Ages followed, especially where Rome had its sway, and light and learning diminished. God's set time however arrived: the darkness and ignorance were deplored, and one here and there was empowered by God to seek to spread the light of the holy scriptures among those professing Christianity, and more modern versions of the word of God were gradually made and printed, being hailed with delight by all who wished to know what God Himself had revealed as the only way of salvation, and to know His will concerning themselves.
From that time, translations have rapidly increased: missionaries all over the world have no sooner obtained a footing and learnt the language, than they have constructed a grammar, and proceeded to translate portions of scripture for those whose salvation they seek. "The word of God is not bound." 2 Timothy 2:9 .
Webster's Dictionary - Scripture
(1):
(n.) A passage from the Bible;; a text.
(2):
(n.) The books of the Old and the new Testament, or of either of them; the Bible; - used by way of eminence or distinction, and chiefly in the plural.
(3):
(n.) Anything written; a writing; a document; an inscription.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Scripture
a term most commonly used to denote the writings of the Old and New Testament, which are sometimes called The Scriptures, sometimes the sacred or holy writings, and sometimes canonical scripture. See BIBLE .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Fool in
The atheist: "The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God" (Psalms 13:52).
The rich fool: "But God said to him, Thou fool, this night they require thy soul of thee and whose shall those things by which thou hast provided?" (Luke 12).
A penalty: "And whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hellfire" (Matthew 5). Those who hear the word of God and do not keep it are like "the fool that built his house upon the sand" (Matthew 7).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Rod in
"Thy rod and thy staff, they have comforted me" (Psalms 22).
Rod of Aaron. "When Pharao shall say to you: Shew signs; Thou shalt say to Aaron: Take thy rod and cast it down before Pharao, and it shall be turned into a serpent" (Exodus 7). "Carry back the rod of Aaron into the tabernacle of the testimony" (Numbers 17). "And Aaron took the rod before Pharao, and his servants, and it was turned into a serpent. ..but Aaron's rod devoured their rod" (Exodus 7). "And there were twelve rods besides the rod of Aaron" (Numbers 17). "He. ..found that the rod of Aaron, for the house of Levi, was budded" (Numbers 17). "Take the rod. ..thou and Aaron thy brother, and speak to the rock before them and it shall yield waters" (Numbers 20). "And the Ark of the Testament. ., in which was. ..the rod of Aaron that had blossomed" (Hebrews 9).
Rod of Jesse. "And there shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse, and a flower shall rise up out of his root" (Isaiah 11).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Scripture
Scripture, writing, and Scriptures, writings. The name given in the Bible to portions of the recorded will of God; called also "Holy Scriptures," Romans 1:2; 2 Timothy 3:16, and once "the Scripture of truth." Daniel 10:21. The more common title in the Bible is "Law," and "Law of Moses." Christ refers frequently to passages in the Old Testament in this way, and once designates the entire collection by the three divisions known to the Jews, "the Law of Moses, and the Prophets, and the Psalms." Luke 24:44. The term Scripture occurs 52 times in the A. V., only once in the Old Testament; but compare 2 Kings 22:13; Psalms 40:7, and Psalms 119:1-176. "Law," "Law of Moses," occur 426 times, and "Gospel" in the New Testament only 101 times. The prophets frequently used the phrase, "the word of the Lord." Isaiah 1:10; Jeremiah 2:4; Ezekiel 12:17; Daniel 9:2; Hosea 1:1; Joel 1:1. Scripture is called in the New Testament "the word of God," "oracles of God," and "God's words." Acts 4:31; Acts 6:7; Acts 12:24; Romans 3:2; and John 8:47. In the New Testament Paul's epistles are classed with the Old Testament as "Scripture." 2 Peter 3:16. The term Bible comes from the Latin Biblia, and Greek Biblos or Biblion, meaning book. It was used by Josephus—70-100 a.d., and Philo, to designate single books of the Old Testament; and later by Chrysostom—350-407 a.d.—for the whole collection. "The Jews have the books—biblia— "... "Provide yourselves with books,... at least procure the new, the Apostolos, the Acts, the Gospels." Hom. 2 and 9. He also called them "the divine books." It was applied to the Holy Scriptures by Chaucer—1400, and Wyckliffe—1384, and used as a title by Coverdale—1535. Since then the "Holy Bible" has become the common English title for the collection of 66 sacred books, accepted by all Christians as the authoritative word of God. The Bible is divided into the Old and the New Testaments, a name based upon 2 Corinthians 3:14; testament referring there to the old covenant. Thus we read of the "book of the Covenant," Exodus 24:7; 2 Kings 23:2, a phrase which was transferred in time to the entire Hebrew Sacred Scriptures, and the New Testament or Covenant to the Christian. There are 39 separate books in the Old Testament, and 27 in the New Testament, making 66 books in the Bible. They are called "holy" or "sacred" because they are the written revelations of God. "For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of men; but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost." 2 Peter 1:21 A. V., or in R. V., "for no prophecy ever came by the will of man; but men spake from God, being moved by the Holy Ghost." Comp. 2 Timothy 3:16, and 2 Peter 3:16. The Jews, besides dividing the Old Testament into the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms, or the writings, as before noted, made other divisions in toe text of separate books for convenience in reading in public worship. For example, they divided the "Law, the five books of Moses, into 54 portions, and these were subdivided into smaller sections. From these grew the modern division of the Old Testament into chapters and verses. The New Testament was divided into chapters and verses by Stephens in 1551, and likewise first appeared in the Genevan English Bible in 1557-1560. The chronological dates were first inserted by Lloyd in 1701, and are from Ussher. The marginal references to facilitate finding texts on the same or similar topics, were greatly improved by Drs. Paris and Blayney, 1762, 1769. The italics in the English versions do not indicate emphatic words, but are inserted by the translators to complete the sense and to show that there are no words in the original Hebrew or Greek to correspond with these English words in italics. The original text of the Old Testament is Hebrew (except a small portion in Chaldaic); the New Testament was written in Greek. The text of the Hebrew Bible has been carefully preserved by the labors of men who regarded it with great reverence. The Massoretic text of today is the work of a body of scholars living at Tiberias, in Galilee, and at Sora in the Euphrates valley, who added the vowel points. The oldest extant Hebrew Old Testament manuscripts date from the tenth century. The entire Hebrew Bible was first printed in 1488. Besides the Jewish Massoretes, able Hebrew scholars have carefully and conscientiously compared various Hebrew copies with the old Greek translations, to give us a more accurate Hebrew text than could be gained from a single ancient manuscript. The New Testament Greek text has received greater critical study than even the Old Testament text. Copies of the gospels and epistles were early multiplied in great numbers. These manuscripts are of two classes—uncials, written in capitals and with no division of words or sentences and very few marks of punctuation, and cursives, written in running band. The former are the older, dating from the fourth to the tenth century. The material used, the style of writing, and other peculiarities, enable experts to tell very nearly to what century any given manuscript belongs. The first printed New Testament text that was published was that of Erasmus in 1516. What is called the Received Text (Greek) is that of the Elzevir Edition, 1633. The toils of a long succession of scholars have sufficed to furnish a text that satisfactorily represents the original. Chief among these scholars were Beza, Mill, Bengel, and Bentley in the centuries that followed the Reformation. They were followed by Griesbach—1754-1812, Lachmann—1793-1851, Tischendorf—1815-1874, Tregelles—1813-1875, Westcott, and Hort, and through their labors we have a satisfactory and pure text of the Greek Testament.
Order of the Books.— The order of the various books differs in Hebrew manuscripts, according as they are Talmudic or Massoretic. The Talmudic order is: the Law, or five books of Moses; the Prophets, viz., Joshua, Judges 1:1-36 and 2 Samuel 1:1-27 and 2 Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Isaiah, the twelve minor Prophets; the Writings, viz., Ruth, Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Lamentations, Daniel, Esther, Ezra with Nehemiah 1:1-11 and 2 Chronicles. The Massoretes order is: the Law, the earlier Prophets, then Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel; and the kʿthubim or Writings are thus arranged: Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the five megilloth, viz., Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, then Daniel, Ezra with Nehemiah 1:1-11 and 2 Chronicles. The order in the Septuagint varies considerably from that of the Hebrew. The books of the New Testament may Declassed as historical, doctrinal, and prophetical. The historical, viz., the four Gospels, and the Acts of the Apostles, always stand first. Of the doctrinal class, some leading manuscripts—including the Alexandrine and Vatican—make the catholic epistles precede those of Paul; the Hebrews following 2 Thessalonians. The Western church has generally placed the Pauline epistles first, namely, those to churches, then those to individuals, with the Hebrews last, the author being, according to many, uncertain. The prophetical book, Revelation, always closes the sacred volume. See Rice's Our Sixty-six Sacred Books for further account of the text, versions, etc.
Ancient Translations.— 1. The oldest translation of the Old Testament is the Greek, made about two centuries before Christ. It is called the Septuagint—i.e., seventy, a round number for the more exact seventy-two—from a tradition that the work was executed by 72 Jewish scholars. It was in universal use among the Jews in Christ's day, and is continually quoted by the New Testament writers. This translation instead of the Hebrew was translated into Latin by the early Christian fathers, and is the authority in the Greek Church today. The Jews, however, abandoned it, and returned to the study and use of the original Hebrew. 2. A translation into Syriac was made by Christians, direct from the Hebrew, called the Peshittâ (simple), because it was literal, and not paraphrastic, was in common use in the fourth century. 3. Of Latin translations are the Itala, made from the Septuagint, and the translation by Jerome, the most learned Christian of his day, directly from the Hebrew, a.d. 385-405, which is called the Vulgate. All Roman Catholic versions must be conformed to it.
Modern Translations.—Only a few leading modern versions can be noticed: 1. German, by Luther, New Testament, in 1522, and Bible, 1534; revised version, 1892. 2. French, by Le Fevre, at Antwerp, 1530; Olivetan, 1535, and Segonds, 1880. 3. Dutch, synod of Dort, 1637, Staats Bibel. 4. Italian, Diodati, 1607. 5. Spanish, by Valero, and by San Miguel, 1602, 1794. 6. Arabic, by E. Smith and Van Dyck, 1866. Many translations have been made by missionaries.
English Translations.— Translations of portions of the Bible were made into Anglo-Saxon in the eighth century and into early English in the thirteenth or earlier. The chief translations are: Wyckliffe's New Testament, from the Latin in 1380, and his followers also translated the Old Testament; these were written. Tyndale's, from the Greek, first English New Testament, printed 1526. Coverdale's Bible, 1535, chiefly from the Latin. This was the first entire Bible printed in English, and probably at Zurich. Matthews' Bible, a fusion of the translations by Tyndale and Coverdale, and made by John Rogers, the martyr, under the name of Matthews. 1537. It was published with the English king's license, and hence was the first authorized version in English. Taverner's Bible was a revision of Matthews' issued in 1589. Cranmer's, or the Great Bible, was simply a new edition of Matthews', issued under the sanction of and with a preface by, Cranmer, also in 1539. The Genevan New Testament, 1557, and Genevan Bible, 1560, were made by English refugees at Geneva, during the persecution under the English queen, Mary, who was a Roman Catholic. It was the first complete English translation from the original Hebrew and Greek texts, and the first English Bible divided into modern chapters and verses. The Bishops' Bible, 1568-1572, a revision of the Great Bible, made by 15 scholars, eight of whom were bishops. The Rheims, New Testament, 1609, and Douai Bible, 1610, made by Roman Catholic scholars at Douai. The King James', or so-called Authorized Version, made from the Hebrew and Greek by 47 scholars, under sanction of James II., king of England, 1611. The Anglo-American revised Bible, New Testament, 1881, Old Testament, 1885. This is a revision of the so-called A. V. made by a company of 67 British and 34 American scholars appointed by a Committee of the Church of England, through the Convocation of Canterbury, in 1870.
Evidences of Scripture.—Concerning the evidences, external and internal, of the truth of Scripture, it may briefly be said that no books have been subjected to such severe critical examination into every statement, and clause, and particular, as the Bible, and never have the arguments for its integrity and authority been as strong as they are today. The fulfillment of prophecy, the minute accuracy of descriptions, formerly supposed to be inaccurate, but which later and more thorough researches have found to be true, sustain the historic verity of the Scriptures. For instance, a searching examination of Paul's shipwreck has proved it to be minutely accurate. The explorations made of late years in Nineveh and Babylon, Egypt and Palestine, have tended to confirm the credibility of Scripture in many hitherto disputed points. It is true that we must receive the evidence so produced with care. Inscriptions and monumental records are more likely to exaggerate the successes than to chronicle the disasters of the people by whom they were made. We could not reasonably expect to find in Egyptian monuments any detail of the judgments which forced the release of Israel. Neither was it likely that Sennacherib would record the fatal overthrow of his vast army at Jerusalem. But much information has been obtained by incidental notices. Thus it had been questioned whether such a king as Nebuchadnezzar ever reigned. His name, it was said, did not appear in Herodotus: and objectors, if they did not deny the existence of the conqueror, at least insinuated that a petty satrap had been magnified into a great king. But now bricks in abundance have been found inscribed with Nebuchadnezzar's name, proving that he had built and adorned a magnificent capital. Daniel 4:30. Yet more serious doubt was expressed in regard to Belshazzar; and consequently the narrative of his feast and the awful sign which interrupted it was pronounced a fable. But it is now distinctly proved by the discovery of unquestionable records that a sovereign of that name was associated in power with his father during the last days of Babylon's independence. These instances could be multiplied many times, from the discoveries at Tanis, Lachish, Nineveh, Memphis, and from the recovery of inscriptions and letters, and from the mummies of the Pharaohs, of priests, and princes, almost without number. The results of Christianity, its effects on individuals, families, nations; its wonderful missions, are an unanswerable proof of the verity of this one Book, the Bible. The Scriptures are the only written revelation of God, and the only authoritative record of his plan of salvation. The Old Testament was given specially at first to the Jews, and the New Testament to the disciples of Christ. The Old Testament is fulfilled in the New. There are not less than 265 direct quotations from the Old Testament in the New, and 350 further allusions in the New Testament to the Old Testament, which imply that the latter was the word of God. Again and again Christ and his apostles cited and approved of the Old Testament as the truth of God, and the New Testament expressly declares: "All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works." 2 Timothy 3:16-17, A. V. (The E. V. modifies, but on the whole rather strengthens this, as a proof text on the subject.) God's word is not to be diminished, or added to, see Deuteronomy 4:2; Deuteronomy 12:32; Revelation 22:19; nor is God's plan of salvation to be modified: "If any man preach any other gospel unto you... let him be accursed." Gat 1:9. The Scriptures from the beginning to their end point to and reveal the living "Word made flesh," even the Lord Jesus Christ, and the eternal life in him. John 1:1-14; Colossians 1:12-20; Hebrews 1:1-3. From the Mosaic book of Deuteronomy in the Old Testament Jesus quoted texts to withstand the awful conflict in the temptations of the devil. Matthew 4:4. It was from the Old Testament books that Jesus talked on the way to Emmaus with two disciples, "beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself." Luke 24:27. These scriptures are sufficient to guide and persuade any who will be reasonably persuaded to salvation. When the rich man in torment plead with Abraham for his five brethren, saying: "If one went unto them from the dead, they will repent," the answer was, "If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead." Luke 16:30-31. They make a fatal mistake who do not so study the Bible as to find Christ in it from beginning to end, a personal Saviour through whom comes eternal, spiritual life.
Circulation of the Bible.—The following statements are from Rice's Our Sixty-six Sacred Books: The Bible and portions of the Scriptures are printed in 367 versions and 287 dialects, according to the American Bible Society reports (founded 1816). The reports of the British and Foreign Bible Society (founded 1804) show that over 60 new versions of the Bible were added to its list in eleven years, and that the Scriptures are now published in 510 versions in upwards of 300 languages. A conservative estimate is that the Bible, or portions, are now issued in 450 languages and dialects by the Bible and mission societies and private publishers of the world. It is computed that 60,000 copies of the gospels were circulated among Christians before the end of the second century after Christ. Over 100,000 copies of Luther's German version were sold within 40 years of its issue. Between 1524 and 1611 not less than 278 editions of English Bibles and Testaments wore printed. In the first 15 years of 18th century private publishers in America issued 131 editions of the Bible and 65 of the New Testament. Not less than 1000 editions, some having a very large circulation, were issued in the first 65 years of 19th century in America alone. The total circulation of the Scriptures and portions, for the nineteenth century, is placed at 300,000,000 copies. Never was the annual circulation greater than now. Bible and mission societies of the world circulate yearly about 6,500,000 copies, and private publishers swell tills number to more than 10,000,000 annually, The copies of the Scriptures circulated in heathen lands, in this century, are believed to exceed in number all that there were in the world from Moses to Martin Luther. "This word of God has held a thousand nations for thrice a thousand years spell-bound," says F. W. Robertson, "held them by an abiding power, even the universality of its truth." "Blessed are" they.. "who walk in the law of the Lord." Psalms 119:1. Rice, Our 66 Sacred Books.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Liberty in
In the Old Testament the idea of liberty was almost entirely absent, religion meant the "fear of the Lord" (Psalms 33), servant was the name of the good (Psalms 18; Hebrews 3). Christianity brought freedom ("ascending on high, he led captivity captive." Ephesians 4) from the ceremonial restrictions of the Mosaic law, "a yoke which neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear" (Acts 15), and gave its disciples the liberty of freely drawing near to God (Hebrews 4). It assumes that man is free ("the truth shall make you free," John 8) by appealing to his sense of responsibility and holding him accountable for his actions. "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty" (2 Corinthians 3); "the liberty of the glory of the children of God" (Romans 8).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Altar in
Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e.g., those of Noe and Abraham, altars erected for the worship of idols, altars of holocaust and of incense, of the Tabernacle and of the Temple, and the altar described in the Apocalypse.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Scripture
Or SCRIPTURES, the writings, that is, by eminence; the inspired writings, comprising the Old and New Testaments. See BIBLE .
King James Dictionary - Scripture
SCRIP'TURE, n. L. scriptura, from scribo, to write.
1. In its primary sense, a writing any thing written. 2. Appropriately, and by way of distinction, the books of the Old and New Testament the Bible. The word is used either in the singular or plural number, to denote the sacred writings or divine oracles, called sacred or holy, as proceeding from God and containing sacred doctrines and precepts. There is not any action that a man ought to do or forbear, but the Scripture will give him a clear precept or prohibition for it.
Compared with the knowledge which the Scriptures contain, every other subject of human inquiry is vanity and emptiness.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sacred Scripture
The term which the Christian Church has generally employed from earliest times to denote the collected writings of the Old and New Testaments. The word Scripture, which means writing, is derived from the Latin scriptura, and has grapha and mikra for its Greek and Hebrew equivalents. In the Old Testament, Scripture is used in the general sense of writing (Exodus 32; 2Para. 36), though at times it denotes a private (Tobit 8) or public (1 Esdras 2; 2 Esdras 7) written document, a catalogue, or index (Psalms 86), or, finally, portions of the Scriptures (Sirach 14). The Apostles and their disciples called the Old Testament simply "the Scripture" (Luke 4; John 2), or "the Scriptures" (Matthew 21; Luke 24; Acts 17); or, referring to its divine origin "the Holy Scriptures" (Romans 1), and "the Sacred Letters" (2 Timothy 3). These terms, however, were not confined to the Old Testament exclusively, for we find that Saint Peter extends the designation "Scripture" to the Pauline espistles (2 Peter 3), and that Paul himself seemingly refers by the same expression (1 Timothy 5) to both Deuteronomy 25:4 and Luke 10:7. It was undoubtedly because the Apostles themselves employed these and cognate expressions to designate the writings of the Old and New Testaments that the term "Sacred Scripture" gained so wide a currency in the early Church.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scripture, Sacred
The term which the Christian Church has generally employed from earliest times to denote the collected writings of the Old and New Testaments. The word Scripture, which means writing, is derived from the Latin scriptura, and has grapha and mikra for its Greek and Hebrew equivalents. In the Old Testament, Scripture is used in the general sense of writing (Exodus 32; 2Para. 36), though at times it denotes a private (Tobit 8) or public (1 Esdras 2; 2 Esdras 7) written document, a catalogue, or index (Psalms 86), or, finally, portions of the Scriptures (Sirach 14). The Apostles and their disciples called the Old Testament simply "the Scripture" (Luke 4; John 2), or "the Scriptures" (Matthew 21; Luke 24; Acts 17); or, referring to its divine origin "the Holy Scriptures" (Romans 1), and "the Sacred Letters" (2 Timothy 3). These terms, however, were not confined to the Old Testament exclusively, for we find that Saint Peter extends the designation "Scripture" to the Pauline espistles (2 Peter 3), and that Paul himself seemingly refers by the same expression (1 Timothy 5) to both Deuteronomy 25:4 and Luke 10:7. It was undoubtedly because the Apostles themselves employed these and cognate expressions to designate the writings of the Old and New Testaments that the term "Sacred Scripture" gained so wide a currency in the early Church.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Canon of Scripture, the,
may be generally described as the "collection of books which form the original and authoritative written rule of the faith and practice of the Christian Church," i.e. the Old and New Testaments. The word canon , in classical Greek, is properly a straight rod , "a rule" in the widest sense, and especially in the phrases "the rule of the Church," "the rule of faith," "the rule of truth," The first direct application of the term canon to the Scriptures seems to be in the verses of Amphilochius (cir. 380 A.D.), where the word indicates the rule by which the contents of the Bible must be determined, and thus secondarily an index of the constituent books. The uncanonical books were described simply as "those without" or "those uncanonized." The canonical books were also called "books of the testament," and Jerome styled the whole collection by the striking name of "the holy library," which happily expresses the unity and variety of the Bible. After the Maccabean persecution the history of the formation of the Canon is merged in the history of its contents. The Old Testament appears from that time as a whole. The complete Canon of the New Testament, as commonly received at present, was ratified at the third Council of Carthage (A.D. 397), and from that time was accepted throughout the Latin Church. Respecting the books of which the Canon is composed, see the article BIBLE . (The books of Scripture were not made canonical by act of any council, but the council gave its sanction to the results of long and careful investigations as to what books were really of divine authority and expressed the universally-accepted decisions of the church. The Old Testament Canon is ratified by the fact that the present Old Testament books were those accepted in the time of Christ and endorsed by him, and that of 275 quotations of the Old Testament in the New, no book out of the Canon is quoted from except perhaps the word of Enoch in Jude. --ED.)

Sentence search

Divide - 2 Timothy 2:15 (a) This indicates the need to make proper comparison of Scripture with Scripture and join together the thoughts that are related
Elias - In Romans 11:2 margin "the Scripture saith in Elias," i. in the Scripture portion that treats of Elijah
Bible - The historical matters of Scripture, both narrative and prophecy, constitute as it were the bones of its system; whereas the spiritual matters are as its muscles, bloodvessels and nerves. As the bones are necessary to the human system, so Scripture must have its historical matters. The expositor who nullifies the historical groundwork of Scripture for the sake of finding only spiritual truths everywhere, brings death on all correct interpretation
Canon - This is another word for Scripture. The Canon is closed which means there is no more revelation to become Scripture
Testament, Old - See BIBLE, Scripture
New Testament - See INSPIRATION, and Scripture
Torah shebichtav - �the Written Torah�); Scripture...
Diversity And Unity of Scripture - See Scripture, Unity and Diversity of ...
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Scripture - Scripture means “a writing” rendering the Latin scriptura and the Greek graphe . ...
In the history of the church, the divine character of Scripture has been the great presupposition for the whole of Christian preaching and theology. For the New Testament authors, Scripture was the record of God speaking and revealing Himself to His people. Thus Scripture and God are so closely joined together that these writers could speak of Scripture doing what it records God as doing (Galatians 3:8 ; Romans 9:17 ). ...
Because of their belief in the Scriptures' divine origin and content, the New Testament writers described it as “sure” (2 Peter 1:19 ), trustworthy “of all acceptation” (1 Timothy 1:15 ), and “confirmed” (Hebrews 2:3 ). Those who build their lives on Scripture “will not be disappointed” (Romans 9:33 NAS). ...
The purpose of Scripture is to place men and women in a right standing before God and to enable believers to seek God's glory in all of life's activities and efforts. ...
Scripture is not only a divine Book, but a divine-human Book. ...
Scripture, comprised of 66 books, written by over 40 authors spanning almost 1,500 years, reveals to God's people the unifying history of His redeeming words and acts. The ultimate focus of Scripture is the incarnation and redemptive work of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is the center to which everything in Scripture is united and bound together—beginning and end, creation and redemption, humanity, the world, the fall, history, and future
Exscriptural - ) Not in accordance with the doctrines of Scripture; unscriptural
Postillation - ) The act of postillating; exposition of Scripture in preaching
Dittology - ) A double reading, or twofold interpretation, as of a Scripture text
Bible, Inspiration of the - " Since the term "inspired" is used of the Bible in different ways, it is important to clarify the particular sense in which it should be employed, not because evangelicals have coined a new meaning for inspiration, but rather to make clear their adherence to the sense in which the Church has historically confessed her faith in Holy Scripture. We should also note that by calling inspiration the cornerstone of evangelical theology we deny the strange charge, often leveled against conservative Christians, that they are "bibliolators, " worshiping the Scriptures in the place of God. The seriousness with which evangelicals take the inspiration of Holy Scriptures derives exclusively from their conviction that when they read it they read the very words of God. Evangelical bibliology (the doctrine of Scripture that centers on its inspiration), far from leading to biblio latry (the worship of Scripture), lies at the heart of true worship of God. For the doctrine, though itself a biblical doctrine, points beyond itself and does nothing other than direct our attention most carefully to everything Scripture says. It assures us that what Scripture says, God says. We may therefore say that this doctrine serves as the point of connection between the canon of Holy Scripture and the God who is its author; it is the ground of Scripture's authority that itself entails its revelatory character. ...
In 2 Peter 1:19-21 , we read that "no prophecy of Scripture came about by the prophet's own interpretation. Certainly it speaks precisely of the divine origin of that portion of Scripture to which it refers, and of the role of the Holy Spirit in "carrying along" the human writers, such that the "word of the prophets" may be "made more certain" (1:19). Every Christian doctrine is founded in Holy Scripture—the creeds and confessions of the church, as surely as the pastor's message, find their justification in one place alone: the teaching of Holy Scripture. It is in the course of conveying teaching on every other subject that Scripture also teaches about itself. It is important to note that texts like 2Timothy 3:16,2 Peter 1:19-21 are not isolated statements but articulate a doctrine taught throughout Holy Scripture. What is recorded in Scripture comes from God; the very recording has taken place under a divine superintendence. "...
Simply to focus on those occasions when the biblical writers explicitly attribute elements in their literary product to God's special work might be taken to imply the contrary of the position we are developing; that parts of Scripture have this special status while other parts do not. The evidence of the New Testament (and, indeed, of the development of Jewish attitudes to the books of the Old Testament before that time) suggests something very different: that these books had been accorded the status of inspired Scripture. Second Timothy 3:16,2 Peter 1:21 indicate a settled view of Scripture on the part of the church, which the Gospels demonstrate was in harmony with the teaching of Jesus himself. That the incarnate Son of God should treat the Old Testament in this fashion offers the strongest possible endorsement of the divine inspiration of Holy Scripture, neatly illustrated in Matthew 19:4-5 were Jesus quotes Genesis 2:24 ("For this reason a man will leave his father and mother "). Jesus puts it directly into the mouth of God: "The Creator made them male and female, ' and said, For this reason '" Since this example fits so well into Jesus' other use of Scripture, its significance is beyond doubt: He regarded all of Scripture as that which God has spoken. In 2 Peter 3:16 we read that Paul's "letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures. " Already, within the pages of the New Testament, Paul's letters are accorded the status of Scripture, setting the pattern for the recognition of all the books of the second Testament as inspired and therefore canonical for the church of Jesus Christ. Berkouwer, Holy Scripture ; D. , Scripture and Truth ; idem, Hermeneutics, Authority, and Canon ; C. Pache, The Inspiration and Authority of Scripture ; I
Scripture - Scripture . The word ‘Scripture’ (Lat. scriptura , ‘a writing,’ ‘something written’) is used for the Bible as a whole, more often in the plural form ‘Scriptures,’ and also more properly for a passage of the Bible. The specific idea of Scripture contains an element of sanctity and authority. Thus it becomes usual to refer to Holy Scripture, or the Holy Scriptures ( en graphais hagiais , Romans 1:2 ). This specific conception of Scripture as distinguished from ordinary writing is due to the reception of it as a record of the word of God, and is therefore associated with inspiration. Since this book is now known to have been Deuteronomy or part of it, we must reckon that this was the first book treated as Scripture. The special function of the scribes in guarding and teaching the Law rested on this Scriptural character attached to it, and in turn rendered it the more venerable as Scripture. Later the reception of the Hagiographa and the Prophets into the Canon led to those collections being regarded also as Scripture, though never with quite the authority attached to the Law. ...
The Rabbis cherished great veneration for Scripture, and ascribed to it a mechanical inspiration which extended to every word and letter. ...
Unlike the Jerusalem Rabbis, in this respect followed by most of the NT writers, who quote the various OT authors by name, Philo quotes Scripture as the immediate word of God, and in so doing is followed by the author of Hebrews. Thus it always conveys the thought that Scripture, although it was written long ago, does not belong to the past, but is in existence to-day, and its inherent present authority is thus emphasized as that of a law now in force. No NT writings during the Apostolic age are treated as Scripture a title, with its associated authority, always reserved by the Apostles for the OT. There is an apparent exception in 2 Peter 3:15-16 , where the Epistles of ‘our beloved brother Paul’ are associated with ‘the other Scriptures’; but this is a strong argument in favour of assigning 2Peter to a late period in the second century. ’ Thus the authority of Christ’s words leads to the record of them being cited as Scripture. 1) we have the title ‘Scripture’ applied to the source of a NT quotation, but only in the Latin tr. 4 a saying of Christ is cited as Scripture. But, apart from these rare instances, no writer previous to the second half of the second century appeals to the NT as technically Scripture. Irenæus (180), on the other hand, constantly treats NT passages as the word of God and authoritative Scripture
Ariel - the capital city of Moab, frequently mentioned in Scripture, Ezra 8:16
Hermeneutically - ) According to the principles of interpretation; as, a verse of Scripture was examined hermeneutically
Sapiential Books - (Latin: sapientia, wisdom) ...
The books of the Scripture which teach wisdom: ...
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Wisdom
Ecclesiasticus
Sacred Scripture - The word Scripture, which means writing, is derived from the Latin scriptura, and has grapha and mikra for its Greek and Hebrew equivalents. In the Old Testament, Scripture is used in the general sense of writing (Exodus 32; 2Para. 36), though at times it denotes a private (Tobit 8) or public (1 Esdras 2; 2 Esdras 7) written document, a catalogue, or index (Psalms 86), or, finally, portions of the Scriptures (Sirach 14). The Apostles and their disciples called the Old Testament simply "the Scripture" (Luke 4; John 2), or "the Scriptures" (Matthew 21; Luke 24; Acts 17); or, referring to its divine origin "the Holy Scriptures" (Romans 1), and "the Sacred Letters" (2 Timothy 3). These terms, however, were not confined to the Old Testament exclusively, for we find that Saint Peter extends the designation "Scripture" to the Pauline espistles (2 Peter 3), and that Paul himself seemingly refers by the same expression (1 Timothy 5) to both Deuteronomy 25:4 and Luke 10:7. It was undoubtedly because the Apostles themselves employed these and cognate expressions to designate the writings of the Old and New Testaments that the term "Sacred Scripture" gained so wide a currency in the early Church
Scripture, Sacred - The word Scripture, which means writing, is derived from the Latin scriptura, and has grapha and mikra for its Greek and Hebrew equivalents. In the Old Testament, Scripture is used in the general sense of writing (Exodus 32; 2Para. 36), though at times it denotes a private (Tobit 8) or public (1 Esdras 2; 2 Esdras 7) written document, a catalogue, or index (Psalms 86), or, finally, portions of the Scriptures (Sirach 14). The Apostles and their disciples called the Old Testament simply "the Scripture" (Luke 4; John 2), or "the Scriptures" (Matthew 21; Luke 24; Acts 17); or, referring to its divine origin "the Holy Scriptures" (Romans 1), and "the Sacred Letters" (2 Timothy 3). These terms, however, were not confined to the Old Testament exclusively, for we find that Saint Peter extends the designation "Scripture" to the Pauline espistles (2 Peter 3), and that Paul himself seemingly refers by the same expression (1 Timothy 5) to both Deuteronomy 25:4 and Luke 10:7. It was undoubtedly because the Apostles themselves employed these and cognate expressions to designate the writings of the Old and New Testaments that the term "Sacred Scripture" gained so wide a currency in the early Church
Derush - "exposition"); the non-literal, homiletic interpretation of Scripture, as in the Midrash or Talmudic aggadot...
Mishna - ) A collection or digest of Jewish traditions and explanations of Scripture, forming the text of the Talmud
Adulterous - In Scripture, idolatrous, very wicked
Tertius - This man hath honourable mention made of him in Scripture, from his services to the Apostle Paul
Silversmith - Only referred to in Scripture as those who formed the silver representations of the temple at Ephesus
Matthias - This selection was regarded as necessary to fulfill Scripture concerning the band of apostles (Psalm 69:25 ; Acts 1:20 ). Scripture mentions nothing further about Matthias
Bibliomancy - ) A kind of divination, performed by selecting passages of Scripture at hazard, and drawing from them indications concerning future events
Lewdness - In Scripture, it generally denotes idolatry
Distil, to - Used in Scripture only with reference to the dew or rain which 'drops' in minute particles
Lection - of Scripture, read in divine service
Porcius Festus - His name is only rendered memorable in Scripture from the history of the apostle Paul
Deposit of Faith - The source or fount of revealed truths, namely, Scripture and Tradition, which must be accepted by all true Christians on the authority of God
Christian Evidences - Time-honored name for advanced courses in Christian doctrine, giving proofs from Scripture, tradition, history, and reason of the truth of the Christian religion
Antiphon, Communion - A verse of Holy Scripture or other text, sung by the choir and recited by the priest, after the Communion and ablutions at Mass
Protocanonical - ) Of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; - opposed to deutero-canonical
Evidences, Christian - Time-honored name for advanced courses in Christian doctrine, giving proofs from Scripture, tradition, history, and reason of the truth of the Christian religion
Potter - Potter, Jeremiah 18:2; Lamentations 4:2, and pottery are frequently alluded to in Scripture, showing that the art was known at an early period
Road - This word is never used in Scripture in the sense of a way or path
Holy Writ - (Anglo-Saxon: hang, holy; Old English: writan, to write) ...
One of the titles of the Bible; the more English equivalent of the expression Sacred Scripture
Nun - An Ephraimite, father of Joshua, and referred to in Scripture only to distinguish his son, who succeeded Moses
Melita - MALTA, MELITA...
An island in the Mediterranean sea, rendered memorable in Scripture from Paul's landing there, (Acts 28:1, etc
Writ, Holy - (Anglo-Saxon: hang, holy; Old English: writan, to write) ...
One of the titles of the Bible; the more English equivalent of the expression Sacred Scripture
Italy - It is only incidentally mentioned in Scripture
Ptolemy - This name of the later Egyptian kings does not occur in Scripture, though the acts of the Ptolemies are prophesied of in Daniel
Exegesis - ) Exposition; explanation; especially, a critical explanation of a text or portion of Scripture
Bithynia - A rich Roman province of Asia Minor, on the Black Sea; named only twice in Scripture
Nachon - Mention is made of this man but once in the Scripture; namely, 2 Samuel 6:1-23
Literalize - ) To make literal; to interpret or put in practice according to the strict meaning of the words; - opposed to spiritualize; as, to literalize Scripture
Tower - Watch-towers or fortified posts in frontier or exposed situations are mentioned in Scripture, as the tower of Edar, etc. (2 Samuel 8:6 ) Besides these military structures, we read in Scripture of towers built in vineyards as an almost necessary appendage to them
Eve - (life ), the name given in Scripture to the first woman. The Scripture account of Eve closes with the birth of Seth
Hornet - In Scripture the hornet is referred to only by the means which Jehovah employed for the extirpation of the Canaanites. (It is said that the Phaselitae, a Phoenician people, were driven from their locality by hornets; and other examples are given in Paxton's "Illustrations of Scripture," 1:303
Tapestry - The Hebrew word occurs nowhere else in Scripture
Judgment, Private - ,the claim that every man is competent to settle for himself the meaning of Scripture with regard to matters of faith and morals. Against this the teachings of the Council of Trent declared, and the Vatican Council reaffirmed, that "that is to be regarded as the true sense of the Sacred Scriptures, which Holy Mother Church has held and holds, and no one may interpret that Holy Scripture contrary to that sense. " Against the claim of private judgment the Church holds that since she, under the guidance of the Holy Ghost, settled the canon of Scripture, and since the Scriptures are committed to her charge, she is the only lawful interpreter of them
Tropist - ) One who deals in tropes; specifically, one who avoids the literal sense of the language of Scripture by explaining it as mere tropes and figures of speech
Kish - There were several of this name in Scripture
Leviathan - , and mentioned in other passages of Scripture
Flea, - an insect but twice mentioned in Scripture, viz
Pharaoh, the Wife of - The wife of one Pharaoh, the king who received Hadad the Edomite, is mentioned in Scripture
Gradual - A portion of Scripture formerly sung after the Epistlefor the Day, from the steps of the Pulpit or Altar, and hence calledGradual, from the Latin gradus, meaning a step
Pagnino, Bantes - Taught the Oriental languages, and wrote numerous works treating of Sacred Scripture, Greek, and Hebrew
Pagnino, Xantes - Taught the Oriental languages, and wrote numerous works treating of Sacred Scripture, Greek, and Hebrew
Water of Jealousy - A phrase employed (not, however, in Scripture) to denote the water used in the solemn ordeal prescribed by the law of Moses (Numbers 5:11-31 ) in cases of "jealousy
Fork - Two types of forks are mentioned in Scripture, an implement used in the sacrificial cult (See Fleshhook) and a farm tool used to winnow grain (See Fanro)
Embalming - This specifically Egyptian (non-Israelitish) method of treating dead bodies is mentioned in Scripture only in the cases of Jacob and Joseph ( Genesis 50:2 f
Surname - In Scripture this means an additional or added name, not a family name, as the word now implies
Vagabond - A term not used opprobriously in Scripture, but as signifying a 'wanderer': from the Latin vagabundus
Lecturn - ) A choir desk, or reading desk, in some churches, from which the lections, or Scripture lessons, are chanted or read; hence, a reading desk
Bantes Pagnino - Taught the Oriental languages, and wrote numerous works treating of Sacred Scripture, Greek, and Hebrew
Joel - The prophet, whose writings form part of the sacred canon of Scripture, and are quoted by Peter in his sermon on the day of Pentecost. ) There were several Joels beside the prophet, whose names are recorded in Scripture
Micah - There were many of this name in Scripture. He is one of what is called the lesser prophets; and his prophecy forms a part of the sacred Canon of Scripture
Coast - A term in Scripture signifying any 'border,' inland as well as near the sea, it also may imply large districts
Mattan - There was another of this name in Scripture, 2 Kings 11:18
Cockle - ” It appears in Scripture only at Job 31:40 , and is identified as Lolium temulentum
Postillate - ) To preach by expounding Scripture verse by verse, in regular order
Simeon - We meet with this name often in Scripture
Reins - In Scripture, the inward parts the heart, or seat of the affections and passions
Bible, Authority of the - This is the theological context for the question of the authority of the Bible, because as God's written ("inscripturated") revelation its authority is the authority of God; for what Scripture says, God says. What is at stake in the authority of Holy Scripture is the authority of its divine author. And, in light of the fact that every doctrine believed by the church is in turn authorized by appeal to Holy Scripture (theological proposals are grounded "according to the Scriptures, " in the words of the creed), it is no exaggeration to say that the entire structure of Christian theology stands or falls by the authority of Scripture, the major premise for every theological statement that would claim the allegiance of the canonical community that is the church of Jesus Christ. This is still widely admitted in contemporary theological discussion, both implicitly (for every theologian, orthodox or not, quotes Scripture to bolster theological argument), and sometimes in so many words. As we shall shortly be reminded, what we find in Holy Scripture is not some bald claim to raw authority but a collation of many testimonies on behalf of Holy Scripture as a book. Third, the chief ground of the believer's and the church's confidence in the authority of Holy Scripture lies in the internal testimony of the Holy Spirit in the heart of the Christian. That is to say, though the Scripture seems to be self-attesting, it is the divine author of Scripture, the Holy Spirit of God, who inspired the writing of that same Scripture, who is its final witness. He assures the believer that this canonical Scripture is verily the word of God written. ...
Yet the authority of Scripture is also a biblical doctrine like any other. Perhaps the most striking, if often least noticed, testimony is the sustained interweaving of the direct speech of God in the text of the canonical Scriptures of the Old and New Testament. While serving as chief illustration and paradigm of revelation, the direct speech of the Creator-Redeemer resonates throughout the Scriptures and imparts its own stamp of authority to those books in which it is found. ...
Of course, it is possible to conclude that such claims to divine authority in particular portions of Holy Scripture need not extend to the whole. A general regard for the trustworthiness of Scripture is all that is needed to sustain the divine authority of sayings placed in the mouth of God. Indeed, is not the implication of "Thus says the Lord" that those other sayings recorded by the prophet fall short of divine authority? Should not the quoted speech of Jesus of Nazareth be taken to have an authority to which the letters of Saul of Tarsus could never aspire?...
As it happens, the Scriptures themselves tell another story. In John 10:34 we read that Jesus said "The Scripture cannot be broken. " And the implication is strong: that what Scripture says, God says, whether Scripture places it in the divine speech or as narration and commentary. ...
The second thread of internal testimony within Scripture may be traced through apostolic use of other canonical books. In 2 Peter 3:15-16 we find this principle carried through into the New Testament Scriptures themselves, as the writings of the apostle Paul are placed on a level with Holy Scripture: "Bear in mind that our Lord's patience means salvation, just as our dear brother Paul also wrote to you with the wisdom that God gave him. His letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures, to their own destruction. "...
The Use of Scripture in the Church The central place of Holy Scripture in the life and history of the church in every age offers telling evidence of its authority. But we note the authority which Scripture has, from the start, exercised in all the churches, as believers in the first century and the twentieth have done homage to the written Word of God as rule for their minds, their hearts, and their lives. Here we unite the devotional and doctrinal use of Scripture, its place in preaching, private reading, the great doctrinal controversies, and the anguish of the believer persecuted or bereft who turns to the Word of God for comfort from God himself. It is through Scripture that God has ruled the mind and heart of the church and the Christian. ...
The Testimony of the Holy Spirit Central to Christian confidence in the authority of Scripture lies the conviction that behind every argument and experience that lead the believer to trust the Bible there is another witness to be discerned; that of God the Holy Spirit, himself inspirer and interpreter of Scripture, as he testifies to that Word of God. So it is in God only that Scripture can be attested. Yet one implication of this wide assumption that theology should be done "according to the Scriptures" is that the tail comes to wag the dog; because it is necessary to justify theological proposals with reference to Scripture, persons of all theological persuasions seek to find some way to connect their conclusions, on whatever ground they may have been reached, with Scripture. The task of contextualizing the teaching of Holy Scripture in the cultures of every century has demanded the best scholars and exegetes at the disposal of the church. The Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy is widely accepted as a consensus statement of the biblical position, and begins with an affirmation that "recognition of the total truth and trustworthiness of Holy Scripture is essential to a full grasp and adequate confession of its authority. " That is to say, acknowledgment of the authority of Holy Scripture is no mere pRom forma indication of respect, but involves confidence in its inerrancy. "The following Statement affirms this inerrancy of Scripture afresh, making clear our understanding of it and warning against its denial. " The heart of the confession that follows is found in this paragraph: "Holy Scripture, being God's own Word, written by men prepared and superintended by His Spirit, is of infallible divine authority in all matters upon which it touches: it is to be believed, as God's instruction, in all that it affirms; obeyed, as God's command, in all that it requires; embraced, as God's pledge, in all that it promises
Johann Franzelin - His treatise on Divine Tradition and Scripture is considered a classic
Franzelin, Johann Baptist - His treatise on Divine Tradition and Scripture is considered a classic
Maaseiah - There are several of this name in Scripture
Scripture - a term most commonly used to denote the writings of the Old and New Testament, which are sometimes called The Scriptures, sometimes the sacred or holy writings, and sometimes canonical Scripture
Measure - Tables of Scripture measures of length and capacity are found at the end of this volume
Week - In Scripture, a prophetic week, is a week of years, or seven years
Scriptures - ) Appropriated in the Bible to the sacred writings (2 Kings 22:13; Psalms 40:7; 2 Timothy 3:15-16, "the Scripture of truth"; Daniel 10:21; Ezra 6:18). The Hebrew, however, substituted mikra , "what is read," for kethubim , which is applied to one division of Scripture, the hagiographa (Nehemiah 8:8). Ezekiel 14:4 "all Scripture (pasa grafee ; every portion of "the Holy Scripture") is God-inspired (not only the Old Testament, in which Timothy was taught when a child, compare Romans 16:26, but the New Testament according as its books were written by inspired men, and recognized by men having "discerning of spirits", 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 14:37), and (therefore) profitable," etc. ...
The position of the "Greek adjectives", theopneustos kai ofelimos , inseparably connected, forbids making one a predicate the other an epithet, "every Scripture given by inspiration of God is also profitable," as Eilicott translated In 2 Peter 1:20-21, explain "no prophecy of Scripture proves to be (ginetai ) of private (an individual writer's uninspired) interpretation," i
Meshullam - There were several of this name in Scripture
Obed - We meet with two of this name in Scripture, Obed the father of Jesse, Ruth 4:17—and Obed the father of Jehu, 1 Chronicles 2:37
Algum - In Scripture, a tree or wood about which the learned are not agreed. The almug, almugim, or algumin, or simply gummin is most probably a gummy wood, and perhaps may be the Shittim, often mentioned in Scripture
uz, the Land of - It is mentioned in Scripture only in these three passages
Curse - In Scripture language it signifies the just and lawful sentence of God's law, condemning sinners to suffer the full punishment of their sin, Galatians 3:10
Ebed-Melech - This man is spoken of with honourable testimony in Scripture, for his service to the prophet Jeremiah
Apocrypha - The name given to those Books which were attached to the MSS copies of the LXX, but which do not form a part of the canon of Scripture. The term itself signifies, 'hidden,' 'secret,' 'occult;' and, as to any pretence of being a part of Scripture, they must be described as 'spurious. 1546, professing to be guided by the Holy Spirit, declared the Apocrypha to be a part of the Holy Scripture. , not regarded by any one as a part of Scripture. The Jews did not receive the Apocrypha as any part of Scripture, and to 'them were committed the oracles of God. The internal evidences of the human authorship of the Apocrypha ought to convince any Christian that it can form no part of holy Scripture. ...
Expressions of the writers themselves show that they had no thought of their books being taken for Scripture. The value of holy Scripture as the fountain of truth is such that anything that might in any way contaminate that spring should be refused with decision and scorn. Nor can it be granted that we need the judgement of the church, could a universal judgement be arrived at, as to what is to be regarded as the canon of Scripture
Arrow - This word is not unfrequently used in Scripture to denote divine judgments, and terrors in the soul from the arrow of the Lord
Maacah - (See 2 Samuel 10:6) There are several persons called by this name in Scripture
Nebat - He is mentioned in Scripture only to distinguish his son, there being two kings named Jeroboam
Reins - The Hebrews often make the reins the seat of the affections, and ascribe to them knowledge, joy, pain, pleasure; hence in Scripture it is said that God searches the heart and tries the reins
Laver - A vessel for washing a large basin in Scripture history, a basin placed in the court of the Jewish tabernacle, where the officiating priests washed their hands and feet and the entrails of victims
Overseer - Used in Scripture for any one that had the oversight or leadership of others
Penuel - There are two persons of this name in Scripture, namely, the son of Hur, (1 Chronicles 4:4) and Penuel, the son of Shashak, (1 Chronicles 8:25)...
Scripture - ), primarily denotes "a drawing, painting;" then "a writing," (a) of the OT Scriptures, (1) in the plural, the whole, e. , "prophetic writings," expressing the character of all the Scriptures; (2) in the singular in reference to a particular passage, e. , Mark 12:10 ; Luke 4:21 ; John 2:22 ; 10:35 (though applicable to all); 19:24,28,36,37; 20:9; Acts 1:16 ; 8:32,35 ; Romans 4:3 ; 9:17 ; 10:11 ; 11:2 ; Galatians 3:8,22 ; 4:30 ; 1 Timothy 5:18 , where the 2nd quotation is from Luke 10:7 , from which it may be inferred that the Apostle included Luke's Gospel as "Scripture" alike with Deuteronomy, from which the first quotation is taken; in reference to the whole, e. , James 4:5 (see RV , a separate rhetorical question from the one which follows); in 2 Peter 1:20 , "no prophecy of Scripture," a description of all, with special application to the OT in the next verse; (b) of the OT Scriptures (those accepted by the Jews as canonical) and all those of the NT which were to be accepted by Christians as authoritative, 2 Timothy 3:16 ; these latter were to be discriminated from the many forged epistles and other religious "writings" already produced and circulated in Timothy's time. Such discrimination would be directed by the fact that "every Scripture," characterized by inspiration of God, would be profitable for the purposes mentioned; so the RV. The AV states truth concerning the completed Canon of Scripture, but that was not complete when the Apostle wrote to Timothy. ...
The Scriptures are frequently personified by the NT writers (as by the Jews, John 7:42 ), (a) as speaking with Divine authority, e. , John 19:37 ; Romans 4:3 ; 9:17 , where the Scripture is said to speak to Pharaoh, giving the message actually sent previously by God to him through Moses; James 4:5 (see above); (b) as possessed of the sentient quality of foresight, and the active power of preaching. Galatians 3:8 , where the Scripture mentioned was written more than four centuries after the words were spoken. The Scripture, in such a case, stands for its Divine Author with an intimation that it remains perpetually characterized as the living voice of God. is used of the Holy Scriptures in 2 Timothy 3:15
Baca - We meet with this word but once in Scripture, and that is in the book of Psalms, (Psalms 84:6) The meaning of it seems to be weeping; though some consider it as referring to the mulberry tree
Omega - Hence in Scripture, Alpha and Omega denotes the first and last, the beginning and the ending
Religion, Religious - This is applied in Scripture to...
