What does Prison mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
φυλακῇ guard 14
φυλακὴν guard 7
φυλακήν guard 6
φυλακῆς guard 5
הַמַּטָּרָֽה guard 4
בֵּ֥ית house. / place. / receptacle. / home 3
הַסֹּֽהַר house of roundness 3
הַמַּטָּרָ֔ה guard 3
הַכֶּ֑לֶא imprisonment 2
(הַכְּלֽוּא) imprisonment. 2
הַמַּטָּרָ֖ה guard 2
δεσμωτήριον a prison 2
כִלְא֑וֹ imprisonment 2
כֶּֽלֶא imprisonment 2
הַמַּטָּרָה֒ guard 2
הַסֹּ֑הַר house of roundness 2
בֵּ֣ית house. / place. / receptacle. / home 2
מִמַּסְגֵּר֙ a shutting up 1
מַסְגֵּ֑ר a shutting up 1
הַמַּטָּרָ֑ה guard 1
מִמַּסְגֵּ֨ר ׀ a shutting up 1
מִשְׁמָ֖ר place of confinement 1
הַמַּטָּרָ֗ה guard 1
הַסֹּ֙הַר֙ house of roundness 1
הַסֹּ֗הַר house of roundness 1
מֵעֹ֤צֶר restraint 1
δεσμωτηρίου a prison 1
כְלָאִ֖ים imprisonment 1
הַמַּהְפֶּ֖כֶת stocks. 1
הַמַּהְפֶּ֔כֶת stocks. 1
؟ הַכֶּֽלֶא imprisonment 1
הַכֶּֽלֶא imprisonment 1
כֶּ֖לֶא imprisonment 1
הַפְּקֻדֹּ֖ת house. / place. / receptacle. / home 1
(בֵֽית־) house. / place. / receptacle. / home 1
לְבֵ֥ית house. / place. / receptacle. / home 1
מִבֵּ֥ית house. / place. / receptacle. / home 1
הֵאָ֣סְר֔וּ to tie 1
וַיַּאַסְרֵהוּ֩ to tie 1
(הָאֲסוּרִ֗ים) prisoner 1
(הָאֲסוּרִֽים) prisoner 1
φυλακὴ guard 1
δεσμωτηρίῳ a prison 1
קֽוֹחַ opening (of eyes) 1

Definitions Related to Prison

G5438


   1 guard, watch.
      1a a watching, keeping watch.
         1a1 to keep watch.
      1b persons keeping watch, a guard, sentinels.
      1c of the place where captives are kept, a Prison.
      1d of the time (of night) during which guard was kept, a watch i.e. a period of time during which part of the guard was on duty, and at the end of which others relieved them.
      As the earlier Greeks divided the night commonly into three parts, so, previous to the exile, the Israelites also had three watches in a night; subsequently, however, after they became subject to the Romans, they adopted the Roman custom of dividing the night into four watches.
      

H4307


   1 guard, ward, Prison, mark, target.
      1a guard, ward, Prison.
      1b target, mark (fig.
      of chastisement).
      

H1004


   1 house.
      1a house, dwelling habitation.
      1b shelter or abode of animals.
      1c human bodies (fig.
      ).
      1d of Sheol.
      1e of abode of light and darkness.
      1f of land of Ephraim.
   2 place.
   3 receptacle.
   4 home, house as containing a family.
   5 household, family.
      5a those belonging to the same household.
      5b family of descendants, descendants as organized body.
   6 household affairs.
   7 inwards (metaph.
   ).
   8 (TWOT) temple adv.
   9 on the inside prep.
      10 within.
      

G1201


   1 a Prison, a jail.
   

H3608


   1 imprisonment, confinement, restraint.
   

H631


   1 to tie, bind, imprison.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to tie, bind.
         1a2 to tie, harness.
         1a3 to bind (with cords).
         1a4 to gird (rare and late).
         1a5 to begin the battle, make the attack.
         1a6 of obligation of oath (figurative).
      1b (Niphal) to be imprisoned, bound.
      1c (Pual) to be taken prisoner.
      

H4929


   1 place of confinement, Prison, guard, jail, guard post, watch, observance.
      1a jail, Prison, guard-house.
      1b guard, guard post, act of guarding.
      1c observances.
      

H4525


   1 a shutting up, locksmith, smith, dungeon, enclosure, builder of bulwarks.
      1a locksmith, smith.
      1b dungeon.
      

H6115


   1 restraint, coercion.
      1a restraint, coercion.
      1b barrenness (of womb).
      

H6495


   1 opening (of eyes), wide.
   

H4115


   1 stocks.
      1a similar instrument of punishment (compelling crooked posture or distorting).
      1b house of stocks, Prison-house.
      

Frequency of Prison (original languages)

