What does Prophets mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
προφητῶν in Greek writings 32
προφῆται in Greek writings 21
προφήτας in Greek writings 15
προφήταις in Greek writings 10
הַנְּבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 10
נְבִיאֵ֣י spokesman 8
הַנְּבִיאִ֖ים spokesman 7
ψευδοπροφῆται one who 5
הַנְּבִיאִֽים spokesman 5
הַנְּבִיאִ֗ים spokesman 5
הַנְּבִאִ֖ים spokesman 4
הַנְּבִיאִים֙ spokesman 4
הַנְּבִאִ֔ים spokesman 4
הַנְּבִיאִ֑ים spokesman 4
הַנְּבִיאִ֣ים spokesman 3
הַנְּבִיאִ֛ים spokesman 3
נְבִאִ֖ים spokesman 3
נְבִיאֶ֣יךָ spokesman 3
הַנְּבִאִים֙ spokesman 3
נְבִיאֶ֖יךָ spokesman 3
הַנְּבִיאִ֥ים spokesman 2
נְבִיאֶ֙יהָ֙ spokesman 2
הַנְּבִיאִים֮ spokesman 2
הַנְּבִיאִ֞ים spokesman 2
וְהַנְּבִאִ֖ים spokesman 2
נְבִיאָ֑יו spokesman 2
וְהַנְּבִיאִים֙ spokesman 2
הַנְּבִאִ֛ים spokesman 2
וְהַנְּבִאִ֛ים spokesman 1
הַנְּבִיאִ֖ם spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֵ֖י spokesman 1
וּבִנְבִאֵ֨י spokesman 1
נְבִֽיאֵיכֶ֖ם spokesman 1
וּבִנְבִיאֵ֥י spokesman 1
לַנְּבִאִ֞ים spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֵיהֶֽם spokesman 1
ψευδοπροφήταις one who 1
הַנְּבִאִ֞ים spokesman 1
וְהַנְּבִאִים֙ spokesman 1
הַנְּבִאִ֗ים spokesman 1
נְבִיאֵיכֶ֜ם spokesman 1
הַנְּבִיאִ֨ים spokesman 1
נְבִיאִ֡ים spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֶ֖יהָ spokesman 1
נְבִיאֶ֔יהָ spokesman 1
נְבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 1
וְ֝לִנְבִיאַי spokesman 1
נְבִיאַ֗יִךְ spokesman 1
נְבִיאֶ֕יהָ spokesman 1
וְלִנְבִיאֵ֥נוּ spokesman 1
וְהַנְּבִיאִ֖ים spokesman 1
נְבִ֣יאֵיכֶ֔ם spokesman 1
הַנְּבִאִ֣ים ׀ spokesman 1
וּנְבִֽיאֵיהֶ֑ם spokesman 1
נְבִֽיאֵיכֶ֥ם spokesman 1
הַנְּבִאִ֜ים spokesman 1
נְבִֽיאֵיכֶ֗ם spokesman 1
נְבִאִ֣ים spokesman 1
נְבִיאֵ֨י spokesman 1
בַּנְּבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 1
הַנְּבִאִים֮ spokesman 1
מִנְּבִיאֵ֨י spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֵ֣י spokesman 1
לִנְבִיאֵ֣י spokesman 1
נְבִאִ֗ים spokesman 1
מֵֽהַנְּבִאִ֖ים spokesman 1
וּבִנְבִיאַ֖י spokesman 1
(נְבִיַּיָּ֥א) prophet. 1
נְבִיאִים֙ spokesman 1
؟ בַּנְּבִיאִֽים spokesman 1
؟ בַּנְּבִאִֽים spokesman 1
(נְבִיַּיָּ֔א) (Ithpael) to prophesy. 1
؟ בַּנְּבִיאִֽם spokesman 1
בַּנְּבִיאִֽם spokesman 1
הַנְּבִיאִם֙ spokesman 1
הַ֨נְּבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֶ֗יהָ spokesman 1
הַנְּבִיאִ֤ים spokesman 1
נְבִיאֶ֥יךָ spokesman 1
וּנְבִיאֵ֤י spokesman 1
נְבִיאֵ֥י spokesman 1
לִנְבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 1
הַ֠נְּבִיאִים spokesman 1
וְהַנְּבִיאִ֔ים spokesman 1
ψευδοπροφητῶν one who 1
הַ֨נְּבִאִ֔ים spokesman 1
וְלַ֣חֹזִ֔ים seer. 1
(נְבִיאֵ֨י) spokesman 1
בִּנְבִאָ֑יו spokesman 1
נְבִיאָֽיו spokesman 1
נְבִאִ֔ים spokesman 1
בִנְבִיאָ֖יו spokesman 1
וְהַ֨נְּבִאִ֔ים spokesman 1

Definitions Related to Prophets

G4396


   1 in Greek writings, an interpreter of oracles or of other hidden things.
   2 one who, moved by the Spirit of God and hence his organ or spokesman, solemnly declares to men what he has received by inspiration, especially concerning future events, and in particular such as relate to the cause and kingdom of God and to human salvation.
      2a the OT Prophets, having foretold the kingdom, deeds and death, of Jesus the Messiah.
      2b of John the Baptist, the herald of Jesus the Messiah.
      2c of the illustrious prophet, the Jews expected before the advent of the Messiah.
      2d the Messiah.
      2e of men filled with the Spirit of God, who by God’s authority and command in words of weight pleads the cause of God and urges salvation of men.
      2f of Prophets that appeared in the apostolic age among Christians.
         2f1 they are associated with the apostles.
         2f2 they discerned and did what is best for the Christian cause, foretelling certain future events.
         (Acts 11:27).
         2f3 in the religious assemblies of the Christians, they were moved by the Holy Spirit to speak, having power to instruct, comfort, encourage, rebuke, convict, and stimulate, their hearers.
   3 a poet (because poets were believed to sing under divine inspiration).
      3a of Epimenides (Tit. 1:12).
                  

H5030


   1 spokesman, speaker, prophet.
      1a prophet.
      1b false prophet.
      1c heathen prophet.
      

G5578


   1 one who, acting the part of a divinely inspired prophet, utters falsehoods under the name of divine prophecies.
   2 a false prophet.
   

H5013


   2 (Ithpael) to prophesy.
   

H5029


   1 prophet.
   

H2374


   1 seer.
      1a seer.
      1b vision.
      

Frequency of Prophets (original languages)

Frequency of Prophets (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Sons of the Prophets
SONS OF THE PROPHETS . See Prophecy, p. 758 a .
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - French Prophets
They first appeared in Dauphiny and Vivarais. In the year 1688, five or six hundred Protestants of both sexes gave themselves out to be prophets, and inspired of the Holy Ghost. They soon became so numerous, that there were many thousands of them inspired. They were people of all ages and sexes without distinction, though the greatest part of them were boys and girls from six or seven to twenty-five years of age. They had strange fits, which came upon them with tremblings and faintings as in a swoon, which made them stretch out their arms and legs, and stagger several times before they dropped down. They struck themselves with their hands, they fell on their backs, shut their eyes, and heaved with their breasts. They remained a while in trances, and, coming out of them with twitchings, uttered all which came in their mouths. They said they saw the heaven open, the angels, paradise, and hell. Those who were just on the point of receiving the spirit of prophecy, dropped down not only in the assemblies, crying out mercy, but in the fields, and in their own houses.
The least of their assemblies made up four or five hundred, and some of them amounted to even three or four thousand persons. When the prophets had for a while been under agitations of body, they began to prophesy. The burden of their prophecies was, Amend your lives; repent ye: the end of all things draws nigh! The hills rebounded with their loud cries for mercy, and imprecations against the priests, the church, the pope, and against the anti-christian dominion, with predictions of the approaching fall of popery. All they said at these times was heard and received with reverence and awe. In the year 1706, three or four of these prophets came over into England, and brought their prophetic spirit along with them, which discovered itself in the same ways and manners, by ecstacies, and agitations, and inspirations under them, as it had done in France; and they propagated the like spirit to others, so that before the year was out there were two or three hundred of these prophets in and about London, of both sexes, of all ages; men, women, and children: and they had delivered under inspiration four or five hundred prophetic warnings.
The great things they pretended by their spirit was, to give warning of the near approach of the kingdom of God, the happy times of the church, the millennium state. Their message was (and they were to proclaim it as heralds to the Jews, and every nation under heaven, beginning at England, ) that the grand jubilee, the acceptable year of the Lord, the accomplishment of those numerous Scriptures concerning the new heaven and the new earth, the kingdom of the Messiah, the marriage of the Lamb, the first resurrection, or the new Jerusalem descending from above, were now even at the door; that this great operation was to be wrought on the part of man by spiritual arms only, proceeding from the mouths of those who should by inspiration, or the mighty gift of the Spirit, be sent forth in great numbers to labour in the vineyard; that this mission of his servants should be witnessed to by signs and wonders from heaven, by a deluge of judgments on the wicked universally throughout the world, as famine, pestilence, earthquakes, &c. that the exterminating angels shall root out the tares, and there shall remain upon earth only good corn; and the works of men being thrown down, there shall be but one Lord, one faith, one heart, one voice among mankind. They declared that all the great things they spoke of would be manifest over the whole earth within the term of three years. These prophets also pretended to the gift of languages, of discerning the secrets of the heart, the gift of ministration of the same spirit to others by the laying on of the hands, and the gift of healing. To prove they were really inspired by the Holy Ghost, they alleged the complete joy and satisfaction they experienced, the spirit of prayer which was poured forth upon them, and the answer of their prayer by God.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Prophecy, Prophets
Reception and declaration of a word from the Lord through a direct prompting of the Holy Spirit and the human instrument thereof.
Old Testament Three key terms are used of the prophet. Ro'eh and hozeh are translated as “seer.” The most important term, nabi , is usually translated “prophet.” It probably meant “one who is called to speak.”
History Moses, perhaps Israel's greatest leader, was a prophetic prototype (Acts 3:21-24 ). He appeared with Elijah in the transfiguration (Matthew 17:1-8 ). Israel looked for a prophet like Moses (Deuteronomy 34:10 ).
Prophets also played a role in the conquest and settlement of the Promised Land. The prophetess Deborah predicted victory, pronounced judgment on doubting Barak, and even identified the right time to attack (Judges 4:6-7 ,Judges 4:6-7,4:9 ,Exodus 4:1-9:14 ). Samuel, who led Israel during its transition to monarchy, was a prophet, priest, and judge (1 Samuel 3:20 ; 1Samuel 7:6,1 Samuel 7:15 ). He was able to see into the future by vision (1 Samuel 3:11-14 ) and to ask God for thunder and rain (1 Samuel 12:18 ). Samuel led in victory over the Philistines (1 Samuel 7:1 ), and God used him to anoint kings. Gad and Nathan served as prophets to the king. Elijah and Elisha offered critique and advice for the kings. The prophets did more than predict the future; their messages called Israel to honor God. Their prophecies were not general principles but specific words corresponding to Israel's historical context.
Similarly the classical or writing prophets were joined to history. Israel's political turmoil provided the context for the writing prophets. The Assyrian rise to power after 750 B.C. furnished the focus of the ministries of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, and Micah. The Babylonian threat was the background and motive for much of the ministry of Jeremiah and Ezekiel. The advent of the Persian Empire in the latter part of the sixth century set the stage for prophets such as Obadiah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Thus the prophets spoke for God throughout Israel's history.
The prophets influenced almost every institution of Israel, despite the fact that they were often viewed with contempt: they were locked up (Jeremiah 37:1 ), ignored (Isaiah 6:9-13 ), and persecuted (1 Kings 19:1-2 ). In addition to serving judges and kings, the prophets also addressed Israel's worship. They criticized vain worship (Amos 5:23-24 ) and priestly failures (Amos 7:10 ; Malachi 2:1 ). The word of the Lord was also spoken in worship (Psalm 50:5 ; Psalm 60:6 ; Psalm 81:6-10 ; Psalm 91:14-16 ; Psalm 95:8-11 ). The prophets' call to covenant faithfulness revealed an awareness of the law (Isaiah 58:6-9 ; 1 Corinthians 14:38-39 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Amos 2:4 ; Amos 5:21-24 ).
Prophets formed guilds or schools (2 Kings 4:38 ; 1 Samuel 10:5 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ). While most references to prophetic schools belong to the period of the monarchy, there is some evidence to believe the schools continued (Jeremiah 23:13-14 ). The mere existence of the books of prophecy is probably due in part to the prophets' helpers (Jeremiah 36:4 ). Perhaps their words were recorded because they provided a moral challenge to the entire nation and not merely to a king or individual. Surely once the prophet's words were written, they were not ignored but continually studied and reapplied.
The Experience of the Prophet Prophets generally shared several key experiences and characteristics. (1) An essential mark of a prophet was a call from God. Attempting to prophesy without such a commission was false prophecy (Jeremiah 14:14 ). The prophets were at times allowed to see into the throne room or heavenly court (Isaiah 6:1-7 ; 1 Kings 22:19-23 ; Jeremiah 23:18-22 ; compare Amos 3:7 ; Job 1:6-12 ; Job 2:1-6 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1-4 ; Revelation 1:1-3 ; Revelation 22:18-19 ). (2) Prophets received a word from God through many means—direct declarations, visions, dreams, or an appearance of God. The great variety in prophetic experience prohibits any oversimplification; ecstatic experiences were not mandatory for receiving God's word. (3) Prophets spoke the word of God. They were primarily spokespersons who called His people to obedience by appealing to Israel's past and future. For example, God's past blessing and future judgment should provoke social justice and mercy for the disadvantaged. (4) Prophets relayed God's message by deed as well as by word. They worked symbolic acts which served as dramatic, living parables. Hosea's marriage taught about God's relationship with Israel (Hosea 2:1-13 ; see also Isaiah 20:1-3 ; Ezekiel 4:1-3 ; Jeremiah 19:10-11 ). (5) The prophets also performed miracles which confirmed their message. While some prophets like Moses (Judges 4:9,4 ) and Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ) worked many miracles, virtually all prophets occasionally saw a miraculous fulfillment of God's word (Isaiah 38:8 ). This miracle-working capacity also included healing (1 Kings 17:17-22 ; 2 Kings 5:1 ; Matthew 12:22-29 ). (6) Prophets also conveyed the word of God by writing (Isaiah 8:1 ; Ezekiel 43:11 ). (7) Prophets were to minister to their people. They were to test God's peoples' lives (Jeremiah 6:27 ) and be watchmen for moral compromise (Ezekiel 3:17 ). Particularly important was the role of intercessor—sometimes even for the prophet's enemy (1 Kings 13:6 ; 1 Kings 17:17-24 ; 2 Kings 4:18-37 ; Amos 7:2 ; Jeremiah 14:17-20 ,Jeremiah 14:17-20,14:21 ; Isaiah 59:16 ). (8) Throughout Israel's history genuine prophets had ecstatic experiences.
False Prophets Distinguishing between false and true prophets was very difficult, though several tests of authenticity emerge in the Old Testament. The true prophet must be loyal to the biblical faith directing one to worship Yahweh alone (Deuteronomy 13:1-3 ). A second test required that the words of a true prophet be fulfilled (Deuteronomy 18:22 ; Jeremiah 42:1-6 ; Ezekiel 33:30-33 ). We must remember that this is a difficult test to apply. There were often long lapses between predictions and fulfillment (Micah 3:12 ; Jeremiah 26:16-19 ). Some predictions seemed very unlikely, and others were conditional—based upon the hearer's response (Jonah 3:4-5 ). Furthermore, prophets could behave inappropriately (Numbers 12:1-2 ; Numbers 20:1-12 ; Jeremiah 15:19-21 ; Jeremiah 38:24-27 ). Prophets appeared ambivalent at times when simply delivering the word of God as it was given (2 Kings 20:1-6 ). Also one could predict correctly while not being loyal to Yahweh (Deuteronomy 13:1-3 ). Accurate prediction was not a final test. Other tests included agreement with previous prophets' words (Jeremiah 28:8 ), good character (Micah 3:11 ), and a willingness to suffer because of faithfulness (1 Kings 22:27-28 ; Jeremiah 38:3-13 ). Similarly, the New Testament believers had to distinguish true prophecy (1 John 4:1 ; 1 Corinthians 14:29 ). See False Prophet .
Hints for Interpretation Prophets intended to evoke faith by proclamation, not merely to predict the future. Thus reading the prophets with a lustful curiosity is inappropriate. Our primary desire must be to know God, not just the facts of the future.
The interpreter must remember the limited perspective of the prophet. The prophets were not all-knowing but all-telling—that is they told what God had told them to tell. Prophecy has a progressive character. One must seek to read prophecy in light of its whole, deriving partial insight from different prophets. Prophecy must also be read in its historical context. Particular attention must be paid to the intention of the prophet. For example, a prophet may rebuke another country to offer assistance to Israel (Isaiah 46-47 ), make Israel examine its own conduct (Amos 1-2 ), or to bring a nation to repentance (Jonah 3:4,8-9 ).
Caution must be exercised when reading predictive prophecy because prophecy often has more than one fulfillment. Many prophecies have an immediate application to their own situation and are also applicable to another context. Thus the prediction that Christ is born of a virgin (Matthew 1:23 ) also had a fulfillment in Isaiah's day (Isaiah 8:3 ). Similarly prophecies of “the day of the Lord” had several fulfillments (partial) which also foreshadowed a final fulfillment (Obadiah 1:15 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1 ; Zephaniah 1:7 ,Zephaniah 1:7,1:14 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; compare 2 Peter 3:10 ).
Modern evangelicals understand predictive prophecies in several ways. (1) Some prophecies seem to have a direct, literal fulfillment: the Messiah was to be born in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:5-6 ; Micah 5:2 ). (2) Not all predictions were fulfilled literally. Jesus taught that the prediction about Elijah's return was fulfilled by John the Baptist and not a literal Elijah (Matthew 11:13-15 ; Malachi 3:1-4 ). Similarly, Paul applied prophecies about literal, national Israel to the church (Romans 9:25-26 ; Hosea 1:9-10 , Hosea 2:23 ). The literal father of Israel, Abraham, was seen to be the father of the believing church (Romans 4:11 ,Romans 4:11,4:16 ; Galatians 3:7 ). This distinctively Christian reading was thought to be legitimate because of Christ's fulfillment and interpretation of the Old Testament (Luke 4:17-21 ). (3) This Christian reading of the Old Testament often takes the form of typological interpretation. The New Testament authors believed Old Testament events, persons, or things foreshadowed the later Christian story. Thus, they used the images of the Old Testament to understand the New Testament realities. Christ can be compared to Adam (1 Corinthians 15:22-23 ; see 1 Corinthians 10:11 ). (4) Some readers believe that Old Testament words take on a “fuller sense” or meaning. Old Testament expressions may have a divine significance, unforeseen by the Old Testament author, which comes to light only after God's later word or deed. See Typology .
New Testament The word prophetes means “to speak before” or “to speak for.” Thus it refers to one who speaks for God or Christ. Prophets were also called pneumatics ( pneumatikos ), “spiritual ones” (1 Corinthians 14:37 ). The prophets played a foundational role in the early church (1 Corinthians 12:28-31 ; Ephesians 4:11 ; Ephesians 2:20 ). Due to the presumed prophetic silence in the time between the Testaments, the coming of Jesus is seen as an inbreaking of the Spirit's work especially visible in prophecy. For example, in Luke the angel's visitation and prediction (Luke 1:11 ,Luke 1:11,1:26-27 ) provoked Mary and Zecharias to prophesy (Luke 1:46-67 ; Luke 67-79 ). After an angelic visitation to the shepherds, the prophet and prophetess declared Jesus to be the redemption Israel awaited (Luke 2:10-12 ,Luke 2:10-12,2:25 ,1 Thessalonians 5:20-219:36-38 ). John the Baptist also predicted that Jesus would baptize in the Spirit (Matthew 3:11 ).
Jesus called Himself a prophet (Luke 13:33 ). His miracles and discernment were rightly understood as prophetic (Acts 27:22-26 ). He taught not by citing expert rabbis, but with His own prophetic authority (Mark 1:22 ; Luke 4:24 ).
The early believers saw the outpouring of the Spirit (Acts 2:17 ) as a fulfillment of Joel's prediction that all God's people, young and old, male and female, would prophesy. These gifts may intensify at the end of time as will evil. While any Christian might occasionally receive a prophecy, some seem to have a special gift of prophecy (1 Corinthians 12:29 ; 1 Corinthians 13:2 ). Prophets function primarily in the worship of the church (Acts 13:2 ). They predict (Acts 11:28 ; Acts 20:23 ; John 4:19 ), announce judgments (Acts 13:11 ; Acts 28:25-28 ), act symbolically (Acts 21:10-11 ), and receive visions (Acts 9:10-11 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1 ). Prophetic insights led to missionary efforts (Acts 13:1-3 ; Acts 10:10-17 ; Acts 15:28 ,Acts 15:28,15:32 ). While teaching and prophecy are different, they also can be related (Acts 13:1-2 ; Revelation 2:20 ). Some prophets “preached” lengthy messages (Acts 15:32 ) and gave exposition to biblical texts (Luke 1:67-79 ; Ephesians 3:5 ; Romans 11:25-36 ).
The prophets used phrases such as “the Lord says” or “the Holy Spirit says” as introductory formulas for prophetic insight into the future (Acts 21:11 ), or for inspired adaptation of an Old Testament text (Hebrews 3:7 ).
New Testament prophecy was limited (1 Corinthians 13:9 ); it was to be evaluated by the congregation (1 Corinthians 14:29 ; 1618831507_87 ). One may even respond inappropriately to prophecy (Acts 21:12 ). The supreme test for prophecy is loyalty to Christ (1 Corinthians 12:3 ; Revelation 19:10 ). Some Christians have the gift of discernment (1 Corinthians 12:10 ). Jesus said prophets could be known by their fruit (Matthew 7:15-20 ). Paul demanded orderly, Christ-honoring, upbuilding prophecy which submits to apostolic authority (1 Corinthians 14:26-40 ). Thus prophecy is not without restraint. Circumstance may even demand that the dress of men and women prophets be stipulated (1 Corinthians 11:5-7 ). Prophecy outside of apostolic authority can be safely ignored; thus prophecy is not a threat to Scripture's special authority (Ezekiel 18:1 ; 2 Timothy 3:16 ; 2 Peter 1:20-21 ).
Randy Hatchett
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sons of the Prophets
Members of a band or guild of prophets. “Sons of” refers to membership in a group or class and does not imply a family relationship. “Sons of the prophets” suggests a community or guild of prophets. The most extensive use of the expression occurs in the Elisha stories where the prophet is portrayed as the leader of the prophetic guild. In that capacity, Elisha cared for the needs of a prophet's widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), agreed to the building of a common dwelling (2 Kings 6:1-7 ), and presided at a common meal (2 Kings 4:38-44 ). The sons of the prophets functioned either as witnesses (2Kings 2:3,2Kings 2:5,2Kings 2:7,2 Kings 2:15 ) or as agents of Elisha's ministry (2 Kings 9:1-3 ).
The single reference outside the Elisha cycle to the sons of the prophets is to someone identified as “a certain man of the sons of the prophets” who condemned Ahab's release of Ben-Hadad (1 Kings 20:35-42 ). The “company of prophets” (1Samuel 10:5,1 Samuel 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ) are groups of prophets whose charismatic spirit involved Saul in prophecy (1 Samuel 10:10 ) and, later, both Saul and his messengers (1 Samuel 19:20 ).
Amos' famous declaration, “I am not a prophet, nor am I the son of a prophet” (1 Samuel 7:14 NAS) is probably a declaration of independence from the prophetic guilds of his day. Similarly, Jeremiah's claim that God made him a prophet even before conception ( Jeremiah 1:5 ) may obliquely represent a rejection of association with the prophetic schools of Judah. See Prophet.
Fred L. Horton, Jr.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophets, the
The books so designated form a distinct and most important part of scripture. Prophecy usually implied a ruined state of things among God's people, calling for His intervention. Some of the prophecies are appeals, reminding the people of what God had done for them, and declaring how willing and ready He was to bless them if they would be faithful to Him; though interwoven with this are constant predictions of that which will be for the blessing of Israel in the future, after they have for the time been set aside. Others strictly allude to events which were then or are still future. As a whole the prophets refer to Israel as an inner circle, or chief platform, on which the dealings of Jehovah were and will be developed, and with which the Messiah is in immediate relation. The nations formed an outer circle, and were regarded more or less according to their relations with the twelve tribes. These nations are sometimes spoken of as being God's instruments by whom He punished His own people, they themselves having afterwards to bear the punishments of God. Beyond and above all, there is God's universal government; in which everything is in result to be made subject to the Messiah, while God's promises are made good to Israel, for all Israel will again be brought into blessing, with Jehovah in their midst surrounded with glory, and the nations will be blessed with them.
The Prophetic scriptures naturally fall into three divisions.
1. Those that were given to Israel while still a nation, though divided into two parts, extending to the complete break up of Judah.
2. Those referring to the times of the Gentiles, which began with Nebuchadnezzar, and, continuing beyond the days of the Messiah on earth, are still running on: these are almost entirely given in Daniel.
3. Those given after a portion of Judah had returned from exile, when they were helped by the prophecies of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, which present the time of the Messiah on earth, and go even beyond to future blessing.
To these may be added the prophecies in the Gospels, the Epistles, and the Revelation, embracing the judgements of God upon apostate Christendom and the nations generally; the final overthrow of Satan, and universal blessing, ending with the judgement of the dead and a glorious outlook into the eternal state.
It will not be inappropriate here to add a few words as to the relative position, in point of time, of the various O.T. prophetic scriptures. It may be premised that the burden of the prophets Obadiah, Jonah, and Nahum has special reference to Edom and to Nineveh, that is, to peoples that were always hostile to Israel. There is but little whereby to fix precisely the dates of Joel and Habakkuk. Of the remainder, Hosea, Amos, and Isaiah are anterior to the captivity of the ten tribes. The visions of Isaiah, however, have reference to Judah and Jerusalem. It appears probable, whatever may be the reason, that the testimony commonly known as "the prophets" began in the time of Jeroboam 2 king of Israel, Uzziah being his contemporary in Judah. The introduction of prophetic scripture indicated that the ordinary relations of the people with God had broken down, Lo-ammi being prophetically written upon them.
Others follow closely, as Micah, who prophesies concerning Samaria and Jerusalem, though no personal reference is made to a king of Israel; and, either before or contemporary with the captivity of Judah, Jeremiah and Zephaniah. The prophets Ezekiel and Daniel speak from the land of Chaldea, when all present hope was over for both Israel and Judah, and the times of the Gentiles had set in. After the return from the captivity we have Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. The testimony of the prophets extended thus over a period of from three to four hundred years.
The approximate dates of each of the prophets may be seen in the tables of chronology under KINGS.
The Books of Isaiah and Jeremiah are remarkable, the former as being the most comprehensive of the prophecies, taking up almost in order the various moral questions involved in God's dealings with Israel, and giving what may be described as a general prophetic framework; and the latter as bringing out, in a peculiarly touching way, the feelings induced by the Spirit of Christ in regard of God's people when, there being no remedy, the end was come.
Two remarks of great importance as regards prophecy may be made: first, that no prophecy carries its own interpretation: each has to be understood in its place and relation to the whole system of prophecy. Secondly, that the scope of all prophecy takes us on to the day of the Lord; the judgement of the nations and of the wicked in Israel; the establishment of the kingdom; and the reunion of Israel and Judah under the Lord their righteousness. This is the great end of God's ways on earth. This recovery and blessing by God of His ancient people, in their Messiah, may be said to be a golden thread running through all the prophets. It was ever before God, and shines out everywhere.
It is of the greatest importance, both for the right understanding of these scriptures, and for a true appreciation of what Christianity is, to see that the church has no place in the prophets. In the church there is neither Jew nor Gentile, and the prophets recognise both, while carefully maintaining the distinction between them. Prophecy treats of the earth and of the government of God and its issue: the Christian belongs to heaven, and he will reign with Christ in the kingdom. In the A.V. of the O.T. the headings of many of the chapters are misleading: the church often spoken of in them is never found in the text; Christ is there, and the manifestation of God; and the scriptures which develop His ways, and speak of the sufferings and the glories of the One to whom the Christian is united, are of deep interest to him, though he himself may not be immediately spoken of.
Some Christians, though they know and enjoy certain portions of prophecy., without seeing its reference strictly to the remnant of Israel, fail to study the prophets. Not a few deem the study to be unprofitable — the subject is too mysterious, they say, and commentators differ so widely in their interpretation! One great hindrance to the understanding of the prophets is that they are not allowed to mean what they say. To allow Israel to signify Israel in its punishment, its restoration, and its future earthly glory, at once clears away a mass of difficulties. Many sayings of the Lord and other parts of scripture cannot be understood unless a true outline of prophecy be grasped; and if this be understood, none of the moral teaching and consolation as to the unchangeable nature and ways of God will be lost.
The twelve prophets that follow the Book of Daniel are often called THE MINOR PROPHETS, simply because they are shorter than the others, and not as being in any respect inferior.
The following are some prophetic events that await fulfilment:-
1. The rapture of the saints, when the dead in Christ will be raised, the living changed, and death swallowed up in victory. 1 Corinthians 15:51,52 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16,17 .
2. The return of a portion of the Jews to Palestine, who in unbelief will rebuild the temple, and re-establish their ordinances. Isaiah 17:10,11 ; Isaiah 66:1-3 ; Revelation 11:1,2 .
3. The resuscitation of the Roman empire, ten of the western powers being more or less under one head. It will at first exercise a protectorate over the Jewish nation. Isaiah 28:14-18 ; Daniel 2:40-43 ; Daniel 7:7,8 ; Daniel 9:27 ; Revelation 17:7,8,10-13 .
4. The apostasy and the revelation of the man of sin. 2 Thessalonians 2:3-12 .
5. The full development of the Romish ecclesiastical system, which at first as a harlot dominates the empire, but afterwards is destroyed by the ten kings. 2 Timothy 3:1-9 ; 2 Timothy 4:3,4 ; 2 Peter 2:1-3 ; Jude 3,4,11 ; Revelation 17:1-6,16 .
6. The casting out of the devil and his angels from heaven, when Satan will energise the beast (head of the Roman empire) and the false prophet (Antichrist): they will persecute the pious Jews, will abolish the worship of Jehovah at Jerusalem, and enforce idolatry and the worship of the image of the beast everywhere. Thus there will be formed a trinity of evil. Daniel 7:19-25 ; Daniel 9:27 ; Daniel 11:36-39 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:4 ; Revelation 13:1-18 .
7. The appearing of the Lord with the heavenly saints to judge His enemies, and to deliver His earthly people. Daniel 2:34,35,44,45 ; Matthew 24:30 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10 ; Revelation 19:11-21 .
8. The gathering of the ten tribes after the coming of the Lord so that all Israel will be reunited in the land, under the sceptre of the Lord, He being the Antitype of David. They will be attacked in their land by Gog (Russia) who will be utterly destroyed. Isaiah 11:11-14 ; Ezekiel 36 , Ezekiel 38 , Ezekiel 39 ; Daniel 12:2,3 ; Romans 11:26,27 .
9. The binding of Satan; the creation will be delivered from the bondage of corruption, and Christ will reign over the earth a thousand years in peace, being Antitype of Solomon. Psalm 72:8,17 ; Isaiah 2:4 ; Isaiah 11:6-9 ; Isaiah 25:6-8 ; Habakkuk 2:14 ; Zechariah 14:9 ; Romans 8:21,22 ; Revelation 20:1-6 .
10. The loosing of Satan for a short time, who will again deceive the nations: they will attack the saints on earth and Jerusalem; but the enemy will be destroyed by fire, and Satan be cast into the lake of fire. Revelation 20:7-10 . The eternal state will ensue.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophets, Sons of the
These are referred to in the O.T., and at times were numerous. They are spoken of as being at Bethel, Jericho, and Gilgal. 2 Kings 2:3,5 ; 2 Kings 4:38 . At one place their dwelling was too limited, and they cut down timber to build themselves a larger place. 2 Kings 6:1,2 . We read of them only in the days of Samuel, Elijah, and Elisha, who were held in repute by them. When Elijah was about to be taken up, these prophets apparently had a revelation concerning it, and they sent fifty men 'to view afar off,' and afterwards sent fifty to look for the prophet. 2 Kings 2:7,17 : cf. 1 Samuel 10:10 . The 'company of prophets' with psaltery, tabret, pipe, and harp, whom Saul met, were probably sons of the prophets. 1 Samuel 10:5 . The hundred prophets whom Obadiah hid from the persecution of Jezebel may have been of the same. 1 Kings 18:4 . From whence these prophets were gathered, and what their functions were is not recorded.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophets, False
These, at various periods in the history of Israel, appeared in large numbers: Ahab had 'about four hundred' of them. 1 Kings 22:6 . Such are described as speaking "a vision of their own heart, and not out of the mouth of the Lord." Jeremiah 23:16 . There were three that opposed Jeremiah to his face — Hananiah, Ahab, and Zedekiah. Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 29:21 . In the N.T. the Lord, early in His ministry, warned His hearers to beware of false prophets, Matthew 7:15 ; and in the church, the spirits are to be tried, for many false prophets have gone forth into the world. 1 John 4:1 . They were and are Satan's counterfeits of the prophets of God, and their purpose is, on the principle of imitation, to neutralise the word of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - False Prophets
FALSE PROPHETS
1. For the understanding of this expression in the NT, we must correctly apprehend the character of the false prophets of the OT. To earlier writers these men were essentially and consciously false, either prophets of false gods, holders of opinions which did not agree with the revealed character of Jehovah the God of Israel, or men who knowingly spoke falsehoods in the name of Jehovah. Modern biblical science takes a more lenient view. It does not deny the existence of such as either possible or actual (Jeremiah 2:8, Ezekiel 13:1-9), though in the matter of creed many of them were probably ‘syncretistic’ rather than simply ‘anti-Jehovistic’ (A. B. Davidson). The majority may be regarded rather as men accustomed to the outward signs of the prophetic office, the hairy mantle (Zechariah 13:4, cf. 1 Kings 19:19), the methods of prophetic instruction (Jeremiah 28:10), and the use of the prophetic formula, ‘Thus saith Jehovah’ (Jeremiah 23:25; Jeremiah 23:31, Ezekiel 13:6), but who had never come under the influence of, or had failed to remain in personal contact with, the revealing Spirit ‘who spake by the prophets.’ Hence the message they gave was merely one that was agreeable to the common thought of the people, whether it concerned the internal condition and life of the nation or its relation to surrounding States. It was principally in the later prophetic period of Micah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah that these prophets of smooth things, subject to no true and Divine revelation, came to be regarded as professional tricksters, making a living out of their false predictions (Micah 3:5, Zechariah 13:4-5). But whether from the desire of gain or of public favour, these false prophets expressed the optimistic, what would be regarded as the patriotic, view of the state and future of their country, and have been described as ‘nationalistic rather than false.’ It is this optimistic, nationalist outlook that particularly explains the reference in Luke 6:26, ‘in the same manner did their fathers (speak well) to the false prophets.’ The false prophets, as declaring the things the nation wished to hear, naturally succeeded in gaining general approval and credence. This is particularly shown in Jeremiah 6:13-15 and Micah 2:11, and is confirmed by instances, not a few, in which the apparently unpatriotic attitude of the true prophet, compared with that assumed by the false, resulted in disfavour and even in persecution (1 Kings 22:27, 2 Chronicles 16:10, Jeremiah 20:2). It was the false prophet, representing the national ‘wish that is father to the thought,’ of whom ‘all men spoke well.’ Our Lord therefore takes such as types of that ill-deserved general approval which may be won by flattery, by concealment of the truth, by the denying or minimizing of danger and of retribution: methods denied to those who ‘are of the truth.’ This view of false prophecy as the saying of things men wish to hear ‘for the hire of wrong-doing,’ is to be discerned in 2 Peter 2:2 f., where the false prophet is the analogue of the false teacher, himself guilty of ‘lascivious doings’ (cf. 2 Peter 2:13-19 for the character of this teaching).
2. The false prophets in the Christian Church.—In the NT as in the OT, the prophetic ministry must be regarded in its two branches as interpretative of God’s mind and as predictive. False prophets of both these classes were to be expected in the Christian community. To grasp the significance of the warnings against these men, the importance of prophecy in NT times must be borne in mind. Prophecy was a more important gift than tongues (1 Corinthians 14), and the prophet is in the list of officers associated with the Apostles, taking, with this one exception, precedence of all other ranks. The prominence of the prophet may be seen in the Didache (c. 11), and in the part played by him in the Montanist movement. Hence their truth or falseness, their faithful use, or their abuse of the spiritual gift, was an important factor for the infant Church. Hence our Lord warns against them as ‘wolves in sheep’s clothing’ (Matthew 7:15), and St. John at the end of the Apostolic age repeats the warning (1 John 4:1). In the former case the reference is apparently to their unethical teaching; in the latter to their denial or misinterpretation of the fact of the Incarnation. Without using the name, our Lord warns also against such men, as falsely predicting or announcing the Parousia (Matthew 24:5-7). In 2 Peter 2:1 stress is laid upon false teaching of an antinomian character, the authors of which are called ‘false teachers,’ but find their analogy in the ‘false prophets’ of the OT.
Literature.—Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, art. ‘Prophecy and Prophets’ (p. 111); Bonwetsch, Die Prophetic in apost. und nach-apost. Zeitalter; Harnack, Lehre der Zwolf, ad xi. 5; Expositor, v. ii. [1] 1; Expos. Times, v. [2] 122.
J. T. L. Maggs.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah
(the dates apply to the kings.)
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.
Prophets.
b.c.
Kings.
Time of Reign.
Samuel.
1095
Saul,
Reigned 40 years.
Gad.
1055
David,
Reigned 40 years.
Nathan.
1015
Solomon,
Reigned 40 years.
IN THE DIVIDED KINGDOM.
JUDAH.
ISRAEL.
Began b.c.
Kings.
Reigned Years
Prophets.
Began b.c.
Kings.
Reigned Years
Prophets.
975
Rehoboam,
Shemaiah.
975
Jeroboam,
Ahijah.
958
Abijah,
Iddo.
955
Asa,
Oded.
Azariah.
954
Nadab,
Hanani.
953
Baasha,
930
Elah,
929
Zimri,
7 dys.
929
Omri,
918
Ahab,
Elijah.
914
Jehoshaphat,
Jehu.
Micaiah.
898
Ahaziah,
Elisha.
Jahaziel.
896
Joram,
892
Jehoram,
Eliezer.
885
Ahaziah,
884
Athaliah,
884
Jehu,
878
Jehoash,
Zechariah, son of Jehoiada.
856
Jehoahaz,
Jonah. [1]
841
Joash,
839
Amaziah,
825
Jeroboam II.,
Hosea.
810
Uzziah,
Zechariah,
Amos.
2 Chronicles 26:5.
784
Interregnum,
773
Zachariah,
6 mo.
772
Shallum,
1 mo.
772
Menahem,
761
Pekahiah,
759
Pekah,
758
Jotham,
Isaiah.
742
Ahaz,
Micah.
739
Anarchy,
Oded.
730
Hoshea,
726
Hezekiah,
Nahum.
721
The kingdom of Israel overthrown by the Assyrians and Samaria . destroyed.
698
Manasseh,
Joel.
643
Amon,
641
Josiah,
Jeremiah.
610
Jehoahaz,
3 mos.
Habakkuk
610
Jehoiakim,
Zephaniah.
599
Jehoiachin,
100 days.
Ezekiel.
——
Daniel.
599
Zedekiah,
Obadiah. [1]
Persian Kings, after the Captivity.
588
Jerusalem destroyed.
536 First year of Cyrus.
Prophets
A prophet, in the strict and proper sense, was one to whom the knowledge of secret things was revealed, that he might declare them to others, whether they were things past, or present, or to come. The woman of Samaria perceived our Saviour was a prophet, by his telling her the secrets of her past life, John 4:19 . The prophet Elisha had the present conduct of his servant Gehazi revealed to him, 2 Kings 5:26 . And most of the prophets had revelations concerning future events; above all, concerning the coming and kingdom of the Messiah: "He has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David, as he spake by the mouth of his holy prophets, which have been since the world began,"
Luke 1:69-70 . Nevertheless, in a more lax or analogical sense, the title prophet is sometimes given to persons who had no such revelation, nor were properly inspired. Thus Aaron is said to be Moses's prophet: "The Lord said unto Moses, See, I have made thee a God to Pharaoh, and Aaron thy brother shall be thy prophet," Exodus 7:1 ; because Aaron received the divine messages, which he carried immediately from Moses; whereas other prophets receive their messages immediately from God himself. In this respect, as Moses stood in the place of God to Pharaoh, so Aaron acted in the character of his prophet. The title of prophets is given also to the sacred musicians, who sung the praises of God, or who accompanied the song with musical instruments. Thus "the sons of Asaph, and of Heman, and of Jeduthun," are said to "prophesy with harps, with psalteries, and with cymbals," 1 Chronicles 25:1 ; and they prophesied, it is said, "according to the order of the king." Perhaps Miriam, the sister of Aaron, may be called a prophetess only on this account, that she led the concert of the women, who sung the song of Moses with timbrels and with dances, Exodus 15:20-21 . Thus the Heathen poets, who sung or composed verses in praise of their gods, were called by the Romans vates, or prophets; which is of the same import with the Greek προφητης , a title which St. Paul gives to Epimenides, a Cretan poet, Titus 1:12 .
Godwin observes, that, for the propagation of learning, colleges and schools were in divers places erected for the prophets. The first intimation we have in Scripture of these schools is in 1 Samuel 10:5 , where we read of "a company of prophets coming down from the high place with a psaltery, a tabret, a pipe, and a harp before them, and they did prophesy." They are supposed to be the students in a college of prophets at גבעת , or "the hill," as we render it, "of God." Our translators elsewhere retain the same Hebrew word, as supposing it to be the proper name of a place, "Jonathan smote the garrison of the Philistines that was in Geba," 1 Samuel 13:3 . Some persons have imagined that the ark, or at least a synagogue, or some place of public worship, was at this time at Geba, and that this is the reason of its being styled in the former passage גבעת האלהים , the hill of God. We read afterward of such another company of prophets at Naioth in Ramah, "prophesying, and Samuel standing as appointed over them," 1 Samuel 19:19-20 . The students in these colleges were called sons of the prophets, who are frequently mentioned in after ages, even in the most degenerate times. Thus we read of the sons of the prophets that were at Bethel; and of another school at Jericho; and of the sons of the prophets at Gilgal, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 ; 2 Kings 4:38 . It should seem, that these sons of the prophets were very numerous; for of this sort were probably the prophets of the Lord, whom Jezebel cut off; "but Obadiah took a hundred of them, and hid them by fifty in a cave," 1 Kings 18:4 . In these schools young men were educated under a proper master, who was commonly, if not always, an inspired prophet, in the knowledge of religion, and in sacred music, 1 Samuel 10:5 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 , and were thereby qualified to be public preachers, which seems to have been part of the business of the prophets on the Sabbath days and festivals, 2 Kings 4:23 . It should seem, that God generally chose the prophets, whom he inspired, out of these schools. Amos, therefore, speaks of it as an extraordinary case, that though he was not one of the sons of the prophets, but a herdsman, "yet the Lord took him as he followed the flock, and said unto him, Go, prophesy unto my people Israel," Amos 7:14-15 . That it was usual for some of these schools, or at least for their tutors, to be endued with a prophetic spirit, appears from the relation of the prophecies concerning the ascent of Elijah, delivered to Elisha by the sons of the prophets both at Jericho and at Bethel, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 .
The Hebrew prophets present a succession of men at once the most singular and the most venerable that ever appeared, in so long a line of time, in the world. They had special communion with God; they laid open the scenes of the future; they were ministers of the promised Christ. They upheld religion and piety in the worst times, and at the greatest risks; and their disinterestedness was only equalled by their patriotism. The houses in which they lived were generally mean, and of their own building, 2 Kings 6:2-4 . Their food was chiefly pottage of herbs, unless when the people sent them some better provision, as bread, parched corn, honey, dried fruits, and the like, 1 Kings 14:3 ; 2 Kings 4:38-39 ; 2 Kings 4:42 . Their dress was plain and coarse, tied about with a leathern girdle, Zechariah 13:4 ; 2 Kings 1:8 . Riches were no temptation to them; therefore Elisha not only refused Naaman's presents, but punished his servant Gehazi very severely for clandestinely obtaining a small share of them, 2 Kings 5:15 , &c. To succeeding ages they have left a character consecrated by holiness, and "visions of the Holy One," which still unveil to the church his most glorious attributes, and his deepest designs. "Prophecy," says the Apostle Peter, "came not of old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost," 2 Peter 1:21 . They flourished in a continued succession during a period of more than a thousand years, reckoning from Moses to Malachi, all cooperating in the same designs., uniting in one spirit to deliver the same doctrines, and to predict the same blessings to mankind. Their claims to a divine commission were demonstrated by the intrinsic excellency of their doctrine; by the disinterested zeal and undaunted courage with which they prosecuted their ministry, and persevered in their great design, and by the unimpeachable integrity of their conduct. But even those credentials of a divine mission were still farther confirmed by the exercise of miraculous powers, and by the completion of many less important predictions which they uttered, Deuteronomy 13:1-3 ; Deuteronomy 18:22 ; Joshua 10:13 ; 1 Samuel 12:8 ; 2 Kings 1:10 ; Isaiah 38:8 ; Matthew 23:27-296 ; 1 Samuel 9:6 ; 1 Kings 13:3 ; Jeremiah 28:9 ; Ezekiel 33:33 . When not immediately employed in the discharge of their sacred office, they lived sequestered from the world, in religious communities, or wandered "in deserts, in mountains, and in caves of the earth;" distinguished by their apparel, and by the general simplicity of their style of life, 2 Kings 1:8 ; 2 Kings 4:10 ; 2 Kings 4:38 ; 2 Kings 6:1 ; Isaiah 20:2 ; Matthew 3:4 ; Hebrews 11:38 ; Revelation 11:3 . They were the established oracles of their country, and consulted upon all occasions when it was necessary to collect the divine will on any civil or religious question. These illustrious personages were likewise as well the types as the harbingers of that greater Prophet whom they foretold; and in the general outline of their character, as well as in particular events of their lives, they prefigured to the Jews the future Teacher of mankind. Like him, also, they laboured by every exertion to instruct and reclaim; reproving and threatening the sinful, however exalted in rank, or encircled by power, with such fearless confidence and sincerity as often excited respect. The most intemperate princes were sometimes compelled unwillingly to hear and to obey their directions, 1 Kings 12:21-24 ; 1 Kings 13:2-6 ; 1 Kings 20:42-43 ; 1 Kings 21:27 ; 2 Chronicles 28:9-14 ; though often so incensed by their rebuke, as to resent it by the severest persecutions. Then it was that the prophets exhibited the integrity of their characters, by zealously encountering oppression, hatred, and death, in the cause of religion. Then it was that they firmly supported "trial of cruel mockings and scourgings, yea, moreover, of bonds and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword; they wandered about, destitute, afflicted, tormented," evil intreated for those virtues of which the memorial should flourish to posterity, and martyred for righteousness, which, whenever resentment should subside, it would be deemed honourable to reverence, 1618831507_87 .
The manner in which the prophets published their predictions was, either by uttering them aloud in some public place, or by affixing them on the gates of the temple, Jeremiah 7:2 ; Ezekiel 3:10 , where they might be generally seen and read. Upon some important occasions, when it was necessary to rouse the fears of a disobedient people, and to recall them to repentance, the prophets, as objects of universal attention, appear to have walked about publicly in sackcloth, and with every external mark of humiliation and sorrow. They then adopted extraordinary modes of expressing their convictions of impending wrath, and endeavoured to awaken the apprehensions of their country, by the most striking illustration of threatened punishment. Thus Jeremiah made bonds and yokes, and put them upon his neck, Jeremiah 27, strongly to intimate the subjection that God would bring on the nations whom Nebuchadnezzar should subdue. Isaiah likewise walked naked, that is, without the rough garment of the prophet, and barefoot, as a sign of the distress that awaited the Egyptians, Isaiah 20. So Jeremiah broke the potter's vessel, Jeremiah 19; and Ezekiel publicly removed his household goods from the city, 2 Kings 25:4-5 ; Ezekiel 12:7 ; more forcibly to represent by these actions some correspondent calamities ready to fall on nations obnoxious to God's wrath; this mode of expressing important circumstances by action, being customary and familiar among all eastern nations. The great object of prophecy was, as has been before observed, a description of the Messiah, and of his kingdom, Matthew 26:56 ; Luke 1:70 ; Luke 18:31 ; Luke 24:44 ; John 1:45 ; Acts 3:18 ; Acts 3:24 ; Acts 10:43 ; Acts 13:29 ; Acts 15:15 ; Acts 28:23 ; 1 Peter 1:10-12 . These were gradually unfolded by successive prophets in predictions more and more distinct. They were at first held forth in general promises; they were afterward described by figures, and shadowed out under types and allusive institutions, and finally foretold in the full lustre of descriptive prophecy. The Hebrew prophets were chosen of God to testify beforehand of the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow. See PROPHECY .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Prophets
A class of men of God, especially in the Old Testament dispensation, inspired to foretell future and secret events; and who also revealed he will of God as to current events and duties, and were his ambassadors to men. But the word is sometimes used in a wider sense; thus Aaron was Moses; prophet, Exodus 7:1 , appointed to deliver to the people the messages that Moses received from God; the sacred musicians are said to prophecy, 1 Chronicles 25:1 ; and Paul gives the name, according to the custom of the Greeks, to the poet Aratus, "a prophet of their own," Titus 1:12 . Scripture does not withhold the name of prophet from impostors, although they falsely boasted of inspiration. As true prophets, when filled y the energy of God's Spirit, were sometimes fervidly and vehemently agitated, similar motions were called prophesying when exhibited by persons who were filled with an evil spirit, "prophesied in his house," 1 Samuel 18:10 . In the New Testament, the "prophets" were a class of men supernaturally endowed, and standing next to the apostles. They seem to have spoken from immediate inspiration, whether in reference to future events of to the mind of the Spirit generally, as in expounding the oracles of God. See 1 Corinthians 11:4 14:1,30 , etc. Thus it is said in Acts 13:1 , that Judas and Silas were prophets; that there were in the church at Antioch certain prophets and teachers, that is, official instructors. God has set in the church, first apostles, then prophets, 1 Corinthians 12:28 . See also Ephesians 2:20 Revelation 18:20 Acts 21:9 .
The Old Testament prophets were special agents of Jehovah, raised up and sent as occasion required, to incite to duty, to convict of sin, to call to repentance and reformation, to instruct kings, and denounce against nations the judgments of God, 2 Kings 17:13 Jeremiah 25:4 . They aided the priest and Levites in teaching religion to the people, especially in the kingdom of Israel, from which the true priests of the Lord withdrew, 2 Kings 4:23 ; and cooperated with the kings in public measure to promote piety and virtue. They were humble, faithful, self-denying, fearless men, 2 Kings 1:8 Zechariah 13:4 Matthew 3:4 ; aloof from the pleasure and luxuries of life, 2 Kings 5:15 ; often persecuted, and slain, Matthew 23:34-37 Hebrews 11:32-38 James 2:10 ; but exerting a powerful influence as witnesses for God. Some of them were called from the plough and the herd, 1 Kings 19:20 Amos 7:14 Zechariah 13:5 . There were also "schools of the prophets," first mentioned in the time of Samuel, established at Gibeah, Naiotyh, Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho, where young men were instructed in religion and prepared to guide in religious worship, 1 Samuel 10:5 19:20 2 Kings 2:3,5 4:38 . Many of the "sons of the prophets" here taught became not only religious teachers, but inspired prophets. Amos speaks of his own case as an exception, Amos 7:14,15 . There are several prophetesses mentioned in Scripture; as Miriam, Deborah, and Huldah; and in the New Testament, Anna, Elisabeth, and Mary, and the four daughters of Philip seem to have partaken for a time of prophetic inspiration.
The prophets received their messages from God, sometimes in visions, trances, and dreams. Compare Numbers 24:2-16 Joel 2:28 Acts 10:11,12 Revelation 1:10-20 . These revelations were at times attended with overpowering manifestations of the Godhead; and at other times were simply breathed into the mind by the Spirit of God. Their messages were delivered to the kings, princes, and priests whom they most concerned, or to the people at large, in writing, or by word of mouth and in public places; often with miracles, or with symbolic actions designed to explain and enforce them, Isaiah 20:1-6 Jeremiah 7:2 19:1-15 Ezekiel 3:10 .
The Old Testament contains the inspired writings of sixteen of the Hebrew prophets; four of whom, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel are called the greater prophets and the other twelve the minor prophets. Respecting the true chronological order of the prophets, there is in some cases great diversity of opinion. Below is given the arrangement preferred by some; while others, so far as the minor prophets ace concerned, adhere to that given in the Hebrew Bible and our common version. See each name in its place, for further particulars.
1. Jonah, during the reign of Jeroboam III, king of Israel, which commenced 825 B. C.; or perhaps as early as Joash, the predecessor of Jeroboam.
2. Joel, under Uzziah king of Judah, nearly 800 B. C., before Amos and Hosea came upon the stage.
3. Amos, under Uzziah king of Judah, and during the latter years of Jeroboam II, king of Israel. About 787 B. C.
4. Hosea, under Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and under Jeroboam II And his successors, kings of Israel. From about 785 to 725 B. C.
5. Isaiah, near the death of Uzziah king of Judah, and the beginning of the reign of Jotham, B. C. 758, to the reign of Manasseh, B. C. 697.
6. Micah, under Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah. Jotham began to reign B. C. 758, and Hezekiah died B. C. 697. Thus Micah was contemporary with Isaiah
7. Nahum, in the latter part of the reign of Hezekiah, and after the expedition of Sennacherib. Between 710,700 B. C.
8. Zephaniah, soon after the beginning of the reign of Josiah, and before the destruction of Nineveh. About B. C. 630.
9. Jeremiah, in the thirteenth year of Josiah king of Judah, B. C. 628. Jeremiah continued to prophesy under Shallum, Jehoiakim, Jeconiah, and Zedekiah, to the taking of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, B. C. 588. It is supposed he died two years afterwards in Egypt.
10. Habakkuk, in Judah, near the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, about 610 B. C., and before the coming of Nebuchadnezzar.
11. Obadiah, near the fall and captivity of Jerusalem, B. C. 588, and before the desolation of Idumaea.
12. Ezekiel, carried captive to Babylon with Jeconiah king of Judah, 598 B. C. He began to prophesy about B. C. 590; and continued, under Nebuchadnezzar, till fourteen years, after the final capture of Jerusalem B. C. 588.
13. Daniel, taken into Chaldea while young, B. C. 606, the fourth year of Jehoiadim king of Judah. He prophesied in Babylon to the end of the captivity and probably finished about 534 B. C.
14. Haggai, returned from the captivity B. C. 536, and prophesied in the second year of Darius son of Hystaspes, B. C. 520.
15. Zechariah, prophesied in Judea at the same time as Haggai, B. C. 520, and seems to have continued after him.
16. Malachi supposed to have prophesied about 416 B. C., in the latter part of the administration of Nehemiah at Jerusalem.
Christ, of whom all the prophets bore witness, Luke 24:27,44 Acts 10:43 1 Peter 1:10-11 , is eminently THE PROPHET of his church in all ages, Deuteronomy 18:15-19 Acts 3:22-24 ; revealing to them, by his inspired servants, by himself, and by his Spirit, all we know of God and immortality.

