What does Samson mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
שִׁמְשׁ֔וֹן a Danite 10
שִׁמְשׁוֹן֙ a Danite 5
שִׁמְשׁ֑וֹן a Danite 5
שִׁמְשׁ֜וֹן a Danite 3
שִׁמְשׁ֖וֹן a Danite 2
שִׁמְשׁ֤וֹן a Danite 2
שִׁמְשׁ֛וֹן a Danite 2
שִׁמְשֽׁוֹן a Danite 2
שִׁמְשׁ֗וֹן a Danite 2
σαμψών a famous judge of Israel renowned for his physical strength. 1
לְשִׁמְשׁ֗וֹן a Danite 1
שִׁמְשׁוֹן֮ a Danite 1
שִׁמְשׁ֥וֹן a Danite 1
לְשִׁמְשׁ֖וֹן a Danite 1
לְשִׁמְשׁ֜וֹן a Danite 1

Definitions Related to Samson

H8123


   1 a Danite, son of Manoah, a Nazarite for life, and a judge of Israel for 20 years.
   Additional Information: Samson = “like the sun”.
   

G4546


   1 a famous judge of Israel renowned for his physical strength.
   Additional Information: Samson = “like the sun”.
   

Frequency of Samson (original languages)

Frequency of Samson (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Samson
SAMSON (LXX [1] and Vulg. [2] ; Heb. Shimshôn ; probably derived from shemesh , ‘sun,’ either as a diminutive, or better ‘sun-man’). Mentioned in OT in Judges 13:1-25 ; Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 ; Judges 16:1-31 , and in NT in Hebrews 11:32 .
1. The story need not be recapitulated, but certain details require explanation. Judges 13:25 seems to be the prelude to a first exploit, now lost. Judges 13:14 is not clear as it stands; probably ‘his father and his mother’ in Judges 13:5-6 b, Judges 13:10 a are glosses introduced to avoid the appearance of disobedience. He goes down alone, meets the lion alone, returns to his home after his visit to his bride ( Judges 13:8 ‘to take her’ being another gloss); then after an interval he goes back to celebrate the marriage he has arranged; Judges 13:10 a is particularly absurd as it stands. The ‘thirty companions’ of Judges 13:11 are the ‘friends of the bridegroom,’ chosen on this occasion from the bride’s people (see below, § 4); the companion of Judges 13:20 is their leader, ‘the best man.’ The ‘linen garments’ of Judges 13:12 are pieces of fine linen, costly and luxurious ( Proverbs 31:24 , Isaiah 3:23 ); ‘the changes’ are gala dresses. The Philistines give up the riddle ‘after three days’ ( Judges 13:14 ), and appeal to the woman on the seventh ( Judges 13:15 ; LXX [1] Syr. ‘fourth’); yet she weeps for the whole week, imploring Samson to tell her ( Judges 13:17 ). Perhaps the figures of Judges 13:14-15 are interpolations, the Philistines giving up at once. ‘Before the sun went down’ ( Judges 13:18 ) is ungrammatical in Heb., with a rare word for ‘sun‘; with best modern edd., read by a slight alteration ‘before he went into the bridal-chamber’ (cf. Judges 19:1-3094 ). In ch. 16, words, variously represented by LXX [1] , have fallen out between Judges 15:13 and Judges 15:14 ; the sense is ‘… and beat them up with the pin, I shall become weak, So while he was asleep she took the seven locks and wove them into the web, and beat them tight with the pin,’ etc. We are to imagine an upright loom with a piece of unfinished stuff; Delilah weaves the hair into this, and heats it tight with the ‘pin.’ Samson pulls up the posts of the loom by his hair which is fastened to the web. For Judges 13:21 , cf. the blinding of captives as shown on Assyr. [5] monuments; to be put to the mill was a frequent punishment of slaves. Nothing is known of the worship of Dagon (cf. 1 Samuel 5:1-12 ); the etymology ‘fish-god’ and the connexion with the Assyr. [5] god ‘Dagan’ are uncertain.
2. Origin and nature of the story . ( a ) The narrative seems to belong entirely to J″ [7] , the Judæan source of the early history of Israel; there are no traces of a double source, as in other parts of Judges. It has been but slightly revised by the Deuteronomic editor. Ch. 16, though an integral part of the original cycle of stories, was apparently at one time omitted by the compiler; see the repeated note in Judges 15:20 ; Judges 16:31 . Perhaps it gave too unfavourable a picture of the hero’s love-affairs. ( b ) Though it is said that Samson ‘judged Israel twenty years’ ( Judges 15:20 ), and that he should ‘begin to deliver’ his nation from the Philistines ( Judges 13:5 ), there is no hint of his ever having held any official position, nor does he appear as a leader of his people; on the contrary, he is disowned by his neighbours of Judah ( Judges 15:11 ). His exploits have only a local significance, and are performed single-handed in revenge for his private quarrels. The story evidently belongs to the class of popular tales, common to every country-side. Every people has its hero of prodigious strength, to whom marvellous feats are ascribed, and it becomes a hopeless task to discover the precise historical basis of the legends, which in this case are undoubtedly of great antiquity. ( c ) It is not necessary to look for a further explanation in the theory of a ‘solar myth.’ The name ‘Samson,’ and the existence of a ‘Beth-shemesh’ (‘house of the sun’) near his home, offer an obvious temptation to such a theory, but it is entirely unnecessary and is now generally abandoned. ( d ) It is more probable that in ch. 15 we find the workings of folk-etymology (‘ætiological myth’), i.e. stories suggested by the fancied meaning of names. Ramath-Lehi (‘the height of Lehi’) is taken to mean ‘the casting away of the jawbone’; En-hakkore (‘Partridge spring’), ‘the spring of him who called’; and incidents are suggested to explain the supposed meanings. ( e ) The parallels with other popular stories, especially the exploits of Hercules, are obvious, e.g . the killing of the lion, the miraculous satisfying of the hero’s thirst, and his ruin at the hand of a woman. For the lion episode, cf., further, the stories of Polydamas, David ( 1 Samuel 17:34 ), Benaiah ( 2 Samuel 23:20 ); for the sacred hair or lock, cf. the story of Nisus. Ovid ( Fasti , lv. 681 712) has a remarkable parallel to the burning of the corn by the foxes (or jackals?); at the Cereaila, foxes with lighted torches tied to their tails were let loose in the Circus; he explains the custom as originally due to the act of a mischievous boy, who burned his father’s corn in the same way. The conclusion to be drawn from such parallels is not necessarily identity of origin, but the similar working of the mind and imagination under similar conditions.
3. Historical value . Regarded as a picture of early conditions and customs, the narrative is of the greatest significance. Politically it takes us to the time when Dan, perhaps weakened by the departure of its 600 men of war ( Judges 1:34 ; Judges 1:18 ) acquiesces in the rule of the Philistines; Timnah is in their hands. There is no state of war between the two peoples, but free intercourse and even intermarriage. As already pointed out, Samson is in no sense the leader of a revolt against the foreign dominion, and his neighbours of Judah show no desire to make his private quarrels an excuse for a rising ( Judges 15:11 ); there is no union even between the tribes of the south. None the less, his exploits would be secretly welcomed as directed against the common foe, and remembering that Judges 17:1-13 ; Judges 18:1-31 ; 1618065208_8 ; Judges 20:1-48 ; Judges 21:1-25 is an appendix, we see how the narrative paves the way for the more defined efforts of Saul and David in 1Samuel to shake off the foreign yoke. Sociatly the story gives us a picture of primitive marriage customs. Ch. 14 is the clearest OT example of a sadika marriage (see Marriage, § 1). We get a good idea of the proceedings, essentially the same as in the East to-day. The feast lasts for a week, and is marked by lavish eating and drinking, songs, riddles, and not very refined merriment. The whole story gives us a valuable insight into the life of the people; we note the grim rough humour of its hero, so entirely natural (ch. 14, the three deceptions of ch. Judges 16 ; Judges 16:28 RVm [8] ).
4. Religious significance . Samson is a popular hero, and we shall expect the directly religious interest of the story to be subordinate. It appears in the account of his birth, perhaps hardly a part of the original cycle, but added later to justify his inclusion among the Judges. As a child of promise, he is in a peculiar sense a gift of God, born to do a special work; an overruling providence governs his acts ( Judges 14:4 ; Judges 16:30 ). The source of his strength is supernatural; at times it is represented as due to a demonic frenzy, an invasion of the spirit of J″ [7] ( Judges 13:25 , Judges 14:6 ; Judges 14:19 , Judges 15:14 ), but in 13, 16 it lies in his hair; he is a Nazirite of God. The rules for the Nazirite are given in Numbers 6:1 ; those in Judges 13:1-25 are the same, with the general prohibition of ‘unclean’ food. The essence of the conception lay in a vow to sacrifice the hair at a sacred shrine, the life-long vow being probably a vow to do so at stated periods. The hair, like the blood, was regarded as a seat of life, and was a common offering not only among the Semites, but in all parts of the world. In Arabia the vow to leave the locks unshorn was particularly connected with wars of revenge ( Deuteronomy 32:42 RVm [8] , Psalms 68:21 ). As soon as a vow was taken, the life of the votary became a continuous act of religion; particularly must the body, which nourishes the hair (now the property of the deity), be kept clean from all defilement; the taboo of the vine and its products is esp. common (cf. Amos 2:11-12 ). In the story itself no stress is laid on any such precautions on the part of Samson ( e.g . in Judges 14:8 he eats from a carcase), and hence no doubt the taboos were transferred to his mother ( Judges 13:4 ). There is unfortunately little basis for the religious feeling with which Milton has invested the character of Samson. He is a popular hero, and the permanent value of the story is to be sought in its ethical lessons . It is true, its morality is on a low level; revenge is Samson’s ruling idea, and his relations with women have been a stumbling-block to apologists. But once we recognize the origin of the story, we shall not feel bound to justify or explain away these traits, and the lessons stand out clearly. The story emphasizes the evils of foreign marriages ( Judges 14:3 ), of laxity in sexual relations, and of toying with temptation. It teaches that bodily endowments, no less than spiritual, are a gift from God, however different may be our modern conception of the way in which they are bestowed, and that their retention depends on obedience to His laws. But if Samson stands as an example ‘of impotence of mind in body strong,’ he also stands, in Milton’s magnificent conception, as an example of patriotism and heroism in death, to all who ‘from his memory inflame their breast to matchless valour and adventures high.’
C. W. Emmet.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Samson
In the days between Israel’s entrance into Canaan and the establishment of the kingdom, the Israelites were often oppressed by other peoples of the region. During one period, when the Philistines dominated them for forty years, the people had become so crushed that they had no more desire to fight. It was easier to accept the hardship of Philistine rule than to try to overthrow it (Judges 15:11-13). The man whom God raised up to stir the Israelites from this apathy was Samson. He began the revolt that would eventually lead to the overthrow of the Philistines (Judges 13:5 b).
As a person dedicated to God according to the conditions of the Nazirite vow, Samson was not to drink wine, cut his hair or touch any dead body (Judges 13:5; cf. Numbers 6:2-8). Although he carried out mighty deeds through the special power of God’s Spirit upon him (Judges 13:25; Judges 14:6; Judges 14:19; Judges 15:14), he was not careful to maintain his Nazirite dedication to God (Judges 14:8-9). When, towards the end of his life, he allowed the removal of the last symbol of this dedication (his uncut hair), God withdrew his divine power from him (Judges 16:19-20).
Samson had to fight his battles against the Philistines virtually unaided by his fellow Israelites. While they were complacent, he was looking for ways of unsettling the enemy. He lost no opportunity of doing as much damage as he could (Judges 14:4).
When, for example, the Philistines won a bet against him through cheating, Samson killed thirty of their citizens (Judges 14:18-19). When his wife was given to another man, Samson burnt the Philistines’ fields (Judges 15:1-5). In retaliation for their murder of his wife and father-in-law, Samson killed more Philistines (Judges 15:6-8). When the Philistines made an attack on the town where he was staying in an attempt to capture him, he killed another thousand of them (Judges 15:15).
