What does Rahab mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ῥαὰβ a harlot of Jericho. 2
רַ֥הַב pride 2
רָחָ֖ב a harlot of Jericho who aided the spies to escape; saved from the destruction of Jericho; married Salmon 2
ῥαχάβ a harlot of Jericho. 1
רַ֖הַב storm 1
רָ֑הַב storm 1
רָחָ֨ב a harlot of Jericho who aided the spies to escape; saved from the destruction of Jericho; married Salmon 1
רָ֠חָב a harlot of Jericho who aided the spies to escape; saved from the destruction of Jericho; married Salmon 1
רָחָ֣ב a harlot of Jericho who aided the spies to escape; saved from the destruction of Jericho; married Salmon 1

Definitions Related to Rahab

H7293


   1 pride, blusterer.
      1a storm, arrogance (but only as names).
         1a1 mythical sea monster.
         1a2 emblematic name of Egypt.
         

H7343


   1 a harlot of Jericho who aided the spies to escape; saved from the destruction of Jericho; married Salmon, an ancestor of David and of Christ; commended for her faith in the book of James.
   Additional Information: Rahab = “wide”.
   

G4460


   1 a harlot of Jericho.
   Additional Information: Rahab = “wide”.
   

H7294


   1 storm, arrogance (but only as names).
      1a mythical sea monster.
      1b emblematic name of Egypt.
      Additional Information: Rahab = “breadth”.
      

G4477


   1 a harlot of Jericho.
   Additional Information: Rahab = “wide”.
   

Frequency of Rahab (original languages)

