What does Salutation mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀσπασμὸς a salutation 1

Definitions Related to Salutation

G783


   1 a Salutation, either oral or written.
   

Frequency of Salutation (original languages)

Frequency of Salutation (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Salutation
SALUTATION (or greeting) is a serious matter in the East; some knowledge of immemorial practice is necessary in dealing with Orientals. The subject salutes his king by prostration; the humble his superior by touching the ground with his hand, and then his lips and brow. The young salutes the aged, the rider the footman, etc. In crowded streets only men of age, rank, and dignity need be saluted ( Matthew 23:7 etc.). Common forms of salutation are, ‘Peace he upon you’; response, ‘And upon you’: ‘May your day be happy’; response, ‘May your day be happy and blessed’: and, in the highway, ‘Blessed be he that cometh’ ( Judges 18:15 , Matthew 10:12 , Luke 24:36 , Psalms 118:26 , Matthew 21:9 etc.). Salutations are frequently prolonged, and repeated inquiries after health and welfare extremely tedious ( 1 Kings 4:29 , Luke 10:4 ). See also Gestures, Kiss.
W. Ewing.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Salutation
"Eastern modes of salutation are not unfrequently so prolonged as to become wearisome and a positive waste of time. The profusely polite Arab asks so many questions after your health, your happiness, your welfare, your house, and other things, that a person ignorant of the habits of the country would imagine there must be some secret ailment or mysterious sorrow oppressing you, which you wished to conceal, so as to spare the feelings of a dear, sympathizing friend, but which he, in the depth of his anxiety, would desire to hear of. I have often listened to these prolonged salutations in the house, the street, and the highway, and not unfrequently I have experienced their tedious monotony, and I have bitterly lamented useless waste of time" (Porter, Through Samaria, etc.). The work on which the disciples were sent forth was one of urgency, which left no time for empty compliments and prolonged greetings (Luke 10:4 ).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Salutation And Salute
* For SALUTATION and SALUTE see GREET
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Salutation
The brotherly greetings expressed at the close of nearly all the epistles. They were sent from the saints located where the epistles were written to the saints addressed, together with, at times, the injunction to greet one another with 'a holy kiss,' that being the ordinary form of salutation in the East among the men as well as among the women. Romans 16:5-23 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; Titus 3:15 , etc.
When evil doctrine had spread in the professing church, the question of salutation became serious. The 'lady' to whom the apostle John wrote was strictly enjoined not to receive into her house any one who brought not good doctrine, nor was she even to salute such a one; for to do so, would be to become morally a partaker of his evil deeds. 2 John 10,11 ; cf. Romans 16:17 .
Salutations in the East being often very lengthy and of mere ceremony, may well account for those sent in haste being told to salute no one by the way. 2 Kings 4:29 ; Luke 10:4 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Salutation
Salutations may be classed under the two heads of conversational and epistolary. The salutation at meeting consisted in early times of various expressions of blessing, such as "God be gracious unto thee," (Genesis 43:29 ) "The Lord be with you;" "The Lord bless thee." (Ruth 2:4 ) Hence the term "bless" received the secondary sense of "salute." The salutation at parting consisted originally of a simple blessing, (Genesis 24:60 ) but in later times the form "Go in peace," or rather "Farewell" (1 Samuel 1:17 ) was common. In modern times the ordinary mode of address current in the East resembles the Hebrew Es-selam aleykum , "Peace be on you," and the term "salam," peace, has been introduced into our own language to describe the Oriental salutation. In epistolary salutations the writer placed-his own name first, and then that of the person whom he sainted. A form of prayer for spiritual mercies was also used. The concluding salutation consisted generally of the term "I salute," accompanied by a prayer for peace or grace.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Salutation
SALUTATION.—See Greetings.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Salutation
(ssal yoo tay' shuhn) Act of greeting, addressing, blessing, or welcoming by gestures or words; a specific form of words serving as a greeting, especially in the opening and closing of letters.
In the Ancient Near East, a salutation covered a wide range of social practices: exchanging a greeting (“Hail”), asking politely about another's welfare, expressing personal regard, and the speaking of a parting blessing (“Go in Peace”). Physical actions, such as kneeling, kissing, and embracing, were also involved. The salutation functioned to maintain close, personal contact and to foster good relations. Though the practice continued into the first century, Jesus and early Christians transformed the act of saluting. Jesus critiqued the Pharisees for practicing long, protracted deferential salutations (Mark 12:37-40 ; Luke 20:45-47 ; compare Matthew 23:1-36 ) and forbade His disciples from practicing such public displays (Luke 10:4 ). Instead, Jesus endorsed a salutation when it signified the long-awaited presence of messianic “peace” (Hebrew, shalom ), that is the “peace” of the kingdom of God (Luke 10:5-13 ; Luke 19:42 ; John 14:27 ; John 20:21 ; Mark 15:18 ; compare Luke 2:14 ,Luke 2:14,2:29 ). Paul, as do other New Testament authors, also transformed the salutation to speak of newness brought on by the cross and resurrection. The typical greeting in Greek letters was the infinitive “to rejoice” (charein). Paul never opened his letters with this greeting; instead, the apostle fused the Greek word for the typical Hebrew blessing, “Peace” (einrene), with the noun form of the Greek blessing, “Grace” (charis), to yield the distinctly Christian salutation: “Grace and Peace” (charis kai eirene). By such a subtle change in the form of Greek letter writing, Paul was able to invoke the range of apostolic blessings found in Jesus: mercy from God (“grace”) and eternal well-being from God's presence (“peace”). See Letter .
Carey C. Newman
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Salutation
The Lord Jesus takes notice of the salutations of the Scribes in the market-place, and their delight to be called of men Rabbi. (Matthew 23:7) Contrary to this when the Lord sent out his disciples to teach and to preach, he commanded them to "salute no man by the way." (Luke 10:4) To an ordinary reader unacquainted with eastern customs, these things appear strange. We are so much in the habit of familiar conversation as we pass persons we know, that the salutation Good morning, or Good day, or the like, seems but common courtesy. But in the manners of the orientals, these things would make constant confusion. Numberless transactions, and that of the highest kind, are carried on with them by the mere bend of the body or the motion of the head, without speaking a word. A modern historian relates, that even upon their public days of transacting business, and where a multitude of concerns is carried on, so much of the whole is done by sign and gesture, that if a blind person were present, he would be unconscious of any company when perhaps some hundreds were assembled. What would those eastern people think of the clamour of voices in our Royal Exchange? In families, among the servants with their masters, a thousand commands are issued and executed, and not a voice heard. This may serve to shew a new beauty on that sweet Psalm of David, the one hundred and twenty third, were the soul of a believer in the Lord is described as waiting in silent adoration and obedience to receive the Lord's commands, "as the eyes of servants look unto the hand of their masters, and as the eyes of a maiden unto the hand of her mistress."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Salutation
In meeting, "God be gracious unto thee," "the Lord bless thee," etc. (Genesis 43:29; Ruth 2:4; Ruth 3:10; 1 Samuel 15:13; Psalms 129:8). Thus "bless" came to moan salute (1 Samuel 13:10 margin). "Peace" (shalom , from whence the oriental salaam ), including health or welfare of body and mind, was the constant salutation of Hebrew; as "joy" (chairein ) is the Greek salutation. James 1:1-2; "greeting ... joy," only found elsewhere in the apostolic letter probably composed by James (Acts 15:23), an undesigned coincidence. "Hail": Matthew 27:29. The Hebrew's very salutation indicated his sense of man's deep spiritual need.
The Greek salutation answers to the national characteristic, "joy," and outward gracefulness (Genesis 43:27 margin; Exodus 18:7 margin). "Peace" was used also in encouraging (Genesis 43:23); at parting a blessing was pronounced (Genesis 24:60). Latterly (1 Samuel 1:17) "go in peace": no empty form in Christ's mouth (Mark 5:34; Luke 7:50; Luke 10:5; Luke 24:36; Acts 16:36). Proverbs 27:14; "he that blesseth his friend with a loud voice, rising early in the morning," i.e., the affected assiduity and loud exaggeration engender suspicion of insincerity and duplicity. "Salute no man by the way," lest it should cause delay by subsequent conversation (2 Kings 4:29; Luke 10:4).