Samson became known as one of the judges of Israel. He was a judge not in the sense that he settled legal disputes, but in the sense that he executed judgments on the oppressors of God’s people. His remarkable attacks, spread over twenty years, began the deliverance that David eventually achieved many years later (Judges 13:5 b; 15:20; 2 Samuel 8:1; 2 Samuel 8:11-12). His greatest triumph was on the day of his death when, through faith in the power of God, he killed all the Philistine rulers along with three thousand of their leading people (Judges 16:23; Judges 16:28; Judges 16:30; Hebrews 11:32-34). It was the turning point that gave Israel new hope.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Samson
Of the sun, the son of Manoah, born at Zorah. The narrative of his life is given in Judges 13-16 . He was a "Nazarite unto God" from his birth, the first Nazarite mentioned in Scripture (Judges 13:3-5 ; Compare Numbers 6:1-21 ). The first recorded event of his life was his marriage with a Philistine woman of Timnath (Judges 14:1-5 ). Such a marriage was not forbidden by the law of Moses, as the Philistines did not form one of the seven doomed Canaanite nations (Exodus 34:11-16 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-4 ). It was, however, an ill-assorted and unblessed marriage. His wife was soon taken from him and given "to his companion" (Judges 14:20 ). For this Samson took revenge by burning the "standing corn of the Philistines" (15:1-8), who, in their turn, in revenge "burnt her and her father with fire." Her death he terribly avenged (15:7-19). During the twenty years following this he judged Israel; but we have no record of his life. Probably these twenty years may have been simultaneous with the last twenty years of Eli's life. After this we have an account of his exploits at Gaza (16:1-3), and of his infatuation for Delilah, and her treachery (16:4-20), and then of his melancholy death (16:21-31). He perished in the last terrible destruction he brought upon his enemies. "So the dead which he slew at his death were more [1] than they which he slew in his life." "Straining all his nerves, he bowed: As with the force of winds and waters pent, When mountains tremble, those two massy pillars With horrible convulsion to and fro He tugged, he shook, till down they came, and drew The whole roof after them, with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors, or priests, Their choice nobility and flower." Milton's Samson Agonistes.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Samson
The seventh of the Judges, he judged the Israelites for twenty years (951-931 BCE). A nazirite from birth and of legendary strength, he single-handedly terrorized the occupying Philistines, once killing one thousand of them with a donkey’s jawbone. Samson’s Philistine wife, Delilah, persuaded him to reveal to her the source of his great strength—his never-cut hair. She revealed the secret to the Philistines, who cut his hair and incarcerated him. At a pagan festival, Samson knocked down the pillars supporting the building, killing himself and thousands of Philistines.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Samson
(Σαμψών)
Samson was the popular hero of the tribe of Dan who began to deliver Israel from the Philistines, the Nazirite whose secret of strength lay in his hair, the blinded giant who prayed for power to avenge himself and his country in the hour of his death (Judges 13-16). He finds a place in the great Roll of Faith contained in Hebrews 11. Much has been written in recent years regarding the legendary elements of the story of Samson and the possibility of its being a solar myth, but such ideas were naturally far from the mind of the anonymous writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews.
Literature.-For solar myth theory see Commentaries on Judges by G. F. Moore (International Critical Commentary , 1895) and K. Budde (Das Buch der Richter, 1897); J. G. Frazer, The Golden Bough2, 1900, iii. 390 ff.; A. Jeremias, The OT in the Light of the Ancient East, Eng. translation , 2 vols., 1911, ii. 169ff.
James Strahan.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Samson
(ssam' ssuhn) Personal name meaning, “Of the sun.” Last of the major judges over Israel about 1100 B.C. (Judges 13:1-16:31 ). The son of Manoah of the tribe of Dan, Samson was a legendary hero who frequently did battle against the Philistines who, at that time, “had dominion over Israel” (Judges 14:4 ).
Before his conception, Samson was dedicated by his parents to be a lifelong Nazirite (Judges 13:3-7 ), a person especially devoted or consecrated. Part of the vow included letting the hair grow and abstaining from wine and strong drink. Samson's legendary strength did not come from his long hair. Rather, it came through the “Spirit of the Lord” who would “come upon” him to enable him to perform amazing feats of physical strength (Judges 14:6 ,Judges 14:6,14:19 ; Judges 15:14 ; compare Judges 16:28-29 ). Although a Nazirite, Samson did not live a devoted life. More frequently, he was careless in his vow. He secretly disobeyed the prohibition of approaching a dead body (Judges 14:8-9 ), had immoral relations with a Gaza harlot (Judges 16:1 ), and with Delilah (Judges 16:4-20 ).
Samson is portrayed as a headstrong young man with little or no self-control. None of his exploits show him as a religious enthusiast. In fact, every major crisis in his life resulting in clashes against the Philistines were brought on by his relationships with Philistine women. Samson's fascination with Delilah finally wrought his downfall. The lords of the Philistines offered her eleven hundred pieces of silver from each of them to find out the source of Samson's strength. In her first three attempts, Samson gave her false answers. However, he did not seem to equate the Philistines binding him each time with betrayal by Delilah. Finally, she coaxed the truth from him, and Samson was captured.
Ultimately, Samson proved little more than a thorn in the flesh to the Philistines. He never really freed Israel from the dominion of the Philistines. In his death, he killed more Philistines than the total he had killed during his life (Judges 16:30 ). He is listed with the heroes of faith in Hebrews 11:32 , because his strength came from God and because in his dying act, he demonstrated his faith. See Nazirite ; Judge; Judges, Book of ; Spirit .
Darlene R. Gautsch
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Samson
A well-known character in the Old Testament: in one grand instance, as a Nazarite, a type of the Lord Jesus Christ. (See Judges 13:1-25 etc.) His name is derived from Shemesh, sun. I refer to his life as is recorded in the book of the Judges; and shall only make one observation upon it, namely that the Holy Ghost hath made honourable mention of him by enrolling his name among those worthies, so eminent for their faith, who are said to be such of whom "the world was not worthy." (Hebrews 11:32) See Nazarene
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Samson
(See MANOAH.) ("awe inspiring".) (Judges 13:6; Judges 13:18-20) or else "sunlike" (Gesenius): compare Judges 5:31, "strong" (Josephus Ant. 5:8, section 4). Judge of Israel for 20 years (Judges 15:20; Judges 16:31), namely, in the Danite region near Philistia. Judah and Dan, and perhaps all Israel, were subject then to the Philistines (Judges 13:1; Judges 13:5; Judges 15:9-11, "knowest thou not the Philistines are rulers over us?" Judges 15:20). His 20 years' office was probably included in the "40 years" of Philistine rule. At the time of the angel's announcement to his mother (Judges 13:5) they ruled, and as his judgeship did not begin before he was 20 it must have nearly coincided with the last 20 years of their dominion. However their rule ceased not until the judgeship of Samuel, which retrieved their capture of the ark (1 Samuel 7:1-14). So the close of Samson's judgeship must have coincided with the beginning of Samuel's, and the capture of the ark in Eli's time must have been during Samson's lifetime. Correspondences between their times appear.
(1) The Philistines are prominent under both.
(2) Both are Nazarites (1 Samuel 7:1-13), Samson's exploits probably moving Hannah to her vow. Amos (Amos 2:11-12) alludes to them, the only allusion elsewhere to Nazarites in the Old Testament being Lamentations 4:7.
(3) Dagon's temple is alluded to under both (1 Samuel 5:2; Judges 16:23).
(4) The Philistine lords (1 Samuel 7:7; Judges 16:8; Judges 16:18; Judges 16:27).
Samson roused the people from their servile submission, and by his desultory blows on the foe prepared Israel for the final victory under Samuel. "He shall begin to deliver Israel" (Judges 13:5) implies the consummation of the deliverance was to be under his successor (1 Samuel 1:11). "The Lord blessed him" from childhood (Judges 13:24); type of Jesus (Luke 2:52, compare Luke 1:80, John the Baptist the New Testament Nazarite). "The Spirit of the Lord" is stated to be the Giver of his strength (Judges 13:25; Judges 14:6; Judges 14:19; Judges 15:14). Samson was not of giant size as were some of the Philistines (1 Samuel 17); his strength was not brute natural strength, but spiritual, bound up with fidelity to his Nazarite vow. An embodied lesson to Israel that her power lay in separation from idol lusts and entire consecration to God; no foe could withstand them while true to Him, but once that they forsook Him for the fascinations of the world their power is gone and every enemy should triumph over them (1 Samuel 2:9).
Still even Samson's falls, as Israel's, are in God's wonderful providence overruled to Satan's and his agents' confusion and the good of God's elect. Samson slays the lion at Timnath, and through his Philistine wife's enticement they told the riddle; then to procure 30 tunics he slew 30 Philistines, the forfeit. His riddle "out of the eater came forth meat (carcasses in the East often dry up without decomposition), and out of the strong (Matthew 12:29) came forth sweetness," is the key of Samson's history and of our present dispensation. Satan's lion-like violence and harlot-like subtlety are made to recoil on himself and to work out God's sweet and gracious purposes toward His elect. Deprived of his wife, Samson by the firebrands attached to 300 "jackals" (shual ), avenged himself on them. The Philistines burnt her and her father with fire; then he smote them with great slaughter at Etam. Then under the Spirit's power with an donkey bone (for the Philistines let Israel have no iron weapons: 1 Samuel 13:19) he slew a thousand Philistines.
This established his title as judge during the Philistine oppression ("in the days of the Philistines": Judges 15:20). (See DELILAH for his fall.) By lust Samson lost at once his godliness and his manliness; it severed him from God the strength of his manhood. Samson set at nought the legal prohibition against affinity with idolatrous women (Exodus 34:15-16; Deuteronomy 7:3). Parting with the Nazarite locks of his consecration was virtual renunciation of his union with God, so his strength departed. Prayer restored it. The foes' attribution of their victory over "Samson the destroyer of their country" to their god Dagon provoked God's jealousy for His honour. A Philistine multitude, including all their lords, congregated in the house, which was a vast hall, the roof resting on four columns, two at the ends and two close together at the center; 3,000 men and women on the roof beheld while Samson made sport. Samson by pulling down the house slew at his death more than in his life. Type of Christ (Colossians 2:15; Matthew 27:50-54).
Fulfilling Jacob's prophecy of Dan, his tribe (Genesis 49:16-17). A token that Israel's temporary backslidings, when repented of, shall issue in ultimate victory. Samson, the physically strong Nazarite, prepared the way for Samuel, the spiritual hero Nazarite, who consummated the deliverance that Samson began. Samson wrought what he did by faith, the true secret of might (Hebrews 11:32; Matthew 21:21). The Phoenicians carried to Greece the story of Samson, which the Greeks transferred to their idol Hercules. The Scholion on Lycophron (Bochart Hieroz. 2:5, section 12) blends the stories of Samson and Jonah, and makes Hercules come out of the belly of the sea monster with the loss of his hair. Hercules was "son of the sun" in Egypt (shemesh ) related to Sam-son). Ovid (Fasti 54) describes the custom of tying a torch between two foxes in the circus, in memory of damage once done to a harvest by a fox with burning straw. Hercules dies by the hand of his wife; but every fault is atoned by suffering, and at last he ascends to heaven. His joviality and buffoonery answer to the last scene in the life of Samson. The history is taken probably from the tribe of Daniel. (See TIMNATH.)
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Samson
EVERYMAN THAT STRIVETH FOR THE MASTERY IS TEMPERATE IN ALL THINGS
SAMSON'S tragical story has been treated in three ways. Some commentators on the Book of Judges have treated the story of Samson as an excellent piece of Hebrew folklore. They have collected out of all the ancient books of the world wonderful tales of giants, and heroes, and demigods, with their astonishing feats of strength in war, and in love, and in jealousy, and in revenge; feats more or less like the feats of strength and of revenge we have in Samson. They have produced remarkable parallels to Samson's exploits out of Atlas and Cyclops, Hercules and Odin, and many suchlike mythological characters. And then their work on Samson has been done when they have illustrated his history with romances and legends of sufficient likeness and richness. Some evangelical preachers, again, have gone out to the opposite extreme, and have displayed Samson to us solely as a type and pattern of Jesus Christ. They have selected texts out of Samson's extraordinary history, and they have suspended excellent New Testament sermons on these adapted texts; hanging great weights on small wires. The former is the mythical way of dealing with Samson's history; the latter is the mystical way. But there is a third way. And the third way is the way that Paul takes, not only with Samson, but with all the patriarchs, and judges, and kings, and great men of Old Testament times. We have this apostle's way with all those Old Testament men and women set before us again and again in his own conclusive words: 'For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.' And again, 'All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.' And again, 'Now, all these things happened unto them for ensamples, and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come. Wherefore let him that thinketh be standeth take heed lest he fall.' And yet again, 'Therefore, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us.' Now, neither the mythical nor the mystical method shall be followed upon Samson tonight. All my leanings and all my drawings, all my reading and all my experience-all combine to make me to sit at Paul's feet, and to pursue, so far as I am able, Paul's expository and homiletical methods. While listening attentively, then, to all that the mythologists and the mystics have to say on Samson; having done so, I feel all the move safe and sure in asking you to look at Samson as John Milton looked at Samson when he treated him with such 'verisimilitude and decorum.' For 'Tragedy, as it was anciently composed, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other poems: therefore said by Aristotle to be of power by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and suchlike passions; that is, to temper and reduce the passions to their just measure.'
What more could God, or man, or angel of God have done for Samson that was not done? Every man must work out his own salvation with his own hands, or not at all; but, short of doing for Samson what neither God nor man could do, what more could God or man have done that was not done? From his birth, and for long before his birth, the gifts of God were simply showered on Samson. He had a father and a mother of the very best. Over and above what the Bible tells us about Samson's father and mother, Joseph us, in supplement of the Bible, tells us that there was 'one Manoah, a person of such virtue that he had few men his equals, and without dispute he was the principal person in his country. And Manoah had a wife celebrated for her beauty, and excelling her contemporaries.' Now, Manoah and his wife had been prepared to be the father and mother of a great deliverer of Israel. And they had been prepared in the same way that God had often taken to prepare the parents of those children who were predestinated to be great and famous men. Like Abraham and Sarah, like Isaac and Rebekah, like Jacob and Rachel, like Hannah, like Zacharias and Elizabeth, and like many more, it was as it were by a special and immediate act of creative power that Manoah and his wife got Samson their son at the hand of God.
And not only was Samson to be separated to God's service from his mother's womb; but, in order to make his separation and dedication both sure and easy and natural to him, his mother was separated and dedicated to God long before her child was born. 'Of all that I said to the woman let her beware. She may not eat of anything that cometh of the vine, neither let her drink wine nor strong drink, nor eat any unclean thing: all that I commanded her let her observe,' said the angel of the Lord a second time to Manoah. 'Not,' says Joseph Hall, 'that there is more uncleanness in the grape than in the fountain; but that wine finds more uncleanness in us than water finds; and that the high feed is not so fit for devotion as abstinence.'