Frequency of Rahab (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Rahab
(raw' hawb) Name meaning, “arrogant, raging, turbulent, afflicter.” 1. Primeval sea monster representing the forces of chaos God overcame in creation (Job 9:13 ; Job 26:12 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 ; compare Psalm 74:12-17 ). 2 . Symbolic name for Egypt (Psalm 87:4 ). Isaiah 30:7 includes a compound name Rahab-hem-shebeth . Translations vary: “Rahab who sits still” (NRSV); “Rahab who has been exterminated” (NAS); “Rahab the Do-Nothing” (NIV); “Rahab the Subdued” (REB). 3. The plural appears in Psalm 40:4 for the proud, arrogant enemies.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Rahab
RAHAB (‘wide’). 1 . The story of this woman, called a harlot, of Jericho is given in Joshua 2:1-24 . The two spies sent out by Joshua to view the Promised Land come first to the house of Rahab, in Jericho. The king hears of it, and bids Rahab bring them forth; but she asserts that they have left her house and that she does not know where they have gone; she had, however, previously hid them among stalks of flax upon the roof. After their pursuers have left, Rahab comes to them, professes her belief in Jahweh, and adjures them to spare her and her kinsfolk when the attack on Jericho is made; this they promise shall be done; and after arranging that a scarlet thread is to be hung from her window, in order to denote which house is to be spared when the sack of the city takes place, the two spies escape from her house by a rope ( Joshua 2:1-24 ). The promise is duly kept, and Joshua spares her when the city is burned ( Joshua 6:22-25 ). In Matthew 1:5 Rahab is mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord.
2 . A name for the Dragon , applied also to Egypt. This name is not the same as that just considered, which is written Rachab in Hebrew, while this is written Rahab . It is the name given to a mythological monster who is frequently referred to in the Bible. In Isaiah 30:7 the old myth that Jahweh in the beginning subdued Rahab (= Tĕhôm , the ‘Great Deep,’ the Bab. [1] Tiamat ) is employed to show that Jahweh will in like manner subdue Egypt (cf. Psalms 87:4 ), and that it is therefore vain for Judah to trust to it. The words in RV [2] , ‘Rahab that sitteth still,’ imply that Rahab had been subjugated, but not annihilated, i.e. it was believed that Rahab was still living somewhere in the depths of the sea; the final destruction is referred to in Revelation 21:1 ‘And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth are passed away; and the sea is no more .’ The next reference to Rahab is in Isaiah 51:9-10 , a very important passage, which shows distinctly that Rahab, the Dragon, the sea or the ‘Great Deep’ ( Tĕhôm ), are all names for one and the same monster. The belief is also expressly stated that in ‘the days of old’ there was a conflict between Jahweh and Rahab, and that the latter was overcome. Further references to the Rahab-myth are to be found in Psalms 89:9-10 , Job 9:13 ; Job 26:10-11 ; it is important to note how in all these passages the myth is treated as well known, it is taken for granted that the reference is perfectly understood. [3]
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Rahab
Insolence; pride, a poetical name applied to Egypt in Psalm 87:4 ; 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 , as "the proud one." Rahab, (Heb. Rahab; i.e., "broad," "large"). When the Hebrews were encamped at Shittim, in the "Arabah" or Jordan valley opposite Jericho, ready to cross the river, Joshua, as a final preparation, sent out two spies to "spy the land." After five days they returned, having swum across the river, which at this season, the month Abib, overflowed its banks from the melting of the snow on Lebanon. The spies reported how it had fared with them (Joshua 2:1-7 ). They had been exposed to danger in Jericho, and had been saved by the fidelity of Rahab the harlot, to whose house they had gone for protection. When the city of Jericho fell (6:17-25), Rahab and her whole family were preserved according to the promise of the spies, and were incorporated among the Jewish people. She afterwards became the wife of Salmon, a prince of the tribe of Judah (Ruth 4:21 ; 1 Chronicles 2:11 ; Matthew 1:5 ). "Rahab's being asked to bring out the spies to the soldiers (Joshua 2:3 ) sent for them, is in strict keeping with Eastern manners, which would not permit any man to enter a woman's house without her permission. The fact of her covering the spies with bundles of flax which lay on her house-roof (2:6) is an 'undesigned coincidence' which strictly corroborates the narrative. It was the time of the barley harvest, and flax and barley are ripe at the same time in the Jordan valley, so that the bundles of flax stalks might have been expected to be drying just then" (Geikie's Hours, etc., ii., 390).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rahab, Rachab
The harlot who secreted the spies that Joshua sent into the land. She had heard of the wonders of God in delivering Israel out of Egypt, and she was aware of the fear that had fallen on the inhabitants. In faith she risked her life in hiding the spies. Her stratagem was successful, and she made an agreement with the spies, that if she did not betray them, her life and the life of her family should be saved when the city was taken. This was only to be binding on them if she brought all into her house, under the token of the scarlet line, hung out at the window from which the spies were let down, the house being built upon the wall. Joshua was careful that the compact should be respected, and she and her relatives were saved. Joshua 2:1-22 ; Joshua 6:17-25 .
Rahab was a traitor to her country, and lied to the king; but it was to throw herself under the protection of the God of Israel. Her falsehood is not commended; her faith is, Hebrews 11:31 ; and her works justified her (before men). James 2:25 . That the RACHAB of Matthew 1:5 is the same as Rahab is evidenced by the article; it was the Rachab mentioned in the O.T. (the Greek language having no letter H, a CH [1] is substituted). That such women as Rahab and Thamar should be mentioned in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus shows the divine origin of the list, for man would probably have omitted these names. Their insertion exalts the grace that superabounds over all sin.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Rahab
The name Rahab appears in English versions of the Bible as belonging to a woman who features in the book of Joshua, and to a mythical sea monster that features in the poetical books. But in the Hebrew Bible the two do not share the same name. There is a difference in spelling.
A woman in Jericho
Before Joshua opened his attack on Canaan, he sent two men to spy out the first city they would meet, Jericho. In Jericho the men met Rahab, a prostitute whose house was attached to the city wall. Rahab had heard sufficient of Israel’s God to fear his power, but she believed in his mercy to save her. She protected the spies from the local authorities, and in return asked protection for herself and her family when the Israelites attacked Jericho (Joshua 2:1-14; Hebrews 11:31).
Rahab further demonstrated her faith by being obedient to the instructions that the spies gave her. She protected the spies as requested, and did as they had told her in preparation for Israel’s attack. As a result the Israelites preserved her and her family when Jericho fell, and accepted them into Israel as part of the nation (Joshua 2:15-24; Joshua 6:17; Joshua 6:22-25; James 2:25). If this Rahab is the person of that name who married Salmon, she was mother of Boaz and an ancestor of Jesus the Messiah (Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:5-6).