"Live for ever" was the salutation to the Babylonian and Persian kings (Daniel 2:4; Daniel 6:6). "Grace and peace" is Paul's opening salutation in his epistles to churches, but in his three pastoral epistles, Timothy and Titus, "grace, mercy, and peace"; for ministers of all men most need "mercy" for their ministry (2 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Corinthians 7:25; 1 Timothy 1:16). Paul added to the epistles written by an amanuensis the salutation with his own hand, "grace" to all (1 Corinthians 16:21-23; Colossians 4:18; 2 Thessalonians 3:17-18). The greeting forbidden toward a false teacher in 2 John 1:10 is of that usual among Christian brethren, a token of Christian brotherhood; this would be insincerity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Angelic Salutation
Part of the greeting of the angel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin repeated in the prayer beginning Hail Mary (Latin: Ave Maria).
Webster's Dictionary - Salutation
(n.) The act of saluting, or paying respect or reverence, by the customary words or actions; the act of greeting, or expressing good will or courtesy; also, that which is uttered or done in saluting or greeting.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Salutation
(1) Motion of reverence by bowing or lifting the hat when meeting a priest, and when passing a church, because it is the House of God and, as a rule, the sanctuary of the Blessed Sacrament. It is common also in the Liturgy, as when at Mass the priest salutes the congregation with "Dominus vobiscum" (The Lord be with you) or "Orate, fratres" (Brethren, pray).
(2) Characteristic opening of the Epistles of the Apostles, wishing those addressed "Grace and the peace of God," and also of the letters of popes and bishops.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Salutation, Angelic
Part of the greeting of the angel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin repeated in the prayer beginning Hail Mary (Latin: Ave Maria).
King James Dictionary - Salutation
SALUTA'TION, n. L. salutatio. See Salute.
The act of saluting a greeting the act of paying respect or reverence by the customary words or actions as in inquiring of persons their welfare, expressing to them kind wishes, bowing, &c. Luke 1 . Mark 12 .
In all public meetings and private addresses, use the forms of salutation, reverence and decency usual among the most sober people.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Salutation
The usual formula of salutation among the Hebrews was Shalom lekha, that is, Peace be with thee. The same expression is the common one among the Arabs to the present day: they say, Salam lekha, to which the person saluted replies, "With thee be peace," Genesis 29:6 Judges 18:15 , margin. Hence we hear of the Arab and Turkish Salams, that is, salutations. Other phrases of salutation are found in Scripture, most of them invoking a blessing: as "The Lord be with thee;" "All hail," or Joy to thee; "Blessed be thou of the Lord."
These and similar phrases the oriental still use on all occasions with the most profuse and punctilious politeness. The letter of an Arab will be nearly filled with salutations; and should he come in to tell you your house was on fire, he would first give and receive the compliments of the day, and then say perhaps, "If God will, all is well; but your house is on fire." Their more formal salutations they accompany with various ceremonies or gestures; sometimes they embrace and kiss each other; sometimes an inferior kiss the hand or the beard of a superior, or bows low, with the hand upon the breast, and afterwards raises it to his lips or forehead. See Jacob's salutation of Esau, Genesis 43:1-34 ; and compare Genesis 19:1 23:7 42:6 1 Samuel 25:44 2 Samuel 1:2 John 20:26 . The due and dignified performance of some of these ceremonious courtesies, especially when frequently recurring, requires much time; and hence, when the prophet sent his servant in great haste to lay his staff upon the dead child, he forbade him to salute any one, or answer any salutation by the way, 2 Kings 4:29 .
For a similar reason, our Savior forbade the seventy disciples to salute any one by the way, Luke 10:4 , that is, in this formal and tedious manner, wasting precious time. Much of the oriental courtesy was superficial with it what was "better than life." "My peace I give unto you; not as the world giveth, give I unto you," John 14:27 .

Sentence search

Regreet - ) To greet again; to resalute; to return a Salutation to; to greet. ) A return or exchange of Salutation
Kiss - See Salutation
Salutation - SALUTATION
Greeting - See Salutation
Salutatorily - ) By way of Salutation
Ood-Den - ) A form of Salutation
Salutation And Salute - * For Salutation and SALUTE see GREET ...
Bel-Accoyle - ) A kind or favorable reception or Salutation
Compellation - ) Style of address or Salutation; an appellation
All Hail - ) All health; - a phrase of Salutation or welcome
All Hail - ) All health; - a phrase of Salutation or welcome
Ave - ) A reverential Salutation
Ave - ) A reverential Salutation
Accolade - (Latin: ad collum, to the neck) Ceremony used in conferring knighthood, either by a kiss, or by a slight blow on the neck, the second form being still used in England; also, a form of Salutation and farewell used in some countries by clerics or religious, like the peace Salutation among the clergy at solemn Mass
Quartus - A 'brother' whose Salutation was sent to Rome
Patrobas - Christian at Rome to whom Paul sent a Salutation
Proface - ) Much good may it do you! - a familiar Salutation or welcome
Nereus - Christian at Rome to whom Paul sent a Salutation
Stachys - A believer in Rome to whom Paul sent a Salutation
Linus - A Christian at Rome, whose Salutation Paul sent to Timothy, 2 Timothy 4:21
Philol'Ogus, - Paul sends his Salutation
Salutation - Salutations may be classed under the two heads of conversational and epistolary. The Salutation at meeting consisted in early times of various expressions of blessing, such as "God be gracious unto thee," (Genesis 43:29 ) "The Lord be with you;" "The Lord bless thee. " The Salutation at parting consisted originally of a simple blessing, (Genesis 24:60 ) but in later times the form "Go in peace," or rather "Farewell" (1 Samuel 1:17 ) was common. In modern times the ordinary mode of address current in the East resembles the Hebrew Es-selam aleykum , "Peace be on you," and the term "salam," peace, has been introduced into our own language to describe the Oriental Salutation. In epistolary Salutations the writer placed-his own name first, and then that of the person whom he sainted. The concluding Salutation consisted generally of the term "I salute," accompanied by a prayer for peace or grace
Salute - Salute, Matthew 10:12; Salutation, Luke 1:41. The Salutations of the Jews were usually of a religious character—at least, in form—and were attended with much ceremony, as they are to this day among the orientals. It passed into the epistolary Salutation. The time occupied in the ceremonies of Salutation, repeatedly bowing, kissing the beard, etc
Banzai - , May you live ten thousand years; - used in Salutation of the emperor and as a battle cry
Salutation - "Peace" (shalom , from whence the oriental salaam ), including health or welfare of body and mind, was the constant Salutation of Hebrew; as "joy" (chairein ) is the Greek Salutation. The Hebrew's very Salutation indicated his sense of man's deep spiritual need. ...
The Greek Salutation answers to the national characteristic, "joy," and outward gracefulness (Genesis 43:27 margin; Exodus 18:7 margin). ...
"Live for ever" was the Salutation to the Babylonian and Persian kings (Daniel 2:4; Daniel 6:6). "Grace and peace" is Paul's opening Salutation in his epistles to churches, but in his three pastoral epistles, Timothy and Titus, "grace, mercy, and peace"; for ministers of all men most need "mercy" for their ministry (2 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Corinthians 7:25; 1 Timothy 1:16). Paul added to the epistles written by an amanuensis the Salutation with his own hand, "grace" to all (1 Corinthians 16:21-23; Colossians 4:18; 2 Thessalonians 3:17-18)
Urbane - Christian at Rome, described by Paul as 'our helper in Christ,' to whom a Salutation was sent
Prosit - , may it do (you) good; - a Salutation used in well wishing, esp
Reeting - ) Expression of kindness or joy; Salutation at meeting; a compliment from one absent
Bow - (Genesis 37:10 ) The eastern mode of Salutation, by kneeling upon one knee and bending the head forward till it touched the ground
Hero'Dion, - Paul, to whom he sends his Salutation amongst the Christians of the Roman church
Tertius - The Christian who wrote the Epistle to the Romans at Paul's dictation, and who sent his own Salutation to the saints
Quartus - A Christian residing at Corinth, but according to his name of Roman origin, whose Salutation Paul sends to the brethren at Rome, Romans 16:23
Persis - A Christian woman at Rome, to whom Paul sent a Salutation
Dominus Vobis Cum - (Latin: The Lord be with you) ...
