What does Resurrection Of Christ mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
Few articles are more important than this. It deserves our particular attention, because it is the grand hinge on which Christianity turns. Hence, says the apostle, he was delivered for our offences, and raised again for our justification. Infidels, however, have disbelieved it, but with what little reason we may easily see on considering the subject. "If the body of Jesus Christ, " says Saurin, "were not raised from the dead, it must have been stolen away. But this theft is incredible. Who committed it? The enemies of Jesus Christ? Would they have contributed to his glory by countenancing a report of his resurrection? Would his disciples? It is probable they would not, and it is next to certain they could not. How could they have undertaken to remove the body? Frail and timorous creatures, people who fled as soon as they saw him taken into custody; even Peter, the most courageous, trembled at the voice of a servant girl, and three times denied that he knew him. People of this character, would they have dared to resist the authority of the governor?
Would they have undertaken to oppose the determination of the Sanhedrim, to force a guard, and to elude, or overcome, soldiers armed and aware of danger? If Jesus Christ were not risen again (I speak the language of unbelievers, ) he had deceived his disciples with vain hopes of his resurrection. How came the disciples not to discover the imposture? Would they have hazarded themselves by undertaking an enterprise so perilous in favour of a man who had so cruelly imposed on their credulity? But were we to grant that they formed the design of removing the body, how could they have executed it? How could soldiers armed, and on guard, suffer themselves to be over-reached, by a few timorous people? Either, says St. Augustine they were asleep or awake: if they were awake, why should they suffer the body to be taken away? If asleep, how could they know that the disciples took it away? How dare they then, depose that it was STOLEN. The testimony of the apostles furnishes us with arguments, and there are eight considerations which give the evidence sufficient weight.
1. The nature of these witnesses. They were not men of power, riches, eloquence, credit, to impose upon the world; they were poor and mean.
2. The number of these witnesses.
See 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 : Luke 24:34 . Mark 16:14 . Matthew 28:10 . It is not likely that a collusion should have been held among so many to support a lie, which would be of no utility to them.
3. The facts themselves which they avow; not suppositions, distant events, or events related by others, but real facts which they saw with their own eyes, 1 John 1:1-10 :
4. The agreement of their evidence: they all deposed the same thing.
5. Observe the tribunals before which they gave evidence: Jews and heathens, philosophers and rabbins, courtiers and lawyers. If they had been impostors, the fraud certainly would have been discovered.
6. The place in which they bore their testimony. Not at a distance, where they might not easily have been detected, if false, but at Jerusalem, in the synagogues, in the pretorium.
7. The time of this testimony: not years after, but three days after, they declared he was risen; yea, before their rage was quelled, while Calvary was yet dyed with the blood they had spilt. If it had been a fraud, it is not likely they would have come forward in such broad day-light, amidst so much opposition.
8. Lastly, the motives which induced them to publish the resurrection: not to gain fame, riches, glory, profit; no, they exposed themselves to suffering and death, and proclaimed the truth from conviction of its importance and certainty. "Collect, " says Saurin, "all these proofs together; consider them in one point of view, and see how many extravagant suppositions must be advanced, if the resurrection of our Saviour be denied. It must be supposed that guards, who had been particularly cautioned by their officers, sat down to sleep; and that, however, they deserved credit when they said the body of Jesus Christ was stolen.
It must be supposed that men, who have been imposed on in the most odious and cruel manner in the world, hazarded their dearest enjoyments for the glory of an impostor. It must be supposed that ignorant and illiterate men, who had neither reputation, fortune, nor eloquence, possessed the art of fascinating the eyes of all the church. It must be supposed either that five hundred persons were all deprived of their senses at a time, or that they were all deceived in the plainest matters of fact; or that this multitude of false witnesses had found out the secret of never contradicting themselves or one another, and of being always uniform in their testimony. It must be supposed that the most expert courts of judicature could not find out a shadow of contradiction in a palpable imposture. It must be supposed that the apostles, sensible men in other cases, chose precisely those places and those times which were most unfavourable to their views. It must be supposed that millions madly suffered imprisonments, tortures, and crucifixions, to spread an illusion. It must be supposed that ten thousand miracles were wrought in favour of falsehood, or all these facts must be denied; and then it must be supposed that the apostles were idiots; that the enemies of Christianity were idiots; and that all the primitive Christians were idiots." The doctrine of the resurrection of Christ affords us a variety of useful instructions. Here we see evidence of divine power; prophecy accomplished; the character of Jesus established; his work finished; and a future state proved. It is a ground of faith, the basis of hope, a source of consolation, and a stimulus to obedience.
See Saurin's Sermons, ser. 8. vol. 2: Robinson's translation; Ditton and Wast on the Resurrection; Cook's Illustration of the general evidence establishing the reality of Christ's resurrection, p. 323. Ecc. Rev. vol. 4. but especially a small but admirable Essay on the Resurrection of Christ by Mr. Dore. Bish. Horsely.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
One of the cardinal facts and doctrines of the gospel. If Christ be not risen, our faith is vain (1 Corinthians 15:14 ). The whole of the New Testament revelation rests on this as an historical fact. On the day of Pentecost Peter argued the necessity of Christ's resurrection from the prediction in Psalm 16 ( Acts 2:24-28 ). In his own discourses, also, our Lord clearly intimates his resurrection (John 20:11-18 ; Mark 9:9 ; 14:28 ; Luke 18:33 ; John 2:19-22 ). The evangelists give circumstantial accounts of the facts connected with that event, and the apostles, also, in their public teaching largely insist upon it. Ten different appearances of our risen Lord are recorded in the New Testament. They may be arranged as follows:
To Mary Magdalene at the sepulchre alone. This is recorded at length only by (Matthew 20:19 ), and alluded to by (Mark 16:9-11 ).