Desire of wine and all delicious drinks,Which many a famous warrior overturns,Thou couldst repress; nor did the dancing ruby,Sparkling, outpour'd, the flavour, or the smellOr taste that cheers the heart of gods and men,Allure thee from the clear crystalline stream:.… Nor envied them the grape.Whose heads that turbulent liquor fills with fumes.But what avail'd this temperance not completeAgainst another object more enticing?What boots it at one gate to make defence,And at another to let in the foe,Effeminately vanquished?.…'I am weary of my life!' said Rebekah to Isaac over the marriage of Esau, and in terror of a like marriage of Jacob. And both Manoah and his wife said the same thing over Samson's marriage. How twice happy are those parents who get a child born in the Lord, and then live to see their child married in the Lord! What a crown of blessing it is to a godly mother to get a second daughter in her son's wife; and what a happy father he is who gets a second son in his daughter's husband! But, then, all the more, what a gnawing sorrow it is when a son or a daughter marries away outside of all sympathy with their father's house! Better, cries many a mother's broken heart-better they had never been born than to be so mis-married. Samson's father and mother never saw another happy day after that day when their son-miraculous birth, Nazarite vow and all-went down to Timnath and saw a woman, a daughter of the Philistines, and said, Get her for me to wife! Then his father and his mother said to Samson, Is there never a woman of the daughters of thy brethren, that thou goest to take a wife of the uncircumcised Philistines? Was it for this day they had sanctified their unborn child? In his misery Manoah declared that he would never all his days pray for anything after this, lest it should turn to his bane, as his prayer for a son had so turned. For how is a child who brings such shame on his father and mother ever to fulfil the promise of his birth? How shall the son-in-law of an uncircumcised Philistine ever deliver Israel? Nor did all Samson's riddles, and jests, and sports, and revenges against the Philistines scatter or relieve the cloud that his first fatal step had brought down on his father's and his mother's heart.
Though we look with fear for it, and almost expect it, and though Josephus actually says it, yet we are not told it in the Bible, and we simply cannot believe Josephus, that Samson broke his Nazarite vow. Could we believe Josephus in what he writes, what a treasure-house for Bible readers he would be! But wherever Josephus stands without corroboration and confirmation, we simply cannot believe a word he says. We shall, therefore, set it down to Samson's credit that, with all his licence and with all his riot, he never became a drunkard. But, then, as it always comes into my heart when I read of Samson's total abstinence-
What boots it at one gate to make defence,And at another to let in the foe?You are making a gallant defence at one gate, but what about all the other gates; and, especially, what about the gates on the other side of the city? You keep, with all diligence, this and that gate of the body, but what about the more deadly gates of the soul? Plutarch tells us of a great Roman who was very brave; but, then, he was very envious of other brave men, and his envy did himself and them and the state more mischief than if he had been a coward. You work hard for God at your books and your visiting as a minister or as a Sabbath-school teacher, but you restrain prayer. You stand up for use and wont in public worship, and in pulpit and in published doctrine; but, then, you hate and hunt down the men who innovate upon you in these things. You go out, like Samson, against the enemies of God and His Church, but all the time you make your campaign an occasion for your own passions, piques, retaliations, and revenges. You do not touch wine, but how do you stand to all Samson's other sins? Death and hell will come still more surely into your hearts through the gates of envy, and ill-will, and hatred, and pride, and revenge, and malice, and unbelief, and neglect of God in prayer, than at those more yawning gates that all decently living men make a defence at. What avails this 'temperance not complete'?
Young men are not raised up among us nowadays with Samson's size and strength. The age of the Judges was a rude age, and God condescended to its rudeness, and raised up rude instruments to shape it. Samsons in body are not born among us in our day, but Samsons in mind are sometimes given us in room of them. And it is not seldom seen that our greatly gifted youths work as little deliverance for themselves and for us as Samson did for Israel. You hear of some young man's Samson-like feats of strength at the University or at the Divinity Hall. He rose from his shoulders upwards above all the men of his time. What was toil and defeat to them was but child's-play to him. Samson rent a lion that roared against him, as if it had been a kid. In the quickness and versatility of their minds our young Samsons set us riddles to which we Philistines cannot supply an answer. They make sport of our slow wits. They tie firebrands to foxes' tails, and turn the foxes in among our standing corn. But we endure it all, looking on it all as but the rough sport of young giants, and we wait with hope for the day when they shall be found working painfully among those very cornfields and vineyards over which they are now making their too destructive sport.
But it often happens with our promised deliverers also that they fall far short of far weaker men in the after-work they do for themselves and for us. A common man, over whose birth no angel did wondrously, will often at the end of the day far outstrip his brilliant neighbour who started with all heaven and all earth looking on with applause and expectation. Genius is genius; but the oil-fed lamp of an honest mind and a humble heart will, not seldom, light its owner better home. Weak men must husband their strength. They have neither time nor strength to spare on those Samson-feats that end in a day's amazement, but work no deliverance in the land. And, moreover, the very diligence and assiduity that their few talents compel them to, keep them from those idle and ruinous dalliances with the Delilahs of the flesh and of the mind that more affluent men are more easily led into.
But, still, in spite of it all, Samson actually judged Israel for full twenty years. At the same time, for some reason or other, a reason we can only guess at, the sacred writer tells us not one single word about what we would give a great deal tonight to know. Not one word are we told, neither about what kind of cases came up before Samson, nor how he managed his court, nor about the wisdom, or otherwise, of his judgments, nor about the manner of life that Israel lived for that whole generation under her gigantic judge. We sometimes hear it complained in our day that all the romance of the world is used up; that there is little or nothing left to the ambitious man of genius of these latter days but the most barren and most trampled spots of sacred and profane history. And, as a sad consequence to them and to us, that our dramatists and tragedians can never again give us such masterpieces as their forerunners have left behind them. Well, were I a sacred dramatist, I would ask for no better scope for my craft tonight than just the twenty years of Samson's judgeship. The whole magnificent drama of Samson Agonistes begins and ends, according to ancient rule and best example, within the space of twenty-four hours. Well, here are twenty untouched and absolutely silent years, during which the plot was laying deep and thickening fast toward the terrible catastrophe of Milton's masterpiece. Those twenty loaded years stand beckoning for a Milton or a Wells or a Browning to enter them, and to give us out of them a companion and a key to the Agonistes-a poem grave enough, moral enough, and profitable enough to satisfy the master of all these matters himself. Such an artist would let us see Samson repenting of having broken his mother's heart, and repenting with the passion of a hundred penitents poured into one. He would let us see the Lord turning again to give Samson another chance. He would let us hear evil men in Israel mocking at Samson and his seat of judgment because of Timnath and Gaza. He would raise pity and anger wherewith to purge our hearts as we saw Samson striving to do only what was right, with men of Belial all about him waiting for his halting, and dwelling on all his past wrong-doing. And his chorus would purge our breasts with fear and with terror as they lifted the veil and let us see the passions of lust, and jealousy, and hatred, and revenge that were all the time tearing at the great heart of Manoah's miserable son. Till one of those passions, even after he had judged Israel twenty years, again broke out, and laid Samson low, never to rise again in this world.
Myself my sepulchre, a moving grave.Prison within prison,Inseparably dark!Nothing of all these evils hath befall'n meBut justly; I myself have brought them on,Sole author I, sole cause. If aught seem vile,As vile hath been my folly.But man's extremity is God's opportunity. And in such words as were possible to Samson's Old Testament biographer, that sacred writer tells us that in Samson also, where sin abounded, grace did much more abound, and that God's strength was made perfect in the day of Samson's weakness. That dark cell in Gaza-in Gaza, the scene of some of Samson's greatest sins-that shameful cell was a house of God, and a place of prayer and repentance to Manoah's overtaken and overwhelmed son. What a past Samson looked back upon as he sat at the mill! What he might have been! What he might have done! How he might have departed to his fathers and left Israel! Three thousand years dissolve, and this is Gaza. This is the mill with slaves. This man, and that man there, is Samson over again. Only, over again against light and truth that Samson never saw. 'What profit is there in my blood,' our Samson cries, 'when I go down to the pit? Shall the dust praise Thee? Shall it declare Thy truth? Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me. Lord, be Thou my helper. Turn my mourning into dancing, my dreaming into earnestness, my falls into clearings of myself, my guilt into indignation, my sin into fear, my transgression into vehement desire, and my pollution into revenge. Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy; when I fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord shall be a light unto me. I will bear the indignation of the Lord, because I have sinned against Him, until He plead my cause, and execute judgment for me; He will bring me forth to the light, and I shall behold His righteousness. Who is a God like unto Thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He retaineth not His anger for ever, because He delighteth in mercy. He will turn again, He will have compassion on us; He will subdue our iniquities, and Thou shalt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.'
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Samson
Son of Manoah, of the tribe of Dan. His birth had been pre-announced by an angel to his mother, who had long been childless. The angel told his parents that he was to be a Nazarite (that is, a separated one) from his birth. When Israel was in bondage to the Philistines, the internal enemies of God's people, a Nazarite had to be raised up by God to work out their deliverance. The statement that "he judged Israel twenty years," doubtless signifies the south-west parts of the land near the country of the Philistines. It was said of Samson before his birth: "He shall begin to deliver Israel out of the hand of the Philistines."
His marriage with a woman of Timnath was so far "of the Lord" that it became in the ways of God an occasion against the Philistines to whom he had allied himself. His going down to her was the occasion of his killing a lion; this led to Samson's riddle, and the riddle to his slaying thirty of the Philistines. Then, his wife being given to another man, Samson burned up their corn, their vineyards, and their olives, and smote the Philistines with 'a great slaughter.'
When the Philistines gathered themselves together to arrest Samson, the men of Judah would not defend him, but, owning their bondage, said, "Knowest thou not that the Philistines are rulers over us?" and three thousand of Judah bound Samson and delivered him to the Philistines. Thus Samson, through God's inscrutable ways, was separated from his own people: they delivered him up, as afterwards the people of Judah delivered up the Lord Jesus, the true Nazarite, who came to save them.
When in the hands of his enemies, he was mightily moved by the Spirit, and with the jaw-bone of an ass slew a thousand of the Philistines. After this great victory he fainted for water, and cried unto the Lord, who clave a hollow place in the rock [1] and gave him drink.
His humiliating end was brought about through his lust after strange women. It was extreme folly to make known the secret of his strength to Delilah when he knew she would betray him. It is a striking instance of the foolish things a Nazarite (and all Christians are morally Nazarites) may do if he gets out of communion with the Lord. The strong man was blinded and made to grind in a dungeon for his enemies.
But God had not forsaken him, and his hair began to grow again. The Philistines offered a great sacrifice to their god Dagon, and they praised their god, and said it was he that had delivered Samson into their hands. Then they sent for him to make sport before them; but he cried unto the Lord, and asked Him to strengthen him this once, that he might be avenged on the Philistines for the loss of his two eyes. God strengthened him, and he pulled down the house, on the roof of which there were about three thousand souls, and thus he slew at his death more than he had slain in his life.
Notwithstanding the failures of Samson, God accomplished the purpose for which He had raised him up in subduing the Philistines; but it was only accomplished in his own death. Among the cloud of witnesses who 'obtained a good report through faith,' Samson is named, but his acts are not there recorded. Hebrews 11:32 . His history is given in Judges 13 — Judges 16 .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Samson
His sun; his service; there the second time
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Samson
son of Manoah, of the tribe of Dan, Judges 13:2 , &c. We are no where acquainted with the name of his mother. He was born A.M. 2849, and was a Nazarite from his infancy, by the divine command. He was brought up in a place called the camp of Dan, between Zorah and Estaol, Judges 13:25 . His extraordinary achievements are particularly recorded in Judges 14-16. "Faith" is attributed to him by St. Paul, though whether he retained it to the end of his life may be doubted. He is not inaptly called by an old writer, "a rough believer."
Webster's Dictionary - Samson
(n.) An Israelite of Bible record (see Judges xiii.), distinguished for his great strength; hence, a man of extraordinary physical strength.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Samson
Samson (săm'son), sunlike. The son of Manoah, and noted as the strongest man. He was judge of a portion of Israel for 20 years, during the latter part of "the 40 years" period, and partly contemporary with Ell and Samuel. Judg. chaps. 13-16. His birth was miraculously foretold; he was a Nazirite from infancy; celebrated for his fearless and wonderful exploits, for his moral infirmities, and for his tragical end. He was not a giant in size; his exploits were wrought by special divine aid; "the Spirit of God came mightily upon him." Judges 13:25; Judges 14:6; Judges 14:19; Judges 15:14; Judges 16:20; Judges 16:28. The providence of God was signally displayed in overruling for good the hasty passions of Samson, the cowardice of his mends, and the malice of his enemies. Samson is ranked with the heroes of the faithful. Hebrews 11:32-33. But we must, of course, not judge him from the standpoint of the New Testament. He lived in the wild anarchial period of the judges, when might was right, and he was just the man for that time.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Samson
Judge of Israel (Judges 13-16). Before his birth an angel predicted that he should be the deliverer of Israel and commanded that his hair should not be cut. He showed his superhuman strength by slaying a lion with his bare hands, by killing a thousand Philistines with the jawbone of an ass, and by carrying off the gates of Gaza. His hair was cut off by Dalila, his paramour, and he fell into the hands of the Philistines, who blinded him. On the feast of the god Dagon he pulled down the pillars of a great edifice and perished in the ruins with the Philistines.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Samson
The son of Manoah, of the tribe of Dan, a deliverer and judge of the southern tribes of the Hebrews for twenty years, Judges 13:1 ; 16:31 . His birth was miraculously foretold; he was a Nazarite from infancy and the strongest of men; and was equally celebrated for his fearless and wonderful exploits, for his moral infirmities, and for his tragical end. His exploits were not wrought without special divine aid; "the Spirit of God came mightily upon him," Judges 13:25 14:6,19 15:14 16:20,28 . The providence of God was signally displayed in overruling for good the hasty passions of Samson, the cowardice of his friends, and the malice of his enemies. The sins of Samson brought him in great disgrace and misery; but grace and faith triumphed in the end, Hebrews 11:32 . His story forcibly illustrates how treacherous and merciless are sin and sinners, and the watchful care of Christ over his people in every age. Compare Judges 13:22 Matthew 23:37 .
