What does Redeem mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
תִפְדֶּ֖ה to ransom 3
יִפְדֶּ֣ה to ransom 3
תִּפְדֶּ֣ה to ransom 2
יִגְאַל֙ to redeem 2
תִּפְדֶּֽה to ransom 2
תִּפְדֶּ֔ה to ransom 2
ἐξαγοράσῃ to redeem. / to buy up 1
גְּאֻלַּ֥ת kindred 1
יָדֵ֔נוּ hand. 1
לִפְדּ֧וֹת to ransom 1
לִפְדּֽוֹת־ to ransom 1
אֶפְדֶּֽה to ransom 1
פָּדָ֣ה to ransom 1
וּפְדִתִ֖יךָ to ransom 1
גְאֻלָּתֽוֹ kindred 1
פָּֽדְךָ֣ to ransom 1
؟ תִּפְדּֽוּנִי to ransom 1
וּפָדָ֣ה to ransom 1
תִפְדֶּ֗ה to ransom 1
פְּדֵ֣ה to ransom 1
פְּדֵ֣נִי to ransom 1
וּ֝פְדֵ֗נוּ to ransom 1
פְדִיתִ֑ים to ransom 1
؟ מִפְּד֔וּת ransom. 1
גְּאֻלָּת֔וֹ kindred 1
גְּאַל־ to redeem 1
לִגְאֹֽל to redeem 1
יִגְאָלֶ֑נָּה to redeem 1
λυτρώσηται to release on receipt of ransom. / to redeem 1
וְגָאַלְתִּ֤י to redeem 1
אֶגְאָלֵ֑ם to redeem 1
גֹֽאֲלוֹ֙ to redeem 1
וְגָאַ֕ל to redeem 1
גֹּאֵ֑ל to redeem 1
יִגְאָלֶֽנּוּ to redeem 1
יִגְאָלֶ֔נּוּ to redeem 1
יִגְאָלֶ֑נּוּ to redeem 1
וְנִגְאָֽל to redeem 1
יִגְאַ֖ל to redeem 1
λυτροῦσθαι to release on receipt of ransom. / to redeem 1
יִגְאַ֛ל to redeem 1
יִגְאָלֵ֣ךְ to redeem 1
גְאָלָ֑הּ to redeem 1
יִגְאַ֣ל to redeem 1
תִּגְאַל֙ to redeem 1
גְּאָ֔ל to redeem 1
יִגְאַ֜ל to redeem 1
לִגְא֔וֹל to redeem 1
אֶגְאָֽל to redeem 1
(לִגְאָל־) to redeem 1
פִּדְיֹ֣ן ransom 1

Definitions Related to Redeem

H6299


   1 to ransom, Redeem, rescue, deliver.
      1a (Qal) to ransom.
      1b (Niphal) to be ransomed.
      1c (Hiphil) to allow one to be ransomed.
      1d (Hophal) redeemed.
      

H1350


   1 to Redeem, act as kinsman-redeemer, avenge, revenge, ransom, do the part of a kinsman.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to act as kinsman, do the part of next of kin, act as kinsman-redeemer.
            1a1a by marrying brother’s widow to beget a child for him, to Redeem from slavery, to Redeem land, to exact vengeance.
         1a2 to Redeem (by payment).
         1a3 to Redeem (with God as subject).
            1a3a individuals from death.
            1a3b Israel from Egyptian bondage.
            1a3c Israel from exile.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to Redeem oneself.
         1b2 to be redeemed.
         

H1353


   1 kindred, redemption, right of redemption, price of redemption.
      1a kin, kindred.
      1b redemption.
      1c right of redemption.
      1d price of redemption, redemption price.
      

G1805


   1 to Redeem.
      1a by payment of a price to recover from the power of another, to ransom, buy off.
      1b metaph.
      of Christ freeing the elect from the dominion of the Mosaic Law at the price of his vicarious death.
   2 to buy up, to buy up for one’s self, for one’s use.
      2a to make wise and sacred use of every opportunity for doing good, so that zeal and well doing are as it were the purchase money by which we make the time our own.
      

G3084


   1 to release on receipt of ransom.
   2 to Redeem, liberate by payment of ransom.
      2a to liberate.
      2b to cause to be released to one’s self by payment of a ransom.
      2c to Redeem.
      2d to deliver: from evils of every kind, internal and external.
      

H6306


   1 ransom, redemption.
   

H6304


   1 ransom.
   

Frequency of Redeem (original languages)

Frequency of Redeem (English)