A mythical sea monster
Rahab the mythical sea monster was considered by people of the Middle East to symbolize the forces of chaos over which God had victory in creating an orderly world (Job 9:13; Job 26:12; Job 38:8-11). Poets at times wrote about God’s overthrow of Egypt in the Red Sea as if it were the overthrow of the sea monster Rahab (Psalms 89:9-10; Isaiah 51:9-10). From this there developed the poetical usage of ‘Rahab’ as another name for Egypt (Psalms 87:4; Isaiah 30:7).
Chabad Knowledge Base - Rahab
Operated an inn located in the walls of the city of Jericho. When Joshua sent two spies to survey Jericho in anticipation of the Israelites’ impending invasion of Canaan, they stayed at her inn. When the Canaanites got wind of the spies whereabouts, she hid them on her rooftop and sent the Canaanites on a wild goose chase. In return, the Israelites spared her and her family. According to the Midrash, she later converted to Judaism and married Joshua.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rahab (2)
("insolence".) A poetical name for Egypt (Isaiah 51:9). In Isaiah 30:7 De Dieu translated "I called her Arrogance (Rahab) that sitteth still." She who boasted of the help she would give, when put to the test, sat still (Isaiah 36:6). Psalms 87:4-5; Psalms 89:10, "Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces, as one that is slain." Egypt is put foremost, as first of the great world powers that opposed God. She was reduced to corpse-like helplessness By God's stroke at the Red Sea, and at the slaying of the firstborn previously. (compare Psalms 74:13-14). Rahab occurs in the Hebrew, Job 9:13; Job 26:12.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Rahab (1)
Joshua 2; Joshua 6. The harlot of Jericho who received Joshua's spies. She had a house of her own, separate from her father, mother, brothers, and sisters; perhaps a lodging convenient for travelers, being situated on the wall. The flax she spread on her roof and the scarlet line make it likely she manufactured linen and dyed, as did the Phoenicians; compare Joshua 7:21 the "Babylonian garment," implying a trade in such articles with Mesopotamia. Jericho, near the fords of Jordan, would be an emporium between Phoenicia and Babylon and Egypt. Hence, Rahab knew the facts of the Exodus, the miraculous passage of the Red Sea, and the overthrow of Sihon and Og. God made the truth bring the conviction to her mind that Israel would conquer Canaan, and that "Jehovah Israel's God is God in heaven above and in earth beneath." Faith induced her, at the risk of her life, to shelter the spies under the stalks of flax spread on the flat roof. Her deceiving the king of Jericho and saying they had "gone she knew not where" is not commended in Scripture, but only the faith which was the mainspring of her conduct.
Scripture forbids a lie, or any "evil doing, that good may come" (Romans 3:7-8). (See JAEL.) Next, she told them of the panic which Israel's advance caused among her countrymen, and obtained from them the promise that when Israel took Jericho she and her father, mother, brethren, and sisters, and all of the household, should be saved; the scarlet line by which they were let down from her window in the wall was the pledge, placed in the window. By her counsel they hid three days in the mountains (Quarantana , abounding in caves, a wall of rock rising 1,200 ft. precipitously) bounding the Jericho plain on the N.; and when the pursuers had returned, and the Jordan fords were clear, they escaped back to Israel's camp. Their tidings must have much encouraged the army. Joshua faithfully kept the promise to her at the destruction of Jericho, causing the two spies to bring out Rahab and all her kindred from her house, which was under the protection of the scarlet line. Salmon, then a youth, who married her, was probably one of the two whom she had saved, gratitude leading on to love and erasing the remembrance of her former life of shame.
Her faith was richly rewarded, she becoming mother of Boaz (Ruth 4:21), an ancestress of Messiah; one of the four women, all foreigners, Thamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba, named in Matthew's genealogy (Matthew 1:5). In it "none of the holy women are included, only those whom the Scriptures blame, in order that He who came in behalf of sinners, being Himself born of sinners, might destroy the sins of all" (Jerome). Possibly the 345 "children of Jericho" were posterity of her kindred, settled in Israel (Ezra 2:34; Nehemiah 3:2). Harlotry was not counted "sin" among the pagan, though not respectable; but when she adopted a pure faith she began a pure life. Believing knowledge of God's purpose concerning Israel and Jericho made her renounce the lower duty, patriotism, for the higher one, piety; she could only have been faithful to her country by unfaithfulness to her God. She renounced the pollution of her country's gods, with which her own harlotry may have been connected, to join Jehovah and His people.
Her provision for her parents' and relatives' safety shows that self was not her sole consideration. Her hospitality to the spies was for their Lord's sake (Matthew 10:40-42). Hebrews 11:31; "by faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that disobeyed not (apeitheesasin , God's will manifested by miracles in Israel's behalf) when she had received the spies in peace," i.e. securing them from hurt. The season, as otherwise comes out, was four days before Passover, "on the tenth day of the first month," barley harvest time, when Jordan periodically overflowed its banks. The flax harvest was simultaneous with barley harvest, it appears from Exodus 9:31. In undesigned coincidence with these casual notices, Rahab "hid the spies with the stalks of flax," doubtless just cut down and spread on the roof of her house (Joshua 2:6; Joshua 3:15; Joshua 4:19; Joshua 5:10-11). Paul quotes Rahab as exemplifying "faith"; James (Romans 10:9-10) quotes Rahab as exemplifying justification by works evidentially.
Therefore Paul's justification by faith alone means a faith, not dead, but working by love (Galatians 5:6). Again, Rahab's act cannot prove justification by works as such, for she was a woman of bad character. But as an example of grace, justifying through an operative as opposed to mere verbal faith, none could be more suitable than the saved "harlot." She believed, so as to act on her belief, what her countrymen disbelieved; and this in the face of every improbability that an unwarlike force would conquer a well armed one, far more numerous. She believed with the heart (James 2:25), confessed with the mouth, and acted on her profession at the risk of her life. A woman of loose life, and a Gentile, is justified even as Abraham, the father of the Jews, the friend of God, was; showing that justifying, working faith manifests itself in every class.
The nature of the works alleged, not works of charity and virtue, but works the value of which consists in their being proofs of faith, proves that James quotes them as evidences of faith, faith expressed in act. We are "justified by works" in the sense that we are justified by a faith which always works where it has the opportunity. The scarlet line typifies Jesus' blood, that secures from wrath the Gentiles and even harlots and notorious sinners (Matthew 21:31-32), within His church, even as the sprinkled blood of the paschal lamb secured Israel in their houses, and typified the same all-atoning blood. Rahab is an instance of the call of Gentiles anticipatory of that under the gospel.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Rahab
RAHAB.—The mother of Boaz, and thus an ancestress of our Lord (Matthew 1:5).
