What does Prostitution mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Prostitution
In the ancient world, as in the modern, prostitution was widespread (Genesis 38:15; Joshua 2:1; Judges 11:1; Judges 16:1; 1 Kings 3:16; Proverbs 2:16; Proverbs 6:26; Luke 15:30). In Israelite law the penalty for prostitution was death, usually by stoning (Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 21:7; Leviticus 21:9; Deuteronomy 22:21; John 8:5).
Prostitutes bring lasting damage to themselves and their lovers. The Bible gives strong warnings against them (Proverbs 2:16-19; Proverbs 5:1-14; Proverbs 6:23-27; Proverbs 7). Christians in particular should have no union with prostitutes, since they already are spiritually united with Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 6:15-20).
Although the Bible condemns prostitution, it does not reject prostitutes as being without hope of salvation. In the time of Jesus, prostitutes and other socially despised people were usually more willing to listen to the message of Jesus than were religiously respectable people. Some believed in him and found forgiveness (Matthew 9:11-13; Matthew 21:31-32; Luke 7:37-50; Luke 15:1). (See also ADULTERY.)
In Old Testament times Israel was unfaithful to God in leaving him and going after false gods. This unfaithfulness was likened to the behaviour of an unfaithful wife who leaves her husband to become a prostitute (Isaiah 1:21; Jeremiah 13:27; Ezekiel 16; Hosea 1:2; Hosea 2:13; 1 Kings 14:23-24). Israel’s idolatry, besides being spiritual prostitution, involved physical prostitution. In many of the idolatrous religions, prostitutes were available for sexual rites that people believed gave increase in family, crops, flocks and herds (Micah 1:7; Jeremiah 3:6-10; Jeremiah 13:22-27; Hosea 4:7-14; Amos 2:7-8; see BAAL).
God’s prophets sometimes likened political and commercial agreements between Israel and pagan nations to acts of prostitution. Such agreements were often unions of shame designed solely for personal advantage. They ignored God’s standards and defied his authority (Isaiah 23:17; Nahum 3:4). This anti-God spirit, symbolized by the prostitute, found its expression in New Testament times in the Roman Empire. It will find its fullest expression in the days of the world’s final great rebellion prior to the return of Jesus Christ (Revelation 17).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Prostitution
The trading of sexual services for pay. It is the result of a double standard whereby men insist on the sexual purity of their wives and daughters, while desiring access to other women. This dynamic is seen clearly in Genesis 38:1 . Judah, thinking that his daughter-in-law Tamar was a prostitute, had intercourse with her; but upon hearing that she was pregnant as the result of “playing the harlot,” he demanded that she be burned. Hosea criticized the attitude which called for the punishment of prostitutes (and women committing adultery), while tolerating the men with whom these acts were committed (Hosea 4:14 ). Because of this double standard, the prostitute or harlot, as she is also called, has had an ambiguous status in society. She was tolerated in ancient Israel—as long as she was not married—but her profession was not socially acceptable. The children of harlots suffered from social biases against them (Judges 11:2 ).
Although the Old Testament records no laws prohibiting men from visiting prostitutes and making use of their services, there are strong counsels against such behavior (Proverbs 23:27-28 ; Proverbs 29:3 ). The apocryphal Book of Ecclesiasticus gives similar warnings (Proverbs 9:3-9 ; Proverbs 19:2 ).
The Holiness Code prohibited Israelite fathers from turning their daughters into prostitutes (Leviticus 19:29 ), which might have been a temptation during times when poverty was widespread. It may be that most prostitutes in Israel were foreign or Canaanite women. That would help explain why the Book of Proverbs speaks of the harlot literally as a “strange” and “foreign” woman (translated in the RSV as “loose woman,” “evil woman”) (Proverbs 2:16 ; Proverbs 5:3 ; Proverbs 6:24 ).
Jesus told the religious leaders of His day that harlots would go into the kingdom before they would (Matthew 21:31 ), not because He condoned prostitution, but because harlots did not have the self-righteousness which kept the religious leaders from repentance. Paul reminded Corinthian Christians that their bodies were the temple of the Holy Spirit; therefore, they should refrain from immorality, including sexual relations with prostitutes (1 Corinthians 6:15-20 ).