Dictionary

Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Redeem, Redemption
A — 1: ἐξαγοράζω (Strong's #1805 — Verb — exagorazo — ex-ag-or-ad'-zo ) a strengthened form of agorazo, "to buy" (see BUY , No. 1), denotes "to buy out" (ex for ek), especially of purchasing a slave with a view to his freedom. It is used metaphorically (a) in Galatians 3:13 ; 4:5 , of the deliverance by Christ of Christian Jews from the Law and its curse; what is said of lutron (RANSOM, No. 1) is true of this verb and of agorazo, as to the Death of Christ, that Scripture does not say to whom the price was paid; the various suggestions made are purely speculative; (b) in the Middle Voice, "to buy up for oneself," Ephesians 5:16 ; and Colossians 4:5 , of "buying up the opportunity" (RV marg.; text, "redeeming the time," where "time" is kairos, "a season," a time in which something is seasonable), i.e., making the most of every opportunity, turning each to the best advantage since none can be recalled if missed.
Note: In Revelation 5:9 ; 14:3,4 , AV, agorazo, "to purchase" (RV) is translated "redeemed." See PURCHASE.
A — 2: λυτρόω (Strong's #3084 — Verb — lutroo — loo-tro'-o ) "to release on receipt of ransom" (akin to lutron, "a ransom"), is used in the Middle Voice, signifying "to release by paying a ransom price, to redeem" (a) in the natural sense of delivering, Luke 24:21 , of setting Israel free from the Roman yoke; (b) in a spiritual sense, Titus 2:14 , of the work of Christ in "redeeming" men "from all iniquity" (anomia, "lawlessness," the bondage of self-will which rejects the will of God); 1 Peter 1:18 (Passive Voice), "ye were redeemed," from a vain manner of life, i.e., from bondage to tradition. In both instances the Death of Christ is stated as the means of "redemption."
Note: While both No. 1 and No. 2 are translated "to redeem," exagorazo does not signify the actual "redemption," but the price paid with a view to it, lutroo signifies the actual "deliverance," the setting at liberty.
B — 1: λύτρωσις (Strong's #3085 — Noun Feminine — lutrosis — loo'-tro-sis ) "a redemption" (akin to A, No. 2), is used (a) in the general sense of "deliverance," of the nation of Israel, Luke 1:68 RV, "wrought redemption;" Luke 2:38 ; (b) of "the redemptive work" of Christ, Hebrews 9:12 , bringing deliverance through His death, from the guilt and power of sin. In the Sept., Leviticus 25:29,48 ; Numbers 18:16 ; Judges 1:15 ; Psalm 49:8 ; 111:9 ; 130:7 ; Isaiah 63:4 .
B — 2: ἀπολύτρωσις (Strong's #629 — Noun Feminine — apolutrosis — ap-ol-oo'-tro-sis ) a strengthened form of No. 1, lit., "a releasing, for (i.e., on payment of) a ransom." It is used of (a) "deliverance" from physical torture, Hebrews 11:35 , see DELIVER , B, No. 1; (b) the deliverance of the people of God at the coming of Christ with His glorified saints, "in a cloud with power and great glory," Luke 21:28 , a "redemption" to be accomplished at the "outshining of His Parousia," 2 Thessalonians 2:8 , i.e., at His second advent; (c) forgiveness and justification, "redemption" as the result of expiation, deliverance from the guilt of sins, Romans 3:24 , "through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus;" Ephesians 1:7 , defined as "the forgiveness of our trespasses," RV; so Colossians 1:14 , "the forgiveness of our sins," indicating both the liberation from the guilt and doom of sin and the introduction into a life of liberty, "newness of life" (Romans 6:4 ); Hebrews 9:15 , "for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first covenant," RV, here "redemption of" is equivalent to "redemption from," the genitive case being used of the object from which the "redemption" is effected, not from the consequence of the transgressions, but from the trangressions themselves; (d) the deliverance of the believer from the presence and power of sin, and of his body from bondage to corruption, at the coming (the Parousia in its inception) of the Lord Jesus, Romans 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 1:30 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; 4:30 . See also PROPITIATION.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer
To pay the required price to secure the release of a convicted criminal, the process therein involved, and the person making the payment. In early use the idea and the words related to legal and commercial activities. They provided biblical writers with one of the most basic and dynamic images for describing God's saving activity toward mankind.
Old Testament Three Hebrew words express the legal and commercial use of the redemptive concept. Padah was used only in relation to the redemption of persons or other living beings. For example, if a person owned an ox which was known to be dangerous but did not keep the ox secured and the ox gored the son or daughter of a neighbor, both the ox and the owner would be stoned to death. If, however, the father of the slain person offered to accept an amount of money, the owner could pay the redemption price and live ( Exodus 21:29-30 ; compare Exodus 21:32 ). Numbers 18:15-17 shows how religious practice adopted such language.
The Hebrew ga' al indicated a redemption price in family members involving the responsibility of a next-of-kin. See Jeremiah 32:6-15 ). Such commercial practices easily passed over into religious concepts. God would redeem Israel from her iniquities.
The third Hebrew word kipper or “cover” came to extensive use in strictly religious concepts and practices. It is the word from which “Kippur” is derived in “Yom Kippur,” Day of Atonement, or Day of Covering, perhaps the most sacred of the holy days in Judaism. The verbal form in the Old Testament is always used in a religious sense such as the covering of sin or the making of atonement for sin. See Amos 5:12 ) or ransom (Exodus 21:30 ). In Psalm 49:7-8 it is used in the sense of ransom in association with padah (redeem).
The doctrine of redemption in the Old Testament is not derived from abstract philosophical thought but from Hebrew concrete thinking. Religious redemption language grows out of the custom of buying back something which formerly belonged to the purchaser but for some reason had passed into the ownership of another. The original owner could regain ownership by paying a redemption price for it. In the Old Testament the terms and ideas are frequently used symbolically to emphasize dramatically the redemptive or saving activity of God. The basic Old Testament reference is the Exodus. At the sea God redeemed His people from slavery in Egypt (for example, Exodus 6:6 ; Exodus 15:13 ; Deuteronomy 7:8 ; Psalm 77:15 ).
God similarly redeemed Israel from the Babylonian captivity by giving Egypt, Ethiopia, and Seba to King Cyrus (Isaiah 43:3 ; compare Isaiah 48:20 ; Isaiah 51:11 ; Isaiah 62:12 ). Job knew that he had a living Redeemer (Job 19:25 ). Psalmists prayed for redemption from distress (Psalm 26:11 ; Psalm 49:15 ) and testified to God's redeeming work (Psalm 31:5 ; Psalm 71:23 ; Psalm 107:2 ). The Old Testament witness is that God is “my strength and my redeemer” (Psalm 19:14 ).
New Testament The New Testament centers redemption in Jesus Christ. He purchased the church with His own blood (Acts 20:28 ), gave His flesh for the life of the world (John 6:51 ), as the Good Shepherd laid down His life for His sheep (John 10:11 ) and demonstrated the greatest love by laying down His life for His friends (John 15:13 ). The purpose of Jesus in the world was to make a deliberate sacrifice of Himself for human sin. He did something sinful people could not do for themselves. He brought hope to sinners, providing redemption from sin and fellowship with the Eternal Father. As the Suffering Servant, His was a costly sacrifice, the shameful and agonizing death of a Roman cross. New Testament redemption thus speaks of substitutionary sacrifice demonstrating divine love and righteousness. It points to a new relationship to God, the dynamic of a new life, God's leniency in the past, and the call for humility for the future.
In other ways and language the centrality of redemption through the death of Jesus Christ is expressed throughout the New Testament from the Lamb of God who lifts up and carries away the sin of the world (John 1:29 ) to the redeeming Lamb praised by a multitude because He was slain and by His blood redeemed unto God's people of every kindred, tongue, and nation (Revelation 5:8-14 ). See Christ; Jesus; Atonement ; Reconciliation.
Ray Summers
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Redeem, Redemption
Finding its context in the social, legal, and religious customs of the ancient world, the metaphor of redemption includes the ideas of loosing from a bond, setting free from captivity or slavery, buying back something lost or sold, exchanging something in one's possession for something possessed by another, and ransoming.
The Old Testament . In the Old Testament, redemption involves deliverance from bondage based on the payment of a price by a redeemer. The Hebrew root words used most often for the concept of redemption are pada [1], gaal [2] and kapar [1].
The verb pada [ Exodus 13:13 ; 34:20 ; Numbers 18:15-16 ). Human firstborn were also redeemed, either by the substitution of an animal or by the payment of a fixed sum (Numbers 18:16 ). The Levites are also said to be a ransom for the firstborn of Israel (Numbers 3:44-45 ). Money was sometimes paid to deliver a person from death (Exodus 21:30 ; Numbers 3:46-51 ; 18:16 ; cf. Psalm 49:7-9 ).
The verb gaal [ Leviticus 25:24-25 ; Ruth 4:1-6 ; Jeremiah 32:6-9 ).
The meaning of the third verb, kapar [ Exodus 21:30 ; 30:11-16 ).
As one who delivers his people, Yahweh is called Israel's "Redeemer, " especially in Isaiah where "redemption" is a key metaphor (41:14; 43:1; 44:6; 47:4). The paradigm of Yahweh's redemptive activity in the Old Testament is the historical deliverance of Israel from Egyptian bondage, but the metaphor of redemption was also utilized by the prophets in relation to the Babylonian captivity.
Although most often found in relation to the redemption of God's people, the concept of redemption was also applied to individuals in distress (Genesis 48:16 ; 2 Samuel 4:9 ; Job 19:25 ; Psalm 26:11 ; 49:15 ; 69:18 ; 103:4 ). The redemptive activity of God is most often described in terms of physical deliverance, but these redemptive Acts are not devoid of spiritual significance. There is only one explicit Old Testament reference to redemption from sin (Psalm 130:8 ), the emphasis falling in the majority of references on God's deliverance from the results of sin.
The New Testament . By the first century a.d. the concept of redemption had become eschatological. Redemption of Israel from Egypt was but the foreshadowing in history of the great act of deliverance by which history would be brought to an end. In rabbinic expectation the Messiah would be the Redeemer of Israel, and the great Day of the Lord would be the day of redemption. It is possibly due to the nationalistic expectation that became attached to the concept of the coming Messiah-Redeemer that Jesus is never called "redeemer" (lytrotes [4]) in the New Testament.
Fundamental to the message of the New Testament is the announcement that Jesus of Nazareth is the fulfillment of Israel's messianic hope and that, in him, the long-awaited redemption has arrived. Deliverance of humankind from its state of alienation from God has been accomplished through the death and resurrection of Christ (Romans 4:25 ; 2 Corinthians 5:18-19 ). In the New Testament, redemption requires the payment of a price, but the plight that requires such a ransom is moral not material. Humankind is held in the captivity of sin from which only the atoning death of Jesus Christ can liberate.
Although the concept of redemption is central to the New Testament, the occurrence of redemption terminology is relatively limited. When reflecting on the work of Jesus Christ, New Testament writers more frequently utilize different images (e.g., atonement, sacrifice, justification). The concept of redemption is nevertheless conveyed in the New Testament by the agorazo and lyo word groups. These terms have in mind the context of a marketplace transaction with reference to the purchase of goods or the releasing of slaves. In using these words, New Testament writers sought to represent Jesus' saving activity in terms that convey deliverance from bondage. Most of these words infer deliverance from captivity by means of a ransom price paid. The noun "ransom" (lytron [ Matthew 20:28 ; Mark 10:45 ; 1 Timothy 2:6 ). Redemption language is merged with substitutionary language in these verses and applied to Jesus' death. Pauline usage of the noun "redemption" (apolytrosis [ Romans 3:24 ; 8:23 ; 1 Corinthians 1:30 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; 4:30 ), although substitutionary meaning is evident in Ephesians 1:7 , where Christ's blood is depicted as the means of redemption.
Jesus conceived his mission to be that of the Son of Man, who came to offer himself in obedience to God's redemptive plan. He applied to himself the things said in the Old Testament of the Servant of the Lord concerning his rejection, humiliation, death, and resurrection (Mark 8:31 ; 9:31 ; 10:33-34 ). Likewise, New Testament writers apply to him the Servant texts and terminology from the Old Testament (e.g., Matthew 8:17 ; 12:18 ; Acts 4:27,30 ; 8:32-33 ; Romans 15:21 ; 1 Peter 2:22-25 ). An important text with regard to Jesus' understanding of his redemptive work is Mark 10:45 , in which Jesus declares that his mission not only includes self-sacrificial service, but also involves giving his life as a "ransom" for many. Thus, Christ's death is portrayed as the payment price for the deliverance of those held captive by Satan (the ransom metaphor must be understood in the light of Jesus' offering of himself in obedience to the Father, however, and not interpreted as a payment to Satan). As the means of redemption, the death of Jesus provides a deliverance that involves not only forgiveness of sin (Ephesians 1:7 ; Colossians 1:14 ), but also newness of life (Romans 6:4 ). Even though Christ's redemptive work is perfect (Hebrews 9:25-28 ), the redemption of the believer will not be complete until the return of Christ (Luke 21:28 ; Romans 8:23 ; Ephesians 4:30 ).