A blessing found in Ruth 2:4, and occurring trequently in Scripture with slight variation, notably in the Salutation of the Angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:28). It occurs eight times in the Mass, four times as a Salutation from priest to people, and before the principal prayer in each hour of the Office
Kiss - ) To make or give Salutation with the lips in token of love, respect, etc. ) A Salutation with the lips, as a token of affection, respect, etc
Greeting - Expression of kindness or joy Salutation at meeting compliment addressed from one absent
Salam - ) A Salutation or compliment of ceremony in the east by word or act; an obeisance, performed by bowing very low and placing the right palm on the forehead
God, Peace of - In early times, a perpetual protection given by the Church to consecrated persons, extending to consecrated places, and embracing consecrated times; a form of Salutation used by the Apostles in their Epistles
Embrace - A "salutation or farewell" was generally made by embracing and kissing (see Luke 10:4 , which indicates the posibility of delay on the journey by frequent Salutation). aspasmos, "a Salutation
Kiss - Kissing the lips in Salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes. Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of Salutation has at all times been customary in the East. In the Christian Church the kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly Salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood
Hadji - ) A Mohammedan pilgrim to Mecca; - used among Orientals as a respectful Salutation or a title of honor
Salutation - ...
In the Ancient Near East, a Salutation covered a wide range of social practices: exchanging a greeting (“Hail”), asking politely about another's welfare, expressing personal regard, and the speaking of a parting blessing (“Go in Peace”). The Salutation functioned to maintain close, personal contact and to foster good relations. Jesus critiqued the Pharisees for practicing long, protracted deferential Salutations (Mark 12:37-40 ; Luke 20:45-47 ; compare Matthew 23:1-36 ) and forbade His disciples from practicing such public displays (Luke 10:4 ). Instead, Jesus endorsed a Salutation when it signified the long-awaited presence of messianic “peace” (Hebrew, shalom ), that is the “peace” of the kingdom of God (Luke 10:5-13 ; Luke 19:42 ; John 14:27 ; John 20:21 ; Mark 15:18 ; compare Luke 2:14 ,Luke 2:14,2:29 ). Paul, as do other New Testament authors, also transformed the Salutation to speak of newness brought on by the cross and resurrection. Paul never opened his letters with this greeting; instead, the apostle fused the Greek word for the typical Hebrew blessing, “Peace” (einrene), with the noun form of the Greek blessing, “Grace” (charis), to yield the distinctly Christian Salutation: “Grace and Peace” (charis kai eirene)
Rufus - A believer in Rome to whom Paul sent a Salutation
Lucius - , of his own tribe, and whose Salutation he conveys to the Roman church
Jeho'Vah-Sha'Lom - " The altar erected by Gideon in Orphrah was so called in memory of the Salutation addressed to him by the angel of Jehovah, "Peace be unto thee
Kiss - This Salutation was customary in the East, to express regard and reverence, as well as affection, Genesis 29. This Salutation being customary in those days between man and man, was used in the early church as a pledge of Christian peace and charity, Romans 16:16 1 Peter 5:14
Hail! - A Salutation, importing a wish for the welfare of the person addressed
Pat'Robas - Paul sends his Salutation
Benedicamus Domino - (Latin: Let us bless the Lord) Invocation said at the end of Mass when the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo" is omitted, and usually answered with "Deo Gratias" (Thanks be to God); sometimes used as a Salutation and as a signal for rising in religious communities and seminaries
Lucius - Kinsman of Paul whose Salutation was sent to Rome
Ave Mary - ...
(2):...
A Salutation and prayer to the Virgin Mary, as mother of God; - used in the Roman Catholic church
Head Cleft by Axe - Health and Apostolical Benediction, form of Salutation in letters written by the pope, first used by Pope Cletus (Anacletus ), second successor of Saint Peter
Kiss (2) - ...
With regard to the Salutation of Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:47-48), to have kissed the hand of Christ after the interval of absence caused by his conference with the chief priests would have been but an ordinary tribute of respect, and as such would have escaped the notice of the disciples, while giving the required information to those who had come with him. If, on the other hand, the kiss was on the face, it was an act of presumption for an Oriental disciple to take the initiative in offering to his master the Salutation of equal friendship. Among those of the same age, and where the relationships of life permitted it, the Salutation is given sometimes on the lips, but more frequently on the check or neck. For intimate relatives or acquaintances of the same sex to part for a time, or to meet after a period of separation without such Salutation, would seem strained and unnatural (Luke 15:20). Such was the kiss of peace or Salutation of goodwill that prevailed for a time in the congregations of the early Church
Salutation - Salutation (or greeting) is a serious matter in the East; some knowledge of immemorial practice is necessary in dealing with Orientals. Common forms of Salutation are, ‘Peace he upon you’; response, ‘And upon you’: ‘May your day be happy’; response, ‘May your day be happy and blessed’: and, in the highway, ‘Blessed be he that cometh’ ( Judges 18:15 , Matthew 10:12 , Luke 24:36 , Psalms 118:26 , Matthew 21:9 etc. Salutations are frequently prolonged, and repeated inquiries after health and welfare extremely tedious ( 1 Kings 4:29 , Luke 10:4 )
Epaenetus - Commendable, a Christian at Rome to whom Paul sent his Salutation (Romans 16:5 )
Salutation - The usual formula of Salutation among the Hebrews was Shalom lekha, that is, Peace be with thee. Hence we hear of the Arab and Turkish Salams, that is, Salutations. Other phrases of Salutation are found in Scripture, most of them invoking a blessing: as "The Lord be with thee;" "All hail," or Joy to thee; "Blessed be thou of the Lord. The letter of an Arab will be nearly filled with Salutations; and should he come in to tell you your house was on fire, he would first give and receive the compliments of the day, and then say perhaps, "If God will, all is well; but your house is on fire. " Their more formal Salutations they accompany with various ceremonies or gestures; sometimes they embrace and kiss each other; sometimes an inferior kiss the hand or the beard of a superior, or bows low, with the hand upon the breast, and afterwards raises it to his lips or forehead. See Jacob's Salutation of Esau, Genesis 43:1-34 ; and compare Genesis 19:1 23:7 42:6 1 Samuel 25:44 2 Samuel 1:2 John 20:26 . The due and dignified performance of some of these ceremonious courtesies, especially when frequently recurring, requires much time; and hence, when the prophet sent his servant in great haste to lay his staff upon the dead child, he forbade him to salute any one, or answer any Salutation by the way, 2 Kings 4:29
Jehovah Shalom - ) Gideon so-called his altar of thanksgiving (not sacrifice) in Ophrah, to commemorate the angel of Jehovah's Salutation, "Peace be unto thee"; where rather judgment for national backslidings was to have been expected, and when he himself had feared death, as having seen the angel of Jehovah
Salutation - ...
In all public meetings and private addresses, use the forms of Salutation, reverence and decency usual among the most sober people
Kiss - Kissing the lips by way of affectionate Salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes, in both patriarchal and later times. (Genesis 29:11 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ) Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of Salutation has at all times been customary in the East, and can hardly be said to be extinct even in Europe. In the Christian Church the kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly Salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood
Salutation - They were sent from the saints located where the epistles were written to the saints addressed, together with, at times, the injunction to greet one another with 'a holy kiss,' that being the ordinary form of Salutation in the East among the men as well as among the women. ...
When evil doctrine had spread in the professing church, the question of Salutation became serious. ...
Salutations in the East being often very lengthy and of mere ceremony, may well account for those sent in haste being told to salute no one by the way
Hail Mary - Most familiar prayer used by the Church in honor of the Mother of God, made up of the Salutation of Angel Gabriel, the greeting of Saint Elizabeth (Luke 1), and a petition framed by the Church
Kiss - The customary Salutation in the East as a mark of respect or affection (Genesis 27:26; Song of Solomon 1:2; Luke 7:45); hence the token used by the hypocrite to pretend love (2 Samuel 15:5 Absalom; Matthew 26:48 Judas). " Not a mere conventional Salutation, "the mystic kiss" (Clemens Alex
Greetings - They merely acknowledged the Salutation and passed on. ...