Frequency of Prison (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Court of the Prison
An open court in the Jerusalem palace reserved for the detention of prisoners during the day of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:8 ,Jeremiah 32:8,32:12 ; Jeremiah 33:1 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ,Jeremiah 38:6,38:13 ,Jeremiah 38:13,38:28 ; Jeremiah 39:14-15 ). Translated in the modern versions as “court of the guard.”
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mamertine Prison
Generally accepted as the one mentioned by Livy (I, 33), lies beneath the church of San Giuseppe dei Falegnami, Via di Marforio, Rome. According to tradition in the Acts of Saint Processus and Saint Martmlanus (6th century), Saint Peter was imprisoned in the lower cliamber or Tullianum where he baptized these saints, his jailers.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Spirits in Prison
SPIRITS IN PRISON . See Descent into Hades.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Prison Keeper
* For PRISON KEEPER see JAILOR
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Prison, Prison-House
1: δεσμωτήριον (Strong's #1201 — Noun Neuter — desmoterion — des-mo-tay'-ree-on ) "a place of bonds" (from desmos, "a bond," deo, "to bind"), "a prison," occurs in Matthew 11:2 ; in Acts 5:21,23 ; 16:26 , RV, "prison house" (AV, "prison").
2: φυλακή (Strong's #5438 — Noun Feminine — phulake — foo-lak-ay' ) for the various meanings of which see CAGE , denotes a "prison," e.g., Matthew 14:10 ; Mark 6:17 ; Acts 5:19 ; 2 Corinthians 11:23 ; in 2 Corinthians 6:5 ; Hebrews 11:36 it stands for the condition of imprisonment; in Revelation 2:10 ; 18:2 , "hold" (twice, RV, marg., "prison;" in the 2nd case, AV, "cage"); Revelation 20:7 .
3: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) "a watching, keeping," then "a place of keeping" is translated "prison" in Acts 5:18 AV (RV "ward"). See KEEPING , B.
Notes: (1) For oikema in Acts 12:7 , AV, "prison," see CELL. (2) In Matthew 4:12 , AV, paradidomi, "to betray, deliver up," is translated "was cast into prison" (RV, "was delivered up"); see BETRAY. In Mark 1:14 , AV, "was put in prison," RV, as in Matthew 4:12 ; see PUT , No. 12.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Prison
God has given governments the right to send law-breakers to prison (Romans 13:4), but he forbids brutal or excessive punishments. The punishment must be in proportion to the crime (Exodus 21:23-25).
In Bible times all sorts of places were used as prisons. In some cases there were official state prisons (Genesis 39:20; 2 Kings 17:4; Mark 6:17; Acts 12:4; Acts 16:24), though in other cases a prisoner may have been locked in the soldiers’ barracks at the palace (Jeremiah 32:2), dropped into an old disused well (Jeremiah 38:6), or kept under guard in a private house (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30). Often the prison conditions were bad (Jeremiah 37:18-20), the food poor (2 Chronicles 18:26) and the treatment cruel (Judges 16:21; Judges 16:25; Jeremiah 52:11; Ezekiel 19:9).
Such conditions were not as common in Israel as in neighbouring countries, because the law of Moses encouraged respect for justice and human life. The guilty were to be punished, but they were not to be degraded (Deuteronomy 25:3; cf. Numbers 15:34). (For further details see PUNISHMENT.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Prison, Prisoners
Any place where persons accused and/or convicted of criminal activity are confined and persons so confined or those captured in war.
Old Testament Imprisonment as a legal punishment is not a feature of ancient law codes. The Mosaic law allowed for a place of custody until the case was decided (Revelation 20:1-3,20 ; Numbers 15:34 ), but beginning only in the Persian period does the Bible mention incarceration as a penalty for breaking the religious law (Ezra 7:26 ).
Prisons mentioned in the Old Testament were under the control of the crown. Joseph was put in a royal prison in Egypt (Genesis 39:20 ), apparently attached to the house of the captain of the guard (Genesis 40:3 ). Asa of Judah (2 Chronicles 16:10 ) and Ahab of Israel (1 Kings 22:26-27 ) made use of prisons, probably associated with the palace. The experience of Jeremiah, however, provides the most interesting glimpses of prisons and prison life. The royal prisons were apparently not large, as the one in which Jeremiah was initially placed was a converted private house (Jeremiah 37:15 ). He was confined to an underground dungeon (Jeremiah 37:16 ), perhaps a converted cistern. Jeremiah later was placed under house arrest in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 37:20-21 ). There, he was available for consultation with the king (Jeremiah 38:14 ,Jeremiah 38:14,38:28 ), able to conduct business (Jeremiah 32:2-3 ,Jeremiah 32:2-3,32:6-12 ), and able to speak freely (Jeremiah 38:1-4 ). Because the latter enraged the princes, Jeremiah was confined for a time to a muddy cistern in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 38:4-13 ).
Persons were confined in royal prisons for offending the king (Genesis 40:1-3 ), perhaps by political intrigue. In Israel, prophets were jailed for denouncing royal policy (2 Chronicles 16:10 ), predicting ill of the king (1 Kings 22:26-27 ), and suspected collaboration with the enemy (Jeremiah 37:11-15 ). Political prisoners in Assyrian and Babylonian prisons included former kings of rebellious nations (2 Kings 17:4 ; 2 Kings 24:15 ; 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:11 ). Samson became a prisoner in a Philistine prison (Judges 16:21 ). Prisoners of war were usually either killed or enslaved.
The lot of prisoners was pitiable, sometimes consisting of meager rations (1 Kings 22:27 ) and hard labor (Judges 16:21 ). In some cases, prisoners were restrained and tortured by the stocks or collar (2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Jeremiah 29:26 ). Jehoiachin was clothed in special prison garments in Babylon (2 Kings 25:29 ). Prison life became a symbol of oppression and suffering (Psalm 79:11 ), and release from prison provided a picture of restoration or salvation (Psalm 102:20 ; Psalm 142:7 ; Psalm 146:7 ; Isaiah 61:1 ; Zechariah 9:11-12 ).
New Testament In New Testament times, persons could be imprisoned for nonpayment of debt (Matthew 5:25-26 ; Luke 12:58-59 ), political insurrection and criminal acts (Luke 23:19 ,Luke 23:19,23:25 ), as well as for certain religious practices (Luke 21:12 ; Acts 8:3 ). For some of these offenses, public prisons were also employed (Acts 5:18-19 ). John the Baptist was arrested for criticizing the king (Luke 3:19-20 ) and seems to have been held in a royal prison attached to the palace (Mark 6:17-29 ). Later, Peter was held under heavy security, consisting of chains, multiple guards, and iron doors (Acts 12:5-11 ).
Paul, who imprisoned others (Acts 8:3 ; Acts 22:4 ; Acts 26:10 ), was often in prison himself (2 Corinthians 11:23 ). His experiences provides the most detail on prisons in the New Testament world. In Philippi, he and Silas were placed under the charge of a lone jailer, who “put them in the innermost cell and fastened their feet in the stocks” (Acts 16:23-24 NRSV). Excavations at Philippi have uncovered a crypt revered by early Christians as the prison and adorned with frescos depicting Paul and Silas in Philippi. If the identification is correct, the crypt's small size eliminates any doubt that when Paul and Silas sang hymns, “the prisoners were listening to them” ( Acts 16:25 NRSV). Perhaps the crypt, originally a cistern, served only as the “innermost cell” ( Acts 16:24 ) for maximum security or solitary confinement. In Jerusalem, Paul was held in the barracks of the Roman cohort (Acts 23:16-18 ). After his transfer to Caesarea, he was confined with some freedom in the headquarters of Roman procurators and was allowed to receive visitors (Acts 23:35 ; Acts 24:23 ). As he and other prisoners were transferred to Rome by ship, Paul was again given some freedom (Acts 27:1 ,Acts 27:1,27:3 ); but when shipwreck became imminent, the soldiers resolved to kill them all lest they should escape (Acts 27:42-43 ). While awaiting trial in Rome, Paul remained under constant guard in a kind of house arrest (Acts 28:16-17 ,Acts 28:16-17,28:30 ), met his own expenses, and was free to receive visitors and preach the gospel “openly and unhindered” (Acts 28:30 ). Paul considered his imprisonment as for Christ (Ephesians 3:1 ; Ephesians 4:1 ; Philippians 1:13-14 ; Philippians 1:1 , Philippians 1:9 ).
The situation for prisoners remained dismal in New Testament times, and concern for such persons is a virtue expected by Christ of every disciple (Matthew 25:36 ,Matthew 25:36,25:39 ,Matthew 25:39,25:43-44 ). It is Satan who will be imprisoned during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 ,Leviticus 24:12:7 ).
Daniel C. Browning, Jr.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Prison Gate
KJV designation for a gate in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:39 ). Modern translations refer to the Gate of the Guard or Guardhouse Gate. The gate is perhaps identical with the Miphkad (Muster) Gate (Nehemiah 3:31 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Prison
The first occasion on which we read of a prison is in the history of Joseph in Egypt. Then Potiphar, "Joseph's master, took him, and put him into the prison, a place where the king's prisoners were bound" (Genesis 39:20-23 ). The Heb. word here used (sohar) means properly a round tower or fortress. It seems to have been a part of Potiphar's house, a place in which state prisoners were kept. The Mosaic law made no provision for imprisonment as a punishment. In the wilderness two persons were "put in ward" (Leviticus 24:12 ; Numbers 15:34 ), but it was only till the mind of God concerning them should be ascertained. Prisons and prisoners are mentioned in the book of (Psalm 69:33 ; 79:11 ; 142:7 ). Samson was confined in a Philistine prison (Judges 16:21,25 ). In the subsequent history of Israel frequent references are made to prisons (1 Kings 22:27 ; 2 Kings 17:4 ; 25:27,29 ; 2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Isaiah 42:7 ; Jeremiah 32:2 ). Prisons seem to have been common in New Testament times (Matthew 11:2 ; 25:36,43 ). The apostles were put into the "common prison" at the instance of the Jewish council (Acts 5:18,23 ; 8:3 ); and at Philippi Paul and Silas were thrust into the "inner prison" (16:24; comp 4:3; 12:4,5).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Spirits in Prison
A much discussed phrase in 1 Peter 3:19 . Christ went and preached to the spirits in prison “who in former times did not obey, when God waited patiently in the days of Noah” (1 Peter 3:20 , NRSV). This event, unmentioned elsewhere in the Bible, is closely associated with the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead (1Peter 3:18,1 Peter 3:21 ).