The central theme of redemption in Scripture is that God has taken the initiative to act compassionately on behalf of those who are powerless to help themselves. The New Testament makes clear that divine redemption includes God's identification with humanity in its plight, and the securing of liberation of humankind through the obedience, suffering, death, and resurrection of the incarnate Son.
R. David Rightmire
See also Death of Christ ; Revelation, Idea of ; Salvation
Bibliography . C. Brown, et al., NIDNTT, 3:177-223; F. Bchsel, TDNT, 4:328-56; I. H. Marshall, Reconciliation and Hope, pp. 153-69; L. Morris, The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross ; J. Murray, Redemption: Accomplished and Applied ; H. E. W. Turner, The Patristic Doctrine of Redemption ; V. Taylor, The Atonement in New Testament Preaching ; W. Pannenberg, Basic Questions in Theology, 1:15-80; B. B. Warfield, The Person and Work of Christ .
Webster's Dictionary - Redeem
(1):
(v. t.) Hence, to rescue and deliver from the bondage of sin and the penalties of God's violated law.
(2):
(v. t.) To recall, as an estate, or to regain, as mortgaged property, by paying what may be due by force of the mortgage.
(3):
(v. t.) To purchase back; to regain possession of by payment of a stipulated price; to repurchase.
(4):
(v. t.) To pay the penalty of; to make amends for; to serve as an equivalent or offset for; to atone for; to compensate; as, to redeem an error.
(5):
(v. t.) To make good by performing fully; to fulfill; as, to redeem one's promises.
(6):
(v. t.) To ransom, liberate, or rescue from captivity or bondage, or from any obligation or liability to suffer or to be forfeited, by paying a price or ransom; to ransom; to rescue; to recover; as, to redeem a captive, a pledge, and the like.
(7):
(v. t.) To regain by performing the obligation or condition stated; to discharge the obligation mentioned in, as a promissory note, bond, or other evidence of debt; as, to redeem bank notes with coin.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Redeem
A. Verbs.
Gâ'al (גָּאַל, Strong's #1350), “to redeem, deliver, avenge, act as a kinsman.” This word group is used 90 times, chiefly in the Pentateuch, Psalms, Isaiah, and Ruth. The root appears to be almost exclusively Hebrew, the only cognate being an Amorite proper name.
The first occurrence of gâ'al is in Gen. 48:16: “The angel which redeemed me [1] from all evil …” (KJV), means as in the NIV, “delivered me from all harm.” Its basic use had to do with the deliverance of persons or property that had been sold for debt, as in Lev. 25:25: “If thy brother be waxen poor, and hath sold away some of his possession, and if any of his kin come to redeem it, then shall he redeem that which his brother sold.” If he prospers, the man himself may “redeem” it (Lev. 25:26). A poor man may sell himself to a fellow Israelite (Lev. 25:39) or to an alien living in Israel (Lev. 25:47). The responsibility “to redeem” belonged to the nearest relative—brother, uncle, uncle’s son, or a blood relative from his family (Lev. 25:25, 48-49). The person (kinsman) who “redeemed” the one in financial difficulties was known as a kinsman-redeemer, as the NIV translates the word in Ruth 2:20. In Deut. 19:6 the redeemer is called the “avenger of blood” whose duty it was to execute the murderer of his relative. The verb occurs in this sense 12 times and is translated “revenger” in KJV (Num. 35:19, 21, 24, 27) or “avenger” (Num. 35:12; always so in NASB and NIV).
The Book of Ruth is a beautiful account of the kinsman-redeemer. His responsibility is summed up in Ruth 4:5: “What day thou buyest the field of the hand of Naomi, thou must buy it also of Ruth the Moabitess, the wife of the dead, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance.” Thus the kinsman-redeemer was responsible for preserving the integrity, life, property, and family name of his close relative or for executing justice upon his murderer.
The greater usage of this word group is of God who promised: “… I am the Lord … I will redeem you with a stretched out arm and with great judgments” (Exod. 6:6; cf. Ps. 77:15). Israel confessed: “Thou in thy mercy hast led forth the people which thou hast redeemed …” (Exod. 15:13). “And they remembered that God was their rock, and the high God their redeemer” (Ps. 78:35).
The Book of Isaiah evidences the word “Redeemer” used of God 13 times, all in chapters 41-63, and gâ'al is used 9 times of God, first in 43:1: “Fear not; for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine.” Gâ'al is used of deliverance from Egypt (51:10; 63:9) and from captivity in Babylon (48:20; 52:3, 9; 62:12). Israel’s “Redeemer” is “the Holy One of Israel” (41:14), “the creator of Israel, your King” (43:14-15), “the Lord of hosts” (44:6), and “the mighty One of Jacob” (49:26). Those who share His salvation are “the redeemed” (35:9).
The Book of Psalms often places spiritual redemption in parallel with physical redemption. For example: “Draw nigh unto my soul, and redeem it: // deliver me because of mine enemies” (Ps. 69:18). “Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits: … who redeemeth thy life from destruction; who crowneth thee with loving-kindness and tender mercies” (Ps. 103:2, 4).
Pâdâh (פָּדָה, Strong's #6299), “to redeem, ransom.” Originally, the usage of this word overlapped with that of pâdâh; both meant “to ransom.” In theological usage, however, each root tended to develop in different directions, so that they can often be considered synonymous only in a very broad sense. Pâdâh indicates that some intervening or substitutionary action effects a release from an undesirable condition. In more secular contexts, it implies a payment of some sort. But 1 Sam. 14:45 indicates that money is not intrinsic in the word; Saul is determined to execute Jonathan for his involuntary transgression, but “… the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not.” Slavery appears as a condition from which one may be “ransomed” (Exod. 21:8; Lev. 19:20).
The word is connected with the laws of the firstborn. As a reminder of slaying all the Egyptian firstborn but sparing the Israelites, God retained an eternal claim on the life of all Israelite firstborn males, both of men and of cattle. The latter were often sacrificed, “but all the firstborn of my children I redeem” (Exod. 13:15). God accepted the separation of the tribe of Levi for liturgical service in lieu of all Israelite firstborn (Num. 3:40ff.). However, the Israelite males still had to be “redeemed” (pâdâh) from this service by payment of specified “redemption money” (Num. 3:44-51).
When God is the subject of pâdâh, the word emphasizes His complete, sovereign freedom to liberate human beings. Sometimes God is said to “redeem” individuals (Abraham, Isa. 29:22; David, 1 Kings 1:29; and when in the Psalter, e.g., 26:11; 21:5; 71:23); but usually Israel, the elect people, is the beneficiary. Sometimes the redemption or deliverance is proclaimed absolutely (2 Sam. 7:23; Ps. 44:26; Hos. 7:13); but the subject is said to be “ransomed” from a specific oppression. At other times, the reference is less explicit—e.g., from “troubles” (Ps. 25:22) and from “wicked” men (Jer. 15:21). Only once is pâdâh used to describe liberation from sin or iniquity: “And he shall redeem Israel from all his iniquity” (Ps. 130:8).
Kâphar (כָּפַר, Strong's #3722), “to ransom, atone, expiate, propitiate.” Kâphar has an initial secular and non-theological range quite parallel to padah In addition, however, kâphar became a technical term in Israel’s sacrificial rituals. On its most basic level of meaning, kâphar denotes a material transaction or “ransom.”
Sometimes man is the subject of kâphar. In 2 Sam. 21:3, David asks the Gibeonites, “… And wherewith shall I make the atonement, that ye may bless the inheritance of the Lord?” He receives in answer the advice to hang seven of Saul’s sons in compensation. In Exod. 32:30, Moses ascends the mountain yet a third time in an effort to “make an atonement” for the people’s sin (apparently merely by intercession, although this is not explicitly stated). Isa. 27:9 speaks of “purging” Israel’s guilt by banishing idolatrous objects. In Num. 25:13, Phinehas is said to have “made an atonement for the children of Israel” by spearing a couple during orgiastic worship of Baal.
God is often the subject of kâphar in this general sense, too. In 2 Chron. 30:18, Hezekiah prays for God to “pardon” those who were not ritually prepared for the Passover. At the conclusion of the Song of Moses, Yahweh is praised because He “will atone for His land and His people” (Deut. 32:43, NASB). Similar general uses of the word appear in Ps. 65:3; 78:38; and Dan. 9:24. Jeremiah once uses kâphar to pray bitterly that Yahweh not “forgive” the iniquity of those plotting to slay him (Jer. 18:23), and in Ps. 79:9 the word means “to purge” sin.
Most often kâphar is used in connection with specific rites, and the immediate subject is a priest. All types of ritual sacrifice are explained in terms of kâphar. We find the priests’ smearing of blood on the altar during the “sin offering” (chatta’t) described as “atonement” (Exod. 29: 36-37; Lev. 4:20, 31; 10:17; Num. 28:22; 29:5; Neh. 10:33). The use of blood is not quite so prominent in sacrifices, but the relation to “atonement” still holds. It is clearly true of the “guilt offering” (Lev. 5:16, 18; 6:7; 7:7; 14:21; 19:22; Num. 5:8). The principle holds even when the poor cannot afford an animal or birds, and they sacrifice only a little flour—i.e., where obviously no blood is involved (Lev. 5:11-13). Making “atonement” (kâphar) is also part of the purpose of the “burnt offering” (Lev. 1:4; Num. 15:25). The only major type of sacrifice not classified an “atonement” in Leviticus is the “cereal offering” (minchah) of chapter 2; but Ezek. 45:15, 17 does include it under that heading. First Chron. 6:49 applies the concept to the priestly ministry in general. The connection of all of the rituals with kâphar peaks in the complex ceremony of the annual Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), as described in detail in Lev. 16.
Most English versions prefer to render kâphar with the more neutral term “atone” or even “ransom.” But various translations often have “expiate” or “propitiate” as well. The terms are partly synonymous. In any sacrifice, the action is directed both toward God (propitiation) and toward the offense (expiation). “Expiate,” “atone,” and even “forgive” (if related to sacrifice) all have God as their primary subject, while “propitiation” addresses God as object.
All the sacrifices in the world would not satisfy God’s righteousness (e.g., Mic. 6:7; Ps. 50:7-15). Hence God alone can provide an atonement or expiation for sin, by which His wrath is assuaged. The righteous God is neither implacable nor capricious, but provides Himself the “ransom” or substitute sacrifice that would satisfy Him. The priest at the altar represents God Himself, bringing the requisite offering before God; sacrifice is not essentially man’s action, but God’s own act of pardoning mercy.
B. Noun.
Ge'ûllâh (גְּאֻלָּה, Strong's #1353), "(right of) redemption.” This word is used in regard to deliverance of persons or property that had been sold for debt. The law required that the “right of redemption” of land and of persons be protected (Lev. 25:24, 48). The redemption price was determined by the number of years remaining until the release of debts in the year of jubilee (Lev. 25:27-28). The word ge'ûllâh also occurs in Jer. 32:7: “Behold, Hanameel the son of Shallum thine uncle shall come unto thee, saying, Buy thee my field that is in Anathoth: for the right of redemption is thine to buy it.”
The noun related to padah is pedut. It occurs about 5 times and means “ransom or redemption”: “He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever …” (Ps. 111:9).
King James Dictionary - Redeem
REDEE'M, L. redimo red, re, and emo, to obtain or purchase.
1. To purchase back to ransom to liberate or rescue from captivity or bondage, or from any obligation or liability to suffer or to be forfeited, by paying an equivalent as, to redeem prisoners or captured goods to redeem a pledge. 2. To repurchase what has been sold to regain possession of a thing alienated, by repaying the value of it to the possessor. If a man shall sell a dwelling house in a walled city, then he may redeem it within a whole year after it is sold.
Leviticus 25 .
3. To rescue to recover to deliver from. Th' Almighty from the grave hath me redeem'd.
Redeem Israel, O God, out of all his troubles. Psalms 25 . Deuteronomy 7 .
The mass of earth not yet redeemed from chaos.
4. To compensate to make amends for. It is a chance which does redeem all sorrows.
By lesser ills the greater to redeem.
5. To free by making atonement. Thou hast one daughter who redeems nature from the general curse.
6. To pay the penalty of. Which of you will be mortal to redeem man's mortal crime?
7. To save. He could not have redeemed a portion of his time for contemplating the powers of nature.
8. To perform what has been promised to make good by performance. He has redeemed his pledge or promise. 9. In law, to recall an estate, or to obtain the right to re-enter upon a mortgaged estate by paying to the mortgagee his principal, interest, and expenses or costs. 10. In theology, to rescue and deliver from the bondage of sin and the penalties of God's violated law, by obedience and suffering in the place of the sinner, or by doing and suffering that which is accepted in lieu of the sinner's obedience. Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us. Galatians 3 . Titus 2 .
11. In commerce, to purchase or pay the value in specie, of any promissory note, bill or other evidence of debt, given by the state, by a company or corporation, or by an individual. The credit of a state, a banking company or individuals, is good when they can redeem all their stock, notes or bills, at par. To redeem time, is to use more diligence in the improvement of it to be diligent and active in duty and preparation. Ephesians 5 .