To certain women, "the other Mary," Salome, Joanna, and others, as they returned from the sepulchre. (Matthew 28:1-10 ) alone gives an account of this. (Compare Mark 16:1-8 , and Luke 24:1-11 .)
To Simon Peter alone on the day of the resurrection. (See Luke 24:34 ; 1 Corinthians 15:5 .)
To the two disciples on the way to Emmaus on the day of the resurrection, recorded fully only by (Luke 24:13-35 . Compare Mark 16:12,13 ).
To the ten disciples (Thomas being absent) and others "with them," at Jerusalem on the evening of the resurrection day. One of the evangelists gives an account of this appearance, (John 20:19-24 ).
To the disciples again (Thomas being present) at Jerusalem (Mark 16:14-18 ; Luke 24:33-40 ; John 20:26-28 . See also 1 Corinthians 15:5 ).
To the disciples when fishing at the Sea of Galilee. Of this appearance also (John 21:1-23 ) alone gives an account.
To the eleven, and above 500 brethren at once, at an appointed place in Galilee (1 Corinthians 15:6 ; Compare Matthew 28:16-20 ).
To James, but under what circumstances we are not informed (1 Corinthians 15:7 ).
To the apostles immediately before the ascension. They accompanied him from Jerusalem to Mount Olivet, and there they saw him ascend "till a cloud received him out of their sight" (Mark 16:19 ; Luke 24:50-52 ; Acts 1:4-10 ). It is worthy of note that it is distinctly related that on most of these occasions our Lord afforded his disciples the amplest opportunity of testing the fact of his resurrection. He conversed with them face to face. They touched him (Matthew 28:9 ; Luke 24:39 ; John 20:27 ), and he ate bread with them (Luke 24:42,43 ; John 21:12,13 ).
In addition to the above, mention might be made of Christ's manifestation of himself to Paul at Damascus, who speaks of it as an appearance of the risen Saviour (Acts 9:3-9,17 ; 1 Corinthians 15:8 ; 9:1 ). It is implied in the words of Luke (Acts 1:3 ) that there may have been other appearances of which we have no record.
The resurrection is spoken of as the act (1) of God the Father (Psalm 16:10 ; Acts 2:24 ; 3:15 ; Romans 8:11 ; Ephesians 1:20 ; Colossians 2:12 ; Hebrews 13:20 ); (2) of Christ himself (John 2:19 ; 10:18 ); and (3) of the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 3:18 ).
The resurrection is a public testimony of Christ's release from his undertaking as surety, and an evidence of the Father's acceptance of his work of redemption. It is a victory over death and the grave for all his followers.
The importance of Christ's resurrection will be seen when we consider that if he rose the gospel is true, and if he rose not it is false. His resurrection from the dead makes it manifest that his sacrifice was accepted. Our justification was secured by his obedience to the death, and therefore he was raised from the dead (Romans 4:25 ). His resurrection is a proof that he made a full atonement for our sins, that his sacrifice was accepted as a satisfaction to divine justice, and his blood a ransom for sinners. It is also a pledge and an earnest of the resurrection of all believers (Romans 8:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:14 ; 15:47-49 ; Philippians 3:21 ; 1 John 3:2 ). As he lives, they shall live also.
It proved him to be the Son of God, inasmuch as it authenticated all his claims (John 2:19 ; 10:17 ). "If Christ did not rise, the whole scheme of redemption is a failure, and all the predictions and anticipations of its glorious results for time and for eternity, for men and for angels of every rank and order, are proved to be chimeras. 'But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that slept.' Therefore the Bible is true from Genesis to Revelation. The kingdom of darkness has been overthrown, Satan has fallen as lightning from heaven, and the triumph of truth over error, of good over evil, of happiness over misery is for ever secured." Hodge.
With reference to the report which the Roman soldiers were bribed (Matthew 28:12-14 ) to circulate concerning Christ's resurrection, "his disciples came by night and stole him away while we slept," Matthew Henry in his "Commentary," under John 20:1-10 , fittingly remarks, "The grave-clothes in which Christ had been buried were found in very good order, which serves for an evidence that his body was not 'stolen away while men slept.' Robbers of tombs have been known to take away 'the clothes' and leave the body; but none ever took away 'the body' and left the clothes, especially when they were 'fine linen' and new (Mark 15:46 ). Any one would rather choose to carry a dead body in its clothes than naked. Or if they that were supposed to have stolen it would have left the grave-clothes behind, yet it cannot be supposed they would find leisure to 'fold up the linen.'"