The framework for this depiction of Christ's work is the notion, attributed to Jesus Himself, that “As it was in the days of Noah, so too it will be in the days of the Son of Man” (Luke 17:26 NRSV; compare Matthew 24:37 ). The immediate focus of the statement in 1Peter is not the flood as such. The flood becomes the center of attention in Matthew 24:20-21 . Matthew 24:19 focuses on the situation that necessitated the flood (see Genesis 6:1-8 ). The disobedient “spirits,” accordingly, are not the people who died in the flood, but the evil spirits, or demons, whose influence brought divine judgment on the world. Peter probably viewed these evil spirits as the offspring of the strange union mentioned in Genesis 6:1-4 between the “sons of God” (that is, angelic or superhuman beings of some kind) and the “daughters of men.” (Compare the Jewish apocalyptic book of 1Enoch 15.8-10: “But now the giants who are born from (the union of) spirits and the flesh shall be called evil spirits upon the earth.”) It is also likely that Peter identified them with the “unclean spirits” over which Jesus had triumphed again and again during His earthly ministry. Jesus' proclamation to these “spirits” must therefore be understood not as redemptive “good news,” but as judgment and defeat at the hands of God (see their anxious question in Matthew 8:29 , “Have you come here to torment us before the time?” NRSV).
That the outcome of this proclamation was the subjection of the disobedient spirits is seen from 1 Peter 3:22 , where Christ is glimpsed “at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him” (NRSV). Yet if they were already “in prison,” what precisely could further defeat and subjection mean? A possible answer to this question is provided by Revelation 18:2 , where “Babylon the great” (or Rome) is seen under God's final judgment as “a haunt for every unclean spirit” (REB). The word translated “haunt” in the RSV is the same word translated “prison” in 1 Peter 3:19 . Peter's point is not that the disobedient spirits were “imprisoned” in the sense of being inactive when Christ came to them, but that He came to them in their “haunts” or “havens” to notify them that their power over humanity was finally broken and that now they must surrender to His universal dominion.
J. Ramsey Michaels
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Prison
Psalm 142:7 (b) This type represents the soul that is held in bondage by doubts and fears. He has not been set free either by CHRIST ( John 8:36), nor by the truth ( John 8:32).
Isaiah 42:7 (b) The type in this passage represents the soul that is held in the grip of sin by the Devil. (See Matthew 12:29).
Isaiah 53:8 (a) This refers to the fact that our Lord JESUS was bound by His enemies in Gethsemane, and was kept as a prisoner until He was nailed to the Cross.
Isaiah 61:1 (b) Our Lord indicates that the unsaved are so bound by their sins and by black darkness in their lives that they are unable to see GOD's way, nor live according to GOD's plan. They have not been set free either by the Word of GOD, or by the Son of GOD. They are help captive by the will of the Devil, as CHRIST describes in Luke 11:21.
1 Peter 3:19 (a) The word is used to describe hell. In the Old Testament hell consisted of two places. One place was a place of comfort, and those in that place were called prisoners of hope, as in Zechariah 9:12. They knew they would be delivered by the Lord JESUS after He put their sins away at Calvary. He did so and "led captivity captive." The other section of hell is a place of torment or punishment and no one who enters there is ever delivered. It is a permanent prison, from which there is no escape. (See also Isaiah 24:22; Isaiah 42:7; Isaiah 61:1; Luke 4:18).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Prison, Spirits in
See Spirits in Prison
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Spirits in Prison
The spirits in prison are referred to in 1 Peter 3:19-20 , where Peter declares that they disobeyed in the time of Noah and that Christ went and preached to them in prison. This passage has often been identified as one of the most obscure in the entire New Testament. Other passages are often used to interpret this one, but it must be understood in its own literary context and ideological environment.
Verses 19-21 appear in the middle of a christological confession of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ (v. 18) and his exaltation to the right hand of the Father (v. 22 cf. 1 Timothy 3:16 ). Verses 19-21 declare his triumphant declaration to the evil spirits, and contrasts them with Noah, who was saved through water—a type of Christian baptism.
Peter used this confession and triumphant journey of Christ to encourage his readers, who were suffering ridicule and persecution as a result of their conversion (1:6; 4:4). In particular it follows 3:13-17, which explains how they should respond to unreasonable abuse, especially when they have been zealous in living an honorable life before their accusers (2:11-3:12). And their participation in the triumph of Christ is assured by their pledge of a good conscience in baptism (v. 21).
This journey of Christ took place after the resurrection rather than between his death and resurrection, since the description follows the resurrection in verse 18, and the relative clause "in which" (en ho ) refers either to his resurrected spiritual state, or "at that time, " that is, after his death and resurrection. Since the very same form of the participle (poreutheis, "going, " or "traveling") is used in both verse 19 and verse 22, it is most likely that this is a single journey of Christ through the heavens to the right hand of the Father (v. 22).
The distinctive characteristic of these spirits is that they were in prison when Christ traveled to them, since the prepositional phrase is in the attributive position (tois en phulake pneumasin, "the in prison spirits").
That these spirits are the evil angels of Genesis 6:1-4 (or their offspring) is indicated by their being in prison, their disobedience in the time of Noah, their mention in 2 Peter 2:4 and Jude 6 , and the New Testament use of the plural noun ("spirits, " pneumasin ) as a reference to evil spirits unless otherwise qualified. This is further supported by contemporary Jewish literature (1Enoch 6:1-8; 12:1-16:4; 19:1; 2Baruch 56:12), which describes these evil angels in the same way as the passage in 1Peter.
Norman R. Ericson
See also Descent into Hell (Hades)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Spirits in Prison
This expression appears in 1 Peter 3:19, and some of its implications have been already discussed under Descent into Hades. It remains to summarize the principal interpretations that the phrase has received.
1. Augustine argues (Ep. clxiv. ‘ad Euod.’ 13 ff.) that 1 Peter 3:19 alludes to a preaching by the pre-incarnate Christ to the contemporaries of Noah, imprisoned in the darkness of ignorance, who were afterwards overwhelmed in the Flood for their sins. He is led to this conclusion by the difficulty which is presented by the apparent restriction of Christ’s preaching, if it was in Hades, to one section only of the men who lived before His advent, viz, the antediluvian patriarchs. Augustine’s interpretation has had a wide influence, but it must be dismissed as inconsistent with the whole tenor of 1 Peter 3:17 f. It was after Christ had been ‘put to death in the flesh’ that He was ‘quickened in the spirit,’ in which He ‘went and preached unto the spirits in prison.’ The words must refer to a ministry of Christ in Hades, after His Passion. To whom was this ministry addressed?
2. πνεύματα in the NT generally means ‘angels,’ and it has been held that the fallen angels are indicated by τὰ πνεύματα ἐν φυλακῇ. This would agree with the language of Judges 1:6 and 2 Peter 2:4, the latter passage (as in 1 Peter 3:19) going on to speak of Noah and the Flood. So in Eth. Enoch, x. 12, the sons of God who had taken wives of the daughters of men (Genesis 6:2) are represented as bound fast under the hills until the Day of Judgment; cf. also Eth. Enoch, xxi. 10, and Slav. Enoch, vii. 1, where the fallen angels in the second heaven are described as ‘the prisoners suspended, reserved for the eternal judgement,’ So also Apoc. Baruch, lvi. 12f.: ‘Some of them descended, and mingled with women. And then those who did so were tormented in chains.… And those who dwelt on the earth perished … through the waters of the deluge.’ But in this literature there is no trace of a preaching by Christ to the fallen angels; although in Eth. Enoch, xii. 4, xiii. 8, the ‘watchers of the heaven’ who have fallen from their high estate are reproved and condemned by Enoch. Again, the ‘spirits in prison’ of 1 Peter 3:19 must be included among the νεκροί of 1 Peter 4:6 to whom the gospel was preached, and these cannot be angels. Augustine, indeed, was forced by the exigencies of his theory to explain νεκροί of the spiritually dead, but the contrast between ‘the quick and the dead’ in the preceding verse (1 Peter 4:5) proves that the physically dead are in view.
The objection of Loofs (Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics iv. 659) that σαρκί in 1 Peter 4:6 proves that the νέκροι must be alive in the flesh is not convincing. When they were judged, they were in the flesh; but ‘the difference in tense in κριθῶσι, ζῶσι makes the former verb antecedent in time to the latter, and the sense is the same as if St. Peter had written ἵνα κριθέντες ζῶσι’ (Bigg, International Critical Commentary , in loc.).
3. We have, then, to interpret πνεύματα of the disembodied spirits of men (as in Hebrews 12:23; cf. Luke 24:37; Luke 24:39), and φυλακή of Sheol or Hades, in which after death they are imprisoned, according to Jewish belief. Thus in Apoc. Baruch, xxiii. 4, we read of ‘a place prepared where the living might dwell and the dead might be guarded’; cf. 2 Es 7:85, 95 and Isaiah 42:7; Isaiah 49:9; Isaiah 61:1 for phrases out of which the idea of Sheol as a prison might have grown (see, further, Descent into Hades, 3). The idea was taken over by the early Christian Church. E.g., Hippolytus (c. Graecos, ed. P. A. de Lagarde, Leipzig 1858, p. 68) writes: τοῦτο τὸ χωρίον (sc. Ἅδης) ὡς φρούριον ἀπενεμήθη ψυχαῖς, and describes Hades as divided into two compartments, for the good and the evil both guarded by angels, the unrighteous being haled to their own place as prisoners (ὡς δἐσμιοι ἑλκόμενοι). And Tertullian (de Anima, 58) explains the φυλακή of Matthew 5:25 as the Hades of discipline for the soul. Indeed, the Peshiṭta Syriac of τοῖς ἐν φυλακῇ πνεύμασιν (1 Peter 3:19) is equivalent to ‘animabus illis quae detinebantur in inferis,’ which leaves no doubt as to the sense which the Syriac translators attached to the phrase under consideration.
4. The ‘spirits in prison’ of 1 Peter 3:19 are, therefore, human souls in Hades or the abode of the departed, to whom Christ ‘preached’ after His Passion, a further allusion to the same mysterious ministry being found in 1 Peter 4:6. This has already been discussed under Descent into Hades, where it has been shown that various opinions were held by the early Christian theologians as to the scope of Christ’s mission to the under world, some confining it to Jews, some to Gentiles, and some admitting all the departed, righteous or unrighteous, to a share in its benediction. But in 1 Peter 3:19, where alone in the NT the phrase ‘spirits in prison’ is found, it is immediately followed by the words ‘which aforetime were disobedient, when the long-suffering of God waited in the days of Noah,’ etc.-an apparent restriction of its content which is not easy to understand.