‘These names [1] are probably introduced as those of women in whose case circumstances were overruled by the Divine providence which, as it might have seemed, should have excluded them from a place in the ancestral line of the Messiah. They were in a sense forerunners of the Virgin Mary’ (W. C. Allen, Com. ad loc.).
The ‘faith’ of Rahab is extolled in Hebrews 11:31, and her ‘works’ in James 2:25.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Rahab
The memorable woman of the city of Jericho, of whose faith the Holy Ghost hath given such honourable testimony, Hebrews 11:31. Her name is derived from Raah, and signifies proud. And if there be aught upon earth to make sinful dust and ashes proud, surely the faith this woman possessed formed the strongest temptation to it; when we consider who she was, what she was; where she lived, and how she acted in the cause of the Lord. Her history is as great and striking, in the illustrious actings of her faith, as any in the records of truth.
She was one of the inhabitants of Canaan, a Gentile, an alien, and by nature an enemy to the commonwealth of Israel, "without hope, and without God in the world." Moreover, she was, as we say, a publican, and an harlot, not only kept an inn, exposed to numberless temptations, but a woman of notoriously known for such a character. She lived also in the accursed city of Jericho, a city devoted to destruction before the Lord, and of peculiar malignity of evil in the Lord's sight. And yet with all those disadvantages, this Rahab, this harlot, was a believer in the Lord God of Israel! Oh, the wonders of distinguishing grace! And what tends yet more to raise our views of the Lord's peculiar manifestation and love to this poor harlot, is the consideration that from the stock of this woman, after the flesh, the Lord appointed the future advent of his dear Son. By her marriage to Salmon; from whom sprang Boaz; and by the marriage of Boaz with Ruth, sprang Obed; and from Obed, Jesse; and from Jesse, David; and from David, after twice fourteen generations after the flesh, sprang Christ. (See Matthew 1:1-17) What subjects of wonder the glorious redemption by the Lord Jesus Christ involves in it! Here, as in a thousand instances beside, we learn that the Lord's ways are not our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts! I pray the reader to give a diligent attention to her history, Joshua 2:1-24 throughout.
We meet with the mention of another Rahab, Psalms 87:4. And in Psalms 89:10, Rahab is said to be broken in pieces: by which is meant most probably, Pharaoh and his host. We find, and not unfrequently, names figuratively used to denote the Lord's enemies. Thus the Psalmist elsewhere saith, "Thou brakest the heads of Leviathan in pieces, and gavest him to be meat to the people inhabiting the wilderness." (Psalms 74:13-14) Here is an evident allusion to the destruction of Pharaoh; and his host in the Red Sea; and afterwords causing the people, when at any time in their wilderness-state, to meet with difficulties, that the recollection of this mighty deliverance might become food to their faith, to help them through any present trouble.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Rahab
Proud; quarrelsome (applied to Egypt)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Rahab
was a hostess of the city of Jericho, who received and concealed the spies sent by Joshua. The Hebrew calls her Zona, Joshua 2:1 , which Jerom and many others understand of a prostitute. Others think she was only a hostess or innkeeper, and that this is the true signification of the original word. Had she been a woman of ill fame, would Salmon, a prince of the tribe of Judah, have taken her to wife! Or could he have done it by the law? Beside, the spies of Joshua would hardly have gone to lodge with a common harlot, they who were charged with so nice and dangerous a commission. Those who maintain that she was a harlot, pretend that she was perhaps one of those women who prostituted themselves in honour of the Pagan deities; as if this could extenuate her crime, or the scandal of her profession if she was a public woman. It is also observable that such women are called kadeshah, not zona, in the Hebrew. Rahab married Salmon, a prince of Judah, by whom she had Boaz, from whom descended Obed, Jesse, and David. Thus Jesus Christ condescended to reckon this Canaanitish woman among his ancestors. St. Paul magnifies the faith of Rahab, Hebrews 11:31 . Rahab is also a name of Egypt, Isaiah 30:7 ; Isaiah 51:9 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rahab
A poetical name, signifying 'insolence,' given to Egypt. Psalm 87:4 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 . The same word occurs in Isaiah 30:7 , where the R.V. reads "therefore have I called her Rahab that sitteth still."
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Rahab
Rahab (râ'hăb), large. 1. A woman of Jericho, who received and concealed two Hebrew spies. In the siege of the city Rahab and her family were spared by the Hebrews from the general massacre of the inhabitants. Joshua 2:1-24; Joshua 6:17-27. She is called "a harlot;" but the proof of her reformation is found in the eminence of her faith. Hebrews 11:31; James 2:25. She subsequently married Salmon, a prince of Judah, and became an ancestress of David, and appears in the genealogy of Christ. Ruth 4:20; Matthew 1:5. 2. Rahab, pride. An appellation for Egypt, designating the insolence and violence of its princes and inhabitants. Psalms 87:4; Psalms 89:10; Isaiah 51:9.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Rahab
(raw' hawb) Name meaning, “arrogant, raging, turbulent, afflicter.” 1. Primeval sea monster representing the forces of chaos God overcame in creation (Job 9:13 ; Job 26:12 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 ; compare Psalm 74:12-17 ). 2 . Symbolic name for Egypt (Psalm 87:4 ). Isaiah 30:7 includes a compound name Rahab-hem-shebeth . Translations vary: “Rahab who sits still” (NRSV); “Rahab who has been exterminated” (NAS); “Rahab the Do-Nothing” (NIV); “Rahab the Subdued” (REB). 3. The plural appears in Psalm 40:4 for the proud, arrogant enemies.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Rahab
Proud; quarrelsome (applied to Egypt)
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rahab
The English word Rahab represents two different Hebrew words:
1. Joshua 2:1-21 6:17-25 . Her faith, in doing this, is commended in Hebrews 11:31 James 2:25 . The Jews and many Christians endeavor to show that Rahab was only an honest innkeeper; but more probably the designation of "harlot" given to her in our Bible is correct. If she had at some time led a dissolute life, she had evidently repented; and she afterwards became a worshipper of Jehovah, and the wife of Salmon, a prince of the tribe of Judah, Ruth 4:21 Matthew 1:4 .
The penitent publican and sinner are always welcome to Christ; and many such a one, through the renovating power of grace, will shine gloriously in heaven, while the unbelieving moralist will perish in his sins.
2. Psalm 87:4 89:10 Isaiah 30:7 51:9 . In the last of these passages, Egypt is further symbolized as a ferocious sea-monster; but it is doubtful whether the word Rahab itself is ever used to denote a sea-monster.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Rahab
RAHAB.—The mother of Boaz, and thus an ancestress of our Lord (Matthew 1:5).
‘These names [1] are probably introduced as those of women in whose case circumstances were overruled by the Divine providence which, as it might have seemed, should have excluded them from a place in the ancestral line of the Messiah. They were in a sense forerunners of the Virgin Mary’ (W. C. Allen, Com. ad loc.).
The ‘faith’ of Rahab is extolled in Hebrews 11:31, and her ‘works’ in James 2:25.