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Samson, a Welsh Saint
Samson (1) ( Sampson ), Welsh saint, bp. of Dôl. His legend is obscured by the admixture of several traditions. The materials for his Life are of their kind very abundant.
Taking the Life in Lib. Land. as a type of the British tradition as distinguished from the Gallican, Samson was son of Amwn Ddu, prince of Armorica in the 5th cent. Born in Glamorganshire, educated by St. Illtyd at Llantwit Major, ordained deacon and priest by St. Dubricius, he became for three and a half years abbat of St. Peirio or Piro's monastery on an island near Llantwit; some say at Llantwit. Afterwards he lived in a desert near the Severn, was consecrated by St. Dubricius and others to the episcopate, though, according to the common Celtic custom, without reference to a specific see, and in course of time proceeded to Armorica, where he became the deliverer of the captive prince Judual, and died at Dôl ( Lib. Land. 305). Thus far, and excluding the miraculous elements, the tradition is generally consistent and complete, though some Welsh traditions bring him back to die at Llantwit. To this are added several fictions, probably of the 12th cent., traceable to Geoffrey of Monmouth and to Girald. Cambr. The monumental inscribed stones to SS. Illtyd and Samson found in the churchyard of Llantwit Major cannot be of this early date; the Samson there mentioned must have lived in the 9th cent., and the lettering would agree with that date. Haddan and Stubbs, Counc. i. 626–628; Rees, Welsh SS. 181, 255).
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Sentence search

Delilah - The Philistine woman who betrayed Samson into the hands of the Philistines. See Samson
Mano'ah - (rest ), the father of Samson; a Danite, native of the town of Zorah. 1161) [1]
Manoah - the father of Samson, was of the tribe of Dan, and a native of the city of Zorah, Judges 13:6-23 . See Samson
Delilah - ” A woman from the valley of Sorek who was loved by Samson (Judges 16:4 ). She enticed Samson into revealing to her that the secret of his great strength lay in his hair, which had never been cut. See Samson ; Judges
Delilah - A harlot of the valley of Sorek, in the tribe of Judah, and near the borders of the Philistines, with whom Samson associated and who betrayed him,. See Samson
Delilah - A Philistine harlot, of the valley of Sorek, loved by Samson. She, being bribed by the Philistines, teased Samson till he told her wherein his great strength lay. We wonder at the folly of Samson, for he had ample proofs of her design; but, alas, being away from God, the light had become darkness, and how great that darkness! The 'lap of Delilah' should be a signal warning to all
Ramath Lehi - So Samson named the scene of his slaying a thousand Philistines with a jawbone. " In Judges 15:9 "Lehi" is used by anticipation, Samson calling it so subsequently, or else he played on the name which it had already, "Ramath Lehi," as expressing what he now has done, namely, "lifted up the jawbone
Manoah - Rest, a Danite, the father of Samson (Judges 13:1-22 , and 14:2-4)
Delilah - ) The mistress of Samson, who betrayed him (Judges xvi
Delilah - A Philistine woman, whom Samson loved, and who betrayed him to the enemies of Israel, Judges 16:1-31
Lehi - It was where Samson slew a thousand men with the jaw-bone of an ass. Samson called the place RAMATHLEHI, 'hill of the jaw-bone
Samson - The son of Manoah of the tribe of Dan, Samson was a legendary hero who frequently did battle against the Philistines who, at that time, “had dominion over Israel” (Judges 14:4 ). ...
Before his conception, Samson was dedicated by his parents to be a lifelong Nazirite (Judges 13:3-7 ), a person especially devoted or consecrated. Samson's legendary strength did not come from his long hair. Although a Nazirite, Samson did not live a devoted life. ...
Samson is portrayed as a headstrong young man with little or no self-control. Samson's fascination with Delilah finally wrought his downfall. The lords of the Philistines offered her eleven hundred pieces of silver from each of them to find out the source of Samson's strength. In her first three attempts, Samson gave her false answers. Finally, she coaxed the truth from him, and Samson was captured. ...
Ultimately, Samson proved little more than a thorn in the flesh to the Philistines
Delilah - Philistine wife of Samson
en-Hak'ko-re - (fount of the caller ), the spring which burst out in answer to the cry of Samson after his exploit with the jawbone
Samson - Samson’s Philistine wife, Delilah, persuaded him to reveal to her the source of his great strength—his never-cut hair. At a pagan festival, Samson knocked down the pillars supporting the building, killing himself and thousands of Philistines
Shimshon - Samson�s Philistine wife, Delilah, persuaded him to reveal to her the source of his great strength�his never-cut hair. At a pagan festival, Samson knocked down the pillars supporting the building, killing himself and thousands of Philistines
Eshtaol - It is named in the history of Samson, Judges 13:25 ; 16:31
Delilah - She was bribed by the "lords of the Philistines" to obtain from Samson the secret of his strength and the means of overcoming it (Judges 16:4-18 ). " (See Samson
Zorah - Samson was a Zorite, or Zorathite, Judges 13:2,25 1 Chronicles 2:54 4:2 . ...
The road followed by Samson in going to Timnath leads down through rocky gorges, very likely to be haunted by wild beasts
Timnath - ...
...
The town where Samson sojourned, probably identical with "Timnah" (1) (Judges 14:1-18 )
Del'Ilah, - (languishing ) a woman who dwelt in the valley Of Sorek, beloved by Samson
Samson - The man whom God raised up to stir the Israelites from this apathy was Samson. ...
As a person dedicated to God according to the conditions of the Nazirite vow, Samson was not to drink wine, cut his hair or touch any dead body (Judges 13:5; cf. ...
Samson had to fight his battles against the Philistines virtually unaided by his fellow Israelites. ...
When, for example, the Philistines won a bet against him through cheating, Samson killed thirty of their citizens (Judges 14:18-19). When his wife was given to another man, Samson burnt the Philistines’ fields (Judges 15:1-5). In retaliation for their murder of his wife and father-in-law, Samson killed more Philistines (Judges 15:6-8). ...
Samson became known as one of the judges of Israel
Samson - So the close of Samson's judgeship must have coincided with the beginning of Samuel's, and the capture of the ark in Eli's time must have been during Samson's lifetime. ...
(2) Both are Nazarites (1 Samuel 1:11), Samson's exploits probably moving Hannah to her vow. ...
Samson roused the people from their servile submission, and by his desultory blows on the foe prepared Israel for the final victory under Samuel. Samson was not of giant size as were some of the Philistines (1 Samuel 17); his strength was not brute natural strength, but spiritual, bound up with fidelity to his Nazarite vow. ...
Still even Samson's falls, as Israel's, are in God's wonderful providence overruled to Satan's and his agents' confusion and the good of God's elect. Samson slays the lion at Timnath, and through his Philistine wife's enticement they told the riddle; then to procure 30 tunics he slew 30 Philistines, the forfeit. His riddle "out of the eater came forth meat (carcasses in the East often dry up without decomposition), and out of the strong (Matthew 12:29) came forth sweetness," is the key of Samson's history and of our present dispensation. Deprived of his wife, Samson by the firebrands attached to 300 "jackals" (shual ), avenged himself on them. ) By lust Samson lost at once his godliness and his manliness; it severed him from God the strength of his manhood. Samson set at nought the legal prohibition against affinity with idolatrous women (Exodus 34:15-16; Deuteronomy 7:3). The foes' attribution of their victory over "Samson the destroyer of their country" to their god Dagon provoked God's jealousy for His honour. A Philistine multitude, including all their lords, congregated in the house, which was a vast hall, the roof resting on four columns, two at the ends and two close together at the center; 3,000 men and women on the roof beheld while Samson made sport. Samson by pulling down the house slew at his death more than in his life. Samson, the physically strong Nazarite, prepared the way for Samuel, the spiritual hero Nazarite, who consummated the deliverance that Samson began. Samson wrought what he did by faith, the true secret of might (Hebrews 11:32; Matthew 21:21). The Phoenicians carried to Greece the story of Samson, which the Greeks transferred to their idol Hercules. 2:5, section 12) blends the stories of Samson and Jonah, and makes Hercules come out of the belly of the sea monster with the loss of his hair. His joviality and buffoonery answer to the last scene in the life of Samson
Eshtaol - Near there, God's Spirit stirred Samson of the tribe of Dan (Judges 13:25 ). Samson was buried near Eshtaol (Judges 16:31 )
Delilah - ) A Philistine harlot, of the valley of Sorek, whom the five Philistine lords, when they found Samson loved her, bribed for 1,100 shekels each to be their political emissary, to find out from Samson the secret of his strength. On the third occasion Samson trifled so presumptuously with the divine gift committed to him as to suggest that his seven consecrated locks should be woven with the web; when we go to the edge of temptation our gall is near. Lust, severing from God the source of strength, makes the strongest powerless; only by waiting on the Lord, we, like Samson, renew the strength which was lost by self-indulgence and self-reliance
Samson, a Welsh Saint - Samson (1) ( Sampson ), Welsh saint, bp. as a type of the British tradition as distinguished from the Gallican, Samson was son of Amwn Ddu, prince of Armorica in the 5th cent. Illtyd and Samson found in the churchyard of Llantwit Major cannot be of this early date; the Samson there mentioned must have lived in the 9th cent
Samson - It was said of Samson before his birth: "He shall begin to deliver Israel out of the hand of the Philistines. His going down to her was the occasion of his killing a lion; this led to Samson's riddle, and the riddle to his slaying thirty of the Philistines. Then, his wife being given to another man, Samson burned up their corn, their vineyards, and their olives, and smote the Philistines with 'a great slaughter. '...
When the Philistines gathered themselves together to arrest Samson, the men of Judah would not defend him, but, owning their bondage, said, "Knowest thou not that the Philistines are rulers over us?" and three thousand of Judah bound Samson and delivered him to the Philistines. Thus Samson, through God's inscrutable ways, was separated from his own people: they delivered him up, as afterwards the people of Judah delivered up the Lord Jesus, the true Nazarite, who came to save them. The Philistines offered a great sacrifice to their god Dagon, and they praised their god, and said it was he that had delivered Samson into their hands. ...
Notwithstanding the failures of Samson, God accomplished the purpose for which He had raised him up in subduing the Philistines; but it was only accomplished in his own death. Among the cloud of witnesses who 'obtained a good report through faith,' Samson is named, but his acts are not there recorded
Bedan - Some suppose that Barak is meant, others Samson, but most probably this is a contracted form of Abdon (Judges 12:13 )
Samson - Samson (săm'son), sunlike. The providence of God was signally displayed in overruling for good the hasty passions of Samson, the cowardice of his mends, and the malice of his enemies. Samson is ranked with the heroes of the faithful
Manoah - Danite of Zorah and father of Samson. An angel had appeared to his wife and announced the birth of Samson, and Manoah besought God that 'the man of God' might be sent again
so'Rek - ( Judges 16:4 ) It was possibly nearer Gaza than any other of the chief Philistine cities, since thither Samson was taken after his capture at Delilah's house
Shave - Samson deliberately broke his vow with GOD
ra'Math-le'hi - (hill of the jawbone , or hill of Lehi ), the name bestowed by Samson on the scene of his slaughter of the thousand Philistines with the jaw bone, ( Judges 15:17 ) a place by the rock Elam, in western Judah of the Philistines
Ramath-Lehi - " Here Samson slew a thousand Philistines with a jawbone
Esh'Taol - ( Joshua 15:33 ; 19:41 ) Here Samson spent his boyhood, and hither after his last exploit his body was brought
Eshtaol - It was near to this town that Samson spent his early life, and there he was buried
Samson - EVERYMAN THAT STRIVETH FOR THE MASTERY IS TEMPERATE IN ALL THINGS...
SAMSON'S tragical story has been treated in three ways. Some commentators on the Book of Judges have treated the story of Samson as an excellent piece of Hebrew folklore. They have collected out of all the ancient books of the world wonderful tales of giants, and heroes, and demigods, with their astonishing feats of strength in war, and in love, and in jealousy, and in revenge; feats more or less like the feats of strength and of revenge we have in Samson. They have produced remarkable parallels to Samson's exploits out of Atlas and Cyclops, Hercules and Odin, and many suchlike mythological characters. And then their work on Samson has been done when they have illustrated his history with romances and legends of sufficient likeness and richness. Some evangelical preachers, again, have gone out to the opposite extreme, and have displayed Samson to us solely as a type and pattern of Jesus Christ. They have selected texts out of Samson's extraordinary history, and they have suspended excellent New Testament sermons on these adapted texts; hanging great weights on small wires. The former is the mythical way of dealing with Samson's history; the latter is the mystical way. And the third way is the way that Paul takes, not only with Samson, but with all the patriarchs, and judges, and kings, and great men of Old Testament times. ' Now, neither the mythical nor the mystical method shall be followed upon Samson tonight. While listening attentively, then, to all that the mythologists and the mystics have to say on Samson; having done so, I feel all the move safe and sure in asking you to look at Samson as John Milton looked at Samson when he treated him with such 'verisimilitude and decorum. '...