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
The Gospel miracle, related by the four Evangelists, of Christ's return to life. By His own power He reunited His body and soul, and issued alive from the sealed and guarded tomb, after His dead body had reposed therein from Friday evening until Sunday morning. This fact was predicted by Christ Himself, and offered by Him as the chief sign or proof of His Divine mission and Divinity. The Apostles after Him made it the cardinal point in their teaching, on which hinged the value of the Christian faith. Saint Paul says: "And if Christ be not risen again, then is our preaching vain: and your faith is also vain." (1 Corinthians 15). Among the many masters who have represented this subject in art are: Aldegrever, Baldovinetti, Bellini, Annibale and Agostino Carracci, Contarini, Correggio, El Greco, Fra Angelico, Ghirlandajo, Murillo, Palma, Perugino, Pinturicchio, Pourbus, Rembrandt, Rubens, San Sepolcro, Tintoretto, Titian, Trevisani, Van de Velde, Vasari, Veronese, and Vivarini.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
This is of fundamental importance in Christianity, both historically and doctrinally. As a fact indisputable proved, it was the crowning demonstration of the truth of all Christ's claims, 1 Corinthians 15:14-18 . He had repeatedly foretold it; and his enemies were careful to ascertain that he was actually dead, and to guard his tomb for additional security. Yet he rose from the dead on the third day, and appeared on eleven different occasions to numerous witnesses, convincing even those who were the most doubtful, and after forty days ascended to heaven from the mount of Olives. To this all-important fact the apostles gave great prominence in their preaching.
Acts 1:22 2:24-32 4:33 10:40,41 . In its relation to Christian doctrine it stands as a rock of strength, assuring us of God's acceptance of the expiatory Sacrifice, of Christ's triumphant accomplishment of the work of redemption, and of his raising to immortal life the souls and bodies of his people. He was buried under the load of our offences; but he rose again, almighty to justify and save us. His dying proved the greatness of his love; his rising again shows that his love had secured its object.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
This is the great central fact on the testimony of which the structure of Christianity has been reared. If Christ be not risen, there is no salvation, since sin would still be reigning by death in universal sway. But Christ, who was made sin, is risen and is at God's right hand, a manifest proof that atonement has been made, and that God's righteousness has been vindicated. The result has been the sending of the Spirit from the Father. Abundant evidence was given to the disciples that Christ was risen from the dead. He appeared again and again, ate in their presence, and gave opportunity for identification. Evidence of the fact was also borne to the Jews by the apostles in the power and by the gifts of the Spirit, Acts 4:10 , confirming what they had themselves seen and heard and the testimony of the scriptures. The resurrection of Christ is the keystone of the faith of the Christian; at the same time it is the assurance on the part of God that He has appointed a day when He is going to judge the world in righteousness. Hence it has a voice to all.
It has been asserted that the accounts given of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus in the gospels are discordant and irreconcilable. This is not the case: it has been overlooked that Luke 23:54-56 refers to Friday evening, before the Sabbath, and Matthew 28:1 refers to Saturday evening, after the Sabbath: the women return after viewing the sepulchre and finish their preparations, according to Mark 16:1 .

Sentence search

Fire, Liturgical Use of - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Liturgical Use of Fire - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Resurrection - By the Resurrection of Christ we have assurance of the future resurrection of men
Glorify - In this view it particularly refers to the Resurrection of Christ, and his ascension to the right hand of God, John 7:39 ; John 12:16
Easter - Hence the name came to be given to the festival of the Resurrection of Christ, which occured at the time of the Passover
Jonah - But the Resurrection of Christ itself was also shadowed forth in the history of the prophet
Martyr - The basis of this assured victory is the death and Resurrection of Christ, who is himself the faithful and true witness (2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:18Revelation 12:10-11...
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Bottom, Bottomless - In Romans 10:7 , quoted from Deuteronomy 30:13 , the abyss (the abode of the lost dead) is substituted for the sea (the change in the quotation is due to the facts of the death and Resurrection of Christ); the AV has "deep" here and in Luke 8:31 ; the reference is to the lower regions as the abode of demons, out of which they can be let loose, Revelation 11:7 ; 17:8 ; it is found seven times in the Apocalypse, 9:1,2,11; 11:7; 17:8; 20:1,3; in 9:1,2 the RV has "the pit of the abyss
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Working - , "energy") is used (1) of the "power" of God, (a) in the Resurrection of Christ, Ephesians 1:19 ; Colossians 2:12 , RV, "working" (AV, "operation"); (b) in the call and enduement of Paul, Ephesians 3:7 ; Colossians 1:29 ; (c) in His retributive dealings in sending "a working of error" (AV, "strong delusion") upon those under the rule of the Man of Sin who receive not the love of the truth, but have pleasure in unrighteousness, 2 Thessalonians 2:11 ; (2) of the "power" of Christ (a) generally, Philippians 3:21 ; (b) in the church, individually, Ephesians 4:16 ; (3) of the power of Satan in energizing the Man of Sin in his "parousia," 2 Thessalonians 2:9 , "coming
Sabbath - But the christian church very early begun and still continue to observe the first day of the week, in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ on that day, by which the work of redemption was completed
Resurrection - -The Resurrection of Christ does not fall to be discussed in this article, the next article being devoted to it. Paul is practically the only NT writer who has really worked out the problem of the resurrection on the basis of the Resurrection of Christ. ...