Sentence search

Rahab - Isaiah 30:7 includes a compound name Rahab-hem-shebeth . Translations vary: “Rahab who sits still” (NRSV); “Rahab who has been exterminated” (NAS); “Rahab the Do-Nothing” (NIV); “Rahab the Subdued” (REB)
Rahab - Isaiah 30:7 includes a compound name Rahab-hem-shebeth . Translations vary: “Rahab who sits still” (NRSV); “Rahab who has been exterminated” (NAS); “Rahab the Do-Nothing” (NIV); “Rahab the Subdued” (REB)
Rahab - Rahab (‘wide’). The two spies sent out by Joshua to view the Promised Land come first to the house of Rahab, in Jericho. The king hears of it, and bids Rahab bring them forth; but she asserts that they have left her house and that she does not know where they have gone; she had, however, previously hid them among stalks of flax upon the roof. After their pursuers have left, Rahab comes to them, professes her belief in Jahweh, and adjures them to spare her and her kinsfolk when the attack on Jericho is made; this they promise shall be done; and after arranging that a scarlet thread is to be hung from her window, in order to denote which house is to be spared when the sack of the city takes place, the two spies escape from her house by a rope ( Joshua 2:1-24 ). In Matthew 1:5 Rahab is mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord. This name is not the same as that just considered, which is written Rachab in Hebrew, while this is written Rahab . In Isaiah 30:7 the old myth that Jahweh in the beginning subdued Rahab (= Tĕhôm , the ‘Great Deep,’ the Bab. ]'>[2] , ‘Rahab that sitteth still,’ imply that Rahab had been subjugated, but not annihilated, i. it was believed that Rahab was still living somewhere in the depths of the sea; the final destruction is referred to in Revelation 21:1 ‘And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth are passed away; and the sea is no more . ’ The next reference to Rahab is in Isaiah 51:9-10 , a very important passage, which shows distinctly that Rahab, the Dragon, the sea or the ‘Great Deep’ ( Tĕhôm ), are all names for one and the same monster. The belief is also expressly stated that in ‘the days of old’ there was a conflict between Jahweh and Rahab, and that the latter was overcome. Further references to the Rahab-myth are to be found in Psalms 89:9-10 , Job 9:13 ; Job 26:10-11 ; it is important to note how in all these passages the myth is treated as well known, it is taken for granted that the reference is perfectly understood
Rachab - See Rahab
Rachab - Same as Rahab
ra'Chab - Rahab the harlot
Rahab - RAHAB. ...
‘These names [1] are probably introduced as those of women in whose case circumstances were overruled by the Divine providence which, as it might have seemed, should have excluded them from a place in the ancestral line of the Messiah. ...
The ‘faith’ of Rahab is extolled in Hebrews 11:31, and her ‘works’ in James 2:25
Rahab - RAHAB. ...
‘These names [1] are probably introduced as those of women in whose case circumstances were overruled by the Divine providence which, as it might have seemed, should have excluded them from a place in the ancestral line of the Messiah. ...
The ‘faith’ of Rahab is extolled in Hebrews 11:31, and her ‘works’ in James 2:25
Sea-Monster - See Dragon, Leviathan, Rahab, Sea
Rahab - The name Rahab appears in English versions of the Bible as belonging to a woman who features in the book of Joshua, and to a mythical sea monster that features in the poetical books. In Jericho the men met Rahab, a prostitute whose house was attached to the city wall. Rahab had heard sufficient of Israel’s God to fear his power, but she believed in his mercy to save her. ...
Rahab further demonstrated her faith by being obedient to the instructions that the spies gave her. If this Rahab is the person of that name who married Salmon, she was mother of Boaz and an ancestor of Jesus the Messiah (Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:5-6). ...
A mythical sea monster...
Rahab the mythical sea monster was considered by people of the Middle East to symbolize the forces of chaos over which God had victory in creating an orderly world (Job 9:13; Job 26:12; Job 38:8-11). Poets at times wrote about God’s overthrow of Egypt in the Red Sea as if it were the overthrow of the sea monster Rahab (Psalms 89:9-10; Isaiah 51:9-10). From this there developed the poetical usage of ‘Rahab’ as another name for Egypt (Psalms 87:4; Isaiah 30:7)
Rachab - (ray' kab) KJV variant form of Rahab (Matthew 1:5 )
Tamar - Rahab
Rachab - Rahab, a name found in the genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:5 )
Rahab (2) - In Isaiah 30:7 De Dieu translated "I called her Arrogance (Rahab) that sitteth still. Psalms 87:4-5; Psalms 89:10, "Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces, as one that is slain. Rahab occurs in the Hebrew, Job 9:13; Job 26:12
Rahab - Rahab (râ'hăb), large. In the siege of the city Rahab and her family were spared by the Hebrews from the general massacre of the inhabitants. Rahab, pride
ra'Hab, - Her reception of the spies, the artifice by which she concealed them from the king: their escape, and the saving of Rahab and her family at the capture of the city in accordance with their promise, are fold in the narrative of (Joshua 2:1 ) . As regards Rahab herself, she probably repented, and we learn from (Matthew 1:5 ) that she became the wife of Salmon the son of Naasson, and the mother of Boaz, Jesse's grandfather. The author of the Epistle to the Hebrews tells us that "by faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that believed not, when she had received the spies with peace," (Hebrews 11:31 ) and St. James fortifies his doctrine of justification by works by asking, "Was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?" (James 2:25 )
ra'Hab, - Her reception of the spies, the artifice by which she concealed them from the king: their escape, and the saving of Rahab and her family at the capture of the city in accordance with their promise, are fold in the narrative of (Joshua 2:1 ) . As regards Rahab herself, she probably repented, and we learn from (Matthew 1:5 ) that she became the wife of Salmon the son of Naasson, and the mother of Boaz, Jesse's grandfather. The author of the Epistle to the Hebrews tells us that "by faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that believed not, when she had received the spies with peace," (Hebrews 11:31 ) and St. James fortifies his doctrine of justification by works by asking, "Was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?" (James 2:25 )
Salmon - Or SALMAH 1 Chronicles 2:11 , a chief man of the tribe of Judah, husband of Rahab, and father of Boaz, Ruth 4:20 Matthew 1:4,5 Luke 3:32
Rahab - The English word Rahab represents two different Hebrew words: ...
1. The Jews and many Christians endeavor to show that Rahab was only an honest innkeeper; but more probably the designation of "harlot" given to her in our Bible is correct. In the last of these passages, Egypt is further symbolized as a ferocious sea-monster; but it is doubtful whether the word Rahab itself is ever used to denote a sea-monster
Chuldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Huldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Rahab - reads "therefore have I called her Rahab that sitteth still
Innkeeper - A targum (early Aramaic Free translation) on Joshua 2:1 identifies Rahab as an innkeeper
Salmon - son of Nahshon: he married Rahab, by whom he had Boaz, 1 Chronicles 2:11 ; 1 Chronicles 2:51 ; 1 Chronicles 2:54 ; Ruth 4:20-21 ; Matthew 1:4
Rahab - " Rahab, (Heb. Rahab; i. They had been exposed to danger in Jericho, and had been saved by the fidelity of Rahab the harlot, to whose house they had gone for protection. When the city of Jericho fell (6:17-25), Rahab and her whole family were preserved according to the promise of the spies, and were incorporated among the Jewish people. "Rahab's being asked to bring out the spies to the soldiers (Joshua 2:3 ) sent for them, is in strict keeping with Eastern manners, which would not permit any man to enter a woman's house without her permission
