What does Resurrection mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἀναστάσεως a raising up 14
ἀνάστασιν a raising up 10
ἀναστάσει a raising up 7
ἀνάστασις a raising up 6
ἀναστάσεως» a raising up 1
ἀναστάσεώς a raising up 1
ἔγερσιν a rousing 1
ἐξανάστασιν a rising up 1

Definitions Related to Resurrection

G386


   1 a raising up, rising (e.g. from a seat).
   2 a rising from the dead.
      2a that of Christ.
      2b that of all men at the end of this present age.
      2c the Resurrection of certain ones history who were restored to life (Heb. 11:35).
                     

G1454


   1 a rousing, excitation.
   2 a rising up.
   3 Resurrection from the dead.
   

G1815


   1 a rising up, a rising again.
   2 Resurrection.
   

Frequency of Resurrection (original languages)

Frequency of Resurrection (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Resurrection
RESURRECTION
1. In OT . In our study of the OT doctrine of the resurrection we recognize the need for taking into consideration the chronological order of the different documents of which it is composed. No other belief, perhaps, presents a history into which the process of slow and halting development enters so visibly and consistently. That the later orthodox Jews advocated the existence in their earlier Scriptures of the principles which give vitality and a rational basis to this doctrine, is seen in their satisfaction with the answer of Jesus to the Sadducean cavils of His day (see Mark 12:28 ; cf. Luke 20:39 , 2Es 7:31-378 ). The gradual awakening of human consciousness in this respect is the best attestation to the Divine self-accommodation to the needs and limitations of the race. Beginning with the vague belief in the existence of a germinal principle of Divine life in man (cf. Genesis 2:7 ), the latest passages of the OT dealing with the subject embody a categorical assertion of the resurrection of individual Israelites (cf. Daniel 12:2 f.). Between these two utterances we have the speculations of Psalmists and Prophets, while death became gradually shorn of many of its terrors and much of its power. The common Jewish belief in the time of Jesus finds expression in the words of Martha concerning her brother Lazarus ( John 11:24 ), while this formed one of the deep lines of religious cleavage between the Pharisees and the Sadducees ( Acts 23:6 ff.; cf. Jos. [1] BJ II. viii. 14; Schürer, HJP [2] ii. ii. 13).
A peculiar feature of Jewish thought as to human life, marking it off clearly from some of the ethnic speculations and philosophic conceptions, consists in their habit of regarding the body as essential to man’s full existence. The traditions embodied in the stories of the translations of Enoch and Elijah (Genesis 5:24 , 2 Kings 2:11 ) receive their explanation on the assumption that in this way alone would they be enabled to enjoy the continuance of a full and complete life beyond the grave. It was this idea also that gave such a strong feeling of the incompleteness of the existence in Hades, and inspired the Psalmist’s assurance, ‘Thou wilt not leave my soul to Sheol, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption’ ( Psalms 16:10 , cf. Job 14:13 ff; Job 19:25 f.).
The first specific mention of the hope of a resurrection is found in Hosea, where the prophet’s words are rather of the nature of an aspiration than the distinct announcement of a future event (Hosea 6:2 , cf. Hosea 13:14 ). This is, however, the expression not of an individual who looks forward to being raised from the dead, but of one who sees his nation once more quickened and ‘brought up again from the depths of the earth’ ( Psalms 71:20 ; cf. Kirkpatrick, The Psalms, ad loc. ). A similar hope finds expression in Ezekiel’s vision of the valley of dry bones ( Ezekiel 37:1-14 ). A distinct advance on these utterances is found in the post-exilic prophecy, Isaiah 26:19 , where the prophet breathes a prayer for the resurrection of the individual dead. When this passage is contrasted with the confident assertion of Isaiah 26:14 it is seen that as yet there was no thought of a resurrection save for the Israelite. The same restriction is also found to exist at the later date, when the Book of Daniel was written. In this book there is a clear, unambiguous assertion of the resurrection of individuals, and at the same time a no less clear announcement that there is a resurrection of the wicked as well as of the righteous ( Daniel 12:2 ). It is true that these words not only have no message of a resurrection hope for nations other than Israel, but even limit its scope to those of that nation who distinguish themselves on the side of good or of evil (cf. Driver, ‘Daniel,’ ad loc. , in Camb. Bible ). At the same time it is easy to see that a great stride forward had been taken already, when the atrocities of Antiochus Epiphanes brought religious despair to the hearts of all true Israelites, and roused the fervid patriotism of Judas Maccabæus and his followers.
2. In the Apocrypha . The development of this doctrine in the deutero-canonical and apocryphal literature of the Jews presents a varied and inharmonious blend of colours. Inconsistencies abound, and can be explained only on the ground that each writing was influenced by the individual experience as well as by the theological Idiosyncrasies of its author.
Sirach . The oldest of the deutero-canonical books is that of ben-Sira, and in his work we look in vain for the idea of a resurrection, either national or individual. On the other hand, the eschatological conceptions of this author do not seem to advance beyond those of Ecclesiastes (cf. Sir 17:30 ).
Book of Enoch . Very different from the foregoing are the ideas prevalent in this composite apocalyptic writing. The oldest portion contains an elaborate theory of Sheol, and teaches the resurrection of all righteous Israelites, and so many of the wicked as have escaped ‘without incurring judgment in their life time’ (22.10f.). The sinners who have suffered here ‘will not be raised from thence’ (22.13), inasmuch as retribution, in part at least, has overtaken them. Another writer of a somewhat later date speaks of the resurrection of righteous Israelites only. These shall be raised, after judgment and retribution have been meted out to sinners, to share in the glories of the Messianic Kingdom (90.29 33). A similar opinion is expressed in another part of this writing. None but the righteous shall rise (91.10); but the author seems to interpret the resurrection as that of the spirit only, and not of the body (103.3f.).
The most important and best known section of the Book of Enoch (chs. 37 70), which is known as the Similitudes , contains an explicit assertion of a general resurrection (51.1). Whether, however, the writer intended to convey the idea of a resurrection of the Gentiles is somewhat doubtful. The words of this passage, if taken literally, would certainly convey the impression that a universal resurrection is meant. At the same time we must remember that this thought would be quite contrary to the whole habit of Jewish eschatological thinking, and would stand unique in Jewish pre-Christian literature. (For discussions of this question see the admirable critical edition of the Book of Enoch by R. H. Charles, passim .)
Psalms of Solomon . These are probably the product of the 1st cent. b.c. Here, too, a resurrection of the righteous alone is taught (3:16, 13:9, cf. 4:6). Moreover, no resurrection of the body is mentioned explicitly, though it would be rash to assume from his words that the author did not hold this doctrine.
2 Maccabees . A very definite doctrine of the resurrection is taught in this book, though the author expressly denies its applicability to the Gentiles ( 2Ma 7:14 , cf. 2Es 7:1-70 [3]). The resurrection of the body is strongly held, as affording a powerful incentive and a glorious hope for those who underwent a cruel martyrdom ( 2Ma 14:46 ; 2Ma 7:11 ; cf. 2Ma 7:9 ; cf. 2Ma 7:14 ). At times the writer seems to be controverting the denial of a resurrection, as when he stops to praise the action of Judas in offering sacrifices and prayers for those who had fallen in battle, on the ground that he did so because ‘he took thought for a resurrection’ ( 2Ma 12:43 ). If there were no resurrection of the dead, such a course of action would be superfluous and idle ( 2Ma 12:44 ).
Book of Wisdom . It is only necessary to say of this writing that it is an Alexandrian work, written about the beginning of the Christian era, and that according to it the body is an incubus dragging the soul, which is destined for incorruption ( Wis 2:23 ; Wis 3:1 ), earthwards ( Wis 9:15 [4] iv. 930 f.]).
3. Position of the doctrine at and immediately subsequent to the time of Jesus Christ . It might be said, and said with justice, that the foregoing views were representative, not of contemporary popular beliefs and ideas, but of conceptions prevalent among the educated and thinking classes. It is reasonable, however, to expect that by the time of Jesus these lines of thought would have penetrated to the masses, with such modifications as they were likely to assume in and during the process. This expectation is found to be in harmony with what we observe to have actually existed; for, with one or two exceptions, when He felt called on to make a specific declaration (cf. Mark 12:18-27 = Matthew 22:23-32 = Luke 20:27-38 , John 5:28 f.). Jesus everywhere in His teaching assumed the truth of, and belief in, the resurrection of the dead. We know that materialistic views of this doctrine were held side by side with the more spiritual ideas so prominent in the Book of Enoch (cf. 51.4, 104.4, 8, 62.15f. etc.).
In the Apocalypse of Baruch, for example, the questions were asked, ‘In what shape shall those live who live in thy day?’ ‘Will they then resume this form of the present, and put on these entrammelling members, which are now involved in evils, and in which evils are consummated, or wilt thou perchance change these things which have been in the world, as also the world?’ (49.2f.). To these the answer is given, that the bodies of the dead shall be raised exactly as they were when committed to the ground, in order that they may be recognized by their friends (50.2ff.). After this object has been achieved, a glorious change will take place: ‘they shall be made like unto the angels, and be made equal to the stars, and they shall be changed into every form they desire, from beauty into loveliness, and from light into the splendour of glory’ (51.10, cf. Mark 12:25 = Luke 20:36 = Matthew 22:30 ). Even in Rabbinical circles sensuous conceptions were frequent, so that even the clothes in which one was to be buried became a subject of anxious care (see The Apoc. [1] of Baruch ed. R. H. Charles, notes on chs. 50 51, and Introd. p. lxxx).
At this period, too, the ideas of a universal and of a first and a second resurrection were held and taught (Apoc. [1] Bar 30.2 5, 2Es 7:28 ; 1618069008_88 ). For our purpose it is not necessary to do more than refer to the Hellenistic or Pythagoræan speculations of the Essenes to which Josephus makes reference (see BJ II. viii. 11; Schürer, HJP [2] ii. iii. 205). The only form of Judaism which contained principles of continuity and life was represented by Pharisaism. The view of this, the most religions and the most orthodox of the Jewish sects, with regard to the resurrection, limited it to the righteous, for whom they postulated a new and a glorified body (see BJ II. viii. 14, cf. Ant. XVIII. i. 3). While this doctrine of a personal resurrection seems to have made much more headway in the Judaism of this age than the other ideas referred to above, it also clearly appears that the limitation of its scope to the righteous was more universally held than its extension to the wicked, in spite of the teaching in Daniel ( Daniel 12:2 ), Apoc. [1] of Baruch (30.2 5), and 2 Esdras (72:32 37). Moreover, a difference of opinion continued to exist as to the time when it was supposed to take place, some writers placing it immediately before (cf. En 51.1f.) and others immediately after the close of the Messianic era (cf. En 91.10, 92.3, Apoc. [1] Bar 40 42, 2Es 4:41 , Ps-Sol 3:16, 13:9 etc.).
4. Teaching of Jesus
( a ) The Synoptics . Many of the passages in which Jesus’ teaching on the resurrection is recorded by the Synoptists might be interpreted as leaving no room for the doctrine that the wicked shall rise again from the dead. The most conspicuous, perhaps, of these is that Incorporated in the Lukan narrative of His controversy with the Sadducees ( Luke 20:35 f.). The form of the expression ‘the resurrection from the dead,’ as has been pointed out, ‘implies that some from among the dead are raised, while others as yet are not’ (see Plummer, ‘St. Luke’ in ICC [2] , ad loc. ). The other expression, ‘sons of the resurrection,’ is remarkable for a similar reason. There seems to be an implied antithesis between those whose sonship results in immortality and those who can have no such hope (cf. Plummer, op. cit. Luke 20:36 n. [11] ). Other instances, which might be considered as lending countenance to this view, speak of the ‘resurrection of the just’ ( Luke 14:14 ), and contain promises of restoration in the glory of His Kingdom to ‘his elect’ ( Mark 13:27 = Matthew 24:31 ). When, on the other hand, we take a general survey of the eschatological teaching of Jesus, we find that the doctrine of a general bodily resurrection occupies a very assured position even in the Synoptic records. Not only do we find, as already noted, that His teaching on this subject, as against Sadducean negations, was pleasing in Pharisaic circles (cf. Luke 20:39 ), but He is also seen to refer to this question in terms of current Jewish orthodoxy. The future life is personal in the fullest sense, and it is not incorporeal, for’ many shall come from the east and the west and shall sit down with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ ( Matthew 8:11 , cf. Luke 13:29 ).
( b ) The Fourth Gospel . The Johannine record of Jesus’ eschatological teaching reveals a profounder view of the resurrection life than that contained in the Synoptics, for it is there dealt with as a spiritual process intimately connected with the quickening life which is ‘given to the Son’ ( John 5:26 ; cf. John 17:2 ; John 1:4 ). When Martha expresses her assurance that her brother ‘shall rise again in the resurrection at the last day’ ( John 11:24 ), Jesus at once lays broader and deeper the foundations upon which this belief is to rest for the future. While tacitly acquiescing in her conviction as a ‘sure and certain hope,’ He establishes an organic relationship, immediate and spiritual, between Himself and those committed to Him. This living relationship, in which all believers share, contains the germ of that resurrection life which springs into being at present, and will be perfected at ‘the last day’ ( John 11:26 , cf. John 6:40 ; John 6:44 ; John 5:21 ; John 3:36 ).
It is true that Jesus seems to have given no thought to the difficulty of conceiving a resurrection of the wicked on the ground that all resurrection life has its origin in Himself; at the same time no doubt can be reasonably entertained that He looked for the resurrection of all men (see John 12:48 ; cf. those passages which speak of the body being cast with the soul into Gehenna, Matthew 10:28 ; Matthew 5:29 f.). Perhaps He considered that a sufficient explanation consisted in asserting the omnipotence of ‘the Father’ after the manner of the OT; ‘The Father raiseth the dead and quickeneth them’ ( John 5:21 ; cf. Deuteronomy 32:38 , 2 Corinthians 1:9 ). In the Lukan version of Jesus’ argument with the Sadducees we may understand a reference to the idea of the resurrection of all men based on the truth that ‘all live unto him’ ( Luke 20:38 , cf. a slightly different expression in Acts 17:28 ).
It may be pointed out here that Jesus seems to have made no attempt to answer the often debated question of the curious as to the nature of the resurrection body . He compared the condition of those who had arisen to that of the angels ( Mark 12:25 ), a comparison which is noteworthy for what it implies as well as for the reserve which Jesus used when speaking on this subject. At the same time, we must remember that certain incidents in the post-resurrection life of Jesus on earth appear to have been designed to meet what is legitimate in speculation of this kind. He was anxious to prove that His was a bodily resurrection ( Luke 24:41 ff., John 20:20 ; cf. Acts 10:41 ), and that His risen body was capable of being identified with the body to which His disciples had been accustomed for so long ( John 20:27 ). On the other hand, the conditions of His existence underwent a complete alteration. For Him now physical limitations, as regards time or space, did not exist ( Matthew 28:2 , John 20:19 ; John 20:25 , Luke 24:15 ; cf. Luke 24:34 ); and this freedom from temporal conditions resulted in a life which transcended ordinary experience. Sometimes He remained unrecognized until a well-known characteristic phrase or act revealed His personality ( John 20:14 f., John 21:4 , Luke 24:16 ; cf. the author’s comment ‘but some doubted’ In Matthew 28:17 ).
5. Apostolic teaching
( a ) The Acts . Although the Apostles do not seem at first to have shaken themselves free from Judaistic conceptions of the Messianic Kingdom ( Acts 1:6 ), it is plain that they looked on the fact of Jesus’ resurrection as of primary importance (see Acts 1:22 ). At all costs this must be placed in the forefront of their evangelistic work, and the principal element of their Apostolic claims to the attention of their Jewish hearers lay in their power, as eye-witnesses, to offer irrefragable proof of the resurrection of Jesus from the dead ( Acts 2:24 ; Acts 2:32 ; Acts 3:15 ; Acts 4:10 ; Acts 4:33 ; Acts 5:30 ; Acts 5:32 ; cf. Acts 10:40 f.). When we compare the fragmentary reports of Petrine teaching in the Acts with the doctrine of 1Peter , we find that in the latter document the Apostle is no less insistent on the fact ( 1 Peter 1:21 ), while he has learned to assign to it the power of penetrating the present life and renewing it ‘unto a living hope’ ( 1 Peter 1:3 ). Christian Baptism for him receives its spiritual validity ‘through the resurrection of Jesus Christ,’ which enables us to satisfy ‘the appeal of a good conscience toward God’ ( 1 Peter 3:21 ). At the same time we must not forget that elements of this power are recognized more than once in his discourses in Acts. The Pentecostal outpouring, the work of healing, the gifts of repentance and forgiveness of sins, are all described as (flowing from the risen life of Jesus (see Acts 2:33 ; Acts 4:10 ; Acts 5:31 ; cf. Acts 5:20 , where the angelic messenger speaks of the Apostolic teaching as having reference to ‘this life’).
( b ) St. Paul . When we turn to the teaching of St. Paul as it gradually comes into contact with Hellenic and Gentile thought, we find the doctrine of the resurrection assuming a new and developed prominence in connexion with the resurrection of Jesus. When addressing Jewish audiences, he emphasizes the fact that God raised up Jesus according to certain promises recorded in the OT (of. Acts 13:32 f., Acts 26:6 ff.), and at the same time bases his doctrine of the resurrection on its necessity, and on the relationship of Jesus and the human race. When, however, he came face to face with the Greek mind, his experience was entirely different. The philosophers of Athens met his categorical assertion of the resurrection of Jesus not merely with a refusal to credit his statement, but with a plain derision of the very idea ( Acts 17:32 ; cf. Acts 26:8 ). It was doubtless the calm mockery of the Athenian Stoics that made him feel that his mission to them was hopeless ( Acts 18:1 ), and caused him, when writing afterwards to the essentially Greek community of Corinthian Christians, to expound fully his doctrine of the resurrection. In the first of the two letters addressed to this Church he establishes the fact of the resurrection of Jesus, by revealing its harmony with the Divine plan set forth to the Jews in the OT, and showing that it was attested by numerous witnesses of His post-resurrection existence. He next goes on to demonstrate the organic connexion between this resurrection and that of those ‘who are fallen asleep in Christ’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:16 ff.), and the necessity of accepting the doctrine as fundamentally essential to Christian belief and hope ( 1 Corinthians 15:3 f., 1 Corinthians 15:19 , cf. Hebrews 6:1 ).
St. Paul’s eschatological doctrine included a belief in a real bodily resurrection . This is quite certain not only from the chapter we have been considering, but also from incidental references scattered throughout his Epistles (cf. the expression, He ‘shall fashion anew the body of our humiliation,’ Philippians 3:21 ; see Romans 8:11 ; Romans 4:14 , 2 Corinthians 5:1-5 etc.). Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the Apostle’s contribution to this doctrine is contained in his conception of the nature of the resurrection body. It is evident from the analogies he employs that he intended to establish the identity of the mortal and the glorified bodies ( 1 Corinthians 15:35-41 ). this idea he puts on a rational, though an apparently paradoxical, basis by postulating the existence of ‘a spiritual body’ as distinct from ‘a natural body’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:44 ), and at the same time by insisting on their strict continuity (cf. the repeated doublets ‘it is sown’ … ‘it is raised,’ 1 Corinthians 15:42 ff.). Doubtless his presentment of this speculative and mysterious question was founded on what he had already learned regarding the nature of the traditional appearances of the risen Jesus. ‘The body of his glory’ Philippians 3:21 ) is the ultimate attainable glory of those whose ‘citizenship is in heaven’ ( Philippians 3:20 ; cf. Colossians 3:10 , Romans 8:20 , 1 John 3:2 , 1 Corinthians 15:49 ).
Side by side with the doctrine of a literal, bodily resurrection, St. Paul’s writings are rich with another conception which is more especially connected with the present life. Following the teaching of Jesus, who claimed to be the power by which resurrection life was alone possible, the Apostle declares that Christ gives this new and glorious life here and now. It is rooted, so to speak, in the earthly life of men, and its final growth and fruit are consummated hereafter (cf. Colossians 2:12 ; Colossians 3:1 , Philippians 3:10 f., Romans 6:5 ). This inchoative resurrection life has its origin in the spiritual union of baptized Christians with Christ (cf. Romans 6:3 f., Colossians 2:12 , Galatians 3:27 ), and the tremendous possibilities of development are, according to St. Paul, due to a transcendent fellowship with the glorified Jesus (see Ephesians 1:20 to Ephesians 2:10 ; Ephesians 2:19 ff.). His resurrection is the power by which this union, in all its aspects, is perfected ( Philippians 3:10 f., cf. Romans 1:4 ). It was doubtless the one-sided presentation of Pauline eschatology that led to the heresy of Hymenæus and Philetus ( 2 Timothy 2:18 ), and the Apostle seems to have felt the necessity of balancing his mystical interpretation by an emphatic insistence on the literal truth that the resurrection is a future objective fact in the progressive life of man.
That St. Paul held the doctrine of the resurrection of the wicked as well as of the righteous is evident not only from the words of his defence before Felix at Cæsarea (Acts 24:15 , cf. Luke 14:14 ), but also from incidental remarks in his Epistles (see 1 Thessalonians 4:16 and 1 Corinthians 15:22 f., where the emphasis which is laid on the first resurrection implies a second and a separate event; cf. Acts 26:7 f. and Philippians 3:11 , where the same implication may be observed). What the connexion is, however, between these two distinct resurrections does not appear to have occurred to the Apostle’s mind, and there seems to be little ground for the supposition that he believed in a distinction between them as regards time. Indeed, the particular passage upon which millenarians rely to prove the affinity of the Pauline and Apocalyptic doctrines in this respect says nothing of any resurrection except that of ‘those that are Christ’s’ (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:22 ff.). The resurrection of the wicked occupies a very subordinate place in Pauline eschatology, and we need not be surprised at the scanty notice taken of it, when we remember how constantly he is pressing on his readers’ attention the power by which the resurrection to life is brought about ( Romans 8:11 ,
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Christ, Resurrection of
The Gospel miracle, related by the four Evangelists, of Christ's return to life. By His own power He reunited His body and soul, and issued alive from the sealed and guarded tomb, after His dead body had reposed therein from Friday evening until Sunday morning. This fact was predicted by Christ Himself, and offered by Him as the chief sign or proof of His Divine mission and Divinity. The Apostles after Him made it the cardinal point in their teaching, on which hinged the value of the Christian faith. Saint Paul says: "And if Christ be not risen again, then is our preaching vain: and your faith is also vain." (1 Corinthians 15). Among the many masters who have represented this subject in art are: Aldegrever, Baldovinetti, Bellini, Annibale and Agostino Carracci, Contarini, Correggio, El Greco, Fra Angelico, Ghirlandajo, Murillo, Palma, Perugino, Pinturicchio, Pourbus, Rembrandt, Rubens, San Sepolcro, Tintoretto, Titian, Trevisani, Van de Velde, Vasari, Veronese, and Vivarini.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mankind, Resurrection of
The universal return to life of all the members of the human race, effected shortly before the last judgment by God's omnipotence, when each individual human soul will be permanently reunited with the identical body with which it was united on earth. The Creed expresses this dogma in the words, "resurrection of the body."
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Resurrection
1: ἀνάστασις (Strong's #386 — Noun Feminine — anastasis — an-as'-tas-is ) denotes (I) "a raising up," or "rising" (ana, "up," and histemi, "to cause to stand"), Luke 2:34 , "the rising up;" the AV "again" obscures the meaning; the Child would be like a stone against which many in Israel would stumble while many others would find in its strength and firmness a means of their salvation and spiritual life; (II) of "resurrection" from the dead, (a) of Christ, Acts 1:22 ; 2:31 ; 4:33 ; Romans 1:4 ; 6:5 ; Philippians 3:10 ; 1 Peter 1:3 ; 3:21 ; by metonymy, of Christ as the Author of "resurrection," John 11:25 ; (b) of those who are Christ's at His Parousia (see COMING), Luke 14:14 , "the resurrection of the just;" Luke 20:33,35,36 ; John 5:29 (1st part), "the resurrection of life;" John 11:24 ; Acts 23:6 ; 24:15 (1st part); 1 Corinthians 15:21,42 ; 2 Timothy 2:18 ; Hebrews 11:35 (2nd part), see RAISE , Note (3); Revelation 20:5 , "the first resurrection;" hence the insertion of "is" stands for the completion of this "resurrection," of which Christ was "the firstfruits;" Revelation 20:6 ; (c) of "the rest of the dead," after the Millennium (cp. Revelation 20:5 ); John 5:29 (2nd part), "the resurrection of judgment;" Acts 24:15 (2nd part), "of the unjust;" (d) of those who were raised in more immediate connection with Christ's "resurrection," and thus had part already in the first "resurrection," Acts 26:23 ; Romans 1:4 (in each of which "dead" is plural; see Matthew 27:52 ); (e) of the "resurrection" spoken of in general terms, Matthew 22:23 ; Mark 12:18 ; Luke 20:27 ; Acts 4:2 ; 17:18 ; 23:8 ; 24:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:12,13 ; Hebrews 6:2 ; (f) of those who were raised in OT times, to die again, Hebrews 11:35 (1st part), lit., "out of resurrection."
2: ἐξανάστασις (Strong's #1815 — Noun Feminine — exanastasis — ex-an-as'-tas-is ) ek, "from" or "out of," and No. 1, Philippians 3:11 , followed by ek, lit., "the out-resurrection from among the dead." For the significance of this see ATTAIN , No. 1.
3: ἔγερσις (Strong's #1454 — Noun Feminine — egersis — eg'-er-sis ) "a rousing" (akin to egeiro, "to arouse, to raise"), is used of the "resurrection" of Christ, in Matthew 27:53 .
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Resurrection
A rising again from the state of the dead; generally applied to the resurrection of the last day. This doctrine is argued,
1. From the resurrection of Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 :
2. From the doctrines of grace, as union, election, redemption, &c.
3. From Scripture testimonies, Matthew 22:23 , &c. Job 19:25 ; Job 19:27 . Isaiah 26:19 . Philippians 2:20 . 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 : Song of Solomon 12: 2. 1 Thessalonians 4:14 . Revelation 20:13 .
4. From the general judgment, which of course requires it. As to the nature of this resurrection, it will be,
1. General. Revelation 20:12 ; Revelation 20:15 . 2 Corinthians 5:10 .
2. Of the same body. It is true, indeed, that the body has not always the same particles, which are continually changing, but it has always the same constituent parts, which proves its identity; it is the same body that is born that dies, and the same body that dies that shall rise again; so that Mr. Locke's objection to the idea of the same body is a mere quibble.
3. The resurrection will be at the command of Christ, and by his power, John 5:28-29 .
4. Perhaps as to the manner it will be successive; the dead in Christ rising first, 1 Corinthians 15:23 . 1 Thessalonians 4:16 . This doctrine is of great use and importance. It is one of the first principles of the doctrine of Christ; the whole Gospel stands or falls with it. It serves to enlarge our views of the divine perfections. It encourages our faith and trust in God under all the difficulties of life. It has a tendency to regulate all our affections and moderate out desires after earthly things. It supports the saints under the loss of near relations, and enables them to rejoice in the glorious prospect set before them.
See Hody on the Resurrection; Pearson on the Creed; Lame Street Lect. ser. 10; Watt's Ontology; Young's Last Day; Locke on the Understanding, 50: 2: 100: 27; Warburton's Legation of Moses, vol. 2: p. 553, &c; Bishop Newton's Works, vol. 3: p. 676, 683.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Resurrection
Both Old and New Testaments record examples of ordinary people who died and were brought back to life. In all these cases the kind of life to which they returned was the same kind of life as they had known previously. They experienced a normal human existence again, and in due course died a normal human death (1 Kings 17:22; 2 Kings 4:32-35; Luke 7:12-15; Luke 8:49-55; John 11:39-44; Acts 9:37-41). The present article, however, is concerned with a kind of resurrection that is an entirely new order of existence, where death has no more power (Romans 6:9; 1 Corinthians 15:54; 2 Corinthians 5:4).
Death and the afterlife
Old Testament believers did not have a clear understanding of eternal life, though they did at times express the hope of a resurrection through which they would have deliverance from the power of death. Likewise they expected a resurrection of the wicked that would be followed by punishment (Psalms 49:14-15; Daniel 12:2). The reason their understanding was so limited was that Jesus Christ had not yet come. By Christ’s death God broke the power of death and revealed the nature of resurrection life (2 Timothy 1:10; Hebrews 2:14-15). A minority of Jews, the Sadducees, refused to believe in a resurrection of any sort (Romans 6:3-48).
Death is a consequence of sin, and therefore salvation from sin must include victory over death if that salvation is to be complete. It must involve the resurrection of the body to a new and victorious life. Because Jesus’ death and resurrection conquered sin and death, the believer in Jesus can look forward to salvation from sin and death (Romans 4:24-25; Romans 6:8-10; Romans 8:11; 1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57).
God created the human being as a unified whole, and therefore he deals with people in the totality of their being. God does not divide them into physical and spiritual ‘parts’. The human being’s destiny, whether for salvation or damnation, is connected not with death but with the resurrection of the body, after which the person faces final judgment (Daniel 12:2; John 14:12-1880; Acts 24:15; see DEATH).
Assurance of Jesus’ resurrection
People’s only basis of hope for a victorious resurrection is the resurrection of Jesus (John 11:25; 1 Corinthians 15:20-21; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49). Throughout his ministry Jesus pointed out that he was not only to die but was also to rise from death (Mark 8:31; Mark 9:9; Mark 9:31; John 2:19-21). In spite of Jesus’ clear statements, his disciples often displayed a lack of understanding concerning his coming crucifixion and resurrection. Therefore, when Jesus met with them after his resurrection, he made sure that they knew it was a true bodily resurrection (Luke 24:39-43; John 20:20; John 20:27; 1 Corinthians 15:4-7).
Nevertheless, there was something uniquely different about Jesus’ body after his resurrection. On some occasions his physical appearance seems to have changed, for his friends did not at first know who he was (Luke 24:30-31; Luke 24:36-37; John 20:14-15; John 21:4; John 21:12). On other occasions they recognized him immediately (Matthew 28:9; John 20:26-28).
In his resurrection body Jesus was capable of normal physical functions (Luke 24:41-43), but he was also able to appear and disappear as he wished. Although always with his disciples invisibly, he could make himself visible to them if he so desired (Luke 24:31; John 20:19; John 20:26; cf. Matthew 18:20). The last time he appeared to them, he disappeared in a way that showed that he would appear to them no more, until he returned in power and glory at the end of the age (Acts 1:3; Acts 1:9-11).
Jesus’ resurrection changed the apostles from people who were confused and cowardly into people who were assured and courageous (Acts 2:14; Acts 2:36; Acts 4:13; Acts 4:18-20; Acts 4:29-31; Acts 5:27-29). By his resurrection he had conquered death and made salvation sure, and they were witnesses of these things (Luke 24:46-48; Acts 2:24; Acts 2:32; Acts 5:30-32; Acts 10:39-43).
The resurrection was therefore a central theme in the apostles’ preaching. It had a significance that people could not ignore (Acts 2:22-24; Acts 4:2; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49). Jesus was alive and, through his disciples, was continuing the work he had begun during the time of his earthly ministry (Acts 3:15-16; Acts 4:10; cf 1618069008_1; see HOLY SPIRIT).
Not just the original disciples but all disciples are changed because of Jesus’ resurrection (Ephesians 2:5-6; Revelation 1:17-18). Paul, who had not known Jesus during the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry, claimed that the resurrection gave him assurance of eternal life and confidence in his Christian service (Acts 23:6; Acts 25:19; Romans 1:4-5; 1 Corinthians 9:1; 1 Corinthians 15:8; 1 Corinthians 15:14-15; 2 Timothy 2:8). The resurrection of Jesus is essential for a person’s entire salvation (1 Corinthians 15:14; 1 Corinthians 15:17; 1 Corinthians 15:19; Romans 4:24-25; Romans 8:10-11). This is one of the truths that believers express when they are baptized (1618069008_26; Romans 10:9; Colossians 2:12; see BAPTISM).
Having become united with Christ through faith, believers share in the resurrection life of Christ. God’s power worked in Christ in raising him to new life, and that same power can work in those who have come into union with Christ. Christians have a new life. They share in Christ’s conquest of sin, and so can claim victory over sin in their everyday lives (Romans 6:6-11; Romans 6:13; Romans 7:4; Romans 8:10; Ephesians 1:19-20; Philippians 3:10).
Future resurrection
Only through Jesus’ resurrection can believers have the assurance of a future resurrection. Through their union with him, they can look forward to an entirely new order of existence where sin and death have no more power (1 Corinthians 15:20-26; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57; 1 Peter 1:3-4). This new order of existence will begin at the return of Jesus Christ, when the resurrection of believers will take place (John 6:40; John 6:54; 1 Corinthians 15:52; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17).
Believers have no way of knowing exactly what the resurrection body will be like. But they know at least that it will be imperishable, glorious and strong, suited to the life of the age to come just as the present body is suited to present earthly life. The link between the future resurrection body and the present physical body may be compared to the link between a plant and the seed from which it grows. The plant is different from the seed, but in a sense it is the same thing. Similarly, the resurrection body of the believer will be different from the present body, but the believer will still be the same person (John 6:40; 1 Corinthians 15:35-38; 1 Corinthians 15:42-44).
As Adam’s body was the pattern for the bodies of people in the present life, so Christ’s resurrection body is the pattern for the bodies of believers in the life to come (Acts 4:33; Philippians 3:20-21). The Christian’s expectation at the resurrection is not for the giving of life to a corpse, but for the changing of the whole person into the likeness of Christ (1 John 3:2; cf. Romans 8:29; 2 Corinthians 3:18).
The resurrection of the ungodly is a different matter. Whatever form their resurrection will take, they will not be given spiritual and imperishable bodies. Their resurrection will result not in life, but in judgment, condemnation and eternal destruction (Daniel 12:2; Matthew 10:28; John 5:29; 1 Corinthians 15:50; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 20:12-14; see HELL).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
Few articles are more important than this. It deserves our particular attention, because it is the grand hinge on which Christianity turns. Hence, says the apostle, he was delivered for our offences, and raised again for our justification. Infidels, however, have disbelieved it, but with what little reason we may easily see on considering the subject. "If the body of Jesus Christ, " says Saurin, "were not raised from the dead, it must have been stolen away. But this theft is incredible. Who committed it? The enemies of Jesus Christ? Would they have contributed to his glory by countenancing a report of his resurrection? Would his disciples? It is probable they would not, and it is next to certain they could not. How could they have undertaken to remove the body? Frail and timorous creatures, people who fled as soon as they saw him taken into custody; even Peter, the most courageous, trembled at the voice of a servant girl, and three times denied that he knew him. People of this character, would they have dared to resist the authority of the governor?
Would they have undertaken to oppose the determination of the Sanhedrim, to force a guard, and to elude, or overcome, soldiers armed and aware of danger? If Jesus Christ were not risen again (I speak the language of unbelievers, ) he had deceived his disciples with vain hopes of his resurrection. How came the disciples not to discover the imposture? Would they have hazarded themselves by undertaking an enterprise so perilous in favour of a man who had so cruelly imposed on their credulity? But were we to grant that they formed the design of removing the body, how could they have executed it? How could soldiers armed, and on guard, suffer themselves to be over-reached, by a few timorous people? Either, says St. Augustine they were asleep or awake: if they were awake, why should they suffer the body to be taken away? If asleep, how could they know that the disciples took it away? How dare they then, depose that it was STOLEN. The testimony of the apostles furnishes us with arguments, and there are eight considerations which give the evidence sufficient weight.
1. The nature of these witnesses. They were not men of power, riches, eloquence, credit, to impose upon the world; they were poor and mean.
2. The number of these witnesses.
See 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 : Luke 24:34 . Mark 16:14 . Matthew 28:10 . It is not likely that a collusion should have been held among so many to support a lie, which would be of no utility to them.
3. The facts themselves which they avow; not suppositions, distant events, or events related by others, but real facts which they saw with their own eyes, 1 John 1:1-10 :
4. The agreement of their evidence: they all deposed the same thing.
5. Observe the tribunals before which they gave evidence: Jews and heathens, philosophers and rabbins, courtiers and lawyers. If they had been impostors, the fraud certainly would have been discovered.
6. The place in which they bore their testimony. Not at a distance, where they might not easily have been detected, if false, but at Jerusalem, in the synagogues, in the pretorium.
7. The time of this testimony: not years after, but three days after, they declared he was risen; yea, before their rage was quelled, while Calvary was yet dyed with the blood they had spilt. If it had been a fraud, it is not likely they would have come forward in such broad day-light, amidst so much opposition.
8. Lastly, the motives which induced them to publish the resurrection: not to gain fame, riches, glory, profit; no, they exposed themselves to suffering and death, and proclaimed the truth from conviction of its importance and certainty. "Collect, " says Saurin, "all these proofs together; consider them in one point of view, and see how many extravagant suppositions must be advanced, if the resurrection of our Saviour be denied. It must be supposed that guards, who had been particularly cautioned by their officers, sat down to sleep; and that, however, they deserved credit when they said the body of Jesus Christ was stolen.
It must be supposed that men, who have been imposed on in the most odious and cruel manner in the world, hazarded their dearest enjoyments for the glory of an impostor. It must be supposed that ignorant and illiterate men, who had neither reputation, fortune, nor eloquence, possessed the art of fascinating the eyes of all the church. It must be supposed either that five hundred persons were all deprived of their senses at a time, or that they were all deceived in the plainest matters of fact; or that this multitude of false witnesses had found out the secret of never contradicting themselves or one another, and of being always uniform in their testimony. It must be supposed that the most expert courts of judicature could not find out a shadow of contradiction in a palpable imposture. It must be supposed that the apostles, sensible men in other cases, chose precisely those places and those times which were most unfavourable to their views. It must be supposed that millions madly suffered imprisonments, tortures, and crucifixions, to spread an illusion. It must be supposed that ten thousand miracles were wrought in favour of falsehood, or all these facts must be denied; and then it must be supposed that the apostles were idiots; that the enemies of Christianity were idiots; and that all the primitive Christians were idiots." The doctrine of the resurrection of Christ affords us a variety of useful instructions. Here we see evidence of divine power; prophecy accomplished; the character of Jesus established; his work finished; and a future state proved. It is a ground of faith, the basis of hope, a source of consolation, and a stimulus to obedience.
See Saurin's Sermons, ser. 8. vol. 2: Robinson's translation; Ditton and Wast on the Resurrection; Cook's Illustration of the general evidence establishing the reality of Christ's resurrection, p. 323. Ecc. Rev. vol. 4. but especially a small but admirable Essay on the Resurrection of Christ by Mr. Dore. Bish. Horsely.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
One of the cardinal facts and doctrines of the gospel. If Christ be not risen, our faith is vain (1 Corinthians 15:14 ). The whole of the New Testament revelation rests on this as an historical fact. On the day of Pentecost Peter argued the necessity of Christ's resurrection from the prediction in Psalm 16 ( Acts 2:24-28 ). In his own discourses, also, our Lord clearly intimates his resurrection (Matthew 20:19 ; Mark 9:9 ; 14:28 ; Luke 18:33 ; John 2:19-22 ). The evangelists give circumstantial accounts of the facts connected with that event, and the apostles, also, in their public teaching largely insist upon it. Ten different appearances of our risen Lord are recorded in the New Testament. They may be arranged as follows:
To Mary Magdalene at the sepulchre alone. This is recorded at length only by (John 20:11-18 ), and alluded to by (Mark 16:9-11 ).
To certain women, "the other Mary," Salome, Joanna, and others, as they returned from the sepulchre. (Matthew 28:1-10 ) alone gives an account of this. (Compare Mark 16:1-8 , and Luke 24:1-11 .)
To Simon Peter alone on the day of the resurrection. (See Luke 24:34 ; 1 Corinthians 15:5 .)
To the two disciples on the way to Emmaus on the day of the resurrection, recorded fully only by (Luke 24:13-35 . Compare Mark 16:12,13 ).
To the ten disciples (Thomas being absent) and others "with them," at Jerusalem on the evening of the resurrection day. One of the evangelists gives an account of this appearance, (John 20:19-24 ).
To the disciples again (Thomas being present) at Jerusalem (Mark 16:14-18 ; Luke 24:33-40 ; John 20:26-28 . See also 1 Corinthians 15:5 ).
To the disciples when fishing at the Sea of Galilee. Of this appearance also (John 21:1-23 ) alone gives an account.
To the eleven, and above 500 brethren at once, at an appointed place in Galilee (1 Corinthians 15:6 ; Compare Matthew 28:16-20 ).
To James, but under what circumstances we are not informed (1 Corinthians 15:7 ).
To the apostles immediately before the ascension. They accompanied him from Jerusalem to Mount Olivet, and there they saw him ascend "till a cloud received him out of their sight" (Mark 16:19 ; Luke 24:50-52 ; Acts 1:4-10 ). It is worthy of note that it is distinctly related that on most of these occasions our Lord afforded his disciples the amplest opportunity of testing the fact of his resurrection. He conversed with them face to face. They touched him (Matthew 28:9 ; Luke 24:39 ; John 20:27 ), and he ate bread with them (Luke 24:42,43 ; John 21:12,13 ).
In addition to the above, mention might be made of Christ's manifestation of himself to Paul at Damascus, who speaks of it as an appearance of the risen Saviour (Acts 9:3-9,17 ; 1 Corinthians 15:8 ; 9:1 ). It is implied in the words of Luke (Acts 1:3 ) that there may have been other appearances of which we have no record.
The resurrection is spoken of as the act (1) of God the Father (Psalm 16:10 ; Acts 2:24 ; 3:15 ; Romans 8:11 ; Ephesians 1:20 ; Colossians 2:12 ; Hebrews 13:20 ); (2) of Christ himself (John 2:19 ; 10:18 ); and (3) of the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 3:18 ).
The resurrection is a public testimony of Christ's release from his undertaking as surety, and an evidence of the Father's acceptance of his work of redemption. It is a victory over death and the grave for all his followers.
The importance of Christ's resurrection will be seen when we consider that if he rose the gospel is true, and if he rose not it is false. His resurrection from the dead makes it manifest that his sacrifice was accepted. Our justification was secured by his obedience to the death, and therefore he was raised from the dead (Romans 4:25 ). His resurrection is a proof that he made a full atonement for our sins, that his sacrifice was accepted as a satisfaction to divine justice, and his blood a ransom for sinners. It is also a pledge and an earnest of the resurrection of all believers (Romans 8:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:14 ; 15:47-49 ; Philippians 3:21 ; 1 John 3:2 ). As he lives, they shall live also.
It proved him to be the Son of God, inasmuch as it authenticated all his claims (John 2:19 ; 10:17 ). "If Christ did not rise, the whole scheme of redemption is a failure, and all the predictions and anticipations of its glorious results for time and for eternity, for men and for angels of every rank and order, are proved to be chimeras. 'But now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that slept.' Therefore the Bible is true from Genesis to Revelation. The kingdom of darkness has been overthrown, Satan has fallen as lightning from heaven, and the triumph of truth over error, of good over evil, of happiness over misery is for ever secured." Hodge.
With reference to the report which the Roman soldiers were bribed (Matthew 28:12-14 ) to circulate concerning Christ's resurrection, "his disciples came by night and stole him away while we slept," Matthew Henry in his "Commentary," under John 20:1-10 , fittingly remarks, "The grave-clothes in which Christ had been buried were found in very good order, which serves for an evidence that his body was not 'stolen away while men slept.' Robbers of tombs have been known to take away 'the clothes' and leave the body; but none ever took away 'the body' and left the clothes, especially when they were 'fine linen' and new (Mark 15:46 ). Any one would rather choose to carry a dead body in its clothes than naked. Or if they that were supposed to have stolen it would have left the grave-clothes behind, yet it cannot be supposed they would find leisure to 'fold up the linen.'"
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of the Dead
Will be simultaneous both of the just and the unjust (Daniel 12:2 ; John 5:28,29 ; Romans 2:6-16 ; 2 th 1:6-10 ). The qualities of the resurrection body will be different from those of the body laid in the grave (1 Corinthians 15:53,54 ; Philippians 3:21 ); but its identity will nevertheless be preserved. It will still be the same body (1 Corinthians 15:42-44 ) which rises again. As to the nature of the resurrection body, (1) it will be spiritual (1 Corinthians 15:44 ), i.e., a body adapted to the use of the soul in its glorified state, and to all the conditions of the heavenly state; (2) glorious, incorruptible, and powerful (54); (3) like unto the glorified body of Christ (Philippians 3:21 ); and (4) immortal (Revelation 21:4 ).
Christ's resurrection secures and illustrates that of his people. "
Because his resurrection seals and consummates his redemptive power; and the redemption of our persons involves the redemption of our bodies (Romans 8:23 ).
Because of our federal and vital union with Christ (1 Corinthians 15:21,22 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ).
Because of his Spirit which dwells in us making our bodies his members (1 Corinthians 6:15 ; Romans 8:11 ).
Because Christ by covenant is Lord both of the living and the dead (Romans 14:9 ). This same federal and vital union of the Christian with Christ likewise causes the resurrection of the believer to be similar to as well as consequent upon that of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:49 ; Philippians 3:21 ; 1 John 3:2 )." Hodge's Outlines of Theology.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Jesus Christ
The bodily, living appearance of Jesus of Nazareth after He died and was buried, providing certain hope for resurrection of believers. The Greek term for resurrection, anastasis , literally means, “to stand again.” In the pagan world it was associated with the cycle of nature and the nature gods, or the survival of a “spiritual part” of a person after death. Because of Jesus Christ and His standing up again from the dead, resurrection has come to mean the restoration of the whole self by God who gave life and creates it anew in the heavenly kingdom. New Testament accounts of the resurrection fall into three categories: the empty tomb, appearances of Jesus before His ascension, and appearances of Jesus after His ascension.
The earliest written account of the resurrection of Jesus is 1 Corinthians 15:3-8 . Paul emphasized the appearances of the resurrected Christ to His followers. Paul mentioned an appearance to Cephas (compare Luke 24:34 ). Then Jesus appeared to the twelve (compare Luke 24:36-43 ). The appearance to the five hundred, some of whom had died by the time Paul wrote 1Corinthians, is supposed by some to refer to the ascension (Acts 1:9-11 ). The appearance of James is nowhere else recorded. Tradition asserts that this was James the brother of Jesus, the author of the Book of James (see Acts 15:13 ). The second appearance to the disciples may be equated with Jesus' presentation of Himself to Thomas a week after the first appearance to the apostles (John 20:24-29 ). Paul mentioned last the appearance of the ascended Christ to Paul himself, an obvious reference to Saul's conversion experience (Acts 9:1-9 ).
Matthew reported that two Marys, Magdalene and the mother of James and Joses (Matthew 28:1-2 ; see Luke 24:13-32 ,Matthew 27:56,27:61 ) came to the tomb and witnessed a violent earthquake. The angel who rolled away the stone covering the tomb entrance told the women that Jesus was risen. They were invited to view the empty tomb, then to go and tell the disciples that Jesus was risen and was going to Galilee. Immediately, the resurrected Christ greeted them, urged them not to be afraid, to go and tell the “brothers” that He would meet them in Galilee. The soldiers posted at the tomb reported to their employers, the chief priests, “everything that happened”; and the entire guard was bribed to keep silent. It is not clear whether the soldiers actually saw the resurrected Christ Himself. It is assumed because of the other New Testament accounts that the resurrected Christ appeared only to believers. Matthew's final report of Jesus' resurrection is on a mountain in Galilee to His eleven disciples where He gave them the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20 ).
Mark's account of the resurrection (Matthew 16:1 ) reports that three women came to the tomb wondering how they would have access to the body in order to use the spices applied to the dead. They discovered the stone rolled away and a young man in white in the tomb. He calmed their fears, told them that Jesus was risen, and that Jesus would meet the disciples in Galilee. The women left bewildered and frightened. The most ancient and reliable manuscripts of Mark end with Matthew 16:8 . The long ending of Mark records several other appearances of Jesus: to Mary Magdalene (see John 20:11-18 ); to two walking in the country (see Matthew 27:56 ); to the eleven as they were eating (see Luke 24:36-43 ).
Luke 24:1 records the visit of three women to the tomb where two angels said that He was risen. The angels reminded the women of Jesus' teachings about His death and resurrection. The women told the unbelieving disciples about the empty tomb, and Peter investigated the empty tomb. Jesus appeared to Cleopas and another disciple on the way to Emmaus and gave them a prophetic overview concerning the Messiah. At supper He was revealed as the risen Christ and disappeared. The two returned to Jerusalem to tell the disciples and heard that Simon had seen the risen Lord. After the report of the two, Jesus appeared to the apostles and assured them He was not a ghost. He showed His hands and feet, and in the most physical act of the resurrection He ate a piece of fish ( Luke 24:43 ). He then reminded them of prophecies of the Messiah and commissioned them on the mission task. Luke's closing paragraph is the account of the ascension. The Lukan narrative is taken up in Acts (Luke 1:6-11 ). Jesus taught for forty days. He told the disciples to await the Spirit in Jerusalem. When the disciples asked questions about the kingdom, He said it was a question beyond their comprehension, repeated His missionary commission, and ascended as they watched and were assured by angels of His return.
John's Gospel adds remarkable details to the other three. In the fourth Gospel another disciple (John?) accompanied Peter to the tomb. Jesus appeared to Mary Magdalene and told her not to detain him—a better translation than “do not touch me.” Jesus appeared twice to the disciples in the upper room, the second time a week after the first for the sake of the unbelieving Thomas. His classic confession “my Lord and my God” (John 20:28 ) became the appropriate response of all believing hearts. In John 21:1 Jesus appeared to seven disciples in Galilee and prepared their breakfast. The occasion was the commissioning of Peter to his special ministry after Peter's three-time confession of his love for Christ, paralleling his earlier three-time denial of Christ.
The risen Christ appeared to Stephen (Acts 7:55-56 ), to Saul/Paul (Acts 9:1-6 ), and to John the Seer (Revelation 1:1 ). All of these accounts are not easy to correlate, but a composite picture reveals the following facts. The tomb was empty. Jesus appeared to many believing disciples, women and men, on numerous occasions. Jesus instructed the earliest believers about the prophetic and theological meaning of His death and resurrection. The resurrection of Jesus involved His physical body; but His resurrected life was a new kind of life called into being by God, the Effector of the resurrection (Acts 2:24 ). Paul, who gave the first account of the resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:3-8 ), provided the full meaning and importance of the resurrection of Christ. Because of the resurrection of Christ, we have assurance of the resurrection of all persons—some to salvation; some to perdition—vouchsafed in the resurrection of Christ. That is God's ultimate answer to the problem of death (1 Corinthians 15:12-58 ). See Ascension ; Christ; Jesus; Resurrection .
William L. Hendricks
Holman Bible Dictionary - Resurrection
The doctrine, event, and act of persons being brought from death to unending life at the close of the age.
Old Testament The preexilic portions of the Old Testament contain no statements which point certainly to a hope of resurrection from the dead even though some of Israel's neighbors had such a belief. Death is the end of human existence, the destruction of life (Genesis 3:19 ; Job 30:23 ). In isolated instances revivification occurs (being brought back to life from death but only as a temporary escape from final death; 1 Kings 17:17-22 ; 2 Kings 4:18-37 ; 2 Kings 13:21 ). In addition, God took from the earth two Old Testament figures before their deaths: Enoch (Genesis 5:24 ) and Elijah (2 Kings 2:9-11 ). The scarcity of these statements and the lack of reflection on their meanings, however, point to the absence of any consistent doctrinal conception of resurrection from the dead.
Similarly, the Psalms are bereft of clear thought on resurrection. Many of the songs, however, express a hope that communion with God, begun on earth, will have no end (as in Psalm 16:11 ; Psalm 49:15 ; Psalm 73:24 ). The Song of Moses (Deuteronomy 32:1 ) and the Song of Hannah (1 Samuel 2:1 ) assert that Yahweh kills and makes alive. These expressions of hope in God may not suggest a doctrine of resurrection from the dead. They at least confess a conviction that the living God is able to intervene in life's darkest hours. They grope for a firm hope in justice and help beyond the grave. They may reflect the beginnings of a doctrine of resurrection.
The prophets proclaimed hope for the future in terms of national renewal (see Hosea 6:1-3 ; Ezekiel 37:1 ). So pointed is the prophetic expression of national hope that the New Testament writers sometimes used the language of the prophets to expound the doctrine of resurrection (compare Hosea 13:14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:55 ). The prophetic statements, however, do not necessarily attest to the hope of individual resurrection from the dead but profess the sovereignty of God over all His subjects, even death.
On the other hand, Isaiah 26:19 and John 11:24-26 decidedly teach a belief in resurrection. The Old Testament emphasis on the sovereignty of God in all matters easily led to the prophetic statements.
The Old Testament statements about resurrection are scant and do not reveal clear theological reflection. The emphasis upon Yahweh as the God of present life tended to make Judaism a this-worldly religion. The future was generally interpreted as a national future under the sovereign rule of Yahweh. In New Testament times the Saduccees still did not believe in resurrection. The belief, however, in God as sovereign Lord over all, even death, eventually flowered in the brief but salient assertions of the Books of Isaiah and Daniel and possibly in the Psalms. See Eschatology ; Future Hope ; Sheol .
New Testament Jesus' preaching presupposed a doctrine of resurrection. Opposition by the Sadducees, who denied the resurrection, gave Jesus the opportunity to assert His own thought on the matter (Mark 12:18-27 ; Matthew 22:23-33 ; Luke 20:27-38 ; compare Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ).
John's Gospel presents Jesus as the mediator of resurrection who gives to believers the life given Him by His Father (John 6:53-58 ). Jesus is the resurrection and the life (Daniel 12:2 ). Jesus pointed to a resurrection of the righteous to eternal life and of the wicked to eternal punishment (Matthew 8:11-12 ; Matthew 25:31-34 ,Matthew 25:31-34,25:41-46 ; John 5:28-29 ). In His postresurrection appearances Jesus had a body that was both spiritual (John 20:19 ,John 20:19,20:26 ) and physical (John 20:20 ,John 20:20,20:27 ; John 21:13 ,John 21:13,21:15 ) in nature.
The greatest biblical exponent of resurrection was Paul. For him, resurrection was the final event which would usher Christians out of the bodily struggle of the present age into the bodily glory which will accompany Jesus' second coming (Philippians 3:20-21 ). In resurrection, God's new creation will reach completion (2 Corinthians 5:17-21 ). The bedrock of hope for Christian resurrection is the resurrection of Christ, the foundation of gospel preaching (1 Corinthians 15:12-20 ). Those who follow Christ are organically related to Christ in His resurrection from the dead; Christ is the first fruits of an upcoming harvest (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 ). Destruction awaits those who do not follow Christ (Philippians 3:19 ).
Paul's discourses on the nature of the resurrected body broadens the Old Testament idea of a restored Israel to include the redemption of persons complete with bodies. Paul viewed the human person as a psychosomatic unity. He recognizes no truth in the Greek idea of a separation of body and soul. See 2 Corinthians 5:1-10 ). Those united to Christ in faith become not only one with Him in spirit but also one with Him in body (1 Corinthians 6:15 ). The resurrected body will be a spiritual body, different from the present physical body (1 Corinthians 15:35-50 ); but it will have continuity with the present body because Christ redeems the whole person (Romans 8:23 ).
The New Testament unquestionably affirms a doctrine of resurrection of all persons from the dead. Humanity has a corporate destiny to encounter just and divine response to faithfulness and unfaithfulness (Acts 24:15 ). A resurrection body and life in the consummated kingdom of God will characterize the resurrection of those who follow Christ.
William L. Hendricks
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Resurrection
(See JESUS; LAW.) His resurrection is the earnest or "firstfruits" of ours. His life is ours by vital union with Him, and because He lives we shall live also (1 Corinthians 15:23; John 14:19). Christ from Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:16 proves the resurrection and charges the Sadducees with ignorance of Scripture and of God's "power" (Mark 12:24) as the root of their "error." God said, "I AM the God of Abraham" when Abraham was dead; but God is the God of the living, Abraham must therefore live again and already lives in God's sure purpose, not a disembodied spirit, which would be no restoration of man in his integrity, but as heir of an abiding city suited to man with perfect body, soul, and spirit (1 Thessalonians 5:23; Hebrews 11:8-16). (See SADDUCEES.) God promised "to thee will I give this land," not merely to thy posterity. This can only be fulfilled by Abraham rising and, in integrity of parts, inheriting the antitypical Canaan. Disembodied spirits require a body if they are to exercise the functions of life. Abraham's soul now receives blessings from God, but will only "live unto God" when he receives again the body.
Rabbi Simai argues on Exodus 6:3-4, "it is not, said, to give you, but to give them, whereby the resurrection of the dead appeareth out of the law." So Manasseh ben Israel, "God said to Abraham, I will give to thee and to thy seed after thee the land wherein thou art a stranger; but Abraham did not possess that land; wherefore it is of necessity that they should be raised up to enjoy the good promises, else God's promise would be vain." The Pharisees in holding this preserved the faith gleaned from the Old Testament by the pious fathers of the nation; such was Martha's and Paul's faith (John 11:25; Acts 26:6-8). Jacob's dying ejaculation "I have waited for Thy salvation" (Genesis 49:18) and Balaam's, "let me die the death of the righteous," etc. (Numbers 23:10), assume a future state. (See JOB expressly asserts his anticipation of the resurrection through his Redeemer (Job 19:23-27) (See REDEEMER for the translated.) So David (Psalms 16:9-11; Psalms 17:14-15) anticipates his "soul not being left in hades," so that "his flesh shall rest in hope," and his "awaking with Jehovah's likeness"; fulfilled in Christ the Head first (Acts 2:25-31), and hereafter to be so in His members.
So Isaiah (Isaiah 26:19), "thy dead shall live ... my dead body shall they arise"; Christ's dead body raised is the pledge of the resurrection of all Jehovah's people. Daniel (Daniel 12:2): Hebrew "many from among the sleepers, these (the partakers of the first resurrection, Revelation 20) shall be unto everlasting life; but those (the rest who do not rise until after the thousand years) shall be unto shame" (1 Corinthians 15:23). The wicked too shall rise (John 5:28-29; Revelation 20:13). Essentially the same body wherewith the unbeliever sinned shall be the object of punishment (Jeremiah 2:10; Isaiah 3:9-11; Revelation 22:11-12; 2 Corinthians 5:10), "that every one may receive the things done by the instrumentality of ('dia ') the body." Self consciousness witnesses the identity between the body of the infant and full grown man, though that identity does not consist in the sameness of the particles which compose the body at different stages.
Possibly there is some indestructible material germ at the basis of identity between the natural (psychic, i.e. soulish or animal) body and the resurrection body which 1 Corinthians 15:44-45 call a "spirit-animated body," in contrast to the "natural." "Christ will transfigure our body of humiliation (2 Corinthians 4:10; 2 Timothy 2:11-12; 'not vile, nothing that He made is vile:' Whately on his death bed), that it may be conformed unto the body of His glory" (Philippians 3:21). The mere animal functions of flesh and blood shall no longer be needed they do not marry, but are equal to the angels (Luke 20:35-36; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 15:35-57; 1 Peter 1:3-4) The time is fixed for the Lord's coming (Colossians 3:4; 1 Thessalonians 4:16; Revelation 20). (See REGENERATION.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Resurrection
I. General Considerations.-The resurrection of Christ does not fall to be discussed in this article, the next article being devoted to it. Nevertheless it will be impossible to treat of the Pauline view of resurrection without some discussion of his attitude towards the nature of Christ’s resurrection. St. Paul is practically the only NT writer who has really worked out the problem of the resurrection on the basis of the resurrection of Christ. It will be necessary to show how much he has in common with the Jewish apocalyptic writers of the 1st cent. a.d. in his attitude towards the problems of the resurrection, and also how far he has introduced new elements and developed along fresh lines. In dealing with the Fourth Gospel we have to examine the relation between that Gospel and St. Paul, how far the author is developing along the lines laid down by St. Paul and how far he is travelling on independent lines.
The principal questions that must be answered by any inquiry into the subject of the resurrection from the historical point of view are: (1) What was the place of the resurrection in the eschatology of the time? (2) Are there more than one resurrection in any of the eschatological schemes of the 1st century? (3) How is the resurrection of Christ related to the general Christian resurrection-doctrine of the period? (4) How is the question of the relation between body and spirit, flesh and spirit, worked out? (5) How far does an ethical element enter into the various views of the resurrection developed by NT writers? These questions involve ethical, metaphysical, and eschatological considerations which were not clearly distinguished in the thought of the time, and cannot be separated in our treatment of the subject; yet they must be borne in mind in examining the various systems of the period.
The roots of eschatology have been found to be far more widely spread in early civilizations than was formerly believed, and of all the conceptions of eschatology none has a more varied and complicated history than the conception of the resurrection. It is not our task to trace out its roots in the ancient past. But we have to consider and take stock of the stage of development which the conception of resurrection had reached at the beginning of our period. It was the moment when the focus of national and political consciousness was shifting from the present to the future-a movement which expressed itself in every phase of human activity, especially in religion. Hence the significance of the mystery-religions, whose emphasis was wholly on the future life. The word ‘syncretism’ has been much abused, but it expresses well the characteristic tendency of this period. An immense number of currents of religious and philosophic thought were meeting and influencing one another, and it is easier to distinguish the main currents than to estimate the extent to which they intermingled and modified one another. The history of the interpretation of St. Paul bears witness to the difficulty of this attempt. The main currents may be broadly distinguished as follows:
(a) Neo-Platonism, in its earliest form, representing a fusion of Platonic philosophy with Oriental mysticism, and emphasizing the superiority of the intellectual principle in man, the νοῦς, over the body. Hence, for our inquiry, it is an influence against the conception of a bodily resurrection. Possibly it would be more accurate to call this current, in which Philo has a place, Neo-Pythagoreanism.
(b) Orientalism, to use a broad term for the various forms in which the dualism and mysticism of the East expressed themselves in religious sects and mystery-cults, and so influenced religious thought in the Graeco-Roman world of our period. The eternal antithesis between matter and spirit, the necessity of redemption from the bondage of matter, and the consequent stress on asceticism, are factors working against the conception of a bodily resurrection.
(c) Judaism, although logically coming under the head of Orientalism, yet practically stands apart. At the time under consideration Judaism presents two forms of resurrection-doctrine: (1) the doctrine of the resurrection of the righteous only, developed from ethical and spiritual interests, and probably quite independent of external influences; (2) the doctrine of a general resurrection of both righteous and wicked, possibly, but not necessarily, due to the influence of Mazdeism (cf. R. H. Charles, Eschatology2, London, 1913, pp. 139-141). In addition to this divergence, Judaism also represents two other lines of divergent thought on this subject, lines which were not so sharply separated at this period as they became later: (i.) the Palestinian doctrine of bodily resurrection, both of the individual and of the nation, for the Messianic kingdom; (ii.) the Alexandrian doctrine, influenced by Neo-Platonic ideas, teaching only a spiritual resurrection, and tending to abandon the idea of the Messianic kingdom. These various forms of thought will be dealt with in fuller detail in the historical examination of the Jewish literature.
(d) Christianity, receiving its doctrine of resurrection from both forms of Judaistic thought, but profoundly modifying the doctrine it thus received by the conception of the nature of Christ’s resurrection as interpreted by St. Paul, to be reacted on later by contact with the Hellenic and Oriental streams of thought, especially in the conflict with Gnosticism.