The term cult prostitution is frequently used to refer to certain practices in Canaanite fertility cults, including the cult of Baal. See 1 Kings 14:24 , 1 Kings 15:12 , 1 Kings 22:46 ; 2 Kings 23:7 ). Cult prostitution is outlawed by the Deuteronomic law code (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 ).
The presence of both “secular” and “cult prostitutes” provided the prophets with a powerful metaphor for the unfaithfulness of the people toward God. The covenant was imaged as a marriage between the Lord and the people; their continual interest in other gods, especially Baal, was seen as a form of harlotry. This idea is graphically presented in Ezekiel 16:1 (compare Ezekiel 23:1 ). Because the Lord's bride has become a harlot, she will be punished as a harlot. Hosea also attacked the Israelite attraction to the fertility religion of Canaan as harlotry. He felt called of God to marry a harlot (Hosea 1:2 ), a symbolic action (or object lesson) representing God's relationship with Israel. Hosea's love for his unfaithful and harlotrous wife was analogous to God's love for unfaithful Israel.
The Book of Revelation applies the image of harlot to Rome, which is likened to a woman in scarlet and jewels, to whom the kings of the earth go (Revelation 17:1-6 ).
Wilda W. Morris
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Prostitution
The Old Testament. Common Prostitution . While the law forbids parents from forcing daughters into prostitution, there is no penalty attached (Leviticus 19:29 ). In one case there is a penalty: If a woman has been betrothed to a man and he discovers that she is not a virgin, she may be stoned to death for prostituting herself (Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ). These two passages lead some scholars to conclude that when two adults, neither of which was betrothed or married, consented to have sex, it was not considered a very serious crime, because no sanctions were expressed. However, before the Mosaic Law, burning was the penalty in one instance (Genesis 38:24 ). Perhaps Israelite society, like modern ones, tolerated a certain amount of prostitution, but it was clearly immoral and the sages sternly warned against it (Proverbs 23:27 ; 29:3 ). Priests were held to a higher standard than non-priests for they could not marry harlots, although again, there was no specified punishment for doing so (Leviticus 21:7,14 ). A priest's daughter, on the other hand, could be burned for harlotry (Leviticus 21:9 ); the intent of this was to keep the priestly line pure.
Apparently, prostitutes in ancient times dressed in recognizable ways (Proverbs 7:10 ). In the patriarchal period, a face covering might be a distinguishing feature (Genesis 38:14-15 ). Some well-known biblical passages mention prostitution. Rahab, who helped the Israelite spies at Jericho, was a harlot (Joshua 2:1 ; 6:17,22 , 25 ); she figures in the genealogy of David and Jesus (Matthew 1:5 ). Jephthah was the son of a harlot (Judges 11:1 ). Samson slept with one (Judges 16:1 ). Two prostitutes asked Solomon to adjudicate between them over a child (1 Kings 3:16 ). For resisting the word of the Lord, the priest Amaziah would be taken into exile, forcing his wife into prostitution to survive (Amos 7:17 ).
Sacral Prostitution . The fertility cult was a central part of Canaanite religion. It is thought that sacral prostitution was a form of sympathetic magic. As people performed sex Acts with the temple harlots, this stimulated sexual activity among the gods, ensuring the fertility of the soil. The terms qades and qedesa ( Deuteronomy 23:17 ) designate male and female sacral prostitutes. The words come from the root qds, meaning "set apart, " "holy, " "consecrated." These men and women considered themselves consecrated to their gods for the purpose of religious prostitution.
The practice was known by the patriarchs, for Tamar was taken for a cult harlot (Genesis 38:21 ). The law of Moses forbids the practice of sacral prostitution (Deuteronomy 23:17 ), but Israelites were led astray by the fertility rites of Baalism in Moab before they even entered the promised land (Numbers 25:1-5 ). Although sacral prostitution is not specifically mentioned, it is likely, since they were priests, that when Hophni and Phineas slept with the women who ministered at the entrance to the tabernacle, that they were borrowing the Canaanite practice (1 Samuel 2:22 ). The fertility cult was established in Judah early in the monarchy (1 Kings 14:24 ) and periodically purged (1 Kings 15:46 ). When Josiah carried out his reform, he had to remove the male cult prostitutes from the temple itself (2 Kings 23:7 ).