Rahab - Rahab married Salmon, a prince of Judah, by whom she had Boaz, from whom descended Obed, Jesse, and David. Paul magnifies the faith of Rahab, Hebrews 11:31 . Rahab is also a name of Egypt, Isaiah 30:7 ; Isaiah 51:9
Chaos - In ancient Semitic legends, a terrible chaos-monster was called Rahab (the proud one), or Leviathan (the twisting dragon-creature), or Yam (the roaring sea). He quieted the sea, shattering Rahab, making the heavens fair, and piercing the fleeing serpent (Job 26:12-13 ). ...
A second use of the chaos-monster figure involved God's victories at the time of the Exodus, using the term Rahab as a nickname for Egypt. He calmed the swelling sea and smashed Rahab like a carcass (Psalm 89:9-10 ). By slaying the monster Rahab, God allowed the people to pass through the barrier-sea (Isaiah 51:9-10 ). Mockingly, Isaiah called Egypt a helpless, vain Rahab whom God exterminated (Isaiah 30:7 ). The psalmist anticipated the day when Rahab and Babylon would be forced to recognize God's rule (Psalm 87:4 )
Rahab, Rachab - ...
Rahab was a traitor to her country, and lied to the king; but it was to throw herself under the protection of the God of Israel. That the RACHAB of Matthew 1:5 is the same as Rahab is evidenced by the article; it was the Rachab mentioned in the O. That such women as Rahab and Thamar should be mentioned in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus shows the divine origin of the list, for man would probably have omitted these names
Booz - or BOAZ, the son of Salmon and Rahab, Ruth 4:21 , &c; Matthew 1:5 . Rahab, we know, was a Canaanite of Jericho, Joshua 2:1
Nah'Shon, - His sister, Elisheba, was wife to Aaron, and his son, Salmon, was husband to Rahab after the taking of Jericho
Harlot - That this class of persons existed in the earliest states of society is clear from (Genesis 38:15 ) Rahab, (Joshua 2:1 ) is said by the Chald
Harlot - 1: πόρνη (Strong's #4204 — Noun Feminine — porne — por'-nay ) "a prostitute, harlot" (from pernemi, "to sell"), is used (a) literally, in Matthew 21:31,32 , of those who were the objects of the mercy shown by Christ; in Luke 15:30 , of the life of the Prodigal; in 1 Corinthians 6:15,16 , in a warning to the Corinthian church against the prevailing licentiousness which had made Corinth a byword; in Hebrews 11:31 ; James 2:25 , of Rahab; (b) metaphorically, of mystic Babylon, Revelation 17:1,5 (AV, "harlots"),15,16; 19:2, RV, for AV, "whore
Rahab (1) - Hence, Rahab knew the facts of the Exodus, the miraculous passage of the Red Sea, and the overthrow of Sihon and Og. Joshua faithfully kept the promise to her at the destruction of Jericho, causing the two spies to bring out Rahab and all her kindred from her house, which was under the protection of the scarlet line. ...
Her faith was richly rewarded, she becoming mother of Boaz (Ruth 4:21), an ancestress of Messiah; one of the four women, all foreigners, Thamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba, named in Matthew's genealogy (Matthew 1:5). Hebrews 11:31; "by faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that disobeyed not (apeitheesasin , God's will manifested by miracles in Israel's behalf) when she had received the spies in peace," i. In undesigned coincidence with these casual notices, Rahab "hid the spies with the stalks of flax," doubtless just cut down and spread on the roof of her house (Joshua 2:6; Joshua 3:15; Joshua 4:19; Joshua 5:10-11). Paul quotes Rahab as exemplifying "faith"; James (James 2:25) quotes Rahab as exemplifying justification by works evidentially. Again, Rahab's act cannot prove justification by works as such, for she was a woman of bad character. Rahab is an instance of the call of Gentiles anticipatory of that under the gospel
Boaz - If the Rahab whom the Israelites saved at the time of Jericho’s destruction is the same Rahab whose name appears in the genealogy of Jesus, then Boaz was descended from her (Joshua 6:17; Ruth 4:18-22; Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:5)
Harlot - The most famous harlot in the Bible is Rahab of Jericho, who saved the Israelite spies sent by Joshua to scout out the Promised Land (Joshua 2:1 ). ...
The Bible gives few details of the ways in which harlots like Rahab practiced their trade. Rahab's house may have been one (Joshua 2:1 )
Nahshon - Salmon his son married Rahab after the fall of Jericho
Boaz - The son of Salmon and Rahab, and the father of Obed, by Ruth; of whom, by descent, after the flesh, sprung Christ. Rahab was an harlot of the city of Jericho, cursed by Joshua, (Joshua 6:26) though famous for her faith in the Lord God of Israel; and Ruth a poor outcast of Moab
Rahab - And yet with all those disadvantages, this Rahab, this harlot, was a believer in the Lord God of Israel! Oh, the wonders of distinguishing grace! And what tends yet more to raise our views of the Lord's peculiar manifestation and love to this poor harlot, is the consideration that from the stock of this woman, after the flesh, the Lord appointed the future advent of his dear Son. ...
We meet with the mention of another Rahab, Psalms 87:4. And in Psalms 89:10, Rahab is said to be broken in pieces: by which is meant most probably, Pharaoh and his host
Harlot - " (Jeremiah 3:1) It hath supposed by some, that in the case of Rahab the harlot, it was not intended to imply the character of a woman of fame. Strange, indeed, to our view, are all the ways and works of God! But it is not more marvellous that Christ, after the flesh, should spring from Rahab, than from Thamar by Judah
Line - Line is used in the sense of a cord in story of Rahab and the spies (Joshua 2:18 ,Joshua 2:18,2:21 )
Spies - Two were also sent by Joshua, who were hidden by Rahab
Messenger - 1: ἄγγελος (Strong's #32 — Noun Masculine — angelos — ang'-el-os ) "a messenger, an angel, one sent," is translated "messenger," of John the Baptist, Matthew 11:10 ; Mark 1:2 ; Luke 7:27 ; in the plural, of John's "messengers," Luke 7:24 ; of those whom Christ sent before Him when on His journey to Jerusalem, Luke 9:52 ; of Paul's "thorn in the flesh," "a messenger of Satan," 2 Corinthians 12:7 ; of the spies as received by Rahab, James 2:25
Jesse - He was also a descendant of Rahab the Canaanite, of Jericho
Salma - Salma took Rahab of Jericho to be his wife
Dragon - " For, to what could a king of Egypt be more properly compared than the crocodile? The same argument he draws from Isaiah 51:9 : "Art thou not he that hath cut Rahab, [1] and wounded the dragon?" Among the ancients the crocodile was the symbol of Egypt, and appears so on Roman coins
Jesse - Obed's son, father of David; sprung from the Moabitess Ruth and the Canaanite Rahab of Jericho; and from Nahshon, at the Exodus chief of Judah, and so from the great house of Pharez, through Hezron
Ruth - The story of "the gleaner Ruth illustrates the friendly relations between the good Boaz and his reapers, the Jewish land system, the method of transferring property from one person to another, the working of the Mosaic law for the relief of distressed and ruined families; but, above all, handing down the unselfishness, the brave love, the unshaken trustfulness of her who, though not of the chosen race, was, like the Canaanitess Tamar (Genesis 38:29 ; Matthew 1:3 ) and the Canaanitess Rahab (Matthew 1:5 ), privileged to become the ancestress of David, and so of 'great David's greater Son'" (Ruth 4:18-22 )
Behemoth - This may be correct, but the oracle which follows says nothing about the ‘beasts of the south’; either the text is corrupt or the title may have been prefixed because Rahab, another name for the chaos-monster, occurs in v
Jes'se - His great-grandmother was Rahab the Canaanite, of Jericho
Josue, Book of - The precise knowledge of lesser details, the ancient names of Chanaanite towns, the treating of Rahab as a living contemporary, and the mention of memorial stones as still in the Jordan (4:9), justify this view, which both the Jews and the Fathers upheld