What more could God, or man, or angel of God have done for Samson that was not done? Every man must work out his own salvation with his own hands, or not at all; but, short of doing for Samson what neither God nor man could do, what more could God or man have done that was not done? From his birth, and for long before his birth, the gifts of God were simply showered on Samson. Over and above what the Bible tells us about Samson's father and mother, Joseph us, in supplement of the Bible, tells us that there was 'one Manoah, a person of such virtue that he had few men his equals, and without dispute he was the principal person in his country. Like Abraham and Sarah, like Isaac and Rebekah, like Jacob and Rachel, like Hannah, like Zacharias and Elizabeth, and like many more, it was as it were by a special and immediate act of creative power that Manoah and his wife got Samson their son at the hand of God. ...
And not only was Samson to be separated to God's service from his mother's womb; but, in order to make his separation and dedication both sure and easy and natural to him, his mother was separated and dedicated to God long before her child was born. And both Manoah and his wife said the same thing over Samson's marriage. Samson's father and mother never saw another happy day after that day when their son-miraculous birth, Nazarite vow and all-went down to Timnath and saw a woman, a daughter of the Philistines, and said, Get her for me to wife! Then his father and his mother said to Samson, Is there never a woman of the daughters of thy brethren, that thou goest to take a wife of the uncircumcised Philistines? Was it for this day they had sanctified their unborn child? In his misery Manoah declared that he would never all his days pray for anything after this, lest it should turn to his bane, as his prayer for a son had so turned. For how is a child who brings such shame on his father and mother ever to fulfil the promise of his birth? How shall the son-in-law of an uncircumcised Philistine ever deliver Israel? Nor did all Samson's riddles, and jests, and sports, and revenges against the Philistines scatter or relieve the cloud that his first fatal step had brought down on his father's and his mother's heart. ...
Though we look with fear for it, and almost expect it, and though Josephus actually says it, yet we are not told it in the Bible, and we simply cannot believe Josephus, that Samson broke his Nazarite vow. We shall, therefore, set it down to Samson's credit that, with all his licence and with all his riot, he never became a drunkard. But, then, as it always comes into my heart when I read of Samson's total abstinence-...
What boots it at one gate to make defence,And at another to let in the foe?You are making a gallant defence at one gate, but what about all the other gates; and, especially, what about the gates on the other side of the city? You keep, with all diligence, this and that gate of the body, but what about the more deadly gates of the soul? Plutarch tells us of a great Roman who was very brave; but, then, he was very envious of other brave men, and his envy did himself and them and the state more mischief than if he had been a coward. You go out, like Samson, against the enemies of God and His Church, but all the time you make your campaign an occasion for your own passions, piques, retaliations, and revenges. You do not touch wine, but how do you stand to all Samson's other sins? Death and hell will come still more surely into your hearts through the gates of envy, and ill-will, and hatred, and pride, and revenge, and malice, and unbelief, and neglect of God in prayer, than at those more yawning gates that all decently living men make a defence at. What avails this 'temperance not complete'?...
Young men are not raised up among us nowadays with Samson's size and strength. Samsons in body are not born among us in our day, but Samsons in mind are sometimes given us in room of them. And it is not seldom seen that our greatly gifted youths work as little deliverance for themselves and for us as Samson did for Israel. You hear of some young man's Samson-like feats of strength at the University or at the Divinity Hall. Samson rent a lion that roared against him, as if it had been a kid. In the quickness and versatility of their minds our young Samsons set us riddles to which we Philistines cannot supply an answer. They have neither time nor strength to spare on those Samson-feats that end in a day's amazement, but work no deliverance in the land. ...
But, still, in spite of it all, Samson actually judged Israel for full twenty years. Not one word are we told, neither about what kind of cases came up before Samson, nor how he managed his court, nor about the wisdom, or otherwise, of his judgments, nor about the manner of life that Israel lived for that whole generation under her gigantic judge. Well, were I a sacred dramatist, I would ask for no better scope for my craft tonight than just the twenty years of Samson's judgeship. The whole magnificent drama of Samson Agonistes begins and ends, according to ancient rule and best example, within the space of twenty-four hours. Such an artist would let us see Samson repenting of having broken his mother's heart, and repenting with the passion of a hundred penitents poured into one. He would let us see the Lord turning again to give Samson another chance. He would let us hear evil men in Israel mocking at Samson and his seat of judgment because of Timnath and Gaza. He would raise pity and anger wherewith to purge our hearts as we saw Samson striving to do only what was right, with men of Belial all about him waiting for his halting, and dwelling on all his past wrong-doing. Till one of those passions, even after he had judged Israel twenty years, again broke out, and laid Samson low, never to rise again in this world. And in such words as were possible to Samson's Old Testament biographer, that sacred writer tells us that in Samson also, where sin abounded, grace did much more abound, and that God's strength was made perfect in the day of Samson's weakness. That dark cell in Gaza-in Gaza, the scene of some of Samson's greatest sins-that shameful cell was a house of God, and a place of prayer and repentance to Manoah's overtaken and overwhelmed son. What a past Samson looked back upon as he sat at the mill! What he might have been! What he might have done! How he might have departed to his fathers and left Israel! Three thousand years dissolve, and this is Gaza. This man, and that man there, is Samson over again. Only, over again against light and truth that Samson never saw. 'What profit is there in my blood,' our Samson cries, 'when I go down to the pit? Shall the dust praise Thee? Shall it declare Thy truth? Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me
en-Hakkore - ” Place where God gave Samson water from the jawbone he had used to kill a thousand Philistines (Judges 15:18-19 )
Makaz - A city of Dan (1 Kings 4:9) Some have thought, that it was the same as Makteosh, which Samson called Enak kore, the jaw tooth; from the supply of water the Lord gave him for his thirst, from the jaw bone of the ass
Enhakkore - This name, signifying 'the caller's spring,' was given by Samson to the place where God gave him water in answer to his call
Sam'Son - Samson takes his place in Scripture, (1) as a judge --an office which he filled for twenty years, (Judges 15:20 ; 16:31 ) (2) as a Nazarite, (Judges 13:5 ; 16:17 ) and (3) as one endowed with supernatural power by the Spirit of the Lord. The divine inspiration which Samson shared with Othniel, Gideon and Jephthah assumed in him the unique form of vast personal strength, inseparably connected with the observance of his vow as a Nazarite: "his strength was in his hair. But Samson told the riddle to his wife and she told it to the men of the city, whereupon Samson slew thirty men of the city. Samson revenged himself by taking 300 foxes (or rather jackals) and tying them together two by two by the tails, with a firebrand between every pair of tails, and so he let them loose into the standing corn of the Philistines, which was ready for harvest, The Philistines took vengeance by burning Samson's wife and her father; but he fell hip upon them in return, and smote them with a great slaughter," after which he took refuge on the top of the rock of Etam, in the territory of Judah. The Philistines gathered an army to revenge themselves when the men of Judah hastened to make peace by giving up Samson, who was hound with cords, these, however, he broke like burnt flax and finding a jawbone of an ass at hand, he slew with it a thousand of the Philistines. This achievement raised Samson to the position of a judge, which he held for twenty years. Then they held a great festival in the temple of Dagon, to celebrate their victory over Samson. Samson asked the lad who guided him to let him feel the pillars, to lean upon them
Sorek - This was the home of Deliah, whom Samson loved (Judges 16:4 )
Lehi - ” City where Samson killed 1,000 Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey and where God provided water from the jawbone (Judges 15:1 )
Lehi - A jawbone, a place in the tribe of Judah where Samson achieved a victory over the Philistines (Judges 15:9,14,16 ), slaying a thousand of them with the jawbone of an ass
be'Dan - The Chaldee Paraphrase reads Samson for Bedan; the LXX
Riddle - A dark or hidden saying, as that which Samson put forth respecting the carcase of the lion, Judges 14:12-19 ; and that of Ezekiel concerning the great eagle, but this is also called a 'parable
Etam - ,; RSV, "cleft") of a rock here Samson retired after his slaughter of the Philistines (Judges 15:8,11 ). On the crest of a rocky knoll, under the village, is a long tunnel, which may be the "cleft" in which Samson hid
Samson - (Σαμψών)...
Samson was the popular hero of the tribe of Dan who began to deliver Israel from the Philistines, the Nazirite whose secret of strength lay in his hair, the blinded giant who prayed for power to avenge himself and his country in the hour of his death (Judges 13-16). Much has been written in recent years regarding the legendary elements of the story of Samson and the possibility of its being a solar myth, but such ideas were naturally far from the mind of the anonymous writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews
Riddle - The oldest and, strictly speaking, the only example of a riddle was that propounded by Samson (Judges 14:12-18 )
Samson - The providence of God was signally displayed in overruling for good the hasty passions of Samson, the cowardice of his friends, and the malice of his enemies. The sins of Samson brought him in great disgrace and misery; but grace and faith triumphed in the end, Hebrews 11:32
Fox - Though both foxes and jackals abound in Palestine, the shu'alim (foxes) of ( Judges 15:4 ) are evidently jackals and not foxes, for the former animal is gregarious, whereas the latter is solitary in its habits; and Samson could not, for that reason, have easily caught three hundred foxes, but it was easy to catch that number of jackals, which are concealed by hundreds in caves and ruins of Syria. It is not probable, however, that Samson sent out the whole three hundred at once
Etam - It is not far from Manoah's patrimony from whence Samson "went down" to it. Into a cleft of it Samson retired after slaying the Philistines for burning the Timnite woman who was to have been his wife (Judges 15:8; Judges 15:11-19). ...
Probably near the city Etam (2): distant enough from Tinmath to seem a safe retreat for Samson from the Philistines' revenge, yet not too far for them to reach in searching after him; The many springs and rocky eminences round Urtas seem the likely site where to find the rock of Etam and the En-hak-kore. ...
Here Samson could hide without any one lighting, except by accident, on the entrance of the tunnel
Jephthah - He is mentioned after Samson, though he was historically earlier, the author probably trusting his memory, or not being over-studious of minute accuracy
Riddle, - Riddles were generally proposed in verse, like the celebrated riddle of Samson
zo'Rah - (Joshua 15:33 ) in the catalogue of Judah, among the places in the district of the Shefelah (Authorized Version "Zoreah"), It was the residence of Manoah and the native place of Samson
Etam - "The rock Etam" to which Samson withdrew, Judges 15:8-19 , may have been in this vicinity, perhaps the Frank mountain two miles east
Bedan - ...
The Chaldee paraphrase reads "Samson" for "Bedan" in 1 Samuel 12:11. Whence some guess Bedan = Ben-Dan, or Be (Hebrew in ) Dan, to be an epithet of Samson, namely, the Danite; compare Judges 13:25
Tim'Nah - (Joshua 15:10 ) It is probably identical with the Thimnathah of (Joshua 19:43 ) and that again with the Timnath, or, more accurately, Timnathah, of Samson (Judges 14:1,2,5 ) and the Thamnatha of the Maccabees. 23 or with the Timnathath of Samson Sorek - On the south is Timnath, where Samson slew the lion; on the north are Sur'a and Eshu'a, the ancient Zoreah and Eshtaol. side of the valley is a chapel dedicated to neby Samit, a name related to Samson
Manoah - A native of Zorah, in the tribe of Dan, and the father of Samson, Judges 13:14 ; 16:31
Bee - Samson found a "swarm of bees" in the carcass of a lion he had slain (Judges 14:8 )
Eshtaol - A lowland city of Judah ( Joshua 15:33 ) on the borders of Dan 19:41), near which Samson began to feel ‘the spirit of the Lord’ ( Judges 13:25 ), and was buried ( Judges 16:31 ); the home of some of the Danites who attacked Laish ( Judges 18:2 ; Judges 18:11 )
Ash'Kelon, as'Kelon - Samson went down from Timnath to Ashkelon
Eshtaol - Here Samson spent his boyhood, and hither his remains were finally carried to the burying ground of Manoah his father (Joshua 15:337; Judges 16:31; Judges 18:2; Judges 18:8; 1618065208_2). Between the Danite towns Zorah and Eshtaol and behind Kirjath Jearim was Mahaneh-Dan, the standing camp of the little host exposed to constant warfare with the Philistines; a neighborhood well calculated to train Samson for his after encounters with that race
e'Tam, the Rock, - a cliff or lofty rock, into a cleft or chasm of which Samson retired after his slaughter of the Philistines
Eshtaol - Here Samson spent his boyhood, and first began to show his mighty strength; and here he was buried in the burying-place of Manoah his father (Judges 13:25 ; 16:31 ; 18:2,8,11,12 )
Manoah - ” A member of the tribe of Dan and the father of Samson (Judges 13:1 )
Mahaneh-Dan - a site between Zorah and Eshtaol where the Lord's Spirit first stirred Samson (Judges 13:25 )
Etam - An altogether obscure place name, applied to a rock in a cleft of which Samson took refuge ( Judges 15:8 ), whence he was dislodged by the Judahites (v
Sport - Samson is said to have made sport for the Philistines ( Judges 16:25 )
Abbey of Bury Saint Edmunds - Abbot Samson (died 1211) founded a hospital and free school and aided the townspeople in obtaining a charter
Ashkelon - One of the five cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles north of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7
Zorah - Zorah (zô'rah), and Zoreah (zô're-ah), hornet's town, and Zareah (zâ're-ah), Nehemiah 11:29, a town in the low country of Judah—afterward assigned to Dan, Joshua 15:33; Joshua 19:41; the birthplace and burialplace of Samson
Dagon - ...