Spiritual Prostitution . The relationship between Yahweh and Israel was that of husband and wife. Therefore, when the Israelites went astray by worshiping other deities, they were prostituting themselves to other gods (Exodus 34:15 ). Ezekiel gave female names to Samaria and Jerusalem (symbolizing Israel and Judah), calling them Oholah and Oholibah. He described their harlotry and pronounced judgment on them (Ezekiel 23 ). Hosea entered into an elaborate sign act in order to preach to the northern kingdom about its sin of spiritual harlotry. God told him to marry Gomer (Hosea 1:2-3 ). When she was unfaithful, he took her back in love (3:1-3). In the same way, God had taken Israel as his bride (2:15), but she had prostituted herself to the Canaanite deities (2:2-13). The divine husband was going to punish his "wife" for a time so that Israel would repent and return (2:3,8-13). Although divorce was invoked (2:2) the ultimate goal was reconciliation (2:16-20).
The New Testament . Jesus pointed out that harlots and tax collectors were quicker to repent, believe, and enter the kingdom of God than the proud religious leaders (Matthew 21:28-32 ). The prodigal son, who apparently wasted his inheritance on harlots (Luke 15:13,30 ), was welcomed home when he repented (vv. 20-24). Paul warns against immorality, because he who sleeps with a prostitute becomes one with her, which is not fitting for the believer, who belongs to Christ (1 Corinthians 6:15-20 ). The Apocalypse refers to Rome (= Babylon) as "the great harlot, " which will be punished forever for persecuting the Lord's servants (17:1-18; 19:1-3).
William B. Nelson, Jr.
See also Gods and Goddesses, Pagan ; Idol, Idolatry ; Immorality, Sexual
Webster's Dictionary - Prostitution
(1):
(n.) The act of setting one's self to sale, or of devoting to infamous purposes what is in one's power; as, the prostitution of abilities; the prostitution of the press.
(2):
(n.) The act or practice of prostituting or offering the body to an indiscriminate intercourse with men; common lewdness of a woman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Prostitution
PROSTITUTION. See Crimes and Punishments, 3 .

Sentence search

White Slave - A woman held in involuntary confinement for purposes of Prostitution; loosely, any woman forced into unwilling Prostitution
Prostitution - Prostitution
Putanism - ) Habitual lewdness or Prostitution of a woman; harlotry
Prostibulous - ) Of or pertaining to prostitutes or Prostitution; meretricious
Prostitution - ) The act of setting one's self to sale, or of devoting to infamous purposes what is in one's power; as, the Prostitution of abilities; the Prostitution of the press
Bordello - ) A brothel; a bawdyhouse; a house devoted to Prostitution
Putage - ) Prostitution or fornication on the part of a woman
Bawdyhouse - ) A house of Prostitution; a house of ill fame; a brothel
White Slaver - A person engaged in procuring or holding a woman or women for unwilling Prostitution
White Slaving - The action of one who procures or holds a woman or women for unwilling Prostitution
Bagnio - ) A brothel; a stew; a house of Prostitution
Brothel - ...
A house of lewdness a house appropriated to the purposes of Prostitution a bawdy house a stew
Pornography - ) A treatise on prostitutes, or Prostitution
Venality - ) The quality or state of being venal, or purchasable; mercenariness; Prostitution of talents, offices, or services, for money or reward; as, the venality of a corrupt court; the venality of an official
Prostitution - In the ancient world, as in the modern, Prostitution was widespread (Genesis 38:15; 1 Kings 14:23-240; Judges 11:1; Judges 16:1; 1 Kings 3:16; Proverbs 2:16; Proverbs 6:26; Luke 15:30). In Israelite law the penalty for Prostitution was death, usually by stoning (Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 21:7; Leviticus 21:9; Deuteronomy 22:21; John 8:5). ...