An explanation which has much to recommend it is that the Noachian patriarchs are here particularly specified, because the Flood was the great typical judgment of the ancient world, and thus the ‘disobedient in the days of Noah’ are representative of the disobedient in every age (see an excellent discussion of this by F. H. Chase in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii. 795). There is, however, no suggestion in 1 Peter 3:20 that the Noachians are mentioned as representative of all those who died in sin. The emphasis is on the fact of Christ preaching in Hades after His death, and not upon the persons to whom He preached. Great stress was laid in the next age upon this ministry as the direct issue of the Passion. Irenaeus actually says (Haer. iv. 33) that the final cause of Christ’s sufferings was that, having died, He might thus visit and deliver the dead. And Origen (in Psalms 3:6), arguing that Christ effected by the separation of His soul from His body much more for the salvation of mankind than would otherwise have been accomplished, quotes 1 Peter 3:19 in proof. Thus the words θανατωθεὶς μὲν σαρκὶ, ζωοποιηθεὶς δὲ πνεύματι lead directly to the recital of the Descent into Hades. If any of those to whom Christ preached were to be specified, the argument would, indeed, require mention of ἄδικοι, as it is the suffering of the just for the unjust that is in question; but to proceed to specify any individuals at this point is a digression. It must be remembered, however, that the two topics-Hades and the Flood-were closely associated in Jewish thought, although to the modern mind they are quite distinct. For the Flood was caused primarily by the breaking forth of the fountains of the great deep (Genesis 7:11), upon which the earth rested, and which was the mysterious abode of dread monsters and evil things (Genesis 1:21, Isaiah 51:9). These abysmal waters were waters of destruction; and the ‘abyss’ (Luke 8:31) was the home of devils, from which the Beast of the Apocalypse came forth (Revelation 11:7; Revelation 17:8). Now Sheol or Hades, the place of departed souls, was conceived as beneath these abysmal waters under the solid earth. ‘They that are deceased tremble beneath the waters and the inhabitants thereof’ (Job 26:5). And it was into this ‘abyss’ that Christ descended after His Passion (Romans 10:7).
Hence the mention of the Descensus would at once suggest to a Jew the abyss, whence the waters of judgment burst forth at the Flood. Of the countless souls imprisoned there, the writer recalls, naturally and immediately, those who were carried to its depths in that overwhelming visitation of God’s wrath. To these (but not to the exclusion of others) Christ preached, that, having been judged in the flesh as men are judged (κατὰ ἀνθρώπους), they might henceforth live in the spirit as God lives (κατὰ θεόν, 1 Peter 4:6). And so was Christ’s ‘quickening in the spirit’ manifest after His death.
Literature.-To the books named under Descent into Hades may be added A. Schweizer, Hinabgefahren zur Hölle als Mythus biblische Begründung, Zürich, 1868; E. H. Plumptre. The Spirits in Prison, London, 1887; R. H. Charles, Eschatology, Hebrew, Jewish, and Christian, London, 1899.
J. H. Bernard.
Webster's Dictionary - Prison
(1):
(n.) A place where persons are confined, or restrained of personal liberty; hence, a place or state o/ confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
(2):
(n.) Specifically, a building for the safe custody or confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful authority.
(3):
(v. t.) To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to confine; to restrain from liberty.
(4):
(v. t.) To bind (together); to enchain.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Prison
In the common acceptation of the word, we generally understand by a prison a place of confinement for the body; but in Scripture language there is added to this view of a prison a state of captivity to the soul. Hence the Lord Jesus is said to be come to open the prison doors, and to bring sinners from the captivity of sin and Satan. Believers are sometimes said to be in prison-frames when, from looking off from Jesus, they get into a dark and comfortless state, and are in bondage to their own unbelieving hearts. And when at any time the soul of a poor buffeted child of God is again delivered by some renewed manifestation of the Lord Jesus, when he is brought out of the prison house, he is constrained to cry out,"O Lord, truly I am thy servant; I am thy servant, and the son of thine handmaid; thou hast loosed my bonds." (Psalms 116:16)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Spirits in Prison
1 Peter 3:18-19. The argument is, Be not afraid (1 Peter 3:14; 1 Peter 3:17) of suffering for well doing even unto death, for death in the flesh leads to life in the spirit as in Christ's case, who was put to death in the flesh but quickened in spirit (i.e. in virtue of His divine nature: Romans 1:3-4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 2 Corinthians 13:4) in which (as distinguished from in person) He went in the person of Noah (compare 1 Peter 1:11 "a preacher of righteousness" (2 Peter 2:5; He went not locally but as Ephesians 2:17, "He came and preached peace," namely, by His ministers) and preached unto the spirits in prison, namely, the antediluvian unbelievers; their bodies seemed free, but their spirits were in prison (Psalms 141:9) and they like "prisoners shut up in the prison" just as the fallen are judicially regarded as in chains of darkness, though for a time at large on the earth (2 Peter 2:4; Isaiah 24:18; Isaiah 24:22-23; Isaiah 61:1; Genesis 7:11, referred to in Isaiah 24:18). "His Spirit" long "strove" with them, but ceased to do so because even the seed of the godly Seth proved "flesh" and quenched the Spirit (Genesis 6:3).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prison
In Egypt, in Babylon, among the Romans, and doubtless in most other nations, these were used as places in which to secure prisoners. Joseph was cast into prison, and his feet were hurt with fetters (Psalm 105:18 ), though it does not appear that there was any trial as to the crime of which he was accused. God interfered on his behalf, and made the keeper or jailor favourable to him, and he committed all the prisoners into Joseph's care. This was the royal prison, but the condition of the place is not known: he called it 'the dungeon.'
Jeremiah was confined in 'the court of the prison,' a place to which the Jews could come and where they could converse with him. Jeremiah 32:2-12 . Jehoiachin was in prison in Babylon. Jeremiah 52:31 . The prison at Jerusalem, under the Romans, is more fully described. Peter was bound by two chains, and lay asleep between two soldiers. It was under military rule, and the soldiers were responsible for the safety of the prisoners. The angel conducted Peter through the first and second guard to the outer iron gate that led into the city. This shows what is meant by the 'inner prison' mentioned elsewhere. Acts 12 . At Philippi there was a jailor who was responsible for the safety of the prisoners. He, supposing some had escaped, was about to destroy himself, when Paul stopped him. Acts 16:23-27 .
Fallen angels are said to be kept in 'everlasting chains,' Jude 6 ; and there are spirits which are kept in prison. 1 Peter 3:19 . The abyss in which Satan is to be shut up for the thousand years is also called a prison, which may refer to the same place. Revelation 20:7 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Prison
PRISON . Imprisonment, in the modern sense of strict confinement under guard, had no recognized place as a punishment for criminals under the older Hebrew legislation (see Crimes and Punishments, § 9 ). The first mention of such, with apparently legal sanction, is in the post-exilic passage Ezra 7:26 . A prison, however, figures at an early period in the story of Joseph’s fortunes in Egypt, and is denoted by an obscure expression, found only in this connexion, which means ‘the Round House’ ( Genesis 39:20 ; Genesis 39:23 ; Genesis 40:3 ; Genesis 40:5 ). Some take the expression to signify a round tower used as a prison, others consider it ‘the Hebraized form of an Egyptian word’ (see Driver, Com. in loc. ). Joseph had already found that a disused cistern was a convenient place of detention ( Genesis 37:24 ; see Pit). The same word ( bôr ) is found in Exodus 12:29 and Jeremiah 37:16 in the expression rendered by AV [1] ‘dungeon’ and ‘dungeon house’ respectively; also alone in Jeremiah 38:8 , Zechariah 9:11 .
The story of Jeremiah introduces us to a variety of other places of detention, no fewer than four being named in Jeremiah 37:15-16 , although one, and perhaps two, of these are later glosses. Rigorous imprisonment is implied by all the four. The first ‘prison’ of Jeremiah 37:15 EV [2] denotes literally ‘the house of bonds,’ almost identical with the Philistine ‘prison house,’ in which Samson was bound ‘with fetters of brass’ ( Judges 16:21 ; Judges 16:25 ). The second word rendered ‘prison’ in Jeremiah 37:15 (also Jeremiah 37:4 ; Jeremiah 37:18 , Jeremiah 52:31 and elsewhere) is a synonym meaning ‘house of restraint.’ The third is the ‘dungeon house’ above mentioned, while the fourth is a difficult term, rendered ‘cabins’ by AV [1] , ‘cells’ by RV [4] . It is regarded by textual students, however, as a gloss on the third term, as the first is on the second.
Jeremiah had already had experience of an irksome form of detention, when placed in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2 ; cf. Acts 16:24 ), an instrument which, as the etymology shows, compelled the prisoner to sit in a crooked posture. 2 Chronicles 16:10 mentions a ‘house of the stocks’ (RVm [5] ; EV [2] ‘prison house’), while Jeremiah 29:26 associates with the stocks (so RV [4] for AV [1] ‘prison’) an obscure instrument of punishment, variously rendered ‘shackles’ (RV [4] ), ‘pillory’ ( Oxf. Heb. Lex .), and ‘collar’ (Driver). The last of these is a favourite Chinese form of punishment.
In NT times Jewish prisons doubtless followed the Greek and Roman models. The prison into which John the Baptist was thrown (Matthew 14:3 ; Matthew 14:10 ) is said by Josephus to have been in the castle of Machærus. The prison in which Peter and John were put by the Jewish authorities ( Acts 4:3 AV [1] ‘hold,’ RV [4] ‘ward’) was doubtless the same as ‘the public ward’ of Acts 5:18 RV [4] (AV [1] ‘common prison’). St. Paul’s experience of prisons was even more extensive than Jeremiah’s ( 2 Corinthians 6:5 ), varying from the mild form of restraint implied in Acts 28:30 , at Rome, to the severity of ‘the inner prison’ at Philippi ( Acts 16:24 ), and the final horrors of the Mamertine dungeon.
For the crux interpretum , 1 Peter 3:19 , see art. Descent into Hades.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Prison