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Proportion of Faith - In post-Reformation times this phrase was used as meaning that all Scripture was to be interpreted with reference to all other Scripture, i
Blot Out - This expression is used in Scripture both in a way of mercy and of judgment. (Isaiah 42:25; Isa 44:22) In other parts of Scripture, blotting out is spoken of as an awful judgment
Jasper, - a precious stone frequently noticed in Scripture. (Revelation 21:19 ) The characteristics of the stone as far as they are specified in Scripture, (Revelation 21:11 ) are that it "was most precious," and "like crystal;" we may also infer from (Revelation 4:3 ) that it was a stone of brilliant and transparent light
Science - Scripture describes Daniel's knowledge with admiration and approval but warns against meaningless debate of issues for the sake of human pride not leading to useful knowledge
Prophecy - ) Public interpretation of Scripture; preaching; exhortation or instruction
Altar in Scripture - Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e
Cessationism - ) ceased with the closing of the Canon of Scripture and/or the death of the last apostle
Scripture, Altar in - Many altars are mentioned in Scripture, e
Dogmatic Theology - Concerns itself with the truths which come from God, explaining them, tracing them to Scripture and tradition, answering difficulties, and objections brought against them, and pointing out how they fit in with our rational knowledge and spiritual life
Beth-Arbel - House of God's court, a place alluded to by (Hosea 10:14 ) as the scene of some great military exploit, but not otherwise mentioned in Scripture
Elephant - Not found in Scripture except indirectly in the original Greek word (elephantinos) translated "of ivory" in Revelation 18:12 , and in the Hebrew word (shenhabim, meaning "elephant's tooth") rendered "ivory" in 1 Kings 10:22 and 2 Chronicles 9:21
Ranters - With regard to the church, Scripture, Ministry, &c
Pine Tree - This tree is spoken of in Scripture by the Lord himself, as one of the trees which the Lord would take to beautify his sanctuary, (Isaiah 60:13) No doubt, it is figuratively spoken in allusion to believers
Shechinah, Shekinah - A name not found in Scripture, but used by the Rabbis and others for the visible symbol of the presence of God, as was seen at the dedication of the temple built by Solomon, and at the Transfiguration
Theology, Dogmatic - Concerns itself with the truths which come from God, explaining them, tracing them to Scripture and tradition, answering difficulties, and objections brought against them, and pointing out how they fit in with our rational knowledge and spiritual life
Lamentation - In the plural, a book of Scripture, containing the lamentations of Jeremiah
Mna'Son - (remembering ) is honorably mentioned in Scripture
de'Havites, - mentioned only once in Scripture, (Ezra 4:9 ) among the colonists planted in Samaria after the completion of the captivity of Israel
Pedaiah - (2 Kings 23:36) We have several of this name in the Scripture: the son of Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:18
Prayer - All the noted saints of Scripture were mighty in prayer; but there is no mention of special prayer before the flood
Rehum - We meet with two of this name in Scripture, one a Levite, son of Beri, who returned from Babylon with the captives, Ezra 2:2—and another Rehum, the chancellor
Anthropomorphites - A sect of ancient heretics, who, taking every thing spoken of God in the Scripture in a literal sense, particularly that passage of Genesis in which it is said, "God made man after his own image, " maintained that God had a human shape
Caiaphas - A name and person, memorable in Scripture from being overruled by God the Ho1y Ghost to deliver a prophecy the very reverse of his own wishes, and like another Balaam, to pronounce good when he intended evil
Egypt - A well known kingdom in Scripture history, from whence the church, under the Lord, made their first Exodus
Barachias - We meet with several of this name in Scripture
Mystify - ) To involve in mystery; to make obscure or difficult to understand; as, to mystify a passage of Scripture
Potter - Frequent mention is made of the potter in Scripture, Jeremiah 18:3 ; Sir_38:29-30
Naamah - There are two of this name in Scripture
Nemuel - There are two of this name in Scripture, one the son of Eliab, (Numbers 26:9) and another the son of Simeon, (Numbers 26:12) It is compounded of Nun, sleep—and El, God-the sleep which God gives
Firmament - In Scripture the Hebrew word denotes an expanse, a wide extent; the great arch or expanse over our heads, in which are placed the atmosphere and the clouds, and in which the stars appear to be placed, and are really seen
Seven - We read in Scripture of seven years of plenty, and seven years of famine, seven trumpets, seven seals, seven vials, &c
Allegory - Scripture histories represent or embody spiritual principles, and these are ascertained, not by the play of the imagination, but by the rightful application of the doctrines of Scripture
Footstool - A figurative expression in Scripture to denote the humiliation of the enemies of Christ (Psalms 109), and therefore emblematic of His Kingdom
Grain - The Hebrews sowed only wheat, barley, and spelt; rye and oats are not mentioned in Scripture
Mary, Psalter of - A work composed by Saint Bonaventure applying the sentiments of the psalms and other canticles of Sacred Scripture to the Blessed Virgin
Lawyer - This term in Scripture does not belong so much to the legal as to the religious sphere
Expound - ) To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle
Gradual - It ordinarily accentuates something in the Epistle, and is taken, except in rare cases, from Scripture, mostly from the Psalms
Armour - In Scripture terms, this word is for the most part used spiritually, meaning that divine strength is to be our armour against all opposition, and under all human weakness
Ethiopia - One of the great kingdoms in Africa, sometimes called Cush in Scripture, from Cush, blackness
Nettles - These are mentioned in Scripture as a sign that a place was deserted and given up to desolation
Cedar - The latter is that which is mentioned in Scripture
Leanness - In Scripture, want of grace and spiritual comfort
Scornful - In Scripture, holding religion in contempt treating with disdain religion and the dispensations of God
Shamgar - Scripture only says he defended Israel, and killed six hundred Philistines with an ox-goad
Whoredom - In Scripture, idolatry the desertion of the worship of the true God, for the worship of idols
Nero - He is repeatedly alluded to in Scripture (Acts 25:11 ; Philippians 1:12,13 ; 4:22 )
Essenes - They are not directly mentioned in Scripture, although they may be referred to in Matthew 19:11,12 , Colossians 2:8,18,23
Cabbala - A Hebrew word, signifying tradition: it is used for a mysterious kind of science pretended to have been delivered by revelation to the ancient Jews, and transmitted by oral tradition to those of our times; serving for interpretation of the books both of nature and Scripture
Baptism Metaphorical - In Scripture the term Baptism is used as referring to the work of the Spirit on the heart, Matthew 3:11 ; also to the sufferings of Christ, Matthew 20:22 ; and to so much of the Gospel as John the Baptist taught his disciples, Acts 18:25
Charity - The outward benefaction, or alms, is a mere manifestation of the inward and true charity of Scripture (1 Corinthians 13:3): "Though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor,
Jasher, Book of - There are several writings extant bearing the above title, but neither of them have any connection with the one alluded to in Scripture
Laban - The Syrian, son of Bethuel, brother to Rebekah, and father to Rachel, whose history forms so interesting a page in Scripture from his connection with Jacob
Zedekiah - There are several of this name in Scripture; and it is no wonder, being a compound of Zedek, justice—and Jah, Lord
Expound - To explain to lay open the meaning to clear of obscurity to interpret as, to expound a text of Scripture to expound a law
Vulgate - ) Of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or the old Latin version of the Scriptures. ) An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; - so called from its common use in the Latin Church
Seed - A word commonly used in Sacred Scripture for family; race; posterity; offspring
Sackcloth - This word is chiefly used in Scripture to denote a cloth or garment worn in mourning, distress or mortification
Ehud - He slew Eglon king of Moab, and, according to Josephus, which is confirmed in Scripture, he became judge of Israel
Heaven - ...
Scripture implies three heavens, since "the third heaven" is revealed to exist (2 Corinthians 12:2). Scripture does not describe specifically the first and second heaven
Abijah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture: and it is not to be wondered at; for it is a very blessed one, compounded of Ab, Father, JAH, Lord, and I, my. ) For the several persons in Scripture, called Abijah, I refer to the several chapters (1 Kings 14:1; 1 Chronicles 24:10; 2 Chronicles 29:1; Nehemiah 10:7
New - Term frequently occurring in Holy Scripture to signify the change of heart from infidelity to faith, from sin to virtue
Scribe - This word has different significations in Scripture
Laodicea - A city rendered famous from its connection with Scripture history
Shalmanezer - King of Assyria, whose name would, most probably never have reached the present day, but from his connection with Scripture history
Adiaphora - Teachings and practices that are neither commanded nor forbidden in Scripture
Tetrarch - In Scripture, however, it is applied to any one who governed a province of the Roman empire, whatever portion of the territory might be within his jurisdiction
Omri - There were several of this name in Scripture
Phylacteries - It should seem that the Jews had a superstition, that by wearing certain amulets or borders with words of Scripture upon them, they would act like so many charms, and preserve them from danger. The Jews, it is said by some, justified this from what was commanded in Scripture. It should rather seem, therefore, that that natural proneness the children of Israel had to imitate their idolatrous neighbours, tempted them to do as the heathen did, whose superstition is well known to have been of this kind; though Israel in the midst of their using charms like them, still had respect to words of Scripture
Bible, History of Interpretation - The fact is that in some periods of Christian history people actually found as many as seven entirely different meanings in a given passage of Scripture. In addition to the obvious, simple, literal meaning of a passage, which Origen believed was only for the simple believer, Origen found a hidden or deeper meaning embedded in the words of Scripture. Origen made extensive use of allegorical interpretation to derive this deeper, preferred meaning of Scripture. This allowed Origen to import his underlying philosophical position into the Scriptures, as though this was the message of God to us. Today, this would seem to be the obvious way that Scripture should be interpreted, but that was not the general opinion in the ancient world. Not until the time of the Reformation (1517) did this kind of biblical interpretation become the dominant approach to the Scripture. ...
In the Middle Ages (500-1500), Origen's allegorical approach to the interpretation of Scripture was the accepted pattern. A fourfold meaning was usually sought in Scripture: the literal-historical, for the simple believer; the allegorical, which supplies a deeper meaning for faith; the moral, which guides conduct; and the anagogical, a mystical interpretation which points towards the ultimate goal of the Christian in his pilgrimage. One of Luther's cardinal principles was “sola scriptura,” only by Scripture, or Scripture alone. Luther and other Reformers insisted on the perspicuity of Scripture—Scripture is clear enough that the ordinary believer can read and understand it by observing the grammatical and historical elements of the text. Calvin insisted (in the preface to his commentary on Romans) “It is the first business of an interpreter say what he [1] does, instead of attributing to him what we think he ought to say. This was the analysis of all of the available biblical manuscripts, comparing the variant readings, and making an informed judgment as to what the original text of the Scriptures really was. Much effort was expended on determining who the original writer of a portion of Scripture was and learning what the historical-cultural conditions of his setting were. With this type of interpretation, more attention is given to historical considerations than merely clarifying the historical context in which a passage of Scripture is set. Thus, by definition, miracles could not be explained on the basis of an act of God who reaches into history; some natural explanation had to be found for what appears in the Scripture record as a miracle. In this type of biblical interpretation, parallels are sought between what is found in Scripture and what is found in the development of other systems of religion
Revelation, Idea of - And the pattern established in the opening chapters of Scripture is repeated, with a dramatic range of variation, right through to the Book of Revelation. Such a reflection helps anchor our understanding and use of Scripture in the religious veneration and doctrinal authority of the Bible books in their original communities, which reaches its remarkable climax in the use made of the Old Testament Scriptures by Jesus himself, which set the pattern for the Christian understanding of both Old and New Testaments. These factors together provide an anchor for the use of Scripture as a source for a doctrine of Scripture, in just the way in which Scripture is universally employed in the church as the source of every other doctrine. To recognize Holy Scripture as the chief locus of that revelation is not to deny that there is also revelation elsewhere. Christians have customarily seen general revelation in creation and in conscience, distinguished from special, saving revelation in word (Holy Scripture), history (the "acts of God"), and the Person of Jesus Christ (incarnation). Evangelicals have sought to maintain a balance, tied firmly to the teaching of Scripture itself. They have welcomed the fresh stress on the revelatory significance of the Acts of God recorded in Scripture, though recoiled from the suggestion that such a historical focus to revelation should somehow be accessed in any other way than through Holy Scripturein which the revelatory speech of God himself records and interprets these events. And they have professed themselves uncomprehending of the accusation that their high view of Holy Scripture somehow demeans or undermines the personal revelation of God himself in the incarnate Jesus Christnot least because that historical person is mediated to us in Holy Scripture and presented as one who himself believes in the revelatory character of the Old Testament Scriptures. It is in the fact of his teaching that we find the analogical connection between incarnation and inscripturationthe Word made flesh, and the word of Scripture. The whole of Scripture testifies to Jesus himself, in prospect, in record, and in retrospect. ...
Part of the reason why evangelicals have resisted moves to emphasize other loci of revelation at the expense of Scripture is a recognition of the role of Scripture as the control on our theological formulation, as the definitive source for our knowledge of God, as the record and interpreter of the biblical history, and as the depository of the teaching of the living Jesus Christ. In so far as he does reveal himself he becomes accessible to us, whether in the shadowy and outline form of general revelation"his eternal power and deity" ( Psalm 19 ; Romans 1 )or in the particularity and detail of the special revelation in history, in Scripture, in Jesus Christ. Of the sources of revelation we have discussed, it is Scripture that offers us the opportunity for sustained study of its subject; its author. ...
Moreover, those who seek to claim the authority of Scripture in some lesser fashion undermine their own position. For every appeal to Holy Scripture as a source of theological authority entails the general authority of the whole; that this massive collection of texts is in fact one single, highly complex text, the work of the one Holy Spirit of God. Divine speech plays a central role in Scripture, both in the texts themselves and in the history to which they witness. ...
Though Scripture itself testifies that there are other forms employed to accomplish the revelation of God, the direct divine speech is both chief among them and paradigm for them all. And they encourage us to examine Scripture for the wealth of evidence of God's speaking, where several kinds of divine speech become evident. His lengthy interviews with God are followed by the giving of the law, the most sustained and formal example of the divine speech in Holy Scripture which offers usin the Ten Commandments, but also in the whole of the extensive Mosaic legislationthe paradigm of divine speech issuing in divine writingof, precisely, inscripturation. Indeed, we could go further: Our understanding of the inspiration of Holy Scripture is signally illumined by the phenomenon of the speaking God taking flesh and, therefore, actual vocal cords. Here we find the key to the incarnational analogy of the Word made flesh and the word made Scripture. But they help explain the centrality of the tradition of the Christian God as the speaking God, and that understanding of Holy Scripture as the deposit of his spoken revelation. And they underline the role of Holy Scripture, above all, in the theological formulation of the church, offering explicit and coherent resolution to the (still) widespread though haphazard use of Scripture to authorize theological proposals in many streams of contemporary theology. If it is the task of evangelical theology to understand God in accordance with his own nature, as he has revealed himselfjust as it was the duty of the ancient Hebrews to order their worship of God in accordance with his revelation through Mosesthen evangelical theology will be done "according to the Scriptures
Nicholas of Lyra - His "Postillae," in which he emphasizes the literal sense of Sacred Scripture, has placed him in the foremost rank of biblical scholars
Nakedness - To uncover nakedness, in Scripture, is to have incestuous or unlawful commerce with a female
Mite - In Scripture, a small piece of money, the quarter of a denarius, or about seven English farthings
Magicians - In Scripture language, the word means a pretender to curious arts
Cuckoo, - Only named in Scripture as an unclean bird not to be eaten
Snow - This is taken in Scripture as a symbol of 'whiteness
Concision - Hence, In Scripture, the Jews or those who adhered to circumcision, which, after our Saviors death, was no longer a seal of the covenant, but a mere cutting of the flesh
Harlot - In Scripture, one who forsakes the true God and worships idols
Accursed - In Scripture language, this means, being separated from, and under the curse of God
Bartholomew - And in confirmation of this, it is remarkable, that where the one name is mentioned in Scripture the other is not
Belly - is used in Scripture for gluttony, Titus 1:12 ; Php_3:16 ; Romans 16:18
Chittim - The country, or countries, implied by this name in Scripture, are variously interpreted by historians and commentators
Sermon - (Latin: sermo, speech) ...
A formal discourse of a sacred character, as opposed to homilies (informal explanations of Scripture) and instructions (catechetical teachings)
Lamb - The Lamb of God, in Scripture, the Savior Jesus Christ, who was typified by the paschal lamb
Ross, School of - Founded by Saint Fachtna, and famous for its study of Sacred Scripture and its liberal education
School of Ross - Founded by Saint Fachtna, and famous for its study of Sacred Scripture and its liberal education
Tribulation - In Scripture, it often denotes the troubles and distresses which proceed from persecution
Bibliomancy - It consisted in taking passages of Scripture at hazard, and drawing indications thence concerning things future. It certainly is not the way to know the mind of God by choosing detached parts of Scripture, or by drawing a card on which a passage may be written, the sense of which is to be gathered only from the context
Symbols - Scripture abounds with symbols, some parts containing far more than others. In reading Scripture, it is necessary to follow carefully the general use of such and such a symbol, throughout the inspired oracles
Play - We should not have needed any attention to this word, had the general acceptation of it in Scripture been similar to the received opinion of it among men. By play we understand pastime, or sport, or diversions; but this is not always the case in Scripture language. " But the Scripture shews that this play was fighting; for we are told that "they caught every one his fellow by the head, and thrust his sword into his fellow's side, so they fell down together; wherefore that place was called Helkath-hazzarim"—which the margin of the Bible renders "the field of strong men. Hence, therefore, it is necessary that in our reading Scripture, we should have a right apprehension of the terms and words made use of, that we may not confound things
Florilegia - Ascetical or ethical florilegia were excerpts from Scripture and the Fathers on such topics as virtues, vices, discipline, etc
Selah - A word frequently found in the Book of Psalms, and also in Habakkuk 3:9,13 , about seventy-four times in all in Scripture
Son - The term "son" is used in Scripture language to imply almost any kind of descent or succession, as ben shanah , "son of a year," i
Sin, Original - It is not found in Scripture
Cleanness - In Scripture, cleanness of hands denotes innocence
Ashes - In the language of Scripture, ashes are sometimes spoken of to denote great humility and contrition of heart
Arm of the Lord - In the language of Scripture, this is one of the names of Christ
i'Vah - (ruined ), or A'va , which is mentioned in Scripture twice, ( 2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:13 ) comp
Leviticus - a canonical book of Scripture, being the third book of the Pentateuch of Moses; thus called because it contains principally the laws and regulations relating to the Levites, priests, and sacrifices; for which reason the Hebrews call it the law of the priests, because it includes many ordinances concerning their services
Sepharvaim - The Scripture speaks of the king of the city of Sepharvaim, which probably was the capital of the people of this name, 2 Kings 19:13 ; Isaiah 37:13
Ephrath - From her, it is believed that the city of Ephratah, otherwise called Bethlehem, where our Lord was born, had its name; and this city is more than once known in Scripture by the name of Ephrath, Genesis 35:16
Scorner - A scoffer a derider in Scripture, one who scoffs at religion, its ordinances and teachers, and who makes a mock of sin and the judgments and threatenings of God against sinners
Cheese - Several times alluded to in Scripture, and still an important article of food in the East, 1 Samuel 17:18 ; 2 Samuel 17:29
Coal - Usually in Scripture, charcoal, or the embers of fire
Francis Patrizi - Except for a period during the Revolution of 1848, he was professor of Sacred Scripture and Hebrew at the Romani College until 1870. His most important works are interpretations of the Scriptures and Gospel commentaries in Latin, intended to refute the rationalistic errors of that time
Behemoth - The word occurs frequently in Scripture, but, except here, always as a common name, and translated "beast" or "cattle
Prophesy - ) To give instruction in religious matters; to interpret or explain Scripture or religious subjects; to preach; to exhort; to expound
Eternal State - A term not found in Scripture, but often applied to the future, when the Lord Jesus will deliver up the kingdom to God the Father, and be Himself subject unto Him who put all things under Him, that God may be all in all
Covet, to - In 1 Corinthians 12:31 ; 1 Corinthians 14:39 , the word is ζηλόω ,and is quite different fromthe coveting that is condemned in Scripture; it is translated in Revelation 3:19 'be zealous,' and the above passages in Corinthians can be so translated, or 'desire earnestly' the best gifts, and 'desire earnestly' to prophesy
Viper - It is frequently spoken of in Scripture, and not unfrequently in allusion to the great enemy of souls
Leviathan - An aquatic animal, described in Job 41 , and mentioned in other passages of Scripture
Deep And Depths - The deep, or the great deep, signifies in Scripture, hell, the place of punishment, the bottomless pit, Luke 8:31 , compare Revelation 9:1 11:7 ; the grave, Romans 10:7 ; the deepest parts of the sea, Psalm 69:15 107:26 ; chaos in the beginning of the world, Genesis 1:2
Madness - In Scripture "madness" is recognized as a derangement proceeding either from weakness and misdirection of intellect or from ungovernable violence of passion
Offertory Sentences - In the old Liturgies there was formerly ashort anthem after the Gospel, called Offertorium; for this inour Liturgy has been substituted the "Offertory Sentences," beingshort selections from Holy Scripture setting forth "instructions,injunctions and exhortations to the great duty of giving; settingbefore us the necessity of performing it and the manner of doing it
Omnipotence - Scripture often affirms that all power belongs to God (Psalm 147:5 ), that all things are possible for God (Luke 1:37 ; Luke 19:26 ), and that God's power exceeds what humans can ask or think (Ephesians 3:20 ). For Scripture, God's omnipotence is not a matter of abstract speculation but a force to be reckoned with
Salem - The first we meet with in Scripture is where Melchizedek is said to be king of Salem. (Genesis 14:18) Jerusalem and Salem in Scripture are one
Clay - In poetry and in Scripture, earth in general. In Scripture, clay is used to express frailty, liableness to decay and destruction
Heresy - The Scriptures being the standard of faith, any opinion that is repugnant to its doctrines, is heresy but as men differ in the interpretation of Scripture, an opinion deemed heretical by one body of christians,may be deemed orthodox by another. In Scripture and primitive usage,heresy meant merely sect, party, or the doctrines of a sect, as we now use denomination or persuasion, implying no reproach
Usury - This word does not in Scripture signify, as now, undue interest, but simply interest of any kind. Scripture strictly enjoins the rich to help the poor
Clean - The Scripture sense of one clean deserves our particular notice. (Zechariah 13:1) And hence, the Scripture sense of cleanness, is the sinner freed from the filth of sin, and the guilt of sin, and the dominion of sin, by the blood of Christ, and the sanctifying influences of the Holy Ghost
Ataroth - Several places of this name occur in Scripture: one in the tribe of Judah, 1 Chronicles 2:54 ; one or two in Ephraim, Joshua 16:2,5,7 ; 18:13 ; and one or two in Gad, Numbers 32:3,34,35
Sta-Cte - See ( Exodus 30:34 ) --the only passage of Scripture in which the word occurs
Birth-Day - There is no recorded instance in Scripture of the celebration of birth-days among the Jews
Bell - The bells first mentioned in Scripture are the small golden bells attached to the hem of the high priest's ephod (Exodus 28:33,34,35 )
Nezib - The accuracy of Scripture in its geographical hints is remarkable
Commentary - But the Midrash is not exactly what we understand by a commentary; it is ‘an imaginative development of a thought or theme suggested by Scripture, especially a didactic or homiletic exposition, or an edifying religious story’ (Driver)
Nurture - The noun occurs elsewhere in the Pauline corpus but once ( 2 Timothy 3:16 ) which relates that all Scripture is profitable for “instruction (paideia ) in righteousness
Prudence - He is called by many wonderful names in the Scripture, and each name represents an attitude or a characteristic or a position which is true of Him, and of no one else
India - India is not mentioned elsewhere in Scripture, but Solomon's ships may have visited it in their three-year voyages for sandal wood, apes, peacocks, etc
Rimmon - We meet with this word frequently in the Scripture
Grass - This word is often used in Scripture for any kind of small herb or fodder
Context - ) The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning
Tower - Often referred to in Scripture as a place of security, and also as a place of defence, on which watchmen were stationed
Hornet - In Scripture the hornet is referred to only as the means which Jehovah employed for the extirpation of the Canaanites
Carmel - There are two different places of this name in Scripture; Mount Carmel, near the brook Kishon; and Carmel, a city of Judah, where Nabal dwelt
Bow - The expression, "to break the bow," so frequent in Scripture, signifies to destroy the power of a people, because the principal offensive weapon, of armies, was anciently the bow
Urim - Nowhere in Scripture are the Urim and Thummim described, and we do not know what they really were
Revenger - Or AVENGER OF BLOOD, is a name given in Scripture to the man who had the right, according to the Jewish polity, of taking revenge on him who had killed one of his relations
School of Clonard - The "Twelve Apostles of Erin" were instructed in Sacred Scripture at Clonard which at one time had more than 3,000 pupils, according to the Office of Saint Finnian
Vial - ...
Vials of God's wrath, in Scripture, are the execution of his wrath upon the wicked for their sins
Doctrine - With all the limitations of human language, we still attempt to reflect upon what we have heard through God's Word of revelation in history, Scripture, and the Christ. It goes without saying that most Christian doctrines reflect something of the culture in which they were brought to speech and Scripture. ...
The Shaping of Christian Doctrine Three factors guide a believer in the formulation of Christian doctrines: Scripture, experience, and intellect. Scripture The Bible witnesses to the revelatory activity of God. ...
Scripture may, however, become bound to tradition. The church may become a servant to and rely only on inherited interpretations of Scripture. ...
Priority of apostolic tradition collected as Scripture over church tradition was the decision of the church. It is still a basic presupposition of Protestant Christianity: Scripture over tradition. Experience A person has doctrine before being able to read and interpret Scripture. It can also make doctrine idiosyncratic, untested by and unrelated to the experiences of history, of others, and to the truths of Scripture. The human intellect tests experience of personal life, church, and culture by the truth of Scripture to describe the church's beliefs in current language. In worship the Spirit of God brings personal experience and leads the intellect to understand Scripture. Scripture must be interpreted in language appropriate to present experience and in categories shaped by human intellect
Ahasuerus - A royal title, common to several Median and Persian kings named in Scripture. But the other kings of Persia are all mentioned in Scripture by their own names, or at least definitely pointed out; while Xerxes is not mentioned, unless under this name
Scripture - The "Scripture," or collection of sacred writings, was thus enlarged from time to time as God saw necessary. We have now a completed "Scripture," consisting of the Old and New Testaments
Sar'Gon - (prince of the sea ), one of the greatest of the Assyrian kings, is mentioned by name but once in Scripture-- ( Isaiah 20:1 ) He was the successor of Shalmaneser, and was Sennacherib's father and his reigned from B. 712 he took Ashdod, by one of his generals, which is the event which causes the mention of his name in Scripture
Jethro - This man is rendered memorable in Scripture history from his connection with Moses; but for this, it is more than probable he would never have been known even by name in the christian church. (See Genesis 25:1-2) There is some little difficulty in explaining one Scripture by another respecting this man
Trinity - This word does not occur in Scripture. As a fact the Scripture reveals the doctrine of the Trinity in two ways: first in passages in which the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are mentioned together as God; and secondly, in passages which speak of each as divine
Fool - The term fool in Scripture language differs from what is understood in the general acceptation of the word among men. So again, that pride and haughtiness of men, which prompts them to reject Christ, this in Scripture language is called folly. " (1 Corinthians 1:21) By comparing two passages in Scripture together, the sense of the word is very strongly marked
Chronicles - This name is given to two historical books of Scripture, which the Hebrews call Dibri-Jamim, "Words of Days," that is, "Diaries," or "Journals. " They are called in the LXX, Paralipomena, which signifies, "things omitted;" as if these books were a supplement of what had been omitted, or too much abridged, in the books of Kings, and other historical books of Scripture. They were compiled, and probably by Ezra, from the ancient chronicles of the kings of Judah and Israel just now mentioned, and they may be considered as a kind of supplement to the preceding books of Scripture. The second book of Chronicles contains a brief sketch of the Jewish history, from the accession of Solomon to the return from the Babylonian captivity, being a period of four hundred and eighty years; and in both these books we find many particulars not noticed in the other historical books of Scripture
Little Chapter - (Latin: capitulum, diminutive of caput, head) ...
In the Divine Office a brief lesson from Scripture recited at the Canonical Hours (except Matins)
Esther, Book of - This book is more purely historical than any other book of Scripture; and it has this remarkable peculiarity that the name of God does not occur in it from first to last in any form
Chapter, Little - (Latin: capitulum, diminutive of caput, head) ...
In the Divine Office a brief lesson from Scripture recited at the Canonical Hours (except Matins)
Seekers - They derived their name from their maintaining that the true church ministry, Scripture, and ordinances, were lost, for which they were seeking. They taught that the Scriptures were uncertain; that present miracles were necessary to faith; that our ministry is without authority; and that our worship and ordinances are unnecessary or vain
Cainites - They honoured those who carry in Scripture the most visible marks of reprobation; as the inhabitants of Sodom, Esau, Korah, Dathan, and Abram
Epistle, the - The portion of Holy Scripture read before the Gospelin the Communion Office, generally taken from one of the N
Symbol - Lancaster's Dictionary of Scripture Symbols; and Bicheno's Symbolical Vocabulary in his Signs of the Times; Faber on the Prophecies; W
Adulterer - In Scripture, an idolator
Bondage - In Scripture, spiritual subjection to sin and corrupt passions, or to the yoke of the ceremonial law servile fear
Translation - This term is used in Scripture in the sense of 'change of place or status
Brass - The "brass" frequently spoken of in Scripture is not that compound metal to which we give the name of brass; for it Is described as dug from the mine, Deuteronomy 8:9; Job 28:2, Very frequently copper is meant; and, no doubt, also bronze, which is a composition of copper and tin, while brass is copper and zinc
Nicolas - (Acts 6:5) Some have supposed that he was the head and leader of the sect called the Nicolaitaines; but there are no authorities in Scripture for this
Nahash - There are several of this name in Scripture
Anagogical - This is one of the four senses in which Scripture may be interpreted, viz
Harmony - Term used in Scripture studies, especially of the four Gospels, to designate: ...
an explanation of differences found in various accounts of the same events
a combination of all four Gospels into one continuous narrative of which a good example is H
Proper Lessons - The portions of Scripture from the Old and NewTestaments appointed to be read on a Sunday or Holy Day at Morningand Evening Prayer
Heritage - In Scripture, the saints or people of God are called his heritage, as being claimed by him, and the objects of his special care
Bibles, Polyglot - (Greek: polys, many; glotta, tongue; many-tongued) ...
 ...
Printed renditions of the text of Scripture in several languages
Moth - This is the only lepidopterous insect referred to in Scripture
Phinehas - (Numbers 25:6-13) There was another Phinehas in Scripture, but of a very different character, namely, Phineas the son of Eli
Handmaid, Handmaiden - These words often refer in Scripture to a female slave, as applied to Hagar the Egyptian, Genesis 25:12 ; but were also used by women themselves as a term of humility, as when Hannah spake to Jehovah and to Eli, 1 Samuel 1:11,16,18 ; as Abigail to David, 1 Samuel 25:24-41 ; and by Mary and Elizabeth as handmaids of the Lord
Adore - ) The word itself does not occur in Scripture
Truth - Used in various senses in Scripture
Synagogue - It is from the worship order established in synagogues that our modern church patterns of reading and expounding upon Scripture from the pulpit are derived
Night March - The term is not used in Scripture, though Exodus 13:21 records that Israel followed the pillar of fire at night (compare Numbers 9:21 )
Night Monster - The term occurs only here in Scripture unless textual emendations are accepted ( Job 18:15 ; Isaiah 2:18 )
Grace, External - Such a grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation
Translation - The translation of the Holy Scriptures into our English language is among the highest instances of divine mercy. The memory of the authors of it under the grace of the Holy Ghost is truly blessed, and proves that Scripture, "the righteous shall be in everlasting remembrance
Wisdom - (See Proverbs 8:1-36 throughout 1 Corinthians 1:24)...
Wisdom is also used as a term in Scripture to denote somewhat supernatural, and in opposition to carnal blindness
Transfiguration - All description of it fails, I can only therefore refer the reader to the Scripture account of it, as the Holy Ghost hath recorded it, (Matthew 17:1-27; Mark 9:1-50; Luke 9:1-62)...
Fallow Deer, - The only description of it in Scripture is that it was a clean animal that the Israelites might eat, and that it was supplied to the table of Solomon
Poison - The poison of serpents and of asps is used in Scripture symbolically for the judgement of God and for the malignity inherent in the wicked
Distort - ) To wrest from the true meaning; to pervert; as, to distort passages of Scripture, or their meaning
Unbeliever, - The name given in Scripture to the class of persons who have not faith in the divine revelation of the gospel
Orthodox - ) According or congruous with the doctrines of Scripture, the creed of a church, the decree of a council, or the like; as, an orthodox opinion, book, etc. ) Sound in opinion or doctrine, especially in religious doctrine; hence, holding the Christian faith; believing the doctrines taught in the Scriptures; - opposed to heretical and heterodox; as, an orthodox Christian
External Grace - Such a grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation
Foxes - Hence false prophets are called in Scripture foxes
Apprehend - In the language of Scripture, this word is peculiarly significant
Latin - In Scripture it is only mentioned as being one of the tongues in which Pilate wrote the inscription on the cross of the Lord Jesus
Biblists - or BIBLICI, a term applied to certain doctors in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, who expounded the sacred writings in their public schools, and endeavoured to establish their doctrines by the authority of Scripture, in opposition to uncertain traditions, or the speculations of the schools. Upon the same principle, the Pietists of the seventeenth century formed what they called Biblical colleges, for expounding the Scriptures
Fool - This term, in Scripture, implies moral pravity
Salvation - As sin is the greatest evil, Scripture uses the word mainly in the sense of redemption and liberation from sin and its consequences
Lachish - For a wonderful confirmation of the truth of Scripture, see SENNACHERIB
Hate - Often denotes in Scripture only a less degree of love, Genesis 29:30,31 Deuteronomy 21:15 Proverbs 13:24 Malachi 1:2,3 Luke 14:26 Romans 9:13
Chastisement - ...
The chastisement of our peace, in Scripture, was the pain which Christ suffered to purchase our peace and reconciliation to God
Iddo - Several other persons of this name are mentioned in Scripture, 1 Chronicles 27:21 Ezra 10:44 Zechariah 1:1
Lord - Jesus Christ, as the Messiah, the Son of God, and equal with the Father, is often called Lord in Scripture, especially in the writing of Paul
Wrath - Gods wrath, in Scripture, is his holy and just indignation against sin
Firmament - In Scripture the word denotes an expanse, a wide extent; for such is the signification of the Hebrew word
Paulinus, Disciple of Ephraem Syrus - 1062) gives a short account of him, speaking of his great talent, knowledge of Scripture, and power as a preacher
Qualifications For Holy Orders - These are stated in the Preface tothe Ordinal set forth in the Prayer-book as follows: that theCandidate be of the age required by the Canon in that case provided;that he be a man of virtuous conversation and without crime; and,after examination and trial, found to be sufficiently instructed inthe Holy Scripture and otherwise learned as the Canons require
Tradition - The apostles' and evangelists' inspiration is attested by their miracles; their New Testament Scriptures had the additional test without which even miracles would be inconclusive (Deuteronomy 13:1-6), accordance with the existing Old Testament revelation (Acts 17:11). ...
When the canon was complete the infallibility was transferred from living men's inspired sayings to the written word, now the sole unerring guide, interpreted by the Holy Spirit; comparison of Scripture with Scripture being the best commentary (1 Corinthians 2:12-16; 1 John 2:20; 1 John 2:27; John 1:33; 1 Corinthians 15:3-44; John 15:26; John 16:13-14). The most ancient and universal tradition is the all-sufficiency of Scripture for salvation, "that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works" (2 Timothy 3:15-17). The apostles never appeal to human tradition, always to Scripture (Acts 15:2; Acts 15:15-17; Acts 17:11; Acts 24:14; 1618451196_35). If tradition must be followed, then we ought to follow that oldest tradition which casts away all tradition not in, or provable by, Scripture. ...
We receive the Christian Lord's day and infant baptism not on the inherent authority of the fathers, but on their testimony as witnesses of facts which give force to the infiltrations of Scripture. Paul's tradition in 2 Thessalonians 2:15 is inspired, and only continued oral in part until the Scripture canon was completed by John; altogether different from Rome's supplementary oral tradition professing to complete the word which is complete, and which we are forbidden to add to, on penalty of God's plagues written therein (Revelation 22:18). We are no more bound to accept the fathers' interpretation (which by the way is the reverse of unanimous; but even suppose it were so) of Scripture, because we accept the New Testament canon on their testimony, than to accept the Jews' interpretation of the Old Testament because we accept the Old Testament canon on their testimony; if we were, we should be as bound to reject Jesus, with the Jews, as to reject primitive Scripture Christianity with the apostate church
New - Scripture expresses God's concern for persons and the larger creation in the broad categories of a new act and a new relationship. ...
God's New Act Scripture often calls to mind past acts such as the creation and Exodus which reveal God's care for God's world and people. Time and again, writers of Scripture called God's people to anticipate God's new intervention in their lives
Bashan - The plain of the Jaulan (Golan of Scripture) is a vast field of powdered lava and basalt, a fertile pasture to this day. The northeastern portion of Bashan, including the Argob of Scripture, is a wild mass of basaltic rock. Bashan is almost literally crowded with cities and villages, now in ruins, some supposed to date back to Joshua's conquest, corroborating the account in Scripture
Ear - EAR, EARS...
In Scripture, such frequent mention is made of the hearing ear, and the uncircumcised in heart and ears, that it ought to be noticed in a work of this kind. In Scripture language, to uncover the ear, (1 Samuel 20:2; 1Sa 20:13) as it is rendered in the margin of the Bibles, is to reveal somewhat particularly to a certain person, or persons, which, in general, to others, is not made known. Surely, it is blessed to eye Christ as our Surety, constantly represented by types in the Old Testament Scripture. As the uncovering the ear is a Scripture expression, to denote divine teaching, and the opening the heart and understanding, so the word of God abounds with figures and similitudes to represent the reverse. (Isaiah 6:10) Hence! no less than seven times in the Scripture; (as, if to denote the awfulness of such a state) the dreadful condition of the ungodly is described under those characters
Matins - The psalms and books of Scripture were recited according to a fixed order. The first three lessons are from Scripture, the second group historical, the third group a patristic homily upon the Gospel of the Mass of the day
Allegory - Once in Scripture (Galatians 4:24): "which things (the history of Hagar and Sarah, Ishmael and Isaac) are an allegory;" (are, when allegorized, etc. Origen at Alexandria introduced a faulty system of interpreting Scripture by allegorizing, for which this passage gives no warrant
Teraphim - It would be easy to suppose, and indeed at once conclude, that they were idols for worship, were it not that the Lord by the prophet Hosea seems to speak in the Scripture referred to, that the children of Israel in their desolations should be without them, which, if idols, would have been their mercy, and not their misery. Nevertheless, as in the case of Rachel there seems a pretty clear testimony that her Teraphim were idols for worship, it is more than probable the whole we meet with in Scripture were to the same purpose
Shalman - The Assyrian canon agrees with Scripture in making Shalman king directly after Tiglath Pileser. Scripture (1 Kings 17:3-6, the general expression "the king of Assyria," and 1 Kings 18:9-10, "they took it,") accords with this: "Shalman spoiled Beth Arbel in the day of battle
Nebuchadnezzar - We have much said in Scripture concerning this monarch, in the book of Daniel. Various have been the opinions of men concerning the wonderful change wrought upon Nebuchadnezzar, as related Daniel 4:28; Dan 4:33; but, after all that hath been said on this subject, the matter stands just where the Scriptures have left it. And those who do not desire to be wise above what is written, will do well to accept of this and all the other parts of sacred Scripture in the Lord's own way, referring all into his sovereign decree, "who worketh all things according to the purpose of his own will
Fuller - The trade of the fullers, so far as it is mentioned in Scripture, appears to have consisted chiefly in cleansing garments and whitening them. The substances used for this purpose which are mentioned in Scripture are natron, (Proverbs 25:20 ; Jeremiah 2:22 ) and soap
Oracle - In the first three of these passages it means the Canonical Scriptures of the OT. treating his words as seriously as if they were inspired Scripture. ), always in the sense of authoritative Scripture, i
Inspiration - Though this word occurs in the Bible but once in reference to the Scriptures, yet the one statement in which it is found is important and full of deep meaning: "Every Scripture is divinely inspired [1], and is profitable for teaching, for conviction, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be complete, fully fitted to every good work. This places all Scripture on one basis as to inspiration, whether it be historical, doctrinal, or prophetic. The whole of Scripture forms the word of God, and both in the O. ...
The above passages should carry conviction to simple souls that every Scripture is God-inspired. Amid the many uncertain things around him he needs words upon which his faith can be based, and in the inspired Scriptures he has them. He had the words of eternal life; and, through the grace of God, many a soul has found them to be such, and has no more doubt of the plenary inspiration of Scripture than of the existence of God Himself. ...
It may be noted that Scripture records the sayings of wicked men, and of Satan himself. If the words of Scripture are inspired, it has been asked, how is it that the style of the writer is so manifest? John's style, for instance, being clearly distinguishable from that of Paul. ...
Another objection to the value of verbal inspiration is that most persons read Scripture in a translation, the words of which cannot, it is alleged, be said to be inspired. And it must not be forgotten that the Lord Himself and those who wrote the New Testament often quoted the Septuagint, which is a translation from the Hebrew; and they quoted it as Scripture. ...
Nothing can exceed the importance of having true thoughts of the inspiration of Scripture
Intermediate State - And if once we are satisfied that a state of separate existence is possible, we shall easily attach credit to the interpretation commonly given of the various expressions in Scripture, which intimate that the souls of good men are admitted to the presence of God immediately after death, although we soon find that a bound is set to our speculations concerning the nature of this intermediate state. But when we leave philosophical probability, and come to the doctrine of Scripture, the only ground of certainty on all such subjects, a great number of passages are so explicit, that no ingenuity of interpretation has been sufficient to weaken their evidence on this point. One branch of the opinions that have been held concerning an intermediate state is the Popish doctrine of purgatory; a doctrine which appears upon the slightest inspection of the texts that have been adduced in support of it to derive no evidence from Scripture; which originated in the error of the church of Rome in assigning to personal suffering a place in the justification of a sinner; and which is completely overturned by the doctrine of justification by faith, and by the general strain of Scripture, which represents this life as a state of probation, upon our conduct during which our everlasting condition depends
Oratorio - A musical composition for solo voices, chorus, orchestra, and organ set to a religious text generally taken from Holy Scripture
Zechariah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture, and it is not to be wondered at, when we consider the sense of it, and the general desire which the Hebrews all had, to carry somewhat in name, which referred to the Lord
Science - , the investigation, discovery, and classification of secondary laws, is unknown in Scripture
Pentateuch - ' The many references to and quotations from them in other parts of the Scripture, and allusions to them by Christ under the name of Moses, show plainly that Moses was the inspired writer of them, except of course the small portion that records his death and burial
Conversation - This word is never used in Scripture in the sense of verbal communication from one to another (Psalm 50:23 ; Hebrews 13:5 )
Abundance - ...
In Scripture, the abundance of the rich is great wealth
Ashes - In Scripture, ashes is used to denote vileness, meanness, frailty, or humiliation
Sodom - A city ever-memorable in Scripture, and now most probably the very spot of the Dead Sea
Cormorant - It is only mentioned in Scripture as an unclean bird
Sargon - Though his name appears in Scripture only in the above passage, it is believed that he accomplished the taking of Samaria which was begun by Shalmaneser
Siloam, Tower in - Nothing is known of the falling of this tower except what the Scripture states in Luke 13:4
Plaster - In Daniel 5:5 the accuracy of Scripture appears; the Nineveh walls were paneled with alabaster slabs, but no alabaster being procurable at Babylon enamel or stucco ("plaster") for receiving ornamental designs covers the bricks; on it Belshazzar's doom was written
Oratorio - ) A more or less dramatic text or poem, founded on some Scripture nerrative, or great divine event, elaborately set to music, in recitative, arias, grand choruses, etc
Hermon - The sacred hill of Hermon is often spoken of in Scripture, and furnisheth out sweet subject to the Hebrew poetry
Bani - There are several of this name in Scripture, (See 2 Samuel 23:36; 1 Chronicles 6:46; Ezra 2:10) Some render the word, from Ban, son
Blood - To blood is ascribed in Scripture the mysterious sacredness which belongs to life, and God reserved it to himself when allowing man the dominion over and the use of the lower animals for food
Apochrypha - Books not admitted into the canon of Scripture, being either spurious, or at least not acknowledged as divine. Origen, Athanasius, Hilary, Cyril of Jerusalem, and all the orthodox writers who have given catalogues of the canonical books of Scripture, unanimously concur in rejecting these out of the canon. The Protestants acknowledge such books of Scripture only to be canonical as were esteemed to be so in the first ages of the church; such as are cited by the earliest writers among the Christians as of divine authority, and after the most diligent enquiry were received and judged to be so by the council of Laodicea
Tradition - A term used in the Thirty-fourth Article of Religion todenote customs, rites, forms and ceremonies of the Church which havebeen transmitted by oral communications or long established usage,and which though not commanded in so many words in Holy Scripture,yet have always been used and kept in the Holy Catholic Church. , the witnessthat the Church bears by the writings of the Fathers and theenactments of her General Councils to the Truths of the ChristianReligion and the interpretation of Holy Scripture. Peter's words, "No prophecy of the Scripture is ofany private interpretation
Meroz - Like Chorazin, it is only mentioned in Scripture in connection with the curse pronounced upon it
Patmos - It is mentioned in Scripture only in Revelation 1:9
Lie - Lies are emphatically condemned in Scripture (John 8:44 ; 1 Timothy 1:9,10 ; Revelation 21:27 ; 22:15 )
Ephraim, Mount - Scripture specifies that the following cities were located in the hill country of Ephraim: Bethel (Judges 4:5 ); Gibeah (Joshua 24:33 ); Ramah (Judges 4:5 ); Shamir (Judges 10:1 ); Shechem (Joshua 20:7 ); Timnath-heres or -serah (Joshua 19:50 ; Judges 2:9 )
Dedication - In the Scripture we meet with dedications of the tabernacle, altars, &c
Texts: Memorable - One looks with interest on that ancient stone at Kingston-upon-Thames, upon which so many Saxon kings were crowned, but far more reverent is the gaze we fix upon those texts of Scripture whereby (through God's grace) many have been made kings unto our God
Samaritan Pentateuch - Their Scripture includes Genesis through Deuteronomy with many variant readings from the Masoretic Text or Hebrew text currently used by scholars
Postil - ) A short homily or commentary on a passage of Scripture; as, the first postils were composed by order of Charlemagne
Afar - In Scripture, figuratively, estranged in affection alienated
Agony of Christ - The word agony is used only once in Scripture, in Luke 22:43, to designate the anguish of Christ in the Garden of Gethsemani
Ass - Animal mentioned over 130 times in Holy Scripture
Antioch, School of - Designation given to the Fathers of Antioch, who insisted more on the so-called grammatico-historical sense of the Holy Scripture than its moral and allegorical meaning
Monolatry - It is a false teaching contrary to Scripture
Zephaniah - Hence, that Scripture, "the secret of the Lord is with them that fear him, and he will shew them his covenant
Kite, - It is only distinguished in Scripture for its keenness of vision, but this characteristic would apply to many different birds
Medad - A reference to the Scripture will give their history, which is but short
Adder - " (Psalms 91:13) Hence also, as sin is of the devil, the infusion of it into our nature, at the fall, is called in Scripture, adder's poison
Caesarea - There are two places of this name spoken of in Scripture
Election - In Scripture, the calling or selection by God of chosen servants, like Saint Paul, "a vessel of election" (Acts 9); and all Christians: "knowing, brethren beloved of God, your election" (1 Thessalonians 1)
Jehovah - The Scripture name of the Supreme Being
Testament - In Scripture, usually signifies covenant, and not a man's last will, Matthew 26:28
School of Antioch - Designation given to the Fathers of Antioch, who insisted more on the so-called grammatico-historical sense of the Holy Scripture than its moral and allegorical meaning
Outcast - Scripture never employs outcast in the now common sense of one rejected by society
Holy Orders - Holy Scripture as well as ancient authors and the universalpractice of the Church bear witness to the fact that Almighty Godof His Divine Providence hath appointed "divers orders" in HisChurch and that these orders have always and in all places beenthree in number, viz
Canon - THE CANON OF Scripture means those books of Scripture which theChurch has received or accepted as inspired, and therefore declaresthem to be canonical, to distinguish them from profane, apocryphalor disputed books
Church - The word used in Holy Scripture for Church is ecclesia,from the Greek word ek-kaleo, meaning to call out. The mark by which theelect are distinguished in Holy Scripture is membership of theChurch by Baptism, although ultimate salvation requires furtherconditions
Good - Scripture affirms that God is and does good (1 Chronicles 16:34 ; Psalm 119:68 ). Though God alone is truly good (Psalm 14:1 ,Psalms 14:1,14:3 ; Mark 10:18 ), Scripture repeatedly speaks of good persons who seek to live their lives in accordance with God's will
Stars - Probably the most famous and intriguing of all the stars mentioned in Scripture is the star of Bethlehem, (Matthew 2:1 ). Suffice it to say that Scripture does not name the star
Potter - Of the potter Scripture says he treadeth the clay to make it pliable, Isaiah 41:25 ; and he forms his vessel on a wheel. This common pottery of the East is very fragile, and as such is often alluded to in Scripture
Scripture - This word occurs but once in the Old Testament, where an angel speaks of 'the Scripture of truth. In the New Testament the various parts of the Old Testament are referred to as 'the Scriptures'; they are the 'holy Scriptures,' 2 Timothy 3:15 ; they must needs be fulfilled; they cannot be broken. Some erred because they did not know the Scriptures. And 'all Scripture' is God-inspired, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, or complete, fully fitted to every good work. As in a nation 'the records' are referred to as authority, so in the church, it is 'the Scriptures' that bind the conscience, and should be an end of all controversy
Revolt - In Scripture, to disclaim allegiance and subjection to God to reject the government of the King of kings. In Scripture, a rejection of divine government departure from God disobedience
Fullness of Grace - Abundance or superabundance of sanctifying grace or interior holiness, predicated by Sacred Scripture of Our Lord, of Saint Stephen, of the Apostles, and of Our Blessed Lady
Truth - It signifies fidelity, sincerity, and punctuality in keeping promises; and to truth taken in this sense is generally joined mercy or kindness, as in Genesis 24:27 , and other places of Scripture
Chester Plays - It was a narrative of Scripture, with the addition of legendary episodes from apocryphal Gospels or other sources, and was completed by the appearance of the Four Evangelists
Proud - 1: ὑπερήφανος (Strong's #5244 — Adjective — huperephanos — hoop-er-ay'-fan-os ) signifies "showing oneself above others, preeminent" (huper, "above," phainomai, "to appear, be manifest"); it is always used in Scripture in the bad sense of "arrogant, disdainful, proud," Luke 1:51 ; Romans 1:30 ; 2 Timothy 3:2 ; James 4:6 ; 1 Peter 5:5
Bible: How to Deal With Its Difficulties - An old man once said, 'For a long period I puzzled myself about the difficulties of Scripture, until at last I came to the resolution that reading the Bible was like eating fish
Cabala - ) A kind of occult theosophy or traditional interpretation of the Scriptures among Jewish rabbis and certain mediaeval Christians, which treats of the nature of god and the mystery of human existence. It assumes that every letter, word, number, and accent of Scripture contains a hidden sense; and it teaches the methods of interpretation for ascertaining these occult meanings
Anthropopathy - We have frequent instances of the use of these figures in holy Scripture
Offertory - ) The Scripture sentences said or sung during the collection of the offerings
Gate - GATE, GATES...