Although the Bible condemns Prostitution, it does not reject prostitutes as being without hope of salvation. Israel’s idolatry, besides being spiritual Prostitution, involved physical Prostitution. ...
God’s prophets sometimes likened political and commercial agreements between Israel and pagan nations to acts of Prostitution
Harlotry - ) The trade or practice of Prostitution; habitual or customary lewdness
Bawd - ) A person who keeps a house of Prostitution, or procures women for a lewd purpose; a procurer or procuress; a lewd person; - usually applied to a woman
Prostitution - Common Prostitution . While the law forbids parents from forcing daughters into Prostitution, there is no penalty attached (Leviticus 19:29 ). Perhaps Israelite society, like modern ones, tolerated a certain amount of Prostitution, but it was clearly immoral and the sages sternly warned against it (Proverbs 23:27 ; 29:3 ). Some well-known biblical passages mention Prostitution. For resisting the word of the Lord, the priest Amaziah would be taken into exile, forcing his wife into Prostitution to survive (Amos 7:17 ). ...
Sacral Prostitution . It is thought that sacral Prostitution was a form of sympathetic magic. " These men and women considered themselves consecrated to their gods for the purpose of religious Prostitution. The law of Moses forbids the practice of sacral Prostitution (Deuteronomy 23:17 ), but Israelites were led astray by the fertility rites of Baalism in Moab before they even entered the promised land (Numbers 25:1-5 ). Although sacral Prostitution is not specifically mentioned, it is likely, since they were priests, that when Hophni and Phineas slept with the women who ministered at the entrance to the tabernacle, that they were borrowing the Canaanite practice (1 Samuel 2:22 ). ...
Spiritual Prostitution
Harlot - ’...
The practice of Prostitution dates from the earliest times. While in Egypt, the Israelites must have been familiar with the fact that Prostitution prevailed in connexion with Egyptian cults. Jeremiah 5:7, Hosea 4:14), we can perceive the prevalence of ordinary Prostitution in their day. One of the blessings of the Exile was the extinction among the Jews both of idolatry and of religious Prostitution. ...
The Gospels supply us with little information as to the extent of Prostitution in Palestine during the time of Christ. Religions Prostitution reappeared in connexion with the Mysteries of Aphrodite, which culminated in vicious orgies, and these rites were not confined to Greece. Nor should it be forgotten that the general effect of the way in which the Master admitted women to His intimate fellowship is to raise the status of woman in such a manner as to render her degradation through Prostitution unthinkable
Harlot - ’...
The practice of Prostitution dates from the earliest times. While in Egypt, the Israelites must have been familiar with the fact that Prostitution prevailed in connexion with Egyptian cults. Jeremiah 5:7, Hosea 4:14), we can perceive the prevalence of ordinary Prostitution in their day. One of the blessings of the Exile was the extinction among the Jews both of idolatry and of religious Prostitution. ...
The Gospels supply us with little information as to the extent of Prostitution in Palestine during the time of Christ. Religions Prostitution reappeared in connexion with the Mysteries of Aphrodite, which culminated in vicious orgies, and these rites were not confined to Greece. Nor should it be forgotten that the general effect of the way in which the Master admitted women to His intimate fellowship is to raise the status of woman in such a manner as to render her degradation through Prostitution unthinkable
Fornication - ...
Israel's neighbors practiced a fertility religion in which Prostitution was part of the worship. This led naturally to describing worship of other gods as Prostitution (Exodus 34:15-16 ; Judges 8:27 ,Judges 8:27,8:33 ; Hosea 4:13 ). ...