1. Greek words translated ‘prison.’-The term φυλακή is almost invariably rendered ‘prison’ in AV_ and RV_. It is also used in a more restricted sense to designate a portion of a prison, in one instance ‘the first and the second ward’ (Acts 12:10 AV_ and RV_), traversed by the apostle Peter on his way to freedom; in another, ‘the inner prison’ (Acts 16:24 AV_ and RV_) in which St. Paul and Silas were immured by the Philippian jailer. The word δεσμωτήριον, frequently applied by Attic orators to the prison at Athens, and used in the Acts interchangeably with φυλακή, is translated ‘prison-house’ in the RV_ (Acts 5:21; Acts 5:23, Acts 16:26). The word οἴκημα (‘a room, in a house’), a polite equivalent in Attic Greek for δεσμωτήριον, is used (Acts 12:7) to denote ‘the cell’ in which the apostle Peter was confined by order of Herod. Another word for prison, τήρησις, translated ‘hold’ (RV_ ‘ward’), is employed in Acts 4:3 to designate the place of confinement into which the apostles were thrown by the sacerdotal authorities at Jerusalem; also in Acts 5:18 qualified by the adjective δημοσία (AV_ ‘common prison,’ RV_ ‘public ward’).
2. The prison in apostolic times.-In most of the instances mentioned in the NT, prisons appear to have been a part of buildings mainly devoted to other uses, such as palaces and fortresses, rather than buildings exclusively set apart for the purpose. The system then in vogue differed in this and other respects from the one that largely prevails at the present day. As a rule, prisons were intended not as places of punishment for convicted criminals, but as places of detention for persons awaiting trial, or pending their execution. In support of this view may be cited the imprisonment of the apostles recorded in Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18 ff., that of the apostle Peter in Acts 12:3-10, and that of the apostle Paul at Jerusalem, Caesarea, and Rome. Among the Jews, as well as among the Greeks and Romans, it was usual to inflict other penalties than imprisonment for offences against law and order, e.g., fines, scourging, death.
In Philippi, which was a Roman colony, the prison into which St. Paul and Silas were cast seems to have been a separate establishment devoted to the purpose. But it is rash to assume that prisons in the provinces were planned on the same principle as the Mamertine prison at Rome. There is nothing to indicate that ‘the inner prison’ in which the Apostle and his companion were incarcerated was a subterranean dungeon. The reference to ‘doors’ (Acts 16:26) and to the circumstance that the jailer ‘sprang in’ (Acts 16:29) points to the fact that their portion of the prison was on a level with the other portions. The narrative affords us one of the few glimpses obtainable into the interior of a Roman prison, with its different cells, provided with the inevitable appurtenances of chains and stocks, and its governor’s house above. In Acts 12:3-10 an interesting glimpse is also given into the interior of the prison in which the apostle Peter was confined at Jerusalem. This was probably a guard-room in the fortress Antonia, situated at the north-west corner of the Temple area, escape from which could be effected only by passing through ‘the first and the second wards,’ lying between it and the iron gate leading into the city. The place of custody to which the apostles were committed by the Temple guard (Acts 4:1-3; Acts 5:18 ff.) was probably attached to the Temple or high priest’s palace, as it would appear to have been adjacent to the court in which the Sanhedrin subsequently met for the trial.
Among the evidences which St. Paul adduces of his pre-eminence in suffering is his ‘more frequent’ confinement ‘in prisons’ (2 Corinthians 11:23). Besides his imprisonment at Philippi and other unrecorded instances which preceded the writing of 2 Cor., he became painfully familiar with custody in prison and out of prison at subsequent dates. (1) As the result of the riot in the Temple, set on foot by the fanatical Jews of Asia, he was consigned for a time to the barracks (παρεμβολή, AV_ and RV_ ‘castle’) connected with the fortress Antonia (Acts 21:34), the scene of St. Peter’s imprisonment at an earlier date. (2) The discovery of the plot aiming at his assassination led to his being transferred to Caesarea, where he was detained for upwards of two years in the praetorium of Herod, now the residence of the procurator (Acts 23:35). Here the strictness of his confinement was sufficiently relaxed to admit of his friends having free access to him. (3) On his being transferred to Rome, as the result of his appeal to Caesar, a still larger measure of liberty was granted him. ‘He dwelt two whole years in his own hired house, and received all that came in unto him’ (Acts 28:30). (4) If we are to assume a second imprisonment at Rome-a subject still under discussion-it seems not unlikely, judging from references in 2 Tim., that he was subjected to severer treatment. According to tradition, his place of custody was the Mamertine prison, in the lower dungeon of which, known as the Tullianum, prisoners condemned for crimes against the State were executed.
3. Metaphorical use of ‘prison.’-The word ‘prison’ is applied in a figurative sense (1) to the place of confinement of the spirits ‘which were disobedient … in the days of Noah’ (1 Peter 3:19 f.; cf. Genesis 6:2-4)._ These are probably to be identified with ‘the angels which kept not their first estate,’ declared in Jude (Judges 1:6) to be ‘reserved in everlasting chains under darkness to the judgment of the great day,’ and with ‘the angels that sinned,’ who are ‘consigned to Tartarus’ (2 Peter 2:4, ταρταρώσας), as distinguished from Gehenna, ‘to be reserved unto judgment.’ The allusion in all these passages appears to be to the Book of Enoch, which represents the fallen angels as undergoing temporary punishment (in Tartarus, xix. 1-3; cf. xx. 2) until the day of their final doom. (2) The term ‘prison’ is also applied to ‘the bottomless pit’ (RV_ ‘the abyss’), in which Satan is bound a thousand years (Revelation 20:7; cf. v. 1).
Literature.-artt._ ‘Carcer’ in Smith’s DGRA_2, 1875, ‘Prison’ in McClintock-Strong’s Bibl. Cyclopaedia, viii. [1], in HDB_ iv. [2], and DCG_ ii. [3]. For instances of imprisonment in the life of St. Paul, see Lives by Conybeare-Howson (new ed., 1877), F. W. Farrar (1897), and others.
W. S. Montgomery.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Prison (2)
PRISON.—The fact that no fewer than eight different Heb. roots are used to express ‘prison’ (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible i. 525) in the OT, testifies to the number of prisoners in ancient times, and the variety of treatment which they experienced. Not only ordinary prison-houses, but also fortresses, barracks, palaces, and temples had commonly accommodation—more or less extensive—for prisoners, just as our rural police stations have cells attached to them for temporary confinement.
The Latin and Greek terms translated ‘prison’ are expressive and significant. Carcer (cf. Gr. ἵρκος) emphasizes restraint. Ergastulum (lit. workhouse) corresponds to our ‘penitentiary.’ Malefactors and slaves laboured therein, as in the building where Samson had languished. The Tullianum at Rome was a condemned cell. Perhaps the mildest form of imprisonment recorded in the NT was that of St. Paul (Acts 28:30), when he dwelt for two whole years in his own hired house (μίσθωυα,—see illustration in Rome and its Story by Tina Duff Gordon and St. Clair Baddeley, p. 114), guarded by, and probably chained to, a soldier. οἴκημα, in polite Attic usage used for a prison, is found once (Acts 12:7). τήρησις, ‘the place of keeping’ (Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18), translation ‘hold’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘ward’) and ‘prison’ (probably that attached to the Temple or the high priest’s palace, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. 103), also suggests the mildest form of restraint. The φυλακή or place of guarding, in which John the Baptist was confined (Matthew 14:3), is believed to have been in the royal palace of Machaerus (Josephus Ant. xviii. v. 2). Custody in a φυλακή might mean anything, from the comparative comfort of a guard-room to the misery of a dungeon. Another word translated ‘prison’ is δεσμωτήριον, the ‘place of bonds.’ It is used interchangeably with φυλακή in speaking of John the Baptist’s prison (Matthew 11:2), and became painfully familiar to the first preachers of the Cross in the course of their mission, ary journeyings. See also following article.
If those mutilations and other horrid cruelties, familiar to the older pagan world, were less common, still vindictiveness rather than reformation was a note of imprisonment at the dawn of the Christian era. The LXX Septuagint translates the place of Zedekiah’s imprisonment at Babylon οἰκία μύλωνος, ‘the millhouse’ (Jeremiah 52:11). Grinding corn in a millhouse is a somewhat more humane punishment than hard labour on the treadmill, and some of the tasks allotted to inmates of an ergastulum may have been no more disagreeable than picking oakum. But much more severe treatment was often the unhappy prisoner’s lot. In our Lord’s parable of the Unforgiving Servant, that ungrateful wretch fell into the hands of torturers (τοῖς βασανισταῖς, Matthew 18:34)—a staff of officials whose very name is sinister. One means of torture was an instrument (ξύλον, Lat. nervus) in which the bodies of victims were confined. It is described as ‘a wooden block or frame in which the feet and sometimes the hands and neck of prisoners were confined’ (Robinson, Gr. Lex. of NT). In such durance were Paul and Silas placed at Philippi (Acts 16:24). The condemned cell of a Roman prison resembled that dungeon in the court of the prison into which Jeremiah was let down with cords, and where he sank in the mire (Jeremiah 38:6). ‘They were pestilential cells, damp and cold, from which the light was excluded, and where the chains rusted on the limbs of the prisoners’ (Conybeare-Howson, Life and Epistles of St. Paul, i. 358). The Career Mamertinus on the slope of the Capitoline of Rome, and the traditional scene of St. Paul’s last imprisonment, is typical of Roman prisons all over the world during Rome’s supremacy. It consists of two chambers, one above the other—the upper one an ‘irregular quadrilateral.’ The lower, ‘originally accessible only through a hole in the ceiling, is 19 ft. long, 10 ft. wide, and 61/2 ft. high. The vaulting is-formed by the gradual projection of the side walls until they meet.’ This prison is supposed to have been built over a well named Tullianum, and hence traditionally attributed to Servius Tullius (see Varro, v. 151). An inscription records that it was restored in b.c. 22 (Baedeker, Italy, ii. p. 226). See also art. Hell (Descent into).
Literature.—Besides the authorities referred to above, see the Commentaries, ad loc.; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , artt. ‘Crimes’ and ‘Prison’; Conybeare-Howson, Life of St. Paul, i. 357 f.; Farrar, Life of St. Paul, i. 497, ii. 390 ff., 547.
D. A. Mackinnon.