The fuller discussion of these various currents of conflicting and intermingling views concerning the nature of the resurrection, its time and conditions, will arise out of our examination of the various passages relating to it in the literature of the Apostolic Age.
II. The Resurrection in the Literature of the Apostolic Age
1. Jewish literature.-The references to the subject of resurrection and the related question of body and spirit may be considered under the separate heads of Alexandrian and Palestinian, although, as already pointed out, at this time there was not a sharp line of demarcation. Palestinian Judaism was influenced by Alexandrian, and the literature of the former will show the influence of the latter in its conceptions.
(a) Alexandrian Judaism.-The principal literary sources for Alexandrian Judaism are Philo, the Book of Wisdom , 2 Enoch, and 4 Maccabees. The general attitude of this phase of Judaism towards the resurrection can only be touched on briefly, as our main inquiry lies in the Christian literature of the period. The Alexandrian and Palestinian Judaism must be touched on sufficiently to show its influence on the formation of Christian thought.
Philo holds the Neo-Pythagorean view of the evil nature of matter. The soul was once free from matter, has become united to and debased by matter, and can attain to the full knowledge of God, the supreme good, only by deliverance from matter. Hence the resurrection of the body is obviously impossible, and any doctrine of a corporate resurrection of a blessed community can have no place. Philo’s mysticism is purely individualistic, like that of Plotinus, and looks to the perfection of the disembodied soul, after death, with God. The national Messianic hope is replaced by the expectation of the universal triumph of the Law. In the words of a French scholar, E. Bréhier, ‘Of the whole Jewish eschatology, this idea alone retains its vitality in Philo’s system, the future of the Law which is destined to attain universal sway’ (Les idées philosophiques et religieuses de Philon d’Alexandrie, Paris, 1908, p. 10).
The author of the Book of Wisdom also held the eternity and evil of matter, and, in spite of some objections, it is most probable that he held the pre-existence of the soul (Wisdom of Solomon 8:19-20). The body, even if ‘undefiled,’ is nevertheless ‘corruptible’ (Wisdom of Solomon 9:15), and clogs and imprisons the soul. Hence ‘immortality’ (Wisdom of Solomon 8:17), ‘incorruption’ (Wisdom of Solomon 2:23, Wisdom of Solomon 6:19), are terms which belong only to the state of the soul, and do not imply any resurrection of the body. The judgment is immediately after death, for both righteous and wicked (Wisdom of Solomon 3:18, Wisdom of Solomon 4:10; Wisdom of Solomon 4:14).
In 2 Enoch we have the conception of the millennial Messianic kingdom, at the end of which occurs the Final Judgment. There are intermediate abodes for souls (7:1-3, 32:1). The writer holds the doctrine of the pre-existence of souls. It is not clear whether he holds a resurrection of the body, since his description of the change from the earthly to the heavenly body is curiously akin to St. Paul’s doctrine of the spiritual body (cf. 22:8-10). His account, too, of the torments of the wicked suggests a bodily state in hell, unless the language used be taken symbolically (10:1, 2).
In 4 Maccabees there is no resurrection of the body. The souls of the righteous are received by Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, after death, and enjoy eternal communion with God (13:16, 17:5).
(b) Palestinian Judaism.-The chief sources are the Assumption of Moses, 2 Baruch , , 4 Ezra for the apocalyptic literature, and such portions of the Talmud as may reflect the Rabbinical tradition of this period. The division Sanhedrin contains the most important of the traditional utterances on this subject.
The Assumption of Moses presents a temporary Messianic kingdom, without a Messiah (cf. 2 Bar.). At its close Israel, probably identified by the writer with the righteous in Israel, is exalted to heaven, and sees its enemies in Gehenna. As in Alexandrian Judaism, so here there is no resurrection of the body.
2 Baruch is a composite work, containing, according to Charles’s analysis, three apocalypses written prior to a.d. 70 and three fragments belonging to a later date. In the parts of the book composed before a.d. 70 we have the following important passages: 30:1, 2, ‘And it will come to pass after these things, when the time of the advent of the Messiah is fulfilled, and He shall return in glory. Then all those who have fallen asleep in hope of Him shall rise again.’ Here the resurrection of the righteous is placed after the period of tribulation preceding the advent of Messiah. The form of the passage strongly suggests Christian influence or interpolation, especially the phrase ‘fallen asleep in hope of Him’ (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:13-14). This doctrine of the bodily resurrection of the righteous seems to be characteristic of only the portions of the book composed prior to a.d. 70. In 30:2-5, which belongs to the sections written after a.d. 70, we have the doctrine of a general resurrection, also in chs. 50, 51. These chapters also discuss the nature of the resurrection very fully. [1] The personal identity of the dead is to be preserved in the resurrection in order to give force to the judgment by the recognition of identity, ‘when they have severally recognized those whom they now know, then judgement will grow strong’ (50:4). The bodies of the righteous will be changed into bodies of glory that they may be able to take part in the world to come; they will be hade like to the angels.
The close resemblance of this teaching to that of the Pauline Epistles and of Luke 20:34-36 is very striking.
4 Ezra is also a composite book, written partly before a.d. 70 and finally edited after that date. The doctrine of resurrection occupies a large place in it. It contains the doctrine of a Messianic kingdom of 400 years’ duration, at the close of which the Messiah and His companions are to die, before the Final Judgment and end of all things. In the earlier sources, i.e. the Ezra-Apocalypse and the Son of Man Vision, we have the doctrine of the revelation of Messiah from heaven with the saints who had been caught up alive, prior to the establishment of the 400 years’ kingdom. Then follows the death of the Messiah and all men, then the Final Judgment for which all will be raised (cf. 4 Ezra 4 f.). In the Salathiel-Apocalypse, the most important of the later constituents of the book, the souls of both the righteous and the wicked await the Final Judgment in a kind of intermediate state of blessing and misery respectively. The terms in which their condition is described suggest some kind of bodily state (cf. 7:75-101). In 7:32 there is a clear reference to the resurrection of the body, but G. H. Box would assign this verse to the redactor, who, according to him, is seeking to supplement the resurrection-doctrine of the author of the Salathiel-Apocalypse. The souls of righteous and wicked are assembled for the Final Judgment which determines the full blessing and torment of each respectively. Hence the resurrection-doctrine of the Salathiel-Apocalypse lies midway between the Alexandrian doctrine of a spiritual resurrection immediately after death, and the Palestinian doctrine of an intermediate disembodied state and a resurrection of the body for the Final Judgment.
The most important point, however, in these two apocalyptic works is the suggestion of the doctrine of a first resurrection which appears explicitly in the NT. This germ of the idea of a first resurrection appears especially in 4 Ezr 7:28, 13:52 (see Charles, Eschatology, p. 133 ff.).
For the Rabbinical views on the resurrection at this period we have the second article in the Shemoneh Esreh, which speaks of the power of God in raising the dead. Lagrange finds no trace of a connexion between the resurrection and the Messianic kingdom earlier than R. Meir; but it must be remembered that the apocalyptic writings already quoted may well represent Rabbinical eschatology of this period, and it is not necessary to suppose that the Talmud is the only source of information as to contemporary Rabbinical belief.
The general tradition, however, is clear for a belief in the bodily resurrection of both righteous and wicked for the Final Judgment. (For an excellent account of the Rabbinical doctrine of the resurrection see Lagrange, Le Messianisme chez les juifs, Paris, 1909, p. 176 ff.)
2. St. Paul.-If the passages relating to the resurrection in St. Paul’s correspondence be collected and compared they appear to show three distinct elements at work.
(a) There is his own view of the resurrection, which, as the evidence of Acts plainly indicates, he held in common with the Pharisaic party of his time. It is not very easy to determine precisely what shade of resurrection-doctrine he held, and possibly St. Luke was not clear himself on the matter, but the point must be discussed as the passages are examined. This form or shade of resurrection-doctrine may be assumed to have constituted a part of St. Paul’s general eschatological belief at the time of his conversion to Christianity. (b) There is the distinctively Christian belief in the resurrection of Christ as a historical fact. Possibly it was afterwards interpreted in different ways according to the particular view held concerning the resurrection, but it is absolutely clear that the belief in the fact of the resurrection of Christ operated more powerfully than any other cause in transforming current beliefs in the resurrection. (c) There is the particular line of modification in St. Paul’s view of the resurrection which can be traced out in process of development and which is due to his interpretation of what he accepted as the historical fact of the resurrection of Christ.
If the speeches in Acts may be accepted as in any degree authentic, they depict the Apostle as holding the general belief in a resurrection of just and unjust for a Final Judgment (cf. Acts 23:6; Acts 24:15). The passage in Acts 17:31 does not necessarily refer to the resurrection of the dead in general, though Acts 17:32 may imply that the Athenians understood it in that sense.
In 1 Thessalonians, where St. Paul’s exposition of the resurrection clearly implies a resurrection before the Messianic kingdom in order that the dead may share in its blessings, it is possible that the idea may have been already present in his original scheme of eschatology, although he had not imparted it to his converts. But it is also clear that, whatever be the source of the idea, it receives a new setting, and is brought into organic connexion with the resurrection of Christ (see article Parousia).
In 1 Corinthians 15 the whole argument presupposes a belief in the resurrection, not necessarily depending upon the resurrection of Christ, although the resurrection of Christ is used to support the belief in the resurrection of the dead and to modify the general outline of the eschatology.
The question of St. Paul’s indebtedness to the mystery-religions for any ideas as to the resurrection belongs rather to the discussion of the development of his doctrine than to the evidence for his original stock of ideas on the subject.
(b) Turning to the second point, St. Paul’s interpretation of Christ’s resurrection, we have first of all several passages which do not call for special discussion proving the Apostle’s belief in the resurrection of Christ as a historical occurrence. Indeed, the whole of his correspondence rests upon this as the most fundamental thing in his religious experience. It is well expressed in Romans 1:3-4 : ‘a certain Jesus, who had died, whom Paul pretended to be alive.’ The discussion of this point belongs to the following article. We are here concerned only with St. Paul’s interpretation of the fact in so far as it bears on his view of the resurrection of believers or of a general resurrection.
The passages in 1 Thessalonians only yield the general inference that the resurrection of Christ is related to His Parousia; through His resurrection He is able to enter upon the Kingdom in power; God will bring Him again with the dead saints; it is as raised from the dead that He becomes the deliverer from the coming wrath.
In Galatians the subject of resurrection is not touched on, but it is possible that the famous passage in Galatians 2:20 may throw light on St. Paul’s view of the resurrection of Christ. Taken along with other passages to be quoted later it appears certain that St. Paul, probably in common with the leaders of the primitive Church, had considered the resurrection of Christ not merely as an eschatological event, or as an article of belief, but as an event in the human experience of Christ intimately related to the experience of the believer. It is possible that we may see in such passages as Acts 25:19; Romans 6:4; Romans 6:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11-14; 2 Corinthians 13:4, and others, the evidence of such an attitude towards the Resurrection. Romans 1:3-4 is commonly interpreted to mean that St. Paul regarded the Resurrection as an evidence of the Messiahship of Jesus. But, while this may be implied, there appears to be much more implied as well. ‘Son of God’ is not used by St. Paul as a Messianic title but rather as a personal name, possibly implying moral likeness to God. Also ‘according to the spirit of holiness’ would seem to refer to the personal holiness of the human life of Jesus, so that the Resurrection marks out or distinguishes Jesus in virtue of His absolute holiness as Son of God, possessing that character. There was something in His life which made this special act of power possible in His case. In addition to this, another element in the experience is introduced, viz. faith. Not St. Paul only, as in 2 Corinthians 4:11-14, but the early Church in general, seems to have regarded the Resurrection as a result of Christ’s faith, and also as an act of necessary justice on God’s part, ‘by the glory of the Father.’
These factors in the interpretation of the Resurrection need to be considered in order to understand the extension of the principle to believers. Now, the passage in Galatians already cited suggests that St. Paul, in considering the death and resurrection of Christ from this point of view, had come to the conclusion that faith was the governing principle in Christ’s life, and that he himself as a believer lived by virtue of the faith which Christ had exercised and which had brought Him through resurrection into a spiritual state in which He could realize and make good the purpose of God in His death by dwelling in those who believed on Him.
This is the central idea in St. Paul’s view of the Resurrection-his belief in the present spiritual existence of the same Christ whose faith during His earthly life bad brought about the whole possibility of resurrection, a spiritual life, and the communication of it to believers. It is a mistake to think that St. Paul separated the earthly from the heavenly Christ; the heavenly Christ was the earthly Christ in a new state of existence, but the same in experience and personal identity. Hence, by His indwelling, the principles that had been proved in His own experience could be reproduced in those who believed on Him.
(c) This brings us to the third set of passages, viz. those in which St. Paul develops the consequences of the indwelling of Christ for the future state of believers. The most important are Romans 8:1-30 especially vv. 11, 30, 1 Corinthians 15, 2 Corinthians 3-5, Philippians 3:10; Philippians 3:20-21. The clearest exposition of this view-point is found in 2 Corinthians 3-5, where St. Paul develops the ministry of the Spirit in its various consequences, identifying Christ with the Spirit, and reaching the climax in the passage 2 Corinthians 4:13 to 2 Corinthians 5:10. The dying of Jesus is at work in him, and by the same spirit of faith he is certain that God will raise him with Jesus and present him along with the other believers, clothed in a new and glorious habitation prepared by God and already existing in heaven.
In the same way, in Romans 8 the consequences of the indwelling of the Spirit of Christ, again identified with Christ, extend to the quickening of the mortal bodies of those who are thus dwelt in. In Philippians 3 the Apostle desires to be completely identified with the experiences of Christ, His death and His sufferings, in order to reach the goal of resurrection and attain to the resurrection from among the dead.
In 1 Corinthians 15 the general line of argument is: (1) the proof of the possibility of a resurrection from the resurrection of Christ accepted as a historical event; (2) the argument from analogy, based on the Rabbinical conception of ‘body,’ to prove the possibility of the existence of such a thing as a spiritual body; (3) the contrast between Christ and Adam as the respective sources of the incorruptible and the corruptible, the heavenly and the earthly. The Second Man, the Last Adam, is a quickening spirit; by this title St. Paul implies all that is developed at length in Romans 8 and 2 Corinthians 3-5. Lastly, he describes the manner in which the change from the earthly to the heavenly body is effected. Hence the general line of St. Paul’s development of the doctrine is clear. As a Pharisee he held the continued existence of the soul after death; as part of his Palestinian eschatology he held the necessity of a resurrection to judgment of both righteous and wicked, and probably a first resurrection of righteous to participation in the Messianic kingdom.
Into this original stock of eschatological belief there broke the new conception of a Messiah who had died and risen. It is so clear from the Pauline correspondence that this new conception was based upon what St. Paul believed to be a trustworthy historical event, supported by contemporary evidence and confirmed for himself by his Damascus experience, that it is unnecessary to discuss the question of whether he owed this conception to one of the mystery-religions.
The effect of this new element was two-fold. On the one hand, it shifted the eschatological centre of interest, almost unconsciously, to the resurrection of Christ, as 1 Corinthians 15 shows. The resurrection of Christ assumes a catastrophic colouring, so to speak: it becomes the first act of Divine intervention in the introduction of the Kingdom, the first step of a process whose culmination also has a catastrophic character derived from the original scheme of eschatology. On the other hand, it introduced into the eschatological scheme the doctrine of the Spirit of Christ with its new ethical implications and a special theory of the way in which the presence of the Spirit operated to transform the whole personality of the believer into the likeness of the Glorified Christ.
The tendency of this double working of the interpretation of the death and resurrection of Christ was to disturb the outline of the old eschatology. We can see in 1 Thess. the stress laid on the first resurrection, that of believers to the likeness of Christ; then in 1 Cor. the outline of the eschatological scheme is adjusted to this new emphasis; first Christ’s resurrection, then the resurrection of those that are Christ’s at His Parousia-clearly the first resurrection-then the end, when the Kingdom is delivered to the Father. No mention is made of what happens in this third stage, whether another resurrection takes place or not.
Thus St. Paul’s doctrine of the resurrection, as far as it can be reconstructed from the Epistles, becomes limited to a resurrection of believers only, in the likeness of Christ; and further, this likeness is conceived of more and more as ethical and spiritual, and the whole ensuing state of blessing as a spiritual state rather than as a concrete kingdom on earth. But the latter never wholly disappeared from St. Paul’s thinking; it only fell into the background. It is difficult to believe that St. Paul ever reached the point of abandoning entirely the resurrection of the body, although his conception of the doctrine was extremely spiritual. But the difference between a mere life of the spirit after death, even in full communion with God, and St. Paul’s doctrine of a spiritual body is much more than a difference of words. It involves two fundamentally different views of redemption. The Oriental view, which influenced Alexandrian eschatology, regarded redemption as the separation of matter from spirit, the dissolution of an evil and unnatural union. The Pauline view, which was based on the Palestinian, and which ultimately passed into the distinctively Christian point of view, was the deliverance of the body from corruption, the corruptible and mortal element in it due to sin, and its true union with the spirit in an incorruptible form. No doubt metaphysical speculation may find practically no difference between a spirit preserving personal i
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Resurrection
The doctrine of the resurrection is full of joy to the bereaved. It clothes the grave with flowers, and wreathes the tomb with unfading laurel. The sepulchre shines with alight brighter than the sun, and death grows fair, as we say, in full assurance of faith, 'I know that my brother shall rise again.' Rent from the ignoble shell the pearl is gone to deck the crown of the Prince of Peace; buried beneath the sod the seed is preparing to bloom in the King's garden. Altering a word or two of Beattie's verse we may even now find ourselves singing:
'Tis night and the landscape is lovely no more: Yet ye beautiful woodlands I mourn not for you;
For morn is approaching your charms to restore, Perfumed with fresh fragrance, and glittering with dew: Nor yet for the ravage of winter I mourn; Kind nature the embryo blossom will save; The spring shall yet visit the mouldering urn; The day shall yet dawn on the night of the grave.'
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Resurrection
The Old Testament. In the Old Testament, the idea of bodily resurrection evolves from a vague concept into a developed expectation. Beginning with the judgment of death in Genesis 3:6 , the divine plan of God unfolds in history. The patriarchal period is more concerned with the first stages of the design. Community function is central because of the "promise" concerning the "seed." The extension of existence is passed through progeny (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 15:1-6 ) and individual resurrection is not the central concern.
Nonetheless, in the Old Testament concern is expressed for the individual soul. Job's despairing vacillation over death and decay is answered by the radiant expectation of preservation: "For I know my Redeemer lives, and that at the last he will stand upon the earth; and after my skin has been thus destroyed, then in my flesh I shall see God" (Job 19:25-26 ; NRSV cf also Psalm 16:10 ; Isaiah 26:19 ).
One of the principal factors in the development of a fixed notion of an individual resurrection is in response to the problem of theodicy. Because it could easily be seen that corrupt people sometimes were not punished for every wrong and that God's people were at times unjustly treated, individual resurrection was a natural philosophical resolution to this quandary. The resurrection of the just to reward and the unjust to punishment resolved the otherwise meaningless existence for those who followed Yahweh during times of persecution. There must be incentive to faithfulness toward God when there is no prosperity and no immediate compensation for belief. A further affront was the prosperous nonbeliever who endured no immediate, perceivable effects of sin and selfishness. Therefore, reward for one's earthly actions is integral to individual resurrection and is its initial catalyst.
Psalm 49 points out that all die, the "wise" and the "fool" alike. Fools are appointed to Sheol (which is used as a synonym for death or the grave) and "their forms will decay in the grave" (v. 14). Fools cannot continue in their resplendence of material possessions; therefore, the psalmist says, "Do not be overawed when a man grows rich for he will take nothing with him when he dies" (vv. 16-17). Even though theodicy is not directly in view, at the core of the psalm is a proclamation of God's justice, which is dispensed to the fool and the wise person after death. The wise follower of Yahweh is triumphant: "But God will redeem my life from the grave, for he will surely take me to himself" (v. 15).
In Psalm 88 the psalmist's existence is about to cease. This is evidenced by the words used to denote death: "the pit" (vv. 4,6); "the dead" (vv. 5,10); "the grave" (vv. 5,11); "the darkest depths" (v. 6); "the lowest pit" (v. 6); "Abaddon" (v. 11); "the place of darkness" (v. 12); "the land of oblivion" (v. 12); and "darkness" (v. 18). The psalmist says, "my life draws near to Sheol " (v. 3), the penumbral expanse of the netherworld. The psalmist then asks the rhetorical questions: "Do you work wonders for the dead? Do the shades rise up to praise you? Is your steadfast love declared in the grace, or your faithfulness in Abaddon? Are your wonders known in the darkness, or your saving help in the land of forgetfulness?" (vv. 10-12 NRSV). As with Psalm 6:4-6 the point is that one must be alive in order to praise God. The reference reveals a cognizance of the concept of an individual's resurrection even though the questions are unanswered (cf. Psalm 7:15 ; 49:15 ).
Psalm 6:5 says, "For in death there is no remembrance of you; in Sheol who can give your praise?" (NRSV). The psalm reveals God's justice being demonstrated in theodicy: "Deliver me; save me because of your unfailing love." Psalm 73 is enlightening in regards to the development of the concept of individual resurrection. The psalm begins, "Truly God is good to the upright, to those who are pure in heart" (NRSV). The problem is stated clearly: "I saw the prosperity of the wicked" (v. 3 NRSV). These wicked people mock, do violence, oppress, are prideful, and speak evil (vv. 6-9). Yet they are at ease and their wealth has increased (v. 12). The psalmist then makes the rhetorical statement, "Surely in vain have I kept my heart pure" (v. 13). Seeking to understand this seeming incongruity was troublesome to the psalmist (v. 16) until he perceived the end of the unfaithful (v. 17). They will be destroyed in a moment (vv. 19,27), but the righteous Yahwist will receive a different recompense. Even though his flesh and heart may fail, God is his "portion forever" and "afterward will take [1] into glory" (v. 24b).
Isaiah 26:10 says, "If favor is shown to the wicked, they do not learn righteousness; in the land of uprightness they deal perversely" (NRSV). Yet God's justice is revealed in the afterlife, as indicated in verse 19: "Your dead will live; their bodies will rise. You who dwell in the dust, wake up and shout for joy!" But the wicked have a different end: "The Lord is coming out of his dwelling to punish the people of the earth for their sins; the earth will disclose the blood shed upon her; she will conceal her slain no longer" (v. 21).
Just prior to the exile, an eschatological emphasis instilled by prophetic preaching imparted a growing concern for individuals. The result was a heightened awareness of the afterlife. For example, Jeremiah 31:30 says, "But everyone will die for his own iniquity" (NASB). The concern was no longer just for the nation of Israel or for Abraham's descendants, as it tended to be in the pre-Mosaic period, but for individuals as well.
The most conspicuous references to a resurrection are to be found in later apocalyptic literature, as the salvation leitmotif moves closer to the comprehensive perception that is later spelled out in Christ's resurrection. A resurrection of the just and the unjust is affirmed in Daniel 12:2-3 : "Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt. Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens, and those who lead many to righteousness, like the stars for ever and ever." Unlike the "resurrections" of 1Kings 17:17-24,2 Kings 4:31-37 , and 2 Kings 13:20-21 , which are resuscitations to the conditions of earthly life, Daniel 12:2-3 apportions a future allotment by the use of the future tense (both in the Hebrew text and LXX).
Second Temple Judaism. With the prophetic voice being silent in the second temple period, and a feeling of the remoteness of God, harmonization with the justice of God took the form of requital after death. The question of why bad things happen to righteous people continued to fuel the concept of the resurrection, especially in light of the failure to establish Israel as the powerful nation it had once been. Apocalyptic literature was more commonplace, and the afterlife and the concern for individual salvation were prominent. It is in the context of persecuted saints in the second temple period that resurrection from the dead was developed into the form that is found in the New Testament. It is during this period that the concept of bodily resurrection takes shape.
The Maccabean revolt in 167 b.c. incited the earlier belief in the resurrection of the just and polarized it to new heights. The second of seven tortured brothers responds to his persecutors "in his last breath of consciousness" by saying, "You like a frenzy take us out of this present existence but the King of the universe shall raise us up to eternal life, because we have died on behalf of his laws" (2 Maccabees 7:9 , translation mine ). The third brother, after putting forth his hands to the fire, says, "I received these [2] from heaven and from him I hope to receive them again" (2 Maccabees 7:11 ). After the seven brothers are slain, their mother says, "The Creator of the universe will give you breath and life again" (2 Maccabees 7:23 ).
Other Jewish sources reveal a belief in a resurrection. The early second-century SyriActs (translated from Greek) text 2Baruch is an example. Baruch ask God the questions, "In which shape will the living live in your day? Or how will remain their splendor which will be after that? Will they, perhaps, take again this present form, and will they put on the chained members which are in evil and by which evils are accomplished?" (2Bar 49:2-3). The answer that is given in 2Baruch 50-51 is that initially the "earth will surely give back the dead not changing anything in their form" (2Bar 50:2). After this event, "the shape of those who are found to be guilty as also the glory of those who have proved to be righteous will be changed" (2Bar 51:1-2). The evil will take a more evil "shape" and the righteous will take a more righteous "shape."
By the time of Christ, the Pharisees (the most influential Jewish sect just prior to the Christian period who dated back to at least the second century b.c.) believed in a resurrection (Acts 23:8 ) whereas, the Sadducees did not (Matthew 22:23 ; Acts 23:8 ).
The New Testament. The resurrection of Jesus is the principal tenet of the New Testament. Baptism is centered in Jesus' resurrection. Even though Jewish illustrations were present for at least a hundred years before Christ, Paul applies the act symbolically to death, burial, and resurrection. He says, "When you were buried with him in baptism, you were also raised with him through faith in the power of God, who raised him from the dead" ( Colossians 2:12 ; NRSV see also Romans 6:3-5 ; 1 Peter 3:21-22 ).
The Lord's Supper is less connected in its symbolism than baptism, but the early correlation that it was celebrated on the Lord's day, that is, on the day that Jesus raised from the dead, reveals an early association.
The retelling of the empty tomb of Jesus is found in all four Gospels (Mark 16:1-8 ; Matthew 28:11-15 ; Luke 24:1-12 ; John 20:11-18 ). The empty tomb of Christ stands in sharp contrast to other world religions whose prophets and their adherents never make such a claim.
The appearances of Jesus after his resurrection to chosen individuals play an important role in the proclamation of the gospel message (e.g., Matthew 28:9-10,16-17 ; Luke 24:34 ; John 20:11-17 ; 21:1-2 ; Acts 2:32 ; 3:15 ; 4:20 ; 10:40-41 ; 13:30-31 ; 1 Corinthians 15:5-7 ).
The resurrection of Jesus is a testimony to the general resurrection of all humans, which will be followed by the dispensing of God's justice; to the righteous there will be a "resurrection of life" and to the unrighteous a "resurrection of condemnation" (John 5:28-29 ; cf. Revelation 20:4-6 ). Regardless of the complex time sequence involved in the various resurrections recorded in the New Testament, Jesus' bodily resurrection is the basis for the future resurrection of humans (1 Corinthians 15:42-50 ). The Spirit, which was given after his resurrection, is the "guarantee" (or "first installment") that God will raise the righteous from the dead, and that they will not be found "naked, " that is, incorporeal (2 Corinthians 5:1-5 ; cf. Ephesians 1:13-14 ), but will have a corporeal existence with God. Even though believers "groan" while in their bodies (2 Corinthians 5:2 ), they will be "further clothed" after their resurrection (v. 4). There will be recompense for what was done in the body; therefore, one must seek to please God (vv. 6-10).
First Corinthians 15. The earliest teaching in the New Testament concerning the resurrection is undoubtedly 1 Corinthians 15 . Paul "passes on" that which he has received (presumably by oral tradition), which is of "first importance." Paul says that the resurrection was in accordance with the Scriptures—a perception that was an important one considering the magnitude of the teaching. The seemingly insignificant detail of the time sequence ("the third day") is not an inconsequential component; rather, it reveals the historical nature of the event, which was not a private, subjective experience but one that occurred in actual time and was attested by Cephas, the Twelve, and five hundred people.
Paul, using simple logic, concludes several things "if the dead are not raised." The specific problem that he is addressing is that some of the Corinthians were saying that there was no resurrection of the dead. If there is no general resurrection, then the conspicuous conclusion that "Christ has not been raised" can be deduced. If "Christ has not been raised, " then several philosophical conclusions can be outlined.
First, the missionary proclamation concerning Christ "is useless" (v. 14). This perception was undoubtedly an important one for Paul considering that his commission to the Gentiles was rooted in the idea that Jesus was "first to rise from the dead" (Acts 26:23 ). Therefore, Paul's mission to the Gentiles unfolds in light of the resurrection of Christ and the corollary futility of his own life ensues if there is no resurrection. Paul corresponds with the Corinthians with much passion in these verses. The collapse of the resurrection was commensurate to Christianity being fallacious for Paul.
Second, if there is no resurrection the faith of the believer is "vain" and "futile" (vv. 14,17). The eschatological aspect of faith is rooted in the notion of resurrection. The resurrection of Jesus guarantees the resurrection of the believer. Future salvation is based on the resurrection of Jesus. Therefore, faith in God's justice in resolving the problem of theodicy is "vain" (cf. 1 Peter 3:21 ; Romans 4:25 ) if there is no resurrection.
Jesus' resurrection is a prototypical event. As "the firstfruits" (1 Corinthians 15:23 ) he gives the Spirit as the firstfruits to the believer (Romans 8:23 ). This Spirit indwelling is the "first installment" (2 Corinthians 1:22 ; 5:5 ; Ephesians 1:14 ) and the basis for the hope of the "redemption of our bodies" (Romans 8:23 ).
Third, the early missionaries were "misrepresenting God" if there is no resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:15 ). Paul's logic allows no room for a "spiritual" approach that discounts the resurrection. The belief in bodily resurrection is commensurate with belief in God. If God exists and if he created the universe and has power over it, he has power to raise the dead. Attempts to explain the resurrection as a mere sociological phenomenon without the supernatural element minimizes the magnitude of the event and the role that it played in the formation of Christianity.
For example, the fourth of Paul's conclusions"you are still in your sins" (v. 17)shows the magnitude for Paul of the resurrection. The resurrection of Jesus showed that Christ's oblation as the sacrificial lamb was accepted by God, which is the basis for the giving of the Spirit to believers and the forgiveness of their sins.
Fifth, if there is no resurrection "those who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost" (v. 18). In other words, they have returned to dust with no future cognizance of any existence. This statement gets at the core of the basis for hoping and not fearing death. It also affects morality. God's future judgment modifies earthly behavior. Paul's conclusion that "If the dead are not raised, Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die'" (v. 32) reveals the tenable resolution of materialistic hedonism, when the resurrection of Christ as the firstfruit and the ensuing general resurrection are dismissed. As in the Old Testament, theodicy, especially in times of persecution, was perceived as futile if there was no future vindication.
Finally, the result of such logic led Paul to declare that "If for this life only we have hoped in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied" (v. 19 NRSV). Paul articulates the persecution he received at Ephesus in verse 32, which only has meaning if the dead are raised. The persecution and even death of many of the early Christians led to Paul's conclusion that theodicy is resolved by bodily resurrection.
The rhetorical question is asked in verse 35, "With what kind of body will they come?" Paul's answer is to stress continuity of identity. Even though individuals will be "changed, " they will remain in essence who they are. He illustrates this by using a grain of wheat that will, after it is planted, be changed, but will remain wheat. In the Gospels, the appearances of Jesus stress the continuity of his identity even though he changed. His pierced hands and side attest to the continuity of his identity.
Paul's discussion on the "first Adam" who is born of "dust" and the "second Adam" who is Christ and is a "life-giving spirit" has as its goal the statement "flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God." In other words, spiritual rebirth is necessary to enter the eternal kingdom of God.
Not only does the resurrection of Jesus have implications for the individual, according to Paul, but Christ's passage through the cosmos unharmed by evil spirits has placed the universe itself in his subjection (vv. 24-28). This early perception, the so-called classic view of the atonement, is common in the New Testament (cf. Acts 2:32-35 ; Ephesians 1:20-23 ; Hebrews 1:13 ). In second temple Judaism, ascension into the cosmos by a saint who confronted evil spirits (e.g., Eth Enoch) was commonplace, but none were permitted passage to "the right hand of God." Jesus' resurrection and subsequent ascension (which are often treated together as one event) is unique in that sense.
Eric W. Adams
See also Second Coming of Christ
Bibliography . J. E. M. Dewart, Message of the Fathers of the Church ; R. B. Gaffin, Jr., The Centrality of the Resurrection: A Study in Paul's Soteriology ; G. R. Habermas, The Resurrection of Jesus: An Apologetic ; M. J. Harris, Raised Immortal: Resurrection and Immortality in the New Testament ; G. E. Ladd, I Believe in the Resurrection .
CARM Theological Dictionary - Resurrection, Resurrection Bodies
Resurrection means to be raised from the dead (John 5:28-29). The word is used in different contexts in the Bible. Lazarus was raised from the dead (John 11:43). This is a resurrection, but it is not part of the resurrection that occurs when we receive our new bodies when Christ returns (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18), on the last day (John 6:39-44) when the last trumpet is blown (1 Corinthians 15:51-55). Lazarus died again. The resurrection of Jesus is promissory in that as we know He was raised, so we will be raised also. In that context, Jesus is the only one who has received a resurrected body. That is why He is called the first-fruit from the dead (1 Corinthians 15:20-23). We will receive our bodies either at the rapture or when Jesus returns to earth.
The resurrected body is not subject to death or sin. We know very little about it except what was manifested by Jesus after His resurrection; namely, that He was able to move about as He desired -- in and out of rooms without the use of doors. Other than that, the rest is conjecture. (See 1 Corinthians 15:1-58).
Webster's Dictionary - Resurrection
(1):
(n.) A rising again; the resumption of vigor.
(2):
(n.) The cause or exemplar of a rising from the dead.
(3):
(n.) State of being risen from the dead; future state.
(4):
(n.) Especially, the rising again from the dead; the resumption of life by the dead; as, the resurrection of Jesus Christ; the general resurrection of all the dead at the Day of Judgment.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Resurrection
The belief of a general resurrection of the dead, which will come to pass at the end of the world, and will be followed with an immortality either of happiness or misery, is an article of religion in common to Jews and Christians. It is very expressly taught both in the Old and New Testaments, Psalms 16:10 ; Job 19:25 , &c; Ezekiel 37:1 , &c; Isaiah 26:19 ; John 5:28-29 ; and to these may be added, Wis_3:1 , &c; Wis_4:15 ; 2Ma_7:14 ; 2Ma_7:23 ; 2Ma_7:29 , &c. At the time when our Saviour appeared in Judea, the resurrection from the dead was received as one of the principal articles of the Jewish religion by the whole body of the nation, the Sadducees excepted, Matthew 22:23 ; Luke 20:28 ; Mark 12:18 ; John 11:23-24 ; Acts 23:6 ; Acts 23:8 . Our Saviour arose himself from the dead, to give us, in his own person, a proof, a pledge, and a pattern of our future resurrection. St. Paul, in almost all his epistles, speaks of a general resurrection, refutes those who denied or opposed it, and proves and explains it by several circumstances, Romans 6:5 ; 1 Corinthians 15:12-15 ; Php_3:10-11 ; Hebrews 11:35 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-17 , &c.
On this subject no point of discussion, of any importance, arises among those who admit the truth of Scripture, except as to the way in which the doctrine of the resurrection of the body is to be understood;—whether a resurrection of the substance of the body be meant, or some minute and indestructible part of it. The latter theory has been adopted for the sake of avoiding certain supposed difficulties. It cannot however fail to strike every impartial reader of the New Testament, that the doctrine of the resurrection is there taught without any nice distinctions. It is always exhibited as a miraculous work; and represents the same body which is laid in the grave as the subject of this change from death to life, by the power of Christ. Thus our Lord was raised in the same body in which he died, and his resurrection is constantly held forth as the model of ours; and the Apostle Paul expressly says, "Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body." The only passage of Scripture which appears to favour the notion of the rising of the immortal body from some indestructible germ, is 1 Corinthians 15:35 , &c: "But some men will say, How are the dead raised up, and with what body do they come? Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened except it die; and that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain," &c. If, however, it had been the intention of the Apostle, holding this view of the case, to meet objections to the doctrine of the resurrection, grounded upon the difficulties of conceiving how the same body, in the popular sense, could be raised up in substance, we might have expected him to correct this misapprehension by declaring, that this was not the Christian doctrine; but that some small parts of the body only, bearing as little proportion to the whole as the germ of a seed to the plant, would be preserved, and be unfolded into the perfected body at the resurrection. Instead of this, he goes on immediately to remind the objector of the differences which exist between material bodies as they now exist;. between the plant and the bare or naked grain; between one plant and another; between the flesh of men, of beasts, of fishes, and of birds; between celestial and terrestrial bodies; and between the lesser and greater celestial luminaries themselves. Still farther he proceeds to state the difference, not between the germ of the body to be raised, and the body given at the resurrection; but between the body itself, understood popularly, which dies, and the body which shall be raised. "It is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption," which would not be true of the supposed incorruptible and imperishable germ of this hypothesis; and can only be affirmed of the body itself, considered in substance, and, in its present state, corruptible. Farther: the question put by the objector,—"How are the dead raised up?" does not refer to the modus agendi of the resurrection, or the process or manner in which the thing is to be effected, as the advocates of the germ hypothesis appear to assume. This is manifest from the answer of the Apostle, who goes on immediately to state, not in what manner the resurrection is to be effected, but what shall be the state or condition of the resurrection body; which is no answer at all to the question, if it be taken in that sense.
Thus, in the argument, the Apostle confines himself wholly to the possibility of the resurrection of the body in a refined and glorified state; but omits all reference to the mode in which the thing will be effected, as being out of the line of the objector's questions, and in itself above human thought, and wholly miraculous. It is, however, clear, that when he speaks of the body, as the subject of this wondrous "change," he speaks of it popularly, as the same body in substance, whatever changes in its qualities or figure may be impressed upon it. Great general changes it will experience, as from corruption to incorruption, from mortality to immortality; great changes of a particular kind will also take place, as its being freed from deformities and defects, and the accidental varieties produced by climate, aliments, labour, and hereditary diseases. It is also laid down by our Lord, that "in the resurrection they shall neither marry nor be given in marriage, but be like to the angels of God;" and this also implies a certain change of structure; and we may gather from the declaration of the Apostle, that though "the stomach," is now adapted "to meats, and meats to the stomach," yet God will "destroy both it and them;" that the animal appetite for food will be removed, and the organ now adapted to that appetite will have no place in the renewed frame. But great as these changes are, the human form will be retained in its perfection, after the model of our Lord's "glorious body," and the substance of the matter of which it is composed will not thereby be affected. That the same body which was laid in the grave shall arise out of it, is the manifest doctrine of the Scriptures. The notion of an incorruptible germ, or that of an original and unchangeable stamen, out of which a new and glorious body, at the resurrection, is to spring, appears to have been borrowed from the speculations of some of the Jewish rabbins. But if by this hypothesis it was designed to remove the difficulty of conceiving how the scattered parts of one body could be preserved from becoming integral parts of other bodies, it supposes that the constant care of Providence is exerted to maintain the incorruptibility of those individual germs, or stamina, so as to prevent their assimilation with each other. Now, if they have this by original quality, then the same quality may just as easily be supposed to appertain to every particle which composes a human body; so that, though it be used for food, it shall not be capable of assimilation, in any circumstances, with another human body. But if these germs, or stamina, have not this quality by their original nature, they can only be prevented from assimilating with each other by that operation of God which is present to all his works, and which must always be directed to secure the execution of his own ultimate designs. If this view be adopted, then, if the resort must at last be to the superintendence of a Being of infinite power and wisdom, there is no greater difficulty in supposing that his care to secure this object may extend to a million as easily as to a hundred particles, of matter. This is, in fact, the true and rational answer to the objection that the same piece of matter may happen to be a part of two or more bodies, as in the instances of men feeding upon animals which have fed upon men, and of men feeding upon one another. The question here is one which simply respects the frustrating a final purpose of the Almighty by an operation of nature. To suppose that he cannot prevent this, is to deny his power; to suppose him inattentive to it, is to suppose him indifferent to his own designs; and to assume that he employs care to prevent it, is to assume nothing greater, nothing in fact so great, as many instances of control, which are always occurring; as, for instance, the regulation of the proportion of the sexes in human births, which cannot be attributed to chance, but must either be referred to superintendence, or to some original law. Another objection to the resurrection of the body has been drawn from the changes of its substance during life; the answer to which is, that, allowing a frequent and total change of the substance of the body (which, however, is but an hypothesis) to take place, it affects not the doctrine of Scripture, which is, that the body which is laid in the grave shall be raised up. But then, we are told, that if our bodies have in fact undergone successive changes during life, the bodies in which we have sinned or performed rewardable actions may not be, in many instances, the same bodies as those which will be actually rewarded or punished. We answer, that rewards and punishments have their relation to the body, not so much as it is the subject but as it is the instrument of reward and punishment. It is the soul only which perceives pain or pleasure, which suffers or enjoys, and is, therefore, the only rewardable subject. Were we, therefore, to admit such corporeal mutations as are assumed in this objection, they affect not the case of our accountability. The personal identity or sameness of a rational being, as Mr. Locke has observed, consists in self-consciousness: "By this every one is to himself what he calls self, without considering whether that self be continued in the same or divers substances. It was by the same self which reflects on an action done many years ago, that the action was performed." If there were indeed any weight in this objection, it would affect the proceedings of human criminal courts in all cases of offences committed at some distance of time; but it contradicts the common sense, because it contradicts the common consciousness and experience, of mankind.
Our Lord has assured us, that "the hour is coming in which all that are in their graves shall hear his voice, and come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life, and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation." Then we shall "all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump," and "the dead shall be raised incorruptible." It is probable that the bodies of the righteous and the wicked, though each shall in some respects be the same as before, will each be in other respects not the same, but undergo some change conformable to the character of the individual, and suited to his future state of existence; yet both, as the passage just quoted clearly teaches, are then rendered indestructible. Respecting the good it is said, "When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, we shall appear with him in glory," "we shall be like him; our body shall be fashioned like his glorious body;" yet, notwithstanding this, "it doth not yet fully appear what we shall be," Colossians 3:4 ; 1 John 3:2 ; Php_3:21 . This has a very obvious reason. Our present manner of knowing depends upon our present constitution, and we know not the exact relation which subsists between this constitution and the manner of being in a future world; we derive our ideas through the medium of the senses; the senses are necessarily conversant with terrestrial objects only; our language is suited to the communication of present ideas; and thus it follows that the objects of the future world may in some respects (whether few or many we cannot say) differ so extremely from terrestrial objects, that language cannot communicate to us any such ideas as would render those matters comprehensible. But language may suggest striking and pleasing analogies; and with such we are presented by the holy Apostle: "All flesh," says he, "is not the same flesh: but there is one flesh of men, another of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds;" and yet all these are fashioned out of the same kind of substance, mere inert matter, till God gives it life and activity. It is sown an animal body; a body which previously existed with all the organs, faculties, and propensities, requisite to procure, receive, and appropriate nutriment, as well as to perpetuate the species; but it shall be raised a spiritual body, refined from the dregs of matter, freed from the organs and senses required only in its former state, and probably possessing the remaining senses in greater perfection, together with new and more exquisite faculties, fitted for the exalted state of existence and enjoyment to which it is now rising. In the present state the organs and senses appointed to transmit the impressions of objects to the mind, have a manifest relation to the respective objects: the eye and seeing, for example, to light; the ear and hearing, to sound. In the refined and glorious state of existence to which good men are tending, where the objects which solicit attention will be infinitely more numerous, interesting, and delightful, may not the new organs, faculties, and senses, be proportionably refined, acute, susceptible, or penetrating? Human industry and invention have placed us, in a manner, in new worlds; what, then, may not a spiritual body, with sharpened faculties, and the grandest possible objects of contemplation, effect in the celestial regions to which Christians are invited? There the senses will no longer degrade the affections, the imagination no longer corrupt the heart; the magnificent scenery thrown open to view will animate the attention, give a glow and vigour to the sentiments; that roused attention will never tire; those glowing sentiments will never cloy; but the man, now constituted of an indestructible body, as well as of an immortal soul, may visit in eternal succession the streets of the celestial city, may "drink of the pure river of the water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God, and of the Lamb;" and dwell for ever in those abodes of harmony and peace, which, though "eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, nor has it entered into the imagination of man to conceive," we are assured "God hath prepared for them that love him,"
1 Corinthians 2:9 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Resurrection of Body
(Latin: re, again; surgere, to rise)
A substantial conversion whereby the human body resolved into its component parts by death is restored to its former condition. The resurrection is styled a conversion to distinguish it from creation by which an entirely new being comes into existence. In ancient times the resurrection was denied especially by the Sadducees, the Gnostics, the Maniehreans, and tbe medieval Albigenses and Waldenses, and is still violently attacked hy atheists, materialists, and rationalists. The doctrine is well founded in Holy Writ being contained in both the Old and New Testaments. The classic text of the Old Testament is the following from Job (19): "For I know that my Redeemer liveth, and in the last day I shall rise out of the earth. And I shall be clothed again with my skin; and in my flesh I shall see my God." Another passage of Scripture is that describing the vision of Ezechiel (Ezechiel 1). The prophet saw how the dry bones on the fleld of the dead began to stir, took on sinews and flesh, and were covered with skin. When they stood upright and breathed and lived, the Lord said to the prophet: "Son of man: all these bones are the house of Israel, ...Behold, I will open your graves, and will bring you out of your sepulchres, O my people, and will bring you into the land of Israel." Though this vision symbolizes the restoration of Israel, it would have been unintelligible to the Jews had they not been familiar with belief in a resurrection of the dead. In the New Testament we have the distinct assurance of Christ and the Apostles that the dead will rise again. Our Lord accused the Sadducees of ignorance because they denied the resurrection of the dead. "You err, not knowing the Scriptures nor the power of God." (Matthew 22) He also predicted that He Himself would raise the dead to life: "The hour cometh, wherein all that, are in the graves shall hear the voice of the Son of God. And they that have done good things shall come forth unto the resurrection of life: but they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of judgment." (John 5) The Apostles testified to the resurrection, Saint Paul especially placing the resurrection of the dead on the same level, as regards certainty, with the resurrection of our Lord; "Now if Christ be preached, that he rose again from the dead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then Christ is not risen again. And if Christ be not risen again, then is our preaching vain: and your faith is also vain." (1 Corinthians 15) Tradition of the early Church establishes the dogma of the resurrection, the Fathers not only referring to it, but even writing entire treatises appealing both to Scripture and reason.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of the Dead
It is the peculiar glory of the New Testament that it makes a full revelation of this great doctrine, which was questioned or derided by the wisest of the heathen, Acts 17:32 . In the Old Testament also we find, though less frequently, the doctrine asserted; as for example, Isaiah 26:19 Daniel 12:2 . When our Saviour appeared in Judea, the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead was received as a principal article of religion by the whole Jewish nation except the Sadducees. Their denial of it rested on the assumption that at death the whole man, soul and body, perishes. "The Sadducees say that there is no resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit," Acts 23:8 . Hence the refutation of this unscriptural assumption was a complete overthrow of the ground on which their denial of a future resurrection rested; for if the soul can survive the body, it is plain that God can give it another body. In this way our Lord met and effectually refuted them, Matthew 22:31,32 Mark 12:26,27 .
The resurrection of Christ is everywhere represented in the New Testament as a pledge and an earnest of the resurrection of all the just, who are united to him by faith, 1 Corinthians 15:49 1 Thessalonians 3:13 , in virtue of their union with him as their Head. He is "the resurrection and the life," John 11:25 ; they "sleep in Jesus," and shall be brought to glory "with him," 1 Thessalonians 4:13-17 5:10 ; their "life is hid with Christ in God," Colossians 3:3 ; and because he lives, they shall live also, John 14:19 . The Scriptures also teach that there will be a resurrection of the unjust. But they shall be raised, not to be glorified with Christ, but to be judged by him, and sentenced to eternal punishment, Daniel 12:2 John 5:28,29 compared with Matthew 28:20 Acts 24:15 .
To cavillers against this doctrine in his own day, Christ replied, "Ye do err, not knowing the Scriptures, nor the power of God." The work is miraculous; and He who is omniscient and omnipotent will permit nothing to frustrate his designs. He has not revealed to us the precise nature of the spiritual body, nor in what its identity with the earthly body consists; but it will be incorruptible, fashioned like Christ's glorious body, Philippians 3.21 , and a meet companion of the soul made perfect in his likeness.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Resurrection, the
Our Lord's way of naming Himself before raising Lazarus from death: "I am the Resurrection and the Life." (John 11)
King James Dictionary - Resurrection
RESURREC'TION, n. s as z. L. resurrectus, resurgo re and surgo, to rise.
A rising again chiefly, the revival of the dead of the human race, or their return from the grave, particularly at the general judgment. By the resurrection of Christ we have assurance of the future resurrection of men. 1 Peter 1 .
In the resurrection, they neither marry, nor are given in marriage. Matthew 22 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
The Gospel miracle, related by the four Evangelists, of Christ's return to life. By His own power He reunited His body and soul, and issued alive from the sealed and guarded tomb, after His dead body had reposed therein from Friday evening until Sunday morning. This fact was predicted by Christ Himself, and offered by Him as the chief sign or proof of His Divine mission and Divinity. The Apostles after Him made it the cardinal point in their teaching, on which hinged the value of the Christian faith. Saint Paul says: "And if Christ be not risen again, then is our preaching vain: and your faith is also vain." (1 Corinthians 15). Among the many masters who have represented this subject in art are: Aldegrever, Baldovinetti, Bellini, Annibale and Agostino Carracci, Contarini, Correggio, El Greco, Fra Angelico, Ghirlandajo, Murillo, Palma, Perugino, Pinturicchio, Pourbus, Rembrandt, Rubens, San Sepolcro, Tintoretto, Titian, Trevisani, Van de Velde, Vasari, Veronese, and Vivarini.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Resurrection of Mankind
The universal return to life of all the members of the human race, effected shortly before the last judgment by God's omnipotence, when each individual human soul will be permanently reunited with the identical body with which it was united on earth. The Creed expresses this dogma in the words, "resurrection of the body."
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
This is of fundamental importance in Christianity, both historically and doctrinally. As a fact indisputable proved, it was the crowning demonstration of the truth of all Christ's claims, 1 Corinthians 15:14-18 . He had repeatedly foretold it; and his enemies were careful to ascertain that he was actually dead, and to guard his tomb for additional security. Yet he rose from the dead on the third day, and appeared on eleven different occasions to numerous witnesses, convincing even those who were the most doubtful, and after forty days ascended to heaven from the mount of Olives. To this all-important fact the apostles gave great prominence in their preaching.
Acts 1:22 2:24-32 4:33 10:40,41 . In its relation to Christian doctrine it stands as a rock of strength, assuring us of God's acceptance of the expiatory Sacrifice, of Christ's triumphant accomplishment of the work of redemption, and of his raising to immortal life the souls and bodies of his people. He was buried under the load of our offences; but he rose again, almighty to justify and save us. His dying proved the greatness of his love; his rising again shows that his love had secured its object.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ
This is the great central fact on the testimony of which the structure of Christianity has been reared. If Christ be not risen, there is no salvation, since sin would still be reigning by death in universal sway. But Christ, who was made sin, is risen and is at God's right hand, a manifest proof that atonement has been made, and that God's righteousness has been vindicated. The result has been the sending of the Spirit from the Father. Abundant evidence was given to the disciples that Christ was risen from the dead. He appeared again and again, ate in their presence, and gave opportunity for identification. Evidence of the fact was also borne to the Jews by the apostles in the power and by the gifts of the Spirit, Acts 4:10 , confirming what they had themselves seen and heard and the testimony of the scriptures. The resurrection of Christ is the keystone of the faith of the Christian; at the same time it is the assurance on the part of God that He has appointed a day when He is going to judge the world in righteousness. Hence it has a voice to all.
It has been asserted that the accounts given of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus in the gospels are discordant and irreconcilable. This is not the case: it has been overlooked that Luke 23:54-56 refers to Friday evening, before the Sabbath, and Matthew 28:1 refers to Saturday evening, after the Sabbath: the women return after viewing the sepulchre and finish their preparations, according to Mark 16:1 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Resurrection
This may be said to be the fundamental principle of God's dealings with man in grace, seeing that man is through sin under the judgement of death. The expression, 'The general resurrection' is found in works on theology, and is explained as meaning that the dead will all be raised at the same time; but this idea is not found in scripture. The Lord speaks of a resurrection unto life. "The dead in Christ " will be raised at the coming of the Lord Jesus, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; and John speaks of the first resurrection, and adds that "the rest of the dead lived not again until the thousand years were finished." Revelation 20:5,6 . The term 'first' designates rather the character than the time of the resurrection, it will evidently include only the saved; 'the rest' being simply raised for judgement.
It will be seen in Romans 8:11 , that the resurrection of believers is of a wholly different order from that of the wicked: the saints will be quickened by, or on account of, God's Spirit that dwells in them, which certainly could not be said of the unconverted. The resurrection of the saints is also distinguished from that of the wicked in being, like that of the Lord and of Lazarus, 'out from among (ἐκ) the dead.' Mark 12:25 . It was the earnest desire of Paul to attain this. Job 19:25-276 (see Greek)
The resurrection condition is in the strongest contrast to that after the flesh. That which springs from the seed sown in the ground appears very different in form from the seed sown, though absorbing the substance of the seed. 1 Corinthians 15 refers only to the resurrection of the saints, as may be seen in 1 Corinthians 15:23,24 . There were those at Corinth who said that there was no resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:12 ); and on the other hand it appears from 2 Timothy 2:18 , some held that the resurrection had already past, that they had in fact reached a final condition!
Few distinct intimations of the resurrection are found in the O.T., though the idea of it underlies all the teaching. Job may perhaps have learnt it (1618069008_26 ), and when the Lord rebuked the Sadducees He taught that resurrection could be gathered inferentially from God speaking of Himself as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob long after they were dead. He is God of the living, not of the dead. Mark 12:26,27 . Martha spoke of the resurrection as a matter of common orthodox belief, John 11:24 ; which is also implied in its being said that the Sadducees did not believe in it.
Isaiah 26:19 ; Ezekiel 37:1-14 ; and Daniel 12:2 , are often quoted as testimony to resurrection; but these passages are figurative and refer to Israel being raised up as from their national decease (the consequence of their departure from the Lord, Isaiah 1:1-4 ), when God will again bless them on the earth. It is an important fact, however, that the figure of resurrection is used.

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c.r. - = Congregation of the Resurrection; Resurrectionist Fathers ...
= Community of the Resurrection (Anglican) ...
= Order of Clerics Regular; Theatines ...
Philetus - Paul’s Epistle to Timothy ( 2 Timothy 2:17 ) as an example of one of those who were doing harm by their false teaching on the subject of the Resurrection of the body. For them the Resurrection was past. It was a spiritual Resurrection from sin to holiness, and there was no future Resurrection of the body, no life to come
Resurrection - 1: ἀνάστασις (Strong's #386 — Noun Feminine — anastasis — an-as'-tas-is ) denotes (I) "a raising up," or "rising" (ana, "up," and histemi, "to cause to stand"), Luke 2:34 , "the rising up;" the AV "again" obscures the meaning; the Child would be like a stone against which many in Israel would stumble while many others would find in its strength and firmness a means of their salvation and spiritual life; (II) of "resurrection" from the dead, (a) of Christ, Acts 1:22 ; 2:31 ; 4:33 ; Romans 1:4 ; 6:5 ; Philippians 3:10 ; 1 Peter 1:3 ; 3:21 ; by metonymy, of Christ as the Author of "resurrection," John 11:25 ; (b) of those who are Christ's at His Parousia (see COMING), Luke 14:14 , "the Resurrection of the just;" Luke 20:33,35,36 ; John 5:29 (1st part), "the Resurrection of life;" John 11:24 ; Acts 23:6 ; 24:15 (1st part); 1 Corinthians 15:21,42 ; 2 Timothy 2:18 ; Hebrews 11:35 (2nd part), see RAISE , Note (3); Revelation 20:5 , "the first Resurrection;" hence the insertion of "is" stands for the completion of this "resurrection," of which Christ was "the firstfruits;" Revelation 20:6 ; (c) of "the rest of the dead," after the Millennium (cp. Revelation 20:5 ); John 5:29 (2nd part), "the Resurrection of judgment;" Acts 24:15 (2nd part), "of the unjust;" (d) of those who were raised in more immediate connection with Christ's "resurrection," and thus had part already in the first "resurrection," Acts 26:23 ; Romans 1:4 (in each of which "dead" is plural; see Matthew 27:52 ); (e) of the "resurrection" spoken of in general terms, Matthew 22:23 ; Mark 12:18 ; Luke 20:27 ; Acts 4:2 ; 17:18 ; 23:8 ; 24:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:12,13 ; Hebrews 6:2 ; (f) of those who were raised in OT times, to die again, Hebrews 11:35 (1st part), lit. , "out of Resurrection. , "the out-resurrection from among the dead. ...
3: ἔγερσις (Strong's #1454 — Noun Feminine — egersis — eg'-er-sis ) "a rousing" (akin to egeiro, "to arouse, to raise"), is used of the "resurrection" of Christ, in Matthew 27:53
Resurrection - By the Resurrection of Christ we have assurance of the future Resurrection of men. ...
In the Resurrection, they neither marry, nor are given in marriage
Jecamiah - Resurrection
Resurrection - The expression, 'The general Resurrection' is found in works on theology, and is explained as meaning that the dead will all be raised at the same time; but this idea is not found in scripture. The Lord speaks of a Resurrection unto life. "The dead in Christ " will be raised at the coming of the Lord Jesus, 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; and John speaks of the first Resurrection, and adds that "the rest of the dead lived not again until the thousand years were finished. The term 'first' designates rather the character than the time of the Resurrection, it will evidently include only the saved; 'the rest' being simply raised for judgement. ...
It will be seen in Romans 8:11 , that the Resurrection of believers is of a wholly different order from that of the wicked: the saints will be quickened by, or on account of, God's Spirit that dwells in them, which certainly could not be said of the unconverted. The Resurrection of the saints is also distinguished from that of the wicked in being, like that of the Lord and of Lazarus, 'out from among (ἐκ) the dead. Philippians 3:11 (see Greek)...
The Resurrection condition is in the strongest contrast to that after the flesh. 1 Corinthians 15 refers only to the Resurrection of the saints, as may be seen in 1 Corinthians 15:23,24 . There were those at Corinth who said that there was no Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:12 ); and on the other hand it appears from 2 Timothy 2:18 , some held that the Resurrection had already past, that they had in fact reached a final condition!...
Few distinct intimations of the Resurrection are found in the O. Job may perhaps have learnt it (Job 19:25-27 ), and when the Lord rebuked the Sadducees He taught that Resurrection could be gathered inferentially from God speaking of Himself as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob long after they were dead. Martha spoke of the Resurrection as a matter of common orthodox belief, John 11:24 ; which is also implied in its being said that the Sadducees did not believe in it. ...
Isaiah 26:19 ; Ezekiel 37:1-14 ; and Daniel 12:2 , are often quoted as testimony to Resurrection; but these passages are figurative and refer to Israel being raised up as from their national decease (the consequence of their departure from the Lord, Isaiah 1:1-4 ), when God will again bless them on the earth. It is an important fact, however, that the figure of Resurrection is used
Camon - His Resurrection
Appearances - —See Resurrection
Eliakim - Resurrection of God
Resurrection - The present article, however, is concerned with a kind of Resurrection that is an entirely new order of existence, where death has no more power (Romans 6:9; 1 Corinthians 15:54; 2 Corinthians 5:4). ...
Death and the afterlife...
Old Testament believers did not have a clear understanding of eternal life, though they did at times express the hope of a Resurrection through which they would have deliverance from the power of death. Likewise they expected a Resurrection of the wicked that would be followed by punishment (Psalms 49:14-15; Daniel 12:2). By Christ’s death God broke the power of death and revealed the nature of Resurrection life (2 Timothy 1:10; Hebrews 2:14-15). A minority of Jews, the Sadducees, refused to believe in a Resurrection of any sort (Matthew 22:23). It must involve the Resurrection of the body to a new and victorious life. Because Jesus’ death and Resurrection conquered sin and death, the believer in Jesus can look forward to salvation from sin and death (Romans 4:24-25; Romans 6:8-10; Romans 8:11; 1 Corinthians 15:26; 1 Corinthians 15:54-57). The human being’s destiny, whether for salvation or damnation, is connected not with death but with the Resurrection of the body, after which the person faces final judgment (Daniel 12:2; John 5:29; Acts 24:15; see DEATH). ...
Assurance of Jesus’ Resurrection...
People’s only basis of hope for a victorious Resurrection is the Resurrection of Jesus (John 11:25; 1 Corinthians 15:20-21; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49). In spite of Jesus’ clear statements, his disciples often displayed a lack of understanding concerning his coming crucifixion and Resurrection. Therefore, when Jesus met with them after his Resurrection, he made sure that they knew it was a true bodily Resurrection (Luke 24:39-43; John 20:20; John 20:27; 1 Corinthians 15:4-7). ...
Nevertheless, there was something uniquely different about Jesus’ body after his Resurrection. ...
In his Resurrection body Jesus was capable of normal physical functions (Luke 24:41-43), but he was also able to appear and disappear as he wished. ...
Jesus’ Resurrection changed the apostles from people who were confused and cowardly into people who were assured and courageous (Acts 2:14; Acts 2:36; Acts 4:13; Acts 4:18-20; Acts 4:29-31; Acts 5:27-29). By his Resurrection he had conquered death and made salvation sure, and they were witnesses of these things (Luke 24:46-48; Acts 2:24; Acts 2:32; Acts 5:30-32; Acts 10:39-43). ...
The Resurrection was therefore a central theme in the apostles’ preaching. ...
Not just the original disciples but all disciples are changed because of Jesus’ Resurrection (Ephesians 2:5-6; Revelation 1:17-18). Paul, who had not known Jesus during the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry, claimed that the Resurrection gave him assurance of eternal life and confidence in his Christian service (Acts 23:6; Acts 25:19; Romans 1:4-5; 1 Corinthians 9:1; 1 Corinthians 15:8; 1 Corinthians 15:14-15; 2 Timothy 2:8). The Resurrection of Jesus is essential for a person’s entire salvation (1 Corinthians 15:14; 1 Corinthians 15:17; 1 Corinthians 15:19; Romans 4:24-25; Romans 8:10-11). ...
Having become united with Christ through faith, believers share in the Resurrection life of Christ. ...
Future Resurrection...
Only through Jesus’ Resurrection can believers have the assurance of a future Resurrection. This new order of existence will begin at the return of Jesus Christ, when the Resurrection of believers will take place (John 6:40; John 6:54; 1 Corinthians 15:52; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17). ...
Believers have no way of knowing exactly what the Resurrection body will be like. The link between the future Resurrection body and the present physical body may be compared to the link between a plant and the seed from which it grows. Similarly, the Resurrection body of the believer will be different from the present body, but the believer will still be the same person (John 6:40; 1 Corinthians 15:35-38; 1 Corinthians 15:42-44). ...
As Adam’s body was the pattern for the bodies of people in the present life, so Christ’s Resurrection body is the pattern for the bodies of believers in the life to come (1 Corinthians 15:45-49; Philippians 3:20-21). The Christian’s expectation at the Resurrection is not for the giving of life to a corpse, but for the changing of the whole person into the likeness of Christ (1 John 3:2; cf. ...