To every form of Salutation custom prescribes an answer. The common Salutation is salâm ‘aleik, ‘peace be upon you’ (Luke 24:36), to which the answer is, ‘And upon you be peace. ’ It is a Moslem’s duty to give this Salutation to another; but it may be omitted without sin. When, however, the Salutation is given, the Moslem is bound to return it. The Moslems claim this as ‘the Salutation of Islâm, and not for the mouths of the heathen, with whom is no peace nor fellowship, neither in this world nor in the next’ (Doughty, Arabia Deserta, i. Doughty was gravely imperilled because he ‘had greeted with Salaam Aleyk, which they [1] will have to be a Salutation of God’s people only—the Moslemîn’ (ib. The nature of the Salutations indicated above sufficiently explains these restrictions, and also enables us to understand the prohibition of Jesus, ‘Salute no man by the way’ (Luke 10:4)
Courtesy - ) To make a respectful Salutation or movement of respect; esp
Welcome - ) Salutation to a newcomer
Hail - Hail, be well be in health health to you a term of Salutation, equivalent to L. A wish of health a Salutation
Tertius - Paul’s amanuensis who wrote Romans and added a personal Salutation ( Romans 16:22 )
Laodicea - A Christian church was early established here, probably from Ephesus, and to this church Paul sent a Salutation when writing to the Colossians, Colossians 4:15; it is also mentioned in Revelation 1:11; Revelation 3:14
Neck - —(1) In the embrace of family Salutation the smooth part of the neck below the car is the part that is kissed, first on one side and then on the other (Luke 15:20)
Recognize - ) To acknowledge acquaintance with, as by Salutation, bowing, or the like
Narcissus - It will be noted that the Salutation is not addressed to Narcissus himself, but to the members of his household
Morrow - Leviticus 7 ...
Good morrow, a term of Salutation good morning
Silence - (Zephaniah 3:17) In relation to the ordinary silence of the Hebrews, I refer to the word Salutation
Kiss - a mode of Salutation, and token of respect, which has been practised in all nations
Luke - But Paul, writing to the Colossians, after mentioning all "of the circumcision" who had been a comfort unto him, adds the Salutation of" Luke, the beloved physician
Epistle - Paul dictated his to an amanuensis, authenticating them with his autograph at the close, wherewith be wrote the Salutation "grace be with thee," or "the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ," etc. ...
The words "I have written" ("wrote," egrapsa ) distinguished this epistle as written by himself from 2 Thessalonians 3:17, "I write," where he only writes the closing Salutation. Philemon 1:19 shows that that epistle also was all written by Paul as a special compliment to Philemon; whereas the accompanying epistle to the Colossians (Colossians 4:18) has only "the Salutation" so written, as also 1 Corinthians 16:21. Peter's closing Salutation is "peace be with you"; as Paul's is "grace," etc
Salutations - Bruce, who says that some Arabs, to whom he gave the salam, or Salutation of peace, either made no reply, or expressed their astonishment at his impudence in using such freedom. Thus it appears that the orientals have two kinds of Salutations; one for strangers, and the other for their own countrymen, or persons of their own religious profession. This precept is not inconsistent with the charge which the Prophet Elisha gave to his servant Gehazi, not to salute any man he met, nor return his Salutation; for he wished him to make all the haste in his power to restore the child of the Shunamite, who had laid him under so many obligations. The manners of the country rendered Elisha's precautions particularly proper and necessary, as the Salutations of the east often take up a long time. This precaution was rendered necessary by the length of time which their tedious forms of Salutation required. They begin their Salutations at a considerable distance, by bringing the hand down to the knees, and then carrying it to the stomach. To avoid this useless waste of time, our Lord commanded them to avoid the customary Salutations of those whom they might happen to meet by the way. All the forms of Salutation now observed appear to have been in general use in the days of our Lord; for he represents a servant as falling down at the feet of his master, when he had a favour to ask; and an inferior servant, as paying the same compliment to the first, who belonged, it would seem, to a higher class; "The servant, therefore, fell down and worshipped him, saying, Lord, have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. In Persia, the Salutation among intimate friends is made by inclining the neck over each other's neck, and then inclining cheek to cheek; which Mr
Salutation - "Eastern modes of Salutation are not unfrequently so prolonged as to become wearisome and a positive waste of time. I have often listened to these prolonged Salutations in the house, the street, and the highway, and not unfrequently I have experienced their tedious monotony, and I have bitterly lamented useless waste of time" (Porter, Through Samaria, etc
Archippus - A member of Philemon's family, possibly his son, whence Paul includes him in the same Salutation with Philemon and Apphia, and the church in Philemon's house (Philemon 1:2)
Friend - A term of Salutation a familiar compellation
Kiss - This common mode of Salutation among relatives is sanctified by its adoption in the church
Salute - ) The act of saluting, or expressing kind wishes or respect; Salutation; greeting
Epicure'Ans, the, - Then follows the formula of Salutation. In one instance, (Romans 16:22 ) the amanuensis in his own name adds his Salutation
Epistles - The most ancient epistles begin and end without either Salutation or farewell; but under the Persian monarchy the Salutation was very prolix. The Apostles, in their epistles, used the Salutation customary among the Greeks; but they omitted the usual farewell at the close, namely, χαιρειν , and adopted a benediction more conformable to the spirit of the Christian religion
Sir - It is the Salutation of servants (slaves) to their masters (‘Sir, didst thou not sow good seed?’ Matthew 13:27); of a son to a father (‘I go, sir,’ Matthew 21:30); of the priests and Pharisees to Pilate (‘Sir, we remember that that deceiver said,’ Matthew 27:63); of the Greeks to Philip (‘Sir, we would see Jesus,’ John 12:21)
Philemon - From Colossians 4:9 it seems that Onesimus, and therefore Philemon, resided in Colossæ; Archippus , too, who is joined with Philemon in the Salutation, is a Colossian ( Colossians 4:17 ), and there is no reason to doubt the natural supposition that St
Beard - (2 Samuel 10:4 ) The beard was the object of Salutation
Patrobas - It is suggested that together they formed an ἐκκλησία or household church, the locality of which we shall suppose to have been Rome or Ephesus, according to our view of the destination of these Salutations. the Salutation to another group of five persons ‘and all the saints that are with them’ in the verse following
Salute - The act of expressing kind wishes or respect Salutation greeting
Julia - Romans 16:3, where a married couple are saluted as ‘fellow-labourers’ with the Apostle, and the Salutation includes ‘the church which assembles at their house’)
Apelles - Nothing is known of Apelles beyond this reference...
Assuming the Roman destination of these Salutations, he was probably a Jewish convert residing in Rome as a member of the Imperial household. As the Salutation which follows is that to ‘the household of Aristobulus,’ it has been suggested that Apelles’ Christian activity may have lain in that direction
Philologus - the Salutation to Prisca and Aquila, a married couple, ‘and the church that is in their house’ Simon - He was "the father of Alexander and Rufus," Mark 15:21 ; and from the cordial Salutation of Paul, Romans 16:13 , it would seem that the family afterwards resided at Rome, and that their labor of love was not forgotten by God
Sopater - ]'>[1] ), whose Salutation is sent by St
Peter, Second Epistle of - The following is a brief outline of the contents of this epistle: The customary opening Salutation is followed by an enumeration of Christian blessings and exhortation to Christian duties
Philemon - Closing Salutation (23-25)...
Kenneth Hubbard...
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Salutation - The Lord Jesus takes notice of the Salutations of the Scribes in the market-place, and their delight to be called of men Rabbi. We are so much in the habit of familiar conversation as we pass persons we know, that the Salutation Good morning, or Good day, or the like, seems but common courtesy
Abner - On his own authority he sent a messenger to invite him back, to have some farther communication with the king; and when Abner was come into Joab's presence, the latter, partly from jealousy lest Abner might become his superior, and partly to revenge his brother Asahel's death, mortally stabbed him in the act of Salutation
Hosanna - It is hardly necessary to tell the reader, that it was with this Salutation the multitude hailed Christ, in his public entrance into Jerusalem, five days before his death
Kiss - 1); the stronger force of this verb has been called in question, but the change from phileo to kataphileo in Matthew 26:49 ; Mark 14:45 can scarcely be without significance, and the act of the traitor was almost certainly more demonstrative than the simple kiss of Salutation
Save - As salve is used in Latin for Salutation or wishing health, as hail is in English, I suspect this word to be from the root of heal or hail, the first letter being changed
Titus, Epistle to - The writer accosts his two friends with the same Salutation, and passes on to the business of his letter by the same transition (Compare 1 Timothy 1:2,3 with Titus 1:4,5 ; Apocalypse - " ...