Sentence search

Quod - ) To put in quod, or Prison; to lock up; to jug. ) A quadrangle or court, as of a Prison; hence, a Prison
Jailer - The keeper of a Prison (Acts 16:23 ). See Prison, Prisoners
Prison, Prison-House - 1: δεσμωτήριον (Strong's #1201 — Noun Neuter — desmoterion — des-mo-tay'-ree-on ) "a place of bonds" (from desmos, "a bond," deo, "to bind"), "a Prison," occurs in Matthew 11:2 ; in Acts 5:21,23 ; 16:26 , RV, "prison house" (AV, "prison"). ...
2: φυλακή (Strong's #5438 — Noun Feminine — phulake — foo-lak-ay' ) for the various meanings of which see CAGE , denotes a "prison," e. , Matthew 14:10 ; Mark 6:17 ; Acts 5:19 ; 2 Corinthians 11:23 ; in 2 Corinthians 6:5 ; Hebrews 11:36 it stands for the condition of imprisonment; in Revelation 2:10 ; 18:2 , "hold" (twice, RV, marg. , "prison;" in the 2nd case, AV, "cage"); Revelation 20:7 . ...
3: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) "a watching, keeping," then "a place of keeping" is translated "prison" in Acts 5:18 AV (RV "ward"). ...
Notes: (1) For oikema in Acts 12:7 , AV, "prison," see CELL. (2) In Matthew 4:12 , AV, paradidomi, "to betray, deliver up," is translated "was cast into Prison" (RV, "was delivered up"); see BETRAY. In Mark 1:14 , AV, "was put in Prison," RV, as in Matthew 4:12 ; see PUT , No
Cage - , Matthew 24:43 ; (d) "a Prison, a hold. , "prison"). The word is almost invariably translated "prison. " See HOLD , IMPRISONMENT, Prison , WARD , WATCH
Cell - , "a habitation" (akin to oikeo, "to dwell"), is euphemistically put for "a Prison," in Acts 12:7 , RV, "cell. " See Prison
Hold - 1: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) translated "hold" in Acts 4:3 , AV, "prison" in Acts 5:18 (RV, "ward"), signifies (a) "a watching, guarding;" hence, "imprisonment, ward" (from tereo, "to watch, keep"); the RV, has "ward" in both places; (b) "a keeping," as a commandments, 1 Corinthians 7:19 . ...
2: φυλακή (Strong's #5438 — Noun Feminine — phulake — foo-lak-ay' ) "a guarding" or "guard" (akin to phulasso, "to guard or watch"), also denotes "a Prison, a hold," Rev, 18:2 (twice), RV, "hold" in both places, AV, "cage," in the second (RV, marg. , "prison," in both). See CAGE , IMPRISONMENT, Prison
Mittimus - ) A precept or warrant granted by a justice for committing to Prison a party charged with crime; a warrant of commitment to Prison
Jailor - See Prison
Matri - Rain; Prison
Prison - In the common acceptation of the word, we generally understand by a Prison a place of confinement for the body; but in Scripture language there is added to this view of a Prison a state of captivity to the soul. Hence the Lord Jesus is said to be come to open the Prison doors, and to bring sinners from the captivity of sin and Satan. Believers are sometimes said to be in Prison-frames when, from looking off from Jesus, they get into a dark and comfortless state, and are in bondage to their own unbelieving hearts. And when at any time the soul of a poor buffeted child of God is again delivered by some renewed manifestation of the Lord Jesus, when he is brought out of the Prison house, he is constrained to cry out,"O Lord, truly I am thy servant; I am thy servant, and the son of thine handmaid; thou hast loosed my bonds
Contract System - (1):...
The system of employing convicts by selling their labor (to be performed inside the Prison) at a fixed price per day to contractors who are allowed to have agents in the Prison to superintend the work
Prisoner - ) A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in Prison or not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive; as, a Prisoner at the bar of a court. ) One who is confined in a Prison
Dungeon - See Prison, Prisoners
Carcelage - ) Prison fees
Bonds - See Prison, Chain
Lobspound - ) A Prison
Bocardo - ) A Prison; - originally the name of the old north gate in Oxford, which was used as a Prison
Prison, Spirits in - See Spirits in Prison ...
...
Prison - In Egypt, in Babylon, among the Romans, and doubtless in most other nations, these were used as places in which to secure Prisoners. Joseph was cast into Prison, and his feet were hurt with fetters (Psalm 105:18 ), though it does not appear that there was any trial as to the crime of which he was accused. God interfered on his behalf, and made the keeper or jailor favourable to him, and he committed all the Prisoners into Joseph's care. This was the royal Prison, but the condition of the place is not known: he called it 'the dungeon. '...
Jeremiah was confined in 'the court of the Prison,' a place to which the Jews could come and where they could converse with him. Jehoiachin was in Prison in Babylon. The Prison at Jerusalem, under the Romans, is more fully described. It was under military rule, and the soldiers were responsible for the safety of the Prisoners. This shows what is meant by the 'inner Prison' mentioned elsewhere. At Philippi there was a jailor who was responsible for the safety of the Prisoners. ...
Fallen angels are said to be kept in 'everlasting chains,' Jude 6 ; and there are spirits which are kept in Prison. The abyss in which Satan is to be shut up for the thousand years is also called a Prison, which may refer to the same place
Court of the Guard - See Court of the Prison
Prison Keeper - * For Prison KEEPER see JAILOR ...
Carceral - ) Belonging to a Prison
Calaboose - ) A Prison; a jail
Prisoned - ) of Prison...
Country-Base - ) Same as Prison base
Bastile Bastille - ) "The Bastille", formerly a castle or fortress in Paris, used as a Prison, especially for political offenders; hence, a rhetorical name for a Prison
Prisoning - ) of Prison...
Disincarcerate - ) To liberate from Prison
Spirits in Prison - SPIRITS IN Prison
Cabin - A Prison cell
Dungeon - Pit used for water, but sometimes dry and used as a Prison. Joseph called his Prison a dungeon, though perhaps it was not a pit
Unprison - ) To take or deliver from Prison
Stocks - See Crimes, 9 ; Prison, p
Jailer - ) The keeper of a jail or Prison
Ward - See CAGE , HOLD (Noun), IMPRISONMENT, Prison , WATCH. ...
2: τήρησις (Strong's #5084 — Noun Feminine — teresis — tay'-ray-sis ) primarily denotes "a watching" (tereo, "to watch"); hence "imprisonment, ward," Acts 4:3 (AV, "hold"); 5:18, RV, "(public) ward" [1]. See HOLD (Noun), KEEPING , B, Prison
Disprison - ) To let loose from Prison, to set at liberty
Carthusian Martyrs - ...
Blessed Humphrey Middlemore...
Blessed James Walworth...
Blessed John Davy...
Blessed John Rochester...
Blessed Richard Bere...
Blessed Robert Salt...
Blessed Sebastian Newdigate, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed Thomas Green (perhaps alias Thomas Greenwood), choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed Thomas Johnson, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on September 20,1537...
Blessed Thomas Redyng, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 16,1537...
Blessed Thomas Scryven, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 15,1537...
Blessed Walter Pierson, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed William Exmew, procurator of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed William Greenwood, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 6,1537...
Blessed William Horne, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, hanged, disembowelled, and quartered at Tyburn, London on August 4,1540...
Saint Augustine Webster...
Saint John Houghton...
Saint Robert Lawrence...
Additional Information Carthusian Martyrs of London, by Barry Bossa...
Catholic Online...
Catholic Online...
Saints Alive, by Father Robert F McNamara...
Wikipedia...
The Book of Saints, by the Monks of Ramsgate...
Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints, by Matthew Brunson ...
Martyrs, Carthusian - ...
Blessed Humphrey Middlemore...
Blessed James Walworth...
Blessed John Davy...
Blessed John Rochester...
Blessed Richard Bere...
Blessed Robert Salt...
Blessed Sebastian Newdigate, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed Thomas Green (perhaps alias Thomas Greenwood), choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed Thomas Johnson, choir monk of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on September 20,1537...
Blessed Thomas Redyng, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 16,1537...
Blessed Thomas Scryven, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 15,1537...
Blessed Walter Pierson, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 10,1537...
Blessed William Exmew, procurator of the London Charterhouse, executed at Tyburn, London, on June 19,1535...
Blessed William Greenwood, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, died of starvation in Newgate Prison, London on June 6,1537...
Blessed William Horne, laybrother of the London Charterhouse, hanged, disembowelled, and quartered at Tyburn, London on August 4,1540...