The Resurrection of the ungodly is a different matter. Whatever form their Resurrection will take, they will not be given spiritual and imperishable bodies. Their Resurrection will result not in life, but in judgment, condemnation and eternal destruction (Daniel 12:2; Matthew 10:28; John 5:29; 1 Corinthians 15:50; Revelation 20:6; Revelation 20:12-14; see HELL)
Resurrection - -The Resurrection of Christ does not fall to be discussed in this article, the next article being devoted to it. Nevertheless it will be impossible to treat of the Pauline view of Resurrection without some discussion of his attitude towards the nature of Christ’s Resurrection. Paul is practically the only NT writer who has really worked out the problem of the Resurrection on the basis of the Resurrection of Christ. in his attitude towards the problems of the Resurrection, and also how far he has introduced new elements and developed along fresh lines. ...
The principal questions that must be answered by any inquiry into the subject of the Resurrection from the historical point of view are: (1) What was the place of the Resurrection in the eschatology of the time? (2) Are there more than one Resurrection in any of the eschatological schemes of the 1st century? (3) How is the Resurrection of Christ related to the general Christian Resurrection-doctrine of the period? (4) How is the question of the relation between body and spirit, flesh and spirit, worked out? (5) How far does an ethical element enter into the various views of the Resurrection developed by NT writers? These questions involve ethical, metaphysical, and eschatological considerations which were not clearly distinguished in the thought of the time, and cannot be separated in our treatment of the subject; yet they must be borne in mind in examining the various systems of the period. ...
The roots of eschatology have been found to be far more widely spread in early civilizations than was formerly believed, and of all the conceptions of eschatology none has a more varied and complicated history than the conception of the Resurrection. But we have to consider and take stock of the stage of development which the conception of Resurrection had reached at the beginning of our period. Hence, for our inquiry, it is an influence against the conception of a bodily Resurrection. The eternal antithesis between matter and spirit, the necessity of redemption from the bondage of matter, and the consequent stress on asceticism, are factors working against the conception of a bodily Resurrection. At the time under consideration Judaism presents two forms of Resurrection-doctrine: (1) the doctrine of the Resurrection of the righteous only, developed from ethical and spiritual interests, and probably quite independent of external influences; (2) the doctrine of a general Resurrection of both righteous and wicked, possibly, but not necessarily, due to the influence of Mazdeism (cf. ) the Palestinian doctrine of bodily Resurrection, both of the individual and of the nation, for the Messianic kingdom; (ii. ) the Alexandrian doctrine, influenced by Neo-Platonic ideas, teaching only a spiritual Resurrection, and tending to abandon the idea of the Messianic kingdom. ...
(d) Christianity, receiving its doctrine of Resurrection from both forms of Judaistic thought, but profoundly modifying the doctrine it thus received by the conception of the nature of Christ’s Resurrection as interpreted by St. ...
The fuller discussion of these various currents of conflicting and intermingling views concerning the nature of the Resurrection, its time and conditions, will arise out of our examination of the various passages relating to it in the literature of the Apostolic Age. The Resurrection in the Literature of the Apostolic Age...
1. -The references to the subject of Resurrection and the related question of body and spirit may be considered under the separate heads of Alexandrian and Palestinian, although, as already pointed out, at this time there was not a sharp line of demarcation. The general attitude of this phase of Judaism towards the Resurrection can only be touched on briefly, as our main inquiry lies in the Christian literature of the period. Hence the Resurrection of the body is obviously impossible, and any doctrine of a corporate Resurrection of a blessed community can have no place. Hence ‘immortality’ (Wisdom of Solomon 8:17), ‘incorruption’ (Wisdom of Solomon 2:23, Wisdom of Solomon 6:19), are terms which belong only to the state of the soul, and do not imply any Resurrection of the body. It is not clear whether he holds a Resurrection of the body, since his description of the change from the earthly to the heavenly body is curiously akin to St. ...
In 4 Maccabees there is no Resurrection of the body. As in Alexandrian Judaism, so here there is no Resurrection of the body. ’ Here the Resurrection of the righteous is placed after the period of tribulation preceding the advent of Messiah. This doctrine of the bodily Resurrection of the righteous seems to be characteristic of only the portions of the book composed prior to a. 70, we have the doctrine of a general Resurrection, also in chs. These chapters also discuss the nature of the Resurrection very fully. [1] The personal identity of the dead is to be preserved in the Resurrection in order to give force to the judgment by the recognition of identity, ‘when they have severally recognized those whom they now know, then judgement will grow strong’ (50:4). The doctrine of Resurrection occupies a large place in it. In 7:32 there is a clear reference to the Resurrection of the body, but G. Box would assign this verse to the redactor, who, according to him, is seeking to supplement the Resurrection-doctrine of the author of the Salathiel-Apocalypse. Hence the Resurrection-doctrine of the Salathiel-Apocalypse lies midway between the Alexandrian doctrine of a spiritual Resurrection immediately after death, and the Palestinian doctrine of an intermediate disembodied state and a Resurrection of the body for the Final Judgment. ...
The most important point, however, in these two apocalyptic works is the suggestion of the doctrine of a first Resurrection which appears explicitly in the NT. This germ of the idea of a first Resurrection appears especially in 4 Ezr 7:28, 13:52 (see Charles, Eschatology, p. ...
For the Rabbinical views on the Resurrection at this period we have the second article in the Shemoneh Esreh, which speaks of the power of God in raising the dead. Lagrange finds no trace of a connexion between the Resurrection and the Messianic kingdom earlier than R. ...
The general tradition, however, is clear for a belief in the bodily Resurrection of both righteous and wicked for the Final Judgment. (For an excellent account of the Rabbinical doctrine of the Resurrection see Lagrange, Le Messianisme chez les juifs, Paris, 1909, p. -If the passages relating to the Resurrection in St. ...
(a) There is his own view of the Resurrection, which, as the evidence of Acts plainly indicates, he held in common with the Pharisaic party of his time. It is not very easy to determine precisely what shade of Resurrection-doctrine he held, and possibly St. This form or shade of Resurrection-doctrine may be assumed to have constituted a part of St. (b) There is the distinctively Christian belief in the Resurrection of Christ as a historical fact. Possibly it was afterwards interpreted in different ways according to the particular view held concerning the Resurrection, but it is absolutely clear that the belief in the fact of the Resurrection of Christ operated more powerfully than any other cause in transforming current beliefs in the Resurrection. Paul’s view of the Resurrection which can be traced out in process of development and which is due to his interpretation of what he accepted as the historical fact of the Resurrection of Christ. ...
If the speeches in Acts may be accepted as in any degree authentic, they depict the Apostle as holding the general belief in a Resurrection of just and unjust for a Final Judgment (cf. The passage in Acts 17:31 does not necessarily refer to the Resurrection of the dead in general, though Acts 17:32 may imply that the Athenians understood it in that sense. Paul’s exposition of the Resurrection clearly implies a Resurrection before the Messianic kingdom in order that the dead may share in its blessings, it is possible that the idea may have been already present in his original scheme of eschatology, although he had not imparted it to his converts. But it is also clear that, whatever be the source of the idea, it receives a new setting, and is brought into organic connexion with the Resurrection of Christ (see article Parousia). ...
In 1 Corinthians 15 the whole argument presupposes a belief in the Resurrection, not necessarily depending upon the Resurrection of Christ, although the Resurrection of Christ is used to support the belief in the Resurrection of the dead and to modify the general outline of the eschatology. Paul’s indebtedness to the mystery-religions for any ideas as to the Resurrection belongs rather to the discussion of the development of his doctrine than to the evidence for his original stock of ideas on the subject. Paul’s interpretation of Christ’s Resurrection, we have first of all several passages which do not call for special discussion proving the Apostle’s belief in the Resurrection of Christ as a historical occurrence. Paul’s interpretation of the fact in so far as it bears on his view of the Resurrection of believers or of a general Resurrection. ...
The passages in 1 Thessalonians only yield the general inference that the Resurrection of Christ is related to His Parousia; through His Resurrection He is able to enter upon the Kingdom in power; God will bring Him again with the dead saints; it is as raised from the dead that He becomes the deliverer from the coming wrath. ...
In Galatians the subject of Resurrection is not touched on, but it is possible that the famous passage in Galatians 2:20 may throw light on St. Paul’s view of the Resurrection of Christ. Paul, probably in common with the leaders of the primitive Church, had considered the Resurrection of Christ not merely as an eschatological event, or as an article of belief, but as an event in the human experience of Christ intimately related to the experience of the believer. It is possible that we may see in such passages as Romans 1:3-4; Romans 6:4; Romans 6:10, 2 Corinthians 4:11-14; 2 Corinthians 13:4, and others, the evidence of such an attitude towards the Resurrection. Paul regarded the Resurrection as an evidence of the Messiahship of Jesus. Also ‘according to the spirit of holiness’ would seem to refer to the personal holiness of the human life of Jesus, so that the Resurrection marks out or distinguishes Jesus in virtue of His absolute holiness as Son of God, possessing that character. Paul only, as in 2 Corinthians 4:11-14, but the early Church in general, seems to have regarded the Resurrection as a result of Christ’s faith, and also as an act of necessary justice on God’s part, ‘by the glory of the Father. ’...
These factors in the interpretation of the Resurrection need to be considered in order to understand the extension of the principle to believers. Paul, in considering the death and Resurrection of Christ from this point of view, had come to the conclusion that faith was the governing principle in Christ’s life, and that he himself as a believer lived by virtue of the faith which Christ had exercised and which had brought Him through Resurrection into a spiritual state in which He could realize and make good the purpose of God in His death by dwelling in those who believed on Him. Paul’s view of the Resurrection-his belief in the present spiritual existence of the same Christ whose faith during His earthly life bad brought about the whole possibility of Resurrection, a spiritual life, and the communication of it to believers. In Philippians 3 the Apostle desires to be completely identified with the experiences of Christ, His death and His sufferings, in order to reach the goal of Resurrection and attain to the Resurrection from among the dead. ...
In 1 Corinthians 15 the general line of argument is: (1) the proof of the possibility of a Resurrection from the Resurrection of Christ accepted as a historical event; (2) the argument from analogy, based on the Rabbinical conception of ‘body,’ to prove the possibility of the existence of such a thing as a spiritual body; (3) the contrast between Christ and Adam as the respective sources of the incorruptible and the corruptible, the heavenly and the earthly. As a Pharisee he held the continued existence of the soul after death; as part of his Palestinian eschatology he held the necessity of a Resurrection to judgment of both righteous and wicked, and probably a first Resurrection of righteous to participation in the Messianic kingdom. On the one hand, it shifted the eschatological centre of interest, almost unconsciously, to the Resurrection of Christ, as 1 Corinthians 15 shows. The Resurrection of Christ assumes a catastrophic colouring, so to speak: it becomes the first act of Divine intervention in the introduction of the Kingdom, the first step of a process whose culmination also has a catastrophic character derived from the original scheme of eschatology. ...
The tendency of this double working of the interpretation of the death and Resurrection of Christ was to disturb the outline of the old eschatology. the stress laid on the first Resurrection, that of believers to the likeness of Christ; then in 1 Cor. the outline of the eschatological scheme is adjusted to this new emphasis; first Christ’s Resurrection, then the Resurrection of those that are Christ’s at His Parousia-clearly the first Resurrection-then the end, when the Kingdom is delivered to the Father. No mention is made of what happens in this third stage, whether another Resurrection takes place or not. Paul’s doctrine of the Resurrection, as far as it can be reconstructed from the Epistles, becomes limited to a Resurrection of believers only, in the likeness of Christ; and further, this likeness is conceived of more and more as ethical and spiritual, and the whole ensuing state of blessing as a spiritual state rather than as a concrete kingdom on earth. Paul ever reached the point of abandoning entirely the Resurrection of the body, although his conception of the doctrine was extremely spiritual
Resurrection - ...
Old Testament The preexilic portions of the Old Testament contain no statements which point certainly to a hope of Resurrection from the dead even though some of Israel's neighbors had such a belief. The scarcity of these statements and the lack of reflection on their meanings, however, point to the absence of any consistent doctrinal conception of Resurrection from the dead. ...
Similarly, the Psalms are bereft of clear thought on Resurrection. These expressions of hope in God may not suggest a doctrine of Resurrection from the dead. They may reflect the beginnings of a doctrine of Resurrection. So pointed is the prophetic expression of national hope that the New Testament writers sometimes used the language of the prophets to expound the doctrine of Resurrection (compare Matthew 22:23-33 ; 1 Corinthians 15:55 ). The prophetic statements, however, do not necessarily attest to the hope of individual Resurrection from the dead but profess the sovereignty of God over all His subjects, even death. ...
On the other hand, Isaiah 26:19 and Daniel 12:2 decidedly teach a belief in Resurrection. ...
The Old Testament statements about Resurrection are scant and do not reveal clear theological reflection. In New Testament times the Saduccees still did not believe in Resurrection. ...
New Testament Jesus' preaching presupposed a doctrine of Resurrection. Opposition by the Sadducees, who denied the Resurrection, gave Jesus the opportunity to assert His own thought on the matter (Mark 12:18-27 ; Hosea 13:14 ; Luke 20:27-38 ; compare Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ). ...
John's Gospel presents Jesus as the mediator of Resurrection who gives to believers the life given Him by His Father (John 6:53-58 ). Jesus is the Resurrection and the life (John 11:24-26 ). Jesus pointed to a Resurrection of the righteous to eternal life and of the wicked to eternal punishment (Matthew 8:11-12 ; Matthew 25:31-34 ,Matthew 25:31-34,25:41-46 ; John 5:28-29 ). In His postresurrection appearances Jesus had a body that was both spiritual (John 20:19 ,John 20:19,20:26 ) and physical (John 20:20 ,John 20:20,20:27 ; John 21:13 ,John 21:13,21:15 ) in nature. ...
The greatest biblical exponent of Resurrection was Paul. For him, Resurrection was the final event which would usher Christians out of the bodily struggle of the present age into the bodily glory which will accompany Jesus' second coming (Philippians 3:20-21 ). In Resurrection, God's new creation will reach completion (2 Corinthians 5:17-21 ). The bedrock of hope for Christian Resurrection is the Resurrection of Christ, the foundation of gospel preaching (1 Corinthians 15:12-20 ). Those who follow Christ are organically related to Christ in His Resurrection from the dead; Christ is the first fruits of an upcoming harvest (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 ). ...
The New Testament unquestionably affirms a doctrine of Resurrection of all persons from the dead. A Resurrection body and life in the consummated kingdom of God will characterize the Resurrection of those who follow Christ
Humiliation of Christ - See Jesus, Death and Resurrection; Kenosis
Resurgence - ) The act of rising again; Resurrection
Resurrection of Body - The Resurrection is styled a conversion to distinguish it from creation by which an entirely new being comes into existence. In ancient times the Resurrection was denied especially by the Sadducees, the Gnostics, the Maniehreans, and tbe medieval Albigenses and Waldenses, and is still violently attacked hy atheists, materialists, and rationalists. " Though this vision symbolizes the restoration of Israel, it would have been unintelligible to the Jews had they not been familiar with belief in a Resurrection of the dead. Our Lord accused the Sadducees of ignorance because they denied the Resurrection of the dead. And they that have done good things shall come forth unto the Resurrection of life: but they that have done evil, unto the Resurrection of judgment. " (John 5) The Apostles testified to the Resurrection, Saint Paul especially placing the Resurrection of the dead on the same level, as regards certainty, with the Resurrection of our Lord; "Now if Christ be preached, that he rose again from the dead, how do some among you say that there is no Resurrection of the dead? But if there be no Resurrection of the dead, then Christ is not risen again. " (1 Corinthians 15) Tradition of the early Church establishes the dogma of the Resurrection, the Fathers not only referring to it, but even writing entire treatises appealing both to Scripture and reason
First-Begotten of the Dead - Our Lord (Apocalypse 1:5), because of His Resurrection
Ascension - See JESUS CHRIST, sub-heading ‘Resurrection and exaltation of Jesus’
Resurrection, Resurrection Bodies - Resurrection means to be raised from the dead (John 5:28-29). This is a Resurrection, but it is not part of the Resurrection that occurs when we receive our new bodies when Christ returns (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18), on the last day (John 6:39-44) when the last trumpet is blown (1 Corinthians 15:51-55). The Resurrection of Jesus is promissory in that as we know He was raised, so we will be raised also. We know very little about it except what was manifested by Jesus after His Resurrection; namely, that He was able to move about as He desired -- in and out of rooms without the use of doors
Resurrection - In the Old Testament, the idea of bodily Resurrection evolves from a vague concept into a developed expectation. " The extension of existence is passed through progeny (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 15:1-6 ) and individual Resurrection is not the central concern. ...
One of the principal factors in the development of a fixed notion of an individual Resurrection is in response to the problem of theodicy. Because it could easily be seen that corrupt people sometimes were not punished for every wrong and that God's people were at times unjustly treated, individual Resurrection was a natural philosophical resolution to this quandary. The Resurrection of the just to reward and the unjust to punishment resolved the otherwise meaningless existence for those who followed Yahweh during times of persecution. Therefore, reward for one's earthly actions is integral to individual Resurrection and is its initial catalyst. The reference reveals a cognizance of the concept of an individual's Resurrection even though the questions are unanswered (cf. " Psalm 73 is enlightening in regards to the development of the concept of individual Resurrection. ...
The most conspicuous references to a Resurrection are to be found in later apocalyptic literature, as the salvation leitmotif moves closer to the comprehensive perception that is later spelled out in Christ's Resurrection. A Resurrection of the just and the unjust is affirmed in Daniel 12:2-3 : "Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt. " Unlike the "resurrections" of 1Kings 17:17-24,2 Kings 4:31-37 , and 2 Kings 13:20-21 , which are resuscitations to the conditions of earthly life, Daniel 12:2-3 apportions a future allotment by the use of the future tense (both in the Hebrew text and LXX). The question of why bad things happen to righteous people continued to fuel the concept of the Resurrection, especially in light of the failure to establish Israel as the powerful nation it had once been. It is in the context of persecuted saints in the second temple period that Resurrection from the dead was developed into the form that is found in the New Testament. It is during this period that the concept of bodily Resurrection takes shape. incited the earlier belief in the Resurrection of the just and polarized it to new heights. ...
Other Jewish sources reveal a belief in a Resurrection. ) believed in a Resurrection (Acts 23:8 ) whereas, the Sadducees did not (Matthew 22:23 ; Acts 23:8 ). The Resurrection of Jesus is the principal tenet of the New Testament. Baptism is centered in Jesus' Resurrection. Even though Jewish illustrations were present for at least a hundred years before Christ, Paul applies the act symbolically to death, burial, and Resurrection. ...
The appearances of Jesus after his Resurrection to chosen individuals play an important role in the proclamation of the gospel message (e. ...
The Resurrection of Jesus is a testimony to the general Resurrection of all humans, which will be followed by the dispensing of God's justice; to the righteous there will be a "resurrection of life" and to the unrighteous a "resurrection of condemnation" (John 5:28-29 ; cf. Regardless of the complex time sequence involved in the various Resurrections recorded in the New Testament, Jesus' bodily Resurrection is the basis for the future Resurrection of humans (1 Corinthians 15:42-50 ). The Spirit, which was given after his Resurrection, is the "guarantee" (or "first installment") that God will raise the righteous from the dead, and that they will not be found "naked, " that is, incorporeal (2 Corinthians 5:1-5 ; cf. Even though believers "groan" while in their bodies (2 Corinthians 5:2 ), they will be "further clothed" after their Resurrection (v. The earliest teaching in the New Testament concerning the Resurrection is undoubtedly 1 Corinthians 15 . " Paul says that the Resurrection was in accordance with the Scriptures—a perception that was an important one considering the magnitude of the teaching. " The specific problem that he is addressing is that some of the Corinthians were saying that there was no Resurrection of the dead. If there is no general Resurrection, then the conspicuous conclusion that "Christ has not been raised" can be deduced. Therefore, Paul's mission to the Gentiles unfolds in light of the Resurrection of Christ and the corollary futility of his own life ensues if there is no Resurrection. The collapse of the Resurrection was commensurate to Christianity being fallacious for Paul. ...
Second, if there is no Resurrection the faith of the believer is "vain" and "futile" (vv. The eschatological aspect of faith is rooted in the notion of Resurrection. The Resurrection of Jesus guarantees the Resurrection of the believer. Future salvation is based on the Resurrection of Jesus. 1 Peter 3:21 ; Romans 4:25 ) if there is no Resurrection. ...
Jesus' Resurrection is a prototypical event. ...
Third, the early missionaries were "misrepresenting God" if there is no Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:15 ). Paul's logic allows no room for a "spiritual" approach that discounts the Resurrection. The belief in bodily Resurrection is commensurate with belief in God. Attempts to explain the Resurrection as a mere sociological phenomenon without the supernatural element minimizes the magnitude of the event and the role that it played in the formation of Christianity. 17)shows the magnitude for Paul of the Resurrection. The Resurrection of Jesus showed that Christ's oblation as the sacrificial lamb was accepted by God, which is the basis for the giving of the Spirit to believers and the forgiveness of their sins. ...
Fifth, if there is no Resurrection "those who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost" (v. 32) reveals the tenable resolution of materialistic hedonism, when the Resurrection of Christ as the firstfruit and the ensuing general Resurrection are dismissed. The persecution and even death of many of the early Christians led to Paul's conclusion that theodicy is resolved by bodily Resurrection. ...
Not only does the Resurrection of Jesus have implications for the individual, according to Paul, but Christ's passage through the cosmos unharmed by evil spirits has placed the universe itself in his subjection (vv. " Jesus' Resurrection and subsequent ascension (which are often treated together as one event) is unique in that sense. , The Centrality of the Resurrection: A Study in Paul's Soteriology ; G. Habermas, The Resurrection of Jesus: An Apologetic ; M. Harris, Raised Immortal: Resurrection and Immortality in the New Testament ; G. Ladd, I Believe in the Resurrection
Resurrection - ) Especially, the rising again from the dead; the resumption of life by the dead; as, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ; the general Resurrection of all the dead at the Day of Judgment
Easter - the day on which the Christian church commemorates our Saviour's Resurrection. This goddess was Astarte, in honour of whom sacrifices were annually offered about the passover time of the year, the spring; and hence the Saxon name "aeaster" became attached by association of ideas to the Christian festival of the Resurrection
Psychopannychism - ) The doctrine that the soul falls asleep at death, and does not wake until the Resurrection of the body
Philetus - A heretic, excluded from the church for denying the Resurrection, and promoting infidelity, 2 Timothy 2:17-18
Resurrection, the - Our Lord's way of naming Himself before raising Lazarus from death: "I am the Resurrection and the Life
Glorify - In this view it particularly refers to the Resurrection of Christ, and his ascension to the right hand of God, John 7:39 ; John 12:16 . It also expresses that change which shall pass upon believers at the general Resurrection, and their admission into heaven
Sadducee - ) One of a sect among the ancient Jews, who denied the Resurrection, a future state, and the existence of angels
Second Coming - See also DAY OF THE LORD; ESCHATOLOGY; JUDGMENT; KINGDOM OF GOD; MILLENNIUM; Resurrection
Easter - The special celebration of the Resurrection at Easter is the oldest Christian festival, except for the weekly Sunday celebration. Since Christ's passion and Resurrection occurred at the time of the Jewish Passover, the first Jewish Christians probably transformed their Passover observance into a celebration of the central events of their new faith. The earliest observance probably consisted of a vigil beginning on Saturday evening and ending on Sunday morning and included remembrance of Christ's crucifixion as well as the Resurrection. 300 most churches divided the original observance, devoting Good Friday to the crucifixion and Easter Sunday to the Resurrection. Most Christians rejected this practice because it meant that the special yearly celebration of the Resurrection would usually not occur on Sunday, the weekly day of the Resurrection. Thus, for centuries many Christians have regarded the egg as a symbol of the Resurrection
Olam haba - �the world to come�); the spiritual realm of the souls in the afterlife; also used to refer to the Era of the Resurrection...
Emmaus - ” A village that was the destination of two of Jesus' disciples on the day of His Resurrection (Luke 24:13 ). See Resurrection
Resurrection of the Dead - The qualities of the Resurrection body will be different from those of the body laid in the grave (1 Corinthians 15:53,54 ; Philippians 3:21 ); but its identity will nevertheless be preserved. As to the nature of the Resurrection body, (1) it will be spiritual (1 Corinthians 15:44 ), i. ...
Christ's Resurrection secures and illustrates that of his people. " ...
Because his Resurrection seals and consummates his redemptive power; and the redemption of our persons involves the redemption of our bodies (Romans 8:23 ). This same federal and vital union of the Christian with Christ likewise causes the Resurrection of the believer to be similar to as well as consequent upon that of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:49 ; Philippians 3:21 ; 1 John 3:2 )
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - The bodily, living appearance of Jesus of Nazareth after He died and was buried, providing certain hope for Resurrection of believers. The Greek term for Resurrection, anastasis , literally means, “to stand again. Because of Jesus Christ and His standing up again from the dead, Resurrection has come to mean the restoration of the whole self by God who gave life and creates it anew in the heavenly kingdom. New Testament accounts of the Resurrection fall into three categories: the empty tomb, appearances of Jesus before His ascension, and appearances of Jesus after His ascension. ...
The earliest written account of the Resurrection of Jesus is 1 Corinthians 15:3-8 . Matthew's final report of Jesus' Resurrection is on a mountain in Galilee to His eleven disciples where He gave them the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20 ). ...
Mark's account of the Resurrection (Matthew 16:1 ) reports that three women came to the tomb wondering how they would have access to the body in order to use the spices applied to the dead. The angels reminded the women of Jesus' teachings about His death and Resurrection. He showed His hands and feet, and in the most physical act of the Resurrection He ate a piece of fish ( Luke 24:43 ). Jesus instructed the earliest believers about the prophetic and theological meaning of His death and Resurrection. The Resurrection of Jesus involved His physical body; but His resurrected life was a new kind of life called into being by God, the Effector of the Resurrection (Acts 2:24 ). Paul, who gave the first account of the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:3-8 ), provided the full meaning and importance of the Resurrection of Christ. Because of the Resurrection of Christ, we have assurance of the Resurrection of all persons—some to salvation; some to perdition—vouchsafed in the Resurrection of Christ. See Ascension ; Christ; Jesus; Resurrection
Lorification - ) The state of being glorifed; as, the glorification of Christ after his Resurrection
Corruption - The term ‘corruption’ came, therefore, to stand for the physical aspects of that state which followed death and preceded the Resurrection. There is no evidence that it had a moral force, although some have found such an implication in Galatians 6:8 , where the reference is rather to a belief that the wicked will not share in the glories of the Resurrection. Jesus through His Resurrection is represented ( 2 Timothy 1:10 ) as having brought life and incorruption to light. The Resurrection as a part of salvation is thus placed in sharpest contrast with the condition of the personality following physical death, since, as St
Philetus - Amiable, with Hymenaeus, at Ephesus, said that the "resurrection was past already" (2 Timothy 2:17,18 )
Resurrection of the Dead - When our Saviour appeared in Judea, the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead was received as a principal article of religion by the whole Jewish nation except the Sadducees. "The Sadducees say that there is no Resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit," Acts 23:8 . Hence the refutation of this unscriptural assumption was a complete overthrow of the ground on which their denial of a future Resurrection rested; for if the soul can survive the body, it is plain that God can give it another body. ...
The Resurrection of Christ is everywhere represented in the New Testament as a pledge and an earnest of the Resurrection of all the just, who are united to him by faith, 1 Corinthians 15:49 1 Thessalonians 3:13 , in virtue of their union with him as their Head. He is "the Resurrection and the life," John 11:25 ; they "sleep in Jesus," and shall be brought to glory "with him," 1 Thessalonians 4:13-17 5:10 ; their "life is hid with Christ in God," Colossians 3:3 ; and because he lives, they shall live also, John 14:19 . The Scriptures also teach that there will be a Resurrection of the unjust
Hieracites - Heretics in the third century; so called from their leader Hierax, a philosopher, of Egypt, who taught that Melchisedec was the Holy Ghost; denied the Resurrection and condemned marriage
Philetus - ” Heretical teacher who asserted that the (general) Resurrection had already occurred (2 Timothy 2:17-18 ), perhaps in a purely spiritual sense
Emmaus - (Hebrew: a people rejected) ...
Town in Palestine "sixty furlongs from Jerusalem" (Luke 24), exact location uncertain, where Our Lord manifested Himself to Cleophas and another disciple after His Resurrection
Resurrection - Resurrection...
1. In our study of the OT doctrine of the Resurrection we recognize the need for taking into consideration the chronological order of the different documents of which it is composed. Genesis 2:7 ), the latest passages of the OT dealing with the subject embody a categorical assertion of the Resurrection of individual Israelites (cf. ...
The first specific mention of the hope of a Resurrection is found in Hosea, where the prophet’s words are rather of the nature of an aspiration than the distinct announcement of a future event (Hosea 6:2 , cf. A distinct advance on these utterances is found in the post-exilic prophecy, Isaiah 26:19 , where the prophet breathes a prayer for the Resurrection of the individual dead. When this passage is contrasted with the confident assertion of Isaiah 26:14 it is seen that as yet there was no thought of a Resurrection save for the Israelite. In this book there is a clear, unambiguous assertion of the Resurrection of individuals, and at the same time a no less clear announcement that there is a Resurrection of the wicked as well as of the righteous ( Daniel 12:2 ). It is true that these words not only have no message of a Resurrection hope for nations other than Israel, but even limit its scope to those of that nation who distinguish themselves on the side of good or of evil (cf. The oldest of the deutero-canonical books is that of ben-Sira, and in his work we look in vain for the idea of a Resurrection, either national or individual. The oldest portion contains an elaborate theory of Sheol, and teaches the Resurrection of all righteous Israelites, and so many of the wicked as have escaped ‘without incurring judgment in their life time’ (22. Another writer of a somewhat later date speaks of the Resurrection of righteous Israelites only. 10); but the author seems to interpret the Resurrection as that of the spirit only, and not of the body (103. 37 70), which is known as the Similitudes , contains an explicit assertion of a general Resurrection (51. Whether, however, the writer intended to convey the idea of a Resurrection of the Gentiles is somewhat doubtful. The words of this passage, if taken literally, would certainly convey the impression that a universal Resurrection is meant. Here, too, a Resurrection of the righteous alone is taught (3:16, 13:9, Resurrection of the body is mentioned explicitly, though it would be rash to assume from his words that the author did not hold this doctrine. A very definite doctrine of the Resurrection is taught in this book, though the author expressly denies its applicability to the Gentiles ( 2Ma 7:14 , cf. The Resurrection of the body is strongly held, as affording a powerful incentive and a glorious hope for those who underwent a cruel martyrdom ( 2Ma 14:46 ; 2Ma 7:11 ; cf. At times the writer seems to be controverting the denial of a Resurrection, as when he stops to praise the action of Judas in offering sacrifices and prayers for those who had fallen in battle, on the ground that he did so because ‘he took thought for a Resurrection’ ( 2Ma 12:43 ). If there were no Resurrection of the dead, such a course of action would be superfluous and idle ( 2Ma 12:44 ). Jesus everywhere in His teaching assumed the truth of, and belief in, the Resurrection of the dead. ...
At this period, too, the ideas of a universal and of a first and a second Resurrection were held and taught (Apoc. The view of this, the most religions and the most orthodox of the Jewish sects, with regard to the Resurrection, limited it to the righteous, for whom they postulated a new and a glorified body (see BJ II. While this doctrine of a personal Resurrection seems to have made much more headway in the Judaism of this age than the other ideas referred to above, it also clearly appears that the limitation of its scope to the righteous was more universally held than its extension to the wicked, in spite of the teaching in Daniel ( Daniel 12:2 ), Apoc. Many of the passages in which Jesus’ teaching on the Resurrection is recorded by the Synoptists might be interpreted as leaving no room for the doctrine that the wicked shall rise again from the dead. The form of the expression ‘the Resurrection from the dead,’ as has been pointed out, ‘implies that some from among the dead are raised, while others as yet are not’ (see Plummer, ‘St. The other expression, ‘sons of the Resurrection,’ is remarkable for a similar reason. Other instances, which might be considered as lending countenance to this view, speak of the ‘resurrection of the just’ ( Luke 14:14 ), and contain promises of restoration in the glory of His Kingdom to ‘his elect’ ( Mark 13:27 = Matthew 24:31 ). When, on the other hand, we take a general survey of the eschatological teaching of Jesus, we find that the doctrine of a general bodily Resurrection occupies a very assured position even in the Synoptic records. The Johannine record of Jesus’ eschatological teaching reveals a profounder view of the Resurrection life than that contained in the Synoptics, for it is there dealt with as a spiritual process intimately connected with the quickening life which is ‘given to the Son’ ( John 5:26 ; cf. When Martha expresses her assurance that her brother ‘shall rise again in the Resurrection at the last day’ ( John 11:24 ), Jesus at once lays broader and deeper the foundations upon which this belief is to rest for the future. This living relationship, in which all believers share, contains the germ of that Resurrection life which springs into being at present, and will be perfected at ‘the last day’ ( John 11:26 , cf. ...
It is true that Jesus seems to have given no thought to the difficulty of conceiving a Resurrection of the wicked on the ground that all Resurrection life has its origin in Himself; at the same time no doubt can be reasonably entertained that He looked for the Resurrection of all men (see John 12:48 ; cf. In the Lukan version of Jesus’ argument with the Sadducees we may understand a reference to the idea of the Resurrection of all men based on the truth that ‘all live unto him’ ( Luke 20:38 , cf. ...
It may be pointed out here that Jesus seems to have made no attempt to answer the often debated question of the curious as to the nature of the Resurrection body . At the same time, we must remember that certain incidents in the post-resurrection life of Jesus on earth appear to have been designed to meet what is legitimate in speculation of this kind. He was anxious to prove that His was a bodily Resurrection ( Luke 24:41 ff. Although the Apostles do not seem at first to have shaken themselves free from Judaistic conceptions of the Messianic Kingdom ( Acts 1:6 ), it is plain that they looked on the fact of Jesus’ Resurrection as of primary importance (see Acts 1:22 ). At all costs this must be placed in the forefront of their evangelistic work, and the principal element of their Apostolic claims to the attention of their Jewish hearers lay in their power, as eye-witnesses, to offer irrefragable proof of the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead ( Acts 2:24 ; Acts 2:32 ; Acts 3:15 ; Acts 4:10 ; Acts 4:33 ; 1 Corinthians 15:35-416 ; Acts 5:32 ; cf. Christian Baptism for him receives its spiritual validity ‘through the Resurrection of Jesus Christ,’ which enables us to satisfy ‘the appeal of a good conscience toward God’ ( 1 Peter 3:21 ). Paul as it gradually comes into contact with Hellenic and Gentile thought, we find the doctrine of the Resurrection assuming a new and developed prominence in connexion with the Resurrection of Jesus. ), and at the same time bases his doctrine of the Resurrection on its necessity, and on the relationship of Jesus and the human race. The philosophers of Athens met his categorical assertion of the Resurrection of Jesus not merely with a refusal to credit his statement, but with a plain derision of the very idea ( Acts 17:32 ; cf. It was doubtless the calm mockery of the Athenian Stoics that made him feel that his mission to them was hopeless ( Acts 18:1 ), and caused him, when writing afterwards to the essentially Greek community of Corinthian Christians, to expound fully his doctrine of the Resurrection. In the first of the two letters addressed to this Church he establishes the fact of the Resurrection of Jesus, by revealing its harmony with the Divine plan set forth to the Jews in the OT, and showing that it was attested by numerous witnesses of His post-resurrection existence. He next goes on to demonstrate the organic connexion between this Resurrection and that of those ‘who are fallen asleep in Christ’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:16 ff. Paul’s eschatological doctrine included a belief in a real bodily Resurrection . Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the Apostle’s contribution to this doctrine is contained in his conception of the nature of the Resurrection body. ...
Side by side with the doctrine of a literal, bodily Resurrection, St. Following the teaching of Jesus, who claimed to be the power by which Resurrection life was alone possible, the Apostle declares that Christ gives this new and glorious life here and now. This inchoative Resurrection life has its origin in the spiritual union of baptized Christians with Christ (cf. His Resurrection is the power by which this union, in all its aspects, is perfected ( Philippians 3:10 f. It was doubtless the one-sided presentation of Pauline eschatology that led to the heresy of Hymenæus and Philetus ( 2 Timothy 2:18 ), and the Apostle seems to have felt the necessity of balancing his mystical interpretation by an emphatic insistence on the literal truth that the Resurrection is a future objective fact in the progressive life of man. Paul held the doctrine of the Resurrection of the wicked as well as of the righteous is evident not only from the words of his defence before Felix at Cæsarea (Acts 24:15 , cf. , where the emphasis which is laid on the first Resurrection implies a second and a separate event; cf. What the connexion is, however, between these two distinct Resurrections does not appear to have occurred to the Apostle’s mind, and there seems to be little ground for the supposition that he believed in a distinction between them as regards time. Indeed, the particular passage upon which millenarians rely to prove the affinity of the Pauline and Apocalyptic doctrines in this respect says nothing of any Resurrection except that of ‘those that are Christ’s’ (cf. The Resurrection of the wicked occupies a very subordinate place in Pauline eschatology, and we need not be surprised at the scanty notice taken of it, when we remember how constantly he is pressing on his readers’ attention the power by which the Resurrection to life is brought about ( Romans 8:11 ,
Archontics - Among many other extravagant notions, they held that the world was created by archangels; they also denied the Resurrection of the body
Easter Tide - They commemorate the forty days ourLord spent on earth after His Resurrection, commonly called THEGREAT FORTY DAYS (which see)
Salome - ...
(2) One of the holy women present at the Crucifixion and at the tomb on the Resurrection morning
Easter - ...
A festival of the christian church observed in commemoration of our Savior's Resurrection
Incredible - 1: ἄπιστος (Strong's #571 — Adjective — apistos — ap'-is-tos ) is once rendered "incredible," Acts 26:8 , of the doctrine of Resurrection; elsewhere it is used of persons, with the meaning "unbelieving
Lent - ...
The quadragesimal fast, or fast of forty days observed by the christian church before Easter, the festival of our Savior's Resurrection
Philetus - One mentioned with Hymenaeus as having taught that the Resurrection was already past (probably allegorising it) by whom the faith of some had been overthrown
Lord's Day - Only once, in Revelation 1:10 , was in the early Christian ages used to denote the first day of the week, which commemorated the Lord's Resurrection
Resurrection - A rising again from the state of the dead; generally applied to the Resurrection of the last day. From the Resurrection of Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 :...
2. As to the nature of this Resurrection, it will be, ...
1. The Resurrection will be at the command of Christ, and by his power, John 5:28-29 . ...
See Hody on the Resurrection; Pearson on the Creed; Lame Street Lect
Joy - The passion opposed to sadness, and arising from the possession of a desired or coveted object; one of the fruits of the Holy Ghost; an effect also of contemplating the sacred mysteries of the Resurrection, Ascension, and Coming of the Holy Ghost
Resurrection of Christ - On the day of Pentecost Peter argued the necessity of Christ's Resurrection from the prediction in Psalm 16 ( Acts 2:24-28 ). In his own discourses, also, our Lord clearly intimates his Resurrection (Matthew 20:19 ; Mark 9:9 ; 14:28 ; Luke 18:33 ; John 2:19-22 ). ) ...
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To Simon Peter alone on the day of the Resurrection. ) ...
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To the two disciples on the way to Emmaus on the day of the Resurrection, recorded fully only by (Luke 24:13-35 . ...
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To the ten disciples (Thomas being absent) and others "with them," at Jerusalem on the evening of the Resurrection day. It is worthy of note that it is distinctly related that on most of these occasions our Lord afforded his disciples the amplest opportunity of testing the fact of his Resurrection. ...
The Resurrection is spoken of as the act (1) of God the Father (Psalm 16:10 ; Acts 2:24 ; 3:15 ; Romans 8:11 ; Ephesians 1:20 ; Colossians 2:12 ; Hebrews 13:20 ); (2) of Christ himself (John 2:19 ; 10:18 ); and (3) of the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 3:18 ). ...
The Resurrection is a public testimony of Christ's release from his undertaking as surety, and an evidence of the Father's acceptance of his work of redemption. ...
The importance of Christ's Resurrection will be seen when we consider that if he rose the gospel is true, and if he rose not it is false. His Resurrection from the dead makes it manifest that his sacrifice was accepted. His Resurrection is a proof that he made a full atonement for our sins, that his sacrifice was accepted as a satisfaction to divine justice, and his blood a ransom for sinners. It is also a pledge and an earnest of the Resurrection of all believers (Romans 8:11 ; 1 Corinthians 6:14 ; 15:47-49 ; Philippians 3:21 ; 1 John 3:2 ). ...
With reference to the report which the Roman soldiers were bribed (Matthew 28:12-14 ) to circulate concerning Christ's Resurrection, "his disciples came by night and stole him away while we slept," Matthew Henry in his "Commentary," under John 20:1-10 , fittingly remarks, "The grave-clothes in which Christ had been buried were found in very good order, which serves for an evidence that his body was not 'stolen away while men slept
Fire, Liturgical Use of - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Liturgical Use of Fire - (1) As a symbol of the Death and Resurrection of Christ, fire (candles and lamps) is extinguished on Good Friday, and rekindled from a flint on Easter Eve
Exaltation of Christ - ...
See articles Resurrection, ASCENSION, INTERCESSION, and JUDGMENT-DAY
Sembiani - He persuaded his followers that wine was a production of Satan and the earth, denied the Resurrection of the body, and rejected most of the books of the Old Testament
Ascension - ) Specifically: The visible ascent of our Savior on the fortieth day after his Resurrection
Cleopas - One of the two disciples who were walking to Emmaus on the day of the Resurrection, when the Lord drew near and talked with them
Emmaus - a village about eight miles northwest of Jerusalem; on the road to which two of the disciples were travelling in sorrow and disappointment after the Resurrection, when our Lord appeared to them, and held that memorable conversation with them which is recorded by St
Lazarus - See the account of his Resurrection related at large in John 11:5 , &c
Joanna - Wife of Chuza, Herod's steward: she ministered to the Lord of her substance, and was one who carried news of His Resurrection to the apostles
Eschatology - Eschatological subjects include the Resurrection, Resurrection, the Rapture, the Tribulation, the Millennium, the Binding of Satan, the Three witnesses, the Final Judgment, Armageddon, and The New Heavens and the New Earth
Pharisees - ...
The Pharisees, contrary to the opinion of the Sadducees, held a Resurrection from the dead, and the existence of angels and spirits, Acts 23:8 . But, according to Josephus, this Resurrection of theirs was no more than a Pythagorean Resurrection, that is, of the soul only, by its transmigration into another body, and being born anew with it. From the Resurrection they excluded all who were notoriously wicked, being of opinion that the souls of such persons were transmitted into a state of everlasting woe. The Pharisees had many Pagan notions respecting the soul; but Bishop Bull, in his Harmonia Apostolica, has clearly proved that they held a Resurrection of the body, and that they supposed a certain bone to remain uncorrupted, to furnish the matter of which the Resurrection body was to be formed. A Resurrection was the privilege of the children of Abraham alone, who were all to rise on Mount Zion; their incorruptible bones, wherever they might be buried, being carried to that mountain below the surface of the earth. Hence the Sadducees, who believed in no Resurrection, and supposed our Saviour to teach it as a Pharisee, very shrewdly urged the difficulty of disposing of the woman who had in this world been the wife of seven husbands. Had the Resurrection of Christianity been the Pharisaical Resurrection, this difficulty would have been insurmountable; and accordingly we find the people, and even some of the Pharisees themselves, struck with the manner in which our Saviour removed it
Christology - Some of the issues studied are: 1) His deity, 2) His incarnation, 3) His offices (See Christ), 4) His sacrifice, 5) His Resurrection, 6) His teaching, 7) His relation to God and man, and 8) His return to earth
Cleopas - (clee' oh puhss) A follower of Jesus, who with a companion was traveling toward the village of Emmaus on the day of Christ's Resurrection (Luke 24:13-25 )
Liberalism - The result is often a denial of essential biblical doctrines such as the Trinity, the deity of Christ, His virgin birth, His Resurrection, and salvation by grace
Hymenae'us - ) He denied the true doctrine of the Resurrection
Hymenaeus - "Erred concerning the truth, saying that the Resurrection is past already, overthrowing the faith of some" (2 Timothy 2:17-18). ...
The Gnostics (2 Peter 3:16) "wrested Paul's words" (Romans 6:4; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:12) as though the Resurrection was merely the spiritual raising of souls from the death of sin (John 5:24-25). The difficulties of the Resurrection (Acts 17:32; Acts 26:8), the supposed evil inherent in matter, and the disparagement of the body, tended to this error (Colossians 2:23). Paul confutes this by showing that, besides the raising of the soul now from the death of sin, there shall be also hereafter a raising of the saint's body from the grave (John 5:28-29), as the fruit of JESUS' bodily Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15)
Iowa Synod - ,not articles of faith, as the first Resurrection, the conversion of Israel, and the antichrist
Corruption - The world's corruption stands in contrast to the permanent, eternal nature of the Resurrection hope
Celestial Bodies - Paul contrasted celestial bodies (sun, moon, and stars) with terrestrial bodies in explaining the difference between the present human body (physical) and the Resurrection body (spiritual body, 1 Corinthians 15:35-50 )
Emmaus - A village sixty furlongs (that is seven miles and a half,) north of Jerusalem, rendered memorable in being the place to which the two disciples walked on the day of our Lord's Resurrection, and where he made himself known unto them, in breaking of bread, and blessing it
Mankind, Resurrection of - The Creed expresses this dogma in the words, "resurrection of the body
Bardesanists - ...
They denied the Resurrection of the body, and the incarnation and death of our Saviour
Hymeneus - A member of the church, probably at Ephesus, who fell into the heresy of denying the true doctrine of the Resurrection, and saying it had already taken place
Resurrection of Mankind - The Creed expresses this dogma in the words, "resurrection of the body
Sadducees - Saint Matthew (22) relates, "Now on that day there came to him Sadducees, who say that there is no Resurrection. " Acts (23), "For the Sadducees say that there is no Resurrection, neither angel nor spirit: but the Pharisees confess both
Metempsychosis - " From whence it has been pretty generally concluded, that the Resurrection they held was only a Pythagorean one, namely, the transmigration of the soul into another body; from which they excluded all that were notoriously wicked, who were doomed at once to eternal punishment; but their opinion was, that those who were guilty only of lesser crimes were punished for them in the bodies into which their souls were next sent. Nevertheless, it is questioned by some persons, whether the words of Josephus, before quoted, are a sufficient evidence of this doctrine of the metempsychosis being received by the whole sect of the Pharisees; for "passing into another or different body," may only denote its receiving a body at the Resurrection; which will be another, not in substance, but in quality; as it is said of Christ at his transfiguration, το ειδος του προσωπου αυτου ετερον , "the fashion of his countenance was" another, or, as we render it, was "altered,"...
Luke 9:29 . Beside, how was it possible any person that saw Christ, who did not appear to be less than thirty years old, should, according to the notion of the metempsychosis, conceive him to be John the Baptist, who had been so lately beheaded? Surely this apprehension must be grounded on the supposition of a proper Resurrection. It may farther be observed, that the doctrine of the Resurrection, which St. Paul preached, was not a present metempsychosis, but a real future Resurrection, which he calls the "hope and Resurrection of the dead,"...
Acts 23:6 . Upon the whole, therefore, it appears most reasonable to adopt the opinion of Reland, though in opposition to the sentiments of many other learned men, that the Pharisees held the doctrine of the Resurrection in a proper sense
Lumen Christi - It is symbolic of Our Lord's Resurrection
Christi, Lumen - It is symbolic of Our Lord's Resurrection
Cerdonians - They denied the incarnation and the Resurrection, and rejected the books of the Old Testament
Cleopas - (Abbreviation of Cleopatros), one of the two disciples with whom Jesus conversed on the way to Emmaus on the day of the Resurrection (Luke 24:18 )
Raise - , of the Resurrection of Christ, Matthew 16:21 ; 17:23 ; 20:19 , RV; 26:32, RV, "(after) I am raised up" (AV, ". risen again"); Luke 9:22 ; 20:37 ; John 2:19 ; Acts 3:15 ; 4:10 [1]; 10:40 [2]; 13:30,37; Romans 4:24,25 ; 6:4,9 ; 7:4 ; 8:11 (twice); 8:34, RV; 10:9; 1 Corinthians 6:14 (1st part); 15:13,14, RV; 15:15 (twice),16,17; 15:20, RV; 2 Corinthians 4:14 ; Galatians 1:1 ; Ephesians 1:20 ; Colossians 2:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:10 ; 1 Peter 1:21 ; in 2 Timothy 2:8 , RV , "risen;" (b) of the Resurrection of human beings, Matthew 10:8 ; 11:5 ; Matthew 27:52 , RV (AV, "arose"); Mark 12:26 , RV; Luke 7:22 ; John 5:21 ; 12:1,9,17 ; Acts 26:8 ; 1 Corinthians 15:29,32 , RV; 15:35,42,43 (twice),44,52; 2 Corinthians 1:9 ; 4:14 ; Hebrews 11:19 ; (c) of "raising" up a person to occupy a place in the midst of a people, said of Christ, Acts 5:30 ; in Acts 13:23 , AV only (the best texts have ago, to bring, RV , "hath . 1, is translated "to raise or raise up," (a) of the Resurrection of the dead by Christ, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; (b) of the Resurrection of Christ from the dead, Acts 2:24 (for ver. 30 see RV , kathizo, "to set," as in the best texts); 2:32; 13:34, see (c) below; Acts 17:31 ; (c) of "raising" up a person to occupy a place in the midst of a nation, said of Christ, Acts 3:26 ; 7:37 ; 13:33 , RV , "raised up Jesus," not here by Resurrection from the dead, as the superfluous "again" of the AV would suggest; this is confirmed by the latter part of the verse, which explains the "raising" up as being by way of His incarnation, and by the contrast in ver. 1, is used (a) of the "resurrection" of believers, 1 Corinthians 6:14 Resurrection with Christ. have episustasis, a Resurrection, preceded by ex (i. , ek), "out of, or by," instrumental, is translated "raised to life again" (a paraphrase), RV, "by a Resurrection
Areopagus - From what they had heard, they thought he was announcing two new gods, whose names were Jesus’ and Resurrection’ (Acts 17:16-20). The death and Resurrection of Jesus made forgiveness of sins available to all, but it also guaranteed judgment for those who refused to repent (Acts 17:22-31). Paul won the attention of the council with an explanation of the gospel that contained specific points relating to Epicurean and Stoic beliefs; but on the whole both groups rejected his teaching about the Resurrection
Galilee, Mountain in - After our Lord’s Resurrection, the eleven disciples went away from Jerusalem ‘into Galilee, unto the mountain where Jesus had appointed them’ ( Matthew 28:16 )
Beatitude of Heaven - , glorified body after the general Resurrection, society of the blessed
Hymenaeus - He is also mentioned with Philetus, as having erred concerning the truth, saying that the Resurrection had passed already (probably allegorising it), and had overthrown the faith of some
Bury - It is a testimony of identification with CHRIST in His death, burial and Resurrection
Joses - His brethren did not at first believe on him, but after his Resurrection they are found among his disciples, John 2:12 7:5 Acts 1:14
Spirits in Prison - ...
Verses 19-21 appear in the middle of a christological confession of the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ (v. ...
This journey of Christ took place after the Resurrection rather than between his death and Resurrection, since the description follows the Resurrection in verse 18, and the relative clause "in which" (en ho ) refers either to his resurrected spiritual state, or "at that time, " that is, after his death and Resurrection
Translate - See Death ; Future Hope ; Resurrection
Joanna - She was one of the women who ministered to our Lord, and to whom he appeared after his Resurrection (Luke 8:3 ; 24:10 )
Anastasia, Saint - (Greek: Resurrection) ...
Martyr (304), died Sirmium (modern Yugoslavia), in the Diocletian persecution
Emmaus - A village about threescore furlongs from Jerusalem, that is, about 7 miles, whither the two disciples were 'travelling on the day of the Resurrection, to whom the Lord made Himself known
Cle'Opas - (of a renowned father ), one of the two disciples who were going to Emmaus on the day of the Resurrection
em'ma-us, - (warm baths ), the village to which the two disciples were going when our Lord appeared to them on the way, on the day of his Resurrection
Baptism For the Dead - ...
If docetic type Christians infected the church at Corinth, they may have accepted baptism for departed souls : but how would that prove bodily Resurrection? Similarly, some Dionysian rites and some practices of the mystery religions were held to ensure access, and safe journeying, in the spiritual world, even for those already dead. But this analogy again does not necessarily imply bodily Resurrection. Is he then arguing that even pagans, if their baptism for the dead be properly understood, testify unconsciously to a bodily Resurrection? ...
R
Burial - That burial resulted in the corruption of the body was understood (Genesis 3:19 ; Job 17:13-16 ; Psalm 16:10 ; Acts 13:36 ), but it was precisely against that common recognition of the fate of the dead that the hope of Resurrection was born (Mark 15:42-46 ; Daniel 12:2 ). ...
Jesus' burial is especially important, of course, because it is followed by his Resurrection. Paul, in his recitation of the Resurrection tradition that he had passed on to the Corinthians, notes that Christ "was buried" (1 Corinthians 15:4 ). The early Christians, therefore, came to understand Jesus' burial as a necessary (but temporary!) prelude to his Resurrection. ...
Paul presses the connection between burial and Resurrection one step further by applying it to baptism. Thus, burial comes to be connected not just with the hope of a future Resurrection secured by the Resurrection of Jesus (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ), but also with the reality of new life in Christ in the present
Intermediate State - Christianity postulates that there will be a Resurrection of the body at the end of the age. " The future Resurrection is spoken of in Daniel 12:2 . ...
In the New Testament, Jesus affirms the certainty of the coming Resurrection (Matthew 22:23-30 ; Luke 14:14 ; John 5:28-29 ) which, of course, requires the existence of an intermediate state. In Matthew 22:31-32 , Jesus affirms the coming Resurrection of the dead, but then says no one is really dead , that is, snuffed out of existence. ...
When reflecting on what it will be like to be in that interim state between death and Resurrection, Paul likens it to being unclothed. At the Resurrection of the dead we will be made complete again, like Christ in his resurrected body. Elwell...
See also Abraham's Bosom ; Paradise ; Resurrection ; Sheol ...
Bibliography
Sorrow - But by his death and Resurrection he conquered death and gave sorrowing believers hope (Romans 6:5-10; Matthew 27:3-560; Romans 8:31-37). The triumphant Resurrection of Jesus guarantees the triumphant Resurrection of all who believe in him (John 11:25-26; Romans 8:10-11; 1 Corinthians 15:20-23; see Resurrection). Just as Jesus’ Resurrection changed the original disciples’ sorrow to joy, so it gives joy to believers of all generations; and nothing, not even grief, can take that joy from them (John 16:20; John 16:22; Romans 8:38-39; Philippians 3:21; Philippians 4:1; Philippians 4:4-7; see JOY)
Ascension of Christ - Our Saviour, having repeatedly conversed with his Apostles after his Resurrection, and afforded them many infallible proofs of its reality, led them from Jerusalem to Bethany, and was raised up to heaven in their sight; there to continue till he shall descend at the last day to judge the quick and the dead. The time of Christ's ascension was forty days after his Resurrection. He continued so many days upon earth, that he might give repeated proofs of his Resurrection, Acts 1:3 ; instruct his Apostles in every thing of importance respecting their office and ministry, Acts 1:3 ; and might open to them the Scriptures concerning himself, and renew their commission to preach the Gospel, Acts 1:5-6 ; Mark 16:15 . To assure the saints of their ascension to heaven after their Resurrection from the dead, John 14:1-2
Macarius, Saint - The Emperor Constantine placed him in charge of the excavations for discovering the sites of the Passion and Resurrection and the finding of the True Cross
Easter - ) An annual church festival commemorating Christ's Resurrection, and occurring on Sunday, the second day after Good Friday
Damnation - ’ In some places a better translation than ‘condemnation’ is ‘judgment,’ as in John 5:29 ‘the Resurrection of damnation’ (Gr
Easter - (Anglo-Saxon: Eastre, from Eostre, Teutonic goddess of dawn and spring) ...
Feast commemorating Christ's Resurrection from the dead. After the introduction of Christianity among Germanic nations the name Easter, denoting spring, was retained to designate the festival of the Resurrection. In this way, the Christian feast is linked with the ancient Hebrew festival of the Passover, not arbitrarily, since the Death and Resurrection of Christ coincided with a particular Jewish Pasch, and because in the designs of God there was a connection between the two incidents
Nathanael - He was one of those to whom the Lord showed himself alive after his Resurrection, at the Sea of Tiberias
Incorruption, - The state which the bodies of the dead in Christ (now going to corruption in their graves) will have at the Resurrection
Damnation - κρίσις, 'judgement,' associated with eternity: judgement of hell,' Matthew 23:33 ; 'eternal judgement,' Mark 3:29 (where some Editors read 'guilty of eternal sin'); and 'resurrection of judgement
Intermediate State - Condition in which the deceased exists between death and the Resurrection or final judgment. Jesus awakens them at the Resurrection. Paul centered his hope on the Resurrection (Philippians 3:10-11 ). ...
The term “Hades” is a general reference to the location of the dead between the time of physical death and Resurrection. See Hades ; Hell ; Resurrection
Eschatology - At his first coming Jesus brought God’s plan of salvation to its fulfilment through his life and work, and particularly through his death and Resurrection. The return of Christ will bring about the victorious Resurrection of believers, but that Resurrection is possible only because of the victorious Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:20-23; see Resurrection)
Sadducees - say there is no Resurrection" is cleared up by what Josephus ( Resurrection of the dead (the doctrine denied by the Sadducees), which was scarcely understood during the Gospels' period (Mark 9:10), became the leading doctrine of Christianity in connection with the apostles' witness for Christ's Resurrection at the time described in Acts 1:22; Acts 2:32; Acts 3:12; Acts 4:2 (Greek "preached in the person of Jesus the Resurrection from the dead"), Acts 4:10; Acts 5:31; Acts 10:40; and was therefore bitterly opposed by the Sadducees. had two disciples, who in turn taught disciples his saying "be not like servants who serve their master for the sake of reward, but serve without view of reward"; and that the disciples reasoned, "if our fathers had known that there is another world, and a Resurrection of the dead, they would not have spoken thus"; so they separated themselves from the law (and denied there is another world and a Resurrection); "so there arose two sects, the Zadokites from Zadok, and Baithusians from Baithos. " Besides their reasonable denial of an oral law, which the Pharisees maintained was transmitted by Moses, the Sadducees denied the Resurrection because it is not explicitly stated in Moses' Pentateuch, the legislator's sanctions of the law being primarily temporal rewards and punishments (Exodus 20:12; Exodus 23:25-26; Deuteronomy 7:12-15; Deuteronomy 28:1-12; Deuteronomy 28:15-68). ...
Christ (Matthew 22:31-32; Luke 20:37) however shows that even Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:16 suffices to prove the Resurrection; and Hebrew 11 quotes the patriarchs as examples of a faith which looked beyond the present for eternal rewards. Job (Job 19:26), Isaiah (Isaiah 26:19), Daniel (Daniel 12:2), and David (Psalm 16; Psalm 17) express the same faith, the germ of which is in the Pentateuch (See Resurrection. ) The Pharisees, though wrong in maintaining oral tradition as obligatory, yet preserved in respect to the Resurrection the faith of the fathers
Resurrection - ) His Resurrection is the earnest or "firstfruits" of ours. Christ from Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:16 proves the Resurrection and charges the Sadducees with ignorance of Scripture and of God's "power" (Mark 12:24) as the root of their "error. ...
Rabbi Simai argues on Exodus 6:3-4, "it is not, said, to give you, but to give them, whereby the Resurrection of the dead appeareth out of the law. (See JOB expressly asserts his anticipation of the Resurrection through his Redeemer (Job 19:23-27) (See REDEEMER for the translated. my dead body shall they arise"; Christ's dead body raised is the pledge of the Resurrection of all Jehovah's people. Daniel (Daniel 12:2): Hebrew "many from among the sleepers, these (the partakers of the first Resurrection, Revelation 20) shall be unto everlasting life; but those (the rest who do not rise until after the thousand years) shall be unto shame" (1 Corinthians 15:23). soulish or animal) body and the Resurrection body which 1 Corinthians 15:44-45 call a "spirit-animated body," in contrast to the "natural
Hymenaeus - He is also mentioned in 2 Timothy 2:17 in conjunction with Philetus as teaching a doctrine which ate into the body of the Church like a gangrene-the doctrine that the Resurrection was past already. 2), the followers of Simon and Carpocrates taught that ‘the Resurrection from the dead was simply an acquaintance with that truth which they proclaimed. ...
‘Wherefore that also must be held to be the Resurrection, when a man is re-animated by access to the truth, and having dispersed the death of ignorance, and being endowed with new life by God, has burst forth from the sepulchre of the old man, even as the Lord likened the Scribes and Pharisees to “whited sepulchers” (Matthew 23:27). Whence it follows that they who have by faith attained to the Resurrection are with the Lord after they have once put Him on in their baptism. With this should be compared the passage in Revelation 20:5-6 which speaks of ‘the first Resurrection’ and of the blessed and holy state of him who had part in it. John sees alive; the Resurrection is clearly spiritual and not corporeal’ (H. (The clause which refers the Resurrection to the last day in John 6:40; John 6:44; John 6:54 may be suspected, with J
Hymenaeus - These false teachers ‘made shipwreck concerning the faith’; their heresy consisted in denying the bodily Resurrection, saying that the Resurrection was already past apparently an early form of Gnosticism which, starting with the idea of matter being evil, made the body an unessential part of our nature, to be discarded as soon as possible
Relation of Soul And Body - At the general Resurrection the body will be reunited to the soul (see body, Resurrection of)
Soul Sleep - The Bible is not specific on the condition of the person between death and Resurrection
Matthias - ”) Disciple who followed Jesus from the time of John's ministry of baptism until Jesus' ascension, who was chosen by lot and prayer to succeed Judas as an apostle and official witness to the Resurrection (Acts 1:20-26 )
Philetus - Coupled with Hymenaeus as "erring" (missing the aim: estocheesan ), and holding that "the Resurrection is past already" (2 Timothy 2:17), as if it were merely the spiritual raising of souls from the death of sin: perverting Romans 6:4; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:12; compare 1 Corinthians 15:12, etc
Emmaus - The village where our Lord revealed himself to two of his disciples, on the afternoon of his Resurrection-day
Joseph Barsabas - One of the two chosen as candidates for Judas Iscariot's vacant apostleship; therefore he must have followed Jesus from His baptism to His ascension, and so was fitted to be a witness of His Resurrection (Acts 1:22)
Immortality - However, after the return of Christ and the Resurrection, the Christians' bodies will also become glorified and immortal (1 Corinthians 15:50-58)
Church Catholic, the - THE CHURCH EXPECTANT where the soul abides after death in astate of expectancy of the final Resurrection; called, also, theINTERMEDIATE STATE (which see)
Cleopas - One of the two disciples who walked to Emmaus on the day of Christ's Resurrection, and unconsciously spoke with Him (Luke 24:18)
Levirate Law, Levirate Marriage - The Sadduccees appealed to levirate law in asking Jesus a question about the Resurrection (Matthew 22:23-33 )
Incorruptibles - so that he ate without occasion before his death, as well as after his Resurrection
Matthi'as - Peter to be the necessary qualification of one who was to be a witness of the Resurrection
Weakness - ...
