What does Rhegium mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ῥήγιον an Italian town situated on the Bruttian coast 1

Definitions Related to Rhegium

G4484


   1 an Italian town situated on the Bruttian coast, just at the southern entrance of the Straits of Messina.
   Additional Information: Rhegium = “breach”.
   

Frequency of Rhegium (original languages)

Frequency of Rhegium (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Rhegium
RHEGIUM (now Reggio ) was an old Greek colony near the south-western extremity of Italy, and close to the point from which there is the shortest passage to Sicily. Messana (modern Messina) on the opposite side is but 6 or 7 miles distant from Rhegium. The whirlpool of Charybdis and the rock of Scylla are in this neighbourhood, and were a terror to the ancient navigators with their small vessels. Rhegium was in consequence a harbour of importance, where favourable winds were awaited. The situation of the city exposed it to changes of government. In the 3rd cent. b.c. Rome entered into a special treaty with it. In NT times the population was mixed Græco-Latin. St. Paul’s ship waited here one day for a favourable south wind to take her to Puteoli. Acts 28:13 describes how the ship had to tack to get from Syracuse to Rhegium, owing to the changing winds.
A. Souter.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Rhegium
Rupture; fracture
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Rhegium
Breach, a town in the south of Italy, on the Strait of Messina, at which Paul touched on his way to Rome (Acts 28:13 ). It is now called Rheggio.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Rhegium
(rhee' jih um) Place name either derived from the Greek rhegnym (rent, torn) or from the Latin regium (royal). Port located at the southwestern tip of the Italian boot about seven miles across the strait of Messina from Sicily. Paul stopped there en route to Rome ( Acts 28:13 ). Rhegium was settled by Greek colonists and retained Greek language and institutions into the first century.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Rhegium
(Ῥήλιον, now Reggio)
Rhegium was an ancient Greek colony, mainly of Chalcidians, in the south of Italy. Commanding the southern entrance to the Sicilian Straits, It had great strategic importance, and willingly or un willingly played a part in many wars. For a time it held its own among the leading cities of Magna Graecia, but in revenge for a slighted Offer of friendship it was totally destroyed by Dionysius, the tyrant of Syracuse (387 b.c.). From this calamity it never quite recovered, but it profited by fidelity to Rome in the Punic Wars and to Augustus in the Civil Wars. Re-peopled by the Emperor, it assumed the name of ‘Rhegium Julium.’ Strabo, in the beginning of our era, speaks of it as ‘tolerably well peopled,’ and as one of three cities founded by the Greeks in Italy-the others were Neapolis and Tarentum-that had not become barbarian, i.e. lost the language and manners of their mother-country (VI. i. 6). Since 134 b.c., it had a further importance as the terminus of the Via Popilia, which branched from the Via Appia at Capua and traversed southern Italy. The actual place of crossing to Messana (now Messina) was, and still is, about 8 miles north of the city, at Columna Rhegina (ἡ Ῥηγίνων στυλίς), now Villa San Giovanni, where the channel is only 5 miles wide.
In view of the destruction of Reggio by earthquake in 1908, when 35,000 out of 40,000 inhabitants perished, Strabo’s words, with their curious mingling of fact and fancy, are Striking. ‘It was called Rhegium, as aeschylus says, because of the convulsion which had taken place in this region; for Sicily wan broken from the continent by Earthquakes.… But now these months [1] being opened, through which the fire is drawn up, and the ardent masses and water poured out, they say that the land in the neighbourhood of the Sicilian Strait rarely suffers From the effect of earthquakes; but formerly all the passages to the surface being blocked up, the fire which was smouldering beneath the earth, together with the vapour, occasioned terrible earthquakes’ (VI. i. 6).
To indicate the course of St. Paul’s ship from Syracuse to Rhegium, St. Luke, who was evidently impressed by the good seamanship of the crew, uses a nautical term (περιελθόντες) which has perplexed exegetes (Acts 28:13). Probably it means ‘by tacking.’ This explanation was suggested by J. Smith, who writes, ‘I am inclined to suppose that the wind was north-west, and that they worked to windward’ (The Voyage and Shipwreck of St. Paul4, 1880, p. 156). This translation is now generally adopted in place of ‘we fetched a compass’ (Authorized Version ) or ‘we made a circuit’ (Revised Version ). The alternative reading in אB-περιελόντες, ‘casting loose’-was probably due to copyists who were not at home in the language of men of the sea. Arriving at Rhegium, the crew had to wait a day for a favourable wind. If the north-west breeze was still blowing, they could not go through the Straits, where there is scarcely enough sea-room for successful tacking; but when the wind veered to south they ran before it to Puteoli, a distance of 180 miles, in little more than a day (28:13).
Literature.-C. Baedeker, southern Italy and sicily12, London, 1896, P. Larissa, Rhegium Chalcidense, Rome, 1905.
James Strahan.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rhegium
A city in the S. of Italy, at the southern entrance of the straits of Messina, opposite Sicily; now Reggio. Here Paul (sailing from Syracuse) landed on his way to Rome and stopped a day (Acts 28:13). By curious coincidence the figures on its extant coins are the "twin brothers, Castor and Pollux," from whom Paul's ship was named. The intermediate position of Rhegium between Syracuse and Puteoli, his waiting there for a S. wind to carry the ship through the straits, the run to Puteoli within the 24 hours, all accord with geographical accuracy. The distance of Rhegium across the straits to Messina is about six miles.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Rhegium
A city of Italy mentioned in Paul's travels. (Acts 28:13)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Rhegium
Rhegium (rç'ji-ŭm), breach. A city on the coast near the southwestern end of Italy, Paul was detained at this place for a day when on his voyage to Rome. Acts 28:13. It is now called Rheggio, the capital of Calabria, having about 10,000 inhabitants.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rhegium
Now Reggio, capital of the province of Calabria Ultra, in the kingdom of Naples, on the coast near the south-west extremity of Italy, eight miles south-east of Messina in Sicily. The ship in which Paul was on his way to Rome touched here, Acts 28:13,14 . Rhegium was a city of considerable note in ancient times. The modern city was nearly destroyed by an earthquake in 1783, and now contains about eighteen thousand inhabitants.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rhegium
Town on the east coast of Sicily, at the entrance of the Straits of Messina, where Saint Paul spent a day on his journey to Rome (Acts 28); the modern Reggio.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rhegium
City on the coast of Italy, near its south-east extremity. The ship in which Paul sailed touched there on the journey to Rome. Acts 28:13 . It is now called Reggio.