Saint Augustine Webster...
Saint John Houghton...
Saint Robert Lawrence...
Additional Information Carthusian Martyrs of London, by Barry Bossa...
Catholic Online...
Catholic Online...
Saints Alive, by Father Robert F McNamara...
Wikipedia...
The Book of Saints, by the Monks of Ramsgate...
Our Sunday Visitor's Encyclopedia of Saints, by Matthew Brunson ...
Little-Ease - , of a Prison
Prison - Greek words translated ‘prison. ’-The term φυλακή is almost invariably rendered ‘prison’ in AV_ and RV_. It is also used in a more restricted sense to designate a portion of a Prison, in one instance ‘the first and the second ward’ (Acts 12:10 AV_ and RV_), traversed by the apostle Peter on his way to freedom; in another, ‘the inner Prison’ (Acts 16:24 AV_ and RV_) in which St. The word δεσμωτήριον, frequently applied by Attic orators to the Prison at Athens, and used in the Acts interchangeably with φυλακή, is translated ‘prison-house’ in the RV_ (Acts 5:21; Acts 5:23, Acts 16:26). Another word for Prison, τήρησις, translated ‘hold’ (RV_ ‘ward’), is employed in Acts 4:3 to designate the place of confinement into which the apostles were thrown by the sacerdotal authorities at Jerusalem; also in Acts 5:18 qualified by the adjective δημοσία (AV_ ‘common Prison,’ RV_ ‘public ward’). The Prison in apostolic times. -In most of the instances mentioned in the NT, Prisons appear to have been a part of buildings mainly devoted to other uses, such as palaces and fortresses, rather than buildings exclusively set apart for the purpose. As a rule, Prisons were intended not as places of punishment for convicted criminals, but as places of detention for persons awaiting trial, or pending their execution. In support of this view may be cited the imprisonment of the apostles recorded in Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18 ff. Among the Jews, as well as among the Greeks and Romans, it was usual to inflict other penalties than imprisonment for offences against law and order, e. ...
In Philippi, which was a Roman colony, the Prison into which St. But it is rash to assume that Prisons in the provinces were planned on the same principle as the Mamertine Prison at Rome. There is nothing to indicate that ‘the inner Prison’ in which the Apostle and his companion were incarcerated was a subterranean dungeon. The reference to ‘doors’ (Acts 16:26) and to the circumstance that the jailer ‘sprang in’ (Acts 16:29) points to the fact that their portion of the Prison was on a level with the other portions. The narrative affords us one of the few glimpses obtainable into the interior of a Roman Prison, with its different cells, provided with the inevitable appurtenances of chains and stocks, and its governor’s house above. In Acts 12:3-10 an interesting glimpse is also given into the interior of the Prison in which the apostle Peter was confined at Jerusalem. Paul adduces of his pre-eminence in suffering is his ‘more frequent’ confinement ‘in Prisons’ (2 Corinthians 11:23). Besides his imprisonment at Philippi and other unrecorded instances which preceded the writing of 2 Cor. , he became painfully familiar with custody in Prison and out of Prison at subsequent dates. Peter’s imprisonment at an earlier date. (4) If we are to assume a second imprisonment at Rome-a subject still under discussion-it seems not unlikely, judging from references in 2 Tim. According to tradition, his place of custody was the Mamertine Prison, in the lower dungeon of which, known as the Tullianum, Prisoners condemned for crimes against the State were executed. Metaphorical use of ‘prison. ’-The word ‘prison’ is applied in a figurative sense (1) to the place of confinement of the spirits ‘which were disobedient … in the days of Noah’ (1 Peter 3:19 f. (2) The term ‘prison’ is also applied to ‘the bottomless pit’ (RV_ ‘the abyss’), in which Satan is bound a thousand years (Revelation 20:7; cf. _ ‘Carcer’ in Smith’s DGRA_2, 1875, ‘Prison’ in McClintock-Strong’s Bibl. For instances of imprisonment in the life of St
Cabin - Jeremiah 37:16 (a) This is really a dungeon or a Prison cell for Prisoners
Prison - The first occasion on which we read of a Prison is in the history of Joseph in Egypt. Then Potiphar, "Joseph's master, took him, and put him into the Prison, a place where the king's Prisoners were bound" (Genesis 39:20-23 ). It seems to have been a part of Potiphar's house, a place in which state Prisoners were kept. The Mosaic law made no provision for imprisonment as a punishment. Prisons and Prisoners are mentioned in the book of (Psalm 69:33 ; 79:11 ; 142:7 ). Samson was confined in a Philistine Prison (Judges 16:21,25 ). In the subsequent history of Israel frequent references are made to Prisons (1 Kings 22:27 ; 2 Kings 17:4 ; 25:27,29 ; 2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Isaiah 42:7 ; Jeremiah 32:2 ). Prisons seem to have been common in New Testament times (Matthew 11:2 ; 25:36,43 ). The apostles were put into the "common Prison" at the instance of the Jewish council (Acts 5:18,23 ; 8:3 ); and at Philippi Paul and Silas were thrust into the "inner Prison" (16:24; comp 4:3; 12:4,5)
Ward - A Prison (Genesis 40:3,4 ); a watch-station (Isaiah 21:8 ); a guard (Nehemiah 13:30 )
Quad - ) A quadrangle; hence, a Prison
Imprisoned - Confined in a Prison or jail restrained from escape or from going at large
Rhoda - A maid in the house of Mary when Peter was delivered from Prison
Clink - ) A Prison cell; a lockup; - probably orig. the name of the noted Prison in Southwark, England
Rhoda - The maid who announced Peter's arrival at Mary's door after his release from Prison (Acts 12:13-14)
Cabin - KJV translation of Hebrew word appearing only in Jeremiah 37:16 and meaning vault, cellar, or Prison cell
Prison - Prison . Imprisonment, in the modern sense of strict confinement under guard, had no recognized place as a punishment for criminals under the older Hebrew legislation (see Crimes and Punishments, § 9 ). A Prison, however, figures at an early period in the story of Joseph’s fortunes in Egypt, and is denoted by an obscure expression, found only in this connexion, which means ‘the Round House’ ( Genesis 39:20 ; Genesis 39:23 ; Genesis 40:3 ; Genesis 40:5 ). Some take the expression to signify a round tower used as a Prison, others consider it ‘the Hebraized form of an Egyptian word’ (see Driver, Com. Rigorous imprisonment is implied by all the four. The first ‘prison’ of Jeremiah 37:15 EV [2] denotes literally ‘the house of bonds,’ almost identical with the Philistine ‘prison house,’ in which Samson was bound ‘with fetters of brass’ ( Judges 16:21 ; Judges 16:25 ). The second word rendered ‘prison’ in Jeremiah 37:15 (also Jeremiah 37:4 ; Jeremiah 37:18 , Jeremiah 52:31 and elsewhere) is a synonym meaning ‘house of restraint. Acts 16:24 ), an instrument which, as the etymology shows, compelled the Prisoner to sit in a crooked posture. ]'>[2] ‘prison house’), while Jeremiah 29:26 associates with the stocks (so RV [1] ‘prison’) an obscure instrument of punishment, variously rendered ‘shackles’ (RV
In NT times Jewish Prisons doubtless followed the Greek and Roman models. The Prison into which John the Baptist was thrown (Matthew 14:3 ; Matthew 14:10 ) is said by Josephus to have been in the castle of Machærus. The Prison in which Peter and John were put by the Jewish authorities ( Acts 4:3 AV [1] ‘common Prison’). Paul’s experience of Prisons was even more extensive than Jeremiah’s ( 2 Corinthians 6:5 ), varying from the mild form of restraint implied in Acts 28:30 , at Rome, to the severity of ‘the inner Prison’ at Philippi ( Acts 16:24 ), and the final horrors of the Mamertine dungeon
Cage - In Revelation 18:2 a Prison, guardhouse
Caged - ) Confined in, or as in, a cage; like a cage or Prison
Marshalsea - ) The court or seat of a marshal; hence, the Prison in Southwark, belonging to the marshal of the king's household
Choky - , a Prison or lockup; a jail
Rhoda - Rose, a young damsel in the household of Mary mother of John Mark, when Peter was miraculously released from Prison, Acts 12:13