New Testament The New Testament also condemns Prostitution. Here again Prostitution played a central role in worship in places like Corinth and Athens. Harlotry and Prostitution (Revelation 2:14 ,Revelation 2:14,2:20 )
Procure - ) To obtain for illicit intercourse or Prostitution
Harlot - In Proverbs 5:17-20 "strange" seemingly contrasts with one's own rightful wife; another term, qudeeshaah , "consecrated woman" (in Genesis 38:21-22; Deuteronomy 23:17; Hosea 4:14), refers to the abominable worship of the Syrian Astarte or Venus by Prostitution. "The men of Babylon made Saccoth Benoth" their idol in Samaria (2 Kings 17:30); the idol's name means "booths for their daughters," referring to their Prostitution in this detestable worship. The masculine qadesh , "Sodomites," implies male Prostitution in the same vile worship (Deuteronomy 23:17; 1 Kings 14:24; 1 Kings 15:12; 1 Kings 22:46; 2 Kings 23:7; Job 36:14)
Whoring, To Go; Harlot, To Be - ” This is the regular term denoting Prostitution throughout the history of Hebrew, with special nuances coming out of the religious experience of ancient Israel. The main reason, however, is the fact that this term is used most frequently to describe “spiritual Prostitution” in which Israel turned from God to strange gods. This was especially true when Israel went after the Canaanite gods, for the worship of these pagan deities involved actual Prostitution with cult prostitutes connected with the Canaanite shrines. ...
The Book of Hosea, in which Hosea’s wife Gomer became unfaithful and most likely was involved in such cult Prostitution, again illustrates not only Hosea’s heartbreak but also God’s own heartbreak because of the unfaithfulness of his wife, Israel
Queen of Heaven - " The male and female pair symbolized nature's generative powers, from whence Prostitution was practiced in her worship
Prostitution - ...
Jesus told the religious leaders of His day that harlots would go into the kingdom before they would (Matthew 21:31 ), not because He condoned Prostitution, but because harlots did not have the self-righteousness which kept the religious leaders from repentance. ...
The term cult Prostitution is frequently used to refer to certain practices in Canaanite fertility cults, including the cult of Baal. Cult Prostitution is outlawed by the Deuteronomic law code (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 )
Adultery - The Old Testament prophets repeatedly spoke of Israel’s unfaithfulness to God as spiritual adultery, or spiritual Prostitution (Jeremiah 5:7; Jeremiah 23:10; Ezekiel 16:30-38; Ezekiel 23:4-5; Ezekiel 23:11; Hosea 9:1; see Prostitution). For the Christian, there is a sense in which sexual sin is spiritual Prostitution (1 Corinthians 6:13-20)
Lucy, Saint - Condemned to suffer the shame of Prostitution, she stood immovable and could not be dragged to the place of evil
Medium - Consulting of mediums defiled the land and was described as Prostitution
Harlot - See Fornication ; Prostitution
Vow - In Ashtoreth's and the Babylonian Mylitta's worship Prostitution for hire devoted to the idol was usual (Leviticus 19:29; 2 Kings 23:7)
Harlot - , a woman consecrated or devoted to Prostitution in connection with the abominable worship of Asherah or Astarte, the Syrian Venus
Men - ...
Sexual passion is usually stronger in men than in women, and for this reason the Bible gives special warnings to men concerning sexual temptations (Proverbs 7:6-23; Hosea 4:14; Matthew 5:28; 1 Thessalonians 4:4-5; 2 Timothy 2:22; Titus 2:6; see ADULTERY; FORNICATION; Prostitution)
Immorality - In the Gospels, the term, on occasion, is related to adultery (Matthew 5:32 ; Matthew 19:9 ) and in Revelation may refer to harlotry or Prostitution (Revelation 2:14 ,Revelation 2:14,2:20 )
Javan - In Joel 3:3; Joel 3:6, God reproves the nations because "they have given a boy for (as price for Prostitution of) an harlot, and sold a girl for wine," especially Tyre and Sidon; "the children of Judah and Jerusalem have ye sold unto the Grecians (sons of Javan), that ye might remove them far from their border
Tammuz - An annual feast was kept to him in June (Tammuz in the Jewish calendar) at Byblos, when the Syrian women tore off their hair in wild grief, and yielded their persons to Prostitution, consecrating the hire of their infamy to Venus; next followed days of rejoicing for his return to the earth