After the Philistines subdued Samson, they credited the victory to Dagon (Judges 16:23 ). However, when Samson collapsed Dagon's temple upon himself and the Philistines, he proved the superiority of Israel's God
Manoah - The father of Samson, of the town of Zorah, and of the family of the Danites ( Judges 13:1-23 ; Judges 14:2-3 ; Judges 14:5-6 ; Judges 14:9-10 ; Judges 16:31 ). Samson
Judges - While Samuel as a judge gave something like a settled government to the south, there was scope for the irregular exploits of Samson on the borders of the Philistines. Thirteenth judge: Samson—20 years; fourteenth judge: Eli—40 years; fifteenth judge: Samuel
Enhakkore - ) It burst out at Samson's, cry, when athirst after slaying a thousand Philistines with a donkey's jawbone (Judges 15:19; Psalms 34:6). " Samson cried to Jehovah ("God of grace"), and Elohim ("God of nature") split the hollow place at Lehi, so that water came out of it, as at Horeb and Kadesh (Exodus 17:6; Numbers 20:8; Numbers 20:11), and the fountain was called "the fount of him who cried in Lehi
Gaza - Its gates were carried away by Samson (Judges 16:1-3 ). (See Samson
Lehi - God did not make water to flow out of the tooth socket of the jawbone which Samson threw away, to slake his thirst, but "cleft an hollow place (maqtesh ; Zephaniah 1:11) in Lehi," from whence" water" miraculously "came out
Barak - Like Gideon, and in a sense Samson, he is an illustration of the words in Hebrews 11:34 , 'Out of weakness were made strong
Mahaneh-Dan - ’ In the former passage we are told that ‘the Spirit of Jehovah began to move Samson in the camp of Dan between Zorah and Eshtaol’; in the latter passage the derivation of the name is given as the place where the last encampment of the band of 600 Danite warriors took place, before they set out on their expedition to Laish
Bedan - Early Jewish rabbis read ben-Dan, “son of Dan” and thought Samson was intended (Judges 13:2 , Judges 13:24 )
Dagon - A temple of Dagon at Gaza was pulled down by Samson, Judges 16:23 , &c
Lehi - Jawbone, a place in Judah, where Samson was enabled to slay one thousand Philistines with the jawbone of an ass, and where, in answer to his petition, a fountain sprung up to relieve his thirst, Judges 15:9-19
Timnah - Probably the same as TIMNATHAH of Dan (Joshua 19:43), and as the Timhah of Samson. Samson in going down to it would descend first 700 ft. As Beit Atab, into which Samson went down for refuge (now called Hasuta), answers to the rock Elam ("eagle's nest"), so seven miles off is a low hill, and close by is a chapel sacred to sheikh Nedhir, "the Nazarite chief," and higher up is the ruin "Ism-Allah," i
Zorah - A town allotted to Judah, according to Joshua 15:33 ; but elsewhere spoken of as Danite ( Joshua 19:41 , Judges 18:2-3 ; Judges 18:11 ); specially noted as the home of Samson ( Judges 13:2 ; Judges 13:25 ), who was buried between Zorah and Eshtaol ( Judges 16:21 )
Fox - Samson used foxes or jackals, Judges 15:4-5, to destroy the grain of the Philistines by binding torches to the tails of the animals, and they ran round setting fire to fields of corn
Dagon - The temple at Gaza was destroyed by Samson, Judges 16:21-30
Gaza - ...
Gaza features in a number of Old Testament stories, among them those concerning Samson (Judges 16:1-3; Judges 16:21-30)
Judges - Even while the administration of Samuel gave something like a settled government to the south, there was scope for the irregular exploits of Samson on the borders of the Philistines; and Samuel at last established his authority as judge and prophet, but still as the servant of Jehovah, only to see it so abused by his sons as to exhaust the patience of the people, who at length demanded a king , after the pattern of the surrounding nations. Thirteenth judge: Samson 20 years
Gaza - One of the five cities of the Philistines, who constantly molested the Jews, when Samson arose and avenged his people; Gaza was the scene of his last triumph and death (Judges 16)
Questions - That the custom of proposing riddles was very ancient, and derived from the eastern nations, appears from the story of Samson, in the book of Judges, who proposed one to the Philistines at his nuptial feast
Timnah - Philistines occupied the site at the time of Samson (Judges 14:1-5 )
Heifer - Samson called his wife a heifer with which others had ploughed to discover his riddle
Samson - For this Samson took revenge by burning the "standing corn of the Philistines" (15:1-8), who, in their turn, in revenge "burnt her and her father with fire. " Milton's Samson Agonistes
Annunciation - While the announcement to Mary about the Incarnation has become associated with the annunciation, the announcements to Samson (Judges 13:2-5 ), Joseph (Matthew 1:20-25 ), and Zechariah (Luke 1:11-20 ) follow a similar pattern
Samson - Samson (LXX Milk And Honey - Yahveh is said to feed his elect with honey out of the rock (Psalms 80); Samson found a honey-comb in the mouth of a dead lion (Judges 14); the people of Israel found the wild honey in a stream upon the earth (1 Kings 14)
Timnah - Here Samson celebrated his marriage
Riddle - The classic biblical example of a riddle is that posed by Samson to the Philistines. ” Samson's retort may reflect yet another commonly known, and rather risque, riddle (Judges 14:18 )
Honey, Milk And - Yahveh is said to feed his elect with honey out of the rock (Psalms 80); Samson found a honey-comb in the mouth of a dead lion (Judges 14); the people of Israel found the wild honey in a stream upon the earth (1 Kings 14)
Captivity - Six captivities are reckoned during the government by judges: the first, under Chushanrishathaim, king of Mesopotamia, which continued about eight years; the second, under Eglon, king of Moab, from which the Jews were delivered by Ehud; the third, under the Philistines, from which they were rescued by Shamgar; the fourth, under Jabin, king of Hazor, from which they were delivered by Deborah and Barak; the fifth, under the Midianites, from which Gideon freed them; and the sixth, under the Ammonites and Philistines, during the judicatures of Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon, Eli, Samson, and Samuel
Captives - They were mutilated, like Samson, or Adonizedek
Manoah - A Danite of Zorah, father of Samson (Judges 13). " Manoah and his wife remonstrated with Samson on choosing a Philistine as his wife (Judges 14:2-3); but they accompanied him to the marriage feast at Timnath. Manoah probably died before his son; since not Manoah but Samson's brothers brought Samson's body to the tomb between Zorah and Eshtaol
Nazirite - ...
Probably the best known Nazirite in the Bible was Samson, whose parents dedicated him to God at birth to be a Nazirite for life. Samson had little regard for the Nazirite laws concerning the drinking of wine and contact with dead bodies, though he did allow his hair to remain uncut
Judges, Book of, - of which the book or Ruth formed originally a part, contains a history from Joshua to Samson. ...
Oppression of the Philistines, contemporary with the judgeships of Eli, Samson (and Samuel?)
Heifer - ...
Samson characterized scheming with his wife as “plowing with my heifer” (Judges 14:18 )
Dan - " This prophecy was accomplished in the person of Samson, who descended from Dan
Sick, To Be - When Samson told Delilah that if he were tied up with bowstrings he would “be weak, and be as another man” ( Samson
Ashkelon, Askelon - It fell to the lot of Judah, who took Askelon and the coasts thereof, Judges 1:18 , but they did not really subdue it, for it was in the hands of the Philistines when Samson, with the Spirit of the Lord upon him, slew thirty men in the city and took their spoil, Judges 14:19 , and that it remained so we see from 1 Samuel 6:17 , and 2 Samuel 1:20
Gaza - The Philistines soon recovered it (Judges 13:1; Judges 16:1-21), and there Samson perished while destroying his captors. Its trade in grain is considerable, and still is heard the "grinding" of grain with millstones such as Samson was forced to work with in his prison house at Gaza. The Tel el Muntar or "hill of the watchman," east of Gaza, is the hill to which Samson carried up the gates
Judges, Book of -
Selected episodes from the history of the Judges, valiant leaders raised by God at different points of the territory, to free the people from their oppressors, after each one of their many apostasies (3,7, to 17); the best known are: Debbora and Barac (4,5), Gedeon (6 to 10,5), Jephte (10,6, to 12,15), and Samson (13-15)
Ashkelon - Samson went down to this place from Timnath, and slew thirty men and took their spoil
Feel - ...
Judges 16:26 (c) Samson felt the pillars, he realized their strength and their size, but was not dismayed by that
Etam - A rocky crag where Samson camped during his battles with the Philistines (Judges 15:8-13 ), conferring there with men of Judah who wanted to bind him and hand him over to the Philistines
Ashkelon - It is doubtful whether Samson took the spoil with which he paid his wages ( Judges 14:19 ) from this city, which is two days’ journey from Timnath, or from a similarly styled village, much nearer at hand, now possibly represented in name by Khurbet ‘Askalan , near Tell Zakariya
Gaza - Samson was here shut in by the Philistines, and escaped by carrying away the gates ( Judges 16:1-3 ); he was, however; brought back here in captivity after being betrayed by Delilah, and here he destroyed himself and the Philistines by pulling down the temple ( Judges 16:21-30 )
Bee - " We read, ( Judges 14:8 ) that "after a time," probably many days, Samson returned to the carcass of the lion he had slain, and saw bees and honey therein
Watchfulness: When Special Need of - All Philistia could not have blinded Samson if Delilah's charms had not deluded him
Quit - Samson hath quit himself like Samson
Naz'Arite, - Of the Nazarites for life three are mentioned in the Scriptures --Samson, Samuel and St. The only one of these actually called a Nazarite is Samson
Nazarites - Samson and probably Samuel and John the Baptist were perpetual Nazirites
Eye - Men were sometimes punished by having their eyes put out (1 Samuel 11:2 ; Samson, Judges 16:21 ; Zedekiah, 2 Kings 25:7 )
Prison - Samson was confined in a Philistine prison (Judges 16:21,25 )
Loom - In a humorous scene, Samson convinced Delilah that his strength would be sapped should someone weave his hair into a piece of cloth on a loom
Lion - " The Bible reader will remember the exploits of Samson and of David, Judges 14:5,6 1 Samuel 17:34-36 , the story of the disobedient prophet slain by a lion, 1 Kings 13:28 , and of the obedient Daniel, safe in the lion's den, Daniel 6:1-28 ; also the sublime image of Jehovah's care for his people, in Isaiah 31:4
Sarah - Motherhood after long childlessness is a recurrent theme in Bible narratives: Rebekah, Rachel, the mother of Samson, of Samuel, of John Baptist had each a happiness like Sarah’s
Nazirite - ...
The lifelong Nazirite in biblical tradition included Samson (Judges 13:1 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 1:1 ), and John the Baptist (Luke 1:15-17 )
Gaza - In the time of Samson, however, the Philistines were in possession, and he was made a prisoner there
Depart - ” Samson is said to have “pulled up” the city gate and posts ( Nazarite - ...
Samson was a Nazarite from his birth. Samson betrayed his secret, but sealed his mission by his own death
Sisera - So in the case of Gideon, Samson, Jephthah, God in approving their faithful zeal in executing His will gives no sanction to the alloy of evil which accompanied their faith (Hebrews 11:32)
Eleaanor - In 1152 at Beaugency their marriage was annulled on the plea of consanguinity by a church council under the presidency of Samson, Archbishop of Rheims, and that same year Eleanor married Henry, who had just succeeded his father as Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy
Bee - Samson, having slain a young lion, found on his return within the dried carcass a swarm of bees and honeycomb, with which he refreshed himself and iris father and mother, without telling them whence it came. ...
A type of the antitypical Samson the stronger One, spoiling the strong and roaring lion, "dividing the spoils" among His friends, and bringing forth life and divine nourishment out of death, and sweetness out of misery (Luke 11:21-22; Hebrews 2:14-15). Samson's history, of which this incident is the epitome, sets forth Satan's lion-like violence and harlot-like subtlety, overruled by divine might to his own destruction and fallen man's redemption
Nazarite - Although there is no mention of any Nazarite before Samson, yet it is evident that they existed before the time of Moses. There is mention made in Scripture of only three who were Nazarites for life, Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist (Judges 13:4,5 ; 1 Samuel 1:11 ; Luke 1:15 )
Judges, the Book of - Of the 13 judges, the account of six (Ehud, Deborah and Barak, Gideon, Abimelech, Jephthah, Samson) is full, that of the remaining seven very brief. Abimelech's was the first effort to substitute an earthly king for the Lord of the theocracy, Samson's history illustrates Israel's, whom he represents, strength and weakness, strength in separation to Jehovah, utter weakness when the consecration became severed, as Samson's locks, by lust. A time "when there was no king in Israel" (Judges 18:30-31), before Samson's days (compare Judges 13:25 margin with Judges 18:12); also before Jabin, 150 years after Joshua, had established a strong Canaanite kingdom in the N. Each only delivered one part of Israel: Shamgar the region toward Philistia; Deborah and Barak northern Israel (Judges 4:10); so Gideon (Judges 6:35), Jephthah, eastern Israel; Samson, Judah, Dan and the region adjoining Philistia. Gideon corrupted the worship of God, Samson yielded to lust, Jephthah made a rash vow and took revenge upon Ephraim. Samson was the last extraordinary judge. ...