Sentence search

Bought - See Redeem, Redemption
Purchase - See Redeem, Redemption ...
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Ransom - See Redeem, Redemption ...
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Kinsman - goel, from root meaning to Redeem.
If any one from poverty was unable to Redeem his inheritance, it was the duty of the kinsman to Redeem it (Leviticus 25:25,28 ; Ruth 3:9,12 ). He was also required to Redeem his relation who had sold himself into slavery (Leviticus 25:48,49 ). God is the Goel of his people because he Redeems them (Exodus 6:6 ; Isaiah 43:1 ; 41:14 ; 44:6,22 ; 48:20 ; Psalm 103:4 ; Job 19:25 , etc
Againbuy - ) To Redeem
Redeemed - ) of Redeem...
Redeeming - ) of Redeem...
Dismortgage - ) To Redeem from mortgage
Ransom - See Atonement ; Expiation, Propitiation ; Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer
Redemptory - ) Paid for ransom; serving to Redeem
Redemptive - ) Serving or tending to Redeem; Redeeming; as, the redemptive work of Christ
Redeem - To purchase back to ransom to liberate or rescue from captivity or bondage, or from any obligation or liability to suffer or to be forfeited, by paying an equivalent as, to Redeem prisoners or captured goods to Redeem a pledge. If a man shall sell a dwelling house in a walled city, then he may Redeem it within a whole year after it is sold. Th' Almighty from the grave hath me Redeem'd. ...
Redeem Israel, O God, out of all his troubles. ...
The mass of earth not yet Redeemed from chaos. It is a chance which does Redeem all sorrows. ...
By lesser ills the greater to Redeem. Thou hast one daughter who Redeems nature from the general curse. Which of you will be mortal to Redeem man's mortal crime? ...
7. He could not have Redeemed a portion of his time for contemplating the powers of nature. He has Redeemed his pledge or promise. Christ hath Redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us. The credit of a state, a banking company or individuals, is good when they can Redeem all their stock, notes or bills, at par. To Redeem time, is to use more diligence in the improvement of it to be diligent and active in duty and preparation
Padon - (Ezra 2:44) Her name is probably derived from Padah, to Redeem
Redeem - ) To pay the penalty of; to make amends for; to serve as an equivalent or offset for; to atone for; to compensate; as, to Redeem an error. ) To make good by performing fully; to fulfill; as, to Redeem one's promises. ) To ransom, liberate, or rescue from captivity or bondage, or from any obligation or liability to suffer or to be forfeited, by paying a price or ransom; to ransom; to rescue; to recover; as, to Redeem a captive, a pledge, and the like. ) To regain by performing the obligation or condition stated; to discharge the obligation mentioned in, as a promissory note, bond, or other evidence of debt; as, to Redeem bank notes with coin
Ransom - Leviticus 25:48 allowed one sold captive to be Redeemed by one of his brethren. The Son of God therefore became man in order that as our elder brother He should Redeem us (Hebrews 2:14-15). (See Redeem
Goel - In Hebrew the participle of the verb Gaal , "To Redeem. " It is rendered in the Authorized Version "kinsman," Numbers 5:8 ; Ruth 3:12 ; 4:1,6,8 ; "redeemer," Job 19:25 ; "avenger," Numbers 35:12 ; Deuteronomy 19:6 , etc. The Jewish law gave the right of Redeeming and repurchasing, as well as of avenging blood, to the next relative, who was accordingly called by this name. (See RedeemER
Ransom - To Redeem from captivity or punishment by paying an equivalent applied to persons as, to ransom prisoners from an enemy. To Redeem from the possession of an enemy by paying a price deemed equivalent applied to goods or property. In Scripture, to Redeem from the bondage of sin, and from the punishment to which sinners are subjected by the divine law
Kinsman - The living brother was the dead brother's goel—his Redeemer (Genesis 38:8 ; Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Ruth 3:9-12 ). See Vengeance ...
The kinsman was also responsible to Redeem the estate which his nearest relative might have sold because of poverty (Leviticus 25:25 ; Ruth 4:4 ). ...
The Old Testament Book of Ruth is the most striking example of a kinsman who used his power and Jewish law to Redeem. See Avenger ; Cities of Refuge ; Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer
Redeemer - A name given to Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world, because he Redeems mankind from the bondage and guilt of their sins, by dying in their place, and thus paying their ransom, Matthew 20:28 Galatians 3:13 Ephesians 1:7 1 Timothy 2:6 Titus 2:14 1 Peter 1:18,19 Revelation 5:9 . In the law of Moses, Leviticus 25:25,48 , this title is given to one who has the right of redemption in an inheritance, especially to a near kinsman, who may Redeem it from a stranger or any Jew who had bought it. Jeremiah Redeemed the field of his nephew Hanameel, which was on the point of being sold to another, Jeremiah 32:7,8 . So Christ became a partaker of flesh and blood, that as our near kinsman he might Redeem for us the heavenly inheritance, Job 19:25,26 . ...
The nearest kinsman was also called the Redeemer of blood-in our English translation, the avenger, or revenger of blood; and had a right to revenge the blood of his murdered kinsman, Numbers 35:12,19,21 Deuteronomy 19:6,12 . To protect the innocent from these avengers, or Redeemers, God appointed cities of refuge throughout Israel
Redemption - (The words ‘redeem’ and ‘ransom’ are related to the same root in the original languages. ...
In the Old Testament...
Under Israelite law, both people and things could be Redeemed. In family matters, all Israelites had to Redeem their firstborn. Therefore, the parents had to Redeem their firstborn by a payment of money to the sanctuary (Exodus 13:2; Exodus 13:13; Numbers 18:15-16; see FIRSTBORN). In matters of property, if people became poor and sold land they had inherited from ancestors, either they or close relatives had to buy the land back (redeem it) as soon as possible (Leviticus 25:25; Ruth 4:3-6; see SABBATICAL YEAR). ...
If Israelites vowed to give God their children, animals, houses or land, they could Redeem those things, again by a payment of money to the sanctuary (Leviticus 27:1-25; see VOWS). If a farmer was under the death sentence because his ox had killed someone, his relatives could Redeem him (since the death was accidental) by a payment of money to the dead person’s relatives (Exodus 21:28-30). ...
Often God is said to have Redeemed Israel; that is, to have delivered Israel from the power of its enemies (Jeremiah 31:11; Micah 4:10). Centuries later, after Israel (Judah) had been taken captive to Babylon, there was a ‘second exodus’, when God again Redeemed his people from bondage (Isaiah 44:22-23; Isaiah 48:20). ...
Sinners are therefore Redeemed by the blood of Christ. When people are Redeemed from the bondage of sin and the curse of the law, they come into a new life of liberty as the sons of God
Hanameel - Anathoth being a sacerdotal city with a thousand cubits of suburban fields, the land could not be alienated (Leviticus 25:25; Leviticus 25:34); but this did not prevent sales within the tribe of Levi, on the failure of the owner the next of kin could Redeem the land
Debenture Stock - By the terms of much debenture stock the holders are not entitled to demand payment until the winding up of the company or default in payment; in the winding up of the company or default in payment; in the case of railway debentures, they cannot demand payment of the principal, and the debtor company cannot Redeem the stock, except by authority of an act of Parliament
Family - The law of redemption applied to the “close relatives in a family”: “After that he is sold he may be Redeemed again; one of his brethren may Redeem him: Either his uncle, or his uncle’s son, may Redeem him, or any that is nigh of kin unto him of his family may Redeem him; or if he be able, he may Redeem himself” ( Covenant Theology - made between God and Adam, and the Covenant of Grace between the Father and the Son where the Father promised to give the Son the elect and the Son must Redeem them
Ransom - ) To Redeem from captivity, servitude, punishment, or forfeit, by paying a price; to buy out of servitude or penalty; to rescue; to deliver; as, to ransom prisoners from an enemy
Redeem - ...
Gâ'al (גָּאַל, Strong's #1350), “to Redeem, deliver, avenge, act as a kinsman. 48:16: “The angel which Redeemed me [1] from all evil …” (KJV), means as in the NIV, “delivered me from all harm. 25:25: “If thy brother be waxen poor, and hath sold away some of his possession, and if any of his kin come to Redeem it, then shall he Redeem that which his brother sold. ” If he prospers, the man himself may “redeem” it ( Redeem” belonged to the nearest relative—brother, uncle, uncle’s son, or a blood relative from his family (Ruth 2:20. 19:6 the Redeemer is called the “avenger of blood” whose duty it was to execute the murderer of his relative. ...
The Book of Ruth is a beautiful account of the kinsman-redeemer. ” Thus the kinsman-redeemer was responsible for preserving the integrity, life, property, and family name of his close relative or for executing justice upon his murderer. ...
The greater usage of this word group is of God who promised: “… I am the Lord … I will Redeem you with a stretched out arm and with great judgments” ( Redeemed …” ( Redeemer” (in 43:1: “Fear not; for I have Redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine. Israel’s “Redeemer” is “the Holy One of Israel” (41:14), “the creator of Israel, your King” (43:14-15), “the Lord of hosts” (44:6), and “the mighty One of Jacob” (49:26). Those who share His salvation are “the Redeemed” (35:9). For example: “Draw nigh unto my soul, and Redeem it: // deliver me because of mine enemies” ( Redeemeth thy life from destruction; who crowneth thee with loving-kindness and tender mercies” ( Redeem, ransom. The latter were often sacrificed, “but all the firstborn of my children I Redeem” ( Redeem Israel from all his iniquity” ( Ransom - ' None "can by any means Redeem his brother, nor give to God a ransom for him
Sabbath - Colossians 2:16 (a) The sabbath day is a shadow and a type of the perfect rest which every sinner finds in CHRIST JESUS when he ceases to work for his own salvation and trusts the Saviour to blot out all his sins, Redeem his soul, bring forgiveness, give him eternal life, and make him a child of GOD
Incarnation - " The Son of God assumed our flesh and dwelt among us like one of us in order to Redeem us
Avenger of Blood - goel, from verb gaal, "to be near of kin," "to Redeem"), the nearest relative of a murdered person
Lovingkindness - ), its poetic personification ( Psalms 42:8 ; Psalms 57:3 ; Psalms 89:14 ), and the appeal to God to be true to Himself, to save and to Redeem ‘for His lovingkindness’ sake’ ( Psalms 6:4 ; Psalms 44:26 ; Psalms 115:1 )
Redemption - See Redeem. The liberation of an estate from a mortgage or the purchase of the right to re-enter upon it by paying the principal sum for which it was mortgaged with interest and cost also, the right of Redeeming and re-entering
Firstborn - Numbers 3:45); as a matter of fact, however, the earliest Code commands the redemption of the firstborn: ‘All the firstborn of man among thy sons shalt thou Redeem’ (Exodus 13:13, cf. Hence the husband of several wives would have to Redeem the firstborn of each one of them, while the husband of a woman who had had children by a previous marriage need not Redeem her child although it was his firstborn’ (Jewish Encyc. Moreover, the first male child of a woman need not be Redeemed if a female child has been born before him. ]'>[7] or Redeem him for five selaim, which thou art bound to give according to the Law?’ The father replies: ‘I desire rather to Redeem my son, and here thou hast the value of his redemption, which I am bound to give according to the Law. ]'>[11] and the price of redemption was, according to Numbers 3:47; Numbers 18:16, five shekels; in Exodus 13:13 the command to Redeem the firstborn is given, though the price of redemption is not mentioned, while in Leviticus 12 there is no mention at all regarding the redemption of the firstborn, reference being made only to an atonement which has to be made for the purification of the mother; it may be owing to Leviticus 12 that in Luke 2:22 ‘their’ purification is spoken of, i. 24 seems to point to an amalgamation of the offerings due from the mother for purification, and on behalf of the child for redemption;* Following - 27:20: “And if he will not Redeem the field, or if he have sold the field to another man, it shall not be Redeemed any more
Redemption - ' God having smitten the firstborn of the Egyptians, claimed all the firstborn of Israel, and received the Levites instead of them; but there not being an equivalent number of the Levites, the residue of the firstborn were Redeemed by money: they were thus set free. So the land, or one who sold himself, could be Redeemed. The Israeliteswere Redeemed out of Egypt by the mighty power of God. The one is λυτρόω, λύτρωσις, 'to loose, a loosing, a loosing away,' hence deliverance by a ransom paid, Redeemed. ' Christ has Redeemed believers from the curse of the law. Christians are exhorted to be "redeeming the time," that is, buying or securing the opportunity. 'to buy,' except in Revelation 5:9 ; Revelation 14:3,4 , where it is rendered 'redeem,' but would be better 'buy. ' The difference is important in such a passage as 2 Peter 2:1 , where it could not be said 'redeemed,' for those spoken of are such as deny Christ's rights of purchase, and bring on themselves swift destruction though they had been 'bought. ' Christ 'bought' all, but only believers are 'redeemed. ' Christians sometimes speak of 'universal redemption' without really meaning it, because they do not observe the difference between 'buying' and 'redeeming. "...
Redemption is sometimes used in the sense of the right or title to Redeem (Psalm 130:7 ; Romans 3:24 ); and this right God has righteously secured to Himself in Christ, and in virtue of it He presents Himself to man as a Justifier
Redemption - denotes our recovery from sin and death by the obedience and sacrifice of Christ, who, on this account, is called the Redeemer. "Christ hath Redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us," Galatians 3:13 . "Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not Redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathers; but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish, and without spot,"...
1 Peter 1:18-19 . But the very terms used in the above cited passages, "to Redeem," and "to be bought with a price," will each be found to refute this notion of a gratuitous deliverance, whether from sin or punishment, or both. Our English word, to Redeem, literally means "to buy back;" and λυτροω , to Redeem, and απολυτρωσις , redemption, are, both in Greek writers and in the New Testament, used for the act of setting free a captive, by paying λυτρον , a ransom or redemption price. "Ye were not Redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, but with the precious blood of Christ," 1 Peter 1:18-19 . ...
John to be the blood of Christ: "Thou wast slain, and hast Redeemed us to God (ηγορασας , hast purchased us) by thy blood," Revelation 5:9
Fullness of Time - The first refers to a past event, the sending of Christ to Redeem those born under the law
Tutor - Then ‘when the fulness of the time came, God sent forth his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, that he might Redeem them which were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons’ (Galatians 4:4)
Scarlet - Genesis 38:30 (a) Since Pharez is found in the genealogy of CHRIST, this thread may indicate that Zarah would need the blood to Redeem him
Love of God - In the gift of his Son to die for them, and Redeem them from sin, death, and hell, Romans 5:9