In Scripture these expressions are not limited to the doors, or entrances, into an house, or city; but the term is figuratively made use of to denote place, or person, or people
Jerubbaal - ) This man was evidently led on by the Spirit of the Lord; and his history affords very striking testimonies in the Scripture referred to, and also in the following chapter (Judges 7:1-25
Jacob - The ever-memorable name of the ever-memorable person, concerning whom it hath pleased God the Holy Ghost to say so much throughout the whole Scripture
Mehetabel - It seems a compound of three words—Mah-to-bel, How good is God! Perhaps this name was given at a time of some remarkable providence, as we do not find the name any where else in Scripture for the name of a man; and this was at a time of peculiar exercises of Israel
Belial - Hence, in Scripture, it is not unfrequently applied to wicked persons
Letter, the - The Lord is the spirit of all that is written in letters in Scripture
Tubal - The Scripture commonly joins together Tubal and Meshech, which makes it thought that they peopled countries, bordering upon each other
Wax - Thus the LXX throughout, κηρος , and vulgate cera; so there is no room to doubt but this is the true meaning of the word: and the idea of the root appears to be soft, melting, yielding, or the like, which properties are not only well known to belong to wax, but are also intimated in all the passages of Scripture in which this word occurs
Lucifer - " In the figurative language of Scripture, a brilliant star denoted an illustrious prince, Numbers 24:17
Hen - The common barn-door fowl is not often mentioned in Scripture, Mark 13:35 ; 14:30 ; Luke 22:34 ; but at the present day they and their eggs are more used in Syria than any other food not vegetable
Pool - (Isaiah 42:15 ) Of the various pools mentioned in Scripture, perhaps the most celebrated are the pools of Solomon near Bethlehem called by the Arabs el-Burak , from which an aqueduct was carried which still supplies Jerusalem with wafer
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The unity of Scripture claims that the Bible presents a noncontradictory and consistent message concerning God and redemptive history. The ultimate basis for unity is contained in the claim of divine inspiration in 2 Timothy 3:16 , that "all Scripture is given by inspiration [theopneustos [ 2 Peter 1:19-21 ; 3:15-16 ). The statements of Paul and Peter model a belief in the unity of Scripture on a priori grounds. ...
This approach to the unity of Scripture is often attacked on the basis that it is circular reasoning, using the source (the Bible) as a testimony to itself. We have noted, however, that ultimately our commitment to Scripture is an issue of faith. At the same time, while it is not within the purpose of the present article to prove the point, it can be argued vigorously and with intellectual integrity that the phenomena of Scripture support a belief in its unity. ...
The Unity of Scripture . Therefore, the organic unity of Scripture is ultimately a theological proposition that reflects a presupposition concerning the nature of God. We do not have a unity of Scripture because we can prove it from the phenomena, but we have phenomenological unity because it exists. The phenomenological study of Scripture serves several purposes: (1) to explicate the beauty of the product of Scripture; (2) to answer the critics who would demean its divine origin and unity; (3) to expose the diversity that is a part of God's plan as represented by its presence in the biblical record. ...
The unity of Scripture is observed in numerous categories. ...
A permeating theological continuity exists throughout Scripture. ...
The Scriptures present a singular view regarding sin and salvation. The Scriptures then proceed to develop these themes. ...
The Diversity of Scripture . The focus of skepticism in relation to Scripture as a unified divine revelation has been on what it views as irreconcilable diversity within the phenomena of the biblical text. If Scripture is viewed for what it claims to be, reasonable explanations for diversity can usually be provided or merely allow the tension to stand. On the other hand, if Scripture is viewed as nothing more than a composite body of literature that records a varied history of religion, no amount of explanation will satisfy. The unity and diversity of Scripture must ultimately be described by the evidence in the biblical text. The work of evangelical scholars in relation to accounting for the diversity that exists in the Synoptic Gospels provides some helpful principles in accounting for other areas of diversity within Scripture. Yet, these are all expressions of diversity Scripture upholds without providing the reader with a systematic theology footnote to ease the tension. Kuyper, The Scripture Unbroken ; G
Biblical Accommodation - An accommodation is not the sense of the text and is not a proof from Scripture
Barbarian - This word nowhere in Scripture bears the meaning it does in modern times
Hierarchy - The word is also used in reference to the subordination some suppose there is among the angels: but whether they are to be considered as having a government or hierarchy among themselves, so that one is superior in office and dignity to others; or whether they have a kind of dominion over one another; or whether some are made partakers of privileges others are deprived of, cannot be determined, since Scripture is silent as to this matter
Golan - There are no further notices of it in Scripture
Comfortable Words - The name given to the short passages ofScripture read after the Absolution in the Communion service. Ithas been pointed out that these are peculiar to our Liturgy and that"perhaps the object of their introduction was the obvious onesuggested in the title of Comfortable Words, of confirming thewords of Absolution with those of Christ and His Apostles; and ofholding forth our Lord and Saviour before the communicants, in thewords of Holy Scripture to prepare them for 'discerning' His Bodyin the Sacrament
Tabret - Scripture associates the tambourine with occasions of strong emotion: farewells (Genesis 31:27 ); prophetic ecstasy (1 Samuel 10:5 ); a victory procession (1 Samuel 18:6 ); the procession of the ark to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:5 )
Leprosy - This term, as used in Scripture, seems to include not only true leprosy ( elephantiasis ) probably the disease of Job but also such skin diseases as psoriasis , ring-worm, and vitiligo
Chains - These are mentioned in Scripture ...
1
Porter - In Scripture this word is used in the sense of doorkeeper
Behemoth - ...
Authors are divided in opinion as to the animal intended in Scripture by this anme some supposing it to be an ox, others, an elephant and Bochart labors to prove it the hippopotamus, or river horse
Anagogical - The word is seldom used, but with regard to the different senses of Scripture
Accommodation, Biblical - An accommodation is not the sense of the text and is not a proof from Scripture
Abelians - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Abelites - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Abelonians - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Lecture - ) The act of reading; as, the lecture of Holy Scripture
Bethesda - Anne (noticed in the tenth to fourteenth centuries), which answer better the Scripture description of Bethesda
Wilderness - In Scripture, it is applied frequently to the deserts of Arabia
Nob - But the event for which Nob was most noted in the Scripture annals was a frightful massacre which occurred there in the reign of Saul
Blindness - (Leviticus 19:14 ; 27:18) Blindness willfully inflicted for political or other purposes is alluded to in Scripture
Persia - The term is generally applied in Scripture to the Persian empire, but in Ezekiel 38:5 it designates Persia proper. A later king, called Artaxerxes in Scripture, forbade the rebuilding of the temple, but Darius Hystaspes authorized the work to go on. Only one of his successors is noticed in Scripture, Darius the Persian
Rationalism - In this sense rationalism denies the supernatural character of Revelation, and affirms that all religious truths are derived from human reason alone; that human reason is the sole medium by which man can arrive at any truth; that the faith of Christ is unalterably opposed to reason; that Divine Revelation is a hindrance rather than a help to man's perfection; and that the miracles and prophecies narrated in Sacred Scripture are poetic fancies. According to rationalism, reason is the supreme judge of what is true, what false, what merely symbolic in Sacred Scripture. The doubts and contradictions arising from private interpretation of Sacred Scripture led many to believe that nothing certain could be known from revelation and hence natural religion sufficed, e
Idle - Scripture distinguishes between those unwilling to work who should not eat (2 Thessalonians 3:10 ) and those unable to earn a living (for example, “true” widows, 1 Timothy 5:9 ) for whom the community of faith is responsible. Though Scripture consistently condemns “willful” idleness, it is also aware of economic realities in which some who are willing workers stand idle because no one has hired them (Matthew 20:6-7 )
Names of God - The following are found in Holy Scripture: ...
Almighty, Genesis 17:1
Benign, II Esdras 9:17
Blessed, Genesis 14:20
Creator, 2Machabees 1:24
Everlasting, Isaiah 40:28
Father, Matthew 6:9
First and Last, Isaiah 44:6
God of Peace, Romans 15:33
God of Vengeance, Psalms 93:1
Great, Psalms 76:14
Helper, Isaiah 50:9
Hidden, Isaiah 45:15
Holy, Apocalypse 4:8
Hope, Romans 15:13
I am who am, Exodus 3:14
Immortal, 1 Timothy 1:17
Invisible, Colossians 1:15
Jealous, Exodus 20:5
Judge, Psalms 7:12
Just, Isaiah 45:21
Life Eternal, 1 John 5:20
Living God, Daniel 6:26
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 5:7
Lord, Psalms 117:27
Merciful, Exodus 34:6
Most High, Luke 1:32
Most Strong, Genesis 46:3
Protector, Psalms 30:3
Redeemer, Psalms 18:15
Salvation, Apocalypse 19:1
Saviour, Psalms 24:5
Spirit, John 4:24
Strength, Apocalypse 7:12
True, Jeremiah 10:10
In his celebrated treatise, The Names of God (New York, 1912), Lessius has many others, not taken from Scripture but principally from the liturgy, with brief explanations
Biblical Institute at Rome, the - " The purpose of its institution was to found a post-graduate school for the training of teachers and writers who would be properly qualified to defend the truths of Sacred Scripture. Applicants for admission to the Institute must be graduates of philosophy and theology as established for ecclesiastical seminaries or religious clergy, and, if they aspire to degrees in Sacred Scripture, they are further required to have previously taken a doctorate in Sacred Theology
Knee, Kneel - The knees are often referred to in Scripture as the place where weakness of the body, from whatever cause, readily manifests itself: e. In many passages of Scripture kneeling is spoken of as the attitude assumed in prayer ( 1 Kings 8:54 , Psalms 95:8 , Daniel 6:10 , Acts 20:36 etc
God, Names of - The following are found in Holy Scripture: ...
Almighty, Genesis 17:1
Benign, II Esdras 9:17
Blessed, Genesis 14:20
Creator, 2Machabees 1:24
Everlasting, Isaiah 40:28
Father, Matthew 6:9
First and Last, Isaiah 44:6
God of Peace, Romans 15:33
God of Vengeance, Psalms 93:1
Great, Psalms 76:14
Helper, Isaiah 50:9
Hidden, Isaiah 45:15
Holy, Apocalypse 4:8
Hope, Romans 15:13
I am who am, Exodus 3:14
Immortal, 1 Timothy 1:17
Invisible, Colossians 1:15
Jealous, Exodus 20:5
Judge, Psalms 7:12
Just, Isaiah 45:21
Life Eternal, 1 John 5:20
Living God, Daniel 6:26
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 5:7
Lord, Psalms 117:27
Merciful, Exodus 34:6
Most High, Luke 1:32
Most Strong, Genesis 46:3
Protector, Psalms 30:3
Redeemer, Psalms 18:15
Salvation, Apocalypse 19:1
Saviour, Psalms 24:5
Spirit, John 4:24
Strength, Apocalypse 7:12
True, Jeremiah 10:10
In his celebrated treatise, The Names of God (New York, 1912), Lessius has many others, not taken from Scripture but principally from the liturgy, with brief explanations
Chaldea - This was strictly the southern part of Babylonia, but the many references in Scripture to the Chaldeans show that the inhabitants of the whole of Babylonia are alluded to by that name. Perhaps Ur is the only place in Chaldea proper to which Scripture definitely refers
Dial - is not mentioned in Scripture before the reign of Ahaz. According to these authors, the lines marked in this pavement are what the Scripture calls degrees
Procopius Gazaeus, a Christian Sophist - His fame rests on his Scripture commentaries. ); his profession of belief as to the nature of the Triune God, and the importance, authority, and interpretation of Scripture, is very satisfactory
Flesh - The word flesh hath different meanings in Scripture. " (Genesis 6:13) But beside this general acceptation of the word in relation to all animal life, the Scripture hath a more confined and special sense in reference to human nature. (Isaiah 58:7)...
There is another and more endearing sense of the word flesh, when spoken of in Scripture in relation to the types and affinities of families. " (Genesis 37:26-27) And there is yet a far more endearing sense in which the word flesh is used in Scripture, when spoken of in the person of our Lord Jesus Christ; the nearest of all types, and the tenderest of all brothers
Azariah - This name was very common among the Jews, and was borne by many briefly referred to in Scripture
Silver - Used for a great variety of purposes, as may be judged from the frequent references to it in Scripture
Chozeba - How accurate Scripture is in its names and topography! The Talmud mentions that a plain is in front of Chozeba; so Kueizibah has before it the valley of Berachoth (wady Arrub)
Marrow - The image of the dividing of joints and marrow pictures the power of Scripture to penetrate a person's thoughts and motives (Hebrews 4:12 )
Explanation - ) The act of explaining, expounding, or interpreting; the act of clearing from obscurity and making intelligible; as, the explanation of a passage in Scripture, or of a contract or treaty
Text - This word is generally used to express the body of Scripture
Bay, Michel de - Ordained in 1541, he taught philosophy at Louvain, where he became president of the College Adrien and professor of Scripture
Conference - The conference of different passages of Scripture
Woe - A declaration of 'woe' on man is frequently found in Scripture
Jot - Our Lord uses it to show the very great care which He exercises over the smallest details of the Scripture
Greece - Its cities noticed in Scripture are Athens, Corinth, and Cenchrea
Jah - We find it joined with many Hebrew names in the Scripture
Hiel - I refer the reader to those two passages in Scripture, for the short but striking account of this man, whose boldness, in face of the curse Joshua pronounced, led him to so daring an act as that of building Jericho, and whose rashness the Lord so fully punished, in conformity to his servant's prediction
Caesar - In Scripture, the reigning emperor is generally mentioned by the name of Caesar, without expressing any other distinction:...
so in Matthew 22:21 ," Render unto Caesar," &c, Tiberius is meant; and in Acts 25:10 , "I appeal unto Caesar," Nero is intended
Arm - As it is by this member of the body that we chiefly exert our strength, it is therefore used in Scripture for an emblem of power
Mount Horeb - This mountain will always be memorable in Scripture; because here it was the Lord appeared to Moses
Sargon - There is some doubt whether he is or is not to be identified with one of the kings elsewhere mentioned in Scripture; and some regard him as having reigned for about three years between Shalmaneser and Sennacherib
Baius, Michel - Ordained in 1541, he taught philosophy at Louvain, where he became president of the College Adrien and professor of Scripture
Silver - It is first mentioned in Scripture in the history of Abraham, Genesis 13:2 20:16 23:16 , and was used in constricting the tabernacle, Exodus 26:19,32 , and afterwards the temple, 1 Chronicles 29:4
Interpretation - We sometimes find various interpretations of the same passage of Scripture and other ancient writings
Barbarian - Indeed, "barbarian" is used in Scripture for every stranger or foreigner who does not speak the native language of the writer, Psalm 114:1 , and includes no implication whatever of savage nature or manners in those respecting whom it is used
Dinah - Daughter of Jacob by Leah, Genesis 30:21 , his only daughter named in Scripture
Clay - The potter's art is referred to in Scripture to illustrate man's dependence upon God, Isaiah 64:8 Romans 9:21
Esar-Haddon - It is only said of him in Scripture that he sent colonists to Samaria, Ezra 4:2
Womb - Womb of the morning, in Scripture, the clouds, which distill dew supposed to be emblematic of the church bringing forth multitudes to Christ
Hind, - It is frequently noticed in the poetical parts of Scripture as emblematic of activity, ( Genesis 49:21 ; Psalm 18:33 ) gentleness, (Proverbs 5:19 ) feminine modesty, (Song of Solomon 2:7 ; 3:5 ) earnest longing, (Psalm 42:1 ) and maternal affection
Cave - The most remarkable caves noticed in Scripture are, that in which Lot dwelt after the destruction of Sodom, (Genesis 19:30 ) the cave of Machpelah, (Genesis 23:17 ) cave of Makkedah, (Joshua 10:10 ) cave of Adullam, (1 Samuel 22:1 ) cave od Engedi, (1 Samuel 24:3 ) Obadiah's cave, (1 Kings 18:4 ) Elijah's cave in Horeb, (1 Kings 19:9 ) the rock sepulchres of Lazarus and of our Lord
Daughter - The word is used in Scripture not only for daughter, but for granddaughter or other female descendant
Dominus Vobis Cum - (Latin: The Lord be with you) ...
A blessing found in Ruth 2:4, and occurring trequently in Scripture with slight variation, notably in the salutation of the Angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:28)
John Cantius, Saint - He studied philosophy and theology, and received the degrees of bachelor, master, and doctor, was ordained priest, occupied the chair of theology at the Academy of Krakow, and was appointed parish priest at Olkusz, but resigned after a short time to teach Sacred Scripture at Krakow
Menochio, Giovanni Stefano - Having entered the Society of Jesus in 1594, he became professor of Sacred Scripture and moral theology at Milan; superior at Cremona, Milan, and Genoa; rector of the Roman College; and provincial at Milan and Rome
Lehmkuhl, Augustinus - Entering the Society of Jesus, 1853, he was ordained, 1862, and appointed professor of Holy Scripture, of dogmatic theology, and of moral theology at the Jesuit scholasticates, Maria-Laach, Germany, and Ditton Hall, England
Cantius, John, Saint - He studied philosophy and theology, and received the degrees of bachelor, master, and doctor, was ordained priest, occupied the chair of theology at the Academy of Krakow, and was appointed parish priest at Olkusz, but resigned after a short time to teach Sacred Scripture at Krakow
Gnosimachi - the studied knowledge or science of Christianity, which they rested wholly on good works; calling it a useless labour to seek for knowledge in the Scripture
Mint - sylvestris), and there can be little doubt that this is the mint of Scripture
Decapolis - Thrice mentioned in Scripture: Mark 5:20, which shows that it was around Gadara (Mark 7:31; Matthew 4:25)
Gouging the Eyes - Scripture records such events as cruelty, not as examples to follow
Scripture: Versus System - The late William Jay, in his 'Practical Illustrations of Character,' says, 'What a difference must a Christian and a minister feel, between the trammels of some systems of divinity and the advantage of Scripture freedom, the glorious liberty of the sons of God
Melita - This island is noted in Scripture as the scene of the shipwreck of Paul Acts 27:1-44
Omniscience - Though Scripture affirms God's immeasurable understanding (Psalm 147:5 ), God's omniscience is not a matter of abstract speculation
Adversary - ...
In Scripture, Satan is called THE adversary, by way of eminence
Arrow - In Scripture, the arrows of God are the apprehensions of his wrath, which pierce and pain the conscience
Giovanni Menochio - Having entered the Society of Jesus in 1594, he became professor of Sacred Scripture and moral theology at Milan; superior at Cremona, Milan, and Genoa; rector of the Roman College; and provincial at Milan and Rome
Chastening - This is in Scripture mostly linked with love and sonship, and implies 'instruction' and 'discipline
Vision - This word hath several significations in Scripture
Crane - Two things are said of this bird in Scripture: it chatters or makes a querulous noise, Isaiah 38:14 ; and it knows its time of migration
Officer - This word is used in Scripture indefinitely for any one in authority, there being seven Hebrew words so translated
Foolish - In Scripture, wicked sinful acting without regard to the divine law and glory, or to one's own eternal happiness
Hewit, Augustine Francis - His "King's Highway" has proved very useful for non-Catholics seeking the truth from Scripture
Augustine Hewit - His "King's Highway" has proved very useful for non-Catholics seeking the truth from Scripture
Augustinus Lehmkuhl - Entering the Society of Jesus, 1853, he was ordained, 1862, and appointed professor of Holy Scripture, of dogmatic theology, and of moral theology at the Jesuit scholasticates, Maria-Laach, Germany, and Ditton Hall, England
Calvary - It is nowhere in Scripture called a "hill
Vine of Sodom - Some judge the vine alluded to in Scripture to be the poisonous colocynth, which grows near the Dead Sea
Jehovah - One of the Scripture names of God, and peculiar to him, signifying the Being who is self-existent, and gives existence to others
Most High - MOST HIGH, MOST HIGHEST...
We find frequent mention made, in holy Scripture, of the Lord JEHOVAH under these appellations; and very blessed and proper they are, when speaking of him
Abstinence - The Scripture sense of both these words hath a very extensive meaning, beyond the mere abstinence of the body
Tadmor - There is no other Scripture mention of this city
Testimony - The whole Scripture, or word of God, which declares what is to be believed, practised, and expected by us, is called God's "testimony," and sometimes in the plural "testimonies," Psalms 19:7
Air - In Scripture it is sometimes used for heaven; as, "the birds of the air;" "the birds of heaven
Bul - We find the name of this month mentioned in Scripture but once, 1 Kings 6:38
Elam - It is frequently mentioned in Scripture, as lying to the south-east of Shinar
Death - This is referred to in Scripture under various aspects
Bramble - The author of "Scripture Illustrated" says, that the bramble seems to be well chosen as the representative of the original; which should be a plant bearing fruit of some kind, being associated, Judges 9:14 , though by opposition, with the vine
Pots - Job 41:20 , applied in Scripture to a great variety of domestic vessels, of earthenware, iron, brass, and gold, used for cooking and serving food, etc
Chaff - In Scripture, false doctrines, fruitless designs, hypocrites and ungodly men are compared to chaff
Captivity - ...
To lead captivity captive, in Scripture, is to subdue those who have held others in slavery, or captivity
Faithful - This appellation is given in Scripture to true Christians, to indicate not only their saving faith in Christ, but their trustworthy and consistent Christian character, Acts 16:15 1 Corinthians 4:17 Ephesians 6:21 Colossians 4:9 1 Peter 5:12
Trance - Numerous instances are mentioned in Scripture: as that of Balaam, Numbers 24:4,16 ; those of Peter and Paul, Acts 10:10 22:17 2 Corinthians 12:1-4
Schism - ...
In Scripture, the word seems to denote a breach of charity, rather than a difference of doctrine
Chariots - Scripture speaks of two sorts of these: one for princes and generals to ride in, Genesis 41:43 ; the other to break the enemy's battalions, by rushing in among them, being "chariots of iron," that is, armed with iron scythes or hooks, projecting from the ends of the axle-trees
Righteous - The righteous, in Scripture, denote the servants of God, the saints
Slime of the Earth - Term used in Holy Scripture in the sense of the material of which man's body is formed, found in the Reims-Douay Version (Genesis 2; Tobias 8)
Wine - ...
Corn and wine, in Scripture, are put for all kinds of necessaries for subsistence
Lord's Day, the - Scripture says very little concerning this day; but that little seems to indicate that the divinely-inspired apostles, by their practice and by their precepts, marked the first day of the week as a day for meeting together to break bread, for communicating and receiving instruction, for laying up offerings in store for charitable purposes, for occupation in holy thought and prayer
East - Nearly all the references in Scripture to the East or to other quarters are of course reckoned from Palestine; so that 'children of the East,' 'men of the East,' point out Assyria, Babylon, etc
Enchantments - The words so translated have several signification: the practice of secret arts, (Exodus 7:11,22 ; 8:7 ); "muttered spells," (2 Kings 9:22 ; Micah 5:12 ) the charming of serpents, (Ecclesiastes 10:11 ) the enchantments sought by Balaam, (Numbers 24:1 ) the use of magic, (Isaiah 47:9,12 ) Any resort to these methods of imposture was strictly forbidden in Scripture, (Leviticus 19:26 ; Isaiah 47:9 ) etc
Sentences, the Opening - Short passages of Holy Scripture read atthe beginning of Daily Morning and Evening Prayer, are so called,and are intended to strike the keynote of the service to follow
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - Its peculiar peaceful and gentle habit its often referred to in Scripture. But it is to the first of these species which the various passages of Scripture refer
Tiglathpileser, Tilgathpilneser - Scripture relates that Ahaz met him there, and also that he paid a heavy tribute; but the final result was that Tiglath-pileser, instead of helping Ahaz, distressed him, and carried away captive the tribes on the east of the Jordan. But in 1 Chronicles 5:26 both kings are mentioned as different persons, and the dates of the Pul of Scripture do not agree with those of Tiglath-pileser
Rechabites - The Rabbis interpret this to signify that they should minister in the sanctuary, and say they became united to the Levites; but we find nothing of this in Scripture. Travellers in the East have met with people who trace their origin to Rechab, and who appeal to the Scripture as a proof of God having preserved them
Foreknowledge - The foreknowledge of God is repeatedly spoken of in Scripture. It must be sufficient to say that the Scripture attributes the most perfect prescience to the Deity
Rings - The antiquity of rings appears from Scripture and from profane authors. ...
The ring was used chiefly as a signet to seal with, and Scripture generally assigns it to princes and great persons; as the king of Egypt, Joseph, Ahaz, Jezebel, king Ahasuerus, his favorite Haman, Mordecai, king Darius, etc
Father - The position and authority of the father as the head of the family are expressly assumed and sanctioned in Scripture, as a likeness of that of the Almighty over his creatures. (Exodus 21:15,17 ; 1 Timothy 1:9 ) It is to this well-recognized theory of parental authority and supremacy that the very various uses of the term "father" in Scripture are due
Simplicianus, Saint, Bishop of Milan - Ambrose, who was often consulted by him, and speaks of his continual study of Holy Scripture (Aug. Ambrose on points of Scripture are extant (Ambr
Read, Reading - , Matthew 12:3,5 ; 21:16 ; 24:15 ; of the private "reading" of Scripture, Acts 8:28,30,32 ; of the public "reading" of Scripture, Luke 4:16 ; Acts 13:27 ; 15:21 ; 2 Corinthians 3:15 ; Colossians 4:16 (thrice); 1 Thessalonians 5:27 ; Revelation 1:3 . ...
B — 1: ἀνάγνωσις (Strong's #320 — — anagnosis — an-ag'-no-sis ) in nonbiblical Greek denoted "recognition" or "a survey" (the latter found in the papyri); then, "reading;" in the NT the public "reading" of Scripture, Acts 13:15 ; 2 Corinthians 3:14 ; 1 Timothy 4:13 , where the context makes clear that the reference is to the care required in reading the Scriptures to a company, a duty ever requiring the exhortation "take heed
Ahasuerus - Archbishop Usher is of opinion that this Ahasuerus was Darius Hystaspes; and that Atossa was the Vashti, and Artystona the Esther, of the Scriptures. Joseph Scaliger maintains that Xerxes was the Ahasuerus, and Hamestris his queen, the Esther, of Scripture. The Ahasuerus of Scripture, according to Dr. ...
Ahasuerus is also a name given in Scripture, Ezra 4:6 , to Cambyses, the son of Cyrus; and to Astyages, king of the Medes, Daniel 9:1
Damas'Cus, - This fertile plain, which is nearly circular and about 30 miles in diameter, is due to the river Barada , which is probably the "Abana" of Scripture. Two other streams the Wady Helbon upon the north and the Awaj, which flows direct from Hermon upon the south, increase the fertility of the Damascene plain, and contend for the honor of representing the "Pharpar" of Scripture. It is first mentioned in Scripture in connection with Abraham, ( Genesis 14:15 ) whose steward was a native of the place
Sermon - ) Specifically, a discourse delivered in public, usually by a clergyman, for the purpose of religious instruction and grounded on some text or passage of Scripture
Agag - The last one mentioned in Scripture was "hewed in pieces" by Samuel, before the Lord, because Saul had sinfully spared him and the flocks and herds, when ordered utterly to exterminate them
Abomination - A term applied in Scripture to objects of great detestation
Fouard, Constant - As professor of Holy Scripture at Rouen (1876), and member of the Biblical Commission (1903), he continued his study of sacred sciences and in 1880 began to publish "Les Origines de PEglise," a scholarly work written as an answer to Renan, which contains several books on the Life of Christ, Saint Paul, Saint Peter, and Saint John, presenting a faithful picture of early Christianity
Faith, Rule of - The remote rule of faith is the revealed Word of God, as contained in Holy Scripture and Divine Tradition; the proximate rule of faith is the teaching of the Church drawn from both these sources
Dispensation - The word is not found with this meaning in Scripture
Kindred, Table of - A table set forth in the Prayer Book of theChurch of England, with the title, "Table of Kindred and Affinity,wherein whosoever are related are forbidden in Scripture and in ourlaws to marry together
Rainbow - It is referred to three other times in Scripture (Ezekiel 1:27,28 ; Revelation 4:1-3 ; 10:1 )
Wolf - zeeb, frequently referred to in Scripture as an emblem of treachery and cruelty
Engines - Thus Scripture is confirmed, that the invention was in Judah under Uzziah
Philo Judaeus - (fi' loh jyoo day' uhss) Early Jewish interpreter of Scripture known for use of allegory. ...
Philo's writings—particularly his commentaries on the Scriptures—influenced the early church
Respect of Persons - Scripture repeatedly affirms that God is no respecter of persons, that is, that God does not show partiality; thus God's people are to refrain from prejudice
Fan - The fan of Scripture ( Isaiah 30:24 , Matthew 3:12 , Luke 3:17 ) is the five- or six-pronged wooden winnowing-fork , for which see Agriculture, § 3
Mallow - In Scripture mallow refers to two plants: 1
Abomination - The object of detestation, a common signification in Scripture
Abundant - In Scripture, abounding having in great quantity overflowing with
Poor - By the character of poor is generally meant persons in indigent circumstances of body; but the Scripture meaning of the word poor, is the poverty of soul in respect to our lost and ruined estate by nature
Ethiopia - At times Ethiopia conquered Egypt: two of the kings mentioned in Scripture were Ethiopians
Wall - This word is used in Scripture, not unfrequently figuratively
Arch - at Nippur, of the discovery of early arches by recent explorers, and of the vaulted roofs of later Jewish tombs, this view is now seen to be erroneous, although the arch is not mentioned in Scripture
Hate - In Scripture, it signifies to love less
Hypatia, Writer - The writer is struck by the teaching of the Christians that God died for men; she founds her plea for Nestorius on an appeal to reason and Scripture
Writ - ) That which is written; writing; Scripture; - applied especially to the Scriptures, or the books of the Old and New testaments; as, sacred writ
Devil - He is known in Scripture under a great variety of names, all, more or less, expressive of his character
Earnest - This word is of great importance in the Scripture tongue, applied as it is, with peculiar emphasis, to the work of the Holy Ghost upon the heart
Breath - This word is sometimes made use of in Scripture in allusion to the Lord Jesus Christ
me'Sech, me'Shech - (drawing out ), a son of Japhet, ( Genesis 10:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:5 ) and the progenitor of a race frequently noticed in Scripture in connection with Tubal, Magog and other northern nations
Clay - חמר , is often mentioned in Scripture, nor is it necessary to explain the various references to what is so well known
Sharon - It extended from Joppa to Cæsarea (whence it is frequently in Scripture coupled with Carmel), and from the central hills to the Mediterranean
Restitution - The repairing of wrongs done, and the restoring of what one has wrongfully taken from another, are strictly enjoined in Scripture, and are a necessary evidence of true repentance, Exodus 22:1-15 ; Nehemiah 5:1-13 ; Luke 19:8 . In Acts 3:21 , the time of the "restitution of all things," is the time when Christ shall appear in his glory, and establish his kingdom as foretold in the Scriptures
Outward - In Scripture, : public as opposed to religious
Reconciliation - In Scripture, the means by which sinners are reconciled and brought into a state of favor with God, after natural estrangement or enmity the atonement expiation
Respect of Persons - Thus ought men to estimate and treat their fellow men; and to court the favor of the rich and influential is sharply censured in Scripture, Proverbs 28:21 James 2:1-9 Jude 1:16
Rule of Faith - The remote rule of faith is the revealed Word of God, as contained in Holy Scripture and Divine Tradition; the proximate rule of faith is the teaching of the Church drawn from both these sources
Nose - Several expressions in Scripture grew out of the fact that anger often shows itself by distended nostrils, hard breathing, and in animals by snorting, 2 Samuel 22:9 Job 39:20 Psalm 18:8
Gilbo'a - ( 1 Samuel 28:4 ) with 1 Samuel 29:1 It is mentioned in Scripture only in connection with one event in Israelitish history, the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan by the Philistines
lu'Cifer - Jerome downward, to Satan in his fall from heaven arises probably from the fact that the Babylonian empire is in Scripture represented as the type of tyrannical and self idolizing power, and especially connected with the empire of the Evil One in the Apocalypse
Keys, Power of - In Holy Scripture, the "Power ofthe Keys" is called a "binding and loosing"; also a "remitting andretaining of sin," having reference to the authority to admit intocommunion with the Church or to exclude therefrom
Responds - In the old system of reading Holy Scripture in DivineService, short selections from different books of the Bible wereread successively, with short Anthems being sung after each, whichwere called "responds. " This responsory system of reading HolyScripture is still retained in its old form in the case of the TenCommandments when read in the Communion service
Scriptures in the Prayer Book - It has been pointed out, on theauthority of a careful and detailed calculation that of the wholePrayer-book, three-fifths of it are taken from the Bible and thattwo-fifths of all the Church's worship are carried on in the actualwords of Holy Scripture
Bible, Concordances of the - It is often useful or even necessary for scholars, preachers, and others to locate a given text in the Scripture, that is, to know in which book of the Bible it occurs, and in what chapter and verse it will be found. For the Catholic Bible (Douay Version), we have a "Concordance of the Proper Names in the Holy Scriptures," by Williams, Saint Louis, 1923, and a "Verbal Concordance to the New Testament" by Thompson, London, 1928. The word "concordance" is sometimes, but incorrectly, used for a collection of Scripture texts arranged according to subject matter
Cedar - Special reference is made to it in Scripture, as "the trees of the Lord are full of sap; the cedars of Lebanon which he hath planted. It cannot be considered as one of the trees of Palestine proper, but is constantly connected in Scripture with Lebanon, where it still grows in a group of some 300, a few being very old, and with no others near: the neighbouring people regard them with reverence
Philosopher, Philosophy - This latter is variously designated in Scripture as the wisdom of this world, fleshly wisdom, wisdom of man, the wisdom that does not come from above. For instance, with some, Christianity is regarded as emanating from man, and so is compared with Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, all of which are said to be branches of the same religion of man; though Christianity is judged to be the best, none are to be condemned; there is truth in them all! Others sit in judgement on the word of God, and profess to be able to cut out many parts as not being written by the professed writers, and having no claim, ought not to form a part of Scripture. Others declare that modern thought cannot be cramped up in the dogmas hitherto held by Christians almost universally, which in general really means what Scripture teaches. ...
Again, another class resort to spirits, and let them teach them: they imagine the inhabitants of the unseen world must be able to tell them what is true, and these spirits even profess to interpret Scripture for them. ...
These and other delusions prove how busy Satan is in using the mind of man to exalt man in his own eyes, and to lead him away from thescriptures, which alone are able to make wise unto salvation
sa'Tan - The personal existence of a spirit of evil is clearly revealed in Scripture; but the revelation is made gradually, in accordance with the progressiveness of God's method. The captivity brought the Israelites face to face with the great dualism of the Persian mythology, the conflict of Ormuzd with Ahriman, the co-ordinate spirit of evil; but it is confessed by all that the Satan of Scripture bears no resemblance to the Persian Ahriman. Of the nature and original state of Satan, little is revealed in Scripture. As to the time cause and manner of his fall Scripture tells us scarcely anything; but it describes to us distinctly the moral nature of the evil one. Besides this direct influence, we learn from Scripture that Satan is the leader of a host of evil spirits or angels who share his evil work, and for whom the "everlasting fire is prepared. They are mostly spoken of in Scripture in reference to possession; but in (Ephesians 6:12 ) find them sharing the enmity to God and are ascribed in various lights. The indirect action of Satan is best discerned by an examination of the title by which he is designated in Scripture. "trial," is essential to man, and is accordingly ordained for him and sent to him by God, as in (Genesis 22:1 ) It is this tentability of man, even in his original nature, which is represented in Scripture as giving scope to the evil action of Satan
Malachi - The last of the prophets, in closing the sacred canon of the Old Testament Scripture. And such views of the name tend, in my humble opinion, to confirm what I have before remarked in the former part of this Concordance, under the word Archangel, (which see) that Christ, the glorious angel of the covenant, is the only archangel of Scripture. And with this man's ministry, the Holy Ghost closeth the sacred volume of the Old Testament Scripture
Image - Nothing can be more clear, full, and distinct, than the expressions of Scripture prohibiting the making and worship of images, Exodus 20:4-5 ; Deuteronomy 16:22 . ...
That the first Christians had no images, is evident from this circumstance,—that they were reproached by the Heathens, because they did not use them; and we find almost every ecclesiastical writer of the first four centuries arguing against the Gentile practice of image worship, from the plain declarations of Scripture, and from the pure and spiritual nature of God. Hence idolatry, in general, is condemned in Scripture; and all use of images in the worship of God, making or bowing to any likeness, is absolutely forbidden
Armenia - It is only named in Scripture as the place of refuge of two Assyrian parricides, 2 Kings 19:37
Asherah - Such religious symbols ("groves") are frequently alluded to in Scripture (Exodus 34:13 ; Judges 6:25 ; 2 Kings 23:6 ; 1 Kings 16:33 , etc
Laodicea - The city of this name mentioned in Scripture lay on the confines of Phrygia and Lydia, about 40 miles east of Ephesus (Revelation 3:14 ), on the banks of the Lycus
Habor - This was not, however, the Habor of Scripture
Witchcraft - In the popular sense of the word no mention is made either of witches or of witchcraft in Scripture
Linus - Irenaeus implies that Linus was made bishop by Paul and Peter before Peter's death; but the Scripture evidence is against Peter's having been at Rome at all, and certainly before Paul's death
Caraites - A Jewish sect, which adheres closely to the text and letter of the Scriptures, rejecting the rabbinical interpretations and the cabbala. Those who maintained the Talmud being almost all rabbins, were called rabbinists; and the others, who rejected traditions, were called Caraites, or Scripturists, from the word cara, which in the Babylonish language signifies Scripture
Bear - A native of the mountain regions of Western Asia, frequently mentioned in Scripture
Ludim - The Egyptian monuments confirm Scripture accuracy
Forbearance - The express command of Scripture, Ephesians 4:2
Maccabees, the - Name of a noted Jewish family not mentioned in Scripture
Type - Occurs only once in Scripture (1 Corinthians 10:11 , A
Bridge - The only hint of bridges in Scripture is the proper name Geshur, in Bashan, N
Examination For Holy Orders - The Books of Holy Scripture, in English, Greek and Hebrew. ...
The Examination for Deacon's Orders is on the Books of HolyScripture, and on the Book of Common Prayer
Reverence - In Scripture, reverence is paid: to father and mother (Leviticus 19:3 ; Hebrews 12:9 ); to God (1Kings 18:3,1 Kings 18:12 ; Hebrews 12:28 ); to God's sanctuary (Leviticus 19:30 ; Leviticus 26:2 ); and to God's commandments (Psalm 119:48 )
Wine - Scripture condemns drunkenness and overindulgence, but pictured wine as a part of the typical ancient meal
Blood - From this fundamental conception of blood as the vehicle of life may be derived all the manifold social and religious beliefs and practices with regard to it, which play so large a part in Scripture
Conversation - This word is not used in Scripture in the sense of familiar discourse
Sandals - We meet with this word but twice in the Scripture, Mark 6:9; Acts 12:8
Shoulder - Often alluded to in Scripture as the place of strength, on which burdens are borne
Propitiation - ' Propitiation represents in Scripture that aspect of the death of Christ in which has been vindicated the holy and righteous character of God, and in virtue of which He is enabled to be propitious, or merciful, to the whole world
Forsake - In Scripture, God forsakes his people, when he withdraws his aid, or the light of his countenance
Massalians - Jortin, that this sect did not last long; that these sluggards were soon starved out of the world; or, rather, that cold and hunger sharpened their wits, and taught them to be better interpreters of Scripture
Thunder - This is of rare occurrence in Palestine, and is regarded in Scripture as being the voice of God in power, both in the O
Acrostic - The term is also applied to passages in Scripture in which the texts begin with letters of the alphabet in consecutive order, e
Giants - GIANT, GIANTS...
The Scripture speaks of such characters in the old world, Genesis 6:4
Chains - In Scripture those expressions are frequently made use of to denote the constraining love of Christ
Midian - (See Numbers 22:1-41) The name is derived from Niddin, judgment There were several persons called Midian in Scripture
Michael - We meet with this name only five times in Scripture: thrice in Daniel 10:13; Dan 10:21; Dan 12:1, once in Jude 1:1:9, and once in Revelation 12:7
Chit'Tim, Kit'Tim - Chittim is frequently noticed in Scripture
Nature - In Scripture the word nature expresses the orderly and usual course of things established in the world
Seth - Seth was the chief of "the children of God," as the Scripture calls them, Genesis 6:2 that is, those who before the flood preserved true religion and piety in the world, while the descendants of Cain gave themselves up to wickedness
Mulberry Tree - There is somewhat sacred in the mulberry-tree, and holy Scripture seems to have pointed this out very strikingly, when directing the movement of the Lord's army to be, when the people heard the sound of a going in the mulberry-trees; for thereby they should know that the Lord went out before them
Hinnom - Ge Hinnom, or "The Valley of Hinnom," from which the Greeks framed their Gehenna, is sometimes used in Scripture to denote hell or hell fire
Lesson - ) A portion of Scripture read in divine service for instruction; as, here endeth the first lesson
Citizenship - The use of this term in Scripture refers to the usages of the Roman empire
Lead - It is mentioned several times in Scripture as entering into the process of purifying more precious metals, Jeremiah 6:29; Ezekiel 22:1-31; Ezekiel 18:1-32; Ezekiel 20:1-49; for which purpose quicksilver is now used
Perizzites - In several places of Scripture, the Canaanites and Perizzites are mentioned as the chief people of the country; as in the time of Abraham and Lot, Genesis 13:7
Raphael the Archangel - One of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (see also Gabriel and Michael)
Shallum - Scripture says that Shallun was the executioner of the threatenings of the Lord against the house of Jehu, 2 Kings 15:10-15
Lively - Lively stones, in Scripture
Reconciliation - In Scripture, is the restoration of harmony between two persons at variance, by the removal of existing obstacles, 1 Samuel 29:4
Enchantments - All these are expressly forbidden and denounced in Scripture, Exodus 22:18 Leviticus 19:26 20:27 Deuteronomy 18:10,11
Vanity - Does not usually denote, in Scripture, self-conceit or personal pride, 2 Peter 2:18 , but sometimes emptiness and fruitlessness, Job 7:3 Psalm 144:4 Ecclesiastes 1:1-18
Lead - There are early allusions to this well-known metal in Scripture
Fornication - This word is used in Scripture not only for the sin of impurity between unmarried persons, but for idolatry, and for all kinds of infidelity to God
Drought - A drought therefore is threatened as one of God's sorest judgments, Job 24:19 Jeremiah 50:38 Joel 1:10-20 Haggai 1:11 ; and there are many allusions to its horrors in Scripture, Deuteronomy 28:23 Psalm 32:4 102:4
Phile'Tus - 68-64) Thep appear to have been persons who believed the Scripture of the Old Testament, but misinterpreted them, allegorizing away the doctrine of the resurrection and resolving it all into figure and metaphor
Citizenship - The use of this term in Scripture has exclusive reference to the usages of the Roman empire
Patriarchs - As to the name of patriarch given to the Greek church in modern times, this is altogether fanciful, and not derived from any authority in Scripture
Anthem - " Antiphon hascome to mean a verse of Scripture which is sung wholly or in partbefore and after the Psalms or Canticles, and designed to strikethe key-note of the teaching of the day
Introit - Some of these are selectedwith a "striking appropriateness to the days for which they areappointed and show a deep appreciation of the prophetic sense ofHoly Scripture
Decree - Scripture attributes just decrees to divine wisdom (Proverbs 8:15 ). Scripture also recognizes unjust decrees (Isaiah 10:1 )
City - Which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God, (Hebrews 11:10) I think it not improper to notice this, in a work of this kind, inasmuch as we meet with the expression frequently in Scripture, both in allusion to the church of God upon earth, and the church triumphant in heaven. (Psalms 137:6) Reader, what saith your heart to those characters? (See that Scripture, Revelation 22:14-15)...
Athanasians - And since every sect was willing to adopt the language of Scripture, it was thought necessary to adopt scholastic terms, in order to fix the sense of Scripture language
Inspiration - That extraordinary or supernatural divine influence vouchsafed to those who wrote the Holy Scriptures, rendering their writings infallible. "All Scripture is given by inspiration of God" (RSV, "Every Scripture inspired of God"), 2 Timothy 3:16
Allegory - The word ‘allegory’ has come to be used more particularly of a certain type of Scripture interpretation (q. Its fundamental characteristic is the distinction between the apparent meaning of Scripture and a hidden meaning to be discovered by the skill of the interpreter. They were less ready than Philo to abandon the primary meaning of Scripture, but they freely employed allegorical devices, particularly in the Haggadic midrâshîm. ...
When Christians in the Apostolic Age began to interpret Scripture, it was inevitable that they should follow the allegorical tendencies so prevalent at the time
Scripture (2) - SCRIPTURE. —The scope of this article does not permit the discussion in it of the employment of Scripture, or of the estimate put upon Scripture, by either our Lord or the Evangelists. It is strictly limited to the use of the term ‘Scripture’ in the NT, particularly in the Gospels: and to the immediate implications of that use. The idea of a ‘canon’ of ‘Sacred Scriptures’ (and with the idea the thing) was handed down to Christianity from Judaism. The Jews possessed a body of writings, consisting of ‘Law, Prophets, and (other) Scriptures (Kethûbhîm),’ though they were often called, for brevity’s sake, merely ‘the Law and the Prophets’ or simply ‘the Law. ’ These ‘Sacred Scriptures,’ or this ‘Scripture’ (הכתיב) as it was frequently called, or these ‘Books,’ or simply this ‘Book’ (הספר), they looked upon as originating in Divine inspiration, and as therefore possessed everywhere of Divine authority. Whatever stood written in these Scriptures was a word of God, and was therefore referred to indifferently as something which ‘Scripture says’ (אמר קרא, or אמר הבתיב, or כתיב קּרא), or ‘the All-Merciful says’ (אמר רחמנא), or even simply ‘He says’ (וכן הוא אומר or merely ואומר); that God is the Speaker in the Scriptural word being too fully understood to require explicit expression. Every precept or dogma was supposed to be grounded in Scriptural teaching, and possessed authority only as buttressed by a Scripture passage, introduced commonly by one or the other of the formulas ‘for it is said’ (שׁנאמר) or ‘as it is written’ (רכתיב or כדכתיב), though, of course, a great variety of more or less frequently occurring formulas of adduction are found. Acts 28:23, Luke 16:29; Luke 16:31), or merely as ‘the Law’ (John 10:34, 1 Corinthians 14:21), or even, perhaps, ‘the Prophets’ (Matthew 2:23; Matthew 11:13; Matthew 26:56, Luke 1:70; Luke 18:31; Luke 24:25; Luke 24:27, Acts 3:24; Acts 13:27, Romans 1:2; Romans 16:26), were, when thought of according to their nature, a body of ‘sacred Scriptures’ (Romans 1:2, 2 Timothy 3:16), or, with the omission of the unnecessary, because well-understood adjective, simply by way of eminence, ‘the Scriptures,’ ‘Scripture. Elsewhere in the NT, however, γράμματα is scarcely used as a designation of Scripture (cf. Practically, therefore, γραφή, in its varied uses, remains the sole form employed in the NT in the sense of ‘Scripture,’ ‘Scriptures. This term occurs in the NT about fifty times (Gospels 23, Acts 7, Catholic Epistles 6, Paul 14); and in every case it bears that technical sense in which it designates the Scriptures by way of eminence, the Scriptures of the OT. 1 Timothy 5:18) that the NT writers were well aware that the category ‘Scripture,’ in the high sense, included also the writings they were producing, as along with the books of the OT constituting the complete ‘Scripture’ or authoritative Word of God. In 20 out of the 50 instances in which γραφή occurs in the NT, it is the plural form which is used, and in all but two of these cases the article is present—αἱ γραφαί, the well-known Scriptures of the Jewish people; and the two exceptions are exceptions only in appearance, since adjectival definitions are present (γραφαὶ ἅγιαι, Romans 1:2, here first in extant literature; γραφαὶ προφητικαί, Romans 16:26). The singular form occurs some 30 times, all but four of which have the article; and here again the exceptions are only apparent, the term being definite in every case (John 19:37 ‘another Scripture’; 1 Peter 2:6, 2 Peter 1:20, 2 Timothy 3:16, used as a proper name). On the other hand, γραφή, in its application to literary products, seems to have sprung lightly across the intermediate steps to designate which γράμμα is most appropriately used, and to have been carried over at once from the ‘writing’ in the sense of the script to the ‘writing’ in the sense of the Scripture. But we are struck at once with the fact that γραφή occurs in the NT solely in its pregnant technical usage as a designation of the Sacred Scriptures. It is tempting, no doubt, to seek to give it such a sense in some of the passages where, occurring in the singular, it yet does not seem to designate the Scriptures in their entirety, and Dr. It is more tempting still to assume that behind the common use of the plural αἱ γραφαί to designate the Scriptures as a whole, there lies a previous current usage by which each book which enters into the composition of these ‘Scriptures’ was designated by the singular ἡ γραφή. But in no single passage where ἡ γραφή occurs does it seem possible to give it a reference to the ‘treatise’ to which the appeal is made; and the common employment in profane Greek of γραφαί (in the plural) for a single document, discourages the assumption that (like τὰ βιβλία) when applied to the Scriptures it has reference to their composite character. the other Scripture statements (cf. § 11 near end)—the implication being that no part of Scripture was safe in their hands. In the Church Fathers the plural αἱ γραφαί is formed freely upon ἡ γραφή both in the sense of ‘book’ of Scripture and in the sense of ‘passage’ of Scripture
Phylactery - A strip of parchment on which some verses of Scripture were written, e
Lip - Many similar forms of expression are found in Scripture
Nile - Dark; blue, not found in Scripture, but frequently referred to in the Old Testament under the name of Sihor, i
Thunder - Often referred to in Scripture (Job 40:9 ; Psalm 77:18 ; 104:7 )
Aven - Probably the great plain of Lebanon, Coele-Syria (included in the Scripture designation, "Syria of Damascus"), in which the idol temple of Baalbek or Heliopolis, the city of the sun god Baal, stood
Daric - It is the first coin mentioned in Scripture, and is the oldest that history makes known to us
Sea - The sea, yam , is used in Scripture to denote--
"The gathering of the waters," "the Ocean
Wormwood - Wormwood, though medicinal, if used as ordinary water would be fatal; heretical wormwood changes the sweet Siloas of Scripture into deadly Marahs (Wordsworth); contrast Exodus 15:23, etc
Contrite - This word signifies beaten or bruised, as with hard blows, or an heaver burden; and so in Scripture language imports one whose heart is broken and wounded for sin, on opposition to the heart of stone, Is
Mesha - A most wonderful corroboration of the Scripture history is found In the famous Moabite stone
Scepter - Ancient Middle Eastern scepters were depicted in Scripture as the striking power of the king (Numbers 24:17 )
Notable - In Scripture, conspicuous sightly as a notable horn
Cistern - Cisterns are frequently mentioned in Scripture
Phylactery - Phylactery particularly denoted a slip of parchment, wherein was written some text of holy Scripture, particularly of the decalogue, which the more devout people among the Jews wore at the forehead, the breast, or the neck, as a mark of their religion
Mantle - ’...