The paralleling of divine empowerment and human suffering in the life of Christ commences with his birth and continues through to the cross and the Resurrection. Indeed, the cross and Resurrection encapsulate the paradox of God's power being evidenced in the midst of human suffering and weakness. ...
The spiritual union between the believer and Christ permits us to experience not only the weakness and the suffering of the cross, but also the power and glory of the Resurrection (Romans 6:1-5 ; 2 Corinthians 13:4 )
First-Fruits - The coincidence of our Lord’s Resurrection on the 16th Nisan—the day on which the sheaf was offered before the Lord—would no doubt suggest the idea of the first-fruits to the Apostle’s mind. Christ’s Resurrection is the pledge of His people’s Resurrection, just as the first-fruits were the pledge of the harvest to come. This is indicated specially in Leviticus 23:21, where it is said that, as death came by man, so it is only by man that the Resurrection can come, i. Resurrection and triumph over death can be man’s possession only when given him by one who is man like himself. That is, perhaps, the most glorious promise of the Resurrection first-fruits
Holy Week - The week climaxing in Easter Sunday in which the church remembers the death and Resurrection of Christ. In the early centuries Easter Sunday celebrations included remembrance of both the crucifixion and the Resurrection
Forty Days, the Great - Easter Tide which commemorates the periodof Forty Days our Lord spent on earth after His Resurrection withHis Apostles "and speaking of the things pertaining to the kingdomof God" (Acts 1:2 and 3). So, then, during thismysterious time of His Resurrection Life our Lord was giving Hisfinal instructions concerning His Church, and to this instructionis to be traced many of the Church's usages and practices set forthin the Acts of the Apostles which otherwise are inexplicable—forexample—the choice of St
Ascension - When our Savior had repeatedly conversed with his apostles during forty days, after his Resurrection, and afforded them infallible proofs of its reality, he led them out to the Mount of Olives, and was raised up to heaven in their sight, there to continue till he shall come again at the last day to judge the quick and the dead, Acts 1:9,11 . Hebrews 10:19,20 ; and assuring his saints of their ascension to heaven after the Resurrection of the dead, John 14:1,2
Resurrection - The belief of a general Resurrection of the dead, which will come to pass at the end of the world, and will be followed with an immortality either of happiness or misery, is an article of religion in common to Jews and Christians. At the time when our Saviour appeared in Judea, the Resurrection from the dead was received as one of the principal articles of the Jewish religion by the whole body of the nation, the Sadducees excepted, Matthew 22:23 ; Luke 20:28 ; Mark 12:18 ; John 11:23-24 ; Acts 23:6 ; Acts 23:8 . Our Saviour arose himself from the dead, to give us, in his own person, a proof, a pledge, and a pattern of our future Resurrection. Paul, in almost all his epistles, speaks of a general Resurrection, refutes those who denied or opposed it, and proves and explains it by several circumstances, Romans 6:5 ; 1 Corinthians 15:12-15 ; Php_3:10-11 ; Hebrews 11:35 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-17 , &c. ...
On this subject no point of discussion, of any importance, arises among those who admit the truth of Scripture, except as to the way in which the doctrine of the Resurrection of the body is to be understood;—whether a Resurrection of the substance of the body be meant, or some minute and indestructible part of it. It cannot however fail to strike every impartial reader of the New Testament, that the doctrine of the Resurrection is there taught without any nice distinctions. Thus our Lord was raised in the same body in which he died, and his Resurrection is constantly held forth as the model of ours; and the Apostle Paul expressly says, "Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body. If, however, it had been the intention of the Apostle, holding this view of the case, to meet objections to the doctrine of the Resurrection, grounded upon the difficulties of conceiving how the same body, in the popular sense, could be raised up in substance, we might have expected him to correct this misapprehension by declaring, that this was not the Christian doctrine; but that some small parts of the body only, bearing as little proportion to the whole as the germ of a seed to the plant, would be preserved, and be unfolded into the perfected body at the Resurrection. Still farther he proceeds to state the difference, not between the germ of the body to be raised, and the body given at the Resurrection; but between the body itself, understood popularly, which dies, and the body which shall be raised. Farther: the question put by the objector,—"How are the dead raised up?" does not refer to the modus agendi of the Resurrection, or the process or manner in which the thing is to be effected, as the advocates of the germ hypothesis appear to assume. This is manifest from the answer of the Apostle, who goes on immediately to state, not in what manner the Resurrection is to be effected, but what shall be the state or condition of the Resurrection body; which is no answer at all to the question, if it be taken in that sense. ...
Thus, in the argument, the Apostle confines himself wholly to the possibility of the Resurrection of the body in a refined and glorified state; but omits all reference to the mode in which the thing will be effected, as being out of the line of the objector's questions, and in itself above human thought, and wholly miraculous. It is also laid down by our Lord, that "in the Resurrection they shall neither marry nor be given in marriage, but be like to the angels of God;" and this also implies a certain change of structure; and we may gather from the declaration of the Apostle, that though "the stomach," is now adapted "to meats, and meats to the stomach," yet God will "destroy both it and them;" that the animal appetite for food will be removed, and the organ now adapted to that appetite will have no place in the renewed frame. The notion of an incorruptible germ, or that of an original and unchangeable stamen, out of which a new and glorious body, at the Resurrection, is to spring, appears to have been borrowed from the speculations of some of the Jewish rabbins. Another objection to the Resurrection of the body has been drawn from the changes of its substance during life; the answer to which is, that, allowing a frequent and total change of the substance of the body (which, however, is but an hypothesis) to take place, it affects not the doctrine of Scripture, which is, that the body which is laid in the grave shall be raised up. ...
Our Lord has assured us, that "the hour is coming in which all that are in their graves shall hear his voice, and come forth; they that have done good, unto the Resurrection of life, and they that have done evil, unto the Resurrection of damnation
Imperishable - Imperishable (KJV, incorruption) describes the spiritual Resurrection body which unlike the physical body is not subject to the decay associated with death (1 Corinthians 15:42-54 )
Eschatology - It includes such matters as the consummation of the age, the day of judgment, the second coming of Christ, the Resurrection, the millennium, and the fixing of the conditions of eternity. ...
There is no thought of Resurrection of the body in the OT, the clause in Job 19:26 generally used to prove such a point being more properly translated ‘apart from my flesh. ’ The Resurrection expected was not individual, but national. ...
The later books of the Canon (Psalms 49:1-20 ; Psalms 73:18-25 ) refer more frequently to immortality, both of good and of evil men, but continue to deny activity to the dead in Sheol ( Job 14:21 ; Job 26:6 , Psalms 88:12 ; Psalms 94:17 ; Psalms 115:17 , Ecclesiastes 9:10 ), and less distinctly ( Isaiah 26:19 ) refer to a Resurrection, although with just what content it is not possible to state. in a national Resurrection . There is also a tendency to regard the Resurrection as wholly of the spirit (Eth. There is no clear expectation of either the Resurrection or the annihilation of the wicked. Resurrection was limited to the righteous, or sometimes to Israel. This is the development of the eschatology of Judaism, modified by the fact of Jesus’ Resurrection. It includes the two ages, the non-physical Resurrection of the dead, the Judgment with its sentences, and the establishment of eternal states. The Christ was soon to appear to establish His Judgment, and to usher in the new period when the wicked were to suffer and the righteous were to share in the joys of the Resurrection and the Messianic Kingdom. Eschatology alone forms the proper point of approach to the Pauline doctrines of justification and salvation, as well as his teachings as to the Resurrection. The elements of the Pauline eschatology are those of Judaism, but corrected and to a considerable extent given distinctiveness by his knowledge of the Resurrection of Jesus. He gives no apocalyptic description of the coming age beyond his teaching as to the body of the Resurrection, which is doubtless based upon his belief as to that of the risen Jesus. Paul held that the believer received the Resurrection body at death or at the Parousia of Christ. Paul, as with Jesus, this new life with its God-like love and its certainty of still larger self-realization through the Resurrection is the supreme good. The two ages, the Judgment and the Resurrection, and the final conquest of God are distinctively described, and the programme of the future is elaborated by the addition of the promise of a first Resurrection of the saints; by a millennium (probably derived from Judaism; cf. Enoch 32, 33) in which Satan is bound; by a great period of conflict in which Satan and his hosts are finally defeated and cast into the lake of fire; and by a general Resurrection including the wicked for the purpose of judgment. It is not clear that in this general Resurrection there is intended anything more than the summoning of souls from Sheol, for a distinction should probably be made between the Resurrection and the giving of the body of the Resurrection. This Resurrection of the wicked seems inconsistent with the general doctrine of the Pauline literature (cf. ...
Such a reinstatement will include two fundamental doctrines: (1) that of individual immortality as a new phase in the great process of development of the Individual which is to be observed in life and guaranteed by the Resurrection of Jesus
Ascension - The Fourth Gospel, while in its accustomed manner omitting the story of the Ascension, probably regarded as known, introduces definite references to it on the part of Christ both before and after the Resurrection ( John 6:62 ; John 7:33 ; John 14:19 ; John 14:28 ; John 16:28 ; John 20:17 etc. Peter, after mentioning the Resurrection, uses the expression ‘having gone his way into heaven’ ( 1 Peter 3:22 , cf. Nor can we omit such considerations as arise out of the fact of the Resurrection itself, which are satisfied only by an event that puts a definite period to the earthly manifestation of the incarnate Christ. ...
From what has been said it will appear that the Ascension stands on a somewhat different level from the Resurrection as an attested fact. The Resurrection is itself the strongest witness to the reality of the Ascension, as of the Virgin-birth, nor would either in the nature of the case have been capable of winning its way to acceptance apart from the central faith that Jesus actually rose from the dead. On the other hand, the fact that the Ascension was accepted in the primitive Church as the event which put a term to the earthly manifestation of Christ brings out the Resurrection in striking relief as in the full sense of the word a fact of history. It is the Ascension, represented as it is in Scripture not only historically but mystically, and not the Resurrection, which might be viewed as an apotheosis or idealization of Jesus. That ‘Jesus is now living at the right hand of God’ (Harnack) is not a sufficient account of the Christian belief in the Resurrection in view of the Ascension narrative, which, even if Keim and others are right in regarding it as a materialization of the doctrine of the eternal Session as set forth in the Epistles, becomes necessary only when the Resurrection is accepted in the most literal sense
Immortality - Immortality is a corollary to references to existence after death or to the Resurrection in general. ...
Peter says Christians have been given "new birth into a living hope through the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade" (1 Peter 1:3-4 ). ...
First Corinthians 15:35-57 contains the most lengthy discussion of immortality, but is actually only a corollary to Paul's affirmation of the Resurrection. Traditional Christianity has held a dualist or tripartite view of persons (soul-spirit and body or soul, spirit, and body) and that between death and the Resurrection there is some sort of an intermediate state in which the immaterial part of the individual continues a conscious existence apart from the physical. Some who emphasize a holistic view of persons assume that at death there is an immediate Resurrection of a new spiritual body and union with God. Others with a similar anthropology propound a form of re-creationism, a temporary extinction at death that ends at the Resurrection in a new creation. This fact, along with the bodily Resurrection, Paul sees as assured because of the Spirit's guarantee, the defeat of death, and the ultimate victory of God through Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 15:54-57 ). ...
See also Death, Mortality ; Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life ; Resurrection ...
Bibliography . Harris, Raised Immortal: Resurrection and Immortality in the New Testament ; idem, From Grave to Glory ; G. , Resurrection, Immortality and Eternal Life in Intertestamental Judaism
Death - Some Bible students see Resurrection hope suggested or even clearly taught in other Old Testament passages. See Resurrection . In His death the positive and negative aspects just discussed come together: Jesus overturned death in the community and ran toward His own death; He agonized over His fate in Jerusalem and wished it were already accomplished; He announced with word and deed the Resurrection Age, but He could not completely welcome His own accursed death which Resurrection would vindicate. ...
Death in the Letters of Paul Paul's understanding of Jesus' death and Resurrection determined his depiction of death as a quality of human existence. Paul's conviction was confirmed: (1) through his assurances to the Thessalonians that their dead were not disadvantaged (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 ); (2) through his concept of the firstfruits (Romans 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 5:20 ); (3) through his doctrine of the eventual transformation of the Resurrection body (1 Corinthians 15:35-58 ), and (4) through his conviction that the proper Christian response to death and all of its signs is an indomitable hope (Romans 8:31-38 ; 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:18 ). Paul's image of rebirth is realistic to the extent that he acknowledged the incompleteness of our death and Resurrection with Christ. Jesus waited until Lazarus had been dead four days and declared to Martha, “I am the Resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: And whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die” ( John 11:25-26 ). ...
Conclusions The New Testament assumed the Old Testament concept of body-soul unity and the late Old Testament and intertestamental concept of Resurrection. The doctrine of Resurrection is an affirmation that even the realm of the dead belongs to God and that death is overcome only at His gracious command. ...
The distinctive contribution of the New Testament is that it relentlessly defines human life, death, and Resurrection in light of Jesus' life, death, and Resurrection
Christ - After the Resurrection He was spoken of as Jesus Christ, and pagans who knew not the import of the word for anointed often referred to Him not as Christos, but, regarding His character and leadership, as Chrestus (the excellent one)
Nathanael - (Hebrew: God has given) ...
A disciple of Jesus Christ, from Cana in Galilee (John 21), praised by Our Divine Lord as "an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no guile" (John 1), and enumerated among the Apostles as a witness to the miraculous draught of fishes, after the Resurrection (John 21)
Rhoda - Her joy in rushing to tell the disciples and their response accusing her of madness recall details of Luke's Resurrection narrative (Acts 12:13 ; compare Luke 24:9-11 )
Joys of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Present practise commemorates seven: the Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity of Christ, Adoration by the Magi, Finding in the Temple, Resurrection, and Assumption
Banner - A symbol of victory, belonging to military saints and to missionaries, and associated in Christian art with ...
Our Saviour after His Resurrection indicative of his victory over death
Saint Ansano
Saint Felix of Valois
Saint George
Saint Hubert
Saint Joan of Arc
Saint Julian
Saint Maurice and Companions
Michael the Archangel
Saint Reparata
Saint Ursula
It is the emblem and symbol of temporal victory, and of spiritual victory over sin, death, and idolatry
Emmaus - seven and a half miles, from Jerusalem) to which two disciples were walking on the day of Jesus' Resurrection when He joined them unrecognized
Thomas - Thomas sought evidence of Jesus' Resurrection (John 20:25 ), but when convinced of the miracle made an historic confession of faith (John 20:28 )
Strip - have enduo, "to clothe"), and Luke 10:30 ; to take off, Matthew 27:31 ; Mark 15:20 ; figuratively, 2 Corinthians 5:4 , "unclothed" (Middle Voice), of putting off the body at death (the believer's state of being unclothed does not refer to the body in the grave but to the spirit, which awaits the "body of glory" at the Resurrection)
Week - In this way they called attention to the Resurrection of their Lord Jesus Christ (Luke 24:1-7 )
Scarabee - ) A stylized representation of a scarab beetle in stone or faience; - a symbol of Resurrection, used by the ancient Egyptians as an ornament or a talisman, and in modern times used in jewelry, usually by engraving designs on cabuchon stones
Anastasius, Saint - (Greek: Resurrection) ...
Martyr (628), died Bethsaloe, Assyria
Eschatology - For the human race the last things embrace the Resurrection from the dead and the general judgment
Aijeleth Shahar - May not its reference be to the Resurrection of the Lord after the cross? The Targum explains it as signifying 'the morning oblation of the lamb
Lord's Day, the - (Kuriake Hemera ), ( Revelation 1:10 ) (only), the weekly festival of our Lord's Resurrection, and identified with "the first day of the week," or "Sunday," of every age of the Church
Tritheists - They agreed in the doctrine of three persons in the Godhead, and differed only in their manner of explaining what the Scriptures taught concerning the Resurrection of the body. Philoponus maintained, that the form as well as the matter of all bodies was generated, and corrupted, and that both, therefore, were to be restored in the Resurrection
Gangrene - The cause of the ‘gangrene’ referred to in 2 Timothy 2:17 is incipient Gnosticism, which subverted the Christian teaching concerning the Resurrection, alleging that it had occurred already, in opposition to the belief of the apostles that the Resurrection was future, being not merely spiritual but involving the whole man
Resurrection of Christ - Who committed it? The enemies of Jesus Christ? Would they have contributed to his glory by countenancing a report of his Resurrection? Would his disciples? It is probable they would not, and it is next to certain they could not. People of this character, would they have dared to resist the authority of the governor? ...
Would they have undertaken to oppose the determination of the Sanhedrim, to force a guard, and to elude, or overcome, soldiers armed and aware of danger? If Jesus Christ were not risen again (I speak the language of unbelievers, ) he had deceived his disciples with vain hopes of his Resurrection. Lastly, the motives which induced them to publish the Resurrection: not to gain fame, riches, glory, profit; no, they exposed themselves to suffering and death, and proclaimed the truth from conviction of its importance and certainty. "Collect, " says Saurin, "all these proofs together; consider them in one point of view, and see how many extravagant suppositions must be advanced, if the Resurrection of our Saviour be denied. " The doctrine of the Resurrection of Christ affords us a variety of useful instructions. 2: Robinson's translation; Ditton and Wast on the Resurrection; Cook's Illustration of the general evidence establishing the reality of Christ's Resurrection, p. but especially a small but admirable Essay on the Resurrection of Christ by Mr
Hymenaeus - Along with Philetus, Hymenaeus taught that the Resurrection had already occurred (2 Timothy 2:17-18 )
Easter - Hence the name came to be given to the festival of the Resurrection of Christ, which occured at the time of the Passover
Bartholomew - He was one of the disciples to whom our Lord appeared at the Sea of Tiberias after his Resurrection (John 21:2 )
Enoch - See Genesis ; Resurrection ; Apocalyptic ; Apocrypha ; Pseudepigrapha
Falsifiability - Jesus' Resurrection was falsifiable in that all the critics had to do was produce the body, but they did not
Breath - " (Lamentations 4:20) And hence, when the Lord Jesus, after his Resurrection, imparted to his disciples the gracious influences of his Spirit, it is said, that "he breathed on them, and said, Receive ye the Holy Ghost
Emmaus - A village near Jerusalem, where two disciples entertained Jesus after his Resurrection
First Fruits - Christ is called the first fruits of them that slept; for as the first fruits were earnests to the Jews of the succeeding harvest, so Christ is the first fruits of the Resurrection, or the earnest of a future Resurrection; that as he rose, so shall believers also rise to happiness and life
Alive - ...
1 Corinthians 15:22 (a) The Resurrection is in view in this passage. In the Resurrection we shall have a physical body which will never die
Inscriptions - Many of the numerous inscriptions in the catacombs are characterized by the belief in the doctrines of purgatory, communion of the saints, and the Resurrection of the dead
Emmaus - Hot baths, a village "three-score furlongs" from jerusalem, where our Lord had an interview with two of his disciples on the day of his Resurrection (Luke 24:13 )
Descent Into Hell - ,Gehenna) but that covered, hidden place where the soul awaits theGeneral Resurrection
Corn - Christ speaks of Himself as a 'CORN OF WHEAT,'which had to die or it would abide alone: there could be no association in life with Christ except through death and Resurrection
Baptism - In Christianity it is the believer's identification with Christ in His death, burial, and Resurrection (Romans 6:4-23)
Nathanael - " He was one of the disciples to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias after his Resurrection, John 21:2 ; and after witnessing the ascension returned with the other apostles to Jerusalem, Acts 1:4,12,13
Seleucians - They did not practise baptism; by hell they understood the present world; Resurrection was explained as merely the procreation of children
Salome - Her conception as to the true nature of Christ's kingdom were no doubt changed by his crucifixion, which she witnessed "afar off," and by his Resurrection, of which she was early apprized by the angels at the tomb, Mark 15:40 ; 16:1
Phile'Tus - 68-64) Thep appear to have been persons who believed the Scripture of the Old Testament, but misinterpreted them, allegorizing away the doctrine of the Resurrection and resolving it all into figure and metaphor
Seleucians - They did not practise baptism; by hell they understood the present world; Resurrection was explained as merely the procreation of children
Gehenna - " The second is Hades, which also occurs in theoriginal Greek of the Creed, and means the hidden, covered,intermediate world where the soul rests between death and thegeneral Resurrection
Sadducees - The only reference to them in the Gospels of (Mark 12:18-27 ) and (Luke 20:27-38 ) is their attempting to ridicule the doctrine of the Resurrection, which they denied, as they also denied the existence of angels. They endeavoured to prohibit the apostles from preaching the Resurrection of Christ (Acts 2:24,31,32 ; 4:1,2 ; 5:17,24-28 )
Jonah - But the Resurrection of Christ itself was also shadowed forth in the history of the prophet
Easter Even - To the disciples it was a day of mourningafter an absent Master, but the Church of the Resurrection seesalready the triumph of the Lord over Satan and Death
Principality - The Lord 'spoiled' principalities on the cross, Colossians 2:15 ; and at His Resurrection He was exalted by God far above all such created powers
Pharisee - The Pharisees believed in life after death, the Resurrection, the existence of angels and demons, and that the way to God was through keeping the law
Immortal - Thus the principle of immortality in differently communicated according to the will of him who can render any creature immortal, by prolonging its life; who can confer immortality on the body of man, together with his soul; and will do so at the Resurrection
Immortality - Christ "hath brought life and immortality to light through the gospel," 2 Timothy 1:10 : the immortal blessedness of Christians, including the Resurrection of the body, is by virtue of their union with Christ, Joshua 14:15
Attain - " In its metaphorical sense of "attaining" to something it is used in three places: Acts 26:7 , of the fulfillment of the promise of God made to the ancestors of Israel, to which promise the twelve tribes "hope to attain" (RV); in Ephesians 4:13 , of "attaining" to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God; in Philippians 3:11 , of the paramount aims of the Apostle's life, "if by any means," he says, "I might attain unto the Resurrection from the dead," not the physical Resurrection, which is assured to all believers hereafter, but to the present life of identification with Christ in His Resurrection
Voice - 1: φωνή (Strong's #5456 — Noun Feminine — phone — fo-nay' ) "a sound," is used of the voice (a) of God, Matthew 3:17 ; John 5:37 ; 12:28,30 ; Acts 7:31 ; 10:13,15 ; 11:7,9 ; Hebrews 3:7,15 ; 4:7 ; 12:19,26 ; 2 Peter 1:17,18 ; Revelation 18:4 ; 21:3 ; (b) of Christ, (1) in the days of His flesh, Matthew 12:19 (negatively); John 3:29 ; 5:25 ; 10:3,4,16,27 ; 11:43 ; 18:37 ; (2) on the Cross, Matthew 27:46 , and parallel passages; (3) from heaven, Acts 9:4,7 ; 22:7,9,14 ; 26:14 ; Revelation 1:10,12 (here, by metonymy, of the speaker),15; 3:20; (4) at the Resurrection "to life," John 5:28 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 , where "the voice of the archangel" is, lit. , "a voice of an archangel," and probably refers to the Lord's voice as being of an archangelic character; (5) at the Resurrection to judgment, John 5:28 [1]; (c) of human beings on earth, e
Resurrection of Christ - The Resurrection of Christ is the keystone of the faith of the Christian; at the same time it is the assurance on the part of God that He has appointed a day when He is going to judge the world in righteousness. ...
It has been asserted that the accounts given of the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus in the gospels are discordant and irreconcilable
Sad'Ducees - The second distinguishing doctrine of the Sadducees was the denial of man's Resurrection after death . In connection with the disbelief of a Resurrection by the Sadducees, they likewise denied there was "angel or spirit," ( Acts 23:8 ) and also the doctrines of future punishment and future rewards. One of the causes of its success was undoubtedly the vivid belief in the Resurrection of Jesus and a consequent Resurrection of all mankind, which was accepted by its heathen converts with a passionate earnestness of which those who at the present day are familiar from infancy with the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead call form only a faint idea
Levirate Law - ...
For the statement of a problem regarding the Resurrection, propounded to Jesus (Matthew 22:23-33, Mark 12:18-27, Luke 20:27-38), the Levirate law was used by the Sadducees, who are described by the Synoptists as saying that there is no Resurrection, and by Josephus (Ant. The Pharisees, on the other hand, accepted such traditions, and with them a belief in the doctrine of the Resurrection (cf. In the Resurrection, since they all had her, whose wife shall she be of the seven? Jesus in His answer to the Sadducees did not discuss the justice or injustice of the Levirate law, or examine the purpose of Moses in decreeing it; but, asserting that they had erred, not knowing the Scriptures or the power of God, He showed them that in the Resurrection men neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are as the angels of God in heaven; and then He proceeded to declare that belief in immortality is involved in our consciousness of the being of God
Prize - The larger context uses multiple expressions (know Christ 1Corinthians 2:8,1 Corinthians 2:10 ;gain Christ 1 Corinthians 2:8 ; know the power of Christ's Resurrection; share Christ's suffering and death 1 Corinthians 2:10 ) to define the goal of Christian living
Friday - Friday as a Fast is intendedto be the weekly memorial of the Crucifixion of our Lord just asSunday is the weekly memorial of the Resurrection
Easter - The day on which the Christian church commemorates our Saviour's Resurrection
Sadducee - They held rigidly to the old Testament law and a denying the life after death, reward and punishment after death, the Resurrection, and the existence of angels and demons
Lord's Supper - Church groups celebrate the Lord's Supper regularly as a sign of the new covenant sealed by Christ's death and Resurrection
Bones - In Luke 24:39 the unique expression seems to emphasize the nature of the Resurrection body, as different from the ordinary ‘flesh and blood
Distraction - On the supposition of the truth of the birth, death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ, irreligion is nothing better than distraction
Rise (up) - ...
Matthew 12:41 (a) We understand, by this expression, the Resurrection scene when the witnesses will be brought before the throne of GOD to testify
Apostle - Paul became an apostle after Jesus' Resurrection (2 Corinthians 1:1), along with Barnabas (Acts 14:14), and others
Acts of Pilate - A relation sent by Pilate to the Emperor Tiberius, concerning Jesus Christ, his death, Resurrection, ascension, and the crimes of which he was convicted before him
Stoics - The humbling doctrines of the cross, the preaching of Jesus, and the Resurrection would, it is clear, be distasteful to such philosophers
Harrowing of Hell - An Old English and Middle English term for the triumphant descent of Christ into hell between the time of His Crucifixion and Resurrection
Hell, Harrowing of - An Old English and Middle English term for the triumphant descent of Christ into hell between the time of His Crucifixion and Resurrection
Signs - The only sign to be given them would be the sign of Jesus’ Resurrection, by which the Father would show clearly that Jesus was his Son (Matthew 12:38-40; Matthew 16:1-4; John 2:18-25; see MESSIAH; MIRACLES). ...
After Jesus’ Resurrection and ascension, his apostles did the same sorts of signs and miracles as Jesus himself had done previously
Descent to Hades - It may be seen as immediately following Christ's Resurrection. Whatever the detailed explanation of each of the phrases, the ultimate purpose is to glorify Christ for His completed work of salvation through His death, Resurrection, and ascension, showing He has control of all places and powers
Preexistence of Souls - The consensus of the early church as evidenced by the Apostle's Creed is that the Christian hope is the Resurrection of the body, not the inherent immortality of souls. See Immortality ; Resurrection ; Soul
Kerygma - Of course, the preaching about Jesus concerns not only His death on a cross but also His Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:12 ). According to this reconstruction, the preaching of the early church included the following elements: (1) the prophecies of the coming Messiah have been fulfilled, (2) the prophecies were fulfilled by the Davidic descent, ministry, death, and Resurrection of Jesus, (3) Jesus has been exalted to God's right hand as the Head of the new Israel, (4) the Holy Spirit is the sign of Christ's present power and glory, (5) Christ will return, and (6) a call for repentance
Easter Day - A festival in honor of our Lord's Resurrection hasbeen observed from the very foundation of Christianity. The western Christians contendedthat the Feast of the Resurrection ought always to be observed on aSunday. Churches aredecorated with flowers and plants as symbolical of the Resurrection. White hangings for the Altar and White vestments have always beenused at Easter in reference to the angel who brought the tidingsof the Resurrection, who appeared in "garments white as snow" and"his countenance was as lightning
Rellyanists - In general they appear to believe that there will be a Resurrection to life, and a Resurrection to condemnation; that believers only will be among the former, who as first fruits, and kings and priests, will have part in the first Resurrection, and shall reign with Christ in his kingdom of the millennium; that unbelievers who are after raised, must wait the manifestation of the Saviour of the world, under that condemnation of conscience which a mind in darkness and wrath must necessarily feel; that believers, called kings and priests, will be made the medium of communication to their condemned brethren; and like Joseph to his brethren, though he spoke roughly to them, in reality overflowed with affection and tenderness; that ultimately every knee shall bow, and every tongue confess that in the Lord they have righteousness and strength; and thus every enemy shall be subdued to the kingdom and glory of the Great Mediator
Aphthartodocetae, a Sect of the Monophysites - Their opponents among the Monophysites, the Severians (from Severus, patriarch of Antioch), maintained that the body of Christ before the Resurrection was corruptible, and were hence called Phthartolatrae ( Φθαρτολάτραι , from φθαρτός and λάτρεία ), or Corrupticolae , i. Both parties admitted the incorruptibility of Christ's body after the Resurrection. This whole question is rather one of scholastic subtlety, though not wholly idle, and may be solved in this way: that the body of Christ, before the Resurrection, was similar in its constitution to the body of Adam before the Fall, containing the germ or possibility of immortality and incorruptibility, but subject to the influence of the elements, and was actually put to death by external violence, but through the indwelling power of the sinless Spirit was preserved from corruption and raised again to an imperishable life, when—to use an ingenious distinction of St
Immortality - Christianity gave its own definite form to all that it took up from the current thought of its time, and the outstanding factor in the form which the primitive Christian hope assumed is the Resurrection of Christ. It has been argued that the form which the belief in the Resurrection took, especially in St. Paul, was determined by these external influences, especially by the existence in various Mystery-cults of the idea of the death of the god and his Resurrection. But these offer no true parallel to the belief in a historic Resurrection and do not explain either its existence or the peculiar moral value attached to the Resurrection of Christ by the primitive Church. of Christianity, we find, in the first place, that it is inseparably connected with the Resurrection of Christ, and, secondly, that it is also inseparable from primitive Christian eschatology. ‘The Resurrection of the body and the life of the world to come’ is the phrase which crystallizes the growth of the idea of immortality for the popular mind during the early stages of Christianity. ...
But the Death and Resurrection of Christ as historical facts are the decisive elements which St. No apocalyptic scheme offered any such conception as the Death and Resurrection of Messiah, and the acceptance by St. Paul of the Death and Resurrection of Jesus as historical facts, together with his identification of Jesus with the Messiah, set a train of thought working in his mind which yielded entirely new forms, not to be explained by any patch-work of older elements to be found in them. Paul and the primitive Church on the ethical value of the Resurrection of Christ and its implications dropped out of sight. Paul the Resurrection of Christ has an ethical value which is of great importance in his view of the future life of believers. The Resurrection of Christ was not a foregone conclusion resulting from His Divinity, but it was intimately connected with Christ’s faith and holiness as man. His Resurrection was according to the Spirit of holiness; He was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father. In His Resurrection the full working of the law of the Spirit of life was displayed. ’...
(b) This Resurrection state of Christ is spiritual. Paul conceives of as dwelling in believers and thereby bringing into operation in them the same law that resulted in His own Resurrection and victory over ‘the law of sin and death. It is an integral part of the triumph of the Kingdom of God, beginning with the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 : ἀπαρχὴ Χριστός). ...
The Pauline view of the subject is also bound up with the Parousia and with the closely allied subject of the Resurrection of believers. Paul and everywhere in the primitive Church, and the same view of the ethical value of the Resurrection of Christ: ‘who through him are believers in God, which raised him from the dead, and gave him glory; so that your faith and hope might be in God’ (1 Peter 1:21). ...
But there is nothing of the extraordinary development of the consequences of the Resurrection-life of Christ in the Spirit, and the resultant view of the Kingdom as already manifested in its working. ...
If the passage be interpreted to refer to the visit of Christ to the souls in Sheol during the interval between His Death and His Resurrection, then this is the only NT passage which supports such a conception, and it is a possible view that the Christian interpretation of the passage has been influenced by the strong belief which grew up in the primitive Church in the descent of Christ to Hades. The writer undoubtedly believes in the Resurrection of Christ and also in the ethical aspect of it already mentioned, but he does not seem to carry on, as St. Paul does, the consequences of this to the bodily Resurrection of believers
Sacrament - ...
Baptism is an outward expression of faith in Christ and what he has done for believers through his death and Resurrection (Acts 2:38; Romans 6:3-4; see BAPTISM)
Ghost - Jesus' disciples mistook Him for a ghost when He walked on water (Matthew 14:26 ; Mark 6:49 ) and when He appeared after the Resurrection (Luke 24:37 ,Luke 24:37,24:39 )
Martyr - The basis of this assured victory is the death and Resurrection of Christ, who is himself the faithful and true witness (2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:18Revelation 12:10-11...
Anastasis, Church of the - (Greek: Resurrection) Jerusalem, erected over the Holy Sepulcher by Emperor Constantine I
Gospel - ...
The history of the birth, life, actions, death, Resurrection, ascension and doctrines of Jesus Christ or a revelation of the grace of God to fallen man through a mediator, including the character, actions, and doctrines of Christ, with the whole scheme of salvation, as revealed by Christ and his apostles
Nathanael - John's Gospel, that our Saviour, after his Resurrection, manifested himself to Peter, Thomas, Nathanael, and the sons of Zebedee, as they were fishing in the lake of Gennesareth
Weeks - In John 20:26 , the disciples are said to have met again after "eight days," that is, evidently after a week, on the eighth day after our Lord's Resurrection
Transfiguration - ...
Attempts have been made to interpret the transfiguration as a misplaced Resurrection account. There are several reasons why this is unlikely: the title given to Jesus ("Rabbi") in Mark 9:5 and the equation of Jesus with Moses and Elijah ( Matthew 17:4 ; Mark 9:5 ; Luke 9:33 ) would be strange addressed to the resurrected Christ; the form of this account is quite different from Resurrection accounts; the presence of Peter-James-John as an inner circle occurs in other accounts during the life of Jesus, but not in a Resurrection account; and the temporal designations associated with the Resurrection are "first day" or "after three days, " not "after six days" (Matthew 17:1 ; Mark 9:2 ) or "about eight days after" (Luke 9:28 ). Still another interpretation is that the transfiguration is a proleptic glimpse of the glory that awaits Jesus at his Resurrection (Luke 24:26 ; Hebrews 2:9 ; 1 Peter 1:21 )
Judgment, Universal - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Final Judgment - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Judgment, Final - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Judgment, General - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Last Judgment - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Martha, Saint 29 Jul - Her love for Christ grew, and she remained faithful to Him during His Passion and Resurrection
Miracle - Examples would be the parting of the Red Sea, Jesus walking on water, the Resurrection of Lazarus, etc
Eternal Life - Second, eternal life will reach its final state at the Resurrection of the believers when Christ returns to earth to claim His church
General Judgment - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Regeneration - Regeneration may also signify, in a cosmic sense, renewal of the Stoic world-cycle; and, in Christian eschatology, the Resurrection of the dead (Matthew 19)
Universal Judgment - That Divine judgment following the general Resurrection, wherein all men, good and bad, will be judged according to their works, in such a manner that the justic of the sentence of each will be manifested to all (Matthew 25; 2 Corinthians 5; Athanasian Creed)
Separate - ]'>[1] ...
A — 2: χωρίζω (Strong's #5563 — Verb — chorizo — kho-rid'-zo ) "to put asunder, separate," is translated "to separate" in Romans 8:35,39 ; in the Middle Voice, "to separate oneself, depart" (see DEPART); in the Passive Voice in Hebrews 7:26 , RV , "separated" (AV, "separate"), the verb here relates to the Resurrection of Christ, not, as AV indicates, to the fact of His holiness in the days of His flesh; the list is progressive in this respect that the first three qualities apply to His sinlessness, the next to His Resurrection, the last to His ascension
Quicken, to: - It is therefore sometimes used as the equivalent of Resurrection, but the word is never applied to the wicked dead. This is not necessarily the result of new birth; for instance, Israel will have to be born again in view of earthly blessing (John 3:12 ; Ezekiel 36:25,26 ); but believers now are not only born again, but, as quickened with Christ, they are made to live spiritually in that sphere of holy love into which Christ has entered by Resurrection, in order that He might introduce them into it; they thus have passed from death to life
Firstfruits - The risen Christ is called the firstfruits of believers who have died, because his Resurrection guarantees the Resurrection of all believers (1 Corinthians 15:20; 1 Corinthians 15:23)
Acts of the Apostles (2) - The Resurrection of Jesus is the main content of the Apostolic preaching, so much so that in Acts 1:22 the Apostles are roundly designated ‘witnesses of the Resurrection. ’ In the eyes of our author it comes to this, that in the gospel of the Resurrection of Jesus is implied the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead in general. This is plainly declared in Acts 4:2 ‘they proclaimed in Jesus the Resurrection from the dead. ’ So also in Acts 17:18 ‘he preached Jesus and the Resurrection,’ and in Acts 17:32 ‘the Resurrection of the dead’ is the point in St. Paul declares: ‘Touching the hope and Resurrection of the dead I am called in question’ (Acts 23:6); to Felix he says: ‘I have the hope that there shall be a Resurrection both of the just and of the unjust’ (Acts 24:15). All Jews who believe in the Resurrection ought really to be Christians. Hence also the Pharisees, who believe in the Resurrection of the dead, appear as the party favourable to Christianity; whereas the Sadducees, who say that ‘there is no Resurrection,’ are its enemies (Acts 23:8). Resurrection, then, is the main theme of the new message, hence the preaching of the Apostles bears the designation ‘words of this Life’ (Acts 5:20). By His Resurrection and exaltation He is proved to be the Saviour (σωτήρ, the term best answering our author’s purpose, and most intelligible to the Greeks of the time, Acts 5:30 f, Acts 13:23); the ‘word’ is the ‘word of salvation’ (Acts 13:26); and the whole of the Acts of the Apostles might have this motto prefixed: ‘In none other is there salvation, and neither is there any other name under heaven, that is given among men, wherein we must be saved’ (Acts 4:12). ...
But who now is the Judge and Saviour accredited by the Resurrection? It is very characteristic of our author that in those passages where for the most part it is himself that speaks, e. Thus the Exalted Christ, working miracles from heaven by His name (Acts 9:34), accredited by the miracle of the Resurrection, and destined to come again with judgment and salvation, occupies the central point of the faith of our author. It was only at a later period that He received the crown, namely at His Resurrection and exaltation. For, in spite of his advanced speculations on the subject of Christ, in spite of his doctrine of pre-existence and his cosmological Christology, the Apostle holds fast in Romans 1:4 and Philippians 2:9 to the notion that Jesus became ‘Son of God in power’ through His Resurrection from the dead, and was invested with the title ‘Lord’ at His exaltation. Paul in Acts 13:33 applies the words of Psalms 2:7 (‘Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee’) not to the birth nor to the baptism of Jesus, but to the day of His Resurrection and exaltation. Hence the copious Scripture proofs, which, however, deal more with the Resurrection than with the sufferings and death (Acts 2:25 ff. ...
The Resurrection is not in these passages, as with St. We have here before us the popular view of the Resurrection in its crudest form
Rise, Rising - (2) For the AV, "should rise" in Acts 26:23 , See Resurrection
Son of God - By Resurrection, as the first born, Acts 13:32-33
Alexander - ...
...
A coppersmith who, with Hymenaeus and others, promulgated certain heresies regarding the Resurrection (1 Timothy 1:19 ; 2 Timothy 4:14 ), and made shipwreck of faith and of a good conscience
Obelisk - At times, they were used in tombs to represent hope for Resurrection
Sadducees - They did not believe in the Resurrection, nor in angels, nor in spirits: they held that the soul perished with the body
Albanenses - They rejected the doctrine of the Resurrection, affirmed that the general judgment was past, and that hell torments were no other than the evils we feel and suffer in this life
Lord's Day, the - It was the day of the week on which the Lord arose — the Resurrection day, and thus emphatically marks the sabbath for the Christian
Thomas - He appears to have been of an impulsive character, sincerely devoted to Christ, ready to act upon his convictions, and perhaps slow to be convinced, as he at first doubted our Lord's Resurrection, John 11:16 ; 14:5-6 ; 20:19-29
Body - What Christians look forward to is the Resurrection of the body to full and eternal life (2 Corinthians 5:1-5; see HUMANITY, HUMANKIND). They do not yet know the exact nature of this Resurrection body, but they know at least that it will be imperishable, beautiful, strong, suited to the life of the age to come, and patterned on Christ’s glorious body (1 Corinthians 15:35-54; Philippians 3:20-21; 1 John 3:2; see Resurrection)
Kerygma - Then comes the crucial assertion in 1:21 that God is saving those who believe through the kerygma—the message about Jesus' death and Resurrection, which from the viewpoint of the world is foolishness. ...
At the end of 1Corinthians, in the last major unit on the Resurrection (15:1-58), Paul returns to the theme of kerygma. Interestingly, at the beginning of this section Paul uses the word "gospel" (euangelion ) and spells out the four crucial elements of the gospel: Christ's death, burial, Resurrection, and appearances (vv. Then, in the process of asserting the absolute necessity of the Resurrection, Paul refers to "our preaching [3]" (v. The interchangeability of kerygma and gospel in this passage brings out unmistakably that the kerygma is the gospel message about Christ's death and Resurrection. " The use of "words" ( logois ) at the end of verse 15 further strengthens the understanding that kerygma in verse 17 does refer to the gospel or message about Jesus' death and Resurrection
Arise, Arose, Arouse, Raise, Rise, Rouse - , of Christ as a prophet, Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 ; as God's servant in the midst of the nation of Israel, Acts 3:26 ; as the Son of God in the midst of the nation, 13:33 (not here of Resurrection, but with reference to the Incarnation: the AV "again" has nothing corresponding to it in the original, it was added as a misinterpretation: the mention of His Resurrection is in the next verse, in which it is stressed by way of contrast and by the addition, "from the dead"); as a priest, Hebrews 7:11,15 ; as king over the nations, Romans 15:12 ; (d) of a spiritual awakening from lethargy, Ephesians 5:14 ; (e) of Resurrection from the dead: (1) of the Resurrection of Christ, Matthew 17:9 ; 20:19 ; Mark 8:31 ; 9:9,10,31 ; 10:34 ; Luke 18:33 ; 24:7,46 ; John 20:9 ; Acts 2:24,32 ; 10:41 ; 13:34 ; 17:3,31 : 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; (2) of believers, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; 11:24 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; of unbelievers, Matthew 12:41 . , 1,2, 3John, and Jude); (2) of Christ's "raising" the dead, Matthew 11:5 ; Mark 5:41 ; Luke 7:14 ; John 12:1,9,17 ; (3) of the act of the disciples, Matthew 10:8 ; (4) of the Resurrection of believers, Matthew 27:52 ; John 5:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:15,16,29,32,35,42-44,52 ; 2 Corinthians 1:9 ; 4:14 ; of unbelievers, Matthew 12:42 (cp. ...
Egeiro stands in contrast to anistemi (when used with reference to Resurrection) in this respect, that egeiro is frequently used both in the transitive sense of "raising up" and the intransitive of "rising," whereas anistemi is comparatively infrequent in the transitive use
Eschatology - These are, chiefly, Jesus' return, the millennium, the last judgment, the final Resurrection, and heaven and hell. (Jesus' Resurrection, for instance, was understood as the beginning of the final Resurrection of the dead [1]). Accordingly, they interpret phenomena such as Jesus' return and the final Resurrection as symbols rather than as historical occurrences. ...
People claim the Bible describes five major final events: Jesus' return, defeat of evil, Resurrection, judgment, and renewal of the cosmos. The Resurrection, however, must now occur in three phases: at the rapture, all who have died in Christ to that time will be raised; at Jesus' second return, those martyred during the Tribulation will rise; finally, after the millennium, the “unjust” will be resurrected. ...
The Final Resurrection While the hope of Resurrection has frequently been expressed in liturgy, hymns, and playful speculation, it has received far less theological discussion than have hell and judgment. Perhaps this is because most have regarded the affirmation of Resurrection as far less problematic. In recent decades, however, some have questioned whether Resurrection is compatible with another notion widely held since the first Christian centuries: the immortality of the soul. Yet this seems contrary to the biblical depiction of Death as an enemy barring the way to God and overcome only by Jesus' painful dying struggle and His Resurrection. This seems to contradict the biblical emphasis on Resurrection of the body. In other words, belief in inherent immortality of the soul tends to make one's eschatology spiritualistic and individualistic; belief in Resurrection emphasizes eschatology's physical, historical, and corporate dimensions. ...
If a future Resurrection be our ultimate hope, though, many will wonder: where are our departed loved ones, if they are not yet fully enjoying God's presence? Some, such as the Adventists, have long responded that souls simply sleep until the Resurrection. ...
Event and Meaning As judgment and Resurrection have been discussed, it has become increasingly clear that eschatological discussions arise not merely from speculation about future events, but also from the hopes, fears, and perplexities which anticipation of these events arouses. ...
The early church also discovered that the anticipated Resurrection of the righteous dead had “already” occurred—although again in a surprising form. His Resurrection had two astounding consequences. Since this power had been defeated, no other power in heaven and earth could separate those who participated in Jesus' Resurrection from God (Romans 8:37-39 ; Ephesians 1:18-23 ; 1 Peter 3:21-22 ). It is more in line with biblical thinking to affirm that the last judgment, in the most decisive sense, has already occurred in Jesus' death and Resurrection
Mercy Seat - Christ's cross and Resurrection showed the perfect presence and accomplished atonement once for all (Hebrews 9:1 )
Nails - ...
Nails pierced the hands and feet of the Saviour when they crucified Him, the marks of which He showed to the disciples after His Resurrection, John 20:20,25 ; and which marks He still retains
Wheat - This clearly shows that there was no union of Christ and natural man by His incarnation alone, and that through the death of Christ the fruit produced by His Resurrection is of the same order as Christ Himself
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Bottom, Bottomless - In Romans 10:7 , quoted from Deuteronomy 30:13 , the abyss (the abode of the lost dead) is substituted for the sea (the change in the quotation is due to the facts of the death and Resurrection of Christ); the AV has "deep" here and in Luke 8:31 ; the reference is to the lower regions as the abode of demons, out of which they can be let loose, Revelation 11:7 ; 17:8 ; it is found seven times in the Apocalypse, 9:1,2,11; 11:7; 17:8; 20:1,3; in 9:1,2 the RV has "the pit of the abyss
Andrew - After the Resurrection he is enumerated with the rest of the eleven (Acts 1:13); and then we hear no more of mm
Lord (2) - From the times of the apostles, the first day of the week has been kept sacred by Christians in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ, and it is invariably designated as the Lord's day by the fathers of the primitive church up to the time of the edict of Constantine, when the name Sunday became common
Working - , "energy") is used (1) of the "power" of God, (a) in the Resurrection of Christ, Ephesians 1:19 ; Colossians 2:12 , RV, "working" (AV, "operation"); (b) in the call and enduement of Paul, Ephesians 3:7 ; Colossians 1:29 ; (c) in His retributive dealings in sending "a working of error" (AV, "strong delusion") upon those under the rule of the Man of Sin who receive not the love of the truth, but have pleasure in unrighteousness, 2 Thessalonians 2:11 ; (2) of the "power" of Christ (a) generally, Philippians 3:21 ; (b) in the church, individually, Ephesians 4:16 ; (3) of the power of Satan in energizing the Man of Sin in his "parousia," 2 Thessalonians 2:9 , "coming
Enemy - But Christ has conquered all these through his death and Resurrection, and in the day of his final victory he will destroy them for ever (Matthew 13:39; Luke 10:18; 1 Corinthians 15:25-28; Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 10:12-13)
Life - I am the Resurrection and the life. Keep alive, I beseech thee, the renewed life thou hast given me in thyself; and cause me to enter into the full apprehension and enjoyment of that most glorious proclamation of thine in which thou hast, said, "I am the Resurrection and the life; he that believeth in me, though he were deadly, yet shall he live, and he that liveth and believeth in, me shall never die
Ascension of Christ - It was forty days after his Resurrection. He continued so many days on earth, that he might give many repeated proofs of his Resurrection, Acts 1:3 ; that he might instruct his followers in every thing which pertained to the abolishment of the Jewish ceremonies, Acts 1:3 ; and that he might open to them the Scriptures concerning himself, and renew their commission to preach the Gospel, Acts 1:5-6
Transfiguration, the - ...
The Nature of the Event It has often been claimed that the story is a misplaced Resurrection appearance; but it is Moses and Elijah, not Jesus, who appear, and there is no reference to them or a voice from heaven in any other Resurrection account. These involve Resurrection, ascension, and return in glory
Dead - ...
The second death takes place when that disembodied soul which has been in hell since its first death, is taken out of hell, is reunited with his body in the second Resurrection, is judged at the Great White Throne in his body, and then both body and soul are cast into the lake of fire, to be punished forever in conscious torment. Just as the believer in the first Resurrection goes to the Judgment Seat of CHRIST in his body to be judged, so the sinner in the second Resurrection and in his body is judged at the Great White Throne and forever cast out of GOD's presence
Christ, Miracles of - They may be divided into five classes: ...
nature miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of Resurrection
NATURE MIRACLES ...
Under this head nine miracles may be enumerated. ...
CASES OF Resurrection ...
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). This general statement has made some commentators think that there were cases of Resurrection not described in the Gospels. This is possible, because the Gospels do not aim at completeness, but the expression quoted would be justified by the three following cases of Resurrection which are related
Miracles of Christ - They may be divided into five classes: ...
nature miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of Resurrection
NATURE MIRACLES ...
Under this head nine miracles may be enumerated. ...
CASES OF Resurrection ...
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). This general statement has made some commentators think that there were cases of Resurrection not described in the Gospels. This is possible, because the Gospels do not aim at completeness, but the expression quoted would be justified by the three following cases of Resurrection which are related
Firstborn - ...
He was "begotten" of the Father to a new life at His Resurrection (the day when the Father fulfilled Psalms 2:7 according to Acts 13:33; Romans 1:4) which is His "regeneration"; so He is "the Prince-leader (archeegos ) of life. " "Regeneration," begun in the soul now, will extend to the body at the Resurrection of the saints; and to nature, now groaning under the curse (Matthew 19:28; Luke 20:36; 1 John 3:2; Romans 8:11; Romans 8:19; Romans 8:23). As Christ is "the firstfruits," earnest and pledge of the coming Resurrection, so believers are "a kind of first-fruits," a pledge and earnest of the ultimate regeneration of creation. ...
As He is first begotten by generation from everlasting, so believers by adoptions, "begotten again unto a lively hope by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance incorruptible," etc
Sadducees - Acts 23:8 defines the Sadducees theologically, saying that, in contrast to the Pharisees, they hold there "is no Resurrection, and neither angels nor spirits. " The Sadducean rejection of the Resurrection is the point at issue in Mark 12:18 and parallels. Like the New Testament, Josephus mentions the Sadducean rejection of the Resurrection (War 2. These traditions also included certain theological points, such as Resurrection and angels and spirits, which, although not particularly emphasized in the Old Testament, were prominent during the intertestamental period. The Sadducees found particularly objectionable the Christian proclamation that in Jesus the Resurrection is a present reality (Acts 4:2 )
Life, Living, Lifetime, Life-Giving - Eternal life is the present actual possession of the believer because of his relationship with Christ, John 5:24 ; 1 John 3:14 , and that it will one day extend its domain to the sphere of the body is assured by the Resurrection of Christ, 2 Corinthians 5:4 ; 2 Timothy 1:10 . By this means the believer becomes identified with Him in His deathless "life," through His Resurrection, and enjoys conscious and eternal fellowship with God. 6), and, particularly, of Resurrection life, John 5:21 ; Romans 4:17 ; (b) of Christ, who also is the bestower of Resurrection life, John 5:21 (2nd part); 1 Corinthians 15:45 ; cp. 1 Corinthians 15:22 ; (c) of the Resurrection of Christ in "the body of His glory," 1 Peter 3:18 ; (d) of the power of reproduction inherent in seed, which presents a certain analogy with Resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:36 ; (e) of the 'changing,' or 'fashioning anew,' of the bodies of the living, which corresponds with, and takes place at the same time as, the Resurrection of the dead in Christ, Romans 8:11 ; (f) of the impartation of spiritual life, and the communication of spiritual sustenance generally, John 6:63 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; Galatians 3:21
Millenarians - are those who believe, according to an ancient tradition in the church, grounded on some doubtful texts in the book of Revelation and other scriptures, that our Saviour shall reign a thousand years with the faithful upon earth after the first Resurrection, before the full completion of final happiness; and their name, taken from the Latin word mille, "a thousand," has a direct allusion to the duration of this spiritual empire, which is styled the millennium. ...
Justin Martyr, the most ancient of the fathers, was a great supporter of the doctrine of the millennium, or that our Saviour shall reign with the faithful upon earth, after the Resurrection, for a thousand years; which he declares was the belief of all orthodox Christians. Some believe that Christ will reign personally on the earth, and that the prophecies of the millennium point to a Resurrection of martyrs and other just men, to reign with him a thousand years in a visible kingdom. " The state of the Christian church, say they, will be, for a thousand years before the general judgment, so pure and so widely extended, that, when compared with the state of the world in the ages preceding, it may, in the language of Scripture, be called a Resurrection from the dead. Paul, in which a conversion from Paganism to Christianity, and a reformation of life is called a "resurrection from the dead," Romans 6:13 ; Ephesians 5:14 . There is, indeed, an order in the Resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:24 ; but we no where observe mention made of a first and second Resurrection at the distance of a thousand years from each other: yet, were the millenarian hypothesis well founded, the words should rather have run thus: "Christ, the first-fruits, then the martyrs at his coming, and a thousand years afterward the residue of mankind,—then cometh the end," &c. John saith, ‘Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first Resurrection,'...
Revelation 20:6 . According to tradition, too, these thousand years of the reign of Christ and the saints are the great day of judgment, in the morning or beginning whereof shall be the coming of Christ in flaming fire, and the particular judgment of antichrist, and the first Resurrection; and in the evening or conclusion whereof shall be the general Resurrection of the dead, small and great; ‘and they shall be judged every man according to his works. And this they suppose is meant by the first Resurrection. And by "the souls of them which were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, neither his image, neither had received his mark upon their foreheads, or in their hands," living again and reigning, with Christ a thousand years; they suppose, is not meant a literal Resurrection, or the Resurrection of their bodies, which is not asserted here, as there is nothing said of their bodies, or of their being raised to life; but that they shall live again, and reign with Christ, in the revival, prosperity, reign, and triumph of that cause and interest in which they lived, and for the promotion of which they died: and in whose death the cause seemed to languish and become extinct. " And they suppose that this revival of the cause of Christ, by the numerous inhabitants of the earth rising up to a new and holy life, is that which is here called the first Resurrection, in distinction front the second, which will consist in the Resurrection of the body; whereas this is a spiritual Resurrection; a Resurrection of the cause of Christ, which had been, in a great degree, dead and lost; a Resurrection of the souls of men, by the renovation of the Holy Spirit. There is nothing expressly said of the Resurrection of the body in this passage. The Resurrection of the body is no where expressed in Scripture by the soul's living. And as there is nothing said of the body, and he only saw their souls to live; this does not appear to be a proper expression to denote the Resurrection of the body, and their living in that. This is therefore a spiritual Resurrection, denoting that all Christ's people shall appear in the spirit and power of those martyrs and holy men, who had before lived in the world, and who shall live again in these their successors, and in the revival of their cause, or in the Resurrection of the church, from the very low state in which it had been before the millennium, to a state of great prosperity and glory. It is expressly said of those who shall partake of this first Resurrection, that they shall be "blessed and holy;" by which the inspired writer seems to denote that it will be a time of eminent holiness
Parousia - ...
For supplementary discussion of various points connected with the subject of the Parousia the reader is referred to the articles in this Dictionary on Immortality, Resurrection, Heaven, etc. In the speech at Athens the final appeal is emphasized by the announcement of an appointed day in which God will judge the world by Christ, and the Resurrection of Christ is assigned as the pledge of the truth of this announcement. In the address before Agrippa the hope of the Resurrection is represented as the hope of the Jewish nation. Paul’s eschatology we see only the orthodox Pharisee, believing in the Resurrection of just and unjust. Paul does not supply his solution to the question ready-made from Jewish apocalyptic material, but bases it on two grounds: (1) his own deduction from the death and Resurrection of Jesus 1 Thessalonians 4:14), and (2) a word of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 4:15). Paul infers from the death and Resurrection of Jesus, probably by way of his own fundamental view of the vital union between Christ and the believer, that as death is not a bar to Christ’s entering on His Messianic Kingdom, neither will it prevent believers who die from sharing that Kingdom. The Resurrection is the key to both difficulties. ) Accordingly, the order of events as presented in this passage is: (1) the Resurrection of Christ takes place; (2) during the present generation (‘we which are alive and remain’) Christ will descend into the air with a word of command, the archangel’s voice, and the trumpet of God; (3) thereupon the dead in Christ rise first; (4) after a very brief interval of time, the living will be ‘caught up,’ with the raised dead, to meet the Lord in the air; (5) both living and dead will then be ‘for ever with the Lord. There is no mention of any Resurrection of the dead or catching up of dead and living into the air, and it is rather a straining of the text to read all this into the one word ἄνεσιν. ...
(a) Resurrection of Christ. ...
(a) No mention of Resurrection as basis of teaching. ...
(d) Resurrection of dead. They present the appearance of the gradual, half-conscious modification of the older lines of eschatology by the working of the new principle of the consequences of the Resurrection, an element which is of course wholly foreign to the Jewish schemes of apocalyptic, and peculiar to the Christian scheme. 15, however, we have more detail, and once more the whole conception is dominated by the Resurrection. The order is-first, the Resurrection of Christ, who is the ἀπαρχή, the firstfruits of the working of the new principle of life, in contrast with the results of the principle of death introduced by Adam (cf. The interval between the Resurrection of Christ and that of believers is indirectly limited to one generation (‘we shall not all sleep’), but the duration of the interval between this event, evidently the Parousia of 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18, and the complete subjugation of every enemy, including death itself, is left quite undetermined. Paul’s view of Christ’s post-Resurrection state. Paul’s interest was turning to the manner of the Parousia, to the application of the principle displayed in Christ’s Resurrection, as he had apprehended it. It is a spiritualization, arising not from the difficulty of squaring eschatological predictions with their non-fulfilment, but from the inner logic of a view of the Resurrection which compelled St. arrives at the conclusion that the Resurrection of the believer, his assumption of the glorified spiritual state, takes place immediately after death, and not at the Parousia
Gamaliel - When the apostles were brought before the council, charged with preaching the Resurrection of Jesus, as a zealous Pharisee Gamaliel councelled moderation and calmness
Natural - Paul between the natural body (called the ‘body of death,’ Romans 7:24 ) and the spiritual body of the Resurrection
Chuza - Subsequently, she was one of the women who, on the morning of the Resurrection, brought spices to complete the Lord's burial (Luke 24:10), and who came and told the eleven and all the rest of His being no longer in the tomb, and of their having seen angels
Resurrection - The doctrine of the Resurrection is full of joy to the bereaved
Mark (2) - Our Lord's last journeyings toward Jerusalem, with the narrative of his passion, death, Resurrection, and ascension
Priscillianists - For they denied the reality of Christ's birth and incarnation; maintained that the visible universe was not the production of the Supreme Deity, but of some daemon or malignant principle; adopted the doctrines of aeons, or emanations from the divine nature; considered human bodies as prisons formed by the author of evil to enslave celestial minds; condemned marriage, and disbelieved the Resurrection of the body
Forty - JESUS revealed Himself to His own for forty days after His Resurrection so that they could endure the tests through the years
Ascension - (Latin: ad, to; scandere, to climb) ...
The elevation of Christ into heaven through His own power on the fortieth day after His Resurrection, in the presence of His disciples (Mark 16; Luke 24; Acts 1)
Annihilation - 461; and articles DESTRUCTIONISTS, Resurrection, SOUL
Epicureans - At Paul's time they had become exceedingly corrupt, and of course their philosophy and their life both led them to oppose with violence his great truths concerning God, the Resurrection, and the judgment ever lasting, Acts 17:16 - 34
Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary - A form of prayer (vocal or mental), consisting of 15 decades of Hail Marys, said on beads, each decade preceded by an Our Father and followed by a Gloria, during the recitation of which the mind meditates or dwells on the principal mysteries of the life, death, and Resurrection of Our Lord
Question - Of the hope and Resurrection of the dead I am called in question
Epicureans - The Epicureans would have agreed with Paul that God needs nothing from mere humans (Acts 17:25), but they refused to accept his teaching on the Resurrection (Acts 17:31-32)
Cornelius - ...
Peter told Cornelius of what Jesus Christ had done for the world through his life, death and Resurrection
Adoption - ...
The "adoption" is used for its full manifestation in the Resurrection of the believer with a body like Christ's glorious body (Romans 8:23). Christ was Son even in His humiliation; but He was only "declared (definitively in the Greek) the Son of God with power by the Resurrection from the dead" (Romans 1:4), "the first begotten from the dead" (Revelation 1:5). Hence Paul refers, "Thou art My Son, this day have I begotten Thee" (Psalms 2:7) to the day of His Resurrection. The first Resurrection shall be the saints' manifested regeneration (Matthew 19:28). Sonship and the first Resurrection are similarly connected (Luke 20:36; 1 Peter 1:3)
Millennium - Through their union with Christ in his death and Resurrection, they have already been made alive and made to sit with him in the heavenly places (Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:6). According to this view, the other ‘coming to life’, which takes place at the end of the thousand years, refers to a Resurrection of all humankind that takes place at the return of Christ. This Resurrection leads to final judgment (Acts 24:15). According to this view, the other ‘coming to life’, which takes place at the end of the thousand years, refers to a second Resurrection. See also ANTICHRIST; DAY OF THE LORD; ESCHATOLOGY; HEAVEN; HELL; JUDGMENT; KINGDOM OF GOD; Resurrection; SECOND COMING
Figure - , pointing to the present time, not "then present," AV (see below); (b) "a corresponding type," 1 Peter 3:21 , said of baptism; the circumstances of the flood, the ark and its occupants, formed a type, and baptism forms "a corresponding type" (not an antitype), each setting forth the spiritual realities of the death, burial, and Resurrection of believers in their identification with Christ. sense of the term) figurative of Resurrection (RV, "parable")
Roll - Both the RV and the AV, "wrapped together," might suggest that this cloth had been "rolled" or wrapped up and put in a certain part of the tomb at the Lord's Resurrection, whereas, as with the body wrappings, the head cloth was lying as it had been "rolled" round His head, an evidence, to those who looked into the tomb, of the fact of His Resurrection without any disturbance of the wrappings either by friend or foe or when the change took place
Three - ...
Joshua 1:11 (c) As Jordan was typical of death, the three days are typical of the Resurrection assured to the people of Israel. ...
Matthew 12:40 (b) No doubt this is typical of the Resurrection, for it was on the third day that JESUS rose
Church Year - The earliest Christians set aside Sunday, the day of the Resurrection, as a time of special remembrance of Christ. By the second century, most Christians were observing a special celebration of the Resurrection at Easter
Descent Into Hell (Hades) - Belief that between his crucifixion and Resurrection Christ descended into the abode of the dead, as confessed in the Apostles' Creed. This corresponds with the uniqueness of his vicarious death and of his Resurrection as an eschatological triumph. ...