The principal questions that must be answered by any inquiry into the subject of the resurrection from the historical point of view are: (1) What was the place of the resurrection in the eschatology of the time? (2) Are there more than one resurrection in any of the eschatological schemes of the 1st century? (3) How is the Resurrection of Christ related to the general Christian resurrection-doctrine of the period? (4) How is the question of the relation between body and spirit, flesh and spirit, worked out? (5) How far does an ethical element enter into the various views of the resurrection developed by NT writers? These questions involve ethical, metaphysical, and eschatological considerations which were not clearly distinguished in the thought of the time, and cannot be separated in our treatment of the subject; yet they must be borne in mind in examining the various systems of the period. (b) There is the distinctively Christian belief in the Resurrection of Christ as a historical fact. Possibly it was afterwards interpreted in different ways according to the particular view held concerning the resurrection, but it is absolutely clear that the belief in the fact of the Resurrection of Christ operated more powerfully than any other cause in transforming current beliefs in the resurrection. Paul’s view of the resurrection which can be traced out in process of development and which is due to his interpretation of what he accepted as the historical fact of the Resurrection of Christ. But it is also clear that, whatever be the source of the idea, it receives a new setting, and is brought into organic connexion with the Resurrection of Christ (see article Parousia). ...
In 1 Corinthians 15 the whole argument presupposes a belief in the resurrection, not necessarily depending upon the Resurrection of Christ, although the Resurrection of Christ is used to support the belief in the resurrection of the dead and to modify the general outline of the eschatology. Paul’s interpretation of Christ’s resurrection, we have first of all several passages which do not call for special discussion proving the Apostle’s belief in the Resurrection of Christ as a historical occurrence. ...
The passages in 1 Thessalonians only yield the general inference that the Resurrection of Christ is related to His Parousia; through His resurrection He is able to enter upon the Kingdom in power; God will bring Him again with the dead saints; it is as raised from the dead that He becomes the deliverer from the coming wrath. Paul’s view of the Resurrection of Christ. Paul, probably in common with the leaders of the primitive Church, had considered the Resurrection of Christ not merely as an eschatological event, or as an article of belief, but as an event in the human experience of Christ intimately related to the experience of the believer. Paul, in considering the death and Resurrection of Christ from this point of view, had come to the conclusion that faith was the governing principle in Christ’s life, and that he himself as a believer lived by virtue of the faith which Christ had exercised and which had brought Him through resurrection into a spiritual state in which He could realize and make good the purpose of God in His death by dwelling in those who believed on Him. ...
In 1 Corinthians 15 the general line of argument is: (1) the proof of the possibility of a resurrection from the Resurrection of Christ accepted as a historical event; (2) the argument from analogy, based on the Rabbinical conception of ‘body,’ to prove the possibility of the existence of such a thing as a spiritual body; (3) the contrast between Christ and Adam as the respective sources of the incorruptible and the corruptible, the heavenly and the earthly. On the one hand, it shifted the eschatological centre of interest, almost unconsciously, to the Resurrection of Christ, as 1 Corinthians 15 shows. The Resurrection of Christ assumes a catastrophic colouring, so to speak: it becomes the first act of Divine intervention in the introduction of the Kingdom, the first step of a process whose culmination also has a catastrophic character derived from the original scheme of eschatology. ...
The tendency of this double working of the interpretation of the death and Resurrection of Christ was to disturb the outline of the old eschatology
Holy Week - The week climaxing in Easter Sunday in which the church remembers the death and Resurrection of Christ
Thessalonians, Epistle to the 1 And 2 - In the first epistle, Paul rejoices over Timothy's good report of the faith of Christians at Thessalonica; and confirms them against the persecutions and temptations they would meet, by discussing the miraculous testimony of God to the truth of the gospel, 1 Thessalonians 1:5-10 ; the character of its preachers, 1 Thessalonians 2:13 ; the holiness of its precepts, 1 Thessalonians 4:1-12 ; and the Resurrection of Christ and his people, 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11
Lower, Lowest - Inasmuch as the passage is describing the effects not merely of the Incarnation but of the death and Resurrection of Christ, the second interpretation is to be accepted; cp
Holy Day - ) The advocates for holy days suppose that they have a tendency to impress the minds of the people with a greater sense of religion; that if the acquisitions and victories of men be celebrated with the highest joy, how much more those events which relate to the salvation of man, such as the birth, death, and Resurrection of Christ, &c
Mat'Thew - He is mentioned by name, after the Resurrection of Christ, only in ( Acts 1:15 ) but he must have lived many years as an apostle, since he was the author of the Gospel of Matthew which was written at least twenty years later
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - Paul, who gave the first account of the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:3-8 ), provided the full meaning and importance of the Resurrection of Christ. Because of the Resurrection of Christ, we have assurance of the resurrection of all persons—some to salvation; some to perdition—vouchsafed in the Resurrection of Christ
Sadducees - They endeavoured to prohibit the apostles from preaching the Resurrection of Christ (Acts 2:24,31,32 ; 4:1,2 ; 5:17,24-28 )
Antitype - The meaning is, that righteousness, or the answer of a good conscience towards God, now saves us, by means of the Resurrection of Christ, as formerly righteousness saved these eight persons by means of the ark during the flood
Resurrection of Christ - The Resurrection of Christ is the keystone of the faith of the Christian; at the same time it is the assurance on the part of God that He has appointed a day when He is going to judge the world in righteousness
Easter - In this way, the Christian feast is linked with the ancient Hebrew festival of the Passover, not arbitrarily, since the Death and Resurrection of Christ coincided with a particular Jewish Pasch, and because in the designs of God there was a connection between the two incidents
Separate - ]'>[1] ...