Samson was born during Eli's high priesthood, for before his birth the Philistines ruled Israel (Judges 13:5); "he shall begin to deliver Israel out of the hand of the Philistines. " Samuel completed Israel's deliverance from them which Samson began. The men of Judah were so degenerate as to seek to give up Samson, their deliverer, to the Philistines (Judges 15:9-14). At the close, as repeated declensions leave the guilty, in spite of revivals, lower than at the first, Samson is left by the degraded people, single-handed, to resist the foe, and in his death accomplishes under God what previous judges failed to effect by their lives. It must be not earlier than the end of that servitude to the Philistines which Samson "began" (Judges 13:5) to deliver Israel out of, and from which Samuel completed their deliverance (1 Samuel 7:9-14)
Dan (1) - ) The judgeship of Samson may also be a fulfillment of Jacob's words (Judges 15:20). ...
Hence, Samson resides at Mahaneh-Dan (the camp of Dan) in the hills, between Zorah and Eshtaol, behind Kirjath Jearim, and thence "comes down" to the vineyards of Timnath and the valley of Sorek. ...
Thrice stress is laid on the 600 being "appointed with weapons of war" (Judges 18:11; Judges 18:16-17), for the Philistines deprived all Israelites they could of arms, so that we find Samson using a donkey's jawbone as his only weapon (1 Samuel 13:19-21). that biteth the horse heels, so that his rider shall fall backward," alludes primarily to Dan's local position in front of the royal Judah; so ready to meet the horse, forbidden in Israelite warfare, with the watchword "I have waited for Thy salvation," and to fall unawares on the advancing enemy by the way Dan's mode of warfare is illustrated in its attack on the men of Laish," careless, quiet, and secure," as also in their great judge Samson's mode of attack, watching for an opportunity and striking an unlooked for, stealthy, sudden blow
Cord, Rope - ]'>[1] ‘new bowstrings’) with which Samson was bound; or again in the tent ropes of Isaiah 33:20 (EV Bind - Samson misled Delilah as she probed for the secret of his strength, telling her to “bind” him with bowstrings ( Fox - It is recorded, in Judges 15:4-5 , that "Samson went and caught three hundred foxes, and took firebrands, and turned tail to tail, and put a firebrand in the midst between two tails; and when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and olives. Shaw thinks jackals to be the animals here intended; observing, that "as these are creatures by far the most common and familiar, as well as the most numerous of any in the eastern countries, we may well perceive the great possibility there was for Samson to take, or cause to be taken, three hundred of them. " So Hasselquist remarks: "Jackals are found in great numbers about Gaza; and, from their gregarious nature, it is much more probable that Samson should have caught three hundred of them, than of the solitary quadruped, the fox. Hence we must infer that this rite must have taken its rise from some other event than that by which Ovid accounted for it; and Samson's foxes are a probable origin of it
Judge - The only cases of direct divine appointment are those of Gideon and Samson, and the latter stood in the peculiar position of having been from before his birth ordained 'to begin to deliver Israel
Lions - Samson seized a young lion with his hands and "rent him as he would have rent a kid" (Judges 14:5,6 )
Garment - 14:12, however, the word is distinguished from linen wrappings (“outer garments”)—Samson promised the Philistines that if they would solve his riddle, he would give them “thirty linen wraps [2] and thirty change of garments” (cf
Copper - 16:21: “But the Philistines took [3], and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza, and bound him with fetters of [4]; and he did grind in the prison house
Copper - Job speaks of bows of copper, Job 20:24 ; and when the Philistines had Samson in their power, they bound him with fetters of copper
Dan - He shared with Ms brethren the prophetic blessing of Jacob, Genesis 49:16-17, fulfilled, perhaps, in the administration of Samson, and in the craft and stratagem which his descendants used against their enemies
Porch - The pillars of the temple of Dagon at Gaza which Samson pulled down, or rather slid from their stone bases, were probably two of those supporting the portico, as ingeniously explained by Macalister, Bible Sidelights , etc
Fox - The incident in the life of Samson, where foxes, or perhaps jackals, are referred to, Judges 15:4-5 , has a parallel in the ancient Roman feast of Ceres, goddess of corn; when torches were bound to the tails of numbers of foxes, and they ran round the circus till the fire stopped and consumed them
Nazarite - Such were Samson and John the Baptist, Judges 13:4,5 Luke 1:15 7:33
Upon - The Philistines be upon thee, Samson
Visit - Samson visited his wife with a kid
Ashkelon - Samson slew thirty of the Ashkelonites, took their spoil, and gave change of raiment unto them of Timhath who expounded his riddle (Judges 14:19)
Gaza or Azzah - Samson carried away its gates, and afterwards perished under the ruins of its vast temple
Hair - Both Samson and Absalom were greatly admired for their long locks (Judges 16:13 ; 2 Samuel 14:25-26 )
Dagon - The temple of Dagon, which Samson pulled down, probably resembled a Turkish kiosk, a spacious hall with roof resting in front upon four columns, two at the ends and two close together at the center
Nazarene - ...
Samson the Nazarite, "separated" or "dedicated unto God," typically foreshadowed Him (Judges 13:5; Judges 16:30), separated as holy unto God, and separated as an "alien" outcast by men (Psalms 69:8)
Philistines - Nazariteship in Samson is God's way of deliverance, but the Nazarite utterly failed, and in the days of Eli the Israelites were conquered by them and the ark taken
Nazarene - (See Isaiah 7:14) This, in my view of the subject, is most blessed indeed!...
Under a fourth particular, the reader will find this great event most strikingly shadowed out in the instance of Samson, the type of Christ, and especially in this feature of character as a Nazarite. The birth of Samson was announced precisely in the same manner, by the ministry of an angel. The wife of Manoah, Samson's mother, was barren at the time, as if to shew that the birth of this child, though not miraculous, yet was extraordinary. And lastly, and above all, as the angel concerning Samson declared, that he should be a Nazarite to God from the womb, and should begin to deliver Israel out of the hand of the Philistines, so eminently did the angel announce to the Virgin Mary concerning the Lord Jesus Christ, that he should be that Holy Thing, and be called the Son of the Highest, and should deliver "his people from their sins. But from the particular precepts concerning it, and the case of Samson, seen with an eye to Christ, "as the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth," I humbly conceive that the point is thus strikingly illustrated. And I trust that the reader will also see with me from the Lord's own teaching, that the law of the Nazarites, (Numbers 6:1-27) and especially the striking typical representation in the case of Samson, had no other meaning but to set forth the feature of the Lord Jesus Christ
Eli - He acted also as a civil judge in Israel after the death of Samson (1 Samuel 4:18 ), and judged Israel for forty years
Sight - The case of Samson, Judges 16:21; the case of Zedekiah, Jeremiah 52:11
Fox - So Samson's 300 jackals (Judges 15); for jackals are gregarious, the fox is solitary. , in our own land;) being gregarious they would naturally run in couples, tied together by a cord of two or three yards length; Samson probably had men to help him, and caught and let them loose from different places to consume the greater quantity of the Philistines' grain
Hair - Samson had seven plaits in his hair, Judges 16:13; Judges 16:19; and these must have been fastened with a fillet
Dan - Dan was not conspicuous among the tribes, but Aholiab, who helped Bezaleel in the work of the tabernacle, was of the tribe, Exodus 31:6 ; and Samson also
Rock - Samson kept garrison in the rock of Etham, Judges 15:8
Mennas - Samson at Constantinople, was elected to the see
Eli - ...
Some reconcile the two by making him co-judge with Samson for 20 years, and sole judge for 20 more years
Midst - 15:4: “And Samson went and caught three hundred foxes, and took firebrands, and turned tail to tail, and put a firebrand in the midst between two tails
Anguish - , in Joshua 17:15 ; Isaiah 49:19 , and in two places in its metaphorical sense, in Judges 16:16 , where Delilah is said to have pressed Samson sore with her words continually, and to have "straitened him," and in Isaiah 28:20
Dan - The last chapters of Judges show Samson of the tribe of Dan fighting the Philistines. The most prominent Danites mentioned in the Bible are Oholiab and Samson
Judges, Theology of - The accounts of the major judges (Othniel, Ehud, Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson) are among the most familiar stories in the Bible. ...
Samson is the last of the major judges, but he is a shadow of what a judge was supposed to be. Samson's proclivity for foreign women has become metaphorical for Israel itself, unable to resist going whoring after the enticement of foreign gods (2:17; 8:27,33). Although like Israel he had been set apart to God from birth (13:5), Samson would not fulfill his potential. How could Samson succeed as the leader of Israel? He was more successful in death than in life (16:30). For it was in faith that Gideon, Barak, Jephthah, and Samson "conquered kingdoms, administered justice, and gained what was promised" (Hebrews 11:32-33 )
Dan - The blessing pronounced on him by his father was, "Dan shall judge his people" (49:16), probably in allusion to the judgeship of Samson, who was of the tribe of Dan
Hunting - Deeds of prowess in the slaughter of such animals by Samson in self-defence ( Judges 14:6 ), David the shepherd to rescue his charges ( 1 Samuel 17:34 ), and Benaiah ( 2 Samuel 23:20 ) gained for these men abiding fame
Hair - Judges 16:22 (b) Samson's long hair revealed his belief and trust in the commandment of GOD. Samson too lost his power, and did not know it until he was overcome by the Philistines
Separate - A “Nazarite” usually made a vow voluntarily; however, in the case of Samson ( Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist as persons who were lifelong “Nazarites
Hebron - Later, Samson put the gates of Gaza on a hill outside of Hebron (Judges 16:3 )
Vengeance - Samson kills three thousand Philistines for blinding him (Judges 14-16 )
Nazarites - Those under the ancient law who made a vow of observing as Samson and John the Baptist
Ashkelon - It appears that Judah did take the city (Judges 1:18 ), but it belonged to the Philistines in the Samson account (Judges 14:19 ) and under Saul and David (1 Samuel 6:17 ; 2 Samuel 1:20 )
Hate - Delilah’s father told Samson: “I verily thought that thou hadst utterly hated her [1] …” ( Nazarites - ...
Perpetual Nazarites, as Samson and John the Baptist, were consecrated to their Nazariteship by their parents, and continued all their lives in this state, without drinking wine or cutting their hair
Nazirite - From the instructions given to the mother of Samson (Judges 13:4) some add, as a fourth mark of the Nazirite, abstinence from unclean food. Premising that its earliest history is quite unknown to us, we may say that it makes its first recorded appearance with Samson (Judges 13). ’ Now the only part of the regulations of Numbers 6 that we can affirm with certainty to have been observed by Samson is that prohibiting the cutting of the hair. His mother, indeed, is commanded to abstain from wine till he be born, but there is no evidence in the stories that there was anything of the ascetic about Samson himself. To be a hero against his people’s enemies is the end of Samson’s consecration. A life-long Nazirite might out his hair once a year, unless he were a Samson-Nazirite (Nâzîr, i
Nazirite - From the instructions given to the mother of Samson (Judges 13:4) some add, as a fourth mark of the Nazirite, abstinence from unclean food. Premising that its earliest history is quite unknown to us, we may say that it makes its first recorded appearance with Samson (Judges 13). ’ Now the only part of the regulations of Numbers 6 that we can affirm with certainty to have been observed by Samson is that prohibiting the cutting of the hair. His mother, indeed, is commanded to abstain from wine till he be born, but there is no evidence in the stories that there was anything of the ascetic about Samson himself. To be a hero against his people’s enemies is the end of Samson’s consecration. A life-long Nazirite might out his hair once a year, unless he were a Samson-Nazirite (Nâzîr, i
Abstain, Abstinence - The most famous Nazirites of biblical history were Samson (Judges 13 ) and Samuel (1 Samuel 1:11 ). Samson was stipulated as a Nazirite by God's message to his parents before he was born
Avenge - ...
When a man was attacked because he was God’s servant, he could rightly call for vengeance on his enemies, as Samson prayed for strength, “… that I may be at once avenged of the Philistines for my two eyes” ( Judges - Thus it was chiefly the land east of the Jordan that Ehud, Jephthah, Elon, and Jair delivered and governed; Barak and Tola governed the northern tribes; Abdon the central; and Ibzan and Samson the southern
Corn - To this feminine occupation Samson was degraded, Judges 16:21
Prison - ]'>[2] denotes literally ‘the house of bonds,’ almost identical with the Philistine ‘prison house,’ in which Samson was bound ‘with fetters of brass’ ( Judges 16:21 ; Judges 16:25 )
Judges, Book of - Samson begins the deliverance from the Philistines (Judges 13:1-16:31 ). ” The major judges are Ehud, Deborah (the only woman among the judges), Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson
Lion - ...
Samson slew one at Timnath (Judges 14:5-6)
Vote - The vow of a Nazirite might be for life, as in the case of Samson (Judges 13:7), or might even include an entire clan for several generations, as in the case of the Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:6-11)
Philistines - Shaamgar, Samson, Samuel, and Saul opposed them, and were victorious over them with great slaughter, at various times, but did not destroy their power, Judges 3:14 1 Samuel 4:1-22 7:1-17 14:1-52 31:1-13
Spiritual Gifts - Examples of this are: Bezaleel, who was given the gift of craftsmanship (Exodus 31:2-3 ); Othniel, who was equipped to be a judge (Judges 3:9-10 ); Gideon, who was given military skills (Judges 6:34 ); Samson, who was given physical strength (Judges 14:6 ,Judges 14:6,14:19 ); Saul, who was given political skills (1 Samuel 10:6 ); and Micah, who was given prophetic gifts (Micah 3:8 )
Giants - Samson was but of average height (Judges 16:17), yet was irresistible by the Philistines so long as he was faithful to God
Hardness of Heart - (See Jeremiah 52:11) And in the similar case of Samson, whose eyes were bored out, for so the expression hath it in the margin of the Bible
Prepare - So Samson said to the lad who was leading him: “Suffer me that I may feel the pillars whereupon the house standeth, that I may lean upon them” ( Prison (2) - ’ Malefactors and slaves laboured therein, as in the building where Samson had languished
Philistia - Neither Shamgar nor Samson delivered Israel permanently from the Philistines. The Israelites so lost heart that they in fear of the Philistines bound Samson (Judges 15:12)
Prostitution - Samson slept with one (Judges 16:1 )
Lion - Samson, Judges 14:5-6; David, 1 Samuel 17:34-36; Benaiah, 2 Samuel 23:20)
Dan - ...