The introduction (1:1 to 3:22) gives the title and description of the book and, after a prefatory Salutation, seven Epistles to various Churches of Asia Minor, commending those who are faithful, reproving and warning the lukewarm and the sinful
Colossians, Epistle to the - '...
After the Salutation, and thanking God for what Paul had heard of their faith (for apparently he had not been to Colosse) he at once prays for them that they might be filled with the full knowledge of God's will; might walk worthy of the Lord, pleasing Him in all things; and might be strengthened with all power. Salutations follow. ) A message to Archippus: the Salutation by the hand of Paul, and a request to remember his bonds close the epistle with "Grace be with you
Thessalonians - Paul begins with the same Salutation as in the former epistle, and then expresses his devout acknowledgments to God for the increasing faith and mutual love of the Thessalonians in the midst of persecution; he represents to them the rewards which will be bestowed upon the faithful, and the punishment which will be inflicted upon the disobedient, at the coming of Christ, 2 Thessalonians 1; he earnestly entreats them not to suppose, as upon authority from him, or upon any other ground, that the last day is at hand; he assures them, that before that awful period a great apostasy will take place, and reminds them of some information which he had given them upon that subject when he was at Thessalonica; he exhorts them to steadfastness in their faith, and prays to God to comfort their hearts, and establish them in every good word and work, 2 Thessalonians 2; he desires their prayers for the success of his ministry, and expresses his confidence in their sincerity; he cautions them against associating with idle and disorderly persons, and recommends diligence and quietness. He adds a Salutation in his own hand, and concludes with his usual benediction
Abba - Hence, among many proofs in point, which might be given in confirmation of this sameness of manners, the mode of Salutation is one, in which there is nothing changed. ) In the days of the Judges, the Salutation was the same. From inferiors, in giving what is called the Asslem-mah, (Salutation) they always offer it, by laying their right hand upon their breast
Caves - Owing to the abundance of grottoes in the valley of Jehoshaphat, tradition assigns to them the sites of such unlikely events to occur in them as the birth of the Virgin, the annunciation, the Salutation, the Baptist's and our Lord's birth, the agony, Peter's denial, the composition of the Apostles' Creed, and the transfiguration
Bow - ) To incline the head in token of Salutation, civility, or assent; to make bow
Letter Form And Function - These parties are usually identified with the Salutation formula “X to Y: Greetings” (Acts 15:23 ; Acts 23:26 ; James 1:1 ). In secular Greek letters a wish (or prayer) for the recipient's good health often follows the Salutation
Leprosy - He had further to warn passers-by to keep away from him, by calling out, 'Unclean! unclean!' nor could he speak to any one, or receive or return a Salutation, since in the East this involves an embrace
Colossians, Epistle to the - He then closes this brief but striking epistle with his usual autograph Salutation
Token - Paul, referring to the concluding Salutation written by his own hand, says that it ‘is the “token” (σημεῖον) in every epistle. These authenticating words might consist of the bare Salutation, as in the present passage, or might contain other words in addition (cf
Peace (2) - This also is the connotation of ‘Peace!’ when used as a form of Salutation (Matthew 10:12-13 = Luke 10:5-6; Luke 24:36, John 20:19; John 20:21; John 20:26); though, as employed by our Lord, and by His disciples according to His instructions, the Salutation is weighted with the larger Messianic meaning (see below). ‘Peace’ was the Salutation which both the Twelve and the Seventy were bidden to use when sent forth on their respective missions (Matthew 10:12 f. And in all these cases it seems evident that ‘Peace be unto you!’ and ‘Go in peace!’ are not merely conventional forms of Salutation or farewell, but refer to the blessings guaranteed by Jesus as the Christ of God. ‘Peace,’ indeed, becomes, like grace, a virtual summary for gospel blessings, and so in the benedictory Salutations of nearly every Apostolic writer it is combined with ‘grace’ as the distinctive gift of ‘God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ’ (Romans 1:7, 1 Corinthians 1:3, 2 Corinthians 1:2, Galatians 1:3, Ephesians 1:2, Philippians 1:2, Colossians 1:2, 1 Thessalonians 1:1, 2 Thessalonians 1:2, 1 Timothy 1:2, Titus 1:4, Philemon 1:3, 1 Peter 1:2, 2 Peter 1:2, 2 John 1:3, Judges 1:2)
Tertius - His personal Salutation does not necessarily imply that he was known to those to whom the letter was directed. If we suppose that the Salutations were sent to Ephesian Christians, we may conjecture that Tertius had met many of them on the missionary journeys on which he may have accompanied St
Easter Day - " In the early Church Christianswere wont to greet one another on this day with the joyoussalutation, "Christ is Risen," to which the response was made,"Christ is risen indeed. This joyous Salutation seems to be retained in ourservices, for instead of the Venite we have as the Invitatory,the Easter anthem, in which we call upon one another to "keep theFeast," for that "Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us," andis also "Risen from the dead; and become the first-fruits of themthat slept
Gestures - See Hand, Mourning Customs, Salutation
Narcissus - As the Salutation to these Christians is preceded by a greeting to ‘Herodion my kinsman,’ it is conjectured that Herodion was a member of the household of Narcissus and the nucleus of the community or church
Bishop - In the Salutation to his Epistle to the Philippians he greeted “the bishops and deacons” of the church at Philippi (Acts 1:1 )
Market, Market-Place - There men met and greetings were exchanged, a scale of distinction being carefully observed, from the recognition accorded to equals and neighbours up to the Salutation offered to those whom it was prudent or becoming to hold in honour on account of seniority, family connexion, worldly prosperity, or religious position (Matthew 23:7, Luke 11:43)
Epaenetus - Assuming the Roman destination of these Salutations, Epaenetus must have been at the time of writing resident in or on a visit to Rome. ) But the reference to Epaenetus, together with the Salutation of Prisca and Aquila (v. Epaenetus, as the senior Christian, had a position of responsibility; and that he was actually a leader would appear from his place in these Salutations-second only to ‘Prisca and Aquila my fellow-workers’ (Romans 16:3)
Alexander And Rufus - Paul’s Epistle to the Philippians, written from Rome, occurs a Salutation sent to the Church at Philippi from Caesar’s household (Philippians 4:22)
Write, Wrote, Written - is undoubtedly a holograph), where again the equivalent English translation is in the present tense (see also Acts 15:23 ; Romans 15:15 ); possibly the Apostle, in Galatians, was referring to his having "written" the body of the Epistle but the former alternative seems the more likely; in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 he says that the closing Salutation is written by his own hand and speaks of it as "the token in every Epistle" which some understand as a purpose for the future rather than a custom; see, however, 1 Corinthians 16:21 ; Colossians 4:18
Kerygma - ...
Paul includes in the opening Salutation of his Letter to Titus a reference to the proclamation. Thus, throughout the Salutation "truth, " "knowledge, " "promise, " "word, " and "preaching" (kerygmati [1]) all refer to the message or the gospel Paul proclaims
Greeting - A Salutation on meeting; an expression of good wishes at the opening (or in Hellenistic times times also the close) of a letter
Moon - Cautions against the worship of the moon, and punishment by death for the convicted worshippers, are to be found in Deuteronomy 4:19 ; Deuteronomy 17:3 ; whilst a superstitious Salutation of the moon by kissing the hand, not quite unheard of even in our own day, is mentioned in Job 31:26-27
Zacchaeus - If we look for an explanation of the wonderful transformation, implicated in the resolve in which Zacchaeus gave expression to his feelings, we find it, undoubtedly, in the delightful frankness of Christ’s first Salutation, and in His courageous brushing aside of popular prejudice
Mary - A Christian woman in Rome to whom Paul sends his Salutation
Titus, Epistle to - ...