So also the apostles understood the death and Resurrection of Jesus "according to the scriptures, " even as he instructed them (Luke 24:46 ; cf. Paul used Deuteronomy 30:12-13 and Psalm 71:20 in Romans 10:6-7 to explain the death of Christ as a descent into the abyss ( tis katabesetai eis abusson ) and the Resurrection as a going up from (among) the dead (ek nekron anagagein )
Saints - It is stated that at the moment of His death there was a supernatural earthquake which caused the tombs to be opened, and that immediately following His Resurrection on the first day of the week many bodies (σώματα) of dead saints arose from their graves, and the persons (ἐξελθόντες, masc. The narrative as it stands says that it was at the moment of His death that the tombs were opened, but that the actual rising of the saints did not take place until after the Lord’s Resurrection. The upholders of the authenticity consider it full of spiritual meaning as to the supernatural character of our Lord’s death in relation to the holy dead, holding that it was a manifestation of His power over death and the grave (1) by the Resurrection of some from Hades, (2) by the clothing of them with a Resurrection body, and (3) by permission to appear to those who knew them
Man From Heaven - He tells the Corinthians that the Resurrection of both Christ and believers is critical to a proper understanding of the gospel (1 Corinthians 15:42-50 ). He explains that eternal existence is qualitatively different from mortal existence and that eternal existence therefore demands a special body that all who are in Christ will obtain at the Resurrection. 47); whereas believers now inhabit a body inherited from the man of dust, the Resurrection will provide them with a heavenly body patterned after that of the resurrected Christ (v
Gospel - But whereas Jesus’ preaching of the gospel was during the period leading up to his death and Resurrection, the early Christians’ preaching followed his death and Resurrection. They therefore laid great emphasis on Jesus’ life, death and Resurrection as historical facts that no one could deny
Body (2) - This meets us in the very fact of the Incarnation (Matthew 11:18-195), in the most solemn utterances of Jesus (Matthew 25:35; Matthew 25:42), in His tender regard for the bodily needs and pains of those around Him—His feeding of the hungry and healing of the sick; but above all in the narratives of His Resurrection and Ascension, which show that the Incarnation was not a temporary expedient of His earthly mission, but a permanent enfolding of our human nature, body as well as soul, within the essential life of the Godhead. ...
In the teaching of Jesus the doctrine of the Resurrection of the body, which had gradually taken root in the Jewish mind, is everywhere presupposed (as in His references to the Future Judgment), and at times is expressly proclaimed (Luke 14:14; Ephesians 1:22-23 John 5:28-29). And by the grave of His friend Lazarus our Lord gave utterance to that profound saying, ‘I am the Resurrection and the life’ (John 11:25), which reveals the ultimate ground of Christian faith in the Resurrection of the body, and at the same time invites us to find in the nature of the risen Christ Himself the type, as well as the pledge, of that new and higher corporeal life to which He is able to raise His people. ), where it rested till the moment of the Resurrection. ...
(2) Christ’s body after the Resurrection. ...
On the other hand, our Lord’s Resurrection body was freed from previous material conditions and possessed of altogether new capacities. These new powers constituted the difference between His pre-resurrection and His glorified body. Rather, it must be said that on the very day of His Resurrection the spirituality of His risen body was as clearly shown as in the case of that much later manifestation by the Sea of Tiberias (cf. His Resurrection body was a spiritual body, but it had the power of materializing itself to the natural senses, and Jesus made use of this power from time to time in order to convince His disciples, by the actual evidence of sight and sound and touch, that the victory of His whole human personality over death and the grave was real and complete. ‘Resurrection’; Lange, Life of Christ, vol. ‘Resurrection’ and ‘Ascension’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Fishing, the Art of - And he "ate a piece of broiled fish" with his disciples after his Resurrection (Luke 24:42,43 ; Compare Acts 1:3 )
Sadducees - Antigonus having often, in his lectures, inculcated to his scholars that they ought not to serve God in a servile manner, but only out of filial love and fear, two of his scholars, Sadoc, and Baithus, thence inferred that there were no rewards at all after this life; and, therefore, separating from the school of their master, they thought there was no Resurrection nor future state, neither angel nor spirit
Epicureans - Paul directs against Epicureanism the declaration of creation (Acts 17:24), providence (Acts 17:26), inspiration (Acts 17:28), the Resurrection and judgment (Acts 17:31)
Evidence - Ditton on the Resurrection; Bellamy on Religion, P
Low Saturday - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Holy Saturday - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Great Sabbath - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Easter Eve - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Easter Even - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Eve, Easter - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Even, Easter - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Bartholomew - The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his Resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Sabbath, Great - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Sabbatum Sanctum - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Saturday, Black - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Saturday, Holy - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Saturday, Low - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Saturday, White - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
White Saturday - In the early Church no Mass was said, services starting about three o'clock in the afternoon and ending with the Mass of the Resurrection on Easter morning, but the services have been gradually anticipated so that the Mass now celebrated on Saturday morning is by origin the first Mass of Easter Sunday, and Lent is over at noon
Sabbath - But the christian church very early begun and still continue to observe the first day of the week, in commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ on that day, by which the work of redemption was completed
James the Less, - At some time in the forty days that intervened between the Resurrection and the ascension the Lord appeared to him
Grave - The hour comes when all that are in the graves shall hear His voice and come forth, some to the Resurrection of life, and others to the Resurrection of judgement
Redemption - The Resurrection is an essential complement of the redeeming Death. Baptism, the initial sacrament by which we appropriate subjectively the graces of the Cross, is viewed by Saint Paul as a mystic death and Resurrection with Christ: ...
"Know you not that all we, who are baptized in Christ Jesus, are baptized in his death? For we are buried together with Him by baptism into death; that as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we also may walk in newness of life
Calvary - In the same place was a private garden, and a tomb in which the body of Christ lay until the Resurrection, John 19:41,42 . Fisk, while visiting the spot under the natural desire to identify the scene of the crucifixion; that the rock shown column he saw, half concealed by iron-work, might have been that to which our Lord was bound when scourged; that the small fragment of rude stone seen by the light of a small taper, through a kind of iron filigree, might have been the place of our Lord's burial and Resurrection: but when he saw the neat juxtaposition of all these things, and knew that in order to provide for the structure of the church the site had to be cut down and leveled; when he reflected that on the very spot a heathen temple had stood, till removed by the empress Helena, to make room for this church; and, moreover, when he considered the superstitious purpose all these things were to serve, and the spirit of that church which thus paraded these objects of curiosity, he could not bring himself to feel they were what they professed to be
Hope - The promises of His Resurrection, of His perpetual spiritual presence, and of His final return in glory, were sure foundations upon which the Church could build her doctrine, and on this basis the developed teaching of the Epistles rests. And if the death of Jesus rudely shattered the Messianic hope of the disciples, His Resurrection, followed by the illumination of the Holy Spirit, restored it to them in a purified and spiritual form. (1) His Resurrection is regarded as the ground of the Christian’s hope: by it Christians are begotten ‘unto a living hope,’ and through it their hope in God is established (1 Peter 1:3; 1 Peter 1:21). Various objects worthy of hope are mentioned, such as salvation (1 Thessalonians 5:8), eternal life (Titus 1:2; Titus 3:7), the glory of God (Romans 5:2, Colossians 1:27), the Resurrection of the dead (Acts 24:15; Acts 23:6); but all these different blessings are summed up in Jesus Christ
Live - 1: ζάω (Strong's #2198 — Verb — zao — dzah'-o ) "to live, be alive," is used in the NT of "(a) God, Matthew 16:16 ; John 6:57 ; Romans 14:11 ; (b) the Son in Incarnation, John 6:57 ; (c) the Son in Resurrection, John 14:19 ; Acts 1:3 ; Romans 6:10 ; 2 Corinthians 13:4 ; Hebrews 7:8 ; (d) spiritual life, John 6:57 ; Romans 1:17 ; 8:13 ; Galatians 2:19,20 ; Hebrews 12:9 ; (e) the present state of departed saints, Luke 20:38 ; 1 Peter 4:6 ; (f) the hope of Resurrection, 1 Peter 1:3 ; (g) the Resurrection of believers, 1 Thessalonians 5:10 ; John 5:25 ; Revelation 20:4 , and of unbelievers, Revelation 20:5 , cp. John 11:25 , and which corresponds to the Resurrection of those who had previously died in Christ, 1 Corinthians 15:52-54
Hope - The promises of His Resurrection, of His perpetual spiritual presence, and of His final return in glory, were sure foundations upon which the Church could build her doctrine, and on this basis the developed teaching of the Epistles rests. And if the death of Jesus rudely shattered the Messianic hope of the disciples, His Resurrection, followed by the illumination of the Holy Spirit, restored it to them in a purified and spiritual form. (1) His Resurrection is regarded as the ground of the Christian’s hope: by it Christians are begotten ‘unto a living hope,’ and through it their hope in God is established (1 Peter 1:3; 1 Peter 1:21). Various objects worthy of hope are mentioned, such as salvation (1 Thessalonians 5:8), eternal life (Titus 1:2; Titus 3:7), the glory of God (Romans 5:2, Colossians 1:27), the Resurrection of the dead (Acts 24:15; Acts 23:6); but all these different blessings are summed up in Jesus Christ
Hades - But the precise expectation of a bodily Resurrection for the wicked and the related conception of Sheol as an intermediate state is late (Daniel 12:2 ). Following David's prophecy in Psalm 16:10 , Peter interprets the Resurrection as God delivering Jesus from Hades (Acts 2:27,31 ). " It is widely accepted that the proclamation in 1 Peter 3:19 occurs after rather than before his Resurrection (v. This is the intermediate state, for the bodily Resurrection and the final judgment are still future. Indeed, his Resurrection establishes that this evil empire is already broken. Then Hades will release its dead for the final Resurrection and judgment (Revelation 20:13 )
Earthquake - —Of these there are two, namely, the earthquakes at the Crucifixion and the Resurrection (Matthew 27:51; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2). Matthew in regard to the darkness and the rending of the veil, apparently know nothing of an earthquake at the Crucifixion [1], and they are equally silent in the case of the Resurrection. : ‘The earth, which trembled with horror at the death of Christ, as it were leaped with joy at the Resurrection’)
Earthquake - —Of these there are two, namely, the earthquakes at the Crucifixion and the Resurrection (Matthew 27:51; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2). Matthew in regard to the darkness and the rending of the veil, apparently know nothing of an earthquake at the Crucifixion [1], and they are equally silent in the case of the Resurrection. : ‘The earth, which trembled with horror at the death of Christ, as it were leaped with joy at the Resurrection’)
History - Paul said that without Christ's Resurrection the Christian faith was without meaning (1Corinthians 15:3-4,1 Corinthians 15:14 ). Jesus' victory over sin, death, and evil on the cross, and the confirming Resurrection, reveal that history will end, and it will end well. The Resurrection (assuming the life and death of Jesus) is the crucial point of defense of the historical validity of Christianity (1 Corinthians 15:14 ). Evidence for the Resurrection is significant: the empty tomb, the appearances (1 Corinthians 15:5-8 ), the prophecy of the Scriptures and Jesus (Luke 24:25-27 ,Luke 24:25-27,24:44 ), and the ongoing witness of the church. The role of evidence is limited: an empty tomb does not a Resurrection make. Evidence is important, however, because an occupied tomb would disprove the Resurrection. The nature and historical reality of the Resurrection is crucial for history. Because of Christ's Resurrection, believers may anticipate a historical and transforming Resurrection for themselves ( 1 Corinthians 15:42-44 )
History - Paul said that without Christ's Resurrection the Christian faith was without meaning (1Corinthians 15:3-4,1 Corinthians 15:14 ). Jesus' victory over sin, death, and evil on the cross, and the confirming Resurrection, reveal that history will end, and it will end well. The Resurrection (assuming the life and death of Jesus) is the crucial point of defense of the historical validity of Christianity (1 Corinthians 15:14 ). Evidence for the Resurrection is significant: the empty tomb, the appearances (1 Corinthians 15:5-8 ), the prophecy of the Scriptures and Jesus (Luke 24:25-27 ,Luke 24:25-27,24:44 ), and the ongoing witness of the church. The role of evidence is limited: an empty tomb does not a Resurrection make. Evidence is important, however, because an occupied tomb would disprove the Resurrection. The nature and historical reality of the Resurrection is crucial for history. Because of Christ's Resurrection, believers may anticipate a historical and transforming Resurrection for themselves ( 1 Corinthians 15:42-44 )
Hell - It is the place of the dead, the location of the person between death and Resurrection
Hades - version of Psalm 16:8-11 , plainly for the purpose of proving our Lord's Resurrection from the dead
Peter, Second Epistle of - It professes to give a history of our Lord's Resurrection and ascension
Regeneration - In Titus 3:5 it denotes that change of heart elsewhere spoken of as a passing from death to life ( 1 John 3:14 ); becoming a new creature in Christ Jesus (2 Corinthians 5:17 ); being born again (John 3:5 ); a renewal of the mind (Romans 12:2 ); a Resurrection from the dead (Ephesians 2:6 ); a being quickened (2:1,5)
Gospel - It is taken also for the history of the life, actions, death, Resurrection, ascension, and doctrine of Jesus Christ
Mary Magdalen, Saint - After her conversion, she remained faithful to Christ; stood at the foot of the cross (Mark 15; Matthew 27; John 19; Luke 22); and was the first witness of the Resurrection
New Age - The age to come is associated with the experience of eternal life ( Mark 10:30 ; Luke 18:30 ), the Resurrection of the dead (Luke 20:35 ) and the immeasurable riches of God's gracious kindness (Ephesians 2:7 )
Lent - Since, from the earliest years of Christianity, it had been considered inappropriate to fast on the day of the Resurrection, Sundays were not counted in the forty days
Sheaf - But as the first fruits of the harvest, Christ was eminently so here, for by his Resurrection from the dead, we are told that he thereby became the first fruits of them that slept
Laz'Arus - John, and that records little more than the facts of his death and Resurrection
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
" 9...
Resurrection of Jesus
Thessalonians, Epistle to the 1 And 2 - In the first epistle, Paul rejoices over Timothy's good report of the faith of Christians at Thessalonica; and confirms them against the persecutions and temptations they would meet, by discussing the miraculous testimony of God to the truth of the gospel, 1 Thessalonians 1:5-10 ; the character of its preachers, 1 Thessalonians 2:13 ; the holiness of its precepts, 1 Thessalonians 4:1-12 ; and the Resurrection of Christ and his people, 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11
e'Noch - Both the Latin and Greek fathers commonly coupled Enoch and Elijah as historic witnesses of the possibility of a Resurrection of the body and of a true human existence in glory
Denial - Other examples of denial of Christian faith and practice include the Sadduccees' rejection for the doctrine of the Resurrection of the body (Luke 20:27 ), and the believer's failure to care for relatives, especially members of the immediate family (1 Timothy 5:8 ). Subsequent to the Resurrection and ascension of Christ into heaven as our eternal high priest, unmitigating denial of Christ is identified as the sin of antichrist (1 John 2:22-23 )
Millennium - The period begins with this first Resurrection, and at its end, Satan, prior to his destruction, is to be released for a time to deceive the nations. In accordance with this theory (see Chiliasm, Parousia), the Resurrection is to be limited not to martyrs but to all Christians
Fish - In John 21:11 the 153 fish taken were all "great fish," whereas in the corresponding earlier miracle (Luke 5:6) this is not said; the net broke in the earlier, not so in the miracle after the Resurrection, the latter typifying the eternal safety of the finally elect, all accounted "great" before God. He ate broiled fish after His Resurrection (Luke 24:42-43; again, John 21:9-13)
Jesus - In the Epistles of James, Peter John, and Jude, men who had companied with the Lord in the days of His flesh, 'Jesus Christ' is the invariable order (in the RV) of the Name and Title, for this was the order of their experience; as 'Jesus' they knew Him first, that He was Messiah they learnt finally in His Resurrection. Thus 'Christ Jesus' describes the Exalted One who emptied Himself, Philippians 2:5 , and testifies to His pre-existence; 'Jesus Christ' describes the despised and rejected One Who was afterwards glorified, Philippians 2:11 , and testifies to His Resurrection
House - 1; (b) metaphorically, the heavenly abode, spoken of by the Lord as "My Father's house," John 14:2 , the eternal dwelling place of believers; the body as the dwelling place of the soul, 2 Corinthians 5:1 ; similarly the Resurrection body of believers (id. " ...
Notes: (1) In 2 Corinthians 5:2 , oiketerion, "a habitation" (see RV) is translated "house" in the AV, of the Resurrection body (cp
House - 1; (b) metaphorically, the heavenly abode, spoken of by the Lord as "My Father's house," John 14:2 , the eternal dwelling place of believers; the body as the dwelling place of the soul, 2 Corinthians 5:1 ; similarly the Resurrection body of believers (id. " ...
Notes: (1) In 2 Corinthians 5:2 , oiketerion, "a habitation" (see RV) is translated "house" in the AV, of the Resurrection body (cp
Body, Bodily - , Matthew 6:22 , or dead, Matthew 27:52 ; or in Resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:44 ; or beasts, Hebrews 13:11 ; of grain, 1 Corinthians 15:37,38 ; of the heavenly hosts, 1 Corinthians 15:40 . The "body" is an essential part of the man and therefore the redeemed are not perfected till the Resurrection, Hebrews 11:40 ; no man in his final state will be without his "body," John 5:28,29 ; Revelation 20:13
Grass - " As, in their decay, the herbs of the fields strikingly illustrate the shortness of human life, so, in the order of their growth, from seeds dead and buried, they give a natural testimony to the doctrine of a Resurrection. The Prophet Isaiah, and the Apostle Peter, both speak of bodies rising from the dead, as of so many seeds springing from the ground to renovated existence and beauty, although they do not, as some have absurdly supposed, consider the Resurrection as in any sense analogous to the process of vegetation, Isaiah 26:19 ; 1 Peter 1:24-25
Heaven - ...
We are taught that the body will share this bliss as well as the soul: the consummation of our bliss is subsequent to the Resurrection of the body; for it is redeemed as well as the soul, and shall, at the Resurrection of the just, be fashioned like unto Christ's glorious body
Body - Throughout the intertestamental period, the belief in the future Resurrection and glorification of the body became even more developed (1Enoch 20:8; 22:13; 2Baruch 50:3-4; 2 Maccabees 7:9,36 ). The physical Resurrection of his body not only served as the Father's "amen" to the life and ministry of Jesus, but also as a kind of "firstfruits" of the Resurrection of all believers (1 Corinthians 15:20-23 ). Just as the fall of Adam brought a curse on the earth, the Resurrection of the body has consequences of cosmic proportions
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - But according to early Christianity, the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ marked a paradigmatic shift resulting in the overlapping of the two ages. For Paul, the kingdom of God has already been inaugurated (2 Timothy 4:1-524 ; 15:24 ) by virtue of the cross and Resurrection of Jesus (1:18-2:5; 15:1-22), but it is not yet complete (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ; 15:50 ). ), undoubtedly a reference reflecting Paul's belief that Jesus' Resurrection began the long-awaited messianic kingdom. Their present struggle with sin attests to that stark reality (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ) as does the futurity of their Resurrection bodies (1 Corinthians 15:50 ). With his death on the cross and Resurrection from the grave, the wisdom of this age, with its propensity to disobey God, has begun to pass away (1 Corinthians 1:29 ; 7:29-30 ). The cross and Resurrection of Christ spelled their defeat; the parousia (the second coming of Christ) will seal their doom. Perhaps the dominant christological perspective operative in 1,2Corinthians is that Jesus the Messiah, by his death on the cross and Resurrection from the grave, has effected the shift of the two ages. Jesus' death, and subsequent Resurrection, was the means by which God began the process of dismantling this present age (cf. ...
First Corinthians 10:11 continues the thought that Christ's death and Resurrection inaugurated the age to come when it describes Christians as the ones "on whom the fulfillment of the ages has come. Paul expands on this theme in 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 which, in the context of the chapter, attests to the truth that Christ's death and Resurrection have brought about several endtime blessings for Christians: (1) The general Resurrection of the endtime has been projected back into the present period in the Resurrection of Christ, the firstfruits of the dead (15:12-22). " For the apostle Paul, the death and glorious Resurrection of Jesus Christ inaugurated the glory of the age to come (1 Corinthians 15:42-49 ). A related concept to the temple of God is found in 2 Corinthians 1:22,5:5 the Spirit is the earnest of the Resurrection body (cf. ...
Nevertheless, the Spirit is not the full payment but a reminder that the present bodies of believers, temples though they are, are frail and mortal, and therefore only the guarantee of the future, glorious Resurrection. This point was one that the Corinthians needed to hear because, in their newfound enthusiasm over the Spirit, their tendency was to assume that the kingdom of God had fully arrived and that they had already received the Resurrection body in this age (see 1 Corinthians 4:8 ; 15:12-28 )
Appear, Appearance - Reference to the appearance of God (in the form of an angel) occurs primarily in the birth and Resurrection narratives of the Gospels (Matthew 1:20-21 ; 28:2-7 ; Mark 16:5 ; Luke 1:11 ; 22:43 ). While reference is made to Christ's presently appearing before God in a priestly capacity on behalf of believers (Hebrews 9:24 ), the major referent is to the post-resurrection earthly appearances of Jesus Christ. In the Gospels, Acts, and writings of Paul the Resurrection is confirmed when the risen Christ's appearance is perceived by the disciples (e. Their import is to reveal the meaning of his life, death, and Resurrection (Luke 24:25-27 ) to those who would witness to him. While Christ's appearing is connected with the abolition of death (2 Timothy 1:10 ), it is not a confirmation of the Resurrection so much as of the truth of the gospel and the worthwhileness of witnessing to Jesus Christ (2 Timothy 4:1 ). ...
Christ's first appearance in all of its facets (incarnation, death, and Resurrection) served to express God's concern for and deliverance of all people
Hope - At that point hope became more focused on the next world, especially on the Resurrection. In addition to putting hope in God and Christ, we hope for salvation (1 Thessalonians 5:8 ); God's glory (Romans 5:2 ; Colossians 1:27 ); Resurrection (Acts 23:6 ; 24:15 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:13 ); the redemption of our bodies (Romans 8:23 ); righteousness (Galatians 5:5 ); eternal life (Titus 1:2 ; 3:7 ); the glorious appearing of Jesus (Titus 2:13 ); and that we shall become like him when he does appear (1 John 3:2-3 ). After being introduced late in Old Testament times, hope in the Resurrection of the dead grew in the intertestamental period in such proportion that Paul could speak of the Resurrection as the "hope of Israel" (Acts 28:20 ; 24:15 ; 26:6-8 ). Hope also leads to comfort; we are to encourage one another with the knowledge of the Resurrection (1 Thessalonians 4:18 ). Following his teaching on Resurrection of the dead, Paul exhorts his readers to do the Lord's work abundantly since such "labor is not in vain" (Romans 15:13 )
Dead, the - The tenets of the Sadducees, denying the Resurrection, future retribution, and indeed any continuance of personal being after death, constituted a sectarian opinion from the standpoint of later Judaism. inferi), that for the wicked there is an eternal imprisonment, but for the righteous a Resurrection to eternal life (Josephus BJ ii. This Resurrection is connected with the glory of the Messianic kingdom. The Resurrection lies beyond. Jesus in His encounter with the Sadducees uses the language of His time, and speaks of the Resurrection as a transition and crisis awaiting the dead (Mark 12:25, Matthew 22:30). 153), which is to be attained by those that shall have been deemed worthy of it, an age evidently to be thought of as ushered in by the Resurrection from among the dead. ‘Eschatology’ and ‘Resurrection’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; ‘Eschatology’ and ‘Dead’ in Encyc
Jesus Christ - ...
Resurrection Jesus' Resurrection grasped the early believers. None before or since had seen a person bring God's Resurrection life to bear on this world's most pressing problem, death. The Resurrection of Jesus Christ is the center of the Christian gospel (1 Corinthians 15:1 ). He raised some from the dead, a sign that He would bring God's Resurrection life to all who would receive it. ...
The Birth of Jesus Christ The Gospels began in the heart of God and in the Resurrection faith of the writers, but Matthew and Luke begin with the story of Jesus' birth. It may have been in this way from Resurrection to preexistence that early Christians stitched together, under the guidance of God, the story of Jesus. John portrays Jesus as the Water of life (John 4:14 ); the Bread of life (John 6:41 ); the Light (John 8:12 ); the Door (John 10:7 ); the Good Shepherd (John 10:11 ); the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25 ); the Way, the Truth, the Life (John 14:6 )
Truce of God - A resolution was formed, that no man should, in time to come, attack or molest his adversaries during the seasons set apart for celebrating the great festivals of the church, or from the evening of Thursday in each week to the morning of Monday in the week ensuing, the intervening days being consecrated as particularly holy; our Lord's passion having happened on one of those days, and his Resurrection on another
Hemerobaptists - Epiphanius, who mentions this as the fourth heresy among the Jews, observes, that in other points these heretics had much the same opinion as the Scribes and Pharisees; only that they denied the Resurrection of the dead, in common with the Sadducees, and retained a few other of the improprieties of these last
Day - Fuller divisions are: dawn, of which the several stages appear in Christ's Resurrection (Mark 16:2; John 20:1; Revelation 22:16, "the bright and morning star" answering to Aijeleth Shahar, "gazelle of the morning," Psalm 22 title; Matthew 28:1; Luke 24:1); sunrise; heat of the day; the two noons (tsaharaim , Hebrew; Genesis 43:16); the cool of the day (Genesis 3:8); evening (divided into early evening and late evening after actual sunset)
Omnipotence of God - In the Resurrection of the dead, 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 :...
8
Rufus - ...
Rufus according to Paul was a disciple of note at Rome; how natural then to designate Simon, who was unknown, to the Romans by his fatherhood to one whom they well knew, Rufus! Mark gives the Romans whom he addresses a reference for the truth of the narrative of Christ's crucifixion and Resurrection to one who was accessible to them all, and who could attest the facts on the authority of his own father, the reluctant bearer of the Lord's cross (Luke 23:26)
Gamaliel - His counsel as to the apostles was not from any leaning to Christianity, but from opposition to Sadduceeism in a case where the Resurrection was the point at issue, and from seeing the folly of unreasoning bigotry (Acts 23:6-9)
Board - He must go with CHRIST through the sufferings of Calvary, his burial and Resurrection, and then be clothed with the golden robe of righteousness, the beauty of his Saviour
Thomas - He had doubted the Resurrection, and described the kind of proof he required; but, when the Lord appeared, and showed by his address to him that he knew his thoughts, then the apostle naturally desired nothing more
Caraites - The rabbinists have been accustomed to call them Sadducees; but they believed in the inspiration of the Scriptures, the Resurrection of the dead, and the final judgment
Vision - Jesus Christ manifested himself to his Apostles, in his transfiguration upon the mount, and on several other occasions after his Resurrection
Mercy Seat - Through His voluntary expiatory sacrifice in the shedding of His blood, under Divine judgment upon sin, and through His Resurrection, Christ has become the Mercy Seat for His people
Lower, Lowest - Inasmuch as the passage is describing the effects not merely of the Incarnation but of the death and Resurrection of Christ, the second interpretation is to be accepted; cp
Caiaphas - , met after the Resurrection of Lazarus, to plot the death of the Savior, lest all the people should believe on him
Firstborn - He is "the firstborn from the dead," Colossians 1:18 , because he is the beginning, and the author of the Resurrection of all who die in faith
Martyrius, Bishop of Jerusalem - of Jerusalem ordained them presbyters, attaching them to the church of the Resurrection (ib
Transfiguration - Silence regarding it is enjoined by Jesus, and practised by the disciples until the Resurrection, with which it is closely connected in significance. The problem of the transfigured body of Jesus and of the Resurrection body is the same
Symbol - Christ's death seen through the Resurrection is at the center of the two major symbolic rituals of Christian faith—baptism and the Lord's Supper or the Eucharist. ...
Baptism is a picture of the death, burial, and Resurrection of Christ
Firstfruits - ...
In 1 Corinthians 15:20,23 , Paul teaches that Christ in his bodily Resurrection is the "firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. First, Christ the "firstfruits" has triumphed in his Resurrection; then, the rest of his "crop, " the redeemed, will be raised triumphantly at his second coming (1 Corinthians 15:23 )
Obscurity - The foretelling of His cruel death and glorious Resurrection was not at first understood (Luke 18:34). Indeed, the Apostles experienced a signal opening of mind after the Resurrection in respect of the prophecies implying His Passion (Luke 24:45)
Pharisees - The Pharisees, for example, believed in the continued existence of the soul after death, the Resurrection of the body and the existence of angelic beings, whereas the Sadducees did not (Matthew 22:23; Acts 23:8). ...
The Pharisees’ belief in the Resurrection was probably one reason for their favourable attitude to Christians in the early days of the church. They did not object to multitudes of people believing in the Resurrection of Jesus
Millennium - The first Resurrection will have taken place before these years commence, the saints who have part in this Resurrection will be priests of God and of Christ, and reign with Christ the thousand years. Satan must be confined, and the first Resurrection must have taken place. See Resurrection
Preaching - It was rather the spontaneous, authoritative announcement of a truth felt to be new to the experience of man, and explicable only in the light of the incarnation, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ as Saviour of men. Paul’s sermons in the synagogues on his missionary journeys appeal to the Resurrection of Jesus in proof of His Messiahship, and support it by quotations from the OT. This included the facts of His earthly life, and His death and Resurrection (Galatians 4:4, 1 Corinthians 15:3 f. But after His death and Resurrection a new content appears in the preaching of His followers, viz. ...
(b) Resurrection and Messiahship of Jesus. ‘The Resurrection of Jesus,’ says G. Hence it was after the Resurrection and the supernatural gift at Pentecost that the apostles ‘ceased not to teach and preach (εὐαγγελιζόμενοι) Jesus as the Christ’ (Acts 5:42; Acts 2:36; Acts 3:14 f. This close connexion between the Resurrection and Messiahship of Jesus appears also in the preaching of the Apostle of the Gentiles. It must be remembered that the good tidings of the Resurrection of Jesus carried with it the glad message also of the believers’ share in the Messianic blessings (Acts 28:31), and a participation in the future Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:20 ff. Paul ‘preached Jesus and the Resurrection’). ...
To ‘preach Christ,’ then, was to proclaim, as good news to sinful and dying men, the many-sided fact of Christ, the whole scheme of salvation-pardon, regeneration, spiritual enrichment, personal immortality-involved in Christ’s death, Resurrection, and exaltation
Thousand Years - Their Resurrection is "the first Resurrection. " (See Resurrection. ) "The rest of the dead live not again until the thousand years are finished: blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first Resurrection; on such the second death hath no power, but they shall be priests of God and of Christ, and shall reign with Him a thousand years. ) Paul's ambition was to "attain the Resurrection from out of the rest of the dead" (exanastasis ). So our Lord declares (Luke 20:35), "they who shall be accounted worthy to obtain the Resurrection from the dead cannot die any more, for they are equal unto the angels, and are children of God, being children of the Resurrection. Earth, not becoming transfigured until after the millennium, shall not be, during it, the meet home for the transfigured saints; but from heaven they with Christ rule the earth, the comparatively free communion between the heavenly and earthly churches being typified by Christ's communion at short intervals with His disciples during the 40 days between His Resurrection and ascension. Finally, when the corrupt flesh and Satan shall have been cast out forever after the millennium, the general Resurrection, judgment, and regeneration of our home shall follow
Holy Day - ) The advocates for holy days suppose that they have a tendency to impress the minds of the people with a greater sense of religion; that if the acquisitions and victories of men be celebrated with the highest joy, how much more those events which relate to the salvation of man, such as the birth, death, and Resurrection of Christ, &c
Thomas - ...
The third incident occurred soon after the Resurrection, when Thomas refused to believe the report that Jesus was alive
Prisoners - The body is placed there and cannot be removed until the Resurrection
Building - ...
2 Corinthians 51:1 (a) This type is used to describe the new body which each believer will have after the Resurrection
Father - After the Resurrection the Lord was able to send this message to His disciples, whom He now calls His 'brethren:' "I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God
Men of Understanding - They said that the Resurrection was accomplished in the person of Jesus, and no other was to be expected; that the inward man was not defiled by the outward actions, whatever they were; that the pains of hell were to have an end; and not only all mankind, but even the devils themselves were to return to God, and be made partakers of eternal felicity
James - He had a separate interview with our Lord after his Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:7 ), and is mentioned as one of the apostles of the circumcision (Acts 1:13 )
Mat'Thew - He is mentioned by name, after the Resurrection of Christ, only in ( Acts 1:15 ) but he must have lived many years as an apostle, since he was the author of the Gospel of Matthew which was written at least twenty years later
Lent, Sundays in - These six Sundays, therefore, are called "SundaysIN Lent, not of Lent; they are in the midst of it, but do not formpart of it; on these Sundays we continue without interruption tocelebrate our Saviour's Resurrection
Apostle - Peter states the qualifications before the election of Judas' successor (Acts 1:21), namely, that he should have companied with the followers of Jesus "all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among them, beginning from the baptism of John unto the day that He was taken up, to be a witness with the others of His Resurrection. They were slow to apprehend the spiritual nature of His kingdom, and His crucifixion and Resurrection as the necessary preliminary to it. Even after His Resurrection seven of them returned to their fishing; and it was only by Christ's renewed call that they were led' to remain together at Jerusalem, waiting for the promised Comforter (John 21; Acts 1:4). ...
From the day of the Pentecostal effusion of the Holy Spirit they became new men, witnessing with power of the Resurrection of Jesus, as Jesus had promised (Luke 24:45; Luke 24:49; Acts 1:8; Acts 1:22; Acts 2:32; Acts 3:15; Acts 5:32; Acts 13:31). He possessed the two characteristics of an Apostle; he had" seen the Lord," so as to be an eye witness of His Resurrection, and he had the power which none but an Apostle had, of conferring spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 9:1-2; 2 Corinthians 12:12; Romans 1:11; Matthew 10:27)
Regeneration - Our Lord, in one instance, uses the term regeneration for the Resurrection state: "Ye which have followed me, in the regeneration, when the Son of man shall sit on the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, judging," Matthew 19:28 . The principal completion will be at the general Resurrection, when there will be, in the most important sense, a renovation or regeneration of heaven and earth, when all things shall become new
Parousia - The order of events awaited is the descent of Jesus with His angels from the upper heavens to the lower; the sounding of the trumpet and the voice of the archangel which will summon the dead from Sheol; the giving to the saints of the body of the Resurrection; the catching up of the living saints, who have been changed in the twinkling of an eye, to meet Jesus and the risen saints in the air; the general judgment of both living and dead; the establishment of the Messianic Kingdom, which, after a period of struggle, is to be victorious over the kingdom of Satan; and finally the fixing of the eternal supremacy of God. Among certain Christians this view was further elaborated, so that the appearance of Christ in the sky was followed by the Resurrection of the martyrs, a thousand years of peace, during which Satan was to be bound, then the conquest of Satan, the general Resurrection, and the establishment of the final conditions of eternity. ( a ) With Christ’s Resurrection
Matthew, Saint - His name occurs several times in the New Testament (Luke 6; Mark 3; Acts 1); he witnessed the Resurrection; was present at the Ascension, and in the upper chamber in Jerusalem with Mary, the Mother of Jesus, and his brethren (Acts 1)
Mohammedanism - It requires, belief in one God, in its Angels, the Koran, in its Prophets, Resurrection and judgment
Birds in Symbolism -
The phoenix, said to rise rejuvenated from its own ashes, is the type of Resurrection and eternity
Stoics - But they dismissed Paul’s belief in the Resurrection as unworthy of serious consideration (Acts 17:32)
Pit - Since God did not reveal the hope of Resurrection and the glories of heaven until late in Old Testament times, many expressions are quite negative
Stoics - The Stoics had no notion of bodily Resurrection, it is the Christian's grand hope
Bachiarius, Monk. - , by his denial of the tenets of Origen regarding the soul and the Resurrection life, and those of Helvidius on the perpetual virginity of the Virgin (§ 3, 4), and by his omission of the Son when speaking of the procession of the Holy Ghost
Paradise - Paradise is the blessed resting place with Jesus to which the penitent thief's soul was received until the Resurrection of the body (Luke 23:43)
Armenians - They believe that the souls of the righteous shall not be admitted to the beatific vision till after the Resurrection, notwithstanding which they pray to departed saints, adore their pictures, and burn lamps before them
Symbolism, Birds in -
The phoenix, said to rise rejuvenated from its own ashes, is the type of Resurrection and eternity
Jude - Jesus’ brothers at first did not accept him as the Son of God and the Davidic Messiah (John 7:5), but the Resurrection must have caused them to change their minds
Holy Ghost, the - This is illustrated by the followingstatement: "By being born again of water and the Holy Ghost weare made members of 'the Holy Catholic Church'; by keeping the unityof the Spirit in the bond of peace, we enjoy the 'Communion ofSaints'; through the Holy Ghost we receive the 'Remission ofSins,' first in our Baptism and afterwards in the Holy Communionand other ordinances; it is through the Holy Ghost that the Lordshall quicken our mortal bodies in the 'Resurrection,' and by Hisgrace we shall be enabled to give a good answer at the JudgmentSeat of Christ and so attain to the 'Life Everlasting
John - To him and Peter, Mary first conveys tidings of the Resurrection (20:2), and they are the first to go and see what her strange words mean. After the Resurrection he and Peter again return to the Sea of Galilee, where the Lord reveals himself to them (21:1,7)
Sanhedrin - Paul identified himself as a Pharisee who was on trial for his hope of Resurrection. This involved the council in a debate of the divisive issue of the Resurrection (Acts 23:1-9 )
Sheol - The situation of those in these four sections varied from extreme bliss in the first case to loss of all hope of the Resurrection in the fourth. At the Resurrection, which preceded the judgment, it was believed, at least by those under the influence of Pharisaism, that the righteous shades would rise from Sheol, and, after receiving new bodies, ascend to heaven
Confidence - Rooted in the confidence that came through the Resurrection of Jesus, the early Christians were willing to follow their Lord's example of suffering and even death. But the Resurrection of Jesus provides the key throughout life that confidence is based not on ourselves or our activity but on God who can raise the dead and give us the capacity to face adversity (2 Corinthians 1:9-10 )
Napkin (2) - ...
The reference to the napkin in John 20:7 is worthy of special attention in connexion with the Resurrection of Christ. For a full discussion of the passage and its bearing on the Resurrection, see H
Sheol - ...
During the latter part of the Old Testament era, believers became more firmly convinced that beyond death lay the Resurrection (Daniel 12:1-2). This confidence grew into bold assurance through the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Rhetoric - One of the brilliant syllogisms in the Bible is 1 Corinthians 15:12-28 in which Paul argued that the only logical conclusion to the fact of Christ's Resurrection is the Resurrection of all the dead
Mary - The wife of Cleophas, was present at the crucifixion and burial of our Lord, Matthew 27:56; Matthew 27:61, was among those who went to embalm him, Mark 16:1-10, was among the earliest to whom the news of his Resurrection was announced, Luke 24:6; Luke 24:10, and on her way to the disciples with the intelligence she met her risen Lord and worshipped him. She was at his crucifixion, John 19:25, and burial, Mark 15:47, and was among those who had prepared the materials to embalm him, Mark 16:1, and who first went to the sepulchre after the Resurrection; and she was the first to whom the risen Redeemer appeared, Mark 16:9, and his conversation with her has an interest and pathos unsurpassed in history
Draught of Fishes - —A twice repeated miracle: (1) at the beginning of the Lord’s ministry, (2) after the Resurrection. Some days or weeks after the Resurrection, when the Apostles have returned to their work as Galilaean fishermen, after a night of fruitless labour, when they are drawing near the shore, an unrecognized voice hails them, asking if they have anything to sell for food
Miracle - It is true indeed, in the instance of the Resurrection of Lazarus from the dead, the Lord Jesus first addressed his Father: but then he assigned the special reason for so doing; because"of them, said Jesus, that stood by, that they might know and believe that the Father had sent me. "At the same time proclaiming himself as the Resurrection and the life, and giving proof of it by becoming so to Lazarus
Baptism, Baptist, Baptize - Distinct form this is the "baptism" enjoined by Christ, Matthew 28:19 , a "baptism" to be undergone by believers, thus witnessing to their identification with Him in death, burial and Resurrection, e. " The experience of those who were in the ark at the time of the Flood was a figure or type of the facts of spiritual death, burial, and Resurrection, Christian "baptism" being an antitupon, "a corresponding type," a "like figure," 1 Peter 3:21
Apostle - After his Resurrection, the eleven, the traitor having hung himself, had frequent interviews with him, and witnessed his ascension. Wherefore of these men which have companied with us all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among us, beginning from the baptism of John, unto that same day that he was taken up from us, must one be ordained to be a witness with us of bis Resurrection
Prince - ’ In the latter passage the title evidently denotes the royal dignity to which Jesus has been raised by the Resurrection; but in the other quotation ἀρχηγὸς τῆς ζωῆς rather refers to His work as Saviour, and thus the marginal translation is preferable. In virtue of the Resurrection Jesus has been exalted to Divine Lordship (cf
Body - The redemption and Resurrection of the body. A person will not be redeemed from the body; rather the body will be redeemed through the Resurrection of the dead (Romans 6:5 ; Romans 8:11 ). ...
Resurrection of the body does not mean that the personality dissolves into an idea, into posterity, or into the society. The Resurrection body is that communion with the Lord and with people that begins before death and finds an unimaginable completion through the Resurrection
Millennium - "a thousand years;" generally employed to denote the thousand years, during which, according to an ancient tradition in the church, grounded on some doubtful texts in the Apocalypse and other scriptures, our blessed Saviour shall reign with the faithful upon earth after the first Resurrection, before the final completion of beatitude. 2dly, That the first Resurrection was not to be confined to the martyrs, but that, after the fall of Antichrist, all the just were to rise, and all that were on the earth were to continue for that space of time. This is the first Resurrection. Some think that Christ will reign personally on earth, and that there will be a literal Resurrection of the saints, Revelation 20:4 ; Revelation 20:7 ; but I rather suppose that the reign of Christ and Resurrection of saints alluded to in that passage, is only figurative; and that nothing more is meant than that, before the general judgment, the Jews shall be converted, genuine Christianity be diffused through all nations, and that Christ shall reign, by his spiritual presence, in a glorious manner
Heaven - The reader is referred to the articles Eschatology, Hades, Immortality, Paradise, Parousia, and Resurrection, in this and other Dictionaries for discussion of various matters which are relevant to the treatment of the conception of heaven. But the most important element is the influence of the primitive apostolic beliefs concerning the Resurrection of Christ and His state of existence after death. -The principal features or Alexandrian Jewish eschatology in relation to heaven are the view that the righteous enter at once into their perfected state of happiness after death, and the view that the Resurrection of the righteous is of the spirit only. ), which is incompatible with a purely spiritual conception of Resurrection and of heaven. it is unnecessary to bring Christ down again after His Resurrection and Ascension. But it is still more evident that he had also thought deeply on the question of Christ’s Resurrection, its nature, His present state of existence, and the bearing of these questions on the future state of believers. Paul’s view of our Lord’s Resurrection, although the conception of a ‘body of light’ found in Jewish and Gnostic sources may have influenced his thought) of a spiritual body laid up in heaven for the believer. This body was evidently after the pattern of our Lord’s Resurrection body or mode of existence (cf. The writer evidently regards the Parousia as the moment when the material heaven and earth will disappear, the wicked and apostates will receive the just judgment of God, and nothing will remain but the heavenly order of things already revealed to faith by the Resurrection and Attainment of Christ. But a Resurrection state in the future is also implied by John 6:39; John 6:54. The Resurrection of the flesh is taught and apparently is referred to the Parousia, but the nature of the intermediate condition is not clearly stated. ’ His emphasis is laid principally on the Resurrection, which is after the pattern of Christ’s (Trall. His view of heaven would seem to coincide with the developed Johannine conception, though several phrases, ‘attaining to Resurrection,’ and so forth, are Pauline. Paul and others, such as the author of Hebrews, were interested principally in the spiritual consequences of the Resurrection of Christ
Preaching in the Bible - In the NT, this message concerned a summation of the basic facts about the life, character, death, burial, Resurrection, and coming again of Christ. The same passage forms a foundation for the exposition of the extensive doctrine of general Resurrection and its Christian dimensions taught in the following verses. Peter's sermon in Acts 2:1 affirms the atoning nature of Jesus' death and the reality of His Resurrection together with a clear call to faith and repentance forming a balanced argument framed around the central proposition that “Jesus Christ is Lord
Security of the Believer - ...
The confidence or secure sense of the believer with respect to the life hereafter is rooted in the united witness of the New Testament writers that the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is the hinge point of the Christian faith. Without the Resurrection, the Christian proclamation would be empty (1 Corinthians 15:14 ). In our identity with Adam, humanity experienced lostness and death; but as we identify with the ultimate power of Christ in the Resurrection, we, too, shall experience the effective meaning of the security of the believer in the triumph of God (1 Corinthians 15:20-28 )
Gospel - The declaration of this gospel was made through the life and teaching, the death, Resurrection, and ascension of our Lord. ...
The writings which contain the recital of our Savior's life, miracles, death, Resurrection, and doctrine, are called GOSPELS, because they include the best news that could be published to mankind. It is a spiritual, rather than historical gospel, omitting many things chronicled by the other evangelists, and containing much more than they do as to the new life in the soul through Christ, union with him, regeneration, the Resurrection, and the work of the Holy Spirit
Hope, Hope - ...
Various phrases are used with the word "hope," in Paul's Epistles and speeches: (1) Acts 23:6 , "the hope and Resurrection of the dead;" this has been regarded as a hendiadys (one by means of two), i. , the "hope" of the Resurrection; but the kai, "and," is epexegetic, defining the "hope," namely, the Resurrection; (2) Acts 26:6,7 , "the hope of the promise (i
Moravian Church - " Accepting the Apostles' Creed as formulating the prime articles of faith found in the Scriptures, it emphasizes the personal mediatorship of Jesus Christ as true God and true Man, in His life, sufferings, death, and Resurrection
Love - This word seems to require explanation only in the case of its use by our Lord in his interview with "Simon, the son of Jonas," after his Resurrection (John 21:16,17 )
Sunday - Or the LORD'S DAY, a solemn festival observed by Christians on the first day of every week in memory of our Saviour's Resurrection
Kenites - " Thus "God is not unrighteous to forget the kindnesses shown to his people; but they shall be remembered another day, at the farthest in the great day, and recompensed in the Resurrection of the just" (M
Victory - Having established complete authority over all things, Christ will then deliver his victorious kingdom to the Father (1 Corinthians 15:24-28; 1 Corinthians 15:54; see Resurrection)
Hilarianus (1) Quintus Julius, Latin Chiliast Writer - ...
887 "...
He believes that after the close of the apocalyptic thousand years will come the loosing of Satan, the seducing of the nations Gog and Magog, the descent of fire from heaven upon their armies; then the second Resurrection, the judgment, the passing away of the old things and the bringing in of the new heavens and new earth; "impii in ambustione aeterna; justi autem cum Deo in vita aeterna" (c
Son of Man, the - The Lord constantly spoke of Himself as 'the Son of man,' a title that connected Him with universal headship, and not merely with Israel, especially in view of His sufferings and Resurrection and kingdom
Tabernacle - At death the spirit leaves the tabernacle, so that GOD may repair the building and fix it up new for the return of the spirit in the day of the Resurrection
Antitype - The meaning is, that righteousness, or the answer of a good conscience towards God, now saves us, by means of the Resurrection of Christ, as formerly righteousness saved these eight persons by means of the ark during the flood
Unitas Fratrom - " Accepting the Apostles' Creed as formulating the prime articles of faith found in the Scriptures, it emphasizes the personal mediatorship of Jesus Christ as true God and true Man, in His life, sufferings, death, and Resurrection
Unity of Brethren - " Accepting the Apostles' Creed as formulating the prime articles of faith found in the Scriptures, it emphasizes the personal mediatorship of Jesus Christ as true God and true Man, in His life, sufferings, death, and Resurrection
Earthquake - In the NT it is recorded that an earthquake occurred at the Crucifixion ( Matthew 27:51 ; Matthew 27:54 ), at the Resurrection ( Matthew 28:2 ), and on the night of St
Earthquake - There was also a great earthquake at the Resurrection of the Lord
Union With Christ - ...
Elsewhere, Paul uses the phrase to describe a mode of existence in which the believer identifies with the death and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 6:11 ); shares in his wisdom and holiness (1 Corinthians 1:30 ); and receives a new life or existence (2 Corinthians 5:17 ). Faith-union with Christ, therefore, makes possible incorporation into a new sphere of existence marked by "fullness, " covenant relation, and Resurrection life. This is closely associated with the notion of sharing in Christ's death and Resurrection (Romans 6:1-11 ; 8:17 ; Galatians 2:20 ; Colossians 2:12 ; 3:1 ). For Paul, union with Christ results in the personal appropriation of the effects of Jesus' life, death, Resurrection, and glorification. Thus, "dying and rising with Christ" is to be understood objectively as a participation in the historical death and Resurrection of Jesus. ...
Christ has accomplished his redemptive work "for us" through his suffering, death, and Resurrection (Romans 5:6-8 ; Galatians 1:4 ; 3:13 ). Union with Christ thus means to be enlivened by the power of his Resurrection, to live in the realm of the Spirit. " Through identification with Christ's Resurrection, they have likewise "put on the new nature. Incorporation into Christ by identification with his death and Resurrection means to become part of a body. Having identified with the death and Resurrection of Christ, the body is empowered by his Spirit to manifest his presence to the world. Faith-union thus finds its focal point in the death and Resurrection of Christ. "In Christ, " believers identify with his death (Romans 6:3,5-11 ), his burial (Romans 6:4 ), his Resurrection (Colossians 3:1 ), his ascension (Ephesians 2:6 ), his lordship (2 Timothy 2:12 ), and his glory (Romans 8:17 )
Paul - He knew the message of Christianity: Jesus' Resurrection, His messiahship, and His availability to all humankind. The real reasons for his arrest are noted: the crowd was enraged at his mentioning his call to the Gentiles (Acts 22:21-22 ), and he stated to the Sanhedrin that he was arrested because of his belief in the Resurrection. See Resurrection ; Sanhedrin . Paul must have realized that he, as well as the young Gentile Christians, needed the approval and support of the Christian leaders in Jerusalem, the very place where the crucifixion, burial, Resurrection, and ascension of Jesus took place. ...
(3) The presentation of Christ as God's reconciling gift to humankind is graphically portrayed in the death, burial, and Resurrection of Jesus . The Death, burial, and Resurrection of Jesus must be thought of as a unit. When Paul stressed the Resurrection event, he thought in terms of the doctrine of the future which he had inherited from his Jewish background: (a) Human history has an end which will begin a new world. Jesus' Resurrection is evidence that God has already begun the messianic era. It guarantees the hope that the complete Resurrection and the new world is sure to come (1 Corinthians 15:20-24 ). Jesus' death and Resurrection was God's way of verifying that Jesus is the One who brings about reconciliation between humankind and God
Apostle - After his Resurrection, he sent them into all the world, commissioned to preach, to baptize, to work miracles, etc
Matthew, Gospel of Saint - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection
Sto'Ics - The ethical system of the Stoics has been commonly supposed to have a close connection with Christian morality; but the morality of stoicism is essentially based on pride, that of Christianity on humility; the one upholds individual independence, the other absolute faith in another; the one looks for consolation in the issue of fate, the other in Providence; the one is limited by Periods of cosmical ruin, the other is consummated in a personal Resurrection
Confirmation - InHebrews 6:1, 2, we find Confirmation or the Laying on of Handsmentioned as a first or foundation principle of the Doctrine ofChrist, as necessary to the health of the soul as Repentance, Faith,Baptism, Resurrection and eternal judgment
Son of God - He does not bear this title in consequence of his miraculous birth, nor of his incarnation, his Resurrection, and exaltation to the Father's right hand
Earnest - Christians earnestly wait the new Resurrection body (2 Corinthians 5:2 )
Luke, Gospel of Saint - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Brothers, Jesus - ” After the Resurrection, however, they changed their minds and joined the disciples in times of prayer ( Acts 1:14 )
Judgment - These were strictly eschatological, and included non-participation in the Resurrection of the body, and suffering in hell
Lift - In John's Gospel, lifting up refers both to the lifting up of Jesus on the cross and to His exaltation (resurrection/ascension) (John 3:14 ; John 8:28 ; John 12:32 ,John 12:32,12:34 )
Just - In nearly every case Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 uniformly gives ‘righteous,’ exceptions being Matthew 5:45 (‘rain on the just and the unjust’), Luke 1:17 (‘wisdom of the just’) Luke 14:14 (‘resurrection of the just’)
Great Supper - As Jesus had just mentioned the reward in store for good done unselfishly at the Resurrection of the just, a man exclaimed: "Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the Kingdom of God
Authority - After His Resurrection Jesus Himself declared: ‘All authority hath been given unto me in heaven and on earth’ ( Matthew 28:18 ; cf
Gospel of Saint Luke - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Gospel of Saint Matthew - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection
Trumpets - The 'last trump' will sound at the Resurrection of the saints
Epistles to the Corinthians - The object and plan of the epistle is accordingly twofold: the denunciation and correction of abuses and crimes, 1:10 to 6:20, in which are treated the dissensions, avoidance of sinners, sins of injustice and impurity; and a reply to the questions addressed to him, 7:1 to 16:4, in which are treated marriage and celibacy, meats offered to idols, divine services and the Holy Eucharist, the charisma, the Resurrection, the collection for the poor of Jerusalem
Embalm - But if the reader will consult all the evangelists, he will find that the thing was not done, but prevented by our Lord's Resurrection
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - In 455 Chrysippus was made the superior of the monastery of Laura, and subsequently of the church of the Resurrection, by the patriarch Juvenal
Mary, Sister of Lazarus And Martha - To Martha Jesus said that she should have her brother back, and should see the power of death broken by the One who was "the Resurrection and the life;" but Mary had Himself
Communion - , the Death) of Christ and the Body of Christ, as set forth by the emblems in the Lord's Supper, 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; of participation in what is derived from the Holy Spirit, 2 Corinthians 13:14 (RV, "communion"); Philippians 2:1 ; of participation in the sufferings of Christ, Philippians 3:10 ; of sharing in the Resurrection life possessed in Christ, and so of fellowship with the Father and the Son, 1 John 1:3,6,7 ; negatively, of the impossibility of "communion" between light and darkness, 2 Corinthians 6:14 ; (b) fellowship manifested in acts, the practical effects of fellowship with God, wrought by the Holy Spirit in the lives of believers as the outcome of faith, Philemon 1:6 , and finding expression in joint ministration to the needy, Romans 15:26 ; 2 Corinthians 8:4 ; 9:13 ; Hebrews 13:16 , and in the furtherance of the Gospel by gifts, Philippians 1:5
Luke (2) - The gospel closes with Christ's Peræan ministry, his last journey to Jerusalem, his passion, death, Resurrection, and Lazarus - Happy are they who, in view of their own death, or that of friends, can know that they are safe in Him who says, "I am the Resurrection and the life;" and, "because I live, ye shall live also
ma'ry Magdalene - " (Matthew 28:5 ; Mark 16:6 ) To her first of all Jesus appeared after his Resurrection
Maran-Atha - " After His Resurrection they used the title of or to Him as applied to God, "but it must here be remembered that the Aramaic-speaking Jews did not, save exceptionally, designate God as 'Lord'; so that in the 'Hebraist' section of the Jewish Christians the expression 'our Lord' (Marana) was used in reference to Christ only" (Dalman, The Words of Jesus)
Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus - From every other place, as far as we can learn, the answer was that they celebrated the feast of our Lord's Resurrection on no other day than Sunday; but Polycrates, writing in the name of the bishops of Asia, declared that they had preserved untampered the tradition to celebrate only on the 14th day of the month, the day when the Jewish people put away their leaven
Lord's Day - The first day of the week is not the Sabbath, but theLord's Day, and as such has been observed since the Resurrectionof our Lord, of which it is the weekly commemoration. Then ourLord has made this day one of the highest spiritual privilege, byuniting it to His own Person and work as the Day of His Resurrection,the weekly recurrence of the Christian Passover, a perpetualEaster; and also as the weekly memorial of His supreme Gift of theHoly Ghost upon the Feast of Pentecost, to abide with His Churchforever
James - Paul specifically mentioned a Resurrection appearance by Jesus to James (1 Corinthians 15:7 ). After the Resurrection and ascension, the brothers are said to have been with the twelve and the other believers in Jerusalem (Acts 1:14 )
Baxterians - Resurrection unto life, and justification in judgment; glorification of the soul at death, and of the body at the Resurrection, Philippians 3:20-21
Assurance - ...
This sense of assurance for believers is not merely limited to the present era on earth, but the Resurrection of Jesus assures Christians that they are not deluded in their expectation of a future hope with their Lord (1 Corinthians 15:17-20 ). The Resurrection of Jesus is the powerful guarantee that Christian preaching and faith are not in vain (v
Keys - Thus in Sanhedrin, 113, ‘Elijah desired that there should be given to him the key of rain; he desired that there should be given to him the key of Resurrection of the dead: they said to him, “Three keys are not given into the hand of a representative, the key of birth, the key of rain, and the key of Resurrection of the dead
John the Apostle - He with Peter on the Resurrection morn ran to the empty tomb of Jesus, and "he saw and believed. The history of the passion and Resurrection or public glorification of the Lord
First-Fruit - Just as the first-fruits are the earnest of later harvesting, so the Resurrection of Christ is the guarantee of our Resurrection
Hieracas, an Egyptian Teacher - that the future Resurrection would be of the soul only not of the material body; for all who counted it a gain to the soul to be liberated by death from the bonds of matter found it hard to believe that it could be again imprisoned in a body at the Resurrection. Rufinus does not make the story turn on the fact that Hieracas denied the Resurrection of the flesh
Life - At Christ’s return, God will raise them to Resurrection life, where sin and death will have no more power (John 11:11; John 11:25-26; 1 Corinthians 15:20-26; 1 Corinthians 15:51-57). When Jesus Christ returns, they will be raised from death to enjoy the Resurrection life of glory, perfection, power and immortality (Matthew 25:46; John 5:28-29; John 6:40; Romans 2:7; Romans 6:22; 1 Corinthians 15:42-44; 2 Corinthians 5:4; 2 Timothy 1:10; see Resurrection)
Lord's Day - -(a) In the brief Resurrection stories, as found in all the Gospels, conspicuous emphasis is laid on ‘the first day of the week’ as the day on which Jesus rose from the dead. Zahn calls attention to the particularity with which John notes the days connected with the Passion and Resurrection, and explains it as due to the Christian week-scheme already fully established among the churches of Asia Minor, with which the Fourth Gospel was so closely associated (Skizzen aus dem Leben der alten Kirche, no. Jesus’ Resurrection from the first figured as a dominating fact concerning Him in early faith and evangelism. What wonder that that day should come to be regarded as par excellence the Lord’s Day?...
Those who deny the reality of the Resurrection as a unique event are hard pressed to account for the undeniable primitive association of the day with that occurrence. by the events of the Day of Pentecost, or by the first appearance of the risen Christ in Galilee, or by the selection of the first available time after the Jewish Sabbath, and that the connexion of it with the date of the Resurrection was an afterthought’ (J. This is another indication of the ecclesiastical and eucharistic atmosphere in which the Resurrection stories grew up’ (p. ’ ‘And after the observance of the Sabbath, let every friend of Christ keep the Lord’s Day as a festival, the Resurrection-day, the queen and chief of all the days,’ Similarly in the Apost. 59: ‘Assemble yourselves together every day, morning and evening, singing psalms and praying in the Lord’s House (ἐν τοῖς κυριακοῖς) … but principally on the Sabbath day; and on the day of our Lord’s Resurrection, which is the Lord’s Day, meet more diligently,’ etc. The commemoration of the Resurrection of Christ alone would make a great difference. -The fact that for Christians the one raison d’étre of the Lord’s Day was the commemoration of the Lord’s Resurrection made it a weekly festival to be kept with gladness. ) The worship includes inter alia the recitation of three psalms, responses, prayers, and the reading of the gospel story of the Resurrection. It arises from the mistaken identification of the weekly festival of the Resurrection of Christ with the Sabbath of the Jews and of the Fourth Commandment in the Decalogue. Christians must rely on other sanctions, and chiefly the definite association of the day with the Resurrection of our Lord, the true instinct by which with great spontaneity the first little Christian communities set the day apart, the continuous usage of the Church, the provision for the function of worship
Atonement (2) - ...
The starting-point of Christian experience is the Resurrection of Jesus (1 Corinthians 15:17, Romans 4:25). ‘Resurrection’). It stood directly related to the event of which the Apostles were the chosen witnesses, the Resurrection of Jesus, whereby He was exalted to be a Prince and a Saviour unto the remission of sins (Acts 2:33; Acts 2:38), of which, according to Hebrew expectation, the kingdom was to be the home (e. It is true that the earliest sermons lay stress rather upon the fact of the Resurrection, but always as closely following upon the Death, which, though inflicted by His enemies, resulted from the determinate counsel of God (Acts 2:23), who glorified ‘his Servant’ Jesus. 1 Corinthians 15:3; 1 Peter 1:11), leaves no room for doubt that Philip the Evangelist was not alone in beginning from the picture of Jehovah’s Suffering Servant to preach Jesus (Acts 8:35), but that the Apostles gave their witness to the Resurrection by preaching what St. The central fact of Christ’s life and work was complex, consisting of both the Cross and the Resurrection. Gospel according to Peter has contrived with singular fidelity to the Apostle’s mind to give an imaginative picture of the Resurrection, wherein the Cross is curiously blended with the rending tomb (Gospel acc. Baptism is the initiatory Christian rite, and whether it conveys or only represents the forgiveness of sins, stood from the first in close relation to the Death and Resurrection of Christ (Matthew 28:19, Mark 16:15-16, Acts 2:38; Acts 8:13; Acts 8:16; Acts 8:36; Acts 9:18; Acts 10:47-48; Acts 16:33; Acts 19:5; Acts 22:16, Romans 6:3-4, Acts 7:55 Ephesians 4:4-6, Colossians 2:12, Titus 3:4-6; 1 Peter 3:21; cf. ’ The antithesis between the Cross and the Resurrection was, indeed, such as to suggest that the death of Jesus was united to its marvellous sequel by a chain of causation removing it from the ordinary category of dissolution, and making it the interpretative fact of a career otherwise the most unintelligible in history. But the main point to observe is that the Resurrection, being in the first instance the crucial fact of experience which marked off for the disciples their Master Jesus as the Son of God (Romans 1:4 ὁρισθέντος, cf. Matthew 3:15 πληρῶσαι; and that again, from the moment when He begins to make plain to the unwilling ears of His disciples that His throne can be reached only through Resurrection after suffering and death, He has to cry, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan’ (Matthew 16:23)
Sabbath - It commemorates not only the creation of the world, but a still greater event-the completion of the work of atonement by the Resurrection of Christ; and as he rose from the dead on the day after the Jewish Sabbath, that day of his Resurrection has been observed by Christians ever since. The early Christian fathers refer to the first day of the week as the time set apart for worship, and to the transfer of the day on account of the Resurrection of the Savior. " Justin Martyr observes that "on the Lord's day all Christians in the city or country meet together, because that is the day of our Lord's Resurrection, and then we read the writings of the apostles and prophets; this being done, the person presiding makes an oration to the assembly, to exhort them to imitate and to practice the things they have heard; then we all join in prayer, and after that we celebrate the sacrament
Jonah - ’ (2) The Resurrection was not a sign to the men of that generation, i. (5) There is the difficulty about the reckoning of the three days and three nights in the case of our Lord’s Resurrection. (2) The Resurrection was a sign, since the Apostles proclaimed it (Acts and Epistles passim), and made it the corner-stone of their teaching about the Christ. Paul, to Jonah’s deliverance after three days from the ‘whale’ as typifying the Resurrection (Luke 24:46, 1 Corinthians 15:4), it being much more unlikely that the reference in these places is to Hosea 6:2 or Genesis 22:4; and this may be thought to add some strength to the probability that our Lord did utter the words recorded in v. It is certain that this length of time did not literally elapse between the burial and the Resurrection of Christ, and the commentaries in explanation usually follow the lead of St. At any rate the difficulty, such as it is, lends support to the arguments for the authenticity of the verse, since if it were an amplification by the Evangelist, or an interpolation, the Evangelist or the interpolator would hardly have made our Lord utter a prediction expressed in a form not in literal and precise accord with the facts of the Resurrection as related in the Gospels. ...