Trouble - ...
Redeem Israel, O God, out of all his troubles
Avenger - Avenger translates Hebrew go'el , which in its verbal form means to Redeem. The avenger or go'el is responsible to take the life of one who killed a family member ( Numbers 35:12 ), to receive restitution for crimes against a deceased relative (Numbers 5:7-8 ), buy back property lost to the family (Leviticus 25:25 ), Redeem a relative who sold himself into slavery (Leviticus 25:48-49 ), or marry the widow of a relative without sons and perpetuate the family (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Lye - In Isaiah 1:25 , God promised to Redeem His corrupt people, but they would have to undergo a painful cleansing time first
Equity - Equity of redemption, in law, the advantage, allowed to a mortgager, of a reasonable time to Redeem lands mortgaged, when the estate is of greater value than the sum for which it was mortgaged
Messiah - The expectations of the Jews were thus kept alive from generation to generation, till the "fulness of the times," when Messiah came, "made of a woman, made under the law, to Redeem them that were under the law
Nothing - Nothing was done to Redeem our character
Lamb of God - See Atonement ; Christ, Christology ; Passover ; Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer ; Sacrifice and Offering ; Servant of the Lord...
Barry Morgan...
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Murder - Money could not Redeem his life: he was dragged away from the altar, if he had there taken refuge
Kinsman - In order to enter into a proper apprehension of its delightful meaning, it will be necessary to remark, that sometimes the same word which we translate kinsman is also translated Redeemer. )" In the margin of the Bible the same word Goel is translated Redeemer; therefore, the sense is, hath not left thee this day without a Redeemer. So again Job 19:25 "For I know that my Redeemer liveth," In the original it is the same word Goel, meaning kinsman, Redeemer. So once more, (Isaiah 44:6) the same word Goel, which is rendered kinsman in Ruth, is rendered Redeemer here. —"Thus saith the Lord, king of Israel, and his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts. " Hence, therefore, from these and the like passages, it is blessed to see that one and the same person is all along spoken of under both characters, our kinsman, Redeemer. To answer this enquiry it should be observed, that the right of redemption belonged to this kinsman, for thus the law enjoined: "If thy brother be waxen poor, and hath sold away some of his possession, and if any of his kin come to Redeem it, then shall he Redeem that which his brother sold. Jesus, by virtue of taking our nature, becomes the nearest of kin to our nature, and is, to all intents and purposes, our Goel, our kinsman, Redeemer. Now as Jesus's poor brother, our whole nature was waxen poor, and had by sin and rebellion sold away some of our possession, and had both brought our souls into captivity and mortgaged our inheritance, to him alone belonged the right of redemption for both; and Jesus hath fully and completely Redeemed both. Hence he hath proved himself to be our Goel in the full sense of the word, our kinsman, and our Redeemer, and our kinsman-Redeemer; and very blessed it is to know the Lord Jesus Christ in those united characters. "I know (said he) that my (Goel, my kinsman) Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth: and though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God; whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold for myself, and not another for me
Boldness (Holy): Congruous With the Gospel - Blush to preach of a dying Savior? Apologize for talking of the Son of God condescending to be made man, that he might Redeem us from all iniquity? Never! Oh! by the grace of God let us purpose, with
Mortgage - But in this case, courts of equity interpose,and if the estate is of more value than the debt, they will on application grant a reasonable time for the mortgager to Redeem the estate
Redeem, Redemption - ; text, "redeeming the time," where "time" is kairos, "a season," a time in which something is seasonable), i. ...
Note: In Revelation 5:9 ; 14:3,4 , AV, agorazo, "to purchase" (RV) is translated "redeemed. ...
A — 2: λυτρόω (Strong's #3084 — Verb — lutroo — loo-tro'-o ) "to release on receipt of ransom" (akin to lutron, "a ransom"), is used in the Middle Voice, signifying "to release by paying a ransom price, to Redeem" (a) in the natural sense of delivering, Luke 24:21 , of setting Israel free from the Roman yoke; (b) in a spiritual sense, Titus 2:14 , of the work of Christ in "redeeming" men "from all iniquity" (anomia, "lawlessness," the bondage of self-will which rejects the will of God); 1 Peter 1:18 (Passive Voice), "ye were Redeemed," from a vain manner of life, i. 2 are translated "to Redeem," exagorazo does not signify the actual "redemption," but the price paid with a view to it, lutroo signifies the actual "deliverance," the setting at liberty
Intermediate State - Their trust was in God who would ultimately Redeem them, and if the specifics of what would transpire after death were not clear, their faith in God was and from this arose an assurance that God would not abandon them in the darkness. In some instances their faith took concrete shape, as in Psalm 49:15 , "God will Redeem my life from the grave; he will surely take me to himself, " or in Job 19:25-27 , "I know that my Redeemer lives … and after my skin has been destroyed, yet in my flesh I will see God
Vows - (Leviticus 27:28 ) (a) If he vowed land, he might either Redeem it or not Levi 25,27. (b) Animals fit for sacrifice if devoted, were not to be Redeemed or changed, (Leviticus 27:9 ; 10:33 ) persons devoted stood thus: devote either himself, his child (not the first-born) or his slave. (2 Samuel 15:8 ) Otherwise he might be Redeemed at a valuation according to age and sex, on the scale given in (Leviticus 27:1-7 ) Among general regulations affecting vows the following may be mentioned: (1) Vows were entirely voluntary but once made were regarded as compulsory
Avenger of Blood - The word in Hebrew law was used in a wide sense for him whose duty it was to Redeem the property or the person of an impoverished or enslaved relative ( Leviticus 25:26 ; Leviticus 25:47-49 , Ruth 4:1 ff
Ruth, Book of - On the circumstances being made known to the latter, and on his declining to Redeem the inheritance, Boaz Redeemed all that had belonged to Elimelech and his two sons, and took Ruth to be his wife
Begging - The brother waxen poor was to be relieved by the nearest of kin; and when he had sold his possession, this brother, born for adversity, was to Redeem it
Wise - If he that sanctified the field will in any wise Redeem it-- Leviticus 27
Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer - God would Redeem Israel from her iniquities. In Psalm 49:7-8 it is used in the sense of ransom in association with padah (redeem). At the sea God Redeemed His people from slavery in Egypt (for example, Exodus 6:6 ; Exodus 15:13 ; Deuteronomy 7:8 ; Psalm 77:15 ). ...
God similarly Redeemed Israel from the Babylonian captivity by giving Egypt, Ethiopia, and Seba to King Cyrus (Isaiah 43:3 ; compare Isaiah 48:20 ; Isaiah 51:11 ; Isaiah 62:12 ). Job knew that he had a living Redeemer (Job 19:25 ). Psalmists prayed for redemption from distress (Psalm 26:11 ; Psalm 49:15 ) and testified to God's Redeeming work (Psalm 31:5 ; Psalm 71:23 ; Psalm 107:2 ). The Old Testament witness is that God is “my strength and my Redeemer” (Psalm 19:14 ). ...
In other ways and language the centrality of redemption through the death of Jesus Christ is expressed throughout the New Testament from the Lamb of God who lifts up and carries away the sin of the world (John 1:29 ) to the Redeeming Lamb praised by a multitude because He was slain and by His blood Redeemed unto God's people of every kindred, tongue, and nation (Revelation 5:8-14 )
Heir - Naomi, being past age of marriage, Boaz takes Ruth her daughter-in-law, and has also to Redeem the sold inheritance of Elimelech, Naomi's husband. ...
A kinsman, or the owner, could at any time Redeem it at a regulated charge (Leviticus 25:23-27)
Adoption - (Ephesians 1:5) And the purpose for which Christ is said to be made of a woman, made under the law, to Redeem them that were under the law was, that they might receive the adoption of sons
Brother - —When the law enjoined tenderness, and the relief to the brother waxen poor, here we behold the law of JEHOVAH, and Jesus the law fulfiller blessedly obeying it among his brethren, "If thy brother be waxen poor, and hath sold away some of his possession, and if any of his kin come to Redeem it, then shall he Redeem that which his brother sold. " (Leviticus 25:25-35)...
Who is the brother waxen poor, having fallen into decay, and sold away some of his possession, but our poor ruined nature; ruined by the fall, and by sin, having sold away our possession? And who is the brother to whom the precept is given, and by whom it hath been fulfilled, and is fulfilling, but the Lord Jesus Christ? Who but him could Redeem our mortgaged inheritance? Who but him had a right so to do, as the nearest of all kin, and the most compassionate of all relations? And do observe in those gracious precepts how blessedly provision is made, in this almighty Brother's obedience to this precept, for all the relations of Jesus, both Jew and Gentile; "Yea, (saith the command of JEHOVAH,) though he be a stranger, or a sojourner, that he may live with thee. He must Redeem, yea, he hath in every individual instance of his people Redeemed their lost possession. Would any man be shy of going to an earthly court if the king of that court was his brother? Nay, would he not be often going there; often telling of it to ever one around him; and delighting to have it known that he had access, at all times, to the person of the king his brother, and might have whatever he asked of him? But what are these privileges, or what great cause for taking pride and consequence in these transitory dignities, compared to that real unfading honour in a consciousness of not only coming to Jesus, the King of kings, and Lord of lords, as to a brother, but who hath made all his Redeemed kings and priests to God and the Father, and "they shall reign with him for ever and ever!" (Revelation 1:6; Rev 22:5)...
Suffer me yet farther to add, that the Scriptures of our God have made this subject of Christ's brotherhood, so peculiarly endearing to the church, that the gracious design of our Lord Jesus, in the assuming of our manhood, is not answered when his church "makes no use of it
City - 25:31 shows that ‛ı̂yr can be used as synonym of chatser: “And if a man sell a dwelling house in a walled city, then he may Redeem it within a whole year after it is sold; … but the houses of the villages [2] which have no wall round about them shall be counted as the fields of the country
Messi'ah - This word also refers to the expected Prince of the chosen people who was to complete God's purposes for them and to Redeem them, and of whose coming the prophets of the old covenant in all time spoke
Kinsman-Redeemer - ...
Although the term "kinsman-redeemer" is used only seven times in the NIV (all in the Book of Ruth) and "avenger of blood" is used twelve times, the Hebrew verb ga'al [ Genesis 48:16 ; Exodus 6:6 ); Redeems property (Leviticus 27:9-25 ) or person (Leviticus 25:47-55 ); avenges the murder of a relative as a guiltless executioner (Numbers 35:9-34 ); and receives restitution for wrong done to a relative who has since died (Numbers 5:8 ). The unique emphasis of the redemption/salvation/vindication associated with the kinsman-redeemer is the fact that this action is carried out by a kinsman on behalf of a near relative in need. ...
God is Israel's Redeemer, the one who will defend and vindicate them. ...
In the psalms God often Redeems in the sense of rescuing from danger. In Job 19:25 the term "redeemer" in context refers to God who, as friend and kinsman of Job, through faith will ultimately defend and vindicate him. ...
Although the doctrine of redemption from sin is taught extensively in the New Testament, it is not connected closely with the Old Testament concept of kinsman-redeemer. Christ can, however, be regarded as an example of a kinsman-redeemer since he identified himself with us and Redeemed us because of our need. " Jesus is not only our Redeemer from sin, but as Hebrews 2:16-18,4:14-16 point out, he is a kinsman to us and understands our struggles. Bramer...
See also Redeem, Redemption ...
Bibliography
Manger - Hence, therefore, the Lord Jesus, in his coming to Redeem our nature, will, from the manger to the cross, debase, humble, and empty himself, and make himself of no reputation, yea, become "sin and a curse for us, when he knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him
Syracuse - And that he would Redeem the time is certain
Suffering (2) - But not by His mere sufferings did He Redeem humanity
Ransom - " And to heighten the subject, beyond all possible conception, of the greatness of the value, Peter was commissioned to tell the church that "they were not Redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, as a lamb without blemish and without spot. " (1 Peter 1:18-19) And the Psalmist brings in his testimony to the same amount, (Psalms 49:7-8) "None can by any means Redeem his brother, nor give to God a ransom for him: for the redemption of his soul is precious, and it ceaseth for ever. " But to shew, at the same time, that what the Lord Jesus gave was fully equal, yea, more than equal to the vast purchase, ‘the Holy Ghost, in the book of Job, introduceth JEHOVAH as speaking concerning the Redeemed sinner, "Deliver him from going down to the pit, I have found a ransom
Name - To “give a name for one” is to make him famous: “And what one nation in the earth is like thy people, even like Israel, whom God went to Redeem for a people to himself, and to make a name, and to do for you great things and terrible, for thy land …” ( Sabbatical Year - All slaves were to be emancipated (this may be a modified substitute for the earlier provisions with regard to emancipation after 7 years); no mention is made of the possibility of perpetual slavery, but it is ordained that the Hebrew slave of a foreigner may be Redeemed by a relative, all Jews being essentially Jehovah’s servants. (2) A kinsman may Redeem land thus mortgaged, or (the meaning may possibly be) exercise a right of pre-emption upon it. (3) The mortgager may Redeem at the selling price, less the yearly proportion for the time elapsed since the sale. (4) House property in walled towns (not in villages) may be sold outright, and is Redeemable only during one year. (5) The Levitical possessions were Redeemable at any time, and did not come under the jubilee provisions. (7) In Leviticus 27:16-25 a field devoted to Jehovah must be valued at once at a fixed rate, and might be Redeemed at this price, plus a fine of 20 per cent. If not Redeemed by then it became sacred property: no redemption of it was thereafter possible
Firstborn - The husband of several wives would have to Redeem the firstborn of each. ...
The firstborn of an unclean animal had to be Redeemed by an estimation of the priest, with the addition of one-fifth (Leviticus 27:27 ; Numbers 18:15 )