A description of the only specific mantle occurring in the relevant section of Scripture will be found under article Cloke
Christian - ...
It was not long, alas! before the outward profession of Christbecame separated from true faith in Him in the great mass who were recognised as Christians in the world, and in practice they became anything but followers of Christ, as both Scripture and history show. To learn what Christianity is according to God, we must turn, not to the great professing body, but to the Scriptures, which testify clearly of the declension which was even then begun
Brass - As 'brass' is a compound, it is probable that copper is the metal often alluded to in Scripture
Bald - Deuteronomy 14:1 (a) Baldness in this Scripture would indicate that the people were opposed to GOD's judgments and GOD's dealings and would prove it to others by making themselves bald
Walking - In the language of Scripture, this is frequently made use of to denote the state of the soul before God
Shelomith - This woman's name is rendered memorable in Scripture, from having a son who blasphemed the Lord
Malchiah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture
Man of od - There are several men in the Scripture to whom is applied this type
Going - Psalms 68 ...
Going out, ...
Goings out, In Scripture, utmost extremity or limit the point where an extended body terminates
Covenant Theology - It represents the whole of Scripture as covenantal in structure and theme
Text - ) A verse or passage of Scripture, especially one chosen as the subject of a sermon, or in proof of a doctrine
Gennesaret - It is named only twice in Scripture
Anathema Maranatha - We meet with this expression but once in the Scripture
Manger - Schleusner contends that the word implies in Scripture "any enclosure, but especially a vestibule to the house, where the cattle were, not enclosed with walls, but wooden hurdles
Bottle - Several words are used in Scripture which our translators have rendered "bottle
Charity - Paul, 1 Corinthians 13; a portion of Scripture which, as it shows the habitual temper of a true Christian, cannot be too frequently referred to for self-examination, and ought to be constantly present to us as our rule
Destruction - There is no thought in Scripture of annihilation in any of the passages, and even in material things it is agreed that there is no such thing as annihilation
Lead - It was early known to the ancients, and the allusions to it in Scripture indicate that the Hebrews were well acquainted with its uses
Dagon - Scripture shows clearly that the statue of Dagon was human, at least, the upper part of it
Asa - In the latter part of his life he became diseased in his feet; and Scripture reproaches him with having had recourse to the physicians, rather than to the Lord
Satisfaction - That such a debt of punishment may reamin after the sin itself has been forgiven, and that man can make satisfaction for it, is evident from Scripture (2 Kings 12; Jonah 3), and from Christian tradition
Gaius or Caius - The name was a common one wherever the Romans lived; and yet it is not certain that more than one or two different individuals of this name are spoken of in Scripture
Mouth - Is sometimes used in Scripture for speaker, Exodus 4:16 Jeremiah 15:19
Nets - Are often referred to in Scripture, Proverbs 1:17 Ecclesiastes 7:26 Isaiah 19:8,9 Habakkuk 1:15,16 , particularly in connection with the first disciples of Christ, Matthew 4:18 13:47-50 Luke 5:1-10
Immortality - All arguments, however, are unsatisfying without the testimony of Scripture
Gods - The words god and gods, Hebrew ELOHIM, are several times used in Scripture to express the power, office, or excellence of some created beings, as angels, magistrates, Exodus 22:20,28 Psalm 86:8 97:12 ; often also for the false gods of the heathen
Desert - The Scriptures, by "desert," generally mean an uncultivated place, a wilderness, or grazing tract. Scripture names several deserts in the Holy Land
Saint - It is particularly applied to the apostles and other holy persons mentioned in Scripture
Scripture - There is not any action that a man ought to do or forbear, but the Scripture will give him a clear precept or prohibition for it. ...
Compared with the knowledge which the Scriptures contain, every other subject of human inquiry is vanity and emptiness
Terror - In Scripture, the sudden judgments of God are called terrors
Vision - In Scripture, a revelation from God an appearance or exhibition of something supernaturally presented to the minds of the prophets, by which they were informed of future events
Altar - " "Altar" and "Table" are used interchangeablyin Holy Scripture, and both words are used in the Prayer Book forthe same thing
Lessons, the - The word "Lesson" is derived from the Latin lectio,meaning a reading, and signifies a portion of Scripture appointedto be read during Divine service; applied especially to thoseScriptures read in the Daily Services. " (See CALENDAR, LECTIONARY, andalso ScriptureS IN PRAYER BOOK
Restitution of All Things - The restitution mentioned in Scripture is of all things "which God hath spoken by the mouth of all his holy prophets
Reason - Watts, "which are plainly and expressly asserted in Scripture, and that in a sense which contradicts not other parts of Scripture, or natural light, our reason must submit, and believe the thing, though it cannot find the modus or manner of its being so in the doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation, which are above the reach of our reason in this present state. But we cannot, nor must we, be led to take the words of Scripture in such a sense as expressly and evidently contradicts all sense and reason, as transubstantiation: for the two great lights of God, reason and revelation, never contradict each other, though one be superior to the other
Syria, Syrian - In Scripture this name mostly signifies the district lying north and north-east of Palestine, the inhabitants of which were Syrians. For the sub-divisions of Syria mentioned in Scripture see ARAM. ...
There are but few references to the Syrians in the early part of Scripture
Judgment the Day of - Scripture, therefore, points onward to a time when all these apparent anomalies will be explained, when a great assize will sit, and a just recompense of reward will be meted out to men. Scripture gives us reason to believe that the latter will be the course of God's procedure, Matthew 25:31-46; Revelation 20:12-13; and a day is spoken of, sometimes called the "last day," John 11:24, sometimes the "great day," Judges 1:6, when this shall be
Sparrow - The Holy Ghost hath taken such notice of this little bird, and thereby rendered the term so familiar to our ears, by his frequent mention of it in Scripture, that I could not altogether find in my heart to pass it by unnoticed. Moreover, it is one of the clean birds: (see Leviticus 11:1-47) not that I suppose that the sparrow, so called in Scripture, is of the same genus or tribe as our English sparrows of the barn; though this much despised bird is in my esteem a very sweet, interesting, and domestic bird; but certainly the sparrow, or the Tzippher, as the Hebrews called it, of the Scriptures, must have been of gentle and familiar manners
Holy - Hallowed consecrated or set apart to a sacred use, or to the service or worship of God a sense frequent in Scripture as the holy sabbath holy oil holy vessels a holy nation the holy temple a holy priesthood. Holy of holies, in Scripture, the innermost apartment of the Jewish tabernacle or temple, where the ark was kept,and where no person entered, except the high priest, once a year
Apostasy - This is, as Scripture says, like the dog returning to his vomit, and the sow to her wallowing in the mire. Scripture holds out no hope in a case of deliberate apostasy, though nothing is too hard for the Lord
Rings - The antiquity of rings appears from Scripture and from profane authors. The ring was used chiefly to seal with, and Scripture generally assigns it to princes and great persons; as the king of Egypt, Joseph, Ahaz, Jezebel, King Ahasuerus, his favourite Haman, Mordecai, King Darius, 1 Kings 21:8 ; Esther 3:10 , &c; Daniel 6:17
Parmenianus, a Bishop of Carthage - About 372 Tichonius, a Donatist, well versed in Scripture, becoming sensible of the narrow and exclusive views of the sect, wrote a book to condemn them, but without abandoning his party. For a full account of the treatise, with a list of Scripture quotations, see Ribbek, Donatus und Augustinus , pp
Archangel - So that, what is said of angels and archangels, together in hymns of praise, seems to be founded in a misapprehension of Scripture in relation to one arch-angel only, for the word of God speaks of no more, and the name is not plural. ...
The question is, who is this archangel, twice, and but twice only, noticed as such in Scripture? if the reader will consult both places, he will find that of whomsoever it be spoken of it is only spoken of him in office. For my own part, I do not hesitate to believe that it is Christ himself, which is meant by the name archangel in Scripture; and of whom it is said, in relation to his coming at the last day, that "he shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels. " (Hebrews 2:16)...
From the whole view of this subject, I venture to believe, that, as Scripture speaks but of one arch-angel, and that officially, that archangel is Christ. If, while Jesus is called the angel of the covenant, is there an archangel also, above this angel of the covenant? I leave these questions with any one, not satisfied with my former observations, that the Lord Jesus Christ is the person spoken of twice in Scripture as the arch-angel
Dancing - (Old High German: dinsan, to draw out, as in forming a chain) ...
Expression of feeling by rhythmical movement of the body, mentioned in Scripture as expressing joy on the part of the women of Israel, led by Mary, the sister of Moses (Exodus 15), and of David before the Ark (2Kings)
Maas, Anthony j - He was professor of Scripture (1891-1905) and prefect of studies (1897-1905) at Woodstock, assistant editor of "The Messenger," New York (1905-1907), rector of Woodstock College (1907-1912), and provincial of the New York-Maryland Province, resident in New York (1912-1927)
Hermas - to be on a level with Scripture
Heart - " Thus, the Scripture implies that the heart and the head act and react on one another; and in men's unbelief it is the will that perverts the intellectual perceptions
Firmament - In Scripture, the word denotes an expanse, a wide extent for such is the signification of the Hebrew word, coinciding with regio, region, and reach
Sinai - The peninsula is usually called in Scripture ‘the desert (or wilderness) of Sinai
Anthony Maas - He was professor of Scripture (1891-1905) and prefect of studies (1897-1905) at Woodstock, assistant editor of "The Messenger," New York (1905-1907), rector of Woodstock College (1907-1912), and provincial of the New York-Maryland Province, resident in New York (1912-1927)
Furnace - In Scripture, a place of cruel bondage and affliction
Guilty - In Scripture, to be guilty of death, is to have committed a crime which deserves death
Seed - ...
2 Corinthians 9:10 (b) There are precious portions of the Scripture which can best be used by each individual Christian
Hail - Though hail is usually formed by natural causes not yet perhaps well understood, it is often referred to in Scripture as one of the judgements of God
Phrygia - The Phrygia meant in Scripture is the southern portion (called "greater Phrygia") of the region above, and contained Laodicea, Hierapolis, Colosse, and Iconium
Wolf - The well-known animal, described in Scripture as 'ravening,' and seeking its prey in the evening
Preach - ) To proclaim or publish tidings; specifically, to proclaim the gospel; to discourse publicly on a religious subject, or from a text of Scripture; to deliver a sermon
Fruit - FRUIT, FRUITS...
In addition to what hath been already offered under the title of First Fruits (which see,) it may not be amiss to observe, that the holy Scriptures are full of expressions to denote the blessedness of the fruits of the Spirit. The Lord in the Old Testament Scripture gave exceeding great and precious promises of blessings, which were to be expected in the fruits and effects under the New Testament dispensation; and in the gospel the Lord Jesus confirmed the whole, when promising to send the Holy Ghost, and testified of his manifold gifts which should follow
Abomination - In the language of Scripture, the word abomination for the most part means idolatry
Branch - This word is often used figuratively in Scripture
Crown - "Many crowns" is an expression occurring in Scripture, Revelation 19:12; it being customary for those who claimed authority over more than one country to wear double or united crowns
Antioch of Pisidia - There were several other cities of the same name, sixteen in number, in Syria and Asia Minor, built by the Seleucidae, the successors of Alexander in these countries; but the above two are the only ones which it is necessary to describe as occurring in Scripture
Bezer - When Scripture mentions Bezer, it adds, "in the wilderness," because it lay in Arabia Deserta, and the eastern part of Edom, encompassed with deserts
Phinehas - He is particularly commended in Scripture for zeal in vindicating the glory of God, when the Midianites had sent their daughters into the camp of Israel, to tempt the Hebrews to fornication and idolatry, Numbers 25:7
Hagarenes - But there seems also to have been a particular tribe who bore this name more exclusively, as the Hagarenes are sometimes mentioned in Scripture distinct from the Ishmaelites, Psalms 83:6 ; 1 Chronicles 5:19
Ludim - The descendants of the latter only are mentioned in Scripture: they are mentioned by Isaiah 66:19 , with Pul, whose settlement is supposed to have been about the island Philoe, near the first cataract of the Nile; by Jeremiah 46:9 , with the Ethiopians and Lybians; by Ezekiel 27:10 , with Phut, as the mercenary soldiers of Tyre, and Ezekiel 30:5 , with the Ethiopians and Libyans; all plainly denoting their African position; but in what particular part of that continent this position was, is not known
Fox - The jackal is probably meant in several passages where "fox" now occurs in Scripture
Firmament - It is not the aim of Scripture to give scientific statements of natural phenomena
Jephthah - There is no intimation in Scripture that God approved of his vow, whatever it was
Gennes'Aret - It is mentioned only twice in Scripture - ( Matthew 14:34 ; Mark 6:53 ) Compare Luke 5:1
Nathan'Ael - (gift of God ), a disciple of Jesus Christ, concerning whom, under that name at least, we learn from Scripture little more than his birthplace, Cana of Galilee, ( John 21:2 ) and his simple, truthful character
la'Mech - His three sons, Jabal, Jubal and Tubal-cain, are celebrated in Scripture as authors of useful inventions
Manslayer, - The cases of manslaughter mentioned in Scripture appear to be a sufficient indication of the intention of the lawgiver
Key - They are used in Scripture as a symbol of authority and power
Helmet - " The head is not to be regarded here as standing for the seat of the intellect; the word is not so used elsewhere in Scripture
Scripture - -The general designation for ‘Scripture’ is γραφή or plur. The terms are almost invariably preceded by the definite article, the only exceptions being in John 19:37, 2 Timothy 3:16, where the article before γραφή is replaced by ἑτέρα and πᾶσα respectively, 1 Peter 2:6, 2 Peter 1:20, where γραφή has become a real proper name, and Romans 1:2; Romans 16:26, where the Scriptures are more explicitly characterized as γραφαί ἅγιαι and γραφαί προφητικαί, ‘holy Scriptures’ and ‘prophetic Scriptures. ), letters of commendation or the reverse (Acts 28:21), the writings of Moses (John 5:47), as well as the Sacred Scriptures (in the phrase cited from 2 Timothy 3:15). The question has been widely canvassed whether the singular γραφή applies to the Scriptures as a unified whole, or to some single section or ‘passage’ of Scripture. In his famous note on Galatians 3:22 Lightfoot lays down the principle that ‘the singular γραφή in the NT always means a particular passage of Scripture,’ though in a subsequent comment on Romans 4:3, while insisting that St. In the present writer’s judgment the former contention vindicates itself, even in the Fourth Gospel and in the crucial text Galatians 3:22 (the Apostle having in mind the passages of Scripture adduced either in Galatians 2:16, Galatians 3:10 or in the longer argument of Romans 3:9 ff. The only clear instances of γραφή applied to the Scriptures as a whole appear to be found in 1 Peter 2:6 and 2 Peter 1:20, where the word is already a proper name, the full development of the personifying tendency observable in Galatians 3:8. above), the reference is to the character, not the scope, of the Scriptures. Authority of Scripture. -The peculiar quality of the Scriptures is indicated by the three defining adjectives, ἅγιαι, ἰεραί, and προφητικαί, the notions of ‘holiness’ and ‘sacredness’ bringing the Books into direct relationship with God, and that of ‘prophecy’ leading forward to the revelation of the mystery of God in Christ. The high Jewish theory of the inspiration of Scripture is fully accepted in the NT. בִּרוּחַ הַקֹּדָשׁ), applied to Scripture in all its parts (πᾶσα γραφή), is found indeed only in 2 Timothy 3:16; but the theory underlies the whole attitude of the NT writers to the older revelation. ), As the ‘living oracles’ of God, then, the Scriptures are the final norm alike of faith and of conduct. ); for ‘whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that through patience and through comfort of the Scriptures we might have hope’ (Romans 15:4), while the very quality of their ‘inspiration’ is tested by their helpfulness for teaching, for reproof, ‘for correction, for discipline which is in righteousness’ (2 Timothy 3:16). It must be admitted, however, that the new spirit of Christianity can move freely within the limits of the older Scriptures only by a frequent straining, and even ‘wresting,’ of their natural sense (see article Old Testament). Extent of Scripture. ’ Of the Hagiographa, the Books of Psalms, Proverbs, and Job (in 1 Corinthians 3:19) are explicitly cited as Scripture, while a phrase front Ecclesiastes 7:20 is introduced in the remarkable conflate of OT texts in Romans 3:10 ff. Naturally their own writings have not yet attained to the dignity of Scripture; but a true feeling for the spiritual value of apostolic letters is already evident in 2 Peter 3:15 f. Warfield, article ‘Scripture,’ in Dict
Ass - An animal well known for domestic uses; and frequently mentioned in Scripture. ...
The Wild Ass is a well-known oriental animal, often mentioned in Scripture, and is a much handsomer and more dignified animal than the common ass
Eternal Death - The Scripture as clearly teaches the unending duration of the penal sufferings of the lost as the "everlasting life," the "eternal life" of the righteous. ...
The idea that the "second death" (Revelation 20:14 ) is in the case of the wicked their absolute destruction, their annihilation, has not the slightest support from Scripture, which always represents their future as one of conscious suffering enduring for ever. There is not the slightest trace in all the Scriptures of any such restoration
Remission, Remit - Scripture makes clear that the Lord's words could not have been intended to bestow the exercise of absolution, which Scripture declares is the prerogative of God alone
Catechism - Dr Watts advises that different catechisms should be composed for different ages and capacities; the questions and answers should be short, plain, and easy; scholastic terms, and logical distinctions should be avoided; the most practical points of religion should be inserted and one or more well chosen texts of Scripture should be added to support almost every answer, and to prove the several parts of it. The doctor has admirably exemplified his own rules in the catechism he has composed for children at three or four years old; that for children at seven or eight; his assembly's catechism, proper for youth at twelve of fourteen; his preservative from the sins and follies of childhood; his catechism of Scripture names, and his historical catechism
Hour - Used with various significations in Scripture: as ...
1. The hours of Scripture are now usually reckoned from 6 o'clock A
Feed - FED, FEED...
The expression of feeding in Scripture is, sometimes applied in a good sense, and sometimes in a bad one. (Isaiah 44:20)...
But the general and principal use of the term in Scripture of feeding, is applied to the Lord Jesus Christ
Earth - There are many senses in which this word is used in holy Scripture. Poor vain man! when shortly after, all that he could embrace of the earth, or the earth him, was just his own breadth and length to lie down upon for corruption and to mingle with in the dust! The word earth is also spoken of by way of a natural and moral sense, Hence, in opposition to spirit, the Scripture describes the first man as of the earth, earthy; while the second man is declared to be, the Lord from heaven
Ransom - In Scripture, the price paid for a forfeited life, or for delivery or release from capital punishment. In Scripture, to redeem from the bondage of sin, and from the punishment to which sinners are subjected by the divine law
Oath, - As a consequence of this principle, appeals to God's name on the one hand, and to heathen deities on the other, are treated in Scripture as tests of allegiance. ) The forms of adjuration mentioned in Scripture are --
Lifting up the hand
Undivided Church - " In all the work ofReformation, covering a long period of time, the appeal wasconstantly made to the primitive standards of the Undivided Church;to Holy Scripture as interpreted by the teaching and customs of thePrimitive Church, the writings of the Fathers and the decisionsof the General Councils. It was during this time, because the Church wasone and undivided, that the Canon of Scripture was established,that it was possible to hold the Ecumenical Councils which defined"the Faith once delivered to the Saints," and gave us the Creeds asthe "Rule of Faith
Tabernacle - Various are the significations of this word in Scripture. What a blessed soul-refreshing view of the Lord Jesus as JEHOVAH'S Tabernacle, is this!...
And what endears it yet more is, that the Holy Ghost immediately adds in the following Scripture, concerning the church's interest and completeness in him, "And ye are complete in him. Here to this one glorious individual person, the Christ of God, JEHOVAH communicates his personality, his subsistence, or to use the words of Scripture: "in him dwelleth all the fulness of the GODHEAD bodily
Lamp - There is frequent mention of lamps in Scripture, and the word is often used figuratively. The houses in the east were, from the remotest antiquity, lighted with lamps; and hence it is so common in Scripture to call every thing which enlightens the body or mind, which guides or refreshes, by the name of a lamp. As this custom no doubt prevailed in Egypt and the adjacent regions of Arabia and Palestine in former times, it imparts a beauty and force to some passages of Scripture which have been little observed
Darkness - In Scripture language the word darkness is variously used. " (Genesis 1:2) In a spiritual sense, darkness is frequently made use of in Scripture to denote the blindness and ignorance of the mind, by reason of sin. " (2 Corinthians 4:6) The darkness of the grave, and the darkness of hell, are both also spoken of in Scripture. Profane writers, as well as the sacred Scriptures, have it upon record. Then it was that Scripture was fulfilled, and Jesus set, as JEHOVAH'S King, "upon his holy hill of Zion. Christ is beheld in the very character he had taken at the call of God the Father; first, made sin, and then, a curse, (see these Scriptures,) 2 Corinthians 5:21; Galatians 3:13 then follows, darkness, soul-trial, and death
Fabiola, Saint - In 395 she went to Bethlehem, where she lived in the hospice of the convent directed by Saint Paula, and under the direction of Saint Jerome applied herself to the study of Scripture and to ascetic exercises
Judgment, Particular - The existence of the Particular Judgment may be inferred from the parable of Lazarus and Dives (Luke 16), from the promise of Christ to the penitent thief (Luke 23), and from other passages in Holy Scripture where it is clearly indicated that the soul's eternal lot will be determined immediately after death
Husk - The term translated husk at 2 Kings 4:42 is a hapax legomena , a term used only once in Scripture
Zerah - With an enormous army, the largest we read of in Scripture, he invaded the kingdom of Judah in the days of Asa (2 Chronicles 14:9-15 )
Altar - In Scripture, Christ is called the altar of Christians, he being the atoning sacrifice for sin
Guardian Angel - The general doctrine that angels are thus deputed to protect men in their pathway through life is a matter of Catholic faith, clearly expressed in Scripture
Intent - ...
The principal intent of Scripture is to deliver the laws of duties supernatural
Blasphemy - In Scripture this does not always refer to speaking evil of God, to which the word is now restricted
Countenance - In this Scripture the sweet experience in the heart and soul which comes from seeing and knowing the loving fellowship of GOD is described as His countenance
Salathiel - There are several of this name in Scripture: one among the sons of Jeconiah, (1 Chronicles 3:17) and another mentioned Ezra 3:2—but here it is spelt according to the Hebrew, Shealtiel, but both is the same name, and derived from the same root, Sheal, a loan
River - We read of the several rivers in Scripture, even from the garden of Eden
Jasper, - To what gem Scripture refers is not known: some suppose the diamond
Angel, Guardian - The general doctrine that angels are thus deputed to protect men in their pathway through life is a matter of Catholic faith, clearly expressed in Scripture
Forgiveness - There are seven words in Scripture that denote the idea of forgiveness: three in Hebrew and four in Greek
Leucopetrians - The founder of this sect is said to have been a person called Leucopetrus, and his chief disciple Tychicus, who corrupted by fanatical interpretations several books of Scripture, and particularly St
Trump - ) A wind instrument of music; a trumpet, or sound of a trumpet; - used chiefly in Scripture and poetry
Hermon - In two passages of Scripture this mountain is called Baal-hermon, Judges 3:3; 1 Chronicles 5:23, possibly because Baal was there worshipped
Horse - The horse was probably not in those early times used except for military purposes; indeed we find scarcely an allusion in Scripture to its employment for the farm or any ordinary domestic service
Alexandria, Clement of - In opposition to the rationalizing Gnostics, then a force in Alexandria, he made faith the basis of his speculations, but interpreted Scripture in too allegorical a manner
Faithful - I only beg to observe, that it appears from Scripture the Lord delights to be known to his people, in his covenant engagements, by this distinguishing perfection
Chaff - But in Scripture language, it is used figuratively, to denote the uselessness and folly of a name to live, while virtually dead before God
Jonathan - There are many of this name in Scripture
Acceptation - There is nothing more opposed to each other, than the Scripture sense of acceptation, as it relates to the Lord, and as it relates to man
Achmetha - This is most probably the Achmetha of Scripture
Beersheba - The two places are frequently thus mentioned in Scripture, as "from Dan to Beersheba," to denote the whole length of the country
Ophir - We read much in Scripture of the gold of Ophir, 1 Kings 9:28
Dedan - Both were founders of tribes frequently named in Scripture
Titus Flavius Clemens - In opposition to the rationalizing Gnostics, then a force in Alexandria, he made faith the basis of his speculations, but interpreted Scripture in too allegorical a manner
Spoil - , to "spoil" them, that is, to rob them of Scripture truths and spiritual blessings, Colossians 2:8
Gold - It is spoken of throughout Scripture; and the use of it among and ancient Hebrews, in its native and mixed state, and for the same purposes as at present, was very common
Yea - In Scripture, it is used to denote certainty, consistency, harmony, and stability
Simon (st.) And Saint Jude's Day - Simon was called to be an Apostleand he is mentioned in Holy Scripture as the "Canaanite" and"Zelotes," both words meaning a zealot
Fulfill - ...
Fulfill is most common in Scripture in the prophetic sense of corresponding to what was promised, predicted, or foreshadowed. Jesus' ministry in both word (Matthew 4:14-17 ) and deed (Matthew 8:16-17 ) fulfilled Scripture (Isaiah 9:1-2 ; Isaiah 53:4 ). Jesus' command of secrecy (Matthew 12:16 ) and His habit of teaching in parables (Matthew 13:35 ) likewise fulfilled Scripture (Isaiah 42:1-3 ; Psalm 78:2 ), as did His humble entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:4-5 ; Zechariah 9:9 ) and His arrest as a bandit (Matthew 26:56 ). ...
In John the failure of the people to recognize God at work in Jesus' signs or to accept Jesus' testimony was explained as fulfillment of Scripture (John 12:37-41 ; compare Mark 4:11-12 ). John also viewed details of the passion story as the fulfillment of Scripture (John 19:24 ,John 19:24,19:28 ; Psalm 22:18 ; Psalm 69:21 )
Capital Punishment - ...
Does Scripture Require Capital Punishment? How do we reconcile Exodus 20:13 (“Thou shalt not kill”) with Genesis 9:6 (“Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed”)? If an individual kills another, it is murder; if the state kills, it is not murder, some would say. ...
Scripture does not present capital punishment as always mandatory. All Scripture should be filtered through the perspective of the apostolic tradition and especially through the mind of Jesus Christ who himself was a victim of capital punishment on the cross. ...
Does Scripture Permit Capital Punishment? If Scripture does not require the state to execute killers, does it allow such action by way of exception? A generally accepted principle of killing not subject to punishment is self-defense, whereby killing is forced on us as the only way to prevent someone from killing us. Does the state have a right to defend its people by executing killers? The Scripture certainly does not prohibit the state from exercising this right. The modern student of Scripture must ask if cases in our society really find parallels in biblical society. Which methods of biblical interpretation allow us to determine where capital punishment should apply? How do biblical forms of capital punishment relate to modern society? Does Scripture absolutely require capital punishment? In what situation(s) does a government have the right and/or responsibility to carry out capital punishment? Are there scriptural answers to the arguments for and against capital punishment?...
Guy Greenfield...
...
Righteousness - A term frequently occurring in Scripture expressing an attribute of God which maintains what is consistent with His own character, and necessarily judges what is opposed to it — sin. ...
The doctrine of the imputed righteousness of Christ, though largely acknowledged in Christendom, is not found in Scripture. One passage of Scripture proves this view to be incorrect: "If righteousness come by the law, then Christ is dead in vain
Obadiah - The name of 13 persons in Scripture
Anger - Anger is in Scripture frequently attributed to God, Matthew 7:11 28:20 ; not that he is liable to those violent emotions which this passion produces, but figuratively speaking, that is, after the manner of men; and because he punishes the wicked with severity of a superior provoked to anger
Memorial - Scripture witnesses to God's participation in human history for the salvation of God's people
Judgment, Universal - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Final Judgment - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Judgment, Final - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Judgment, General - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Last Judgment - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Infinite - Though Scripture does not use the term infinite to describe God, theologians have found the term a suitable summary of several attributes of God
Trinity - A word not found in Scripture, but used to express the doctrine of the unity of God as subsisting in three distinct Persons
Key - Frequently mentioned in Scripture
Sarah - Her death, at the age of one hundred and twenty-seven years (the only instance in Scripture where the age of a woman is recorded), was the occasion of Abraham's purchasing the cave of Machpelah as a family burying-place
Candace - Pliny (6:35) and Strabo (17:820), pagan authors, confirm Scripture as to Candace being the name of the Ethiopian queens, as Pharaoh was common to the Egyptian kings
Even Song - Our beautifulEvening Prayer thus rendered is certainly much more in keeping withScripture and much more elevating than the "Song Services," or"Vesper Services" of the various denominations. Yet in some placesif a choral Even Song is attempted, at once the cry of "Romanism"is raised, and yet from Holy Scripture we learn that music is adivinely ordained element in the public worship of God and theservice thus rendered is an approach to the worship of Heaven
Dot - Matthew's qualification “until all is accomplished” is perhaps a reference to the saving work of Christ as the fulfillment of all Scripture
Jabal - But Scripture represents man as placed by God in a simple civilization, raised above barbarism and the need of living by the chase, though not a highly developed culture
Damnation - This word is used to denote the final loss of the soul; but it is not always to be understood in this sense in the sacred Scripture
Vinegar - Toward the close of His crucifixion, to fulfill Scripture He cried "I thirst," and vinegar was brought which He received (John 19:28; Matthew 27:48)
Collegians - or COLLEGIANTS, a sect formed among the Arminians and Anabaptists in Holland, about the beginning of the seventeenth century; so called because of their colleges or meetings twice every week, where every one, females excepted, has the same liberty of expounding the Scripture, praying, &c. They are said to be all either Arians or Socinians: they never communicate in the college, but meet twice a year, from all parts of Holland, at Rhinsberg (whence they are also called Rhtnsberghers, ) a village two miles from Leyden, where they communicate together; admitting every one that presents himself, professing his faith in the divinity of the Holy Scriptures, and resolution to live suitably to their precepts and doctrines, without regard to his sect or opinion
Homily - 185-253), to a didactic commentary, without formal introduction, division, or conclusion, on some part of Sacred Scripture, the aim being to explain the literal, and evolve the spiritual, meaning of the text
Inspiration - All Scripture is given by inspiration of God
Pharoah - The Pharaoh, the tyrant of Egypt, we know most of in Scripture, was a type of the devil; and as such the Lord's people should read his history, %with the Lord's striking observation upon him
Candle - The modern 'candle' was notknown in Scripture times
Immortality, - '...
The immortality of the soul is plainly revealed in Scripture
Storehouse - There is no Scripture at all, nor suggestion, that all the money which is given by GOD's people should be put into one basket to be spent by others
Sword - This is constantly referred to in Scripture as the instrument of death, and is mentioned in the N
Tract - ) Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter; - so called because sung tractim, or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons
General Judgment - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Wisdom - BOOK OF, an apocryphal book of Scripture, so called on account of the wise maxims contained in it
Pillar - properly means a column raised to support a building; but in Scripture the term mostly occurs in a metaphorical or figurative sense
Gilead - The Scripture speaks of the balm of Gilead, Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 46:11 ; Jeremiah 51:8
Sycamore Tree - The tree so called in Scripture is not the sycamore of this country, which is a species of maple
Candle - In Scripture, the candle of the Lord is the divine favor and blessing, Job 14
Gog And Magog - Are usually spoken of together in Scripture. The Scythians, the Goths, the Persians, and several other nations, have been specified by interpreters as the Magog of the Scriptures; but most probably it is a name given generally to the northern nations of Europe and Asia, or the districts north of the Caucasus
Penny - In reading the Scripture passage in which this word, occurs, we should consider that the real value of money, to purchase labor or commodities, was far greater then that now; and also that even the nominal value of the drachma would be better expressed by "shilling," or "franc," than by "penny
Havilah - The Scripture mention a Havilah descended from Ham, Genesis 10:7 , and another from Shem, Genesis 11:29
Terah - Scripture intimates plainly that Terah had fallen into idolatry, or had for a time mingled some idolatrous practices with the worship of the true God, Joshua 24:2,14 ; and some think that Abraham himself at fist did the same thing; but that afterwards God, being gracious to him, convinced him of the vanity of this worship, and that he undeceived his father Terah
Riches - In Scripture, an abundance of spiritual blessings
Universal Judgment - The General Judgment is clearly and repeatedly foretold in Holy Scripture
Throne - In Scripture, sovereign power and dignity
Visitation - In Scripture, and in a religious sense, the sending of afflictions and distresses on men to punish them for their sins, or to prove them
Wicked - ...
The wicked, in Scripture, persons who live in sin transgressors of the divine law all who are unreconciled to God, unsanctified or impenitent
Dog, - an animal frequently mentioned in Scripture
Covetousness - It is foolish: it destroys reputation, breaks the rest, unfits for the performance of duty, and is a contempt of God himself: it is unprecedented in all our examples of virtue mentioned in the Scripture. Acts 5:1-42 :; the misery with which it is attended; the curse such persons are to society; the denunciations and cautions respecting it in the Holy Scripture; and how effectually it bars men from God, from happiness, and from heaven
Redemption - The Greek word so rendered is Apolutrosis , A word occurring nine times in Scripture, and always with the idea of a ransom or price paid, i. It is the plain doctrine of Scripture that "Christ saves us neither by the mere exercise of power, nor by his doctrine, nor by his example, nor by the moral influence which he exerted, nor by any subjective influence on his people, whether natural or mystical, but as a satisfaction to divine justice, as an expiation for sin, and as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law, thus reconciling us to God by making it consistent with his perfection to exercise mercy toward sinners" (Hodge's Systematic Theology)
Testament, New - The two covenants are always in Scripture the two dispensations: that under Moses is the old, that under the Messiah is the new. In the latitude wherein the term is used in holy writ, the command under the sanction of death, which God gave to Adam, may, with sufficient propriety, be termed a Covenant; but it is never so called in Scripture; and when mention is made of the two covenants, the old and the new, or the first and the second, there appears to be no reference to any thing that related to Adam
Meditation - Therefore it has been suggested that, in ancient Hebrew meditation, Scripture frequently was recited in a low murmur. The constant recollection of God's past deeds by the hearing of Scripture and repetition of thought produce confidence in God (Psalm 104:34 ; Psalm 119:15 ,Psalms 119:15,119:23 ,Psalms 119:23,119:48 ,Psalms 119:48,119:78 ,Psalms 119:78,119:97,99,148 ; Psalm 63:6-8 ; Psalm 143:5 )
Crucifixion - The crucifixion of the Lord Jesus and of the two malefactors are the only cases named in Scripture: crucifixion was not practised by the Jews. It is clear from Scripture, by His crying with a loud voice just before His death, that as stated in John's gospel (John 10:18 ) He gave up His life
Bush - Before the [2] division into chapters and verses it was not easy to cite Scripture with precision. ‘In or at the Bush’ (Authorized Version in Mark and Luke respectively) means not ‘beside that memorable bush,’ but ‘in the passage in Scripture describing the theophany in the bush’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885, ‘in the place concerning the Bush’)
Pharaoh - Some kings of Egypt are mentioned in Scripture without this title, as Shishak, Necho, Hophra, So, and Tirhakah, the last two of whom were Ethiopians. ...
After a period of about 500 years Scripture refers to...
6
Heaven - For thus it is expressed in Scripture. "Thus saith the Lord, The heaen is my throne, and the earth is my footstool: where is the house that ye build unto me? and where is the place of my rest?" (Isaiah 66:1) But Solomon breaks out in an expression, as one overwhelmed with surprise and wonder in the contemplation: "But will God indeed (said he) dwell on the earth? behold, the heaven, and the heaven of heavens cannot contain thee!" (1 Kings 8:27) But what would this mighty monarch have said, had he lived to have seen the Lord of heaven and earth tabernacling in the substance of our flesh?...
But, though, according to the language of Scripture, we call that place heaven which John saw opened, and where the more immediate presence of the Lord is gloriously displayed, yet it were to limit the Holy One of Israel to suppose, that JEHOVAH dwelleth in any place, to the exclusion of his presence or glory elsewhere
Father - This name in Scripture hath many applications. " (John 8:44)...
But while we carefully attend to these distinctions, respecting the application of the name of father in Scripture it should be always kept in remembrance that the name Father is in a peculiar and blessed sense had in special reference to God, as "the father of our Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the whole family in heaven and earth is named. (Let the reader consult also those Scriptures, Matthew 23:9; Isaiah 63:16; Malachi 2:10)...
Lebanon - ...
The western range is the Lebanon generally referred to in Scripture and the one from whence Solomon obtained cedar and fir trees for the temple. ...
The eastern range is often called ANTI-LEBANON, but in Scripture it is alluded to as 'Lebanon toward the sun-rising
Chariots of War - The Scripture speaks of two sorts of these chariots, one for princes and generals to ride in, the other used to break the enemies battalions, by letting them loose armed with iron, which made dreadful havoc among the troops. Chariots were sometimes consecrated to the sun; and the Scripture observes, that Josiah burned those which had been dedicated to the sun by his predecessors, 2 Kings 23:11
Wisdom - In Scripture, human learning erudition knowledge of arts and sciences. In Scripture theology, wisdom is true religion godliness piety the knowledge and fear of God, and sincere and uniform obedience to his commands
Mustard - is mentioned in (Matthew 13:31 ; 17:20 ; Mark 4:31 ; Luke 13:19 ; 17:6 ) It is generally agreed that the mustard tree of Scripture is the black mustard (Sinapis nigru ). It is an error, for which the language of Scripture is not accountable, to assert that the passage implies that birds "built their nests" in the tree: the Greek word has no such meaning; the word merely means "to settle or rest upon" anything for a longer or shorter time; nor is there any occasion to suppose that the expression "fowls of the air" denotes any other than the smaller insessorial kinds--linnets, finches, etc
Obadiah - We meet with many of this name in Scripture. ) But the most important to us among the Obadiahs of the Scripture, is the one whom God the Holy Ghost raised up for a prophet and hath given to the church, even to this hour, this man's labours
Handicraft - In the present article brief notice only can be given of such handicraft trades as are mentioned in Scripture. ( Genesis 4:22 ) After the establishment of the Jews in Canaan, the occupation of a smith became recognized as a distinct employment- (1 Samuel 13:19 ) The smith's work and its results are often mentioned in Scripture. ...
Carpenters are often mentioned in Scripture. ( Jeremiah 18:2-6 ) ...
Bakers are noticed in Scripture, (Jeremiah 37:21 ; Hosea 7:4 ) and the well-known valley Tyropoeon probably derived its name from the occupation of the cheese-makers, its inhabitants
Authority - The church soon began ascribing authority to its tradition as well as to the Scriptures. The medieval church especially emphasized the church as the sole interpreter of Scripture, through its tradition and creeds, councils, and pope. The Reformers argued that all authority, even that of the church, is derived from the Bible itself, and valuable only as it is consistent with Scripture. While each of the approaches to authority described in the above historical survey is still practiced and taught today, Scripture says all legitimate authority comes directly or indirectly from God. The Christian accepts the truth of Scripture as authoritative by faith, and the command of Scripture as authoritative in obedience, and so demonstrates love for the Lord (John 14:15 )
Incarnation - The Word is the Son of God; by flesh in Scripture is meant mankind, human nature, man, body and soul, as in Luke 3: "And all flesh shall see the salvation of God
Aretas - The only one mentioned in Scripture gave his daughter in marriage to Herod Antipas; but she being repudiated by Herod, Aretas made war upon him and destroyed his army
Domenico Palmieri - He entered the Society of Jesus, 1852, and taught in several colleges, finally becoming professor of Scripture and Oriental languages at Maestricht, 1880-1887
Palmieri, Domenico - He entered the Society of Jesus, 1852, and taught in several colleges, finally becoming professor of Scripture and Oriental languages at Maestricht, 1880-1887
Cucumbers - " Groser's Scripture Natural History
Firmament - The language of Scripture is not scientific but popular, and hence we read of the sun rising and setting, and also here the use of this particular word
Bondage - This is a word in Scripture of strong meaning
Wormwood, - This occurs in Scripture only in a metaphorical sense
Maschil - All Scripture is for "instruction" (2 Timothy 3:16)
Fowler - A variety of means are mentioned in Scripture: snares (Psalm 91:3 ; Psalm 124:7 ); traps (Psalm 141:9 ; Jeremiah 5:26-27 ); ropes (Job 18:10 KJV, “snare”); and nets ( Hosea 7:12 )
Cruelty - However, many instances of cruelty remain in the OT records, and some of these seem to have the sanction of Scripture
Dragon - In Scripture, dragon seems sometimes to signify a large marine fish or serpent, Isaiah 27
Famine - The most severe famines recorded in Scripture are the two of seven years' duration, one in the time of Joseph, and the other in the days of Elisha
Salome - Though not mentioned by name in Scripture, this Salome is therein spoken of as the daughter of Herodias (by her first husband, Herod Philip)
Gate - In Scripture, figuratively, power, dominion
Generation - This is used in various senses in Scripture
Abyssinian Church - " Their Canon of Scripture contains many apocryphal books
Flour - This word in Scripture is sometimes figuratively used, to express the Lord's gracious dealings with his people
Fountain - This word is used in Scripture to denote the spring and source of divine life to the church; and what is worthy of remark, as if to confirm the fundamental truth of our holy faith, in that of JEHOVAH existing in a threefold character of persons, this word is equally applied to each and to all
Brick - In Scripture bricks are frequently and early mentioned, as well as the material with which they were cemented
Trump - It is seldom used in prose, in common discourse but is used in Scripture, where it seems peculiarly appropriate to the grandeur of the subject
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Mentioned in Scripture only in Joel 3:2,12
Cities - The earliest notice in Scripture of city-building is of Enoch by Cain, in the land of his exile
Joktan - The Scripture list of his descendants confirms this; almost all the names are certainly connected with this locality: "Almodad (El-Mudad), Sheleph (Sulaf or Silfan), Hazarmaveth" (Hadramaut), etc
River - The three principal rivers referred to in Scripture are the Nile, the Jordan, and the Euphrates
Regeneration - It will be seen that the word regeneration has not in Scripture the sense of 'new birth,' to which the term has been commonly applied
Canon of Scripture - As to the Scriptures the expression refers to what books should be included: thus the 'canon' of Scripture is often spoken of, and the books are called 'canonical' or 'uncanonical. 400) lists of the books were made out, and at the Council of Trent they dogmatically settled what books constituted the Scripture. Now the Scripture informs us that to the Jews were committed the oracles of God, Romans 3:2 , and as is well known they most carefully guarded the O. Scriptures for centuries before there was any christian church. The above principle — that the Scriptures require to be accredited by the church — is false
Child - CHILD, CHILDREN, SONS...
These are variously used in Scripture, to denote one and the same. ...
We meet with the word Child, in relation to Jesus, several times in Scripture; but there are two places where it occurs, with a peculiar emphasis of expression, and where the word holy is prefixed, as if to give it an endearedness to the believer's heart. How many consider a large family the reverse, and overlook that Scripture, which declares the man "happy, that hath his quiver full of children!" (Psalms 127:5)...
Dancing - DANCE, DANCING...
I think it not a little important, for every serious reader of the Bible, to have proper ideas of the Scripture meaning of dancing, and therefore it would have been wrong, in a work of this kind, to have passed it by. " All which very evidently proves, that the dancing spoken of in Scripture totally differed from that vain, frivolous, and idle, not to say sinful, custom of dancing practised in modern times. " (Exodus 15:20-21) Some have thought, that the holy dances of the Scripture were by way of resembling the motions of the heavenly bodies, as if in the joy of the heart, in any renewed instances of God's grace and mercy manifested to the people, they looked up to heaven, and endeavoured by action of the body, as well as the going forth of the soul in praise, to testify their sense of the divine goodness
Apocrypha - ...
...
The contents of the books themselves show that they were no part of Scripture
Diabolism - The possibility of consulting and securing the help of the devil is sufficiently attested by Scripture: God forbids consultation of soothsayers (Deuteronomy 18); to "go aside after wizards" is unlawful (Leviticus 19)
Milk And Honey - A metonomy used in the Holy Scripture to denote excellent articles of food
Amorites - The name Amorite is often taken in Scripture for Canaanite in general, Genesis 15:16 Amos 2:9
Didache - A short treatise which some of the Fathers accounted as next to Holy Scripture, supposed to have been written A
Doctrine of the Twelve Apostles - A short treatise which some of the Fathers accounted as next to Holy Scripture, supposed to have been written A
Moran, Patrick Francis - In 1886 he became secretary to Cardinal Cullen, and professor of Scripture at Clonliffe College
Migne, Jacques Paul - Later he erected a printing-house in the suburb Petit-Montrouge where he published reference works on Scripture, theology, history, apologetics, sacred oratory, philosophy, science, monasticism, canon law, liturgy, and most important of all, collections of the Greek and Latin Fathers
Origenism - He claimed that Scripture has a threefold sense: the literal, the spiritual, and the mystic; many passages have no literal meaning and must be interpreted in an allegorical way
Millennium - " On the other hand, it is maintained, more in accordance with the teaching of Scripture, we think, that Christ's second advent will not be premillennial, and that the right conception of the prospects and destiny of his kingdom is that which is taught, e
Cathedral Schools - In the higher school, to the trivium, including grammar, rhetoric, and dialectics, might be added the quadrivium, or arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music, with Scripture and theology
Jacques Migne - Later he erected a printing-house in the suburb Petit-Montrouge where he published reference works on Scripture, theology, history, apologetics, sacred oratory, philosophy, science, monasticism, canon law, liturgy, and most important of all, collections of the Greek and Latin Fathers
Famine - The first mentioned in Scripture was so grievous as to compel Abraham to go down to the land of Egypt (Genesis 26:1 )
Pharaoh's Daughters - Three princesses are thus mentioned in Scripture:
The princess who adopted the infant Moses (q
Calixtins - that the tenets and opinions which had been constantly received by the ancient doctors, during the first five centuries, were to be considered as of equal truth and authority with the express declarations and doctrines of Scripture
East, Turning to the - When converts toChristianity were baptized, which was usually in the early morning,they first turning to the west where the night was fast receding,renounced the world and the powers of darkness, then turning tothe east where the sun was rising as the source of all light, theyconfessed their belief in Christ who, in Holy Scripture is Himselfcalled the EAST, "the Dayspring from on high
Doctrines: Duplicate Nature of - What matters it we appear to be inconsistent, so long as we keep to the high way of Scripture, which is our only safe road to knowledge Angels may, perhaps, be systematic divines; for men should be enough to follow the word of God, let its teaching wind as they may
Gardens - Mentioned in Scripture, of Eden (Genesis 2:8,9 ); Ahab's garden of herbs (1 Kings 21:2 ); the royal garden (2 Kings 21:18 ); the royal garden at Susa (Esther 1:5 ); the garden of Joseph of Arimathea (John 19:41 ); of Gethsemane (John 18:1 )
Soul, levels of - The five terms Scripture uses to refer to man�s soul; each denotes a different gradation of the soul � in ascending order from Nefesh to Yechidah: Nefesh is the basic life-force or natural soul in general, and specifically relates to the soul�s basic or external manifestations in terms of the faculties of thought, speech and action
Doctrines (Mysterious): to be Believed - There are truths in Scripture which puzzle us, we cannot understand their relation to other portions of revelation, they are mysteries, apparently alien to the spirit of other passages
Weaving, Weavers - No mention of the loom is found in Scripture, but we read of the "shuttle" (Job 7:6 ), "the pin" of the beam (Judges 16:14 ), "the web" (13,14), and "the beam" (1 Samuel 17:7 ; 2 Samuel 21:19 )
Mansion - The English word occurs in Scripture only in John 14:2 , ‘In my Father’s house are many man-sioos’ (RVm Fuel - Numerous types of fuel are mentioned in Scripture: wood (Isaiah 44:14-16 ); charcoal (Jeremiah 36:22 ; John 18:18 ); shrubs (Psalm 120:4 ); thorn bushes (Ecclesiastes 7:6 ; Nahum 1:10 ); grass (Matthew 6:30 ); weeds (Matthew 13:40 ); vines (Ezekiel 15:4 ,Ezekiel 15:4,15:6 ); branch trimmings (John 15:6 ); animal or even human dung (Ezekiel 4:12 ); and the blood-stained clothing of fallen warriors (Isaiah 9:5 )
Mouth - Frequently in Scripture ‘mouth’ is used fig
Frontlets - Objects containing Scripture passages worn on the forehand and between the eyes, primarily at prayer times. ...