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Sons of the Prophets - Members of a band or guild of Prophets. “Sons of the Prophets” suggests a community or guild of Prophets. The sons of the Prophets functioned either as witnesses (2Kings 2:3,2Kings 2:5,2Kings 2:7,2 Kings 2:15 ) or as agents of Elisha's ministry (2 Kings 9:1-3 ). ...
The single reference outside the Elisha cycle to the sons of the Prophets is to someone identified as “a certain man of the sons of the Prophets” who condemned Ahab's release of Ben-Hadad (1 Kings 20:35-42 ). The “company of Prophets” (1Samuel 10:5,1 Samuel 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ) are groups of Prophets whose charismatic spirit involved Saul in prophecy (1 Samuel 10:10 ) and, later, both Saul and his messengers (1 Samuel 19:20 )
Prophets, Sons of the - When Elijah was about to be taken up, these Prophets apparently had a revelation concerning it, and they sent fifty men 'to view afar off,' and afterwards sent fifty to look for the prophet. The 'company of Prophets' with psaltery, tabret, pipe, and harp, whom Saul met, were probably sons of the Prophets. The hundred Prophets whom Obadiah hid from the persecution of Jezebel may have been of the same. From whence these Prophets were gathered, and what their functions were is not recorded
Igdaliah - ” Ancestor of the Prophets whose chamber in the Temple Jeremiah used to test the Rechabites loyalty to their oath not to drink wine (Jeremiah 35:4 ). This is apparently evidence for professional Prophets on the Temple staff
Sons of the Prophets - SONS OF THE Prophets
Men of the great assembly - A panel of 120 Prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
Anshei knesset hagdolah - A panel of 120 Prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
False Prophet, (the) - ...
Jesus warned about false Prophets in Matthew 24:24 stating that in the last days many false Prophets would arise and deceive, if possible, even the elect. False Prophets teach false doctrine and lead people away from the true gospel message and teaching of God found in the Bible. Examples of modern day false Prophets are Joseph Smith (Mormonism), Charles Taze Russell (Jehovah's Witnesses), Mary Baker Eddy (Christian Science), etc
Jezebel - Induced the Israelites to worship Baal, supported the Prophets of Baal, and killed hundreds of true Prophets
Haftorah - "concluding portion"); reading from the Prophets at the conclusion of the weekly Torah reading
Old Testament - For Jews it is the complete Bible, sometimes called Tanak for its three parts (Torah or Law, Nebiim or Prophets, Kethubim or Writings). The Old Testament has three major divisions: Law, Prophets (Former and Latter), and Writings. The Prophets—Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah Ezekiel, and the Twelve Minor Prophets—continue with the nation in the land of Palestine until the Exile and includes prophetic messages delivered to the nation
Prophecy, Prophet - They divided their Bible (our Old Testament) into three sections, which they called the Law, the Prophets and the Writings. The Prophets consisted of the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) and the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and the twelve so-called Minor Prophets). ...
It becomes clear, as we look at the composition of the Former Prophets group, that the books that we call historical the Israelites called prophetical. Most of Israel’s historians were in fact Prophets (1 Chronicles 29:29; 2 Chronicles 9:29; 2 Chronicles 12:15). In summary we might say that in the Former Prophets God revealed himself in the history of Israel, and in the Latter Prophets he revealed himself through the words of his spokesmen. ...
Because they understood prophecy in this way, the Israelites excluded Chronicles from the Former Prophets and Daniel from the Latter Prophets. )...
Professional and writing Prophets...
The Prophets whose writings have become part of the Old Testament are commonly referred to as the writing Prophets. Their writings date from the eighth century BC, but Prophets had been active in Israel long before the eighth century. Even before the establishment of Israel’s monarchy, Prophets had been preachers and spiritual guides in Israel (Judges 4:4; 1 Samuel 3:20; 2 Samuel 7:2). ...
In the days of Samuel there were many young Prophets in Israel. These young men had plenty of enthusiasm, but their emotional and sometimes uncontrolled behaviour helped to give Prophets a poor reputation (1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 10:9-12; 1 Samuel 19:20-24; 2 Kings 9:11; cf. In an effort to redirect this religious enthusiasm for the spiritual benefit of the nation, Samuel established a school of Prophets at Ramah. Nevertheless, when Israel’s religion was under threat from the Baal worship introduced by Jezebel, the Prophets Elijah and Elisha found many faithful followers of God in these schools. These young men (the ‘sons of the Prophets’) helped maintain the worship of the true God in a nation that had become unfaithful (2 Kings 2:1-7; 2 Kings 2:15; 2 Kings 4:38; 2 Kings 6:1). By the time of the writing Prophets two hundred years later, many from these schools were more concerned with being religious professionals than with spiritually feeding God’s people. Very few of the writing Prophets appear to have been professionals. ...
True and false Prophets...
Religion was an important part of Israelite life, and people often consulted Prophets about their affairs. Consequently, many of the Prophets operated near Israel’s public places of worship (1 Samuel 9:11-12; 1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Kings 13:1-2; 1 Kings 18:30; Jeremiah 35:4; Amos 7:12-13). ...
Prophets received their income from those to whom they ministered, and this tempted them to say the sorts of things they knew their hearers wanted to hear. Because of their dishonesty and greed they were known as false Prophets (1 Kings 22:5-8; 1 Kings 22:13-18; Jeremiah 6:13-14; Jeremiah 23:16-17; Micah 2:11; Micah 3:5-7; Micah 3:11). ...
True Prophets denounced the false Prophets as being appointed by themselves, not by God. Instead of rebuking the people for their sin and so running the risk of becoming unpopular, the false Prophets assured the people that God was pleased with them. The truth was that the people were heading for judgment, and the corruption of the Prophets was only adding to that judgment (Jeremiah 23:11-17; Ezekiel 13:8-16; Ezekiel 13:22). ...
The test of a prophet, whether he was true or false, was not whether his predictions came true, for even the predictions of false Prophets could come true. ...
If Prophets were truly God’s messengers, their chief concern was not with foretelling events, but with leading people to repentance and obedience (Micah 3:8; Micah 7:18; Zephaniah 2:1-3). ...
The Prophets, like all the godly in Israel, looked forward to the day when God would punish all enemies, cleanse the earth of sin and establish his righteous rule in the world (Isaiah 24:17-23; Isaiah 32:1-4). ...
But while the Prophets pictured the Messiah as a king, a conqueror and a saviour, they also spoke of a prophetic figure whom they pictured as a servant, a sufferer and a victim. ...
Another point that the Prophets did not see was that this person would fulfil God’s purposes not all at once, but through two separate entrances into the world. ...
The language of prophecy...
Early Prophets such as Deborah, Samuel, Nathan, Ahijah, Elijah and Elisha have left little or no record of their prophecies. Over the following centuries, Prophets increasingly wrote down their messages as well as, or sometimes instead of, speaking them ( Teacher - As distinct from the ecstatic exhortations of ‘prophets,’ the instruction given by ‘teachers’ would be exposition of the OT and of the words and acts of Christ. ‘Teachers’ were inferior to ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets,’ and were connected with ‘pastors’ (1 Corinthians 12:28-29, Ephesians 4:11). ‘Apostles’ always had the gift of teaching; ‘prophets’ and ‘pastors’ usually possessed it: but men might have it without belonging to any of these classes
False Prophet - Old Testament While the term “false prophet” does not occur in the Old Testament, references to false Prophets are clear. The pages of the Old Testament are filled with men and women who fit the description of a false prophet given in Jeremiah 14:14 (NAS): “The Prophets are prophesying falsehood in My name. False Prophets were cast away from God's presence and permanently humiliated. A familiar example is the story of Elijah and the Prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:20-39 ). In a test against Elijah and the true God, the Prophets of Baal suffered humiliating defeat. ...
New Testament Jesus and the apostles spoke many times about false Prophets. He also cautioned His followers to beware of false Prophets who would arise during times of tribulation and in the end times (Matthew 24:11 ,Matthew 24:11,24:24 ; Mark 13:22 ). ...
The apostles instructed believers to be diligent in faith and understanding of Christian teachings, in order to discern false Prophets when they arise (Acts 13:6-12 ; 2 Peter 1:19-2:1 ; 1 John 4:1 ). The tests of a prophet are: 1) Do their predictions come true (Jeremiah 28:9 )? 2 ) Does the prophet have a divine commission (Jeremiah 29:9 )? 3 ) Are the prophecies consistent with Scripture (2 Peter 1:20-21 ; Revelation 22:18-19 )? 4 ) Do the people benefit spiritually from the prophet's ministry (Jeremiah 23:13-14 ,Jeremiah 23:13-14,23:32 ; 1 Peter 4:11 )?...
Punishments for false Prophets were just as severe in the New Testament as they were in the Old. Jesus said the false Prophets would be cut down and burned like a bad tree (Matthew 7:19 ). See Prophets
Prophecy, Prophets - ...
Prophets also played a role in the conquest and settlement of the Promised Land. Gad and Nathan served as Prophets to the king. The Prophets did more than predict the future; their messages called Israel to honor God. ...
Similarly the classical or writing Prophets were joined to history. Israel's political turmoil provided the context for the writing Prophets. The advent of the Persian Empire in the latter part of the sixth century set the stage for Prophets such as Obadiah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Thus the Prophets spoke for God throughout Israel's history. ...
The Prophets influenced almost every institution of Israel, despite the fact that they were often viewed with contempt: they were locked up (Jeremiah 37:1 ), ignored (Isaiah 6:9-13 ), and persecuted (1 Kings 19:1-2 ). In addition to serving judges and kings, the Prophets also addressed Israel's worship. The Prophets' call to covenant faithfulness revealed an awareness of the law (Isaiah 58:6-9 ; Ezekiel 18:1 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Amos 2:4 ; Amos 5:21-24 ). ...
Prophets formed guilds or schools (2 Kings 4:38 ; 1 Samuel 10:5 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ). The mere existence of the books of prophecy is probably due in part to the Prophets' helpers (Jeremiah 36:4 ). ...
The Experience of the Prophet Prophets generally shared several key experiences and characteristics. The Prophets were at times allowed to see into the throne room or heavenly court (Isaiah 6:1-7 ; 1 Kings 22:19-23 ; Jeremiah 23:18-22 ; compare Amos 3:7 ; Job 1:6-12 ; Job 2:1-6 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1-4 ; Revelation 1:1-3 ; Revelation 22:18-19 ). (2) Prophets received a word from God through many means—direct declarations, visions, dreams, or an appearance of God. (3) Prophets spoke the word of God. (4) Prophets relayed God's message by deed as well as by word. (5) The Prophets also performed miracles which confirmed their message. While some Prophets like Moses (Exodus 4:1-9 ) and Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ) worked many miracles, virtually all Prophets occasionally saw a miraculous fulfillment of God's word (Romans 11:25-36 ). (6) Prophets also conveyed the word of God by writing (Isaiah 8:1 ; Ezekiel 43:11 ). (7) Prophets were to minister to their people. (8) Throughout Israel's history genuine Prophets had ecstatic experiences. ...
False Prophets Distinguishing between false and true Prophets was very difficult, though several tests of authenticity emerge in the Old Testament. Furthermore, Prophets could behave inappropriately (Numbers 12:1-2 ; Numbers 20:1-12 ; Jeremiah 15:19-21 ; Jeremiah 38:24-27 ). Prophets appeared ambivalent at times when simply delivering the word of God as it was given (2 Kings 20:1-6 ). Other tests included agreement with previous Prophets' words (Jeremiah 28:8 ), good character (Micah 3:11 ), and a willingness to suffer because of faithfulness (1 Kings 22:27-28 ; Jeremiah 38:3-13 ). ...
Hints for Interpretation Prophets intended to evoke faith by proclamation, not merely to predict the future. Thus reading the Prophets with a lustful curiosity is inappropriate. The Prophets were not all-knowing but all-telling—that is they told what God had told them to tell. One must seek to read prophecy in light of its whole, deriving partial insight from different Prophets. Prophets were also called pneumatics ( pneumatikos ), “spiritual ones” (1 Corinthians 14:37 ). The Prophets played a foundational role in the early church (1 Corinthians 12:28-31 ; Ephesians 4:11 ; Ephesians 2:20 ). Prophets function primarily in the worship of the church (Acts 13:2 ). Some Prophets “preached” lengthy messages (Acts 15:32 ) and gave exposition to biblical texts (Luke 1:67-79 ; Ephesians 3:5 ; Revelation 2:20 ). ...
The Prophets used phrases such as “the Lord says” or “the Holy Spirit says” as introductory formulas for prophetic insight into the future (Acts 21:11 ), or for inspired adaptation of an Old Testament text (Hebrews 3:7 ). Jesus said Prophets could be known by their fruit (Matthew 7:15-20 ). Circumstance may even demand that the dress of men and women Prophets be stipulated (1 Corinthians 11:5-7 )
Hagiographa - , the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms
Zechariah ben iddo - (4th century BCE) A contemporary of Haggai and Malachi, the last Prophets, prophesied during the construction of the Second Temple
Tanach - , the Five Books of Moses), Nevi’im (Prophets), and Ketuvim (the “Writings”; the Hagiographa)
Prophets, False - the Lord, early in His ministry, warned His hearers to beware of false Prophets, Matthew 7:15 ; and in the church, the spirits are to be tried, for many false Prophets have gone forth into the world. They were and are Satan's counterfeits of the Prophets of God, and their purpose is, on the principle of imitation, to neutralise the word of God
Prophet - Prophets were the immediate organs of God for the communication of his mind and will to men (Deuteronomy 18:18,19 ). The great task assigned to the Prophets whom God raised up among the people was "to correct moral and religious abuses, to proclaim the great moral and religious truths which are connected with the character of God, and which lie at the foundation of his government. Thus Enoch, Abraham, and the patriarchs, as bearers of God's message (Genesis 20:7 ; Exodus 7:1 ; Psalm 105:15 ), as also Moses (Deuteronomy 18:15 ; 34:10 ; Hosea 12:13 ), are ranked among the Prophets. Colleges, "schools of the Prophets", were instituted for the training of Prophets, who were constituted, a distinct order (1 Samuel 19:18-24 ; 2 Kings 2:3,15 ; 4:38 ), which continued to the close of the Old Testament. The "sons" or "disciples" of the Prophets were young men (2 Kings 5:22 ; 9:1,4 ) who lived together at these different "schools" (4:38-41). There was also in the Church a distinct order of Prophets (1 Corinthians 12:28 ; Ephesians 2:20 ; 3:5 ), who made new revelations from God. ...
Of the Old Testament Prophets there are sixteen, whose prophecies form part of the inspired canon. These are divided into four groups: ...
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The Prophets of the northern kingdom (Israel), viz. ...
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The Prophets of Judah, viz. ...
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The Prophets of Captivity, viz. ...
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The Prophets of the Restoration, viz
Nahum - One of the lesser Prophets
Yonatan ben uzziel - (1century CE) Mishnaic sage, the greatest of Hillel's students, translated the Prophets and much of the Holy Writings into Aramaic
Jonathan ben uzziel, rabbi - (1century CE) Mishnaic sage, the greatest of Hillel's students, translated the Prophets and much of the Holy Writings into Aramaic
ni'Ger - (black ) is the additional or distinctive name given to the Simeon who was one of the teachers and Prophets in the church at Antioch
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --We learn from Holy Scripture that it was by the agency of the Spirit of God that the Prophets received the divine communication; but the means by which the divine Spirit communicated with the human spirit, and the conditions of the latter under which the divine communications were received, have not been clearly declared to us. Had the Prophets a full knowledge of that which they predicted? It follows from what we have already said that they had not, and could not have. --Of the sixteen Prophets, four are usually called the great Prophets, namely, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and twelve the Minor Prophets, namely, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakuk,Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. They may be divided into four groups: the Prophets of the northern kingdom --Hosea, Amos, Joel, Jonah; the Prophets of the southern kingdom --Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah; the Prophets of the captivity --Ezekiel and Daniel; the Prophets of the return --Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. It was reserved for the Prophets to bring out these features more distinctly. Its culminating point is found in the prophecy contained in ( Isaiah 52:13-15 ) and Isai 52:53 Prophets of the New Testament . --So far as their predictive powers are concerned, the Old Testament Prophets find their New Testament counterpart in the writer of the Apocalypse; but in their general character, as specially illumined revealers of God's will, their counterpart will rather be found, first in the great Prophet of the Church and his forerunner, John the Baptist, and next in all those persons who were endowed with the extraordinary gifts of the Spirit in the apostolic age, the speakers with tongues and the interpreters of tongues, the Prophets and the discerners of spirits, the teachers and workers of miracles. ( 1 Corinthians 12:10,28 ) That Predictive powers did occasionally exist in the New Testament Prophets is proved by the case of Agabus, (Acts 11:23 ) but this was not their characteristic. The Prophets of the New Testament were supernaturally illuminated expounders and preachers
Manaen - One of the Prophets or teachers at Antioch who had been 'brought up' with Herod Antipas, that is, was his foster brother, as in the R
Nazarene - Joseph and Mary, when they returned from Egypt, went to reside at Nazareth, "that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene. , but the thought conveyed by them is in the Prophets generally, that the Messiah would be despised and reproached: cf
Lucius - One of the Prophets of the Christian church at Antioch
Hag'ga-i - (festive ), the tenth in order of the minor Prophets, and first of those who prophesied after the captivity
False Prophet - Even though the Old Testament does not use the term "false prophet, " it is clear that such "professional Prophets" existed throughout much of Israel's history and that they were diametrically opposed to the canonical Prophets. Scripture, however, regarded them as mere imitations of the genuinely appointed Prophets of God. ...
Distinguishing Marks of False Prophecy and False Prophets . ...
False Prophets prophesied lies (Jeremiah 6:13 ; 27:14 ; Zechariah 13:3 ), deceived the people with their dreams (Jeremiah 29:8 ), prophesied by the alleged authority of Baal (Jeremiah 2:8 ; 23:13 ), threatened the lives of the true Prophets (Jeremiah 26:7 ), and dared to speak when they had not stood in the council of Yahweh and received a word directly from the Lord (Jeremiah 23:18 ). Some false Prophets used magic (1618831507_52 ), others appeared to use divination, soothsaying, witchcraft, necromancy, and sorcery, which were all forbidden arts and practices in the classical passage that set forth divine revelation in contrast to such practices (Deuteronomy 18:9-13 ). The false Prophets gave the people what they wanted to hear and thereby placed "whitewash" (Ezekiel 13:10-12,14-15 ; 22:28 ) over every situation, no matter how adverse it appeared. ...
The fullest discussion of charges that could be brought against false Prophets can be found in Jeremiah 23:9-39 . Jeremiah condemns the pseudoprophets on four grounds: (1) they are men of immoral character (v. Rather than having a "burden" from the Lord, they themselves were another burdenboth to the Lord and to the misled people!...
The Theology of the False Prophets . The false Prophets were zealous to maintain the inviolability and invincibility of Zionfor all times and for all occasions. Any and all new revelations that would predict judgment, doom, and disaster were, from the false Prophets' standpoint, contrary to their list of immutables; therefore, they preached that all such negative declarations were wrong, treasonous, and unnecessary. 6), but he recovered sufficiently to add: "From early times the Prophets who preceded you and me have prophesied war, disaster and plague against many countries and great kingdoms. ...
This is what makes the discernment of what constitutes pseudoprophecy so difficult, for many of the false Prophets also subscribed to some of the same theological traditions as did the canonical Prophets. ...
The theology of the false Prophets was characterized by the following: (1) a selective appeal to the Davidic/Zion and Sinaitic covenants as a type of fire insurance against any threatened calamity; (2) an exclusive teaching of hope/salvation with no attention given to any potential adversities for lack of obedience to God's Word; and (3) a constant appeal to what the masses wanted to hear as a basis for promoting their own power and the status quo. ...
More often than not, the false Prophets prophesied in the name of one or more false gods while they also syncretistically appealed to Yahweh's name (Jeremiah 23:13,17 , 25 ; 26:27 ). ...
False Prophets in the New Testament . False Prophets continued to make their presence felt well beyond the days of the Old Testament; indeed, Jesus warned his disciples, and through the apostles, he warned the early church about the character and teachings of such frauds. ...
As was characteristic of false Prophets in the Old Testament, their New Testament counterparts were also motivated by greed (2 Peter 2:3,13 ), exhibited arrogance (2 Peter 2:18 ), lived immoral lives (2 Peter 2:2,10-13 ), and generally could be described as ungodly persons (Jude 4 ). ...
The classical encounter between true and false Prophets of God in the New Testament is Paul and Barnabas's rebuke of the Jewish magician Bar-Jesus on the island Paphos (Acts 13:6-10 ). Bar-Jesus belonged to the same line of pseudoprophets as the prophetess Jezebel from the church of Thyatira (Revelation 2:20 ). ...
In the endtimes, false Prophets will attempt to deceive the world's populace into following the false prophet, the beast, and Satan himself (Matthew 24:1,24 ; Revelation 16:13-14 ; 19:20 ; 20:10 )even by performing miracles and signs
Hill of God - Here Saul met a band of ecstatic Prophets and joined them in their frenzy (1 Samuel 10:5 )
Manaen - One of the Christian Prophets and teachers at Antioch, and ‘foster-brother’ of Herod Antipas ( Acts 13:1 ). , Acts 21:9 , 1 Corinthians 14:31 ), yet there was in NT a class of official Prophets ( Ephesians 2:20 ; Ephesians 3:5 , Revelation 18:20 , perhaps 1 Thessalonians 2:15 ); and so in the Didache ( c Naioth - Some interpret the word to mean a school of Prophets over which Samuel presided
Horonaim - Place in Moab, mentioned by the Prophets, with Zoar and Luhith
False Prophets - FALSE Prophets...
1. For the understanding of this expression in the NT, we must correctly apprehend the character of the false Prophets of the OT. To earlier writers these men were essentially and consciously false, either Prophets of false gods, holders of opinions which did not agree with the revealed character of Jehovah the God of Israel, or men who knowingly spoke falsehoods in the name of Jehovah. 1 Kings 19:19), the methods of prophetic instruction (Jeremiah 28:10), and the use of the prophetic formula, ‘Thus saith Jehovah’ (Jeremiah 23:25; Jeremiah 23:31, Ezekiel 13:6), but who had never come under the influence of, or had failed to remain in personal contact with, the revealing Spirit ‘who spake by the Prophets. It was principally in the later prophetic period of Micah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah that these Prophets of smooth things, subject to no true and Divine revelation, came to be regarded as professional tricksters, making a living out of their false predictions (Micah 3:5, Zechariah 13:4-5). But whether from the desire of gain or of public favour, these false Prophets expressed the optimistic, what would be regarded as the patriotic, view of the state and future of their country, and have been described as ‘nationalistic rather than false. ’ It is this optimistic, nationalist outlook that particularly explains the reference in Luke 6:26, ‘in the same manner did their fathers (speak well) to the false Prophets. ’ The false Prophets, as declaring the things the nation wished to hear, naturally succeeded in gaining general approval and credence. The false Prophets in the Christian Church. False Prophets of both these classes were to be expected in the Christian community. In 2 Peter 2:1 stress is laid upon false teaching of an antinomian character, the authors of which are called ‘false teachers,’ but find their analogy in the ‘false Prophets’ of the OT. ‘Prophecy and Prophets’ (p
Prophet - False Prophets. Some of the Prophets, an appellation given to young men who were educated in the schools or colleges under a proper master, who was commonly, if not always, an inspired prophet in the knowledge of religion, and in sacred music, and thus were qualified to be public preachers, 1 Samuel 10:1-27 : 1 Samuel 11:1-15 : 2 Samuel 19:1-43 : 2 Kings 2:1-25 :...
ki'Shon - (winding ) , The river, a torrent or winter stream of central Palestine, the scene of two of the grandest achievements of Israelitish history --the defeat of Sisera, Judges 4 , and the destruction of the Prophets of Baal by Elijah. The part of the Kishon at which the Prophets of Baal were slaughtered by Elijah was doubtless close below the spot on Carmel where the sacrifice had taken place
Unction - Kings, Prophets, and priests were anointed, in token of receiving divine grace
Gap - The false Prophets did not stand in the gap (Ezekiel 22 :: 30 ), i
Memphis - The Prophets often notice it
Hab'Akkuk - (embrace ), the eighth in order of the minor Prophets
Fowler - In the punishment of Israel their Prophets became as the snare of the fowler
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - John the Baptist, the herald of Christ, may be called the last of the older Prophets. -It is natural to look for the prophet in the earliest environment of Christianity; and, as a matter of fact, we find Prophets and prophetesses from the very beginning of the early Jewish Church. Christian Prophets are referred to in the context of Acts 2:18, where προφητεύσουσιν is not part of the original quotation; and the gift which developed at Pentecost in the Church at Jerusalem was destined to spread wherever a Christian society came into being. Prophets are mentioned in the Acts-Agabus (Acts 11:28; Acts 21:10), Symeon Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, in addition to Barnabas and Saul (Acts 13:1), and Judas and Silas (Acts 15:32). ...
‘The three members of the Christian group-apostles, Prophets, teachers-were already to be met with in contemporary Judaism,’ but ‘the grouping of these three classes, and the special development of the apostleship, were the special work of the Christian church’ (Harnack, The Mission and Expansion of Christianity, Eng. The ‘apostles’ were the itinerant missionaries of the Christian Church; they were also by nature of their office Prophets and teachers (cf. Ephesians 2:20, ‘the foundation of the apostles and Prophets,’ where the two are virtually identified; also Ephesians 3:15 and Ephesians 4:11, whore ‘classes of functions rather than persons’ are indicated; see Hort, Christian Ecclesia, p. ’ While the ‘apostle’ is a wandering missionary, the ‘prophets’ and ‘teachers’ were in general attached to a local church; e. Silas and Judas, Prophets of the Church of Jerusalem, are described as ἡγούμενοι (Acts 15:22); and in Hebrews 13:7 such ἡγούμενοι or leaders are described as speaking ‘the word of God. To use the latter gift, which issued in a jargon of words and unduly excited the speaker, was to speak to God instead of man’ (Selwyn, Christian Prophets, p. Two or three Prophets may speak, while the rest are to discriminate as to the character of their addresses; but if a ‘revelation’ be given to another sitting by, the first prophet must keep silence. ‘Ye can all prophesy one by one, that all may learn, and all may be comforted (and the spirits of the Prophets are subject to the Prophets),’ which means that, although individual inspiration is legitimate and undoubted, it is subject to the control of the Prophets collectively. Paul did not limit freedom of speech, but in urging that only two or three Prophets should address a given meeting he aimed at securing not only spiritual edification, but reverence and order in the assembly. The author of Revelation speaks of the Prophets as his fellow-servants, and of the Church as made up of ‘saints, apostles, and Prophets’ (Revelation 18:20), ‘prophets and saints’ Revelation 18:24), and ‘saints and Prophets’ (1 Corinthians 16:6); and in such a connexion it is easy to understand how ecstasy might lead to a vivid realization of the circumstances of the Parousia. He is to receive ‘the first-fruits’: for ‘the Prophets are your high-priests. ’ Both ‘prophets’ and ‘apostles’ hold a higher rank in the Didache than bishops and deacons (presbyters are not mentioned), concerning whom the warning is given not to ‘despise’ them. , the warning against false Prophets, and the prediction of lawlessness and persecution and of the appearance of the world-deceiver (ὁ κοσμοπλάνος). Thus it would appear that the authority of the Prophets was already beginning to be undermined by the appearance of false and covetous Prophets. In the Apostolic Fathers ‘prophets’ are not mentioned; when Ignatius speaks of Prophets, they are OT Prophets: at the same time, he claims to receive revelations, lofty and incommunicable (Trall. XI he refers to false Prophets as mere magicians practising on people of wavering faith who apply to them ὡς ἐπὶ μάντιν. Selwyn, The Christian Prophets, 1900; P
Malachi - A contemporary of Zechariah and Haggai, the last of the Prophets
Jezebel - ...
Jezebel was so zealous, that she fed at her own table four hundred Prophets belonging to the goddess Astarte; and her husband Ahab, in like manner, kept four hundred of Baal's Prophets, as ministers of his false gods
Amos - The third of the minor Prophets was a shepherd of Tekoa, a small town of Judah. The book of Amos takes a high rank among the writings of the Prophets
Restitution of All Things - The restitution mentioned in scripture is of all things "which God hath spoken by the mouth of all his holy Prophets. " The thought is thus limited to what had been stated in the Prophets
Niger - Designation of Simeon, one of the teachers and Prophets at Antioch
Pestilence - The Prophets usually connect together sword, pestilence, and famine, being three of the most grievous inflictions of the Almighty upon a guilty people
Micaiah - When Ahab was joined by Jehoshaphat, and all Ahab's Prophets foretold his success against Ramoth-gilead, Jehoshaphat asked if there was not yet another prophet of Jehovah of whom they could inquire. A spirit volunteered to accomplish it by being a lying spirit in the mouth of all Ahab's Prophets. Zedekiah, one of Ahab's Prophets, struck Micaiah on the cheek, and said, "Which way went the Spirit of the Lord from me to speak unto thee?" Micaiah replied, "Behold, thou shalt see on that day when thou shalt go into an inner chamber to hide thyself. Ahab's four hundred Prophets, and Jehovah's one prophet are an instance of the conflict of spirits , which the Christian is now called upon to try
Niger - Surname of Simeon, second of the five teachers and Prophets of the Antioch church (Acts 13:1)
Naioth - The abode of Samuel, and his pupils in a "school of the Prophets," 1 Samuel 19:18-24 20:1
Prophets - As true Prophets, when filled y the energy of God's Spirit, were sometimes fervidly and vehemently agitated, similar motions were called prophesying when exhibited by persons who were filled with an evil spirit, "prophesied in his house," 1 Samuel 18:10 . In the New Testament, the "prophets" were a class of men supernaturally endowed, and standing next to the apostles. Thus it is said in Acts 13:1 , that Judas and Silas were Prophets; that there were in the church at Antioch certain Prophets and teachers, that is, official instructors. God has set in the church, first apostles, then Prophets, 1 Corinthians 12:28 . ...
The Old Testament Prophets were special agents of Jehovah, raised up and sent as occasion required, to incite to duty, to convict of sin, to call to repentance and reformation, to instruct kings, and denounce against nations the judgments of God, 2 Kings 17:13 Jeremiah 25:4 . There were also "schools of the Prophets," first mentioned in the time of Samuel, established at Gibeah, Naiotyh, Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho, where young men were instructed in religion and prepared to guide in religious worship, 1 Samuel 10:5 19:20 2 Kings 2:3,5 4:38 . Many of the "sons of the Prophets" here taught became not only religious teachers, but inspired Prophets. ...
The Prophets received their messages from God, sometimes in visions, trances, and dreams. ...
The Old Testament contains the inspired writings of sixteen of the Hebrew Prophets; four of whom, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel are called the greater Prophets and the other twelve the minor Prophets. Respecting the true chronological order of the Prophets, there is in some cases great diversity of opinion. Below is given the arrangement preferred by some; while others, so far as the minor Prophets ace concerned, adhere to that given in the Hebrew Bible and our common version. ...
Christ, of whom all the Prophets bore witness, Luke 24:27,44 Acts 10:43 1 Peter 1:10-11 , is eminently THE PROPHET of his church in all ages, Deuteronomy 18:15-19 Acts 3:22-24 ; revealing to them, by his inspired servants, by himself, and by his Spirit, all we know of God and immortality
Joel - One of the minor Prophets and son of Pethuel
Chaff - Jeremiah 23:28; "What is the chaff to the wheat?" God answers the objection, What must we do when lies are spoken as truths and Prophets oppose Prophets? Do as you would with wheat mixed with chaff; do not reject the wheat, because of the chaff mixed with it, but bring both to the test of "My word" (Jeremiah 23:27; Jeremiah 23:29); so discriminate as to what to reject, and what to keep. false Prophets, their followers and doctrine
Niger - The second name of Symeon , one of the Prophets and teachers in the Church of Antioch ( Acts 13:1 )
Vision - It was one of the ways in which the Almighty was pleased to reveal himself to the Prophets, Is
Chaggai - ...
Chaggai: (4th century BCE) A contemporary of Zechariah and Malachi, the last of the Prophets; member of the Great Assembly; urged the Jews to build the Second Temple
Prophet - In the case of the OT Prophets their messages were very largely the proclamation of the Divine purposes of salvation and glory to be accomplished in the future; the "prophesying" of the NT "prophets" was both a preaching of the Divine counsels of grace already accomplished and the foretelling of the purposes of God in the future. ...
In the NT the word is used (a) of "the OT Prophets," e. , Matthew 5:12 ; Mark 6:15 ; Luke 4:27 ; John 8:52 ; Romans 11:3 ; (b) of "prophets in general," e. , Matthew 10:41 ; 21:46 ; Mark 6:4 ; (c) of "John the Baptist," Matthew 21:26 ; Luke 1:76 ; (d) of "prophets in the churches," e. , John 1:21 ; 6:14 ; 7:40 ; Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 , or, without the article, and, without reference to the Old Testament, Mark 6:15 , Luke 7:16 ; in Luke 24:19 it is used with aner, "a man;" John 4:19 ; 9:17 ; (f) of "two witnesses" yet to be raised up for special purposes, Revelation 11:10,18 ; (g) of "the Cretan poet Epimenides," Titus 1:12 ; (h) by metonymy, of "the writings of Prophets," e
Example - Of Christ (1 Peter 2:21 ; John 13:15 ); of pastors to their flocks (Philippians 3:17 ; 2 th 3:9 ; 1 Timothy 4:12 ; 1 Peter 5:3 ); of the Jews as a warning (Hebrews 4:11 ); of the Prophets as suffering affliction (James 5:10 )
Haggai - (4th century BCE) A contemporary of Zechariah and Malachi, the last of the Prophets; member of the Great Assembly; urged the Jews to build the Second Temple
College - The Rabbis derive it from 'to teach;' hence 'the school' of the Prophets
Foretell - ...
All the Prophets from Samuel, and those that follow after, as many as have spoken, have likewise foretold of these days
Potter's Field - Or it is possible that as the Jews anciently placed Jeremiah at the beginning of the Book of the Prophets (Ezekiel, Isaiah, and the twelve minor Prophets following), 'Jeremiah' may have been a sort of heading for the whole
Malachi - the last of the twelve minor Prophets. He reproves the people for their wickedness, and the priests for their negligence in the discharge of their office; he threatens the disobedient with the judgments of God, and promises great rewards to the penitent and pious; he predicts the coming of Christ, and the preaching of John the Baptist; and with a solemnity becoming the last of the Prophets, he closes the sacred canon with enjoining the strict observance of the Mosaic law, till the forerunner, already promised, should appear in the spirit of Elias, to introduce the Messiah, who was to establish a new and everlasting covenant
Nazarene - Matthew, Matthew 2:23, writes "Jesus came and dwelt in Nazareth that it might be fulfilled which is spoken by the Prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene"; not "by the prophet," but "by the Prophets," meaning no particular quotation but the general description of Messiah in them as abject and despised (Isaiah 53:2-3). "Called," as in Isaiah 9:6, expresses what He should be in His earthly manifestation; not that the Prophets gave Him the literal name, though His contemporaries did. The "Nazarene dweller" (Νatsri ) was, as all the Prophets foretold, a "pain sufferer" (natsari from the Aramaic tsear , "pain"); the Aramaeans pronounced the Hebrew "a" as "o," from whence arose the Greek form Νazoraios . Had the Prophets expressly foretold He should be of Nazareth, it would not have been so despised; nor would the Pharisees, who were able from Micah 5 to tell Herod where Messiah's birthplace was - Bethlehem (Matthew 2) - have been so ignorant of the prophecy of His connection with Nazareth as to say, "out of Galilee ariseth no prophet" (John 7:52)
Prophets - And most of the Prophets had revelations concerning future events; above all, concerning the coming and kingdom of the Messiah: "He has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David, as he spake by the mouth of his holy Prophets, which have been since the world began,"...
Luke 1:69-70 . Thus Aaron is said to be Moses's prophet: "The Lord said unto Moses, See, I have made thee a God to Pharaoh, and Aaron thy brother shall be thy prophet," Exodus 7:1 ; because Aaron received the divine messages, which he carried immediately from Moses; whereas other Prophets receive their messages immediately from God himself. The title of Prophets is given also to the sacred musicians, who sung the praises of God, or who accompanied the song with musical instruments. Thus the Heathen poets, who sung or composed verses in praise of their gods, were called by the Romans vates, or Prophets; which is of the same import with the Greek προφητης , a title which St. ...
Godwin observes, that, for the propagation of learning, colleges and schools were in divers places erected for the Prophets. The first intimation we have in Scripture of these schools is in 1 Samuel 10:5 , where we read of "a company of Prophets coming down from the high place with a psaltery, a tabret, a pipe, and a harp before them, and they did prophesy. " They are supposed to be the students in a college of Prophets at גבעת , or "the hill," as we render it, "of God. We read afterward of such another company of Prophets at Naioth in Ramah, "prophesying, and Samuel standing as appointed over them," 1 Samuel 19:19-20 . The students in these colleges were called sons of the Prophets, who are frequently mentioned in after ages, even in the most degenerate times. Thus we read of the sons of the Prophets that were at Bethel; and of another school at Jericho; and of the sons of the Prophets at Gilgal, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 ; 2 Kings 4:38 . It should seem, that these sons of the Prophets were very numerous; for of this sort were probably the Prophets of the Lord, whom Jezebel cut off; "but Obadiah took a hundred of them, and hid them by fifty in a cave," 1 Kings 18:4 . In these schools young men were educated under a proper master, who was commonly, if not always, an inspired prophet, in the knowledge of religion, and in sacred music, 1 Samuel 10:5 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 , and were thereby qualified to be public preachers, which seems to have been part of the business of the Prophets on the Sabbath days and festivals, 2 Kings 4:23 . It should seem, that God generally chose the Prophets, whom he inspired, out of these schools. Amos, therefore, speaks of it as an extraordinary case, that though he was not one of the sons of the Prophets, but a herdsman, "yet the Lord took him as he followed the flock, and said unto him, Go, prophesy unto my people Israel," Amos 7:14-15 . That it was usual for some of these schools, or at least for their tutors, to be endued with a prophetic spirit, appears from the relation of the prophecies concerning the ascent of Elijah, delivered to Elisha by the sons of the Prophets both at Jericho and at Bethel, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 . ...
The Hebrew Prophets present a succession of men at once the most singular and the most venerable that ever appeared, in so long a line of time, in the world. Then it was that the Prophets exhibited the integrity of their characters, by zealously encountering oppression, hatred, and death, in the cause of religion. ...
The manner in which the Prophets published their predictions was, either by uttering them aloud in some public place, or by affixing them on the gates of the temple, Jeremiah 7:2 ; Ezekiel 3:10 , where they might be generally seen and read. Upon some important occasions, when it was necessary to rouse the fears of a disobedient people, and to recall them to repentance, the Prophets, as objects of universal attention, appear to have walked about publicly in sackcloth, and with every external mark of humiliation and sorrow. These were gradually unfolded by successive Prophets in predictions more and more distinct. The Hebrew Prophets were chosen of God to testify beforehand of the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow
Achor - The Prophets allude to it with promises of hope and joy in the gospel era, Isaiah 65:10 ; Hosea 2:15
Hagiographa - ) The last of the three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament, or that portion not contained in the Law and the Prophets
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
Prophets. ...
Reigned Years...
Prophets. ...
Reigned Years...
Prophets
Prophet - Chazon is used in the Pentateuch, Samuel, Chronicles, Job, and the Prophets for a prophetic revelation. , "prophesied with a harp" (Hosea 1:2-112); Miriam and Deborah were "prophetesses" (Exodus 15:20; Judges 4:4, also Judges 6:8); John the Baptist, the greatest of Prophets of the Old Testament order. The Prophets were Jehovah's remembrancers, pleading for or against the people: so Elijah (1 Kings 17; 1 Kings 18:36-37; Romans 11:2-3; James 5:16; James 5:18; Isaiah 7:14-167). God as King of the theocracy did not give up His sovereignty when kings were appointed; but as occasion required, through the Prophets His legates, superseded, reproved, encouraged, set up, or put down kings (as Elisha in Jehu's case); and in times of apostasy strengthened in the faith the scattered remnant of believers. ...
The earlier Prophets took a greater share in national politics. The Prophets were a marked advance on the ceremonial of Leviticus and its priests: this was dumb show, prophecy was a spoken revelation of Christ more explicitly, therefore it fittingly stands in the canon between the law and the New Testament The same principles whereon God governed Israel in its relation to the world, in the nation's history narrated in the books of Samuel and Kings, are those whereon the prophecies rest. This accounts for those historical books being in the canon reckoned among "the Prophets. " The history of David and his seed is part of the preparation for the antitypical Son of David of whom the Prophets speak. ...
Daniel on the other hand is excluded from them, though abounding in the predictive element, because he did not belong to the order of Prophets officially, but ministered in the pagan court of the world power, Babylon. Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings were "the former Prophets"; Isaiah to Malachi "the latter Prophets. " The priests were Israel's regular teachers; the Prophets extraordinary, to rouse and excite. In northern Israel however, where there was no true priesthood, the Prophets were God's regular and only ministers, more striking prophetic deeds are recorded than in Judah. Nor can they be said to be self deceivers, for this could not have been the case with a succession of Prophets, if it were possible in the case of one or two. Prophets as an order. But when under the judges the nation repeatedly apostatized, and no longer regarded the acted lessons of the ceremonial law, God sent a new order to witness for Him in plainer warnings, namely, the Prophets. Samuel, of the Levite family of Kohath (1 Chronicles 6:28; 1 Chronicles 9:22), not only reformed the priests but gave the Prophets a new standing. Prophets existed before: Abraham, and the patriarchs as recipients of God's revelations, are so designated (Psalms 105:15; Genesis 15:12; Genesis 20:7); but Samuel constituted them into a permanent order. He instituted theological colleges of Prophets; one at Ramah where he lived (1 Samuel 19:12; Matthew 4:13-156), another was at Bethel (2 Kings 2:3), another at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), another at Gilgal (2 Kings 4:38, also 2 Kings 6:1). Official Prophets seem to have continued to the close of the Old Testament, though the direct mention of "the sons of the Prophets" occurs only in Samuel's, Elijah's, and Elisha's time. Sacred songs occur in the Prophets (Isaiah 12:1; Isaiah 26:1; Jonah 2:2; Habakkuk 3:2). The Prophets held meetings for worship on new moons and Sabbaths (2 Kings 4:23). Of the hundreds trained in the colleges of Prophets only sixteen have a place in the canon, for these alone had the special call to the office and God's inspiration qualifying them for it. The Prophets so commissioned were the national poets (so David the psalmist was also a prophet, Acts 2:30), annalists (2 Chronicles 32:32), theocratic patriots (Psalm 48; 1618831507_43), promoters of spiritual religion (Isaiah 1), extraordinarily authorized expounders of the spirit of the law (Isaiah 58:3-7; Ezekiel 18; Micah 6:6-8; Hosea 6:6; Amos 5:21) which so many sacrificed to the letter, official pastors, and a religious counterpoise to kingly despotism and idolatry, as Elijah was to Ahab. Their utterances being continued at intervals throughout their lives (as Isaiah in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah) show that they did not earn their reputation as Prophets by some one happy guess or oracle, but maintained their prophetical character continuously; which excludes the probability of imposture, time often detecting fraud. Above all, the Prophets by God's inspiration foretold concerning Jesus the Messiah (Matthew 1:22-23 with Isaiah 7:4; Isaiah 8:8). ...
The formula "that it might be fulfilled" implies that the divine word spoken through the Prophets ages before produced the result, which followed in the appointed time as necessarily as creation followed from the creative word. Christ appeals to the Prophets as fulfilled in Himself: Matthew 13:14 (Isaiah 6:9), Matthew 15:7 (Isaiah 29:13), John 5:46; Luke 24:44. The details as to Messiah scattered through so many Prophets, yet all converging in Him, the race, nation, tribe, family, birthplace, miracles, humiliation, death, crucifixion with the wicked yet association with the rich at death, resurrection, extension of His seed the church, are so numerous that their minute conformity with the subsequent fact can only be explained by believing that the Prophets were moved by the Holy Spirit to foretell the event. What is overwhelmingly convincing is, the Jews are our sacred librarians, who attest the Prophets as written ages before, and who certainly would not have corrupted them to confirm Jesus' Messianic claims which they reject. " The only key that opens this immensely complicated lock is the gospel narrative of Jesus, written ages after the Prophets. The absence of greater clearness in the Prophets is due to God's purpose to give light enough to guide the willing, to leave darkness enough to confound the willfully blind. The Prophets did net generally speak in ecstatic unconsciousness, but with self possession, for "the spirits of the Prophets are subject to the Prophets" (1 Corinthians 14:32); but sometimes they did (Genesis 15; Daniel 7; Daniel 8; Daniel 10; Daniel 11; Daniel 12, "the visions of Daniel"); "the vision of Isaiah" (Isaiah 6); "the vision of Ezekiel" (Ezekiel 1); "the visions of Zechariah" (Zechariah 1; Zechariah 4; Zechariah 5; Zechariah 6); the vision of Peter (Acts 10); of Paul (Acts 10:43; Acts 22:2 Corinthians 12); Job ( Man'Aen - (comforter ) is mentioned in ( Acts 13:1 ) as one of the teachers and Prophets in the church at Antioch at the time of the appointment of Saul and Barnabas as missionaries to the heathen
Asaliah - After Ahaziah's death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true Prophets and to support Baal worship
Athaliah - After Ahaziah's death, she killed his potential heirs and ruled for six years, using her influence to suppress the true Prophets and to support Baal worship
Sack, Sackcloth - The Prophets were often clothed in sackcloth, and generally in coarse clothing, Matthew 11:21 . Zechariah says, Zechariah 13:4 , that false Prophets should no longer prophesy in sackcloth, (English translation, a rough garment,) to deceive the simple
Prophecy, Prophet - God's power came at times upon individuals who were not recognised as Prophets, and they prophesied, as for instance Saul in 1 Samuel 10:10,11 . , were also Prophets. Of some of the Prophets no prophecies are recorded, while others are only known to us by what they wrote under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Prophets ( Ephesians 2:20 ), that is, the truth taught by them
Yeshayahu - (a) (7th century BCE) One of the greatest Prophets, a contemporary of Hosea, Amos and Micah
Haphtarah - ) One of the lessons from the Nebiim (or Prophets) read in the Jewish synagogue on Sabbaths, feast days, fasts, and the ninth of Ab, at the end of the service, after the parashoth, or lessons from the Law
Discerning of Spirits - This was one of the gifts in the early church, needful for 'testing the spirits,' because even then many false Prophets had gone forth into the world
Isaiah - (a) (7th century BCE) One of the greatest Prophets, a contemporary of Hosea, Amos and Micah
Jezebel - Jezebel tried to destroy all God's Prophets in Israel (1 Kings 18:4 ), while installing Prophets of Baal and Asherah (1 Kings 18:19 , modern translations) as part of the royal household. Elijah proved these Prophets to be false on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:1 ), bringing Jezebel's threat to kill Elijah (1 Kings 19:2 )
Prophet - The term Law and Prophets refers to the writings of the OT divided into two categories. The Prophets are all the rest of the OT books
Jezabel - She was a Sidonian princess, a fanatical devotee of the Phenician deities, the worship of which she imposed on Israel, persecuting the Prophets of Jehovah
Jezebel - She was a Sidonian princess, a fanatical devotee of the Phenician deities, the worship of which she imposed on Israel, persecuting the Prophets of Jehovah
Regem-Melech - The prophet repeated the word of previous Prophets: God desires moral lives rather than fasts (Zechariah 7:9-10 )
Wormwood - The Old Testament Prophets pictured wormwood as the opposite of justice and righteousness (Amos 5:7 ; Jeremiah 23:15 )
Chittim - ' It points originally to Cyprus (see KITTIM); but in Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6 the 'isles of Chittim' are spoken of, so it is evident that in the Prophets other islands are associated with Cyprus
Colhozeh - The name Colhozeh may indicate a family of Prophets
Cane - The true odoriferous calamus or grass came from India; and the Prophets speak of it as a foreign commodity of great value, Isaiah 43:24 Jeremiah 6:20 Ezekiel 27:19
Prophecy - John calls him, and very properly so, the Lord God of the Prophets, (Revelation 22:6) And the apostle Paul draws a line of everlasting distinction between him and all his servants when, in the opening of his Epistle to the Hebrews, he saith, "God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spake in time past unto the fathers by the Prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, and by whom he made the world?" (Hebrews 1:1-2)...
Concerning the Spirit of prophecy, the Holy Ghost hath taught the church that prophecy came not in old time by the will of man, but "holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. But between Jesus and his servants an everlasting difference marks their different characters as Prophets. The servants of the Lord who ministered to the church in his name as Prophets, had the gifts and anointings of the Holy Ghost; but this, it should seem, not always, but as occasion required. " (Matthew 11:11; John 1:23-27)...
Concerning the Prophets of the Old Testament, they were sometimes called seers; but before the drays of Samuel we do not meet with the name. The difference, it should seem, between the prophet and the seer lay in this, the Prophets were inspired persons, to predict to the church the will of JEHOVAH either by word of mouth, or writing; the seer committed to writing the records of the church. Hence we read concerning the acts of Manasseh, that they were written among the sayings of the Seers, (2 Chronicles 33:19)...
It were unnecessary to remark, what every reader of the Bible is supposed to know, that we have recorded, from the grace of God the Holy Spirit, the writings of four of what, by way of distinction, are called the greater Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel; and the Writings of the twelve of lesser Prophets, as they are named, Hoses, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. I do not apprehend that these distinctions of greater and lesser Prophets is given to them from the most distant idea that the writings of the lesser Prophets are less important than those of the greater, but wholly on account of their bulk. The evening of the Prophets only testified the approach of the morning of the evangelists
Law - This term is applied in the New Testament to the old covenant and revelation, in distinction from the new; the dispensation under the law in distinction from the dispensation under the gospel; that by Moses and the Prophets in distinction from the dispensation by Christ. The law, the Prophets, and the psalms, Luke 24:27; Luke 24:44; Acts 13:15, thus designate the entire Old Testament
Obadiah - The chief officer of king Ahab's household, who preserved the lives of one hundred Prophets from the persecuting Jezebel, by concealing them in two caves and furnishing them with food, 1 Kings 18:4 . The fourth of the minor Prophets, supposed to have prophesied about 587 B
Put, Phut - A people counted amongst the sons of Ham ( Genesis 10:6 , 1 Chronicles 1:8 ), and frequently mentioned in the Prophets as an ally of Egypt ( Jeremiah 46:9 , Ezekiel 27:10 ; Ezekiel 30:5 ; Ezekiel 38:5 , Nahum 3:9 ). : warriors may perhaps have been obtained thence for Egypt; or (2) Libya, whose people were called by the Egyptians Paiat (in the times of the Hebrew Prophets the Libyans were the backbone of the semi-native army); or (3) the bow-bearing allies pidati (?); (4) being generally associated with Lud = Lydians (once in Nah
Ecstasy - In the Old Testament ecstasy was associated with bands or schools of Prophets (1Samuel 10:5,1 Samuel 10:9 ; 1 Samuel 19:20 ; 2 Kings 9:1 ). Prophetic ecstasy could be accompanied by irrational behavior (1 Samuel 19:24 ; perhaps 1 Samuel 21:15 ) leading Prophets to be identified with madmen (2 Kings 9:11 ; Jeremiah 29:26 ; Hosea 9:7 ). See Prophecy, Prophets ; Tongues, Gift of
Hagiography - The word Hagiography, which means holy writings, is generally applied, by the Jews to all the books of the Old Testament, excepting the Law and the Prophets. Maimonides himself owns, that Daniel, and the other writers of the Hagiography, may be called Prophets. And Josephus doth not scruple to say that Daniel was one of the greatest Prophets. The reader will, I hope, clearly understand what is meant by Hagiography in the Scripture, and wherefore the Jews so distinguished them from the five books of Moses and the Prophets
Pathros - The country is mentioned in the Prophets, and nearly always in connection with Egypt
Naioth - It was probably the common residence of the "sons of the Prophets
Epistle, the - Epistles, though sometimes from the Acts of the Apostles or fromone of the books of the Prophets of the Old Testament
Plumb Line - Prophets spoke of the measurement God would use on the nation (Isaiah 28:17 ; Amos 7:7-8 )
Carmel, Mount - (car' mehl) In 1 Kings 18:19 , the scene of the confrontation between the prophet Elijah and the Prophets of Baal
Backsliding - Term used by the Prophets to describe Israel's faithlessness to God (Isaiah 57:17 RSV; Jeremiah 3:14 ,Jeremiah 3:14,3:22 ; Jeremiah 8:5 ; Jeremiah 31:22 ; Jeremiah 49:4 ; Hosea 11:7 ; Hosea 14:4 )
Obadiah - Merited the gift of prophecy after hiding and feeding the Prophets whom Jezebel persecuted
Ovadiah - Merited the gift of prophecy after hiding and feeding the Prophets whom Jezebel persecuted
Ovadiah (2) - Merited the gift of prophecy after hiding and feeding the Prophets whom Jezebel persecuted
Canon of the Old Testament - At the same time the presence of the living Prophets in the church caused the exact definition of the completed canon to be less needful, until the spirit of prophecy had departed. Nehemiah, according to 2 Maccabees 2:13, "gathered together the acts of the kings, and the Prophets, and of David. "...
Zechariah (Zechariah 7:12) speaks of "the law" and "the former Prophets" upon which the later Prophets rested; the succeeding sacred writers, under inspiration, setting their seal to their predecessors by quotations from them as Scripture. Nehemiah (Nehemiah 9:30) saith, "Thou testifiedst by Thy Spirit in Thy Prophets. " Daniel (Daniel 9:2) "understood by THE books (so the Hebrew) the number of the years whereof the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah the prophet, that He would accomplish seventy years in the desolation of Jerusalem"; probably Jeremiah's letter to the captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:1-10), others explain it the books of the Old Testament or of the Prophets. ) mentions the three integral parts, "the law, the Prophets, and the remainder of the books," as constituting a completed whole; just as the Lord Jesus refers to the whole Old Testament: "the law of Moses, the Prophets, and the psalms" (answering to the hagiographa or the Kethubim), Luke 24:44, compare Acts 28:23; and comprehends all the instances of innocent blood shedding in the formula "from Abel to Zacharias," i. the Prophets, . " The law is the basis of the whole, the Prophets apply the law to the national life, the hagiographa apply it to the individual. ) Josephus refers to the 22 books of Scripture, namely, 5 of Moses, 13 of the Prophets extending to the reign of Artaxerxes (the time of Nehemiah), 4 containing hymns and directions for life (c. the FIVE of MOSES; THIRTEEN prophetical books, namely,...
(1) Joshua,...
(2) Judges and Ruth,...
(3) the two of Samuel,...
(4) the two of Kings...
(5) the two of Chronicles,...
(6) Ezra and Nehemiah,...
(7) Esther,...
(8) Isaiah,...
(9) Jeremiah and Lamentations,...
(10) Ezekiel,...
(11) Daniel,...
(12) the twelve minor Prophets,...
(13) Job; and FOUR remaining, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon: the 22 thus being made to answer to the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. , are reckoned, in the Jewish use of the term "prophet" for inspired historian or writer, among" the former Prophets. ...
Josephus denies the Apocrypha the same authority: "from the time of Artaxerxes to our own everything has been recorded; but these accounts are not worthy of the same credit, owing to the absence of the regular succession of Prophets
Neck - Threatenings of coming judgments are represented by the Prophets by their laying bands upon the people's necks (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Isaiah 10:27 ; Jeremiah 27:2 )
Hosea - Son of Beeri, and one of the minor Prophets
Foxes - Hence false Prophets are called in Scripture foxes
Men'Ahem - The contemporary Prophets Hosea and Amos have left a melancholy picture of the ungodliness, demoralization and feebleness of Israel
Gath - It was a place of strength in the time of the Prophets Amos and Micah, and is placed by Jerom on the road between Eleutheropolis and Gaza
Prophesy - 10:6, where Saul is told by Samuel that when he meets a certain band of ecstatic Prophets, he too will “prophesy with them, and … be turned into another man. Sometimes, especially in the earlier Prophets, it seems that some kind of ecstatic experience may have been involved, as in Prophets, although not empowered by the divine spirit, are spoken of as prophesying also: “… I have not spoken to them, yet they prophesied” ( Prophets of Israel that prophesy, and say thou unto them that prophesy out of their own hearts, Hear ye the word of the Lord; … Woe unto the foolish Prophets, that follow their own spirit, and have seen nothing!” ( Prophets were mouthpieces of the true God. ” The words translated “seer” emphasize the means by which the “prophet” communicated with God but do not identify the men as anything different from Prophets (cf. Immediately, this constitutes a promise and definition of the long succession of Israel’s Prophets. They were called sons of the Prophets (1 Kings 20:35). ...
The word is also used of “heathen Prophets”: “Now therefore send, and gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the Prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the Prophets of the groves four hundred, which eat at Jezebel’s table” (1 Kings 18:19)
Amos - The fourth of the minor Prophets, was a herdsman of Tekoah, a small town of Judah, about twelve miles south of Jerusalem. In regard to style, Amos takes a high rank among the Prophets
Arnish - ...
Matthew 23:29 (b) This is a description of the flowery words used by the Pharisees to describe the virtues of the dead Prophets while they themselves rejected the teachings of those same Prophets
Zephaniah - The ninth in order of the minor Prophets, of the tribe of Simeon. His prophecy contains two oracles, in three chapters, directed against idolaters in Judah, against surrounding idolatrous nations, and against wicked rulers, priests, and Prophets
Remnant - ...
When God’s people of Old Testament times rebelled against him, the Prophets announced God’s judgment upon them. Time and again the Prophets declared that God had rejected his unfaithful people but would preserve the faithful remnant. One task of the Prophets was to build up and encourage the remnant (1 Kings 19:18; Isaiah 1:9; Isaiah 8:16-19; Isaiah 10:20-23; Isaiah 28:5; Jeremiah 15:19-21). ...
The Prophets saw that events were heading towards a judgment far greater than anything the people had met previously
Christ - ...
The ancient Hebrews, being instructed by the Prophets, had clear notions of the Messiah; but these became gradually depraved, so that when Jesus appeared in Judea, the Jews entertained a false conception of the Messiah, expecting a temporal monarch and conqueror, who should remove the Roman yoke and subject the whole world. ...
The ancient Prophets had foretold that the Messiah should be God, and man; exalted, and abased; master, and servant; priest, and victim; prince, and subject; involved in death, yet victor over death; rich, and poor; a king, a conqueror, glorious-and a man of grief, exposed to infirmities, unknown, in a state of abjection and humiliation. The unction that the Prophets and the apostles speak of is the spiritual and internal unction of grace and of the Holy Ghost, of which kings, priests, and Prophets were anciently anointed, was but the figure and symbol
Elcesaites - They kept a mean between the Jews, Christians, and Pagans: they worshipped but one God, observed the Jewish sabbath, circumcision, and the other ceremonies of the law; yet they rejected the Pentateuch and the Prophets: nor had they any more respect for the writings of the apostles
Carmelites - One of the four tribes of Mendicants, or begging friars; so named from Mount Carmel, formerly inhabited by Elias, Elisha, and the children of the Prophets; from whom this order pretends to descend in uninterrupted succession
Watchman - Israel's Prophets saw themselves as watchmen warning the nation of God's approaching judgment if the people did not repent
Barsabas - He and Silas are called 'chief men among the brethren,' and 'prophets,' who exhorted the brethren and confirmed them
Zephaniah - Son of Cushi, and one of the 'minor Prophets
Vision - The vision of Prophets such as Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, Micah, Ezekiel, Daniel, and John are representative of this aspect of revelation. ...
Among the classical Prophets (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah, Obadiah, etc. By this avenue, the Prophets interpreted the meaning of immediate events in the history of Israel
Gifts in the Church - These were apostles, Prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers, for the perfecting of the saints, for the edifying of the body of Christ. " Later in the same chapter these persons are seen to be members of Christ's body, and as such set in the church — apostles, Prophets, teachers. ...
Those mentioned in Ephesians 4:11 (except apostles and Prophets in the full sense) are gifts for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for edifying the body of Christ, "till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ
High Places - The Prophets reproach the Israelites for nothing with more zeal than for worshipping upon the high places. The people sometimes went upon those mountains which had been sanctified by the presence of patriarchs and Prophets, and by appearances of God, to worship the true God there. But they frequently adored idols upon these hills, and committed a thousand abominations in groves, and caves, and tents; and hence arose the zeal of pious kings and Prophets to suppress the high places
Fulness -
Of time (Galatians 4:4 ), the time appointed by God, and foretold by the Prophets, when Messiah should appear
Sibmah - This fact explains the words of the Prophets referred to above
Zoar - It is referred to by the Prophets (Isaiah 15:5 ) and (Jeremiah 48:34 )
Zoar - It is referred to by the Prophets (Isaiah 15:5 ) and (Jeremiah 48:34 )
Symeon ( Simeon) Called Niger - Symeon is mentioned second in the list of Prophets and teachers at Antioch (Acts 13:1)
Obadiah - He protected God’s Prophets from Jezebel’s violence, and on one occasion carried a message from Elijah to Ahab (1 Kings 18:1-16)
Landmark - ...