After the introductory Salutation in which the counsels of God are referred to, and the acknowledging of truth which is according to piety, Paul states for what purpose he had left Titus at Crete: 1, to set in order things that were still left incomplete; and 2, to establish elders in every city, which elders are in Titus 1:7 called 'bishops,' or overseers
Hand - The ceremony of putting the fight hand on the New Testament in the administration of oaths, and the ordinary Salutation of friends, by the shaking of the hand, are proofs in point
Blessing And Cursing - ...
Words of blessing also are used as a Salutation or greeting, with an invocation of blessing as a stronger greeting than “peace” (shalom , Genesis 48:20 ). As such it may be used in meeting (Genesis 47:7 ), departing (Genesis 24:60 ), by messengers (1 Samuel 25:14 ), in gratitude (Job 31:20 ), as a morning Salutation (Proverbs 27:14 ), congratulations for prosperity (Genesis 12:3 ), in homage (2 Samuel 14:22 ), and in friendliness (2 Samuel 21:3 )
Thom'as - He uttered the same Salutation, "Peace be unto you;" and then turning to Thomas, as if this had been the special object of his appearance, uttered the words which convey as strongly the sense of condemnation and tender reproof as those of Thomas had shown the sense of hesitation and doubt
Titus, Epistle to - Salutation (2 Timothy 1:1-4 )...
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Friend - Friend is a word of ordinary Salutation, whether to a friend or foe: he is called friend who had not on a wedding garment, Matthew 22:12
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - Hence in both he begins with warm commendations, and drops the official title of "apostle" in the Salutation. Some professed to know by "the Spirit" (2 Thessalonians 2:2) it was so, others declared Paul when with them had said so; a letter purporting to be from him to that effect was circulated among them (2 Thessalonians 2:2, in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 he marks his autograph Salutation as the test whereby to know his genuine letters). )...
(3) 2 Thessalonians 3:1-16; exhorts to orderly conduct, prays the God of peace in their behalf, autograph Salutation and blessing
Salutations - Salutations are friendly greetings, literary and otherwise, which Christianity took over from the social life of antiquity, but filled with a new content of Divine love and made a symbol of a common brotherhood in Christ. Erhes thinks that these were actual Salutations sent to Rome by the Apostle, occasioned perhaps by these embassies and letters; and that this beautiful message covering with renown these humble and faithful workers might not be lost, they inserted it in the most appropriate place in the Epistle to the Romans. ] ...
The religious interest, however, so predominates in the NT that Salutations like those in Romans 16 are rare. Paul, or were actually present when he dictated this letter, join in his Salutation; ‘All the saints salute you, especially they that are of Caesar’s household’ (Philippians 4:22), where we are reminded of what recent research in inscriptions has shown, not to speak of the literary evidence-that converts, and some of them of high rank, were in the Imperial Court, besides many in the city of the highest circles. Even their Salutations must first be given to them. The Salutation by the kiss was taken over under Christianity as a matter of course, but, like everything else, purified and sanctified. Athenagoras quotes an extra-canonical Scripture warning against an abuse of the kiss, saying that ‘the kiss, or rather the Salutation, should be given with the greatest care; since, if there be mixed with it the least defilement of thought, it excludes us from eternal life’ (Legat. ‘Salutations
Romans - Paul gives some practical instructions, and recommends some particular virtues; and he concludes with a Salutation and a doxology
Aichmalotarch - After the first Salutation, the prince represented the grievances, or discussed the affairs, of his people
Hospitality - " This reminds us of the guests of Abraham, Genesis 18:1-33 , of the conduct of Job, Job 31:17 , and of the frankness with which the apostles of Christ were to enter into a man's house after a Salutation, and there to continue "eating and drinking such things as were set before them," Luke 10:7
Levites - They were also the temple guards, Nehemiah 13:13,22 ; and the Salutation and response in Psalm 134:1-3 are thought by Bishop Lowth to have been their song in the night
Grace - Hence the correspondence between the common Greek Salutation chaire ( te ) or chairein (‘Joy to you!’) and the Christian charis (‘Grace to you!’) is more than a verbal coincidence. Ten of the latter examples belong to Salutation-formulæ (so in Revelation 22:21 ), the fullest of these being 2 Corinthians 13:14 , where ‘the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ’ is referred to ‘the love of God’ as its fountain-head; In the remaining five detached instances the context dictates the combination ‘grace of Christ’ (‘our Lord,’ etc
Mark, John - A friendly Salutation is not the place where an enigmatically prophetical title would be used (Revelation 17:5)
Colosse - Paul assures them, that since he had heard of their faith in Christ Jesus, and of their love to all Christians, he had not ceased to return thanks to God for them, and to pray that they might increase in spiritual knowledge, and abound in every good work; he describes the dignity of Christ, and declares the universality of the Gospel dispensation, which was a mystery formerly hidden, but now made manifest; and he mentions his own appointment, through the grace of God, to be the Apostle of the Gentiles; he expresses a tender concern for the Colossians and other Christians of Phrygia, and cautions them against being seduced from the simplicity of the Gospel, by the subtlety of Pagan philosophers, or the superstition of Judaizing Christians; he directs them to set their affections on things above, and forbids every species of licentiousness; he exhorts to a variety of Christian virtues, to meekness, veracity, humility, charity, and devotion; he enforces the duties of wives, husbands, children, fathers, servants, and masters; he inculcates the duty of prayer, and of prudent behaviour toward unbelievers; and after adding the Salutations of several persons then at Rome, and desiring that this epistle might be read in the church of their neighbours the Laodiceans, he concludes with a Salutation from himself, written, as usual, with his own hand
Titus - Paul, after his usual Salutation, intimates that he was appointed an apostle by the express command of God, and reminds Titus of the reason of his being left in Crete; he describes the qualifications necessary for bishops, and cautions him against persons of bad principles, especially Judaizing teachers, whom he directs Titus to reprove with severity; he informs him what instructions he should give to people in different situations of life, and exhorts him to be exemplary in his own conduct; he points out the pure and practical nature of the Gospel, and enumerates some particular virtues which he was to inculcate, avoiding foolish questions and frivolous disputes; he instructs him how he is to behave toward heretics, and concludes with Salutations
Book - To other letters he only affixed his Salutation with his own hand, 1 Corinthians 16:21 Colossians 4:18 2 Thessalonians 3:17
Sun - In the Book of Deuteronomy ( Deuteronomy 4:19 ) there is a caution against sun-worship , and the punishment of death by stoning is assigned to the convicted worshipper of the sun ( Deuteronomy 17:3 ), whilst in Job ( Job 31:26 ) there is an allusion to a superstitious Salutation of the sun by the kissing of the hand
Rachel - Jacob's first interview, courteous removal of the stone at the well's mouth, emotion, and kissing her in the usual mode of Salutation in pastoral life in the East in those days, are simply and graphically narrated; his love to her making his seven years' service "seem but a few days"; the imposition of Leah upon him, his second term of service for her, and his receiving her in marriage
Reverence - The terms ἀσπάζειν, ‘to salute,’ and ἀσπασμός, ‘salutation’ (Mark 9:15; Mark 15:18, Luke 1:29-41), are also expressive of reverential regard
Voice - Luke 1:44, ‘the voice of thy Salutation,’ or the sound of thunder, wind, water, and musical instruments
Pre-Eminence - , 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10; 2 Thessalonians 2:8-12); God’s Son (1 Thessalonians 1:10), and associated with God in Salutation and prayer (1 Thessalonians 1:1, 2 Thessalonians 1:1 f. This linking of Christ and the Father in Salutation, and the ascribing to Him what is ascribed to God, are regular features of St
Thomas - On the next Lord's day, Thomas, laying aside his morbid isolation, attended the weekly assembly of disciples; though the doors were shut Jesus came and stood in the midst with His wonted Salutation, cf6 "Peace be unto you"; then saith He to Thomas, with grave yet tender reproof (showing that He knew all that had passed in Thomas's mind and all he had said to his fellow disciples), cf6 "reach here thy finger, and behold My hands, and reach here thy hand, and thrust it into My side; and be ("become", ginou ) not faithless but believing"
Letter - ...