Phylacteries were bound with thongs to the forehead, though some phylacteries were worn on the upper arm so that when a person crossed his arms the Scriptures contained in the phylactery would be close to the heart
Rehoboth (1) - At hand is Shutnet, the "Sitnah" of Scripture: Rehoboth lies 20 miles S
Exorcism - plied in Scripture to the Christian casting out of demons
Honey, Milk And - A metonomy used in the Holy Scripture to denote excellent articles of food
Horns - These are referred to in Scripture as ...
1
Bottle - The oriental nations use skins or leather for the conveyance of liquors and of this kind are the bottles mentioned in Scripture
Inventions - Many things also are found in Christendom of which there is not the least mention in Scripture
Prison - In the common acceptation of the word, we generally understand by a prison a place of confinement for the body; but in Scripture language there is added to this view of a prison a state of captivity to the soul
Window - This is the truth represented in the above Scripture
Lip - LIP, LIPS...
The fruit of the lips is sometimes spoken of in Scripture, for the whole of the life and conversation
Scribe - We read in the Old Testament Scripture of this office in the time of the Kings, and it should seem at that time that it was an employment of great power
Standard - ...
Scripture does not state the form of the standards and ensigns
Oven - There are many instances in Scripture where on the arrival of a visitor bread had to be kneaded and baked for them
Sons of God - This title is susceptible of considerable latitude of meaning and has various applications in Scripture
Folk - In Scripture, the singular number is used as a few sick folk impotent folk
Joseph - In this Scripture, Joseph is a type of CHRIST in that he is honored by his father and mother
Apocrypha - The Septuagint (LXX) includes the books, not as Scripture, but as part of the translation of the Hebrew manuscripts as a whole
Washing of Regeneration - 'Regeneration' is not used in Scripture in the modern ecclesiastical signification of the word, as may be seen from the only other occurrence of it in Matthew 19:28 , where it evidently refers to an order of things still future
Israel - The whole people of God are frequently in Scripture called by this name
Abigail - A memorable name in Scripture, whom the Lord, in his providence made instrumental to save David from blood-shedding
Galatia - Neither is it probable, that the church would have known the history of Sarah and Hagar, to have been a type and allegory of the covenants, had not that Scripture said so
Daughter - But there is a great sweetness in it, when read in Scripture in allusion to the church
Garment - The wedding garment of Scripture, particularly spoken of, (Matthew 22:11) hath been a subject of so much anxiety to many precious souls, that the matter itself ought to be put in the clearest light possible
Earring - We find that in the Old Testament Scripture, the earring was a token and pledge of overtures to marriage
Blessing - This word is variously used in Scripture
Divination - There is frequent mention of diviners in Scripture; and the Hebrews are repeatedly warned against the pretensions of those who affected to foretell events
Eagle - There can be little doubt that the eagle of Scripture is the griffon (Gyps fulvus), or great vulture, see margin of the R
Avims - The Scripture says expressly, that the Caphtorims drove out the Avims, who dwelt in Hazerim, even unto Azzah, Deuteronomy 2:23
Profane - The Scripture calls Esau profane, because he sold his birthright, which was considered a holy thing, not only because the priesthood was annexed to it, but also because it was a privilege relating to Christ, and a type of the title of believers to the heavenly inheritance, Hebrews 12:16
Schism - Campbell shows that the word schism in Scripture does not usually signify an open separation, but that men may be guilty of schism by such an alienation of affection from their brethren as violates the internal union in the hearts of Christians, though there be no error in doctrine, nor separation from communion
Night - I need not stay to remark, for I presume the sense of the expression is generally understood, that night in Scripture language is sometimes figuratively used for darkness in divine things
Necromancer - We meet with this name but once in Scripture, (Deuteronomy 18:11) but that once is enough to shew, that from the earliest days there have been characters of such awfulness
Archangel - Whether there are other beings of this exalted rank in the heavenly hosts, Scripture does not say, though the description 'one of the chief princes' suggests that this may be the case; cp
Bill - See LEARNING, LETTER , Scripture , WRITING
Oven - The form of "oven" commonly in use in the east indicates the kind in use as mentioned in Scripture
Wormwood - ]'>[1] From the passages of Scripture, however, where this plant is mentioned, something more than the bitterness of its qualities seems to be intimated, and effects are attributed to it greater than can be produced by the wormwood of Europe
Talent - ) Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture parable of the talents (Matt
Adultery - In many parts of the Scripture the church is called an adulteress when she forsakes the worship of God and practices idolatry
Asia - This word in Scripture never means the continent, as with us
Leaven - The nature of leaven, affecting the whole lump of the substance to which it is added, furnishes some striking illustrations in Scripture, Matthew 13:33; Matthew 16:6; 1 Corinthians 6:6; as also does the corruption it had undergone; thus we have warnings in Luke 12:1; 1 Corinthians 5:7-8, where the word is symbolically used for corruptness of life, or doctrine
Lily - A flower repeatedly mentioned in Scripture in both the Old and the New Testaments
Sea - The Hebrew word yam, or "sea," is used in Scripture: 1
Hermon - ...
The "little Hermon" of modern travellers, not mentioned in Scripture, is a shapeless mass of hills north of the smaller valley of Jezreel
Rend - ...
To rend the heart, in Scripture, to have bitter sorrow for sin
Snow - Is often alluded to in Scripture, for its whiteness, Exodus 4:6 ; Numbers 12:10 ; 2 Kings 5:27 ; Psalm 51:7 ; Isaiah 1:18 , and for its cleansing qualities, Job 9:30
Timbrel - An instrument of music, early and often mentioned in Scripture, Genesis 31:27 Job 21:12
University of Rome - , for Scripture; Copernicus for astronomy, and Accoramboni for medicine
Rome, University of - , for Scripture; Copernicus for astronomy, and Accoramboni for medicine
Thorn - In Scripture, great difficulties and impediments
Scribe - In Scripture and the Jewish history, a clerk or secretary to the king
Famine - Scripture records several famines in Palestine, and the neighboring countries, Genesis 12:10 26:1 Ruth 1:1 2 Kings 6:25 Acts 11:27
Brother - Signifies in Scripture the son of the same parent or parents, Matthew 1:2 Luke 6:14 ; a cousin or near kinsman, Genesis 13:8 14:16 John 7:3 Acts 1:14 ; one of the same stock or country, Matthew 5:47 Acts 3:22 Hebrews 7:5 ; a fellow-man, and equal, Matthew 5:23 7:3 ; one beloved, 2 Samuel 1:26 ; Christians, as sons of God, Acts 9:30 11:29
Tempt - In Scripture, to try to prove to put to trial for proof
Inspiration - ...
Christ everywhere treats the Old Testament Scripture as infallibly true, and of divine authority-the word of God
Moth - Allusions to the moth, as devouring clothes, and as a frail and feeble insect, are frequent in Scripture, Job 4:19 13:28 27:18 Isaiah 50:9 Hosea 5:12 Matthew 6:19,20
Vengeance - In this latter sense the word is used in Scripture, and frequently applied to the punishments inflicted by God on sinners
Dogs - In various places in Scripture the epithet "dogs" is given to certain classes of men, as expressing their insolent rapacity, Matthew 7:6 Psalm 22:16 Philippians 3:2 , and their beastly vices, Deuteronomy 23:18 2 Peter 2:22 Revelation 22:15
Luz - ( Judges 1:28 ) Its situation, as well as that of the land of the Hittites," has never been discovered, and is one of the favorable puzzles of Scripture geographers
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - In sacred Scripture he appears among the persons who, by command of Nebuchadnezzar, released Jeremiah from prison
ed'Rei - (Numbers 21:33 ; 1:4; 3:10; Joshua 12:4 ) In Scripture it is only mentioned in connection with the victory gained by the Israelites over the Amorites under Og their king, and the territory thus acquired
Retreat - In Holy Scripture we read of our Lord and His disciples constantly going into retreat in some shape or other
Deluge, the - The deluge is referred to in several passages of Scripture as a historical fact; the writings of the Fathers consider the event in the same light; and this view is confirmed by the tradition existing in all places and at all times as to occurrence of a similar catastrophe. It is impossible to fix the time of the deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred
Flood, the - The deluge is referred to in several passages of Scripture as a historical fact; the writings of the Fathers consider the event in the same light; and this view is confirmed by the tradition existing in all places and at all times as to occurrence of a similar catastrophe. It is impossible to fix the time of the deluge, since the dates mentioned in the three available texts of Scripture disagree both as to the year from Adam and as to the year before Christ that it occurred
Horn - In Scripture horn refers to trumpets, vessels, topographical features, and figurative symbols. Such references are used in Scripture as emblems of power of God (Hebrews 3:4 ) and other physical or spiritual entities
Mesopotamia - part between the bend of the Euphrates and the upper Tigris is what Scripture names Mesopotamia. Assyrian inscriptions confirm Scripture in asserting that Mesopotamia was independent of Assyria until after David ("the tribes of the Nairi," stream lands, were under their several independent princes, until in 880 B
Gospel, a Law - The answer plainly depends upon adjusting the meaning of the words Gospel and law: if the Gospel be taken for the declaration God has made to men by Christ, concerning the manner in which he will treat them, and the conduct he expects from them, it is plain that this includes commands, and even threatenings, as well as promises; but to define the Gospel so, as only to express the favourable part of that declaration, is indeed taking the question for granted, and confining the word to a sense much less extensive than it often has in Scripture: compare Romans 2:16 . If law signifies, as it generally does, the discovery of the will of a superior, teaching what he requires of those under his government, with the intimation of his intention of dispensing rewards and punishments, as this rule of their conduct is observed or neglected; in this latitude of expression, it is plain, from the proposition, that the Gospel, taken for the declaration made to men by Christ, is a law, as in Scripture it is sometimes called, James 1:25
Cabbalists - They study principally the combination of particular words, letters, and numbers; and by this, they say, they see clearly into the sense of Scripture. They have employed the above methods of interpretation, which have rendered the Scripture a convenient instrument of subserviency to any purpose which they might choose. No part of the Scriptures was safe from this profanation
Tig'Lath-Pile'Ser - ) Tiglath-pileser is the second Assyrian king mentioned in Scripture as having come into contact with the Israelites. (2 Kings 16:10 ) This is all that Scripture tells us of Tiglath-pileser
Anxiety - The most common words in Scripture translated as "anxious" or "anxiety" are the Hebrew deagaa [1] (ten times in either the verbal or noun form) and the Greek merimna [2] (twelve times in either the verbal or noun form). Anxiety is portrayed in the Scripture as being inconsistent with trust in God
Plane Tree - The word Harmon, or Ormon, is so rendered in that Scripture. " (Isaiah 25:4) And in many other parts of Scripture the same figures are beautifully chosen by way of representing the Lord Jesus as both a protecting power from every danger, and a source of refreshment in all good
Belshazzar - Of these, two are mentioned in Scripture: Evil-merodach, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 ; and Nergal-sharezer. Belshazzar is called the son of Nebuchadnezzar, but this in Scripture often means grandson, and Nabonadius is supposed to have married a daughter of Nebuchadnezzar
Angel - ...
From Scripture, we know that the angels constitute a vast multitude, beyond the power of man to imagine or conceive. There are also feast-days for Raphael and Gabriel who, with Michael, are the only angels mentioned by name in Scripture
Ascension of Christ - The ascension of Jesus Christ was not only presignified by many Scripture types, but also by many remarkable Scripture prophesies. He continued so many days on earth, that he might give many repeated proofs of his resurrection, Acts 1:3 ; that he might instruct his followers in every thing which pertained to the abolishment of the Jewish ceremonies, Acts 1:3 ; and that he might open to them the Scriptures concerning himself, and renew their commission to preach the Gospel, Acts 1:5-6
Hagiography - This word is not used in the Bible, but, nevertheless, as it hath been used by the Jews in a way of distinction concerning certain parts of the word of God in the Old Testament Scripture, it may not be improper to notice it in a work of this kind. The reader will, I hope, clearly understand what is meant by Hagiography in the Scripture, and wherefore the Jews so distinguished them from the five books of Moses and the prophets
Soul - Scripture clearly teaches its immortality. Scripture informs us that the human soul will be judged after death, will be consigned to heaven or to hell, and on the Day of General Judgment renited with its body, the composite thenceforth to enjoy the Beatific Vision or to suffer the torments of the damned, for eternity
Imagery - Scripture prefers to convey truths by pictorial representations rather than through abstract language. Scripture abounds in word-pictures for God, God's people, and their experience of salvation. Scripture itself witnesses the difficulty of this task, “To whom will you liken me, and make me equal, and compare me that we may be like” (Isaiah 46:5 )
Lamb - The Scripture says "man is born a wild ass's colt. ...
Proverbs 27:26 (c) It may be that this also is a picture of the Lord JESUS in that we must be clothed with Him as the Scripture say; "Put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ. The lamb was used as the Passover sacrifice, and the Scripture says, "Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us
Lamp - Much is said in the holy Scripture concerning the lamps of the temple. " (1 Samuel 3:3-4) Was not this emblematical of the Spirit of prophecy, that before one lamp of the Lord went out another should be lighted, before Eli was quite extinguished Samuel should be kindred? Do we not find it so through the church's history in all ages? Did not the spirit of Elijah rest on Elisha? Did not all the prophets succeed one another in their ministry, as might best promote and carry on the Lord's cause in the earth? I do not presume to speak decidely upon the subject, but if the thought be right, is there not great sweetness in that Scripture explained in reference to this view, and with an eye to the Lord Jesus? "I have ordained a lamp for mine anointed. " (Psalms 132:17)...
That lamps are constantly used figuratively in Scripture, I need not insist upon
Covenant - The Scripture sense of this word is the same as in the circumstances of common life; namely, an agreement between parties. (1 Samuel 20:42) To the same amount, in point of explanation, must we accept what is related in Scripture of God's covenant concerning redemption, made between the sacred persons of the GODHEAD, when the holy undivided Three in One engaged to, and with, each other, for the salvation of the church of God in Christ. It is, therefore, very properly called in Scripture everlasting; for it is sure, unchangeable, and liable to no possibility of error or misapplication
Old Testament Quotations in the New Testament - It is clear that the writers of the New Testament were concerned with demonstrating the continuity between the Old Testament Scriptures and the faith they proclaimed. ” The most common introductory formulas are: “as the Scripture hath said” (John 7:38 ); “What saith the Scripture” (Galatians 4:30 ); “it is (stands) written,” emphasizing the permanent validity of the Old Testament revelation (Mark 1:2 ; Romans 1:17 ; Romans 3:10 ); “that it might be fulfilled,” emphasizing the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies (Matthew 4:14 , Matthew 12:17 , Matthew 21:4 ); “God hath said,” “He saith,” “the Holy Spirit says,” which personify Scripture and reflect its divine dimension (Romans 9:25 ; Romans 10:21 ; 2 Corinthians 6:16 ); “Moses,” “David,” or “Isaiah” says which emphasize the human element in Scripture (Romans 10:16 , Romans 10:19-20 ; Hebrews 4:7 ). ...
The Uses of Old Testament Quotations The New Testament writers used Old Testament quotations for at least four reasons: (1) to demonstrate that Jesus is the fulfillment of God's purposes and of the prophetic witness of the Old Testament Scriptures ( Romans 1:2 ; Matthew 4:14 ; Matthew 12:17-21 ; Psalm 118:22 ); (2) as a source for ethical instruction and edification of the church ( Romans 13:8-10 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1 ); (3) to interpret contemporary events (Romans 9-11 ; Romans 15:8-12 ); (4) to prove a point on the assumption that the Scripture is God's Word (1 Corinthians 10:26 ; 1 Corinthians 14:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:55 ). Underlying typology is the conviction that certain events in the past history of Israel as recorded in earlier Scriptures revealed God's ways and purposes with persons in a typical way. ” In first-century Judaism where large portions of Scripture were known by heart, it was customary to quote only the beginning of a passage even if its continuation was to be kept in mind. While many of the Old Testament texts quoted in the New Testament had already been accepted as messianic (for example, Psalm 110:1 ) or could in light of Jesus' actual life claim to be messianic (Psalm 22:1 ; Isaiah 53:1 ), for the early Christians, all Scripture was to be interpreted by the fact of Christ because it is to Him that the Old Testament Scripture points (John 5:39 )
Sanctification - It may not be improper in a work of this kind to examine the doctrine by the standard of Scripture, which, is the only unerring standard, in order to form a right judgment upon a point of such infinite consequence. ...
It will be a sure plan in forming just conceptions of sanctification, if we bring all that is said of it in Scripture under these two distinct branches, namely, the sanctification which means setting apart, consecrating, or appointing to solemn and holy purposes—and the sanctification which means making that holy which before was polluted and defiled. I venture to believe that under one or other of these distinct particulars every thing in Scripture relating to sanctification may be included. ...
Concerning the first mentioned, the sanctification which means to set apart, to consecrate, or appropriate, to solemn and holy purposes, we meet with expressions in Scripture leading to this in both Testaments. Thus much may serve to explain the former sense of sanctification of persons and things dedicated to God...
The other sense of sanctification in making that holy which before was polluted and defiled, is by much the most general sense of the term sanctifying, in Scripture. Thus the church of the Corinthians, when regenerated and brought into fellowship with Christ's mystical body, are said to have been cleansed and purified thereby: And such, saith the apostle, (speaking to characters notoriously known to have been once in the filth and under the dominion of sin, but now brought nigh by the blood of Christ) "and such were some of you; but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified, in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the spirit of our God," (1 Corinthians 6:11)...
But the most essential point, in sanctification is to enquire concerning the source and fountain of it, not being founded in creature-power, or creature-holiness, but wholly in the Lord; and this will very fully appear from what the Scripture saith concerning it
Lamb - In the symbolical language of Scripture the lamb is the type of meekness and innocence (Isaiah 11:6 ; 65:25 ; Luke 10:3 ; John 21:15 )
Palm Palm Tree - There are several hundred species of palm; but the Phœnix dactylifera, or date-palm, is that which, growing in Palestine, is often referred to in Scripture
Infallibility - The object of papal infallibility is those truths contained explicitly or implicitly in the public deposit of Revelation, comprehended in Scripture and tradition
John the Evangelist, Saint - He lived to an advanced age, and is believed by some to be immortal, this belief being founded on the passage in Scripture (John 21), "So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee?" Patron of Asia Minor
Final Perseverance - Sacred Scripture, the Holy Fathers, and Doctors of the Church represent final perseverance as the fruit of prayer
Enoch - " This is the first "city" mentioned in Scripture
Stones, Precious - Precious stones are frequently alluded to in Scriptures; they were known and very highly valued in the earliest times. Precious stones are used in Scripture in a figurative sense, to signify value, beauty durability, etc
Nethinim - The name given to the hereditary temple servants in all the post-Exilian books of Scripture
Divine - ...
B — 1: λατρεία (Strong's #2999 — Noun Feminine — latreia — lat-ri'-ah ) akin to latreuo, "to serve," primarily, any service for hire, denotes in Scripture the service of God according to the requirements of the Levitical Law, Romans 9:4 ; Hebrews 9:1,6 , "Divine service
Gilead - Abarim, Pisgah, Nebo, and Peor are its mountains mentioned in Scripture
Summer - Scripture has no special words for ‘spring’ and ‘autumn’; and while the Arab speaks of er-rabîʿa, ‘the time of fresh pasture,’ and el-kharîf, ‘the time of gathering’ of grapes and other fruits, they are hardly regarded as distinct seasons
Watches - There are frequent references in Scripture to the duties of watchmen who were appointed to give notice of the approach of an enemy (2 Samuel 18:24-27 ; 2 Kings 9:17-20 ; Isaiah 21:5-9 )
Myrrh - " Myrrh is frequently mentioned in Scripture
Shechi'Nah - The idea which the different accounts in Scripture convey is that of a most brilliant and glorious light, enveloped in a cloud, and usually concealed by the cloud, so that the cloud itself was for the most part alone visible but on particular occasions the glory appeared
Basin - The Greek word is found nowhere else in Scripture, but from the context is understood to mean a vessel specifically suited for washing a particular part of the body, such as the hands or the feet, and is therefore used with a definite article, “the basin
Levi - He is characterized in Scripture as savage and merciless, avenging the rape of his sister, Dinah, by annihilating the male population of an entire city (Genesis 34:25-31 )
Meat - In Scripture, spiritual food that which sustains and nourishes spiritual life or holiness
Master - Scripture uses master in two basic senses: (1) one in authority and (2) teacher
Loins - Scripture also uses the loins as a symbol of procreative powers (Genesis 35:11 ; 1 Kings 8:19 ; Acts 2:30 ; Hebrews 7:5 ,Hebrews 7:5,7:10 )
Anna - It is remarkable she is the only one of note mentioned in Scripture of the tribe of Asher, though the name means blessedness
Jesse - After David was compelled to leave the court of Saul, he took his father and his mother into the country of Moab, and there they disappear from the records of Scripture, b
Allegory - The distinction in Scripture between a parable and an allegory, is said to be that a parable is a supposed history, and an allegory, a figurative description of real facts
Respect - By respect to persons or things, in Scripture language, is meant the preferring one to another
Washing - In Scripture language the act of washing carries with it an interest in the service for which it is observed. " (Revelation 7:14) We are so little acquainted with the customs of the East that it is next to an impossibility to have a full and clear apprehension of the signification of washing as expressed in the Scriptures
Draw - John 12:32 (a) This word is used throughout the Scripture to indicate an unseen power which pulls men by an irresistible force either to do good or to do evil
Herod Antipas - This led to the death of John the Baptist by her desire, as recorded in Scripture; and also to his being attacked and defeated with great loss by Aretas
Proverbs - The general sense of the word, accordding to Scripture, means somewhat that is instructive
Canaan - The extent and boundaries of Canaan are fully set forth in different parts of Scripture ( Genesis 10:19 ; 17:8 ; Numbers 13:29 ; 34:8 )
Henry Coleridge - He served as professor of Scripture at Saint Beuno's in North Wales from 1859-1865
Belly - In Scripture, belly is used for the heart
Error - In Scripture and theology, sin iniquity transgression
Fox - —Foxes and jackals are referred to indiscriminately in Scripture, although the fox is somewhat smaller in size, and is generally found singly, whereas jackals prowl around villages in small packs
Annihilation - With respect to human beings, it appears probable from reason; but it is confirmed by Scripture that they will not be annihilated, but exist in a future state, Matthew 10:28
Original - ) Not copied, imitated, or translated; new; fresh; genuine; as, an original thought; an original process; the original text of Scripture
Evangelist, John the, Saint - He lived to an advanced age, and is believed by some to be immortal, this belief being founded on the passage in Scripture (John 21), "So I will have him to remain till I come, what is it to thee?" Patron of Asia Minor
Branch - From the vast importance of this word in Scripture, as it refers to the Lord Jesus Christ, it is marked by the prophet Zechariah in capitals
Bow - The bow, in Scripture language meaneth much more than the instrument called the bow, used in war
Earthquake - The Scripture relates another earthquake in the days Uzziah, king of Judah
Glorious - This is a term we meet with in Scripture, taken from the former, and is applied to the Lord as solely his
Gittith - This word is found in Scripture only at the head, or title page, of several Psalms; namely, Psalms 8:1-9; Psalms 81:1-16 and Psalms 84:1-12
Ancient of Days - Three times, in the Prophecy of Daniel, and in the same chapter, we find the Lord distinguished by this name, and in no other part of Scripture
Milk - It is drunk in its natural condition, or shaken up in a skin into a sour curdled state, called in Scripture 'butter
Kiss - Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols
Brook - However, this distinction is not always observed in the Scripture; and one is not unfrequently taken for the other,—the great rivers, such as the Euphrates, the Nile, the Jordan, and others being called brooks. It is observed that the Hebrew word, נחל , which signifies a brook, is also the term for a valley, whence the one is often placed for the other, in different translations of the Scriptures
Nehemiah - 3595, at which time the Scripture history closes; and, consequently, the historical books, from Joshua to Nehemiah inclusive, contain the history of the Jewish people from the death of Moses, A
Worm - the general name in Scripture for little creeping insects
Rephaim - The giants Goliah, Sippai, Lahmi, and others, were some remains of the Rephaim; their magnitude and strength are known from Scripture
Degrees, Songs of - Scripture does not specify any particular occasion on which they were used
Dragon - James Hurdis, in a dissertation relative to this subject, observes, that the word translated "whales," in Genesis 1:21 , occurs twenty-seven times in Scripture; and he attempts, with much ingenuity, to prove that it every where signifies the crocodile
Quail, - Scripture speaks of their being brought with the wind, and this agrees with their habits; they do not seem to be able to fly against the wind, and therefore wait for a favourable breeze
Chariots - Scripture speaks of two kinds of chariots, two-wheeled, and both drawn by horses: one for princes and generals to ride in, Genesis 41:43; Genesis 46:29; 2 Kings 5:9; Acts 8:28; or dedicated to idols, 2 Kings 23:11; the other "chariots of iron," armed with iron scythes or hooks, projecting from the ends of the axletrees
Cities - The distinction of villages from towns, and of towns from cities is not very clearly marked in Scripture
Woe - Is sometimes used in our Bibles where a softer expression would be at least equally proper: "Woe to such a one!" is in our language a threat or imprecation of some calamity, natural or judicial, to befall a person; but this is not always the meaning of the word in Scripture
Parthia - It soon extended itself over a great part of the ancient Persian Empire, and is frequently put for that empire in Scripture, and other ancient writings
Coney - An old English name for the rabbit; used in Scripture to translate the Hebrew Leviticus 11:5 Deuteronomy 14:7 Psalm 104:18 Proverbs 30:26
Kingdom - In Scripture, the government or universal dominion of God
Canon - As the standard to which they sought to appeal on all questions was the will of God contained in the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, they came naturally to apply this term to the collective body of those writings, and to speak of them as the canon or rule. ...
In order to establish the canon of Scripture, it must be shown that all the books are of divine authority; that they are entire and incorrupt; that it is complete without addition from any foreign source; and that the whole of the books for which divine authority can be proved are included
Mother - The fond affection of a mother is often referred to in Scripture; and God has employed it to illustrate his tender love for his people, Isaiah 49:15
Trumpet - Scripture does not mention the occasion of appointing this feast
Scorpion - In Scripture, a painful scourge a kind of whip armed with points like a scorpion's tail
Rechabites - Scripture acquaints us, Jeremiah 35:2-11 , that Jonadab son of Rechab, in the time of Jehu king of Israel; laid an injunction on his posterity not to drink wine, not to build houses, not to plant vineyards, to have no lands, and to dwell in tents all their lives
Tree - In Scripture, a cross
Parable - " (Matthew 13:34)...
There is another sense of the word parable, in which it is sometimes used in Scripture when spoken in a way of reproach; hence Moses, when charging Israel to faithfulness, declares that if the people of God apostatize from him, and set up idols in the land, the Lord would scatter them among all nations, "and thou shalt become (saith Moses) an astonishment, a proverb, (or parable) and a by-word, among all nations whither the Lord shall lead thee
Commerce - (Genesis 13:2 ; 24:22,53 ) Among trading nations mentioned in Scripture, Egypt holds in very early times a prominent position
Moon - (4:19) In the figurative language of Scripture, the moon is frequently noticed as presaging events of the greatest importance through the temporary or permanent withdrawal of its light
Responsive Service - " Thus theBaptized are called in Holy Scripture "a royal priesthood," andthis doctrine pervades the Prayer-book
Inspiration - ...
The supernatural action of the Holy Spirit on the mind of the sacred writers whereby the Scriptures were not merely their own but the word of God. Scripture not merely contains but is the word of God. The term "scriptures" is attached to them exclusively in the word of God itself, as having an authority no other writings have (John 5:39; John 10:34-36). ...
If Scripture were not plenarily and verbally sanctioned by God, its practical utility as a sure guide in all questions directly or indirectly affecting doctrine and practice would be materially impaired, for what means would there be of distinguishing the false in it from the true? Inspiration does not divest the writers of their several individualities of style, just as the inspired teachers in the early church were not passive machines in prophesying (1 Corinthians 14:32). As to religious truths the collective Scriptures have unity of authorship; as to other matters their authorship is palpably as manifold as the writers. ...
Peter (2 Peter 3:16) classes Paul's epistles with "the other Scriptures"; therefore whatever inspiration is in the latter is in the former also. That inspiration excludes error from Scripture words, so far as these affect doctrine and morals, appears from Psalms 12:6, "the words of the Lord are pure words, as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times. Paul (2 Timothy 3:16) declares that no part of the written word is uninspired, but "ALL" (literally, "every Scripture," i. ) The mode of God's inspiring the writers it is not essential for us to know; the result is what momentously concerns us, namely, that their writings are our sure guide; for (2 Peter 1:21) "the prophecy of Scripture (the written word of men inspired, as 'prophet' means 1 Corinthians 14:29, not merely a foreteller) came not by the will of man, but holy men spoke as they were moved (literally, borne along, Acts 2:2; rapt out of themselves, yet not losing self control 1 Corinthians 14:32) by the Holy Spirit. But, however varied the mode, the result is that all Scripture alike is sanctioned as the word of God. For "no prophecy of Scripture proves to be of private solution" (Greek text of 2 Peter 1:20), i. it is not the utterance of the mere individual, and so to be solved or interpreted by him, but of "the Holy Spirit" by whom the writer was "moved"; Scripture is not restricted to the immediate sense in the mind of the individual writer, but has in view "the testimony of Jesus," which is "the spirit of prophecy" in the "holy men moved by the Holy Spirit. Our Lord makes it a fundamental principle "the Scripture cannot be broken," even as to one word (John 10:35). Verbal inspiration does not require that every saying reported in Scripture should be a literal transcript of the speaker's words, but that it should be substantially a true statement, and such a one as the Spirit of God sanctions for the ends of the revelation. Moreover, in recording wicked men's sayings or doings, Scripture does not sanction but simply records them. It is the original Scriptures whose words have inspired authority, not the subsequent copies or versions. Yet a remarkable providence has watched over Scripture, keeping the Jews from mutilating the Old Testament and the Roman and Greek Catholics from mutilating the New Testament though witnessing against themselves, (See CANON. , 2:47) says, "in the mauy voiced tones of Scripture expressions there is one symphonious melody"; Origen (Hom. The apostles declare of them, "the Scripture must needs have been fulfilled which the Holy Spirit by the mouth of David spoke," "God showed by the mouth of all His prophets that," etc. ...
If then the Old Testament prophets were infallible, much more the apostles in their New Testament Scriptures; as these and even the least in the gospel kingdom rank above those (Matthew 11:11; Ephesians 3:5; 1 Corinthians 2:9-10)
Assurance - The "full assurance of understanding" (Colossians 2:2 ) is an entire unwavering conviction of the truth of the declarations of Scripture, a joyful steadfastness on the part of any one of conviction that he has grasped the very truth. That such a certainty may be attained appears from the testimony of Scripture (Romans 8:16 ; 1 John 2:3 ; 3:14 ), from the command to seek after it (Hebrews 6:11 ; 2 Peter 1:10 ), and from the fact that it has been attained (2 Timothy 1:12 ; 4:7,8 ; 1 John 2:3 ; 4:16 )
Deliverance, Deliverer - In Scripture God gives deliverance (Psalm 18:50 ; Psalm 32:7 ; Psalm 44:4 ), often through a human agent. Scripture also speaks to deliverance from sin ( Psalm 39:8 ; Psalm 79:9 ); the way of evil (Proverbs 2:12 ); the power of evil (Matthew 6:13 ; Galatians 1:4 ; Colossians 1:13 ); the body of death (Romans 7:24 ); the law (Romans 7:6 ); and the coming wrath of God (1 Thessalonians 1:10 )
Ur - (Acts 7:2,4 ) These are all the indications which Scripture furnishes as to its locality. It was the Orchoe of the Greeks, and probably the Ereck of Holy Scripture
Clement - Scriptures is remarkable. For thus saith the Scripture, in a certain place, 'I will appoint their bishops in righteousness, and their deacons in faith. Though there are many pious remarks scattered through the epistle, there is on the whole a great difference between it and holy Scripture; a deep dark line separates it widely from everything that bears the stamp of divine inspiration
Chamber - Chamber and Chambers...
These words we meet in Scripture upon various occasions. (2 Kings 9:2; Mark 14:1-72) But the sweetest sense of the word chambers, in Scripture language, is in reference to those endearing views of Jesus, when he brings his church into the chambers of his grace, to make himself known unto them, otherwise than he doeth unto the world
Fat - In Scripture language there is something of great importance in this word. " (Psalms 17:10) If these views be well founded, it may serve also by way of additional testimony to the truth of Scripture, that the law in all points was but a shadow, the body is Christ
Herod - ...
The first Herod made mention of in holy Scripture, was called Herod the Great. (See Matthew 14:1-12; Mark 6:14-29)...
The fourth Herod we meet with in Scripture, is the one mentioned with such everlasting infamy in the twelfth chapter of the Acts of the Apostles
Gilead - The balm of Gilead is used in Scripture as typical of Christ. If this balm be never used, and this physician never known or regarded, how shall the blessings of either be experienced? (Jeremiah 8:22)...
I must not dismiss this article of Gilead without first taking notice of a beautiful similitude of our Lord's in Scripture, when comparing his church to this mount, on account of its loveliness
Age, - Though these terms do not occur in Scripture, many allusions are made to the different ages. Thus we speak of the Antediluvian age, and Scripture speaks of the same period as 'the old world,' i
Leb'Anon, - Lebanon is represented in Scripture as lying upon the northern border of the land of Israel. The western range is the "Libanus" of the old geographers and the Lebanon of Scripture. It runs northeast in a straight line parallel to the coast, to the opening from the Mediterranean into the plain of Emesa, called in Scripture the "entrance of Hamath. Anti-Libanus is only once distinctly mentioned in Scripture, where it is accurately described as "Lebanon toward the sunrising
Giant - Scripture speaks of giants before the flood: "Nephilim, mighty men who were of old, men of renown," Genesis 6:4 . Scripture sometimes calls giants Rephaim: Chedorlaomer beat the Rephaim at Ashteroth-Karnaim. ...
The Rephaim in some parts of Scripture signify spirits in the invisible world, in a state of misery. As to the existence of giants, several writers, both ancient and modern, have thought that the giants of Scripture were men famous for violence and crime, rather than for strength or stature
Canon of the New Testament - the New Testament Scriptures were put forth as they were successively written. The earliest notice of a collection is in 2 Peter 3:16, which speaks of "all the epistles" of Paul as if some collection of them then existed and was received in the churches as on a par with "the other Scriptures. , 2:27) term the New Testament writings "the Holy Scriptures. The quotations by the fathers (of whom Origen quotes at least two thirds of New Testament), and the oldest versions, the Syriac, Latin, and Egyptian, prove that their Scriptures were the same as ours. ...
Nothing but almighty Providence could have constrained both the Jews (in the case of the Old Testament) and the Roman and Greek apostate churches (in the case of the New Testament) to witness for the very Scriptures which condemn them. It utterly disproves the infidel allegation of collusion and corruption of the Scriptures. Again Rome argues, since the rule of faith must be known, and since some books of Scripture were not universally received until the 4th century, Scripture cannot be the rule of faith. The answer is: those portions of Scripture are not the rule of faith to those to whom they are not given with full means of knowing them as such. But all Scripture is the rule of faith to all to whom it is given, and who may, if they will, know it. That could not become a portion of inspired Scripture in the 4th century which was not so before. ...
The council of Carthage did not make aught part of Scripture which was not so before. " Accordingly in the Nicene Creed, "according to the Scriptures," quoted from 1 Corinthians 15:4, implies their being recognized as the standard. 303) was directed against the Christian Scriptures; whoever delivered them were stigmatized as "traitors" (tradilores), so that they must have then existed as a definite collection. instructing by word of mouth, was the mode at first, and "faith" then "came by hearing" (Luke 1:4; Romans 10:17), in which however there was always an appeal to Old Testament Scripture (Acts 17:11). ...
The scantiness of direct quotations from Scripture in the apostolic fathers arises from their being so full of all they had seen and heard, and so dwelling less on the written word. All four make some express references to New Testament Scripture. So far from there being a gradual waning of inspiration from the writings of the apostles and evangelists to those of succeeding Christian writers, there is so wide a chasm (the more remarkable as the early fathers had the apostolic writings to guide them) that this alone is a strong proof that the Scripture writers were guided by an extraordinary divine power
Divide, Divider, Dividing - " What is intended here is not "dividing" Scripture from Scripture, but teaching Scripture accurately
Midrash - Title of a body of Jewish literature that gathers together the Jewish scholars' exegesis, exposition, and homiletical interpretations of Scripture in the centuries just before and after Jesus. This Jewish method of searching the Scriptures sought to discover the deeper meaning of the most minute details contained in the sacred text. Midrash became the basic work leading to the production of the Targumin (Aramaic paraphrases of Scripture) and of the mainline expression of Judaism (Mishnah, Talmud). ...
An important use of the Midrash is that it gives the interpreter of Scripture a greater insight into interpretation from a people closer to the original appearance of the Old Testament books, as well as an understanding of the text across history by Jewish people
Righteousness - ...
Now the Scriptures with one voice, and in the most unqualified and unaccommodating manner, declare that when the Lord looked "down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand and seek after God," the result of that enquiry was, that "they were all gone aside, and altogether become filthy, that there was none that did good, no not one. ...
What then is the righteousness of the Scripture, and who is the righteous man before God? The answer is direct. " Hence, therefore, it undeniably follows that Christ is the only righteousness of his people; and he is what Scripture declares his name is, and shall be, JEHOVAH our Righteousness. (Jeremiah 23:6)...
Now then the conclusion from this statement of Scripture is evidently this—if Jesus be the only righteousness of his people, either this is my right eousness, or I have none at all
Handicraft - The smith's work and its results are often mentioned in Scripture, 2 Samuel 12:31; 1 Kings 6:7; 2 Chronicles 26:14; Isaiah 44:12; Isaiah 54:1-17; Isaiah 16:1-14. Carpenters are often mentioned in Scripture. Bakers are noticed in Scripture, Jeremiah 37:21; Hosea 7:4; and the well-known valley Tyropœon probably derived its name from the occupation of the cheese-makers, its inhabitants
Bible, Hermeneutics - ...
There are some basic principles that should be observed by the interpreter of the Scriptures. We must be careful to reverence the divine character of Scripture. 2) The Bible has a genuinely human element, also, since God used ordinary people to write the Scriptures. 5) Only one meaning should be given to any passage of Scripture, unless a later passage of Scripture assigns it a second meaning. Only an inspired writer of Scripture can be allowed to give a passage more than one meaning. 7) Careful attention must be given to the historical situation of a portion of Scripture. The literary task begins with the task of translation of the Scripture from the ancient Hebrew and Greek into the language best understood by the interpreter. ...
Consideration must be given to the context of a passage of Scripture. No portion of Scripture ought to be interpreted without regard to its content. ...
The literary task of the interpreter must include comparing the meaning given to a passage to what is taught elsewhere in the Scriptures. This does not mean that we should arbitrarily force one viewpoint upon all of the Scriptures. But it does mean that we should be careful not to interpret Scriptures in such a way that we introduce contradictions into our interpretation of the Bible. While there is progression, there is not contradiction in the Scriptures. One who would be a good interpreter must be devoted to diligent, careful study of the Scriptures (2 Timothy 2:15 ), prayerfully seeking the leadership of the Holy Spirit continually while interpreting the Scriptures (John 16:12-15 ; 2 Peter 1:19-21 )
Fact And Theory - ...
This is the conception of revelation which the Scripture writers themselves give us. It will no longer signify the communication of truth by God’s acts and words,*
The extreme result of this tendency to give up the authority of Scripture, and the consequent subordination of the facts of Christianity to a theory, is seen in an art. According to the author, the fundamental error in Scripture is its identification of Jesus Christ with the Spirit of God, communion with whom is the essence of religion. Thus, having abandoned all external authority, we lose the fact-basis as well as its Scripture interpretation, and are left with a philosophy of religion. This type of religious philosophy may not admit the authority of the Scripture, but it should frankly admit that what it leaves us is not Christianity. Wherever the principle of external authority is given up, we are sure to meet with the same distinction between kernel and husk in reference to Scripture fact and doctrine. And whenever this takes place, the Scripture idea of revelation has been changed, revelation being simply the product of religious thoughts and feelings in the mind of man. ), they nevertheless regard the Scripture facts as Scripturally interpreted, i. ’ The dogmatic interpretation of them in the Scripture is also regarded as the external hull or symbol of rational truth. 4) says that it is the business of Dogmatics to ‘work over critically’ the Scripture as well as the Church dogma in order to reach its abiding truth. The Scripture doctrine is said to contain a ‘sensuous’ element which is not rational and which must be rationalized. ...
It is evident that the principle of external authority in religious knowledge having been abandoned by this school also, the historic facts of Christianity as well as the Scripture interpretation are given up. ...
The subjection of the Scripture facts and doctrines to a subjective norm has taken also a more mystical form. These so-called eternal truths are temporally conditioned just as are the Scripture dogmas. Accordingly it is natural that a demand for a truly undogmatic Christianity should arise, seeking to be rid not only of Scripture doctrine, but also of the rational element into which it had been distilled. External authority, whether of Scripture or the Church, kills religion
Humanity - ” The pages of Scripture depict a great variety of human actions and attitudes, thoughts and feelings, sins an successes. Although Scripture depicts humans as thinking creatures, this definition was originally derived from Greek philosophy. Scripture represents people not as individuals composed of parts, but as integrated, acting units intimately interrelated with others. Through its many stories of people turning from God, Scripture insists that strong divine influence is needed to counteract sin; but Scripture may not provide a precise answer to the other side of the issue—humanity's ability to turn to God
Infallibility - To communicate authority to the Scripture; or, in other words, that the Scripture (quoad nos, ) as to us, receives its authority from her. To assign and fix the sense of Scripture, which all Christians are submissively to receive. To decree as necessary to salvation whatever she judges so, although not contained in Scripture. Every impartial person, who considers this subject with the least degree of attention, must clearly perceive that neither any individual nor body of Christians have any ground from reason or Scripture for pretending to infallibility
Michael, Saint - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Michael the Archangel - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Mortal Sin - The gravity of matter is determined by Holy Scripture, by the definitions of the Church, by the testimony of the Fathers, Doctors, and theologians, by the universal belief of the faithful, and by reason enlightened by faith
Jair - He was a vigorous and suceessful leader, who kept such an approach to royal state, that, as Scripture says, his 30 sons rode like princes, on as many ass colts
Shechinah - A Chaldee word meaning resting-place, not found in Scripture, but used by the later Jews to designate the visible symbol of God's presence in the tabernacle, and afterwards in Solomon's temple
Immortality - Of what nature or kind that immortality is, which distinguisheth the state or existence of the miserable in hell, Scripture hath not said
Apple - Tristram has suggested that the apricot has better claims than any other fruit-tree to be the apple of Scripture
Error - 1), "a wandering, a forsaking of the right path, see James 5:20 , whether in doctrine, 2 Peter 3:17 ; 1 John 4:6 , or in morals, Romans 1:27 ; 2 Peter 2:18 ; Jude 1:11 , though, in Scripture, doctrine and morals are never divided by any sharp line
Sodom - This city and its awful destruction are frequently alluded to in Scripture (Deuteronomy 29:23 ; 32:32 ; Isaiah 1:9,10 ; 3:9 ; 13:19 ; Jeremiah 23:14 ; Ezekiel 16:46-56 ; Zephaniah 2:9 ; Matthew 10:15 ; Romans 9:29 ; 2 Peter 2:6 , etc
Abarim - Tristram verified the observation of the landscape from Nebo, as seen by Moses according to the Scripture record
Holocaust - It is called in Scripture a burnt-offering
Deacon - The Office of Deacon is stillretained in the Church as an order of the Ministry, for "it isevident unto all men reading Holy Scripture and ancient Authors,that from the Apostles' time there have been these Orders ofMinisters in Christ's Church,—Bishops, Priests and Deacons
Ahasuerus - There are three kings designated by this name in Scripture
Pool - ...
The following are some of the principal pools mentioned in Scripture: pool of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:20 ), upper and lower pools of Gihon (Isaiah 7:3 ; Isaiah 22:9 ), old pool (Isaiah 22:11 ), King's pool at Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:14 ), pool of Bethesda (John 5:2 ,John 5:2,5:4 ,John 5:4,5:7 ), and pool of Siloam (John 9:7 ,John 9:7,9:11 )
Neck - A stiff neck, in Scripture, denotes obstinacy in sin
Wages - (Exodus 2:9 ) The only mention of the rate of wages in Scripture is found in the parable of the householder and the vineyard, (Matthew 20:2 ) where the laborer's wages was set at one denarius per day, probably 15 to 17 cents, a sum which may be fairly taken as equivalent to the denarius, and to the usual pay of a soldier (ten asses per diem) in the later days of the Roman republic
Archangel, Michael the - (Herew: who is like God?) ...
Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10,12; Jude; Apocalypse 12)
Add - ...
To add to, is used in Scripture, as equivalent to give, or bestow upon
Pul - 745-727, and some have supposed that this king was Pul; but these dates do not agree with Scripture, and in 1 Chronicles 5:26 , Pul is mentioned as a distinct king from Tiglath-pileser
Courses - ...
Twenty-four is a number seldom found in the Scripture: there may therefore, as to number, be an allusion to the 24 courses of priests in the 24 elders seated on thrones in Revelation 4:4 , etc
Heart - The heart is often referred to in Scripture as the seat of the affections and of the passions, also of wisdom and understanding — hence we read of 'the wise in heart,' also the Lord gave to Solomon 'a wise and understanding heart
Rod - The holy Scriptures have a variety of meanings concerning this word. " (Psalms 23:4) I refer to the Scripture for the general account of the rod "of Moses and Aaron's rod that budded," and the like
Sea - The seas referred to in Scripture are: ...
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Conversion - ' It is in Scripture the real effect that accompanies the new birth, a turning to God
Valley - We meet with an account of numberless values and vales in the Scripture
Curtain - In Scripture, tents dwellings
Woman - It is evident from Scripture that women were anciently held in much more honour and esteem in Eastern countries than they are now
Keys - But every one must see that this is an absolute perversion of Scripture; for the keys of the kingdom of heaven most probably refer to the Gospel dispensation, and denote the power and authority of every faithful minister to preach the Gospel, administer the sacraments, and exercise government, that men may be admitted to or excluded from the church, as is proper
Unicorn - ' There is nothing in the Scripture to intimate that the animal had but one horn, indeed Deuteronomy 33:17 speaks of 'the horns of a unicorn' (see margin ), and it must have been some animal with which the Israelites were familiar
Eve (2) - In the early ages the evening and night before a feast were spent in prayer, fasting, Scripture-reading, and preaching
Jehu - See also 1 Kings 19:15-18)...
It is a remarkable feature concerning Jehu, that the appointment of Jehu, and his becoming king, occupied a period of more than twenty-two years; which will be seen by comparing the dates of those two Scriptures. There are two other Jehus mentioned in Scripture, Jehu the fourth son of Rehoboam, king of Judah, (2 Chronicles 11:19) and Jehu the son of Obed
John - We have abundant cause to bless God for the ministry of this man, on account of the precious gospel which bears his name, and also for those three Epistles, as well as the Book of the Revelations, with which the sacred canon of Scripture closeth
Unbelief - " (Mark 16:16) And his servant, the beloved apostle, confirms the awful account, when in the close of the canon of Scripture, he saith that "the fearful and unbelieving shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone; which is the second death
Abana - In the Arabic version Abana is translated 'Barda,' which goes to confirm the conjecture that Barada is the Abana of Scripture
Adultery - Was it the case then, as it is but too generally now, that both the sin and the shame are thrown, with fulness of every thing blameable, upon women, while the seducers and more worthless, pass off unrebuked? yea, to the disgrace of human nature, not unfrequently applauded! Not so in thine eye, blessed Lord Jesus! (See John 8:1; Joh 8:11) It should be remarked under this article, that beside this natural adultery, noticed in the Scripture, there is a spiritual fornication of which the Lord complains, which is idolatry
David - The very important figure which David, king of Israel, makes in Scripture, demands, that in a work of this kind, he should not be overlooked
Ant - ' This insect is held up as a practical reproof to the sluggard; the Scripture says that it provides its meat in the summer, and gathereth its food in the harvest
Liberty - Besides the common application of this term, it is used in Scripture symbolically, as...
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Nehushtan - (2 Kings 18:4) It should seem very plain, from what is said in this Scripture, that what Moses in his days had lifted up at the command of God, and for the most blessed purposes, the Israelites in after-ages had perverted into an idol
Dance - The dance is spoken of in Holy Scripture universally as symbolical of some rejoicing, and is often coupled for the sake of contrast with mourning, as in (Ecclesiastes 3:4 ) comp
Hauran - The tract of country of this name is mentioned only twice in Scripture, Ezekiel 47:16 ; Ezekiel 47:18
Shoulder - " The Scripture calls that a rebellious shoulder, a withdrawing shoulder, which will not submit to the yoke; and to bear it together with joint consent, is termed "serving with one shoulder
Darkness - Used in various significations in Scripture
Apple - Boyle says, "The rich color, fragrant odor and handsome appearance of the citron, whether in flower or in fruit, are particularly suited to the passages of Scripture mentioned above
Vigil - In the early ages the evening and night before a feast were spent in prayer, fasting, Scripture-reading, and preaching
Sin, Mortal - The gravity of matter is determined by Holy Scripture, by the definitions of the Church, by the testimony of the Fathers, Doctors, and theologians, by the universal belief of the faithful, and by reason enlightened by faith
Earthquake - Scripture speaks of several earthquakes, Numbers 16:1-50 1 Kings 19:11,12
Leopard - It seems from Scripture that the leopard could not be rare in Palestine
Rebuke - In Scripture, chastisement punishment affliction for the purpose of restraint and correction
Rain - In Scripture the "early" and the "latter" rain of Palestine is spoken of, Deuteronomy 11:14 Hosea 6:3
Beard - These facts explain many passages of Scripture: as the gross insult offered to David's ambassadors, 2 Samuel 10:4-14 ; the zealous indignation of Nehemiah, Nehemiah 13:25 ; the mode in which the feigned insanity of David was expressed, 1 Samuel 21:12 , and the grief of Mephibosheth, 1 Samuel 19:24 ; the treachery of Judas; also several passages in the prophets, Isaiah 7:20 50:6 Ezekiel 5:1-5
Rehoboam - ...