It is worth noticing that the story of Jonah had a peculiar interest for the early Christians; his deliverance from a strange sea-monster is depicted many times in the Roman catacombs as typifying the Resurrection
Body - Paul’s attitude to the idea of a bodily Resurrection. To him the Resurrection of Christ was a fact of the most absolute certainty (Romans 1:4, 1 Corinthians 15:3 ff. Had he thought of the body as something essentially evil, had he not been persuaded of its absolute worth, his hopes for the future life must have centred in a bare doctrine of the immortality of the soul, and not, as they actually did, in the Resurrection of the body. But while he clung passionately to the hope of the Resurrection, he did not believe in the Resurrection of the present body of flesh and blood (1 Corinthians 15:50). His doctrine of the Resurrection includes the assurance that when the dead in Christ are raised (he has little to say of the physical Resurrection of others), it will not be in the old bodies of their earthly experience, but in new ones adapted to heavenly conditions (1 Corinthians 15:47 ff
Christ, Christology - ) They appealed for confirmation of this conviction to the fact that God had ‘raised him from the dead’; and also that He had been ‘exalted’ by, and to, the right hand of God, the Resurrection and Exaltation marking a decisive moment in the Messiahship. ) At the same time they referred back behind the Resurrection to facts and characteristics of His earthly ministry. The first may be stated thus: What did the disciples understand by the Messiah? What character, rôle, or function did they assign to Him? And the second thus: At what point did they understand Him to have entered on His Messiah-ship? They identified Jesus with the Messiah of Jewish expectation; but did that mean that He had been (and was still, and was to return as) Messiah, or that the Messiahship was a dignity conferred on Him after death and at the Resurrection? The answer to these questions follows on the examination of the other elements in the primitive conviction. ) That conviction rested upon, and appealed to, the Resurrection as the conclusive proof of the Messiahship of Jesus. But the Resurrection was uniformly connected with the Exaltation to the right hand of God, or with its equivalent-the participation of Jesus in the Divine ‘glory. The Resurrection is thus regarded as the externally visible side of a great transaction which has its true significance in the Exaltation of Jesus to Messianic rank and honour in heaven; it was a public declaration of His station; the man whom they had seen crucified now occupied the place of dignity and authority which prophecy and apocalyptic had assigned to the Messiah. The word ‘Lord’ (κύριος), like ‘Christ,’ is probably used as an official title; but in any case the phrase witnesses to the belief that the Resurrection and Exaltation had marked a decisive moment in the Messiahship of Jesus. Peter is careful to emphasize on more than one occasion the ministry which had preceded the Crucifixion and Resurrection. Of all that He had done also in Judaea and Jerusalem (as well as of the Resurrection) St. There are numerous indications that from the very outset the minds of some at least of the disciples were at work on the material provided for them by (a) their recollection of what Jesus had been, said, and done; (b) the facts of His Crucifixion and Resurrection; and (c) the promises and predictions of the OT, together possibly with some of the language of the apocalypses
Hope - in the latest times, the Resurrection of the dead ( Isaiah 25:8 ; Isaiah 26:19 , Daniel 12:2 ; probably Job 19:25 ff. ‘By the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead’ humanity was ‘begotten again unto a living hope’ ( 1 Peter 1:3 ; cf. ; for it dates from our Lord’s Resurrection and the gift of the Holy Spirit ( Romans 15:13 ). This will begin with the Resurrection of the dead ( 1Th 4:16 , 1 Corinthians 15:12-23 , John 5:28 f. ); and its guarantee is twofold, being given objectively in the Resurrection and ascension of our Lord ( Acts 17:31 , Romans 1:4 , Matthew 6:33 , Colossians 1:18 , Hebrews 6:20 , 1 Peter 1:21 etc
Messiah - ...
The Messiah’s death and Resurrection...
Even true believers of Jesus’ time still thought of the Messiah solely in relation to the establishment of God’s kingdom throughout the world at the end of the age. ...
Jesus’ Resurrection provided the solution to this apparent difficulty. Even the disciples did not understand when Jesus foretold his Resurrection (Mark 8:29-33; Mark 9:31-32), but afterwards they looked back on the Resurrection as God’s final great confirmation that Jesus was the Messiah (Luke 24:45-46; Acts 2:31-32; Acts 2:36). ...
Title and name...
So firmly was the Messiah identified with Jesus after his Resurrection, that the Greek word for Messiah (Christ) became a personal name for Jesus
On - The legend of the wonder-bird Phoenix, early used to illustrate the doctrine of the Resurrection, arose here; to this city Joseph, delivered from prison, came with royal honors to marry the daughter of Potipherah, "dedicated to Ra
John, Gospel of - 13-21) presents our Lord in the retirement of private life and in his intercourse with his immediate followers (13-17), and gives an account of his sufferings and of his appearances to the disciples after his Resurrection (18-21)
Mark, Gospel of Saint - " The sixteen chapters are written in the chronological order, with some exceptions, and follow these general divisions: ...
preparation through the preaching of Saint John, the baptism, and temptation (1,2-13)
the preaching and miracles of Jesus in Galilee (1,14, to 9,50)
the journey to Jerusalem for the feast of the Pasch, and the last days of Our Lord's teaching (10-13)
the Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension (14-16)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that all reasonable doubt that Saint Mark is the author of the second Gospel as now contained in our Bibles, and that the Gospel was written before the year 70 and according to the preaching of Saint Peter, has been removed by the clear evidence of tradition from the earliest ages, as found in the testimony of the Fathers, in the use of the Gospel by early Christians, and its place in ancient codices and versions
Thomas - Thus, when Jesus on the evening of the Resurrection-day appeared to the Apostles in the room at Jerusalem where they were assembled with closed doors, Thomas was absent, buried in despair; and when he heard that they had seen the Lord, he would not believe it
Witness - In the NT the Apostles frequently appear as witnesses ( martyres ) of the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus ( Luke 24:48 , Acts 1:8 ; Acts 2:32 ; Acts 3:15 etc
Faithfulness of God - Whoever will take the pains to compare the predictions of the birth, poverty, life, sufferings, death, Resurrection, and ascension of Christ, with the accomplishment of the same, will find a striking demonstration of the faithfulness of God
Firstfruits - Christ in His Resurrection is described as the “firstfruits” of them that slept (1Corinthians 15:20,1 Corinthians 15:23 )
Judgment, the Final - ...
The time of the judgment will be after the Resurrection (Hebrews 9:27 ; Acts 17:31 )
Salutation - Paul, as do other New Testament authors, also transformed the salutation to speak of newness brought on by the cross and Resurrection
Great Commission, the - Mandate to "make disciples of all nations" given by Christ to his disciples following his death and Resurrection (Matthew 28:16-20 ; Mark 16:15-18 ; Luke 24:46-49 ; John 20:21-23 ; Acts 1:8 )
Ascension of Christ - The ascended Christ gives hope of Resurrection and eternal life with Christ to all believers and thus encourages them to live the life to which Christ calls them (Colossians 3:1-4 )
Signs - Christ's death and Resurrection is God's way of deliverance
Naaman - ...
This is an illustration of the truth that there is no blessing for sinful man but through death: all is in Resurrection and in Christ Jesus
Son, the; Son of God - by the Resurrection of [1] dead
Gamaliel - If the Jewish council had thought this, it would have been very absurd in Gamaliel to exhort them to wait to see whether "the counsel and work" was of God, that is, whether the Apostles related a fact when they preached the Resurrection, and grounded the divine authority of their religion upon that fact
Sadducees - They denied the existence of angels and spirits, and maintained that there was no Resurrection, Matthew 22:23; Acts 23:8, the soul according to them dying with the body; hence they denied a future state of reward or punishment
Kingdom of Heaven - He introduced his disciples into it while on earth, and more fully after his Resurrection and ascension, John 20:22 Acts 2:32-36 ; is "head over all things," in order to make it triumphant and supreme even on earth, Daniel 7:27 Ephesians 1:20-22
Sign of the Cross - We say "In the name" - expressing the unity of God; we mention the three Persons of the Trinity; the cross itself, made with the hand, manifests our belief in the Incarnation, death, and Resurrection of Our Saviour, and shows that we regard Him not only as God but as man - for otherwise He could not die
jo'Nah - " (Luke 11:29,30 ) But the Resurrection of Christ itself was also shadowed forth in the history of the prophet
Hell - ; consequently it has been the prevalent, almost the universal, notion that Hades is an intermediate state between death and Resurrection, divided into two parts one the abode of the blest and the other of the lost
Fasting - They fasted only when he was taken from them and killed; but their sorrow was turned into joy at his Resurrection (Luke 5:33-35)
Sadducees - Also, they did not believe in the continued existence of the soul after death, the bodily Resurrection of the dead, the directing will of God in the events of life, or the existence of angelic beings. Secondly, the church’s rapid growth was based on the truth of the Resurrection, which the Sadducees denied (Acts 4:1-2; Acts 4:10; Acts 4:17)
Thomas - When Jesus appeared to the disciples on the evening of the Resurrection day, Thomas was absent, and was unable afterwards to accept the testimony, ‘We have seen the Lord. Though not persuaded of the reality of the Resurrection, he keeps his old loyalty and love; and when the Master’s presence is utterly sure, he gladly accepts the highest that the revelation of Christ implies
Pelagians - That the general Resurrection of the dead does not follow in virtue of our Saviour's Resurrection
Cleopas - —One of the two disciples to whom the Lord appeared on the afternoon of the Resurrection day as they went to Emmaus, distant about two hours from Jerusalem (See Emmaus). Paul’s knowledge extended to all the actual events of the Passion and Resurrection period (cf
Adam - In 1 Corinthians 15:1 , Paul used the Adam-Christ analogy to affirm the Resurrection. As by a man came death, so by a Man has come Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:21 )
Death - Paul argued on the basis of Jesus’ Resurrection that this event had already taken place ( Resurrection when God would wipe away our tears ( Heaven - Jesus Christ came from heaven (John 3:31; John 6:38), returned to heaven after his death and Resurrection (Acts 1:11; Ephesians 1:20), at present appears in heaven on behalf of his people (Colossians 3:1; Hebrews 8:1; Hebrews 9:24) and will one day return from heaven to save his people and judge his enemies (Acts 1:11; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-9). Matthew 22:23-30; 1 Corinthians 15:35-44; 1 Corinthians 15:50; see Resurrection)
Incarnation - Two special miracles, the Resurrection and the Virgin-birth, are noticed separately below. ...
(5) What crowned the faith of the disciples was the fact of the Resurrection. At first, no doubt, they were so much absorbed in the fact itself that they did not at once reason out all that it meant to their beliefs; and in teaching they had to adapt their message to the capacities of their hearers; but there can be no question about the place which the belief in the Resurrection took in determining their creed (see Jesus Christ, p. This work is invariably associated in the NT with His death and Resurrection. Many metaphors are used in the NT to describe the effect of His death and Resurrection, such as redemption, which conveys the idea of a deliverance at a great cost from slavery; propitiation, or an act or process by which sin is neutralized; salvation, or bringing into a condition of health or safety; reconciliation with God, and remission of sin (see Atonement). (3) These two parts of Christ’s work for man were accomplished by His earthly life, death, and Resurrection. The Resurrection transformed this faith, and it naturally became the central point of their early teaching. The conception of Christ prominent in the earliest Apostolic age, and emphasized in the first part of the Acts and in the Epistles of 1Peter , James, and Jude, regards Him primarily as the Messiah, the glory of whose Person and mission has been proved by the Resurrection, who has been exalted to God’s right hand, and who will be judge of quick and dead
Exaltation - Through his death and Resurrection Christ was exalted to the right hand of the Father. It was through the Resurrection from the dead that Christ's death was demonstrated in a powerful way (Romans 1:4 ). By the Resurrection Christ's human nature entered the glorious state of the unending life, and the risen Lord swallowed up death in victory (1 Corinthians 15:54 )
Ignorance - Sometimes they referred to the blessedness of those ‘with Christ’ (Philippians 1:23), sometimes to their quiescence in a state of sleep (1 Corinthians 15:20), and sometimes to the activities carried on (1 Peter 4:6), but the intermediate state was comparatively uninteresting to the Apostolic Age, as their main thought centred in the Resurrection and the Parousia. Even with regard to these great events of the future there was not always assured knowledge; disciples of Christ were not only doubtful of the Resurrection, but even opposed to its teaching, and St. Paul, and was associated with their low ethics, their heathen intimacies, and their disbelief in the Resurrection
Redeem, Redemption - Deliverance of humankind from its state of alienation from God has been accomplished through the death and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 4:25 ; 2 Corinthians 5:18-19 ). He applied to himself the things said in the Old Testament of the Servant of the Lord concerning his rejection, humiliation, death, and Resurrection (Mark 8:31 ; 9:31 ; 10:33-34 ). The New Testament makes clear that divine redemption includes God's identification with humanity in its plight, and the securing of liberation of humankind through the obedience, suffering, death, and Resurrection of the incarnate Son
Judgment - The words ‘the time’ (Matthew 8:29), and ‘then’ (Matthew 16:27, Matthew 25:1), point to a time which follows the Lord’s appearing in glory with His angels after the Resurrection from the dead. ‘That day and hour’ (Matthew 24:36), ‘the Resurrection of life’ and ‘the Resurrection of judgment’ (John 5:29), are the antithetical statements of what takes place after the Resurrection, which to one class of men is entrance into life, and to the other entrance into judgment followed by spiritual death. The Gospels do not give information as to whether or not the Final Judgment follows immediately on the general Resurrection
Corinthians, Epistles to the - Some three years after Paul's first visit to Corinth he heard that there were divisions among them, 1 Corinthians 1:11,12 ; that there was allowed evil in their midst, 1 Corinthians 1:1 ; and that there were some among them who said that there was no Resurrection. ...
1 Corinthians 15 : Speculations having arisen as to the Resurrection, the subject is discussed. Resurrection is a fact essential in the gospel. Here the Resurrection of the just is specially contemplated. He had been in great danger (probably referring to the uproar at Ephesus, Acts 19 ), but the God of Resurrection had delivered him
Heaven - The reader is referred to the articles Eschatology, Hades, Immortality, Paradise, Parousia, and Resurrection, in this and other Dictionaries for discussion of various matters which are relevant to the treatment of the conception of heaven. But the most important element is the influence of the primitive apostolic beliefs concerning the Resurrection of Christ and His state of existence after death. -The principal features or Alexandrian Jewish eschatology in relation to heaven are the view that the righteous enter at once into their perfected state of happiness after death, and the view that the Resurrection of the righteous is of the spirit only. ), which is incompatible with a purely spiritual conception of Resurrection and of heaven. it is unnecessary to bring Christ down again after His Resurrection and Ascension. But it is still more evident that he had also thought deeply on the question of Christ’s Resurrection, its nature, His present state of existence, and the bearing of these questions on the future state of believers. Paul’s view of our Lord’s Resurrection, although the conception of a ‘body of light’ found in Jewish and Gnostic sources may have influenced his thought) of a spiritual body laid up in heaven for the believer. This body was evidently after the pattern of our Lord’s Resurrection body or mode of existence (cf. The writer evidently regards the Parousia as the moment when the material heaven and earth will disappear, the wicked and apostates will receive the just judgment of God, and nothing will remain but the heavenly order of things already revealed to faith by the Resurrection and Attainment of Christ
Matthew - Though the Bible gives no details of Matthew’s later activities, he was involved in the establishment of the church after Jesus’ Resurrection (Acts 1:13)
Dwelling - The heavenly dwelling of 2 Corinthians 5:2 is the Resurrection body
Martha - Jesus’ Resurrection of Lazarus demonstrated not only the power that Jesus had over death, but also the unity that Jesus had with his Father in all his works (John 11:41-44)
Sacrament - When Paul wrote of being “buried with Christ” in baptism, he certainly meant that this visible rite demonstrates our spiritual union with Christ in His death and Resurrection
Brethren of the Lord - After the Resurrection, however, convinced by so tremendous a demonstration, they joined the company of the believers ( Acts 1:14 )
Beloved Disciple - When the other disciple followed and saw the empty tomb, he believed in the Resurrection of Jesus (John 20:2-4 ,John 20:2-4,20:8 )
Slowness of Heart - As Godet says, ‘If they had embraced the living God with more fervent faith, the fact of the Resurrection would not have been so strange to their hopes’ (Com
Gehenna - The NT writers employ the word in its general force as a synonym for the idea of endless punishment for sinners, as over against ‘heaven’ the synonym of endless bliss for those who have enjoyed the Resurrection
Dew - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:2) Hence, the Resurrection of his people by grace, as hereafter to glory, is said to be "as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out her dead
Cleopas - The third day after our Saviour's death, on the day of his Resurrection, Cleopas, with another disciple, departed from Jerusalem to Emmaus; and in the way discoursed on what had lately happened
Messiah or Messias - Numerous and clear detached predictions respecting the birth, character, life, sufferings, and death of Christ, his Resurrection, ascension, and kingdom, were all in him perfectly fulfilled, John 1:41 4:25
Advocate - Just as Jesus’ death and Resurrection was the basis on which God accepted them as his people in the first place, so it is the basis on which God continues to forgive their failures (Romans 8:34; 1 John 1:9; 1 John 2:1-2)
Theodosius, a Monophysite Monk - of Jerusalem in the church of the Resurrection, and at once proceeded to ordain bishops for Palestine, chiefly for those cities whose bishops had not yet returned from Chalcedon
Tiberius ii., Emperor of Constantinople - A book concerning the nature of the Resurrection, published by Eutychius, taught that the body would be impalpable like a pure spirit
Salvation, Saviour - ...
The teaching of the prophets bore fruit in the age preceding the advent of Jesus in deepening ideas of the future life, of Resurrection and a future perfected state: of the connexion of prosperity with righteousness though mostly in the sense of outward legal obedience, the very error against which the prophets declaimed and in more concrete representations of the Messiah. The name Jesus was given Him because ‘it is he that shall save his people from their sins’ ( Matthew 1:21 ); He is distinctively the ‘Saviour’ ( Luke 2:11 ); His work on earth was ‘to seek and to save that which was lost’ ( Luke 19:10 ); His death and Resurrection were a means to salvation ( Romans 5:8 ; Romans 5:10 ); He is exalted ‘to be a Prince and a Saviour’ to give repentance and remission of sins ( Acts 5:31 ); ‘in none other is there salvation’ ( Acts 4:12 )
Trump Trumpet - The verse is part of the climax of the Pauline argument which bases the future Resurrection on the Resurrection of Christ
Lord's Day - The most obvious reason, of course, was the Resurrection of Jesus which took place on that first Lord's Day. Evidence from the early centuries clearly shows that Christians regarded Sunday as a day to rejoice in the new life brought by the Resurrection
Asleep, Sleep - anastasis, Resurrection, from ana, 'up,' and histemi, to cause to stand); cp. has 'fallen asleep;' (b) from the fact that in the NT the word Resurrection is used of the body alone; (c) from Daniel 12:2 , where the physically dead are described as 'them that sleep (Sept
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - Among these are the house of Caiaphas with the pillar at which our Lord was scourged, the praetorium of Pontius Pilate, the little hill ( monticulus ) of Golgotha, and, a stone's throw from it, the cave of the Resurrection. He tells us that Constantine built a house of prayer on the site of the Resurrection and beautified the caves connected with our Lord's Birth and Ascension, and that he did so in memory of his mother, who had built two churches, one at Bethlehem, the other on the Mount of Ascension. Thus of the three famous caves, Eusebius connects Helena not with that of the Resurrection, but only with the other two. He indeed says that these were not the only churches she built, but it is hardly conceivable that he should have left the one on the site of the Resurrection unspecified. All his words bear upon the Resurrection, not the Passion, of our Lord. At the same time it is difficult to believe that, had the cross or any part of it been discovered, it should not have been more exactly described, and the most probable explanation is that πάθος is used to describe the whole scene of Redemption, of which the Resurrection was a part (Eus. 395) tells us that Helena built three basilicas (not two, as in Eusebius), one on each of the sites of the Passion, Resurrection, and Ascension. 581) speaks of the images of Jove and Venus which stood until the time of Constantine on the sites of the Resurrection and of the Passion respectively
Cross, Crucifixion - Mark emphasized the messianic meaning, using the taunts of the crowds to “save yourself” (Mark 15:30-31 ) as an unconscious prophecy pointing to the Resurrection. ” Three major themes are interwoven in this and other creeds ( Romans 4:25 ; Romans 6:1-8 ; Romans 8:32 ; Colossians 2:11-12 ; 1 Timothy 3:16 ; Hebrews 1:3-4 ; 1 Peter 1:21 ; 1 Peter 3:18-22 ): Jesus death as our substitute (from Isaiah 53:5 ; compare Mark 10:45 ; Mark 14:24 ); Jesus' death and Resurrection as fulfilling Scripture; and Jesus' vindication and exaltation by God. ...
The cross is the basis of our salvation in Paul's epistles (Romans 3:24-25 ; Ephesians 2:16 ; Colossians 1:20 ; Colossians 2:14 ), while the Resurrection is stressed as the core in the Book of Acts (Acts 2:33-36 ; Acts 3:19-21 ; Acts 5:31 ). The reason for the distinct emphases is most likely seen in the fact that Acts chronicles the preaching of the early church (with the Resurrection as the apologetic basis of our salvation) and the epistles the teaching of the early church (with the crucifixion the theological basis of our salvation). The believer relives the death and Resurrection by putting to death the old self and putting on the new. In other words, both at conversion and in spiritual growth, the believer must relive the cross before experiencing the Resurrection life
Thessalonians, First And Second, Theology of - Because God in Christ has brought a new sense of hope to the world, Paul is able to view the pain and suffering experienced in this world from the ultimate perspective of the Resurrection and glorification of Christians (1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:10 ) together with the judgment of evil (1 Thessalonians 5:2-3 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:6-9 ). ...
This text has also given rise to questions concerning the state of the dead between their death and Resurrection. First, the concept of an immortal "soul" is a Greek idea, which in the theory has been imported into the Christian theology of the Resurrection. It is merely assumed that God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit are ultimately one (1 Thessalonians 1:2-5 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:13-16 ); that the one God is in fact working in Christ Jesus (1 Thessalonians 2:13-14 ; 5:18 ); that the death and Resurrection of Jesus are fundamental elements of Christian faith and the basis for Christian hope and authentic Christian living (1 Thessalonians 1:10 ; 2:14-16 ; 4:14 ). Borchert...
See also Paul the Apostle ; Resurrection ; Revelation, Theology of ; Second Coming of Christ ; Sleep ...
Bibliography. Cullmann, Immortality of the Soul or Resurrection from the Dead; R
Jonah - Hosea (Hosea 6:2) saw the prophetical meaning of Jonah's entombment: "after two days will He revive us, in the third day He will raise us up;" primarily Israel, in a short period (Luke 13:32-33) to be revived from its national deadness, antitypically Messiah, raised on the third day (John 2:19; 1 Corinthians 15:4); as Israel's political Resurrection typifies the general Resurrection, of which Christ's Resurrection is the firstfruits (Isaiah 26:19; Ezekiel 37:1-14; 1 Corinthians 15:22-23; Daniel 12:2). Jonah was a type to Nineveh and Israel of death following sin, and of Resurrection on repentance; preeminently of Christ's death for sin and Resurrection by the Spirit of God (Matthew 12:40). Christ's death, entombment three days without corruption, and Resurrection, is the grand proof of His Messiahship and of His power and will to save, just as Jonah's message derived its weight with the Ninevites from his past entombment and restoration
Son - It is also used to describe characteristics other than moral, as: (i) sons of the Resurrection, Luke 20:36 ; (j) sons of the Kingdom, Matthew 8:12 ; 13:38 ; (k) sons of the bridechamber, Mark 2:19 ; (l) sons of exhortation, Acts 4:36 ; (m) sons of thunder, Boanerges, Mark 3:17 . ...
The declaration "Thou art My Son, this day have I begotten Thee," Psalm 2:7 , quoted in Acts 13:33 ; Hebrews 1:5 ; 5:5 , refers to the birth of Christ, not to His Resurrection. In Acts 13:34 the statement as to the Resurrection of Christ receives the greater stress in this respect through the emphatic contrast to that in Acts 13:33 as to His being raised up in the nation, a stress imparted by the added words "from the dead. 34 of His Resurrection. , Matthew 8:20 ; 11:19 ; 12:40 ; 26:2,24 : (b) those which refer to His glory in Resurrection and to that of His future advent, e
Lazarus - the Resurrection and the Life. " Martha, retaining still remainders of unbelief (she believed in Lazarus' future Resurrection, but she hardly dared to believe what she herself had hinted at in John 11:22, that Christ will raise him now), objected on the ground of the body's presumed decomposition by this time. cf6 "Loose him, and let him go"; contrast Jesus' Resurrection, the graveclothes and the napkin folded separately, because, unlike Lazarus, He was to die no more (John 20:6-7). Plumptre (Smith's Dictionary) identifies Simon the leper with Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-40); Martha had the Pharisees' belief in the Resurrection (John 11:24); Mary's gift of the ointment was after the example of the sinful woman in Simon's house; the leprosy came on subsequently. cf6 "one thing is needful"; "Jesus beholding loved him" (Mark) is said also of Lazarus (John 11:5); Jesus' love at last wrought out his conversion, possible to God though not to man; a sharp Palestine fever is sent to discipline him; his death and rising through Jesus' power is accompanied by his spiritual Resurrection (John 5:24-25)
Hour - An appointed time for meeting or for religious festival, a brief moment of time, one twelfth of the day or of the night, and in the Gospel of John the significant period of Jesus' saving mission on earth from His triumphal entry until His death and Resurrection. ...
Jesus' hour is a central theme in John's Gospel, creating an emotional uncertainty and expectancy and a theological understanding of the central importance of Jesus' death and Resurrection. In John's Gospel, “hour” usually refers to the period from the triumphant entry (John 12:23 ) until the climactic death and Resurrection
Conflagration - They suppose that the earth, thus beautified and improved, shall be inhabited by those who shall inherit the first Resurrection, and shall here enjoy a very considerable degree of happiness, though not equal to that which is to succeed the general judgment; which judgment shall, according to them, open when those thousand years are expired, mentioned in Revelation 20:4 . ...
But it seems an invincible objection against this hypothesis, which places the millennium after the conflagration, that the saints inhabiting the earth after the first Resurrection are represented as distressed by the invasion of some wicked enemies, Revelation 20:7-9 . 400; Fleming on the first Resurrection; Ray's three Discourses; Whiston's Theory of the Earth; and article DISSOLUTION in this work
Celsus, Polemical Adversary of Christianity - He challenges the evidence of Christianity, and asks, "Who saw the dove lighting on the head of Jesus after His baptism?" As to the Resurrection, he makes the remark which has been copied by Renan and others, that it was Mary Magdalene, "a fanatical woman," who was the first witness of the Resurrection, according to all the accounts (ii. 55); and remarks on the disbelief invariably given to such accounts as those of the Resurrection of Zamolxis, Pythagoras, Orpheus, Protesilaus, Hercules, and Theseus
Heaven - The third heaven is the seat of God and of the holy angels; the place into which Christ ascended after his Resurrection, and into which St. For that God resides in a particular part of the universe, where he makes his presence known to his intelligent creatures by some transcendent, visible glory, is an opinion that has prevailed among Jews and Christians, Greeks and Romans, yea, in every nation, civilized or savage, and in every age; and, since it is confirmed by revelation, why should it be doubted? Into this most holy place, the habitation of the Deity, Jesus, after his Resurrection, ascended; and there, presenting his crucified body before the manifestation of the divine presence, which is called "the throne of the Majesty in the heavens," he offered unto God the sacrifice of himself, and made atonement for the sins of his people. Some of the ancients imagined that the habitation of good men, after the Resurrection, would be the sun; grounding this fanciful opinion on a mistaken interpretation of Psalms 19:4 , which they rendered, with the LXX and Vulgate, "He has set his tabernacle in the sun
Apocalyptic Literature - The eschatology of these chapters is somewhat sensuous as regards both the Resurrection and rewards and punishments. In them we have probably the oldest piece of Jewish literature touching the general Resurrection of Israel and representing Gehenna as a place of final punishment (see Gehenna). In them are to be found representations of the sleep of the righteous, the Resurrection of the spirit of the Messiah, though human, as God’s Son (105. There is no mention of a Resurrection, and the righteous are upon death to go immediately to Paradise. The book contains no doctrine of the Resurrection; but spirits are immortal. Certain passages would seem to imply a Resurrection of the dead and a renewing of all creation along with the endless punishment of the wicked. In 2Es 7:30-70 is an elaborate account of the general Resurrection, Judgment, and the condition of souls after death; and it is this material quite as much as the Messianic prediction of chs
James - At some time in the 40 days that intervened between the Resurrection and the ascension, the Lord appeared to him, 1 Corinthians 15:7
Job, Book of - The book furnishes Divine consolation and possesses marked dogmatic importance because of the doctrine concerning the Resurrection of the Body (19:25-27)
Everlasting Punishment - ...
According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, Resurrection and promised return
Counselor - The Paraclete leads believers into all truth and presents this truth in light of the Resurrection
Assurance - The Resurrection of Jesus (Acts 17:31 ) is the "assurance" (Gr
Eternal - , of God, Romans 16:26 ; of His power, 1 Timothy 6:16 , and of His glory, 1 Peter 5:10 ; of the Holy Spirit, Hebrews 9:14 ; of the redemption effected by Christ, Hebrews 9:12 , and of the consequent salvation of men, Hebrews 5:9 , as well as of His future rule, 2 Peter 1:11 , which is elsewhere declared to be without end, Luke 1:33 ; of the life received by those who believe in Christ, John 3:16 , concerning whom He said, 'they shall never perish,' John 10:28 , and of the Resurrection body, 2 Corinthians 5:1 , elsewhere said to be 'immortal,' 1 Corinthians 15:53 , in which that life will be finally realized, Matthew 25:46 ; Titus 1:2
Right, Rightly - It was exercised by the Son of God, as from, and in conjunction with, the Father when the Lord was upon earth, in the days of His flesh, Matthew 9:6 ; John 10:18 , as well as in Resurrection, Matthew 28:18 ; John 17:2
Everlasting Punishment - According to the early church's teaching (Hebrews 6:2 ), the eternal fate of creation and human beings is bound up with gospel preaching and thus with the end-of-time events of Jesus' death, Resurrection and promised return
Paradise - Since Israel had no immediate access to the garden at history's origin or conclusion, paradise, sometimes called Abraham's Bosom, was associated with the realm of the righteous dead awaiting the Resurrection of the body
Clement - " As an emblem of the Resurrection Clement relates the heathen fable of the phoenix living five hundred years, and then rising again as a fresh bird from its own ashes
Chamber - And the same, where the disciples met after our Lord's Resurrection, for fear of the Jews
Golgotha - "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope, by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance, incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away
Intermediate State - Beside questions concerning the nature of the happiness of heaven, there have also arisen questions concerning the state of the soul in the interval between death and the general Resurrection
Daniel, Book of - The prophecies contained in the latter part of the book extend from the days of Daniel to the general Resurrection
Handle - 1: ψηλαφάω (Strong's #5584 — Verb — pselaphao — psay-laf-ah'-o ) "to feel, touch, handle," is rendered by the latter verb in Luke 24:39 , in the Lord's invitation to the disciples to accept the evidence of His Resurrection in His being bodily in their midst; in 1 John 1:1 , in the Apostle's testimony (against the gnostic error that Christ had been merely a phantom) that he and his fellow Apostles had handled Him
Reuben - Remaining there was a type of a Christian stopping short of the place of nearness God has given him — not realising his death and Resurrection with Christ, and his true place in the heavenlies
Witness - ...
Witness in the early church...
After Jesus’ Resurrection and ascension, the disciples boldly bore witness to him as Lord and Messiah. They emphasized the facts of his life, death, and particularly his Resurrection, for they were personal eye-witnesses of those events (Acts 2:22-24; Acts 2:32-33; Acts 5:30-32; Acts 10:36-43; Acts 13:27-31)
Hear, Hearing - Both before (Matthew 11:15 ; 13:9,43 ; and parallels ) and after (Revelation 2:7,11 , 17,29 ; 3:6,13 , 22 ) his Resurrection, Jesus calls on those who have spiritual ears to use them. Jesus' immediate followers testify to what they have seen and heard both during his ministry and after his Resurrection (Acts 4:20 ; 22:15 ; 1 John 1:3,5 )
Jephthah - ’ Among early peoples there were certain rites which represented the death and Resurrection of vegetation, in connexion with which various myths arose. This death of Tammuz was celebrated annually with bitter wailing, chiefly by women ( Judges 11:40 ); often (though not always, for the rite differed in different localities) his Resurrection was celebrated the next day, thus ensuring by means of imitative magic the re-appearance of fresh vegetation in its time
Mary - She was also present at his burial, prepared perfumes to embalm him, and was early at his sepulchre on the morning of his Resurrection. The character of the two sisters was well contrasted at the supper in Bethany, after the Resurrection of Lazarus
Judgment Damnation - Compared with the outlook of the great prophets, this conception of a Resurrection of the dead for judgment and sentence is something altogether new. ...
This belief in a Resurrection of the dead and a universal judgment forms a landmark in the history of Hebrew religion. The pessimism and dualism of the apocalyptic world-view, its demonology and angelology, its conception of a death-struggle between the kingdom of Satan and the kingdom of God, its conception of a Resurrection from the dead and a Final Judgment, can be accounted for only on the hypothesis of Persian Influence. Then will come the general Resurrection and the Judgment (Revelation 20:11-13). In Matthew 25:46 we read of a Resurrection of believers who have died and of a gathering of these and of living believers to meet the Lord in the air and be for ever with Him, but there is no mention of a Resurrection of the wicked and a Final Judgment. Though the picture here is more detailed, the Resurrection of the wicked and the Judgment find no place in it. ‘The hour cometh,’ Christ is represented as saying, ‘in which all that are in the tombs shall hear his (the Son of man’s) voice, and shall come forth; they that have done good unto the Resurrection of life, and they that have done ill unto the Resurrection of judgment’ (John 5:28-29; cf. ...
But notwithstanding this spiritualizing train of thought, the traditional apocalyptic notions-the Parousia, a Resurrection of the just and unjust, final judgment by Christ and eternal punishment for the lost-succeeded in maintaining themselves in the Church’s faith
Eschatology (2) - ...
(b)The Resurrection. Yet obviously both they and the general populace, and even the disciples after the Resurrection (Acts 1:6), thought of a state of things in which the position of God’s ancient people would be central and supreme. Whether or not the author of Daniel in the latter of these passages conceived of a Resurrection from the dead available for all past generations of faithful Israelites, it seems certain that in the time of our Lord this sense was assigned to his words by those who, like the Pharisees, held the doctrine. ’...
(b) The Resurrection. It was taught that there would be a Resurrection of the righteous (Luke 14:14), i. ), or said to the penitent malefactor (Luke 23:43), ‘To-day shalt thou be with me in Paradise,’ had He not been addressing people accustomed to the idea that in the intermediate state, previous to the Resurrection and the final judgment, moral distinctions were accorded a real, if incomplete, recognition. In our Christian minds, as with the NT writers, the idea of the Resurrection is inseparably associated with that of the Judgment which follows it. Hence even in Daniel 12:2, which cannot be said to teach a universal Resurrection, among the ‘many’ who awake from the dust of the earth there are ‘some’ who arise to ‘shame and everlasting contempt. a vengeance of Jahweh exercised upon all rebel Gentiles and upon the transgressors of the covenant in Israel), and if the collective unit of the nation was practically displaced by the individual, it is clear that the idea of universal judgment must have come to have for its counterpart the idea of universal Resurrection. When Jesus spoke of the ‘resurrection of the dead,’ or even of the Messianic ‘Son of Man’ as executing judgment, He was using language whose general implications were either entirely or (as in the case of ‘Son of Man’) at least partially understood by His hearers
Lord - The decisive reason for transferring the divine title Lord to Jesus was His Resurrection from the dead. ...
Before His Resurrection, Jesus was addressed with the Jewish title of honor Rabbi (“teacher”, Mark 9:5 ; Mark 11:21 , for example). The Resurrection changed the respectful student/teacher relationship of the disciples with Jesus into the believers' servant/Lord relationship. ...
Jesus as the Messiah of Israel (Acts 2:36 ) was installed as Head of His church and Ruler of the cosmos by His Resurrection (Colossians 1:17 ; Colossians 2:6 ,Colossians 2:6,2:10 ; Ephesians 1:20-23 ). See Christ; God ; Holy Spirit ; Messiah ; Jesus; Rabbi ; Resurrection
Unbelief - An example of this phase may be found in the Corinthian church, where many failed to believe in the Resurrection of the dead and were not slow to express openly their unbelief. They accepted the common faith in the personal Resurrection of Jesus Christ, but they seemed to have assumed that this was a unique occurrence, and to have rejected the general truth of the recovery and Resurrection of the body as sharing in the Christian salvation. Paul in his reply asserted that such unbelief was destructive of the faith of the Church, and affirmed in some of the most brilliant passages of all his writings that the Resurrection of Christians was part of the Christian redemption, gave inspiration to the Christian life, and crowned with glory the Christian experience (1 Corinthians 15)
Preaching Christ - In point of fact, it is found in the first instance in His Resurrection and exaltation to God’s right hand. The one is represented by the series of witnesses to the Resurrection cited by St. It is the testimony of the Apostles to the Resurrection of Jesus, and experience of the new life in His spirit, not any pre-Christian Christology, or Jewish Messianic dogmatic, that define for the first Christians the content of the title ‘the Christ. The Apostles sincerely believed that they had seen the Lord, and they could not conceive of their calling as having anything in it to take precedence of this—that they were witnesses of the Resurrection, and therefore of the Messiahship of Jesus. No doubt this gave its whole character to primitive Christianity; but if we accept the testimony of the Apostles to the Resurrection, we shall be slow to say that it transformed its character, and made it a new and essentially an inferior thing as compared with the religion of Jesus. Jesus was not forgotten when the Apostles, appealing to the Resurrection and to Pentecost, argued that He was the Christ, God’s King, through whom all the hopes which God had inspired were to be fulfilled. With the experience of the Resurrection and with this dogma of the death of the Messiah, the Christ-religion, Christianity in the narrower sense, begins. His function was to be a witness to the Resurrection—that is, to the Messiahship of Jesus; he was, in other words, to be a preacher of the Christ. To preach Christ, even in the days when belief in the Resurrection was so overpowering, one required to have a full knowledge of Jesus. We need, of course, to know the historical Jesus, as the qualifications for Apostleship show; but to preach Christ means to preach that Person as present in the sovereignty of His Resurrection. This it does through the Resurrection as apprehended by faith. He Himself, in the sense at least of being God’s representative, is King in it (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 20:21; Matthew 25:34, Luke 23:42), and it is from what we know of Him, including ultimately His Resurrection and exaltation, that all our conceptions of the Kingdom must be derived
Eschatology - This scheme is as follows: (1) the signs foreshadowing the end, (2) the Coming of the Messiah, (3) the Resurrection of the dead, (4) the Last Judgment, (5) the inauguration of the Kingdom of God, The NT passages in which this ‘eschatological scheme’ is implied are too numerous to be cited; for typical examples, see Acts 2:17-36; Acts 3:20 f. Again, the Death, Resurrection, and Ascension of our Lord were proclaimed by the apostles, not merely as interesting historical events, but as part of the miraculous portents which were to form the ‘birth-pangs of the Kingdom of God’ (Acts 2:24-36; Acts 3:14-26; Acts 26:8). ...
4 The Resurrection. -Questionings with regard to the nature and manner of the Resurrection are scarcely seen at all in the earliest eschatology as reflected in Acts and the Judaeo-Christian Epistles (see Lake, The Earlier Epistles of St. Generally the references apply to our Lord’s Resurrection, and even where the general Resurrection is implied (Acts 23:6-8; Acts 24:15; Acts 26:6-8) no details as to the manner thereof are fo
Determine, Determinate - " In Romans 1:4 it is translated "declared," where the meaning is that Christ was marked out as the Son of God by His Resurrection and that of others (see under DECLARE)
Sign - ...
"Signs" confirmatory of what God had accomplished in the atoning sacrifice of Christ, His Resurrection and ascension, and of the sending of the Holy Spirit, were given to the Jews for their recognition, as at Pentecost, and supernatural acts by apostolic ministry, as well as by the supernatural operations in the churches, such as the gift of tongues and prophesyings; there is no record of the continuance of these latter after the circumstances recorded in Acts 19:1-20
Israel, Spiritual - ...
Such interpretations seek to understand the mystery of divine election which began with Israel and climaxed in the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus
Bethany - This magnificent miracle by Jesus demonstrated His authority, prepared for His Resurrection, and was even magnified through the name of His friend, Lazarus (an abbreviation of Eleazar, “God has helped”)
Mediator - ...
The work of Jesus through his life, death and Resurrection is therefore the basis on which God deals with human sin and brings repentant sinners back to himself
Impossibility - He Himself showed it in the supreme triumph of the Resurrection, when the tomb had been sealed so that escape might be impossible (Matthew 27:66)
Morning - The passages in the Gospels in which πρωῑ̔ (morning) plays the most interesting and puzzling part are those connected with the visit of the women to the sepulchre after the Resurrection of Jesus (Matthew 28:1, Mark 16:2, Luke 24:1, and John 20:1)
Sealing - On the day of Pentecost, after Peter had proclaimed the death, Resurrection, and exaltation of Christ, the hearers being "pricked in their heart," said, "What shall we do?" Peter replied, "Repent, and be baptised every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost
Flesh - All outward distinctions are lost sight of in experiment, ally knowing Him in His new Resurrection life (Galatians 2:6; Galatians 2:20; Galatians 3:28; Romans 6:9-11; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 1 Peter 3:18; 1 Peter 4:1-2); disproving both Mariolatry and transubstantiation
Marcionites - He denied the Resurrection of the body, and allowed none to be baptized but those who preserved their continence; but these he granted might be baptized three times
Sleep (And Forms) - Their bodies are raised in the Resurrection, but only for punishment and to be sent away into the outer dark
Commodianus - ), probably because of certain heterodox statements respecting Antichrist, the Millennium, and the First Resurrection
First-Fruits - Christ is called the first-fruits of them that slept; for as the first-fruits were earnests to the Jews of the succeeding harvest, so Christ is the first-fruits or the earnest of the general Resurrection
Order - 1, signifying "that which has been arranged in order," was especially a military term, denoting "a company;" it is used metaphorically in 1 Corinthians 15:23 of the various classes of those who have part in the first Resurrection
Corinthians - He replies to their queries respecting celibacy and marriage, and the eating of food offered to idols; and meets several errors and sins prevalent in the church by timely instructions as to disputes among brethren, decorum in public assemblies, the Lord's supper, the Resurrection of believers, true charity, and the right use of spiritual gifts, in which the Corinthian Christians excelled, but not without a mixture of ostentation and disorder
John, Gospel of - (John 18:1 ; 19:1 ) ...
His Resurrection, and the proofs of it, ch
Must - , Matthew 17:10 ; 24:6 ; 26:54 ; 1 Corinthians 15:53 , especially regarding the salvation of men through the death, Resurrection and ascension of Christ, e
Firstborn - Also, through his Resurrection, he is the firstborn from the dead
Lucanus (1) - He accuses him of going beyond other heretics who merely denied the Resurrection of the body, and of maintaining that not even the soul would rise, but some other thing, neither soul nor body
Adam - As all who are in physical union with Adam share the deathly consequences of Adam’s sin, so all who are in spiritual union with Christ share the Resurrection life that Christ has made possible (1 Corinthians 15:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:45-49; see also IMAGE)
Mary - On the morning of Jesus’ Resurrection, she and some others, including Mary the mother of James and Joseph, went to anoint the body of Jesus, but found the tomb empty (Matthew 28:1-5; John 20:1). Jesus’ Resurrection seems to have changed his brothers, for in the days immediately after his ascension, they along with Mary were among the group of Jerusalem believers who met for fellowship and prayer (Acts 1:14; cf
Ark of God - This typifies association with Christ's death and Resurrection. It is only in the power of Christ in Resurrection that the saint can be victorious
Son of Man - Passion Sayings The second largest group of Son of man sayings are connected with the suffering, death, and Resurrection of Jesus. Death would be followed by victory, the Resurrection from the dead (Matthew 17:9 ). ...
In his own way, John highlighted this dual emphasis on the humiliation of the cross and the glory of the Resurrection
Lord's Day, the - Certainly the second-century Gospel of Peter, which twice speaks of the day of Jesus' Resurrection as "the Lord's Day" (9:35; 12:50), makes the connection. 130) notes that Christians celebrate Jesus' Resurrection of "the eighth day" (15:9; cf. It soon became a fixed day for worship, a celebration of the Resurrection centered around the Lord's Supper
Lord, Lordship - ...
"His purpose did not become clear to the disciples until after His Resurrection, and the revelation of His Deity consequent thereon. ...
"How soon and how completely the lower meaning had been superseded is seen in Peter's declaration in his first sermon after the Resurrection, 'God hath made Him, Lord,' Acts 2:36 , and that in the house of Cornelius, 'He is Lord of all,' Acts 10:36 ; cp. ...
"The title 'Lord,' as given to the Savior, in its full significance rests upon the Resurrection, Acts 2:36 ; Romans 10:9 ; 14:9 , and is realized only in the Holy Spirit, 1 Corinthians 12:3
Miracle - Lazarus' revivification grounds Jesus' subsequent claim to be the Resurrection and the life (John 11:25 ). ...
The greatest miracle of Jesus' life, of course, is his Resurrection. Immediately following his death, nature heralds its unusual significance with an earthquake, the rending of the temple veil, and the opening of tombs of certain Old Testament saints, who would then be raised following Jesus' Resurrection (Matthew 27:51-54 ). God's Resurrection of Jesus vindicates his claims, gives atoning meaning to his death, serves as a prelude to his ascension and exaltation, and makes eternal life and bodily Resurrection available to all who trust in him. Whereas the Synoptics use "signs" in a negative sense as that which unbelieving skeptics demand but do not receive save for the Resurrection as the "sign of Jonah" (Matthew 12:38-42 ), John consistently speaks of Jesus' miracles as "signs" meant to lead people to faith in Christ (2:11; 4:54; Resurrection appearances, marks his return to the Father, and enables him to bestow the Spirit permanently on all believers (Acts 1:1-11 )
Christ, Christology - If this is the correct background to Jesus' self-awareness, both of His relationship to God and to His mission, it helps to explain how He looked confidently beyond defeat and death to His vindication by God in the Resurrection. Their appreciation of who Jesus was took its point of departure from the conviction that, with His Resurrection and exaltation, the new age of God's triumph, described in the Old Testament and the intertestamental writings, had indeed dawned, and the Old Testament Scriptures (notably Psalm 110:1 ) had been fulfilled. The crux is seen in Deuteronomy 21:23 which prescribed that anyone hanging on a tree died under God's curse (the verse is quoted in Galatians 3:13 ) A rationale was found in two ways: it came by asserting (1) that Jesus' rejection was already foreseen in the Old Testament, notably Psalm 118:22 ; Isaiah 53:1 , and that His implicit claims to be the Messenger and embodiment of God's kingdom revealed only human unbelief; and (2) that at the Resurrection God had reversed this verdict, vindicated His Son, and installed Him in the place of honor and power. The first Christological statement therefore was based on the fact of two stages in Jesus' existence: He was the Son of David in His human descent, and since the Resurrection He is known as the Son of God with power and alive in the Spirit (Romans 1:3-4 ). ...
At a practical level this way of seeing Jesus' life and Resurrection gave these believers a personal relationship with Jesus as a present reality. This is the startling novelty of what the Resurrection and enthronement of Jesus meant. ” Drawn from Daniel 7:13-18 , the Son of man title is one of authority and dignity, two ideas that the Resurrection of Jesus confirmed (Acts 7:56 )
Athenagoras - ), de Resurrectione Animarum against Origen, there is an unmistakable quotation from the Apology (c. In the Commentatio of Clarisse, § 8, is the acute conjecture that the treatise de Resurrectione was written at Alexandria rather than Athens, from c. —These are, (1) the Apology ; (2) the Treatise on the Resurrection of the Dead. ...
(2) Treatise on the Resurrection. 39 c, "let the argument upon the Resurrection stand over"; from which words we may not unfairly gather that the Treatise on the Resurrection shortly followed the former work. "We have not made it our aim to leave nothing unsaid that our subject contained, but summarily to point out to those who came together what view ought to be taken in regard to the Resurrection" must allude not merely to a few friends who might happen to be present when the book was read, but to a regular audience. (ii) Arguments for the Resurrection. His treatment of the Resurrection is for the most part admirable. In the treatise On the Resurrection, c
Isaac - His living still after the three days (Genesis 22:4) in which he was dead in Abraham's purpose prefigures the Messiah's Resurrection on the third day. in the way of a typical representation of Christ's death and Resurrection. Resurrection. God is still "the God of Isaac," who is one of the triad with whom the children of the kingdom shall sit down at the Resurrection of the just (Luke 20:37-38, etc
Apostle - Their unique place is based not only on having witnessed the Resurrection, but also on having been commissioned and empowered by the resurrected Lord to proclaim the gospel to all nations. In this broader sense, an apostle was a witness to the Resurrection of Christ, sent by him to make disciples of all nations. In addition to the divine call, the person must have been a disciple of Jesus from John's baptism to the ascension, and specifically a witness of the Resurrection (Acts 1:21-22 ). The Twelve had intimate knowledge of his life, and a wider group had been witnesses to his Resurrection
Ascension of Jesus Christ - Event, recorded most fully in Acts 1:1-11 , by which Christ concluded his postresurrection appearances, left the earth, and was taken up into heaven, not to return physically until his second advent. In virtually all these passages, a literal ascension from earth to heaven seems assumed, although some scholars have challenged whether Paul believed in such an ascension because of his movement from Resurrection directly to exaltation in such passages as Romans 1:4 ; 8:34 ; and 1 Corinthians 15:12-28 . Ephesians 4:10,1 Timothy 3:16 contradict this opinion, and it can be safely said that, given the clear references to Christ's ascension in other New Testament documents and the plain and relatively uniform witness of the New Testament to a bodily Resurrection of Christ, that Paul and indeed all the New Testament authors would agree with Luke that after forty days of appearances to his disciples, Jesus experienced a literal, physical ascension into heaven, albeit in his "spiritual body" as the firstfruits of the final Resurrection that is envisioned for us all at the end of time (cf. Romans 8:34 connects the present intercessory work of Christ with his work on the cross, viewing the death, Resurrection, and exaltation (implying the ascension) of Jesus as one continuous event
Discourse - (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Mark 8:31 to Luke 19:47-485 Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (Luke 10:1-24); teaching as to Prayer, with parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (Luke 17:1-10); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the Resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19). Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (Luke 11:14-36); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:14-31); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Matthew 21:23 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50)
Gospel - a history of the life, actions, death, Resurrection, ascension, and doctrine of Jesus Christ. But if all the circumstances of the history of Jesus, that is, his miraculous conception in the womb of the virgin, the time at which he was born, the place where he was born, the family from which he was descended, the nature of the doctrines which he preached, the meanness of his condition, his rejection, death, burial, Resurrection, and ascension, with many other minute particulars; if all these various circumstances in the history of Jesus exactly accord with the predictions of the Old Testament relative to the promised Messiah, in whom all the nations of the earth were to be blessed, it follows that Jesus was that Messiah. Lastly: if he really foretold his own death and Resurrection, the descent of the Holy Ghost, its miraculous effects, the sufferings of the Apostles, the call of the Gentiles, and the destruction of Jerusalem, it necessarily follows that he spake by the authority of God himself. The sacred narratives then represent to us the high character that he assumed; the claim he made to a divine original; the wonderful miracles he wrought in proof of his divinity; the various prophecies which plainly marked him out as the Messiah, the great Deliverer of the Jews; the declarations he made that he came to offer himself a sacrifice for the sins of all mankind; the cruel indignities, sufferings, and persecutions to which, in consequence of this great design, he was exposed; the accomplishment or it, by the painful and ignominious death to which he submitted, by his Resurrection after three days from the grave, by his ascension into heaven, by his sitting there at the right hand of God, and performing the office of a Mediator and Intercessor for the sinful sons of men, till he shall come a second time in his glory to sit in judgment on all mankind, and decide their final doom of happiness or misery for ever
Pre-Eminence - Both here and in Romans the Resurrection is due to His holiness (Acts 13:35). ]'>[1] , further, the holiness is due to His sonship, of which the Resurrection is God’s formal declaration, or (as Meyer) into which the Resurrection instates Him. May this not be the idea here also? Linguistic usage permits; for the priest was said ‘to cleanse’ the leper when he officially pronounced him ‘clean’; so may it not be that the thought in Acts 13:33 is that in the Resurrection God formally declared Jesus to be His begotten Son? On the other hand, the occurrence of the term ‘justified’ (Acts 13:39) shows how precarious a procedure it is to assert development of doctrine according to the occurrence or non-occurrence of a particular expression in brief letters addressed to different local conditions
Session - the Resurrection, the Ascension, and the Session, which means the sitting or the state of being seated. Harnack indeed thinks that in some of the oldest accounts the Resurrection and the sitting at the right hand of God are taken as parts of the same act, without mention of any ascension. ), ‘are four well-marked links in a chain of facts—our Lord’s Death, Resurrection, Session, Intercession. It is difficult to see why the second and the third, the Resurrection and the Session, should be taken as parts of the same act, when the first is clearly distinct. John do not carry their accounts beyond the Resurrection
Dove - The dove with an olive branch was used on a sarcophagus to signify peace and hope of Resurrection; in flight, it represents the Ascension of Christ or the entrance of saints into glory
Michael - Michael will usher in the coming Resurrection by standing up for God's people, as their unique champion (Daniel 12:1-2; Daniel 10:21), "your prince
Galilee - His first miracle was wrought at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, and his last, after his Resurrection, on the shore of Galilee's sea
Waiting - It is used again in Galatians 5:5 in reference to an issue of Christian experience, namely ‘the hope of righteousness’ (ἐλπίδα δικαιοσύνης); but, as a rule, the verb is applied to the Parousia, as in 1 Corinthians 1:7 and Philippians 3:20, while in 1 Peter 3:20 it is found in an absolute sense, of the longsuffering of God in the days of the Flood, though the context suggests that what is waited for is the repentance and moral Resurrection of mankind
Chiliasm - chilioi ), that is to say, the period of 1000 years between the Resurrection of the saints and that of the rest of the dead, of the visible appearance of Christ to establish His Kingdom of risen saints and defeat an equally literal Antichrist, and of the Last Judgment
Work - Abundant activity in this office follows a firm belief in the Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:58)
Star - Paul’s well-known argument on the Resurrection of the body: ‘One star differeth from another star in glory’ (1 Corinthians 15:41)
Ascension - ...
Most of all the ascension combined with the Resurrection exalted Christ (Philippians 2:9 )
Raca - Whereas we find the apostle, Paul using the very phrase in his discourse on the Resurrection
Psalms - And it is remarkable, (but whether it may be considered as confirming this opinion I do not presume to say) that when the Lord Jesus was expounding to the two disciples, in his way to Emmaus, on the morning of his Resurrection, the things concerning himself, he made use of those very arguments as proofs in his humiliation, and glory of his divine mission
Day of Christ - This work was to be inaugurated with the Resurrection of the dead, the establishing of judgment, and the conquest of His enemies
Hosea - The principal predictions contained in this book, are the captivity and dispersion of the kingdom of Israel; the deliverance of Judah from Sennacherib; the present state of the Jews; their future restoration, and union with the Gentiles in the kingdom of the Messiah; the call of our Saviour out of Egypt, and his Resurrection on the third day
Natural - ...
The natural man is here evidently opposed to, ο πνευματικος , "him that is spiritual," 1 Corinthians 2:15 , even as the natural body which we derive from Adam is opposed to the spiritual body which believers will receive from Christ at the Resurrection, according to 1 Corinthians 15:44-45
Simon Peter - Because of his faith, fidelity, enthusiasm, and love, although he was somewhat irresolute of character, Jesus showered him with many favors; He gave him the name Peter, cured his mother-in-law, appointed him chief of the Apostolic band, made him head of the Church, chose him as one of the witnesses of the raising of Jairus's daughter from the dead, and of the Transfiguration, and of the Agony in the Garden; and after the Resurrection, lest Peter's denial make him lose prestige, Our Lord renewed his commission as chief pastor of the flock
Messi'ah - The apostles themselves were infected with this opinion till after the Resurrection
Demons - Christ has conquered them by his death and Resurrection, and Christians can claim that conquest for themselves (Colossians 2:8-10; Colossians 2:15; cf
Hope - For Christians, then, to have the hope of Christ’s return means to look forward to it eagerly; and the basis for such hope is Christ’s atoning death and glorious Resurrection
Marcianus, Presbyter at Constantinople - His erection of the remarkable (θαυμαστόν ) church of the Anastasia or Holy Resurrection and of the church of St
Mary - She was a witness of His crucifixion ( Mark 15:40 ; Matthew 27:56 ; John 19:25 ), burial (Mark 15:47 ; Matthew 27:61 ), the empty tomb (Mark 16:18 ; Luke 1:34 ; Luke 24:10 ), and she was a witness of Jesus' Resurrection (Mark 16:9 ; John 20:1-18 ). Mary from Bethany played a primary role in the episode of Lazarus' Resurrection from the dead in John 11:1
Heaven, Heavenly - It is to be the eternal dwelling place of the saints in Resurrection glory, 2 Corinthians 5:1 . , in a position of Divine authority), Ephesians 1:20 ; and of the present position of believers in relationship to Christ, Ephesians 2:6 ; where they possess "every spiritual blessing," Ephesians 1:3 ; (c) of Christ as "the Second Man," and all those who are related to Him spirtually, 1 Corinthians 15:48 ; (d) of those whose sphere of activity or existence is above, or in contrast to that of earth, of "principalities and powers," Ephesians 3:10 ; of "spiritual hosts of wickedness," Ephesians 6:12 , RV, "in heavenly places," for AV, "in high places;" (e) of the Holy Spirit, Hebrews 6:4 ; (f) of "heavenly things," as the subjects of the teaching of Christ, John 3:12 , and as consisting of the spiritual and "heavenly" sanctuary and "true tabernacle" and all that appertains thereto in relation to Christ and His sacrifice as antitypical of the earthly tabernacle and sacrifices under the Law, Hebrews 8:5 ; 9:23 ; (g) of the "calling" of believers, Hebrews 3:1 ; (h) of heaven as the abode of the saints, "a better country" than that of earth, Hebrews 11:16 , and of the spiritual Jerusalem, Hebrews 12:22 ; (i) of the kingdom of Christ in its future manifestation, 2 Timothy 4:18 ; (j) of all beings and things, animate and inanimate, that are "above the earth," Philippians 2:10 ; (k) of the Resurrection and glorified bodies of believers, 1 Corinthians 15;49 ; (l) of the "heavenly orbs," 1 Corinthians 15:40 ("celestial," twice, and so rendered here only)
Fellowship - Those who believe the gospel of the Resurrection are united in the Spirit through the Son to the Father. ...
By his sacrificial death and glorious Resurrection/exaltation, Jesus Christ brought into being a new creation, a new order, and a new epoch. In fact, to be "in the Spirit" is possible because of the fundamental truth of Christ's establishment of the new order, age, and epoch by his death and Resurrection
Worship - The Lord's Supper, the crucifixion, and the Resurrection of Jesus are all closely related to the Passover celebration (1 Corinthians 11:23-26 ; Matthew 26:17 ,Matthew 26:17,26:26-28 and parallels). The first-day celebration became “the Lord's day” (Revelation 1:10 ) with emphasis on the Resurrection. Such fundamental aspects are essential for a life of faith and merge without conflict with the celebration of the Resurrection and the lordship of Christ
Judgment, Last - The Resurrection of Christ is a certain proof of it. Gill supposes; since the Resurrection of all the bodies of the saints is spoken of as in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump, in order to their meeting the Lord in the air, and being with him not on earth, but for ever in heaven, 1 Corinthians 15:52 . As to the time of judgment: the soul will either be happy or miserable immediately after death, but the general judgment will not be till after the Resurrection, Hebrews 9:27
Divine Retribution - The standard has been revealed to all creation in the events surrounding the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Apostle - It was characteristic of the apostles and necessary (1) that they should have seen the Lord, and been able to testify of him and of his Resurrection from personal knowledge (John 15:27 ; Acts 1:21,22 ; 1 Corinthians 9:1 ; Acts 22:14,15 )
Enemy - Because of this severed relationship, God has made provision for our forgiveness in the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Mystery - The word is also used in reference to things which remain in part incomprehensible after they are revealed; such as the incarnation of Christ, the Resurrection of the dead, &c
Epicureanism - Paul met Epicureans as he preached about Jesus and the Resurrection in Athens (Acts 17:18 )
Spirits in Prison - This event, unmentioned elsewhere in the Bible, is closely associated with the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead (1Peter 3:18,1 Peter 3:21 )
Soldiers - Lastly, soldiers were keeping guard at the sepulchre when the Resurrection took place (Matthew 27:65 f
Image - ...
This is seen in perfection in the second Man, who has in Resurrection superseded Adam, who was in this sense a figure or type of Christ
Feasts - ...
First Fruits (barley ), 'day after the } The Resurrection
Sabbath - The Lord lay in death on the Jewish Sabbath: the Christian keeps the first day of the week, the Resurrection day
Meditation - of God's word, Psa cxix; the value, powers, and immortality of the soul, Mark 8:36 ; the noble, beautiful, and benevolent plan of the Gospel, 1 Timothy 1:11 ; the necessity of our personal interest in and experience of its power, John 3:3 ; the depravity of our nature, and the freedom of divine grace in choosing, adopting, justifying, and sanctifying us, 1 Corinthians 6:11 ; the shortness, worth, and swiftness of time, James 4:14 ; the certainty of death, Hebrews 9:27 ; the Resurrection and judgment to come, 1 Corinthians 15:50 , &c
Transfiguration of Christ - As an emblem of humanity glorified at the Resurrection
Build, Builder, Building - It is also used of the believer's Resurrection body, 2 Corinthians 5:1
Pharisees - They considered the soul as immortal, and held the doctrine of a future Resurrection of the body, Acts 23:8
Mock, Mocker, Mocking - ...