Proverbs 22:28 (c) We should learn by this that we are to see and ask for the old paths which GOD has set by His Prophets and apostles
Pillar - The stately column which adorns and supports the front of a temple, Judges 16:25-30 Job 9:6 26:11 , illustrates the position of Prophets, Jeremiah 1:18 , apostles, Galatians 2:9 , believers, Revelation 3:12 , and the church itself, respecting the truth, 1 Timothy 3:15
Hose'a - (salvation ), son of Beeri, and first of the minor Prophets
Joel - (Ἰωήλ)...
Joel is proved by internal evidence to have been one of the latest of the Hebrew Prophets. But Joel has not the wide outlook of some of the other Prophets. Nothing less will satisfy him than the fulfilment of Moses’ wish: ‘Would to God that all Jahweh’s people were Prophets. ’ For him the goal of Hebrew history, the Divine event to which all things move, is that God shall, by the mighty working of His Spirit, so enlighten and control His people, so adapt them to share His confidence and receive His revelations, that the thrilling experiences which have hitherto been confined to the Prophets shall then be shared by all Israel. Time would also show that there was to be no limit of race (Jew or Gentile); for however men (even Prophets) may limit ‘all flesh,’ to Christ and His Church it means ‘all humanity
Samuel - His unique position in the history of Israel is indicated by two phrases in Acts-‘all the Prophets from Samuel’ (Acts 3:24), and God ‘gave them judges until Samuel the prophet’ Acts 13:20). He is regarded as the last of the Judges and the first of the Prophets
Canon - These quotations and references by our Lord and the apostles most clearly imply the existence at that time of a well-known and publicly acknowledged collection of Hebrew writings under the designation of "The Scriptures;" "The Law and the Prophets and the Psalms;" "Moses and the Prophets," etc
Sackcloth - The Prophets were often clothed in sackcloth, and generally in coarse clothing. Zechariah says that false Prophets shall no longer prophesy in sackcloth, to deceive the simple, Zechariah 13:4
Demoniacs - we have a remarkable instance of a spirit influencing 400 Prophets. He would go out and be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his Prophets. "Now therefore," said Micaiah, "behold, the Lord hath put a lying spirit in the mouth of these thy Prophets, and the Lord hath spoken evil against thee. We do not know the nature of this spirit, nor how he influenced the Prophets
Sheaf - The Prophets used sheaves as figures of judgment (Jeremiah 9:22 ; Amos 2:13 ; Micah 4:12 ; Zechariah 12:6 )
Threatening - The Prophets are filled with God's threatenings against the rebellious Jews
Naioth - The dwellings of a college of Prophets, under Samuel (1 Samuel 19:18-23; 1 Samuel 20:1)
Lucius of Cyrene - Mentioned with Barnabas, Simeon Niger, Manaen, and Saul, among the Prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch (Acts 13:1)
Naioth - A place ‘in Ramah,’ where was a ‘company of the Prophets
Mantle - Many of the Prophets wore them (1 Samuel 15:27 ; 1 Kings 19:13 ), as did women in Jerusalem (Isaiah 3:22 ) and Job (Job 1:20 )
Reformation - ' The thought is taken up from the Prophets and will be fulfilled in the kingdom, and implies the setting in order of things on earth according to the mind of God
Bible - The names given to the Old in the writings of the New are "the scriptures" ( Matthew 21:42 ), "scripture" (2 Peter 1:20 ), "the holy scriptures" (Romans 1:2 ), "the law" (John 12:34 ), "the law of Moses, the Prophets, and the psalms" (Luke 24:44 ), "the law and the Prophets" (Matthew 5:17 ), "the old covenant" (2 Corinthians 3:14 , RSV). The Prophets, consisting of (1) the former, namely, Joshua, Judges, the Books of Samuel, and the Books of Kings; (2) the latter, namely, the greater Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, and the twelve minor Prophets
Ahab - The Baalism promoted by Ahab and Jezebel was a threat to Israel’s existence as God’s people, and for this reason God sent the Prophets Elijah and Elisha to oppose it. He allowed the queen to try to kill the prophet who opposed her Baalism (1 Kings 19:1-2), but at the same time he looked to another of God’s Prophets for directions that would bring him military victory against Syria (1 Kings 20:13-14; 1 Kings 20:22). Ahab won a decisive victory (1 Kings 20:20-21), and the next year won another victory, again at the direction of one of God’s Prophets (1 Kings 20:22). When Ahab agreed to spare the enemy kings because of trade advantages he could win for himself, another of God’s Prophets condemned his actions (1 Kings 20:34-43). Most of the court Prophets were corrupt, and gave Ahab whatever advice they thought would please him
Mount Tabor - Here Debbora assembled 10,000 Israelites under Barac to attack and destroy Sisara and his army (Judges 4); poetically treated by the Prophets, Jeremiah 46; Osee, 5; and Psalms 88
Mount Thabor - Here Debbora assembled 10,000 Israelites under Barac to attack and destroy Sisara and his army (Judges 4); poetically treated by the Prophets, Jeremiah 46; Osee, 5; and Psalms 88
Joel - ...
The second of the twelve minor Prophets
Shiggaion - But as both Prophets, David and Habakkuk, are celebrating things of higher moment than what relates to themselves, I cannot but be led to believe the word itself hath a reference, and the Scriptures connected with this title, to the Lord Jesus Christ
Bozrah - Royal city of Edom, on which the Prophets pronounced judgements
Gourd - The wild gourd of 2 Kings 4:39, gathered by one of "the sons of the Prophets," is a poisonous gourd, supposed to be the colocynth, which bears a fruit of the color and size of an orange
Nebo - It is denounced in the Prophets as belonging to Moab
Tabor, Mount - Here Debbora assembled 10,000 Israelites under Barac to attack and destroy Sisara and his army (Judges 4); poetically treated by the Prophets, Jeremiah 46; Osee, 5; and Psalms 88
Thabor, Mount - Here Debbora assembled 10,000 Israelites under Barac to attack and destroy Sisara and his army (Judges 4); poetically treated by the Prophets, Jeremiah 46; Osee, 5; and Psalms 88
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major Prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor Prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Jezebel - The daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre, and wife of Ahab, king of Israel, infamous for her idolatry, wickedness and cruel persecution of the Prophets of Jehovah. When Elijah caused 450 Prophets of Baal to be put to death this wicked woman threatened to slay Elijah, but he escaped
Theocracy - All the people were the servants of Jehovah, who ruled over their public and private affairs, communicating to them his will through the medium of the Prophets
Eldad - Moses replied, "Enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the Lord's people were Prophets" (Numbers 11:24-30 ; Compare Mark 9:38 ; Luke 9:49 )
New Moon - ) On it work was suspended (Amos 8:5), the temple was opened for worship (Isaiah 66:23), and in northern Israel the godly repaired to the Prophets for religious instruction (2 Kings 4:23)
See r - A name sometimes applied to the Prophets because of the visions granted to them
Woe - In the Prophets there are many woes against Israel and Judah, and also against the nations which had to do with Israel
Zephaniah - One of the minor Prophets, in the days of Josiah
Prophet - Samuel himself Levite of the family of Kohath, ( 1 Chronicles 6:28 ) and almost certainly a priest, was the instrument used at once for effecting a reform in the sacerdotal order (1 Chronicles 9:22 ) and for giving to the Prophets a position of importance which they had never before held. For this purpose he instituted companies or colleges of Prophets. So successful were these institutions that from the time of Samuel to the closing of the canon of the Old Testament there seems never to have been wanting due supply of men to keep up the line of official Prophets. Generally, the inspired prophet came from the college of Prophets, and belonged to prophetic order; but this was not always the case. ( Amos 7:14 ) The sixteen Prophets whose books are in the canon have that place of honor because they were endowed with the prophetic gift us well as ordinarily (so far as we know) belonging to the prophetic order. --What then are the characteristics of the sixteen Prophets thus called and commissioned and intrusted with the messages of God to his people?
They were the national poets of Judea. The system of morals put forward by the Prophets, if not higher or sterner or purer than that of the law, is more plainly declared, and with greater, because now more needed, vehemence of diction. ...
But the Prophets were something more than national poets and annalists, preachers of patriotism moral teachers, exponents of the law, pastors and politicians. " ...
That the state of the Prophets, at the time of receiving the divine revelation, was such as necessarily to make their predictions fragmentary figurative, and abstracted from the relations of time
Prophets, the - As a whole the Prophets refer to Israel as an inner circle, or chief platform, on which the dealings of Jehovah were and will be developed, and with which the Messiah is in immediate relation. It may be premised that the burden of the Prophets Obadiah, Jonah, and Nahum has special reference to Edom and to Nineveh, that is, to peoples that were always hostile to Israel. It appears probable, whatever may be the reason, that the testimony commonly known as "the Prophets" began in the time of Jeroboam 2 king of Israel, Uzziah being his contemporary in Judah. The Prophets Ezekiel and Daniel speak from the land of Chaldea, when all present hope was over for both Israel and Judah, and the times of the Gentiles had set in. The testimony of the Prophets extended thus over a period of from three to four hundred years. ...
The approximate dates of each of the Prophets may be seen in the tables of chronology under KINGS. This recovery and blessing by God of His ancient people, in their Messiah, may be said to be a golden thread running through all the Prophets. ...
It is of the greatest importance, both for the right understanding of these scriptures, and for a true appreciation of what Christianity is, to see that the church has no place in the Prophets. In the church there is neither Jew nor Gentile, and the Prophets recognise both, while carefully maintaining the distinction between them. , without seeing its reference strictly to the remnant of Israel, fail to study the Prophets. Not a few deem the study to be unprofitable — the subject is too mysterious, they say, and commentators differ so widely in their interpretation! One great hindrance to the understanding of the Prophets is that they are not allowed to mean what they say. ...
The twelve Prophets that follow the Book of Daniel are often called THE MINOR Prophets, simply because they are shorter than the others, and not as being in any respect inferior
Christ - In the Old Law priests, kings, and Prophets were anointed; therefore the One who was to combine this threefold dignity in His Person, was looked forward to as Messias, or Christ
Bozrah - This place is mentioned by the Prophets in later times (Isaiah 34:6 ; Jeremiah 49:13 ; Amos 1:12 ; Micah 2:12 )
Corner - Later the Prophets constantly complain of the rich defrauding the poor (Isaiah 3:14-15; Isaiah 10:2; Amos 5:11)
Micaiah - Having witnessed Yahweh's heavenly council, Micaiah was certain Ahab's 400 Prophets were possessed by a lying spirit
Confirmation - Judas and Silas, messengers from Jerusalem to Antioch, being Prophets, exhorted the brethren with many words and confirmed them
Vision - ) Beside these, the books of the Prophets are called visions
Seer - Ezekiel also says, "Woe unto the foolish Prophets, that follow their own spirit and have seen nothing !" Ezekiel 13:3
Eldad - Joshua would have had Moses forbid them, but Moses replied, "Enviest thou for my sake? Would God that all the Lord's people were Prophets, and that God would pour forth his Spirit upon them!"...
Numbers 11:24-29
Partaker - ...
Wish me partaker in thy happiness-- ...
If we had been in the days of our fathers, we would not have been partakers with them in the blood of the Prophets
lu'Dim - Lud and the Ludim are mentioned in four passages of the Prophets -- (Isaiah 66:19 ; Jeremiah 46:9 ; Ezekiel 27:10 ; 38:5 ) There call be no doubt that but one nation is intended in these passages, and it seems that the preponderance of evidence is in favor of the Mizaraite Ludim
Gifts - It was usual also to take presents to Prophets, 1 Samuel 9:7 ; and as the Prophets were sometimes judges, the gifts were liable to become bribes, as they did with the sons of Samuel, though Samuel himself could challenge the people, and they admitted the fact, that he had never taken a bribe to blind his eyes therewith
Vision - Thus, in the earliest times, to patriarchs, Prophets, and holy men God sent angels, he appeared to them himself by night in dreams, he illuminated their minds, he made his voice to be heard by them, he sent them ecstasies, and transported them beyond themselves, and made them hear things that eye had not seen, ear had not heard, and which had not entered into the heart of man. Vision is also used for the prophecies written by the Prophets
Inquire of God - A variety of methods were employed to seek God's counsel: dreams (1 Samuel 28:6 ); priests with the ephod (1 Samuel 22:10 ; 1 Samuel 23:9-13 ); Prophets (2 Kings 3:11 ); and direct consultation. Prophets frequently took the initiative to announce God's will when no consultation was requested. See Prophets, Prophecy; Necromancy ; Teraphim ; Milcom
Zechariah - Zechariah is the eleventh of the minor Prophets. These two Prophets, with united zeal, encouraged the people to resume the work of the temple, which had been discontinued for some years, Ezra 5:1 . ...
Zechariah's prophecies concerning the Messiah are more particular and express than those of most other Prophets, and many of them, like those of Daniel, are couched in symbols
Messiah or Messias - They were accustomed to anoint their kings, high priests, and sometimes Prophets, when they were set apart to their office; and hence the phrase, "to anoint" for an employment, sometimes signifies merely a particular designation or choice for such an employment. ...
But, as we have already observed, MESSIAH is the designation given by the Hebrews, eminently, to that Savior and Deliverer whom they expected, and who was promised to them by all the Prophets. As the holy unction was given to kings, priests, and Prophets, by describing the promised Savior of the world under the name of Christ, Anointed, or Messiah, it was sufficiently evidenced that the qualities of king, prophet, and highpriest would eminently center in him, and that he should exercise them not only over the Jews but over all mankind, and particularly over those who should receive him as their Savior
Ahab - She was a devotee to the Tyrian god Melqart and gave open endorsement to the worship of Baal in Israel by supporting 450 Baal Prophets and 400 Prophets of the goddess Asherah (1 Kings 18:19 ). His surrender to the influences of idolatry is illustrated by the construction of a temple for Baal (1 Kings 16:32 ), the massacre of the Lord's Prophets (1Kings 18:4,1 Kings 18:19 ), and seizure of an Israelite's property (1 Kings 21:1 ). He frequently consulted with Yahweh's Prophets (1Kings 20:13-14,1Kings 20:22,1 Kings 20:28 ; 1Kings 22:8,1 Kings 22:16 ), used the divine name in naming his children (Ahaziah, Jehoram, and Athaliah) and did not interfere with the execution of the priests of Baal after the contest on Mt. The influence of Jezebel in his life, however, overshadowed any significant influence the Prophets of the Lord had in his life
Scriptures - )...
Divisions of the Scriptures...
Jews divided their Scriptures (our Old Testament) into three parts, which they called the Law, the Prophets and the Writings. They often referred to the Scriptures in general simply as the Law (John 10:34; 1 Corinthians 14:21) or the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 7:12; Matthew 22:40; Luke 16:16). The Prophets consisted of the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) and the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and the twelve so-called Minor Prophets) (see PROPHECY)
Elijah - ”...
On Mount Carmel his greatest public miracle involved his encounter with the 450 Prophets of Baal and the 400 Prophets of Asherah (1 Kings 18:19-40 ). The false Prophets called on their gods, and Elijah called on His God to see which would rain fire from heaven. After the false Prophets failed to hear from their gods, Elijah wet the wood on his altar to the true God by pouring four jars of water over it three times. As a result of their deception, Elijah ordered the false Prophets killed. ...
Jezebel planned revenge toward Elijah for ordering the false Prophets slain, so Elijah retreated to Judah and finally Mount Horeb. ...
Relationship to Messiah Elijah and Elisha were involved in the schools of the Prophets when Elijah struck the waters of the Jordan and they parted to allow their crossing (2 Kings 2:1-12 )
Hagiographa - In contrast to the first two divisions (the law and the Prophets), “the writings” (Hebrew, Kethubim ) are a miscellaneous collection
Fanatics - at their first rise, and is now an epithet given to modern Prophets, enthusiasts, &c
Kishon - Later, the river was the place where Elijah brought the Prophets of Baal to be executed following God's display and victory on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:40 )
Lucius - Lucius of Cyrene was one of the Prophets and teachers who presided in the Church at Antioch (Acts 13:1)
Ezekiel - Son of Buzi; a priest and one of the four great Prophets
Zoan - The Prophets used Zoan to refer to the Egyptian government and its activities ( Isaiah 19:11 ,Isaiah 19:11,19:13 ; Isaiah 30:4 ; Ezekiel 30:14 )
Visions - With the Prophets they were frequently employed: more than twenty times we read of them in Daniel
Pillows - The male Prophets "built a wall with untempered mortar" (Ezekiel 13:10), the women sewed pillows; both alike promising "peace" to the impenitent
Kishon, River of, Kison - It was also at this brook that Elijah slew the Prophets of Baal
Micah - He is one of what is called the lesser Prophets; and his prophecy forms a part of the sacred Canon of Scripture
Jeroboam - (See 2 Kings 14:23) During this man's reign, the Prophets Hosea, Amos and, Jonah exercised their ministry
Liar - , APOSTLES, BRETHREN, CHRISTS, Prophets, TEACHERS, WITNESS
Gemariah - He was also the bearer of a letter in which Jeremiah warned the captive Jews against false Prophets who promised them a speedy return, Jeremiah 29:3,4
Hind - In Genesis 49:21 , Naphtali is compared to a hind roaming at liberty, or quickly growing up into elegance; while the "goodly words" of Naphtali refer to the future orators, Prophets, and poets of the tribe
na'Ioth - In its corrected from the name signifies "habitations," and probably means the huts or dwellings of a school or college of Prophets over which Samuel presided as Elisha did over those at Gilgal and Jericho
Baasha - In so doing he brought the house of Jeroboam to an end as foretold by one of God’s Prophets
Oracles - The early church did have Prophets like Agabus (Acts 21:10-11 ), who expressed God's word regarding what was to come. Many of the writing Prophets have pronouncements against (or concerning) nations surrounding Israel (Amos 1:1 ; Isaiah 13-19 ; Jeremiah 46-51 ). Other nations had their own gods and their own Prophets. Although anyone could seek a word from God and many, such as Gideon or Abraham, received an oracle directly; these divine communications usually came through either priests, Prophets, or prophetesses. Later, the Prophets were more prominent. One caution about Prophets and their pronouncements must be made. Often the Prophets were not Prophets until they received God's word (consider Amos' experience in Amos 7:14-15 ). ...
Different methods were used by priests and Prophets to receive the two forms of oracles, although we should not try to make too rigid a distinction. The drama came from a true prophet receiving one answer regarding the decision and a large number of false Prophets giving a different answer. Prophets did sometimes use music as a means of receiving a decision oracle as did Elisha (2 Kings 3:15 ). Through Jeremiah, God condemned those Prophets who relied on dreams to receive an oracle (Jeremiah 23:23-32 ). The frequent use of sights in pronouncements has led some to believe that the Prophets had encounters with God that later they had to interpret and communicate to others. This is especially true of the pronouncements of the writing Prophets which have been preserved for us
Obadiah - Amid great spiritual degeneracy he maintained his fidelity to God, and interposed to protect The Lord's Prophets, an hundred of whom he hid at great personal risk in a cave (4,13). ...
...
A prophet, fourth of the minor Prophets in the Hebrew canon, and fifth in the LXX
Harp - There was a smaller harp played with the hand, as by the walking Prophets (1 Samuel 10:5), besides the larger, with more strings, played with the plectrum. It was an important adjunct to the "schools of the Prophets
Martyr - Jezebel cut off the Prophets of Jehovah. The Lord charged the Pharisees with being the children of them which killed the Prophets, Matthew 23:31 ; and in the "cloud of witnesses" spoken of in Hebrews 11 , were some of whom it is said "others were tortured Gilgal - A school of the Prophets was established, 2 Kings 4:38 ; and yet it afterwards appears to have become a seat of idolatry, Hosea 4:15 9:15 12:11 Amos 4:4 5:5 . There are not wanting those who would make the Gilgal near Antipatris the seat of Samuel's judgeship, and of one of the schools of the Prophets
Jez'Ebel - At her table were supported no less than 450 Prophets of Baal and 400 of Eastward. (1 Kings 16:31,21 ; 18:19 ) The Prophets of Jehovah were attacked by her orders and put to the sword
Prophecy - And men are termed Prophets, Abraham for example, Genesis 20:7, of whom it is nowhere recorded that they uttered a single prophecy in the sense of foretelling future events. What, then, are the characteristics of the 16 Prophets thus called and commissioned and intrusted with the messages of God to his people? 1. The system of morals put forward by the Prophets, though not higher or purer than that of the law, is more plainly declared, and with greater, because now more needed, vehemence of diction. But the Prophets were something more than national poets and annalists, preachers of patriotism, moral teachers, exponents of the law, pastors, and politicians
Foreknowledge - Thus Paul proclaimed the gospel which God had promised beforehand through His Prophets in the holy Scriptures (Romans 1:2 ). The gospels similarly declare that those things which the Prophets had said were now fulfilled in the life and death of Jesus (Matthew 1:22-23 ; Matthew 2:5-6:15 ; John 19:24 ). ...
Even the Prophets' knowledge of future events presupposed God's revelation to the Prophets. Amos 3:7 (NRSV) proclaims, “Surely the Lord God does nothing, without revealing his secret to his servants the Prophets,” indicating that the Prophets acted and spoke on behalf of God and not at their own initiative. Concerning the false Prophets in Israel, God says, “I have not sent these Prophets, yet they ran: I have not spoken to them, yet they prophesied
Bible - They arranged the books of the Old Testament in three divisions, called, the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings, that is, the Holy Writings. The second division, the Prophets, is subdivided into the former Prophets, namely, the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings; and the later, that is, the Prophets proper, with the exception of the book of Daniel. The later Prophets are once more distributed into the greater-Isaiah, Jeremiah, (not including Lamentations,) and Ezekiel; and the less-the twelve minor Prophets. Selection from both the earlier and the later Prophets are read in the synagogues along with the sections of the Law; but these don not embrace the whole of the Prophets, and the arrangement of them differs among different divisions of the Jews
Say, Utter, Affirm - ” The word is a verbal form of the verb ne'ûm, which occurs only once in the entire Old Testament: “Behold, I am against the Prophets, saith [1] the Lord, that use their tongues, and say [2], He saith [1]” ( Prophets, and of your young men for Nazarites. But ye gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the Prophets, saying, Prophesy not” (Amos 2:11-12)
Isaiah - One of the great Hebrew Prophets. Isaiah is the evangelist among the Old Testament Prophets. Among the other Prophets each of the more important ones is distinguished by some one particular excellence and some one peculiar talent; in Isaiah all kinds of talent and all beauties of prophetic discourse meet together, so as mutually to temper and qualify each other; it is not so much any single feature that distinguishes him as the symmetry and perfection as a whole
Dreams - But the people were not forbidden, when they thought they had a significative dream, to address the Prophets of the Lord, or the high priest in his ephod, to have it explained. Saul, before the battle of Gilboa, consulted a woman who had a familiar spirit, "because the Lord would not answer him by dreams, nor by Prophets," 1 Samuel 28:6-7 . God said, that he spake to other Prophets in dreams, but to Moses face to face
Daniel, Book of - Sir Isaac Newton regards Daniel as the most distinct and plain of all the Prophets, and most easy to be understood; and therefore considers that in things relating to the last times, he is to be regarded as the key to the other Prophets. Paul, who have copied his prophecies; of the Jewish church and nation, who have constantly received this book as canonical; of Josephus, who recommends him as the greatest of the Prophets; and of the Jewish Targets and Talmuds, which frequently cite his authority
Tah'Panhes, Tehaph'Nehes, Tahap'Anes, - a city of Egypt, mentioned in the time of the Prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel
Mantle - " The recognized dress of a prophet (Zechariah 13:4, "a rough garment" of Prophets)
Huldah - Huldah ranks with Deborah and Hannah among the rare women-prophets of the OT
Nethaniah - Son of Asaph who served in a company of Prophets established by David
Islands, Isles - It is thought that in some places in the Prophets the sea-coasts or maritime countries are intended
Gourd, Wild, - In a time of dearth a lap-full of gourds from a wild vine was gathered to provide a meal for Elisha and the sons of the Prophets
Habakkuk - One of the twelve minor Prophets
Phut - The Prophets often speak of Phut
Dreamer of Dreams - Such are classed with false Prophets
Haggai - One of the minor Prophets, probably accompanied Zerubbabel in the first return of the Jew from Babylon, B
Jahaz - This town is mentioned in the denunciations of the Prophets against Moab (Isaiah 15:4 ; Jeremiah 48:34 )
French Prophets - In the year 1688, five or six hundred Protestants of both sexes gave themselves out to be Prophets, and inspired of the Holy Ghost. When the Prophets had for a while been under agitations of body, they began to prophesy. In the year 1706, three or four of these Prophets came over into England, and brought their prophetic spirit along with them, which discovered itself in the same ways and manners, by ecstacies, and agitations, and inspirations under them, as it had done in France; and they propagated the like spirit to others, so that before the year was out there were two or three hundred of these Prophets in and about London, of both sexes, of all ages; men, women, and children: and they had delivered under inspiration four or five hundred prophetic warnings. These Prophets also pretended to the gift of languages, of discerning the secrets of the heart, the gift of ministration of the same spirit to others by the laying on of the hands, and the gift of healing
Nazarene - According to Matthew 2,23, Nazarene, as a title of Christ, was foretold by the Prophets. No text of the Prophets announced that the Messias was to belong to Nazareth and was to be called a Nazarene for that reason
Elias - At length he once more confronted the king and challenged the Prophets of Baal to a contest on Mount Carmel, when Elias's oblation was consumed by fire from heaven, and the false Prophets were slain by the people at his command
Elijah - At length he once more confronted the king and challenged the Prophets of Baal to a contest on Mount Carmel, when Elias's oblation was consumed by fire from heaven, and the false Prophets were slain by the people at his command
Pastor - In Ephesians 4:11, while ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ and ‘evangelists’ have each a separate article, ‘pastors and teachers’ are coupled by a common article, and probably form only one group, distinguished by being attached to particular congregations, whereas ‘apostles,’ ‘prophets,’ and ‘evangelists’ were itinerant preachers and missionaries
Prophet - 3) speaks of Him as ‘the only High Priest of all men, the only King of all creation, and the Father’s only supreme Prophet of Prophets’ (see also Ambrose on Jeremiah 1:4-10,7 and Cassiodorus on Psalms 132:2). She recognized that the old dispensation was established and preserved by those who were anointed to be Prophets, priests, and kings, and she believed that each of these offices found its perfection in the Person and work of Jesus Christ. Nor does this separation of the offices of ‘the Prophet’ and ‘the Messiah’ seem to be due to any special obtuseness on the part of our Lord’s contemporaries; the OT Prophets themselves appear also to have been unable to rise above it. The truth appears to be: the Prophets of Israel, influenced by the national circumstances and needs of their own day, predicted under the Spirit’s influence, now a coming king, now a prophet, now a priestly sufferer with prophetic functions; and these parallel lines of yearning thought found together their satisfaction in the Person of Jesus. The nation, galled by a foreign yoke, and meditating on the predictions found in their sacred books, and, above all, picturing the return of Elijah as a herald of emancipation, ‘mused in their heart’ whether the Baptist were himself the Messiah, or Elijah, or the Prophet, or one of the old Prophets returned (Luke 3:15, John 1:20 ff. Later in His ministry, when His death was imminent, He openly placed Himself in line with the ancient Prophets of Israel, foretelling that, similarly to them, He could not perish out of Jerusalem (Matthew 23:29 ff. , Luke 13:33); and when He used, in the parable of the Vineyard, the familiar OT figure of the Kingdom of God, He deliberately made Himself the last of the long line of God’s martyr messengers to His people; and told the Jews that, notwithstanding the fact that they had ‘shamefully handled’ His predecessors the Prophets; yet He had been sent to them by God with a final call to repentance. —When we turn to the records of the life of Jesus, we find predicated of Him every characteristic that marked the Hebrew Prophets. We read: ‘It came to pass when our Lord had ascended out of the water, the whole fountain of the Holy Spirit came down and rested upon him and said unto him, “My Son, in all the Prophets I was looking for thee, that thou mightest come and that I might rest in thee. The OT Prophets were men of God. This title, doubtless, was frequently used, as conveying little more than a customary appellation of those holding the office; yet the fact of its having been chosen as a title shows the underlying conviction, on the part of the nation, that sanctity of character was a necessary condition of receiving communications from Jehovah; and it thus suggests not only the Divine purport of their message, but also the personal religiousness of the Prophets. He, the one sinless Man, whose whole life was lived in conscious communication, full and continuous, with His Father, must necessarily, as regards the fitness of holiness, be the very Prophet of Prophets. The pre-eminence of that message rests on the fact that whereas ‘God of old times spake unto the fathers in the Prophets, he hath in these last times spoken unto us in his Son’ (Hebrews 1:1). Further, as men of God, the message of the Prophets was one of moral import. ’ The greater Prophets had developed far beyond the earlier Prophets and still earlier seers, who used their gifts to reveal matters of mere personal interest: their message to the individual or to the nation was filled, as occasion required, with moral teachings; rebuking sin, calling to repentance, and threatening Divine judgment. For not only did He, like the Prophets before Him, utter words pregnant with moral enlightenment but also by His every word and act He constantly manifested the perfection of moral being. The Prophets were conscious of being recipients of direct communications from Jehovah. In Amos (Amos 3:7) it is said, ‘The Lord God docth nothing without revealing his counsel to his servants the Prophets’; and in Jeremiah (Jeremiah 23:22) we are told that the prophet stands in ‘the counsel of Jehovah. Like the Prophets of old, He received communications from God: but in virtue of His Divine Personality He perfectly heard and faithfully expressed every thought revealed to Him. The apologetic use of prophecy in the past no doubt led to a too exclusive consideration of this aspect of the prophetic books; and the Church has gained much by regarding the Prophets as men inspired by Jehovah with special moral messages to the age in which they lived. The writings of the Hebrew Prophets are saturated with prediction. ...
Now, full of prediction as are the writings of the Prophets, the sayings of Jesus are even more so. ...
If the Hebrew Prophets received at times illumination which revealed to them glimpses of coming events, Jesus was at all times able to reveal hidden things of the future with as much certainty as He could speak of the things clearly seen in the present. ...
In addition to the predictions of general events, there is also found, but less frequently, among the Hebrew Prophets, the power of foretelling particular events to individuals. This gift was partially granted to the Prophets, and may in a measure account for their predictions. Jesus is above all other Prophets. OT Prophets, receiving their revelation only at such times as Jehovah desired to reveal His will, could exercise their functions only intermittently; whereas Jesus, living in uninterrupted communion with His Father, was in receipt of a constant revelation of the purposes and will of God. The OT Prophets could be recipients of only a partial revelation. Great as was the usefulness of the Prophets to God’s chosen people, yet it is clear that in them they had no infallible guides. They had to distinguish between ‘the false Prophets’ and those who truly represented Jehovah. The false Prophets were not as a class mere impostors trading on the religious feelings of the people, but rather they were men who, Prophets by profession, lacked the spiritual discernment to interpret the mind of Jehovah
Kings, First And Second Books of, - A most important aid to a right understanding of the history in these books, and to the filling up of its outline, is to be found in the Prophets, and especially in Isaiah and Jeremiah. But in addition to these national annals, there, were also extant, at the time that the books of Kings were compiled, separate works of the several Prophets who had lived in Judah and Israel. They are reckoned among the Prophets, in the threefold division of the Holy Scriptures; a position in accordance with the supposition that they were compiled by Jeremiah, and contain the narratives of the different Prophets in succession
Jezebel - ) She established the Phoenician idolatry on a grand scale at her husband's court, maintaining at her table 450 Prophets of Baal and 400 of Astarte (so "the groves" ought to be translated): 1 Kings 16:31-32; 1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:13. She even slew the Prophets of Jehovah (2 Kings 9:7). When Elijah under God wrought the miracle at Carmel, and killed her favorite Prophets, Jezebel still unsubdued swore by her gods to do to Elijah as he had done to them (1 Kings 19:1-3). )...
In Revelation 2:20 Jezebel typically expresses some self-styled prophetess, or a set of false Prophets (for the Hebrew feminine expresses collectively a multitude), as closely attached to the Thyatira church as a wife is to a husband, and as powerfully influencing that church for evil as Jezebel did her husband
Jonah - The fifth of the minor Prophets; was the son of Amittai, and a native of Gath-hepher
Hexateuch - More recent scholarship has evidenced a renewed appreciation of the canonical arrangement in which Joshua begins the “former Prophets” or history of Israel from its entrance into the Promised Land until its departure with the Exile
Kuyunjik - It existed as early as 1800 and in the time of Sennacherib (7th century) was the capital of the empire, the center of the worship of Ishtar, and well known in the Old Testament in connection with the Prophets, especially as the theater of Jonas's mission
Irvingites - " Irving attempted to restore the Primitive Church as he interpreted it, and established an elaborate ministry, consisting of apostles, Prophets, evangelists and pastors; each congregation is in charge of an "angel" who ranks as a pastor, assisted by 24 priests and 7 deacons
Jonah - , and thus was contemporary with Hosea and Amos; or possibly he preceded them, and consequently may have been the very oldest of all the Prophets whose writings we possess
Calamity - The Prophets tend to use 'êyd in the sense of national “disaster,” while Wisdom writers use it for “personal tragedy
Ninive - It existed as early as 1800 and in the time of Sennacherib (7th century) was the capital of the empire, the center of the worship of Ishtar, and well known in the Old Testament in connection with the Prophets, especially as the theater of Jonas's mission
Marduk - The Prophets mocked Marduk and his worshipers as products of human craftsmen who would lead Babylon to defeat and exile (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ,Jeremiah 50:2,50:38 ; Jeremiah 51:47 )
Niger - ” Surname of Simeon (KJV, Symeon), one of the teacher-prophets of the early church at Antioch
Barnabas, Saint - Although not of the chosen Twelve Apostles, Barnabas is mentioned frequently in the Acts, and is included among the Prophets and doctors at Antioch, where he received the name Barnabas, signifying son of consolation (Acts 4; 13)
Eagle, the Body And the - Hence, there is no need to fear deception by false Prophets, announcing the second coming of Christ; the very fact that this so-called Christ needs announcing is proof that he is not the true Christ
Agabus - In the former passage it is said that Agabus "signified by the Spirit" that there should be great dearth; and in the latter he said, "Thus saith the Holy Ghost," plainly showing that the prophetic spirit in man was under the immediate guidance of the Holy Spirit, who now dwells in the Christian, to explain to him what was given to the Prophets
Asherah - Elijah asked that 400 Prophets of Asherah that ate at Jezebel's table be gathered at Carmel
Sackcloth - Such garments were sometimes the dress of Prophets and ascetics
Revelation - The act of disclosing or discovering to others what was before unknown to them appropriately, the disclosure or communication of truth to men by God himself, or by his authorized agents, the Prophets and apostles
Vision - In Scripture, a revelation from God an appearance or exhibition of something supernaturally presented to the minds of the Prophets, by which they were informed of future events
Offices in the New Testament - ...
Other officers whose tasks apparently were not limited to one church were Prophets and evangelists . The Prophets, similar to those in the Old Testament, were probably those who had demonstrated a gift for inspired preaching. Although some of those termed Prophets spoke in tongues, Paul valued more highly those whose message was understood by the church (1 Corinthians 14:4-5 ). Consequently, Paul advised that Prophets should be tested carefully (1 Thessalonians 5:19-21 ; 1 Corinthians 14:29-33 ). Very few Prophets are mentioned specifically; among them are the four daughters of Philip (Acts 21:8-9 ). Though many Prophets seem to have not had a settled ministry (Acts 21:10-11 ), others, as evidenced by Paul's discussion in 1 Corinthians 14:1 , apparently exercised their gift within a local church. The tasks involved in these offices are not as easy to outline as those of apostles and Prophets. ...
Apostles , commissioned by Christ Himself, and Prophets, whose gifts were directly and immediately from God, did not receive any additional commissioning ceremony from the church. Sometimes reference to a distinct office may be intended ( 1 Corinthians 12:28 ), but in many cases teaching was apparently a function of the elders (1 Timothy 3:2 ), as well as the apostles and perhaps the Prophets
Lazarus And the Rich Man - He is reminded they have ample warning in Moses and the Prophets. He is told: "If they hear not Moses and the Prophets, neither will they believe, if one rise again from the dead
Micah - Whereas the other court Prophets said only those things that pleased Ahab, Micaiah spoke the truth, whether Ahab liked it or not (1 Kings 22:5-9). The outcome proved (as Micaiah had asserted) that he spoke the truth and that the other Prophets were liars (1 Kings 22:13-36)
Baptist - John the Baptist, the herald and fore-runner of our Lord, predicted by the Prophets. Such, in comparison to the Lord Jesus Christ, was this greatest of all Prophets, born among women
Persecution in the Bible - Jezebel persecuted the Prophets of the Lord, and the prophet Elijah persecuted and killed the Prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:1 ). The Prophets—Amos (1 Kings 7:10-12 ), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 1:19 ; Jeremiah 15:15 ; Jeremiah 37-38 ), and Urijah (Jeremiah 26:20-23 )—suffered persecution because they fleshed out the will of God in adverse circumstances. In an evil world, disciples are to expect persecution (Matthew 10:16-23 ; Hebrews 10:32-39 ; Mark 13:9 ; John 15:20 ; John 16:2 ), just as was the case with the Prophets in the Old Testament (Matthew 5:12 ; Matthew 23:31 ; Luke 11:47-51 ; Acts 7:52 ; Hebrews 11:32-38 ). See Apostles ; Maccabees; Martyr ; Prophets; Prophecy; Suffering ; War
Nahum - One of the twelve minor Prophets
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred court Prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 )
Charismata - Saint Paul enumerates most of them in 1 Corinthians 12: the word of wisdom, the word of knowledge, faith, the grace of healing, the working of miracles, prophecy, the discerning of spirits, the gift of tongues, interpretation of speeches, and the charismata of apostles, Prophets, doctors, helps, governments
Grave - Kings (1 Kings 2:10 ) and Prophets (1 Samuel 25:1 ) were generally buried within cities
Lucius - Of Cyrene, one of certain Prophets and teachers at Antioch in Syria, mentioned in Acts 13:1 , to whom it was revealed that Paul and Barnabas should be separated for the work to which they had been called
Muggletonians - The followers of Ludovic Muggleton, a journeyman tailor, who, with his companion Reeves (a person of equal obscurity, ) set up for great Prophets, in the time of Cromwell
Memphis - Its overthrow was distinctly predicted by the Hebrew Prophets; Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 46:19; and it never recovered from the blow inflicted upon it by Cambyses, 525 b
Gad (2) - " He joined David while in "the hold," having probably first become acquainted with David in the latter's visits to Samuel and the schools of the Prophets, and by his advice David left it for the forest of Hareth (1 Samuel 22:5)
Abana - May we not say with the poor captive servant in the house of Naaman: Would God that sinners, conscious, like Naaman, of their disease, "were with the Lord God of the Prophets, for he would recover them of their leprosy!" (See 2 Kings 5:1-14
Zedekiah - Son of Chenaanah, and one of Ahab’s four hundred court Prophets ( 1 Kings 22:11 ; 1 Kings 22:24-25 , 2 Chronicles 18:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:23-24 )
Messiah - Thus priests (Exodus 28:41 ; 40:15 ; Numbers 3:3 ), Prophets (1 Kings 19:16 ), and kings (1 Samuel 9:16 ; 16:3 ; 2 Samuel 12:7 ) were anointed with oil, and so consecrated to their respective offices. , of those Prophets whose works form a part of the Old Testament canon
Obadiah - He feared the Lord greatly, and had the boldness, in spite of Ahab and Jezebel, to hide a hundred of the Prophets of Jehovah, and feed them with bread and water, when Jezebel was cutting off the Prophets
Asherah - " '...
Ăshêrâh signifies the name of the goddess herself: "Now therefore send, and gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the Prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the Prophets of the groves [2] four hundred, which eat at Jezebel's table" (1 Kings 18:19)
Music, Musicians, Musical Instruments - When Moses sang the song of triumph at the Red Sea, Miriam answered with a tabret in her hand; and Samuel told Saul that he would meet a company of Prophets with a psaltery, a tabret, a pipe, and a harp. ...
There must have been with these Prophets some knowledge of music, which doubtless under David was further cultivated and devoted to the service of God, their music being intimately connected with temple worship
Kings, First And Second Book of - The kingdom was at its height in the reign of Solomon, but because of his sin the kingdom was divided, and after many warnings from God through His Prophets, to both Israel and Judah, both kingdoms were brought to a close, the people being carried away into captivity, and Jerusalem and the temple destroyed. The names of the contemporary Prophets are also added
Jonah - son of Amittai, the fifth of the minor Prophets, was born at Gathhepher, in Galilee. He is generally considered as the most ancient of the Prophets, and is supposed to have lived B
Jeremi'ah, Book of - (Jeremiah 36:2 ) Apparently the Prophets kept written records of their predictions, and collected into larger volumes such of them as were intended for permanent use. Shorter prophecies, delivered at different times, against the kings of Judah and the false Prophets
Jezebel - She 'cut off' the Prophets of Jehovah, and had four hundred Prophets of Baal that ate at her table
Branch - It was not uncommon for the Prophets to depict the Messiah as a new shoot or branch growing from David's stock, even though that "tree" would be cut off. More often, however, the Prophets use the analogy of the vine and branches to describe Israel's future restoration (Isaiah 60:21 ; Hosea 14:6 ). Beecher, The Prophets and the Promise ; R
Eldad - The context favors KJV When "the (so Hebrew for a) young man" reported it at the tabernacle, and Joshua begged Moses to forbid them, he refused saying, "enviest thou for my sake? Would God that all the Lord's people were Prophets," etc. In the sense only that Moses' Pentateuch is the basis of all subsequent prophecy, the psalms and the Prophets, it is true. " The diffusion of the spirit of prophecy, no longer limited to Moses, and its separation from the tabernacle service, led to the establishment of the "schools of the Prophets
Necromancy - Why would the Prophets mock such behavior if it did not exist (Isaiah 8:19-20 )? The list of idolatrous practices and divinatory rites condemned by the Prophets certainly included necromancy (Isaiah 56:9-57:13 , ; Isaiah 57:6 ). Cutting the flesh when a person died (Jeremiah 16:5 ) or certain burial practices (Ezekiel 43:7-9 ), acts condemned by the Prophets, may allude to Acts associated with necromancy. He received no communication from Urim and Thummim, dreams, or Prophets (v
Mount Carmel - (4Kings 1), and there his sacrifice was consumed by fire from above, after the sacrifice of the Prophets of the false god Baal had remained unconsumed, whereupon they were all put to death (3Kings 18)
Carmel, Mount - (4Kings 1), and there his sacrifice was consumed by fire from above, after the sacrifice of the Prophets of the false god Baal had remained unconsumed, whereupon they were all put to death (3Kings 18)
te'Man - Teman is mentioned in five places by the Prophets, in four of which it is connected with Edom and in two with Dedan
Nativity of Christ - The birth of our Lord took place at the time and place predicted by the Prophets (Genesis 49:10 ; Isaiah 7:14 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Micah 5:2 ; Haggai 2:6-9 ; Daniel 9:24,25 )
Messenger - In an extended sense, the Prophets (2 Chronicles 36:15-16 ; Isaiah 44:26 ; Haggai 1:13 ) and priests (Malachi 2:7 ) are termed messengers in their role as bearers of God's message for humanity
Malachi - The last of the Prophets of the Old Testament, and called "the seal" because his prophecies form the closing book of the canon of the Old Testament
Whirlwind - The Prophets used the stormwind as a figure for judgment (Isaiah 5:28 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; Hosea 8:7 ; Amos 1:14 ; Zechariah 7:14 )
Burden - ' The false Prophets were not to use this expression, as if they had a message from God
Heshbon - After the captivity it fell into the hands of the Moabites; and is denounced in the Prophets
Inspiration - The Prophets and apostles spake "as they were moved by the Holy Ghost
Sophonias - (Hebrew: Zepkania, the Lord protects) ...
One of the Minor Prophets who lived under King Josias near the end of the 7th century before Christ, a contemporary of Jeremias
Ekron - The city is denounced in the Prophets
Dreams - Saul complained that “neither by dreams, nor by Urim, nor by Prophets” did God answer him ( 1 Samuel 28:6 ). In the Old Testament the interpreted dreams were most often those of Prophets and rulers. Jeremiah lumped dreamers together with soothsayers, sorcerers, and false Prophets (Jeremiah 27:9 ). He cautioned exiles in Babylon not to listen to dreamers and false Prophets who told them that the Exile would not be long (Jeremiah 29:8 ). See Inspiration; Oracles ; Prophets; Revelation
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - In this manner classes of professional diviners and magicians arose, as in Egypt ( Genesis 41:8 , Exodus 7:11 ), in Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ), in connexion with Baal ( 1 Kings 18:19 ), and even among the Israelites in the lower rank of professed Prophets ( Micah 3:5-11 ; see G. Smith, Twelve Prophets , Introd. The teaching of the inspired Prophets of Jehovah was very different from that of the merely professional Prophets and from the religion of the common people. Throughout pre-exilic times there was a struggle in Israel between the pure worship of Jehovah alone as inculcated by the great Prophets, and the worship of ‘other gods,’ such as the local Canaanitish Baalim and idols in the homes of the people. In process of time magic and divination became closely linked with these illicit cults, and were consequently denounced by the great Prophets; but at the same time the desire of the human heart to learn the future and to secure Divine help (which lies at the root of magic and divination) was met by God, purified, elevated, and satisfied by the revelation of His will through the Prophets. God’s revelation was suited to the stage of spiritual development to which the people had attained, hence His Prophets sometimes employed methods similar to those of divination; consequently some forms of divination are allowed to pass without censure in many passages of the Bible, but these were gradually put aside as the people were educated to a more spiritual conception of religion. The employment of the Urim and Thummim for consulting God disappeared before the clearer guidance received through the inspired Prophets. It also appears as a method of the lower rank of Prophets in Israel ( Micah 3:8-11 , Ezekiel 13:6 ; Ezekiel 13:9 ; Ezekiel 22:28 ). Prophets are named in connexion with diviners ( qôsĕmîm , Jeremiah 27:9 ; Jeremiah 29:8 ). Dreams are spoken of as a legitimate channel for God’s communications to His Prophets and others ( 1 Samuel 19:18-245 , 1 Samuel 28:6 , Job 33:15 , Joel 2:28 ). (3) Dreams were sought by the Prophets of a lower order in Israel, and it is known that among the Egyptians and other ancient nations special means, such as fasting or drugs, were used to induce them, from the belief that they were Divine communications. References to misleading divination by dreams occur in Deuteronomy 13:1-5 (prophets were to he judged by the character of their teaching and to be put to death if they favoured idolatry), Jeremiah 23:25-28 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Jeremiah 29:8 , Zechariah 10:2 . ...
Vision ( châzôn , with its cognate words) has a similarly wide application, extending from the God-given experiences of the higher Prophets to the misleading predictions of false Prophets. The word is used respecting the deception practised by lower Prophets, as in Numbers 24:3 ; Numbers 24:16 , where reference is apparently made to the seer receiving the intimation in a trance, but the interpretation is not quite certain (see Gray, Numbers , p. Smith, Twelve Prophets , i. The word also appears in connexion with false Prophets ( Isaiah 28:7 ; Isaiah 30:10 , Lamentations 2:14 , Ezekiel 12:24 ; Ezekiel 13:6 , Ezekiel 13:16 , 28; Ezekiel 21:29 ; Ezekiel 22:28 , Zechariah 10:2 ). ...
Connected with the use of omens is the appointment of ‘ signs ’ by Prophets to assist their consultors in believing what they predicted. Signs were given by God and His Prophets as well as by false Prophets; these were exhibitions of Divine power in smaller matters by which men might be enabled to trust God in things of greater moment ( Judges 6:36 ); or they were Instances of truth in small predictions, to awaken confidence in greater promises or threatenings ( Exodus 4:8 ; Exodus 10:2 , Isaiah 7:11 ); or they were simply the attachment of particular meaning to ordinary facts to remind men of God’s promises or threats ( Genesis 9:12 ; Genesis 17:11 , Isaiah 8:18 , Ezekiel 12:11 , Zechariah 3:8 )
Hosea - He is placed the first of what is called the minor Prophets; not so called as if the writings of those holy men of old were considered less important than others—not so—but the reason of their being called minor Prophets, was on account of the bulk of their prophetical writings being less. Hosea began to prophecy very early in the church, prehaps, as some think, the first of all the Prophets whose writings have been preserved in the canon of Scripture; and he continued through several reigns, as the preface in his first chapter shews
Prophecy, Prophesy, Prophesying - ...
"In such passages as 1 Corinthians 12:28 ; Ephesians 2:20 , the 'prophets' are placed after the 'Apostles,' since not the Prophets of Israel are intended, but the 'gifts' of the ascended Lord, Ephesians 4:8,11 ; cp. ]'>[1] ...
B — 1: προφητικός (Strong's #4397 — Adjective — prophetikos — prof-ay-tik-os' ) "of or relating to prophecy," or "proceeding from a prophet, prophetic," is used of the OT Scriptures, Romans 16:26 , "of the Prophets," lit
Evangelist - Paul, in his list of five kinds of ministers which have been given by Christ to His Church (Ephesians 4:11), places ‘evangelists’ after ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ and before ‘pastors’ and ‘teachers’; and ‘evangelists’ may be classed with the two groups which precede, ‘Apostles, Prophets, and evangelists’ were itinerant ministers, preaching wherever they found a door opened to them, while ‘pastors and teachers’ were attached to some congregation or locality. Possibly Prophets commonly preached to believers, evangelists to unbelievers, while apostles addressed either. ]'>[2] ) thinks that ‘evangelists’ has been inserted in Ephesians 4:11 into the usual list of ‘apostles, Prophets, and teachers’ because this circular Epistle is addressed to churches which had been founded by missionaries who were not apostles; also (p. 338) that ‘evangelists’ were not placed next to the ‘apostles,’ because the combination ‘apostles and Prophets’ was too well established to be disturbed. There was no such close connexion between ‘prophets’ and ‘teachers
Evangelist - Paul, in his list of five kinds of ministers which have been given by Christ to His Church (Ephesians 4:11), places ‘evangelists’ after ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ and before ‘pastors’ and ‘teachers’; and ‘evangelists’ may be classed with the two groups which precede, ‘Apostles, Prophets, and evangelists’ were itinerant ministers, preaching wherever they found a door opened to them, while ‘pastors and teachers’ were attached to some congregation or locality. Possibly Prophets commonly preached to believers, evangelists to unbelievers, while apostles addressed either. ]'>[2] ) thinks that ‘evangelists’ has been inserted in Ephesians 4:11 into the usual list of ‘apostles, Prophets, and teachers’ because this circular Epistle is addressed to churches which had been founded by missionaries who were not apostles; also (p. 338) that ‘evangelists’ were not placed next to the ‘apostles,’ because the combination ‘apostles and Prophets’ was too well established to be disturbed. There was no such close connexion between ‘prophets’ and ‘teachers
Obadiah - The officer of Ahab's court who hid 150 Prophets from Jezebel
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the Prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Ramoth-Gilead - In this city Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, was anointed by one of the sons of the Prophets (9:1,4)
Carmel - The towering mountain (1 Kings 18:19 ) where Elijah confronted the Prophets of Baal
Oracle - ) The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the Prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures - usually in the plural
Ahab - AHAB the son of Kolaiah, and Zedekiah the son of Maaseiah, were two false Prophets, who, about A
Samuel - He appears also as the head of a school of Prophets
Habakkuk - One of the minor Prophets
Pestilence - The Prophets generally connect together the sword, the pestilence, and the famine, as three evils, which usually accompany each other
Goats' Hair - , is coarse and black; and this is the kind of which the garments of the Hebrew Prophets and of the poor were made
Bride - In the Old Testament, the Prophets presented Israel as a bride who had committed repeated adulteries (Jeremiah 3:1 ; Ezek, 16; Hosea 3:1 ). The Prophets also proclaimed that God was faithful to His unfaithful bride and would restore her (Jeremiah 33:10-11 ; Isaiah 61:10 ,Isaiah 61:10,62:5 )
Kir-Hareseth - ...
The Prophets would later correct this view. Kir-Hareseth was destroyed by the Babylonians whom the Prophets described as God's instrument of punishment (see Jeremiah 4:5-31 ; Jeremiah 6:1-8 , Jeremiah 6:22-26 ; Jeremiah 25:1-14 )
New Life - ...
The gift of new life was foretold by the Prophets in the Old Testament. The new age promised by the Prophets came in Jesus Christ, the new Adam
Baal, Baalim - The Israelites in coming into the land doubtless found temples, groves, altars and high places set apart to Baal: incense was offered and offerings burnt, and children were sacrificed to him, whilst a great retinue of Prophets and priests was maintained in his service, as is manifest by its revival afterwards. This led to the destruction of all the Prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:17-40 ; but his idolatrous worship continued until the days of Jehu, who slew his worshippers and destroyed his house and images
Former - 8:13), is well represented throughout the entire Old Testament, with the exception of the poetic books and the minor Prophets. The “prophets of the past” ( Day - The term 'that day' often occurs in the Prophets and in the N. the days of the Law and the Prophets, which extended from the giving of the law until the coming of the Messiah
jo'Nah - (dove ), the fifth of the minor Prophets, was the son of Amittai, and a native of Gath-hepher. He was therefore taught by the significant lesson of the "gourd," whose growth and decay brought the truth at once home to him, that he was sent to testify by deed, as other Prophets would afterward testify by word, the capacity of Gentiles for salvation, and the design of God to make them partakers of it
False Christs - Christian false Prophets there might be, and were, but we have no evidence during the 1st cent. 308 C) thus: ‘Our Lord said many false Prophets and false Christs would come in His name and deceive many; which is the case. ’ The false Prophets, of course, are the heralds of the false Messiahs; they guarantee the movement in question by means of miracles. The Didache, curiously enough, omits all mention of false Messiahs, though it notices the danger of false Prophets (xvi. Christians, at Israel’s great crisis, were to be saved by unbelief in pseudo-Messiahs and pseudo-prophets’ (Expos
Trance - See Ecstasy ; Prophets
Cyrene - Among "the Prophets and teachers" who "ministered to the Lord at Antioch" was Lucius of Cyrene (13:1)
Anoint - Kings, Prophets and priests were set apart or consecrated to their offices by the use of oil
Astrologer - Rather the Bible mocks such practices and shows that God's word to the Prophets and the wise of Israel far surpasses any foreign skills
Revelation - ...
Special revelation is that which is given to us through Prophets, the Bible, and even visions and dreams (Numbers 12:6-8)
Eclipse of the Sun - No historical notice of an eclipse occurs in the Bible, but there are passages in the Prophets which contain manifest allusion to this phenomenon
Carmel - This gives added significance to the contest on Mt Carmel where Elijah defeated the Prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:17-46; see ELIJAH)
Darius - During the reign of Darius Hystaspes the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah aroused the Jews from their spiritual laziness, with the result that the temple in Jerusalem was rebuilt (Ezra 4:24; Ezra 5:6; Ezra 6:15; Haggai 1:1; Zechariah 1:1; see EZRA; PERSIA)
Elijah - Returning to King Ahab, he procured the great assembling at mount Carmel, where God "answered by fire," and the Prophets of Baal were destroyed. Being now forewarned of the approach of his removal from earth, he gives his last instructions to the school of the Prophets, crosses the Jordan miraculously, and is borne to heaven in a fiery chariot without tasting death, leaving his mantle and office to Elisha, 1 Kings 17:1-19:21 21:29 2 Kings 1:1-2:18 . ...
Elijah was one of the most eminent and honored of the Hebrew Prophets
Sela - ) It is mentioned by the Prophets (Isaiah 16:1 ; Obadiah 1:3 ) as doomed to destruction
Micaiah - " Ahab's Prophets approved of the expedition; but Jehoshaphat, still dissatisfied, asked if there was no other prophet besides the four hundred that had appeared, and was informed of this Micaiah
Nazarene - , he whom the Prophets called the Netse , the "Branch
Sackcloth - Closely related to this use of sackcloth was the use of it by ascetics and Prophets (cf
Micah - The sixth of the minor Prophets, is called the Morashite, from his birthplace Moresheh, in the territory of Gath, westward from Jerusalem, He prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, b
Walls - A “brazen wall” is symbolic of Prophets and their testimony against the wicked (Jeremiah 15:20 )
Sackcloth - We read much of the sackcloth with which the Prophets and mourners in Zion clad themselves upon occasions of sorrow
Morter - The work of the false Prophets who prophesied peace to Jerusalem when God threatened to bring judgement is compared to building a wall and daubing it with untempered [1]: God's wind would blow down the wall
Slide - ...
Hosea 4:16 (b) This interesting picture describes Israel refusing to come at GOD's call, and resisting the sweet influences of His Word, and His Prophets
Amos - One of the minor Prophets, a native of Tekoa in Judah, possibly the father of the prophet Isaiah
Nahum - Of all the minor Prophets, says Bishop Lowth, none seems to equal Nahum in sublimity, ardour, and boldness
Joel - the second of the twelve lesser Prophets
lu'Cius - ...
Lucius of Cyrene is first mentioned in the New Testament in company with Barnabas, Simeon called Niger, Manaen and Saul, who are described as Prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch
Ahaz - The eleventh king of Judah; he was contemporary with the Prophets Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah
Ashtaroth - The 400 Prophets of the Asherah which ate at Jezebel's table, mentioned 1 Kings 18:19, R
Carmel - That which has made Carmel most familiar to us is its intimate connection with the history of the two great Prophets of Israel—Elijah and Elisha
Transfiguration - The Law and the Prophets, in the persons of Moses and Elijah, did homage to the Gospel
Gentiles - Since the promulgation of the gospel, the true religion has been extended to all nations; God, who had promised by his Prophets to call the Gentiles to the faith, with a superabundance of grace, having fulfilled his promise; so that the Christian church is composed principally of Gentile converts, the Jews being too proud of their privileges to acknowledge Jesus Christ as their Messiah and Redeemer
Balance - The moral necessity of a just balance and true weights and the iniquity of false ones are frequently emphasized by the Prophets, moral teachers, and legislators of Israel; see Amos 8:5 , Micah 6:11 , Proverbs 11:1 ; Proverbs 16:11 (‘a just balance and scales are the Lord’s’) Proverbs 20:23 , Leviticus 19:36 , Deuteronomy 25:13 ff
Sackcloth - Closely related to this use of sackcloth was the use of it by ascetics and Prophets (cf
Obadiah - Its canonicity is based on the following considerations: though never cited in the New Testament, it was ever embodied in the lists of Prophets; it is quoted by Jeremias, in chapter 49; it is comprised in the commendation of Sirach 49:12; it was ever recognized by the Church. , while others regard him as the most ancient of minor Prophets
Tal'Mud - The classical subject is the following in the Mishna on this wing: "Moses received the (oral) law from Sinai, and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the Prophets and the Prophets to the men of the Great Synagogue
Abdias, Book of - Its canonicity is based on the following considerations: though never cited in the New Testament, it was ever embodied in the lists of Prophets; it is quoted by Jeremias, in chapter 49; it is comprised in the commendation of Sirach 49:12; it was ever recognized by the Church. , while others regard him as the most ancient of minor Prophets
Vision - 2:14 the word means “to see” in relation to Prophets’ vision: “Thy Prophets have seen vain and foolish things for thee: and they have not discovered thine iniquity
Stephen - Stephen appeared in the midst of this assembly, with a countenance like that of an angel; and the high priest asking him what he had to answer, in his defence, he rapidly traced the history of the Jews, showing that they had always opposed themselves to God and his Prophets; faithfully upbraided them with the hardness of their hearts, with their putting the Prophets to death, and, lastly, with slaying Christ himself
Gentile - God, who had promised by his Prophets to call the Gentiles to the faith, with a superabundance of grace, has fulfilled his promise; so that the Christian church is now composed principally of Gentile converts; and the Jews, too proud of their particular privileges, and abandoned to their reprobate sense of things, have disowned Jesus Christ, their Messiah and Redeemer, for whom, during so many ages, they had looked so impatiently. The Prophets declared very particularly the calling of the Gentiles
Obadi'ah - (Nehemiah 10:5 ) ...
The fourth of the twelve minor Prophets. (1 Kings 18:3 ) He was a devout worshipper of Jehovah, and at the peril of his life concealed over a hundred Prophets during the persecution by Jezebel; (1 Kings 18:3-16 ) (B
Haggai - ...
After sixteen years of inactivity, God raised up two Prophets to arouse the people and get them working on the temple again. One of these Prophets was Haggai, the other Zechariah (Ezra 5:1-2; Haggai 1:1; Zechariah 1:1)
Salvation, Saviour - ‘Salvation’ is the generic term employed in Scripture to express the idea of any gracious deliverance of God, but specially of the spiritual redemption from sin and its consequences predicted by the OT Prophets, and realized in the mission and work of the Saviour Jesus Christ. In the Prophets, accordingly, the perspective somewhat changes. ...
The teaching of the Prophets bore fruit in the age preceding the advent of Jesus in deepening ideas of the future life, of resurrection and a future perfected state: of the connexion of prosperity with righteousness though mostly in the sense of outward legal obedience, the very error against which the Prophets declaimed and in more concrete representations of the Messiah