Scripture leads us to trace the sins and misfortunes of Rehoboam in part to the influence of his heathen mother, 2 Chronicles 12:13
Bar'Nabas - Here the Scripture notices of him cease
Jes'se - (1 Samuel 16:11 ; 17:34,35 ) After David's rupture with Saul he took his father and his mother into the country of Moab and deposited them with the king, and there they disappear from our view in the records of Scripture
Eagle, - Its habits agree with those related of the eagle in Scripture, and they are plentiful in Palestine
Dance - The dance is spoken of in Holy Scripture universally as symbolical of some rejoicing, and is often coupled for the sake of contrast with mourning, as in (Ecclesiastes 3:4 ) comp
Ear - The organ of hearing is often used symbolically in Scripture
Ecclesiastical History - It will show us the evil of imposing unreasonable terms of communion, and requiring Christians to profess doctrines not propounded in Scriptural words, but inferred as consequences from passages of Scripture, which one may call systems of consequential divinity. Watts's Scripture History; and Fleury's History of the Israelites
Way - We do not wonder that a word lending itself so easily to figurative use should be applied to religion as frequently as is the case in Scripture, and that Christianity should be called pre-eminently ‘the Way. Butler’s remark that religion is a practical thing is quite in the spirit of the whole of Scripture, as seen in the Prophets, the Sermon on the Mount, the Parables, and the Epistles, ‘Every one … which heareth these words of mine, and doeth them … and doeth them not’ (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 7:26); ‘Inasmuch as ye did it … did it not’ (Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45)
Cedar - According to Scripture, tall (Isaiah 2:13), spreading (Ezekiel 31:3), fit for beams, boards, and pillars (1 Kings 6:10; 1 Kings 6:15; 1 Kings 7:2), masts (Ezekiel 27:5), and carved work as images (Isaiah 44:14). As our modern cedar is hardly fit for masts, and is of a worse quality than inferior deal, probably by the "cedar" of Scripture is meant Scotch fir (Pinus sylvestris)
Sceptre - This word in Scripture language seems to be intended for much more than is generally annexed to the term in ordinary speech. By sceptre we connect with the idea some insignia, or staff of office; but as the same word is used in Scripture in a very different sense as well, it certainly merits our attention, may not confine it to the one meaning take it in both
Tree - We meet with the names of a great variety of trees in Scripture, but if we may give credit to ancient writers, there was nothing in the Hebrew language less determined than the special names of trees. It has been thought so by some writers, and there is reason for the opinion; and when we consider how God the Holy Ghost, from the description of the garden of Eden, in the very opening of the Bible, to the closing the canon of Scripture, in the description of the Paradise of God, makes use of the several names of "the tree of life, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil," which were evidently symbolical and sacramental, I cannot but pause over the several elegantly and highly finished representations which the whole Book of God abounds with, more or less, from beginning to end, and accept them as such
Zion, Sion, Mount Zion - ...
The term Zion has constantly in Scripture a metaphorical sense. In Scripture Zion never means the church: it always signifies blessing on earth, and is specially in connection with Israel, when the ultimate blessing of the nations will be through Israel; nevertheless Christians now enter into its spiritual import as being under the reign of grace while here on earth
Create, Creation, Creator, Creature - A — 1: κτίζω (Strong's #2936 — Verb — ktizo — ktid'-zo ) used among the Greeks to mean the founding of a place, a city or colony, signifies, in Scripture, "to create," always of the act of God, whether (a) in the natural creation, Mark 13:19 ; Romans 1:25 (where the title "The Creator" translates the article with the aorist participle of the verb); 1 Corinthians 11:9 ; Ephesians 3:9 ; Colossians 1:16 ; 1 Timothy 4:3 ; Revelation 4:11 ; 10:6 , or (b) in the spiritual creation, Ephesians 2:10,15 ; 4:24 ; Colossians 3:10 . , denotes in Scripture "the Creator," 1 Peter 4:19 (cp
Responsibility - This verse has been dubbed the greatest "therefore" in Scripture. There are a number of illustrations in Scripture in which a person attempted to shift responsibility for an action onto others. Solidarity in accountability is seen early in Scripture. ...
Of all of the writers of Scripture, Paul addressed the issue of accountability most extensively in the Book of Romans
Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - The author calls attention to the blessings recorded in Holy Scripture as connected with lonely spots ( e. This is a defence of the lawfulness of the allegorical sense of Scripture pleading the testimony of Scripture itself; e. It displays a very extensive acquaintance with the Bible and anticipates many favourite usages of mediaeval mystics and hymnwriters; such as the term anagoge (ἀναγωγὴ) for the application of Scripture to the heavenly Jerusalem identification of the digitus Dei with the Holy Spirit (St
Good, Goodness - ...
God's goodness is a bedrock truth of Scripture. In 1 Peter 2:3 Peter echoes the language of Psalm 34:8 : "Taste and see that the Lord is good!"'...
Although we might discuss God's goodness in some abstract philosophical sense, in Scripture his goodness appears most clearly in his dealings with people. In Scripture goodness always involves particular ways of behaving
Fasting - From many examples recorded in Scripture. By plain and undeniable inferences from Scripture, Matthew 7:16 . They, however, who in times of public distress, when the judgments of God are in the earth, and when his providence seems to call for humiliation, will not relinquish any of their sensual enjoyments, nor deny themselves in the least, cannot be justified; since good men in all ages, more or less, have humbled themselves on such occasions; and reason as well as Scripture evidently prove it to be our duty, Matthew 9:15
Swedenborgians - From that time he began to print and publish various wonderful things, which, he says, were revealed to him, relating to heaven and hell, the state of men after death, the worship of God, the spiritual sense of the Scriptures, the various earths in the universe, and their inhabitants; with many other strange particulars. He farther maintains, that the sacred Scripture contains three distinct senses, called celestial, spiritual, and natural, which are united by correspondences; and that in each sense it is divine truth accommodated respectively to the angels of the three heavens, and also to men on earth. ever since the time of Job, but is now revived by Emanuel Swedenborg, who uses it as a key to the spiritual or internal sense of the sacred Scripture; every page of which, he says, is written by correspondence, that is, by such things in the natural world as correspondent unto and signify things in the spiritual world. That all those passages in the Scripture generally supposed to signify the destruction of the world by fire, and commonly called the last judgment, must be understood according to the above-mentioned science of correspondences, which teaches, that by the end of the world, or consummation of the age, is not signified the destruction of the world, but the destruction or end of the present Christian church, both among Roman Catholics and Protestants, of every description or denomination; and that this last judgment actually took place in the spiritual world in the year 1757; from which aera is dated the second advent of the Lord, and the commencement of a new Christian church, which, they say, is meant by the new heaven and new earth in the Revelation, and the New Jerusalem thence descending
Purgatory - The texts quoted from the Scriptures have no reference to this doctrine, as may be seen by consulting the context, and any just commentator thereon. Scripture, in general, speaks of departed souls going immediately at death to a fixed state of happiness or misery, and gives us no idea of purgatory, Isaiah 57:2 . If Christ died for us, and redeemed us from sin and hell, as the Scripture speaks, then the idea of farther meritorious suffering detracts from the perfection of Christ's work, and places merit still in the creature; a doctrine exactly opposite to Scripture
Mantle - The Hebrew word occurs nowhere else in Scripture
Lessons of the Roman Breviary - From Apostolic days the books of Scripture, as well as non-canonical writings, were read in the Christian assemblies
Chapter - ...
(2) Short lesson or passage from Holy Scripture called the "little chapter," read at Office
Sheep - They are frequently mentioned in Scripture
Hare - Scripture usually speaks of things in nature is they appear to the senses of man, and not according to strict science
Three - That there are those who bear witness in Heaven is not borne out by any other Scripture
Mesha - (See DIBON on his victorious campaign against Israel, and confirmation of Scripture
Footstool - Elsewhere, the Scripture was applied to the ascension of Christ (Acts 2:34-35 ), the exaltation of Christ (Hebrews 1:13 ), and the future victory of Christ (Hebrews 10:13 )
Prescription - Besides, the thing is in itself natural; for if a man finds a variety of opinions in the world upon important passages in Scripture, where shall he be so apt to get the true sense as from contemporary writers or others who lived very near the apostolic age? And if such a man shall find any doctrine or interpretations to have been universally believed in the first ages, or, as Vicentius Lirinensis words it, semper ubique et ab omnibus, he will unquestionably be disposed to think such early and universal consent, or such prescription, of very considerable weight in determining his opinion
Regeneration - " ...
The necessity of such a change is emphatically affirmed in Scripture (John 3:3 ; Romans 7:18 ; 8:7-9 ; 1 Corinthians 2:14 ; Ephesians 2:1 ; 4:21-24 )
Baldness - The Egyptians, contrary to oriental custom, shaved on joyous occasions and only let the hair grow in mourning; the mention of Joseph's "shaving" when summoned before Pharaoh is therefore an undesigned coincidence in Genesis 41:14, and mark of the truth of the Scripture record
Biography - We shall only, therefore, point out some of the best pieces, which the reader may peruse at his leisure:...
Hunter's Sacred Biography; Robinson's Scripture Characters; Hunter's History of Christ; J
Woman - Several women are mentioned in Scripture as having been endowed with prophetic gifts, as Miriam (Exodus 15:20 ), Deborah (Judges 4:4,5 ), Huldah (2 Kings 22:14 ), Noadiah (Nehemiah 6:14 ), Anna (Luke 2:36,37 ), and the daughters of Philip the evangelist (Acts 21:8,9 )
Root - In Scripture root generally appears in a figurative sense
ti'Gris - We find but little mention of the Tigris in Scripture
Desertion - As all things, however, are under the divine control, so even desertion, or, as it is sometimes expressed in Scripture, "the hidings of God's face, " may be useful to excite humility, exercise faith and patience, detach us from the world, prompt to more vigorous action, bring us to look more to God as the fountain of happiness, conform us to his word, and increase our desires for that state of blessedness which is to come
New Age - The term new age does not occur in Scripture
Rainbow - ...
Revelation 4:3 (a) The bow in this Scripture is a complete one
Hosts, Lord of - Scripture reveals that there is a mighty heavenly host, and principalities and powers in the unseen world
Alien - In Scripture, one who is a stranger to the church of Christ, or to the covenant of grace
Calling - The words καλέω, κλῆσις, κλητός, have various applications in Scripture
Hedibia, a Lady in Gaul - Hedibia was a diligent student of Scripture, and, finding no one to assist her, sent, by her friend Apodemius, a list of questions to Jerome
So - Egyptian monuments illustrate Scripture; precisely in Hoshea's time a change occurs in the Egyptian dynasties
Correction - All Scripture is profitable for correction
Experience - ‘Christian experience,’ in modern phraseology, covers what is spoken of in Scripture as the knowledge of God, of Christ, etc
Heal - In Scripture, to forgive to cure moral disease and restore soundness
Gentiles - A name commonly used in Scripture to denote any and every nation except Israel
Sister - ...
Matthew 13:56 These are really the sisters of the Lord JESUS, although the Roman church denies the plain statement of Scripture and teaches that these were really nieces, and not sisters
Invocation - The Protestants censure and reject this opinion, as contrary to Scripture; deny the truth of the fact; and think it highly unreasonable to suppose that a limited, finite being, should be in a manner omnipresent, and, at one and the same time, hear and attend to the prayers that are offered up to him in England, China, and Peru; and from hence infer, that, if the saints cannot hear their request, it is inconsistent with common sense to address any kind of prayer to them
Ministry, Gospel - 1 Peter 5:2-4 ; from the promises of assistance which were given to the first ministers of the new dispensation, Matthew 28:20 ; and from the importance of a gospel Ministry, which is represented in the Scripture as a very great blessing to them who enjoy it, and the removal of it as one of the greatest calamities which can befall any people, Revelation 2:3 : ...
See books under last article
Gibeon - The Gibeonites form a very interesting subject in the Scripture history, and lead to an enquiry not less interesting
Crown - In allusion to Christ, the Scripture meaning of crown is, that all the merit of redemption is his; and as such, he wears the crown
Elimelech - This man was the husband of Naomi, whom we read of with such honourable testimony for her faith in God, in the book of Ruth; and as so much is contained in that sweet fragment of sacred Scripture, in allusion to the Lord Jesus Christ, I thought it proper to notice in this place, this name
Flood - But the word in Scripture is made use of to denote many things of an overwhelming nature
Access - This, in Scripture language, means, the drawing nigh to a throne of grace, and having a nearness, and audience with God in Christ
Demetrias, Roman Virgin - He warns her not to perplex herself with difficult questions introduced by the Origenists; and recommends the study of Scripture
Acceptable Year of the Lord - The Lord added, "This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears
Brother - ...
In Scripture, the term brother is applied to a kinsman by blood more remote that a son of the same parents as in the case of Abraham and Lot, Jacob and Laban
Hermon - a celebrated mountain in the Holy Land, often spoken of in Scripture
Blindness - is often used in Scripture to express ignorance or want of discernment in divine things, as well as the being destitute of natural sight. An ignorant or erring teacher is compared by our Lord to a blind man leading a blind man;—a strong representation of the presumption of him that professes to teach the way of salvation without due qualifications, and of the danger of that implicit faith which is often placed by the people in the authority of man, to the neglect of the Holy Scriptures
Earth - " The restriction of the term "earth" to Judea is more common in Scripture than is usually supposed; and this acceptation of it has great effect on several passages, in which it ought to be so understood
Hadad - Here he began to raise disturbances against Solomon; but the Scripture does not mention particulars
Ear - The Scripture uses the term figuratively
Seeing - To see, in Scripture, is often used to express the sense of vision, knowledge of spiritual things, and even the supernatural knowledge of hidden things, of prophecy, of visions, of ecstacies
Olive Tree - Tournefort mentions eighteen kinds of olives; but in the Scripture we only read of the cultivated and wild olive
Famine - Several famines are noted in the Scripture history
Gibeah - Scripture remarks, that this occurred at a time when there was no king in Israel, and when every one did what was right in his own eyes
Kadesh or Kadesh-Barnea - Robinson found a watering place answering well to the indications in Scripture, on the western border of El-Arabah, about twenty-seven miles from the Dead Sea
Roman Breviary, Lessons of the - From Apostolic days the books of Scripture, as well as non-canonical writings, were read in the Christian assemblies
Cup - This word is taken in Scripture both in a proper and in a figurative sense
Rephaim - Their magnitude and strength are often spoken of in Scripture
Regeneration - It is expressed in Scripture by being born again and born from above, John 3:3-7 ; becoming a new creature, 2 Corinthians 5:17 ; being quickened to a new life of holiness, Ephesians 2:1 ; having Christ formed in the heart, Galatians 4:19 ; and being made partaker of the divine nature, 2 Peter 1:4
Frontlets, - (Exodus 13:16 ; 6:8; 11:18; Matthew 23:5 ) These "frontlets" or "phylacteries" were strips of parchment, on which were written four passages of Scripture, (Exodus 13:2-10,11-17 ; 6:4-9,13-23) in an ink prepared for the purpose
Patriarch - In common usage the title of patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in Scripture previous to the time of Moses, as Adam, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
Dreams - The Scripture declares that the influence of the Spirit of God upon the soul extends to its sleeping as well as its waking thoughts
Inclose - 26, and, in reference to the Gentiles, in the light of verses 12-25; in Galatians 3:22,23 ("the Scripture hath shut up all things under sin"), the Apostle shows that, by the impossibility of being justified by keeping the Law, all, Jew and Gentile, are under sin, so that righteousness might be reckoned to all who believe
Correct, Correction, Corrector, Correcting - 1), hence, "correction," is used of the Scripture in 2 Timothy 3:16 , referring to improvement of life and character
Lectionary - The Tables to be found in the Prayer Book setting forththe portions of Scripture to be read daily in Public Worshipthroughout the year, also the Proper Lessons for Sundays and theHoly Days of the Church. No other religious body makes so large provision for thepublic reading of the Scriptures, and the Episcopal Church has beenappropriately called a "Bible Reading Church. (See LESSONS; also ScriptureS IN PRAYER BOOK
Ungodliness - ...
Cremer remarks interestingly on the rare use of ἀσεβέω and the comparatively rare use of the whole group in the NT: ‘Generally the negative and strong terms ἀδικεῖν, ἀσεβεῖν, ἀνόσια ποιεῖν, which occur often in profane Greek, are met with in Scripture far more rarely than the positive ἀμαρτάνειν, … which in profane Greek was far less morally, and still less religiously, estimated. Herein is manifest, on the one hand, the far deeper religious view of Scripture, which estimates “failings,” or sins of omission, so seriously, and, on the other, its deeper humanity, which does not resort to the strongest terms to designate whatever is actually sinful’ (op
Milk - ...
One of the more perplexing sayings of Scripture is the repeated rule (Exodus 23:19 ; Exodus 34:26 ; Deuteronomy 14:21 ) not to boil a kid in its mother's milk. It remains one of the mysteries of Scripture
Ancient - Some persons apply ancient to men advanced in years still living but this use is not common in modern practice, though found in Scripture. In Scripture, very old men
Barnabas - He rejoiced in the reality of the work and exhorted them to cleave to the Lord; the Scripture says he was "a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith. It was most probably written by a Gentile, for it is strongly opposed to Judaism; it has numerous inaccuracies as to the Old Testament, and absurd interpretations of Scripture, and contains many silly allusions to the writer's superior knowledge
Earth - ...
In Scripture, earth is used for a part of the world. In Scripture, things on the earth, are carnal, sensual, temporary things opposed to heavenly, spiritual or divine things
Wolf - The Scripture observes of the wolf, that it lives upon rapine; is violent, bloody, cruel, voracious, and greedy; goes abroad by night to seek its prey, and is a great enemy to flocks of sheep. This circumstance is expressly mentioned in several passages of Scripture
Coal - ...
Coal, or rather charcoal, supplies several Scripture metaphors, the most interesting of which is illustrated by the expression of the wise woman of Tekoa, ‘thus shall they quench my coal that is left’ (2 Samuel 14:7 )
Sell - In Scripture, to give up to be harassed and made slaves
Astronomy - The following heavenly bodies are alluded to particularly in Scripture: Venus, the morning star, Isaiah 14:12 Revelation 2:28 ; Orion, and the Pleiades, Job 9:9 38:31 Amos 5:8 ; the Great Bear, called "Arcturus," Job 9:9 38:32 ; Draco, "the crooked serpent" Job 26:13 ; and Gemini, "the twins," 2 Kings 23:5 Acts 28:11
Thigh - More often Scripture regards the thigh as the seat of vital functions, especially procreation
Serpent - ophis), frequently noticed in Scripture
Hebrew - A name applied to the Israelites in Scripture only by one who is a foreigner (Genesis 39:14,17 ; 41:12 , etc
Admiration - In Scripture language, somewhat more is meant by those words than we annex to them, in our ordinary discourse
Tiglath-Pileser Iii. - He is first mentioned in Scripture, however, as gaining a victory over Pekah, king of Israel, and Rezin of Damascus, who were confederates
Bible, Editions of the - It has been the task of Scripture scholars, by the comparison and appraisal of these manuscripts, to reconstruct the original as exactly as possible
Baal-Zephon - I beg the reader to consult the Scripture concerning it, (Exodus 14:2) Piha-hiroth it should seem was so called, because it formed the mouth or gullet of entrance to the sea
Red Sea - ...
The great historical event connected with the Red Sea is the passage of the children of Israel, and the overthrow of the Egyptians, to which there is frequent reference in Scripture (Exodus 1415,15 ; Numbers 33:8 ; Deuteronomy 11:4 ; Joshua 2:10 ; Judges 11:16 ; 2 Samuel 22:16 ; Nehemiah 9:9-11 ; Psalm 66:6 ; Isaiah 10:26 ; Acts 7:36 , etc
Shushan - Modern explorers have brought to light numerous relics, and the ground-plan of the splendid palace of Shushan, one of the residences of the great king, together with numerous specimens of ancient art, which illustrate the statements of Scripture regarding it (Daniel 8:2 )
Quietness - It is of such importance, that we find it enjoined in the sacred Scripture; and we are commanded to study and peruse it with the greatest diligence and care, 1 Thessalonians 4:11
Obedience - Occasionally this word occurs in Scripture to express the duty of one person to another, as in Deuteronomy 21:18-19 , 2 Samuel 22:45 , 2 Thessalonians 3:14 , Philippians 2:12 , Ephesians 6:1 ; Ephesians 6:5 , 1 Peter 3:6
Washing the Hands And Feet - As knives and forks were not used in the East, in Scripture times, in eating, it was necessary that the hand, which was thrust into the common dish, should be scrupulously clean; and again, as sandals were ineffectual against the dust and heat of the climate, washing the feet on entering a house was an act both of respect to the company and of refreshment to the traveller
Devoted Thing - The pagan confounded the two ideas, the devoted thing under ban (as criminals and captives), and the sacrifice of one's flock or herd as a voluntary offering in worship; but Scripture keeps them distinct
Mark - Nothing further of him is recorded in the Scripture; but we may identify him with the author of the second Gospel, and may readily believe ecclesiastical history which tells us that he was bishop of the church in Alexandria
Loom - Thus it is surprising that there are so few references to the process in Scripture
Dream - In Scripture, dreams were sometimes impressions on the minds of sleeping persons, made by divine agency
Finger - The finger or fingers of God, in Scripture, signify his power, strength or operation
Marry - In Scripture, to unite in covenant, or in the closest connection
Gall - their poison, contained in a sac in the mouth; Scripture uses popular language when no moral truth is thereby endangered
After - ...
To follow after, in Scripture, is to pursue, or imitate to serve, or worship
Anabaptists - The principal tenets were: ...
(1) rejection of baptism of infants as unscriptural, and its restriction to adults as a sign of Christian belief; ...
(2) restoration of what they considered primitive Christianity, abolition of capital punishment, oaths, and the magistracy; ...
(3) Scripture as a rule of faith; ...
(4) foundation of a new kingdom of God on communistic grounds
Adultery - In Scripture, idolatry, or apostasy from the true God
Blind - In Scripture, blind implies not only want of discernment, but moral depravity
Tamar - A character remarkable in Scripture
Lebanon - A mountain famous in Scripture, and highly celebrated: it separates Syria from Palestine
Burnt Offering - ...
Leviticus 1:4 (c) The offering in this Scripture is the first in the five offerings
Eunuch - It is the second class that are otherwise mentioned in Scripture
Raven - The raven is classed among the unclean by the law, (Leviticus 11:15) Notwithstanding, we have an account in Scripture of the ministry of this bird upon two remarkable occasions. But the Scriptures have uniformly held forth this history of Elijah as miraculous, which would not have been the case but in the supposition of his being fed by ravens
Flesh, - This term is used in various senses in Scripture
Salvation - This may be seen in various connections in Scripture
Schism, - The modern ideas of 'agreeing to differ,' or of 'unity only in essentials,' are not found in Scripture, but the contrary
Coast - The exterior line, limit or border of a country, as in Scripture
Dwell - In Scripture, it denotes a residence of seven days during the feast of tabernacles
Harvest - In Scripture, harvest signifies figuratively the proper season for business
Garden, Gardener - ...
The two most noted gardens in Scripture were the gardens of EDEN and of GETHSEMANE, q
Ambrosius of Alexandria - From that time to his death Ambrose devoted his whole energy to encouraging his great master in his labours on Holy Scripture, and used his fortune to further them (Eus
Potiphar - Egyptian monuments, in harmony with Scripture, represent rich men's stewards, as Joseph, carefully registering all the produce of the garden and field, and storing it up
Editions of the Bible - It has been the task of Scripture scholars, by the comparison and appraisal of these manuscripts, to reconstruct the original as exactly as possible
Angel - (Hebrews 1:14) In Scripture we meet with many accounts of them
no - This is the Scripture name of THEBES,a noted city in Egypt, built on both sides of the river Nile, having a hundred gates, situate about 25 46' N
Allelujah - This word which is become so general in use, in our churches and places of worship, is preserved to us in many parts of Scripture, as it is in the original Hebrew, compounded of Hallelu, Praise ye, and Jab, Lord
Cock - Though this bird is too well known to need any account being given of him, yet being rendered so memorable in Scripture, from the circumstance of the apostle Peter's denial of Christ, I cannot pass it by without remarking, in allusion to that striking event, how slender the means which the Lord is pleased sometimes to make use of, to answer the most important purposes! The crowing of a cock is enough, in the Lord's hand, to accomplish the Lord's design
Abide - To abide, in the language of Scripture, means somewhat more than merely the remaining in one place
Chosen of God - We find this, act of special grace in JEHOVAH, as it concerns the person of Christ and his people in him, so often in the Scripture, and as it is so important, I have thought a reference to some of the more prominent texts would not be unacceptable, in a work of this kind
Thomas - The Scripture is afterwards silent as to this apostle
Beth'Any - (house of dates, or house of misery ), a village which, scanty as are the notices of it contained in Scripture, is more intimately associated in our minds than perhaps any other place with the most familiar acts and scenes of the last days of the life of Christ
Door - Besides the common use of the door as the means of entrance into a house, and of enclosing those within when shut, it is used in Scripture symbolically for the way of entrance into blessing
Dog - Constantly referred to in Scripture as an unclean and debased animal: hence the unclean Gentiles or heathen are compared to dogs
Therapeutae - An allegorical interpretation of Scripture was the foundation of their speculations; and they had old theosophical writings which gave them this turn
Vision - the act of seeing; but, in Scripture, it generally signifies a supernatural appearance, either by dream or in reality, by which God made known his will and pleasure to those to whom it was vouchsafed, Acts 9:10 ; Acts 9:12 ; Acts 16:9 ; Acts 26:13 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1
Pine Tree - The author of "Scripture Illustrated" says," I should prefer the whole species called jasmin, on account of its verdure, its fragrance, and its flowers, which are highly esteemed
Silk - As the word which is rendered "silk" in our version more probably meant cotton, or rather muslin, it is doubtful whether silk is mentioned expressly in the Scripture, unless, perhaps, in Isaiah 19:9 , where we find the Hebrew word שריקות , from שרק , yellowish, tawny; which is generally the natural colour of raw silk; hence the Latin sericum: or it may be from the Seres, a nation whence the Greeks and Romans first obtained the article silk
Heath - Celsius thinks it to be the juniper; but from the mention of it as growing in a salt land, in parched places, the author of "Scripture Illustrated" is disposed to seek it among the lichens, a species of plants which are the last production of vegetation under the frozen zone, and under the glowing heat of equatorial deserts; so that it seems best qualified to endure parched places, and a salt land
Sodom - Throughout Scripture the ruin of Sodom and Gomorrah is represented as a most signal effect of God's anger, and as a mirror in which those living at ease in sin and lust may see their own doom
Death - Is taken in Scripture, first, for the separation of body and soul, the first death, Genesis 25:11 ; secondly, for alienation from God, and exposure to his wrath, 1 John 3:14 , etc
Melchizedek - Scripture tells us nothing of his father or mother, of his genealogy, his birth, or his death; he stands alone, without predecessor or successor, a royal priest by the appointment of God; and thus he was a type of Jesus Christ, who is "a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek," and not after the order of Aaron, whose origin, consecration, life, and death, are known, Psalm 110:4 Hebrews 7:1-28
Bashan - It is celebrated in Scripture for its rich pasturage: "Rams, of the breed of Bashan," Deuteronomy 32:14 ; "Rams, bulls, goats, all of them fatlings of Bashan," Ezekiel 39:18
Lion - The well-known and noble king of beasts, frequently spoken of in Scripture
Apple Tree, Apple - On the other hand Dr Royle says,"The rich color, fragrant odor and handsome appearance of the citron, whether in flower or in fruit, are particularly suited to the passages of Scripture mentioned above
Beth'Any - (house of dates, or house of misery ), a village which, scanty as are the notices of it contained in Scripture, is more intimately associated in our minds than perhaps any other place with the most familiar acts and scenes of the last days of the life of Christ
Pierius, a Presbyter of Alexandria - An eminent presbyter of Alexandria, famous for voluntary poverty, philosophical knowledge, and public expositions of Holy Scripture
Regeneration - This is amistake and contrary to the teaching of Holy Scripture
Concordance - Charo seems to have been the first who compiled a concordance to the Holy Scriptures; and for carrying on this work, it is said, he employed 500 monks to assist him. Rabbi Mordecai Nathan published a Hebrew concordance, printed at Venice in 1523, containing all the Hebrew roots, branched into their various significations, and under each signification all the places in Scripture wherein it occurs; but the best and most useful Hebrew concordance is that of Buxtorf, printed at Basil in 1632. Calasius, an Italian cordelier, has given us concordances of the Hebrew, Latin, and Greek, in two columns: the first, which is Hebrew, is that of rabbi Mordecai Nathan verbatim, and according to the order of the books and chapters: in the other column is a Latin interpretation of each passage of Scripture quoted by R
Hierocles (1), Neoplatonic Philosopher - Lactantius supposed him to have been in early life a Christian, as he displayed in his writings such intimate knowledge of Scripture and Christian teaching. Duchesne, in an acute treatise on the then lately discovered works of Macarius Magnes (Paris, Klinksieck, 1877), suggests that the work of Hierocles embodied the objections drawn by Porphyry from Holy Scripture, and that the work of Macarius was a reply to them, and suggests that Hierocles wrote his book while ruling at Palmyra before the persecution
House - So in Scripture, the house of Israel,or of Judah. In Scripture, those who dwell in a house and compose a family a household
Unclean - ...
Revelation 18:2 (b) Birds in the Scripture are usually connected with Satan and his angels. This Scripture is informing us that the great apostate religions, and evil religious systems of the world are occupied by demons who control the teachings and the practices of those religions
Fear - There are several ideas intended to be conveyed to the mind, by that passion which is called in Scripture fear. Since the fall of man, the whole race of Adam have known the effects both of natural and sinful fear; none but the regenerated are acquainted with what is known in Scripture by a religious, or holy fear
Resurrection of Body - " Another passage of Scripture is that describing the vision of Ezechiel (Ezechiel 1). "You err, not knowing the Scriptures nor the power of God. " (1 Corinthians 15) Tradition of the early Church establishes the dogma of the resurrection, the Fathers not only referring to it, but even writing entire treatises appealing both to Scripture and reason
Euphrates - Scripture often calls the Euphrates simply "the river," Exodus 23:31 Isaiah 7:20 8:7 Jeremiah 2:18 ; or "the great river," and assigns it for the eastern boundary of that land which God promised to the Hebrews, Deuteronomy 1:7 Joshua 1:4 . ...
The Euphrates is a river of consequence in Scripture geography, being the utmost limit, east, of the territory of the Israelites
Prophecy - Many of the prophecies of Scripture foretold events ages before they occurredevents of which there was then no apparent probability, and the occurrence of which depended on innumerable contingencies, involving the history of things and the volitions of persons not then in existence; and yet these predictions were fulfilled at the time and place and in the manner prophesied. ...
The Scripture prophecies are a scheme of vast extent, the very earliest predictions reaching down to the end of the world's history a scheme gradually and harmoniously developed from age to age, and by many different persons, some of them not fully apprehending, and "searching diligently what the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify," 1 Peter 1:11 , the whole manifestly the work of Jehovah, and marvelous in our eyes
Demon - Philosophers spoke of demons quite differently from the way they are represented in Scripture. Scripture makes it plain that the demons were evil spirits: cf. ...
Scripture also shows that idolatry was essentially demon-worship, the idol itself being nothing
Proselyte - It is said they did not dwell in the cities, but only in the suburbs and the villages; but it is certain that the Jews often admitted into their cities, not only proselytes of habitation, but also Gentiles and idolaters, as appears by the reproaches on this account, throughout the Scriptures. ...
Many, however, are of opinion that there appears to be no ground whatever in Scripture for this distinction of proselytes of the gate, and proselytes of righteousness. Gentiles were allowed to worship and offer sacrifices to the God of Israel in the outer court of the temple; and some of them, persuaded of the sole and universal sovereignty of the Lord Jehovah, might renounce idolatry without embracing the Mosaic law; but such persons appear to me never to be called proselytes in Scripture, or in any ancient Christian writer. Jennings also observes that "there does not appear to be sufficient evidence in the Scripture history of the existence of such proselytes of the gate, as the rabbins mention; nor, indeed, of any who with propriety can be styled proselytes, except such as fully embraced the Jewish religion
Shepherd - There are many indications in the Scripture of the conscious strength and independence of he ancient shepherd patriarchs, of the extent of their households, and the consideration in which they were held, Genesis 14:14-24 21:22-32 26:13-16 30:43 Job 1:3 . ...
God sometimes takes the name of Shepherd of Israel, Psalm 80:1 Jeremiah 31:10 ; and kings, both in Scripture and ancient writers, are distinguished by the title of "Shepherds of the people. Modern travelers in the East meet with many pleasing confirmation of the truth of Scripture in respect to these particulars; they see the shepherd walking before his flock, any one of which will instantly run to him when called by its own name
Advent, Second - Scripture speaks of many momentous and solemn events connected with the second coming of Christ which will be found under the different headings connected with this subject. We find both these aspects of the coming of the Lord Jesus plainly revealed in the Scripture. There is no event revealed in Scripture that must take place before the Rapture of the saints. ...
In other Scriptures it is revealed that there will be an interval between the Rapture (the catching away of the saints), and the Lord's coming, to the earth
Serpent - It will be sufficient to all the purposes I mean to offer upon the subject, to observe that the Great and Almighty Author of Scripture hath in many places plainly declared that by the serpent is intended the devil, yea, the devil is expressly called the old serpent. (See Job 26:13; Isaiah 27:1)...
The whole tenor of Scripture, therefore being directed to set forth the devil under this image and figure of the serpent, there appears a beautiful analogy between the brazen serpent lifted, up in the wilderness at the command of God, and the Lord Jesus lifted up on the cross for the salvation of his people by the same authority—and for this plain reason, because none but the serpent of all the creatures in the creation of God was cursed; and therefore none but the serpent among the creatures of God could be the suitable type or figure to represent Christ when redeeming, his people from the curse of the law, "being made a curse for them. But while the uniform testimony of Scripture is with this subject, and the devil is continually called by the name of serpent through the whole of the Bible, and while the faithful in all ages have, without a single instance of departure, received no other idea, it should seem the safest method to accept the good old way of translation, assured that if the fact had not been so, God the Holy Ghost would have taught the church accordingly. ...
I cannot help making a farther remark, that the Hebrew name for serpent (Nechash) is the general name used throughout the whole Scripture
Lucifer - Whether, hell from beneath is moved at the unawakened sinner's coming, or heaven from above opens her golden gates to receive the redeemed regenerated saint in Jesus, this Scripture, with others to the same amount, plainly testify that that thinking faculty, that immortal incorporeal part, which at death separates from the body, hastens into the world of spirits like its own, and exists in a state perfectly distinct from and unconnected with the body, and will so continue until the general resurrection. ...
And there is another thought connected with it, which gives solemnity to the former, and which this Scripture tends to prove, namely, that in that world of spirits they think and speak, have conversation and fellowship, with each other, as familiarly as we have with each other that are yet in the body. One thing is certain, as this Scripture shews, namely, that they are intimately acquainted with the past circumstances of their own lives, and the lives of others with whom they dwelt. And hence, though they cease for ever from us, and we from them, in respect to farther communion; though as the Scripture saith, "Abraham be ignorant of us, and Israel acknowledge us not," (Isaiah 63:16) yet the existence is made up of identity, consciousness, and unceasing thinking, and acting, and the most lively perception. Oh, the multitude, the unnumbered, unknown, unanswerable arguments which the Scriptures hold forth "to seek the things which make for our everlasting peace, and to flee from the wrath to come
Inspiration - —The term employed to denote the action of the Divine Spirit upon the writers of Scripture. In Scripture itself we find the idea in Hosea 9:7 (LXX Septuagint) expressed by the word πνευματοφόρος—though in this case the inspiration was not Divine. The use of the word ‘inspiration’ to express the Divine factor in Scripture is probably derived from the fact that the words of 2 Timothy 3:16 πᾶσα γραφὴ θεόπνευστος are rendered in the Vulgate ‘omnis Scriptura divinitus inspirata. ...
Inspiration is claimed not only for our Scriptures, but for the other sacred books of the world. The claim of Scripture to be inspired. His personal reliance upon Scripture is visible in His use of it as His defence in the stress of temptation (Matthew 4:4; Matthew 4:7; Matthew 4:10) and as the authentication of His ministry (Luke 4:17-21). In their first independent action the disciples were determined by their belief that they must fulfil the Scripture ἥν προεῖπεν τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἁγιον διἀ στόματος Δαυείδ (Acts 1:16; cf. The Scripture is identified with God, so that St. Paul can say (Romans 9:17) ‘the Scripture saith unto Pharaoh’; and it is God who speaks in the prophets (Romans 9:25). In the Epistle to the Hebrews the same conception of Scripture prevails. The very titles under which the OT Scriptures are designated sufficiently manifest the belief that they were written under the inspiration of God. ...
No belief of later Judaism was more universal or constant than this acceptance of the OT Scriptures as inspired. —This is the theory that in writing the books of Scripture the human author was merely the mouthpiece of the Divine, and that therefore every word in the Bible as truly represents the mind of God as if He had dictated it. But these men were so controlled by Him, that He is the Author of the writing and to the Author, that any charge of inaccuracy against the record, or Scripture, as originally given, must be preferred against Him’ (Kennedy, The Doctrine of Insp. Immediately upon giving utterance to this saying He Himself proceeds to repeal commandments of the Law, substituting for them His own better principles, and thus showing that what He had in view was not Scripture as Scripture. ...
(b) It is irreconcilable with the phenomena presented in Scripture. ...
(c) Another class of phenomena presented by Scripture is inconsistent with this theory
Canon of the Old Testament - Jews recognize no NT, and have a polemic interest in avoiding this designation of their Holy Scripture. Under the influence of Ezra and Nehemiah, the Law ( Torah ) as in the Pentateuch was set apart as Holy Scripture; at some date prior to b. 132, most, though not all, of the remaining books ranked as Scripture. An illiterate race can have no Scripture. Variations appear in the reasons annexed even to the Decalogue; and the priests who offered incense to the brazen serpent in the Temple in the days of Hezekiah cannot have regarded the Tables of the Law in the light of canonical Scripture. 300, recognizes that the Law has become Holy Scripture, but he makes the freest use of the history in Samuel and Kings. The Lectionary of the Synagogue would quickly establish the unique position of the Law and the Prophets as Holy Scripture (cf. The NT expresses a doctrine of Holy Scripture; it acknowledges a threefold division ( Luke 24:44 ); it implies that Chronicles was the last book in the roll of the OT ( Matthew 23:35 , Luke 11:51 ); but it does not quote Esther, Cant. 40) acknowledges the inspiration of Scripture (the Mosaic Law pre-eminently), and quotes many of, but not nearly all, the OT books. as Scripture. The popularity of the Alexandrian OT, including Apocrypha, and the growing influence of NT books caused the Rabbinical teachers to remove all doubt as to the limits of their Scripture. ‘All Holy Scriptures defile the hands (the Hebrew phrase for ‘are canonical’): Canticles and Eccleslastes defile the hands. But it is also recognized that Scripture may be misapplied, and that therefore criticism is essential. He did not pronounce any book in Itself adequate to determine the communion between the Living God and living men; all Scripture must be illuminated by the testimonium Spiritus Sancti
Free Will - That God is not bound by any necessity external to Himself, that He acts according to the counsel of His will, is rather to be gathered from the general spirit of Scripture teaching than to be deduced from particular passages. ’ But Scripture simply accepts the freedom of the Divine will rather than formally states it. Those who hold that the will is not free, or, as we should rather put it, that men are not free to will, do not as a rule argue so much from Scripture, although they may do that in part, as from philosophical grounds, and what they regard as experience. No doubt those who regard liberty as incompatible with predestination may argue that predestination is the plain doctrine of Scripture, but the conclusion that because predestination is the doctrine of Scripture man cannot be free is their own, and is not taught in Scripture. Scripture, as before remarked, accepts man’s freedom as a fact, and we all have the consciousness of being free
Inspiration of Scripture - The Bible summarizes this by saying, “All Scripture is given by inspiration of God” (2 Timothy 3:16 ). A climax to that divine-human encounter is the fact that the Scripture is focused on the divine-human person of Jesus Christ. ...
In addition to the specific statements in the Scriptures, an abundance of internal evidences show divine inspiration from its content in general. This contradicts the statements of Scripture that all Scripture is inspired. This view holds that particular passages of Scripture carry various degrees of inspiration. As indicated previously, there are many passages of Scripture that support the idea of verbal inspiration
Hunger - Scripture contains haunting pictures of hunger
Honesty - Scripture often refers to honest or right speech ( Job 6:25 ; Proverbs 12:17 ; Proverbs 16:13 ; Proverbs 24:26 )
Patriarch - This name is generally applied to the progenitors of families or "heads of the fathers" (Joshua 14:1 ) mentioned in Scripture, and they are spoken of as antediluvian (from Adam to Noah) and post-diluvian (from Noah to Jacob) patriachs
Temple - This word is generally used in Scripture of the sacred house erected on the summit of Mount Moriah for the worship of God
Election of Grace - The Scripture speaks (1) of the election of individuals to office or to honour and privilege, e
Brass - What is designated by this word in Scripture is properly copper (Deuteronomy 8:9 )
Holy Day - On the other side it is observed, that if holy days had been necessary under the present dispensation, Jesus Christ would have observed something respecting them, whereas he was silent about them; that it is bringing us again into that bondage to ceremonial laws from which Christ freed us; that it is a tacit reflection on the Head of the church in not appointing them; that such days, on the whole, are more pernicious than useful to society, as they open a door for indolence and profaneness; yea, that Scripture speaks against such days, Galatians 4:9-11
Transubstantiation - Nothing can be more contradictory to Scripture, or to common sense, than this doctrine
Flax - Matthew understood Jesus' ministry as the fulfillment of this Scripture ( Matthew 12:20 )
Philip - He is last seen in Scripture when Paul lodged in his home on his last journey to Jerusalem (Acts 21:8 )
Asa - In the latter part of his life, he became diseased in his feet; and Scripture reproaches him with having had recourse to the physicians, rather than to the Lord, 2 Chronicles 16:12
Deaconess - ...
But as the primitive Christians seem to be led to this practice from the peculiarity of their circumstances, and the Scripture is entirely silent as to any appointment to this supposed office, or any rules about it, it is very justly laid aside, at least as an office
Tutor - ]'>[1] ) in the Revised Version of Galatians 3:24, and of ‘instructed’ in 1 Corinthians 4:15, has itself given place to ‘guardian’ in the only passage of Scripture where it formerly appeared- Galatians 4:2
Faith - ) The belief in the facts and truth of the Scriptures, with a practical love of them; especially, that confiding and affectionate belief in the person and work of Christ, which affects the character and life, and makes a man a true Christian, - called a practical, evangelical, or saving faith. ) The belief in the historic truthfulness of the Scripture narrative, and the supernatural origin of its teachings, sometimes called historical and speculative faith
Appear - To become visible to the eye, as a spirit, or to the apprehension of the mind a sense frequent in Scripture
Blot - In Scripture, to blot one out of the book of life, is to reject him from the number of those who are to be saved
Fan - ...
Jeremiah 51:2 (a) The process of punishment is reversed in this Scripture and the enemies of the Jews are being punished themselves
Stork, - There are three particulars mentioned in Scripture respecting this bird
Behind - Behind the back, in Scripture, signifies,out of notice, or regard overlooked disregarded
Cord - In Scripture, the cords of the wicked are the snares with which they catch the unwary
Wine - Intemperance is the abuse of it, and against such abuse there are abundant protests and warnings in the Scripture
Ecclesiastical Seminary - At least two years are devoted to philosophy and kindred sciences; the theological course consists of four full years in the study of dogmatic and moral theology, Sacred Scripture, church history, canon law, liturgy, homiletics, and ecclesiastical chant; lectures in pastoral theology and practical exercises, especially in catechetical method, administering the Sacraments, attending the sick and the dying, complete the curriculum
Horn - HORN, HORNS...
This word in Scripture doth not seem to be very generally understood
Antitype - Where Scripture is silent as to types and antitypes the teaching of the Holy Spirit is needed, or grievous error may result in associating two things together which have no spiritual connection, though names and words may seem to correspond
Life - ...
Scripture recognises a difference between 'life' in a moral sense and 'existence,' as seen in the passage, "What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good?" Psalm 34:12 . True, but many other Scriptures prove that the wicked will have an eternal existence
Blasphemy - But the original words in Scripture had often a wider signification, and meant evil-speaking, slander, reviling generally
Tobiah - From this time the Scripture makes no farther mention of Tobiah
Key - is frequently mentioned in Scripture, as well in a natural as in a figurative sense
New Moon - (See 2 Kings 4:23) We read also of the new moon festivals in other parts of Scripture
Boar - These shady marshes then, it should seem, are called in the Scripture, "woods;"...
for it calls these animals, "the wild boars of the woods
Chemosh - As to the form of the idol Chemosh, the Scripture is silent; but if, according to Jerom, it were like Baal-Peor, it must have been of the beeve kind; as were, probably, all the Baals, though accompanied with various insignia
Kadesh - In Scripture it is sometimes called Kadesh alone, and sometimes Kadesh-barnea, and is identical with Meribah-kadesh, Ezekiel 47:19; Joshua 15:3; Joshua 15:23; with En-Mishpat = the fountain of judgment, Genesis 14:7; and with Rithmah = the broom, Numbers 33:18, thus called from a shrub growing in the desert
Zoan - There are no other Scripture references to Zoan
Seminary, Ecclesiastical - At least two years are devoted to philosophy and kindred sciences; the theological course consists of four full years in the study of dogmatic and moral theology, Sacred Scripture, church history, canon law, liturgy, homiletics, and ecclesiastical chant; lectures in pastoral theology and practical exercises, especially in catechetical method, administering the Sacraments, attending the sick and the dying, complete the curriculum
Lord's Supper - The dogma of the Romish church, that the bread is changed into the very body and soul of Christ, which the priest offers anew in sacrifice, is contrary to the Scripture and to all the senses, as it is also to commonsense
Shalmaneser - Scripture reports that he came into Palestine, subdued Samaria, and obliged Hoshea to pay him tribute; but in the third year, being weary of this exaction, Hoshea combined secretly with So, King of Egypt to remove the subjection
Vessel - Vessels of wrath, in Scripture, are such persons as are to receive the full effects of God's wrath and indignation, as a punishment for their sins
Her'Mon - In two passages of Scripture this mountain is called Baal-hermon , ( Judges 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) possibly because Baal was there worshipped
Elea'Zar - (Joshua 14:1 ) The time of his death is not mentioned in Scripture
Pearl - The pearl of great price, mentioned, (Matthew 13:46) being a figurative expression to denote the preciousness of Jesus and his salvation, may serve, to explain wherefore it is that the glories of Christ's person, and the beauty of his church in him, are so often set forth in Scripture under the similitude of pearls, and rubies, and precious stones
Ministry, the - As to the nature of thisMinistry it is declared in the Preface to the Ordinal that "It isevident unto all men diligently reading Holy Scripture and AncientAuthors, that from the Apostles' time there have been theseOrders of Ministers in Christ's Church,—Bishops, Priests andDeacons
Fire - But in Scripture language it is used upon many occasions. ...
Add to these, the Lord is pleased to reveal himself under the similitude of fire, in several parts of Scripture. " (1 Corinthians 3:13)...
And lastly, to mention no more, the torments of the damned are uniformly described in Scripture under the image of fire. Some of the most sublime, and at the same time most awful passages in Scripture, are made use of in the description. But the world have sadly mistaken their name, in calling those learned who would fritter away the plain truths of Scripture into metaphor and figure
ad'am - (red earth ), the name given in Scripture to the first man. His sons mentioned in Scripture are Cain, Abel and Seth; it is implied, however, that he had others
Evangelist - So in 1 Timothy 5:18...
Paul says, "the Scripture saith, The laborer is worthy of his reward," quoted from Luke 10:7; but Matthew 10:10 has "his meat;" whereby he recognizes the Gospel according to Luke as inspired "Scripture," and naturally quotes that one of the Gospels which was written by his own evangelistic helper
Selah - It is three times also in this third chapter of Habakkuk, and no where else that I remember in all the Scripture. But this opinion is liable to great objection; for in this case David and Habakkuk are the only writers that thus impress consideration on their Readers, and they that always, neither at what we should consider the most striking parts of their writings: and if this were indeed the sense of Selah, how comes it that not one of the Lord's servants have ever used?...
Others, and that a great majority of writers on Scripture, have concluded that the word Selah had reference to the music in the temple-service, and was a note of the ancient psalmody, but which now and for a long time, hath lost its use. This opinion doth not seem more satisfactory than the former; for supposing this to be the case, it were unaccountable that the Holy Ghost should have uniformly watched the word so as to preserve it with equal care as the Scriptures themselves with which the word is connected
Water - As the Christian studies the Scripture against temper, he will become sweet-spirited. In this Scripture the blessing is lacking, and the message is dry and unfruitful
Hell - ...
It represents four different words in the original of Scripture—Sheôl, Hades, Gehenna, and Tartarus. ...
The Greek word Gehenna occurs twelve times in Scripture
Mount - MOUNT, MOUNT OF THE LORD...
We find the church of Christ continually distinguished by this name in the Old Testament Scripture, and as such we cannot pass it over without some attention to the subject; otherwise the name itself is too familiar to every reader to require explanation. ...
Perhaps the reader will be pleased to behold the several most remarkable mountains of Scripture brought into, one point of view. I shall not arrange them according to the order in which they stand in the Bible, but, for the better apprehension and memory, in alphabetical order, together with references to the Scriptures where the account of them may be seen
ad'am - (red earth ), the name given in Scripture to the first man. His sons mentioned in Scripture are Cain, Abel and Seth; it is implied, however, that he had others
ad'am - (red earth ), the name given in Scripture to the first man. His sons mentioned in Scripture are Cain, Abel and Seth; it is implied, however, that he had others
Destructionists - Bourn argues, that there are many passages of Scripture, in which the ultimate punishment to which wicked men shall be adjudged is defined, in the most precise and intelligible terms, to be an everlasting destruction, proceeding from Him who is equally able to destroy as to create; and who, by our Lord himself, is said to be "able to destroy both soul and body in hell. ...