A — 3: χλευάζω (Strong's #5512 — Verb — chleuazo — khlyoo-ad'-zo ) "to jest, mock, jeer at" (from chleue, "a jest"), is said of the ridicule of some of the Athenian philosophers at the Apostle's testimony concerning the Resurrection of the dead, Acts 17:32
Joel - In New Testament times Peter saw a fulfilment of Joel’s prophecy in the events that resulted from Jesus’ death and Resurrection
Vigilius Thapsensis - or so later they determined upon the Resurrection as the time when the human nature was swallowed up in the divine
Worship - The weekly and the yearly festivals originally arose from the self-same fundamental idea, which was the centre point of the whole Christian life; the idea of imitating Christ, the crucified and the risen; to follow him in his death, by appropriating to ourselves, in penitence and faith, the effects of his death, by dying to ourselves and to the world; to follow him in his Resurrection, by rising again with him, by faith in him and by his power, to a new and holy life, devoted to God, which, beginning here below in the seed, is matured in heaven. Hence the festival of joy was the festival of the Resurrection; and the preparation for it, the remembrance of the sufferings of Christ, with mortification and crucifixion of the flesh, was the day of fasting and penitence. Thus in the week the Sunday was the joyful festival; and the preparation for it was a day of penitence and prayer, consecrated to remembrance of the sufferings of Christ and the preparations for them, and this was celebrated on the Friday; and thus also the yearly festivals were to celebrate the Resurrection of Christ, and the operations of the Redeemer after he had risen again; the preparation for this day was in commemoration of the sufferings and fastings of our Saviour. Allusion is made to Sunday under the character of a festival, as a symbol of a new life, consecrated to the Lord in opposition to the old Sabbath, in the epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians: "If they who were brought up under the Old Testament have attained to a new hope, and no longer keep [3] Sabbaths holy, but have consecrated their life to the day of the Lord, on which also our life rose up in him, how shall we be able to live without him?" Sunday was distinguished as a day of joy by the circumstances, that men did not fast upon it, and that they prayed standing up and not kneeling, as Christ had raised up fallen man to heaven again through his Resurrection. The day following this passover was consecrated to the remembrance of the sufferings of Christ, and the third day from it to the remembrance of his Resurrection. They appointed one Sunday in the year for the festival of the Resurrection, and one Friday as a day of penitence and fasting preparatory to this Sunday, in remembrance of the sufferings of Christ; and they gradually lengthened this time of penitence and fasting, as a preparation for that high and joyful festival. The festival of pentecost, Whitsuntide, was closely connected with that of the Resurrection; and this was dedicated to commemorating the first visible effects of the operations of the glorified Christ upon human nature, now also ennobled by him, the lively proofs of his Resurrection and reception into glory; and therefore Origen joins the festivals of the Resurrection and of pentecost together as one whole. The fundamental notion of the whole Christian life, which referred every thing to the suffering, the Resurrection, and the glorification of Christ, as well as the adherence, or, on the other hand, the opposition, to the Jewish celebration of festivals, were the cause that these were the only general festivals
Messiah - Through all these years it is certain that the fundamental elements of the Messianic hope remained fixed; namely, the ineradicable belief that Jehovah would ( a ) make of the Jewish nation a world empire; ( b ) establish the house of David; ( c ) punish the enemies of His chosen people, whether Gentiles or Jews; and ( d ) that this glorious future would be established by the expression of the Divine power in the Resurrection, not of the individual from Sheol, but of the nation from its miseries. These elements were subsequently to develop into the dominant characteristics of the later Messianic hope the Kingdom of God, the Davidic King, the Day of Judgment, and the Resurrection of the Righteous. In this union of the idea of the Resurrection of the nation with that of the individual we find material which was ready to grow into the pictures of the later apocalypse. But eschatology, though involving the Resurrection, is still somewhat naïve. The Resurrection comes at the end of the Messianic reign, which is to be one of struggle, in which the wicked are to be subdued. The Judgment was to close this period, but there was to be no Resurrection of the body. ...
In Slavonic Enoch , likewise, there is no mention of the Messiah or of the Resurrection, although the latter is doubtless involved in the doctrine of the millennium, which this book sets forth. Then the Messiah and all mankind die, remaining dead for an entire ‘week’; after that come a general Resurrection and judgment, and the fixing of the destinies of eternity. The chief difference between the Messianic hope of the Pharisees and that of the Zealots and people was probably the lack in the latter of the eschatological, transcendental element, such as the Resurrection from the dead and the heavenly Jerusalem, which was so important in the hope of the Pharisees
Sadducees - -It is clear that the Sadducees did not believe in the Resurrection of the body (Acts 23:8). Josephus, he holds rightly enough, does not separate the questions of Resurrection and immortality, and represents for his Greek readers, to whom Resurrection was an unfamiliar idea, the denial of the one as a denial of the other. This is not improbable in itself, but it is difficult to explain away the agreement on this point between Josephus and Acts 23:8, ‘The Sadducees say that there is no Resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit. It is not obvious how he can conclude that probably the Sadducees believed in the immortality of the soul, after admitting that they did not believe in Resurrection or in the departed becoming spirits
Upper Room (2) - ...
It is possible that the room in an unspecified house in Jerusalem where the disciples met after the Resurrection (" translation="">Mark 16:14, " translation="">Luke 24:33; " translation="">Luke 24:36, " translation="">John 20:19; " translation="">John 20:26), and ‘the upper chamber (ὑπερῷον) where they were abiding’ after the Ascension (" translation="">Acts 1:13), were the same as the ‘upper room’ (ἀνάγαιον) in which the above events took place; and that this, again, was in ‘the house of Mary the mother of John whose surname was Mark’ (" translation="">Acts 12:12). ’ On the octave of the Resurrection ‘all the people conduct the bishop with hymns to Sion. When they have come there, suitable hymns for the place and day are said, and that passage from the Gospel is read in which, eight days after the Resurrection, the Lord came in where the disciples were, and rebuked Thomas for his want of belief. There also the Lord appeared to them after the Resurrection
Gospel - ...
The New Testament: Stage Two: For the gospel declared after Jesus' Resurrection, our main sources are Acts and the letters of Paul. But Christ's death and Resurrection, the crucial saving events, are the gospel's most prominent themes. In Paul's gospel Jesus' death and Resurrection are central (1 Corinthians 15:1-4 ), with the cross at the very center (1Col 1:17-2:5; Romans 3:21-26 ; 2Col 5:14-21). Acts proclaims Jesus' death (8:35; 20:24,28) and preeminently his Resurrection, the event by which he conquered death and was exalted as Lord and coming Judge (10:36-43; 13:32-33; 17:31)
Hell - The Old Testament infrequently suggests a bodily Resurrection for the wicked (Daniel 12:2 ), a final judgment and retribution for evil deeds (Psalm 21:10 ; 140:10 ; Malachi 4:1-2 ). In the New Testament hell is where the reprobate exist after the Resurrection from Hades and the final judgment. After the Resurrection and the final judgment, the wicked and even Hades are thrown into hell. The prophecy in Isaiah 66:24 , which has been so used, does not refer to this eschatological event, for the Resurrection of the body has not occurred
Timothy, the First Epistle to - Another Gnostic error, "that the Resurrection is past," is noticed (2 Timothy 2:17-18; compare 1 Corinthians 15:12-32-33). In the epistle to Philippians (Philippians 3:2; Philippians 3:18-19) the further stage appears, immoral practice accompanying false doctrine as to the Resurrection. ...
Not knowing the true use of "the law" (1 Timothy 1:7-8) the false teachers "put away good conscience," as well as "the faith" (1 Timothy 1:19; 1 Timothy 4:2), "spoke lies in hypocrisy, corrupt in mind," regarded "piety as a means of gain" (1 Timothy 6:5; Titus 1:11); "overthrew the faith" by heresies "eating as a canker, saying the Resurrection is past, leading captive silly women, ever learning yet never knowing the truth, reprobate as Jannes and Jambres (2 Timothy 3:6-8), defiled, unbelieving, professing to know God but in works denying Him, abominable, disobedient, reprobate" (Titus 1:15-16)
Miracles - ...
Of all the miracles, the greatest are those that concern the birth and Resurrection of Jesus. The Resurrection is a miracle so basic to the Christian faith that without it there can be no Christian faith (1 Corinthians 15:12-14; see Resurrection)
Glory (2) - This glorifying is in a true sense accomplished in the Passion, as issuing in the Resurrection, whereby the true nature of Christ and His redemptive work were recognized and rejoiced in by the faithful. Indeed, the ‘glorifying’ of the believer is already ideally complete (Romans 8:30); it will be visibly completed in the Resurrection of the body (Philippians 3:21, cf. ...
In the Resurrection life, therefore, Christ will be seen and known by all the faculties, the whole being of man redeemed, as sharing fully and essentially in the ‘glory’ of the Godhead
Bartholomew - The place given him also in the fishing after the Resurrection of the Lord (John 21:2) implies his being one of the twelve
Power - The supreme demonstration of God’s power is the Resurrection of Jesus (Romans 1:4; Ephesians 1:19-20)
Wisdom, the, of Solomon, - ch, 9:15; contrast ( 2 Corinthians 5:1-4 ) There is, on the other hand no trace of the characteristic Christian doctrine of a Resurrection of the body
Glorification - Specifically, glorification arrives with the second coming of Christ (Ephesians 5:27 ; Philippians 3:20-21 ; Colossians 3:4 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:10 ), accompanied by the Resurrection of believers (1 Corinthians 15:43 ) and the day of judgment (Romans 2:5-10 )
Ark of Noah - It is thus referred to in 1 Peter 3:20,21 , "into which few, that is, eight souls, were saved through water: which figure also now saves you, [1] baptism, not a putting away of [2] filth of flesh, but [2] demand as before God of a good conscience, by [2] Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Breathing - —On the evening of the Resurrection, the Lord appeared to the disciples, gave them the commission ‘As my Father, etc
Apostles - They were the men who had been with Jesus, and their peculiar function was to testify of Him, and especially of His Resurrection ( Acts 1:21-22 ; cf
Travail - Then CHRIST JESUS came to bring betterment, goodness, and the salvation of the soul by the sacrifice and the Resurrection of Himself
Gospel - " The term refers to the good news of the new dispensation of redemption ushered in by the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Philosopher, Philosophy - " And why? "Because he preached unto them Jesus and the Resurrection
Destructionists - understands "everlasting destruction," literally speaking, "from the presence of the Lord," which is "the second death;" from which there can be no Resurrection, and which is set in opposition to "eternal life
Sepulchres - " In the account we have of the Resurrection of Lazarus, when Mary went suddenly out to meet Jesus, the Jews supposed that she was gone to the grave, "to weep there
Accomplish, Accomplishment - , "fill out," is used in Acts 13:33 , of the fulfillment of a Divine promise of the Resurrection of Christ
Last - 11); 2:8; 22:13; in eschatological phrases as follows: (a) "the last day," a comprehensive term including both the time of the Resurrection of the redeemed, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; 11:24 , and the ulterior time of the judgment of the unregenerate, at the Great White Throne, John 12:48 ; (b) "the last days," Acts 2:17 , a period relative to the supernatural manifestation of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost and the resumption of the Divine interpositions in the affairs of the world at the end of the present age, before "the great and notable Day of the Lord," which will usher in the messianic kingdom; (c) in 2 Timothy 3:1 , "the last days" refers to the close of the present age of world conditions; (d) in James 5:3 , the phrase "in the last days" (RV) refers both to the period preceding the Roman overthrow of the city and the land in A
Water Watering, Waterless - the symbolic use in Ephesians 5:26 ), or, in view of the preposition ek, "out of," (2) of the truth conveyed by baptism, this being the expression, not the medium, the symbol, not the cause, of the believer's identification with Christ in His death, burial and Resurrection
Sabbath - Jesus’ death and Resurrection marked the end of the law as a binding force upon God’s people (Romans 7:6; Romans 8:1-3; Romans 10:4; Colossians 2:14). This was usually the first day of the week, a day that they called the Lord’s Day, because it was the day of Jesus’ Resurrection (John 20:19; Acts 20:7; 1 Corinthians 16:2; Revelation 1:10)
Word - The content of this word is certainly the good news story concerning Jesus' death and Resurrection—the heart of the gospel ( 1 Corinthians 15:3-5 ). Because of His sacrifice and Resurrection, the gospel message is a “word of reconciliation” (2 Corinthians 5:19 ) and a “word of life” (Philippians 2:16 )
Monotheism - She found him in Sheol and effected his Resurrection from the dead by coaxing him back to activity in the world of the living. This scene of Resurrection occurred in the spring when the world springs back to life
Areopagite, Areopagus - If the council happened to be sitting, as was evidently the case, it was a most natural impulse to hurry the newcomer, who ‘babbled’ apparently of two new deities, Jesus and ‘Resurrection’ (for so they would understand him), to its meeting-place, that the question might be settled as to whether or not he was to be allowed to continue. But the general effect produced by the mention of the Resurrection was contempt
Print - ...
When Jesus appeared on the evening of the Resurrection to His disciples during the absence of Thomas, it is related that He showed them His hands and His feet, evidently bearing the marks of the wounds, in order to convince them of the reality and identity of His risen body (Luke 24:39, cf. They prove the reality of the Resurrection body, and its continuity with that body which was crucified; though Christ glorified was in many respects changed, yet He was essentially the same who suffered, seeing that the prints could become visibly present to Thomas and the others
Justification (2) - Paul, in the Person of Christ (2 Corinthians 5:19) and in His work, more especially in His death, but also in His Resurrection. Christ’s Resurrection is also included in the revelation by which God’s grace to sinners is made known (Romans 4:25; Romans 8:34; Romans 10:9, 1 Corinthians 15:17), but St. In fact, Christ’s Resurrection, as the object of faith, is hardly separable from the Risen Christ. He does it by opening a new line of argument, in which he presents a fresh view of the death and Resurrection of Christ, where these acts appear in the ethical sense of a death to sin and a Resurrection to a new life unto God (Romans 6:10), and where, further, Christ in His death and Resurrection appears as inclusive of all for whom He died (2 Corinthians 5:14). It is still a receptivity and an obedience; but as that which it receives is different, it appears with new powers, as establishing a mystic union with Christ in His death and Resurrection, the outward symbol of which is baptism (Galatians 2:20, Romans 6:1-6, Colossians 2:11), from which union St
Matthew, Gospel According to - ...
...
The sufferings, death and Resurrection of our Lord (20:17-28)
Mean - ...
If by any means I might attain to the Resurrection of the dead
Cup - ...
For the church, the cup has come to represent the central events of Christianity, the death and Resurrection of Christ
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - ...
...
The concluding part (15; 16) contains an elaborate defense of the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead, which had been called in question by some among them, followed by some general instructions, intimations, and greetings
Galilee, Sea of - He stilled its tempest, saying to the storm that swept over it, "Peace, be still" (Matthew 8:23-27 ; Mark 7:31-35 ); and here also he showed himself after his Resurrection to his disciples (John 21 )
Joseph - Joseph Barsabbas, surnamed Justus, was one of those who accompanied Jesus during His whole public ministry and witnessed His Resurrection
Socinians - Some of them likewise maintain the sleep of the soul, which, they say, becomes insensible at death, and is raised again with the body at the Resurrection, when the good shall be established in the possession of eternal felicity, while the wicked shall be consigned to a fire that will not torment them eternally, but for a certain duration proportioned to their demerits
Salvation - The future aspect is that believers will experience the fulfilment of their salvation at the return of Jesus Christ (Romans 8:24; Romans 13:11; Philippians 3:20; 1 Thessalonians 5:9; Hebrews 9:28; 1 Peter 1:5; see Resurrection)
Time - ) Jesus’ birth, ministry, death and Resurrection all took place at the time God had appointed (Galatians 4:4; Mark 1:15; John 8:20; John 12:23; John 12:27; John 17:1)
Repentance - But the preaching of repentance, like the preaching of faith, must be related to the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Luke 24:46-47)
Instruction - The church presents the basic details of Jesus' life and ministry: His death, burial, and Resurrection
Lord's Day - The Lord singled it out as the day of His repeated appearances after His Resurrection (John 20:19; John 20:26), and the evangelists' special mention of this day as the day of those reappearances implies their recognition of its sanctity
Messianic Secret - Complete human understanding of the messianic secret would only be possible after the Resurrection (Mark 9:9-10 )
Redeemer - Job elsewhere hoped for the Resurrection after his being "hidden in the grave" for a time (1618069008_96; John 5:21-26; John 5:28; Isaiah 26:19-21; Psalms 17:15)
Uncorruptness - Paul has no doctrine of the natural immortality’ of the soul; and in 1 Corinthians 15 he is dealing specifically with the Resurrection of the body, so that ‘incorruptibility’ and ‘immortality’ are practically synonymous
Transfiguration - 231, 266), that those opponents who denied the Parousia perhaps denied the Resurrection as well, and that therefore it would have been useless for the writer to meet them by blankly affirming the fact of the Ascension; whereas they would acknowledge the truth of the events of our Lord’s ministry
Sabbath - Their holy day, the day that belonged especially to the Lord, was the first day of the week, the day of Resurrection (Matthew 28:1 ; Acts 20:7 ; Revelation 1:10 )
Sheol - ...
Toward the end of the Old Testament, God revealed that there will be a Resurrection of the dead (Isaiah 26:19 )
Spiritualizing of the Parables - 1 Thessalonians 4:16) shows that the Resurrection will take place by night
Build - ...
Matthew 26:61 (b) Here the reference is to the Resurrection of the Lord JESUS, wherein His body, so badly disfigured on the Cross, would be restored in three days to full strength and power
Considerateness - The post-resurrection sayings to Mary Magdalene (John 20:15; John 20:18), to St
Have - In the Resurrection, whose wife shall she be of the seven? for they all had her
Hope - " (Hebrews 6:19) In short, Christ is the only hope of eternal life, to which we are "begotten by his Resurrection from the dead
Hannah - It is worthy remark, that the Lord so distinguished this Old Testament saint: to be the first preacher of Jesus as the Anointed, and Mary Magdalen, in the New Testament, to be the first preacher of Jesus in his Resurrection
Annas - In Acts 4:6 Annas again appears as the head of the party who tried the apostles and enjoined them to keep silent about the Resurrection
Sadducees - Whatever foundation there may be for this account of the origin of the sect, it is certain, that in the time of our Saviour the Sadducees denied the Resurrection of the dead, Acts 23:8 , and the existence of angels and spirits, or souls of departed men; though, as Mr
Enoch - The intent of the Apostle, in the discourse containing this passage, is, to show that there has been but one way of obtaining the divine favour ever since the fall, and that is, by faith, or a firm persuasion and confidence in the atonement to be made for human transgressions by the obedience, sufferings, death, and Resurrection of the promised Messiah
Obtain, Obtaining - A — 1: τυγχάνω (Strong's #5177 — Verb — tunchano — toong-khan'-o ) "to meet with, light upon," also signifies "to obtain, attain to, reach, get" (with regard to things), translated "to obtain" in Acts 26:22 , of "the help that is from God;" 2 Timothy 2:10 , of "the salvation which is in Christ Jesus with eternal glory;" Hebrews 8:6 , of the ministry obtained by Christ; Hebrews 11:35 , of "a better Resurrection
Daniel - In the third year of Cyrus, he had a series of visions disclosing the state of the Jews till the coming of the promised Redeemer; and at last we see him calmly awaiting the peaceful close of a well-spent life, and the gracious Resurrection of the just
Theodotus of Byzantium - He taught that at the baptism of Jesus, Christ descended on Him in the form of a dove, and that He was then able to work miracles, though He had never exhibited any before: but even so He was not God; though some of the sect were willing to acknowledge His right to the title after His Resurrection
Grace - (For further discussion on God’s work of grace through the death and Resurrection of Jesus see FORGIVENESS; JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION; RECONCILIATION
Methodius - ...
(3) On the Resurrection. The Origenist speakers deny the materiality of the Resurrection body, and urge that it is enough if we believe that the same form shall rise again, beautified and glorified. Methodius's view, however, could not have been the same as that of Eustathius, for a passage at the close of Photius's extracts from the treatise on the Resurrection implies a belief that the appearance of Samuel was real
Angels - Yet some of the Jews rejected all belief in them, and this sharply divided the Pharisees from the Sadducees, who said ‘that there is no Resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit’; the Pharisees confessed both (Acts 23:8). they seem to be differentiated from ‘spirits’ (‘no Resurrection, neither angel, nor spirit … what if a spirit hath spoken to him or an angel?’). both the Resurrection and angel-spirits; only two categories are intended. ...
They neither marry nor are given in marriage; and so in the Resurrection life there is no marrying, for men will be ‘as angels in heaven’ (Matthew 22:30, Mark 12:25), ‘equal to angels’ (ἰσάγγελοι, Luke 20:36). Paul’s words may refer to the ‘heavenly bodies’ in the modern sense (Robertson-Plummer), or to the post-resurrection human bodies (cf
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ...
(2) The Resurrection of the body. -Let us have no doubt about the Resurrection of the dead. In the Scriptures God has promised a Resurrection. God raised Him from the dead, and we shall one day share His Resurrection (xxiv. ...
(5) The Resurrection of the dead. -The truth of the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead is dwelt upon at considerable length (xxiv-xxvi. But the final argument is the promise of God in the Scripture, and the precedent of the Resurrection of Christ who is ‘the first-fruits’ of the harvest of the dead. The passage dealing with the Resurrection interrupts the argument of the Epistle, and it is not quite evident why the subject is introduced at all
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - In a similar manner, Paul says that believers have the "firstfruits of the Spirit" and await the full eschatological adoption that will occur in the Resurrection ( Leviticus 23:23-25 ). Christ himself is the firstfruit of the power of the Resurrection, and his victory over death is the guarantee that believers too will experience Resurrection (John 18:28 ). ...
In the New Testament, therefore, aparche [6] is used to signify that the power of the Resurrection and the new creation has broken into the present creation. Whether it be the first Gentile converts in a geographic area, the new birth and gift of the Spirit experienced by Christians, or the Resurrection of Jesus himself, all are like the firstfruits of the harvest in that they are tokens of the new age in Christ and give the promise of greater things to come. Jesus stated that the last judgment would be inaugurated with a trumpet blast (Matthew 24:31 ), and Paul says that trumpets will sound on the day of the Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ). The point that trumpets initiate the end of one age in judgment and the beginning of another in Resurrection should not be missed
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - Having reproved the Corinthians for these abuses, the Apostle answers the questions put in their letter to him, as to marriage and other social questions; perhaps also as to Christian worship, the doctrine of the Resurrection, and the collection for the poor of Judæa. But both are transitory, and the body as a whole is for the Lord; in virtue of the Resurrection fornication is a serious sin, for it destroys the spiritual character of the body. The Resurrection of the Body ( 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 ). This, the only doctrinal chapter of the Epistle, contains also the earliest evidence for our Lord’s Resurrection. Apparently the Gentile converts at Corinth felt a great difficulty in accepting the doctrine of the Resurrection of the body; it appeared to them too material a doctrine to he true ( 1 Corinthians 15:12 , cf. Against that of our Epistle in particular it has been alleged that it is dependent on Romans thus, 1 Corinthians 4:6 (‘the things which are written’) is said to be a quotation of Romans 12:3 , surely a most fanciful idea and on the Synoptic Gospels, especially in two particulars, the account of the Last Supper (see § 8 ( b ) above), and that of the Resurrection appearances of our Lord ( 1 Corinthians 15:4 ff. It is a little doubtful, however, whether the Gentile churches kept the annual as well as the weekly feast of the Resurrection at this early date; see art
Day of Judgment - That this day of Resurrection is to be identified with the Day of Judgment appears not only from the entire drift of the Messianic expectation current in the time of Jesus, but also expressly in John 12:48. The awards of the Judgment-day are: (a) for those who have accepted Him as Christ, eternal life, including the Resurrection (Mark 9:47; Mark 10:17; Mark 12:25, Matthew 19:23-24; Matthew 25:46, John 5:29; John 6:39-40; John 6:44; John 6:54). Eternal life with Jesus is not an artificial reward, but rather the consummation of personality which is determined by faith and relationship with God, and includes the Resurrection of the body. This, of course, implies the bringing of the dead from Sheol, and therefore accounts for the exceptional expressions which speak of the ‘resurrection of judgment’ (John 5:29, cf. Such a Resurrection of the dead must be treated as something other than the acquisition of the body of the Resurrection, which was to be a part of the great reward of the believer. His figure clearly teaches that the Christian is subject to the Judgment as truly as any one else, and that although he will be given the body of the Resurrection and the other blessings of salvation, he will also suffer certain losses
Ascension (2) - of Olives; the time, forty days after the Resurrection; the occasion, a conversation concerning the Kingdom; the act of parting in being taken up; the vanishing in a cloud; the vision of two men in white apparel and their announcement of His coming again: all indicating a bodily disappearance by an upward movement into the sky. Incarnation, Resurrection, etc. The only sure statement that may be affirmed with regard to it is that it was the same, yet not the same, as the pre-Resurrection body: it was a body which issued from the sepulchre with identity complete, yet physically changed, existing under new conditions of which we have only the faintest apprehension. For one thing, the Ascension is plainly regarded as belonging to the Resurrection appearances, viz. A suggestion, again, of great interest as justifying the sparse particulars given in the Gospels, is that a sort of convention forbade the introduction of the theme into a narrative of Christ’s life, the Resurrection being regarded as the culminating point of His earthly existence. article on ‘Resurrection and Ascension Narratives’). The departures from the traditional view here referred to are better dealt with under Resurrection
Building - Heavenly Houses for God's People The Resurrection body of the believer can also be called a dwelling. Harris, From Grave to Glory: Resurrection in the New Testament ; A
Sabbath - As the seventh day was observed by the Jewish church in memory of the rest of God after the works of the creation, and their deliverance from Pharaoh's tyranny, so the first day of the week has always been observed by the Christian church in memory of Christ's Resurrection. Pliny bears witness of the first day of the week being kept as a festival, in honour of the Resurrection of Christ: and the primitive Christians kept it in the most solemn manner
Transmigration - It is belief in Resurrection rather than in rebirth. Finally, the idea of Resurrection from the dead furnished an analogue to reincarnation
Philosophy - The Resurrection of Christ is the "assurance" that all will raise from the dead and stand before God (v. The Resurrection of Christ, with the subsequent philosophical and logical argument that Paul makes in 1 Corinthians 15 , stands in sharp contrast to hedonistic Epicureanism
Mary - Mary the mother of James the Little and Joses, one of the women who followed Jesus from Galilee, stood beside the cross, watched the burial, and visited the sepulchre on the Resurrection morning (Matthew 27:55-56 = Mark 15:40-41, Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47, Mark 16:1 = Matthew 26:6-136 = Luke 24:10). She was one of the devoted women who stood by the cross (John 19:25, Matthew 27:56 = Mark 15:40), watched His burial (Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47), and came on the Resurrection morning to the sepulehre (John 20:1 = Matthew 28:1 = Mark 16:1 = Luke 24:10)
Son of Man - According to Jerome, the Gospel according to the Hebrews stated that Jesus had revealed Himself to James after His Resurrection as ‘the Son of man’ (‘filius hominis’ Gospels, the - The ascension is not recorded: the record ends with the Lord in Resurrection power on the earth, agreeing with the fact that the kingdom for Israel will be established on earth in the power of Him who is risen. In this gospel the raising of Lazarus is recorded, and the Lord declares Himself to be 'the Resurrection and the life
Feasts - ...
Doth not every regenerated child of God in honouring the Lord's day, honour at the same time the Lord's work; and while he celebrates God the Father's resting from the works of the old creation, celebrate also God the Father's work in the new creation of his precious soul in Christ Jesus? (See Ephesians 2:10) And in the celebration of the sabbath in honour of God the Son, who by his triumph over death, hell, and the grave, when he arose on that day, and manifested himself to be the Resurrection and the life; doth not every regenerated child of God thereby prove, "that he is risen with Christ from dead works, to serve the living and true God?" Yea, doth he not manifest his personal interest in that sweet promise, by those acts of giving honour to his Lord, where it said, "Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first Resurrection; on such the second death hath no power
Feasts - Christians have always celebrated the memory of his Resurrection, and observe this feast on every Sunday, which was commonly called the Lord's day, Revelation 1:10 . ...
Forty days after his Resurrection, our Lord ascended into heaven, in the sight of his disciples
Cerinthians - Cerinthus has been handed down as the first person who held the notion of a millennium; and though the fathers undoubtedly believed that, previous to the general Resurrection, the earth would undergo a renovation, and the just would rise to enjoy a long period of terrestrial happiness, yet there was a marked and palpable difference between the millennium of the fathers and that of Cerinthus. The Gnostics, as we have seen, denied the Resurrection altogether
James - Some days after the Resurrection of our Saviour, James and John went to fish in the sea of Tiberias, where they saw Jesus. Our Saviour appeared to James the less, eight days after his Resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:7
pe'Ter - On the morning of the Resurrection we have proof that Peter, though humbled, was not crushed by his fall. He is the most prominent person in the greatest event after the Resurrection, when on the day of Pentecost the Church was first invested with the plenitude of gifts and power
Mary - Mary the mother of James the Little and Joses, one of the women who followed Jesus from Galilee, stood beside the cross, watched the burial, and visited the sepulchre on the Resurrection morning (Matthew 27:55-56 = Mark 15:40-41, Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47, Mark 16:1 = Matthew 28:1 = Luke 24:10). She was one of the devoted women who stood by the cross (John 19:25, Matthew 27:56 = Mark 15:40), watched His burial (Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47), and came on the Resurrection morning to the sepulehre (John 20:1 = Matthew 28:1 = Mark 16:1 = Luke 24:10)
Son of Man - According to Jerome, the Gospel according to the Hebrews stated that Jesus had revealed Himself to James after His Resurrection as ‘the Son of man’ (‘filius hominis’ Peter, First Epistle of - Imbued with a strong love for the risen Christ, and a profound conviction of the truth of the gospel as established in the world by the life, death, and Resurrection of the Messiah, the author delineates a rich Christian life on the basis of these evangelical facts. ...
( b ) To redeem us from sin the eternal and spotless Messiah was slain, and by His Resurrection has awakened us to true faith in God. By recalling the fact of the Resurrection of Christ, and by an appeal to the example of His remedial sufferings, the author seeks to awaken their faith and hope in God. Faith in God as the holy Father and faithful Creator is built upon the solid facts of the gospel, in particular, the life, death, and Resurrection of Christ the eternal Messiah ( 1 Peter 1:8-21 ). By His Resurrection He has been exalted to God’s right hand, and will soon return to unveil further glories ( 1 Peter 1:13 , 1 Peter 3:22 ). is that Christ went, during the period between His death and Resurrection, to the abode of the dead, and, having preached His gospel to those who had been the wicked antediluvian world, has made it of universal efficacy (cf
Son, Sonship - NT renders simply ‘the wicked,’ evading a personal significance in τοῦ πονηροῦ); ‘of Gehenna’ (Matthew 23:15); ‘of perdition’ (John 17:12); ‘of the Resurrection’ (Luke 20:36). This per se seems to limit the description ‘sons of God’ to those who are accounted worthy to attain the Resurrection life (Luke 20:35). They ‘are sons of God through being sons of the Resurrection’ (Weymouth)
Stone - ) by Him who is the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25). For whenever Christian men think of the Lord’s sepulchre, they always see that great stone rolled back from the door, and the angel of the Resurrection sitting upon it (Matthew 28:2 ||). He describes the Lord now, with evident reference to His Resurrection (cf
Angels (2) - They ‘do not owe their existence to the ordinary process of filiation, but to an immediate act of creation’ (Godet, OT Studies, 7); thus resembling in their origin the bodily nature of those who are ‘sons of the Resurrection. This is taught in Matthew 22:30 ‘In the Resurrection they neither marry [8] nor are given in marriage [9], but are as the angels of God in heaven. ’ These words were spoken by our Lord in response to the doubts of the Sadducees on the subject of the Resurrection. While answering their objection against the Resurrection, He affirms that ‘those who are accounted worthy to attain to that αἰών, and the Resurrection from the dead … are equal to the angels’—thus plainly disclosing His belief in angels and setting it over against their disbelief
Names Titles And Offices of Christ - ...
Resurrection and life, John 11:25
Grief And Mourning - ...
5) Tactfully remind the griever of Him who said, “I am the Resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:25 ), and invoke His blessing
Athens - 52, and though alone among its proud philosophers, preached Jesus and the Resurrection to them with fidelity and success, Acts 17:15 - 34
Fundamental Theology - The demonstratio Christiana culminates in the stupendous and irrefutable argument of the Resurrection
Command, Commandment - All that Jesus did, including his death and Resurrection, were at the Father's commandment and served to further eternal life (John 10:18 ; 12:49-50 )
Mary, Sister of Lazarus - Her faith had been lacking when, like Martha, but without her addition of expression of faith in Christ and the Resurrection, Mary said as one who had trusted His love and power, and who cannot understand why then He had allowed her brother to die, "Lord, if Thou hadst been here, my brother had not died" (John 11:21-27; John 11:32)
Nail - The print of the nails in Jesus' hands and feet were Thomas' test of the reality of the Resurrection (John 20:25)
Caesarea - The remoteness and privacy of Caesarea Philippi fitted it for being the place where Jesus retired to prepare His disciples for His approaching death of shame and His subsequent Resurrection; there it was that Peter received the Lord's praise, and afterward censure
Adam, the Second - In the Resurrection we will bear the likeness of the man from heaven (1 Corinthians 15:49 )
Blameless - ...
This positional quality of blamelessness is not earned by personal gain, but imputed by the death and Resurrection of Christ (Colossians 1:22 )
Queen (2) - The Pharisees had demanded of Him a special sign, and He replied that no such sign should be given them, but that they should have a sign in Himself and in His burial and Resurrection, as the Ninevites had had in Jonah
Rapture Ecstasy - Mark, in describing the effects of the Resurrection upon the minds of the women, as they fled from the tomb, states that ‘trembling and astonishment (ἔκστασις) had come upon them’ (Luke 16:8)
Name - It may be also that the Lord is referring in this passage to the changed bodies which we shall have in the Resurrection
Grave - With the Resurrection of Christ tombs in Jerusalem were opened and the dead came out (Matthew 27:52 )
Power - Romans 6-8 ) and introduces him or her to the "power of [2] Resurrection" (Philippians 3:10 )
Law of Christ - ...
Paul believed that the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ marked the beginning point of God's new covenant (2 Corinthians 3:1-18 ; Galatians 4:21-31 ; cf
Living - -(4) Figuratively, the expression is applied to the oracles given by God to Moses (Acts 7:38, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the word of God generally (Hebrews 4:12, Authorized Version ‘quick’); to the way into the holy place which Jesus dedicated for us (Hebrews 10:20); to the hope unto which God has begotten us by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead (1 Peter 1:3, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the Stone rejected of men but with God elect, precious (1 Peter 2:4), and the stones built up on that foundation into a spiritual house (1 Peter 2:5, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the fountains of waters to which the Lamb shall lead His people (Revelation 7:17 TR Corn - The death and fruitful Resurrection of the grain of wheat became the prophecy and type of Christ’s Passion and consequent power to draw all men unto Himself
Peter, First Epistle of - The teaching of the epistle is based upon a living hope by the Resurrection of Christ, in contrast to the portion of the Jews on earth
Morning - ”...
At least once the word appears to represent the Resurrection: “Like sheep they [3] are laid in the grave; death shall feed on them; and the upright shall have dominion over them in the morning …” ( Caius, Ecclesiastical Writer - 25) purporting to be written by a great apostle and ascribed by Caius to Cerinthus, in which the author professes to have been shewn by angels that after the Resurrection Christ's kingdom should be earthly, that men should inhabit Jerusalem, should be the slaves of lusts and pleasures, and should spend a thousand years in marriage festivities
Cerdo, Gnostic Teacher - -Tertullian goes on to say that Cerdo rejected the law and the prophets, and renounced the Creator, teaching that Christ was the son of the higher good deity, and that He came not in the substance of flesh but in appearance only, and had not really died or really been born of a virgin; and that Cerdo only acknowledged a Resurrection of the soul, denying that of the body
Acts of the Apostles - Chrysostom, the "Gospel of our Saviour's Resurrection," or the Gospel of Jesus Christ risen from the dead
Daniel - In the last six chapters we have a series of prophecies, revealed at different times, extending from the days of Daniel to the general Resurrection
Angel - Hebrews 1:14 They appear at every important stage in the history of revelation, especially at the birth of Christ, Luke 2:9-13; in his agony in Gethsemane, Luke 22:43; at his Resurrection, Matthew 28:2; Mark 16:5; Luke 24:4, and at the final judgment, Matthew 13:41
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - He taught its mysteries to the disciples, especially after his Resurrection, Acts 1:3; and sent them forth to preach it
Kingdom of God - He taught its mysteries to the disciples, especially after his Resurrection, Acts 1:3; and sent them forth to preach it
Kingdom of Heaven - He taught its mysteries to the disciples, especially after his Resurrection, Acts 1:3; and sent them forth to preach it
Creation - The bodies of believers, now subject to vanity, are secure of full deliverance at the Resurrection-"the redemption of our body," Romans 8:23
Theology, Fundamental - The demonstratio Christiana culminates in the stupendous and irrefutable argument of the Resurrection
Disciple - After the Resurrection and ascension of Jesus, all the followers of Jesus became known as disciples (Acts 1:15; Acts 6:1; Acts 9:1), and later as Christians (Acts 11:26; 1 Peter 4:16; see CHRISTIAN)
James the Brother of Jesus - This suggests that whatever happened at Jesus’ special appearance to James after the Resurrection, it helped turn James, and the other brothers, from unbelief to faith (1 Corinthians 15:7)
Virgin Birth - ...
The supernatural nature of Jesus' birth is compatible with the broader New Testament picture of him—in particular, his Resurrection. By means of his death and Resurrection, God has provided humanity with complete and final deliverance from sin and death. ...
In view of the whole Gospel story, their acceptance of God's call unquestionably cost them dearly at times: as the recipients of slander and gossip, in lingering confusion as to when and how Jesus would fulfill what was announced of him, and ultimately Mary's deep grief at seeing Jesus crucifiedplus her added difficulties of not (fully ) understanding that Jesus was to be raised from the dead or the saving significance of his death until some time after the Resurrection. Brown, The Birth of the Messiah ; idem, The Virginal Conception and Bodily Resurrection of Jesus ; C
Mediation Mediator - Peter on the Day of Pentecost boldly interprets Jesus as the Messiah (Acts 2:31) of whose Resurrection from the dead they were all witnesses (Acts 2:32). On the strength of the claim that Jesus is both Lord and Messiah as shown by His Resurrection, Peter urges repentance and baptism in the name of Jesus Christ. The death of Christ was part of God’s foreseen plan (Acts 2:23), was predicted by the OT prophets (Acts 3:18), was the basis of repentance and forgiveness of sin (Acts 3:19), and, with His Resurrection, proved Him to be the sole hope of salvation (Acts 4:10-12). But the Resurrection of Christ is guarantee of His power to save, so that ‘in Christ shall all be made alive’ (1 Corinthians 15:22)
Lord - It was in virtue of the Resurrection that the Church came to invest Jesus with such unique dignity. 22), has by the Resurrection and Exaltation been made by God ‘both Lord and Christ. Paul says that Jesus has been constituted (ὁρισθέντος) God’s Son in power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the Resurrection of the dead (cf. To confess Him as Lord with one’s mouth, and to believe in one’s heart that God has raised Him from the dead (observe the connexion between the Resurrection and Lordship), is to be assured of salvation (Romans 10:9)
Mark, Theology of - ...
The development of the meaning of discipleship follows the structure of the Gospel of Mark with its division between Jesus' ministry in Galilee (1:16-8:26), Jerusalem (8:27-13:37), and his passion and Resurrection (14:1-16:8). This means that there is no clear statement after Jesus' Resurrection of his intention to return as in Matthew 28:18-20 or Luke 24:50-53 (cf. The references in Mark to a return and its results, outside of an explicit eschatological context, may be taken as either an interpretation of events related to Jesus' Resurrection, or the end of the age. ...
The transfiguration story (9:2-13), with its emphasis on the presence of Elijah and Moses and the uniqueness of Jesus as God's beloved Son, also stresses the passion and Resurrection of the Son of Man
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - Not only so, but this also, that Matthias had been a witness with the eleven of the Resurrection of the Lord. It could not possibly be said of any man living in these dregs of time of ours that he had been an actual witness of the Resurrection of Christ. And if he does: if he makes your hearts to burn with the noble doctrine of his and your oneness with the risen Christ, then you have in your offer a living witness of apostolic rank for Christ's Resurrection. Give me for my minister, not Gabriel himself, but a fellow-sinner who has been quickened together with Christ, and who can describe the process and the experience till my death-cold heart burns within me with the Resurrection-life of Christ
Atonement - (uh tohne' mehnt), meaning reconciliation, was associated with sacrificial offerings to remove the effects of sin and in the New Testament,] refers specifically to the reconciliation between God and humanity effected by the death, burial, and Resurrection of Christ. ...
Furthermore, the New Testament interprets the cross in light of the Resurrection. In much of the New Testament the glorification of Jesus is associated with His Resurrection and ascension
Evil (2) - That the material Universe will be glorified along with the spiritual is not distinctly stated by Jesus, but is a necessary inference from the doctrine of the Resurrection of the body, which was undoubtedly held by Him (Matthew 5:29; Matthew 10:28 etc. Three of His most striking recorded miracles were victories over death (Mark 5:41, Luke 7:14, John 11:43); and His own Resurrection, according to the energetie expression of the Apostle, ‘abolished death, and brought life and incorruption to light’ (2 Timothy 1:10). His kingdom will surely come to an end; in fact its fall has already been virtually secured by the Passion and Resurrection of Jesus (John 12:31)
Pharisees - Doubtless because after Christ's Resurrection the Resurrection of the dead was a leading doctrine of Christians, which it was not before (Mark 9:10; Acts 1:22; Acts 2:32; Acts 4:10; Acts 5:31; Acts 10:40). "...
Paul: regarded the Pharisees as holding our view of the Resurrection of the dead (Acts 23:6-8)
Gnostics - Their same abhorrence of matter, and their same notion concerning that purity of knowledge which Christ came upon earth to impart, led them to reject the Christian doctrines of a future Resurrection and a general judgment. They seem to have understood the Apostles as preaching literally a Resurrection of the body; and it is certain that the fathers insisted upon this very strongly as an article of belief. According to their scheme, no Resurrection was necessary, much less a final judgment
Wisdom of Christ - ...
(4) It is implied in Scripture that Christ’s human knowledge received a great extension at His Resurrection and Ascension. At the Resurrection He received all authority (πᾶσα ἐξουσία) in heaven and on earth (Matthew 28:18), and this authority He exercises as man, and not simply as God (Philippians 2:10, Revelation 5:6-14 etc
Peter, First, Theology of - By Christ's sacrificial death she has been redeemed from her vain and futile life, and by his Resurrection she has been regenerated to a living hope and an imperishable inheritance (1:3,18-20; 3:18). His Resurrection and ascension affirm the church's ultimate triumph over her enemies, just as Jesus announced his triumph to the spirits in prison on his journey through the heavens (3:18-22)
Gods - Joshua, ‘In what manner is the Resurrection of the dead proved from the Law?’ with the answer that it is said in Psalms 84:4 ‘They shall praise thee’; not ‘they have praised thee. Chaia the answer is that the Resurrection is proved from Isaiah 52:8 (see Wünscbe, Neue Beitrage zur Erlauterung der Evangelien aus Talmud und Midrash)
Numbers as Symbols - A new departure outside of, but connected with, creation-order: hence in Resurrection. The Resurrection-day may be called the eighth, the day after the seventh, the Jewish sabbath
Holiness, Holy, Holily - ...
A — 2: ἁγιωσύνη (Strong's #42 — Noun Feminine — hagiosune — hag-ee-o-soo'-nay ) denotes the manifestation of the quality of "holiness" in personal conduct; (a) it is used in Romans 1:4 , of the absolute "holiness" of Christ in the days of His flesh, which distinguished Him from all merely human beings; this (which is indicated in the phrase "the spirit of holiness") and (in vindication of it) His Resurrection from the dead, marked Him out as (He was "declared to be") the Son of God; (b) believers are to be "perfecting holiness in the fear of God," 2 Corinthians 7:1 , i. ; Hebrews 7:26 ; and of certain promises made to David, which could be fulfilled only in the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus, Acts 13:34
Baptism - The object of saving faith is Jesus Christ and what he has done through his death and Resurrection. ...
Peter, like Paul, interprets Christian baptism in relation to the death and Resurrection of Christ
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - " This will result in Resurrection "at the last day" (6:40). ...
Eternal life as presented in John's Gospel forms a solid core within apostolic preaching and teaching in the decades subsequent to Jesus' death and Resurrection. Paul speaks of the "eternal house" that awaits humans after death (2 Corinthians 5:1 ), but he has in mind the Resurrection body rather than a heavenly dwelling place in terms of a building. "The Resurrection of the dead and eternal judgment" are rudimentary truths that mature believers should long since have learned (6:2). O'Donovan, Resurrection and Moral Order ; B
Saviour (2) - In Acts 5:31 we have the combination ἀρχηγὸς καὶ σωτήρ: Christ was made both by the Resurrection and by the Ascension. It is plain that the meaning of σωτήρ in Acts 5:31 is determined by that of ἀρχηγός, and Acts 3:15 proves that ἀρχηγός has specifically to do with Jesus’ life-giving power, whence also in both passages the Resurrection is emphasized. ’ The reference to the Resurrection in both Petrine passages renders it probable that the word ἀρχηγός is here used in the same pregnant sense: Jesus is in virtue of the Resurrection a leader of life, one who has Himself attained unto life, and now makes others partakers of the same. In Philippians 3:20 the word σωτήρ has a specific eschatological reference: Christ is σωτήρ, because at the Resurrection He will transform the body of believers into the likeness of His own glorious body
Ascension - The Ascension, the last of the series of the post-Resurrection appearances, is a new subject, and the description of it begins a new book. There had been no record of angelic appearances when the risen Jesus was seen by the disciples, as we might have expected from John 1:51; the angels appeared only to announce the Resurrection and to explain the Ascension. -In the passages given above, the Ascension is described as the parting of Jesus from the disciples at the last of the Resurrection appearances; for thereafter there were no such manifestations as those in which Jesus had been touched by the disciples and had eaten in their presence (Matthew 28:9, Luke 24:43 and probably Luke 24:30; Luke 24:35, John 20:27 -though St. The fact that men were accustomed to speak symbolically of heaven being ‘above’ was doubtless the reason of the last disappearance taking the form that it did; it would seem that when Jesus disappeared on former occasions during the Forty Days (for the Gospels describe His Resurrection body as being not bound by the ordinary laws of Nature) He did not vanish by an apparently upward movement. ’ ‘The Resurrection had begun the great change; from Easter morning He was already ascending’ (Swete, Holy Spirit in NT, p
Regeneration - They thought of the necessary transformation as a death and Resurrection, as a new birth, as a purification. The schema of the new religion is clearly set forth; Jesus is the Messiah (Acts 2:36, Acts 5:42), predicted in the Scriptures (Acts 7:52, Acts 8:35, Acts 13:47), attested by the Resurrection (Acts 2:32, Acts 10:41, Acts 13:33, Acts 26:23); acceptance of Him as such is the basis of salvation (Acts 4:12, Acts 10:43, Acts 13:39); but there must be also a very definite repentance, not merely for having crucified the Messiah (Acts 2:38), but a turning from iniquities (Acts 3:26), and from darkness to light (Acts 26:18), and this is to be followed by works worthy of repentance (Acts 26:20); baptism follows on repentance and seems to have a sacramental efficacy (βαπτισθήτω … εἰς ἄφεσιν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ὑμῶν, Acts 2:38; βάπτισαι καὶ ἀπόλουσαι τὰς ἁμαρτίας σου, Acts 22:16). (1) Death and Resurrection. Would it not be nearer to the Apostle’s thought, as to his experience, to say that he regards the process of spiritual renewal as one bestowed by God through faith, but rendered significant and vital only by continued faithfulness? To the Colossians he affirms in repeated metaphors a definite change that has been effected by Divine agency: a translation from the kingdom of evil to the Kingdom of Christ (Colossians 1:13), a reconciliation from alien enmity (1618069008_55), a death and Resurrection with Christ (Colossians 2:20, Colossians 3:1; Colossians 3:3), an unclothing and reclothing (Colossians 3:9-10). Paul writes in the most absolute terms of a fore-ordained adoption as sons (Ephesians 1:5) and of salvation as a free gift (Ephesians 2:8), and the metaphor of the new life is a Resurrection (Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5-6), not as in Romans a dying and rising with Christ, which is merely a bold use of the symbol of baptism, but a Resurrection to new life of a nature so corrupt as to be regarded as morally dead
Regeneration (2) - ...
Perhaps another approach to the figure of regeneration (though that of Resurrection is equally obvious) may be recognized in the passages in which Jesus speaks of the sinful life as death, and of recovery from it as a return to or entrance into life. Indeed, the new life is often identified with the Resurrection life of Jesus in such a way that the present spiritual experience of it seems rather a deduction from that transcendent possession than something having an independent existence of its own. Paul spoke of baptism, however, as involving men in the death and Resurrection of Jesus,—making them mysteriously participant in all that was meant by both, a death to sin and a life to God, with the assurance of immortality at the heart of it,—he was not thinking of baptism as a sacrament which produced these effects as an opus operatum. Peter, who uses twice (1 Peter 1:3; 1 Peter 1:23) the word which is exactly rendered by regenerate (ἀναγεννᾶν), connects the experience which he so describes first with the Resurrection of Christ, and then with the incorruptible seed which he identifies with the word of God—the gospel message which has been delivered to his hearers. The first brings him closely into line with Paul: the new life is distinctively life in the power of Christ’s Resurrection, a living hope which has an incorruptible inheritance in view (cf. This Resurrection life is, of course, ethical, because it is Divine, but its ethical character is more explicitly secured by reference to the incorruptible seed from which it springs
Gospels (2) - But in Apostolic references to the life of Jesus Christ His human ancestry is co-ordinated with His Resurrection, e. Romans 1:1-4 ‘the gospel of God … concerning his Son, who was born of the seed of David …, who was declared to be the Son of God … by the Resurrection of the dead’; and 2 Timothy 2:8 ‘Remember Jesus Christ, risen from the dead, of the seed of David, according to my gospel. ’ Acknowledgment of the Lordship of Jesus, and belief in the historical fact of His Resurrection, are declared to have saving efficacy (Romans 10:9). A little consideration will make it clear that a proclaiming of the Resurrection of One who had been slain entails of necessity an account of who and what manner of man He was, and why He was put to death. The Resurrection, again, was declared to constitute an authentication by God Himself of the prediction of Jesus that He would come again to judge the living and the dead; and salvation from the terrors of the judgment to come was offered on the conditions of repentance, followed by baptism into the name of Jesus. This is the barest outline of the main features in the first Christian preaching: the accomplishment in Jesus of all that was hoped for in the Christ; His death and Resurrection illuminating the dark places of prophecy, and proving the truth of His own claims; judgment; repentance; baptism
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Heart of Jesus, our life and Resurrection, have mercy on us
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Heart of Jesus, our life and Resurrection, have mercy on us
Household - The motivation for conversion was at times social and not wholly individual, though in baptism each confessed Christ as Lord and showed forth His death and Resurrection
Thom'as - The first-named trait was seen after the Resurrection
Consolation - Christians may comfort each other by reflecting on the future Resurrection (1 Thessalonians 4:18 )
Biblical Chronology - ...
Closely associated with the death of Jesus are His Resurrection, His Ascension, and the coming of the Holy Ghost
Spiritual - , 'spiritualities,' 1 Corinthians 12:1 ; 14:1 ; (i) the Resurrection body of the dead in Christ is 'spiritual,' i
Fasting - The church of England also has particular seasons for fasting, especially that of Lent, which is to be observed as a time of humiliation before Easter, the general festival of our Saviour's Resurrection
Swedenborgians - ...
He denies the doctrine of atonement, or vicarious sacrifice; together with the doctrines of predestination, unconditional election, justification by faith alone, the Resurrection of the material body, &c
French Prophets - Their message was (and they were to proclaim it as heralds to the Jews, and every nation under heaven, beginning at England, ) that the grand jubilee, the acceptable year of the Lord, the accomplishment of those numerous Scriptures concerning the new heaven and the new earth, the kingdom of the Messiah, the marriage of the Lamb, the first Resurrection, or the new Jerusalem descending from above, were now even at the door; that this great operation was to be wrought on the part of man by spiritual arms only, proceeding from the mouths of those who should by inspiration, or the mighty gift of the Spirit, be sent forth in great numbers to labour in the vineyard; that this mission of his servants should be witnessed to by signs and wonders from heaven, by a deluge of judgments on the wicked universally throughout the world, as famine, pestilence, earthquakes, &c
Discipline - They would carry on His work after His death and Resurrection
Caesarea Philippi - This occasion is also important because for the first time Jesus predicted His coming arrest, death, and Resurrection in Jerusalem
Second Coming, the - Some say He was referring to the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, others that He was referring to His Resurrection, others to the fact that He was going to be spiritually present with us (Matthew 28:20 ), others to an individual's conversion experience (see Revelation 3:20 )
Purgatory - If they were, the texts referred to would rather prove that there is no such place as purgatory, since Judas did not expect the souls departed to reap any benefit from his sin- offering till the Resurrection
Exodus, the - The manner of their deliverance thus became a type of the Christian being delivered from the thraldom of him who had the power of death, by the death and Resurrection of the Lord Jesus
Ishmael - In this act Abraham acknowledged in faith that the blessing asked for his natural seed could not be had through the strength of the flesh: all the mercies of God are secured in Resurrection
Exorcism - In the case of His disciples, the power to exercise was given both before and after the Resurrection ( Matthew 10:1 ; Matthew 10:8 , Mark 3:15 ; Mark 16:17 , Luke 9:1 ), and was successfully exercised by them ( Mark 6:13 , Luke 10:17 , Acts 5:16 ; Acts 8:7 ; Acts 19:12 ); but the authority was derived, and on that ground, if not by explicit command (cf
Purgatory - If they were, the texts referred to would rather prove that there is no such place as purgatory, since Judas did not expect the souls departed to reap any benefit from the sin-offering till the Resurrection
Psychology - Man is the unity of spirit and matter; hence the hope of immortality involves the belief in the Resurrection of the body, even though in St
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Heart of Jesus, our life and Resurrection, have mercy on us
Apostle - On the feast of Pentecost, ten days after our Lord's ascension, the Holy Spirit came down on the assembled church, Acts 2 ; and from that time the apostles became altogether different men, giving witness with power of the life and death and Resurrection of Jesus, as he had declared they should
Paradise - The voice John heard from heaven, commanding him to write "Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord; from henceforth," that is, immediately, instantly, the bodies rest from their labours, until the Resurrection of the just, and then the solemn events Jesus speaks of will take place
Freedom - This is an act of God’s supreme grace that has as its basis the life, death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Luke 4:17-19; John 8:36; Romans 7:4-6; Romans 8:2; Hebrews 2:14-15)
Tichonius, an African Donatist - Tichonius also wrote a commentary on the Revelation which Gennadius tells us he interpreted entirely in a spiritual sense—that the human body is an abode of angels ("angelicam stationem corpus esse"); that the Millennium in a personal sense is doubtful that there is only one Resurrection in which human bodies of every sort and age will rise and that of the two Resurrections mentioned one is to be understood of the growth of grace in the soul of man and in the church
Daniel, Theology of - The concluding vision contains the only explicit Old Testament reference to the Resurrection (12:1-3). Even in persecution and death, the sovereign Lord of the kingdom will provide Resurrection (12:1-3). The seventy weeks of years (9:24-27) and the promise of the Resurrection (12:1-3) presuppose that the faithful saints of God will have to endure hardship for a limited time
Adam - ) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s Resurrection. Paul maintains (1 Corinthians 15:36-44 a), by a series of illustrations from the natural world, the reasonableness of a Resurrection from death. Paul, who has from 1 Corinthians 15:35 been leading up to the thought of the Resurrection, could at the critical moment throw his argument to the winds, and content himself with saying, ‘according as we have been earthly in our thoughts, let us strive to be heavenly
Peter - Peter was one of the three Apostles whom Jesus admitted to witness the Resurrection of Jairus's daughter, and before whom he was transfigured, and with whom he retired to pray in the garden the night before he suffered. Peter, however, obtained forgiveness; and, when Jesus had risen from the dead, he ordered the glad tidings of his Resurrection to be conveyed to St. The effects produced on the mind of this great Apostle of the circumcision by the Resurrection of his divine Master, and the consequent effusion of the Holy Spirit, were evidently of the most extraordinary kind, and such as it is impossible to account for upon natural principles
Prayer - her husband’s]'>[2] soul, and requests refreshment for him in the meanwhile, and fellowship in the first Resurrection, and she offers [3] on the anniversaries of his falling asleep. And there is a continuous tradition of such prayers in the ancient Liturgies, in which prayers are offered for those who rest in Christ that they may have peace and light, rest and refreshment: that they may live in God (or in Christ): that they may be partakers of the joyful Resurrection, and of the inheritance of the Kingdom of God. And the Sadducees who controlled the Temple services did not believe in any Resurrection, so we cannot suppose that they would have approved of such prayers
Adam - ) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s Resurrection. Paul maintains (1 Corinthians 15:36-44 a), by a series of illustrations from the natural world, the reasonableness of a Resurrection from death. Paul, who has from 1 Corinthians 15:35 been leading up to the thought of the Resurrection, could at the critical moment throw his argument to the winds, and content himself with saying, ‘according as we have been earthly in our thoughts, let us strive to be heavenly
Bible, Theology of - The Bible then proceeds to develop the theme of God's redemptive grace, tracing various stages of God's revelation of Himself: the call of Abraham; the establishment of the covenant with the Israelite community as His chosen people; the institution of the sacrificial system, teaching the people the proper way to approach God for forgiveness; the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus as the provision of forgiveness and regeneration for those dead in sin; the church as the new covenant community, the redeemed people of God on mission for Him in the world; finally, the life to come, in heaven for the redeemed, and in hell for the unregenerate. The whole Bible is the unfolding story of how God has met each of these needs through the salvation that unfolded finally in its completed form through the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. They saw Jesus' death and Resurrection as the way in which God conquered sin and death, and opened regeneration to mankind as God shares the power of Jesus' Resurrection with those who come to Him by faith
Promise - The promises appear after our Lord's Resurrection (Luke 24:49 ; Acts 2:33 ,Acts 2:33,2:38-39 ). ...
There are other subjects related to God's promise: rest (Hebrews 4:1 ); the new covenant with its prospect of an eternal inheritance (Hebrews 9:15 ); the new heavens and new earth (2 Peter 3:13 ); the Resurrection (Acts 26:6 ); the blessing of numerous descendants (Hebrews 6:14 ); the emergence of an unshakable kingdom (Hebrews 12:28 ), and Gentiles as recipients of the same promise (Ephesians 2:11-13 )
Manifestation - Manifestations after the Resurrection. That this does not refer to the manifestations of the Resurrection, which were so soon to follow, is clear from His reply to Jude’s very natural question as to how He would manifest Himself to the disciples and yet not to the world (John 14:22)
Jesus, the Lord - His Resurrection and subsequent exaltation to glory. " As Lord, He administers everything for God according to the redemption He has accomplished, and the place He has taken in Resurrection life and glory
Arnobius - His Resurrection and the subsequent appearances are insisted upon; it is asserted (apparently) that He still appears to the faithful. The Resurrection of the flesh is emphatically asserted, but in somewhat obscure terms (ii
Burial - There the body remained undisturbed over the Jewish Sabbath; but when on the morning of the first day of the week the women visited the tomb, bringing with them an additional supply of ‘spices and ointments’ to complete the anointing which want of time had previously prevented, it was only to find the tomb empty, and to receive the first assurance of their Lord’s Resurrection (Luke 24:1 ff. The empty grave-clothes, out of which the Risen Lord had passed, became thus a sign not only that no violence had been offered to His body by human hands, but also a parable of the true meaning of His Resurrection: ‘all that was of Jesus of Nazareth has suffered its change and is gone
Unitarians - Paul, 2 Corinthians 12, in which he supposed himself taken up into heaven, and in consequence of which he speaks of his descent from heaven; that he exercised his ministry on earth for the space of a year or more, and then suffered death upon the cross, not to exhibit the evil of sin, or in any sense to make atonement for it, but as a martyr to the truth, and as a necessary preliminary to his Resurrection, which they consider as a pledge of the Resurrection of mankind
Matthew - It is certain that the Apostles, immediately after the descent of the Holy Ghost, which took place only ten days after the ascension of our Saviour into heaven, preached the Gospel to the Jews with great success; and surely it is reasonable to suppose, that an authentic account of our Saviour's doctrines and miracles would very soon be committed to writing, for the confirmation of those who believed in his divine mission, and for the conversion of others; and, more particularly, to enable the Jews to compare the circumstances of the birth, death, and Resurrection of Jesus with their ancient prophecies relative to the Messiah; and we may conceive that the Apostles would be desirous of losing no time in writing an account of the miracles which Jesus performed, and of the discourses which he delivered, because the sooner such an account was published, the easier it would be to inquire into its truth and accuracy; and, consequently, when these points were satisfactorily ascertained, the greater would be its weight and authority. Matthew's Gospel, and not found in any other, are the following: the visit of the eastern magi; our Saviour's flight into Egypt; the slaughter of the infants at Bethlehem; the parable of the ten virgins; the dream of Pilate's wife; the Resurrection of many saints at our Saviour's crucifixion; and the bribing of the Roman guard appointed to watch at the holy sepulchre by the chief priests and elders
Enoch - ...
Enoch in the antediluvian generation, and Elijah in the postdiluvian, witnessed before Christ in their own persons to the truth of the Resurrection of the body and its existence in heaven
Declare, Declaration - ...
A — 9: ὁρίζω (Strong's #3724 — Verb — horizo — hor-id'-zo ) "to mark off by boundaries," signifies "to determine," usually of time; in Romans 1:4 , Christ is said to have been "marked out" as the Son of God, by the fact of His Resurrection; "declared" (RV, marg
Fertility Cult - Baal's Resurrection came with the return of the rains
Servant of the Lord - Jesus’ glorious Resurrection showed God’s complete satisfaction with his Son’s atoning work
Magnificat - But no Evangelist of the NT could have failed to speak of Christ by His human name, writing after His Death and Resurrection
Ignorance (2) - Of the Jews the most culpable were the leaders—the Sadducees, because they were ignorant of the Resurrection and the future life, truths inculcated by Moses himself (Matthew 22:29); and the Pharisees and scribes, those blind leaders of the blind, who led their unwary followers into a pit (Matthew 15:14)
Flesh - (3) Relationship by birth or marriage ( Genesis 2:24 ; Genesis 37:27 , Nehemiah 5:5 ), for which also the further phrase ‘flesh and bones’ is found ( Genesis 2:23 , 2 Samuel 19:12 ) a phrase which is also used to describe the reality of the humanity of Jesus after His Resurrection ( Luke 24:39 )
James - Like the rest of the Lord’s brethren, James did not believe in Him while He lived, but acknowledged His claims after the Resurrection
Fool, Foolishness, Folly - Perhaps even more significant than the above characteristics is a failure to act on the words of Jesus by building a house without an adequate foundation (Matthew 7:26-27 ), and a failure to believe the good news of Jesus' Resurrection (Luke 24:25 here the foolish are described as "slow of heart" the Old Testament expression is "without heart, " without understanding, as in Proverbs 9:16 )
Isaac - ...