Joshua, Book of - The precise knowledge of lesser details, the ancient names of Chanaanite towns, the treating of Rahab as a living contemporary, and the mention of memorial stones as still in the Jordan (4:9), justify this view, which both the Jews and the Fathers upheld
Tamar - " (Isaiah 55:8) It is a very remarkable circumstance also, that in the genealogy given by the Evangelist Matthew, under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, of our Lord Jesus Christ, in the first chapter of his gospel, no mention is made of any women but of this Thamar, Matthew 1:3; of Rachab or Rahab the harlot, Matthew 1:5; Ruth the poor Moabitess, Matthew 1:5; and Bathsheba the wife of Uriah, Matthew 1:6
Cord - Rahab let down the spies by a cord through the window
Jericho - The spies had been sheltered there by Rahab the harlot, from whom they heard that the terror of Israel had fallen upon the inhabitants. The city was destroyed and all that had life was put to the sword, except Rahab and those she had with her sheltered under the scarlet line
Sinai - Ras Sufsafeh, the northern end of (2), with the vast plain er Rahab ("the wilderness of Sinai") for Israel below, is the Mount Sinai of the law. In the long retiring sweep of er Rahab the people could "remove and stand afar off," for it extends into the side valleys
Harlot - It has been attempted to show that Rahab, usually called a "harlot" (Joshua 2:1 ; 6:17 ; Hebrews 11:31 ; James 2:25 ), was only an innkeeper
Spies - They learned from Rahab (q
Jericho - There is somewhat particularly striking concerning Jericho being cursed by Joshua before the Lord, and yet that Rahab the harlot should be of this city, concerning whom such blessed things are spoken of in Scripture
Leviathan - See Rahab ; Creation
Line - the same root as qaw ) is used of the cord of scarlet thread that Rahab bound in the window ( Joshua 2:18 ; Joshua 2:21 )
Ruth, Book of - ...
Ruth is mentioned in Matthew 1:5 , and in her and in Rahab we have a Moabitess and a woman of Canaan in the genealogy of Christ
Sea - 89:9- 10 is a more likely place to see a mention of Yamm, for there the word is identified as one of God’s enemies in immediate proximity to the goddess Rahab: “Thou rulest the raging of the sea [1]: when the waves thereof arise, thou stillest them. Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces, as one that is slain; thou hast scattered thine enemies with thy strong arm
Jericho - It was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, who being miraculously aided by the downfall of its walls, totally destroyed it, sparing only Rahab and her household, and pronounced a curse upon the person who should ever rebuild it, which was more than five hundred years afterwards fulfilled on Hiel, Joshua 6:26 1 Kings 16:34
Joshua - " And from the twenty-fifth verse of the following chapter, it appears that the book was written before the death of Rahab: "And Joshua saved Rahab the harlot alive, and her father's household, and all that she had; and she dwelleth in Israel even unto this day; because she hid the messengers which Joshua sent to spy out Jericho
Lie - Israel’s spies lodged with Rahab: “And they went, and came into a harlot’s house, named Rahab, and lodged there” ( e'Gypt - Psalm 78:51 --a name most probably referring to Ham the son of Noah --and "Rahab," the proud or insolent: these appear to be poetical appellations
Kindness - Rahab expected kindness in return for her kindness to the spies (Joshua 2:12 ,Joshua 2:12,2:14 )
Sign - Rahab asked her Israelite guests for a trustworthy “mark” (NASB, “pledge of truth”), which they stipulated to be the scarlet cord by which she lowered them out of her window and outside Jericho’s walls ( Jer'Icho - (Matthew 20:30 ; Mark 10:46 ; Luke 18:35 ) Here the descendant of Rahab did not disdain the hospitality of Zaccaeus the publican
Antichrist - Genesis 1:21 ; see also the reference to Rahab the dragon/sea monster defeated at the time of creation, Psalm 89:9-10 ; cf
Alliances - When pagans renounced idolatry for Israel's God, Israelites might lawfully wed them, as Rahab, Ruth, Zipporah
Anathema - ...
So in the case of Jericho the city was so devoted to destruction, and all in it, except Rahab; and the silver, gold, brass, and iron, were consecrated to Jehovah (Joshua 6:17-26)
Hagar - Further interest attaches to the narrative as containing the earliest reference in Scripture to ‘the angel of Jehovah’ (Genesis 16:7 ), and as being the first of a series (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Naaman) in which the regard of God is represented as singling out for blessing persons outside Israel, and thus as preparing for the universal mission of Christ
Mercy, Merciful - ...
Like racham, chesed describes a variety of human relationships: husband and wife ( Genesis 20:13 ), next-of-kin (Genesis 24:49 ), father and son (Genesis 47:29 ), host and guest (Rahab and the spies—Joshua 2:12-14 ), friends like David and Jonathan (1Samuel 20:8,1 Samuel 20:14-17 ), king and subjects (2 Samuel 2:5 ). Also like racham , it expresses itself in action: Rahab delivered the spies; Jonathan protected David from Saul. Thus, the spies promised protection for Rahab, and David pledged to protect the house of Jonathan
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ]'>[1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 ). The details about Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba, not to be expected in a genealogy, but suitable for that purpose (see below), and the artificial divisions, seem to point to this view. We note that in the OT Rahab is not said to have been the wife of Salmon as in Matthew 1:5
Lie, Lying - , Rahab, Joshua 2:4-6 ), it must be understood that lack of condemnation is not approval nor is commendation of an individual by God a commendation of every element or action of that person. In the case of the commendation of Rahab it is her faith that welcomed the spies that is sanctioned (Hebrews 11:31 ) and so the lie must be seen as an unnecessary addition
Caleb - "...
By marriage and submission to the bond of Jehovah's covenant with Israel he became a true Israelite by adoption; a specimen of God's mercy to the Gentiles even in Old Testament times, and a pledge of the opening of the door of faith to them widely in the New Testament So Jethro, Rahab, Ruth, Naaman
Elisha - A Rahab and harlot is found in Jericho; and Æthiopia, and Seba, and the multitude of isles, shall stretch forth their hands unto God
Jericho - Only Rahab "and her father's household, and all that she had," were preserved from destruction, according to the promise of the spies (Joshua 2:14 )
Proselytes - But he could not hold land nor intermarry with Aaron's descendants (Leviticus 19:10; Leviticus 21:14), he is presumed to be in a subject condition (Deuteronomy 29:11); Hobab and the Kenites (Numbers 10:29-32; Judges 1:16), Rahab of Jericho (Joshua 6:25), and the Gibeonites as "hewers of wood and drawers of water" (Joshua 9), are instances of strangers joined to Israel. ) Hezekiah's triumph over Sennacherib was followed by many bringing gifts: unto Jehovah to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 32:23); this suggested the prophecy in Psalm 87 that Rahab (Egypt) and Babylon (whose king Merodach Baladan had sent a friendly embassy to Hezekiah), Philistia, Tyre, and Ethiopia should be spiritually born (Psalms 51:5; Psalms 51:10; Psalms 22:31; Isaiah 66:8; John 3:3; John 3:5; both Old and New Testament teach the need of the new birth) in Jerusalem as proselytes
Joshua, Book of - The spies learned that the fear of Israel had fallen upon the people of the land, and the faith of Rahab saved her and her family. See Rahab
Colour - It was a crimson thread that Rahab was to bind on her window as a sign that she was to be saved alive (Joshua 2:18 ; 6:25 ) when the city of Jericho was taken