Ministry - ), the Church had also Prophets and evangelists and teachers , all of them, in somewhat different ways no doubt, fulfilling this same task of proclaiming the word ( 1 Corinthians 12:28-29 , Ephesians 4:11 ; for Prophets, see also Acts 11:27 ; Acts 15:32 ; Acts 21:10 ; for evangelists, Acts 21:8 , 2 Timothy 4:5 ; for teachers, Acts 13:1 , 1 Timothy 2:7 , 2 Timothy 1:11 ), and moving about from place to place in order to do so. There was the need of government and discipline, of pastoral counsel and comfort, of stated instruction by regular teachers as well as of occasional visits from wandering apostles and Prophets. The local ministry, it thus appears, came to discharge some of the functions that had originally belonged to the general ministry of Apostles and Prophets
Apocalyptic Literature - ...
By this time, the ministry of Israelite Prophets, which had never been as prominent after the captivity as before, had almost disappeared entirely. But whereas the Prophets were largely concerned with denouncing Israel’s unfaithfulness and assuring the people of their coming judgment, the apocalyptists were more concerned with condemning Israel’s oppressors and announcing certain doom upon them. ...
In contrast to the Prophets, who said, ‘This is what God said to me’, the apocalyptists said, ‘This is what God showed me’ (Jeremiah 7:1-3; Jeremiah 23:18 with Zechariah 1:20; Revelation 4:1). The biblical apocalyptic writers, though they had similarities with other apocalyptic writers, also had the fervent evangelistic and pastoral spirit of the biblical Prophets
Elisha - Elisha was at that time in the camp; and seeing Jehoram, the king of Israel, he said, "What have I to do with thee? get thee to the Prophets of thy father, and to the Prophets of thy mother. " The widow of one of the Prophets having told Elisha, that her husband's creditor was determined to take her two sons and sell them for slaves, Elisha multiplied the oil in the widow's house, in such quantity that she was enabled to sell it and to discharge the debt. At Gilgal, during a great famine, one of the sons of the Prophets gathered wild gourds, which he put into the pot, and they were served up to Elisha and the other Prophets. This is a striking instance of the disinterestedness of the Jewish Prophets. Elisha sent one of the sons of the Prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, and grandson of Nimshi, to be king, in pursuance of an order given to Elijah some years before; and Jehu having received the royal unction, executed every thing that had been foretold by Elijah against Ahab's family, and against Jezebel
Canon of the Old Testament - 200, the Prophets ( Nebîîm ), including the prophetic interpretation of history in the four books Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings had been constituted into a second canonical group; by b. Mosaic Law provided that Divine guidance would be given through the voice of Prophets and of priests ( Deuteronomy 18:18 ; Deuteronomy 19:17 ; Deuteronomy 21:5 ; Deuteronomy 24:8 ); with these living sources of direction, it would be less easy to feel dependence on a book. The Prophets, Isaiah I. Laws, that had been kept for rare reference in the sanctuary, were studied by disciples of the Prophets, and were expounded with a new sense of their Divine obligation. Canon of the Prophets . The next addition to the Canon consists of the Prophets, reckoned as 8 books Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve (Minor Prophets) forming one book. Internal evidence thus implies that when the Law was made canonical, the Prophets had not been carefully edited or collected into one group. The predictions of the Prophets had been ominously vindicated by the course of history. 44 50) shows that the Law and the Prophets were invested with canonical authority in his day. The Lectionary of the Synagogue would quickly establish the unique position of the Law and the Prophets as Holy Scripture (cf. Several of these books may have been prized as highly as the Prophets, though their inclusion in the Second Canon would have been incongruous. The earliest testimony to the existence of sacred books in addition to the Law and the Prophets is given in the Prologue to Ecclesiasticus. ’ In the preface he refers three times to ‘the Law, the Prophets, and the other books of our fathers. Such a formula as ‘All this was done that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet’ ( Matthew 1:22 ), Implies that the Supreme Disposer of events had Intimated His purpose through the Prophets. Posterity, therefore, rightly apprehends any occurrence when it has detected its place in the scheme of things foretold by the Prophets. He did not report the word of the Lord as received by vision or prophecy; in His own name He supplied what was wanting in Law and Prophets
Hanan - Clan or guild of Prophets or priests living in the Temple
Jesus Christ, Knowledge of - But, besides this experimental knowledge, He had also what theologians call infused knowledge, such as the Prophets of old received
Knowledge of Jesus Christ - But, besides this experimental knowledge, He had also what theologians call infused knowledge, such as the Prophets of old received
Girdle - Several items of clothing in KJV: (1) an ornate sash worn by the officiating priests (Exodus 28:4 ,Exodus 28:4,28:40 ) and by the wealthy of Jerusalem (Isaiah 3:24 ); (2) a decorated band (NRSV), woven belt (TEV, NAS), or waistband (NIV, REB) for the high priest's ephod (Exodus 28:8 ,Exodus 28:8,28:27-28 ); (3) a belt on which a sword or bow might be carried (1 Samuel 18:4 ; 2 Samuel 20:8 ; perhaps Isaiah 5:27 ); a leather belt forming part of the proverbial garb of the Prophets (2 Kings 1:8 ; Matthew 3:4 ); (4) an undergarment (Jeremiah 13:1-1158 ; 1618831507_5 ), often rendered waistcloth or loincloth
Ammonites - The children of Ammon afterwards, at various times, troubled the Israelites, for which the Prophets threatened them with divine judgments, Jeremiah 46:1-6 Ezekiel 25:2-10
Deafness - Part of the future hope of the Prophets is that the deaf will hear (Isaiah 42:18-20 ; Isaiah 43:8 )
Jude, Epistle of Saint - When rising heresies endangered the faith of the Hebrew Christian communities, the Apostle Jude, with the surname Thaddeus (Matthew 10), the brother of James the Less (Luke 6) and one of the "brethren of the Lord" (Matthew 13), addressed to them his "Catholic Epistle" as a warning against the false Prophets
Malachi - Messenger or angel, the last of the minor Prophets, and the writer of the last book of the Old Testament canon (Malachi 4:4,5,6 )
Sephe'la, - The historical works, and the topographical passages in the Prophets always with the article prefixed, and always denoting the same region
Chuza - Also from the margin of Acts 13:1, where "Manaen, Herod's foster brother," appears among the Christian "prophets
Epistle of Saint Jude - When rising heresies endangered the faith of the Hebrew Christian communities, the Apostle Jude, with the surname Thaddeus (Matthew 10), the brother of James the Less (Luke 6) and one of the "brethren of the Lord" (Matthew 13), addressed to them his "Catholic Epistle" as a warning against the false Prophets
Fox - The petty and furtive intentions of Herod must give way to the grander rapacity of Jerusalem as the historical destroyer of the Prophets
Branch - We find Christ spoken of, under the spirit of prophecy, by the Lord JEHOVAH, in this character by three of the Prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah
Hinnon - The Prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah both speak of this awful spot
Pestilence - ” The word occurs fewer than 60 times in the Old Testament, and mainly in the Prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel
Escape - When Josiah’s reform called for burning the bones of false Prophets, a special directive was issued to spare the bones of a true prophet buried at the same place: “… So they let his bones alone …” (2 Kings 23:18; literally, “they let his bones escape”)
Ten Commandments - On these, summed up as our Lord summed them up, hung all the law and the Prophets
Samuel - Samuel began the order of the Prophets, which was never discontinued till the death of Zechariah and Malachi, Acts 3:24
Poor - Neglect and oppression of the poor were severely reproved by the Prophets, Isaiah 10:2 Jeremiah 5:28 Amos 2:6 ; but charity to the poor was an eminent virtue among primitive Christians, Matthew 6:2-4 Luke 10:33-35 19:8 Acts 9:36-39 10:2 11:29-30
Oracle - Among christians, oracles, in the plural, denotes the communications, revelations or messages delivered by God to Prophets
Nahum - Consolation, the seventh of the twelve minor Prophets
Jezebel - When the Prophets of Baal perished at Carmel, at the word of Elijah, she sought to avenge herself on him
Hosea - The first of the twelve Minor Prophets, as arranged in our Bibles
Preaching - Frequent instances of religious addresses occur in the history of Moses, the judges, and the Prophets; and these were to some extent in connection with the Jewish ritual, Nehemiah 1:1-11
Synagogue - From the silence of the Old Testament with reference to these places of worship, many commentators and writers of biblical antiquities are of opinion that they were not in use till after the Babylonish captivity; and that before that time, the Jews held their social meetings for religious worship either in the open air or in the houses of the Prophets. The westerly part of the building contained the ark or chest in which the book of the law and the section of the Prophets were deposited, and was called the temple by way of eminence. The next thing was the repetition of their phylacteries; after which came the reading of the law and the Prophets. The former was divided into fifty-four sections, with which were united corresponding portions from the Prophets; (see Acts 13:15,27 15:21 ) and these were read through once in the course of the year. After the return from the captivity, an interpreter was employed in reading the law and the Prophets, Nehemiah 8:2-8 , who interpreted them into the Syro-Chaldaic dialect, which was then spoken by the people
Micah - (Hebrew: Mikhayahu, Who is like Jehovah?) ...
Sixth of the twelve minor Prophets of the Old Testament; born Morasthi, near Eleutheropolis, c. " In the second discourse (3-5), the birthplace of the coming Saviour is named; God abominates the crimes of princes and judges and false Prophets, "Therefore, because of you, Sion shall be ploughed as a field and Jerusalem shall be as a heap of stones and the mountain of the temple as the high places of the forests
Micheas - (Hebrew: Mikhayahu, Who is like Jehovah?) ...
Sixth of the twelve minor Prophets of the Old Testament; born Morasthi, near Eleutheropolis, c. " In the second discourse (3-5), the birthplace of the coming Saviour is named; God abominates the crimes of princes and judges and false Prophets, "Therefore, because of you, Sion shall be ploughed as a field and Jerusalem shall be as a heap of stones and the mountain of the temple as the high places of the forests
Cornerstone - Paul builds on this concept in Ephesians 2:20 by saying that Jesus Christ is the chief cornerstone, the apostles and Prophets are foundation stones, and the whole building (the church) is a holy temple in the Lord. This was prophesied by the Prophets of old and fulfilled through the incarnation
Messiah - 24:6), high priests, and some Prophets (1 Kings 19:16) were so anointed: “If the priest that is anointed do sin according to the sin of the people …” ( Prophets no harm” ( Zechariah - Many of these were priests, Prophets or rulers. ...
The most important of the Prophets named Zechariah was the man whose book is part of the Old Testament
Caves - Obadiah hid the Lord's Prophets by fifties in a cave (1 Kings 18:4), Elijah at Horeb was in a cave when the Lord revealed Himself (1 Kings 19:9). The rock tombs near Jerusalem are assigned to kings and Prophets with less certainty
Ahab - The trial of fire from heaven is an especial instance of this, which was followed by the death of 450 of the Prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:19-40 , but there was no repentance in the king. After this Ahab made another attack upon Syria, and his 400 Prophets foretold that he would be successful; and he, though warned of his danger by the prophet Micaiah, went into battle accompanied by Jehoshaphat king of Judah, his ally
Nazarites - " (Lamentations 4:7-8) So the prophet Amos: "I raised up of your sons for Prophets, and of your young men for Nazarites. But ye gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the Prophets, saying, Prophesy not
jo'el - (Nehemiah 11:9 ) ...
The second of the twelve minor Prophets, the son of Pethuel, probably prophesied in Judah in the reign of Uzziah, about B. The book of Joel contains a grand outline of the whole terrible scene, which was to be depicted more and more in detail by subsequent Prophets
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - ...
Sixteen years later God raised up the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah to stir up Zerubbabel, Joshua and the people to get to work once more on the temple (Ezra 4:24; Ezra 5:1-2; Haggai 1:1-11). When work restarted, the Prophets brought further messages of encouragement to the people through Zerubbabel and Joshua (Haggai 1:12-15; Haggai 2:1-9)
Bethel - Bethel was an important religious and administrative centre in the time of Samuel and a school for Prophets was established there. The idolatry of Bethel, which God’s Prophets repeatedly denounced, was the reason why the altar and the town were eventually destroyed (Judges 20:18; 1 Kings 13:1-3; 2 Kings 23:15-20; Jeremiah 48:13; Amos 3:14; Amos 4:4; Amos 5:5; Amos 7:10-13)
Carmel - Carmel is not only expressly mentioned in Scripture as excelling other districts in that respect; but, every place possessed of the same kind of excellence obtained from it the same appellation in the language both of the Prophets and the people. Mount Carmel is celebrated in the Old Testament, as the usual place of residence of the Prophets Elijah and Elisha. It was here that Elijah so successfully opposed the false Prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18; and there is a certain part of the mountain facing the west, and about eight miles from the point of the promontory, which the Arabs call Man-sur, and the Europeans the place of sacrifice, in commemoration of that miraculous event
Metempsychosis - It is also supposed, that it was upon this notion the disciples asked our Lord, "Did this man sin, or his parents, that he was born blind?" John 9:2 ; and that some said, Christ was "John the Baptist, some Elias, others Jeremias, or one of the Prophets," Matthew 16:14 . As to the opinion which some entertained concerning our Saviour, that he was either John the Baptist, or Elias, or Jeremias, or one of the Prophets, Matthew 16:14 , it is not ascribed to the Pharisees in particular, and if it were, one cannot see how it could be founded on the doctrine of the metempsychosis; since the soul of Elias, now inhabiting the body of Jesus, would no more make him to be Elias, than several others had been, in whose bodies the soul of Elias, according to this doctrine, is supposed to have dwelt since the death of that ancient prophet, near a thousand years before. Luke expresses it thus: "Others say, that one of the old Prophets is risen from the dead," Luke 9:19
Nazarene - When our Lord was taken as a child to Nazareth, which thus became for many years his dwelling-place, the evangelist records this as a fulfilment of prophecy, Matthew 2:23, citing no particular place, but referring generally to "the Prophets," who predicted Messiah's humble and despised condition
Ezekiel - " ...
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One of the great Prophets, the son of Buzi the priest (Ezekiel 1:3 )
Signet - " It has been asked, Might not this be the actual seal of Haggai the prophet? We know that he was in Jerusalem after the Captivity; and it is somewhat singular that he alone of all the minor Prophets makes mention of a signet (Haggai 2:23 )
Exhortation - The ability to exhort or encourage to action is a spiritual gift (Romans 12:8 ) sometimes associated with Prophets/preachers (Acts 15:32 ; 1 Corinthians 14:3 )
Lovingkindness - Smith renders ‘leal love’ ( Book of the Twelve Prophets , i
Nineveh - The Prophets of God assured them of a fitting divine punishment (Isaiah 10:5; Isaiah 10:12-16; Nahum 1:1; Nahum 3:1-7; Zephaniah 2:13; see NAHUM)
Sorrow - To remove sorrow, the Prophets urged repentance that led to obedience (Joel 2:12-13 ; Hosea 6:6 )
Storehouse, Storage City - The picture of a full storehouse served as an image of God's blessing and was often used by the Prophets
Ahaz - His sixteen-year reign was contemporary with the Prophets Isaiah and Micah
Begin - As he spake by the mouth of his holy Prophets, who have been since the world began
Gilgal - As Bethel is 3300 feet above the Jordan plain, it must have been a Gilgal not in that plain, It has been identified with Jiljilia, 8 miles north of Bethel, where the school of the Prophets was probably established
Horse - In the period of the eighth-century Prophets and following, “horses” became a sign of luxury and apostasy ( Bath-Kol - By this name the Jewish writers distinguish what they called a revelation from God, after verbal prophecy had ceased in Israel; that is, after the Prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi
Bethel - , "house of idols," Hosea 10:5 (in verse 8 simply Aven); taken by Judah, 2 Chronicles 13:19; home of Prophets, 2 Kings 2:2-3; of a priest, 2 Kings 17:28; 2 Kings 23:15; 2 Kings 23:19; was desolate, Amos 3:14; Amos 5:5-6; settled by Benjamites after the captivity, Nehemiah 11:31; named about seventy times in the Old Testament; not noticed in the New Testament; now called Beitin (nine miles south of Shiloh), a village of about 25 Moslem hovels, standing amid ruins which cover about four acres
Watchmen - Watchmen always had a station at the gate of a city and in the adjacent tower, 2 Samuel 18:24-27 2 Kings 9:27 ; also on hill-tops overlooking a large circuit of terraced vineyards, whence they could "see eye to eye," and "lift up the voice" of warning or of cheer, Isaiah 52:7,8 ; and their responsible office, requiring so much vigilance and fidelity, illustrates that of Prophets and ministers, Jeremiah 6:17 Ezekiel 33:1-9 Hebrews 13:17
Beard - These facts explain many passages of Scripture: as the gross insult offered to David's ambassadors, 2 Samuel 10:4-14 ; the zealous indignation of Nehemiah, Nehemiah 13:25 ; the mode in which the feigned insanity of David was expressed, 1 Samuel 21:12 , and the grief of Mephibosheth, 1 Samuel 19:24 ; the treachery of Judas; also several passages in the Prophets, Isaiah 7:20 50:6 Ezekiel 5:1-5
Elisha - Some years afterwards he witnessed the miraculous ascension of Elijah, divided the Jordan with his mantle, and took his place at the head of the schools of the Prophets
Send - I have not sent these Prophets, yet they ran
Car'Mel - That which has made the name of Carmel most familiar to the modern world is its intimate connection with the history of the two great Prophets of Israel, Elijah and Elisha
Evangelist - In the New Testament the "evangelists" appear on the one hand after the "apostles" and "prophets;" on the other before the "pastors" and "teachers
Divination - Of false Prophets (Deuteronomy 18:10,14 ; Micah 3:6,7,11 ), of necromancers (1 Samuel 28:8 ), of the Philistine priests and diviners (1 Samuel 6:2 ), of Balaam (Joshua 13:22 ). ...
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Through his Prophets God revealed himself, and gave intimations of his will (2 Kings 13:17 ; Jeremiah 51:63,64 )
Prophecy - In the writings of the Prophets (Isaiah 2:18-21 ), (Jeremiah 27:3-7 ; 29:11-14 ), (Haggai 2:6-96 ; 8 ), Daniel Daniel 9:26,27 ), (Hosea 9:17 ), there are also many prophecies regarding the events which were to befall that people. "To him gave all the Prophets witness
Mountain - ...
Other Old Testament mountain episodes include Aaron's death on Mount Hor (Numbers 33:38 ), the death of Moses on Mount Nebo (Deuteronomy 34:1-8 ), and Elijah's defeat of the Prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:15-40 ). Jesus was declared to be preeminent over both Moses and Elijah, the representatives of the Law and Prophets
Fox - Ezekiel 13:4; "thy Prophets are like the foxes in the deserts," where the foxes from having nothing to eat become doubly ravenous and crafty to get food. So, in Israel, once a vineyard now a moral desert, the Prophets whose duty was to guard the church from being spoiled themselves spoil it, through crafty greed of gain
Marcionites - In many things he followed the sentiments of the heretic Cerdon, and rejected the law and the Prophets. He pretended the Gospel had been corrupted by false Prophets, and allowed none of the evangelists but St
Amos - the fourth of the minor Prophets, who in his youth had been a herdsman in Tekoa, a small town about four leagues southward of Jerusalem. Paul speaks of himself, that he was rude in speech, though not in knowledge; and his authority, says Bishop Lowth, "has influenced many commentators to represent him as entirely rude, and void of elegance; whereas it requires but little attention to be convinced that he is not a whit behind the very chiefest of the Prophets;" equal to the greatest in loftiness of sentiment, and scarcely inferior, to any in the splendour of his diction, and in the elegance of his composition
Mat'Thew, Gospel of - It is the Gospel of Jesus, the Messiah of the Prophets. This Gospel takes the life of Jesus as it was lived on earth, and his character as it actually appeared, and places them alongside the life and character of the Messiah as sketched in the Prophets, the historic by the side of the Prophetic, that the two may appear in their marvellous unity and in their perfect identity
Ahab - A persecution of the Prophets of the Lord followed—many of them being destroyed by Jezebel. As a judgment, a drought was sent upon the land; and then came the solemn vindication of Jehovah's authority by the prophet Elijah before Ahab and the assembled people, and the punishment, according to the law of Moses, of the idolatrous Prophets
Kings, the Books of - ...
The book is not a mere chronicle of kings' deeds and fortunes, but of their reigns in their spiritual relation to Jehovah the true, though invisible, King of the theocracy; hence it is ranked in the canon among "the Prophets. " The Prophets therefore as His ministers, guardians of His rights, and interpreters of His counsel and will, come prominently forward in the book to maintain His prerogative before the kings His viceroys, and to counsel, warn, and punish as He who spoke in them deemed necessary, confirming their word by miraculous signs. ...
Thenceforth, David's seed having been established in Judah in conformity with God's promise (2 Samuel 7), the Prophets' agency in Judah was restricted to critical times and special cases requiring the expression of Jehovah's will in the way of either reproof of declension or encouragement of faithfulness. Elijah "the prophet as fire, whose words burned as a torch" (Sirach 48:1), as champion of Jehovah, defeated Baal's and Asherah's Prophets at Carmel; and averted utter apostasy front northern Israel by banding God's Prophets in schools where Jehovah's worship was maintained, and a substitute supplied for the legal temple worship enjoyed by the godly in Judah. The Prophets are prominent in Kings, as Nathan, Abijah, Elijah, Elisha, the prophet against the Bethel altar, Jonah, etc. The mention of Seraiah and Zephaniah as slain by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:18) accords with Jeremiah 21:1; Jeremiah 29:25-29, wherein Zephaniah appears as of the faction that opposed Jeremiah and was headed by priests and false Prophets. Not, the national archives kept by the "recorders" or kings' remembrancers; but annals compiled by Prophets from the public, yearbooks or national archives, and also from Prophets' monographs, and collections of prophecies reaching in Israel to Pekah (2 Kings 15:31), and in Judah to Jehoiakim (2 Kings 24:5), the collection being worked into a book of the times of each kingdom shortly before the overthrow of Judah. The book of Chronicles embodies also writings of individual Prophets, as Isaiah, Iddo, and Jehu, beside the daybooks of the kings (2 Chronicles 20:34; 2 Chronicles 32:32). Some of the Prophets' individual writings were received into the annals. The composition of the annals by Prophets accounts for the prominence given to Elijah and Elisha. The books have always stood in the second division of the Jewish canon, "the Prophets" (nibiyim ), being of prophetic composition and theme (see above, the beginning), namely, God's administration through His Prophets in developing the theocratic kingdom under kings. Contemporary Prophets, as Isaiah, with Ahaz and Hezekiah, Jeremiah with Jehoiakim and Zedekiah, elucidate the histories of Kings just as the epistles of New Testament are commentaries on Acts
Daniel, Book of - The book addresses a current situation with a call for moral uprightness, as did the Prophets. It focuses on the nations as well as Israel, as did the other Prophets. It does not, however, use the literary forms of the Prophets, particularly the standard formulas such as, “Thus says the Lord”; nor does it represent a collection of prophetic sermons. ...
Canon and Authority The basic twelve chapters of Daniel appear in the Hebrew Bible between Esther and Ezra in the last section called the Writings rather than in the Law or the Prophets. The Greek translation called the Septuagint introduced Daniel into the Prophets and also introduced additional materials: the prayer of Azariah, the song of the three children, story of Susanna, Bel and the Dragon. The Christian church has followed the Septuagint in placing Daniel among the Prophets, but Protestant Christianity has not accepted the additions, whereas the Catholic tradition has. The point at issue among interpreters is the fidelity to detail that prophecy must contain and whether Daniel with its wisdom and apocalyptic overtones must have the same type of historical setting and perspective as do the classic Prophets of Israel. The first sees Daniel standing in the precise line of previous Prophets, so that every detail of his visions points to the future and not the past
Malachi - The dates of most Old Testament Prophets are indicated in the superscription of their book by the names of the kings reigning at that time. The Prophets Haggai and Zechariah added to these hopes by assuring the people that unprecedented blessings would come when the Temple was complete. Micah and Jeremiah had disputes with false Prophets (Micah 2:6-11 ; Jeremiah 27-28 )
Samuel - ...
Samuel served as the prototype for future Prophets in tension with the kings of Israel and Judah. Samuel's recording of the rights and duties of kingship (1 Samuel 10:25 ) set the stage for later Prophets to call their monarchs to task for disobedience to God's commands and for overstepping God's limits for kingship in Israel. Later when Saul sought David's life, David took refuge with Samuel and his band of Prophets at Ramah (1 Samuel 19:18-24 )
Fierceness - It is present in the Nazareth sermon in His OT illustrations of Prophets not honoured in their own country (Luke 4); in His declaration of war with evil,—‘I am come to send fire on the earth’ (Luke 12:49), and ‘I came not to send peace but a sword’ (Matthew 10:34); it even finds expression in the very phrase γεννἠματα ἐχιδνῶν used by the Baptist (Matthew 12:34). They are ‘false Prophets … ravening wolves’ (Matthew 7:15); ‘hypocrites’ is hurled at them in every phrase of Matthew 23, in the close of Luke 11, and in Mark 7:6, where Isaiah’s bitterest words against lip-service are quoted against them. They are ‘whited sepulchres,’ ‘blind guides,’ ‘sons of them that slew the Prophets,’ ‘serpents
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - " In the case of Moses, vis--vis all other Prophets, God would speak in direct conversation—"face to face. " Other Prophets would receive no less a revelation from God, but in their case the means God would use to communicate his word would be the less direct, somewhat enigmatic form of dreams and visions. ...
It is true, nevertheless, that there were many who "prophesied" who were not called to be Prophets, but were called to be judges, leaders, or priests. And few Prophets could rank or rate as high in esteem as Moses, but his call was primarily not to the office of prophet but to being a leader of God's people in the exodus (Exodus 3:10 ). ...
It is true that Acts 3:24 speaks of "all the Prophets from Samuel on, " making Samuel appear to be the first to prophesy. Psalm 105:14-15 , in referring to the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, urged, "do my Prophets no harm. This divine constraint is one of the most characteristic elements in God's calling of his Prophets. ...
Even though the Prophets professed strong feelings of inadequacy and unworthiness (Isaiah 6:5 ; Jeremiah 1:6 ), they nevertheless could not resist the strong divine compulsion they were under (Jeremiah 15:20 ; Ezekiel 1:3 ; 3:14 ; 8:1 ). There were false prophetesses just as there were false Prophets. Another general name for the Prophets in Scripture is "My servants. ...
The Prophets are also given figurative names. It is of more than just passing interest to learn how the Prophets received their messages from God and how they delivered them to their intended recipients. ...
The Prophets were neither especially precocious savants who could render wise counsel at will nor were they mere automatons through whom God spoke as they remained in a zombie-like trance. ...
How did God communicate his word to his Prophets? In rare cases, God spoke in an audible voice that could be heard by anyone who might have been in the vicinity. ...
God also communicated with his Prophets in a third way: by opening the prophet's eyes so that he could see realities that ordinarily would be hidden. ...
The fourth way that God communicated with his Prophets was the extensive use of visions, dreams, and elaborate imagery. ...
In all these ways, God wanted his Prophets to receive his message and the people to remember what he had said. ...
At other times, the Prophets were available to answer direct questions, such as the time when the kings of Israel, Judah, and Edom came to Elisha as an embarrassed delegation to ask how they could extricate themselves out of the military mess that they had managed to get themselves into (2 Kings 3:11-19 ). The Prophets were conscious of contributing to the ongoing plan of God's ancient, but constantly renewed promise. So said all the Prophets
Mantle - It was worn not only by priests but by kings (1 Samuel 24:4 ), Prophets (15:27), and rich men (Job 1:20 ; 2:12 )
Zephani'ah -
The ninth in order of the twelve minor Prophets
Ashkelon - The Prophets foretold its destruction (Jeremiah 25:20 ; 47:5,7 )
Synagogue, the Great - It consisted of 120 members, and these were known as the men of the Great Synagogue, the successors of the Prophets, themselves, in their turn, succeeded by scribes prominent, individually, as teachers
Search - 1: ἐραυνάω (Strong's #2045 — Verb — eraunao | ereunao — er-yoo-nah'-o ) an earlier form, "to search, examine," is used (a) of God, as "searching" the heart, Romans 8:27 ; (b) of Christ, similarly, Revelation 2:23 ; (c) of the Holy Spirit, as "searching" all things, 1 Corinthians 2:10 , acting in the spirit of the believer; (d) of the OT Prophets, as "searching" their own writings concerning matters foretold of Christ, testified by the Spirit of Christ in them, 1 Peter 1:11 (cp
Insult - God's Prophets were sometimes the objects of insults ( Jeremiah 20:7-8 ; 2 Kings 2:23 )
Azariah - He was contemporary with the Prophets Isaiah, Amos, and Joel
Moon - The Israelites were guilty of the same wrong attitudes towards the ceremonies of the new moon as towards other religious ceremonies, and as a result God’s Prophets condemned them (Isaiah 1:13-14; Hosea 2:11; Amos 8:5; cf
Nathan - Like many Prophets, Nathan was a court historian (1 Chronicles 29:29; 2 Chronicles 9:29; 2 Chronicles 29:25)
Dumb - They had no message for GOD's people; they were false Prophets; they were wicked leaders; and they failed either to warn Israel, or to encourage, or to help them back to GOD
Chapter - The Prophets were divided in somewhat the same manner into Haphtaroth or passages
Ashkelon - It is referred to in the story of the return of the ark ( 1 Samuel 6:17 ), and in David’s lament ( 2 Samuel 1:20 ), and with the other Philistine cities is made an object of denunciation by various Prophets
Threshing Floors - From the above account it appears that a threshing floor (rendered in our textual translation "a void place") might well be near the entrance of the gate of Samaria, and that it might afford no improper place in which the kings of Israel and Judah could hear the Prophets, 1 Kings 22:10 ; 2 Chronicles 18:9 ; Psalms 1:4
Ear - "Make the ears of this people heavy," Isaiah 6:10 ; that is, render their minds inattentive and disobedient; the Prophets being said often to do that of which they were the innocent occasion
Seeing - Whence it is that formerly those were called seers who afterward were termed nabi, or Prophets; and that prophecies were called visions
Rabbah, Rabbath - Subsequently, when the strength of Israel was broken, it appears to have recovered itself, for we find its doom announced in the Prophets
School - Schools were established under the Prophets to train young men to become expounders of Jewish law, and to fit them for the priestly and prophetical offices
Gifts - Prophets received gifts, or declined them, as duty required, 2 Kings 5:15 8:9 Daniel 2:48 5:17
Divination - Those were to be stoned who pretended to have a familiar spirit, or the spirit of divination, Deuteronomy 18:9-12 ; and the prophecies are full of invectives against the Israelite who consulted such, as well as against false Prophets, who seduced the people, Isaiah 8:19 47:11 - 14 Ezekiel 13:6-9
Gath - (2 Kings 12:17 ; 2 Chronicles 11:8 ; 26:6 ; Amos 6:2 ) The ravages of war to which Gath was exposed appear to have destroyed it at a comparatively early period, as it is not mentioned among the other royal cities by the later Prophets
Garden - (Exodus 23:11 ; Jeremiah 29:5 ; Amos 9:14 ) Gardens of herbs, or kitchen gardens, are mentioned in (11:10) and 1 Kings 21:2 The rose garden in Jerusalem, said to have been situated westward of the temple mount, it is remarkable as having been one of the few gardens which, from the time of the Prophets, existed within the city walls
Heresy - The one biblical reference to heretics in this sense is to false Prophets who deny Christ
Mouth - Zacharias’ words, Luke 1:70 ‘as he spake by the mouth of his holy Prophets’ (διὰ στόματος); and Jesus’ words to His disciples, ‘I will give you a mouth (στόμα) and wisdom’ (Luke 21:15)
Jotham - The Prophets Hosea, Isaiah and Micah denounced the social and religious evils of the self-satisfied people (Isaiah 1:1; Hosea 1:1; Micah 1:1)
Joel - (Hebrew: Jehovah is God) ...
Second in the list of the twelve Minor Prophets. The most probable theory attaches his work to the reign of King Azarias, 789-738 BC, relying on the place traditionally assigned to him in the list of the minor Prophets, where he stands between Osee and Amos
Galilee - " This saying of theirs was "not historically true, for two Prophets at least had arisen from Galilee, Jonah of Gath-hepher, and the greatest of all the Prophets, Elijah of Thisbe, and perhaps also Nahum and Hosea
Thyatira - ) Some self-styled prophetess, or collection of Prophets (the feminine in Hebrew idiom expressing a multitude), closely attached to and influencing the Thyatira church and its presiding bishop or "angel" (the Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts read "thy wife" for "that woman") as Jezebel did her weak husband Ahab. ...
The presiding angel ought to have exercised his authority over the prophetess or Prophets so-called, who seduced many into the libertinism of the Balaamites and Nicolaitans of Thyatira's more powerful neighbour Pergamos (Revelation 2:6; Revelation 2:14; Revelation 2:16)
Hosanna - ...
Those from whose lips "Hosanna" rose that day seem to have looked on Jesus as God's anointed one from the house of David of whom the Prophets had spoken and through whom they hoped that all their messianic expectations would be fulfilled. However misguided their particular expectations may have been, their actions underscore the theme of the Gospels that Jesus is indeed the promised son of David through whom the redemption announced by God's Prophets has come
Anointing - Prophets were anointed; for Psalm 105:15 should read'anointed ones;' and cf. , the kings, Prophets, and priests were anointed as set apart for God, so the Christian is by the Holy Spirit sanctified for God , both as to his position and service
Hosea - son of Beeri, the first of the minor Prophets. They are not so clear and detailed, as the predictions of those Prophets who lived in succeeding ages
Of - In Ephesians 2:20 , "the foundation of the apostles and Prophets" is subjective, i. , the foundation laid by the apostles and Prophets ("other foundation can no man lay than
Messi'ah - This word also refers to the expected Prince of the chosen people who was to complete God's purposes for them and to redeem them, and of whose coming the Prophets of the old covenant in all time spoke. Later on the Prophets show the Messiah as a king and ruler of David's house, who should come to reform and restore the Jewish nation and purify the Church, as in Isaiah 11,40-66 The blessings of the restoration, however, will not be confined to Jews; the heathen are made to share them fully
Repentance - Against such misleading and, therefore, futile expressions of remorse, the eighth-century Prophets spoke out. For the Prophets, such a turning or conversion was not just simply a change within a person; it was openly manifested in justice, kindness, and humility ( Micah 6:8 ; Amos 5:24 ; Hosea 2:19-20 ). ...
New Testament A direct connection between the Prophets and the New Testament is found in John the Baptist. He differed, though, from the Prophets in that his message of repentance was intricately bound up with his expectation of the imminent coming of the Messiah (Luke 3:15-17 ; see also Acts 19:4 )
Amos - A shepherd (probably owning flocks) and dresser of sycamore fig trees; specially called of the Lord to prophesy, though not educated in the Prophets' schools (Amos 1:1; Amos 7:14-15). The two forces from God acted simultaneously by His appointment, the invading hosts from without arresting Israel's attention for the prophet's message from God within the land, and the Prophets showing the spiritual meaning of those invasions, as designed to lead Israel to repentance. Israel, as abounding in impostors, needed the more true Prophets of God from Judah to warn her. Her Prophets often fled to Judah from fear of her kings
Zechari'ah -
The eleventh in order of the twelve minor Prophets. Both Prophets had the same great object before them; both directed all their energies to the building of the second temple. He leans avowedly on the authority of the older Prophets, and copies their expressions. Like them he delights in visions; like them he uses symbols and allegories rather than the bold figures and metaphors which lend so much force and beauty to the writings of the earlier Prophets
Hosea - Placed first of the minor Prophets in the canon (one collective whole "the book of the Prophets," Acts 7:42), probably because of the length, vivid earnestness, and patriotism of his prophecies, as well as their resemblance to those of the greater Prophets, Chronologically Jonah was before him, 862 B. He mentions in the inscription, besides the reign of Jeroboam in Israel, the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, though his prophecies are addressed primarily to Israel and only incidentally to Judah; for all the Prophets whether in Judah or Israel regarded Israel's separation from Judah, civil as well as religious, as an apostasy from God who promised the kingship of the theocracy to the line of David. The later Prophets also stamp with their inspired sanction Hosea's prophecies, which they quote
Violence - ...
The Former Prophets also link violence with murder in the Gideon narrative, when the narrator refers to the murder of Abimelech's brothers as "violence" (Judges 9:5,24 ). ...
The Latter Prophets reflect the dual nuance of physical violence and nonphysical violence/ethical violence of the term. ...
Similar usage of the term is found in the Former Prophets when Judges 9:25 asserts that the Shechemites "plundered" all who passed by. ...
Several of the Latter Prophets inveigh against various leaders of Israel because they, through legal manipulation or in some situations physical abuse, "plunder" the poor (Isaiah 3:14 ; 10:2 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Micah 2:2 ; 3:2 ; Malachi 1:13 ). ...
Wisdom use of the term correlates with the indictments of the Prophets; one of the words of the wise counseled against plundering the poor because he is poor (Proverbs 22:22 ; cf. Various pre- and postexilic Prophets use the term with a similar nuance of ethical violence
Commentary - ...
Those to Timothy, Titus, Philemon, and the Revelation, Ezekiel, and the minor Prophets, were done by Mr. contain commentaries on the Pentateuch, Joshua, homilies on Samuel, sermons on Job, commentaries on Psalms, Isaiah, Evangelists, Acts, Paul's epistles, and the other Catholic epistles; an praelectiones on Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. Lowth on the Prophets. Pocock on some of the Minor Prophets. Hutcheson on the Smaller Prophets. Newcome on Ezekiel and Minor Prophets. ...
Of the other Minor Prophets, see Commentaries on Select Parts
Girdle - 'ezor, something "bound," worn by Prophets (2 Kings 1:8 ; Jeremiah 13:1 ), soldiers (Isaiah 5:27 ; 2 Samuel 20:8 ; Ezekiel 23:15 ), Kings (Job 12:18 )
Gourd - There is, however, another species, called the Cucumis prophetarum, from the idea that it afforded the gourd which "the sons of the Prophets" shred by mistake into their pottage
Malachias - (Hebrew: Malakhi, My angel) ...
Last of the Minor Prophets
Music - It was an essential part of training in the schools of the Prophets (1 Samuel 10:5 ; 19:19-24 ; 2 Kings 3:15 ; 1 Chronicles 25:6 )
Saying - 7:36,40; 8:51,52; 10:19; 14:24; 15:20; 18:9,32; 19:13; (c) by an angel, Luke 1:29 ; (d) by OT Prophets, John 12:38 (RV, "word") Romans 13:9 (ditto); 1 Corinthians 15:54 ; (e) by the Apostle Paul in the Pastoral Epp
Kishon - This was the scene of the defeat of Sisera (Judges 4:7,13 ), and of the destruction of the Prophets of Baal by Elijah (1 Kings 18:40 )
Hephzibah - " As the Prophets naturally mould their prophecies in a form suggested by the facts of the day, Hezekiah's marriage to Hephzibah, Manasseh's mother (2 Kings 21:1), would obviously suggest itself
Divine - The Prophets thereof divine for money
Anabaptists - The fanatical Anabaptists were active in Saxony, Thuringia, and other parts of Germany, and were the so-called "Zwickau Prophets
Artemon, Artemonites - He asserted that Christ was a mere man, but born of a virgin, and superior in virtue to the Prophets
Transfiguration - The law and the Prophets were represented by Moses and Elias; but when Peter proposed to make three tabernacles, he was silenced by a voice from heaven, saying "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased: hear ye him
Agrippa ii - Paul knew also that he believed the Prophets
Dream - ” Both true and false Prophets claimed to communicate with God by these dreams and visions
Male - It occurs 82 times and usually in early prose (Genesis through Deuteronomy), only 5 times in the biblical Prophets, and never in biblical wisdom or poetical literature
Transfiguration - Moses the lawgiver and Elijah tie chief of the Prophets both appear talking with Christ the source of the gospel, to show that they are all one and agree in one
Noph - " The Prophets often speak of this city, and foretel the miseries it was to suffer from the kings of Chaldea and Persia, Isaiah 19:13 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 ; Jeremiah 46:19 ; Hosea 9:6 ; Ezekiel 30:13 ; Ezekiel 30:16
Gourd - ...
The wild gourd of (2 Kings 4:39 ) which one of "the sons of the Prophets" gathered ignorantly, supposing them to be good for food, is a poisonous gourd, supposed to be the colocynth, which bears a fruit of the color and size of an orange, with a hard, woody shell
Jehu - He was a commander of the army when Elisha the prophet sent one of the sons of the Prophets to Ramoth-gilead to anoint him as king (2 Kings 9:1-10 )
Sodom - ...
The Prophets, in denouncing woes upon other countries, mention the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, and intimate that these places shall be desert and dried up and uninhabited, Jeremiah 49:18 50:40 ; that they shall be covered with briers and brambles, a land of salt and sulphur, where can be neither planting nor sowing, Deuteronomy 29:23 Amos 4:11
Malachi - The last of the minor Prophets, and of all the Old Testament writers; so little known, that it is doubted by some, though without sufficient reason, whether his name be a proper name, or only a generical one, signifying the angel of the Lord that is, a messenger, a prophet, Haggai 1:13 ; Malachi 3:1
Plague, the - The notices in the Prophets present the same difficulty
Olves, Mount of - " ...
This mount, or rather mountain range, has four summits or peaks: (1) the "Galilee" peak, so called from a tradition that the angels stood here when they spoke to the disciples (Acts 1:11 ); (2) the "Mount of Ascension," the supposed site of that event, which was, however, somewhere probably nearer Bethany (Luke 24:51,52 ); (3) the "Prophets," from the catacombs on its side, called "the Prophets' tombs;" and (4) the "Mount of Corruption," so called because of the "high places" erected there by Solomon for the idolatrous worship of his foreign wives (1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Vulg
Trance - " (Numbers 24:4 ) Saul, in like manner, when the wild chant of the Prophets stirred the old depths of feeling, himself also "prophesied" and "fell down" --most, if not all, of his kingly clothing being thrown off in the ecstasy of the moment --"all that day and all that night. (Ezekiel 3:15 ) As other elements and forms of the prophetic work were revived in "the apostles and Prophets" of the New Testament, so also was this
Idolatry - And, though after the return there was much lukewarmness shown, and alliances were made afresh with ungodly nations,, and false Prophets appeared, Ezra 9:1-2; Nehemiah 6:14, yet so far as we can judge by the national covenant, Nehemiah 10:1-39, and the general tone of the post-exilian Prophets, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, idolatry ceased to nourish
Joel - Unlike most of the other Prophets, Joel does not state the period during which he preached. This would explain why there is no mention of oppressive enemy nations such as Syria, Assyria and Babylon, which are constantly mentioned in the other Prophets, for at that time those nations had not begun to interfere in Judean affairs
Lord of Hosts - The third stage is reached in the Prophets, esp. Hence the term ‘Lord of hosts’ becomes with the Prophets the highest and most transcendental title of God, and is even rendered by the LXX [2] has the form ‘ Lord of Sabaoth ’), where it is singularly appropriate in the passionate denunciation of the oppression practised by the unscrupulous landowners, recalling as it does the spirit of the Hebrew Prophets
Pride - "Pride" is found mainly in the Prophets and the books of poetry. ...
Fifteen Old Testament texts (NIV ) contain the word "arrogance, " nearly half of them (7) in the Prophets (Isaiah 2:17 ; 9:9 ; 13:11 ; Jeremiah 13:15 ; 48:29 ; Ezekiel 7:10 ; Hosea 5:5 ; 7:10 ). When the Prophets accuse Israel of pride (Jeremiah 13:9 ; Ezekiel 7:10,20 ; 16:56 ; Hosea 5:5 ; 7:10 ; Amos 6:8 ; 8:7 ; Zephaniah 2:10 ), the word hybristes [ ὑβριστής ]'>[5] connotes a wanton, insolent person
Camel, Camel's Hair - In Israel this coarse mantle was the badge of the prophet (Zechariah 13:4 ‘The Prophets shall be ashamed each one of his vision, when he prophesieth; and they will no more wear a hairy garment in order to deceive’); and in 2 Kings 1:8 Elijah is described as being an ‘owner of hair’ בַּעַל שִעָר, that is, wearing this garment of the Prophets; Authorized Version, ‘an hairy man’), and girt with leather. As the successor of Elijah and of the Prophets, John the Baptist adopted the same dress (Matthew 3:4, Mark 1:6)
Golden Rule - Matthew's citation presents the Golden Rule as encapsulating the teachings of the law and the Prophets. Matthew 7:12 reads, "So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. When asked what was the greatest commandment, Jesus claimed that to love God totally and to love one's neighbor as oneself was the sum of the Law and the Prophets (cf. And just as the Golden Rule is the sum of the law and Prophets, it can be argued that it also summarizes Jesus' teachings here
Samuel - ...
With the corruption of the priesthood, God made increasing use of Prophets, rather than priests, to speak to his people. The emotionalism of some of these Prophets led to unusual behaviour at times (1 Samuel 10:9-12; 1 Samuel 19:20-24), but rather than silence the Prophets, Samuel tried to redirect their spiritual zeal for the benefit of the nation. He established a school for Prophets at Ramah, and others were established later at Bethel, Jericho and Gilgal (1 Samuel 19:18-20; 2 Kings 2:3; 2 Kings 2:5; 2 Kings 4:38)
Sepulchre - ...
It was thought an act of piety to preserve and adorn the tombs of the Prophets, but was often an act of hypocrisy and our Savior says that the Pharisees were like whited sepulchres, which appeared fine without, but inwardly were full of rottenness and corruption, Matthew 23:27-29 ; and Lightfoot has shown that every year, after the winter rains were over, the Hebrews whitened them anew. A superstitious adoration of the tombs and bones of supposed saints was then and is now a very prevalent form of idolatry; and our Savior tells the Jews of his day they were as guilty as their fathers, Luke 11:47,48 : they built the sepulchres of the Prophets, their fathers slew them; the hypocritical idolatry of the sons was as fatal a sin as the killing of the Prophets by their fathers. These worshippers of the Prophets soon afterwards showed that they allowed the deeds of their fathers, by crucifying the divine Prophet who Moses had foretold
Canon - Hence it appears, that as the writings of the Prophets, Apostles, and Evangelists contain an authentic account of the revealed will of God, they are the rule of the belief and practice of those who receive them. Chrysostom is cited by Bellarmine as saying, "that many of the writings of the Prophets had perished, which may readily be proved from the history in Chronicles. ...
And in 2 Chronicles 9:29 , it is said, "Now, the rest of the acts of Solomon, first and last, are they not written in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and in the visions of Iddo the seer, against Jeroboam, the son of Nebat?" Now, it is well known that none of these writings of the Prophets are in the canon; at least, none of them under their names. It is said, also, in 2 Chronicles 12:15 , "Now, the acts of Rehoboam, first and last, are they not written in the book of Shemaiah the prophet, and of Iddo the seer, concerning genealogies?" Of which works nothing remains under the names of these Prophets. Inspiration was not constantly afforded to the Prophets; but was occasional, and for particular important purposes. In common matters and especially in things no way connected with religion, it is reasonable to suppose that the Prophets and Apostles were left to the same guidance of reason and common sense as other men. Let it be remembered that the Prophets and Apostles were only inspired on special occasions, and on particular subjects, and all difficulties respecting such works as these will vanish. "I think," says he, "that those books which should have authority in religion were revealed by the Holy Spirit, and that men composed others by historical diligence, as the Prophets did these by inspiration. But again: it may be maintained, without any prejudice to the completeness of the canon, that there may have been inspired writings which were not intended for the instruction of the church in all ages, but composed by the Prophets for some special occasion. We know that the Prophets delivered, by inspiration, many discourses to the people, of which we have not a trace on record. Many true Prophets are mentioned, who wrote nothing that we know of; and several are mentioned, whose names are not even given. The books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles, were, probably, not written by one, but by a succession of Prophets. There is reason to believe that, until the canon of sacred Scripture was closed, the succession of Prophets was never interrupted. That some parts of these histories were prepared by Prophets, we have clear proof in one instance; for Isaiah has inserted in his prophecy several chapters which are contained in 2 Kings, and which, I think, there can be no doubt were originally written by himself
Bible - ...
The Lord comprehends and stamps with divine sanction the whole Old Testament, under the threefold division recognized by the Jews, "the law, the Prophets, and the psalms" (including all the holy writings not included in the other two, namely, the Hagiographa) (Luke 24:44). ...
"The Prophets" comprise the former (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings), and the latter, comprising the greater (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel) and the less (the twelve minor Prophets). The including of histories among the Prophets arose from the fact that they were the inspired productions of such prophetic men as Samuel, Gad the seer of David (1 Chronicles 29:29), Nathan, Ahijah, and Iddo (2 Chronicles 9:29). The schools of the Prophets trained such men as Isaiah for the office of historian (2 Chronicles 26:22; 2 Chronicles 32:32). Daniel is not included among the Prophets, because he did not hold the prophet's office among the chosen people. spoken before by the holy Prophets, and of the commandment of us the apostles of the Lord and Savior. " Justin Martyr (Apology 1:66) states that "the memoirs of the apostles" were read side by side with the scriptures of the Prophets. The divisions of the Prophets were called Haphtaroth, from patar , to "dismiss"; as Missa or "Mass" comes from the dismissal of the congregation on its completion. ...
To the histories succeed the epistles of Paul the apostle of faith, Peter of hope, and John of love, unfolding the gospel facts and truths more in detail; just as in the Old Testament the histories come first, then the inspired teachings based on and intimately connected with them, in Psalms, Proverbs, the Song of Solomon of Solomon, and the Prophets. ...
The credibility of the Old Testament is established by establishing that of the New Testament, for the Lord quotes the Old Testament in its threefold parts, "the law, the Prophets, and the psalms," as the word of God. Though they hated and killed the Prophets, they never mutilated their prophecies
Gate - At the gates Prophets also frequently delivered their messages (Proverbs 1:21 ; 8:3 ; Isaiah 29:21 ; Jeremiah 17:19,20 ; 26:10 )
Plead - The Prophets use rı̂yb frequently to indicate that God has an indictment, a legal case, against Israel: “The Lord standeth up to plead, and standeth to judge the people” ( Apparel - Prophets and ascetics wore coarse garments (Isaiah 20:2 ; Zechariah 13:4 ; Matthew 3:4 )
Manaen - One of the teachers and Prophets at Antioch when Saul and Barnabas were "separated" to missionary work, A
Sabaoth - ‘Lord of Hosts,’ יְהֹוָה צְבָאֹוח) is a common title for Jahweh in the Prophets, with the exception of Hosea and Ezekiel
Obadiah - He was devoted to Yahweh and saved Yahweh's Prophets from Jezebel's wrath
Beard - To have one's beard shaved was an insult (2 Samuel 10:4-5 ; Isaiah 50:6 ) or used as a sign by the Prophets of coming destruction (Isaiah 7:20 ; Isaiah 15:2 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ; Ezekiel 5:1 )
Zedekiah - When Micaiah stated that God had put a lying spirit in the mouths of Zedekiah and his band of Prophets, Zedekiah struck Micaiah on the cheek
Beware - ...
Beware of false Prophets beware of the leaven of the Pharisees beware of the concision
Gaza - Having been a stronghold of the Philistines, woes were pronounced against it by the Prophets
Babylon - Who that considers this, and connects with it what the Prophets declared concerning it, years before the event took place, but must be struck with wonder and praise! I beg the reader to look again at Isaiah's prophecy, Memphis - It was denounced in the Prophets and given over to destruction
Evangelists - As they were directed to ordain pastors or bishops in the churches, but had no authority given them to ordain successors to themselves in their particular office as evangelists, whatever it might be, they must be considered as but temporary officers in the church, like the Apostles and Prophets
Noph - The Prophets, in the places above referred to, foretell the miseries Memphis was to suffer from the kings of Chaldea and Persia; and threaten the Israelites who should retire into Egypt, or should have recourse to the Egyptians, that they should perish in that country
Education in Bible Times - ...
The ineffective work of the priests was supplemented by the teaching of the Prophets. The first of these Prophets, Samuel, attempted to make his reform permanent by instituting a school of the Prophets in Ramah (1 Samuel 19:19-20 ). Later other schools of the Prophets were begun at other places. Not all of the students of these schools had predictive gifts nor were all the Prophets students in such schools
Elisha - After Elisha has recrossed the river, he is greeted by the sons of the Prophets as their leader ( 2 Kings 2:15 ). ’ We find him at the headquarters of the sons of the Prophets, making his benign presence felt. ‘What have I to do with thee? Get thee to the Prophets of thy father and the Prophets of thy mother,’ indicates that Elisha had not forgotten the past and the conflicts of his master (2 Kings 3:13 ff. While Jehu is commanding the forces besieging Ramoth-gilead, Elisha sends one of the sons of the Prophets to anoint the general as king, and thus he executes the commission which Elijah received from Jehovah at Horeb ( 1 Kings 19:16 )
Lie, Lying - ...
The Old Testament Prophets emphatically forbid lying and all deceit and show that this standard is fundamental to those who are in covenant relationship with the Lord (Isaiah 59:4,14-15 ; Jeremiah 7:28 ; Ezekiel 13:9 ; Hosea 4:1-2 ; Zechariah 8:16-17 ). False Prophets (i. However, there are difficulties to be reckoned with in Scripture such as the lack of condemnation of untruths in certain circumstances, the use made of lies in the fulfilling of God's purposes, the approval of the use of partial truth, and the appearance of God as being the sponsor of falsehood in connection with inspiring false Prophets with erroneous messages. ...
The appearance of God as being the sponsor of falsehood in connection with inspiring false Prophets with erroneous messages (e. He can, however, in his sovereignty, use committed false Prophets to accomplish his divine purpose
Scribes - When, however, there were no inspired teachers in Israel, no divine oracle in the temple, the scribes presumed to interpret, expound, and comment, upon the law and the Prophets in the schools and in the synagogues. Thus, when our Saviour asserts his divine nature, and appeals to "Moses and the Prophets who spake of him, the people sought to slay him," John 5; and he expresses no surprise at their intention. But when he converses with Nicodemus, John 3, who appears to have been convinced by his miracles that he was "a teacher sent from God," when he came to Jesus by night," anxious to obtain farther information concerning his nature and his doctrine, our Lord, after intimating the necessity of laying aside all prejudices against the spiritual nature of his kingdom, asks, "Art thou a master in Israel, and knowest not these things?" that is, knowest not that Moses and the Prophets describe the Messiah as the Son of God? and he then proceeds to explain in very clear language the dignity of his person and office, and the purpose for which he came into the world, referring to the predictions of the ancient Scriptures. And Stephen, Acts vii, just before his death, addresses the multitude by an appeal to the law and the Prophets, and reprobates in the most severe terms the teachers who misled the people. Our Lord, when speaking of "them of old time," classed the "prophets, and wise men, and scribes," together, Matthew 23:34 ; but of the later scribes he uniformly speaks with censure, and indignation, and usually joins them with the Pharisees, to which sect they in general belonged
Urim And Thummim - The higher revelation by Prophets superseded the Urim and Thummim. Music then, instead of visions, became the help to the state of prayer and praise in which Prophets revealed God's will (1 Samuel 9:9)
Zephaniah - Ninth of the minor Prophets; "in the days of Josiah," between 642 and 611 B. His position among the Prophets, and his quotations from Joel, Amos, and Isaiah, indicate the correctness of the date assigned to him in Zephaniah 1:1
Bear - The Prophets use the image of childbirth to illustrate the terror to overcome men in the day of the Lord ( Prophets sometimes mourn the day of their “birth” ( Captivities of Israel - But when we examine carefully the writings of the Prophets, we find a return of at least a great part of Israel from the captivity clearly pointed out. To the same purpose speak the other Prophets
Father - The principal Prophets were considered as fathers of the younger, who were their disciples, and are called sons of the Prophets, 2 Kings 2:12
Oracle - Fifthly, After the building of the temple, they generally consulted the Prophets, who were frequent in the kingdoms of Judah and Israel. ...
From Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, who are the last of the Prophets that have any of their writings remaining, the Jews pretend that God gave them what they call Bathkol, the Daughter of the Voice, which was a supernatural manifestation of the will of God, which was performed either by a strong inspiration or internal voice, or else by a sensible and external voice, which was heard by a number of persons sufficient to bear testimony of it. And the Lord asked him, How? To which Satan answered, I will go and be a lying spirit in the mouth of his Prophets. This dialogue clearly proves these two things; first, that the devil could do nothing by his own power; and, secondly, that, with the permission of God, he could inspire the false Prophets, sorcerers, and magicians, and make them deliver false oracles
Samuel, the Books of - " Nehemiah is said in 2 Maccabees 2:13 to have "gathered together the acts in the kings and the Prophets. ...
That the composer used various existing materials appears from the distinct, but not irreconcilable, accounts of Saul's first acquaintance with David (1 Samuel 16:14-23; 1 Samuel 17:55-58), also of Saul's death (1 Samuel 31:2-6; 1 Samuel 31:8-13; 2 Samuel 1:2-12), also of the origin of the proverb "is Saul also among the Prophets?" (1 Samuel 10:9-12; 1 Samuel 19:22-24). Probably an inspired member of the schools of the Prophets composed the book, incorporating in abridged form existing memoirs and records; so thought Theodoret, Athanasius, and Gregory. Prophets are prominent in Samuel
Wisdom - In one sense, wisdom is an appropriate theological complement to the law and the Prophets, the latter two religious paradigms basically addressing the nation. That is not to overlook the fact, however, that much in the law and Prophets applies to individuals. Rather, it is to recognize that God spoke the law to the nation of Israel, and similarly the Prophets spoke basically to the nation. Again, this view is a helpful theological complement to the Redeemer theology of the Torah and Prophets
Bible - However, after the time of Moses, several Prophets, and other writers divinely inspired, composed either the history of their own times, or prophetical books and divine writings, or psalms appropriated to the praise of God. The book of Ecclesiasticus affords sufficient evidence that the canon of the sacred books was completed when that tract was composed; for that author, in chapter 49, having mentioned among the famous men and sacred writers, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, adds the twelve minor Prophets who follow those three in the Jewish canon; and from this circumstance we may infer that the prophecies of these twelve men were already collected and digested into one body. It is farther evident, that in the time of our Saviour the canon of the Holy Scriptures was drawn up, since he cites the law of Moses, the Prophets, and the Psalms, which are the three kinds of books of which that canon is composed, and which he often styles, "the Scriptures," or, "the Holy Scripture," Matthew 21:42 ; Matthew 22:29 ; Matthew 26:54 ; John 5:39 ; and by him therefore the Jewish canon, as it existed in his day, was fully authenticated, by whomsoever or at what time it had been formed. Kennicott, with better reason, supposes, that long before this time there were several copies of the law in Israel, during the separation of the ten tribes, and that there were some copies of it also among the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, particularly in the hands of the Prophets, priests, and Levites; and that by the instruction and authority of these MSS, the various services in the temple were regulated, during the reigns of the good kings of Judah. From this time copies of the law were extensively multiplied among the people; and though, within a few years, the autograph, or original copy of the law, was burnt with the city and temple by the Babylonians, yet many copies of the law and the Prophets, and of all the other sacred writings, were circulated in the hands of private persons, who carried them with them into their captivity. The canon of the whole Hebrew Bible seems, says Kennicott, to have been closed by Malachi, the latest of the Jewish Prophets, about fifty years after Ezra had collected together all the sacred books which had been composed before and during his time. Prideaux supposes the canon was completed by Simon the Just, about one hundred and fifty years after Malachi: but, as his opinion is rounded merely on a few proper names at the end of the two genealogies, 1 Chronicles 3:19 ; Nehemiah 12:22 , which few names might very easily be added by a transcriber afterward, it is more probable, as Kennicott thinks, that the canon was finished by the last of the Prophets, about four hundred years before Christ. But, among the ancient Jews, they formed only twenty-two books, according to the letters of their alphabet, which were twenty-two in number; reckoning Judges and Ruth, Ezra and Nehemiah, Jeremiah and his Lamentations, and the twelve minor Prophets, (so called from the comparative brevity of their compositions,) respectively as one book. From the death of Moses to that of Artaxerxes, who was king of Persia after Xerxes, the Prophets, who succeeded Moses, committed to writing, in thirteen books, what was done in their days. " The threefold division of the Old Testament into the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms, mentioned by Josephus, was expressly recognised before his time by Jesus Christ, as well as by the subsequent writers of the New Testament. About fifty years before the time of Christ were written the Targums of Onkelos on the Pentateuch, and of Jonathan Ben-Uzziel on the Prophets; (according to the Jewish classification of the books of the Old Testament;) which are evidence of the genuineness of those books at that time. makes evident references to the prophecies of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, and mentions these Prophets by name: he speaks also of the twelve minor Prophets. It likewise appears from the prologue to that book, that the law and the Prophets, and other ancient books, were extant at the same period. The prologue was added by the translator; but this circumstance does not diminish the evidence for the antiquity of the Old Testament: for he informs us, that the law and the Prophets, and the other books of their fathers, were studied by his grandfather; a sufficient proof that they were extant in his time. Till the time of the persecution of Antiochus Epiphanes, they read only the law; but being then prohibited from reading it any more, they substituted in the room of the fifty-four sections of the law, fifty-four sections out of the Prophets, the reading of which they ever after continued. Thus, when the reading of the law was restored by the Maccabees, the section which was read every Sabbath out of the law served for their first lesson, and the section out of the Prophets for their second lesson; and this practice was continued to the times of the Apostles, Acts 13:15 ; Acts 13:27 . From the time when the Old Testament was completed by Malachi, the last of the Prophets, till the publication of the New Testament, about four hundred and sixty years elapsed. During the period between the resurrection and the publication of the New Testament, the churches possessed miraculous gifts, and the Prophets were enabled to explain the predictions of the Old Testament, and to show their fulfilment