As Isaac thus became in principle a risen or heavenly man, he must not return for a wife to the country from whence he had been separated by death and Resurrection, as also by the call of Abraham; a bride must be fetched for him from thence, and she must be one of the same 'kindred:' a remarkable type of the heavenly Christ, and of those given to Him of the Father: they are heavenly as He is heavenly
Baptism - ...
the second one seems to be the baptism of the sinner in the lake of fire from which there is no Resurrection
Ark - Jubilees, 5), imagines Christ, as a bodiless spirit, preaching, in the days between His Passion and His Resurrection, to the spirits in prison
Redemption - Hence, in the above cited and other passages, it is said, "We have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins," in opposition to guilt; redemption from "the curse of the law;" deliverance from sin, that "we should be set free from sin;" deliverance from the power of Satan; from death, by a Resurrection; and from future "wrath," by the gift of eternal life
Calvary - It was this sepulchre, so close at hand, and so appropriate, which he resigned for the use of our Lord; little thinking perhaps, at the time, how soon it would again be left vacant for its original purpose by his glorious Resurrection
Universalists - They teach, also, that the righteous shall have part in the first Resurrection, shall be blessed and happy, and be made priests and kings to God and to Christ in the millennial kingdom, and that over them the second death shall have no power; that the wicked will receive a punishment apportioned to their crimes; that punishment itself is a mediatorial work, and founded upon mercy, and, consequently, that it is a means of humbling, subduing, and finally reconciling the sinner to God
Peter - ...
The death and Resurrection of Christ, and the circumstances, which accompanied them, led to a wonderful change in the apostle's mind, and thenceforward his bold and steadfast course is worthy of his name
Joannes Philoponus, Distinguished Philosopher - 62), but after his decease they became divided because of the opinions he had maintained on the Resurrection-body, both in his writings against the heathen and in a special work on this subject
Mourning - The emphasis placed by the early Church on the overthrow of death as an elemental power by the Resurrection of Jesus, on the certainty of a future life, the conception of a fuller, richer existence beyond the grave-a ‘clothing upon’ rather than a stripping of personality-all tended to rob death of its sting and the grave of its victory
Nineveh, Ninevites - ’ The ‘sign of Jonah’ is thus the sign of the Resurrection
Glory - After the triumph of his life, death and Resurrection, God exalted him to heaven’s highest place and gave him heaven’s highest glory (Philippians 2:6-11; Hebrews 2:9; 1 Peter 1:11; 1 Peter 1:21)
Advent, Second - But the important aspect of the Resurrection and Rapture of the saints is, that it is God's answer in those that believe to the all-glorious worth of His own Son
Atonement - The elements of this experience are:...
(1) The Resurrection. -This is the starting-point of the new experience; the ultimate root of the apostolic doctrine of atonement was the presence of the Risen Christ in the consciousness of the primitive Christian community; for it was the secret of the restoration and enrichment of personal faith, the re-creation of the corporate confidence of the community which ‘was begotten again unto a, living hope by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead’ (1 Peter 1:3). Now and for always these two-death and Resurrection-stood together. When the apostles stated the one, they implied the other; the Resurrection was the great theme of the apostolic preaching because it interpreted the significance of the Death. The redeeming virtue issues from the Death and Resurrection as from a common source, though the cross ultimately became its chosen symbol. The illumination of the apostolic mind for its construction of a doctrine of atonement resulting from the Resurrection and the Great Commission was perfected by the experiences of-...
(3) Pentecost
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
‘Also the so-called Gospel according to the Hebrews, which was recently translated by me into Greek and Latin, which Origen, too, often uses, relates after the Resurrection of the Saviour: “But when the Lord had given the linen cloth to the priest’s servant, He went to James and appeared to him. It relates in some detail the death, burial, and Resurrection of Jesus. ’ At the time of the Resurrection the soldiers are said to have seen how ‘three men cams forth from the tomb, and two of them supported one, and the cross followed them; and of the two the head reached unto the heavens, but the head of him that was led by them overpassed the heavens; and they heard a voice from the heavens saying, “Thou hast preached unto them that sleep. As it now stands it gives an elaborate account of the trial of Jesus, His descent to Hades, Resurrection, and ascension. The story of the burial is further elaborated by the introduction of a number of Biblical characters, who undertake to prove the genuineness of the Resurrection. ...
Although the Gospel of Nicodemus was of a nature to acquire great popularity, and has had a profound influence upon the various poetical and homiletic presentations of the events supposed to have taken place between the death and Resurrection of Jesus, and although the Acts of Pilate has been treated more seriously than the evidence in its favour warrants, the Gospel is obviously of the class of Jewish Haggadah or legend
John, Theology of - Similar statements have been made in reference to Christ’s ‘coming’ and the ‘resurrection. ’ That each of these three events is recognized as still in the future, to be anticipated as coming to pass at the end of the world, or at ‘the last day,’ is clear from such passages as the following: ‘judgment’ in John 12:48 and 1 John 4:17 ; ‘coming’ in John 14:3 and 1 John 2:18 ; 1 John 2:28 ; ‘resurrection’ in 1 John 1:5 ; 1 John 1:7 ; John 11:24 etc. There is nothing in these descriptions of present spiritual blessing to interfere with the explicit statement that after death there shall be a Resurrection of life and a Resurrection of judgment ( John 5:29 ), any more than our Saviour intended to deny Martha’s statement concerning the Resurrection at the last day, when He said to her, ‘I am the Resurrection and the life’ ( John 11:25 )
Passover - Bingham, indeed, on very slender grounds holds that the ‘first Christians of Jerusalem … did not keep Easter with the Jews on what day of the week scever it fell, but on the Sunday following in honour of our Saviour’s Resurrection’ (Ant. The ‘first day of the week,’ the Lord’s Day, was the regular, weekly commemoration of our Lord’s Resurrection. He sees, again, in the first-fruits offered at the Passover an illustration of what Christ is in His Resurrection to the harvest field of the dead. -The true celebration of Easter, the festival of our Lord’s Resurrection, was, as we have seen above, a thing of weekly occurrence. ...
This correspondence is made abundantly clear by the fact that the name for the festival of the Resurrection of our Lord is in most countries simply the name ‘Pascha’ reproduced in various forms. ...
It was only to be expected that with the weekly celebration there should gradually grow up a special yearly commemoration of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Miracles - In the case of the Resurrection (Matthew 28:11-15) and the cure of the blind man (John 9) the Jews made a self confuted charge of fraud. The "sign" of Jonah in his virtual burial and Resurrection, and the sign of their destroying the temple of His body and His raising it in three days (John 2:18-21; Matthew 16:4), were the only sign which remained to convince them. ...
His Resurrection is the central miracle toward which all the rest converge. He would still give such signs of unobtrusive mercy as hereto; if they not only still reject them but also His Resurrection, there only remains the last condemning sign, the Son of man coming with the clouds of heaven (Revelation 1:7; Matthew 12:15). His incarnation and His Resurrection include all between, and involve the wonders of Pentecost
Romans, Theology of - Paul quickly moves off his own role as servant in verse 1 to honor the archetypal source of all generous servanthood in Christ, who is designated Son of God by his Resurrection from the dead (v. A trinitarian theology is immediately invoked that focuses on the Resurrection of Christ as the culminating event "in power" of divine generosity, which is spelled out in verse 5 and establishes the theme of the entire letter. The believer is accordingly saved by the twofold work of Christ: in his life of faithful perfection, which is imputed to the Christian, and in his death and Resurrection, which remove the penalty of eternal separation from God. Here the already and not yet aspects of Christian living and salvation are illustrated by the foundational work of Christ in his death and Resurrection. 1) because participation in Christ's death and Resurrection through the baptism of faith enjoins the believer to walk in newness of life (vv
Baptism - That our Lord instituted such an ordinance as baptism, is plain from the commission given to the Apostles after his Resurrection, and recorded in Matthew 28:19-20 . Paul, endeavouring to prove the Resurrection of the dead, among several other reasons in support of the doctrine, says, "If the dead rise not at all, what shall they do who are baptized for the dead?" 1 Corinthians 15:29 . Macknight supplies the words, της...
αναστασεως , and reads the clause, "Who are baptized for the Resurrection of the dead;" or in consequence of their believing in the doctrine of the Resurrection of the dead; on account of which faith, and their profession of it, they are exposed to great sufferings, for which they can have no recompense, if there be no Resurrection of the dead, nor any future life at all
Begetting - Applied to Christ, this might be taken as referring to such an event as the Resurrection, with reference to which St. Paul did, by the light of the Resurrection of Jesus. Paul appears to teach in his discourse in Acts (Acts 13:33) and in his Epistle to the Romans, to the period of the Resurrection. That ‘sanctification’ and that ‘sending’ of which He speaks (John 10:36) correspond to the begetting referred to by the Psalmist, though in this case they point to the Incarnation, and not, as in Romans 1:4, to the Resurrection
Children of God, Sons of God - ’ He seems to mean that only at the Resurrection, when the body rises incorruptible, will the process of adoption be really completed, and made manifest. Paul seems to look forward to the Resurrection as the moment when adoption to sonship shall be consummated, so St. The consummation of this process will be a final adoption at the Resurrection (St
Disciples - The New Testament apostle, on the other hand, emerges as a divinely appointed, lifetime witness to the saving acts of God, specifically, the death and Resurrection of Jesus. ...
Apostle in the New Testament The term “apostle” in the New Testament is used primarily to designate that group of leaders within the early church(es) who were historical witnesses of the resurrected Lord and proclaimers of God's saving mercies enacted through the death and Resurrection of Jesus. However, just as the term “disciple” could mean other followers of Jesus than the twelve in the time of His ministry, so also after His Resurrection the term “disciple” had a wider meaning as well, being clearly applied to all His followers
Mission - ...
The pattern of mission set by Jesus' sending of his followers during his earthly ministry was repeated and extended during his post-resurrection appearances. The risen Lord commissioned his followers to proclaim a salvation fully accomplished in his atoning death and victorious Resurrection and freely offered to those who repent and receive it (1618069008_29 ). In a post-resurrection appearance to the disciples he says, "As the Father has sent me, I am sending you" (20:21)
Righteousness - ...
God's righteousness is, for Paul, God's saving activity in and through the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ, his Son. God's gift to those who believe is a righteousness that exists and can be given only because of the sacrificial death of Jesus for sinners and his Resurrection from the dead as the vindicated Lord of all. Those who believe will become and remain righteous in their Resurrection bodies of glory
Apocrypha, New Testament - ...
Passion Gospels, another class of apocryphal gospel, are concerned with supplementing the canonical accounts by describing events surrounding the crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus. Another apocryphal work that might be classified as a passion gospel is the Book of the Resurrection of Christ by Bartholomew the Apostle . The Epistle of the Apostles is a second-century collection of visions communicating post-resurrection teachings of Christ
Church - He established the church under His authority (Matthew 16:13-20 ) and created the foundation for its existence in His redeeming death and demonstration of God's power in His Resurrection. Baptism or immersion in water was performed because Christ had commanded it (Matthew 28:18-20 ) and was itself a dramatic symbolic picturing of the burial and Resurrection of Christ (Romans 6:3-4 ). ...
The growth and expansion of the early church Jesus taught His disciples that by following Him they were to be involved in a movement that would continue (Matthew 16:13-20 ; John 14:12-14 ), but it was after the Resurrection of Jesus that the mission of the church really began (Matthew 28:16-20 ; John 20:19-23 ; Acts 1:6-11 )
Philippians - Prehyexhyishytence, incarnation, passion, Resurrection, and exhyhaltation are all summarized in a masterful fashion. Warning against confidence in the flesh: Place confidence only in Christ and the Resurrection hope (Philippians 3:4-11 )...
C
Messiah - It was only after the Resurrection that the disciples were in a position to see how Jesus was truly a king Messiah and how Jesus then opened their minds to what true Messiahship meant (see Luke 24:45-46 ). ...
Messiah as a Title in the Early Church From the Resurrection onward the first preachers announced that Jesus was the Messiah by divine appointment (Acts 2:36 ; Romans 1:3-4 )
Law, Ten Commandments, Torah - It can be seen in the life, death, and Resurrection of our Lord. The third theme we find in Paul is that Christ freed us from the requirements of the Law by His death and Resurrection (Romans 8:3-4 )
Jesus Christ - Near Cæsarea Philippi Peter made his confession of faith, and then Jesus foretold his own death and Resurrection and the trials of Ms followers. A third time he foretold his death and Resurrection, and approaching Jericho healed blind men, called Zacchæus, and gave the parable of the pounds
Ezekiel, Book of - It has been thought by many, because of the graves being opened, and the people being brought out of their graves, that this passage refers to the Resurrection of the body; but the people are saying, before the graves are opened, "Our bones are dried and our hope is lost," the exact feeling of many to this day. The Resurrection is used as a figure of life being given to Israel, and also to Judah
Materialists - This system gives a real value to the doctrine of the Resurrection from the dead, which is peculiar to revelation; on which alone the sacred writers build all our hope of future life: and it explains the uniform language of the Scriptures, which speak of one day of judgment for all mankind; and represent all the rewards of virtue, and all the punishments of vice, as taking place at that awful day, and not before. In the Scriptures, the heathens are represented as without hope, and all mankind as perishing at death, if there be no Resurrection of the dead
Burial - This is the way in which it was proposed to embalm the lifeless body of our Saviour; which was prevented by his Resurrection. This appears to be confirmed by a prediction in the eighth chapter: "And the songs of the temple shall be howlings in that day, saith the Lord God; there shall be many dead bodies in every place; they shall cast them forth with silence;" they shall have none to lament and bewail; none to blow the funeral trump or touch the pipe and tabor; none to sing the plaintive dirge, or express their hope of a blessed Resurrection, in the strains of inspiration
Offices of Christ - In respect of Christ’s priesthood, the preparation consisted in imposition of office, sanctification by the Spirit, obedience, sufferings and death, and Resurrection; and the discharge of the office consisted in His offering His body and blood. The results of Christ’s official work are the gathering of the Church, the obedience of His people, the actual remission of sins, Resurrection from the dead, and life eternal
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus - ...
By Thy Resurrection, have mercy on us
Litany of the Holy Name - ...
By Thy Resurrection, have mercy on us
Sadducees - They denied the Pharisaic doctrine of the Resurrection of the body ( Mark 12:18 , Matthew 22:23 , Luke 20:27 , Acts 23:8 )
Religion - It affords us no intelligence as to the immortality of the soul, the Resurrection of the body, and a future state of happiness and misery
Soul - That is why the Bible encourages believers to look for their eternal destiny not in the endless existence of some bodiless ‘soul’ or ‘spirit’, but in the Resurrection of the body to a new and glorious life (1 Corinthians 15:42-53; Philippians 3:20-21)
Son of Man - ...
If, however, the crucified Son of man was to receive an eternal kingdom, his death had to be followed by Resurrection (Mark 9:31; Mark 10:33-34)
Dispensation - Grace (John 1:17 ) This dispensation begins with the death and Resurrection of Jesus
Bread, Bread of Presence - After the Resurrection, Jesus' eating of bread with the disciples was a token of his victory over death (Luke 24:30,35 ; John 21:13 ), and Christians after that met on the first of the week for the breaking of bread (Acts 20:7 )
Holy Name, Litany of the - ...
By Thy Resurrection, have mercy on us
Powers - These forces are not able to defeat believers, or to separate them from the love of Christ, for Christ has subordinated them through the cross and his Resurrection
Fullness - " This phrase has been interpreted to mean either an extensive turning to faith in Christ by the Gentiles or the actual Resurrection in conjunction with the return of Christ
God And Magog - These interpretations depend on the view taken of the ‘thousand years’ and the ‘first Resurrection
Godliness - The Christian united to Christ in His Death and Resurrection is a new man, and must accordingly live as such
Lion - He, who had overcome through death and the Resurrection, who had thus opened a way to God’s sovereignty over men, and is therefore alone able to loose the seals of the Divine judgment, i
Adoption - The adoption process will be finalized when God restores all creation, giving His children Resurrection bodies (Romans 8:23 )
Genesis, Book of - But the son of promise must be offered up, and be received back as from the dead, then the covenant was established figuratively in Resurrection
Luke, Gospel of - ...
After this (Luke 19 , Luke 20 , Luke 21 ), details are given as to that which should happen to the Jew according to the righteous government of God; and, at the end, the account of the death and Resurrection of the Lord, accomplishing the work of redemption
Manichaeans - Construing too literally the assertion that flesh and blood could not inherit the kingdom of God, they denied the doctrine of the Resurrection
Sacrament of Penance - Implied in the right of "binding and loosing" promised by Christ to the rulers of His Church (Matthew 16:18), the power to forgive sins was unequivocally granted to the Apostles, and consequently to their successors, since the Church is permanent and unchangeable; it was thus granted by the words of Christ to the Apostolic college on the day of His Resurrection: "Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained
Feasts - Christians have always celebrated the memory of his Resurrection by regarding the Sabbath, which we see, from Luke 14:12-144 , was in John's time commonly called "the Lord's day
Descent Into Hades - Peter (Acts 2:24-31 ), when he quotes Psalms 16:10 , ‘Thou wilt not leave my soul in Hades,’ as a prophecy of the Resurrection
Profession - His Resurrection (Romans 10:9), His Divine Sonship (1 John 1:4; 1 John 1:7), His coming in the flesh (1 John 4:2), and the baptismal confession or formula (Matthew 28:19)
Jesus Christ - 14-37) somewhere in Palestine; that he was a religious leader who worked miracles and exorcised demons and was later regarded as a deity by his followers; that he was executed by crucifixion by the Jewish and Roman authorities during a Passover season; that reports circulated about his Resurrection from the dead. They also believed that none of the supernatural elements of the Gospels, such as the virgin birth, the miracles of Jesus, or his bodily Resurrection was true, anyway, but only an ancient way of describing an existential experience of the present day. For Jesus triumph in Jerusalem meant death and Resurrection; for the disciples it meant a special and obvious place in God's kingdom. ...
Jesus' Resurrection and Ascension . During the forty days Jesus had confirmed the fact of his Resurrection, instructed his disciples about his new relationship to them, and promised them a new work by the Holy Spirit in their lives
Ascension of Isaiah - It is thus of considerable importance in the light which it throws upon the views held in certain circles of the Christian Church of the apostolic period with regard to the doctrines of the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Resurrection, the Seven Heavens, the Antichrist, angels and demons. There Isaiah beholds His wonderful birth, miracles, and crucifixion, Resurrection, mission of the Twelve, ascension, and session on the right hand of the Great Glory. The Ascension, not the Resurrection, is the distinctive object of faith to the believer in 2:9; 3:18. Then follows ‘[2] a judgment,’ and the godless are entirely destroyed by fire from before the Beloved (4:16). ...
(b) The Resurrection is apparently a spiritual one. [2] 298-301; W
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - ’ In these passages Jesus taught plainly that the OT testified that His death and Resurrection were necessary antecedents to the preaching of repentance and the forgiveness of sins. In other words, according to Jesus, the OT clearly showed that His death and Resurrection were a necessity in the Divine economy. ...
It is quite significant that no one passage is quoted or mentioned in the reports of the teaching of Jesus given by Him after His Resurrection. Yet He taught His disciples explicitly that His sufferings, death, and Resurrection were necessary in order to fulfil the OT. Further, the disciples, after they understood the Scriptures, also saw the necessity of the death and Resurrection
Psalms (2) - Paul regards the Psalmist’s utterance as fulfilled not in the baptism, but in the Resurrection of Jesus; and this view appears to underlie the Apostle’s statement in Romans 1:4 that it was by the Resurrection that Jesus was declared to be the Son of God with power. ...
Here, then, are three different interpretations of the verse within the NT: the Divine sonship of the Messiah is variously connected with His baptism, His Resurrection, or His eternal generation. Peter quotes four verses of the psalm (Psalms 16:8-11) in confirmation of the Resurrection of Christ. The psalm is therefore regarded as a prophecy of the Resurrection of Christ, though it is, in reality, only a devout believer’s confession of faith in his own immortality
John, the Gospel of - The account of Jesus' crucifixion and Resurrection, which makes frequent allusions to the Hebrew Scriptures, was probably shaped during this period. The Resurrection of Jesus (John 20:1-29 ) ...
E
Scripture - in Romans and Galatians), but in interpreting the mission and person of Christ, and the significance of His death, Resurrection, and ascension (Acts 2:25 ff. ), with the subsequent outpouring of the Spirit, the persecution of the Church, the rejection of the Jews and mission to the Gentiles, the Resurrection of the body, and the final salvation (Acts 1:16 ff
Sadducees (2) - ...
The distinctive Sadducean doctrines are usually classed under three heads:—(1) They denied the Resurrection, personal immortality, and retribution in a future life. They thought to inveigle Him with the Roman power by asking whether it was lawful to give tribute to Caesar (Luke 20:22), and they attempted to discredit His teaching by presenting to Him the problem of the woman who had been married to seven brethren, and asking whose wife she should be in the Resurrection; but they only brought upon themselves discomfiture, and the reproof that they knew neither the Scriptures nor the power of God (Matthew 22:23 ||)
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - " So, again, it is Jesus , according to one passage of Epiphanius, Who dies and rises again, the Christ being spiritual and remaining impassible; according to a second, it is Christ Who dies, but is not yet risen, nor shall He rise till the general Resurrection. He held that if a man died unbaptized another was to be baptized in his stead and in his name that at the day of Resurrection he might not suffer punishment and be made subject to the ἐξουσία κοσμοποίος (cf
Church - It was new in that it would not formally come into existence till after Jesus’ death, Resurrection and ascension (Matthew 16:18; Matthew 16:21; Acts 1:4-5; Titus 2:14; Acts 2:17-188). Through his Resurrection and ascension, Jesus Christ became head over the church and the source of its life and growth (1618069008_3; Ephesians 4:15-16; Colossians 1:18; Colossians 2:19; Colossians 3:1-4)
Fact And Theory - Hence we have, first of all, God’s redeeming acts, culminating in the Incarnation, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. The whole of the Pauline letters are occupied to a large extent with the interpretation of the facts of our Lord’s Incarnation, Death, and Resurrection. Christ’s death is simply a symbol of something which must be repeated in every man’s inner life, and His bodily Resurrection a symbol of the return of the finite spirit to the Infinite. by Schmiedel on ‘The Resurrection and Ascension Narratives’ in Encye. , illustrates the same distinction between kernel and husk, and the giving up of the fact of the bodily Resurrection of Christ. So also the Resurrection of Christ need not be true in its literal Scriptural form, but at the same time it symbolizes the truth of the entrance of Christ into the heavenly world
Baptism - "...
It saves us also, not of itself (any more than the water saved Noah of itself; the water saved him only by sustaining the ark, built in faith), but the spiritual thing conjoined with it, repentance and faith, of which it is the seal: as Peter proceeds to explain, "not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God (the instrument whereby it so saves, being) by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ" (Colossians 2:12; 1618069008_20); not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but of the soul. Here, and in 1618069008_77-5-6, baptism is viewed as identifying us with Christ, by our union to His once crucified and now risen body, and as entailing in us also a death unto sin and a new birth unto righteousness, and as involving as the final issue our bodily sharing in the likeness of His Resurrection, at the coming first Resurrection, that of the saints
Baptize, Baptism - It looks back to one of Jesus' metaphors for repentance, self-crucifixion (Mark 8:34 ; Galatians 2:20 ; 6:14 ), and recognizes in baptism the moment when the convert does indeed, publicly, take up his or her cross, dying with Christ to self, to sin, and to the world, and rising with him to a life constantly renewed by his Resurrection power (Romans 6:1-11 ). ...
Such a death and Resurrection with Christ is implied in accepting the gospel. It is as an appeal for a "clear conscience, " and through the triumphant Resurrection and ascension of Christ above all "authorities, " that baptism achieves this "salvation
Jews, Judaism - Related to this problem was the development of ideas latent in Hebrew Scripture on Resurrection of the body, immortality of the soul, and the concept of the afterlife. The Pharisees were strictly orthodox, holding to the authority of both the Torah and the oral tradition, and believing in Resurrection and immortality. These ideas included messianic stirring, interest in the eschaton (the end of days), the Resurrection from the dead, and the rule of God
Christianity (History Sketch) - The open manner in which it was announced, the length of time during which its Author publicly addressed his countrymen, the innumerable miracles which he performed, and, above all, the report of the Resurrection under circumstances which must have been communicated to the imperial government at Rome, excited the deep attention of the numerous Jews and proselytes who, from surrounding nations, regularly went up to Jerusalem, and of whom vast numbers were actually in that city when the Resurrection must have been the subject of universal discussion. ) What was the effect of this depressing situation? Did it check the dissemination of the Gospel, or confine it to the men by whom it was preached? So far was this from being the case, that from the period of the death, and, as it must here be termed, the alleged Resurrection of Jesus, it was embraced by immense numbers in all the countries to which it was conveyed; and even while they were contemplating the sacrifices and the trials to which, by attaching themselves to it, they would be exposed, they did not hesitate to relinquish the religion in which they had been educated, and to exchange for misery and death all the comforts which the strongest feelings and propensities of our nature lead men to value and to pursue
Names of Our Lord - ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Condemnation - Unless they repent they face the irrevocable finalization of this condemnation at the Resurrection and judgment (Matthew 25:46 ; John 5:28-29 ; Acts 17:30-31 ; 24:15 ; Romans 2:5-16 ; 1618069008_98 ; 2:9-12 ; 1 Peter 4:4-5,17 ; 2 Peter 2:1-10 ; Jude 4-9 ; Revelation 20:7-14 ; 21:6-8 ; 22:12-17 )
Intercession - His death secured removal of sin; His Resurrection bestowed life on those who believe in Him; His ascension brought exaltation to power in heaven and on earth
Perfect, Perfectly - 5:9; 7:28, RV, "perfected" (AV, "consecrated"); of His saints, John 17:23 , RV, "perfected" (AV, "made perfect"); Philippians 3:12 ; Hebrews 10:14 ; 11:40 (of Resurrection glory); 12:23 (of the departed saints); 1 John 4:18 ; of former priests (negatively), Hebrews 9:9 ; similarly of Israelites under the Aaronic priesthood, Hebrews 10:1 ; (b) of things, Hebrews 7:19 (of the ineffectiveness of the Law); James 2:22 (of faith made "perfect" by works); 1 John 2:5 , of the love of God operating through him who keeps His word; 1 John 4:12 , of the love of God in the case of those who love one another; 1 John 4:17 , of the love of God as "made perfect with" (RV) those who abide in God, giving them to be possessed of the very character of God, by reason of which "as He is, even so are they in this world
Essenes (2) - The indications of incipient dualism which may be found in their abstinence from marriage and in other ascetic practices, find a parallel in their doctrine of immortality, wherein they agreed with the Pharisees against the Sadducees as to the immortality of the soul, but differed from the Pharisees in denying the Resurrection of the body
Evil - ...
Sixth, God deals with evil through the incarnation, the cross, and the Resurrection
Joy - Later they understood, when the dark sorrow of the cross gave way to the joy of the Resurrection (Luke 24:41 )
Rachel - ...
"There is hope in thine end," namely, when Rachel shall meet her murdered children at the Resurrection of the saints bodily, and of Israel nationally (Ezekiel 37)
Reverence - In these passages we have reference to the adoration of Jesus by the Magi, Herod’s desire to do homage to the child at Bethlehem, the request of the devil that Jesus should worship him, the disciples doing homage to their Lord by the sea, the Canaanite woman humbling herself before Jesus, the mother of James and John as she made her bold request for her two sons, the disciples after the Resurrection of Christ, the demoniac of Gadara before Jesus, the mock homage paid to Jesus on the Cross
Adam in the nt - These verses ( a ) go behind that, and show that there is a radical difference between the nature of each; ( b ) look forward, and show that this difference has a vital bearing on the truth of man’s Resurrection
Feet (2) - It was His feet that the two Marys clung to when they first met Jesus on the Resurrection morning
Fool - The term ‘fool’ (ἅφρων), signifying mental stupidity, is applied to the imaginary controversialist of 1 Corinthians 15:36, who finds unnecessary difficulties in the Resurrection (cf
Form - Paul always regards the Death and Resurrection of Christ as adding something to it
Mark, Gospel by - From this time we find the Lord repeatedly bringing before His disciples the truth of His approaching death and Resurrection, and the consequences flowing therefrom
Age - , of God, Romans 16:26 , His power, 1 Timothy 6:16 , His glory, 1 Peter 5:10 , the Holy Spirit, Hebrews 9:14 , redemption, Hebrews 9:12 , salvation, 5:9, life in Christ, John 3:16 , the Resurrection body, 2 Corinthians 5:1 , the future rule of Christ, 2 Peter 1:11 , which is declared to be without end, Luke 1:33 , of sin that never has forgiveness, Mark 3:29 , the judgment of God, Hebrews 6:2 , and of fire, one of its instruments, Matthew 18:8 ; 25:41 ; Jude 1:7
Job - It teaches the being and perfections of God, his creation of all things, and his universal providence; the apostasy and guilt of evil spirits and of mankind; the mercy of God, on the basis of a sacrifice, and on condition of repentance and faith, Job 33:27-30 42:6,8 ; the immortality of the soul, and the Resurrection of the body, Job 14:7-15 19:25-27
Day of the Lord - For one it will be a day of wrath, for the other a day of salvation (Matthew 24:36-41; Matthew 25:32; Matthew 25:46; Luke 21:27-28; Acts 24:15; Romans 2:5; Philippians 1:6; Philippians 1:10; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-18; 2 Thessalonians 1:5-8; Revelation 22:12-15; see JUDGMENT; Resurrection)
Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - ...
(5) Six Homilies: on Nativity, Epiphany, Lent, Palm Sunday, The Passion, The Resurrection (Zingerlé, Sechs Homilien des heilig
Ephesians, Letter to the - By his death and Resurrection he has triumphed over the evil spiritual forces of the universe and, because of this, Christians likewise can have victory in their battles against evil (Ephesians 2:2-6; Ephesians 6:12)
Teaching - In addition to a recital of the facts concerning the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Romans 1:3 f. ...
The story of the events of the earthly life of Jesus, together with an account of His sinless character and His death and Resurrection, had to be told (1 Corinthians 15:1 ff. In order that men should intelligently believe that Jesus was the promised Christ, as proved by His Resurrection ‘according to the scriptures’ (1 Corinthians 15:4), that He was the Saviour of sinful men through His expiatory death upon the Cross (Romans 5:6; Romans 5:8, 2 Corinthians 5:18; 2 Corinthians 5:21), that He was the redeeming head of the human race (Romans 5:15, 1 Corinthians 15:22), that, moreover, He was the eternal Son of God and the creative ideal of the whole universe (Ephesians 1:10, Colossians 1:16 f. The preacher heralded an impending Parousia; he exhorted his hearers to repentance in view of the certain approach of Christ as Judge; he proclaimed the sure and certain hope of Resurrection
Gospels - Matthew, the earlier, omits the ascension as involved in the Resurrection. Luke, writing for Gentile converts, describes facts less familiar to them which occurred after the Resurrection in and about Jerusalem. John 21:6-7 supplements Luke 5:6; Luke 5:8, the corresponding miracle before His Resurrection. The angel's words addressed to Mary Magdalene after Christ's Resurrection, "Go, tell His disciples and Peter," are recorded owing to Peter's deep sense of Christ's pardoning grace after his grievous fall; delicacy forbade his recording his own repentance, gratitude can never forget that Jesus' first words of special comfort were sent to him, "tell Peter" specially, for his Saviour has risen even for his justification (Mark 16:7)
Propitiation (2) - He foretold that His Resurrection would follow His death (Matthew 12:40 || Luke 11:29). As the end drew near, He dwelt more upon His death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23; Matthew 20:18-19; Matthew 21:33-40, cf. Immediately after His Resurrection He began to instruct His disciples as to the meaning of His mission and death as they stood related to the Law and the Prophets (1618069008_87). They were interpreting His death in the fuller light of His own teachings after His Resurrection and with the Spirit’s help
Apostles - Finally, the women had to tell the news of the Resurrection to the apostles (Luke 24:10 ). Qualifications for an apostle were clear: participation in Jesus' earthly ministry beginning with His baptism and a witness of the Resurrection (Acts 1:21-22 )
Atonement, Day of - ...
The life after death also points to our being dead with Christ to sin and its penalty and power, and becoming alive unto God by union with Him in His Resurrection life (Romans 6:5-11). so far hath lie removed our transgressions from us" (Psalms 103:12); the slain goat expresses "Christ was delivered for our offenses," so that in believing union with Him we are dead to sin, and to the law as a condemning power, and to death; the living goat expresses "Christ rose again for our justification" (Romans 4:25), so that we live by union with His Resurrection life, sin being utterly put away in proportion as that life works in us (John 14:19; Romans 6; Colossians 3)
Flesh - They are best taken to refer to the death and Resurrection of Christ, which is reproduced in the life of the believer, bringing death to sin and Resurrection to new life
Preach, Proclaim - Then 15:11,12 both refer to proclaiming Christ in defending the reality of the Resurrection. They also show that the content of this proclamation is the gospel or Christhis death and Resurrection for the salvation of humankind
Psalms, Book of - The light of Resurrection dawns for the faithful in this book, Christ having gone through death into fulness of joy at God's right hand: compare Revelation 6:11 . Though Resurrection may be dimly seen by the faithful in the circumstances of this book, yet what is before them is the restoration of Zion ( Psalm 45 — Psalm 48 and Psalm 69:35 )
Ave Maria - ...
After the Resurrection this veil was so completely removed, and the awe of Christ’s presence became so unclouded and continuous, that one of the Apostles could write, ‘Though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now we know him so no more’ (2 Corinthians 5:16). Instead of the parched abstractions that with us so often take the place of the mystical indwelling, they preached ‘Jesus and the Resurrection’ (Acts 17:18), ‘Jesus Christ and him crucified’ (1 Corinthians 2:2)
Parable - The change of mode would awaken attention, and judgment thus end in mercy, when the message of reconciliation addressed to them first after Jesus' Resurrection (Acts 3:26) would remind them of parables not understood at the time. A third reason was, gospel doctrines could not be understood fully before the historical facts on which they rested had been accomplished, namely, Jesus' death and Resurrection
Foundation - … Christianity is a Life, a Spirit’-‘ “That I may know Him, and the power of His Resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being made conformable unto His death”. The different elements that constitute the foundation, which is not to be laid again, are three, taken in pairs: (i) personal attitudes of heart and mind: repentance from dead works and faith toward God; (ii) church ordinances: baptism and laying on of lands; (iii) leading beliefs: Resurrection and judgment
Sacrifice (2) - He is the Bread of Life, the Living Water, that giveth life to men (John 6:1-71; John 7:37-38; John 3:10-15); He is the Resurrection and the Life (John 11:25); but that this πνεῦμα ζωοποιοῦν may act with completed power, it must pass through death to larger life. But the death itself has a value apart from the Resurrection, for in it is revealed the triumph of holy love over the power of evil: it is the means whereby the Father glorifies the Son (John 12:27-28, John 13:31-32). The glad facts of the Resurrection and Ascension, with all of spiritual quickening that these had brought them, were the all-important things to them. It was the Resurrection they preached, not the Cross (Acts 3:13-16; Acts 10:40-41). Paul attaches to the Resurrection of Christ enforces all that has been said
Holy Spirit - In the Gospel of John, the Spirit possesses Christ (Genesis 1:2 ); is indicative of the new birth (John 3:1-16 ); will come upon Jesus' departure (John 16:7-11 ); and will endow the believer after the Resurrection (John 20:22 )
Sabbath - ...
After his Resurrection, which took place on the first day of the week (Matthew 28:1 ; Mark 16:2 ; Luke 24:1 ; John 20:1 ), we never find Christ meeting with his disciples on the seventh day
Angel - They predict his advent (Matthew 1:20 ; Luke 1:26-38 ), minister to him after his temptation and agony (Matthew 4:11 ; Luke 22:43 ), and declare his Resurrection and ascension (Matthew 28:2-8 ; John 20:12,13 ; Acts 1:10,11 )
Thomas - The Resurrection of the Son of man proved that He was the Son of God (Romans 1:4)
Acts of the Apostles - It was early called "The Acts," "The Gospel of the Holy Ghost," and "The Gospel of the Resurrection
Inspiration - The promise of the Spirit by Christ to His disciples was fulfilled when He Himself after the Resurrection breathed on them, and said, ‘Receive ye the Holy Ghost’ ( John 20:22 ), and after His Ascension the Spirit descended on the Church with the outward signs of the wind and fire ( Acts 2:2-3 )
Joseph - But our Joseph was not only sold for thirty pieces of silver, but at length crucified and slain, and from the grave which he made with the wicked and with the rich in his death, by his Resurrection and ascension, at the right hand of power, he is become the universal and eternal Governor both of heaven and earth
Bethesda - But this, if admitted as an argument of doubt, would go farther than the objectors perhaps intend; since the same cause of objection would equally hold good against the pool of Siloam, the Resurrection of Lazarus, several of the sweet and precious discourses of Christ, his miracle of Cana, at Galilee, and very many other blessed relations concerning the Lord Jesus, which are mentioned by none of the other evangelists
Eutychius - ...
Towards the end of his life Eutychius maintained that after the Resurrection the body will be more subtle than air, and no longer palpable
Law of Moses - ' Christianity is not in its true power apart from death and Resurrection
Phar'Isees, - They appear to have believed in a Resurrection of the dead, very much in the same sense: as the early Christians
Image - ...
By his life, death and Resurrection, Jesus undid the evil consequences of Adam and Eve’s disobedience (Romans 5:12-20)
Gospels - ...
Preserving the message...
After the Resurrection and ascension of Jesus, his followers spread the good news of salvation through him, firstly in Jerusalem, and then throughout Palestine and neighbouring countries
Witness (2) - Miracles, Resurrection of Christ, and Sign. After His Passion and Resurrection He expressly commissioned them to go forth as His witnesses (Luke 24:48, Acts 1:8). ’ After His Resurrection this office is committed to faithful witnesses
Eternal Life (2) - John’s Gospel the ‘eternal life’ which the believer now ‘hath’ is destined to attain a glorious consummation in the Resurrection ‘at the last day’ (John 5:40; John 5:45). For Jesus is Himself the Resurrection as well as the life, and declares: ‘He that believeth on me, though he die, yet shall he live; and whosoever liveth and believeth on me shall never die’ (John 11:25-26). Heaven, Immortality, Resurrection
Soul - ’]'>[4] ...
At the Last Day, according to Jesus, there will be a bodily Resurrection of all men, followed by a final judgment, and a final settlement of the destiny of each soul (Matthew 25:31-46). The Resurrection of the wicked is clearly taught in Matthew 10:28, John 5:29. See, further, Resurrection of the Dead, Eschatology, Abraham ($ ‘Abraham’s bosom’), Paradise, Hell Peter, Second Epistle of - They satisfied their own avarice and lust, and scoffed at moral responsibility, teaching, it would appear, that there is no Resurrection of the body or judgment to come, by playing upon the deferred Christian hope of the Return of the Lord. The Divine names are different, and different conceptions of Christ’s work and of the Christian life are emphasized in 1Peter Jesus is the Messiah whose sufferings, death, and Resurrection are the leading motives for the Christian life; in 2Peter Christ is ‘Saviour,’ who brings power for a godly life to all who have knowledge of Him. Both teach that Jesus Christ is progressively revealed to the believer, the Parousia being the fulfilment of the Transfiguration or the Resurrection ( 1 Peter 1:13 ; 1 Peter 4:13 ; 1Pe 5:1 , 2 Peter 1:3-4 ; 2 Peter 1:16 )
Soul - ’]'>[4] ...
At the Last Day, according to Jesus, there will be a bodily Resurrection of all men, followed by a final judgment, and a final settlement of the destiny of each soul (Hebrews 1:14). The Resurrection of the wicked is clearly taught in Matthew 10:28, John 5:29. See, further, Resurrection of the Dead, Eschatology, Abraham ($ ‘Abraham’s bosom’), Paradise, Hell [5]
Atonement - The main task of Jesus on earth was to reveal the Father, to disclose the true nature of the Kingdom of God and its righteousness, in opposition to false ideals, to lead men to the recognition of His Messiahship, to recover the lost, to attach a few faithful souls to Himself as the foundation of His new Kingdom, and prepare their minds for His death and Resurrection, and for the after duty of spreading His gospel among mankind. After Peter’s great confession, He makes full announcement of His approaching sufferings and death, always coupling this with His after Resurrection ( Matthew 16:21 ; Matthew 17:22-23 ; Matthew 20:18-19 ||). Mark 14:33 ff; Mark 15:34 , John 12:27 ); how strange to see them submitted to by the Prince of Life; how awful the horror of great darkness in which the Christ passed away! Can we explain it on the hypothesis of a simple martyrdom? Do we not need the solution which the other passages suggest of a sin-bearing Redeemer? Finally, there is the crowning attestation to His Messiahship, and seal upon His work, in the Resurrection, and the commission given to the disciples to preach remission of sins in His name to all nations a clear proof that through His death and Resurrection a fundamental change had been wrought in the relations of God to humanity ( Matthew 28:18-20 , Luke 24:47 , John 20:21-23 )
Apocrypha - Second Maccabees is more openly theological and affirms such ideas as the glories of martyrdom, the sufferings of the martyr as being expiatory for the sins of the nation, the Resurrection of the body, prayer for the dead, and the intercession of the saints. The Gospel of Peter presents, after an otherwise straightforward account of the crucifixion, a vivid narration of the Resurrection of Jesus: two angels come down from heaven, enter the tomb, and exit with Jesus, followed by a talking Cross
Antichrist - ...
Again, in the case of the second beast or the false prophet, the wound given at the Reformation is healed, and he appears again as "the beast that was, and is not, yet is," a Resurrection man, the embodiment of a Resurrection empire, a mock Christ; as the true Christ saith, "I am He that liveth, and was dead, and behold I am alive for evermore" (Revelation 1:18; Revelation 17:8)
Timothy, Epistles to - All Asia had turned away fromPaul — not necessarily from profession of Christ, but from the practicalbearing of His death and Resurrection: cf. False doctrine, which would eat as a gangrene into the very vitals of Christianity, was abroad as to the Resurrection, but the foundation of God stood sure, having this seal (God's side) "The Lord knoweth them that are his;" and (man's side) "Let everyone that nameth the name of the Lord [1] depart from iniquity
Carpocrates, Philospher - But as was also taught by the Basilidians of Irenaeus and by the Ophites, salvation belonged to the soul alone; there would be no Resurrection of the body. he emphasizes the Carpocratian doctrine of the unity of the first principle, tells of emanations from that principle of angels and powers, gives a different version of the excellence of Jesus, and says that Carpocrates denied the Resurrection of the body
Docetism - 6); and he held that of this body our Lord made only a temporary use, and that when He had shewn it to His disciples after His Resurrection He gave it back to the elements from which He had received it (Hipp. that Christ had come into the world, not merely as sent by the Father, but as really born of the Virgin; that He was truly incarnate, and did not assume the form of a body merely as did the angels whose appearances have been recorded; that He was circumcised, baptized, tempted; that His death was a real one, as was necessary in order that His Resurrection also should be real (see in particular the disputation between Augustine and Faustus)
Decrees - Romans 1:4 , which says Jesus Christ was "declared [or possibly decreed ]'>[9] with power to be the Son of God by his Resurrection from the dead, " may well allude to the "decree" of Psalm 2:7
Satan - But in the long run Satan cannot be successful, because Jesus Christ, by his life, death and Resurrection, has conquered him and delivered believers from his power (Matthew 12:28-29; Luke 10:18; John 12:31; John 16:11; Acts 26:18; Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 2:14-15; 1 John 3:8)
Jewish Parties in the New Testament - They had a firm belief in life beyond the grave and a Resurrection of the body
Surprise - During His earthly ministry the secrets of all hearts were not laid bare to Him, although He occasionally displayed an extraordinary insight into the thoughts and wishes of others; nor was the veil of the future altogether withdrawn, even although He did, in regard to His own death and Resurrection, and the doom of the city which rejected Him, show an exceptional knowledge
Eternal Life - The quality of life including the promise of Resurrection which God gives to those who believe in Christ
Judgment Day - Judgment Day follows the Resurrection of the dead and determines the eternal destiny of the righteous (either Paradise in Heaven or on a renewed earth, or life in the heavenly Jerusalem or in the heavenly Garden of Eden come down to earth) and of the wicked (Gehenna or some other place of eternal punishment) based on their obedience/disobedience to the law of God
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - Satan and the demonic forces have been overcome by the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ
Baptism of the Holy Spirit - ...
The experience of the disciples at Pentecost is further complicated by the fact that they lived through the transitional period from the old covenant age to the time of the new covenant, which the complex of events beginning with the crucifixion and Resurrection and culminating with Christ's exaltation and sending of the Spirit at Pentecost inaugurated
Witness - -The primary business of the Apostles was to testify as eyewitnesses to the facts of the earthly life of Christ and above all to His Resurrection
Servant of the Lord, the - In the Resurrection and ascension, God glorified Jesus the Servant (Acts 3:1 ;Acts 3:1;13:1 ; compare Acts 13:26 where the same Greek word for servant appears though KJV translates “Son
New Heavens And a New Earth - Christ's incarnation and the believer's Resurrection body provide analogies although in different realms
Peace - Peace with God came through the death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Romans 5:1 ; Ephesians 2:14-17 ; Colossians 1:19-20 ; see Hebrews 13:20 )
Energy - These Divine qualities were exercised in the Resurrection and exaltation of Christ, and the Christian soldier is exhorted (Ephesians 6:10) to obtain a portion of them in equipment for his spiritual warfare
Martha - She greeted Him calmly, not without upbraiding for His delay; and when He assured her that her brother would rise again, she took His words in her matter-of-fact way as a reference to the current doctrine of the Resurrection of the righteous at the last day, seeing in them merely a commonplace of pious consolation
Flood, the - Man was the head of creation, and all was involved in the consequences of his sin, and there must be a new start under the figureof the death and Resurrection of Noah in the ark
Sabbath - " (Hebrews 4:10)...
Since the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ from the dead, the name of Sabbath hath been less used, and that of the Lord's day substituted more generally in its place; and the authority for so doing is derived from the apostles
Lucifer - Whether, hell from beneath is moved at the unawakened sinner's coming, or heaven from above opens her golden gates to receive the redeemed regenerated saint in Jesus, this Scripture, with others to the same amount, plainly testify that that thinking faculty, that immortal incorporeal part, which at death separates from the body, hastens into the world of spirits like its own, and exists in a state perfectly distinct from and unconnected with the body, and will so continue until the general Resurrection
Apostle - ...
On the death of Judas Iscariot, Matthias, an early disciple, was chosen in his place, for there must be (irrespective of Paul, who, as we have seen, held a unique place) twelve apostles as witnesses of His Resurrection, Acts 1:22 ; Revelation 21:14 as there must still be twelve tribes of Israel
Break, Breaker, Breaking, Brake - A — 1: κλάω (Strong's #2806 — Verb — klao | klazo — klah'-o ) "to break, to break off pieces," is used of "breaking bread," (a) of the Lord's act in providing for people, Matthew 14:19 ; 15:36 ; Mark 8:6,19 ; (b) of the "breaking of bread" in the Lord's Supper, Matthew 26:26 ; Mark 14:22 ; Luke 22:19 ; Acts 20:7 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 11:24 ; (c) of an ordinary meal, Acts 2:46 ; 20:11 ; 27:35 ; (d) of the Lord's act in giving evidence of His Resurrection, Luke 24:30
Victor, Bishop of Rome - Synods were held on the subject in various parts—in Palestine under Theophilus of Caesarea and Narcissus of Jerusalem, in Pontus under Palmas, in Gaul under Irenaeus, in Corinth under its bishop, Bachillus, at Osrhoene in Mesopotamia, and elsewhere, by all of which synodical letters were issued, unanimous in disapproval of the Asian custom, and in declaring that "on the Lord's Day only the mystery of the Resurrection of the Lord from the dead was accomplished, and that on that day only we keep the close of the paschal fast" (Eus
Man - -The fundamental fact for apostolic anthropology is the new value assigned to human nature by Jesus Christ, both through His personal attitude and teaching, and through His life, death, and Resurrection. The Resurrection of the (spiritually transformed) body will create anew the unity of personality, which physical death destroys. Except for one passage (John 5:29), in which the term ‘the Resurrection of judgment’ may have become a conventional phrase, Resurrection appears to be confined to the believer (John 6:40), and is intended, as with St
Mahometanism - Persia, which had long persecuted Christianity, was added to their increasing territories; Syria submitted to their yoke; and, what filled with horror and with anguish the believers in the Gospel, Palestine, that holy land from which the light of divine truth had beamed upon the nations, which had been the scene of those awful or interesting events recorded in the inspired Scriptures, which had witnessed the life, the ministry, the death, the Resurrection, and ascension of the Redeemer of mankind, bent under the iron sceptre of an infidel sovereign, nominally, indeed, revering the Founder of its religion, but filled with bigoted and implacable hatred against the most attached and conscientious of his disciples. Hence, too, the various descriptions of the general Resurrection and final judgment with which the Koran every where abounds; and hence the vast but ideal balance in which the actions of all mankind shall then be impartially weighed, and their eternal doom be assigned them, either in the regions of bliss or misery, according as their good or evil deeds shall preponderate. Again: our Saviour expressly tells us, that, at the Resurrection, "they will neither marry nor be given in marriage; but be like the angels of God in heaven. In the Koran are advanced the following assertions, among others already noticed: That both Jews and Christians are idolaters; that the patriarchs and Apostles were Mohammedans; that the angels worshipped Adam, and that the fallen angels were driven from heaven for not doing so; that our blessed Saviour was neither God, nor the Son of God; and that he assured Mohammed of this in a conference with the Almighty and him; yet that he was both the word and Spirit of God: not to mention numberless absurdities concerning the creation, the deluge, the end of the world, the Resurrection, the day of judgment, too gross to be received by any except the most debased understandings
John, the Gospel by - Those in their graves shall also hear, and shall come forth, and there shall be a Resurrection of life, and one of judgement. Here the glory of the Son of God is revealed, Jesus setting Himself forth to the faith of His own as the Resurrection and the life. In the Resurrection of Lazarus this is set forth in pattern; but at the same time a crisis was reached as regards His testimony to the Jews, and He is now conspired against by the leaders of the people, who decide that it was expedient that one man should die for the nation. ...
John 20 records the Resurrection of the blessed Lord and its result
Church, the - Many scholars in this century have maintained that the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus inaugurated the kingdom of God, producing an overlapping of the two ages. Not until after his Resurrection does the New Testament speak with regularity about the church. These passages demonstrate some further truths about baptism: (1) baptism is intimately related to faith in God; (2) baptism identifies the person with the death and Resurrection of Jesus; (3) baptism incorporates the person into the community of believers
Philippians, Theology of - And yet Paul, whose mind is filled with thoughts of God, Christ, the Spirit, salvation, Resurrection, and the new world to come, cannot write even the briefest of letters without thinking and writing theologically. Rather, Jesus was God's humble servant, the Anointed of the Lord, sent not only to Israel but to the world, to show them his strength by his weakness; his power to save people, not from Rome, but from death by his own death upon a cross; his ability to reverse the destructive forces not of the emperor but of the Evil One by his Resurrection from the dead. All that people could not do for themselves because of their weakness and sinfulness God did for them through the life and death and Resurrection of Christ (Philippians 3:4b-9 ; 2:6-11 ; Romans 1:17 ; 3:21-28 )
Revelation, Theology of - Jesus was the first martyr (1:5; 3:14), and because of his death and Resurrection he can promise life to those who, like him, are faithful to death at Roman hands (2:8,10; 11:7-13). After the thousand years there is a second worldwide conflict, another Resurrection, and another throne scene for judgment (20:7-15). Signs of God's wrath (6:12-17; trumpets; bowls) will precede the return of Christ to dispose of God's enemies (2:27; 14:14-20; 19:17-21), followed by a general Resurrection and judgment (11:18; 20:11-15), and the eternal kingdom of God and Christ (11:15; chaps
Justification - John, manifested in words, works, Resurrection [17] This general proof is further specialized into the events of His Death and Resurrection, its ultimate and most impressive parts, which as such procured the redemption from sin through which we are justified (Romans 5:9; Romans 4:25, Hebrews 8, 9, 10). -Justification is by God’s grace (Romans 3:24; Romans 4:5, Ephesians 2:8, Titus 3:7), by man’s faith (Acts 13:39, Romans 5:1), by Christ’s Death (Romans 5:9), by His Resurrection (Romans 4:25)
Evolution (Christ And) - This conception of the Person and work of Christ, while it falls into line with the Evolutionary idea in one direction, appears to fall foul of it in another, because of the claim it makes that there was in the nature of Christ an incommensurable factor, incapable of being explained by the laws of organic life, or by human psychology,—manifesting itself in a life of unique goodness and power, begun by a free special act of God in the Virgin-birth, and consummated by the objective Resurrection of our Lord from the dead. These three aspects of His work are specially related to His human life as our great Exemplar; to His Cross and Passion as our Sacrifice and Reconciler; to His Resurrection and Ascension into the unseen world, and His influence through His Spirit on the individual and wider life of mankind. The Resurrection and the Ascension indicate a fresh epoch in the history of mankind, both in the development of the individual soul and in the progress of society
Necessity - He has ‘life in himself’ (John 5:26), and is to creatures ‘the Resurrection and the life’ (John 11:26). John 8:20); John 12:23 ‘the hour is come that the Son of Man should be glorified’ [6]; John 12:27 ‘for this cause came I unto this hour’ [7]; John 13:1 ‘knowing that his hour was come that he should depart out of this world unto the Father’; John 17:1 ‘Father, glorify thy Son [8], that thy Son may glorify thee. * [8] He frequently declared the necessity He was under of working during the appointed time—‘We must (δεῖ) work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work’ (John 9:4); ‘Howbeit I must (δεῖ) go on my way to-day, and to-morrow, and the day following, for it cannot be (οὐκ ἐκδέχεται) that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem’ (Luke 13:33); ‘My meat is to do the will of him that sent me, and to accomplish his work’ (John 4:34; cf. ’ From the time of Peter’s confession at (Caesrea Philippi, intimations of the necessity of the Passion and Resurrection become more frequent; ‘From that time began Jesus to show unto his disciples how that he must (δει) go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and the third day be raised up’ (Matthew 16:21); ‘but first must (δεῖ) he suffer many things, and be rejected of this generation’ (Luke 17:25); ‘Behoved it not (δὐκ ἐδει) the Christ to suffer these things, and to enter into his glory?’ (Luke 24:26)
Timothy, Epistles to - In 2 Timothy 2:18 one heresy is distinctly named the belief that the Resurrection was already past; this opinion may have been the same as that held by those within the Gentile Corinthian Church who said there was no Resurrection ( 1 Corinthians 15:12 )
Jerusalem - All four Gospels relate that the central event of the Christian faith—the crucifixion-resurrection of Jesus—took place in Jerusalem. All of Luke's Resurrection appearances took place in or near Jerusalem, and the disciples were instructed to stay there until the Day of Pentecost
Harmony of the Gospels - ...
3) The story ends with His crucifixion and Resurrection. Scholars agree that Q was primarily a collection of Jesus' teachings with little narrative and no mention of the crucifixion and Resurrection
Mark, the Gospel of - The story ends as abruptly as it began; Mark finished his Gospel account with the angelic announcement of the Resurrection of Jesus the Nazarene (the earliest Greek manuscripts of the New Testament end Mark's Gospel at Mark 16:8 ). Although the disciples saw the messianic secret, their vision was not be focused until the Resurrection
Life - Daniel envisions a Resurrection and judgment assigning those raised to everlasting life or everlasting shame and contempt (Daniel 12:1-3 ). ...
According to Paul, the death of Jesus on the cross opens the way to reconciliation with God, and it is the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ that gives life to those who believe (Romans 5:10 ; 6:3-4 ; Galatians 2:20 )
Mercy - Ultimately the mercy of God that Jesus demonstrated in individual salvific Acts becomes for the New Testament writers the illustration of the release from sin and death that God offers to the whole world through the sacrificial death and Resurrection of Christ. Each redemptive act of God—the exodus from Egypt and Jesus' crucifixion/resurrectionis interrelated. Peter (1 Peter 1:3 ) reached back to the Old Testament records of God's establishment of a covenant with Israel and connected them with the new life in Christ to describe the salvation of Christians: "By his great mercy he has given us a new birth through the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead" (NRSV)
Salvation - But the movement of Jesus' life goes through the cross and Resurrection. So critical is the Resurrection to the future hope of salvation that "If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins" (1 Corinthians 15:17 )
Lord's Supper, the - eucharistein/eulogein) and the Eucharistic Assembly (synaxis); from its Jewish-Christian origins, it is the Breaking of Bread and the Memorial of the Lord's passion and Resurrection; in patristic development, it is the Holy Sacrifice because it mysteriously makes present the one, unique sacrifice of Christ and includes the church's offering; also it is the Holy and Divine Liturgy because the whole worship of the church finds its center in the celebration of this Sacred Mystery. After his Resurrection from the dead and before his ascension into heaven, the disciples ate with Jesus on various occasions (e
Holy Day - The life and work, the example and precept, and above all the Resurrection of Jesus, implied the complete abrogation of the Mosaic dispensation; but as that dispensation was still part of the personal environment, and eventually bound up with the personal religion of individual Christians-both Jew and Gentile-for many generations, it is not to be expected that its cogency would at once cease to be felt. That factor was the Resurrection of Jesus, the experience of the New Creation, and the inevitable sense of victory over all that would fetter Christian freedom (see further, article Sabbath)
Atonement - The Spirit, in the power of the word, makes the death of Christ available in the power of His Resurrection. It is the cleansing of man in death to the flesh, but in the power of Resurrection known in Christ who once died to sin
Baptism - -Hebrews 6:2; Hebrews 6:4, the first principles are repentance, faith, teaching of baptisms (βαπτισμῶν) and of laying on of hands, Resurrection, and judgment; Christians were once enlightened (φωτισθέντας) and tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy Ghost; hence the name ‘illumination’ (φωτισμός) and ‘illuminated’ for ‘baptism’ and ‘the baptized’ in Justin (Apol. Paul have even tacitly approved of such a thing?-(b) The words ὑπὲρ τῶν νεκρῶν are rendered by many Greek Fathers ‘in expectation of the Resurrection of the dead’; but this forces the grammar, and gives no good sense to ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν, which is the best attested reading at the end of the verse; also ‘they which are baptized’ means not all Christians, but some of them
Foreknowledge - The New Testament writers perceived in the life, death, and Resurrection of Jesus the outworking of God's eternal plans to save sinful humanity
Manna - ...
(8) Its preservation in the golden pot in the holiest typifies Jesus, now in the heavenly holiest place, where He gives of the hidden manna to him that overcometh (Revelation 2:17); He is the manna hidden from the world but revealed to the believer, who has now a foretaste of His preciousness; like the incorruptible manna in the sanctuary, the spiritual food offered to all who reject the world's dainties for Christ is everlasting, an incorruptible body, and life in Christ at the Resurrection
Gentiles - ...
Following the Resurrection of Jesus, the commission included “all nations” (Matthew 28:19 )
Mourning Customs - ...
The Apostle Paul commends as a Christian duty the showing of sympathy towards those in affliction (Romans 12:15 ), but intimates that in Christ the familiar phrase of greeting to the afflicted, ‘Hope is cut off!’ has been made obsolete by the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus ( 1 Thessalonians 4:18 )
Truth - ) Some have “swerved from the truth by claiming that the Resurrection has already taken place ( 2 Timothy 2:18 NRSV
Origenists - That at the Resurrection of the dead we shall be clothed with ethereal bodies
Nicodemus - ...
Christ's Resurrection richly rewarded the faith of him who stumbled not at His humiliation
Hell - In the Old Testament time, when as yet Christ had not "abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel" (2 Timothy 1:10), death and the intermediate state represented by Hades suggested thoughts of gloom (as to Hezekiah, Isaiah 38:9-20), lit up however with gleams of sure hope from God's promises of the Resurrection (Psalms 16:10-11; Psalms 17:15; Isaiah 26:19; Hosea 13:14; Daniel 12:2)
Confession - After the Resurrection, confession of Christ carried with it readiness to bear witness to that supreme fact ( John 20:28-29 , Romans 10:9 ); and this of course implied an acceptance of the historical tradition as to His marvellous life and character which made it impossible for death to hold Him (cf
Land, Ground - The Bible indicates that humankind as unique creatures do survive death through Resurrection (John 5:28-29 ; Philippians 1:21-24 ; 2 Corinthians 5:1 )
Enthusiasm - After His Resurrection and Ascension the Christian Church received at Pentecost the permanent and communicable gift of holy enthusiasm (πνεῦμα ἅγιον, as explained above)
Guest - ), and after His Resurrection He ‘sat down to meat’ in the house of the two disciples at Emmaus (Luke 24:30)
Honey - ]'>[4] and Authorized Version, of a piece ‘of a honeycomb’ (ἀπὸ μελισσίου κηρίου) as having been offered along with ‘a piece of broiled fish’ to Jesus after His Resurrection
Daniel, Book of - The doctrine of the Resurrection is also distinctly asserted: individuals are to rise again; not all men, or even all Israelites, but the martyrs and the apostates
Church - Historically this spiritual building, (for 'building' never refers to a material edifice) was begun after His death and Resurrection, when the Holy Ghost descended at the day of Pentecost
Antonius - He met objections against the doctrines of the Incarnation and the Resurrection as mysterious by the retort that the pagan mythology, whether in its grossness as apprehended by the vulgar or as the mystical system of philosophers, was equally above reason
Certainty (2) - And when it is recorded of the disciples to whom the Lord appeared after His Resurrection, that ‘they saw him, and worshipped, but some doubted’ (διστάζω, Matthew 28:17), He met this mixed regard by a great personal affirmation, and a great charge laid on them, which formed in point of fact the strongest appeal to their most certain trust
Atonement - As a most effectual defense against the terrors of dying, and as our joyful hope of a blessed Resurrection, 1 Corinthians 15:50
Synagogue - ...
It is important to see that everywhere in their own buildings a clear testimony was borne by the Lord Himself as to the significance of His appearance among them; and afterwards by Paul and others to the work He had accomplished by His death and Resurrection for them — reference being constantly made to the scriptures which they professed to reverence and to follow
Angels - ...
The law was given by their ministry, Acts 7:53 ; Galatians 3:19 ; Psalm 68:17 ; and they had to do with proclaiming the birth of the Saviour, Luke 2:8-14 ; and they attended at the Resurrection
Acts of the Apostles - The rulers however were grieved that they preached by Jesus the Resurrection from among the dead, and commanded Peter and John not to speak or teach in the name of Jesus
Pilate - Eusebius insinuates that they spoke of his Resurrection and ascension
Rab - And Mary Magdalene, when she saw Christ after his Resurrection, "said unto him, Rabboni,"...
John 20:16 , that is, my rabban, like my lord in English; for rabbon is the same with rabban, only pronounced according to the Syriac dialect
Sin - The greater heinousness of the sin of these men would consist in their rejecting a greater body of testimony; for they are supposed to be acquainted with the Resurrection of our Saviour from the dead, with his ascension into he