The Salutation is the only letter characteristic that has been positively identified in the Book of James
Corinth - The Apostle might still, from his celestial abode, give the Salutation of peace to his children, and address them in the words, "Paul to the church of God, which is at Corinth
Mary, the Virgin - When in "fear she cast in her mind what might the meaning of the Salutation be," the angel reassured her by the promise, "behold thou shalt conceive in thy womb and bring forth a son, and shalt call His name Jesus. On Mary's saluting Elisabeth the latter hailed her as "mother of her Lord," inasmuch as at her Salutation "the babe leaped in her womb for joy," adding, in contrast to Zacharias whose unbelief had brought its own punishment," blessed is she that believed, for there shall be a performance of those things told her from the Lord
Seventy (2) - ’ Peace was and still is the favourite Eastern Salutation; the Kingdom of God was the Jews’ highest aspiration. ’ The ‘time when he should be received up ‘was at hand: there were many places still to be visited; delay in preparing the way must be avoided; the profuse and elaborate Salutations, customary on a journey, must be forgone. 328–329) describes graphically the Salutation of two Orientals in Palestine even at the present day
Banquet - The first ceremony, after the guests arrived at the house of entertainment, was the Salutation performed by the master of the house, or one appointed in his place. Among the Greeks, this was sometimes done by embracing with arms around; but the most common Salutation was by the conjunction of their right hands, the right hand being reckoned a pledge of fidelity and friendship
Peace - In relation to organic processes it stands for health (Genesis 29:6), and this, in part at least, gives rise to the employment of the word in the formula of Salutation, although the wider sense of security of one’s actions and interests in general enters likewise into this usage (Genesis 41:16). In this sense we find the word in the Salutations at the beginning or close of the Epistles, usually associated with χάρις (Romans 1:7, 1 Corinthians 1:3, 2 Corinthians 1:2; 2 Corinthians 13:11, Galatians 1:3; Galatians 6:16, Ephesians 1:2; Ephesians 6:23 [3], Philippians 1:2, Colossians 1:2, 1 Thessalonians 1:1, 2 Thessalonians 1:2; 2 Thessalonians 3:16, 1 Timothy 1:2, 2 Timothy 1:2, Titus 1:4, Philemon 1:3, 1 Peter 1:2; 1 Peter 5:14, 2 Peter 1:2, 2 John 1:3, 3 John 1:14, Revelation 1:4). This goes back in the last analysis to the use of the word in ordinary social Salutation, which in the OT already refers not exclusively to friendly intercourse, but also to positive well-being, including health and general security
Ephesians, Epistle to - It contains (1) the Salutation (1:1,2); (2) a general description of the blessings the gospel reveals, as to their source, means by which they are attained, purpose for which they are bestowed, and their final result, with a fervent prayer for the further spiritual enrichment of the (Ephesians (1:3-2:10);); (3) "a record of that marked change in spiritual position which the Gentile believers now possessed, ending with an account of the writer's selection to and qualification for the apostolate of heathendom, a fact so considered as to keep them from being dispirited, and to lead him to pray for enlarged spiritual benefactions on his absent sympathizers" ((2:12-3:21);); (4) a chapter on unity as undisturbed by diversity of gifts (4:1-16); (5) special injunctions bearing on ordinary life ((4:17-6:10);); (6) the imagery of a spiritual warfare, mission of Tychicus, and valedictory blessing (6:11-24)
Kiss - (see 2 Samuel 20:9) And yet more, in an infinitely greater degree, when Judas hailed Christ with the awful Salutation, "Joy to thee Rabbi, (for so hail means) and kissed him?" (Matthew 26:49) In the former instance, Joab took Amasa by the beard, we are told, which was an action betokening the highest regard of affection: for as the beard was always considered the chief honour and ornament of a man, so to touch it or kiss it was considered the highest proof of respect
Babylon, Mystical - " A friendly Salutation is hardly the place wherein to find mystical phraseology
Harvest - Nor ought we to pass over in silence the mutual Salutation of Boaz and his reapers, when he came to the field, as it strongly marks the state of religious feeling in Israel at the time, and furnishes another proof of the artless, the happy, and unsuspecting simplicity, which characterized the manners of that highly favoured people
Philemon, Epistle to - there is also close connexion in the fact that Onesimus was a Colossian ( Colossians 4:9 ), and in the Salutations in both Epistles from Epaphras, Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke. Paul’s religious faith that this private letter in its Salutation, thanksgiving, and benediction is as loftily devout as any Epistle to the Churches
Thessalonians Epistles to the - -After the opening Salutation (1 Thessalonians 1:1), which represents a combination of the conventional Greek and Hebrew greetings of the period (χάρις καὶ εἰρήνη), the Epistle falls into two sections. -(1) The Salutation (1 Thessalonians 2:18) leads up to a thanksgiving for the readers’ spiritual progress, especially for their endurance under persecution. The Epistle closes with a Salutation in Paul’s own handwriting
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - ) The Salutation which he transmits from believers in Italy implies that Rome was the place of writing (Hebrews 13:24). ...
The epistle ends in the Pauline manner with exhortations and prayers for them, and especially his wonted apostolic Salutation, "grace be with you all," his "token (of identification) in every epistle" (2 Thessalonians 3:17-18; so 1 Corinthians 16:21-23; Colossians 4:18)
Joseph And Mary - At the angel's Salutation she did not swoon nor cry out. But like the heavenly-minded maiden she was, she cast in her mind what manner of Salutation this should be
Hebrews, Epistle to - The general Salutation of Hebrews 13:24 is similar to what is found in most of the NT Epistles (cf. On the other hand, the only direct internal evidence pointing to the readers’ relations with Rome is found in the Salutation, ‘They of Italy salute you’ ( Hebrews 13:24 )
Entry Into Jerusalem - with enclitic, הוֹשַׁעצָא, is evidently a Salutation = ‘greeting to (cf. , was used in Salutation, it contains an allusion to the preceding Feast of Tabernacles, expresses the convictions of many of the people, and offers a remarkable parallel to Psalms 118:25-27
Thessalonians, First Epistle to the - A general admonition to the church to respect its leaders and to cultivate peace ( 1 Thessalonians 5:12-13 ) leads out into a beautiful series of short exhortations, like a ‘string of glittering diamonds’ ( 1 Thessalonians 5:14-22 ), prayer and Salutation ( 1618542529_8 ), an injunction that the letter be read to all the brethren ( 1 Thessalonians 5:27 ), and final benediction ( 1 Thessalonians 5:28 )
Colossians, Epistle to the - After the usual Salutation, thanksgiving, and prayer, in which St
Blessing (2) - †
Besides the Salutation, other forms of blessing prevailed, notably the blessing of children by parents (and sometimes by others)
Philippians - Salutation (Philippians 1:1-2 )...
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Jude, Epistle of - ) Salutation, Judges 1:1-2
Judge Judging (Ethical) - They are to pronounce anathema on the proclaimer of ‘another’ gospel (Galatians 1:9), and to refuse hospitality to a false teacher, on the ground that a welcome or Salutation involves participation in his evil works (2 John 1:10 f
James Epistle of - The Salutation, ‘James … to the twelve tribes … giveth joy’ (James 1:1), supplies the key-word for the apparently abrupt opening: ‘And joy unmixed count it, brethren, when …’ (James 1:2). are: (α) the unassuming character of the writer’s self-designation, which makes against forgery, while his authoritative tone implies a position of influence; (β) the number of apparent echoes from sayings of Jesus, which yet never take the form of quotations from the Gospels; (γ) the number of linguistic coincidences with the speech of James at the Apostolic Conference, and the Decree, which was apparently drafted by him (salutation χαίρειν [3]; name called ‘upon’ persons [16] [17]; ‘hearken, brethren’ [James
James, the Letter - Salutation (James 1:1 )...
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John, the Letters of - The Salutation of Love for Those Who Know the Truth (1-2) ...
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Joy - In view of all this, it may be surmised that the conventional formula of Salutation by means of χαίρειν has perhaps, when used among believers, acquired a deeper meaning (cf
Timotheus - Paul, after his usual Salutation, assures Timothy of his most affectionate remembrance; he speaks of his own apostleship and of his sufferings; exhorts Timothy to be steadfast in the true faith, to be constant and diligent in the discharge of his ministerial office, to avoid foolish and unlearned questions, and to practise and inculcate the great duties of the Gospel; he describes the apostasy and general wickedness of the last days, and highly commends the Holy Scriptures; he again solemnly exhorts Timothy to diligence: speaks of his own danger, and of his hope of future reward; and concludes with several private directions, and with Salutations
Philippians Epistle to the - Not even in Philippians 4:21, the final Salutation, where one might naturally expect it, is Timothy mentioned. Paul associates with himself in the closing Salutation the brethren, οἱ σὺν ἐμοὶ ἀδελφοί (Philippians 4:22)
Thessalonians, Second Epistle to the - ...