A — 2: χωρίζω (Strong's #5563 — Verb — chorizo — kho-rid'-zo ) "to put asunder, separate," is translated "to separate" in Romans 8:35,39 ; in the Middle Voice, "to separate oneself, depart" (see DEPART); in the Passive Voice in Hebrews 7:26 , RV , "separated" (AV, "separate"), the verb here relates to the Resurrection of Christ, not, as AV indicates, to the fact of His holiness in the days of His flesh; the list is progressive in this respect that the first three qualities apply to His sinlessness, the next to His resurrection, the last to His ascension
jo'Nah - " (Luke 11:29,30 ) But the Resurrection of Christ itself was also shadowed forth in the history of the prophet
Resurrection - From the Resurrection of Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 :...
2
Immortality - Christianity gave its own definite form to all that it took up from the current thought of its time, and the outstanding factor in the form which the primitive Christian hope assumed is the Resurrection of Christ. But these offer no true parallel to the belief in a historic Resurrection and do not explain either its existence or the peculiar moral value attached to the Resurrection of Christ by the primitive Church. of Christianity, we find, in the first place, that it is inseparably connected with the Resurrection of Christ, and, secondly, that it is also inseparable from primitive Christian eschatology. ...
But the Death and Resurrection of Christ as historical facts are the decisive elements which St. Paul and the primitive Church on the ethical value of the Resurrection of Christ and its implications dropped out of sight. Paul the Resurrection of Christ has an ethical value which is of great importance in his view of the future life of believers. The Resurrection of Christ was not a foregone conclusion resulting from His Divinity, but it was intimately connected with Christ’s faith and holiness as man. It is an integral part of the triumph of the Kingdom of God, beginning with the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 : ἀπαρχὴ Χριστός). Paul and everywhere in the primitive Church, and the same view of the ethical value of the Resurrection of Christ: ‘who through him are believers in God, which raised him from the dead, and gave him glory; so that your faith and hope might be in God’ (1 Peter 1:21). The writer undoubtedly believes in the Resurrection of Christ and also in the ethical aspect of it already mentioned, but he does not seem to carry on, as St
Raise - , of the Resurrection of Christ, Matthew 16:21 ; 17:23 ; 20:19 , RV; 26:32, RV, "(after) I am raised up" (AV, ". 1, is translated "to raise or raise up," (a) of the resurrection of the dead by Christ, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; (b) of the Resurrection of Christ from the dead, Acts 2:24 (for ver
Resurrection of the Dead - ...
The Resurrection of Christ is everywhere represented in the New Testament as a pledge and an earnest of the resurrection of all the just, who are united to him by faith, 1 Corinthians 15:49 1 Thessalonians 3:13 , in virtue of their union with him as their Head
Symbol - ...
Baptism is a picture of the death, burial, and Resurrection of Christ
Resurrection of Christ - " The doctrine of the Resurrection of Christ affords us a variety of useful instructions. but especially a small but admirable Essay on the Resurrection of Christ by Mr
Accomplish, Accomplishment - , "fill out," is used in Acts 13:33 , of the fulfillment of a Divine promise of the Resurrection of Christ
Eschatology - The return of Christ will bring about the victorious resurrection of believers, but that resurrection is possible only because of the victorious Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:20-23; see RESURRECTION)
Cup - ...
For the church, the cup has come to represent the central events of Christianity, the death and Resurrection of Christ
Napkin (2) - ...
The reference to the napkin in John 20:7 is worthy of special attention in connexion with the Resurrection of Christ
Philosophy - The Resurrection of Christ is the "assurance" that all will raise from the dead and stand before God (v. The Resurrection of Christ, with the subsequent philosophical and logical argument that Paul makes in 1 Corinthians 15 , stands in sharp contrast to hedonistic Epicureanism
Blameless - ...
This positional quality of blamelessness is not earned by personal gain, but imputed by the death and Resurrection of Christ (Colossians 1:22 )
Grave - With the Resurrection of Christ tombs in Jerusalem were opened and the dead came out (Matthew 27:52 )
Peter, First Epistle of - The teaching of the epistle is based upon a living hope by the Resurrection of Christ, in contrast to the portion of the Jews on earth
First-Fruit - Just as the first-fruits are the earnest of later harvesting, so the Resurrection of Christ is the guarantee of our resurrection
Life, Living, Lifetime, Life-Giving - Eternal life is the present actual possession of the believer because of his relationship with Christ, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14 , and that it will one day extend its domain to the sphere of the body is assured by the Resurrection of Christ, 2 Corinthians 5:4 ; 2 Timothy 1:10 . 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; (c) of the Resurrection of Christ in "the body of His glory," 1 Peter 3:18 ; (d) of the power of reproduction inherent in seed, which presents a certain analogy with resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:36 ; (e) of the 'changing,' or 'fashioning anew,' of the bodies of the living, which corresponds with, and takes place at the same time as, the resurrection of the dead in Christ, Romans 8:11 ; (f) of the impartation of spiritual life, and the communication of spiritual sustenance generally, John 6:63 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; Galatians 3:21
Trump Trumpet - The verse is part of the climax of the Pauline argument which bases the future resurrection on the Resurrection of Christ
Peter - ...