Redeemer - ) Redeem, Hebrew padhah and gaal . So our Redeemer "through death has destroyed Satan (man's "murderer from the beginning", John 8:44) who had the power of death," and has delivered us from everlasting "bondage" to him (Hebrews 2:14-15; Hosea 13:14). Our Boaz has not "left off His kindness to the living and to the dead" (Ruth 2:20); translated Job 19:25-27 "I know that my Redeemer (vindicator, avenger; redressing my wrongs on Satan their inflicter) liveth, and that He shall arise the Last (1 Corinthians 15:45; Revelation 1:17) above the dust (with which is mingled man's crumbling body: 1 Corinthians 15:20; 1 Corinthians 15:23; Romans 8:23; Ephesians 1:14), and though after my skin (is destroyed) this (body) is destroyed, yet from my flesh (mibesari ; as from a window, Song of Solomon 2:9) shall I see God, whom I shall see for myself (on my side), no longer estranged" (zar ) from me. The Egyptian myth of Osiris and his son Horus in the "Ritual of the Dead" strikingly confirms the primitive revelation of the promised Redeemer, of which it is the corruption. Horus as Ra was "creator"; as Τeti , the "redeemer from the power" of Αpophis the "serpent", and of Τyphoon the "hippopotamus", representatives of the evil being; as Νets , Horus is "the deliverer of the justified"
Levitical Cities - To prevent the dispossession of Levites, it was ordained that they might at any time Redeem houses in their own cities which they had been forced by need to sell. Moreover, such a house, if not Redeemed, reverted to its original Levitical owner during the year of Jubilee
Ant - "Redeem the time" (Greek favorable season) is the spiritual lesson (Ephesians 5:16)
Titus, Epistle to - The grace of God that carries salvation for all has appeared, teaching how a Christian is to live, awaiting the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of the great God and Saviour Jesus Christ, who died to Redeem such from all lawlessness, and to purify to Himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works
Joash - Joash, to Redeem himself from the difficulties of a siege, and from the danger of being plundered, took what money he could find in the temple, which had been consecrated by Ahaziah his father, Jehoram his grandfather, and himself, and gave the whole to Hazael
Servant - In the case of a female Hebrew slave, there was not the release at the end of six years: but if marriage with the owner or his son did not take place, she was not to be sold to a foreigner, but "he shall cause her to be Redeemed," i. When Hebrews became the slaves of non-Hebrews, they might be Redeemed or Redeem themselves, or else go free at the year of Jubilee
Dereliction - ’ What was it that wrong from His lips that exceeding bitter cry? The Evangelists have not drawn the veil aside and revealed what was passing in the Redeemer’s soul, and it becomes us to refrain from curious speculation, and recognize that there is here an impenetrable mystery. ...
If Jesus was indeed the eternal Son of God, ‘bearing our sins in his body on the tree’ (1 Peter 2:24), it is in no wise strange that His experience at that awful crisis should lie beyond our ken; but some light is shed upon the mystery by the profound truth, so often reiterated in the NT, that it was necessary for Him, in order that He might Redeem the children of men, to be identified with them in every particular of their sorrowful condition. That He might ‘redeem us from the curse of the law’ it was necessary that He should be ‘made a curse for us’ (Galatians 3:13); ‘it behoved him in every respect to be made like unto his brethren, that he might prove a merciful and faithful High Priest’; and it is because ‘he hath himself suffered, having been tempted,’ that ‘he is able to succour them that are being tempted’ (Hebrews 2:17-18)
Redemption (2) - ): the latter of Redeeming the firstborn of animals or of children (Exodus 13:13; Exodus 13:15; Exodus 34:20, Numbers 18:15 ff. The person who has the right to Redeem, or who undertakes the duty, is a נֹּאֵל, or ‘redeemer’ (Numbers 5:8, Ruth 2:20 etc. ...
In the NT the terms by which the idea is directly expressed are ἀγοραξω, ‘to buy’ or ‘purchase’ (1 Corinthians 6:20; 1 Corinthians 7:23, 2 Peter 2:1, Revelation 5:9; Revelation 14:3-4—the last translation in Authorized Version , ‘redeem’), and its compound ἐξαγοράζω, used by St. ...
It has been seen, accordingly, that while, in their legal usage, the OT terms for ‘redeem’ and ‘redemption’ imply payment of a price, or, in the case of the firstborn, substitution of a life, or a monetary ransom, these terms are often used in the more general sense of simple deliverance or salvation. Prayers, therefore, are frequent that Jehovah would Redeem from oppression, from violence, from sickness, from death, from captivity, etc. Hence the affection with which Deutero-Isaiah dwells on the idea of Jehovah as the נֹּאֶל, or ‘Redeemer’ of Israel. ‘The angel which hath Redeemed me from all evil,’ says Jacob, in the earliest instance of the use of the word נָּאֵל, in Genesis 48:16; and again in Isaiah 63:9 we have, with the use of the same word, the like idea: ‘In all their affliction he was afflicted, and the angel of his presence saved them; in his love and in his pity he Redeemed them,’ etc. The use of ‘redeem’ in connexion with the firstborn (the substitution, e. Such deliverance was only a means towards serving the God who had Redeemed His people in holiness and righteousness (Luke 1:75). John the Baptist was to prepare the way for the Redeemer’s coming (Luke 1:76, cf. The real evils from which Jesus came to Redeem were spiritual evils; the priceless good He came to bestow was a spiritual good. ...
(1) We have first, then, to look at sin and its consequences as the evil to be Redeemed from. ...
(2) This description of the evil to be Redeemed from already determines the positive character of the redemption
Reconciliation - Woodruff...
See also Faith ; Justification ; Redeem, Redemption ; Salvation ...
Bibliography
Poor - "...
(5) Lasting bondservice was forbidden, and manumission , with a liberal present, enjoined in the sabbatical and Jubilee years (Deuteronomy 15:12-15; Leviticus 25:39-42; Leviticus 25:47-54); the children were not enslaved; an Israelite might Redeem an Israelite who was in bondage to a rich foreign settler
Mary - This premised, we may now go farther, and observe that this body given by the Father, produced by the overshadowing power of the Holy Ghost, and taken by the Son, is to be of the same nature and quality as our nature, sin only excepted; for the more he is like to his Redeemed in nature, the more suited he is to be our Mediator. We see the blessedness and propriety that the Redeemer should be man, and not an angel;—the next enquiry is, how this manhood shall be united with the GODHEAD in the most suitable and becoming manner, agreeably to the purposes of the divine counsel and will, so as to answer all the great ends of redemption. " Hence, therefore, the Redeemer must be born of a woman, must be in all points like to his brethren, sin only excepted, both for the salvation of his people and the destruction of his enemies. " (Genesis 2:22) But neither could this have been called a birth, nor of the seed of the woman; neither would this have suited the purposes of redemption; for the Scripture saith, that "when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to Redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons. ...
We find then, that for Christ to be of the seed of the woman, of the same flesh and blood with those he came to Redeem, and to be born under the law, to Redeem them that are under the law, he must still come nearer to our nature, and be born as the children are born, only with that distinguishing and vast difference, that though he partakes of our nature, yet it is the sinless infirmities of our nature only. ...
And it is a most blessed and soul-satisfying view, when opened to our understanding by the Holy Ghost, what the same Almighty Author of his sacred word hath taught us concerning it in the Scriptures of eternal tRuth We now discover the suitability of our dear Redeemer for the great purposes of his mission, and plainly perceive how needful such a priest is for us, "who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens
Walk - 33:14), to go to Redeem (deliver) them from Egypt ( Hosea - Like Gomer, Israel has been unfaithful to her husband God (Yahweh) (2:2-23), but as Hosea Redeemed Gomer from slavery, so God will Redeem Israel from the coming captivity (3:1-5)
Titus, Theology of - Jesus was the One who "gave himself for us to Redeem us from all wickedness and to purify for himself a people that are his very own, eager to do what is good" (v. Jesus Christ "gave himself for us to Redeem us from all wickedness and to purify for himself a people that are his very own, eager to do what is good" (2:14)
Heathen - Newton, favour the same opinion; the latter of whom thus observes: "If we suppose a heathen brought to a sense of his misery; to a conviction that he cannot be happy without the favour of the great Lord of the world; to a feeling of guilt, and desire of mercy, and that, thought he has no explicit knowledge of a Saviour, he directs the cry of his heart to the unknown Supreme, to have mercy upon him; who will prove that such views and desires can arise in the heart of a sinner, without the energy of that Spirit which Jesus is exalted to bestow? Who will take upon him to say, that his blood has not sufficient efficacy to Redeem to God a sinner who is thus disposed, though he have never heard of his name? Or who has a warrant to affirm, that the supposition I have made is in the nature of things impossible to be realized?" Newton's Messiah; Dr
Kin - Should the latter have been compelled by misfortune to sell himself as a slave, it fell to his next of kin to Redeem him. ]'>[2] Redeemer ), and Israel as His Redeemed (so esp
Acrostic - Common though it is in other literatures and with such mediæval Jewish poets as Ibn Ezra, no decisive instance of the type of acrostic in which the initial letters compose a name, has been found in the OT, though some have detected the name Simeon (or Simon) thus given in Psalms 110:1-7 , Psalms 25:1-22 ; Psalms 34:1-22 contain each an additional strophe at the close of the alphabetic strophes; in each case the first word of the verse is a part of the Hebrew verb pâdâh , ‘to Redeem,’ and it has been suggested that the author or a copyist has thus left us a clue to his name Pedahel ; but interesting as this suggestion is, it is for several reasons doubtful
Adoption - ‘To Redeem those under the law’ (Galatians 4:5 ) suggests that God’s action in sending His Son to buy out mankind from slavery to the Law, may be illustrated by the adopting parent’s purchase of a son from his natural father
Seal - Mullen...
See also Holy Spirit ; Redeem, Redemption ...
...
Inherit - One could Redeem the property, whenever it had come into other hands, as did Boaz, in order to maintain the name of the deceased: “Moreover Ruth the Moabitess, the wife of Mahlon, have I purchased to be my wife, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance, that the name of the dead be not cut off from among his brethren, and from the gate of his place” (Ruth 4:10)
Freedom - "Remember that you were slaves in Egypt and the Lord your God Redeemed you. Christ, however, came specifically to Redeem, that is, to liberate those who were under the law by delivering them from its curse (Galatians 3:13-14 ; 4:4-5 ). Our final liberation is yet to come, when we receive the full adoption of sons, when even our bodies are Redeemed, and when the whole creation will be freed from its bondage and decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God (Romans 8:18-23 ). ...
Moisé Silva...
See also Redeem, Redemption ; Salvation ...
Bibliography
Condemnation - ...
In biblical theology, God as creator, Redeemer, and lawgiver, is the judge of all humankind. All this is based on the fact that God has acted to Redeem human beings and reveal his will to them. He Redeemed Israel from Egypt and gave them a land along with a covenant that set before them the conditions of his continued blessing (Exodus 19-20 ). God as creator, Redeemer, and covenanter stood as judge over Israel and set before them life and prosperity, death and adversity (Exodus 34:5-7 ; Deuteronomy 30:15-20 ). ...
To summarize, the theme of condemnation is always seen in the Bible against the background of a just God who creates, Redeems, and covenants with his people so that they may live out his justice on the earth
Go Out, Go Forth - So Hosea says that the Lord’s “going forth” to Redeem His people is as certain as the sunrise (6:3)
Stretch Out - So God told Moses: “… I will Redeem you with a stretched out arm, and with great judgments” ( Tithes - And if a man will at all Redeem aught of his tithes, he shall add thereto the fifth part thereof
Jubilee - The "original proprietor" or "the nearest of kin" (goel ) could Redeem the land at any time. If a man sanctified his land to Jehovah it could be Redeemed before the Jubilee on paying the worth of the crops and a fifth. ...
If not Redeemed before Jubilee it remained sanctified for ever
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - And, when you cannot Redeem that dreadful damage, commit it to Him who can Redeem both it and you
Miracles, Signs, Wonders - They have affirmed the continuing miraculous work of God in the universe He created, continues to care for, uses to reveal Himself, and has promised to Redeem
Jephthah - The law allowed him to Redeem his daughter for 30 shekels
Ransom (2) - One is Psalms 49:7 ‘None of them [1] can by any means Redeem his brother, nor give to God a ransom for him ‘(cf. ’ כֹּפֶר, in both of these passages, has clearly the sense of something given in exchange for a life, which Redeems it from death. He has Redeemed the world by Himself dying for it (Romans 5:6; Romans 5:9-10). He came to Redeem the world by offering Himself as a ‘ransom’ for it. This interpretation fails, if account be taken of the Redeeming efficacy which Jesus in other places (as in the words at the Last Supper) undeniably attributes to His death (see Redemption). He sees a solemn and weighty import in the words of Jesus, and interprets them to mean that Jesus, by His voluntary and guiltless death, directed to this end, Redeems the members of His community from the doom of final annihilation impending over them in the judgment of God, gives death a new character to them, and delivers them from its fear (ii
Atonement - Someone comes and pays the price (provides the ransom) to Redeem those in captivity. Peter declared that “ye were not Redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, But with the precious blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:18-19 ). See Propitiation ; Expiation; Redeem; and the Atonement chart that follows
Abel - Redeem the time. Redeem it, and you will be justified for so doing long before the great white throne is set No; one whole hour every twenty-four hours of your present life would not be too much time to give to go over your past life. For the Holy Ghost also is the purchase of Christ's blood, a new heart also, and a whole lifetime of the means of grace The Bible also, the Sabbath day, the Lord's table, a minister after God's own heart, deep, divine, unsearchable providences, a peaceful death-bed, a happy resurrection morning, a place at the right hand of the Judge, an open acknowledgment and acquittal on the day of judgment, 'Come, ye blessed of My Father,' and then a mansion with our own name in blood upon its door-post and its lintel to all eternity! Yes; precious blood indeed! What blood that must be that can so outery and drown silent in its depths all the accusing cries that are even now going up to God all behind me and all around me! I feel that I would need a whole Redeemer and all His Redeeming blood to myself
Indulgences - " "Lo, " said they, "the heavens are open: if you enter not now, when will you enter? For twelve pence you may Redeem the soul of your father out of purgatory; and are you so ungrateful that you will not rescue the soul of your parent from torment? If you had but one coat, you ought to strip yourself instantly, and sell it, in order to purchase such benefit, " &c
Cherubim - " (Exodus 33:20) Moreover, before the cherubim was sprinkled, on the great day of atonement, the blood of the sacrifice, which we all know was typical of Christ, and represented the one offering of the Redeemer. ...