Micaiah - The 400 Prophets whom Ahab gathered together to "inquire the word of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5) were Prophets of Jeroboam's symbolic calf worship of Jehovah not of Baal. ...
Micaiah therefore revealed the source unseen of the 400 Prophets' falsehood; Jehovah, seen in real vision on His throne amidst His hosts, asked, who shall persuade Ahab to go up and fall at Ramoth Gilead? A lying spirit undertook to influence the 400 to Ahab's ruin (Zechariah 13:2; 1 John 4:6)
Blessedness - Israel's persecuted Prophets lived in the same unresolved dilemma, one now promised Christians (Matthew 5:12 ). Blessedness is seen not in how God materially rewarded the Prophets, but in their perseverance (James 5:11 ). The apostles are blessed in seeing what Prophets could only long for (Matthew 13:16 ) and rejoice because they are allowed to suffer for Christ (Acts 5:41 )
Gifts - The more ancient Prophets did not deem it discreditable to them to receive presents, nor unbecoming their sacred calling, except when, as was sometimes the case, they refused by way of expressing their dissatisfaction or indignation, 2 Kings 5:15 ; 2 Kings 8:9 . In later times, when false Prophets, in order to obtain money, prophesied without truth and without authority, the true Prophets, for the purpose of keeping the line of distinction as broad as possible, rejected every thing that looked like reward
Hezekiah - ...
Religious reforms...
The Prophets of Hezekiah’s time (he reigned from 716 to 687 BC) were Hosea, Isaiah and Micah. Yet none of the Prophets records Hezekiah’s reforms. Perhaps this was because the Prophets were more concerned with the spiritual attitudes of people than with the revised procedures for temple worship
Elijah - ...
After three years of drought, Elijah challenged Ahab to gather Baal’s Prophets to Mt Carmel for a public contest to show who was the true God, Yahweh or Baal (1 Kings 18:19-21). Elijah tested his young successor to see whether he was prepared for the difficult and wide-ranging work ahead, or whether he would rather settle at one of the schools of the Prophets (2 Kings 2:1-6). Their presence symbolized that the one to whom the law and the Prophets pointed had now arrived
Prophecy - Thus, in Nehemiah it is said, "Thou hast appointed Prophets to preach, " ch. Hence it was that there were schools of Prophets in Israel, where young men were instructed in the truths of religion, and fitted to exhort and comfort the people. ...
Pagans had their oracles, augurs, and soothsayers; modern idolaters their necronancers and diviners; and the Jews, Christians, and Mahometans, their Prophets. Its sudden bursts of eloquence, its earnest warmth, its affecting exhortations and appeals, affords very interesting proofs of that lively impression, and of that inspired conviction, under which the Prophets wrote; and which enable them, among a people not distinguished for genius, to surpass, in every variety of composition, the most admired productions of Pagan antiquity. If the imagery employed by the sacred writers appears sometimes to partake of a coarse and indelicate cast, it must be recollected, that the Eastern manners and languages required the most forcible representations; and that the masculine and indignant spirit of the Prophets led them to adopt the most energetic and descriptive expressions. No style is, perhaps, so highly figurative as that of the Prophets. God permitted them to apply to him and to his Prophets, even upon small occasions; and, he raised up amongst them a succession of Prophets, to whom they might have recourse for advice and direction. These Prophets were reverenced abroad as well as at home, and consulted by foreign princes; and, in times of the captivity, they were honoured by great kings, and advanced to high stations. It is principally this double sense of prophecy which renders it obscure; for though the predictions of the Prophets were sometimes positive and exactly descriptive, and delivered with an accurate and definite designation of names and times, prophecy was not generally designed to be clear before its accomplishment. Time, that detracts something from the evidence of other writers, is still adding something to the credit and authority of the Prophets. It is in vain to say that these prophecies were delivered since the events have taken place; for we see the prophecies, the latest whereof were delivered about 1700 years ago, and some of them above 3000 years ago, fulfilling at this very time; and cities, and countries, and kingdoms, in the very same condition, and all brought about in the very same manner, and with the very same circumstances, as the Prophets had foretold. " Farther, in order to understand the prophecies, we must endeavour to find out the true subject of prophecy; that is, precisely what the Prophets speak of, and the characters that are applied to that subject. ...
See Bishop Newton's Dissertations on the Prophecies; Bishop Sherlock's Use and Intent of Prophecy; Bishop Hurd's Sermons on the Prophecies; Sir Isaac Newton's Observations on the Prophecies of Daniel and the Apocalypse; Gray's Key to the Old Testament; Simpson's Key to the Prophecies; Illustrations of Prophecy; Vitringa's Typhus Doctrine Propheticae; Gill on the Prophets; Etrick's second Exodus, or Remarks on the Prophecies of the Last Times; Kett's History the Interpreter of Prophecy
Mohammedanism - It requires, belief in one God, in its Angels, the Koran, in its Prophets, resurrection and judgment
Canticle of Zachary - Through his holy Prophets he promised of old that he would save us from our enemies, from the hands of all who hate us
Micah, Book of - The sixth in order of the so-called minor Prophets
Point, Points - ...
B — 1: δηλόω (Strong's #1213 — Verb — deloo — day-lo'-o ) "to make plain" (delos, "evident"), is translated "did point unto" in 1 Peter 1:11 , RV (AV, "did signify"), of the operation of "the Spirit of Christ" in the Prophets of the Old Testament in "pointing" on to the time and its characteristics, of the sufferings of Christ and subsequent glories
Require - 1), also denotes "to demand, require," Luke 11:50,51 , of executing vengeance for the slaughter of the Prophets (cp
Gaza - The Prophets denounce the judgments of God against it (Jeremiah 25:20 ; 47:5 ; Amos 1:6,7 ; Zephaniah 2:4 )
Zephaniah -
The son of Cushi, and great-grandson of Hezekiah, and the ninth in the order of the minor Prophets
Benedictus, the - Through his holy Prophets he promised of old that he would save us from our enemies, from the hands of all who hate us
Urim And Thummim - Saul sought the spirit of Samuel through a witch because God would not answer Saul through Urim or dreams or Prophets (1 Samuel 28:6-25 )
Manaen - Luke prefaces his account of the Church of Jerusalem (Acts 1-5) by giving a list of the apostles who were its chiefs and leaders (1:23), so he prefaces his account of the Church of Antioch, and the missionary activity of which it was the centre, by a list of the most noted Prophets and teachers who were connected with it: they were Barnabas, and Symeon called Niger, and Lucius the Cyrenian, and Manaen, the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul (13:1)
School - ) A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the Prophets
Jesus - The Prophets prophesied about Him (Acts 10:43)
Heal - ...
False Prophets are condemned because they deal only with the symptoms and not with the deep spiritual hurts of the people: “They have healed also the hurt of the daughter of my people slightly, saying, Peace, peace; when there is no peace” ( School - ) A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the Prophets
Satan - By collecting the passages where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be concluded, that he fell from heaven with his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that by his envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over subordinate apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men, and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false Prophets and seducers; that it is he, or his agents, that torment or possess men, and inspire them with evil designs, as when he suggested to David, the numbering of the people, to Judas to betray his Lord and Master, and to Ananias and Sapphira to conceal the price of their field; that he is full of rage like a roaring lion, and of subtlety like a serpent, to tempt, to betray, to destroy, and involve us in guilt and wickedness; that his power and malice are restrained within certain limits, and controlled by the will of God; in a word, that he is an enemy to God and man, and uses his utmost endeavours to rob God of his glory, and men of their souls
Dreams - God said that He would instruct His Prophets in dreams
Pentecost - They hear an oration in praise of the law, and read from the Pentateuch and Prophets lessons which have a relation to this festival, and accommodate their prayers to the same occasion
Zachary, Canticle of - Through his holy Prophets he promised of old that he would save us from our enemies, from the hands of all who hate us
Jonah - One of the minor Prophets, was a native of Gath-hepher, in Zebulun, 2 Kings 14:25
Chalde'a, - " The Hebrew Prophets applied the term "land of the Chaldeans" to all Babylonia and "Chaldeans" to all the subjects of the Babylonian empire
Sophronius, Ecclesiastical Writer - He had, while still young, composed a book on the glories of Bethlehem, and, just before the catalogue was written, a book on the destruction of the Serapeum, and had translated into Greek Jerome's letter to Eustochium on virginity, his Life of Hilarion, and his Latin version of the Psalms and Prophets
Remnant - ' In every crisis in the history of Israel there has been a remnant: this was seen in the time of Ahab (1 Kings 19:18 ), and so too in the introduction of Christianity (Luke 2:38 ), and that it will be so in the future is abundantly evident from the testimony of the Prophets
Osee, Book of - (Hebrew: deliverance) ...
One of the minor Prophets whose career is known only by his prophecy. The book is the first of the so-called Minor Prophets
Heresy - It clearly refers to false Prophets who have denied the true teaching about Christ. Since the remainder of 2 Peter 2:1 refers to the immoral living of the false Prophets, the word also refers to their decadent living
Jeremiah - He was raised In love and respect for Jewish traditions, and studied with care the utterances of previous Prophets, in particular the oracles of Isaias and Micheas. The priests and false Prophets seized him, crying, "Let him be put to death
Jeremias - He was raised In love and respect for Jewish traditions, and studied with care the utterances of previous Prophets, in particular the oracles of Isaias and Micheas. The priests and false Prophets seized him, crying, "Let him be put to death
Calf Worship - The Prophets of the calves regarded themselves as "prophets of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5-6)
Hosea, Book of - (Hebrew: deliverance) ...
One of the minor Prophets whose career is known only by his prophecy. The book is the first of the so-called Minor Prophets
Elijah - The Prophets were slain, the altars were digged down, he was left alone, and his enemies were seeking his life. Ahab and Jezebel and the false Prophets had triumphed; it was all over with the cause of righteousness and truth for which he had laboured
Acceptance - Israel succumbed to the temptation of separating sacrifice from ethical action, so the great Prophets again and again hammered home the truth that no sacrifice is acceptable if it is divorced from just treatment of others (Isaiah 1:10-17 ; Amos 5:21-24 ). ...
Jesus summarized the law and the Prophets in the two great commandments (Matthew 22:37-40 ) and held them up as the requirements for eternal life (Luke 10:25-28 )
Reproach - The noun appears most frequently in the Book of Psalms, in the major Prophets, and in Daniel. ” Several Prophets predicted that Israel’s judgment was partly to be experienced by the humiliating “reproach” of the nations: “And I will persecute them with the sword, with the famine, and with the pestilence, and will deliver them to be removed to all the kingdoms of the earth, to be a curse, and an astonishment, and a hissing, and a reproach among all the nations whither I have driven them” ( Divination - The writings of the Prophets are full of invectives against the Israelites who consulted diviners, and against false Prophets who by such means seduced the people
Mount Zion - The Prophets, with one voice, have described their privileges. ) And all the Prophets in like manner, describe this blessedness of the gospel church in Zion
Synagogue - The Prophets' assemblies for psalmody and worship led the way (1 Samuel 9:12; 1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 19:20-24). Periodic meetings for hearing the law and the Prophets read were customary thenceforth on the return (Ezra 8:15; Nehemiah 8:2; Nehemiah 9:1; Zechariah 7:5; Acts 15:21). Besides the ark for "the law" (torah ) there was a chest for the haphtaroth or "roll of the Prophets". He desired to undertake the office of maptir or "reader of the lesson from the Prophets", and was at once permitted owing to His fame) answered to our deacon or subdeacon; besides getting the building ready for service he acted as schoolmaster during the week. ...
The Prophets were similarly read as second lessons; the exposition (derash ) or "word of exhortation" followed (Acts 13:15; Acts 15:21). , to have succeeded the Prophets, and to have been succeeded by the scribes, Ezra presiding; among the members Joshua, the high priest Zerubbabel, Daniel, the three children Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Nehemiah, Mordecai; their aim being to restore the crown or glory of Israel, the name of God as great, mighty, and terrible (Daniel 9:4; Jeremiah 32:18; Deuteronomy 7:21); so they completed the Old Testament canon, revising the text, introducing the vowel points which the Masorete editors have handed down to us, instituting "the feast" Ρurim , organizing the synagogue ritual
Persecution - -‘For so persecuted they the Prophets which were before you’ (Matthew 5:12). Whether they are Hebrew Prophets or Christian martyrs-Albigenses, Pilgrim Fathers, or Huguenots-the struggle is at bottom of the same nature, and for the same ideal. Stephen re-echced his Master’s interpretation of the nation’s attitude when he asked ‘which of the Prophets did not your fathers persecute?’ (Acts 7:52). Jesus charged His contemporaries with raising sepulchres to the Prophets whom their ancestors had put to death (Luke 11:47). ...
But it is obvious that the Prophets were not simply men who suffered for their religious opinions. The Prophets of this early age advocated the sole worship of Jahweh. Henceforth the Prophets denounced the existing order of things-religious and social. The true Prophets parted company with the false Prophets because they would not ‘fall in’ and preach what was popular. In other lands the Prophets were obliging courtiers and fell in with the royal wishes. We should traverse the Semitic world in vain for an attitude like that of Micaiah-ben-Imlah-‘what the Lord saith unto me, that will I speak’ (1 Kings 22:14)-when the king had given peremptory orders that he should fall in with his fellow-prophets. The Prophets loved their nation and their country. That was the privilege of the court-prophets whose message was inspired from the throne. The Prophets thus came into collision with current theology, for they declared that Jahweh was not simply the God of Israel, but the God of righteousness, and they came up against popular religion, for they identified religion with the practice of social justice. Their theology made the Prophets preachers of judgment and destruction. According to the teaching of the Prophets the Israel of God would be a nation which organized its whole life-social and religious-in accordance with the Divine will
Lamentations, Theology of - ...
Her sin, while not to be excused, can be better understood in the light of another tradition: the ministry expected from Prophets. Israel's wound, now deep as the sea, came because the Prophets failed to expose her sin and so failed to ward off her captivity (2:14). Back of this charge is the conviction that one of the functions of the Prophets was to identify the shape of evil in the society (cf. The reference in 2:14 to Prophets whose oracles were false may well be to those who announced peace to a sinning people, and with whom Jeremiah so vigorously debated (23:16-18). Jeremiah and other Prophets before him warned Israel of the severity of God's anger should it be unleashed (30:23-24; Amos 1:3-5,6 , 10,11 )
Elijah - This man, though in such apostate surroundings, was truly pious, and had befriended Jehovah's Prophets when Jezebel had sought to slay them. He directed him to call all the Prophets of Baal together to mount Carmel, and there before the assembled throng of Israel he stood alone for God. The issue is presented: the Prophets of Baal offered their sacrifice, and from morning till noon in vain implored the intervention of their god. "Jehovah, He is the God" was the twice repeated cry of Israel in view of these things; and, controlled by the power of God in the prophet, they, at his bidding, seized the Prophets of Baal, who were to a man slain by him. ...
Moses and Elijah were seen on the mount of transfiguration, as representatives of the law and the Prophets; but theirs was then a subordinate place, for the proclamation was "This is my beloved Son; hear him
Elijah - This man, though in such apostate surroundings, was truly pious, and had befriended Jehovah's Prophets when Jezebel had sought to slay them. He directed him to call all the Prophets of Baal together to mount Carmel, and there before the assembled throng of Israel he stood alone for God. The issue is presented: the Prophets of Baal offered their sacrifice, and from morning till noon in vain implored the intervention of their god. "Jehovah, He is the God" was the twice repeated cry of Israel in view of these things; and, controlled by the power of God in the prophet, they, at his bidding, seized the Prophets of Baal, who were to a man slain by him. ...
Moses and Elijah were seen on the mount of transfiguration, as representatives of the law and the Prophets; but theirs was then a subordinate place, for the proclamation was "This is my beloved Son; hear him
Targums - It is, however, interesting to note an exception in the case of Southern Arabia, where the custom still survives; and in Bokhara the Persian Jews read the Targum, with the Persian paraphrase of it, to the lesson from the Prophets for the last day of the Passover Feast, namely, Isaiah 10:32 to Isaiah 12:6 . ’ This latter is sometimes erroneously called the ‘Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel on the Pentateuch’; but though this Jonathan was believed to be the author of the Targum to the Prophets which bears his name (see below), there was not the slightest ground for ascribing to him the authorship of the Targum to the Pentateuch (‘Targum Jerushalmi’). ]'>[3] ,’ which of course stood for ‘Jerushalmi,’ was taken to refer to ‘Jonathan,’ the generally acknowledged author of the Targum to the Prophets; thus it came about that this Targum to the Pentateuch, as well as the Targum to the Prophets, was called the Targum of Jonathan. ’...
The Targum of Jonathan to the Prophets owes its name to an ancient tradition, according to which Jonathan ben Uzziel composed it ‘from the mouths of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi’ ( Megillah , 3 a ); this is merely a figurative way of saying that the traditional interpretation, as supposed to have been handed down by these Prophets, was embodied in written form by Jonathan. ...
Of much later date, and also of less importance than the Targums of Onkelos, pseudo-Jonathan, or Jonathan, is the Targum Jerushalmi to the Prophets . 61, ‘Most of the quotations given in the Targum Jerushalmi are Haggadic additions, frequently traceable to the Babylonian Talmud, so that this Palestinian Targum to the Prophets belongs to a later period, when the Babylonian Talmud had begun to exert an influence upon Palestinian literature
Hosea, Book of - , and entitled ‘The Twelve Prophets’ (see Micah [1]). There is little doubt that such passages were added to ancient prophecies, but it is not yet by any means generally admitted that the early Prophets made no promises of a brighter future beyond judgment. Smith ( Book of the Twelve Prophets , vol
Ancestors - Leaders and Prophets implored the Israelites to remember their heritage and the God of their forefathers. God warned them through the Prophets not to consult the dead in an effort to learn the future (Isaiah 8:19 ; Isaiah 65:4 ). Such acts were considered by the Prophets to be dangerously at odds with God's will (1 Samuel 28:7 )
Haggai - Festive, one of the twelve so-called minor Prophets
Jotham - He was contemporary with the Prophets Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, by whose ministrations he profited
Moab - "Surely if we had nothing else to interest us in the land of Moab, the fact that it was from the top of Pisgah, its noblest height, this mightiest of the Prophets looked out with eye undimmed upon the Promised Land; that it was here on Nebo, its loftiest mountain, that he died his solitary death; that it was here, in the valley over against Beth-peor, he found his mysterious sepulchre, we have enough to enshrine the memory in our hearts
Theocracy - A premonarchic form was based on the Sinaitic covenant (Exodus 19:1 ) and on the charismatic leadership of the judges and the Prophets
Meekness - And, just as the Psalmists and Prophets had sympathized with the Lord’s hidden ones and promised them deliverance ( Psalms 9:12 ; Psalms 9:18 ; Psalms 10:12-18 ; Psalms 37:11 Nathanael - (1) When told by Philip, ‘We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the Prophets did write Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph,’ Nathanael hesitated
Montanists - The Montanists, finding themselves exposed to the censure of the whole church, formed a schism, and set up a distinct society under the direction of those who called themselves Prophets
Prophecy: Too Often Interpreted by Imagination - Great truths are in the Prophets and in the precious book of Revelation, but your fanciful theologians turn these sublimities of truth into the toys of children, when they give their imagination license to act as an expositor
Sidon And Tyre - Jesus spent time in Tyre and Sidon and in contrast to the Prophets' attitude toward the cities, He contrasted them with the Jews as examples of faith ( Matthew 11:20-22 )
Idumaeans - The Prophets foretold the desolation of the descendants of Esau and their country
Foundation - " (1 Corinthians 3:11) And blessed is the corresponding experience and testimony of true believers in the heart, when built upon the foundations of apostles and Prophets, "Jesus Christ being the chief corner-stone; they are in all the building fitly framed, and growing together unto an holy temple in the Lord
Saul - 2909; his prophesying along with the young Prophets; his appointment by the lot; his modesty in hiding himself; his first victory over the Ammonites; his rash sacrifice in the absence of Samuel; his equally rash curse; his victories over the Philistines and Amalekites; his sparing of King Agag with the judgment denounced against him for it; his jealousy and persecution of David; his barbarous massacre of the priests and people of Nob; his repeated confessions of his injustice to David, &c, are recorded in 1 Samuel 9-31
Zechariah - The eleventh of the twelve minor Prophets, of priestly descent and a contemporary or Haggai
Jeremiah - One of the chief Prophets of the Old Testament, prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah, and also after the captivity of the latter
Bethel - The Prophets were charged with messages against Bethel, 1 Kings 13:1,2 Jeremiah 48:13 Amos 3:14 7:10
Holy, Holiness - The Bible applies the epithet holy in a secondary sense to whatever pertains especially to God-to heaven, to his temple, its parts, utensils, and services; to his day, his ministers, priests, Prophets, and apostles
Pipe - The pipe and tabret were used at the banquets of the Hebrews, (Isaiah 5:12 ) and accompanied the simpler religious services when the young Prophets, returning from the high place, caught their inspiration from the harmony, (1 Samuel 10:5 ) or the pilgrims, on their way to the great festivals of their ritual, beguiled the weariness of the march with psalms sung to the simple music of the pipe
Peter, Second Epistle of - (2 Peter 1:14-21 ) The danger of being misled by false Prophets is dwelt upon with great earnestness throughout the second chapter, which is almost identical in language and subject with the Epistle of Jude
Zechariah, Book of - According to Ezra ( Ezra 5:1 ; Ezra 6:14 ), the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah roused Zerubbabel and Joshua to build the Temple, and the work went forward prosperously through their prophesying. The book opens with an exhortation to return unto Jehovah ( Zechariah 1:1-6 ), based upon the sad experience of the fathers who had not heeded the word of the Prophets to return from their evil ways. Rather than fast they should observe the teachings of the earlier Prophets concerning justice and mercy. Zechariah has a large measure of the spirit of the early ethical Prophets. His message is rich and full, for he has caught the ethical enthusiasm of the great eighth-century Prophets, and has enriched it by the spiritual insight of Jeremiah and the glorious hopes of the exilic Prophets. The closing verses of the first section in this division (13:1 6) indicate a time when prophecy is utterly degraded idols, Prophets, unclean spirit are evils to be removed
Daniel, the Book of - Its position there, not among the Prophets as one would expect, shows it was not an interpolation of later times, but deliberately placed where it is by Ezra and the establishers of the Jewish canon. Daniel was "the politician, chronologer, and historian among the Prophets" (Bengel). ...
Similarly, the Psalms, though largely prophetic, are ranked with the Hagiographa, not the Prophets. His book written amidst pagan isolation is the Old Testament Apocalypse, as the Revelation of John written in the lonely Patmos is the New Testament Apocalypse; the two respectively stand apart, his from the Prophets, John's from the epistles. But the forgery of a prophecy, if Daniel were spurious, would never have been received by the Jews from an age when confessedly there were no Prophets. Daniel's Hebrew is closely like that of Ezekiel and Habakkuk, that is, just those Prophets living nearest the assumed age of Daniel. ...
The vision mode of revelation, which is the exception in other Prophets, is the rule in Daniel and in Zechariah 1-6
Elijah - The Prophets of Baal were then put to death by the order of Elijah. He went down to Gilgal, where was a school of the Prophets, and where his successor Elisha, whom he had anointed some years before, resided. ...
No one of the old Prophets is so frequently referred to in the New Testament. It may be supposed either that Elijah anticipated the character of Jehoram, and so wrote the warning message, which was preserved in the schools of the Prophets till Jehoram ascended the throne after the Tishbite's translation, or that the translation did not actually take place till after the accession of Jehoram to the throne (2 Chronicles 21:12 ; 2 Kings 8:16 )
Marks - In 1 Kings 20:35-43 there is the account of how one of the Prophets ‘disguised himself with a headband over his eyes’; the king does not recognize the man as a prophet until the latter takes away this covering from his face, whereupon the king ‘discovered him as one of the Prophets. (2) There is the analogy of circumcision; just as among the Israelites this was the distinguishing mark of the people of Jahweh, so those who, like the Prophets, were more especially His close followers also had a special mark, a distinctive sign, which differentiated them from other men. When one remembers how rife anthropomorphisms were among the Israelites, it is perhaps not fanciful to see here an analogy: just as the owners of herds marked their own property, so Jahweh marked His own people; and as the Prophets were differentiated from the ordinary people, so they would have their special mark
Kings, Books of - ...
The presentation of Israel’s history as prophetic history is partly because many of the historians in Israel were Prophets (e. The author of Kings (who is not named) most likely used some of the records of the Prophets, along with the official records of various kings, in preparing his book (1 Kings 11:41; 1 Kings 14:19; 1 Kings 14:29). the ministry of certain Prophets; 1 Kings 17; 1 Kings 18; 1 Kings 19; 1 Kings 20; 1 Kings 21; 1 Kings 22; 2 Kings 1; 2 Kings 2; 2 Kings 3; 2 Kings 4; 2 Kings 5; 2 Kings 6; 2 Kings 7; 2 Kings 8; 2 Kings 9). Elijah won a great victory over the Prophets of Baal on Mt Carmel (18:1-46), but when the people of Israel still did not give up their Baalism, God strengthened and reassured the discouraged Elijah (19:1-21)
Foundation - Paul describes believers as ἑποικοδομηθέντες ἐπὶ τῷ θεμελίῳ τῶν ἀποστόλων καὶ προφητῶν, ‘Being built upon the foundation of the apostles and Prophets. ’ The latter are of course NT teachers and exhorters (the omission of the article before Prophets indicates members of the same class). ...
Considerable variety of opinion has been expressed as to the meaning of ‘the foundation of the apostles and Prophets. of apposition = the foundation which consists of apostles and Prophets; (b) gen. Paul by a change of metaphor (1 Corinthians 3:11) presents the apostles and Prophets as themselves the foundation, and Christ as the corner-stone ‘binding together both the walls and the foundations. ’ But the consensus of interpretations tends to (b), the gospel of the apostles and Prophets (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) , ii
Law - The existence and authority of a law would still leave room for doubt in matters of individual application, ( d ) As social life became more complex, the three divisions of the tôrah became more specialized; civil suits were tried by the judge; the Prophets almost confined themselves to giving oral direction on moral duties; the priests were concerned mainly with the solution of ritual difficulties. The tôrah of the Prophets was moral, not ceremonial. The priests, while by their office necessarily much engaged in ceremonial and ritual actions, nevertheless had boundless opportunities for giving the worshippers true direction on the principles underlying their religions observances; and it is for their neglect of such opportunities, and not, as is often crudely maintained, on account of any inherently necessary antagonism between priestly and prophetical ideals, that the Prophets so frequently rebuke the priests, not because of the fulfilment of their priestly ( i. This the Prophets do not deny; but they do deny that the distinctive feature of the Sinaitic legislation lay in anything but its moral excellence. It is wholly unwarrantable to say that the Prophets condemned the sacrificial system, or denied its worth and Divine sanction; but, on the other hand, we are justified in asserting that the tôrah of Jehovah, ‘the law of the Lord,’ meant to the Prophets something wholly different from the punctilious observance of traditional ceremonies; and what is more, they appeal without fear of contradiction to the contents of the Mosaic legislation as completely establishing their conviction that it was in the sphere of morality, rather than in the organizing of worship, that the essence of Jehovah’s law was to be found. To this it may be replied: we cannot call the Prophets as witnesses for the truth of two mutually contradictory propositions. Having already cited the Prophets in disproof of the Mosaic authorship of the Levitical legislation, on the ground that the latter is essentially ritualistic (and therefore does not correspond to the Prophets’ view of the Law of Moses), it is monstrously unfair to deny the Sinaitic origin of what is left in conformity with the prophetical standard, on the ground that it ought to be ‘essentially ritualistic’ also, and is not. We have rightly had our attention called to the witness of the Prophets. It is argued that such a policy is in direct contradiction to the universalistic teaching of the earlier Prophets. The Prophets realized the inadequacy of this legal system: it was no real appeal to man’s highest nature; it did not spring from the man’s own heart; and so they prophesied of the New Covenant when Jehovah’s laws should be written in the heart, and His sin-forgiving grace should remove all elements of servile fear (cf. Our Lord stated His position in the saying of Matthew 5:17 : ‘I did not come to destroy the law or the Prophets, but to fulfil. Thus Jesus asserted, in accordance with views already advanced among the scribes, that ‘the whole law and the Prophets hang on the two commandments’ of love to God and to our neighbour ( Matthew 17:27 , Luke 10:25-37 ) the parable of the Good Samaritan gives to the second command an unprecedented scope. His ‘I say unto you,’ spoken in a tone never assumed by Moses or the Prophets, implied so much and was so understood by His Apostles ( 1 Corinthians 7:10 , Ahab - " In the midst of this great apostasy, God visited the land with three years of drought and famine; and then, at Mount Carmel, reproved idolatry by fire from heaven, and by the destruction of four hundred and fifty Prophets of Baal
Council, Heavenly - For Jeremiah the sign of false Prophets was that they had not “stood in the counsel of the Lord” (Jeremiah 23:18 )
Obadiah - Ahab’s steward, the protector of Jahweh’s Prophets against Jezebel ( 1 Kings 18:3-16 )
Fruit - Jesus cautioned that false Prophets could be identified by the fruit they produced (Matthew 7:15-20 ), that is, by the qualities manifested in their lives
Tithe - The neglect of this duty was sternly rebuked by the Prophets (Amos 4:4 ; Malachi 3:8-10 )
Remission, Remit - They could not, nor could anyone subsequently, forgive sins, any more than that Joseph actually restored the butler to his office and hanged the baker ( Genesis 41:13 ), or any more than that the Prophets actually accomplished things when they declared that they were about to be done (Jeremiah 1:10 ; Ezekiel 43:3 )
Ahab - After three years of peace, for some cause Ahab renewed war (1Kings 22:3) with Ben-hadad by assaulting the city of Ramoth-gilead, although the prophet Micaiah warned him that he would not succeed, and that the 400 false Prophets who encouraged him were only leading him to his ruin
False Christs - These messianic imposters and the barely distinguishable false Prophets repeatedly urged the Jewish people to take up armed resistance to Rome or to stay in Jerusalem to fight
Transfiguration - ...
Moses and Elijah, the two people of the Old Testament era who appeared with Jesus, possibly symbolized the law and the Prophets (Matthew 17:3)
Gilgal - ...
...
A place, probably in the hill country of Ephraim, where there was a school of the Prophets (2 Kings 4:38 ), and whence Elijah and Elisha, who resided here, "went down" to Bethel (2:1,2)
Anoint - Prophets were also anointed (1 Kings 19:16 ; 1 Chronicles 16:22 ; Psalm 105:15 )
Eden - These exilic Prophets promised that the nation God restored after the Exile would be like Eden's garden
Repentance of God - ...
The concept of God's repentance is not limited to one section of the Old Testament, but can be found throughout the Law, Prophets, and Writings
Rephan - also Prophets of Israel, do
Veil - Μispachot , the false Prophets' magical veils or "kerchiefs" (Ezekiel 13:18; Ezekiel 13:21) which they put over the heads of those consulting them as if to fit them for receiving a response, that they might be rapt in spiritual trance above the world; placed "upon the head of every stature," i
Zarephath - The choice, among all others, of the widow of pagan Phœnician Zarephath, and of Naaman the leper of heathen Syrian Damascus, to receive the favours of the Prophets Elijah and Elisha, filled the crabbed synagogue hearers of Nazareth with wrath and murder (Luke 4:25 ff
Violence - Through the Prophets God demanded an end to violence (Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 45:9 )
Jehu - He then, at a great festival, exterminated all the idolatrous priests and Prophets of Baal, as traitors to King Jehovah, and turned the temple of Baal into a draughthouse
Seraiah - Seraiah was not one of the courtiers hostile to God's Prophets, but quiet and docile, ready to execute Jeremiah's commission, notwithstanding the risk
Ordain - None of God's priests or Prophets were ordained, in the sense now understood by that word, as inducting into some spiritual place, with power and authority imparted by man
Company - It may be applied to a small number, or any multitude whatever as in scripture we read of a company of priests, a company of Prophets, and an innumerable company of angels also, a company of horses
Heaven - The Supreme Power the Sovereign of heaven god as Prophets sent by heaven
Jeshua - , after these Prophets had begun to stimulate the people to undertake building operations in earnest ( Haggai 1:1 ; Haggai 1:12 ; Haggai 1:14 , Zechariah 3:1 ff; Zechariah 6:10-11 )
Jezebel - These are: the account of the trial of strength between the Prophets of Baal and Elijah (1 Kings 18:19 to 1 Kings 19:3 ), the narrative about Naboth and his vineyard ( 1 Kings 21:1-16 ), and, as illustrating her obstinate, unbending character to the very end note especially her words to Jehu in 2 Kings 9:31 the story of her death ( 2 Kings 9:30-37 )
Nakedness - Saul continued naked among the Prophets; that is, having only his under garments on
Sleep - Thus also the superstitions and idolatrous Jews, in contempt of the Prophets, and of the temple of the Lord, went into the tombs and temples of idols to sleep there, and to have dreams that might discover future events to them
Micah - The Morasthite, or of Maresheth, a village near Eleutheropolis, in the west of Judah; the seventh in order of the lesser Prophets
Joel - One of the minor Prophets, of whom nothing is known beyond the few hints furnished in his brief but valuable prophecy
Rabbath - Towards the conclusion of the kingdom of Israel, Tiglathpileser having taken away a great part of the Israelites, the Ammonites were guilty of many cruelties against those who remained; for which the Prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel pronounced very severe prophecies against Rabbath, their captial, and against the rest of the country; which probably had their completion five years after the destruction of Jerusalem, Jeremiah 49:1-3 Ezekiel 21:20
New Moon - In the kingdom of the ten tribes, it seems to have been a custom of the people to visit the Prophets at the new moons, for the purpose of carrying them presents, and hearing their instructions, 2 Kings 4:23
Gird, Girdle - Girdles of leather were worn by the common people; and also by Prophets, 2 Kings 1:8 Matthew 3:4
High Places - The Prophets reproach the Israelites for worshipping on the high places; the destroying of which was a duty, but the honor of performing it is given to few princes in Scripture, though several of them were zealous for the law
ez'ra - The principal works ascribed to him by the Jews are--
The instruction of the great synagogue; ...
The settling the canon of Scripture, and restoring, correcting and editing the whole sacred volume; ...
The introduction of the Chaldee character instead of the old Hebrew or Samaritan; ...
The authorship of the books of Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and, some add, Esther; and, many of the Jews say, also of the books of Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve Prophets; ...
The establishment of synagogues
mi'Cah - ...
The sixth in order of the minor Prophets
Burial, Sepulchres - Kings and Prophets alone were probably buried within towns
Oil - (Leviticus 8:12 ) Kings, priests and Prophets were anointed with oil or ointment
Day of the Lord - ”...
The Old Testament Prophets used a term familiar to their audience, a term by which the audience expected light and salvation (Amos 5:18 ), but the Prophets painted it as a day of darkness and judgment (Isaiah 2:10-22 ; Isaiah 13:6 ,Isaiah 13:6,13:9 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1-11 ,Joel 2:1-11,2:31 ; 1618831507_9 ; Amos 5:20 ; Zephaniah 1:7-8 ,Zephaniah 1:7-8,1:14-18 ; Malachi 4:5 )
Elisha - After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the Prophets, and became noted in Israel. ...
We then find Elisha at Damascus, to carry out the command given to his master to anoint Hazael king over Syria (2 Kings 8:7-15 ); thereafter he directs one of the sons of the Prophets to anoint Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Israel, instead of Ahab
Babylon - ...
The Prophets describe Babylon as a city of pride and idolatry. Yet the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon presents the Prophets with a dilemma
Come - For example, the Prophets speak of the “coming” day of judgment ( Prophets (e
Cerdo, Gnostic Teacher - Irenaeus says that Cerdo taught that the God preached by the law and the Prophets was not the Father of our Lord; for that the former was known, the latter unknown; the former was just, the latter good. -Tertullian goes on to say that Cerdo rejected the law and the Prophets, and renounced the Creator, teaching that Christ was the son of the higher good deity, and that He came not in the substance of flesh but in appearance only, and had not really died or really been born of a virgin; and that Cerdo only acknowledged a resurrection of the soul, denying that of the body
Christ - The names of Messiah and Christ were originally derived from the ceremony of anointing, by which the kings and the high priests of God's people, and sometimes the Prophets, 1 Kings 19:16 , were consecrated and admitted to the exercise of their functions; for all these functions were accounted holy among the Israelites. But the most eminent application of the word is to that illustrious personage, typified and predicted from the beginning, who is described by the Prophets, under the character of God's Anointed, the Messiah, or the Christ
Presbytery - On the other hand, it may have been no more than a commendation of Timothy to the grace of God for strength and guidance in his new work as a missionary, analogous thus to the action of the Prophets and teachers of Antioch in the case of Barnabas and Saul ( Acts 13:1-3 ). Paul without doubt received a consecrating grace from the hands both of Ananias and of those Prophets and teachers of the Church at Antioch, but he claimed to be an Apostle ‘not from men, neither through man, but through Jesus Christ and God the Father who raised him from the dead’ ( Galatians 1:1 )
Holiness - ...
The preaching of the Old Testament Prophets was very much concerned with this ethical aspect of holiness. The Prophets emphasized that it was useless for people to be ritually holy before God if they were not ethically holy in their daily lives (Isaiah 58:13-14; Amos 2:7)
Wonders - Jesus used the conjoined terms twice in His recorded sayings—once when He foretold that false Prophets would come and ‘show great signs and wonders’ (Mark 13:22, Matthew 24:24), and once when He complained that the people demanded such things of Him before they would have faith in Him—‘Except ye see signs and wonders, ye will in no wise believe’ (John 4:48). From the use of the word made by Jesus we might conclude that He did not esteem signs and wonders very highly, and that He freely granted that they were possible to false Prophets as well as to Himself. Both Origen and Celsus, however, as these passages show, are willing to grant that signs and wonders were wrought by Jesus and by false Prophets alike
Criticism - Prophets as affording the true basis of that religion, rather than the Pentateuch which is later in date, and the references of which to earlier times can be best appreciated after a study of the Prophets. This study of the Prophets, as the key to the OT, was greatly promoted in England by Robertson Smith, who also introduced the newer views of the OT generally to English readers. On the other hand, we see in Duhm, among the more recent critics, an advance of disintegrating criticism, especially with regard to the Prophets; and a quite unique attitude is taken up by Cheyne. Adam Smith, who accept the main positions of Wellhausen and assign a primary place to the Prophets as the chief exponents of the higher religion of Israel, in which the world possesses a genuine revelation of the mind and will of God of the highest value for all ages
Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - The life for which the Prophets laboured, that which they represented as the ideal, was adopted by Him as the ideal, and their labours were continued by Him. He claimed no less an authority to carry on the development of the ideal than the greatest of the Prophets had exercised. ...
Jesus, like the Prophets, was certain that the religious life for which He laboured was to become a universal religion. Words uttered by Him when the Greeks sought to see Him (John 12:32), were an assumption to Himself personally of the universal significance for human history which the Prophets (Isaiah 11:9, Habakkuk 2:14) had claimed for the religion of Jehovah. The Apocryphal literature shows how far short they fell of the ideals of the ancient Prophets in spite of their ethical zeal. ‘Think not that I came to destroy the law or the Prophets: I came not to destroy, but to fulfil’; cf. In Law and Prophets alike Jesus found declarations of the Divine purposes in human history, and intimations of the programme of the accomplishment of this purpose. In the Law and the Prophets He found intimations of Himself, of His experiences, and of the relation of these experiences to the establishment of the Kingdom. Were the intimations which Jesus found in the Prophets detailed and exact predictions which He was to fulfil? How did He look at the OT in relation to His own life? Did the Messianic conceptions of Jesus come chiefly from predictions which He found in the OT? Early in His ministry (Luke 4:21), after reading from Isaiah 61:1-2 He said, ‘To-day hath this scripture been fulfilled in your ears. Matthew 26:54 ‘How then should the scriptures be fulfilled, that thus it must be?’; Matthew 26:56 ‘But all this is come to pass, that the scriptures of the Prophets might be fulfilled’; less fully in Mark 14:49 ‘But this is done that the scriptures might be fulfilled’; Luke 18:31 ‘And he took unto him twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all the things that are written by the Prophets shall be accomplished unto the Son of Man. ’ Most important of all are Luke 24:26-27; Luke 24:44-47 ‘Behoved it not the Christ to suffer these things, and to enter into his glory? And beginning from Moses and from all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself. … And he said unto them, These are my words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, how that all things must needs be fulfilled, which are written in the law of Moses, and the Prophets, and the psalms, concerning me
Elijah - In contrast to the detailed genealogy of Samuel, Elisha, and other Prophets, Elijah abruptly appears, like Melchizedek in the patriarchal dispensation, without father or mother named, his exact locality unknown; in order that attention should be wholly fixed on his errand from heaven to overthrow Baal and Asherah (the licentious Venus) worship in Israel. " The shutting up of heaven at the prophet's word was, Jehovah's vindication of His sole Godhead; for Baal (though professedly the god of the sky)and his Prophets could not open heaven and give showers (Jeremiah 14:22). In "standing before the Lord" he assumed the position of a Levitical priest (Deuteronomy 10:8), for in Israel the Levitical priesthood retained in Judah had been set aside, and the Prophets were raised up to minister in their stead, and witness by word and deed before Jehovah against the prevailing apostasy. It was probably at this time that Jezebel, foiled in her deadly purpose against Elijah, "cut off Jehovah's Prophets" (1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 19:2). " Toward the close of the three and a half years of famine, when it attacked Samaria the capital, Ahab directed his governor of the palace, the Godfearing Obadiah who had saved and fed a hundred Prophets in a cave, to go in one direction and seek some grass to save if possible the horses and mules, while he himself went in the opposite direction for the same purpose. " On Carmel the issue was tried between Jehovah and Baal, there being on one side Baal's 450 Prophets with the 400 of Asherah, "the groves"), who ate at Jezebel's table under the queen's special patronage; on the other side Jehovah's sole representative, in his startling costume, but with dignified mien. The idolatrous Prophets were slain at the Brook Kishon, idolatry being visited according to the law with the penalty of high treason against God the king of the national theocracy (Deuteronomy 13:9-11; Deuteronomy 13:15; Deuteronomy 18:20). Jezebel's fury upon hearing of the slaughter of her favorite Prophets knew no bounds: "so let the gods do to me and more also, if I make not. Symptoms appear of his work beginning to act on the nation, in the increased boldness of other Prophets to the king's face, besides Elijah himself: e. ...
To these sons of the Prophets, as well as to Elisha, it was revealed that their master Elijah was about to be caught up front them. border of the Ephraimite hills), Bethel, and Jericho successively, by the Lord's mission, Elijah went, giving probably parting counsels to the Prophets' schools in those places. ...
The "double portion" is not "double" what Elijah had, for Elisha had not tidal; but, as the firstborn son and heir received two portions, and the other children but one, of the father's goods (Deuteronomy 21:17), so Elisha, as Elijah's adopted son, begs a preeminent portion of Elijah's spirit, of which all the other "sons of the Prophets" should have their share (Grotius); compare Deuteronomy 21:15. But the comparison in the context is not with other Prophets but with Elijah. "...
Elijah is called by Malachi "the prophet," not the Tishbite, as he here represents the whole series of Prophets culminating in the greatest, John (though he performed no miracles as Elijah)
Teach, Teacher - ...
Israel's Prophets also have much to say about education. The Prophets foresee days when all nations will be taught God's ways (Isaiah 2:3 ; 54:13 ; Micah 4:2 ). His ministry of word and deed and his redemptive sacrifice fulfill the Old Testament prototypes: kings, priests, and Prophets. This teaching was carried out through the kings, priests, and Prophets of the Old Testament theocratic community
Tradition (2) - In the Talmud it was written that ‘Moses received the oral Law from Sinai and delivered it to Joshua, and Joshua delivered it to the elders, and the elders to the Prophets, and the Prophets to the men of the Great Mission - Prophets were sent to interpret to Israel the moral and spiritual dimension of her suffering (Judges 6:8 ). ...
The line of Prophets from Moses to Samuel was sent by God to provide deliverance for Israel (1 Samuel 12:11 ). All other missions by the Prophets to kings and to Israel involved confronting sin using God's law, calling for repentance, and warning of judgment if the monarch or the nation did not turn back to God (2 Samuel 12:1 ; 1 Kings 14:6 ; 2 Chronicles 25:15 ). In fact, summaries of the northern kingdom's rebellion leading to Assyrian subjugation and exile and Judah's similar end at the hands of Babylon stress that again and again God in his pity sent Prophets to the people (2 Kings 17:13 ; 2 Chronicles 24:19 ; 36:15 ; Jeremiah 29:19 ; 35:15 ; 44:4 ). ...
Of the Old Testament Prophets, Isaiah and Jeremiah have the clearest articulation of God's personal call to mission (Isaiah 6:8 ; Jeremiah 1:7 ). ...
When the Prophets did speak of a hope for future deliverance "in the last days, " they refer to a mission for God's messenger or Elijah whom God sends to prepare his way (Malachi 3:1 ); of the Servant-Messiah, anointed to preach good news to the oppressed, whom the Lord sends to bring deliverance (Isaiah 61:1 ); and of a remnant of survivors who are sent to evangelize the nations: "They will proclaim my glory among the nations" (Isaiah 66:19 ). There were the Prophets, wise men, scribes, and apostles, whom Israel had and would reject, even kill (Matthew 23:33-36 ; Luke 11:47-51 ; 13:34 ; cf
Church Government - This is manifestly true of the apostles and the Christian Prophets. These Gentile churches have gifted persons who take the lead in public worship, ‘apostles, Prophets, and teachers’ (1 Corinthians 12:28, Ephesians 4:11; cf. But here again these guides, like the ‘apostles, Prophets, and teachers,’ seem to owe their appointment to personal qualities. There is a fast and a solemn service conducted by Prophets and teachers at Antioch. During the service, the Spirit (through one of the Prophets) says: ‘Since you desire to know (δή), separate for me Barnabas and Saul,’ who were present. There is another fast and service, and then the two are separated by the laying on of the hands of the other Prophets and teachers. ‘By prophecy’ probably refers to utterances of Prophets which marked him out for ordination (1 Timothy 1:18) as a helper of St
Elijah - Elijah retorted the charge upon the king, and his iniquities, and challenged Ahab to gather the people together, and the Prophets of Baal, that it might be determined by a sign from heaven, the falling of fire upon the sacrifice, who was the true God. In this the prophet obeyed the impulse of the Spirit of God; and Ahab, either under an influence of which he was not conscious, or blindly confident in the cause of idolatry, followed Elijah's direction, and convened the people of Israel, and four hundred Prophets of Baal. The Prophets of Baal prepared their altar, sacrificed their bullock, placed it on the altar, and called upon their gods. " Elijah then, having excited the people to slay the false Prophets of Baal, said to Ahab, "Go home, eat and drink, for I hear the sound of abundance of rain;" which long-expected blessing descended from heaven according to his prediction, and gave additional proof to the truth of his mission from the only living and true God. Jezebel, the wife of Ahab, threatened Elijah for having slain her Prophets. They went therefore together to Jordan, and fifty of the sons of the Prophets followed them at a distance. Elijah was one of the most eminent of that illustrious and singular race of men, the Jewish Prophets
Peace - ...
One of the key issues among the Prophets was the doctrine of "peace. " The false Prophets proclaimed "peace, peace" and in that announcement hoped to create peace for their constituency. The true Prophets argued that peace could never be achieved apart from righteousness and justice
John the Baptist - Like Prophets of a former era, John was to live a life of hardship and self-denial, at the same time preaching a message of repentance to the people of Israel. God had called him to be a prophet (Luke 1:76; Luke 7:26; Luke 16:16; Luke 20:6) and he preached after the manner of the Old Testament Prophets. Jesus reassured John by pointing out that his works were those that the Old Testament Prophets had spoken of when they foretold the messianic age (Luke 7:21-23; cf
Mediator, Mediation - Likewise, God graciously provided for the communication of his will to his people in special circumstances through the Prophets. Samuel pled with God for the people generally and for the king in particular (1 Samuel 12:17-18 ; 13:13-14 ; 15:10-33 ); the true Prophets attempted to stand between God and his disobedient people to avert disaster; and the priests, when they were faithful to their appointed tasks, offered sacrifices to atone for the people's sins (Leviticus 4:1-5:19 ). ...
The Prophets recognized, however, that Israel's sin was too deeply etched into their hearts for these measures to effect a lasting reconciliation between God and his people (Jeremiah 13:23 ; 17:1 ; 18:12 ). Just as Moses, the priests, and the Prophets continued to mediate between God and Israel after the covenant was established, so Jesus "always lives to intercede" on our behalf and therefore to bring complete salvation to us (7:25; cf. Whereas Moses mediated a temporary covenant whose primary purpose was to pronounce the just penalty of death over those who sinned, they argue, Jesus mediated the new covenant predicted by the Prophets
Michelangelo Buonarroti - From 1508-1512 he was occupied, at the command of Pope Julius II, with painting on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel the history of the Creation and Fall, with numberless additional figures, including the heroic Prophets and sibyls
Heavenly City, the - Some interpreters thus take the Heavenly City as an image of the redeemed people of God whose “foundation” is the apostles and Prophets (Ephesians 2:20 )
Arabia - This country is frequently referred to by the Prophets (Isaiah 21:11 ; 42:11 ; Jeremiah 25:24 , etc
Syria - The third, and to us most interesting, period is that during which the kings of Assyria were dominant over the plains of Syria; when Tyre, Sidon, Ashdod, and Jerusalem bowed beneath the conquering armies of Shalmaneser, Sargon, and Sennacherib; and when at last Memphis and Thebes yielded to the power of the rulers of Nineveh and Babylon, and the kings of Assyria completed with terrible fulness the bruising of the reed of Egypt so clearly foretold by the Hebrew Prophets
Canon of Scripture - Isaiah (Isaiah 8:20) as representative of the Prophets makes the law the standard of appeal: "to the law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them
Reveal - The subjective use is that in which something is presented to the mind directly, as, (a) the meaning of the acts of God, Matthew 11:25 ; Luke 10:21 ; (b) the secret of the Person of the Lord Jesus, Matthew 16:17 ; John 12:38 ; (c) the character of God as Father, Matthew 11:27 ; Luke 10:22 ; (d) the will of God for the conduct of His children, Philippians 3:15 ; (e) the mind of God to the Prophets of Israel, 1 Peter 1:12 , and of the Church, 1 Corinthians 14:30 ; Ephesians 3:5
Zidon - It is frequently referred to by the Prophets (Isaiah 23:2,4,12 ; Jeremiah 25:22 ; 27:3 ; 47:4 ; Ezekiel 27:8 ; 28:21,22 ; 32:30 ; Joel 3:4 )
Translation - From the symbolical style of the Prophets
Degrees, Songs of - The temple was completed under Zerubbabel the governor and Joshua the high priest, with the help of the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah (Ezra 5:1-2; Ezra 6:14)
Dispensation - From that time to the time of David and the Prophets
Messiah - As in ancient times not only the king, but also the priest and the prophet, was consecrated to his calling by being anointed, the word "Messiah" often occurs in the Old Testament in its literal sense, signifying one who has been anointed, 1 Samuel 24:6; Lamentations 4:1-22 :' 20; Ezekiel 28:14; Psalms 105:15; hut generally it has a more specific application, signifying the One who was anointed, the supreme Deliverer who was promised from the beginning, Genesis 3:15, and about whom a long series of prophecies runs through the whole history of Israel from Abram, Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:18; Jacob, Genesis 49:10; Balaam, Numbers 24:17; Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15; Deuteronomy 18:18; and Nathan, 2 Samuel 7:16; through the psalmists and Prophets, Psalms 2:1-12; Psalms 16:1-11; Psalms 22:1-31; Psalms 40:1-17; Psalms 45:1-17; Psalms 110:1-7; Isaiah 7:10-16; Isaiah 9:1-7; Isaiah 11:1-16; Isaiah 13:1-22; Isaiah 53:1-12; Isaiah 61:1-11; Jeremiah 23:5-6; Micah 5:2; Malachi 3:1-4, to his immediate precursor, John the Baptist
Loan - As in most human communities, greed prevailed; and the Prophets railed against the exploitation of the poor (e
Darius - The Prophets Haggai and Zechariah encouraged the people to go on with the work, and when Tattenai, the Persian governor of Syria, demanded their authority, they alleged a decree of Cyrus
Fire - He showed His acceptance of the sacrifices by fire from heaven; He vindicatedHis servant Elijah, when he stood alone against the Prophets of Baal, by consuming the sacrifice, the wood and the stone, by fire from heaven (1 Kings 18:38 ); and He vindicated His own honour by fire, by destroying those who were disobedient in approaching to Him
Babylon the Great - Heaven, the apostles and Prophets are called on to rejoice over the fall of that seductive and soul-destroying system: cf
Cave - " ...
The cave in which Obadiah hid the Prophets (1 Kings 18:4 ) was probably in the north, but it cannot be identified
Gilead - Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor Prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Daniel - The death of this Prophets in the place, and time, and manner, is not known
Destroy - Shâchath is used frequently by the Prophets in the sense of “to corrupt morally” ( Sanctify - These things were in reality of no moral worth or value; they were merely typical institutions, intended to represent the blessings of the new and better covenant, those "good things that were to come;" and therefore God is frequently spoken of in the Prophets as despising them, namely, in any other view than that for which his wisdom had ordained them, Isaiah 1:11-15 ; Psalms 50:8-9 ; Psalms 51:16
Engedi - Into such caves the Israelites frequently retired for shelter from their enemies, Judges 6:2 ; 1 Samuel 13:6 ; 1 Samuel 14:11 ; a circumstance which has afforded some striking and terrific images to the Prophets, Isaiah 2:19 ; Hosea 10:8 ; Revelation 6:15-16
Music - When Saul sent messengers to seize David, the melody of the Prophets so affected their minds that they joined the chorus
Fulness - "The fulness of time" is the time when the Messiah appeared, which was appointed by God, promised to the fathers, foretold by the Prophets, expected by the Jews themselves, and earnestly longed for by all the faithful: "When the fulness of the time was come, God sent his Son,"...
Galatians 4:4
Kings - See list of kings and Prophets in Appendix
Scribe - Like the Pharisees, they were bitterly opposed to Christ, and joined with the priests and counselors in persecuting him and his followers, having little knowledge of Him concerning whom Moses and the Prophets did write
Kingdom of Heaven - The ancient Prophets, when describing the character of the Messiah, Daniel 2:44 7:13,14 Micah 4:1-7 , and even when speaking of his humiliation and sufferings, were wont to intersperse hint of his power, his reign, and his divinity
Jeroboam - See also the contemporary Prophets, particularly Amos and Hosea
Gil'Gal - This could not be the Gilgal of the low plain of the Jordan, for the Prophets are said to have gone down to Bethel, which Isaiah 3000 feet above the plain
na'Hum - Nahum, called "the Elkoshite," is the seventh in order of the minor Prophets
Chariot, - (1 Kings 22:34 ; 2 Kings 9:20,24 ; Acts 8:38 ) The Prophets allude frequently to chariots as typical of power
ye, You, Yourselves, Your Own Selves - , Revelation 18:20 , "ye saints, and ye apostles, and ye Prophets" (lit
Hang - 1: κρεμάννυμι (Strong's #2910 — Verb — kremannumi — krem-an'-noo-mee ) is used (a) transitively in Acts 5:30 ; 10:39 ; in the Passive Voice, in Matthew 18:6 , of a millstone about a neck, and in Luke 23:39 , of the malefactors; (b) intransitively, in the Middle Voice, in Matthew 22:40 , of the dependence of "the Law and the Prophets" (i
Offerings - In this Jesus takes His stand with the Hebrew Prophets, and fulfils their moral law
Leadership - In summary, God warned the kings again and again for their unfaithfulness, sending them his messengers, the Prophets, but they did not listen until finally God moved in wrath to judge them at the hands of the Babylonians (36:12-16). ...
Jeremiah 18:18 speaks of the priests, the Prophets, and the counselors. ...
The Prophets/prophetesses were God's mouth to the people similarly as Aaron was Moses' mouth (Exodus 4:16 ). They spoke out to kings, princes, priests, false Prophets, and people, and even to the nations. God sent Prophets to sound a warning before the northern kingdom fell to Assyria (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah) and before Babylon took Judah (Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Jeremiah, Ezekiel). ...
How the Prophets were received was in direct proportion to the Godward bent of their audience, the rulers in particular. ...
As the apostles and missionary Prophets and teachers died off or moved on, there was left a need for someone or some persons to be the focal point for the community life of the local group of believers. ...
Though Prophets ranked in importance second only to the apostles (1 Timothy 3:1 ; Ephesians 4:11 ), none carried the role of statesmen as did Samuel, Elijah, Isaiah, and Jeremiah. The Prophets' ministry included revelation (1 Corinthians 14:29-32 ), prediction, identifying individuals for specific ministry (
Jeremiah - ...
THE most exquisite sensibility of soul was Jeremiah's singular and sovereign distinction above all the other Hebrew Prophets. ...
Jeremiah was far and away the most spiritually-minded of all the Prophets. Some other Prophets stand in time and in place nearer to the New Testament; but it is only in time and in place. Jeremiah's extraordinary inwardness, and depth, and absolutely pure spirituality, have all combined to deliver both himself and his book from all those apocalyptic, secular, and unspiritual interpretations which have so infested the other Prophets. The depth, the purity, the beauty, the absolute heavenliness of his doctrine were the reward and the joy of his heart, let his fellow-citizens and his fellow-prophets and priests do to him what they pleased. Jeremiah was of all the Prophets of the Old Testament the supreme prophet of the human heart. Let other Prophets negotiate and send embassies as they pleased; Jeremiah, in season and out of season, for a long lifetime, laid siege to the hearts of his hearers. And your Prophets who say Peace, peace!-like Law, he called all such preachers so many dancing-masters; and, like Leighton, he called them so many mountebanks, till they smote him, and imprisoned him in the dungeon, and put his feet in the stocks. ...
Nazianzen says somewhere that Jeremiah was both by nature and by grace the most inclined to pity of all the Prophets
Peace - When God’s Prophets warned the Old Testament Israelites of certain judgment if they continued in their sin, false Prophets comforted the rebellious people with false assurances of salvation (Jeremiah 8:10-11; Jeremiah 8:15; Jeremiah 14:19; Ezekiel 13:10)
Discipline - Parents, judges, kings, Prophets, and wisemen worked with God in teaching His people. ...
The Prophets established “schools of the prophet
Zechariah, Book of - Then, in 520 BC, God raised up two Prophets, Haggai and Zechariah, to stir up the people to get to work again and finish the temple (Ezra 5:1-2; Haggai 1:1; Zechariah 1:1). ...
Characteristics of the book...
The Prophets’ preaching for the first six months was largely concerned with encouraging the people through the early difficulties
Vision - Jeremiah warns the people against the visions of false Prophets which are elaborated out of the uninspired minds of those whom God had not sent (Jeremiah 14:14; Jeremiah 23:16). Some writers affirm that the imagery of the revelation is supplied, in the case of the later Prophets, by their own illuminated thought, whilst the truths themselves in more abstract form were the material of the communication
Anoint - As applied to Prophets (1 Chronicles 16:22; 1 Kings 19:16), priests (Leviticus 4:3), and kings (Isaiah 45:1), it marked their consecration to the office, and was a symbol of the spiritual qualification divinely imparted for its due discharge (Exodus 30:29-30). , the Assyrian oppression shall be taken away from Judah, because of the consecration that is upon the elect nation, its Prophets, priests, kings, and holy place (Psalms 105:15); the Antitype to all which is Messiah, "the Anointed" (Daniel 9:24)