The death and Resurrection of Christ, and the circumstances, which accompanied them, led to a wonderful change in the apostle's mind, and thenceforward his bold and steadfast course is worthy of his name
Parousia - In the speech at Athens the final appeal is emphasized by the announcement of an appointed day in which God will judge the world by Christ, and the Resurrection of Christ is assigned as the pledge of the truth of this announcement. ) Accordingly, the order of events as presented in this passage is: (1) the Resurrection of Christ takes place; (2) during the present generation (‘we which are alive and remain’) Christ will descend into the air with a word of command, the archangel’s voice, and the trumpet of God; (3) thereupon the dead in Christ rise first; (4) after a very brief interval of time, the living will be ‘caught up,’ with the raised dead, to meet the Lord in the air; (5) both living and dead will then be ‘for ever with the Lord. ...
(a) Resurrection of Christ. The order is-first, the Resurrection of Christ, who is the ἀπαρχή, the firstfruits of the working of the new principle of life, in contrast with the results of the principle of death introduced by Adam (cf. The interval between the Resurrection of Christ and that of believers is indirectly limited to one generation (‘we shall not all sleep’), but the duration of the interval between this event, evidently the Parousia of 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18, and the complete subjugation of every enemy, including death itself, is left quite undetermined
Reverence - In these passages we have reference to the adoration of Jesus by the Magi, Herod’s desire to do homage to the child at Bethlehem, the request of the devil that Jesus should worship him, the disciples doing homage to their Lord by the sea, the Canaanite woman humbling herself before Jesus, the mother of James and John as she made her bold request for her two sons, the disciples after the Resurrection of Christ, the demoniac of Gadara before Jesus, the mock homage paid to Jesus on the Cross
Form - Paul always regards the Death and Resurrection of Christ as adding something to it
Resurrection - The bedrock of hope for Christian resurrection is the Resurrection of Christ, the foundation of gospel preaching (1 Corinthians 15:12-20 )
Redeem, Redemption - Deliverance of humankind from its state of alienation from God has been accomplished through the death and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 4:25 ; 2 Corinthians 5:18-19 )
Arise, Arose, Arouse, Raise, Rise, Rouse - , of Christ as a prophet, Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 ; as God's servant in the midst of the nation of Israel, Acts 3:26 ; as the Son of God in the midst of the nation, 13:33 (not here of resurrection, but with reference to the Incarnation: the AV "again" has nothing corresponding to it in the original, it was added as a misinterpretation: the mention of His resurrection is in the next verse, in which it is stressed by way of contrast and by the addition, "from the dead"); as a priest, Hebrews 7:11,15 ; as king over the nations, Romans 15:12 ; (d) of a spiritual awakening from lethargy, Ephesians 5:14 ; (e) of resurrection from the dead: (1) of the Resurrection of Christ, Matthew 17:9 ; 20:19 ; Mark 8:31 ; 9:9,10,31 ; 10:34 ; Luke 18:33 ; 24:7,46 ; John 20:9 ; Acts 2:24,32 ; 10:41 ; 13:34 ; 17:3,31 : 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; (2) of believers, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; 11:24 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; of unbelievers, Matthew 12:41
Sabbath - Pliny bears witness of the first day of the week being kept as a festival, in honour of the Resurrection of Christ: and the primitive Christians kept it in the most solemn manner
Manaen (2) - What passed between the foster-brothers after John’s murder? Was Manaen a silent or a protesting spectator when Jesus was mocked? Did the death of Christ complete a work of grace already begun at the death of John? Did the Resurrection of Christ (no rumour this time, Matthew 14:2, but a well attested fact) seal for ever the allegiance of a halting disciple? Did he remain in the train of his foster-brother till the latter left for Rome in a
Type - In a still later age, the miraculous preservation of the Prophet Jonah displayed a sign, which was fulfilled in the Resurrection of Christ
Union With Christ - ...
Elsewhere, Paul uses the phrase to describe a mode of existence in which the believer identifies with the death and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 6:11 ); shares in his wisdom and holiness (1 Corinthians 1:30 ); and receives a new life or existence (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). Having identified with the death and Resurrection of Christ, the body is empowered by his Spirit to manifest his presence to the world. Faith-union thus finds its focal point in the death and Resurrection of Christ
Exodus - The Exodus in the Old Testament was to Israel what the death and Resurrection of Christ was to Christians in the New Testament
Sabbath - It commemorates not only the creation of the world, but a still greater event-the completion of the work of atonement by the Resurrection of Christ; and as he rose from the dead on the day after the Jewish Sabbath, that day of his resurrection has been observed by Christians ever since
Baptism - ...