The question is then, What, or whom, did they represent? I would very humbly say in answer, that I am inclined to think, with several who have gone before me in the study of this solemn and mysterious subject, that the cherubim were emblematical of the glorious persons of the GODHEAD, in their covenant engagements to Redeem our fallen nature, as represented in those characters united with the manhood of Christ
Redemption - ’ The terms ‘redeem,’ ‘redemption,’ ‘redeemer’ are a gift of the Latin Bible to our theological language. ’ The English word ‘ransom,’ etymologically a doublet of ‘redeem,’ has more completely lost its etymological implication of specifically ‘buying back,’ taking on in its stead rather that of ‘buying out. In our common English usage the words ‘redeem,’ ‘redemption,’ ‘redeemer’ retain no sure intimation of their etymological denotation of ‘buying back,’ but suggest ordinarily only a ‘buying out. ...
We may be surprised to observe that the epithet ‘Redeemer’ (‘Ransomer,’ λυτρωτής) is never applied to our Lord in the NT. In fact, we do not meet with ‘Redeemer’ (λυτρωτής) as a designation of our Lord in extant Christian literature, until the middle of the 2nd cent. ‘For we call Him Helper and Redeemer,’ he says, with an allusion to Psalms 19:14. The Israelites had demanded of Moses, ‘Who made thee a ruler and a judge?’ Stephen, driving home his lesson, declares that him who was thus rejected as ‘ruler and judge’ God has sent ‘both as ruler and as Redeemer. ‘Redeemer’ is introduced with great emphasis; attention is called markedly to it as a significant point in the argument. We must look upon the absence of instances of the application of the epithet ‘Redeemer’ to Christ in early Christian writers, therefore, as merely a literary phenomenon. Christians were from the first accustomed to speak of their Lord as ‘Redeemer. ...
It is only an elaboration of the central idea of this declaration when Paul (Titus 2:14), stirred to the depths of his being by the remembrance of all that he owes to ‘our great God and Saviour, Jesus Christ,’ for ‘the epiphany of whose glory’ he is looking forward as his most ‘blessed hope,’ celebrates in burning words the great transaction to which he attributes it all: ‘who gave himself for us, that he might Redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a people for his own possession, zealous of good works. ‘Knowing,’ says he, ‘that ye were Redeemed … from your vain manner of life handed down from your fathers’ (1 Peter 1:18)
Calvinists - They maintain that though the death of Christ be a most perfect sacrifice, and satisfaction for sins, of infinite value, abundantly sufficient to expiate the sins of the whole world; and though on this ground the Gospel is to be preached to all mankind indiscriminately; yet it was the will of God that Christ, by the blood of the cross, should efficaciously Redeem all those, and those only, who were from eternity elected to salvation, and given to him by the Father. ...
For it was the most free counsel, and gracious will and intention of God the Father, that the quickening and saving efficacy of the most precious death of his Son should exert itself in all the elect, to give unto them only justifying faith, and by it to conduct them infallibly to salvation; that is, it was the will of God that Christ, by the blood of the cross, whereby he confirmed the new covenant, should efficaciously Redeem out of every people, tribe, nation, and language, all those, and those only, who were from eternity elected to salvation, and given to him by the Father. ...
He gave himself for us, that he might Redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works. ...
And they sang a new song, saying, Thou art worthy; for thou wast slain, and hast Redeemed us to God by thy blood, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation
Body - He was to be in all points like those he Redeemed, sin only excepted; and, therefore, a body he assumes for the accomplishment of this great end. )...
This, therefore, being determined on in the council of peace, that He who undertook to Redeem our nature, should partake of the same nature as those he Redeemed; the next enquiry is, What saith the Scripture concerning the Son of God resuming our nature, and how was it wrought?...
The Scriptures, with matchless grace and condescension, have shewn this, and in a way, considering the dulness of our faculties in apprehension, so plain and circumstantial, that under the blessed Spirit teaching, the humblest follower of the Lord, taught by the Holy Ghost, can clearly apprehend the wonderful subject. The Son of God as God, assuming this holy thing, so expressly called by the angel, underived from our fallen nature, and as to any shadow of imperfection, unconnected with it; becomes a suited Saviour for all the purposes of redemption, and being by this sacred and mysterious union, God and man in one person, formed one Christ: he, and he only, becomes the proper Redeemer and Mediator, the God-man Christ Jesus. ) And it is a matter of holy joy and rapture, never to be lost sight of by the humblest and poorest of his Redeemed people, that the hand of God the Father is in all these glorious concerns, "who gave his dear Son to be the Head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fulness of Him that filleth all in all
Exaltation - As the God-man, Jesus Christ entered the world to Redeem humankind from their sinful condition
Scythian - The Apostle, on the other hand, gloried in a religion which could Redeem and elevate the most degraded
Titus - The one grand remedy which Titus was to apply is (Titus 2:11-15) "the grace of God that bringeth salvation" in Christ, who "gave Himself for us, that He might Redeem us from all iniquity
Plagues of Egypt - " Thus did God bring His sore judgements upon Egypt, to let Pharaoh know that He was the mighty God, and to Redeem His chosen people with a high hand
Husbandry - It was another law of Moses, that the vender of a piece of land, or his nearest relative, had a right to Redeem the land sold, whenever they chose, by paying the amount of profits up to the year of jubilee, Ruth 4:4 ; Jeremiah 32:7
Propitiation - It is seen, therefore, that Christ’s death is here regarded as having a true power to expiate guilt, Redeem the sinner from condemnation, set him in righteous relations with God, and make him an object of God’s favour
Flesh - Christ came in the “likeness” of sinful flesh (John 1:14 ; Romans 8:3 ; Hebrews 4:15 ) to Redeem those who are in sinful flesh
Micah, Book of - God plans to Redeem and rule His weakened remnant (Micah 4:6-11 ). God has done His part, Redeeming His people (Micah 6:1-5 )
Ransom - The alternative words are פָּדָה and נָּאַל with the primary significance of ‘liberating,’ which lean towards the social or legal notion of redemption, illustrated possibly by the obligation to Redeem laid upon the goel or kinsman (cf
Supralapsarians - ...
The decree of the means includes the decree to create men to permit them to fall, to recover them out of it through redemption by Christ, to sanctify them by the grace of the Spirit, and completely save them; and which are not to be reckoned as materially many decrees, but as making one formed decree; or they are not to be considered as subordinate, but as co-ordinate means, and as making up one entire complete medium; for it is not to be supposed that God decreed to create man, that he might permit him to fall, in order to Redeem, sanctify, and save him; but he decreed all this that he might glorify his grace, mercy, and justice
Adoption - "...
Galatians 4:4-6 , "But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to Redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons; and because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father
Advent (2) - As the Son of God (Matthew 10:32, John 3:16-17), revealing and representing God in His own person (John 5:30; John 14:9-10), whose mission it was to Redeem men from sin (Matthew 18:11, Luke 4:43; Ezekiel 36:25-3027), Jesus was to prove Himself in the truest sense the Messiah whom the Jewish people had long been expecting,—‘a Saviour, who is Christ the Lord’ (Luke 2:11). The coming of Jesus brought the birth of a new spirit in religion, a spirit of fresh vitality and power; and the life of absolute devotion to righteousness which He began to live, and which He was ultimately to close in a death of sacrificing love, infused into religion an inspiring energy destined on a scale of vast magnitude to regenerate and Redeem
Slave - In the first case, a man who had mortgaged his property, and was unable to support his family, might sell himself to another Hebrew, with a view both to obtain maintenance and perchance a surplus sufficient to Redeem his property
Exodus - The record makes it clear that God delivered Israel from bondage because of His covenant with the patriarchs and because He desired to Redeem His people (Exodus 6:2-8 )
Service - ’ Both He who through suffering should Redeem the people, and the people themselves, idealized as they were in the vision of the seer, were to serve
Joel - (1) The Creator and Redeemer God of all the universe is in complete control of nature and can use calamities to bring His people to repentance. (4) The God of judgment also is a God of mercy who stands ready to Redeem and restore when His people come before Him in repentance
Salvation - See Atonement ; Conversion ; Election ; Eschatology ; Forgiveness ; Future Hope ; Grace ; Justification ; New Birth ; Predestination ; Reconciliation, Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer; Repentance ; Sanctification ; Security of the Believer
Malachi, Theology of - Christ came to fulfill the law of Moses, but he also came to establish the New Covenant by giving his life to Redeem humankind
Proselytes - The proselytes of the gate were not bound to circumcision, only to the seven precepts of Noah, namely, the six said to have been given to Adam:...
(1) against idolatry,...
(2) blasphemy,...
(3) bloodshed,...
(4) uncleanness,...
(5) theft,...
(6) the precept of obedience to authorities, and...
(7) that given to Noah against "flesh with the blood"; but he had not the full Israelite privileges, he must not study the law nor Redeem his firstborn
Isaiah, Book of - The character of the remnant: they are owned as 'my people' by the Lord God, and He will comfort and Redeem them. Indignation of the Spirit at the condition of Israel at the time the prophecy was uttered, but goes on to the end, when the Redeemer shall come to Zion
Galatians, Epistle to the - But now God had sent forth His Son, to Redeem those under law, that believers might receive sonship
Christianity - The paganism that reared altars to an unknown God proved impotent to Redeem human life from the dominion of evil (see Romans 1:21 ff. Paul sets Christ before us as the Divine Reconciler and Redeemer. And it is the witness of the whole NT that Christ accomplished His work of seeking and saving, of reconciling and Redeeming, by taking our sins upon Him, by suffering with men and for them, by dying at last on the cross the Just for the unjust, by rising from the dead and sitting down at God’s right hand to dispense those spiritual gifts and powers whereby we are enabled to overcome the world. It is not from the pains of sin merely that Jesus comes to Redeem us, but from sin itself
Hosea - God's love is deep enough to Redeem His people (Hosea 3:2 )
Time - Throughout history God has been carrying out his plan for Redeeming a fallen world. The incarnation supremely exemplifies this: "But when the time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under law, to Redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons" (Galatians 4:4-5 ; cf. God promises unending life with him to those who believe in Jesus' Redeeming work (John 3:16 ; 1 John 5:13 ) and unending separation from him to those who spurn it (Matthew 25:46 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:6-8 )
Unbelief - To those whose eyes had been opened to see the glory of God in Christ Jesus, it seemed the strangest of all experiences that those whom God had taken to be His peculiar people, and to whom He had granted so many privileges, should have turned away in unbelieving scorn from the Lord who had come to be their Redeemer. In all the Jewish history the purpose of God was to Redeem some within the Hebrew race to be the means of blessing, and even in the Christian era, as of old, there was a ‘remnant’ that believed and shared in the purposes of God
Athens - Full of aesthetes and dilettantes, loving the reputation more than the reality of culture, letting a restless inquisitiveness and shallow scepticism take the place of high aspiration and moral enthusiasm, she became blind to the visions, and deaf to the voices, which Redeem individual and collective life from vanity
Genesis - God thus establishes a plan to Redeem and bless the humanity that persists in sin. God is Creator and Redeemer
Covenant - Hebrews 2:13 , Redeem them by his blood, John 17:1-26 : Hebrews 10:1-39 : obey the law in their room, Romans 10:4
Simeon - " When Jesus' parents brought Him into the temple to Redeem Him as the firstborn with five shekels according to the law (Numbers 18:15), and to present Him to the Lord, Simeon took Him up in his arms, and blessing God said, "Lord, now Thou dost let Thy servant depart in peace (not a prayer, but a thanksgiving; again like Jacob, Genesis 46:30); for mine eyes (not another, Job 19:27) have seen (1 John 1:1) Thy (Isaiah 28:16; Luke 3:6) salvation: which Thou hast prepared before the face of all people (the universality of the gospel): a light to lighten the Gentiles (Isaiah 9:2), and (not only light, but also) the glory of Thy people Israel" (Isaiah 60:1-3)
Nathanael - Here the point may be that He is come, not to revive the old theocracy, nor to ‘restore the kingdom to Israel’ (Acts 1:6), but to Redeem the whole human race
Biblical Theology - Yet the curse of sin is ameliorated from the start by a God who seeks sinners to Redeem them (3:9). He chooses Abram through whom to Redeem a people, thereby blessing all the nations of the earth (12:3)
God - When human beings reject God's kindness, he resorts to methods that characterize sinful human naturenot to Redeem the methods, but to Redeem Israel and the world. God is Creator and Sustainer (Psalm 104 ), Redeemer and Savior (Psalm 25:22 ), Vindicator of the Innocent (Psalm 26 ), and Giver of mercy to the guilty (Psalm 51 )
Festivals - Just as the sacrifice of the day of atonement was burned outside the camp of Israel, Jesus suffered outside the gate of Jerusalem so that He might Redeem His people from sin (Hebrews 13:11-12 )
Revelation of God - Within time and space God has acted and spoken to Redeem the human race from its own self-imposed evil
Zebedee - They would lament many a friend and brother there, and during the years to come they would be making efforts to Redeem their relatives from slavery. His earlier years were spent in the midst of its fierce politics, He knew the various party watchwords; He knew what was meant by ‘wars and rumours of wars’; He had come into contact with soldiers from Tabor and Sepphoris, and early learned the terrors associated with the word ‘legion’; He had met returned slaves—redeemed, freed, or fugitive; He had wrought in the villages of this tribe, and we can even think of Joseph taking the young Jesus to work with him at Sepphoris during the busy days of its rebuilding—for there was not the same objection to entering it as the polluted Tiberias
Silence - The iniquity of the world He had come to Redeem swept over the pure spirit of Jesus with such overwhelming force that utterance was choked, and His human nature had to seek, in silence, communion with the Father in order to regain its equanimity
Jacob - One grand personage was in the mind of the patriarch, as it had been in the contemplation of his predecessors, even the illustrious Deliverer who should arise in after ages to Redeem his people, and bring salvation to the human race