Salutation (Acts 1:1-2 ); thanksgiving (with prayer) for their growth in faith and love in the midst of affliction patiently endured, with assurance of God’s vengeance upon their persecutors ( Acts 1:3-12 ); warning that the ‘day of the Lord’ is not yet, but must be heralded by certain signs ( Acts 2:1-12 ); renewed thanksgiving, exhortation, and prayer ( Acts 2:13-17 )
Labour (2) - —See three remarkable addresses on social service by Westcott in his Christian Aspects of Life, especially that on ‘The Christian Law,’ in which he quotes from Bishop Tucker of Uganda the Salutation ordinarily addressed in that country to a man engaged in manual labour, ‘Many thanks; well done
Benedictus - It is abundantly clear that the Song was composed in the light both of the Annunciation made to the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:35-38) and of the inspired Salutation wherewith she was greeted by Elisabeth (Luke 1:43)
Mary - Then turn to the evangelist Luke, (Luke 1:35) where we find, at the visit of the angel to Mary, to inform her of the miraculous conception, when Mary expressed her astonishment at the Salutation, and modestly intimated the impossibility of the thing, the angel made this remarkable answer: "The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee; therefore, also, that holy thing which shall be born of thee, shall be called the Son of God
Timothy, Epistles to - ...
After a Salutation in which he desires mercy for Timothy, as well as grace and peace, Paul thanks God, whom he had served from his forefathers with pure (not always enlightened) conscience, having Timothy in unceasing remembrance in prayer, calling to mind his unfeigned faith and that of his maternal ancestors; and he desires that Timothy would rekindle the gift that he had received by the imposition of Paul's hands, for God had given, not a spirit of cowardice, but of power, of love, and of a wise discretion. Salutations and the benediction close the epistle
Hebrews - Paul begin with a Salutation in his own name, and that, in the Epistle to the Hebrews, there is nothing of that kind; but this omission can scarcely be considered as conclusive against positive testimony. Paul might have reasons for departing, upon this occasion, from his usual mode of Salutation, which we at this distant period cannot discover
Magnificat - ...
Having described the visit of the Virgin Mary to Elisabeth, and Elisabeth’s Salutation, the Textus Receptus has καὶ εἶπεν [1] with the variant reading Ἐλισάβετ
Romans, Epistle to the - At the time of writing, Paul and Timothy are together, for the latter’s name appears in the Salutation ( 1 Corinthians 16:21 ). The following is a brief analysis of the argument: ...
The Salutation is unusually long, extending to seven verses, in which St. The last chapter contains a recommendation of Phœbe who brings the letter, and a number of detailed Salutations to individual members of the Church, and to some house-churches
Trinity - The third passage is the following Salutation or benediction in the beginning of the Revelation of St. " Here the Father is described by a periphrasis taken from his attribute of eternity; and "the seven spirits" is a mystical expression for the Holy Ghost, used upon this occasion either because the Salutation is addressed to seven churches, every one of which had partaken of the Spirit
Galatians, Theology of - Already in the Salutation, which is longer than usual, Paul addresses the major issues, such as the divine origin of his apostleship and the redeeming character of Christ's work
Joy (2) - Another strange attendant circumstance of the joy of these days that preceded our Lord’s incarnation is the utterance of Elisabeth, who, when Mary, the predestined mother of the Messiah, comes to visit her, cries out in an ecstasy of wonder and joy, ‘Behold, when the voice of thy Salutation came into mine ears, the babe leapt in my womb for joy’ (Luke 1:44)
Ananias And Sapphira - " That was a terrible Salutation for a man to be met with who had just sold a possession and laid such a large part of the price at the apostle's feet
Synagogue - The first service was merely a Salutation or blessing, namely, "The Lord be with you," or, "Peace be with you
Ephesians, Book of - Salutation: The apostle greets the church (Ephesians 1:1-2 )
Lord (2) - (1) Without the article, it is employed in direct address, as the Salutation of a son to a father, ‘I go, sir’ (Matthew 21:30); of servants to their master, ‘Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field?’ (Matthew 13:27); ‘Lord, let it alone this year also’ (Luke 13:8); of the Greeks to Philip, ‘Sir, we would see Jesus’ (John 12:21); of the Pharisees and priests to Pilate, ‘Sir, we remember that this deceiver said’ (Matthew 27:63)
New Testament - Paul, like Cicero or Pliny often employed the services of an amanuensis, to whom he dictated his letters, affixing the Salutation "with his own hand
Michal, Saul's Daughter - The fast-dying ashes of her first love for David would have been blown up into all their former flame as she shared in the splendid Salutation that David received from the assembled land
Peter, Second Epistle of - The Epistle opens with a Salutation from Simon Peter to readers who, through the righteousness of God, have been admitted to the full privileges of the Apostolic faith
Holy Spirit - ’ Essentially the same formulation is found in the Salutation of 1 Peter (1 Peter 1:2), and in a like sense we must interpret the baptismal formula in Matthew 28:19, where the one Name into which the nations are to be baptized embraces the Son and the Spirit as well as the Father, because the work of calling man to God and of bringing him within the Divine grace is effected by Christ through the medium of the Spirit
Paul as a Pastor - I, Paul, the servant of the Lord, is his Salutation and seal in every Epistle of his
Ephesians Epistle to the - Salutation. ’ This is its sense in the Pauline Salutations and in Ephesians 3:8, and it is thus possible to conceive St
Galatians Epistle to the - The customary Salutation is so framed, with its insistence on the writer’s apostolic authority, as to lead up to the main subject of the Epistle
Marriage - It can hardly mean unmarried women included in the order of widows, for Ignatius in that case would have omitted in his Salutation all those who were literally widows, and such a custom is treated as unheard of by Tertullian (Virg
Grace - In the Salutation of the letter (1:3), one gets a greeting that follows on from a strongly worded theological statement about sanctification and calling (1:2) and that leads into a statement about grace in 1:4 demonstrating the theological import Paul intends. A similar seriousness could be argued about the other Salutations in Paul's letters
Hebrews Epistle to the - ...
Yet, notwithstanding these general characteristics and the absence of any opening Salutation, the Epistle is not to be regarded as a theological essay addressed to Christendom in general
Colossians, Epistle to the - ...
A short passage follows in which brief words of counsel are addressed to wives, husbands, children, fathers, servants, masters (Colossians 3:18 to Colossians 4:1), and one or two general exhortations lead up to the Salutations with which the letter closes (Colossians 4:2-18). Finally, it would be most remarkable, in a letter written from Caesarea, that there should be no Salutation from Philip. wore probably sent together, it has caused comment that there is some variation in the Salutations
John, Epistles of - ’ On the other hand, it is urged that this mystical interpretation destroys the simplicity and natural meaning of the letter (see especially 1 Peter 5:5 ; 1 Peter 5:10 ), that the church being constituted of members, the distinction between the ‘lady’ and her ‘children’ would disappear, and that if the lady be a private person of influence the parallel with the form of Salutation to another private person in the Third Epistle is complete
Apocalypse - ...
(a)Introduction, including Salutation, theme, attestation, Revelation 1:4-8
Book - But he affixed the Salutation with his own hand, 2 Thessalonians 3:17 ; 1 Corinthians 16:21 ; Colossians 4:18
Peter Epistles of - -The content of this Epistle may be outlined as follows:...
(a) Salutation (1 Peter 1:1 f
Revelation, the - " The closing Salutation is "The grace of the Lord Jesus be with the saints
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - -(a) Opening Salutation from ‘the Church of God which sojourneth in Rome to the Church of God which sojourneth in Corinth
Augustinus, Aurelius - He began a continuous commentary on the Epistle, but only succeeded in completing the Salutation
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - —Antiquity furnishes authority for three suppositions: (a) the author was the Hermas to whom a Salutation is sent in Rom_16:14; or (b) brother to Pius bp