Peter, like Paul, interprets Christian baptism in relation to the death and Resurrection of Christ
Resurrection - Therefore, Paul's mission to the Gentiles unfolds in light of the Resurrection of Christ and the corollary futility of his own life ensues if there is no resurrection. 32) reveals the tenable resolution of materialistic hedonism, when the Resurrection of Christ as the firstfruit and the ensuing general resurrection are dismissed
Judgment, Last - The Resurrection of Christ is a certain proof of it
Temple - Luke evidently attached much importance to the fact recorded at the end of his Gospel, that after the Resurrection of Christ the apostles ‘were continually in the temple, blessing God’ (Luke 24:53)
James, the General Epistle of - As Paul's epistles unfold the doctrines flowing from the death and Resurrection of Christ, so James's epistle unfolds His teaching during His life, and is a commentary on the Sermon on the Mount
Peter, First Epistle of - By recalling the fact of the Resurrection of Christ, and by an appeal to the example of His remedial sufferings, the author seeks to awaken their faith and hope in God. Faith in God as the holy Father and faithful Creator is built upon the solid facts of the gospel, in particular, the life, death, and Resurrection of Christ the eternal Messiah ( 1 Peter 1:8-21 )
Apostle - In this broader sense, an apostle was a witness to the Resurrection of Christ, sent by him to make disciples of all nations
Ascension of Jesus Christ - Ephesians 4:10,1 Timothy 3:16 contradict this opinion, and it can be safely said that, given the clear references to Christ's ascension in other New Testament documents and the plain and relatively uniform witness of the New Testament to a bodily Resurrection of Christ, that Paul and indeed all the New Testament authors would agree with Luke that after forty days of appearances to his disciples, Jesus experienced a literal, physical ascension into heaven, albeit in his "spiritual body" as the firstfruits of the final resurrection that is envisioned for us all at the end of time (cf
Flesh - They are best taken to refer to the death and Resurrection of Christ, which is reproduced in the life of the believer, bringing death to sin and resurrection to new life
New Covenant - Paul understood the new covenant as having been realized through the death and Resurrection of Christ and the giving of the Spirit, and contrasted this salvation-historical phase with that of the law
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - The cross and Resurrection of Christ spelled their defeat; the parousia (the second coming of Christ) will seal their doom. Paul expands on this theme in 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 which, in the context of the chapter, attests to the truth that Christ's death and resurrection have brought about several endtime blessings for Christians: (1) The general resurrection of the endtime has been projected back into the present period in the Resurrection of Christ, the firstfruits of the dead (15:12-22)
Son - In Acts 13:34 the statement as to the Resurrection of Christ receives the greater stress in this respect through the emphatic contrast to that in Acts 13:33 as to His being raised up in the nation, a stress imparted by the added words "from the dead
Atonement - (uh tohne' mehnt), meaning reconciliation, was associated with sacrificial offerings to remove the effects of sin and in the New Testament,] refers specifically to the reconciliation between God and humanity effected by the death, burial, and Resurrection of Christ
Inspiration And Revelation - This leads on to a bold affirmation of the fulfilment of these and of other prophecies in the Life, Death, and Resurrection of Christ (Acts 2:22-24; Acts 3:13-15; Acts 3:24; Acts 10:39-43; Acts 13:23-37; Acts 26:22-23). And yet the great difference between the prophets and the apostles is just this, that the outstanding Christian facts-the Incarnation or Life, the Death, and the Resurrection of Christ-have intervened between them
Lord's Day - The commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ alone would make a great difference. It arises from the mistaken identification of the weekly festival of the Resurrection of Christ with the Sabbath of the Jews and of the Fourth Commandment in the Decalogue
Heaven - But the most important element is the influence of the primitive apostolic beliefs concerning the Resurrection of Christ and His state of existence after death. Paul and others, such as the author of Hebrews, were interested principally in the spiritual consequences of the Resurrection of Christ
Psalms (2) - Peter quotes four verses of the psalm (Psalms 16:8-11) in confirmation of the Resurrection of Christ. The psalm is therefore regarded as a prophecy of the Resurrection of Christ, though it is, in reality, only a devout believer’s confession of faith in his own immortality
Death, Mortality - ...
For those who overcome and attain to the Resurrection of Christ, the second death has no power (Revelation 2:11 ; 20:6 )
Mercy - Ultimately the mercy of God that Jesus demonstrated in individual salvific Acts becomes for the New Testament writers the illustration of the release from sin and death that God offers to the whole world through the sacrificial death and Resurrection of Christ
Nazarene - " (John 19:19) Still farther, the angels which attended the Lord's sepulchre, when he arose from the dead, announced to the pious women the Resurrection of Christ by the same name, "Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified; he is risen, he is not here; behold the place where the Lord lay
Time, Meaning of - It is God's greatest saving deed on our behalf, the death and Resurrection of Christ, that must come to pass in our hearts anew
Jonah - It is certain that this length of time did not literally elapse between the burial and the Resurrection of Christ, and the commentaries in explanation usually follow the lead of St
Body - To him the Resurrection of Christ was a fact of the most absolute certainty (Romans 1:4, 1 Corinthians 15:3 ff
Apocrypha, New Testament - Another apocryphal work that might be classified as a passion gospel is the Book of the Resurrection of Christ by Bartholomew the Apostle
Church - Baptism or immersion in water was performed because Christ had commanded it (Matthew 28:18-20 ) and was itself a dramatic symbolic picturing of the burial and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 6:3-4 )
Fact And Theory - , illustrates the same distinction between kernel and husk, and the giving up of the fact of the bodily Resurrection of Christ. So also the Resurrection of Christ need not be true in its literal Scriptural form, but at the same time it symbolizes the truth of the entrance of Christ into the heavenly world
Mediation Mediator - But the Resurrection of Christ is guarantee of His power to save, so that ‘in Christ shall all be made alive’ (1 Corinthians 15:22)
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - It could not possibly be said of any man living in these dregs of time of ours that he had been an actual witness of the Resurrection of Christ
Witness (2) - Miracles, Resurrection of Christ, and Sign
Philippians, Theology of - All that people could not do for themselves because of their weakness and sinfulness God did for them through the life and death and Resurrection of Christ (Philippians 3:4b-9 ; 2:6-11 ; Romans 1:17 ; 3:21-28 )
Gods, Pagan - The idea of a dying and rising god has been compared to the death and Resurrection of Christ, but the death of those gods was mythical, cyclical, and involuntary, in contrast to the historical, once-for-all act of Christ motivated by love
Miracles - If the Resurrection of Christ is proved, this fact, conjoined with His absolutely unique moral character and religious consciousness, in vests the Person of Jesus with a supernaturalness which forbids our limiting the actions possible to Him by the normal human tests
James Epistle of - ...