Jeremi'ah - He was accordingly accused of treachery, and men claiming to be Prophets had the "word of Jehovah" to set against his. "A reign of terror had commenced (in the preceding reign), during which not only the Prophets but all who were distinguished for religion and virtue were cruelly murdered
Jeremi'ah - He was accordingly accused of treachery, and men claiming to be Prophets had the "word of Jehovah" to set against his. "A reign of terror had commenced (in the preceding reign), during which not only the Prophets but all who were distinguished for religion and virtue were cruelly murdered
Hosea - The two Prophets who began to attack the social injustice and religious corruption of the age were Amos and Hosea. ...
The particular social evils that the Prophets attacked were connected with the exploitation of the poor by those of the upper classes
Daniel, Theology of - Daniel, like other Old Testament Prophets, is concerned with the Sinai covenant (9:11,13, 15) and with the basic social message of the other Prophets (4:27). Other Old Testament Prophets knew that Yahweh, the god of Israel, was sovereign over the whole world, including the other nations. Most of the other Prophets have oracles against Israel's enemy nations, a prophetic form that is ancient in Israelite literature (see, e. The role of the "Son of David" is a central theme among Israel's Prophets. This anointed one ("Messiah" in Hebrew, "Christ" in Greek) was the principal figure for the Prophets, who speak of a movement from chaos and defeat to victory and redemption for national Israel
Scripture - " Christ refers frequently to passages in the Old Testament in this way, and once designates the entire collection by the three divisions known to the Jews, "the Law of Moses, and the Prophets, and the Psalms. The Prophets frequently used the phrase, "the word of the Lord. The Jews, besides dividing the Old Testament into the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms, or the writings, as before noted, made other divisions in toe text of separate books for convenience in reading in public worship. The Talmudic order is: the Law, or five books of Moses; the Prophets, viz. , Joshua, Judges 1:1-36 and 2 Samuel 1:1-27 and 2 Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Isaiah, the twelve minor Prophets; the Writings, viz. The Massoretes order is: the Law, the earlier Prophets, then Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel; and the kʿthubim or Writings are thus arranged: Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the five megilloth, viz. It was from the Old Testament books that Jesus talked on the way to Emmaus with two disciples, "beginning at Moses and all the Prophets, he expounded unto them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself. When the rich man in torment plead with Abraham for his five brethren, saying: "If one went unto them from the dead, they will repent," the answer was, "If they hear not Moses and the Prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead
Vision(s) - The extensive use of the term in nearly all the Old Testament Prophets implies that visions were a normal medium for receiving the divine word. As such, the "vision" of the Old Testament Prophets represents not just a visionary drama perceived by the eyes (as in Isaiah 6 , for example), but also a distinctive worldview or perception of reality that was proclaimed through the Prophets
Burial - Kings and Prophets alone were buried within the walls of towns. ...
Fine ranges of tombs, said to be of the kings, judges, and Prophets, still remain near Jerusalem; but these, many think, are the tomb of Helena, the widow of the king of Adiabene, who settled at Jerusalem and relieved poor Jews in the famine foretold by Agabus under Claudius Caesar. To repair the Prophets' tombs was regarded as an act of great piety (Matthew 23:29)
Bible, Inspiration of the - " The scope of prophecy here is uncertain: It may refer simply to the corpus of the writing Prophets, or more broadly to the historical books of the Old Testament also, or indeed (as Warfield argues) to the whole Old Testament. Certainly it speaks precisely of the divine origin of that portion of Scripture to which it refers, and of the role of the Holy Spirit in "carrying along" the human writers, such that the "word of the Prophets" may be "made more certain" (1:19). "The word of the Lord came to me, saying " is the constant refrain of the writing Prophets, offering the most explicit endorsement of the apostle Peter's model of prophetic inspiration, as Isaiah and Jeremiah and Ezekiel were "carried along by the Holy Spirit
Monotheism - ...
A move away from henotheism and polytheism appears first in the Old Testament among the Prophets. That competition came to its sharpest focus in the story about the contest between Elijah, the prophet for the Lord, and the Prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:1 ). If the Lord is really God and if that claim can be substantiated by acts of power, then how could the people of the Lord lose their independence and their land to a foreign people? Would the success of the Babylonians against Judah not undergird the claim that Marduk, the god of the Babylonians, is really God? Would it not suggest that the Lord, the God of the Judeans, had been defeated by Marduk, the god of the Babylonians? The Prophets' response to this crisis was: the tragedy of the Exile was not the result of the power of Marduk against the power of the Lord, a result that would establish Marduk as God
Hosea - Their Prophets had failed, and the people were destroyed for lack of knowledge. "...
Thus the dealings of God with Israel and Judah are dealt with in Hosea more fully perhaps than in any other of the minor Prophets. The learned look upon Hosea as the most difficult of the Prophets to translate, its abrupt transitions being numerous and hard to understand, because of its dealing strictly with Jewish circumstances
Separate - “When they had sent unto the home of God Sherezer and Regemmelech, and their men, to pray before the Lord, And to speak unto the priests which were in the house of the Lord of hosts, and to the Prophets, saying, Should I weep in the fifth month, separating myself [1], as I have done these so many years?” ( Prophets as spiritual leaders, but that the people “gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the Prophets, saying, Prophesy not” (Amos 2:11-12)
Elisha - Elijah tested him to see if he would try to avoid some of the difficulties by remaining at one of the schools for young Prophets. He helped the poor widow of one of the godly Prophets by giving her a miraculous supply of oil that saved her entire family (2 Kings 4:1-7). ...
Many of the faithful were to be found in the schools where young men trained to be Prophets
Joel - As many as twenty references to and quotations from other Prophets attest to his position in the prophetic ministry. The position of the book among the early Prophets in the Hebrew canon is considered as evidence for an early date. Emphasis on ethical living, so characteristic of preexilic Prophets such as Amos and Micah, was lacking. All could become Prophets, with no exclusions, no go-betweens, and all could know His salvation
Nahum, Theology of - In the first place, it is among the shortest of the Minor Prophets and is overshadowed by Micah, which precedes it and contains some well-known messianic prophecies. At the end of the Old Testament period the Prophets looked forward to the coming of a mighty warlike deliverer (Zechariah 14 ) who would deliver the people of Israel out of their oppression. Hillers, Treaty-Curses and the Old Testament Prophets ; W. Longman III, WTJ 44 (1982): 290-307; idem, JETS 27 (1984): 267-74; idem, Reformed Theological Journal 1 (1985): 13-24; idem, The Minor Prophets, vol
Samuel - Last of the judges, first of the successional Prophets (Moses was a prophet, Deuteronomy 18:15, but more a lawgiver; Acts 3:24, "all the Prophets from Samuel and those that follow after," Acts 13:20, shows Samuel was first of the succession); founder of the monarchy. Samuel founded "the schools of the Prophets," to which belonged "the sons of the Prophets," whose education, beside the law, was in sacred, vocal, and instrumental music and processions (1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 10:10; Acts 19:2; 1 Chronicles 25:1; 1 Chronicles 25:6)
Poetry - Elijah, the father of the Prophets, was no poet; nor were the Prophets poets strictly, except insofar as in their teachings they were lifted up to the poetic modes of thought and expression. The schools of the Prophets diffused a religious spirit, lyric instruments were used to accompany their prophesyings; but David it was (Amos 6:5) who molded lyric effusions of devotion into a permanent and more perfect style. The national religious awakening under Samuel, with which are connected the schools of the Prophets (1 Samuel 10:5-11; 1 Samuel 19:19-24) having a lyrical character, immediately prepared the way
Jeremiah - Among the Old Testament Prophets, Jeremiah is the one who reveals more personal details than anyone else. Like all the Prophets he declared his opposition to false religious practices, wrong social behaviour and foolish government policies, but above all his writings display the unhappiness that was a feature of much of his life. The common people of Jerusalem cursed him (15:10), false Prophets ridiculed him (28:10-11; 29:24-28), priests stopped him from entering the temple (36:5) and the civil authorities plotted evil against him (36:26; 38:4-6). The false Prophets, on the other hand, assured the people of peace, knowing that messages that pleased the hearers brought good financial rewards (6:13; 8:11). There are additional warnings to lying Prophets (23:9-40), and messages concerning God’s control over the destinies of nations (23:1-8; 25:1-38)
Bible - The Greek word Biblia is first met with in this connexion in the Introduction to Sirach, written by the grandson of Sirach, the phrase ‘the rest of the books’ implying that the Law and the Prophets previously named, as well as those books subsequently known specially as ‘the Writings,’ are included. ...
The Jewish division of the OT is into three parts known as (1) the Law, (2) the Prophets, and (3) the Writings, or the Sacred Writings ( Hagiographa ). The ‘Prophets’ included not only the utterances ascribed to inspired teachers of Israel, but also the chief historical books later than the Pentateuch. There were reckoned to be 8 books of the Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Minor Prophets) and 11 of the Hagiographa (Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, and Chronicles). The list was reduced to this number by taking Samuel, Kings, Ezra and Nehemiah, and Chronicles as one book each, and by making one book of the Minor Prophets. Selections from the Prophets (called Haphtârahs ) were made to go with the appointed sections of the Law. gives us Nahum, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk among the Prophets, also Deuteronomy, and at the beginning of this century we have the earliest complete historical books, Samuel and Judges. has Proverbs, Job, Book 3 of the Psalter, and the Prophets Joel and Jonah. ]'>[12] , the prophetic element, written in the spirit of the Prophets, dated about b. The official Targum of the Prophets also bears the name of Jonathan
God - The Prophets later helped Israel understand that this undivided loyalty was in fact directed to the only God who existed (e. ...
From the time of Moses to Malachi, God sent his servants the Prophets, as his messengers. Whereas he had spoken to the patriarchs in dreams and visions, and to Moses directly, he spoke to Israel through the Prophets. Just as he had entrusted his word to Moses, he also gave his word to the Prophets and equipped them to speak it boldly (Isaiah 6:6-13 ; Jeremiah 1:9-10 ). ), a series of events that the Prophets were inclined to call the day of the Lord ( Amos 5:18-20 ). Thus, the disloyalty for which the Prophets indicted Israel was best summed up in their blatant idolatry. The writer attributes the disaster to the failure of the Prophets and priests, who were more interested in personal gain than the souls for whom they were responsible (Lamentations 4:13-16 ). God is known in the Old Testament as the God of wisdom in the Torah and Prophets, but this attribute never receives the kind of emphasis it does among the wise men (sages) and in the Wisdom Literature they produced (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes). ...
Rather than emphasizing the precepts of the Torah or the oracles of the Prophets, wisdom stresses the design of nature as a means of divine revelation. Since God, then, speaks more indirectly through nature than the Torah and Prophets, it is not surprising that the Book of Ecclesiastes describes him as sometimes elusive, particularly in revealing to men and women the meaning of life. To sum up the view of God in psalms poses the same difficulty as the Torah and the Prophets
Horse - Prophets condemned trusting in horses rather than the Lord for victory (Isaiah 31:1 ; Ezekiel 17:15 )
Consecration - With the Prophets God's holiness was understood to include justice, righteousness, and many ethical concerns
Neighbor - The precept of love of the neighbor is one of supreme importance; it is the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 7)
Development of Doctrine - New truths, hitherto entirely unknown, or understood but imperfectly, were revealed through the ancient Prophets, but more especially through Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of the Father
Doctrine, Development of - New truths, hitherto entirely unknown, or understood but imperfectly, were revealed through the ancient Prophets, but more especially through Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of the Father
Kings, the Books of - ...
In the threefold division of the Scriptures by the Jews, these books are ranked among the "Prophets
Equity - Our Lord beautifully and comprehensively expresses it in these words: "All things whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even so to them, for this is the law and the Prophets, " Matthew 7:12
Ammonite - The Prophets predicted fearful judgments against the Ammonites because of their hostility to Israel (Zephaniah 2:8 ; Jeremiah 49:1-6 ; Ezekiel 25:1-5,10 ; Amos 1:13-15 )
Pilgrimage - The Prophets condemned the celebration of religious pilgrimages and feasts when not accompanied by genuine devotion to the Lord expressed in righteous lives (1618831508_73 ; Amos 4:4-5 ; Amos 5:5-6 ,Amos 5:5-6,5:21-24 )
Merchant - The Prophets railed against the pride which accompanied merchants' material successes (Isaiah 23:1 ; Ezekiel 27:1 )
Nahum - Nahum was most likely one of those Prophets who began to preach in Judah during the revival of prophetic activity that occurred during Josiah’s reign
Education - The Prophets, or special public authoritative teachers, were trained in schools or colleges (Amos 7:14)
Wages - The authority of Prophets could also be purchased
Sharon - It was admired by Prophets and poets for the richness of its vegetation and the beauty of its wild flowers-‘the excellency of Sharon’ (Isaiah 35:2), ‘the rose of Sharon’ (Song of Solomon 2:1)
Slowness of Heart - Bengel, who paraphrases, ‘void of mind and slow of heart’) as the joint cause of their failure to understand and believe the testimony of the Prophets concerning Himself
Jacob - The example of Jacob is quoted by the first and the last of the minor Prophets
Alien - Unexpectedly, the Prophets have little to say about aliens
Gath - Amos refers to it in terms which imply that some great calamity has befallen it ( 2 Chronicles 6:2 ); the later Prophets, though they mention other cities of the Pentapolis, are silent respecting Gath, which seems therefore to have dropped out of existence
Adultery - ...
Several Old Testament Prophets used adultery as a metaphor to describe unfaithfulness to God
Philip - ' Philip at once announced to Nathanael that he had found the One of whom Moses and the Prophets had written
Media - If, however, Madai and his immediate descendants did not people this country, some of his posterity might have carried his name thither, since we find it so often given to Media, from the times of the Prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah, and from the transportation of the ten tribes, and the destruction of Samaria under Salmaneser, A
Zechariah - ZECHARIAH, the eleventh of the twelve lesser Prophets, was the son of Barachiah, and the grandson of Iddo
Heart - "The Prophets prophesy out of their own heart," Ezekiel 13:2 ; that is, according to their own imagination, without any warrant from God
Christ - The Prophets are called hoi christoi Theou, "the anointed of God," Psalm 105:15
Sapphire - Whence it is that the Prophets describe the throne of God like unto sapphire, Ezekiel 1:26 ; Ezekiel 10:1
Alien - Unexpectedly, the Prophets have little to say about aliens
Gaza or Azzah - It was often referred to by the Prophets, Jeremiah 25:20 47:5 Amos 1:6,7 Zephaniah 2:4 Zechariah 9:5
Sanhedrin - It decided causes brought before it by appeal from inferior courts; and even the king, the high priest, and the Prophets, were under its jurisdiction
Gate - Here too the public proclamations were made, and the messages of Prophets delivered, Proverbs 1:21 8:3 Isaiah 29:21 Jeremiah 17:19 26:10
Dan'Iel - ) ...
The fourth of 'the greater Prophets
Beth'el - (2 Chronicles 13:19 ) Elijah visited Bethel, and we hear of "sons of the Prophets" as resident there
Phil'ip the Evangelist - (Acts 21:8,9 ) He is visited by the Prophets and elders of Jerusalem
Anointing - In Old Testament times, a common practice was to appoint priests, kings, and sometimes Prophets to their positions by the ceremony of anointing
Rest - God is again and again described as 'rising up early,' sending His Prophets, etc
Lamentations - The second poem pictures the widespread starvation in the city at the height of the siege, and shows how misleading were the false Prophets’ assurances of deliverance
Targum - The Targum of Jonathan, son of Uziel, is upon the greater and lesser Prophets. He is much more diffuse than Onkelos, and especially upon the lesser Prophets, where he takes greater liberties, and runs on in allegories
Revelation - Through his Prophets and other special messengers, God taught his people and interpreted the events of their history to make himself and his purposes known to them (Numbers 12:6-8; Amos 3:7; Hebrews 1:1; see PROPHECY). And just as God used Prophets and others to record and interpret his pre-Christ revelation, so he used apostles and others to record and interpret his post-Christ revelation (1 Corinthians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 2:13; 2 Peter 3:15-16)
Logos - The term was often used to designate God's communication to his people, as at the beginning of many of the writings of the Prophets: “The word of the Lord came. See Christ, Christology ; Creation ; Philo Judaeus ; Prophets; Wisdom
Septuagint - In the greater Prophets important passages are misunderstood, as Isaiah 9:1; Isaiah 9:6; Jeremiah 23:6; Ezekiel and the lesser Prophets are better
Book - Prophets wrote “books” in their lifetime. ” The prophet Jeremiah wrote a letter to the Babylonian exiles, instructing them to settle themselves, as they were to be in Babylon for 70 years: “Now these are the words of the letter (sêpher) that Jeremiah the prophet sent from Jerusalem unto the residue of the elders which were carried away captives, and to the priests, and to the Prophets, and to all the people whom Nebuchadnezzar had carried away captive from Jerusalem to Babylon …” ( Mystery - " And, lastly, whatever be the particular meaning of the "mystery of God," mentioned Revelation 10:7 , yet it was something he had declared "to (or rather by ) his servants the Prophets. Paul applied in a peculiar sense to the calling of the Gentiles, which he styles "the mystery,"...
Ephesians 3:3-6 ; and "the mystery of Christ, which in other generations was not made known to the sons of men, as it is now revealed to his holy Apostles and Prophets by the Spirit, that the Gentiles should be fellow heirs, and of the same body, and partakers of Christ by the Gospel,"...
Romans 16:25 ; Ephesians 1:9 ; Ephesians 3:9 ; Ephesians 6:19 ; Colossians 1:26-27 ; Colossians 4:3
Isaiah - New epochs in the relations of the church to the world were fittingly marked by revelations to and through Prophets. ) The Prophets were now needed to interpret Jehovah's dealings, that the people might recognize His righteous judgments as well as His merciful longsuffering. Subsequent Prophets imitate the latter portion (Jeremiah 1:34, compare Isaiah 47:4; Jeremiah 51:6; Jeremiah 51:45 with Isaiah 48:20). ...
Having deep insight into the eternal principles on which God governs the world, that sin entails judgment but that God's covenant mercy to His people is unchangeable, the Prophets speak accordingly. History as written by the Prophets is retroverted prophecy. Hence the Old Testament histories (1 and 2 Samuel, and 1 and 2 Kings) were written by contemporary Prophets, Samuel, Nathan, Iddo, Isaiah, etc. The Chronicles are not classed so, and therefore can hardly be their composition, but probably Ezra's, gathered from the public records and historical monographs of the Prophets (as Isaiah's life of Uzziah and of Hezekiah: 2 Chronicles 26:22; 2 Chronicles 32:32). )...
The historical books from Joshua onwards and the prophetic books from Isaiah form a bipartite whole of prophetic writings called "the Prophets"; for the history of the past in the former part is as prophetic as the history of the future in the latter part
Preaching - When the ignorant notions of Pagans, the vices of their practice, and the idolatry of their pretended worship, were in some sad periods incorporated into the Jewish religion by the princes of that nation, the Prophets and all the seers protested against this apostasy; and they were persecuted for so doing. Hence, false Prophets, bad men, who found their account in pretending to be good, crowded the courts of princes. Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred Prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended Prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5 . ...
When the Jews were carried captive into Babylon, the Prophets who were with them inculcated the principles of religion, and endeavoured to possess their minds with an aversion to idolatry; and, to the success of preaching, we may attribute the re-conversion of the Jews to the belief and worship of one God; a conversion that remains to this day. There were not wanting, however, multitudes of false Prophets among them, whose characters are strikingly delineated by the true Prophets, and which the reader may see in Ezekiel 13; Isaiah 56; Jeremiah 23. When the seventy years of the captivity were expired, the good Prophets and preachers, Zerubbabel, Joshua, Haggai, and others, having confidence in the word of God, and being concerned to possess their natural, civil, and religious rights, endeavoured, by all means, to extricate themselves and their countrymen from that mortifying state into which the crimes of their ancestors had brought them
Ezekiel - The priestly tone appears throughout his book, so that he is the priest among the Prophets. Believing the Prophets they obeyed Nebuchadnezzar's first summons to surrender, as the only path of safety. Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29) sent a letter to the exiles to warn them against the flattering promises of false Prophets that they should soon return, for that the captivity would last 70 years. On comparing Ezekiel 13 with Jeremiah 6:14; Jeremiah 8:11; Jeremiah 23:9-10; Jeremiah 23:16; Jeremiah 23:26; and Ezekiel 34, with Jeremiah 23:4-5; Jeremiah 23:33, we see the inner harmony between the two Prophets, though Ezekiel did not receive his commission until toward the close of Jeremiah's prophesying; the latter having prophesied 34 years before Ezekiel, and continuing to prophesy six or seven years after him. ...
(4) Sins of the several classes, priests, Prophets, and princes: Ezekiel 12-19. ...
For Daniel was rather a seer, unveiling the future in the pagan court, but not discharging the prophetical office as Ezekiel among the covenant people; therefore his book was not classed with the Prophets but with the hagiographa
Unconscious Faith - Not Abraham alone, but all the Prophets in Israel, and even all ‘they that feared the Lord, and thought upon his name,’ rejoiced to see Christ’s day, and saw it with joy; for all of them are included in the Divine saying, ‘They shall be mine in the day which I do make, even a peculiar treasure’ (Malachi 3:16-17). Inasmuch as the eternal belongs to no one epoch more than another, the teaching of the Prophets was bound to find its realization in after times so far as it concerned itself with the real principles and laws of spiritual life; and to this extent it was predictive in what concerned ‘the deep things of God. So the Prophets are accurately described by St. The faith of the Prophets was thus an unconscious faith in Christ no less truly than it was a conscious faith in God. And among His own disciples, ‘beginning from Moses and from all the Prophets, he interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself’ (Luke 24:27; cf. And ‘in the fulness of the times’ this hope was revealed through Apostles and Prophets and saints in the Church (Ephesians 3:5, Colossians 1:24), that the faith which had been unconscious and incomplete might become conscious and resolute and full of glory, working in power in all (ἰνεργουμέιη ἐν δυνάμυ)
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - In fact, one of the great theological contributions of Kings is to emphasize the working of God in the Solomonic succession, not through direct divine intervention, miracles, Prophets, or sacred institutions, but through ordinary personalities and individuals working in the secular sphere. The spoken word of the Prophets was considered equal in authority to the Torah (2 Kings 22:13-20 ), to which the Prophets continually alluded. The writer of Kings clearly identifies his interpretation of Israel's history with that of the Prophets. God is not to be blamed for the failure of the nation since he had sent numerous Prophets. Jehu's revolt is sanctioned by the Prophets Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 9:7-10,26,30-37 )
Israel, Israelite - But it was not long before the Hebrew Prophets taught that Jehovah was the God of all the nations of the earth, a spiritual Being whose service was incumbent upon all mankind, that service consisting not primarily in ritual but in morality. But the earlier Prophets, though they do not expressly mention a covenant—except Hosea (Hosea 6:7 doubtful, Hosea 8:1)—all teach the truth that Jahweh requires moral, ethical service from His people. It had been foreshadowed in the life story of Hosea, and was to be the fulfilment of the dreams and longings of all the Prophets. ‘The Law and the Prophets,’ as a dispensation, have had their day, and have given place to ‘the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 11:12 f. Even the Law and the Prophets meant something deeper than they had hitherto been understood to mean (Matthew 7:12; Matthew 22:34-40); and this deeper meaning is contained in a ‘new commandment’ which Jesus gives to the disciples (John 13:34)
Elijah - Elijah, the weirdest figure among the Prophets of Israel, steps across the threshold of history when Ahab is on the throne ( c Elisha - ...
And let all our Prophets, and all the sons of our Prophets, go to school in manners and in morals to those fifty sons of the Prophets in that day in Israel. And, yet, in a moment, and without a murmur, the fifty sons of the Prophets at once accept Elisha as the true successor of Elijah, and as their young master. The old men who had not had great success themselves did not cast up Elisha's youth to him when his success began, nor did the sons of the Prophets keep up against him his humble origin, or his lack of letters
Isaiah - Though fifth in the order of time, the writings of the Prophet Isaiah are placed first in order of the prophetical books, principally on account of the sublimity and importance of his predictions, and partly also because the book which bears his name is larger than all the twelve minor Prophets put together. Isaiah was contemporary with the Prophets Amos, Hosea, Joel, and Micah. ...
Isaiah is uniformly spoken of in the Scriptures as a prophet of the highest dignity: Bishop Lowth calls him the prince of all the Prophets, and pronounces the whole of his book to be poetical, with the exception of a few detached passages. It is remarkable, that his wife is styled a prophetess in Isaiah 8:3 ; whence the rabbinical writers have concluded that she possessed the spirit of prophecy: but it is very probable that the Prophets' wives were called prophetesses, as the priests' wives were termed priestesses, only from the quality of their husbands. Beside the volume of prophecies, which we are now to consider, it appears from 2 Chronicles 26:22 , that Isaiah wrote an account of "the acts of Uzziah," king of Judah: this has perished with some other writings of the Prophets, which, as probably not written by inspiration, were never admitted into the canon of Scripture
Exile - ...
The Prophets Hosea and Amos had prophesied the fall of Israel. These two Prophets proclaimed that Israel's fall was due to moral and spiritual degeneration rather than to the superior military might of the Assyrian nation. In addition, the Prophets Micah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, Habakkuk, and Ezekiel agreed that Judah would fall. They joined Prophets like Ezekiel in looking for a rebuilt Temple and a restored Jewish people
Jeremiah - ...
Jeremiah is depicted as living in constant friction with the authorities of his people, religious (priests Jeremiah 20:1-6 ; Prophets Jeremiah 28:1 ; or both Jeremiah 26:1 ), political (kings Jeremiah 21-22 ; Jeremiah 36-38 ), or all of them together (Jeremiah 1:18-19 ; Jeremiah 2:26 ; Jeremiah 8:1 ), including Jewish leaders after the Babylonian invasion (Jeremiah 42:1-43:13 ). Still his preaching emphasized a high respect for Prophets whose warning words could have saved the people if they had listened (Jeremiah 7:25 ; Jeremiah 26:4 ; Jeremiah 29:17-19 ; Jeremiah 35:13 ). Words against kings (Jeremiah 21:11-22:30 ) and against Prophets (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ) appear to be independent collections. Neither the Davidic monarchy (Jeremiah 21:1-22:30 ), nor Prophets and priests (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ), nor the cultic institutions of the Temple (Jeremiah 7:1-34 ; Jeremiah 26:1-9 ) could help the people to prevent impending calamities; nor could they detect that inconspicuous apostasy that mixes up the little aims of personal egoism (Jeremiah 2:29-37 ; Dress - Such a coat of skin Elijah and the Prophets commonly wore, 'addereth implying its amplitude. (1 Kings 19:13; 1 Kings 19:19; 2 Kings 2:13; Zechariah 13:4; Matthew 7:15, "false Prophets come to you in sheep's clothing, but," etc. Those stripped of every garment but this are termed "naked," it being but a partial covering, our "undress": 1 Samuel 19:24 Saul to imitate the Prophets; David (2 Samuel 6:20); Peter (John 21:7); Isaiah 20:2, the prophet's undress being a silent monition to repentance. Jesus' "seamless tunic" was probably the meil or upper tunic without sleeves, reaching to the ankles, worn by kings, Prophets, youths, and nobles (1 Samuel 24:4; 1 Samuel 28:14; 1 Samuel 2:19; Job 1:20), whereas the ketoneth reached only to the knee
Ahab - Jezebel cut off Jehovah's Prophets, except 100 saved by Obadiah. ...
So prevalent was idolatry that Baal had 450 Prophets, and Asherah ("the groves") had 400, whom Jezebel entertained at her own table. " Baal's Prophets were slain at the brook Kishon, and the national judgment, through Elijah's prayers, was withdrawn, upon the nation's repentance. ...
With Jehoshaphat, in spite of the prophet Micaiah's warning, and urged on by an evil spirit in the false Prophets, he tried to recover Ramoth Gilead (1 Kings 22)
Bible, - The Prophets (Nebiim), including Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2Samuel, 1 and...
2Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the twelve Minor Prophets. The above triple division is doubtless alluded to by the Lord, in Luke 24:44 , "All things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the Prophets, and in the Psalms, concerning me;" cf. To make out this number they count the two books of Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles as one book each; Ezra and Nehemiah as one; and the twelve Minor Prophets as one
Habakkuk - A Prayer of Habakkuk (Habakkuk 3:1-19 )...
Of these three parts, only one, the woes (Habakkuk 2:6-20 ) fits the traditional pattern of the Prophets. The great Prophets of the Lord saw themselves as spokesmen for the Lord to the people. ...
The woes (Habakkuk 2:6-20 ), not unlike those of the other Prophets, denounce various kinds of tyranny: plunder (Habakkuk 2:6-8 ); becoming rich and famous by unjust means (Habakkuk 2:9-11 ); building towns with blood (Habakkuk 2:12-14 ); degrading one's neighbor (Habakkuk 2:15-17 ); and idol worship (Habakkuk 2:18-19 )
Obadiah - " So much so that he dared to hide from her fury 100 Prophets, feeding them by fifty in a cave (compare on love to the Lord's brethren, Matthew 25:40). He stands fourth of the minor Prophets in the Hebrew canon, fifth in the Septuagint Jerome makes him contemporary with Hosea, Joel, and Amos. ...
Joel drew the outline which succeeding Prophets fill in (compare Obadiah 1:10 with Joel 3:19; Amos 1:11; Obadiah 1:11 with Joel 3:3; Joel 3:5; Joel 3:17, where the language is the same, "strangers," "cast lots," "the day of the Lord," Obadiah 1:15; Joel 3:14
Versions, Ancient, of the Old And New Testaments, - ...
Targum on the Prophets , --viz. Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Kings, the twelve minor Prophets, --called TARGUM OF JONATHAN BEN-UZZIEL. --Onkelos and Jonathan on the Pentateuch and Prophets, whatever be their exact date, place, authorship and editorship, are the oldest of existing Targums, and belong in their present shape, to Babylon and the Babylonian academies flourishing between the third and fourth centuries A
Peter, Second, Theology of - It is the Spirit who spoke through the Prophets (1:21; 3:2), the Father who spoke to the disciples (1:17), and Jesus who delivered his commandment(s) to the churches through the apostles (3:2). The church is equated with Israel by their common experience of false Prophets or teachers within the community (2:1), by their common possession of divine revelation in the prophetic word (1:19; 3:2), and by their common claim to the patriarchs who have long since fallen asleep (3:4). This apostolic teaching, like the writings of Paul (3:15-16), has a divine authority (1:18-19) equal to that of the Prophets of Israel and the Hebrew Scriptures
Chapters - The custom of reading it publicly in the Christian assemblies after the law and the Prophets, would soon cause such divisions to be applied to it. The law and the Prophets were for this end already divided into parashim and haptaroth, and the New Testament could not long remain without being treated in the same way. Pericopes therefore were nothing else but αναγνωσματα , church lessons, or sections of the New Testament, which were read in the assemblies after Moses and the Prophets
Jehu - The Prophet Elisha received a commission to anoint him; but the order does not appear to have been executed until more than twenty years afterward, and then it was done by one of the sons of the Prophets, 2 Kings 9:1-3 . Jehu was then at the siege of Ramoth-Gilead, commanding the army of Joram, the king of Israel, when a young prophet appeared, who took him aside from the officers of the army, in the midst of whom he was sitting, and, when alone in a chamber, poured oil on his head, and said to him, "Thus saith the Lord, I have anointed thee king over Israel; thou shalt smite the house of Ahab, and avenge the blood of the Prophets which hath been shed by Jezebel. Send now and gather together all the ministers, priests, and Prophets of Baal
Joel - Of the twelve minor Prophets. The sentiment and language of the three Prophets correspond. References to the law, on which all the Prophets lean, occur: Joel 2:13, compare Exodus 34:6; Exodus 32:14; Exodus 2:28, compare Numbers 11:29, fulfilled in the pentecostal outpouring of the Spirit in part (Acts 2:16; Acts 2:21; Acts 21:9; John 7:39), but awaiting a further fulfillment just before Israel's restoration, when "the Spirit shall be poured upon all flesh" (of which the outpouring on all classes without distinction of race is the earnest: Acts 2:28; Acts 2:38; Romans 10:12-13; Zechariah 12:10; Joel 2:23)
Everlasting Punishment - Though one can find expressions of individual guilt, punishment and forgiveness in the Psalms, and though one can find the language of universal judgment in the Prophets—that is, that unfaithful Israel and all the nations of the world will be historically punished—it is not until after the Old Testament that the notions of “eternal punishment” or “everlasting judgment” are developed
Apocalypse - This book belongs, in its character, to the prophetical writings, and stands in intimate relation with the prophecies of the Old Testament, and more especially with the writings of the later Prophets, as Ezekiel, Zechariah, and particularly Daniel, inasmuch as it is almost entirely symbolical
Prostitution - ...
God’s Prophets sometimes likened political and commercial agreements between Israel and pagan nations to acts of prostitution
Everlasting Punishment - Though one can find expressions of individual guilt, punishment and forgiveness in the Psalms, and though one can find the language of universal judgment in the Prophets—that is, that unfaithful Israel and all the nations of the world will be historically punished—it is not until after the Old Testament that the notions of “eternal punishment” or “everlasting judgment” are developed
Foundation - Foundation serves as a metaphor for the initial preaching of the Gospel (Romans 15:20 ; Hebrews 6:1-2 which outlines the foundational topics), for the apostles and Prophets as the first generation of preachers ( Ephesians 2:20 ; compare Revelation 21:14 ,Revelation 21:14,21:19 ); and for Christ as the content of preaching (Deuteronomy 32:22 )
Divination - Divination of all kinds being the offspring of credulity, nursed by imposture, and strengthened by superstition, was necessarily an occult science, retained in the hands of the priests and priestesses, the magi, the soothsayers, the augurs, the visionaries, the priests of the oracles, the false Prophets, and other like professors, till the coming of Jesus Christ, when the light of the Gospel dissipated much of this darkness
Desert - In the Prophets and poetical books arabah is used generally for a waste (Isaiah 35:1)
Zephaniah - Among the Prophets who followed him were Jeremiah, Nahum and Habakkuk
Burden - Most utterances of the Prophets, moreover, were of necessity from their occasion minatory
Refreshing, Times of - This age, with its potential for change and renewal, is thus seen as a fulfillment of the promises of the Prophets as to what will happen when people experience the presence of God, and a precursor of the final event when God makes all things new
Grafting - Paul here follows the Prophets (cf
Day of the Lord - With the later Prophets there is to be seen an element of reconstruction as well as punishment in Jehovah’s action
Malachi - The last of the Prophets, in closing the sacred canon of the Old Testament Scripture
Scriptures - Now the Jews read the Pentateuch once in every year, divided into 54 parashas or "sections": and parts only of the "prophets", haphtaroth) , shorter lessons read by a single individual, whereas the parasha is distributed among seven readers
Stephen - Joseph they had refused; Moses they had repelled; they had turned to idolatry; had slain the Prophets; had always resisted the Holy Ghost; and had been the betrayers and murderers of the Just One
Alliance - The Prophets from the first set their faces against it ( Deuteronomy 17:16 , Hosea 8:9 , Is 20, 30, Jeremiah 2:18 ; Jeremiah 2:36 )
Fool - O fools, and slow of heart to believe all the Prophets have written
Zechariah - Son of Berechiah, and one of the 'minor Prophets
Age, - Again, from Moses to Christ formed a definite period: "the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ," John 1:17 ; "the law and the Prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it
Agabus - Taking the Apostle’s girdle, he bound his own hands and feet, and in the symbolic manner of the ancient Hebrew Prophets predicted that so the Jews would bind the owner of the girdle and hand him over to the Gentiles (Acts 21:10-11)
Plow - ” The Prophets denounced the craftsmanship of these workers in metals when they made images ( Philistines - In the Prophets destruction is pronounced upon their land and the remnant of the people
ja'Cob - The example of Jacob is quoted by the first and the last of the minor Prophets
Gilgal - It seems to have been the place in which Jeroboam or some of the kings of Israel instituted idolatrous worship; and hence the allusions to it by the Prophets, Hosea 4:15 ; Amos 4:4
Travelling - " Instead of the Koran of modern times, let us conceive of Abraham, and other patriarchal emirs, collecting their numerous dependents and teaching them the true religion, and we then see with what truth they are called the Lord's "prophets
Book - It is used in referring to "books" of Scripture, the "book," or scroll, of Matthew's Gospel, Matthew 1:1 ; the Pentateuch, as the "book" of Moses, Mark 12:26 ; Isaiah, as "the book of the words of Isaiah," Luke 3:4 ; the Psalms, Luke 20:42 ; Acts 1:20 ; "the Prophets," Acts 7:42 ; to "the Book of Life," Philippians 4:3 ; Revelation 3:5 ; 20:15
Barley - ...
So the false Prophets are charged with seducing the people for handfuls of barley, and morsels of bread, Ezekiel 13:19
Daniel - The name of one of "the greater Prophets
Daniel (2) - Josephus also reports that it was written by Daniel, "one of the greatest of the Prophets
Jericho - It contained a school of the Prophets, and as the residence of Elisha, 2 Kings 2:4,18
Moabites - The Jewish Prophets recorded many threatenings against these hereditary enemies of God and his people, Numbers 24:17 Psalm 60:12 83:6 Jeremiah 25:9-21 48:1-47 Amos 2:1-3 ; and all travelers concur in attesting the fulfillment of these predictions
e'Dom, Idumae'a - For their cruelty at this time they were fearfully denounced by the later Prophets
Peregrinus, Called Proteus - The "Teaching of the Twelve Apostles" takes elaborate precautions against wandering apostles and Prophets, who desired only to make gain of the gospel
Jericho - A school for young Prophets was located at Jericho in the time of Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 2:4-5; 2 Kings 2:15-22)
Fulfill - Jesus described His mission not as coming “to abolish the law or the Prophets” but “to fulfill” (Matthew 5:17 ). ...
Luke and Acts are especially interested in Christ's suffering and later glorification as the fulfillment of the expectations of all the Old Testament, the law, Prophets, and writings (Luke 24:25-26 ,Luke 24:25-26,24:44-47 ; Acts 3:18 ; Acts 13:27-41 ) Jesus interpreted His journey to Jerusalem as a second “exodus” (Luke 9:31 ), an event that would result in freedom for God's people
Sep'Tuagint - In the major Prophets (probably translated nearly 100 years after the Pentateuch) some of the most important prophecies are sadly obscured. Ezekiel and the minor Prophets (generally speaking) seem to be better rendered
Pharisees - "Who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind?" and when the disciples told Christ that some said he was Elias, Jeremias, or one of the Prophets, Matthew 16:14 . the meaning can only be, that they thought he was come into the world with the soul of Elias, Jeremias, or some other of the old Prophets transmigrated into him
Obedience - The massive turning away from God and the refusal to heed the Prophets' warnings left God no alternative but to exercise his judgment and to destroy both kingdoms. ...
The Prophets called for a new covenant, which would resolve the problem of failure to remain obedient to God
David - The early Prophets, Amos (Amos 9:11), Hosea (Hosea 3:5), Isaiah (Isaiah 9:7; Isaiah 16:5; Isaiah 37:35), unite with the author of Kings (1 Kings 2:45; 1 Kings 6:12 etc. Psalms 17 is a notable Messianic prophecy, prayer and prediction being freely inter-mingled after the fashion of the OT Prophets and poets
David - The early Prophets, Amos (Amos 9:11), Hosea (Hosea 3:5), Isaiah (Isaiah 9:7; Isaiah 16:5; Isaiah 37:35), unite with the author of Kings (1 Kings 2:45; 1 Kings 6:12 etc. Psalms 17 is a notable Messianic prophecy, prayer and prediction being freely inter-mingled after the fashion of the OT Prophets and poets
Bible, Canon of the - The proper designation for the Jewish Bible is Tanak, an acronym constituted from the initial letters of the three divisions of that canon—Law (Torah), Prophets (Naviim), and Writings (Kethubim). This included three categories embracing five books of Law (Torah), eight Prophets, and eleven Writings. The eight Prophets included Joshua, Judges, Samuel (1,2), Kings (1,2), Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Minor Prophets (12). The Prophets and Writings were produced over a period of centuries and gradually won their place in the hearts of the people
Micah, Theology of - Unlike the false Prophets, for whom money speaks louder than God (3:5,11), Micah, filled with the power of the Lord's Spirit, preaches justice (3:8). ...
Micah's fourth prophecy is against the false Prophets who abet the rapacious racketeers with their half-baked theology. ...
In the second cycle (3:1-5:16), Micah delivers three oracles of judgment against Jerusalem's corrupt leaders: the avaricious magistrates, who cannibalize their subjects (3:1-4); the greedy Prophets, who should be the nation's watchdogs but only wag their tails if fed a bone (3:5-7); and all the leaders, rulers, Prophets, and priests (3:8-11), who are in cahoots to plunder their subjects. Heschel, The Prophets ; D
Messiah - He was the greatest of the Old Testament Prophets and the model of all faithful Prophets who spoke God's word. ...
The psalmists and Prophets gave further explication of the Penteteuchal presentations of the Messiah. ...
The Prophets especially brought together the wider and narrower views concerning the Messiah. Postexilic Prophets spoke of the Messiah as the royal, redeeming, restoring One to come (Haggai 2:20-22 ; Zechariah 4:1-14 ; 6:9-15 ; 9:9-10 ), Malachi spoke of the Messiah as a cleansing agent who, as messenger of the covenant, would bring healing in his wings (3:1-4; 4:1-3)
Nazarene - ...
And first, then, I request to remark on the expression of the evangelist Matthew, (Matthew 2:23) "And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Prophets—he should be called a Nazarene?"...
The question is, what Prophets are there who so spake concerning Christ? To which I answer, all the writers of the Old Testament are generally called Prophets, because many of their sayings are really and truly prophesies. " (2 Peter 1:19) So that not only the immediate writings of the Prophets whose titles are expressly so spoken of as prophetical, but the scope of the whole body of Scripture, and especially such as are looking into gospel times, and speaking of events then to be accomplished, may be truly and justly called prophecies, and the writers of them Prophets. " (Mark 1:24) Next we find the apostles giving in their testimony to the same blessed truth, John 1:45 "We have found him (saith Philip) of whom Moses in the law and the Prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph
Israel, History of - During an approximate fifty-year period, two primary Prophets spoke in the south—Isaiah (742-701) and Micah (724-701)—while two Prophets spoke in the north—Amos (about 750) and Hosea (about 745). ...
The dangers the Prophets saw materialized for Israel in the first quarter of the eighth century. In many ways, Micah seemed to lack the original spirit of the other eighth century Prophets. Yahwistic Prophets were persecuted; Baalism was encouraged; activities associated with the Assyrian astrological rites were incorporated; and the practice of human sacrifice was revived. ” In addition, other literary products were formulated, including most of the written record associated with the preexilic Prophets, the final editorial work on the Deuteronomic History (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings), and the prophetic contributions of Ezekiel and the anonymous figure known as Deutero- or Second Isaiah. Eventually, primarily under the influence of the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah, the Temple was rebuilt from 520 to 515; and the Temple worship reinstituted. ...
In the interval between the completion of the Temple (515) and Nehemiah's first visit (445), several Prophets spoke, each giving a sense of the period
Fulfilment - Fulfilment of law [19]. But what of Matthew 5:17 (‘Think not that I came to destroy the law or the Prophets; I came not to destroy but to fulfil’—πληρῶσαι)? (a) Much has been written on this subject since the present writer discussed the passage in Christ and the Jewish Law, 1886. And would He have called His paradoxes a ‘perfected’ law? They are at least as like a ‘destruction’ of the régime of law! Moreover, we have the reference to the ‘prophets. ’ (c) When ‘fulfil’ is predicated of ‘prophecy,’ the sense is well known; the ‘prophets’ become the predominant partner in such a juxtaposition as ‘to fulfil law and Prophets’; and we have to think of the OT’s moral lawgiving as a sort of type, fulfilled, when the word of the Prophets is fulfilled, in Christ’s person. ‘Law and Prophets’ repeatedly occur together in Christ’s words, esp. (c) we are inclined to regard as due to the mistaken intrusion in Matthew 5:17 of [27] and Prophets,’—words doubtless used by Christ (of the OT as a whole?) in other connexions
Judgment - ...
Now it is remarkable that, in these prophecies, none of the Prophets have spoken, as Peter has done, of the entire destruction of this mundane system, nor of the destruction of any part thereof. This difference affords room for believing that the events foretold by the Prophets are different in their nature from those foretold by the Apostle; and that they are to be figuratively understood, while those predicted by the Apostle are to be understood literally. To this conclusion, likewise, the phraseology of the Prophets, compared with that of the Apostle, evidently leads: for the prophetic phraseology, literally interpreted, exhibits impossibilities; such as the rolling of the heavens together as a scroll; the turning of the moon into blood, and the falling down of the stars from heaven as the leaf of a tree. ...
Not so the apostolic phraseology: for the burning of the heavens, or atmosphere, and its passing away with a great noise; and the burning of the earth and the works thereon, together with the burning and melting of the elements, that is, the constituent parts of which this terraqueous globe is composed; are all things possible, and therefore may be literally understood; while the things mentioned by the Prophets can only be taken figuratively
Scripture (2) - The Jews possessed a body of writings, consisting of ‘Law, Prophets, and (other) Scriptures (Kethûbhîm),’ though they were often called, for brevity’s sake, merely ‘the Law and the Prophets’ or simply ‘the Law. To the NT writers, as to other Jews, the sacred books of what was now called by them ‘the old covenant’ (2 Corinthians 3:14), described according to their contents as ‘the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms’ (Luke 24:44), or more briefly as ‘the Law and the Prophets’ (Matthew 7:12, Luke 16:16; cf. Acts 28:23, Luke 16:29; Luke 16:31), or merely as ‘the Law’ (John 10:34, 1 Corinthians 14:21), or even, perhaps, ‘the Prophets’ (Matthew 2:23; Matthew 11:13; Matthew 26:56, Luke 1:70; Luke 18:31; Luke 24:25; Luke 24:27, Acts 3:24; Acts 13:27, Romans 1:2; Romans 16:26), were, when thought of according to their nature, a body of ‘sacred scriptures’ (Romans 1:2, 2 Timothy 3:16), or, with the omission of the unnecessary, because well-understood adjective, simply by way of eminence, ‘the Scriptures,’ ‘Scripture. Similarly αἱ γραφαἱ τῶν προφητῶν (Matthew 26:56), γραφαὶ προφητικαί (Romans 16:26) appear to refer not to particular passages deemed prophetic, or to the special section of the OT called ‘the Prophets,’ but to the entire OT conceived as prophetic in character (cf
Law of God - His mission being not to destroy but to fulfil the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 5:17), so far from saying anything in disparagement of the Law of Moses or from encouraging His disciples to assume an attitude of independence with regard to it, He expressly recognized the authority of the Law of Moses as such, and of the Pharisees as its official interpreters (Matthew 23:1-3). In doing this He practically ignored the distinctions of the scribes between greater and lesser commandments of the Law, and between the Law, the Prophets, and the Psalms (or ‘the Writings’), and insisted upon the authority of Scripture as the word of God. The attitude which Jesus adopted towards the whole question of the Law, considered as the Law of God, is well exemplified in the Sermon on the Mount, and in particular in those words which may be fitly taken as the motto of His teaching: ‘Think not that I am come to destroy the law or the Prophets. In the latter case He clearly speaks as God’s representative, and we are reminded of John the Baptist’s illustration of the difference between Christ and himself, the last of the Prophets: ‘He whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God; for God giveth not the Spirit by measure [1]’ (John 3:34). The scribes who, forgetting the teaching of the Prophets (for here Jesus made no essential addition to Jeremiah’s doctrine of the New Covenant or Ezekiel’s doctrine of the renewed heart and the washing of regeneration, Jeremiah 31:31 ff. ...
Jesus taught essentially the same truth when, in controversy with the Pharisees, He summarized the teaching of the Law and the Prophets
Shepherd - Later Prophets referred to Israel's leaders as shepherds (Jeremiah 23:1 ; Ezekiel 34:1 )
Stephen - But the people had persecuted the Prophets as they now had killed Jesus
Micah - the seventh in order of the twelve lesser Prophets, is supposed to have prophesied about B
Canaan - Moses, and all patriarchs, Ezekiel; and all the Prophets, are praises of Canaan, and all describe it as a land "flowing with milk and honey
Kishon River - The scene of Sisera's defeat and of Elijah's slaying of Baal's Prophets (Judges 4:7; Judges 4:13; Judges 5:19; Judges 5:21; Psalms 83:9; 1 Kings 18:40)
Sign - With such cravings the Gospel of a 'crucified Messiah' was to them a stumblingblock indeed" (Lightfoot); 1 Corinthians 14:22 ; (2) by demons, Revelation 16:14 ; (3) by false teachers or Prophets, indications of assumed authority, e
Ebionites - ...
They differed from the Nazarenes, however, in several things, chiefly as to what regards the authority of the sacred writings; for the Nazarenes received all for Scripture contained in the Jewish canon; whereas the Ebionites rejected all the Prophets, and held the very names of David, Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, in abhorrence
Satan - "By collecting the passages, " says Cruden, "where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be observed, that he fell from heaven with all his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that, by his envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils, came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over his subordinates, over apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false Prophets, seducers, and heretics; that it is he, or some of his, that torment or possess men; that inspire them with evil designs, as he did David, when he suggested to him to number his people; to Judas, to betray his Lord and Master; and to Ananias and Sapphira, to conceal the price of their field
Reader - Among the Jews any member of the congregation—even a minor—might be the reader both of the Law and of the Prophets, although if a priest or a Levite were present he should have precedence (Gittin, v
Testament (2) - Yet the idea of a ‘new covenant’ had been the theme of OT Prophets (cf
Exhortation - That it was the constant practice of Prophets, apostles, and Christ himself, Is
Proselyte - And the Prophets speak of the time as coming when the strangers shall share in all the privileges of Israel (Ezekiel 47:22 ; Isaiah 2:2 ; 11:10 ; 56:3-6 ; Micah 4:1 )
Christianity - Many psalms (as Psalm 2; Psalm 72; Psalm 22; Psalm 67) and all the Prophets (compare Isaiah 2; Isaiah 53) look forward to the Messiah as about to introduce a new and worldwide dispensation
Way - Butler’s remark that religion is a practical thing is quite in the spirit of the whole of Scripture, as seen in the Prophets, the Sermon on the Mount, the Parables, and the Epistles, ‘Every one … which heareth these words of mine, and doeth them … and doeth them not’ (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 7:26); ‘Inasmuch as ye did it … did it not’ (Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45)
Gehazi - " In his master's name, under pretense of charity (!), as if wanting presents for "two sons of the Prophets from mount Ephraim," he obtained from Naaman two talents of silver and two changes of raiment
Hedge - Patriots and Prophets saw and sang their gaps, and did their best to repair the historic institutional hedges
Faith, - For this the Christian should contend earnestly; for it is fundamental; and many false Prophets are gone into the world, and have even crept into association with the saints unawares
Poetry - The Books of Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and various parts of the Prophets are poetical
Grave - Those now bearing this name may be seen marked on maps to the north of Jerusalem; and others called the TOMBS OF THE Prophets are placed on the mount of Olives
Harlot - ), and it is grimly significant that the Prophets designate apostasy and declension by ‘whoredom
Zidon, Sidon - ...
Zidon is denounced by the Prophets for destruction
Zion, Sion, Mount Zion - The favoured people of God are often spoken of as DAUGHTERS OF ZION, Israel are constantly thus addressed in the Prophets, whether to be blamed for their waywardness and punished; or to be cheered with the prospect of future prosperity
Ass - ) that the Lord Jesus, to fulfil the prophecy of one of his servants the Prophets, made his entry into Jerusalem on an ass
Messenger - In like manner Prophets, teachers, and ambassadors, are not unfrequently called messengers
Might - In messianic expectations the Prophets projected the Messiah’s special role as a demonstration of “might” and counsel: “And the spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord” ( Ear - The Lord reveals His words to the “ears” of his Prophets: “Now the Lord had told Samuel in his ear a day before Saul came, saying …” ( Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - (For table of kings of Judah and Israel, and of Prophets, see next page
Mem'Phis - The city's overthrow was distinctly predicted by the Hebrew Prophets
Caves - See also Jeremiah 41:9 : "To enter into the holes of the rocks and into the caves of the earth," became with the Prophets a very proper and familiar image to express a state of terror and consternation
Glory - When the Prophets describe the conversion of the Gentiles, they speak of the "glory of the Lord" as filling the earth; that is, his knowledge shall universally prevail, and he shall be every where worshipped and glorified
Mount Olivet - Sweet and sacred spot from whence the Lord Jesus ascended, when having finished redemption-work, he returned to glory! and where, according to the voice both of Prophets and angels, his feet shall again stand, when the mountains shall cleave in the midst, and Jesus shall come to reign before his ancients gloriously
Tradition - The Jews had numerous unwritten traditions, which they affirmed to have been delivered to Moses on Mount Sinai, and by him transmitted to Joshua, the judges, and the Prophets
Simeon - Surnamed NIGER, or the Black, Acts 13:1 , was among the Prophets and teachers of the Christian church at Antioch
Anointing, - Prophets were occasionally anointed to their office, ( 1 Kings 19:16 ) and were called messiahs, or anointed
Naaman - Then, to justify and to illustrate His action in Working miracles outside the limits of His own city, He referred to the cases of the widow of Sarepta and of Naaman, which were instances of blessings bestowed through the instrumentality of two of Israel’s greatest Prophets on persons who were not of the house of Israel at all
Habakkuk - Unlike most of the Prophets, Habakkuk gives no specific statement to indicate the era during which he prophesied
Interpretation - As the Hebrew tongue ceased to be that of the common people, interpreters were required at the sacred services to translate or explain the Law and the Prophets after the reading of the original (see W. The function of the Prophets is described as that of interpreters or ambassadors explaining to Israel Jehovah’s messages in terms suited to their capacity ( Isaiah 43:27 , cf
Condemnation - In the Old Testament theocracy God mediated his justice through judges, kings, priests, and Prophets. Through his Prophets he continued to call Israel to obedience, yet his theocratic rulers frequently neglected his justice by condemning the innocent and vindicating the guilty
Israel - In the Prophets also, though the ten tribes are not called Judah, the two tribes are at times called Israel. The ten tribes in the Prophets are often spoken of as EPHRAIM, which was the chief of the ten
Haggai - A prophet whose writings occupy the tenth place in the collection of the Minor Prophets. ...
The Book of Haggai reflects the condition of its age, and offers a contrast to the earlier Prophets in the absence of any denunciation of idolatry, the practice of which had been largely eradicated from the Jews of the Exile by their experiences
Gourd - We read of the wild gourd in 2 Kings 4:39 ; that Elisha, being at Gilgal during a great famine, bade one of his servants prepare something for the entertainment of the Prophets who were in that place. When they were brought to table, the Prophets, having tasted them, thought they were mortal poison
Babylon - Justly therefore might the Prophets call her "the great," Daniel 4:20 ; "the praise of the whole earth," Jeremiah 51:41 ; "the beauty of the Chaldees' excellency," Isaiah 13:19 ; "the lady of kingdoms," Isaiah 47:5 ; but also "the tender and delicate," and "given to pleasures," Isaiah 47:1,8 . Indeed, the woes denounced against Babylon by the Prophets constitute some of the most awfully splendid and sublime portions of the whole Bible, Isaiah 13:1-22 14:22 21:9 47:1-15 Jeremiah 25:1-38 50:1-46 51:1-64 , etc
Proverb - Such a combination at once secured currency to the unpremeditated exclamation, ‘Is Saul also among the Prophets?’ ( 1 Samuel 10:11-12 ). Both the Prophets and Christ Himself were charged with speaking in this problematical manner ( Ezekiel 20:49 , John 16:29 )
Olives, Mount of - Proceeding from north to south there occur four independent summits, called -- 1, "Viri Galilaei:" 2, "Mount of Ascension;" 3, "Prophets" --subordinate to the last and almost a part of it; 4, "Mount of Offence. [1] ...
Next to the central summit, on the southern side is a hill remarkable only for the fact that it contains the "singular catacomb" known as the "Tombs of the Prophets," probably in allusion to the words of Christ
Malachi - ...
The analogy of the headings of the other Prophets favors the view that Malachi is a proper name. Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:7) implies that "prophets" supported him, by his desire, in his reformation. Bold and abrupt, yet with the smoothness of a reasoner rather than a poet, at the same time modeled after the old Prophets
Hosea - The main subject of the prophecy of Amos is the Northern Kingdom, but Amos himself was a native of the South; so also were Isaiah and Micah, and these two Prophets, though they included the Northern Kingdom in their denunciations, devoted themselves mainly to Judah. Influenced himself probably by Amos, he seems to have exercised some influence over Isaiah; but these conclusions must rest on a comparison of the writings of the three Prophets. But since these chapters are clearly not allegorical, there are few Prophets whose spiritual experience is better known to us
Sign - The signs of pagan Prophets similarly serve as a challenge to trust in Yahweh (Deuteronomy 13:1-4 ). The reality of wonder-working false Prophets underscores the truth that signs themselves are ambivalent; the function of the sign, either to evoke or challenge faith in Yahweh, is the deciding factor. Though the term sign is not used, Agabus' action in binding Paul with his belt (Acts 21:11 ) parallels the acts of the Old Testament Prophets
Pharisees - The working capital of the Jews was the monotheism of the Prophets, the self-revelation of God in His character of holy and creative Unity, and, inseparable from this, the belief in the perfectibility and indestructibility of the Chosen Nation (the Messianic idea). Now, it was the Pharisees who made idealized nationalism, based upon the monotheism of the Prophets, the pith and marrow of Judaism. They developed the spirit of proud and arrogant orthodoxy, until the monotheism of the Prophets became in their hands wholly incompetent to found a society where Jew and Gentile should be one (Galatians 3:28 , Colossians 3:11 )
Jeremiah, Theology of - Disputation with Kings and Prophets (21-29) E. Like Prophets before him, Jeremiah's personal life was far from untouched by his role. ...
Integrity, part of the justice agenda, is the forefront issue in the indictment against another leadership group, the Prophets. Prophets lack integrity; they commit adultery. Any misuse of power, whether by kings or Prophets, is altogether counter to "justice, " a matter of "doing the right. One of the functions of Prophets is to identify the shape of evil in a society irrespective of consequences (26:11,20-23; 37:16; 38:4,6-9). Patiently God has dispatched Prophets "again and again" (25:4)
Jeremiah, Book of - The false Prophets were no excuse: they were utterly rejected. A lamentation was made against the false Prophets. In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah exhorted to repentance, but the priests and Prophets demanded his death. The false Prophets are condemned
Philistim - Lastly, they regained their full liberty under the later kings of Judah; and we may see, by the menaces made against them by the Prophets Isaiah, Amos, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that they brought a thousand hardships and calamities on the children of Israel, for which God threatened to punish them with great misfortunes. No human probability, says Keith, could have existed, in the time of the Prophets, or at a much more recent date, of its eventual desolation. But its aspect presents some existing peculiarities, which travellers fail not to particularize, and which, in reference both to the state of the country and the fate of its different cities, the Prophets failed not to discriminate as justly as if their description had been drawn both with all the accuracy which ocular observation, and all the certainty which authenticated history, could give. " There is yet another city which was noted by the Prophets, the very want of any information respecting which, and the absence of its name from several modern maps of Palestine, while the sites of other ruined cities are marked, are really the best confirmation of the truth of the prophecy that could possibly be given
Bible - The Prophets. The writings of the Prophets are-...
1, Joshua;-...
2, Judges, with Ruth;-...
3, Samuel;-...
4, Kings;-...
5, Isaiah;-...
6, Jeremiah, with his Lamentations;-...
7, Ezekiel;-...
8, Daniel;-...
9, ...
The twelve minor Prophets;-...
10, Job;-...
11, Ezra;-...
12, Nehemiah;-...
13, Esther. Afterwards the Jews reckoned twenty-four books in their canon of scripture; in disposing of which the law stood as in the former division, and the Prophets were distributed into former and latter: the former Prophets are Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings; the latter Prophets are Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the twelve minor Prophets. ...