One thing is also certain and indisputable: the strong language of Scripture is intended to deter men from sin; and whoever attempts to remove the barrier, offers insult to the divine wisdom, and trifles with his own destiny
Kings - In Scripture many persons are called kings, whom we should rather denominate chiefs or leaders; and many single towns, or, at most, together with their adjacent villages, are said to have had kings. They are mentioned in many parts of Scripture; thus 1 Kings 11:41 , we read of the book of the Acts of Solomon, which is supposed to have been written by Nathan, Ahijah, and Iddo, 2 Chronicles 9:29
Bread - A word which in Scripture is often put for food in general, Genesis 3:19 18:5 28:20 Exodus 2:20 Leviticus 11:3 . ...
As the Hebrews generally made their bread thin, and in the form of flat cakes, or wafers, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it, Lamentations 4:4 , which gave rise to that expression so usual in Scripture, of "breaking bread," to signify eating, sitting down to table, taking a repast
Chaldaea - Scripture is thus confirmed, that Babel came from Cush and Ham, not from Shem (Genesis 10:6-10). ...
Scripture is to the letter fulfilled: "a drought is upon her waters" (Jeremiah 50:38). Now, while dry in some parts, it is a stagnant marsh in others, owing to neglect of the canals; as Scripture also foretells: "the sea is come up upon Babylon," etc. The Chaldaean cities are celebrated in Scripture: "Babel, Erech (now Warka), Accad, Calneh (Niffer)" (Genesis 10:10)
Rebels - ...
I humbly conceive that by the term, in the language of Scripture, is meant reprobate; and therefore is never used in application to any of God's children, in confirmation of this opinion, I beg the reader to consult all the places in Scripture where the word occurs; and these, as far as I recollect, are only five, namely, Numbers 17:10; Num 20:10; Jeremiah 50:21 —in the margin of the Bible, Ezekiel 2:6; Eze 20:38. ...
It should seem by the term rebels, in those passages of Scripture, the Holy Ghost intended to mark the children of the wicked one, by way of distinction, from the children of the kingdom: hence the word is similar to that of traitor. " And what that place and that people implied, the Scriptures, in other parts, explain. ...
Though I have largely trespassed under this article, yet I must still detain the reader with one observation more to fulfil my promise, by shewing, as I proposed, that the one only place in Scripture where the Lord's children are called rebels was misapplied, and in that misapplication of the name, and the Lord's displeasure in consequence on this occasion, becomes in my view the highest confirmation of the whole
Analogy of Faith - This has been often and largely descanted upon as an important rule for interpreting Scripture, founded, as it is said, upon Romans 12:6 , "Let us prophesy according to the proportion" ( analogy ) "of faith. If nothing more be meant than that, what is obscure in a revelation should be interpreted by that which is plain, the same rule applies to all sober interpretations of any book whatever; but if we call our opinions, perhaps hastily taken up, or admitted on some authority without examination by the light of Scripture, "the analogy of faith," we shall greatly err. Cambell remarks:—...
"In vain do we search the Scriptures for their testimony concerning Christ, if, independently of these Scriptures, we have received a testimony from another quarter, and are determined to admit nothing as the testimony of Scripture which will not perfectly...
quadrate with that formerly received. They searched the Scriptures as much as we do; but, in the disposition they were in, they would never have discovered what that sacred volume testifies of Christ. That a strong conviction of any tenet, from whatever cause it arises, is in Scripture sometimes termed faith. Undoubtedly there is a class of great and leading truths in the Scriptures so clearly revealed as to afford principles of interpretation in doubtful passages, and these are so obvious that persons of sound minds and hearts will not need those formal rules for the application of the analogy of faith to interpretation, which have been drawn up by several writers, and which when not misleading, are generally superfluous
Doubt - ...
With only rare exceptions, however, doubt in Scripture is seen as a negative attitude or action because it is directed toward God by man (or evil spiritual agents). ...
Doubt in Scripture can be seen to be characteristic of both believers and unbelievers. Scripture, as would be expected, does not look at doubt philosophically or epistemologically
Hear, Hearing - ...
Scripture often refers to the physical ear (Genesis 35:4 ; Exodus 29:20 ; Deuteronomy 15:17 ; Mark 7:33 ; Luke 22:50 ; 1 Corinthians 12:16 ) or the physical faculty of hearing (Deuteronomy 31:11 ; 1 Samuel 15:14 ; Mark 7:35 ), but relies more heavily on the figurative meanings of the words. In Scripture God hears; he pays attention to his people. Throughout Scripture God hears his people's prayers (1 Kings 8:31-53 ; Psalm 34:15 , ; quoted in 1 Peter 3:12 ; more than fifty times in the Psalms Isaiah 59:1 ; Matthew 6:7-8 ; Luke 1:13 ; 1 John 5:14 )
Locusts - The Scripture account of the locusts is to be closely attended to, in order to aright apprehension. It will be sufficient for the great purposes of improvement from such Scripture, to consider how terrible the Lord's judgments are, who can, from causes so apparently trifling and insignificant, throw down the props of all human comforts. " (Revelation 9:11) So that upon the whole, it should seem the Scripture relates, under the general name of locusts, different species of them, but all ministers and instruments of the Lord for destruction; and most awful each and all of them are
Per'Sia - But the name is more commonly applied, both in Scripture and by profane authors to the entire tract which came by degrees to be included within the limits of the Persian empire. The only passage in Scripture where Persia designates the tract which has been called above "Persia proper" is ( Ezekiel 38:5 ) Elsewhere the empire is intended. He is the last of the Persian kings who had any special connection with the Jews, and the last but one mentioned in Scripture
Idol, Idolatry - ...
The testimony of Scripture is that God alone is worthy of worship. The sense of Scripture was to destroy idolatry or be destroyed by it. ...
In contrast to such a bleak picture it is interesting to note that some of the highest accolades of Scripture are reserved for those individuals who shunned idolatry: Abraham, the friend of God; Moses, to whom God spoke face to face; and David, a man after God's own heart, are three examples. ...
Scripture views idols as impotent. ...
Reference to the construction of idols in Scripture is more prevalent than might be expected. What makes the polemic against idols so significant is that other religions condoned the making of images—the Lord did not!...
Recorded in Scripture are the results of idolatry for both humankind and God. But Scripture not only records people's failures; it also records the hope of repentance
Cabbala - a mysterious kind of science, delivered to the ancient Jews, as they pretend, by revelation, and transmitted by oral tradition to those of our times; serving for the interpretation of the books both of nature and Scripture. Cabbala, then, primarily, denotes any sentiment, opinion, usage, or explication of Scripture, transmitted from father to son. Among the explications of the law which are furnished by the cabbala, and which, in reality, are little else but the several interpretations and decisions of the rabbins on the laws of Moses, some are mystical; consisting of odd abstruse significations given to a word, or even to the letters whereof it is composed: whence, by different combinations, they draw meanings from Scripture very different from those it seems naturally to import. The art of interpreting Scripture after this manner is called more particularly ...
cabbala; and it is in this last sense the word is more ordinarily used among us. The generality of the Jews prefer the cabbala to the literal Scripture; comparing the former to the sparkling lustre of a precious stone, and the latter to the fainter glimmering of a candle. The cabbala only differs from masorah, as the latter denotes the science of reading the Scripture; the former, of interpreting it. Cabbala is also applied to the use, or rather abuse, which visionaries and enthusiasts make of Scripture, for discovering futurity by the study and consideration of the combination of certain words, letters, and numbers, in the sacred writings
Angel - Some of these are spoken of in Scripture in such a manner as plainly to signify that they are real beings, of a spiritual nature, of high power, perfection, dignity, and happiness. Others have distributed angels into nine orders, according to the names by which they are called in Scripture, and reduced these orders into three hierarchies; to the first of which belong seraphim, cherubim, and thrones; to the second, dominions, virtues, and powers; and to the third, principalities, archangels, and angels. Following the Scripture account, we shall find mention made of different orders of these superior beings; for such a distinction of orders seems intimated in the names given to different classes. We learn also from Scripture, that they dwell in the immediate presence of God; that they "excel in strength;" that they are immortal; and that they are the agents through which God very often accomplishes his special purposes of judgment and mercy. Nothing is more frequent in Scripture than the missions and appearances of good and bad angels, whom God employed to declare his will; to correct, teach, reprove, and comfort. Others think that angels existed long before the formation of our solar system; and Scripture seems to favour this opinion, Job 38:4 ; Job 38:7 , where God says, "Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth?— and all the sons of God shouted for joy. But, without noticing all the wild reveries which have been propagated by bold or ignorant persons, let it suffice to observe, that by "the sons of God" we are evidently to understand the descendants of Seth, who, for the great piety wherein they continued for some time, were so called; and that "the daughters of men" were the progeny of wicked Cain As to the doctrine of tutelary or guarding angels, presiding over the affairs of empires, nations, provinces, and particular persons, though received by the later Jews, it appears to be wholly Pagan in its origin, and to have no countenance in the Scriptures. '"...
The exact number of angels is no where mentioned in Scripture; but it is always represented as very great
Quarries -
The "Royal Quarries" (not found in Scripture) is the name given to the vast caverns stretching far underneath the northern hill, Bezetha, on which Jerusalem is built
Ostrich - Scripture must, of course, be composed in popular language; and the meaning here is evidently not that the bird is through stupidity unfaithful to its instinct, but that that instinct is of a kind which seems to imply want of forethought and natural care
Amalekites - Haman, the last of the race mentioned in Scripture, perished like his fathers, in conflict with the Jews
Arms And Armor - The cuirass, or defense of the body-this is called in Scripture the coat of mail, habergeon, and breastplate; it appears to have been made of leather or some pliant material, sometimes covered with metallic scales, and capable of taking the form of the parts of the body it protected; ...
2
Shepherd - A word naturally of frequent occurence in Scripture
Baptism of Fire - ...
Throughout Scripture, fire often represents judgment (Genesis 19:24 ; 2 Kings 1:10 ; Amos 1:4-7 ; Matthew 7:19 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:8 ; James 5:3 ), including everlasting punishment (Matthew 18:8 ; Jude 7 )
Lawyer - The scribes were originally simply men of letters, students of Scripture, and the name first given to them contains in itself no reference to the law; in course of time, however, they devoted themselves mainly, though by no means exclusively, to the study of the law
Serpent - 1: ὄφις (Strong's #3789 — Noun Masculine — ophis — of'-is ) the characteristics of the "serpent" as alluded to in Scripture are mostly evil (though Matthew 10:16 refers to its caution in avoiding danger); its treachery, Genesis 49:17 ; 2 Corinthians 11:3 ; its venom, Psalm 58:4 ; 1 Corinthians 10:9 ; Revelation 9:19 ; its skulking, Job 26:13 ; its murderous proclivities, e
Nathan - He wrote a 'book' containing the Acts of David the king and of Solomon, which does not form a part of Scripture
Self-Seeking - Micah 2:1-2 ; that it is contrary to the example of all wise and good men: that the most awful examples of the punishment of this sin are recorded in Scripture; as Pharaoh, Achan, Haman, Gehazi, Absalom, Ananias and Sapphira, Judas, and many others
Sabbatarians - That this sacred rest of the seventh-day sabbath is not (by divine authority) changed from the seventh and last to the first day of the week, or that the Scripture doth no where require the observation of any other day of the week for the weekly sabbath, but the seventh day only
Illyricum - The only Scripture mentionis Romans 15:19 , where St
Chittim - designate Cyprus as "the land of Yavnan," as the Scripture traces it to Javan
Ecbatana - The finding of Cyrus' decree at Ecbatana, whereas, when Ezra wrote, the Persian kings resided usually at Susa or Babylon, visiting only occasionally in summer time Ecbatana or Persepolis, is one of those little points of agreement between sacred and profane history which confirm the truth of Scripture, because their very minuteness proves the undesignedness of the harmony
Murder - Heart murder is the secret wishing or designing the death of any man; yea, the Scripture saith, "Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer, " 1 John 3:15
Ambrose, Saint - He gave his personal property to the poor, his landed possessions to the Church, studied the Scriptures and the Fathers, and preached every Sunday, frequently on virginity. Ambrose left many writings on Scripture, priesthood, virginity, and doctrinal subjects; he composed many hymns and is one of the founders of Christian hymnology; Ambrosian Chant, Hymnography, and the Milanese Rite are named after him
Wine - Wine in Scripture is frequently put for some choice thing
Hagar - The church is of God's eternal counsel, heavenly, and is never in Scripture called a mother
Cup - But as the word cup is sometimes, and indeed, not unfrequently in Scripture, used figuratively, I thought it proper to attend to what is implied in the term
Hireling - In Scripture language, our nature is frequently spoken of as an hireling
Judges - ...
We have but little account in Scripture concerning this Sanhedrim
Apostolic Fathers - Nearly all the above writings are very differentfrom the Scripture except where that is quoted
Bethlehem - There was another Bethlehem in Zebulun, though it is but rarely spoken of in Scripture
Beer-Elim - I beg the reader to consult the Scripture, and let him judge for himself, whether it be not so
Euphrates - In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12
Bear - The Scripture alludes in three places to this furious disposition
Earthquake - The Scripture speaks of several earthquakes
Punishments of the Hebrews - There were several sorts of punishments in use among the Jews which are mentioned in the Scripture
Brimstone - Fire and brimstone are represented in many passages of Scripture as the elements by which God punishes the wicked; both in this life, and another
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia is also mentioned in Scripture as the abode of the first oppressor of Israel in the time of the judges, Judges 3:8-10 ; in the history of the wars of David, 2 Samuel 10:16 ; and as furnishing a delegation of Jews, and perhaps proselytes, to attend the Passover at Jerusalem, Acts 2:9
Seven - As from the beginning this was the number of days in the week, so it often has in Scripture a sort of emphasis attached to it, and is very generally used as a round or perfect number
Oak - The oak is often referred to in Scripture, Genesis 35:8 Isaiah 44:14 Amos 2:9
Flax - The "fine linen of Egypt," which was manufactured from this article, is spoken of for its superior excellence, in Scripture, Proverbs 7:16 Ezekiel 27:7
Hours - The word hour, in Scripture, signifies one of the twelve equal parts into which each day, from sunrise to sunset, was divided, and which of course were of different lengths at different seasons of ht year, Matthew 20:3-6 John 11:9
Calf - Jeroboam is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture without the brand upon him, "who made Israel to sin," 2 Kings 17:21
Chalde'a, - Chaldea proper was the southern part of Babylonia, and is used in Scripture to signify that vast alluvial plain which has been formed by the deposits of the Euphrates and the Tigris
Homosexuality - Only heterosexual preference and behavior patterns are approved in Scripture as conforming to God's plan in the creation of man and woman. Homosexual desires or feelings are never mentioned as such in Scripture, but homosexual behavior is strongly condemned as a deviation from God's will for human beings
Hittites - ) ...
They are first referred to in Scripture in the history of Abraham, who bought from Ephron the Hittite the field and the cave of Machpelah (Genesis 15:20 : 23:3-18 ). ...
After this there are few references to them in Scripture
Sargon - He is not mentioned in the Scripture histories nor the classics; but Assyrian inscriptions show he succeeded Shalmaneser, and was father of Sennacherib, and took Ashdod as Isaiah says; he finished the siege of Samaria (721 B. Scripture, while naming at the capture of Samaria Shalmaneser, 2 Kings 17:3, in 2 Kings 17:4-5-6, four times says "the king of Assyria," which is applicable to Sargon
Atonement - But in Scripture usage the word denotes the reconciliation itself, and not the means by which it is effected. The primary idea presented to us in different forms throughout the Scripture is that the death of Christ is a satisfaction of infinite worth rendered to the law and justice of God (q
Hardening of Heart - —(a) The relation in Scripture between the blood and the life (Leviticus 17:11) is such that the heart is naturally ‘the typical centre of personal life’ (cf. And God, who established that law of man’s nature, is said in Scripture to do that which occurs under it or results from it’ (Vaughan on Romans 9:18)
Sprinkling - SPRINKLE, SPRINKLING...
The Scripture sense of those acts being very interesting, renders it necessary that we should have a proper idea thereof; and therefore I have thought it not improper to detain the Reader with a short observation. I do not take upon me to determine the matter, but I would ask, is it not probable the custom was taken from Scripture? and is it not probable also that the meaning of it had an allusion to the precious doctrine of the application and sprinkling of the blood of Christ? It is worthy of farther remark, as an additional reason to this probability, that one of the prophets when speaking of Christ, said that he should sprinkle many nations
Linen - We meet with precepts in the Old Testament Scripture respecting apparel, that, taken in the literal sense, do not appear altogether accountable. The fine linen, we are told in Scripture (see Revelation 19:8) "is the righteousness of the saints;" and this righteousness, the prophet saith, (Isaiah 54:17) is of the Lord
Paran - How strikingly accurate are Scripture details! We should never have guessed that a nomadic people like the Midianites would have wrought mines; but research confirms fully the truth of Scripture, which represents them as having ornaments and tablets of gold, and chains for their camels' necks
Infant Communion - His arguments from Scripture chiefly depend upon this general medium; that Christians succeeding to the Jews as God's people, and being grafted upon that stock, their infants have a right to all the privileges of which they are capable, till forfeited by some immoralities: and consequently have a right to partake of this ordinance, as the Jewish children had to eat of the passover and other sacrifices; besides this, he pleads those texts which speak of the Lord's supper as received by all Christians. ...
On the whole, it is certain there would be more danger of a contempt arising to the Lord's supper from the admission of infants, and of confusion and trouble to other communicants; to that not being required in Scripture, it is much the best to omit it
Flies - By flies in Scripture are meant, not only those that have wings and fly in the open air, but also insects which creep upon the earth. I beg the reader to turn to the Scripture account of this
Hand - It was so much the custom in the eastern world to do great and interesting actions by the motions and signs of the hand, that we find in Scripture continued expressions to this amount. The right hand of JEHOVAH is well known to be one of the names by which the Mediator, as Mediator, is mentioned in Scripture. How sweet to this purpose are those Scriptures: "I know the thoughts I think towards you, saith the Lord; thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end
Law - The subject of 'law' is not restricted in Scripture to the law given by Moses. 'Law' a principle stands also in Scripture in contrast to 'faith
Elect - We meet with this word so very often in Scripture, that one might have been led to conclude, that it would have been received in the church with implicit faith, referring the act itself, as becometh sinful ignorant creatures to do, into the sovereignty and good pleasure of God. (Ephesians 1:4) The Scriptures uniformly declaring while in the very moment of establishing the truth itself, that it is all of free grace, no merit, no pretensions of merit here or hereafter, becoming in the least instrumental to this distinguishing mercy, but wholly resulting from the sovereign will and purpose of the Lord. (1 Peter 5:13) I must not overlook, under this article, what%is said in Scripture of elect angels, also
Outcasts - We several times in Scripture meet with this expression. And concerning the outcasts of Israel, in several parts of Scripture we find the Lord is expressing more than ordinary attention to them
Dove - The dove is mentioned in Scripture as the symbol of simplicity, innocence, gentleness, and fidelity, Hosea 7:11 ; Matthew 10:16 . "...
The first mention of the dove in the Scripture is Genesis 8:8 ; Genesis 8:10-12 , where Noah sent one from the ark to ascertain if the waters of the deluge had assuaged
Apostle - One was appointed to fill the place of Judas, The Scripture account is as follows: "His bishopric let another take. Scripture says but little of the personal history of most of the apostles; but what is known of each will be found under their respective names
Damascus - The plain is well watered by the Barada, the Chrysorrhoas (or "Golden Stream" of the Greeks, the Abana of Scripture; now El Aʾwaj, "the Crooked"), and the Pharpar of Scripture
Pharaoh - ...
Of the kings of Egypt, there are not less than twelve or thirteen mentioned in Scripture, all of whom bore the general title of Pharaoh, except four. From this time onward the proper name of the Egyptian kings are mentioned in Scripture
Begotten - ...
If we look at the several Scriptures which speak Christ being begotten, we find the word connected at different places with different terms. The eternal generation of the Son of God as God, is declared in Scripture as a most blessed reality; and as such, forms an express article of our faith. Had this begetting referred to the eternal generation of the Son of God as God, how could it be called this day? Eternity is never spoken of as a day in Scripture. " (Psalms 90:2) Everlasting, in the language of Scripture, is without beginning without ending. Hence, (according to my view of things) nothing plainer than that in those expressions of the begotten and only begotten of the Father, is not the least reference to the eternal generation of the Son of God; but those, and the like of Scripture, respect only the person of the Jesus in his character and office of Mediator. And if so, and my view of this sublime subject is agreeable to the unerring word of the holy Scripture, and if the reader's apprehension of this doctrine corresponds with mine, he will find (what I bless the Lord I have found,) much sweetness in such precious views of the Lord Jesus Christ. And uniformly in Scripture, the act of begetting is altogether ascribed to the Lord
Prayer - ...
No rules are anywhere in Scripture laid down for the manner of prayer or the attitude to be assumed by the suppliant. ...
If we except the "Lord's Prayer" (Matthew 6:9-13 ), which is, however, rather a model or pattern of prayer than a set prayer to be offered up, we have no special form of prayer for general use given us in Scripture. ...
Prayer is frequently enjoined in Scripture (Exodus 22:23,27 ; 1 Kings 3:5 ; 2 Chronicles 7:14 ; Psalm 37:4 ; Isaiah 55:6 ; Joel 2:32 ; Ezekiel 36:37 , etc
Stone - The stone is used as a type of many things throughout the Scripture. ...
1 Samuel 17:49 (c) This may represent a portion of the Scripture, the Gospel. ...
Revelation 2:17 (b) Since the Scripture says that no man knows what this represents, we can hardly dare to express an opinion
Junilius, Quaestor of the Sacred Palace - Junilius had an introduction to the Scriptures by this Paul, which, on the solicitation of Primasius, he translated into Latin, breaking it up into question and answer. ...
Junilius divides the books of Scripture into two classes. The first, which alone he calls Canonical Scripture, are of perfect authority; the second added by many are of secondary (mediae ) authority; all other books are of no authority. 29, to the question how we prove the books of Scripture to have been written by divine inspiration
Oath - The forms of solemn affirmation mentioned in Scripture are: 1
Calf - Calves were commonly made use of in sacrifices, and are therefore frequently mentioned in Scripture
Merom - It is not again mentioned in Scripture
Olive-Tree - Is frequently mentioned in Scripture
Covetousness - It is considered to be a very grievous offense in Scripture
Prince - It may not be amiss to observe, in a world of this kind, that the Scripture attaches the title of prince to various characters among men
Seven - This number occurs frequently in Scripture, and in such connections as lead to the supposition that it has some typical meaning
House - The roofs of the dwelling-houses were flat, and are often alluded to in Scripture (2 Samuel 11:2 ; Isaiah 22:1 ; Matthew 24:17 )
Sobriety - The general language of Scripture, 1 Peter 5:8
Sunday - The words Sabbath and Lord's Day, say some, are the only names mentioned in Scripture respecting this day
Kenites - They are mentioned for the last time in Scripture in 1 Samuel 27:10 ; comp 30:20
Ar - Thus Israel came into possession of Ar, as the inscription records, confirming Scripture
Dung - The word is used also in Scripture to indicate symbolically the degradation to which a person or a nation might fall (2 Kings 9:37 ; Jeremiah 8:2 )
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - The turtle-dove occurs first in Scripture in ( Genesis 15:9 ) In the Levitical law a pair of turtle-doves or of young pigeons are constantly prescribed as a substitute for those who were too poor to provide a lamb or a kid
Field - In Scripture, field often signifies the open country, ground not inclosed, as it may in some countries in modern times
Gadara, Gadarenes - ’ These are the only passages—all referring to the cure of the demoniac and the destruction of the herd of swine—where Gadara is mentioned in Scripture
Decree - , do not receive this designation in Scripture
Fir (Tree) - This Scripture was used at Spurgeon's funeral
Milk - ...
1 Corinthians 3:2 (a) Here is a picture of the simpler truths of the Scripture which most anyone can grasp without particular study and without much help
Water - In the language of Scripture, this word hath numberless applications made of it, but in a peculiar manner is principally made use of in relation to the person, work, and offices of God the Holy Ghost
Babylon - ...
Revelation 18:2 (b) As in the above Scripture we see the religious side of false religions So in this verse we find the political aspect of those great apostate religions, the political religious world
Wheel - In this Scripture the wheels represent the power of GOD in action
Galenus, Physician - In the practice of virtue they surpass philosophers; in probity, in continence, in the genuine performance of miracles (verâ miraculorum patratione—does he mean the Scripture miracles, on which their religion was based?) they infinitely excel them" (Casiri, Biblioth
Eat - Isaiah 22 ...
In Scripture, to eat the flesh of Christ, is to believe on him and be nourished by faith
Heir - In Scripture, saints are called heirs of the promise, heirs of righteousness, heirs of salvation, &c
Lass - ...
James 1:23 (b) This is a way of saying that a man sees in the Scripture the spots and the blemishes of his life but does not use the remedy to get rid of them
Sheep - The image is frequent in Scripture: Jehovah the Shepherd, His people the flock (Psalms 23:1; Isaiah 40:11; Jeremiah 23:1-2; Ezekiel 34)
Hidden - HID, HIDDEN...
I pause over these words merely to remark, that in Scripture they express a great deal
Foundation - But in Scripture language it means Christ, the foundation God hath laid in Zion, and on which JEHOVAH hath built his church; and against which the gates of hell can never prevail
Girdle - There are several sorts of girdles spoken of in Scripture. (Exodus 20:4-8) The holy Scriptures, by a beautiful allusion to this strengthener of a man's loins by the girdle, conveys to the church a most lively and striking idea of God's strengthening himself in his faithfulness to his people
Finish - This is a blessed word in Scripture language in application to the Lord Jesus Christ
Leprosy - This loathsome and, for millennia, incurable disease is often mentioned in Scripture
Life, Eternal - This stands commonly in Scripture in contrast to death
Leaven - As a symbol it is always used in Scripture for the working of the human element, whether mind or flesh, in the things of God, and hence evil
zo'ba, - (2 Chronicles 8:3 ) This is the last that we hear of Zobah in Scripture
Hear - This word is used in several senses in Scripture
Faith - There are various shades of meaning belonging to the word "faith" in Scripture; sometimes it means the gospel revelation
Zechariah - Besides the prophet, 27 other persons of the name Zechariah are mentioned in' Scripture
Urim And Thummin - It would appear, though not certainly, to have been made known to the Jews at some time prior to its first mention in Scripture, Exodus 28:30
So - A singular fact has been brought to light by the recent explorations at Nineveh, corroborating the Scripture record the more forcibly, because unexpected and direct
Kiss - Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols
Law - The word is properly used, in Scripture as elsewhere, to express a definite commandment laid down by any recognized authority; but when the word is used with the article, and without any words of limitation, it refers to the expressed will to God, and in nine cases out of ten to the Mosaic law, or to the Pentateuch of which it forms the chief portion
Elam - In Scripture Elam often designates Persia
Serapion, Bishop of Antioch - the canon of Scripture" ( Patriarch
Thomas (st.) the Apostle - We find very little in Holy Scripture concerning St
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - ...
The chief design of the Christian Topography is "to confute the impious heresy of those who maintain that the earth is a globe, and not a flat oblong table, as is represented in the Scriptures" (Gibbon, Decline and Fall, c. Pinning their faith on the literal meaning of the words of Scripture according to its traditional interpretation they deduced a system which had for them all the authority of a divine revelation any departure from which was regarded as impious and heretical. The arguments by which Cosmas supports his theory are chiefly built on isolated passages of Scripture as interpreted by the early Fathers. Cosmas denounces as heretics those who following the false lights of science venture to maintain opposite views and speaks in terms of strongest condemnation of "men who assume the name of Christians and yet in contempt of Holy Scripture join with the pagans in asserting that the heavens are spherical. (2) The Christian hypothesis as to the figure and position of the universe proved from Scripture. (4) A brief recapitulation, and a description of the figure of the universe according to Scripture, and a confutation of the sphere. (12) Testimonies of heathen writers to the antiquity of Holy Scripture. ...
His remarks on Scripture manifest a not altogether uncommon mixture of credulity and good sense
Gnostics - It appears from several passages of Scripture, particularly 1 John 2:18 ; 1 Timothy 6:20 ; Colossians 2:8 ; that many persons were infected with the Gnostic heresy in the first century; though the sect did not render itself conspicuous, either for numbers or reputation, before the time of Adrian, when some writers erroneously date its rise. At first, the Gnostics were the only philosophers and wits of those times, who formed for themselves a peculiar system of theology, agreeable to the philosophy of Pythagoras and Plato; to which they accommodated all their interpretations of Scripture. In this sense the father uses Gnostics, in opposition to the heretics of the same name; affirming, that the true Gnostic is grown old in the study of the holy Scripture, and that he preserves the orthodox doctrine of the apostles, and of the church; whereas the false Gnostic abandons all the apostolical traditions, as imagining himself wiser than the apostles. Indeed he dwells more on the Valentinians than any other sect of Gnostics; but he shows the general principles whereon all their mistaken opinions were founded, and the method they followed in explaining Scripture
Creation - ...
The discoveries made by geologists of the various strata of the earth, the fossils found therein, together with the time that would necessarily be required for the formation of those strata, raised a cry that Scripture must be incorrect in saying all was done in seven days. This led Christians to compare these works of God in creation with His words in Scripture; and the principal question resolved itself into this: where in Scripture could be found the many thousands of years which were apparently needed under ordinary circumstances for the formation of the strata? Putting aside the theories of the geologists, the facts are undeniable. It is maintained that the term 'day' is often used for indefinite periods of time in Scripture, and therefore may be so in Genesis 1 ; that they refer to God's days, and not to natural days, seeing that 'the evening and the morning' are spoken of before the sun, which naturally causes the evening and morning
Prayer - The object of this article will be to touch briefly on --
The doctrine of Scripture as to the nature and efficacy of prayer; ...
Its directions as to time, place and manner of prayer; ...
Its types and examples of prayer. ...
Scripture does not give any theoretical explanation of the mystery which attaches to prayer. Now, Scripture, while, by the doctrine of spiritual influence it entirely disposes of the latter difficulty, does not so entirely solve that part of the mystery which depends on the nature of God. It would seem the intention of Holy Scripture to encourage all prayer more especially intercession, in all relations and for all righteous objects
Inspiration - It is generally allowed that the Scriptures were written by divine inspiration. "There are many things in the Scriptures, " says, Mr. It is with respect to such passages of Scripture alone, as did not exceed the natural ability of the writers to compose, that I would admit the notion of superintendence, if it should be admitted at all. In the passages of Scripture which we are now considering, I conceive the writers to have been not merely superintended, that they might commit no error, but likewise to have been moved or excited by the Holy Ghost to record particular events, and set down particular observations. "There are other parts of the Scriptures in which the faculties of the writers were supernaturally invigorated and elevated. It is enough to know, that there are many parts of Scripture in which, though the unassisted mind might have proceeded some steps, a divine impulse was necessary to enable it to advance. "Farther; it must be allowed that in several passages of Scripture there is found such elevation of thought and of style, as clearly shows that the powers of the writers were raised above their ordinary pitch. "It is manifest, with respect to many passages of Scripture, that the subjects of which they treat must have been directly revealed to the writers. ...
This account of the inspiration of the Scriptures has, I think, these two recommendations: that there is no part of Scriptures which does not fall under one or other of the foregoing heads; and that the different degrees of the agency of the Divine Spirit on the minds of the different writers are carefully discriminated. "Some men have adopted very strange and dangerous notions respecting the inspiration of the Scriptures. But this man and his followers find it their interest to weaken and set aside the authority of the Scriptures, as they have adopted a system of religion from which all the distinguishing doctrines of revelation are excluded. Others consider the Scriptures as inspired in those places where they profess to deliver the word of God; but in other places, especially in the historical parts, they ascribe to them only the same authority which is due to the writings of well informed and upright men. If they could blend their own stories with the revelations made to them, how can I be certain that they have not, on some occasions, published, in the name of God, sentiments of their own, to which they were desirous to gain credit and authority? Who will assure me of their perfect fidelity in drawing a line of distinction between the divine and the human parts of their writings? The denial of the plenary inspiration of the Scripture tends to unsettle the foundations of our faith, involves us in doubt and perplexity, and leaves us no other method of ascertaining how much we should believe, but by an appeal to reason. ...
"A question of very great importance demands our attention, while we are endeavouring to settle, with precision, the notion of the inspiration of the Scriptures: it relates to the words in which the sacred writers have expressed their ideas. As a great part of the Scriptures was suggested or revealed to the writers; as the thoughts or sentiments, which were perfectly new to them, were conveyed into their minds by the Spirit, it is plain that they must have been accompanied with words proper to express them; and, consequently, that the words were dictated by the same influences on the mind which communicated the ideas. No man could write an intelligible discourse on a subject which he does not understand, unless he were furnished with the words as well as the sentiments; and that the penmen of the Scriptures did not always understand what they wrote, might be safely inferred from the comparative darkness of the dispensation under which some of them lived; and is intimated by Peter, when he says, that the prophets 'enquired and searched diligently what, and what manner of time the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. "In other passages of Scripture, those not excepted in which the writers relate such things as had fallen within the compass or their own knowledge, we shall be disposed to believe that the words are inspired, if we calmly and seriously weigh the following considerations. ...
If, then, the sacred writers had not been directed in the choice of words, how could we have been assured that those which they have chosen were the most proper? Is it not possible, nay, is it not certain, that they would have sometimes expressed themselves inaccurately, as many of them were illiterate; an by consequence would have obscured and misrepresented the truth? In this case, how could our faith have securely rested on their testimony? Would not the suspicion of error in their writings have rendered it necessary, before we received them, to try them by the standard of reason? and would not the authority and the design of revelation have thus been overthrown? We must conclude, therefore, that the words of Scripture are from God, as well as the matter; or we shall charge him with a want of wisdom in transmitting his truths through a channel by which they might have been, and most probably have been, polluted. It is easy, therefore, to conceive that the style of the writers of the Scriptures should differ, just as it would have differed if they had not been inspired. " ...
See Dick's Essay on the Inspiration of the Scriptures; Hawker on Plenary Inspiration; Appendix to 3d vol. Stennett on the Authority and Use of Scripture; Parry's Enquiry into the Nature and Extent of the Inspiration of the Apostles; Brown's Nat. 78; and article CHRISTIANITY and Scripture, in this work
Goat - This animal is sometimes introduced in Scripture symbolically, as in Daniel 8:5; Daniel 8:21; comp
Melchisedech - Scripture is silent about his lineage, about his birth and death; and in this sense he is "without father, without mother, without genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life" (Hebrews 7)
Melchizedek - Scripture is silent about his lineage, about his birth and death; and in this sense he is "without father, without mother, without genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life" (Hebrews 7)
Iddo - The latter indicates he wrote a midrash (NAS, “annotations”), which may indicate a Jewish exposition of Scripture
Judith, Book of - For instance, Scripture scholars find it difficult to identify the city of Bethulia with any ancient town in the Plain of Esdraelon where the writer of the Book locates it
Original Sin - All this is based on Holy Scripture, particularly on Saint Paul's Epistle to the Romans 5: "Wherefore as by one man sin entered into this world, and by sin death; and so death passed upon all men, in whom all have sinned
Fruit - ...
Literal uses Various types of fruit are mentioned frequently in Scripture
Mystical Numbers - The Fathers of the Church have regarded numbers in Scripture as full of mystical meaning
Cedar - cedrus), a tree very frequently mentioned in Scripture. ...
The cedar is often figuratively alluded to in the sacred Scriptures
Jubilee - There is no record in Scripture of the actual observance of this festival, but there are numerous allusions (Isaiah 5:7,8,9,10 ; 61:1,2 ; Ezekiel 7:12,13 ; Nehemiah 5:1-19 ; 2 Chronicles 36:21 ) which place it beyond a doubt that it was observed
Jehohanan - The relationships between the priestly Eliashibs and Jehohanans of Scripture are too unclear to make dating decisions on them
Holy Water - Holy water, indeed! If there be such a thing, it trickles from the eye of penitence, bedews the cheek of gratitude, and falls upon the page of holy Scripture when the word is applied with power
Eternity of the World - Collyer's Scripture Facts, ser
Kidron - This valley is known in Scripture only by the name "the brook Kidron
Bear - The Ursus Syriacus is the particular species meant in Scripture
Preexistence of Souls - Scripture affirms the material body as the good creation of God
Ostrich - The feathers ( Job 39:13 ), the swift pace ( Job 39:18 ), and the mournful cry ( Micah 1:8 ) of the ostrich are all referred to in Scripture, and in Job 30:28 its cry is associated with that other melancholy night-cry the ‘wailing’ of the jackals
Power - These two aspects of power are often related in Scripture
Numbers, Mystical - The Fathers of the Church have regarded numbers in Scripture as full of mystical meaning
Shu'Shan, - It was originally the capital of the country called in Scripture Elam, and by the classical writers Susis or Susiana
Armor - Scripture frequently employs the imagery of armor as a metaphor for spiritual defense and protection
Child - This word has considerable latitude of meaning in Scripture
Baruch - Tradition adds nothing of any certainty to the references of Scripture; see, however, Jos
Judgment - While the Scripture writers sometimes conceived of disease and misery as the result of sin, such suffering was not identified by them with the penalties inflicted at the Judgment
Fence - ...
Psalm 62:3 (a) There is some irony in this Scripture and some misery with it
Cloud - ' The word does not occur in Scripture, but is often used by Jewish and Christian writers as signifying the dwelling or resting place of Jehovah
Lunatic - It may not be improper, in a work of this kind, to take notice of the lunacies of Scripture, because, in all probability, they differed from the common supposed lunacy, or moon-sick-disease, common in life
Calvary - ...
Calvary is not called a 'hill' or 'mount' in Scripture, though often so designated in poetry, and as it was called by an early traveller known as the Bordeaux Pilgrim, in A
Benhadad - There are three mentioned in Scripture bearing this name, and the last apparently not a relative of the other two
Candlestick - This, in Scripture, signifies a lamp-stand, as is plainly implied in 2 Chronicles 4:20 : 'the candlesticks with their lamps,' used in the temple
Presents - We read in Scripture of presents upon various occasions; and it should seem to have been intended as not only important on account of the value of what was given, but also more so as a testimony of some particular meaning
Fellowship, - This in Scripture is association, and having things in common
Ezra - Nothing more is recorded of Ezra in Scripture
Punishment - There is no record in Scripture of crucifixion being practised among the Jews
Perfect - ' The Lord Jesus was always morally perfect, yet Scripture speaks of His being 'made perfect,' for instance, as the captain of salvation: antitype of Joshua, leader into the purpose of God
Company - It may be applied to a small number, or any multitude whatever as in Scripture we read of a company of priests, a company of prophets, and an innumerable company of angels also, a company of horses
Pul (2) - ) The first Assyrian king mentioned in Scripture
Flowers - But in spite of the comparative infrequency of Scripture allusions to them or praise of their beauty, the Jews were lovers of flowers
Light - This word is used in many ways in the Scripture
Wars - The principal wars recorded in Scripture are, however, different: they are those of Israel in taking possession of Canaan for Jehovah as the Lord's host, and in maintaining their position in His land, for which they had divine instruction
Gate - The doors of the larger gates mentioned in Scripture were two-leaved, plated with metal, closed with locks and barred with metal bars
Horeb - A mountain or range frequently mentioned in Scripture
Backsliding - I humbly conceive that this word, and which we often meet with in Scripture, is not so well understood, by the generality of readers, as it were to be wished
Embalm - (Genesis 1:2) This is the earliest account of embalming that we have in Scripture
Adam - In that Scripture of the apostle, when speaking of Christ, he is called, "the image of the invisible God, the first born of every creature
Hell - Some apply it to the grave; but the most general acceptation of it, according to Scripture language, is a place of torment
Jericho - There is somewhat particularly striking concerning Jericho being cursed by Joshua before the Lord, and yet that Rahab the harlot should be of this city, concerning whom such blessed things are spoken of in Scripture
Certain - So, in like manner, when in Scripture, at any time, it is said, a certain man, there is somewhat striking affixed to the expression; such as in that instance, when It is said, a certain man drew a bow at a venture, and smote the king, (1 Kings 22:34) the meaning is the arrow was directed by the Lord
Friend - The word friend in the language of Scripture is very general; but eminently so when spoken of Christ
Chariot - The word is used repeatedly in Scripture, both as a real representation of the thing itself, and also figuratively
Honey - There is frequent mention made in Scripture concerning honey
Abednego - ) I should not have thought it necessary, in a work of this kind, to have noticed the change of name; neither perhaps the name itself, more than many others, to be met with in Scripture, which I shall pass by; had it not been for the purpose of making an observation upon it; and which I hope will not be found improper or unprofitable
Ark - We read in Scripture of the ark which the Lord directed Noah to make. They who talk of arks, like them who talk of archangels, do err, "not knowing the Scriptures, neither the power of God
Chrysologus, Petrus, Archbishop of Ravenna - Many other works ascribed to him, including commentaries on Scripture, and letters against the Arians, have all perished by fire, partly in the siege of Imola, by Theodoric, c
Camel - The latter was used by the Israelites, and is the one commonly referred to in Scripture
Bull - The writing is in the old, round Gothic letter and the instrument has about it a cross with some text of Scripture, or religious motto
Tarshish - The LXX translate Tarshish sometimes by "the sea;" and the Scripture gives the names of ships of Tarshish to those that were fitted out at Ezion-Geber, on the Red Sea, and which sailed upon the ocean, as well as to those that were fitted out at Joppa, and in the ports of the Mediterranean
Nicodemus - (See Luke 23:51-52 with John 19:38-39) It is very blessed thus to trace the progress of grace, and to prove the truth of that sweet Scripture, "the path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto a perfect day
Bull - There are several words translated "bull" in Scripture, of which the following is a list, with the meaning of each:...
שור , a bove, or cow, of any age
High Places - The destroying of these high places is a commendation given to only few princes in Scripture; and many, though zealous for the observance of the law, had not courage to prevent the people from sacrificing upon these eminences
Tables of the Law - The expression, however, in Scripture always signifies immediate divine agency
Out, Out of - In 1 Thessalonians 1:10 , "even Jesus, which delivereth us from the wrath to come," RV, the question whether ek here means "out of the midst of" or "away from," is to be determined by some statement of Scripture where the subject is specifically mentioned; this is provided, e
Neighbor - This may be seen from the chief characteristics of the privileges and duties of neighborhood as set forth in Scripture, (a) its helpfulness, e
Mandrake - It appears from Scripture, that they were in perfection about the time of wheat harvest, have an agreeable odour, may be preserved, and are placed with pomegranates
Myrtle - " The myrtle is mentioned in Scripture among lofty trees, not as comparing with them in size, but as contributing with them to the beauty and richness of the scenery
Almah - Because this word constantly denotes a virgin in all other passages of Scripture in which it is used
Ape - " The Scripture says that the fleet of Solomon brought apes, or rather monkeys, &c, from Ophir
Hemlock - "If," says the author of "Scripture Illustrated," "the comparison be to a plant growing in the furrows of the field, strictly speaking, then we are much restricted in our plants, likely to answer this character; but if we may take the ditches around, or the moist or sunken places within the field also, which I partly suspect, then we may include other plants; and I do not see why hemlock may not be intended
Onyx - The author of "Scripture Illustrated" observes, upon this passage, that "the word onyx is equivocal; signifying, first, a precious stone or gem; and secondly, a marble called in Greek onychites, which Pliny mentions as a stone of Caramania
Solomon the Song of - The same similitude, not indeed wrought out with such particularity, is to be found in other parts of Scripture
Gilead or Galeed - The Scripture references to the stately oaks and herds of cattle in this region are well known, Genesis 37:25 Numbers 32:1
Schism - Some have claimed that they cannot ally themselves with abuses in the Church, others have pleaded the division of the Articles of the Creed into fundamental and non-fundamental, and still others have advanced the theory that the individual should abide by Scripture alone
Sin, Original - All this is based on Holy Scripture, particularly on Saint Paul's Epistle to the Romans 5: "Wherefore as by one man sin entered into this world, and by sin death; and so death passed upon all men, in whom all have sinned
Ethiopia - One of the great kingdoms in Africa, frequently mentioned in Scripture under the name of Cush, the various significations of which in the Old Testament have been mentioned under the article Isaiah 18:1-7 Zephaniah 3:10
Jealousy - Jealousy is used in three senses in Scripture; (1) as intolerance of rivalry or unfaithfulness; (2) as a disposition suspicious of rivalry or unfaithfulness; and (3) as hostility towards a rival or one believed to enjoy an advantage
Gardens - Are often mentioned in Scripture, though in a sense somewhat peculiar; for in the language of the Hebrews, every place where plants and trees were cultivated with greater care than in the open field, was called a garden
Isaac - Two sons of Isaac are named in Scripture
Fire - In Scripture, is often connected with the presence of Jehovah; as in the burning bush, and on Mount Sinai, Exodus 3:2 19:18 Psalm 18:1-50 Habakkuk 1:1-3:19
Dew - Dew is a favourite emblem in Scripture: (a) richness and fertility ( Genesis 27:28 , Deuteronomy 33:13 ); (b) refreshing and vivifying effects ( Deuteronomy 32:2 , Isaiah 18:4 ); (c) stealth ( 2 Samuel 17:12 ); (d) inconstancy ( Hosea 6:4 ; Hosea 13:3 ); (e) the young warriors of the Messianic king ( Psalms 110:3 )
Temple - In Scripture, the tabernacle is sometimes called by this name
Testimony - In Scripture, the two tables of the law. The word of God the Scriptures
High Places - The prophets reproach the Israelites for worshipping on the high places; the destroying of which was a duty, but the honor of performing it is given to few princes in Scripture, though several of them were zealous for the law
Star - To express increase and multiplication, Scripture uses the similitude of the stars of heaven, or of the sands of the sea, Genesis 15:5 22:17 26:4 Exodus 32:13
Honey - Was formerly very plentiful in Palestine, and hence the frequent expressions of Scripture which import that that country was a land flowing with milk and honey, Leviticus 20:24
e'Lam - (Genesis 14:1,9 ; Isaiah 11:11 ; 21:2 ) The Elam of Scripture appears to be the province lying south of Assyria and east of Persia proper, to which Herodotus gives the name of Cissia (iii
Macedo'Nia - The character of the Christians of Macedonia is set before us in Scripture in a very favorable light
ez'ra - The principal works ascribed to him by the Jews are--
The instruction of the great synagogue; ...
The settling the canon of Scripture, and restoring, correcting and editing the whole sacred volume; ...
The introduction of the Chaldee character instead of the old Hebrew or Samaritan; ...
The authorship of the books of Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and, some add, Esther; and, many of the Jews say, also of the books of Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve prophets; ...
The establishment of synagogues
Jeho'Vah - The Scripture appellation of the supreme Being, usually interpreted as signifying self-derived and permanent existence
Divination - " It is used in Scripture of false systems of ascertaining the divine will
Euphra'Tes - The Euphrates is first mentioned in Scripture as one of the four rivers of Eden
Egypt, Land of - CUSH, or ETHIOPIA,extended much farther south, but is often mentioned in Scripture along with Egypt: Psalm 68:31 ; Isaiah 11:11 ; Isaiah 20:4 ; Isaiah 43:3 ; Isaiah 45:14 ; Nahum 3:9
Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus - Polycrates himself had followed the traditions of his kindred, seven of whom had been bishops before him, and had been confirmed in his view by his own study of the whole Scripture and by conference with brethren from all the world
Sisinnius, Bishop of Novatianists - He had a considerable reputation for learning, being very familiar with philosophical writings as well as expositions of Scripture, and was well skilled in dialectics
Nail - Isaiah 41:7; "fastened (the idol) with nails" to keep it steady in its place! Jeremiah 10:4; 1 Chronicles 22:3; 2 Chronicles 3:9, where the "fifty shekels of gold" were to gild the nails fastening the sheet gold on the wainscoting; Ecclesiastes 12:11, "words of the wise are as nails fastened (by) the master of assemblies," rather "the masters" or "associates in the collection (of the canonical Scriptures), i. ...
Scripture has a power penetrating as a nail the depths of the soul, worldly literature reaches only the surface. A canon whereby to judge sermons: they are worth nothing unless, like Scripture, they resemble goads and nails
Canon (1) - That council enlarged the canon very considerably, taking into it the apocryphal books; which the council of Trent farther enforced, enjoining them to be received as books of holy Scripture, upon pain of anathema. ...
See articles BIBLE, CHRISTIANITY, ScriptureS; Blair's Canon of Scripture; Jones's Canonical authority of the New Test
Esarhaddon - The Scripture is thus confirmed; for naturally Esarhaddon would seek to avenge his father's murder, and they would seek the throne. Scripture by a striking minute coincidence with truth represents Manasseh as carried to Babylon, not to the Assyrian capital Nineveh; which would seem inexplicable but for the above fact, revealed by the monuments
Elam - In Scripture Elam's importance may have been due to its role as a vassal of the great empires, supplying troops for them. ...
Elam is mentioned in Scripture in narratives and oracles
Water - The word "water" is used in a variety of metaphorical ways in Scripture. "...
In other passages of Scripture, the following are said metaphorically to be "water": God's help (Isaiah 8:6 : "the gently flowing waters of Shiloah" ); God's judgment (Isaiah 28:17 : "water will overflow your hiding place" ); man's words (Proverbs 18:4 : "The words of man's mouth are deep waters" ); man's purposes (Proverbs 20:5 : "The purposes of a man's heart are deep waters" ); an adulterous woman (Proverbs 9:17 : "Stolen water is sweet" ); and a person's posterity (Isaiah 48:1 : "Listen to this, O house of Jacob, who are called by the name of Israel and have come forth out of the line [1] of Judah" )
Alexander the Great - This conqueror is not mentioned by name in Scripture, but his kingdom is certainly referred to in prophecy, principally in Daniel, some 200 years before he was born. These dates show the rapidity of his conquests, agreeing with the above Scriptures. This was the work of the 'leopard' of Scripture
Cluster - We meet with this word upon many occasions in Scripture, but eminently so in two places. I leave the reader to his own observation upon the subject, with only remarking, that on the supposition the Hebrew Doctors were right, what a lovely Scripture this is in the Songs, (Song of Song of Solomon 1:14) when the church so sings of Christ
Beloved - To refer to all the passages of Scripture, in which Christ is declared beloved, would be very many indeed. And what I would beg the reader particularly to remark with me on this occasion is, that this love of the Father to the Son is specially spoken of in Scripture, not with reference to his divine nature, but in his mediatorial character
Camel - The camel is very common in Arabia, Judea, and the neighbouring countries; and is often mentioned in Scripture, and reckoned among the most valuable property, 1 Chronicles 5:21 ; Job 1:3 , &c. ...