(g) We should also have expected some reference to the Death and Resurrection of Christ, and to Messianic doctrine, which, as all the evidence seems to show, formed the staple of early Christian preaching
Heaven - But the most important element is the influence of the primitive apostolic beliefs concerning the Resurrection of Christ and His state of existence after death
Metaphor - So the Resurrection of Christ was the pledge of the Resurrection of all in union with Him’ (Goudge, in loc
Atonement (2) - Baptism is the initiatory Christian rite, and whether it conveys or only represents the forgiveness of sins, stood from the first in close relation to the Death and Resurrection of Christ (Matthew 28:19, Mark 16:15-16, Acts 2:38; Acts 8:13; Acts 8:16; Acts 8:36; Acts 9:18; Acts 10:47-48; Acts 16:33; Acts 19:5; Acts 22:16, Romans 6:3-4, Galatians 3:26-27, Ephesians 4:4-6, Colossians 2:12, Titus 3:4-6; 1 Peter 3:21; cf
Adam - ...
And then, just as the full truth about the atonement led the apostle back from Christ to Adam, so in another epistle of his, the Resurrection of Christ, and the resurrection of all those who have fallen asleep in Christ, leads Paul back again to Adam in this way
Romans, Theology of - A trinitarian theology is immediately invoked that focuses on the Resurrection of Christ as the culminating event "in power" of divine generosity, which is spelled out in verse 5 and establishes the theme of the entire letter
Justification (2) - He does it by opening a new line of argument, in which he presents a fresh view of the death and Resurrection of Christ, where these acts appear in the ethical sense of a death to sin and a resurrection to a new life unto God (Romans 6:10), and where, further, Christ in His death and resurrection appears as inclusive of all for whom He died (2 Corinthians 5:14)
Regeneration (2) - Peter, who uses twice (1 Peter 1:3; 1 Peter 1:23) the word which is exactly rendered by regenerate (ἀναγεννᾶν), connects the experience which he so describes first with the Resurrection of Christ, and then with the incorruptible seed which he identifies with the word of God—the gospel message which has been delivered to his hearers
Annunciation, the - Probably most of the first generation of Christians were ignorant of this mystery, for the Book of Acts and the Epistles show us that what was preached by the Apostles was not the miraculous birth, but the death and Resurrection of Christ (Acts 1:22; Acts 2:23-24; Acts 2:32; Acts 3:15; Acts 4:10; Acts 10:39-40; Acts 13:28-30; Acts 17:31 etc
Revelation (2) - Their interpretation leads to new thoughts of God and man, undiscoverable, or at any rate undiscovered, without them; and thus it is that ‘signs’such as the Resurrection of Christ (which would be classed as miraculous) or the moral beauty of His life (which some would not regard as necessarily a miracle) form the premises of Christian theology (cf
Sacrifice (2) - Paul attaches to the Resurrection of Christ enforces all that has been said
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - But the final argument is the promise of God in the Scripture, and the precedent of the Resurrection of Christ who is ‘the first-fruits’ of the harvest of the dead
Church - ...
It is impossible to say which of the forces which characterized Christianity contributed most to its success: its preaching of the life, death, and Resurrection of Christ, its lofty monotheism, its hope of immortality, its doctrine of the forgiveness of sins, its practical benevolence, its inward cohesion and unity
Jesus Christ - From the Epistles it is possible to collect the outstanding facts as to the earthly condition, the death, and the Resurrection of Christ
Tatianus - ); but he does not rest his reasons on the Resurrection of Christ (as St
Ambrosius of Milan - (For example, speaking of the Resurrection of Christ, he says, "Resurrexit in eo mundus, resurrexit in eo coelum, resurrexit in eo terra," de Fide Res
Christ in the Early Church - To Irenaeus and the Christian Fathers generally, participation in the Eucharist is the actual means whereby Christians share in the life and Resurrection of Christ
Christ in the Middle Ages - Everything pertaining to man’s salvation was accomplished by the death and Resurrection of Christ
Worship - Thus in the week the Sunday was the joyful festival; and the preparation for it was a day of penitence and prayer, consecrated to remembrance of the sufferings of Christ and the preparations for them, and this was celebrated on the Friday; and thus also the yearly festivals were to celebrate the Resurrection of Christ, and the operations of the Redeemer after he had risen again; the preparation for this day was in commemoration of the sufferings and fastings of our Saviour
Pelagianism And Pelagius - (4) Neither by the death nor the fall of Adam does the whole race of man die, nor by the Resurrection of Christ rise again