Sentence search

Rhegium - Rhegium (now Reggio ) was an old Greek colony near the south-western extremity of Italy, and close to the point from which there is the shortest passage to Sicily. Messana (modern Messina) on the opposite side is but 6 or 7 miles distant from Rhegium. Rhegium was in consequence a harbour of importance, where favourable winds were awaited. Acts 28:13 describes how the ship had to tack to get from Syracuse to Rhegium, owing to the changing winds
Rhegium - The intermediate position of Rhegium between Syracuse and Puteoli, his waiting there for a S. The distance of Rhegium across the straits to Messina is about six miles
Rhegium - Rhegium (rç'ji-ŭm), breach
Rhegium - (Ῥήλιον, now Reggio)...
Rhegium was an ancient Greek colony, mainly of Chalcidians, in the south of Italy. Re-peopled by the Emperor, it assumed the name of ‘Rhegium Julium. ‘It was called Rhegium, as aeschylus says, because of the convulsion which had taken place in this region; for Sicily wan broken from the continent by Earthquakes. Paul’s ship from Syracuse to Rhegium, St. Arriving at Rhegium, the crew had to wait a day for a favourable wind. Larissa, Rhegium Chalcidense, Rome, 1905
Rhegium - Rhegium was settled by Greek colonists and retained Greek language and institutions into the first century
Rhegium - Rhegium was a city of considerable note in ancient times
Caster And Pollux - This accords with the Alexandrian vessel that Paul sailed in (Acts 28:11), having as the figure head or painting on the bow these deities, as they may be seen on coins of Rhegium (where the ship touched); two youths on horseback, with conical caps, and stars above their heads
Syracuse - They waited three days there for the wind, then by a circuitous course, necessitated by the direction of the wind, reached Rhegium
Ship - ) Paul was first in the Adramyttian coasting vessel from Caesarea to Myra; then in the large Alexandrian grain ship wrecked at Malta; then in another Alexandrian grain ship from Malta by Syracuse and Rhegium to Purcell. The ship's run from Rhegium to Puteoli, 180 miles in two days, the wind being full from the S
Melita - The Castor and Pollux after wintering in Melita proceeded with Paul to Puteoli (Acts 28:11-13) by way of Syracuse and Rhegium. Therefore Melita lay on the regular route between Alexandria and Puteoli, which Malta does; and Syracuse, 80 miles off, and Rhegium would be the natural track from the neighboring Malta
Ship - It is important to remember that he accomplished it in three ships: first, the Adramyttian vessel which took him from Caesarea to Myra, and which was probably a coasting-vessel of no great size, (Acts 27:1-6 ) secondly, the large Alexandrian corn-ship, in which he was wrecked on the coast of Malta (Acts 27:6-28 ) :1; and thirdly, another large Alexandrian corn-ship, in which he sailed from Malta by Syracuse and Rhegium to Puteoli
Titus (Emperor) - After sending the fifth and fifteenth legions back to their former garrisons and selecting 700 captives for his triumph, he took the usual route by sea from Alexandria past Rhegium to Puteoli (see Roads and Travel), and thence to Rome
Luke, the Gospel According to - ...
Luke's describing minutely, in Paul's journey, the places before reaching Sicily and Italy, but omitting such description of Syracuse, Rhegium, Puteoli, Appii Forum, and the Three Taverns, as if familiar to his reader, implies Theophilus was well acquainted with Sicily and Italy
Rufinus of Aquileia - Rufinus records that he was in the "coetus religiosus" of Pinianus on the Sicilian coast, witnessing the burning of Rhegium across the straits by the bands of Alaric, when he wrote the preface to the translation of Origen's Commentary on Numbers
Paul - They touched at Syracuse, where they stayed three days, and at Rhegium, from which place they were carried with a fair wind to Puteoli, where they left their ship and the sea