Of this eponymous ancestor of the tribe tradition has preserved no details, but some of the most interesting stories of the Book of Judges tell of the exploits of the Danite Samson, who, single-handed, wrought discomfiture in the ranks of the Philistines
See, Perceive - This verb can also mean “to observe”: “… And there were upon the roof about three thousand men and women, that beheld while Samson made sport” ( Judges (1) - ...
The Book of Judges itself is comprised in Judges 2:6 to Judges 16:31 ; and here it is to be noticed, first of all, that a certain artificiality is observable in the structure; the exploits of twelve men are recounted, and the idea seems to be that each represents one of the twelve tribes of Israel, thus: Judah is represented by Othniel, Benjamin by Ehud, the two halves of the tribe of Manasseh by Gideon (West) and Jair (East), Issachar by Tola, Zebulun by Elon, Naphtali by Barak, Ephralm by Abdon, Gad by Jephthah, and Dan by Samson; besides these ten there are Shamgar and Ibzan, two unimportant Judges, but against them there are the two tribes Reuben and Simeon, who, however, soon disappear; while the tribe of Levi, as always, occupies an exceptional position. (5) Lastly, the history of Samson and his doings is recorded, chs. The fourteenth chapter gives an account of Samson’s courtship and marriage with the Philistine woman of Timnah: Judges 13:1-4 his first meeting with her, and his desire that his parents should go down to Timnah to secure her for him, they at first demur, but ultimately they accompany him thither. 15: Samson’s burning of the Philistines’ fields by sending into them foxes with burning torches tied to their tails ( Judges 15:1-8 ); the Philistines attack Judah in consequence, but the men of Judah bind Samson with the purpose of delivering him up; he, however, breaks his bonds, and kills a thousand Philistines with the jawhone of an ass ( Judges 15:1-9 ); the remaining verses describe the miracle of the origin of the spring in En-hakkore ( Judges 15:18-20 ). 16 there is a continuation of Samson’s adventures: his carrying off the gates of Gaza ( Judges 16:1-3 ); his relationship with Delilah and her treachery, resulting in his final capture by the Philistines ( Judges 16:22 ); their rejoicing ( Judges 16:23-25 ); the destruction of the house, and death of Samson ( Judges 16:26-30 ); his burial ( Judges 16:31 ). 13 16, which recount the adventures of Samson, must be regarded as having a character of their own: if these adventures have any basis in fact, they have been so overlaid with legendary matter that it would be precarious to pronounce with any degree of certainty any part of them in their present form to be historical
Mill - It displays, also, the vindictive contempt which suggested the punishment of Samson, the captive ruler of Israel, that the Philistines, with barbarous contumely, compelled him to perform the meanest service of a female slave; they sent him to grind in the prison, Judges 16:21 , but not for himself alone; this, although extremely mortifying to the hero, had been more tolerable; they made him grinder for the prison, perhaps while the vilest malefactor was permitted to look on, and join in the mockery. Samson, the ruler and avenger of Israel, labours, as Isaiah foretold the virgin daughter of Babylon should labour: "Come down, and sit in the dust, O virgin daughter of Babylon: there is no throne," no seat for thee, "O daughter of the Chaldeans
Prayer - ...
"Samson prayed to God, and God showed him a well where he quenched his burning thirst, and so lived to judge Israel (Judges 15:18-20 )
Angel - They appear to rebuke idolatry (Judges 2:1-4 ), to call Gideon (Judges 6:11,12 ), and to consecrate Samson (13:3)
Prison, Prisoners - Samson became a prisoner in a Philistine prison (Judges 16:21 )
Captives - This dreadful calamity Samson had to endure from the unrelenting vengeance of his enemies
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - The miraculous battles of Joshua, Gideon, Samson, and David were inspiring to them
Judges, Book of - }...
Oppression by the | Oppression by the }...
Philistines, during which | Ammonites Judges 10:8 18 }...
Samson was judge, and | Jephthah Judges 12:7 6 }...
Samuel after Eli
Judges - ...
These extraordinary judges, raised by God, the temporal as well as spiritual King of Israel, as His vicegerents, between Joshua and the kings were 13: Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar, Deborah and Barak, Gideon, Abimelech (an usurper), Tola, Jair Jephtha, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon (Bedan 1 Samuel 12:11), Samson
Spinning And Weaving - That the Hebrews were early familiar with it is evident from the incident of Samson and Delilah above referred to, the true interpretation of which will be given in a later section, 4 ( c ). ’ For Delilah, seated on the ground beside her horizontal loom with Samson’s head upon her knees (v. When Samson awoke he pulled up the loom, which was fastened to the ground with pegs
Heart - Samson told Delilah “all his heart” (Judges 16:17 )
Nazarite - Samson ordained to be a Nazarite from the womb (Judges 13:5-6; Judges 16:17). The seeming violation of the Nazarite law in Samson's contact with the dead shows that the spirit of the law herein rises above the letter; the object of his mission justified the deviation from rule even without ceremonial purification
Philistines, the - This threat is first seen in the stories of Samson (Judges 13-16 )
Fire - Other examples of fire as the expression of God's acceptance of offerings are those of Gideon (Judges 6:19-24 ) and of the father and mother of Samson (Judges 13:15-20 )
Absalom - Impatient of delay in his ambitious schemes, he sent for Joab, and, not being heeded, he burnt Joab's grain (as Samson did to the Philistines, Judges 15:4), which drove Joab to intercede with David for Absalom's admission to his presence
Spirit; Breath - …” When one’s “breath” returns, he is revived: “… When he [1] had drunk [2], his spirit [3] came again, and he revived …” ( Philistines - )...
The Philistines first make their appearance in Biblical history late in the period of the Judges, when Samson, of the tribe of Dan, is said to have waged his curious single-handed combats with them (Judges 13:1-25 ; Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 ; Judges 16:1-31 )
Philis'Tines - Individual heroes were raised up from time to time, such as Shamgar the son of Anath, (Judges 3:31 ) and still more Samson, Judges 13-16 , but neither of these men succeeded in permanently throwing off the yoke
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ...
When the Philistines captured and overcame Samson, the five Philistine cities planned a great celebration. Presumably they intended to offer Samson as a human holocaust/offering
Micah - ) The date of the event is implied as before Samson, for the origin of the name Mahaneh Dan occurs in this narrative (Judges 18:12) and it is mentioned as already so named in Samson's childhood (Judges 13:25, margin)
Nazirite - Judges 13:7 states that Samson’s mother was bidden to abstain, but the same is not affirmed of Samson himself; all the stress, in his case, is laid on the hair being untouched ( Judges 16:17 )
Miracle - ...
Exploits of Samson, Judges 14:1-16:31
Marriage - The companions of the bridegrooms are expressly mentioned in the history of Samson, Judges 14:11,20 Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 8:13 Matthew 9:14 ; also the companions of the bride, Psalm 45:9,14 Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 2:7 3:5 8:4 . The young men at Samson's wedding diverted themselves in proposing riddles, and the bridegroom appointed the prize to those should could explain them, Judges 14:14 . The ceremonies of Samson's wedding continued seven whole days, Judges 14:17,18
Zedekiah - " So Samson "did grind" (Judges 16:21)
Lion - ...
"Then went Samson down, and, behold, a young lion roared against him, and the Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon him, and he rent him as he would have rent a kid, and he had nothing in his hand," Judges 14:5-6
Africanus, Julius - In computing the years of the Judges he is blamed by Eusebius for lengthening the chronology by adding, without authority, 30 years for the elders after Joshua, 40 for anarchy after Samson, and 25 years of peace
Habits - The clothes of those Philistines whom Samson slew at Askelon required no altering to fit his companions; nor the robe of Jonathan, to answer his friend
Philistim - True it is, that Shamgar, Samson, Samuel, and Saul, opposed them, and killed some of their people, but did not reduce their power
Marriage - In the parable the father is said to make a marriage, or a marriage feast (ποιεῖν γάμον), for his son (Matthew 22:2); so in the OT, Genesis 24:3 (Abraham and his steward for Isaac) Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8 (Hamor for Shechem) Genesis 38:6 (Judah for Er), Judges 14:2-10 (Manoah for Samson). The feast is given by the bridegroom’s father (Matthew 22:2) or by himself; Samson provided it, though he came from a distance, and this is said to have been the custom of the time (Judges 14:10)
Jephthah - Jephthah was manifestly a superstitious and ill-instructed man, and, like Samson, an instrument of God's power, rather than an example of his grace
the Thorn in Paul's Flesh - What then is that thorn in the flesh of all God's best saints and of all Christ's best servants,-that thorn which still humbles, and humbles, and humbles them down, past all possible glorying in anything they are, or have ever been, or can ever be? Humbles the most heavenly-minded men in all the world down to death and hell, and so humbles such men only? What is it that Christ sends to stab His best servants deeper and deeper every day, and to impale them and buffet them till they are so many dead corpses rather than living and breathing and Christian men? And then on the other hand, what is that same thorn and stake and devil's fist that at every stab and stound and blow draws down the whole grace of Jesus Christ on the sufferer, till the sanctified saint kisses his thorn, and blesses his Lord, and would not part with the one or the other for all the world? Samson offered so many sheets and so many changes of raiment to any Philistine who within seven days would declare his riddle. And after John Bunyan had reset Samson's riddle to the readers of his Grace Abounding he felt sure that his sheets and his changes of raiment were all quite safe, for, after his offer to them, he said: "The Philistines will not understand me
Numbers, Book of - Samson, Samuel, etc
Ananias And Sapphira - But Peter was a perfect Samson in the Israel of that day
the Ethiopian Eunuch - " Bunyan also tells us that when he was beginning to read his Bible he much preferred the adventures of Joshua and Samson and Gideon to Isaiah or Paul
War - Such were Joshua, Caleb, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson, David, Josiah, and the Maccabees, whose names alone are their own sufficient encomiums
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Chants of victory on the lips of the victor (compare Samson following his slaying of the Philistines recorded in Judges 15:16 ) or those greeting the one successful in battle (compare 1 Samuel 18:7 ) establish music as a medium for uncontainable joy
Insects - The bee gained fame in the story of Samson, for he ate honey from the carcass of a lion and later tested the Philistines with a riddle concerning the incident (Judges 14:5-18 )
Saul - The Spirit of God came upon Jesus at the Jordan, but He came also upon Samson at the camp of Dan, and upon Balaam beside the altar of Baal
Bride - Samson also consulted his parents about his marriage; and entreated them to get for him the object of his choice. This custom serves to explain a circumstance in Samson's marriage, which is involved in some obscurity. These circumstances are distinctly marked in the account which the sacred historian has given us of Samson's marriage: "So his father went down unto the woman, and made there a feast; for so used the young men to do
Palestine - Here Samson grew to manhood
Presence (2) - But the religion of Jehovah was rid of such a tendency through the work of the prophets, with the result that, when all other religions in the Roman Empire were vulgarized and eviscerated of power, Judaism remained like a Samson with locks unshorn, with a God who could keep His own secret, and with a faith still pregnant with possibility
Tribes of Israel, the - The pressure and harassment the people of Dan experienced from the Philistines is reflected in the stories of Samson, the Danite, and his encounters with them (Judges 13-16 )
Leadership - , Jephthah and Samson, Judges 10:7 )
Israel, History of - Over them divinely designated Judges emerged, men like Gideon and Samson, and one woman, Deborah
Woman - In other instances, women seduce men (Delilah and Samson Judges 16 ) or unjustly accuse them (Potiphar's wife and Joseph Genesis 39 )
Marriage - Samson’s marriage. Possible traces in OT are the marriages of Jacob (Laban claims wives and children as his own, Genesis 31:31 ; Genesis 31:42 ), Moses ( Exodus 2:21 ; Exodus 4:18 ), Samson ( Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 , Judges 16:4 ; there is no hint that he meant to take his wife home; his kid seems to be the sadac or customary present). ‘60 mighty men’ of Deuteronomy 22:29 ) going, often by night, to fetch the bride and her attendants; in Judges 14:11 ; Judges 14:1-208 ; Judges 14:20 Samson’s comrades are necessarily taken from the bride’s people
Holy Spirit - Four judges are so characterized (Othniel Judges 3:10 ; Gideon 6:34; Jephthah 11:29; Samson 14:19; cf
Israel - We learn from Joshua 19:47 that they possessed the town of Zorah, where Samson was afterwards born
Criticism - , to the exploits of Samson; and later סם at the beginning of the 19th cent
Clemens Romanus of Rome - In a passage, which until the discovery of the Syriac letters had been felt as perplexing, he describes Clement as "in the encyclical letters which he wrote, and which are read in the holy churches," having taught virginity, and praised Elias and David and Samson, and all the prophets
Justinianus i, Emperor - Anthimus was deposed, and Mennas, head of the hospitium of Samson in Constantinople, appointed in his place and consecrated by Agapetus, who soon afterwards died