Presentation - He would not slay him: He permitted him (and required him) to be Redeemed (Exodus 13:13-15). Instead of the firstborn, however, God took for the service of His sanctuary the tribe of Levi (Numbers 3:12; Numbers 8:14-18), requiring, at the time of this substitution, that as many firstborn as there were in Israel in excess of the number of the Levites must be Redeemed by the payment of five shekels for each one (Numbers 3:44-51). Afterwards (Numbers 18:15-16), every firstborn son must be presented and Redeemed by the payment of this amount. But He came not to claim exemptions but to share our burdens, carry our sorrows, take away our sins, and, more particularly, to Redeem them that are under the Law (Galatians 4:5). Moreover, by being thus Redeemed from the personal obligation of serving in the Temple, His love to it, which at His next visit to it He was to manifest (Luke 2:49 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), and His zeal for it which devoured Him (John 2:17), were brought into clearer light. ...
The act of presenting Him would be performed by Joseph (Exodus 13:15) as the putative father, at once the shield of Mary and the protector of her child (Luke 3:23); not by the Virgin, as Cornelius à Lapide assumes, although there is some beauty in his interpretation of the five shekels, which constituted the redemption money, as ‘symbolizing the Five Wounds at the price whereof Christ Redeemed the race of man’ (Com
Salvation Save Saviour - ‘Redemption’ is used in Luke 1:68; Luke 2:38 and ‘redeem’ in Luke 24:21 for the redemption to be accomplished by the Messiah, and ‘redemption’ is used in Luke 21:28 for that which is to accompany the coming of the Son of Man after our Lord’s earthly ministry ‘with power and great glory
Esdras, the Second Book of - Paul, and in opposition to the usual Rabbinical doctrine, our anther despairs of the efficacy of the Law to Redeem and save the sinner (2 Esdras 9:36; cf
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - I will Redeem them from the fear of death
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - to Coroticus Patrick says, "It is the custom of the Roman Gallic Christians to send holy men to the Franks and other nations with many thousand solidi, to Redeem baptized captives
Temple - Sabbath and temple Redeem time and space
Wealth - But although fallen humanity has used wealth for great evils, God will Redeem his originally good purposes in creation in the new heavens and earth when all wealth will be used for godly ends (21:24)
Antioch - The brilliant civilization and perfect art of the Greek failed to Redeem the turbulent, fickle, and dissolute character of the Syrian
Adoption - Paul, though addressing those who were not by any means all Jewish Christians, but many of whom, being Gentiles, had come directly into the Church, yet seems at first sight to speak as if Christ’s coming was only to give adoption to those whom, being under the Law, He Redeemed. The phrase ‘redeem …’ is thought to reflect the Roman idea that the adopter purchased a son from the father by nature; adoption was effected before a praetor and five witnesses, by a simulated sale
Evangelize, Evangelism - As in the military context, the basic message is one of complete victory: "Your God reigns!" God, with supreme sovereign power, has acted in covenant loyalty to Israelto restore, comfort, Redeem, save, and protect her (52:8-12)
Bible, Theology of - The Bible then proceeds to develop the theme of God's redemptive grace, tracing various stages of God's revelation of Himself: the call of Abraham; the establishment of the covenant with the Israelite community as His chosen people; the institution of the sacrificial system, teaching the people the proper way to approach God for forgiveness; the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus as the provision of forgiveness and regeneration for those dead in sin; the church as the new covenant community, the Redeemed people of God on mission for Him in the world; finally, the life to come, in heaven for the Redeemed, and in hell for the unregenerate. His coming was prophesied in the Old Testament as the coming of a Messiah, a Suffering Servant who would Redeem His people
Paul the Apostle - In this sense Paul was not the originator of Christianity but merely its faithful witness and divinely guided interpreter (1 Corinthians 7:40 )granted, with the advantage of hindsight available after "the time had fully come" when "God sent his Son to Redeem those under law, that we might receive the full rights of sons" (Galatians 4:4-5 )
Resurrection - Job's despairing vacillation over death and decay is answered by the radiant expectation of preservation: "For I know my Redeemer lives, and that at the last he will stand upon the earth; and after my skin has been thus destroyed, then in my flesh I shall see God" (Job 19:25-26 ; NRSV cf also Psalm 16:10 ; Isaiah 26:19 ). The wise follower of Yahweh is triumphant: "But God will Redeem my life from the grave, for he will surely take me to himself" (v
Abortion - Elsewhere, Christ is the quintessential divine image-bearer according to whose pattern Redeemed humanity is being recreated ( Colossians 1:15 ; 3:10 ; Hebrews 2:6-10 ; cf. 22Rom 5:14), Jesus fully embraced humanity to Redeem it
Jephthah And His Daughter - Take it all back again if Thou seest good; only let me Redeem Thy people Israel
David - in His Services - I declare to you that I would lie down with a good will tonight and wrap my head out of sight in my winding-sheet, if I saw my son standing ready to take up and repair and Redeem my lost life. And not to Israel only, but to the God of Israel, and to the Redeemer of Israel. '...
I have said that David did a great service to the Redeemer of Israel, and I intended to say it. And, having once begun to read and to think in that way you will go on till you come to the cross, where you will see and hear your dying Redeemer with one of David's Psalms on His lips when He can no longer hold it in His hands
Necessity - His original purpose to become incarnate, and to Redeem the world, was freely chosen (Philippians 2:7, 2 Corinthians 8:9 etc
Christ, Christology - Christos [2], from chrio [3], to anoint), whom God has anointed to Redeem his people and creation. In these declarations of messianic intention Jesus shows that he is conscious of being the stronger man who, with the Father and the Spirit, is despoiling satanic power and Redeeming prisoners from spiritual bondage
Universalism (2) - It is admitted on both sides of the controversy that the merits of Christ suffice to Redeem all men; and it is Election - -Election, in the teaching of the apostles, is the method by which God gives effect to His eternal purpose to Redeem and save mankind; so that the elect are those who are marked out in God’s purpose of grace from eternity as heirs of salvation
Descent Into Hades - ‘God will Redeem my soul from the power of Sheol’ was his hope (Psalms 49:15; cf. ...
(d) The Gospel of Nicodemus describes the passage to Paradise of the saints Redeemed from Hades by Christ
Righteous, Righteousness - Dcutero-Isaiah goes further still, and finds in the thought of God’s unfailing righteousness the pledge that He will comfort and Redeem His servants
Sin - "...
Exodus reveals that sin not only brings suffering and punishment, but also violates the law of the Lord, Israel's holy Redeemer and king. Sin continues to grip even the Redeemed (7:14-25). Because God chose to Redeem his people from it, sin has been the stimulus for God's demonstration of his amazing patience, grace, and love (Romans 5:6-8 ; Galatians 2:17-20 ; 1 Timothy 1:15-17 ). From a postresurrection perspective, sin indirectly gives opportunity to praise the creating and Redeeming Lord for his gracious deliverance (Romans 11:33-36 )
Fall (2) - The Mediator is necessary for the perfecting of the world no less than for its redemption, and has a cosmical significance wider and deeper than His work as Redeemer. ‘The Son of man came to seek and to save’ (Luke 19:10); ‘God sent forth his Son … that he might Redeem’ (Galatians 4:4 f. In this plan Incarnation holds a central place, and its redemptive significance is one aspect of a wider relation to the world, as the means for perfecting as well as for Redeeming the human race. ) the main points of detail in which the Fall and the Redeeming work of Christ explain and illustrate each other. The Scripture doctrine of sin as absolute evil; man’s universal sinfulness, helplessness, and state of spiritual death, which form the very basis of Redemption; the representation of mankind as ‘lost,’ ‘alienated’ from God, and yet capable and worthy of being Redeemed and restored;—all this, as so abundantly presented and emphasized in connexion with the atoning work of Christ, affords the strongest confirmation of the doctrine that man has fallen from a higher condition
Peter, First Epistle of - ...
( b ) To Redeem us from sin the eternal and spotless Messiah was slain, and by His resurrection has awakened us to true faith in God
Propitiation (2) - There it is ever as the Lamb that was slain—the antitype of the sacrificial victim—that He is spoken of, and that His blood is said to purify and Redeem (Revelation 5:6; Revelation 5:8; Revelation 5:12; Revelation 6:1 etc
Lust - Man himself is the moral origin, and the great question is how to Redeem sinful man
Atonement - His life was given to Redeem the lives of others. Mark 14:33 ff; Mark 15:34 , John 12:27 ); how strange to see them submitted to by the Prince of Life; how awful the horror of great darkness in which the Christ passed away! Can we explain it on the hypothesis of a simple martyrdom? Do we not need the solution which the other passages suggest of a sin-bearing Redeemer? Finally, there is the crowning attestation to His Messiahship, and seal upon His work, in the Resurrection, and the commission given to the disciples to preach remission of sins in His name to all nations a clear proof that through His death and resurrection a fundamental change had been wrought in the relations of God to humanity ( Matthew 28:18-20 , Luke 24:47 , John 20:21-23 ). Varied in standpoints and in modes of representation, the Apostolic writings are singularly consentient in their testimony to the central fact of the propitiatory and Redeeming efficacy of Christ’s death
Sexuality, Human - (6) The community of the Redeemed is charged with modeling in itself the fruits of redemption and with laboring to bring about the redemption of the world. ...
Accordingly, since narratives of Eden before the fall picture the unsullied created order as God ordained it, they become normative and prescriptive; hence the way that unfallen man interfaced with woman should provide a working model for male/female relationships in the community of the Redeemed. The eschaton and its values, therefore, reflect the end toward which the present Redeemed community labors. Commands, teachings, laws, and institutions that are designed to move one from a fallen to a postfallen (redeemed) state or community are redemptive and therefore prescriptive, although care must be taken to distinguish the spirit from the letter in their application ( Mark 9:47 ). Such distinctions are not a product of the fall to be Redeemed, therefore, but a part of the created order to be nurtured. Unless, however, one insists that equality means identity, whatever woman's Redeemed position may be will not be the same as that held by the man. Instead, the two roles function in a complementary manner, each contributing its unique gifts to the perfecting of a Redeemed society. If the reason for the creation of woman was to enable the man to become whole and a legitimate microcosm of the human species, then it follows that man/woman relations in a Redeemed society would be theologically humanizing. Any exploitive efforts by a member of the Redeemed community to reduce another to an object that can be manipulated is therefore wrong. Sensing here a life that could be Redeemed, he engaged her in dialogue. During the course of their conversation, he led her to see that he was the one who could Redeem her from the sins of her past
Annunciation, the - ...
There is perhaps more irreverence than wisdom in speculating whether God could have Redeemed mankind by one who was produced without human parent; or, again, by one who had a human father as well as a human mother. It may be pointed out that a new act of creation would have left no nexus between the Redeemer and those to be Redeemed. Just as the prophet (John the Baptist) who was to renovate Israel was taken from the old priesthood, so the Christ who was to Redeem the whole of mankind was not created out of nothing, but ‘born of a woman
Sinlessness - Had He been one of the sinful sons of Adam, He could have done nothing of the kind; for ‘none of them can Redeem his brother or offer to God a ransom for him’ (Psalms 49:7)
Augustine - That for these his chosen he decreed to send his Son to Redeem them, and his Spirit to call them and sanctify them; the rest he decreed to forsake, leaving them to Satan and themselves, and to punish them for their sins
Incarnation (2) - The Logos is too ethereal, too Divine, to take to itself any particle of the material world, or to Redeem any life which is bound up with matter. In His love for God there is no trace of the compunctions, the heart-breaking memories, which make the love of the Redeemed a thing compounded of tears and pain, as well as of adoration and gladness
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - There is but one God, Creator of the world and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, Who is the Son, the Eternal God-Logos, and has truly been made Flesh in order to Redeem mankind from its fall in Adam
Methodists, Protestant - "There is, Psalms 130:8 : 'He shall Redeem Israel from all his iniquities
Expiation - " "The man only that doeth these things shall live by them," was the rule; and it was, therefore, to Redeem the offenders from this penalty that sacrifices were appointed
Calvinism - God willed that Christ, through the blood of the cross, should, out of every people, tribe, nation, and language, efficaciously Redeem all those, and those only, who were from eternity chosen to salvation, and given to him by the Father; that he should confer on them the gift of faith," &c
Person of Christ - This totally ignores the difference in Jesus’ status which the uniform teaching of the NT considers to have been made by the Resurrection, while it also obscures the fact indicative of the vast Redeeming sacrifice of God that the life of Jesus, the Son Incarnate, was a life in the flesh, a distinctly human phenomenon which moved within the normal lines of a human mind and will. The title Messiah (‘Christ’), familiar to Jewish religion from Psalms 2:1-12 , denotes in general the anointed Head of the Kingdom of God, the new King of a Redeemed people; and Jesus, retaining the outline of the traditional idea, infused into it a new spiritual meaning, which, as applied to Himself, signified that He was not a new Teacher or Lawgiver or even the Founder of a new faith, but the Bearer and Finisher of divinely wrought salvation. It was in this mode through the felt need and reality of saving vicarious sorrow that the conception of Israel’s Messiah was so glorified as to pass into that of the Redeemer of the world. With apparently not a single interval of doubt, He knew Himself to be the chosen One of God, by whose presence the powers of evil were already vanquished, who should Redeem many by His death, who should rise from the dead and come hereafter with Divine power as the Judge of the world
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - He calls it "a small and desolate city," with but "few inhabitants, and those poor," whose ugliness he had striven to Redeem by costly buildings erected at his own expense ( Ep