Corinth - Lasciviousness, particularly, was not only tolerated, but consecrated here, by the worship of Venus, and the notorious Prostitution of numerous attendants devoted to her
Harlot - Religious Prostitution was prohibited in Israel ( Deuteronomy 23:17 ), and all gain from the unholy calling as Temple revenue was spurned (see Driver, Deut
Stone - 13:10), and Prostitution ( Fornication - As for Prostitution, bestiality, incest and homosexual practices, God condemns them as perversions (Leviticus 18:6-18; Leviticus 18:22-23; Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 20:10-21; Romans 1:26-27; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10; 1 Corinthians 6:13-18; 1618878348_5; Revelation 21:8)
Fertility Cult - See Asherah ; Ashtoroth; Baal ; Canaan, History and Religion of ; Dagon ; Diana ; Gods, Pagan ; High Place ; Prostitution ; Tammuz ; Ugarit
High Place - The bâmâh was a place of cult Prostitution: "[9] pant after the dust of the earth on the head of the poor, and turn aside the way of the meek: and a man and his father will go in unto the same maid, to profane my holy name: And they lay themselves down upon clothes laid to pledge by every altar, and they drink the wine of the condemned in the house of their god” (Amos 2:7-8)
Goat - It is well known that Baal-peor and Ashtaroth were worshipped with unclean rites, and that public Prostitution formed a grand part of the worship of many deities among the Egyptians, Moabites, Canaanites, &c
Stretch Out - This is a figure of temple Prostitution
Ugarit - In addition to these acts, in actual practice the Canaanites employed sacred Prostitution and other imitative practices to restore fertility to the world. So too was religious Prostitution (compare Deuteronomy 23:18 ; Hosea 4:14 )
Backsliding - Her sins of Prostitution and sexual immorality, indicative of her spiritual condition, drove her away from God, causing her to apostasize from the faith
Ashtoreth - At Agade, Calah, and Babylon greater stress seems to have been laid upon the milder aspect, and it is doubtless with the worship of this side of Ishtar’s nature that the religious Prostitution mentioned by Greek writers was connected (Hdt
High Place - See Asherah ; False Gods; Golden Calves; Prostitution
Corinth - In the centre of the city was a celebrated temple of Venus, a part of whose worship consisted in Prostitution; for there a thousand priestesses of the goddess ministered to dissoluteness under the patronage of religion: an example which gave the Corinthians very lax ideas on the illicit intercourse of the sexes
Ethics - At their shrines they were "worshiped" with orgies of drunkenness and sexual license (male and female cult Prostitution, incest). " Avaricious moneylenders exploiting hardship, wealthy landlords dispossessing small landowners, merchants who oppressed the poor by ruthless competition and unjust balances, those who sold debtors into slavery or Prostitution or exacted forced labor—all are indicted. Prostitution, child sacrifice, and divination are suppressed; the right to glean, to receive wages before evening, regular provision for the poor, and reverence for the aged, are all enacted
Crimes And Punishments - Ordinary Prostitution is condemned by H Prostitution (H Sex, Biblical Teaching on - ...
Sexual Deviations Several deviations of sexual behavior are condemned in the biblical teachings: homosexuality (Leviticus 18:22 ; Romans 1:26-27 ; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ); bestiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 18:23 ); incest (Leviticus 18:6-18 ; 1 Corinthians 5:1 ); rape (Exodus 22:16-17 ; Deuteronomy 22:23-29 ); adultery (Exodus 20:14 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ); Prostitution (Genesis 3:7 ; Proverbs 29:3 ;); fornication (1 Corinthians 6:9-10 ; compare Matthew 19:9 )
Kill, Killing - Capital punishment was employed for the following criminal cases: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), Prostitution by the priest's daughter (Leviticus 21:9 ), persistent disobedience against parents (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 27:16 ), apostasy from the Lord (Numbers 25:5 ; Deuteronomy 13:10 ), killing the king (1618878348_5 ), fratricide (Genesis 4:14 ; Exodus 21:14 ; Judges 9:56 ; 2 Samuel 14:7 ), child sacrifice (Exodus 23:7 ; Heb
Diana - Instead of being kept on a spiritual level, it was continually made the excuse for brutalizing and enervating practices-prostitution, incest, etc