Till the persecution of Antiochus Epiphanes, they read only the law; but, the reading of it being then prohibited, they substituted in the room of it fifty-four sections out of the Prophets; and when the reading of the law was restored by the Maccabees, the section which was read every Sabbath out of the law served for their first lesson, and the section out of the Prophets for their second. There are some other Arabic versions of later date mentioned by Walton in his Prolegomena, particularly a version of the Psalms, preserved at Zion College, Loudon, and another of the Prophets at Oxford; neither of which have been published
Olives, Mount of - of the mount of ascension, and almost a part of it, stands that of the tombs of the Prophets; again, S. to the tombs of the Prophets, and then to the village. of the central mount are: the tomb of the Virgin, then successively up the hill, namely, an olive garden, cavern of Christ's prayer and agony, rock where the disciples slept, place of Jesus' capture, spot from whence the Virgin saw Stephen stoned, spot where her girdle dropped at her assumption, spot of Jesus' lament over Jerusalem (Luke 19:41), tombs of the Prophets, including Haggai and Zechariah (the Jews say; Matthew 23:29), place of the ascension, and church. The catacomb called "the tombs of the Prophets," on the hill S. The road in the hollow between it and the hill of "the tomb of the Prophets" is the road from Bethany whereby Christ in triumph entered Jerusalem
Revelation, Idea of - In law, Prophets, and history we read the speech of God; the most common of all the Acts of God in history is the use of quotation marks. And as the book which, supremely, testifies of Jesus and records his teachings, which was written under the impress of his Spirit, "who spoke by the Prophets, " and which is today illumined by that same Spirit as it is read, preached, made the subject of theological formulationit serves most appropriately as the "supreme rule of faith and practice" of his own church. As with the law, so with the Prophets: The form changes, but the extensive first-person accounts given as from the mouth of God serve as the chief content of the prophetic books. Since we are introduced to him as God incarnate, his teaching brings to a climax the biblical witness to the speaking God as the divine speech incarnated, God who "spoke by the Prophets" speaking now by himself. This matter is more complex in the case of multiauthor or multiedition documents, whether deriving from one writer who made different use of his material (as may be the case with some of the Prophets) or several writers whose work was collected (as with the psalms)
Vision - The earlier Prophets had already attained to the idea of vision as inspired insight, of revelation as an inward and ethical word of God ( Isaiah 1:1 ; Isaiah 2:1 etc
Babylon - 13:19) was foretold by the Prophets ( Ezekiel, Book of - After an account of his call to the prophetical office ((1-3:21),), Ezekiel (1) utters words of denunciation against the Jews (3:22-24), warning them of the certain destruction of Jerusalem, in opposition to the words of the false Prophets (4:1-3)
Sam'Uel - (1 Samuel 25:1 ) Samuel represents the independence of the moral law, of the divine will, as distinct from legal or sacerdotal enactments, which is so remarkable a characteristic of all the later Prophets
Hebrew - After the constitution of Israel as a separate people (in Exodus) Hebrew rarely occurs; in the national poetry and in the Prophets the name does not occur as a designation of the elect people among themselves
Nathan - See Books; David ; Prophets
New - He said these two commandments fulfilled the Law and the Prophets
Amos - (meaning not clear; perhaps "a burden") ...
Third among the Minor Prophets, a subject of the Kingdom of Juda, born Thecua, 6 miles south of Bethlehem
Raca - (1 Corinthians 15:36) And our blessed Lord him self, when reproving the dullness of his disciples, said, "O fools, and slow of heart, to believe all that the Prophets have spoken
Hedge - ...
Ezekiel 13:5 (a) By this figure we understand that the Prophets were not protecting GOD's people as they should by proper teaching, leading and example
Psalms - As to Jesus give all the Prophets witness, and as the Psalms many of them are prophetical, evidently they are included
Sun - %Very blessedly therefore the Holy Ghost caused it to be recorded by one of the Prophets, that when the Lord Jesus shall come to be glorified by his saints, and admired in all that believe that his superoior lustre shall make his creature the sun to blush and not shine before him
Festus, Porcius - " Then he appealed to Agrippa, "Believest thou the Prophets? I know that thou believest
Gehazi - He follows the cavalcade of Naaman, and, fabricating a message from his master, begs a talent of silver and two changes of raiment for two young men of the sons of the Prophets, who are supposed to be on a visit to Elisha
Jericho - A college of Prophets was shortly afterwards founded here ( 2 Kings 2:4 ), for whose benefit Elisha healed its bitter waters ( 2 Kings 2:18 )
Carmel - , the place of burning), that Elijah brought back the people to their allegiance to God, and slew the Prophets of Baal ( 1 Kings 18 )
Impurity - The saints and Prophets of the Old Testament were sensible of this; and our Saviour, in the Gospel, has strongly inculcated, ...
that they are not outward and corporeal pollutions which render us unacceptable to God, but such inward pollutions as infect the soul, and are violations of justice, truth, and charity
Command - He also issues “orders” through and to the Prophets ( Abyss - Lastly, in these dark dungeons the kings of Tyro, Babylon, and Egypt are described by the Prophets as suffering the punishment of their pride and cruelty, Isaiah 26:14 ; Ezekiel 28:10 , &c
Judaism - Notwithstanding God's Prophets, and oracles, and ordinances, and the symbol of his presence, were among them, the Jews were ever very prone to idolatry, till the Babylonish furnace served to purify them from that corruption
First-Fruits - In Israel after the schism they were sometimes offered to the Prophets
Samuel - He instituted the "schools of the Prophets," which were long continued and very useful
Demons - He gave his followers the power to cast out demons (Matthew 10:1; Matthew 10:8; Luke 10:17-18; Acts 16:16-18), and the ability to see whether Prophets in the church were speaking through the influence of demons or the influence of God’s Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:3; 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Timothy 4:1; 1 John 4:1-3)
Holy Spirit - The Old Testament has numerous examples when God inspired the Prophets indirectly by the Spirit. Not only did the Prophets benefit from the influence of the Spirit, but also the Spirit will be shed upon the people of God (Isaiah 44:3 ) and upon all the people (Joel 2:28 )
Angel - It is used of an ordinary messenger (Job 1:14 : 1 Samuel 11:3 ; Luke 7:24 ; 9:52 ), of Prophets (Isaiah 42:19 ; Haggai 1:13 ), of priests (Malachi 2:7 ), and ministers of the New Testament (Revelation 1:20 ). In the days of the Prophets, from Samuel downward, the angels appear only in their behalf (1 Kings 19:5 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ; Zechariah 1-6 ; Daniel 4:13,23 ; 10:10,13,20,21 )
Resurrection - ...
The Prophets proclaimed hope for the future in terms of national renewal (see Hosea 6:1-3 ; Ezekiel 37:1 ). So pointed is the prophetic expression of national hope that the New Testament writers sometimes used the language of the Prophets to expound the doctrine of resurrection (compare Hosea 13:14 ; 1 Corinthians 15:55 )
Backsliding - Repeatedly the Prophets addressed Israel's waywardness and unfaithfulness. As agents of God's covenant lawsuit against the obstinate and stiff-necked people, the Prophets pleaded with Israel to repent of her sins and return to God in true faith and holiness
Jehovah - ...
Elohim is the God of providence; Jehovah is the God of promise and prophecy; hence, the Prophets' formula is, "thus saith Jehovah," not Elohim. The more frequent use of the name Jehovah from Samuel's time is due to the religious revival then inaugurated, and to the commencement of the regular school of Prophets
Sanctification - The moral implications of this word came into focus with the Prophets and became a major emphasis in the New Testament. In the Prophets especially, the ethical responsibility of being holy in conduct came to the forefront (Isaiah 5:1 ; Jeremiah 5-7 ; Amos 4-5 ; Hosea 11:1 )
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - He uses the ordinary Eastern phrase, "Christ our God," speaks of Him as Maker of the world, as Master of the creation, as present from the beginning with the Prophets, and as the Lord of Isaiah's vision. Let him come in early morning to church for the Eucharistic service (the features of it are enumerated: the psalmody, the reading of Prophets, of St
Isaiah - The son of Amoz, (not Amos,) one of the most distinguished of the Hebrew Prophets. The simplicity, purity, sweetness, and sublimity of Isaiah, and the fullness of his predictions respecting the Messiah, give him the preeminence among the Hebrew Prophets and poets
Inspiration - With the Prophets God spoke in vision, but with Moses "face to face" and "mouth to mouth" (Exodus 33:11; Numbers 12:6-8). " So (1 Peter 1:11) the Old Testament Prophets "searched what, or what manner of time, the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glory, . " The Prophets preface their prophecies with "thus saith the Lord," "the burden (weighty utterance) of the word of the Lord" (Zechariah 9:1; Zechariah 12:1; Malachi 1:1). The apostles declare of them, "the Scripture must needs have been fulfilled which the Holy Spirit by the mouth of David spoke," "God showed by the mouth of all His Prophets that," etc. ...
If then the Old Testament Prophets were infallible, much more the apostles in their New Testament Scriptures; as these and even the least in the gospel kingdom rank above those (Matthew 11:11; Ephesians 3:5; 1 Corinthians 2:9-10). in vested with His commission; and Nehemiah 9:30, "by Thy Spirit in Thy Prophets"; and David (2 Samuel 23:2), "the Spirit of the Lord spoke by me, and His word was in my tongue
Sin - The Prophets . By far the most important stage in the history of the OT doctrine of sin is that which is marked by the teaching of the Prophets. The four practically contemporary Prophets of the 8th cent. was as much in evidence in the ranks of Prophets and priests as among the other ruling classes, and to it, as the cause, is assigned the downfall which so speedily followed ( Amos 3:11 ; Amos 6:1-7 ; Amos 2:7 ; Amos 9:1 ff. ), and it may be said that it is owing to the preaching of these four Prophets that the centre of gravity, as it were, of sin is changed, and the principles of universal justice and love, as the fundamental attributes of Jehovah’s character and rule, are established. Terrible, however, as were the denunciations, and emphatic as were the declarations of the Prophets against the vices of greed, oppression, and lust, they were no less clear in their call to repentance, and in promises of restoration and pardon ( Isaiah 1:18 f
Christ, Christology - ...
A key passage that summarizes the risen Christ's own interpretation of his completed messiahship is the Emmaus saying of Luke 24:25-27 : "'How foolish you are, and how slow of heart to believe all that the Prophets have spoken! Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?' And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself. ...
The Prophets, too, were anointed, and Jesus fulfills their role as the superior messianic prophet. God says of his anointed Prophets, "Do not touch my anointed ones; do my Prophets no harm" (Psalm 105:15 ). For I tell you the truth, many Prophets and righteous men longed to see what you see but did not see it, and to hear what you hear but did not hear it" (Matthew 13:17 ). Jesus sees himself as the Messiah who inaugurates the reign of God and phases out the old era of the Prophets represented by John the Baptist
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - , the Prophets and tongues-speakers in Acts 19:6 ), while others build on a lifetime of divinely superintended preparation (as with Paul's apostleship, prepared for by his unique blend of Jewish, Greek, and Roman backgrounds). Apostles and Prophets are foundational in the life of any church (cf. 29-30; 14:31; is best taken as referring to "all Prophets" not "all believers" ); hence no specific gift may be made a criterion of salvation, sanctification, or spiritual status. Other individuals called Prophets include Paul and Barnabas (Acts 13:1 ). He also requires Prophets to regulate their behavior (vv. "Two or three Prophets should speak, and the others
Unlike the Old Testament, in which divinely accredited Prophets were not subject to constant reassessment, New Testament prophecy seems less immediate or infallible (apart from the exceptional instances that created the New Testament canon)
Inspiration - Paul can say (Romans 9:17) ‘the scripture saith unto Pharaoh’; and it is God who speaks in the Prophets (Romans 9:25). It was God who spoke in the Prophets (Hebrews 1:1). The Prophets demand attention to their words by prefacing them with the announcement, ‘Thus saith the Lord. ’ From these two phenomena it was a necessary inference that at any rate the Law and the Prophets were inspired. ’ It must, however, also be borne in mind that among the Jews themselves it was the Law, rather than the Prophets, which satisfied, and perhaps suggested, their idea of inspiration. The Law itself was a perfect and complete revelation, and neither Prophets nor Hagiographa were indispensable (see passages in Weber, Lehren d. Possibly it was the belief that the whole OT was normative that prompted the usage by which even the Prophets and the Psalms were cited in the NT as ‘the Law’ (see John 15:25; John 10:34, 1 Corinthians 14:21, Romans 3:19). ’ But, as the context shows, that which our Lord intimates in these words is that it was in Himself the Law and the Prophets were to find their fulfilment
Preaching - When the ignorant notions of Pagans, the vices of their practice, and the idolatry of their pretended worship, were in some sad periods incorporated into the Jewish religion by the princes of that nation, the Prophets and all the seers protested against this apostacy, and they were persecuted for so doing. Hence false Prophets, had men who found it worth while to affect to be good, crowded the courts of princes. Jezebel, an idolatress, had four hundred Prophets of Baal; and Ahab, a pretended worshipper of Jehovah, had as many pretended Prophets of his own profession, 2 Chronicles 18:5 . When the Jews were carried captive into Babylon, the Prophets who were with them inculcated the principles of religion, and endeavoured to possess their minds with an aversion to idolatry; and to the success of preaching we may attribute the re-conversion of the Jews to the belief and worship of one God; a conversion that remains to this day. There were not wanting, however, multitudes of false Prophets among them, whose characters are strikingly delineated by the true Prophets, and which the reader may see in the 13th chapter of Eze 56; Isaiah 23:1-18 d Jeremiah. When the seventy years of the captivity were expired, the good Prophets and preachers, Zerubbabel, Joshua, Haggai, and others, having confidence in the word of God, and aspiring after their natural, civil, and religious rights, endeavoured by all means to extricate themselves and their countrymen from that mortifying state into which the crimes of their ancestors had brought them
Joshua, the Book of - It is the first book of the second division of the Hebrew Old Testament, the Prophets. Authorship and Date The Former Prophets are all anonymous. Other Bible students think the Book of Joshua only reached its present form when the Former Prophets were collected together during the Exile
Jehoiachin - heads of tribes and families found in Jerusalem (including the nation's spiritual heads, priests and Prophets, with Ezekiel: Jeremiah 29:1; Ezekiel 1:1) must have been 2,000, to make up the "ten thousand. In the fourth year of his uncle Zedekiah (so called by Nebuchadnezzar instead of Mattaniah), false Prophets encouraged the popular hope of the return of Jehoiachin to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 28:4). ) A party of the captives at Babylon also, through the false Prophets, expected restoration with Jehoiachin and Nebuchadnezzar's overthrow
Ephesians, Epistle to - Paul, especially when three years of imprisonment had given him opportunities for quiet thought, and had brought him into contact with Roman imperialism at its centre? (3) The references to ‘apostles and Prophets’ in Ephesians 3:5 , Ephesians 4:11 , which seem to suggest that the writer is looking back on the Apostolic age from the standpoint of the next generation. But in 1 Corinthians 12:28 ‘apostles’ and ‘prophets’ stand first in the order of spiritual gifts, and both there and here the word ‘apostle’ ought probably to be taken in a wider sense than as including only the Twelve and St. Apostles and Prophets were the two kinds of teachers exercising general, as distinguished from localized, authority in the early Church
Ministry, Minister - There is ministry of the Word in evangelism, founding and guiding churches (apostles, Prophets, evangelists, teachers, etc. Apart from the apostles, Prophets, and evangelists, we read of elders/presbyters, bishops, and deacons, who were settled in local congregations. In the New Testament period the real distinction was among the itinerant apostles, evangelists, and Prophets and the settled presbyters and deacons
Egypt - Both movements, the Flight and the Return to Nazareth, are described as fulfilments of the word spoken ‘through the prophet’ (Matthew 2:15), or ‘through the Prophets’ (Matthew 2:23). Smith, Twelve Prophets, in loc. And to him it is significant of much that this land should thus be brought into connexion with the birth of a new era for the people, in the Person of a greater Son, in whom he saw the fulfilment of the best hopes and brightest anticipations of Israel’s ancient Prophets
Zedekiah - He is distinguished by Jehoshaphat ("is there not here besides a prophet of Jehovah, that we might inquire of him?") from Jehovah's Prophets. Zedekiah therefore was one of the "400 Prophets of the GROVES" , (Asheerah Ashtaroth) who apparently were not slain when Elijah slew the 450 Prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:22; 1 Kings 18:24), or rather a prophet of the calves symbolizing "Jehovah," for they spoke in Jehovah's name (1 Kings 22:8)
Amos - ...
As a prophet, Amos was a primary figure among the series of courageous men known as the “Minor Prophets. ” Neither they nor their inspired messages were minor, and they are called “minor” only because their books are far shorter than “Major Prophets” such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. Hence, those writings were commonly known as the Book of the Twelve or the Minor Prophets
Egypt - Both movements, the Flight and the Return to Nazareth, are described as fulfilments of the word spoken ‘through the prophet’ (Matthew 2:15), or ‘through the Prophets’ (Matthew 2:23). Smith, Twelve Prophets, in loc. And to him it is significant of much that this land should thus be brought into connexion with the birth of a new era for the people, in the Person of a greater Son, in whom he saw the fulfilment of the best hopes and brightest anticipations of Israel’s ancient Prophets
Nahum - The tradition occurs in a Syriac version of the biographies of the Prophets, ascribed to Epiphanius, bishop of Salamis in Cyprus towards the close of the 4th cent. ) separate him sufficiently from the Prophets of the Chaldæan period, and give him a position not far behind that of Isaiah. Findlay says ( Books of the Prophets , II. Where he differs chiefly from the other Prophets is in the complete outwardness of his gaze
Fig Tree - The fig-tree figures in the New Testament in the symbolic action of Our Lord (Matthew 21; Mark 11), which is a reminder of the symbolic actions of the Prophets of the Old Testament
Hebron - The name of this city does not occur in any of the Prophets or in the New Testament
Judge (Office) - Instructions on proper exercise of judgment include: the call to judge reputed Prophets by their fruits (Matthew 7:5-17 ); encouragement for Christians to judge what is right for themselves and thus avoid pagan lawcourts (Exodus 18:16 ; 1 Corinthians 6:1-6 ); and instructions regarding church cases (Matthew 18:15-20 )
Esdraelon - He later slaughtered all the men of Ahab and Azariah and all the Prophets of Baal there (2 Kings 10:1 )
Scripture - , Matthew 21:42 ; 22:29 ; John 5:39 ; Acts 17:11 ; 18:24 ; Romans 1:2 , where "the Prophets" comprises the OT writers in general; 15:4; 16:26, lit
Oil - ...
Oil was used to anoint priests, kings and at times Prophets, to symbolize their setting apart for God’s service and their appointment to office (Exodus 28:41; 1 Samuel 10:1; 1618831508_79; 1 Kings 1:39; 1 Kings 19:16; Zechariah 4:11-14)
Enemy - This view is also espoused by many of the Prophets
Sheba, Queen of - A lengthy history of queen Bilkis, from Ta‘labi’s Lives of the Prophets , may be found in Brünnow’s Arabic Chrestomathy
Samuel, Books of, - In our own time the most prevalent idea in the Anglican Church seems to have been that the first twenty-four chapters of the book of Samuel were written by the prophet himself, and the rest of the chapters by the Prophets Nathan and Gad
Blindness - ...
The figure of blindness is a favorite device of Isaiah, who repeatedly announces to rebellious Israel that God has afflicted them and their apostate Prophets, priests, and rules with blindness (43:8; 56:10; 59:10)
Zerubbabel - The promise was fulfilled four and a half years after the Prophets began their preaching (Ezra 6:15)
Balaam - ...
Old Testament Balaam was one of many Prophets of eastern religions who worshiped all the gods of the land
Gospel - In Romans 10:16 ‘the gospel’ is used absolutely of the message of the OT Prophets
Kindness - ...
Human response to the covenant with God, however, was bewailed by the Prophets as a youthful loyalty that vanished like the morning dew (Jeremiah 2:2 ; Hosea 6:4 )
Lawlessness - The love of God and the love of man constitute the essence of the Law’s demands and the Prophets’ promises (Matthew 22:40)
Firstfruits - The Prophets insist on this duty (Ezekiel 20:40; Ezekiel 44:30; Ezekiel 48:14; Malachi 3:8)
Desolation - To nearly all the Prophets the idea of a wasted and depopulated land, such as is given in the graphic description of Isaiah 1:7-9, is familiar
Follow - Wo to the foolish Prophets, who follow their own spirit, and have seen nothing
Frontlets - And we do not find a word in any of the Prophets in respect to their neglect, or the use of them
Maiden, Virgin - The Prophets who denounce Israel for playing the harlot also called her the bethûlâh of Yahweh, or the bethûlâh (daughter) of Israel ( Testament - The Prophets very frequently, and undoubtedly not without cause, exclaim against the neglect and injustice shown to widows, Isaiah 1:17 ; Isaiah 10:2 ; Jeremiah 7:6 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ; Exodus 22:22-24 ; Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Deuteronomy 24:17
Transfiguration of Christ - As maintaining the grand distinction, the infinite difference, between Christ and all other Prophets: he is "THE SON
Prophecy - For other meanings of "prophecy," see Prophets
Edom - ...
Edom is constantly referred to in the Prophets as having had relations with Israel, and is judged because of its perpetual hatred against them
Zechariah, the Book of - He insisted on the great dissimilarity of style as well as subject between the earlier and later chapters and he was the first who advocated the theory that the last six chapters of Zechariah are the work of two distinct Prophets
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat, however, did not trust Ahab’s court Prophets, who seemed more concerned with pleasing Ahab than with telling him God’s will
Joannes, the Faster, Bishop of Constantinople - ...
(4) Homily on False Prophets and False Doctrine
Evangelist - Some of them were at the same time apostles, Prophets, pastors and teachers
Impostors - (Latin: imponere, to place or put upon; impose) ...
In the religious significance, various charlatans and false Prophets. Sinnett, Prophets of Esoteric Buddhism; and Mrs
High Place - During this short period Samuel worshiped inside a city (possibly Ramah) at a high place dedicated to the worship of the God of Israel (1 Samuel 9:12-25 ), and a group of Prophets of God worshiped at the “hill of God” (1 Samuel 10:5 , probably Gibeah or Gibeon). ...
The Israelite Prophets also condemned the high places of Moab (Isaiah 15:2 ; Isaiah 16:12 ), Judah (Jeremiah 7:30-31 ; 1618831508_37 ; Jeremiah 19:3-5 ; Jeremiah 32:35 ), and Israel (Ezekiel 6:3 ,Ezekiel 6:3,6:6 ; Ezekiel 20:29-31 ; Hosea 10:8 , Amos 7:9 ) because they were places of sin where false gods were worshiped
Samuel, Books of - They are part of the collection that the Hebrews referred to as the Former Prophets, that is, the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings. (Concerning the significance of the name ‘Former Prophets’ see PROPHECY
Amen - Where the Prophets often said, "Thus says the Lord, " Jesus often says, "Amen I say to you. Likewise, Prophets never spoke on their own authority
Carmel - The scene of Elijah's conflict with, and execution of, Baal's Prophets was at the N. They and the 850 Prophets of Baal stood close beneath the high place of the altar, near the spring, in full view of Jezreel and Ahab's palace and Jezebel's temple in the distance
Baal - Baal had his Prophets and his priests in great numbers; accordingly, we read of four hundred and fifty of them that were fed at the table of Jezebel only; and they conducted the worship of this deity, by offering sacrifices, by dancing round his altar with violent gesticulations and exclamations, by cutting their bodies with knives and lancets, and by raving and pretending to prophesy, as if they were possessed by some invisible power. Baal had priests and Prophets consecrated to his service
Darius - Daniel does not inform us of any previous war between them; but the Prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah supply this deficiency. Some believe that the Jews were either expelled by the Babylonians, as being too much in the interest of Darius; or that, in obedience to the frequent admonitions of the Prophets, they quitted that city when they saw the people determined to rebel, Isaiah 48:20 ; Jeremiah 50:8 ; Jeremiah 51:6-9 ; Zechariah 11:6-7
Greek Versions of ot - 132), where the writer speaks of ‘the law itself and the Prophets and the rest of the books’ ( sc . It is at its worst in the Prophets, which presented the greatest difficulties in the way of interpretation. The Minor Prophets form a single group, which has considerable affinities with the first translators of both Jer. the Pentateuch; (ii) the Prophets, consisting of the Former Prophets (Jos. ]'>[8]4 , Judges 1:1-36 ; Judges 2:1-23 ; Judges 3:1-31 ; Judges 4:1-24 Kings) and the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Minor Prophets); (iii) the Hagiographa, including Chron. to the three Greater Prophets
Samuel - Without being Prophets we could predict what kind of a judge Samuel would make when he sat down on the seat of justice. That school of the Prophets to which we owe so much of Samuel himself; to which we owe David, and Gad, and Nathan, and all their still greater successors; that great school was the creation and the care of Samuel's leisure from office. How much of the Old Testament itself we owe to the Prophets, and the preachers, and the psalmists, and the sacred writers, and other trained students of Samuel's great school, we have not yet fully found out. But the throne was destined to stand long after Saul was cast out of it; and Samuel is determined to do his very best to secure it that Saul's successors shall have around them and over their people a class of men who, if not indeed Prophets,-Samuel cannot secure that-the wind bloweth where it listeth,-yet Samuel can and will secure that there shall be an estate of learned and earnest-minded men, who shall watch over the religion and the morals of the people, in the prophetical spirit and in the prophetical name. And thus it came about that at Naioth in Ramah the first school of the Prophets was set up. Ramah was Elkanah's old property; it had now come into Samuel's hands; and at Naioth, the quietest and sweetest spot of all his patrimonial estate, Samuel set up the first divinity hall; the first school for Prophets and psalmists in Israel. ' As much as to say that Samuel stands at the head of all the men of prayer in Israel, just as Moses and Aaron stand at the head of all the Prophets and priests in Israel
Foresight - All of them lay open before the eyes of God; and the only limit to pre-announcement was the extent to which God had chosen to reveal what was to come to pass, through His servants the Prophets. Whatever stood written of Him in the Law or the Prophets or the Psalms (Luke 24:44) must needs (δεῖ) be accomplished (Matthew 26:54, Luke 22:37; Luke 24:26, John 20:9). (John 12:38; John 13:18; John 15:25; John 17:12; John 19:24; John 19:36), but found also in the other Evangelists (Mark 14:49, Luke 4:21), the several occurrences of His life fell out as they did, ‘in order that what was spoken by the Lord’ through the Prophets or in Scripture, ‘might be fulfilled’ (cf. The meaning is rather that all that stands written of Jesus in the OT Scriptures has its certain fulfilment in Him; and that enough stands written of Him there to assure His followers that in the course of His life, and in its, to them, strange and unexpected ending, He was not the prey of chance or the victim of the hatred of men, to the marring of His work or perhaps even the defeat of His mission, but was following step by step, straight to its goal, the predestined pathway marked out for Him in the counsels of eternity, and sufficiently revealed from of old in the Scriptures to enable all who were not ‘foolish and slow of heart to believe in all that the Prophets have spoken,’ to perceive that the Christ must needs have lived just this life and fulfilled just this destiny. Acts 3:22-23), resided beyond precedent the gifts proper to Prophets. They record with evident sympathy the impression made by Him at the outset of His ministry, that God had at last in Him visited His people (Mark 6:15, Luke 7:16, John 4:19; John 9:17); they trace the ripening of this impression into a well-settled belief in His prophetic character (Matthew 21:11, Luke 24:19, Matthew 21:46, Luke 7:39, John 7:40); and they remark upon the widespread suspicion which accompanied this belief, that He was something more than a prophet—possibly one of the old Prophets returned, certainly a very special prophet charged with a very special mission for the introduction of the Messianic times (Matthew 16:14, Mark 6:15; Mark 8:28, Luke 9:8; Luke 9:19, John 6:14; John 7:40)
Canon of the New Testament - "The Prophets" in the Christian church, speaking themselves under inspiration, and those having the Spirit's gift," the discerning of spirits," acted as checks on the transmission of error orally before the completion of the written word. " The anonymous epistle to Diognetus still earlier speaks of "the law, the Prophets, the gospels, and the apostles. 325) Constantine appeals to "the books of the evangelists, apostles; and Prophets" as "the divinely inspired books for deciding their controversies. They were publicly read in the churches (Colossians 4:16) as an essential part of worship, just as the law and the Prophets were in the synagogue (Justin Martyr, Apol
Jerusalem - The true Prophets of the Lord knew better. The Prophets also spoke of Jerusalem's exaltation in the “latter days” (Isaiah 2:2-4 ). ...
The restoration of Jerusalem spoken of by the preexilic Prophets had taken place (Jeremiah 29:10 ; Jeremiah 33:7-11 ), but only in part. Prophets like Zechariah painted new images concerning the future of Jerusalem (Zechariah 14:1 )
Court Systems - Both Deborah and Samuel were Prophets. We only know that Jeremiah was tried in Jerusalem by “the princes of Judah” after being charged by the priests and Prophets with a crime worthy of death. The Prophets condemned corrupt judges (Isaiah 1:21-26 ; Amos 5:12 ,Amos 5:12,5:15 ; Micah 7:3 ) and those who supported them (Amos 5:10 )
Church Government - In 1 Corinthians 12:28 he counts up ‘first, apostles; second, Prophets; third, teachers; then powers; then gifts of healing, helps, governments, kinds of tongues. A few years later ( Ephesians 4:11 ) he tells us how the ascended Lord ‘himself gave some as apostles, some Prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, for the work of service’ ( diakonia ) they are all of them ‘deacons’ ( diakonoi ), whatever more they may be. Yet even in the Apostolic age prophecy ( 1 Thessalonians 5:20 ) is beginning to fall into discredit, and false Prophets are flourishing (1 John, 2 Peter, Jude)
Mission(s) - This redeeming activity of God is missionary because God sends His messengers to the house of Israel and His Prophets as His spokesmen to all nations. The message of the Prophets served as the first important reminder. Not just selected Prophets like Jonah but all the believers were to go and tell what they had seen with others
Elisha - When God was about to take Elijah to Himself, it became known to the sons of the Prophets, and they told Elisha, but he knew it already; and when Elijah suggested to him to remain behind he refused and followed him from place to place, until he had traversed Jordan (figuratively death) with Elijah. ...
A widow ofone of the Prophets appealed to Elishato save her two sonsfrom the grasp of a creditor. Elisha sent one of the sons of the Prophets to anoint Jehu to be king over Israel: he was to execute God's judgement on the house of Ahab and on Jezebel, which had been prophesied by Elijah
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - Whatever of truth the heathen authors contain he regards as borrowed from Moses and the Prophets who alone declare God's revelation to man. He regards the Sibylline verses as authentic and inspired productions quoting them largely as declaring the same truths with the Prophets. and other minor Prophets
Rechab, Rechabites - Hence it seemed to more than one of the Prophets that the early, simple period of the nation’s life, ere it became immersed in the Canaanite civilization, was preferable to all later developments ( Judges 2:2 , Hosea 10:1 )
Seraphim - ...
It was customary with the Prophets to transform and purify popular conceptions, by bringing them into relation with their ethical idea of God
Fornication - Revelation, as well as the Prophets, extends the meaning of fornication to include political and religious unfaithfulness (Revelation 14:8 ; Revelation 17:2 ,Revelation 17:2,17:4 ; Revelation 18:3 ; Revelation 19:2 )
Evangelist - Not only the office, but the men, were a divine gift: "He gave some to be apostles, and some to be Prophets (inspired forth-tellers, not fore-tellers), and some to be evangelists," i
Miracle - Such were the miracles which God wrought by the Prophets; and those wrought by Christ and by the apostles and disciples in his name
Wisdom, the, of Solomon, - Generally, too, it may be observed that, as in the cognate books, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes, there are few traces of the recognition of the sinfulness even of the wise man in his wisdom, which forms in the Psalms and the Prophets, the basis of the Christian doctrine of the atonement: yet comp
Searching - The former falls into line with the general tenor of Christ’s teaching, that the Jews had only to use the means at their disposal in order to see in Himself the fulfilment of the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 5:17, Luke 16:31; Luke 24:27, John 7:38)
Evangelist - ...
In Ephesians 4:11 Apostles, Prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers are all named as gifts bestowed on the Church by the ascended Christ
Famine - Accordingly famine is almost always a direct judgment from Him ( 1 Kings 17:1 , Ezekiel 5:1-17 , and continually in the Prophets; James 5:17 )
Kishon - The other OT incident connected with this river is the slaughter there of the Prophets of Baal after Elijah’s vindication of Jehovah on the heights of Carmel ( 1 Kings 18:40 )
Hate, Hatred - ...
The Bible says that God hates religiosity (Isaiah 1:14 ; Amos 5:21 ), hypocrisy and lies (Zechariah 8:17 ), wrongdoing (Isaiah 61:8 ); divorce (Malachi 2:16 ), violence (Malachi 2:16 ), idolatrous practices (Hosea 9:15 ), and the way the Prophets are treated (Jeremiah 44:4 )
Harvest - The Prophets indicate that the Lord destroyed the harvest in judgment (Isaiah 18:4-6 ; Jeremiah 12:13 )
Asherah - ...
The writers of the Old Testament referred to the image of Asherah as well as to “prophets” belonging to her and to vessels used in her worship (1 Kings 15:13 , 1 Kings 18:19 ; 2 Kings 21:7 , 2 Kings 23:4 ; 2 Chronicles 15:16 )
Jericho - Afterwards 'sons of the Prophets' dwelt there: they said that the situation of the city was 'pleasant,' but the water was bad
Selah - If the word Selah means the end, perhaps it may be found not to mean the end of the Psalm where it stands, but to a higher end, even pointing to him who is "the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth," and to whom the law of Moses, and the Prophets, and the Psalms, all refer as the end
Bethel - There were sons of the Prophets dwelling at Beth-el, 2 Kings 2:3 , but the idolatrous altar was not destroyed until the days of Josiah
Alms, Almsgiving - The writings of the Prophets, also, are full of generous advocacy of the rights of the poor
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - The princes, judges, Prophets, and priests were all corrupt
Mount - In allusion to the times of the gospel, the Holy Ghost, by his servants the Prophets, pointed to the church under these figures
Jeremiah - (See Isaiah 49:1-26 throughout, and Proverbs 8:12-36) What a decided proof and conviction by the way doth this afford, that if Jeremiah was ordained a prophet to the church before he was formed in the belly, surely the glorious Head of that church, and that church in him, was set up, and Christ in all his offices and characters ordained the Lord God of the Prophets before all worlds
Street - ...
Other descriptions of the “streets” are given by the Prophets
Cord - ”...
The word may refer to a group of people, describing them as that which is tied together— “a band”: “… Thou shalt meet a company of Prophets coming down from the high place …” ( Lamentations of Jeremiah - Jeremiah as in the presence of Jehovah spreads out all the humiliating reverses that had fallen upon them, mentioning separately the Nazarites, the Prophets, the priests, and the people; and then he foretells that God's wrath should pass also unto Edom, who had doubtless rejoiced at the calamities of Jerusalem
Frontlets - The Prophets never inveigh against the omission or neglect of them, nor was there any question concerning them in the reformation of manners at any time among the Hebrews
Gibeon - 1021; and the Prophets told David that this calamity would continue while Saul's cruelty remained un-avenged
Kings - These records appear to have been made by the contemporary Prophets, and frequently derived their names from the kings whose history they contained
Anoint - The private anointings, which we learn to have been performed by the Prophets, 2 Kings 9:3 , comp
Last - ...
Notes: (1) In Hebrews 1:2 , RV, "at the end of these days" (AV, "in these last days"), the reference is to the close of the period of the testimony of the Prophets under the Law, terminating with the presence of Christ and His redemptive sacrifice and its effects, the perfect tense "hath spoken" indicating the continued effects of the message embodied in the risen Christ; so in 1 Peter 1:20 , RV, "at the end of the times" (AV, "in these last times")
Neomenia - In the kingdom of the ten tribes, the serious among the people used to assemble at the houses of the Prophets, to hear their instructions
Sabbath - The sacrifices of the temple were doubled; the shew-bread was changed; the inner court of the temple was opened for solemn services: the Prophets and the Levites took the occasion for imparting religious instruction to the people
Palace - ...
The Prophets, particularly Amos, condemned the rich for building palaces at the expense of the poor
School - A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind as the schools of the Prophets
Jer'Icho - In its immediate vicinity the sons of the Prophets sought retirement from the world; Elisha "healed the spring of the waters;" and over against it, beyond Jordan, Elijah "went up by a whirlwind into heaven
Nahum (2) - " Moreover Nahum has none of the reproofs for national apostasy which abound in the other Prophets. Plainly, Nahum is the last of the Prophets of the Assyrian period
Persia - ...
Throughout the period, the Jews kept looking for the kind of restoration promised by Prophets such as Isaiah (Isaiah 40-66 ) and Ezekiel (Ezekiel 40-48 ). Prophets such as Haggai and Zechariah and Malachi helped the Jews to hope, but these men of God also reminded their hearers of the importance of present faithfulness and obedience to God
Zerubbabel - "Jehovah hereby stirred up the spirit of Zerubbabel (Haggai 1:14-15) and of Joshua, so that they rose up, came, and did work in the house of Jehovah of hosts, their God, in the 24th day of the sixth month, in the second year of Darius the king," "and with them were the Prophets of God helping them" (Ezra 5:1-2). This successful issue was mainly under God due to the Prophets who strengthened the hands of Zerubbabel and Jeshua
Desert, Wilderness - God’s care for the people in those days of wandering is repeatedly referred to by Prophets and psalmists (e. Psalms 78:40; Psalms 106:14), while on the other hand several of the Prophets seem to look on the time of the sojourn in the wilderness as the ideal period in the story of Israel’s relation to God (e
Spirit; Breath - There may be a suggestion of purposelessness, uselessness, or even vanity (emptiness) when rûach is used with this significance: “And the Prophets shall become wind, and the word is not in them …” ( Prophets, that follow their own spirits, and have seen nothing” (cf
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the Prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c. After the Babylonish captivity, and the last of the Prophets, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, the oracle ceased; but its revival was foretold by Ezra 2:63 , and accomplished by Christ, who was himself the oracle, under the old and new covenants, Genesis 15:1 ; John 1:1
Analogy of Faith - ‘But,' say some, ‘is not this mode of interpretation warranted by Apostolical authority? Does not Paul, Romans 12:6 , in speaking of the exercise of the spiritual gifts, enjoin the Prophets to prophesy κατα την αναλογιαν της πιστεως , according to the proportion of faith, as our translators render it, but as some critics explain it, according to the analogy of the faith?' Though this exposition has been admitted into some versions, and adopted by Hammond and other commentators, and may be called literal, it is suited neither to the ordinary meaning of the words, nor to the tenor of the context. The Prophets of God were not acted upon like machines in delivering their predictions, as the diviners were supposed to be among the Heathen, but had then, as at other times, the free use of their faculties, both of body and mind
Idol, Idolatry - The impious Jezebel endeavored to extinguish the worship of the Lord, by persecuting his Prophets, (who, as a barrier, still retained some of the people in the true religion,) till God, incensed at their idolatry, abandoned Israel to the kings of Assyria and Chaldea, who transplanted them beyond the Euphrates. The descriptions given by the Prophets of their irregularities and idolatries, of their abominations and lasciviousness on the high places and in woods consecrated to idols, and of their human sacrifices, fill us with dismay, and unveil the awful corruption of the heart of man
Old Testament - Christ Himself is the Prophet whose coming was heralded by Moses (Acts 3:22; Acts 7:37), and His death is the ‘fulfilling’ of ‘the things which God foreshewed by the mouth of all the Prophets’ (Acts 3:18). ), and points forward to the final restoration of all things ‘whereof God spake by the mouth of his holy Prophets which have been since the world began’ (Acts 3:21). Thus in his speech at Antioch he sets forth Jesus as the Saviour of David’s seed brought unto Israel ‘according to the promise,’ whose condemnation and death at the hands of the people and rulers of Jerusalem were the fulfilment of the words of the Prophets ‘which are read every sabbath,’ and His resurrection the bringing to pass of ‘the holy and sure blessings of David,’ as promised in Psalms 2, 8 (Acts 13:23 ff. The new faith of which he was called to be an Apostle is ‘the gospel of God, which he promised afore by his Prophets in the holy scriptures’ (Romans 1:1 f. ‘God, having of old time spoken unto the fathers through the Prophets in many parts and in many modes, hath at the end of these days spoken unto us in a Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, through whom also he made the worlds, who being the effulgence (ἀπαύγασμα) of his glory, and the very impress of his essence (χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ), and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had made purification of sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high’ (Hebrews 1:1 ff. The Aaronic priesthood was thus as imperfect a channel of the mediation of grace as the Prophets had been of the revelation of God’s mind. 2 Peter 2:5 ff, 2 Peter 2:15 f, 2 Peter 2:22) and 1 John (1 John 3:12) are of the same character; while the numerous reminiscences in Revelation, if not distinctively ethical, are yet concrete and imaginative, the clothing of the writer’s own dreams in the majestic symbolism of the OT poets and Prophets (see article Quotations)
Revelation of John, the - "The fellow servant of angels and brother of Prophets" (Revelation 22:9) is more likely to be the celebrated apostle John than any less known person bearing the name. Writing a revelation related to the Old Testament Prophets (Daniel especially), John, himself a Galilean Hebrew, reverts to their Hebraistic style. God has said "surely He will do nothing, but He revealeth His secret unto His servants the Prophets" (Amos 3:7). ...
The Jews had a succession of Prophets to guide them by the light of prophecy; He never would leave the New Testament church without similar guidance for the 1,700 or 1,800 years since John's age; what the Prophets were to the Jews, that Revelation is to us. "...
At the beginning John hastens, as is the tendency of all the Prophets, to the grand consummation (Revelation 1:7): "Beheld he cometh with clouds," etc
Oil - Several persons in the Old Testament were anointed with oil: kings (1 Samuel 10:1 ; 1 Samuel 16:13 ), priests (Leviticus 8:30 ), and possibly Prophets (1 Kings 19:16 ; Isaiah 61:1 )
Matthew, Gospel According to - The one aim prevading the whole book is to show that Jesus is he "of whom Moses in the law and the Prophets did write
Moon - Language which must have been derived from the appearance of the moon during eclipses is used by the Prophets
Transfiguration, the - Moses and Elijah represented the law and the Prophets respectively, which testify to but must give way to Jesus
Darkness - Third, God uses the darkness for his own purposes: to hide himself from the sight of men (Psalm 18:11 ; 1 Kings 8:12 ) and to bring his judgment on evildoers (Deuteronomy 28:28-29 ; Matthew 8:12 ; 22:13 ), evil nations (Ezekiel 30:18-19 ), and false Prophets (Jeremiah 23:12 ; Micah 3:6 ; Revelation 16:10 )
Canon of the Holy Scriptures - Of the Old Testament: the five books of Moses; Josue; Judges; Ruth; four books of Kings; two of Paralipomenon; two of Esdras; Tobias; Judith; Esther; Job; the Psalter; Proverbs; Ecclesiastes; Canticle of Canticles; Wisdom; Ecclesiasticus; Isaias; Jeremias with Baruch; Ezechiel; Daniel; the 12 minor Prophets; and two books of Machabees
Synagogue - The exiles gathered together for the reading of the law and the Prophets as they had opportunity, and after their return synagogues were established all over the land (Ezra 8:15 ; Nehemiah 8:2 )
Joseph - The critical verdict is that the story is based upon facts which have been idealized in the spirit of the earlier Hebrew Prophets
Famine And Drought - At times the coming of droughts and famines was predicted by Prophets (2 Kings 8:1 ; Isaiah 3:1 ; Jeremiah 14:12 ; Acts 11:28 )
Say, Speak, Answer - The phrase “thus says the Lord,” so frequent in the Prophets, has been analyzed as a message-formula
Time - (Concerning the time element in the writings of the Prophets see PROPHECY
Therapeutae - After their morning prayers, they spent the day in studying the law and the Prophets, endeavouring, by the help of the commentaries of their ancestors, to discover some allegorical meaning in every part
Council - They tried cases of idolatry and false Prophets
Gift, Giving - ...
Both Testaments witness to God's gift of leadership to God's people as: priests (Numbers 8:19 ; Zechariah 3:7 ); Davidic kings (2 Chronicles 13:5 ); deliverers (2 Kings 13:5 ); shepherds with Godlike hearts (Jeremiah 3:15 ); apostles, Prophets, evangelists, and pastor-teachers (Ephesians 4:11-12 )
Body of Christ - God calls leaders into His church; apostles, Prophets, evangelists, and pastor/teachers are designed to equip members to build up the body of Christ (Ephesians 4:11-16 )
Olives, Mount of - Far more interesting than these ecclesiastical inventions are the numerous ancient Jewish and early Christian tombs (especially the tomb of Nicanor the donor of the ‘Beautiful Gate’ of the Temple; the extraordinary labyrinth commonly known as the ‘Tombs of the Prophets’); and the fragments of mosaic found here from time to time which testify to the pious regard in which the mount was naturally held from early times
Prostitution - ...
The presence of both “secular” and “cult prostitutes” provided the Prophets with a powerful metaphor for the unfaithfulness of the people toward God
San'Hedrin - As a judicial body the Sanhedrin constituted a supreme court, to which belonged in the first instance the trial of false Prophets, of the high priest and other priests, and also of a tribe fallen into idolatry
Sama'Ria - He also makes it the burial-place of the Prophets Elisha and Obadiah
Build up - ...
This same verb is found in Ephesians 2 , describing the mystical body of Christ into which the Gentile believers are "built on the foundation of the apostles and Prophets" (v
Jehonadab - Jeremiah (Jeremiah 35) argues, a fortiori, if earthly sons so honour their father how much more ought Judah, to whom God hath commanded "Return ye now every man from his evil way" by His Prophets, "rising early and speaking," hearken to the heavenly Father; yet Judah has not done so
Baal - The Prophets Elijah and Elisha delivered the condemnation of God concerning Baal worship and tried to rid the land of the idolatry (1 Kings 18:17-40 ; 2 Kings 1:9-16 )
Bethel - It is noteworthy that Elijah is silent regarding the calf-worship at Bethel; and that a school of the Prophets, apparently in sympathy with him, flourished there ( 2 Kings 2:2 f
Judas - Judas and Silas are described as ‘chief men among the brethren’ ( Acts 15:22 ) and ‘prophets’ ( Acts 15:32 )
Saul - See Prophets
Servant, Service - ...
Doulos [ Revelation 15:3 ) and the Prophets (Revelation 10:7 )
Spiritualizing of the Parables - The traveller is Adam; Jerusalem is Paradise; Jericho is the world; the robbers are hostile demons; the Priest is the Law; the Levite is the Prophets; the Samaritan is Christ; the wounds are disobedience; the beast is the Lord’s body; the inn is the Church; the two denarii are the Father and the Son (the New and the Old Covenant, says Euthymius Zigabenus); the innkeeper is the Bishop
Scriptures - " (John 5:38) "Thy words were found, (said one of the Prophets) and I did eat them, and they were unto me the joy and rejoicing of my heart
Lamp - " (1 Samuel 3:3-4) Was not this emblematical of the Spirit of prophecy, that before one lamp of the Lord went out another should be lighted, before Eli was quite extinguished Samuel should be kindred? Do we not find it so through the church's history in all ages? Did not the spirit of Elijah rest on Elisha? Did not all the Prophets succeed one another in their ministry, as might best promote and carry on the Lord's cause in the earth? I do not presume to speak decidely upon the subject, but if the thought be right, is there not great sweetness in that Scripture explained in reference to this view, and with an eye to the Lord Jesus? "I have ordained a lamp for mine anointed
Sprinkling - I do not take upon me to determine the matter, but I would ask, is it not probable the custom was taken from Scripture? and is it not probable also that the meaning of it had an allusion to the precious doctrine of the application and sprinkling of the blood of Christ? It is worthy of farther remark, as an additional reason to this probability, that one of the Prophets when speaking of Christ, said that he should sprinkle many nations
Ai - The Prophets later referred to Ai as a symbol of the power of God who provided victory for his obedient people
Mischna - By these they were transmitted to the seventy elders; by them to the Prophets, who communicated them to the men of the great sanhedrim, from whom the wise men of Jerusalem and Babylon received them
Targum - The principal ones are the Pentateuch by Onkelos, and the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and the Prophets (except Daniel), by Jonathan Ben Uzziel
Pride - ” This noun is a poetic word, which is found only in poetic books, the Prophets (12 times in Isaiah), Moses’ song ( Elijah - There was, it is true, a personal appearance of Elijah with Moses, when the two in glory stood beside the transfigured Saviour on the holy mount, and talked with him of his coming death—a proof how both the law and the Prophets pointed to a Redeemer suffering ere he was triumphant
Mishna - By these they were transmitted to the seventy elders; by them to the Prophets, who communicated them to the men of the great sanhedrim, from whom the wise men of Jerusalem and Babylon received them
Carmel - It is memorable for frequent visits of the Prophets Elijah and Elisha, 2 Kings 2:25 4:25 , and especially for the destruction of the priests of Baal upon it, 1 Kings 18:1-46
Providence - , Psalms 104:1-35 ; Psalms 136:1-26 ); Prophets point to the proofs of God’s guidance in the past in order that the people may gain wisdom for the present and courage for the future ( Deuteronomy 32:7 ff
Time - ...
God, who at sundry times, and in divers manners, spoke in time past to the fathers by the Prophets
Jeroboam - The Prophets (Hosea 1:1 ), (Joel 3:16 ; Amos 1:1,2 ), (Amos 1:1 ), and Jonah (2 Kings 14:25 ) lived during his reign
Jeremiah - ...
...
One of the "greater Prophets" of the Old Testament, son of Hilkiah (q
Amos - Of the four Prophets of this time whose writings have been preserved in the Bible, the earliest was almost certainly Amos
Pammachius, a Roman Senator - After this we hear of Pammachius only in connexion with the Bible-work of Jerome, who dedicated to him his commentaries on the Minor Prophets (406) and Daniel (407), and at his request undertook the commentaries on Is
Adultery - The Old Testament Prophets repeatedly spoke of Israel’s unfaithfulness to God as spiritual adultery, or spiritual prostitution (Jeremiah 5:7; Jeremiah 23:10; 1618831508_98; Ezekiel 23:4-5; Ezekiel 23:11; Hosea 9:1; see PROSTITUTION)
John, the Letters of - 1 John 4:1 warns the church to test the spirits because “many false Prophets are gone out into the world. The false Prophets, who had gone out from the community, denied the incarnation (1 John 4:1-6 ). It may be that in an effort to prevent outsiders from spreading false teachings and dissension in the church he refused to receive any traveling Prophets or teachers
Idolatry - , when the earlier Jehovism was changing into typical Judaism, all such apparatus was felt to be wrong, and was attacked with increasing violence by Prophets and reformers, as their conception of God became more clear and spiritual. As with reforming Prophets, so with reforming kings. Prophets that prepared the way for the remarkable reformation under Josiah ( 2 Kings 22:1-20 ; 2 Kings 23:1-37 )
Scripture - Thus the words of Moses, David, Isaiah, and the other Prophets may be attributed directly to God (Romans 9:25, Hebrews 1:5 ff; Hebrews 5:5 f. The true servant of God believes ‘all things which are according to the law, and which are written in the Prophets’ (Acts 24:14), and sets an example to others not, even in their estimate of the apostles, to go ‘beyond the things which are written’ (1 Corinthians 4:6). There is frequent reference to the canonical groups of the ‘Law’ and the ‘Prophets
Messiah - Israelites of Old Testament times anointed kings, priests, and sometimes Prophets to their positions by the ceremony of anointing. ...
Messianic interpretations...
The idealism of the Prophets was not fulfilled in any of the Davidic kings of the Old Testament, but this did not cause the people of Israel to lose hope. As the Davidic kings in some way foreshadowed the king-messiah, so Israel’s Prophets in some way foreshadowed the prophet-messiah
Parable - ...
However, could Jesus' use of these symbols for God mean simply that he saw himself, as all of the Prophets did, as doing God's work and speaking God's word? A few of these parables, like the two houses and the two sons, with their particular focus on obedience to Jesus' word, could be interpreted in this way. But three points support the view that Jesus was in fact presenting himself as God: ...
None of the Prophets applied symbols for God to himself in the way that Jesus did so consistently in his parables. None of the Prophets claimed that they were doing or would do what the Scriptures specifically say that God will do
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - The supposition that we have here private prayers to be said before and after reception is excluded by the direction that "prophets" should be permitted to offer thanks as they pleased where it is plain that public thanksgiving is intended. treat of the honour to be paid to Christian teachers who are described as "apostles and Prophets. " Every true apostle was a prophet but only those Prophets received the name apostle who were not fixed in one place but accredited by churches on a mission to distant localities. Hilgenfeld's notion, that the Didaché is as late as Montanism, is condemned both by the whole character of the document and by its silence on the vital question in the Montanist controversy, whether true Prophets lost their self-command when prophesying. To the Prophets are to be given the first-fruits of all produce; "for they are your high priests. " If there are no Prophets, the first-fruits are to go to the poor. " These are to receive the same honour as the Prophets and teachers as fulfilling a like ministration. only of apostles Prophets and teachers; and of these apostles are only stranger visitors of the church and Prophets are men endowed with supernatural gifts of the Holy Ghost who may or may not be found in any particular church
Authority in Religion - On these two commandments hangeth the whole law and the Prophets. (a) Thus the preceptive portions of the OT, though mediated by ‘Moses and the Prophets,’ are really ‘the commandments of God. ’ Moses and the Prophets, quoad this matter, are, so to speak, merely the heralds of the ‘Great King,’ or, to borrow an OT account of the relation between the prophet and God, the former is the ‘mouth’ of the latter (Exodus 4:16; cf. In the parable of Dives and Lazarus, our Lord puts these very significant words into the mouth of Abraham, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them hear them’ (Luke 16:29). Further, Christ’s summaries of ‘the law and the Prophets’ (Matthew 7:12; Matthew 22:37 ff. ‘Whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, even so do ye also unto them,’ is, according to our Lord, but a just summary of ‘the law and the Prophets’ in terms that may be appreciated by the moral sense of all men. ‘Think not,’ said He, ‘that I am come to destroy the law or the Prophets: I came not to destroy, but to fulfil’ (Matthew 5:17). The former made it a charge against Him that He taught contrary to Moses and the Prophets; and the latter, strangely enough, has supposed that it honours Him by affirming the same
Synagogue - ...
As regards the furniture of the synagogue, the most important item was the chest or cupboard ( tçbâ , the ‘ark’), in which the sacred rolls of the Law and the Prophets were kept. the prayers, ( c ) the lessons from the Law and the Prophets, and ( d ) the priestly benediction. After the Law came, at the Sabbath morning service only a lesson from the Prophets, read by one person and left to his choice. The unique position of the Law in the estimation of the time is shown by the fact that the Pentateuch lessons had to be translated a verse at a time, while the Prophets might he rendered three verses at a time
Joel, Theology of - ...
Like that of other Prophets, Joel's theology is not set forth systematically. Joel does not appear to castigate his people for their sinfulness, as do other Prophets. Some support for the idea of a proclamation to the nations may be found in the reference to those who find security through the Lord's call (2:32) and the fact that sometimes God is said to extend his call through the work of Prophets (Jeremiah 35:15-17 ). ...
A great many interpreters, making a connection with Numbers 11:29 , see Joel as announcing the realization of a wish of Moses that all of the Lord's people be Prophets having God's Spirit
Mount of Olives - is sometimes known as the Hill of the Prophets, on account of the interesting old ‘Tomb of the Prophets’—a sepulchre generally believed, until recently,† Judgment Damnation - -Long before the days of the great Prophets, Israel worshipped Jahweh as a God of judgment. Not till we come to the great Prophets do judgment and justice appear as equivalent terms. The theatre of judgment is this earth: of reward or punishment beyond death the Prophets know nothing. That the correspondence between desert and lot in the existing order is but imperfect, and salvation an object of hope rather than of experience, are facts to which the Prophets are keenly alive. Compared with the outlook of the great Prophets, this conception of a resurrection of the dead for judgment and sentence is something altogether new. ...
Apocalyptic had its roots in the hope held up before Israel by the Prophets of a glorious day in the future, ‘the day of the Lord,’ when her oppressors would be overthrown, and she, purified by her sufferings, exalted to a position of unparalleled splendour and power. A fulfilment of the prophetic promise through the means that the Prophets had in view-inner reform, political revolution, a victorious leader-no longer seemed within the range of possibility
Sacrifice - -Before touching upon the priestly or Levitical sacrificial system, from which it is evident apostolic teaching chiefly drew its thought-forms and its sacrificial terminology, reference must be made to the attitude taken towards sacrifice by the OT Prophets, especially by those of the 8th century. It is not probable that the Prophets actually proposed the abolition of sacrifice, as some scholars have maintained. a purely spiritual worship, the Prophets denied that sacrifice in itself has efficacy with God, and that He has appointed it as essential to the ministry of His grace. In thus setting character before cultus the Psalmists join the Prophets, emphasizing at the same time the abiding value in the sight of God of penitential feeling (cf. The transition from the ethical ideals of the Prophets to the ceremonial ritual of the Levitical system carries us into a different world of sacrificial ideas; in many respects the change marks reaction; ethically it is on a lower plane, though it may possibly as a hard shell have preserved for future generations the kernel of the prophetic teaching regarding sacrifice. That such sinners might through confession and true penitence approach God, and through His grace, apart from sacrifice, meet with His mercy was the evangelical proclamation of the Prophets. Owing to the renewed authority of the teaching of the Prophets, and the widening distance from the Temple services of the multiplied congregations of the Dispersion, knowledge of the Law and the ethical value of good deeds became recognized forms of religious activity which were regarded as directly well-pleasing to God; the Rabbi and the scribe became at least complementary authorities, often indeed competitors with the priest and the Levite
Building - Israel's Prophets looked forward to a day when God's sanctuary would be forever among his people (Ezekiel 37:26-28 ; 43:1-7 ; Micah 4:1-2 ; Haggai 2:7 ; Zechariah 2 6:11-15 ; 8:3,23 ; 14:4 ). As a celebration of Jew-Gentile unity and equality in Christ, Ephesians 2:20-22 portrays the church as building ( oikodome [ Psalm 118:22 ; Isaiah 28:16 ; Matthew 21:42 ; Acts 4:11 ; 1 Peter 2:7 ) and provides the whole with life and growth (Ephesians 2:21 ), while the apostles and New Testament Prophets provide a solid foundation (2:20; cf
Monotheism - The bitter experiences of exile and suffering on the one hand, and on the other the lofty teachings of Prophets and men of God, had eradicated all tendencies to polytheism, and had fixed immovably in the conscience and conviction of the entire nation the faith that Jehovah was the one God of the whole earth. ...
Some of these expressions might, it is true, be satisfied by a wide conception, such as the ancient Prophets had formed, of a God of Israel to whom the sons of Israel were a first interest and charge, or even of a Sovereign the limits of whose sway left room for other sovereigns beside Him
Micah, Book of - Other Prophets, however, led the people to believe that this could never happen because God was residing in the nation and would protect them. Micah contended that the other Prophets' message was not from God
Nations - But when the belief in Jahweh’s absolute and exclusive claims possessed the mind of Israel, as it began to do in the time of the earliest literary Prophets (see Amos 9:1-15 ff. The teaching of the oldest Prophets looked in the same direction (see Amos 2:11 ; Amos 3:15 ; Ezekiel 48:1-35 ; Amos 5:25 ; Amos 6:8 ; Amos 8:5 , Hosea 2:19 ; Hosea 8:14 ; Hosea 9:10 ; Hosea 10:13 ; Hosea 12:7 ff; Hosea 14:4 , Isaiah 2:6 ; Isaiah 10:4 ; Isaiah 17:10 , Zephaniah 1:8 ; Zephaniah 1:11 , Jeremiah 35:1 ff; Jeremiah 37:6 f
Book(s) - ...
Also mentioned in 1,2Chronicles are books of various Prophets: the “Book of Samuel the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Book of Nathan the prophet” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ; 2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Gad the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Visions of Iddo the Seer against Jeroboam the Son of Nebat” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Shemaiah the Prophet and Iddo the Seer” (2 Chronicles 12:15 ), the “Story of the Prophet Iddo” (2 Chronicles 13:22 ), the “Book of Jehu the Son of Hanani” (2 Chronicles 20:34 ), the “Acts of Uzziah” (2 Chronicles 26:22 ; written by Isaiah), the “Vision of Isaiah the Prophet” (2 Chronicles 32:32 ), and the “Saying of the Seers” (2 Chronicles 33:19 ). ...
Books by the Prophets Isaiah (Isaiah 30:8 compare Isaiah 8:16 ) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:13 ; Jeremiah 30:2 ; Jeremiah 36:1 ; Jeremiah 45:1 ; Jeremiah 51:60 ,Jeremiah 51:60,51:63 ) are said to have written books
Levite - ...
Prophets . Though rarely referred to in the Prophets, and even then usually in the context of priests who are Levites, the Levites as distinct from the Zadokite priests are mentioned in Ezekiel 44:11
Predestination - God plans and makes his plans known, as he chooses, to his servants the Prophets (Amos 3:7 ). "...
Predetermined also, and thus mentioned variously in the Prophets, is the purpose of God to be fulfilled in a Messiah of the house of David (Isaiah 9:6-7 ; 11:1-9 ; Jeremiah 23:5-6 ; Ezekiel 34:23-24 ; 37:24-28 )
Kill, Killing - The killing of political opponents occurred during periods of revolution, in disputes with Prophets, or in the battle for succession to the throne. Gideon destroyed Peniel and its people when they refused his aid (Judges 8:17 ); Saul thought about killing Samuel (1 Samuel 16:2 ), and was successful in having the priests of Nob slain (1 Samuel 22:17 ); Jezebel killed the Prophets of Yahweh (1 Kings 18:13 ; cf
Legalism - The Prophets in particular denounce preoccupation with the niceties of sacrificial ritual while inward obedience expressed in justice, compassion, and humility is lacking (1 Samuel 15:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 ). The increased focus on the law during the postexilic era intensified the danger confronted by the earlier Prophets: concentration on the latter at the expense of the spirit