Prostitution - Rahab, who helped the Israelite spies at Jericho, was a harlot (Joshua 2:1 ; 6:17,22 , 25 ); she figures in the genealogy of David and Jesus (Matthew 1:5 )
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Five females are in Matthew's Gospel: incestuous Tamar, Rahab the Moabitess and a harlot, Ruth, Uriah's wife Bathsheba the object of David's adulterous love, and above all Mary; all extraordinary monuments of God's grace, that chooses out of the vilest to make vessels unto honor, for the bringing forth of the promised Seed, who was to save sinners of every type and race
Ruth - Tamar and Rahab are the other two similar instances in Christ's genealogy (Genesis 38; Joshua 6:25; Judges 6:3-4,3; Matthew 1:5)
Mary - ...
In the genealogy of 1:1-17 there are no less than four women (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba), all of whom have irregular marital unions
Foreigner - Rahab, Ruth, Naaman, the widow of Zarepath)
Dualism - Tiamat appears under the name Rahab in several passages ( Job 9:13 Jericho - Joshua's two spies lodged in Rahab's house upon the wall; and she in reward for their safety received her own preservation, and that of all in her house, when Joshua burned the city with fire, and slew man and beast, as all had been put under the ban. ...
The Lord Himself, in whose genealogy Rahab the harlot is found, here was guest of Zacchaeus the publican, a lucrative office in so rich a city as the Roman Jericho was
Jericho - He sent thither spies, who were received by Rahab, lodged in her house, and preserved from the king of Jericho
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - ...
Confining our attention for the moment to the direct male line, we note that in the first section the names are taken from 1 Chronicles 2:1-15, and that if Salmon was the younger contemporary of Joshua (as is implied by his marriage with Rahab), there are only four generations to cover the 300 or 400 years between that time and David’s reign. Tamar became a mother through incestuous intercourse with her father-in-law; Rahab was a harlot; Ruth was a Moabitess, and according to the Deuteronomic law (Deuteronomy 23:3, cf. In the case of Ruth this is fully satisfactory; and the conduct of the other three women is represented in Scripture as justified or pardoned, Judah was obliged to say of Tamar, ‘She is more righteous than I’ (Genesis 38:26); the remembrance of Rahab’s former life was blotted out by her subsequent faith (James 2:25, Hebrews 11:31); there is no intimation in Scripture that Bathsheba was morally responsible for the sin into which she was forced by a powerful king, and certainly the birth of Solomon is not represented as in any way displeasing to God, but rather the contrary (see 2 Samuel 12:25, where Nathan named the child ‘Jedidiah [5] for the Lord’s sake’; cf. ...
In regard to Rahab, there is no evidence for her marriage with Salmon, nor is anything known that would be likely to have suggested the idea: it would seem that the compiler was determined to introduce the name, and therefore, without evidence and against all chronological probability, made her the wife of the father of Boaz
Joshua, the Book of - ...
(5) In Joshua 5:1; Joshua 5:6, he uses the first person, "we passed over"; and in Joshua 6:25, "Rahab dwelleth in Israel even unto this day"; both passages imply a contemporary writer
Joshua, the Book of - Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, was accepted, along with her family, as a part of the covenant community (Joshua 2:9-13 ; Joshua 6:22-23 ,Joshua 6:22-23,6:25 )
Egypt - Egypt is also called THE LAND OF HAM in Psalm 105:23,27 ; Psalm 106:22 ; and Rahab, signifying 'the proud one'in Psalm 87:4 ; Psalm 89:10 ; Isaiah 51:9 . (This name in Hebrew is not the same as Rahab, the harlot, which is really Rachab
Creation - In a later speech Job expressed the effortless manner in which God created the universe (Job 26:7-11 ) and defeated Rahab and the serpent (Job 26:12-13 )
Divorce - Rahab, Ruth, and Christ's genealogy in Matthew 1:5 )
House - On the flat roof it was that Rahab spread the flax to dry, hiding the spies (Joshua 2:6)
Joshua, Theology of - An alternative, or perhaps complementary, explanation focuses on the exceptions of Rahab's family and of the Gibeonites, who escaped divine wrath through confession of faith in Israel's God (2:8-13; 9:9-10,24-25). They are found in the content of the confessions of Rahab, of the Gibeonites, and of Joshua as already mentioned
Houses - Rahab concealed the spies on the roof, with the stalks of flax which she had laid in order to dry, Joshua 2:6 ; the king of Israel, according to the custom of his country, rose from his bed, and walked upon the roof of his house, to enjoy the refreshing breezes of the evening, 2 Samuel 11:2 ; upon the top of the house the prophet conversed with Saul, about the gracious designs of God, respecting him and his family, 1 Samuel 9:25 ; to the same place Peter retired to offer up his devotions, Acts 10:9 ; and in the feast of tabernacles, under the government of Nehemiah, booths were erected, as well upon the terraces of their houses, as in their courts, and in the streets of the city, Nehemiah 8:16
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ), and Rahab from the fate of Jericho (xii. By ‘faith and hospitality’ Rahab was saved (xii
Matthew, the Gospel of - ” The genealogies confirm Jesus' authoritative, kingly lineage and remind the reader of His relation to all nations by mentioning Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and the wife of a Hittite
House - also Rahab, Joshua 2:15)
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people
Hebrews, Epistle to the - Beginning with Abel and closing with Rahab, various individual characteristics of faith and its consequences are presented, while in Hebrews 11:32 , etc
Egypt - It is also known as the Land of Ham, Psalms 105:23; Psalms 105:27, and Rahab, "the proud one
Woman - Perhaps the paradigm of God's sovereignty through the grace of unlikely heroines is the story of Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, who believes in the God of the Israelites, protects their spies from her own officials (Joshua 2 ), and becomes one of the great persons of faith praised in Hebrews 11 (v
Job, Theology of - Thus, Job trusts that god's hand controls the elements of chaos in creation such as the sea, the storm cloud, and the cosmic sea monster Rahab (26:12-13)
Old Testament - In the same way the Apostle refers to Rahab, Job, and Elijah as notable examples of works, patience, and prayer respectively (James 2:25, James 5:11; James 5:17 f
Matthew, Gospel According to - The history of the supernatural birth was, of course, an easy mark for Jewish calumny, but nevertheless it was a fact which had been Divinely foreordained (Matthew 1:22); and in the history of the Davidic family there had been women of old time (Rahab, Bathsheba, Tamar, Ruth) whose lives should have taught the calumniators of the Virgin that God overrules and uses circumstances for His own Divine ends
Faith - ...
If the Epistle was written in very early times, the argument must move more on Judaic than on Christian grounds, and a certain corroboration of this is found in the fact that the illustrations are taken from OT examples like Abraham and Rahab, and that the typical example chosen is belief in the unity of God, which was the war-cry of the Jew as it became in later days that of the Muhammadan
Faith - ...
If the Epistle was written in very early times, the argument must move more on Judaic than on Christian grounds, and a certain corroboration of this is found in the fact that the illustrations are taken from OT examples like Abraham and Rahab, and that the typical example chosen is belief in the unity of God, which was the war-cry of the Jew as it became in later days that of the Muhammadan
Egypt - Rahab, "the insolent," is Egypt's poetical name (Psalms 87:4; Psalms 89:10; Isaiah 51:9)