The passage of Scripture in which our Lord says, "It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of heaven," Matthew 19:24 , has been the occasion of much criticism
Calf - There is frequent mention in Scripture of calves, because they were made use of commonly in sacrifices. As for Jeroboam, after he had, for political reasons, 1 Kings 12:27 , &c, made a schism in the Jewish church, and set up two calves in Dan and Bethel, as objects of worship, he is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture but with a particular stigma set upon him: "Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin
Creation - In either case the idea of the eternity of matter is to be rejected, as contrary to sound reason and to the teachings of Scripture, Proverbs 8:22-31 John 1:1-3 Hebrews 11:3 . ...
There are several modes of reconciling these geological discoveries with the statements of Scripture: First, that the six days of Genesis 1
Tent - The Midianites, the Philistines, the Syrains, the descendants of Ham, the Hagarites, and the Cushanites are mentioned in Scripture as living in tents. The house of God, and heaven, are spoken of in Scripture as the tent or tabernacle of Jehovah, Psalm 15:1 61:4 84:1 Hebrews 8:2 9:11 ; and the body as the tabernacle of the soul, taken down by death, 2 Corinthians 5:1 2 Peter 1:13
Profane - But while these things are plain enough, and cannot well be mistaken, there are some other cases where the word to profane is used in Scripture, that may not be so generally apprehended. " It should seem very evidently by these Scriptures, that things were considered uncircumcised and unclean in the first product of them; but after the time limited they were no longer unclean, but were now brought into common use, and were profane; that is, were to be considered fit for common use. ...
Let us add one Scripture more in proof. But if we interpret this expression of our Lord concerning profaning the temple by the analogy of Scripture, and not our ordinary sense of the word, it would follow that the priests were considered blameless in the temple in using the Lord's blessings, of what kind soever they were, to the Lord's glory, when the three years of their uncircumcised state had passed as appointed by the Lord
Law of Moses - This theory is however opposed to Scripture, which says, "sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace. Scripture speaks only of 'the law. Scripture does not say a word about the Christian being ruled by law; but it says that grace teaches him how to walk (Titus 2:11,12 ), and because he is under grace sin will not have dominion over him
Nimrod - But the phrase is used with considerable latitude, like "father" and "son," in Scripture. That of Nimrod, or "Rebel," was probably a parody, or nickname, given him by the oppressed Shemites, of which we have several instances in Scripture. ‘Ωριων nearly resembles ‘Ουριαν , the oblique case of ‘Ουριας , which is the Septuagint rendering of Uriah, a proper name in Scripture, 2 Samuel 11:6-21
Ostrich - This very extraordinary bird is so spoken of in the Scripture, that it would be wrong in a work of this kind not to notice it, especially as the Lord himself, from the whirlwind, condescended to call the attention of the man of Uz to it. "...
I would only add under this article, that in Scripture sometimes the owl is put for the ostrich, but corrected in the margin. Jaanah and Rinonem are the names by which, in the Scripture, the ostrich is known; the latter name from Onah and Ronah, meaning noise: for by night their cry is hideous
Criticism - Biblical criticism is divided into two branches: (1) Lower Criticism , which is concerned with the original text of Scripture the Hebrew of the OT and the Greek of the NT, by reference to ( a ) the external evidence of MSS, versions, and citations in ancient literature, and ( b ) the intrinsic evidence of the inherent probability of one reading as compared with a rival reading, judged by such rules as that preference should be given to the more difficult reading, the shorter reading, the most characteristic reading, and the reading which accounts for the alternative readings (see Text of the NT); (2) Higher Criticism , which is concerned with the authorship, dates, and circumstances of origin, doctrinal character and tendency, historicity, and other such questions concerning the books of Scripture, as far as these matters can be determined by a careful examination of their contents, comparing the various sections of each one with another, or comparing the books in their entirety with one another, and bringing all possible light to bear upon them from history, literature, antiquities, monuments, etc. It is not to be denied that there are Higher Critics whose arguments may be construed in this way; but these are a minority, and there are also Higher Critics who are not only loyal to the Divine revelation in Scripture, but whose work may be described as largely constructive. The several parts of Scripture are viewed in their places in the total development of the literature to which they belong, with regard to the spirit of the times in which they were produced, and as themselves throwing light on the problem of their own origin and purpose. It may be said to have commenced with Lessing and Herder in their literary treatment of Scripture; but this did not seriously affect the historical position
Bread - a term which in Scripture is used, as by us, frequently for food in general; but is also often found in its proper sense. Such were the unleavened cakes which we so frequently read of in Scripture; and those also which Sarah made quickly upon the hearth. As the Hebrews made their bread thin, in the form of little flat cakes, they did not cut it with a knife, but broke it; which gave use to the expression, breaking bread, so frequent in Scripture. The Scripture mentions only salt and incense; but it is presumed that wine was added, because it was not wanting in other sacrifices and offerings. It appears, from some places in Scripture, (see Exodus 29:32 , and Numbers 6:15 :) that there was always near the altar a basket full of bread, in order to be offered together with the ordinary sacrifices
Scripture - Scripture, writing, and Scriptures, writings. The name given in the Bible to portions of the recorded will of God; called also "Holy Scriptures," Romans 1:2; 2 Timothy 3:16, and once "the Scripture of truth. The term Scripture occurs 52 times in the A. Scripture is called in the New Testament "the word of God," "oracles of God," and "God's words. In the New Testament Paul's epistles are classed with the Old Testament as "Scripture. " It was applied to the Holy Scriptures by Chaucer—1400, and Wyckliffe—1384, and used as a title by Coverdale—1535. Thus we read of the "book of the Covenant," Exodus 24:7; 2 Kings 23:2, a phrase which was transferred in time to the entire Hebrew Sacred Scriptures, and the New Testament or Covenant to the Christian. ...
Evidences of Scripture. —Concerning the evidences, external and internal, of the truth of Scripture, it may briefly be said that no books have been subjected to such severe critical examination into every statement, and clause, and particular, as the Bible, and never have the arguments for its integrity and authority been as strong as they are today. The fulfillment of prophecy, the minute accuracy of descriptions, formerly supposed to be inaccurate, but which later and more thorough researches have found to be true, sustain the historic verity of the Scriptures. The explorations made of late years in Nineveh and Babylon, Egypt and Palestine, have tended to confirm the credibility of Scripture in many hitherto disputed points. The Scriptures are the only written revelation of God, and the only authoritative record of his plan of salvation. Again and again Christ and his apostles cited and approved of the Old Testament as the truth of God, and the New Testament expressly declares: "All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works. The Scriptures from the beginning to their end point to and reveal the living "Word made flesh," even the Lord Jesus Christ, and the eternal life in him. It was from the Old Testament books that Jesus talked on the way to Emmaus with two disciples, "beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. These Scriptures are sufficient to guide and persuade any who will be reasonably persuaded to salvation. —The following statements are from Rice's Our Sixty-six Sacred Books: The Bible and portions of the Scriptures are printed in 367 versions and 287 dialects, according to the American Bible Society reports (founded 1816). The reports of the British and Foreign Bible Society (founded 1804) show that over 60 new versions of the Bible were added to its list in eleven years, and that the Scriptures are now published in 510 versions in upwards of 300 languages. The total circulation of the Scriptures and portions, for the nineteenth century, is placed at 300,000,000 copies. Bible and mission societies of the world circulate yearly about 6,500,000 copies, and private publishers swell tills number to more than 10,000,000 annually, The copies of the Scriptures circulated in heathen lands, in this century, are believed to exceed in number all that there were in the world from Moses to Martin Luther
Dream (2) - Any such allusions that may occur in Scripture are, of course, purely incidental; they are therefore in the whole extent of Scripture very infrequent. ...
Very exaggerated language is often met with regarding the place which supernatural dreams occupy in Scripture. Bouché-Leclercq, who usually studies precision, remarks that ‘the Scriptures are filled with apparitions and prophetic dreams’ (Histoire de la divination dans l’antiquté, i. The truth is the supernatural dream is a very uncommon phenomenon in Scripture. In effect, the patriarchal stories of the Book of Genesis, the story of Daniel at the palace of the king, and the story of the birth of Jesus, are the sole depositions of supernatural dreams in Scripture; the apparent exceptions (Judges 7:13-15, 1 Kings 3:5, Matthew 27:19) may be reduced to the single one of 1 Kings 3:5. Perhaps it is only a part of the general tendency of the supernatural manifestations recorded in Scripture to gather to the great historical crises; throughout Scripture the creative epochs are the supernaturalistic epochs. But these very passages establish dreams among the media statedly used by God for the revelation of His will, and drop no word depreciatory of them; nor is there discoverable in Scripture any justification for conceiving the revelations made through them as less valuable than those made through other media (cf. Of course, there is nothing’ of all this in the narrative, as there is nothing to justify it in any Scripture reference to the significance of revelation through dreams. ...
It is probable that the mere appearance of dreams among the media of revelation recognized by Scripture constitutes more or less of a stumbling-block to most readers of the Bible. We naturally question whether we are not to look upon their presence in the Scripture narrative just as we look upon them in the Gilgames epic or the annals of Assurbanipal, on the stêle of Bentrest or the inscriptions of Karnak, in the verses of Homer or the histories of Herodotus. ...
We have already pointed out how little there is in common between the occasional employment of dreams for revelations, such as meets us in Scripture, and the superstitious view of dreams prevalent among the ancients. It is an under-statement when it is remarked that ‘the Scriptures start from a spiritual height to which the religious consciousness of the heathen world attained only after a long course of evolution, and then only in the case of an isolated genius like Plato’ (Jevons, loc. No special sacredness or significance is ascribed by the Scriptures to dreams in general. The Scriptures merely affirm that God has on certain specific occasions, in making known His will to men, chosen to approach them through the medium of their night-visions; and has through these warned them of danger, awakened them to a sense of wrong-doing, communicated to them His will, or made known His purposes. of Sacred Scripture, ii
Prophecy - the prediction of future events; it is especially understood of those predictions which are contained in the Holy Scriptures; all of which claim divine inspiration, and by their wonderful fulfilment are proved to have proceeded from God, who only with certainty can know the future. Prophecy is one great branch of the external evidence of the truth of the Scriptures; and the nature and force of this kind of evidence may here be properly pointed out. To borrow a case, for the sake of illustration, from the Scriptures, though the claims of their predictions are not now in question; let us allow that such a prophecy as that of Isaiah respecting the taking of Babylon by Cyrus was uttered, as it purports to be, more than a century before Cyrus was born, and that all the actions of Cyrus and his army, and those of the Babylonian monarch and his people, were necessitated; is it to be maintained that the chain of necessitating causes running through more than a century could be traced by a human mind, so as to describe the precise manner in which that fatality would unfold itself, even to the turning of the river, the drunken carousal of the inhabitants, and the neglect of shutting the gates of the city? This being by uniform and universal experience known to be above all human apprehension, would therefore prove that the prediction was made in consequence of a communication from a superior and divine Intelligence. ...
The distinction between the prophecies of Scripture and the oracles of Heathenism is marked and essential. ) The Scripture prophecies, on the other hand, constitute a series of divine predictions, relating principally to one grand object, of universal importance, the work of man's redemption, and carried on in regular progression through the patriarchal, Jewish, and Christian dispensations, with a harmony and uniformity of design, clearly indicating one and the same divine Author. Mohammedanism, though it stands itself as a proof of the truth of Scripture prophecy, is unsupported by a single prediction of its own. ...
The objection which has been raised to Scripture prophecy, from its supposed obscurity, has no solid foundation. The style of the prophecies of Scripture very often differs in nothing from the ordinary style of the Hebrew poets; and, in not a few cases, and those too on which the Christian builds most in the argument, it sinks into the plainness of historical narrative. The two great ends of prophecy are, to excite expectation before the event, and then to confirm the truth by a striking and unequivocal fulfilment; and it is a sufficient answer to the allegation of the obscurity of the prophecies of Scripture, that they have abundantly accomplished those objects, among the most intelligent and investigating, as well as among the simple and unlearned, in all ages. Here the question of the actual fulfilment of Scripture prophecy is involved; and it is no argument against the unequivocal fulfilment of several prophecies, that many have doubted or denied what the believers in revelation have on this subject so strenuously contended for. How few of mankind have read the Scriptures with serious attention, or been at the pains to compare their prophecies with the statements in history. Eccentricities and absurdities are found among the learned in every department of knowledge, and much of this waywardness and affectation of singularity has infected interpreters of Scripture. ...
For want of a right apprehension of the true meaning of this somewhat unfortunate term which has obtained in theology, an objection of another kind has been raised, as though no definite meaning could be assigned to the prophecies of Scripture. But the double sense of the Scripture prophecies, far from originating in any doubt or uncertainty, as to the fulfilment of them in either sense, springs from a foreknowledge of their accomplishment in both; whence the prediction is purposely so framed as to include both events, which, so far from being contrary to each other, are typical the one of the other, and are thus connected together by a mutual dependency or relation. So far, then, from any valid objection lying against the credibility of the Scripture prophecies, from these seeming ambiguities of meaning, we may urge them as additional proofs of their coming from God. ...
Beside these historical passages, of which the covert allusions were explained by the interpretation of the Gospel writers, who were enlightened by the Spirit to unfold the mysteries of Scripture, the prophets often uttered positive predictions which in consequence of the correspondence established between the two dispensations, were descriptive of a double event, however they might be themselves ignorant of the full extent of those prophecies which they delivered. To unravel this is, however, an interesting and instructive study; though an admiration of the spiritual meaning should never lead us to disregard or undervalue the first and evident signification; for many great men have been so dazzled by their discoveries in this mode of explication, as to be hurried into wild and extravagant excess; as is evident from the writings of Origen and Jerom; as also from the Commentaries of Austin, who acknowledges that he had too far indulged in the fancies of an exuberant imagination, declaring that the other parts of Scripture are the best commentaries
Mining And Metals - The Scripture references to mining, accordingly, though not very numerous, are sufficiently definite. ...
The list of metals in Numbers 31:22 includes all those that are mentioned in Scripture, viz. The uses of iron alluded to in Scripture are very varied, but call for no special comment. In other Scripture references to flint its hardness is chiefly in view ( Deuteronomy 32:13 , Job 28:9 RV Canon of the Old Testament - Accordingly (as the rabbis allege, compare 2 Esdras) it was at the return from the Babylonian captivity that Ezra and "the great synagogue" (a college of 120 scholars) collected and promulgated all the Old Testament Scriptures in connection with their reconstruction of the Jewish church. "...
Zechariah (Zechariah 7:12) speaks of "the law" and "the former prophets" upon which the later prophets rested; the succeeding sacred writers, under inspiration, setting their seal to their predecessors by quotations from them as Scripture. ) Josephus refers to the 22 books of Scripture, namely, 5 of Moses, 13 of the prophets extending to the reign of Artaxerxes (the time of Nehemiah), 4 containing hymns and directions for life (c. " "The faith with which we receive our Scriptures is manifest; for though so long a period has elapsed, no one has dared to add to, detract from, or alter them in any respect. Just so the persecution of Diocletian in New Testament times was especially directed against those possessing the Christian Scriptures. To the Jews, saith Scripture," were committed the oracles of God" (Romans 3:2). It never accuses them of altering the Scriptures. Their testimony condemns the decree of Rome's council of Trent that the apocryphal books deserve "equal veneration" as Scripture, and that all are "accursed" who do" not receive the entire books with all their parts as sacred and canonical
Lie, Lying - Therefore, to despise truth is to despise God, and the Scriptures treat this topic with profound seriousness. The seriousness of lying in relation to the Holy Spirit of Truth (John 16:13 ) is indicated in Scripture by the fate of Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:1-11 ). ...
The Scriptures bear universal, consistent, and clear testimony to the absolute sin of lying. However, there are difficulties to be reckoned with in Scripture such as the lack of condemnation of untruths in certain circumstances, the use made of lies in the fulfilling of God's purposes, the approval of the use of partial truth, and the appearance of God as being the sponsor of falsehood in connection with inspiring false prophets with erroneous messages. ...
Concerning the lack of condemnation, at times, of untruth in Scripture (e. Rather, lying that is not denounced must be seen as that which is assumed as wrong in keeping with the universal teaching of Scripture on truth
Scripture - " It is, however, commonly used to denote the writings of the Old and New Testaments, which are called sometimes the Scriptures, sometimes the sacred or holy Scriptures, and sometimes canonical Scriptures. These books are called the Scriptures by way of eminence, as they are the most important of all writings. Among other arguments for the divine authority of the Scriptures, the following may be considered as worthy of our attention: "...
1. When the authenticity of the miracles was attested by thousands of living witnesses, religious rites were instituted and performed by hundreds of thousands, agreeable to Scripture injunctions, in order to perpetuate that authenticity: and these solemn ceremonies have ever since been kept up in all parts of the world; the Passover by the Jews, in remembrance of Moses's miracles in Egypt; and the Eucharist by Christians, as a memorial of Christ's death, and the miracles that accompanied it, some of which are recorded by Phlegon the Trallian, an heathen historian. The Scriptures have not only the external sanction of miracles, but the eternal stamp of the omniscient God by a variety of prophecies, some of which have already been most exactly confirmed by the event predicted. ...
There we have a particular account of all our spiritual maladies, with their various symptoms, and the method of a certain cure; a cure that has been witnessed by multitudes of martyrs and departed saints, and is now enjoyed by thousands of good men, who would account it an honour to seal the truth of the Scriptures with their own blood. The wonderful efficacy of the Scriptures is another proof that they are of God. To conclude: It is exceedingly remarkable, that the more humble and holy people are, the more they read, admire, and value the Scriptures: and, on the contrary, the more self-conceited, worldly- minded, and wicked, the more they neglect, despise, and asperse them. " To understand the Scriptures, says Dr. If the term be only once used in Scripture, then recur to the ordinary acceptation of the term in classical authors. Above all, let the reader unite prayer with his endeavours, that his understanding may be illuminated, and his heart impressed with the great truths which the sacred Scriptures contain. As to the public reading of the Scriptures, it may be remarked, that this is a very laudable and necessary practice. "...
It surely would be better to abridge the preaching and singing, and even the prayers, to one half of their length or more, than to neglect the public reading of the Scriptures. "Afterward, when synagogues were erected in the land of Israel, that the people might every Sabbath meet to worship God, it is well known that the public reading of the Scripture was a main part of the service there performed: so much so, that no less than three-fourths of the time ws generally employed, it seems, in reading and expounding the Scriptures. "This work, or practice, of reading the Scripture in the congregation, is warranted, and recommended in the New Testament, as well as in the Old. His example, as well as his precepts, is full of precious and most important instruction; and it is a remarkable circumstance, which ought never to be forgotten, that he began his public ministry, in the synagogue of Nazareth, by reading a portion of Scripture out of the book of the prophet Isaiah; Luke 4:15 ; Luke 4:19 . there can be no reason for separating these three, as if the former was only a private duty, and the others public ones; the most natural and consistent idea is, that they were all three public duties; and that the reading here spoken of, was no other than the reading of the Scriptures in those Christian assemblies where Timothy was concerned, and which the apostle would have him by no means to neglect. If the public reading of the Scriptures was so necessary and important in those religious assemblies which had Timothy for their minister, how much more must it be in our assemblies, and even in those which enjoy the labours of our most able and eminent ministers!" ...
On the subject of the Scriptures, we must refer the reader to the articles BIBLE, CANON, INSPIRATION, PROPHECY, and REVELATION. ; Melmoth's Sublime and Beautiful of the Scriptures; Dwight's Dissertation on the Poetry, History, and Eloquence of the Bible; Edwards on the Authority, Style, and Perfection of Scripture; Stackhouse's History of the Bible; Kennicott's State of the Hebrew Text. ; Jones on the figurative Language of Scripture; and books under articles BIBLE, COMMENTARY, CHRISTIANITY, and REVELATION
Egypt - ...
The first mention of Egypt in Scripture is when Abraham went to sojourn there because of the famine. It was to the Egyptians that shepherds were an abomination, as Scripture says, which may not have applied to the Hyksos (which signifies 'shepherds' and agrees with their being called shepherd-kings), and this may account, under the control of God, for 'the best of the land' being given to the Israelites. Scripture does not state positively that he fell under that judgement, but it does say that God "overthrew Pharaoh and his host in the Red Sea. As Scripture does not give the names of the Pharaohs in the Pentateuch, there is really no definite link between those mentioned therein and any particular kings as found on the monuments. ...
After the Exodus Scripture is silent as to Egypt for about 500 years, until the days of Solomon. It will be noticed that Scripture does not say that Zerah was a Pharaoh. Its first king, named Shabaka, or Sabaco, was the So of Scripture. The Necho of Scripture is Nekau on the monuments, a king of the twenty-sixth dynasty. ...
The Greek writers and the Egyptian monuments mention Psamatik 2 as the next king to Necho, and then Apries (Uahabra on the monuments, the letter U being equivalent to the aspirate), the HOPHRA of Scripture. He also believes that the dates coinciding, with the above-named kings agree with the common chronology of Scripture for the book of Joshua
Rock - And in Scripture we meet with the continual mention of rocks by particular names, such as the rock of Horeb, the rock of Adullam, the rock of divisions, called Selahammah lekoth. But it would have been unnecessary in a work of this kind to have noticed the word had it not been for the special application of the term, in a figurative way and manner, to the person of the Lord Jesus Christ as the visible JEHOVAH He is, if I mistake not, the glorious person all along spoken of in the Old Testament Scripture, and explained most clearly in the New "as the rock whose work is perfect? Beautifully to this purpose doth Moses, the man of God, speak of him under this figure,"He is the rock, (saith Moses) his work is perfect; for all his ways are judgment: a God of truth, and without iniquity, just and right is he? And speaking of the defects of Israel, and his departure from the Lord, he saith, "he forsook God which made him, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. Hence the several manifestations of JEHOVAH in both Testaments of Scripture are all to this effect
Shem - ) Usually named first, but in Genesis 10:21 last, because from that point forward Scripture traces the history of his descendants. Scripture in Shem's genealogy notices four out of the five: Asshur for the Assyrian, Aram for the Syrian or Aramaean, Eber for the Hebrew, and Joktan for the pure Arabic. The harmony between Genesis 10 and ethnology strikingly confirms Scripture
Baal - It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins. ...
The temples and altars of Baal were generally placed on eminences: they were places inclosed by walls, within which was maintained a perpetual fire; and some of them had statues or images, called in Scripture, "Chamanim. This false deity is frequently mentioned in Scripture in the plural number, Baalim, which may intimate that the name Baal was given to several different deities
Protestant - I see plainly, and with my own eyes, that there are popes against popes, and councils against councils; some fathers against other fathers, the same fathers against themselves; a consent of fathers of one age against a consent of fathers of another age; traditive interpretations of Scripture are pretended, but there are few or none to be found; no tradition but that of Scripture can derive itself from the fountain, but may be plainly proved either to have been brought in in such an age after Christ, or that in such an age it was not in. In a word, there is no sufficient certainty but of Scripture only for any considering man to build upon. Yet, on the other hand, they by no means fastidiously reject them as of no use; for while they admit the Bible, or the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament, to be the only infallible rule by which we must measure the truth or falsehood of every religious opinion, they are sensible that all men are not equally fitted to understand or to apply this rule; and that the wisest men want, on many occasions, all the helps afforded by the learning and research of others to enable them to understand its precise nature, and to define its certain extent
Grape - It is frequent in Scripture to describe a total destruction by the similitude of a vine, stripped in such a manner, that there was not a bunch of grapes left for those who came to glean. The vineyards of Engedi and of Sorek, so famous in Scripture, were in the tribe of Judah; and so was the valley of Eshcol, whence the spies brought those extraordinary clusters. This peculiarity seems to be confined to those in this neighbourhood; for at the distance of only six miles to the south, is the rivulet and valley called Escohol, celebrated in Scripture for its fertility, and for producing very large grapes
Brother - Holy Scripture hath several distinct meanings for this term, and of very different significations from each other. And in Scripture to be of the same stock, or family, though not of the same parents, constitutes a brother. And hence, what we read in the Old Testament Scripture of the Jewish brother, and the precepts so frequently given of regarding him, had a special reference to Jesus. We lose the whole beauty of the Scripture if Christ be not first beheld in this subject. " (Ephesians 2:11-12) Blessed for ever be the almighty Lawgiver for enjoining those precepts! And, blessed for ever be the almighty Law fulfiller for his complete obedience to them! And blessed for ever be the almighty Author of Scripture for recording these things, and both bringing my soul acquainted with them, and causing me to believe them, to the divine glory and my soul's joy! And ought it not to be added, by way of rich consolation to every believer's heart, that Jesus our Brother is still carrying on the same blessed purposes, and fulfilling the precept even now in heaven? Jesus is still the Brother; for though his state is changed, yet not his nature. Would any man be shy of going to an earthly court if the king of that court was his brother? Nay, would he not be often going there; often telling of it to ever one around him; and delighting to have it known that he had access, at all times, to the person of the king his brother, and might have whatever he asked of him? But what are these privileges, or what great cause for taking pride and consequence in these transitory dignities, compared to that real unfading honour in a consciousness of not only coming to Jesus, the King of kings, and Lord of lords, as to a brother, but who hath made all his redeemed kings and priests to God and the Father, and "they shall reign with him for ever and ever!" (Revelation 1:6; Rev 22:5)...
Suffer me yet farther to add, that the Scriptures of our God have made this subject of Christ's brotherhood, so peculiarly endearing to the church, that the gracious design of our Lord Jesus, in the assuming of our manhood, is not answered when his church "makes no use of it
Ass - Frequently mentioned throughout Scripture
Bible, Use of the - Its doctrinal use grows out of the official teaching of the Church as incorporated in the decrees of the Council of Trent and the Vatican Council, which states that the Sacred Scriptures, together with Apostolic tradition, constitute the twofold fount of Divine revelation. Indeed, it is no exaggeration to say that the roots of dogmatic, moral, and ascetical theology are deeply grounded in the Sacred Scriptures. In liturgy the Catholic Church, like the Jewish Church before it (Deuteronomy 31; 2Paralipomenon 29; Luke 4), has given Sacred Scripture, in both its Old and New Testament portions a most prominent place. From time immemorJal the Catholic Church has always directed her preachers, in their devotional sermons and the direction of souls, to draw heavily on the Sacred Scriptures, and the prayers which the Church has approved for the piety and sanctification of the faithful, are composed largely of scriptural passages
Esther - That she was raised up as an instrument in the hand of God to avert the destruction of the Jewish people, and to afford them protection and forward their wealth and peace in their captivity, is also manifest from the Scripture account
Adjure - This word in Scripture language is much more striking and significant than is generally considered
Parable - ...
Two dangers are to be avoided in seeking to interpret the "parables" in Scripture, that of ignoring the important features, and that of trying to make all the details mean something
Aretas - It seems therefore to harmonize with history, as well as with Scripture, to assume that in A
Fathers - Others have such an high opinion of the fathers, as to be almost afraid of interpreting Scripture against their decision. One caution, however, is necessary, which is this; that though the judgment of antiquity in some disputable points certainly may be useful, yet we ought never to put them on the same footing as the Scriptures
Hittites - ...
The names of Hittites mentioned in Scripture, Adah, Ahimelech, etc
Blasphemy - It is in Scripture applied to reproaches not aimed against God only, but man also, Romans 3:8
Death - It is represented under a variety of aspects in Scripture:
"The dust shall return to the earth as it was" (Ecclesiastes 12:7 )
Samson - He was a "Nazarite unto God" from his birth, the first Nazarite mentioned in Scripture (Judges 13:3-5 ; Compare Numbers 6:1-21 )
Island - Scripture mentions many islands by name: Arvad (Ezekiel 27:8 ,Ezekiel 27:8,27:11 ) is an island two miles offshore from northern Phoenicia
Eglon - Scripture simply records the fact, and that Ehud was raised up by Jehovah as Israel's deliverer
Ivory - There is no Hebrew word in Scripture for the elephant, for the Israelites knew of the elephant first only by its ivory, which was imported from Africa and India
Medes - There are references in Scripture to this kingdom under the title of the "Medes and Persians. The only city in Media alluded to in Scriptures is Achmetha, or Ecbatana
Mesopotamia - Assyrian inscriptions and the Scripture record show that Mesopotamia was inhabited in the early times of the empire, b
Leviathan - Scripture used the name known to so many people and removed fear connected with it, showing God easily controlled Leviathan, who thus offered no threat to God's people
Keys - ]'>[1]...
With the other apostles, Peter also received the power of binding and loosing (Matthew 16:19 ; Matthew 18:18 ), a phrase used to describe the work of scribes who sought God's will through a study of Scripture and declared it through teaching and judging
Gift - ...
In general, in Scripture the word "gift" has three senses: gifts men give to men; sacrificial offerings presented to God; and gifts God gives to men, especially in connection with salvation, righteousness, and his grace
Age - ...
But figures have in Scripture a mystical meaning as well as a literal; faith must wait until the Father reveals fully "the times and seasons which He hath put in His own power" (Acts 1:7)
Propitiation - There is no hint in the Scripture of Christ's offering his body and blood to his Father at his institution of the eucharist
Armageddon - The word “Armageddon” appears once in Scripture and is not found in Hebrew literature
Manoah - A name eminent in Scripture, from the manifestation that the Lord made to him in a time when visions of God were rare
Son - Besides the application of this term to natural generation, it is used metaphorically in Scripture
Face - , is described in the Scripture as the "face of the earth
Language - It is plain from Scripture, that in the early ages of the world, "the whole earth was of one language and of one speech
Publican - Very different from this was the character of the publican in Scripture
Spikenard - We meet with this word not very frequently in Scripture
Exorcists - On the whole it seems plain from Scripture that the casting out demons could only be by the power of God
Babylon the Great - ...
It should be noted that though Papal Rome is one of the worst of the antichrists, and the one that has had sway for the longest period; yet she is not what is called in Scripture the Antichrist or Man of sin: she is rather the anti-church
Seal - But be this as it may the Scripture sense of sealing is the same; Christ desires his church, and his church desires her Christ, that there may be such a nearness, and connection, and union, and intimacy between them as is formed between those where the arm is always lifted up to protect and help, and the heart hath an everlasting impression in love abiding, so that the person and interest is never taken off from the mind
Son, the; Son of God - That the Lord Jesus is a divine Person is of the very foundation of Scripture
Physician - On the other hand, there are many proofs in Scripture that diseases were sent as a punishment for the sins of His people
Months - ...
The months of Tammuz and Ab are not mentioned in Scripture
Eight - This is true both in Scripture and in nature. The chapters numbered "eight" contain a new revelation not previously found in the Scriptures
Obadiah, Book of - Edom (Esau) is characterised in Scripture by his deadly hatred to his 'brother Jacob,' Obadiah 10
Salt - In Scripture salt is used as symbolical of moral savour and thus of a preservative
Alexandria - The school was noted for its allegorical approach to Scripture
Beauty - A beautiful person, In Scripture, the chief dignity or ornament
Court - In Scripture, an inclosed part of the entrance into a palace or house
Glory - In Scripture, the divine presence or the ark, the manifestation of it
Leg - In the Scripture before us, the legs are used as a type of the wonderful power, stability and endurance of our precious Lord
Weakness - While the Gospels often use the word "weakness" to describe the many illnesses Jesus healed, the concept of weakness is seldom used in a physical sense in Scripture
Pisgah - " In Scripture Nebo denotes only the town (Isaiah 15:2; 1618451196_92)
Vail, Veil - Beside the allusions to the veils worn by women (a custom which has become almost universal in the East), the veil is often used symbolically in Scripture for that which hides the glory of God
Gilead - Its mountains named in Scripture are Abarim, Pisgah, Nebo, and Peor, and are about 2000 to 3000 feet above the valley of the Jordan
Eternal - ETERNAL, ETERNITY...
The Scripture sense of these terms, in reference to the persons of the GODHEAD, and the events connected with them, are in the strictest sense of the word, for ever and ever. How infinitely sublime are those Scriptures! "Thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy
Mercy-Seat - Much is spoken of in the Old Testament Scripture concerning this sacred part of the temple, from whence the Lord promised to commune with his people
Babel - And our English language; in the strong term of bablers, has very happily borrowed from the Scripture babel or babbel, to express confusion. (Genesis 10:10) And to go farther still, mystical Babylon, in the error and follies by which it is distinguished, may well retain the name, as the Scriptures have given it, for nothing but confusion is in it, and in confusion must it end
Medes - Scripture
Light - Besides the references to physical light as existing distinct from the sun, and then emanating from the sun as the great light-bearer, the term is mainly used in Scripture in a moral sense
Concubine - Concubines are mentioned very early in Scripture, as in the history of Abraham, Genesis 16:1-16, of Nahor, 22:24, of Jacob, 30
Mel'Ita - This island has an illustrious place in Scripture as the scene of that shipwreck of St
Day - Besides the ordinary application of the word, it is used in Scripture as defining different periods
Magician - not unfrequently occurs in Scripture
Music - Of the music of the Old Testament Scripture it is no easy matter to form a right apprehension. (See 1 Samuel 19:19-24)...
But, while all possible allowance is made to this view of the music of the Hebrews, we cannot conceive that all that is said of musical instruments in the Old Testament Scriptures means literally so to be received
Ashes - To repent in sackcloth and ashes, or, as an external sign of self-affliction for sin, or of suffering under some misfortune, to sit in ashes, are expressions common in Scripture
Inchantments - Several terms are used in Scripture to denote inchantments:...
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Roofs - Hence the frequent expression in Scripture, when allusion is made to sudden tumults and calamities, to get up to "the house top
Gad - The Scripture calls him a prophet and David's seer, 2 Samuel 24:11
Beasts - Wild beasts are used in Scripture as emblems of tyrannical and persecuting powers
Cedar - The tree is much celebrated in Scripture
Chald a - Chaldæa is noticed in Scripture as the native country of Abram, Genesis 11:31; its people attacked Job, Job 1:17, and it was the term by which the empire of Nebuchadnezzar was sometimes called
Feasts - The religious feasts mentioned in Scripture fall under three heads:(A) Those properly connected with the institution of the Sabbath; (B) the historical or great festivals; (C) the day of atonement
Fig - Not only was the fresh fruit of the fig tree valued, but also cakes of figs are mentioned in Scripture; e
Fig Tree - Not only was the fresh fruit of the fig tree valued, but also cakes of figs are mentioned in Scripture; e
Shechem - Its history begins 4000 years ago, before Jerusalem was founded, and extends through Scripture from Abraham to Christ
Lord - In Scripture, the Supreme Being Jehovah
Use of the Bible - Its doctrinal use grows out of the official teaching of the Church as incorporated in the decrees of the Council of Trent and the Vatican Council, which states that the Sacred Scriptures, together with Apostolic tradition, constitute the twofold fount of Divine revelation. Indeed, it is no exaggeration to say that the roots of dogmatic, moral, and ascetical theology are deeply grounded in the Sacred Scriptures. In liturgy the Catholic Church, like the Jewish Church before it (Deuteronomy 31; 2Paralipomenon 29; Luke 4), has given Sacred Scripture, in both its Old and New Testament portions a most prominent place. From time immemorJal the Catholic Church has always directed her preachers, in their devotional sermons and the direction of souls, to draw heavily on the Sacred Scriptures, and the prayers which the Church has approved for the piety and sanctification of the faithful, are composed largely of scriptural passages
Know - In Scripture, to have sexual commerce with
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - An Egyptian king, mentioned not only in Scripture, but by Herodotus, who says that he was son of Psammetichus, king of Egypt: and that, having succeeded him in the kingdom, he raised great armies, and sent out great fleets, as well on the Mediterranean as the Red Sea; that he expended a vast sum and many thousands of lives in a fruitless effort to unite and Nile and the Red Sea by a canal; and that he was the first to send a ship wholly around Africa
Genesis - Its authenticity is attested by the most indisputable evidence, and it is cited as an inspired record thirty-three times in the course of the Scriptures. The book of Genesis was written, like the rest of Scripture, "by inspiration of God
Revenge - this word and avenge were formerly used as synonymous, and it is so used in the common version of the Scripture, and applied to the Supreme Being
Voice - In Scripture, command precept
Wing - In Scripture, protection generally in the plural
Word - The Scripture divine revelation, or any part of it
Chariot, - The earliest mention of chariots in Scripture is in Egypt, where Joseph, as a mark of distinction, was placed in Pharaoh's second chariot
Canon of Scripture, the, - The word canon , in classical Greek, is properly a straight rod , "a rule" in the widest sense, and especially in the phrases "the rule of the Church," "the rule of faith," "the rule of truth," The first direct application of the term canon to the Scriptures seems to be in the verses of Amphilochius (cir. (The books of Scripture were not made canonical by act of any council, but the council gave its sanction to the results of long and careful investigations as to what books were really of divine authority and expressed the universally-accepted decisions of the church
Gate - (2 Samuel 18:24 ) The doors themselves of the larger gates mentioned in Scripture were two leaved, plated with metal, closed with locks and fastened with metal bars
Canticle - (Latin: canticum, song) ...
In the Divine Office, a sacred chant or prayer from Scripture apart from the Psalms, to which it bears a resemblance, however, in structure and poetic form. There are many canticles in Scripture besides the ones mentioned above
Hexapla - To conceive what this Hexapla was, it must be observed, that, besides the translation of the sacred writings, called the Septuagint, made under Ptolemy Philadelphus, above 280 years before Christ, the Scripture had been since translated into Greek by other interpreters. Now, Origen, who had held frequent disputations with the Jews in Egypt and Palestine, observing that they always objected to those passages of Scripture quoted against them, appealed to the Hebrew text, the better to vindicate those passages, and confound the Jews, by showing that the Seventy had given the sense of the Hebrew; or rather to show, by a number of different versions, what the real sense of the Hebrew was, undertook to reduce all these several versions into a body, along with the Hebrew text, so as they might be easily confronted, and afford a mutual light to each other
Lion - The variety of names shows the abundance of lions in the regions of Scripture at that time. But the names Lebaoth (Joshua 15:32), Arieh (2 Kings 15:25), Ariel for Jerusalem (Isaiah 29:1-2; Isaiah 29:7), Laish (Judges 18:7), incidentally, and so undesignedly, confirm the Scripture assertions as to their former existence
Scribes - (A midrash was an explanation of the ‘deeper meaning’ of a portion of Scripture, or in some cases a practical sermon based on a portion of Scripture
Predestination - Predestinarians deny these consequences, and endeavour to prove this doctrine from the consideration of the perfections of the divine nature, and from Scripture testimony. But, supposing there are difficulties in this subject (and what subject is without it?) the Scripture abounds with passages which at once prove the doctrine, Matthew 25:34
Gomorrah - Traces of the catastrophe recorded in Genesis 19 are visible in the whole region about the Dead, or as Scripture calls it, the Salt Sea. ...
Scripture does not say the cities were immersed in the sea, but that they were destroyed by fire from heaven (Deuteronomy 29:23; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6; Judges 1:4-7, "an example unto those that after should live ungodly"; Amos 4:11)
Vagabond - ...
Whether the conjecture be, or be not well founded, certain it is that in Scripture language a vagabond carries with it a high degree of odium, and ought not to be brought into use in common life, as it is too often is done to describe the persons of wandering poor. To call such vagabonds, if the Scripture sense of the word be as I have before stated, is unsuitable in man, and offensive to God
Unperfect - ...
Let the reader remember, that Christ, under the Spirit of prophecy, is speaking in this Psalm of his substance, his body, and which in another Scripture, he is introduced as saying to his Father "A body hast thou prepared me," (Hebrews 10:5) compared with (Psalms 40:6) Now in this Psalm also Christ is speaking to the Father, and saith: "Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect: and in this book all my members were written, which in continuance were fashioned, (or as the margin of the Bible renders it what days, they should be fashioned,) when as yet there was none of them. It might be, and indeed it was unperfect, because unfinished: that is, as it was to be finished in the full manifestation of Christ in substance of our flesh in what is called in Scripture language, the fulness of time
Abomination - The images of their gods and emperors were delineated on these ensigns; and the ensigns themselves, especially the eagles, which were carried at the heads of the legions, were objects of worship; and, according to the usual style of Scripture, they were therefore an abomination. Every thing in doctrine or practice which tended to corrupt the simplicity of the Gospel is also in Scripture called abominable; hence Babylon is represented, Revelation 17:4 , as holding in her hand a cup "full of abominations
King, Kings - In Scripture, the word king does not always imply either a high degree of power or great extent of territory. Many single towns, or towns with their adjacent villages, are said to have had kings; and many persons are called kings in Scripture, whom we should rather denominate chiefs or leaders
Peace - But the Scripture sense of the word peace, and more especially the gospel signification of it, in respect to that peace believers have with God in Christ makes it well worth attention in a work of this kind. "...
Such then is the Scripture sense of that peace of God and peace with God, in the blood and righteousness of God's dear Son, "which passeth all understanding, keeping the heart and mind, in Jesus Christ
Oil (Olive) - As the Greek name implies, the common oil of Scripture is olive oil. Puller, The Anointing of the Sick in Scripture and Tradition, 1904)
Tichonius, an African Donatist - He was apparently a layman with a strong turn for church matters including theology was well versed in Scripture and though a Donatist revolted from the exclusive views of the sect and occupied a position intermediate as Neander says between it and the church (Ch. Its main heads are: (1) The church is the Lord's body indivisible from Him so that in Scripture language applicable to Him is applied also to the church
Vincentius Lirinensis - The second source of information would not be needed had not all the leading heretics claimed the support of Holy Scripture (cc. Additions to the faith or detractions from it are alike condemned by Holy Scripture especially by St. The heretics use the Scriptures but only in the way in which bitter potions are disguised for children by a previous taste of honey or poisons labelled as healing medicines. Their employment of Scripture resembles that of Satan in the temptation of our Lord. Catholics must apply to the interpretation of Scripture the tests of universality antiquity and consent. Inveterate heresies can generally be met by Holy Scripture alone or by clear decisions of oecumenical councils. The whole of the bishops, for the most part metropolitans, acted upon the principles maintained in this treatise and censured Nestorius for his unhallowed presumption—that he was the first and only man who rightly understood the Scriptures (xli. The Magdeburg Centuriators distinctly pronounced in its favour as a work of learning and acuteness; as a book which revealed and forcibly assailed the frauds of heretics, supplied a remedy and antidote against their poisons, set forth a weighty doctrine and displayed a knowledge of antiquity with skill and clearness in its treatment of Holy Scripture
Body - In the language of Scripture, somewhat more is meant than the mere animal life, when speaking of the body. ...
The Scripture account of this mysterious work is not more marvellous than it is endearing. )...
This, therefore, being determined on in the council of peace, that He who undertook to redeem our nature, should partake of the same nature as those he redeemed; the next enquiry is, What saith the Scripture concerning the Son of God resuming our nature, and how was it wrought?...
The Scriptures, with matchless grace and condescension, have shewn this, and in a way, considering the dulness of our faculties in apprehension, so plain and circumstantial, that under the blessed Spirit teaching, the humblest follower of the Lord, taught by the Holy Ghost, can clearly apprehend the wonderful subject. (Luke 1:26-53) And I would farther beg him to turn to the Scriptures of the prophets, who, with one voice, pointed to this great event in all their ministrations, (Isaiah 7:14; Isa 9:6; Micah 5:2) And when the reader hath gone over all these Scriptures of the Old Testament, I request him to finish the enquiry in reading the history of the facts themselves, as they are recorded in the New, and bless God for his grace and condescension in bringing the church acquainted with such an event, in the interest of which our present and everlasting happiness is so intimately concerned. ...
In speaking, therefore, or having a right conception of the body of the Lord Jesus Christ; this is the point of view in which the Scriptures of God teach us to regard that holy body. And hence the plain and obvious meaning of all these Scriptures
Origenists - He alleged, that the source of many evils lies in adhering to the literal and external part of Scripture: and that the true meaning of the sacred writers was to be sought in a mysterious and hidden sense, arising from the nature of things themselves. For the Scriptures teach us that the soul of the Messiah was created before the beginning of the world, Philippians 2:5 ; Philippians 2:7 . This text must be understood of Christ's human soul, because it is unusual to propound the Deity as an example of humility in Scripture. and other texts of Scripture
Assurance - Assurance of final salvation must stand or fall with the doctrine of personal unconditional election, and is chiefly held by divines of the Calvinistic school; and that nothing is an evidence of a state of present salvation but so entire a persuasion as amounts to assurance in the strongest sense, might be denied upon the ground that degrees of grace, of real saving grace, are undoubtedly mentioned in Scripture. ...
The first of these conclusions is sufficiently disproved by the authority of Scripture, which exhibits justification as a blessing attainable in this life, and represents it as actually experienced by true believers. The notion that though an act of forgiveness may take place, we are unable to ascertain a fact so important to us, is also irreconcilable with many Scriptures in which the writers of the New Testament speak of an experience, not confined personally to themselves, or to those Christians who were endowed with spiritual gifts, but common to all Christians. ...
An assurance, therefore, that the sins which are felt to "be a burden intolerable" are forgiven, and that the ground of that apprehension of future punishment which causes the penitent to " bewail his manifold sins," is taken away by restoration to the favour of the offended God, must be allowed, or nothing would be more incongruous and impossible than the comfort, the peace the rejoicing of spirit, which in the Scriptures are attributed to believers. Their differences have rather respected the means by which the contrite become assured of that change in their relation to Almighty God, whom they have offended, which in Scripture is expressed by the term justification
Salvation - Scripture, particularly the New Testament, extends salvation to include deliverance from the penalty and power of sin. Scripture uses a wealth of images to describe this act: new birth (John 3:3 ; Titus 3:5 ); new creation (2 Corinthians 5:17 ); adoption (Romans 8:15 ; Galatians 4:4-5 ; Ephesians 1:5 ); empowerment to be God's children (John 1:12 ); the status of “saints” (1 Corinthians 1:2 ; 2 Corinthians 1:1 ). Scripture, however, uses a wealth of terms for this future saving work: adoption (Romans 5:8-9 ); redemption (Luke 21:28 ; Romans 8:23 ; Ephesians 4:30 ); salvation (Romans 13:11 ; Hebrews 1:14 ; Hebrews 9:28 ; 1 Peter 1:5 ; 1 Peter 2:2 ); and sanctification (1 Thessalonians 5:23 ). ...
Some Contested Issues (1) The relationship between faith and works: Scripture repeatedly affirms that salvation is the free gift of God appropriated through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9 ; Romans 3:28 )
Satan - Nevertheless, in a work of this kind, I cannot prevail upon myself to pass it wholly by, without offering a few brief observations concerning the Scripture account which is given us of one, to whose infernal malice we owe all the miseries, sorrows, and evils of the present life. ...
Now the Scriptures of God relate to us that the devil, under the appearance of a serpent, beguiled our first parents in the garden of Eden, prompted them to break the divine commands, and by so doing introduced death into the circumstrances of them and all their posterity. ...
The Scriptures farther teach concerning Satan, that having thus by the introduction of sin brought in all the consequent effects of sorrow and misery, he hath set up a kingdom in the hearts of men and is "the ruler of the darkness of this world," and carries on a despotic government over all men, yea even the Lord's own children while remaining in their unregenerate and unawakened state. " (John 13:27)...
Hence, therefore, when the Lord Jesus Christ is spoken of in the holy Scriptures as coming for the redemption of his people, this great feature of character is intimately linked with it; "for this purpose was the Son of God manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil. (Hebrews 2:14-15)...
I stay not to remark, what hath not indeed in so many plain words Scripture authority, positively saying so, but what hath been the received opinion of learned and studious minds in all ages pondering over the word of God on this subject, that the devil's enmity began not with our nature, but with the Son of God for assuming our nature. I must not go so far into the subject as to bring in all that the Scripture seems to intimate of the quarrel of the devil being first levelled against Christ for becoming the Head of his body the church. ...
In this view of the subject, if we take a comprehensive survey of what the Scriptures have said on the matter, we shall find that the kingdom Satan hath attempted to set up in the earth is personally directed against the kingdom of God and of his Christ: hence our Lord, speaking of Satan, calleth his empire a kingdom. ...
When therefore we behold the Lord Jesus going forth for the salvation of his people, we behold him, as he is represented through all the Scriptures, as first conquering Saran in his own person and then destroying his dominion in the hearts of his people. The first he did when through death, as the Scripture speaks, he destroyed him that had the power of death; and the second conquest was, and is, in every individual instance of his people, when by his regenerating grace in the sinner's heart he converts him from sin to salvation, and the sinner is translated out of "the kingdom of darkness into the kingdom of God's dear Son. " (Colossians 1:13)...
And there is another and a open display of victory: which the Lord Jesus Christ will obtain over Satan, before a whole congregated world, when he will set up a visible kingdom upon earth before the final judgment, during which period the Scriptures tell us Satan will be shut up, and his power restrained from tempting any of Christ's church, as he now is permitted to do, neither will he during that period be allowed to deceive the world and make the ungodly harrass and afflict Christ's people any more
Judah - " (Revelation 5:1-109) The Jews themselves, however unintentionally and unconsciously, confirmed the certainty that this Scripture referred to the Lord Jesus Christ under a double evidence. And surely, as it is said of Christ in one blessed Scripture, that the names of his people are all "written in the book of life," (Revelation 20:15) and in another he bids his people to "rejoice that their names are written there," (Luke 10:20) as when considering himself the shepherd of his flock, and his people the sheep of his fold, he saith that "he calleth them all by name, and leadeth them out," (John 10:3) and as the whole flocks of the mountains and of the vale, and of the cities of Benjamin, Jerusalem, and Judah, shall all pass again under the hands of him that telleth them, (Jeremiah 33:13) surely it is not stretching the Scripture to say, that the Shebeth of Jehudah is as eminently descriptive of the greatness of his character, when speaking of this use of it, in writing, as in ruling, for sovereignty is implied in both, And the poor feeble hand that is now writing these lines, (earnestly begging forgiveness if he errs in the matter) cannot conclude this article without first saying, (and will not the reader for himself also join the petition?) Oh, that the almighty Jehudah may have graciously exercised the Shebeth of his power, and written my poor name, worthless as it is, among the millions he hath marked down in the book of life! Amen. When this is named in Scripture, as distinguished from Israel, it is meant thereby to denote that the kingdoms were divided
Divination - Used in Scripture of false systems of ascertaining the divine will, such as are allied to idolatry: as necromancy, which evoked the dead (2 Thessalonia