Habakkuk - The eighth of the Minor Prophets. It marks the beginnings of Hebrew reflective thought as to the workings of Providence in history, afterwards so powerfully expressed in Job and in the later Prophets
Cerinthians - He was certainly a Gnostic in his notion of the creation of the world, which he conceived to have been formed by angels; and his attachment to that philosophy may explain what otherwise seems inconsistent, that he retained some of the Mosaic ceremonies, such as the observance of Sabbaths and circumcision; though, like other Gnostics, he ascribed the law and the Prophets to the angel who created the world. The institution of the jubilee, and the glowing descriptions given by the Prophets of the restoration of the Jews, and the reign of the Messiah, may have led the later Jews to some of their mystical fancies; and when all these systems were blended together by the Gnostics, it is not strange, if a millennium formed part of their creed long before the time of Cerinthus
Poetry of the Hebrews - But in the Prophets and a few of the psalms, we find a less regular, and sometimes compound parallelism. ...
More than a third of the Old Testament is poetry in Hebrew, including most of Job, the Psalms, Solomon's books, and the greater part of the Prophets; technically, however, in the usage of the Jews, the three poetic books of the Old Testament are Job, Psalms, and Proverbs, which have a system of accentuation peculiar to themselves
Idol, Idolatry - God’s Prophets mocked these lifeless idols and denounced both those who made them and those who worshipped them (Psalms 115:4-8; Numbers 25:1-26; Isaiah 40:18-20; Isaiah 41:6-7; Isaiah 44:9-20; Isaiah 46:1-2; Isaiah 46:5-7). ...
The reason for the Prophets’ condemnation of idols was not just that idols were lifeless pieces of wood or stone, but that behind the idols were demonic forces
Daniel - ...
The book of Daniel...
Although the book of Daniel is commonly known as one of the Major Prophets, the Jews who arranged the books in their Bible included Daniel not among the Prophets but among the miscellaneous writings
Holy Spirit - By the time of the divided kingdom, the Spirit is beginning to inspire and empower Prophets, guiding individuals to specific places where they proclaim messages of salvation or judgment from God to appointed audiences (Elijah 1 Kings 18:12 ; 2 Kings 2:16 ; Micaiah 1 Kings 22:24 ; Azariah 2 Chronicles 15:1 ; Jahaziel 2 Chronicles 20:14 ; Zechariah son of Jehoiada 2 Chronicles 24:20 ). ...
The writing Prophets preserve many of the older insights about the Spirit but for the first time begin to disclose the coming of a new era in the Spirit's ministry. ...
Jesus agrees with the Old Testament Prophets that Scripture is Spirit-inspired (Matthew 22:43 , ; citing Acts 8:1-77 ). He inspires predictive prophecy (11:28; 21:11), even if it remains subject to potential misinterpretation by the Prophets in ways not found in the Old Testament. He echoes previous themes, seeing his own writing as Spirit-inspired (1 Corinthians 7:40 ), as with the ministry of apostles and Prophets more generally (Ephesians 3:5 ). He sanctifies (1 Peter 1:2 ), inspires Prophets (1 Peter 1:11-12 ; 2 Peter 1:21 ), vindicates Christ (1 Peter 3:18 ), and brings blessing to believers (1 Peter 4:14 )
Gospels - Hence by the reading of the law and the Prophets in the synagogues everywhere each sabbath proselytes of righteousness were gathered from the Gentiles, such as the eunuch or chamberlain of Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, a student of Scripture, Cornelius the centurion who "feared God with all his house, and gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God always. ...
The Jews' national rejection of Jesus is no valid objection to the gospel, since He foretold it Himself (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 26:2), and the Old Testament Prophets did so too (Isaiah 49:16; Isaiah 49:21; Isaiah 49:52; Isaiah 49:53; Psalm 22); so that, fixing their eyes on the prophecies of Messiah's glory and kingdom which they wrested to mean His setting up a temporal kingdom at Jerusalem and overthrowing the Roman existing dominion, and shutting their eyes to the prophecies of His humiliation, "they knew Him not, nor yet the voices of the Prophets which are read every sabbath," and yet in spite of themselves, like their types Joseph's brethren (Genesis 50:20), "they have fulfilled them in condemning Him" (Acts 13:27; Acts 3:18). The "prophets" in the Christian church who had the spiritual gift of "discerning spirits" were an effectual check on the introduction of a pseudo-inspired writing. 5), calls "the (written) Gospel the flesh of Jesus," and classes it with the Old Testament Prophets. ...
Matthew presumes his readers are familiar with Jewish usages and localities, and appeals to their Prophets continually
Apostles - The apostles represent the foundation of the church along with the Prophets (Ephesians 2:19-20 ; compare Ephesians 3:5 ). He also called his readers back to the authority of the Prophets and of the apostles (2 Peter 3:2 ). He called heaven, the Prophets, and the holy apostles to rejoice at the fall of Babylon (Revelation 18:20 )
King - In the Psalms and the Prophets God Himself is constantly designated ‘King of Israel’ or ‘my King’ ( e. David had the power to compass the death of Uriah and take his wife, but public opinion, as expressed by the Prophets, exerted a considerable influence on the kings (cf. We hear much from the Prophets of the oppression and injustice practised by these officials on the poor of the land (cf
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - ...
Certainly the most grievous examples of poverty and severest rebukes come from the Prophets. It should be noted, however, that the Prophets were not primarily spokespersons for the poor or the oppressed peoples; they were spokespersons for God. Prophets clearly called attention to the misuse of riches and the abuse of the poor but they were primarily messengers of the Lord
Bishop, Elder, Presbyter - They gradually absorbed the functions of the expiring charismatic ministry, and were at once Prophets and teachers, and they conducted the correspondence with other local churches. Montanism was a revolt against this official episcopacy-an attempt to restore the charismatic ministry of the Prophets, and when it failed, the triumph of episcopacy wag complete. As the specially gifted persons known as ‘apostles, Prophets, and teachers’ became less common, their functions would be transferred to the permanent local officials, especially to the highest of them, viz
Old Testament - The synagogue rolls contain separate from each other, the Pentateuch, the Haphtaroth or appointed sections of the Prophets, and the so-called Megilloth, viz. 3) containing the Prophets, on parchment, in small folio, although only dating, according to the inscription, from A. , Masoretic or Talmudic authority, those in the book of Genesis do not exceed eleven; those in the Psalms are proportionately three times as numerous; those in the historical books and the Prophets are proportionately more numerous than those in the Psalms
Ethics - As there is no systematic presentation of the subject, all that can be done is to gather from the Jewish and Christian writings the moral conceptions that were formed by historians, Prophets, poets, apostles. In the later Prophets, even when the soul of each man is deemed to be of immense interest ( Ezekiel 18:1-32 ), national ideals have the ascendency in thought. The Decalogue, which is an outline of the demands made by the Covenant on Israel, requires in its early clauses faith, reverence, and service; then ( Isaiah 25:8 , Commandments 5 to 9) the duty of man to man is set forth as part of man’s duty to Jehovah, for Moses and all the Prophets declare that God is pleased or displeased by our behaviour to one another. Nothing is more common in the Prophets than complaints of a disposition to neglect the former ( Isaiah 1:11 f. The Prophets were glad to think that God was not limiting Himself to the letter of the Covenant, the very existence of which implied that Jehovah, in the greatness of His love, had chosen Israel to be His peculiar treasure
Miracle - The next major cluster of miracles involves the Prophets Elijah and Elisha. The predominant purpose behind the miracles of these two Prophets is to demonstrate Yahweh's superiority over Baal and to call God's people back to worship him. The classic expression of this combat comes at Carmel, as fire from heaven consumes Elijah's sacrifice and the Prophets of Baal are destroyed (1 Kings 18:16-40 ). Both Prophets, too, work Scripture's first miraculous resuscitations (1 Kings 17:17-24 ; 2 Kings 4:8-37 ). The Prophets speak of present and future signs, some more supernatural than others, to corroborate their message
Molech, Moloch - The Prophets undoubtedly regarded the cult as foreign, and as an apostasy to heathenism
Canon (1) - '" ...
The ancient canon of the books of the Old Testament, ordinarily attributed to Ezra, was divided into the law, the Prophets, and the hagiographia, to which our Saviour refers, Luke 24:45
Zechariah -
A prophet of Judah, the eleventh of the twelve minor Prophets
Elam - Prophets mentioned Elam in oracles
Blasphemy - Specifically mentioned were the instances of the golden calf (Nehemiah 9:18 ) and the harsh treatment of the Prophets (Nehemiah 9:26 )
Malachi - ) The usual understanding, however, is that the writer, in calling himself Malachi, is introducing himself by his name, as do the other writing Prophets
Micah, Book of - Of the four eighth century Prophets whose writings have been preserved in the Old Testament, Micah was the last
Hand - " "The hand of the Lord on" the Prophets is the Holy Spirit's extraordinary and powerful impulse, His felt impression inspiring them (1 Kings 18:46; 2 Kings 3:15; Ezra 1:3; Ezra 3:14)
Rapture Ecstasy - When the Prophets felt that the hand of the Lord was upon them, there would doubtless have been the exaltation of spirit and the entrance upon the higher transcendent experiences, accompanied more or less by a cataleptic condition of the body
Word - )...
Prophets, for example, were God’s spokesmen, and their announcements were the authoritative Word of God for his people (Isaiah 1:2-4; Isaiah 1:18; Jeremiah 23:22; Ezekiel 1:3; Hosea 4:1; Joel 1:1; Amos 1:3; Hebrews 1:1-2; see PROPHECY)
Cuttings in the Flesh - The custom is referred to without condemnation by the pre-Deuteronomic Prophets, see Hosea 7:14 (corrected text, as RVm Reconciliation - They are all built on the foundation of the apostles and Prophets with Christ as the Chief Cornerstone
Laying on of Hands - Similarly the Prophets and teachers of the church at Antioch laid their hands on Saul and Barnabas in order to "separate" them for their ground-breaking mission work (Acts 13:3 )
Law of Christ - ...
Help is found in the Prophets
Honest - The burden of the social-reform Prophets of the OT is repeated in the denunciations of the unscrupulously rich-‘Behold, the hire of the labourers, who mowed your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth out’ (James 5:4)
Incense - Hence the denunciations of the Prophets (Isaiah 1:13 etc
Keys - The knowledge from which the people are thus excluded is ‘that of the way of salvation’ (Plummer), or, more profoundly, that knowledge of the Lord, for lack of which the ‘people perish’ (Hosea 4:6), to seek which they had been urged by the Prophets (cf
Ashdod - ...
The Prophets of Israel spoke about the city of Ashdod in various military, political and moral contexts (Nehemiah 13:23-24 ; Isaiah 20:1-6 ; Jeremiah 25:20 ; Amos 1:8 ; Zechariah 9:6 )
Ahab - Other Prophets do not seem to have been disturbed, for we find them at the court of Ahab in the last year of his life ( 1 Kings 22:6 )
Debt - ’ That loans played a large part in social life is shown by frequent references in the Prophets, Psalms, and Proverbs ( Isaiah 24:2 , Psalms 15:5 ; Psalms 37:21 , Proverbs 19:17 ; Proverbs 28:8 )
Burden - ...
Lamentations 2:14 (b) The word is used here to describe the false information given by false Prophets to bring fear upon the people
Zacharias - As Zacharias' prayer for vengeance is the judicial side of God's word by His Prophets (Revelation 6:9-11; Luke 18:7), so Stephen's prayer is the gospel loving side of it (Acts 7:60)
Jehu - A young man of the Prophets, who had been sent by Elisha, arrived at the camp and said he had a message for Jehu
Avenge - ...
The Prophets frequently speak of God’s “vengeance” on His enemies: Be - ...
The Prophets use hâyâh to project God’s intervention in the future
Ephraim - At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the Prophets
Thirteen - ...
eze13 - This records the wrath of GOD against the Prophets of Israel
Gilgal - The two Prophets went 'down' from Gilgal to Bethel, whereas when No
Poor - ...
The Prophets especially vindicate the claims of the poor: compare Ezekiel 18:12; Ezekiel 18:16-17; Ezekiel 22:29; Jeremiah 22:13; Jeremiah 22:16; Jeremiah 5:28; Isaiah 10:2; Amos 2:7, "pant after the dust of the earth on the head of the poor," i
Test - ...
The verb occurs fewer than 35 times in the Old Testament, mainly in the Prophets and in the Book of Psalms
Court - ” In the Hebrew Old Testament, châtsêr appears about 190 times; its usage is welldistributed throughout, except for the minor Prophets
Malachi - The last of the minor Prophets
Whoring, To Go; Harlot, To Be - This theme of religious harlotry looms large in the Prophets who denounce this backsliding in no uncertain terms
Sacrifice - ...
The Prophets looked with condemnation on apostate Israel’s “sacrifices”: “To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the Lord: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats” ( Kingdom - Campbell, in which there is a manifest allusion to the predictions in which the dispensation of the Messiah was revealed by the Prophets in the Old Testament, particularly by Daniel, who mentions it as "a kingdom which the God of heaven would set up, and which should never be destroyed,"...
Daniel 2:44
Manasseh - The Lord being provoked by so many crimes, threatened him by his Prophets, "I will blot out Jerusalem as a writing is blotted out of a writing tablet
Naaman - I refer the reader to the article Leper, for farther remarks on the nature of the disease itself, and shall only add on that subject, that if such was the power of the servant of the prophet in his Master's name, instantly to cure this Syrian, what may we suppose, is the sovereign power and grace of the Lord God of the Prophets, to heal all the leprosies of the souls of his people! Would to God (I would say in the words of the poor captive to her mistress) every poor sinner convinced by the Holy Ghost of his leprous state of sin, were with the Lord Jesus Christ, the Almighty prophet of his church and people, for He would recover him of his leprosy! (See 2 Kings 5:1-27 throughout
Daniel - With respect to the genuineness and authenticity of the book of Daniel, there is abundance both of external and internal evidence; indeed all that can well be had or desired in a case of this nature: not only the testimony of the whole Jewish church and nation, who have constantly received this book as canonical, but of Josephus particularly, who recommends him as the greatest of the Prophets; of the Jewish Targums and Talmuds, which frequently cite and appeal to his authority; of St
Dispensation, - Connected with this was prophetic testimony: the law and the Prophets were until John
Anointing - Anointing with oil was a rite of inauguration into each of the three typical offices of the Jewish commonwealth, (a) Prophets were occasionally anointed to their office, 1 Kings 19:16, and are called messiahs, or anointed
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - The Prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Matthew 16:28; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Kingdom of God - The Prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Kingdom of Heaven - The Prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Samaria - The Prophets often denounced it for its idolatry, Isaiah 9:9 Ezekiel 16:46-63
Edom, Edomites - This deepened the old-time enmity, and called forth bitter denunciations and predictions of vengeance from Israel’s Prophets (cf
mo'ab - (Isaiah 15,16,25:10-12 ) predicts the utter annihilation of the Moabites; and they are frequently denounced by the subsequent Prophets
Isaiah, the Book of - Thus they say that some five or seven, or even more, unknown Prophets had a hand in the production of this book
Joel, Book of - Of the minor Prophets, Joel is judged to be the earliest in connection with Judah, though there are no dates given in the prophecy itself
Ephraim - At the division of the tribes Ephraim took the most prominent place; Shechem and Samaria being in their territory naturally contributed to this, and accounts for the ten tribes being constantly called 'Ephraim' by the Prophets
Revela'Tion of st. John, - Lastly, the writer was a fellow servant of angels and a brother of Prophets
Joash - God sent them Prophets, but they would not hear
Josiah - He burnt the bones of the false Prophets on their altar, after which he destroyed it (2 Kings 23:15-20; cf
Mouth Lips - , through the ‘mouth’ of David (Acts 1:16; Acts 4:25) or of the Prophets (Acts 3:18; Acts 3:21)
Incense - Hence the denunciations of the Prophets (Isaiah 1:13 etc
Pamphilus, Presbyter of Caesarea - Jerome gloried in the possession of Origen's commentaries on the Minor Prophets in 25 volumes in Pamphilus's autograph
Jews - But we soon after find Malachi, the last of the Prophets under the Old Testament, reproving both priests and people very severely, not for idolatry, but for their scandalous lives and gross corruptions. To this corruption and misconduct, and to the increasing wickedness of the people, their sufferings ought indeed to be attributed, according to the express declarations of God by the mouth of his Prophets. The Jews divide the books of the Old Testament into three classes: the law, the Prophets, and the hagiographa, or holy writings. The most ancient are that of Onkelos on the law, and that of Jonathan Ben Uzziel on the Prophets: the former is supposed to be of greater antiquity than the latter, and it approaches, in simplicity and purity of style, to the Chaldee of Daniel and Ezra. The Targum on the Prophets is believed to have been written before the birth of Christ; and, though inferior in respect of style to the Targum of Onkelos, is much superior to any other Targum. When Joshua died, all the interpretations he had received from Moses, as well as those made in his time, were transmitted to the elders: they conveyed them to the Prophets, and by one prophet they were delivered to another. That whatever is taught by the Prophets is true. The portion read from the law is followed by a portion from the Prophets
Amos, Theology of - Like all biblical Prophets, Amos spoke the oracles of Yahweh, Israel's God, to people in a particular context. In this he is comparable to other Prophets whose utterances include oracles about foreign nations (cf. Subsequently, these territories were controlled by David (2 Samuel 8:1-14 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 4:21,24 ) and, ultimately, they will be included in the messianic kingdom envisioned by the Prophets. People who have rejected the ministry of Yahweh's Prophets will experience a famine for the word of Yahweh and will search for it everywhere, but without success (2:12; 7:12-16; 8:11-12). Seemingly implied in verse 11 is what other Prophets state explicitly, namely, that Yahweh will restore a united kingdom over which an eschatological David will preside (cf. Craigie, The Twelve Prophets ; R
Woe - As in the mouth of the OT Prophets, so in His, ‘the word of Yahwè must of necessity be a word of woe to a sinful people’
The lawyers are then condemned for amplifying the written Law with their intolerably burdensome enactments, which they contrive to evade themselves, while so rigorous in exacting obedience to them from others (Luke 11:46); for their zeal in the erection and adornment of the tombs of the Prophets, which, in bitter irony, is pronounced to be a sign of their continuing the work of the murderers of the Prophets (Luke 11:47-48; Wendt, i. The final Woe was pronounced with a stinging reference to the honours they were paying to the Prophets whom their fathers killed (Matthew 23:29-31); and, the cup of His indignation brimming over at the thought of His own impending death at their hands, He said, ‘Fill ye up then the measure of (the sins of) your fathers’ (Matthew 23:32)
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - Many of the Prophets were hostile toward the abuses of the priests and the excesses of the priesthood, but they did not condemn the priesthood, itself. In fact, some Prophets were members of the Temple personnel. The Prophets functioned mainly as “messengers” of their God. See Prophets; Priests ; High Priest ; Levite; Temple
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - They did not want simply to jettison their Jewish heritage, but sought genuinely to understand how the "word" spoken through the Prophets related to the new "word" now revealed in Christ (this applies even to Paul, whose "not under law, but under grace" [1] looks at first sight like wholesale rejection of the Old Testament ). ...
Matthew has a special fondness for the messianic prophecies in Isaiah (1:23; 2:23; 4:15-16; 8:17; 12:17-21) and other Prophets (2:6,17; 21:5; 26:31). Only Prophets and other leaders were anointed with the Spirit in the Old Testament. Hence the shocking nature of Jesus' encouragement actually to ask God for the Holy Spirit (Luke 11:13 )! So now, possessing the Spirit in common, the whole church occupies a prophetic status, admitted like the Prophets of the old covenant into the presence of God himself and is now enabled to share the worship of heaven by the Spirit, and to "worship in spirit and in truth" ( John 4:24 ), rather than through a program of ritual
the Disobedient Prophet - There are Prophets and Prophets' sons all this time at Bethel. ...
...
And then this-follow your conscience to the end, let men and angels say what they will, A man is but a man: an angel is but an angel: and false Prophets have come out into the world. My conscience, accordingly, is more to me than all Prophets and apostles and preachers, and very angels themselves
Advent (2) - It fired the imagination of the Prophets amid the troubles of the later monarchy. We see there, amid the stress of national misfortunes, the prediction of the Prophets interpreted and expanded in such a way as to furnish elaborately drawn out schemes of future glory. Notwithstanding the supernatural elements they so largely introduce, they throw into strong relief the higher religious conceptions which the best of the Prophets had insisted on as essentially bound up with the great period of blessing expected; while the scope of the ancient promise is widened out beyond national and temporal limitations to embrace the world and the life to come. ...
Meanwhile the scribes were at work, hardening the Messianic idea into scholastic form, and reducing the poetic language and bold imagery of the Prophets to dogmatic statements and literal details, with the result, on the whole, of a restoration of the theocratic idea that God was to vindicate His authority as the true Sovereign of the nation, and to send His vicegerent in the line of David to establish His law and introduce the rule of righteousness under His anointed King
Wisdom - ’ Not only laid the Prophets hand down the literary forms through which the sages expressed themselves, e. ’ These were: ( a ) monotheism, which found free course in Deuteronomy, Jeremiah, and Deutero-Isaiah; ( b ) individualism, or the responsibility of the individual before God for his own sins and for the sins of no one else the great message of Ezekiel; and ( c ) the insistence of God upon right character as the only passport to His favour a truth proclaimed by all the great Prophets. The task of the sage was to adjust the truths left to him by the Prophets to the new situation
Amos - Amos, the earliest of the Prophets whose writings have come down to us, and the initiator of one of the greatest movements in spiritual history, was a herdsman, or small sheep-farmer, in Tekoa, a small town lying on the uplands some six miles south of Bethlehem. Amos disclaimed all connexion with the hireling Prophets whose ‘word’ was dictated by the immediate political and personal interest. Smith, Twelve Prophets , i
Widow - The Prophets were the champions of exploited widows. His Prophets were sent as messengers with the directive to his people: "Don't hurt my little ones. Limburg, The Prophets and the Powerless ; S
Gnostics - Since they held that the supreme God was revealed for the first time to mankind by Christ, he could not have been the God who inspired the Prophets; and yet, with that strange inconsistency which we have already observed in them, they appealed to these very Scriptures in support of their own doctrines. They believed the Prophets to have been inspired by the same creative aeon, or the same principle of evil, which acted originally upon matter; and if their writings had come down to us, we should perhaps find them arguing, that, though the Prophets were not inspired by the supreme God, they still could not help giving utterance to truth
Power - A vague attempt at assimilation likened Him to one of the Prophets (Matthew 16:14), and Herod saw in Him the risen John the Baptist (Mark 6:16), but otherwise His life and character were ever recognized as unique and beyond comparison (see Awe). His works were stated by Himself to have been wrought in God (John 14:10), who also had sent Him (John 9:4, John 16:28); and His day had been foreseen by Abraham (John 8:56) and Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1-2), and by the Prophets generally (Luke 24:27). By its connexion with the One Name of which the OT spoke it fulfilled the vision of the Prophets which Judaism had obscured, and, on the other hand, included in due place and proportion those gifts for physical need and circumstance that had been the crown and consummation of Gentile desire (Matthew 6:33)
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - In the services of the synagogue He would be familiar not only with the recognized reading of the Law in accordance with the prescribed practice and order, and may even have been frequently called upon in His youth to read, but in the chief Sabbath service He would also become familiar with passages read from the Prophets. This is at least a possible fancy, and if it is true, it would form an excellent training for His subsequent service as a deeper interpreter of the inner meaning of both Law and Prophets. A general reference to the ill-treatment of the Prophets at the hands of their countrymen is made in the pathetic lament over Jerusalem, attributed to our Lord in Matthew 23:37, Luke 13:34, while a more specific reference is contained in the immediately preceding verses in Mt. The passage referred to is contained in Matthew 23:29-36, where the religious teachers are spoken of as those who ‘build the sepulchres of the Prophets and garnish the tombs of the righteous, and who say, If we had been in the days of our fathers, we should not have been partakers with them in the blood of the Prophets. So far as the available evidence is concerned, it would seem, as we might expect, that the writings which were most familiar to Him were those in which the spirit of the Prophets reached its highest level, and on which His countrymen and fellow-religionists had most perfectly matured their own spiritual life—such books as Isaiah, the Psalms, and that most spiritual setting forth of the Law, the Book of Deuteronomy. There is another of the Prophets—in all likelihood a native of Galilee, where our Lord Himself was brought up—who seems to have influenced His thought and teaching not a little, viz
Samuel - He established regular services at Shiloh, where he built an altar; and at Ramah he gathered a company of young men around him and established a school of the Prophets. The schools of the Prophets, thus originated, and afterwards established also at Gibeah, Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho, exercised an important influence on the national character and history of the people in maintaining pure religion in the midst of growing corruption
Exodus - The Prophets constantly reminded Israel that election and covenant were closely related to the Exodus (Isaiah 11:16 ; Jeremiah 2:6 ; Jeremiah 7:22-25 ; Ezekiel 20:6 ,Ezekiel 20:6,20:10 ; Hosea 2:15 ; Hosea 11:1 ; Amos 2:10 ; Amos 3:1 ; Micah 6:4 ; Haggai 2:5 ). When the kingdom of God did not come, the later Prophets began to look for a second Exodus
Jehoiakim - ) Jehoiakim showed his vindictive malice against Jehovah's Prophets. Jehoiakim "slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people," instead of burial in the cemetery of the Prophets (Matthew 23:29)
Perseverance - 17-18); Isaac, Noah, and the Prophets stood fast (4Macc 13:12; 15:31; 16:21); the mother and her seven sons withstood the cruelty of the tyrant (16:1; 17:7) and conquered him (1:11). While the Prophets were examples of patience (makrothymia [5:10, a term meaning "longsuffering" or "forbearance" ), Job's experience mirrored perseverance
Prophet, Christ as - Therefore, this passage at once provides for a whole order, or institution of Prophets, while it incorporates within that same seminal thought the provision for one who would be the representative of all of Prophets par excellence
Numbers as Symbols - In some cases the symbolical number may be discovered where the numeral itself is not mentioned: as, for instance, under three we may class the law, the psalms, and the Prophets; spirit, soul, and body, etc. The scriptures, comprising the law, the Prophets, and the psalms, bore witness to Christ
Call, Called, Calling - Not only was Israel thus called as the people of God, but complaint is again and again made by the Prophets that they refused to hearken and stopped their ears that they should not hear (Isaiah 6:9, Zechariah 7:11-13). The Prophets, moreover, had visions of the day when the Gentiles should be called into the covenant and service of Jahweh (Isaiah 55:4-5)
Ordination - In opposition to episcopal ordination, they urge that Timothy was ordained by the laying on of the hands of the presbytery, 1 Timothy 4:14 ; that Paul and Barnabas were ordained by certain Prophets and teachers in the church of Antioch, and not by any bishop presiding in that city, Acts 13:1-3 ; and that it is a well known fact, that presbyters in the church of Alexandria ordained even their own bishops for more than two hundred years in the earliest ages of Christianity. Watts, that since there are some texts in the New Testament, wherein single persons, either Apostles, as Paul and Barnabas, ordained ministers in the churches, or evangelists, as Timothy and Titus; and since other missions or ordinations are intimated to be performed by several persons, namely, Prophets, teachers, elders, or a presbytery, Acts 13:1 ; 1 Timothy 4:14 ; since there is sometimes mention made of the imposition of hands in the mission of a minister, and sometimes no mention is made of it; and since it is evident that in some cases popular ordinations are and must be valid without any bishop or elder,—I think none of these differences should be made a matter of violent contest among Christians; nor ought any words to be pronounced against each other by those of the episcopal, presbyterian, or independent way
Minister - , Mark 1:31 ; Luke 10:40 , "serve;" John 12:2 , "served;" (c) of relieving one's necessities, supplying the necessaries of life, Matthew 25:44 ; 27:55 ; Mark 15:41 ; Acts 6:2 , "serve;" Romans 15:25 ; Hebrews 6:10 ; more definitely in connection with such service in a local church, 1 Timothy 3:10,13 , [1]; (d) of attending, in a more general way, to anything that may serve another's interests, as of the work of an amanuensis, 2 Corinthians 3:3 (metaphorical): of the conveyance of materials gifts of assisting the needy, 2 Corinthians 8:19,20 , RV, "is ministered" (AV, "is administered"); of a variety of forms of service, 2 Timothy 1:18 ; of the testimony of the OTs Prophets, 1 Peter 1:12 ; of the ministry of believers one to another in various ways, 1 Peter 4:10,11 (not here of discharging ecclesiastical functions). In the NT (see Note below) it is used (a) of the Prophets and teachers in the church at Antioch, who "ministered to the Lord," Acts 13:2 ; (b) of the duty of churches of the Gentiles to "minister" in "carnal things" to the poor Jewish saints at Jerusalem, in view of the fact that the former had "been made partakers" of the "spiritual things" of the latter, Romans 15:27 ; (c) of the official service of priests and Levites under the Law, Hebrews 10:11 (in the Sept
Interpretation - They will understand the messages of the Old Testament Prophets and the New Testament letter-writers only as they understand the circumstances in which the writers wrote. Psalms and many of the Prophets)
Worship - It was the time for the Prophets, men who believed themselves and were believed by their brethren to be specially taught by the Holy Spirit, to take part. When the Prophets were silent, first one, then another, and sometimes two at once, began strange ejaculatory prayers, in sentences so rugged and disjointed that the audience for the most part could not understand, and had to wait till some of their number, who could follow the strange utterances, were ready to translate them into intelligible language. Sometimes during the meeting, at some part of the services, but oftenest when the Prophets were speaking, there was a stir at the back of the room, and a heathen, who had been listening in careless curiosity or in barely concealed scorn, suddenly felt the sinful secrets of his own heart revealed to him, and pushing forward fell down at the feet of the speaker and made his confession, while the assembly raised the doxology: “Blessed be God, the Father of the Lord Jesus, for evermore. But let the Prophets give thanks as much as they will’ (x. 67, repeating his account of the Eucharist, emphasizes the fact that it is celebrated on Sunday, and adds that the Gospels are read ‘or the writings of the Prophets, as long as time permits
Lord's Supper. (i.) - But whether the average Hebrew recognized the sacramental character is doubtful, for the great Prophets constantly warn the people that the mere ritual performance of sacrifice is inefficacious. Some, especially the earlier Prophets, often seem to disparage offerings entirely, as though the only worship with which Jehovah is well pleased is the spiritual service of moral character and a contrite heart. And yet the Prophets employ symbolic action again and again in the service of an ideal spirituality, so that in itself symbol has been a widespread and perfectly legitimate means of grace. The transcendental element in worship, however brightly or faintly the contemporary life of Israel may have been illumined by the spiritual truth of the Prophets, had all but vanished from the official Judaism of our Lord’s day. He discovers and applies to Himself the title ‘Son of Man,’ and in virtue of His position inaugurates changes in religion which constitute a breach with the past, for His doctrine concerning worship, foreshadowed by the Prophets, antiquates bloody sacrifices and opaque ritual
Elisha - " He was subordinate; so the sons of the Prophets represent it: "Jehovah will take away thy master (Elijah) from thy head" (2 Kings 2:3). At Bethel, on his way from Jericho to Carmel (2 Kings 2:23), where he had been with Elijah (2 Kings 2:2), he was met by "young men" (narim , not "little children"), idolaters or infidels, who, probably at the prompting of Baal's Prophets in that stronghold of his worship sneered at the report of Elijah's ascension: "Go up" like thy master, said they, "thou bald head" (qereach , i. In a time of dearth (2 Kings 4:38), perhaps the same as that in 2 Kings 8:1-2, one of the sons of the Prophets brought in a lap full of gourds or wild cucumbers, off a plant like a wild vine, the only food to be had; the effect in eating was such that one exclaimed, "There is death in the pot. ...
Next, a man of Baal Shalisha brings firstfruits (paid to the Prophets in the absence of the lawful priests: Numbers 18:8; Numbers 18:12; Deuteronomy 18:3-4), namely, 20 small loaves of new barley, and full green ears of grain roasted, esteemed a delicacy (Leviticus 2:14; Leviticus 23:14), in his garment (margin) or bag. During Elisha's residence at Jericho, the numbers of the sons of the Prophets increasing, the place became "too strait" for them. There Elisha anointed Jehu, by the hand of one of the children of the Prophets, to take vengeance on Ahab's guilty seed, having been witness of that monarch's wicked seizure of Naboth's vineyard and of Elijah's awful sentence on him (2 Kings 9:26)
Beatitude - ‘Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the Prophets which were before you. ...
Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the Prophets which were before you. ...
Rejoice in that day, and leap for joy: for behold, your reward is great in heaven: for in the same manner did their fathers unto the Prophets. The Apostles will have the privilege of bearing ‘the reproach of Christ,’ and as sharers in the experience of the Prophets they shall receive the Prophets’ reward (cf. The ‘Beatitudes’ reveal the nature of true blessedness and the conditions of its attainment; they reflect the light which shines from the Hebrew Scriptures that declare the blessedness of the righteous; but they are illumined not only by the Prophets and Psalmists who went before, but also by the Apostles and Teachers who come after
Litany of Loreto - ...
Queen of Prophets, pray for us
Temple, the Second - In the second year of this monarch the work of rebuilding the temple was resumed and carried forward to its completion (Ezra 5 :: 617-17 ; 6:1-15 ), under the stimulus of the earnest counsels and admonitions of the Prophets Haggai and Zechariah
Bethel - This accounts for a school of Prophets of Jehovah being there in Elijah's time (2 Kings 2:2-3)
Epistle - The epistles are the inspired commentaries unfolding the truths in the histories, the Gospels, and Acts; just as the Prophets interpret the spiritual lessons designed by God to be drawn from the Old Testament histories
Holy Ghost - The former by immediate inspiration, making men Prophets, the latter by his regenerating and sanctifying influences making men saints
Gath - This conclusion is reinforced by the fact that Gath is obviously omitted in the lists of Philistine sites mentioned by the Prophets (Jeremiah 25:20 ; Amos 1:6-8 ; Zephaniah 2:4 ; 1618831508_1 )
Theophany - Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel, giants among the Prophets, saw God in visions (Isaiah 6:1 ; Ezekiel 1:1 ; Daniel 7:9 )
Directions (Geographical) - ...
Some Prophets spoke of the enemy from the north, which was called the punishing tool of God on Israel
Loreto, Litany of - ...
Queen of Prophets, pray for us
Age, Ages - Normally the "ages to come" are invoked by the Prophets to underscore God's unending blessings for his people (1 Timothy 6:17-19 ; Daniel 7:18 )
Tyre - They are not called a church, yet among them were some who spoke ‘through the Spirit,’ with the rapt utterance of NT Prophets
Torment - Of mental torment we have instances in 2 Peter 2:8, where Lot is said to have ‘vexed’ (Revised Version margin ‘tormented’) his soul with the lawless deeds of his neighbours; in Revelation 11:10 : ‘These two Prophets tormented them that dwell on the earth’; in 4 Ezr 5:34 : ‘My reins torment (torquent) me every hour while I labour to comprehend the way of the Most High’; and in 7:64: ‘By reason of this we are tormented (cruciamur), because we perish and know it
Caesarea Philippi - When He asked them who men said He was, they answered that people were identifying Him with Elijah, John the Baptist, or one of the Prophets (Mark 8:27-33 ; Matthew 16:13-23 )
Lamentations, Book of - Lamentations 4:1 vividly pictures the horrors of the siege and fall of Jerusalem and places part of the blame for the judgment on the immoral Prophets and priests of the city
Obadiah, Book of - (oh buh di' uh) The shortest book of the Minor Prophets, preserving the message of Obadiah, the prophet
Element - By these ‘elements of the beginning of the oracles of God’ the writer means the primary and simplest truths of God’s revelation of Himself in the Prophets and in Christ
Lie, Lying - The moral reprobation of falsehood reaches its climax in the utterances of the Prophets
Micah, Micaiah - The parable which the prophet then utters is a terrible indictment against the ‘lying Prophets’ of Israel; the blow which one of them thereupon gives him is answered by a further prophecy, this time directed against the false prophet who gave the blow
Shame - "...
The word-group for shame ("disconcerted, " "disappointed, " "confounded") occurs in the Old Testament most frequently in the Wisdom Literature and in the Prophets (especially Isaiah and Jeremiah)
Harlot - From glimpses of social life afforded us by the Prophets (e
Baal, Master - ...
Among the Prophets, Jeremiah and Hosea mention Baal most frequently
Anger (Wrath) of God - ...
Yet the wrath of God remains an essential element of His revelation through the Prophets, a real Divine attribute, conplementary, not antithetic to the Divine mercy (Isaiah 1:18-20 ; Isaiah 5:25 ; Isaiah 42:25 ; Isaiah 54:8 )
Evil Spirits - Jeremiah denies the inspiration of lying Prophets, and makes them entirely responsible for their own words and influence ( 1 Chronicles 23:16 ; 1 Chronicles 23:21 ; 1 Chronicles 23:25 f
Babblings - ’ To this masterly characterization ‘of the evil excesses of some of the Prophets, lunatic preachers, and loquacious hypocrites’ in Puritan times may be added R
Apostasy - ...
The Prophets picture Israel's history as the history of turning from God to other gods, from His law to injustice and lawlessness, from His anointed king to foreign kings, and from His word to the word of foreign kings
Amos, Book of - Though Amos and Hosea were Prophets at the same time, and both prophesied of the sins of Israel, there is much difference in the style of the two
Manasseh - He was warned by God's Prophets, but ceased not to do evil
Companion - The Prophets charged Israel with breaking the commandment: They oppressed each other ( Death - In the poetic language, mâveth is used more often than in the historical books: Job-Proverbs (about 60 times), Joshua-Esther (about 40 times); but in the major Prophets only about 25 times
Ezekiel - He may be compared to the Grecian AEschylus; he displays a rough but majestic dignity; an unpolished though noble simplicity; inferior perhaps in originality and elegance to others of the Prophets, but unequalled in that force and grandeur for which he is particularly celebrated, He sometimes emphatically and indignantly repeats his sentiments, fully dilates his pictures, and describes the idolatrous manners of his countrymen under the strongest and most exaggerated representations that the license of eastern style would admit
Philistines - They regained their full liberty, however, under the later kings of Judah; and we see by the menaces uttered against them by the Prophets Isaiah, Amos, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that they brought many calamities on Israel, for which God threatened to punish them with great misfortunes, 1618831508_37 Ezekiel 25:15 Amos 1:6-8 Obadiah 1:19 Zechariah 9:5
Spirit - For THE HOLY, HOLINESS SPIRIT, the third person of the Holy Trinity, who inspired the Prophets, animates good men, pours his unction into our hearts, imparts to us life and comfort; and in whose name we are baptized and blessed, as well as in that of the Father and the Son
King, Kings - The writer probably drew a part of his materials from the records of each reign left by contemporary Prophets and priests, 1 Kings 11:41
Dispersion - Here the Jewish religion was maintained; Prophets like Ezekiel and priests like Ezra sprang up, the old laws were studied and worked over, the Pentateuch elaborated, and from this centre Jews radiated to many parts of the East ( Nehemiah 1:1 ff
Idumea - Many predictions of the Prophets foreshadowed Edom's real doom, Obadiah 1:1-21 Jeremiah 49:7 Ezekiel 25:17 Malachi 1:3,4
Peace, Spiritual - ) The Law, the Prophets, and the Writings of the Old Testament each bear testimony that such peace is the gift of God, for God alone can give peace in all its fullness (Leviticus 26:6 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10 ; 1 Chronicles 22:9 ; 1 Kings 2:33 ; Isaiah 26:12 ; Isaiah 52:7 ; Ezekiel 34:25 ; Ezekiel 37:26 ; Zechariah 6:13 ; Malachi 2:5-6 ; Job 22:21 ; Job 25:2 ; Psalm 4:8 ; Psalm 29:11 ; Psalm 37:37 ; Psalm 85:8 ; Psalm 122:6-8 ; Psalm 147:14 ; Proverbs 3:17 )
Gos'Pels - He places the life and character of Jesus, as lived on earth, alongside the life and character of the Messiah, as sketched in the Prophets, showing Christianity as the fulfillment of Judaism
Harlot - From glimpses of social life afforded us by the Prophets (e
David - His impact on the history of Israel is seen from the extensive interest in him and his successors as reflected in the Deuteronomic history, the Prophets, the Chronicler's history, the psalms, and the New Testament. The royal psalms (2,45, 72,84, 89,110) join with the Prophets in giving voice to Israel's messianic hopes for another king like David. ...
David in the Prophets
Sacrifices - ...
It is of importance to notice that the usage of sacrifice is not only adopted and regulated in the OT, but is expressly commanded by Prophets of God from Moses to Malachi (Exodus 23:15, Malachi 1:7-14). And it is the more to be attended to because so often the sacrifices of the Mosaic law seem to be disparaged by the Prophets. Since, therefore, sacrifice was undoubtedly of Divine institution, through the Prophets, we may take it that whatever feelings of confidence toward God, or of the consciousness of guilt, were expressed by sacrifice, these were not only Divinely allowed and sanctioned, but were required by God on the part of His people towards Him. Thus the OT sacrifices outclassed the customs of the heathen by their blamelessness, and collaborated with the Prophets and with God’s providences to inculcate a high quality of conduct (Leviticus 20:23, 1 Corinthians 10:20)
Saul - Next Prophets met him, and suddenly the Spirit of God coming upon him he prophesied among them, so that the proverb concerning him then first began, "is Saul also among the Prophets?" The public outward call followed at Mizpeh, when God caused the lot to fall on Saul. the spoil" (Genesis 49:27), Saul was energetic, choleric, and impressible, now prophesying with the Prophets whose holy enthusiasm infected him, now jealous to madness of David whom he had loved greatly and brought permanently to court (1 Samuel 16:21; 1 Samuel 18:2) and made his armour bearer; and all because of a thoughtless expression of the women in meeting the conquerors after the battle with Goliath, "Saul hath slain his thousands, David his ten thousands" (1 Samuel 17; 1 Samuel 18:7). But Jehovah, "in whose hand the king's heart is, to turn it wheresoever He will" (Proverbs 21:1), caused him who came to persecute to prophesy with the Prophets
Teaching - Paul, ‘teachers’ are mentioned after apostles and Prophets (1 Corinthians 12:28 f. Some Prophets were able also to teach, but not all teachers were able to prophesy. Teachers, like apostles and Prophets, travelled about from place to place, being greatly honoured (Did. Teachers were more likely than apostles and Prophets to settle down in one place, and the reference to ‘pastors and teachers’ (Ephesians 4:11) shows this tendency at work. In earlier times the apostles, Prophets, and teachers had authority because they possessed gifts of insight and knowledge qualifying them to give directions in belief and practice
Type - The forward look of their own Scriptures was apparent to the Jews themselves; to the apostles it had become evident that what Prophets and psalmists looked for was now in their very midst. From that time onward He had pointed out repeatedly that what was written in the OT Scriptures was now being accomplished, that what Prophets and righteous men of old had desired to see and hear was now being seen and heard by those around Him (Mark 7:6, Matthew 13:17). 1 Corinthians 10:6) and his First Epistle show how strong a sense he had that the Spirit of Christ was in the Prophets (1 Peter 1:11). Paul with his larger outlook upon history and revelation the whole of Scripture was prophetic-the Law as well as the Prophets (Romans 3:21); and so the Law became ‘our tutor to bring us unto Christ’ (Galatians 3:24). All through the Epistle there runs a series of contrasts between Judaism as preparatory and typical and Christianity as antitypical and perfect, (a) In the opening verses the fragmentary and varying revelation ‘of old time’ by the Prophets is set over against God’s speech unto us in His Son (Hebrews 1:1-2), and this is immediately followed by the contrast of angels as ministering spirits sent forth to do service for the heirs of salvation (Hebrews 1:14) with Him who was made a little lower than the angels that He might bring many sons unto glory (Hebrews 2:9-10), (b) Next comes (Hebrews 3:1 to Hebrews 4:13) a contrast between Moses, a faithful servant in God’s house, and Christ, a Son set over it (Hebrews 3:5 f
Sin - ...
Many kings compounded their sin by rejecting and sometimes persecuting the Prophets who pressed God's covenantal claims. The kings in question may have called it diplomacy; the Prophets called it adultery. ...
Other Prophets decried the social character of sin: "They sell the righteous for silver, and the needy for a pair of sandals. ...
Jesus continued the Prophets' work of deepening the concept of sin in two ways. Why would Adam and Eve, well-cared-for and without propensity toward sin, rebel against God? Why would a creature want to rebel against the Creator? The Prophets find Israel's rebellion absurd; even animals know better
Jesus Christ - Is the mission of the Prophets a work of God? Jesus Christ is the Lord God of the holy Prophets; and it was the Spirit of Christ which testified to them beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow, Nehemiah 9:30 . Examine whether events have justified that notion of Christianity which the Prophets gave their countrymen of it, if Jesus Christ be not God. The calling of the Gentiles from the worship of idols to the worship of the one living and true God, is one event, which, the Prophets said, the coming of the Messiah should bring to pass. He now converses with Prophets, lawgivers, and angels; and the next instant he meekly endures the dulness of his disciples, and the blasphemies and rage of the multitude
Jeremiah - He saw that the reformation was but a surface one, and would not ensure the permanent peace which many anticipated from it (Jeremiah 36:27-32), for while "the temple" was restored the spirit of apostasy still prevailed, so that even Israel seemed just in comparison with what Judah had become (Jeremiah 3:11), a seeker of the truth was scarcely to be found, and self seeking was the real aim, while "the Prophets prophesy falsely, the priests hear rule by their means, and God's people (!) love to have it so" (Jeremiah 5:1; Jeremiah 5:31). ) On Jehoiakim's accession idolatry returned, combined with the worship of Jehovah; and priests, Prophets, and people soon brought Jeremiah before the authorities, urging that he should be put to death for denouncing evil against the temple and the city (Jeremiah 26:7-11). Some symbolical acts of Prophets, being scarcely possible, probable, or decorous, existed only in spiritual vision; when possible and proper, they were often materialized by outward performance. ...
Even among the captives at Babylon were false Prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return. His protests against the priests and Prophets answer to our Lord's against the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23); his lamentations over his doomed country correspond to the Saviour's tears over Jerusalem
Restitution - According to the Authorized Version rendering the relative pronoun ὦν has πάντων for its antecedent, so that the restitution is a restitution only of those things of which the Prophets had spoken. According to the Revised Version and the great majority of modern commentators the antecedent is χρόνων, so that it was the times of restoration of which the Prophets spoke, and the restoration is a restoration of all things in some sense not defined in the context
Bishop - Indicated possibly in 1 Corinthians 12:28 ‘helps, governments’: more distinctly in Ephesians 4:11 ‘pastors and teachers,’ in pointed contrast to ‘apostles, Prophets, and evangelists,’ whose office was not local. ...
Preaching is rather connected with the unlocal ministry of apostles, Prophets, and evangelists: but in their absence the whole function of public worship would devolve on the local ministry of bishops and deacons
Isaiah - Of the four Prophets of the 8th cent. Amos was a native of Judah, but prophesied in and to Israel; and thus Isaiah is the earliest of these four Prophets who addressed himself primarily to Judah, and even he in his earlier years, like his fellow-countryman Amos, prophesied also against Israel (see Isaiah 5:26-30 to Isaiah 10:4 ; Isaiah 9:7 ; Isaiah 17:1-11 )
Salvation - The early Prophets anticipated God's salvation to be realized in the earth's renewed fruitfulness and the rebuilding of the ruined cities of Israel (Amos 9:13-15 ). The Prophets also hinted of a salvation that lies outside history (for example, Isaiah 51:6 )
Servant of the Lord - There are several references to "my servants the Prophets" (2 Kings 17:13 ; Jeremiah 7:25 ; 26:5 ), sent by God to call Israel to repentance and renewal of the covenant. Sadly, the Prophets were often rejected and sometimes killed (Luke 11:47-51 ), in spite of the divine word they delivered
Persecution - Examples in the Old Testament include Abel, who offered a better sacrifice than Cain (Genesis 4:4-10 ; Hebrews 11:4 ); Lot, also a "righteous man who was distressed by the filthy lives of lawless men" (2 Peter 2:7 ) who rejected him and who "kept bringing pressure on [3] and moved forward to break down the door" of his house in Sodom (Genesis 19:9 ); Elijah, who spoke against the Prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:25-40 ) and against the idolatry of Israel (1 Kings 18:16-21 ), and was persecuted by Jezebel for his godly stand (1 Kings 19:1-3 ); David, who conducted himself in a godly manner despite the machinations and pursuit of Saul (1 Samuel 9-27:1 ); Jeremiah, who spoke God's message of condemnation against Judah for her sins and the coming judgment against her to be brought by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 9:11,13-16 ; 21:3-7 ; 25:1-14 ), had his message rejected (Jeremiah 36-37 ), was beaten (Jeremiah 37:15 ), and finally dropped into a muddy cistern (Jeremiah 38:6-13 ). His was a perfect and God-honoring life and message, reflected in part by the Old Testament Prophets whom, as Jesus reminds them, they had also persecuted and killed (Matthew 23:29-36 )
Learning - But while Israel was producing its Prophets, the imaginative genius of Greece was creating a secular literature and founding sciences. In early youth He showed His interest in the synagogal instruction (Luke 2:46), and ever afterwards it was His ‘custom’ to frequent those services of the synagogue at which Moses and the Prophets were read and explained (Luke 4:15)
Moses - On the mount of transfiguration Moses still represented the law, as Elias did the Prophets. , called the Pentateuch, there are many proofs in scripture; such as "have ye not read in the book of Moses?" Mark 12:26 ; "If they hear not Moses and the Prophets," Luke 16:31 ; Luke 24:27 ; "When Moses is read," 2 Corinthians 3:15
Zechariah, Book of - The Book of Zechariah is the eleventh of the so-called Minor Prophets. In the midst of that turmoil, God raised two Prophets, Haggai and Zechariah, to urge finishing the Temple
Angel - ...
In the books of the Prophets, angels rarely are mentioned. The reason for the absence is most likely that God is conceived as acting directly in relation to His people, and the messengers of God in these books are the Prophets themselves
je'Sus Christ - ( 1 Chronicles 16:22 ) In the New Testament the name Christ is used as equivalent to the Hebrew Messiah (anointed ), ( John 1:41 ) the name given to the long-promised Prophet and King whom the Jews had been taught by their Prophets to expect. (Matthew 11:3 ; Acts 19:4 ) The use of this name, as applied to the Lord, has always a reference to the promises of the Prophets
Cloth, Clothing - Long sleeveless external robes of blue or purple fabric were worn by royalty, Prophets, and the wealthy (1 Samuel 18:4 ; Ezra 9:3 ; Luke 15:22 ). Mantles of various types were worn by kings, Prophets, and other distinctive persons
John the Baptist - ...
Yet John never formally joined Jesus; for he was one of the greatest among the Old Testament Prophets, but not strictly in the New Testament kingdom, the least in which, as to spiritual privileges, was greater than he (Luke 7:28). His standing was the last of Old Testament Prophets, preparatory to the gospel
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - prophecy did not involve a denial that the Prophets had foretold the coming of a Christ; but the Christ of the Prophets could not be our Christ. The former was to be a warrior—Christ was a man of peace; Christ suffered on the cross—the law pronounced accursed him that hangeth on a tree; the Christ of the Prophets is to rule the nations with a rod of iron kings are to set themselves against Him He is to have the heathen for His inheritance and to set up a kingdom that shall not be destroyed. Jesus did none of these things therefore the Christ of the Prophets is still to come. Tertullian successfully shews that if Jesus was not the Christ of the Prophets He must have wished to personate Him coming as He did at the time and in the place which the Prophets had foretold and fulfilling so many of the indications they had given. as wicked received Christ's preaching and were taken up by Him into His kingdom; but that Abel Enoch Noah Abraham the Prophets and other righteous men imagined that the Demiurge was tempting them as on other occasions and so being afraid to join themselves to Christ and accept deliverance from Him were left in the underworld
Jonah - The Book of Jonah is unique among the Minor Prophets in consisting of a short story about a prophet and in confining his message to a sentence (3:4)
Daniel - ...
...
One of the four great Prophets, although he is not once spoken of in the Old Testament as a prophet
Evangelism - God's care for the first couple after they had sinned, His plan to “bless” all people through the Israelite nation, and His continuing attempts through the Prophets and through discipline to forge His people into a usable nation all speak of His concern
Preaching - This is the fault for which false Prophets were consistently condemned in the Old Testament (Isaiah 30:8-11; Jeremiah 5:31; Jeremiah 23:16-17; Jeremiah 23:21-22)
Elisha - Following this miracle the prophetic order or “sons of the Prophets” declared, “The spirit of Elijah is resting on Elisha” ( 2 Kings 2:15 )
Transfiguration, the - " Moses the law giver and Elijah the chief of the Prophets both appear talking with Christ the source of the gospel, to show that they are all one and agree in one
Wisdom Literature - He used Prophets to bring direct messages from himself that would stir the people to change their ways and develop right attitudes (Amos 3:1; Amos 3:7; Amos 4:1-3; Amos 5:14-15)
Ignorance (2) - But far more culpable than the half-heathen Samaritans were the Jews, who had behind them a long religious ancestry of patriarchs and Prophets (Romans 9:5), who inherited the promises, and to whom were committed the oracles of God (Romans 3:2, Romans 9:4)
Wilderness - ...
The Prophets felt that most of Israel's religious troubles began with the settlement of Canaan and apostasy to Canaanite idolatry, but they also looked forward to a renewed pilgrimage in the wilderness (Hosea 2:14-15 ; Hosea 9:10 , compare Deuteronomy 32:10 ; Jeremiah 2:2-3 ; Jeremiah 31:2-3 )
Reap - " The Prophets had been telling that the Messiah would come, and that they should believe on Him when He arrives
Caiaphas (2) - Gifford, Voices of the Prophets, 73; W
Hesychius (25), Presbyter of Jerusalem - Prophetas et Esaiam, an epitome of the 12 Minor Prophets and Isaiah, section by section
Teeth - ...
Micah 3:5 (a) By this type we understand that the false Prophets were hypocrites
Law - ...
The Prophets called Israel to repeat by returning to the tôrâh (“instruction”) of God ( Humble (Self) - ...
The Prophets called the people to repent and to demonstrate their return to God by lowliness
Idol - ” Jeremiah told Israel that their Prophets were “prophesy [6] unto you a false vision and divination, and a thing of nought …”
Apocrypha - To conclude: notwithstanding the veneration in which these books were held by the western church, it is evident that the same authority was never ascribed to them as to the Old and New Testament until the last council of Trent, at its fourth session, presumed to place them all (except the Prayer of Manasseh and the third and fourth books of Esdras) in the same rank with the inspired writings of Moses and the Prophets
Romans - The Apostle, after expressing his affection to the Roman Christians, and asserting that the Gospel is the power of God unto salvation to all who believe, takes a comprehensive view of the conduct and condition of men under the different dispensations of Providence; he shows that all mankind, both Jews and Gentiles, were equally "under sin," and liable to the wrath and punishment of God; that therefore there was a necessity for a universal propitiation and redemption, which were now offered to the whole race of men, without any preference or exception, by the mercy of him who is the God of the Gentiles as well as of the Jews; that faith in Jesus Christ, the universal Redeemer, was the only means of obtaining this salvation, which the deeds of the law were wholly incompetent to procure; that as the sins of the whole world originated from the disobedience of Adam, so the justification from those sins was to be derived from the obedience of Christ; that all distinction between Jew and Gentile was now abolished, and the ceremonial law entirely abrogated; that the unbelieving Jews would be excluded from the benefits of the Gospel, while the believing Gentiles would be partakers of them; and that this rejection of the Jews, and call of the Gentiles, were predicted by the Jewish Prophets Hosea and Isaiah
Demon - ...
It must not be supposed that demon-agency has ceased: the exhortation is, "Believe not every spirit, but try the spirits whether they are of God: because many false Prophets are gone out into the world
Anoint, Anointing - , and is used of kings, 1 Samuel 10:1 , and priests, Exodus 28:41 , and Prophets, 1 Kings 19:16
Church - The most of the Prophets were sent to the church to upbraid them for their idolatries and for forsaking God
Shepherd - " The Prophets often inveigh against the "shepherds of Israel," that is, the kings, who feed themselves and neglect their flocks; who distress, illtreat, seduce, and lead them astray, Ezekiel 34:10
Captivity - The Prophets labored, not in vain, to keep alive the flame of the true religion
Parable - ...
The Prophets employed parables the more strongly to impress prince and people with their threatening or their promises
Clouds - Dark clouds overshadow the judgment day of Yahweh, which the Prophets announced (Ezekiel 30:3 ,Ezekiel 30:3,30:18 ; Joel 2:2 ; Zephaniah 1:15 )
Edom - ...
Later history...
Some time after the destruction of Jerusalem, Edom itself was destroyed, as the Prophets had foretold (Malachi 1:2-4)
Jeroboam - The prosperity, however, brought with it greed, injustice and exploitation that the Prophets Amos and Hosea condemned fearlessly (Amos 1:1; Amos 2:6-8; Amos 3:15; Amos 4:1; Amos 5:10-12; Amos 6:4-6; Hosea 1:1; Hosea 4:1-2; Hosea 4:17-18; Hosea 6:8-9; Hosea 12:7-8; see AMOS; HOSEA)
Montanus - The church party looked on the Montanists as wilfully despising our Lord's warning to beware of false Prophets, and as being in consequence deluded by Satan, in whose power they placed themselves by accepting as divine teachers women possessed by evil spirits. He notes it as a characteristic of false Prophets ἐν ἐκστάσει προεφήτευον ὡς ἂν Ἀποστάτου διάκονοι (i. Visitors came from far to witness the wonderful phenomena; and the condemned Prophets hoped to reverse the first unfavourable verdict by the sentence of a larger tribunal. It had its rudimentary principle in the religion of nature, its infancy in the law and the Prophets, its youth in the gospel, its full maturity only in the dispensation of the Paraclete. Hippolytus tells that the Montanists "have an infinity of books of these Prophets whose words they neither examine by reason, nor give heed to those who can, but are carried away by their undiscriminating faith in them, thinking that they learn through their means something more than from the law, the Prophets, and the gospels
Atonement - The Prophets, at first sight, seem to take up a position altogether antagonistic to sacrifices. The basis of it is in the idea of the Righteous Sufferer, which is seen shaping itself in the Prophets and the Psalms (cf. Yet in His own suffering and death He claimed to be fulfilling the Law and the Prophets ( Luke 22:37 ; Luke 24:46 ). He who recalled the fate of all past Prophets, and sent forth His disciples with predictions of persecutions and death ( 1 John 4:10 ), could be under no delusions as to His own fate at the hands of scribes and Pharisees (cf. This was the task of the Apostles, guided by the same Spirit that had inspired the Prophets; and from it arose the Apostolic doctrine of the atonement
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - A similar expression that stands close to it is "on that day, " which occurs 208 times in the Old Testament; half the occurrences are in the Prophets. ...
Still, for the Prophets and for many of the New Testament writers, the day of the Lord points to the future. With metaphor the Prophets excel in describing the calamitous aspect of day of the Lord. The table below sketches the nature of the day of the Lord as described by the preexilic Prophets
Ethics - The Prophets opposed the popular religion and even temple worship, resenting not only the use of images but the total divorce of such "worship" from morality. The Prophets called constantly for justice; they condemned perjury and bribery, the selfish luxury of women, the scarcity of upright men, the lack of trust between neighbors through lies, deceitfulness, and fraud, as people preferred lies to truth and nourished "the lie within the soul. ...
So the Prophets argued: as Israel went after false idols and became false (2 Kings 17:15 ), so to know and worship the true God would ensure righteousness in individuals and society. Even when her Prophets were silent, Judah's worship effectively kept alive the hope of a world governed by her righteous king
War, Holy War - ...
Wars in the Bible have been discouraged or even stopped by Prophets. Micaiah refused to be swayed by the unanimous clamor of the war Prophets (1 Kings 22 ). She attempts to kill all the Prophets of the Lord (1 Kings 18:13 ). Various means of determining Yahweh's stance in the coming battle were sought such as Urim, dreams, or Prophets
Zechariah, the Book of - ...
In the second part, the interpretation of the visions is given by the angel who knows Jehovah's will, intercedes with Jehovah for Israel, and by whom Jehovah speaks (Zechariah 14:20-21), "the angel that talked with me," or "in me"; compare 1 Peter 1:11, "the Spirit of Christ which was in the Prophets. Zechariah, even in his later chapters, shows his familiarity with the Prophets of the exile, Jeremiah and Ezekiel; Zechariah 9:2 alludes to Ezekiel 28:3; Zechariah 10:3 alludes to Ezekiel 34:17; Zechariah 11:4 alludes to Ezekiel 34:4; Zechariah 11:3 alludes to Jeremiah 12:5; Zechariah 13:8-9 alludes to Ezekiel 5:12; Zechariah 14:8 alludes to Ezekiel 47:1-12; Zechariah 14:10-11 alludes to Jeremiah 31:38-40; Zechariah 1:9 alludes to Ezekiel 43:12; Ezekiel 44:9. But Zechariah is often elevated, as the earlier Prophets; and the style generally accords with the subject. Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi are the three Prophets of the restoration, best illustrated by comparison with Ezra and Nehemiah; Haggai and Zechariah are at the beginning of the period, Malac