Marriage - God's ideal exclusiveness of the "one flesh" relationship disallows any other relationship: homosexuality, polygamy, adultery, premarital sex, concubinage, incest, bestiality, cultic Prostitution. Sin caused polygamy, concubinage, incest, adultery, rape, Prostitution, and all kinds of immorality (cf
Marriage - It condemns Prostitution, incest, bestiality and homosexual practices as perversions
Cross - It was the punishment of robbers and murderers, provided that they were slaves too; but otherwise, if they were free, and had the privilege of the city of Rome, this was then thought a Prostitution of that honour, and too infamous a punishment for such a one, let his crimes be what they would
Punishment - Prostitution was outlawed but no punishment is listed (Leviticus 19:29 ; Deuteronomy 23:17 )
Fornication - -(1) πορνεία is used sometimes in the strict sense of ‘prostitution’ or ‘fornication’ (1 Corinthians 6:13), It is thus different from μοιχεία, or ‘adultery’ (Hebrews 13:4 Love - It may apply to God’s love for people (Deuteronomy 7:12-13; John 3:16), people’s devotion to God (Psalms 91:14; 1 Corinthians 8:3), pure sexual love between a man and a woman (Proverbs 5:18-19; Song of Song of Solomon 2:4-5), impure sexual activity such as in Prostitution (Jeremiah 4:30; Hosea 2:12-13), love between members of a family where sexual feelings are not involved (Genesis 22:2; Ruth 4:15), an attitude of kindness towards others, whether friends or enemies (Leviticus 19:17-18; 1 Samuel 18:1; 1 Samuel 18:16; Matthew 5:43-46; John 11:3), or the desire for things that brings pleasure or satisfaction (Proverbs 20:13; 1 Timothy 6:10)
Gods, Pagan - Temple Prostitution was an important part of her cult and gave Uruk, the city of her older Sumerian equivalent, Inanna, a sordid reputation. As the female counterpart of Baal, Astarte/Ashtoreth seems to have been worshiped through sacred Prostitution designed to promote fertility
Idolatry - Two features of these religions were Prostitution [2] (cf
Divorce - Sin brought polygamy, concubinage, incest, adultery, rape, Prostitution, and all kinds of immorality (cf
Hosea, Theology of - They had developed a spirit of Prostitution in their hearts (5:4; Balaam - " This Baal-peor was an obscene idol, before which image, the votaries offered the most horrid Prostitution of their bodies, and wrought such abomination as would be shocking to the feelings of chastity to relate
Clean, Unclean - Since sexual Acts made one unclean, Israel could not follow the practice of sacred Prostitution where a god's giving of fertility was symbolized by sex Acts in the cult
Profaning, Profanity - Moreover, those legal refinements lent themselves to all sorts of falsehood and deceit in the intercourse of men, and thus became a Prostitution of the holiest realities to wicked ends
High Place, Sanctuary - 1 Samuel 1:13 ); Prostitution even was practised with religious sanction ( Deuteronomy 23:13 , 1 Kings 14:24 )
Wages - , through Prostitution) and therefore could not be offered to the sanctuary (Deuteronomy 23:19 )
Moses - , shows us that abstinence from idolatrous sacrifices and abstinence from sexual immorality are closely related, and that πορνεία here refers not merely to the forbidden degrees of marriage but also to ceremonial Prostitution; the Gentile Christians must abstain both from taking part in the sacrificial meals of the heathen world and from the immoralities connected therewith, i
Homosexuality - While many modern revisionists simply disagree with Paul or discount his proscription as applying only to Prostitution or pederasty, some have attempted to reinterpret the passage as tacit approval of homosexuality
Ezekiel, Theology of - Wealthy and beautiful, she turned to promiscuity and Prostitution
Marriage - This is distinguished from mere Prostitution, in that no disgrace is attached, and the children are recognized by the trine; cf
Education in Bible Times - Of course, common and cultic Prostitution remained a source of employment for women in ancient society
Sexuality, Human - ...
Prostitution
Justinianus i, Emperor - Oppressive as taxation had been before, he seems to have made it even more stringent; and when the land-tax and other ordinary sources of revenue failed, he was driven to such expedients as the sale of public offices, and even to the Prostitution of justice and the confiscation of the property of private persons