Catholic Prisoners' Aid Society - Deals with necessitous Catholics on their discharge from Prison or police court, and, if necessary, with dependents of Prisoners while the latter are in Prison; its essential object is reclamation by means of religion. The society came into existence under the auspices of Cardinal Vaughan through the efforts of Canon John Cooney, at that time chaplain at Wandsworth Prison. English Prison regulations require Prisoners on admission to state their religion, and to attend the appropriate Prison services; thus a Catholic Prisoner attends Mass and is seen, more or less frequently according to the length of his term, by the Prison Catholic chaplain, and also by the Prison Catholic visitor who takes particulars of the Prisoner's case, his prospects on release, and the circumstances of any dependents he may have. After investigation applications are laid before the society's executive; before the Prisoner's release a course of action is decided. Material assistance varies according to the Prisoner's sex, age, and occupation. Discharged female Prisoners may be provided with temporary maintenance in a special home managed by ladies, who find them employment and supply any clothing required; or they may be placed fur longer periods in suitable Convent homes. Cases frequently occur in which the magistrates, instead of sentencing an offender to imprisonment, discharge her on probation, but require her (under penalties) to remain for a time under the friendly supervision of a lady probation officer. For men discharged after a term of imprisonment the society endeavors to find honest employment; meanwhile, if necessary, providing them with board and lodging, clothes, tools, etc. Concentrated efforts are made to bring all offenders back to the practise of their religion by bringing in the moral influence of personal interest in their future welfare; the society's voluntary workers visit Prisons, the Prisoners' homes, interview prospective employers, and escort discharged offenders to their destinations, as well as assist in the administrative work
Society, Catholic Prisoners' Aid - Deals with necessitous Catholics on their discharge from Prison or police court, and, if necessary, with dependents of Prisoners while the latter are in Prison; its essential object is reclamation by means of religion. The society came into existence under the auspices of Cardinal Vaughan through the efforts of Canon John Cooney, at that time chaplain at Wandsworth Prison. English Prison regulations require Prisoners on admission to state their religion, and to attend the appropriate Prison services; thus a Catholic Prisoner attends Mass and is seen, more or less frequently according to the length of his term, by the Prison Catholic chaplain, and also by the Prison Catholic visitor who takes particulars of the Prisoner's case, his prospects on release, and the circumstances of any dependents he may have. After investigation applications are laid before the society's executive; before the Prisoner's release a course of action is decided. Material assistance varies according to the Prisoner's sex, age, and occupation. Discharged female Prisoners may be provided with temporary maintenance in a special home managed by ladies, who find them employment and supply any clothing required; or they may be placed fur longer periods in suitable Convent homes. Cases frequently occur in which the magistrates, instead of sentencing an offender to imprisonment, discharge her on probation, but require her (under penalties) to remain for a time under the friendly supervision of a lady probation officer. For men discharged after a term of imprisonment the society endeavors to find honest employment; meanwhile, if necessary, providing them with board and lodging, clothes, tools, etc. Concentrated efforts are made to bring all offenders back to the practise of their religion by bringing in the moral influence of personal interest in their future welfare; the society's voluntary workers visit Prisons, the Prisoners' homes, interview prospective employers, and escort discharged offenders to their destinations, as well as assist in the administrative work
Conciergerie - ) A celebrated Prison, attached to the Palais de Justice in Paris
Jeho-i'Achin - (Jeremiah 29:2 ; Ezekiel 17:12 ; 19:9 ) There he remained a Prisoner, actually in Prison and wearing Prison garments, for thirty-six years, viz. , till the death of Nebuchadnezzar, when Evilmerodach, succeeding to the throne of Babylon, brought him out of Prison, and made him sit at this own table
Bagnio - ; - also, in Turkey, a Prison for slaves
Sentry - Government official with responsibility for guarding a Prison (Acts 5:23 ; Acts 12:6 ) or possibly a captain over such a guard (Jeremiah 37:13 )
Rhoda - A name ever-memorable from Peter's history, in the angel delivering him from Prison
Potiphar's wife - When Joseph resisted her overtures, she claimed that he raped her and he was thrown into Prison
Fleet - FLEET, in English names, denotes a flood, a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, or a river as in Fleet-street, North-flete, Fleet-prison
Dietary - ) A rule of diet; a fixed allowance of food, as in workhouse, Prison, etc
Jailer - 1: δεσμοφύλαξ (Strong's #1200 — Noun Masculine — desmophulax — des-mof-oo'-lax ) "a Prison keeper, jailer" (desmos, "a band," phulax, "a guard, keeper"), occurs in Acts 16:23,27,36
Rho'da - (rose ), the name of a maid who announced Peter's arrival at the door of Mary's house after his miraculous release from Prison
Evil Merodach - He therefore cast Evil Merodach into Prison, where the prince met Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, and became his friend. When Evil Merodach mounted the throne therefore he brought him out of Prison, changed his Prison garments, and set his throne above the throne of the kings with him in Babylon, and "Jehoiachin did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life" (Jeremiah 52:31-34)
Potiphar - The Prison in which he confined Joseph was an apartment arched, vaulted, and rounded (ha-sohar ) for strength (called a "dungeon," Genesis 40:15), in the house of the chief of the executioners (Genesis 40:3). ...
Joseph's feet at first "they afflicted with fetters, the iron entered into has soul" (Psalms 105:17-18); but Jehovah gave him favor in the sight of "the keeper of the Prison," probably distinct from Potiphar. There seems little ground for thinking that Potiphar was succeeded by another "chief of the executioners," "the keeper of the Prison" was entrusted by Potiphar with Joseph. Potiphar scarcely believed his lustful wife's story, or he would have killed Joseph at once; but instead he put him in severe imprisonment at first, then with Potiphar's connivance the Prison keeper put the same confidence in Joseph as Potiphar himself had put in him when he was free
Zelicha - When Joseph resisted her overtures, she claimed that he raped her and he was thrown into Prison
Prison (2) - PRISON. roots are used to express ‘prison’ (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible i. 525) in the OT, testifies to the number of Prisoners in ancient times, and the variety of treatment which they experienced. Not only ordinary Prison-houses, but also fortresses, barracks, palaces, and temples had commonly accommodation—more or less extensive—for Prisoners, just as our rural police stations have cells attached to them for temporary confinement. ...
The Latin and Greek terms translated ‘prison’ are expressive and significant. Perhaps the mildest form of imprisonment recorded in the NT was that of St. οἴκημα, in polite Attic usage used for a Prison, is found once (Acts 12:7). τήρησις, ‘the place of keeping’ (Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18), translation ‘hold’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘ward’) and ‘prison’ (probably that attached to the Temple or the high priest’s palace, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. Another word translated ‘prison’ is δεσμωτήριον, the ‘place of bonds. ’ It is used interchangeably with φυλακή in speaking of John the Baptist’s Prison (Matthew 11:2), and became painfully familiar to the first preachers of the Cross in the course of their mission, ary journeyings. ...
If those mutilations and other horrid cruelties, familiar to the older pagan world, were less common, still vindictiveness rather than reformation was a note of imprisonment at the dawn of the Christian era. The LXX Septuagint translates the place of Zedekiah’s imprisonment at Babylon οἰκία μύλωνος, ‘the millhouse’ (Jeremiah 52:11). But much more severe treatment was often the unhappy Prisoner’s lot. It is described as ‘a wooden block or frame in which the feet and sometimes the hands and neck of Prisoners were confined’ (Robinson, Gr. The condemned cell of a Roman Prison resembled that dungeon in the court of the Prison into which Jeremiah was let down with cords, and where he sank in the mire (Jeremiah 38:6). ‘They were pestilential cells, damp and cold, from which the light was excluded, and where the chains rusted on the limbs of the Prisoners’ (Conybeare-Howson, Life and Epistles of St. Paul’s last imprisonment, is typical of Roman Prisons all over the world during Rome’s supremacy. ’ This Prison is supposed to have been built over a well named Tullianum, and hence traditionally attributed to Servius Tullius (see Varro, v. ‘Crimes’ and ‘Prison’; Conybeare-Howson, Life of St
Crofton System - A system of Prison discipline employing for consecutive periods cellular confinement, associated imprisonment under the mark system, restraint intermediate between imprisonment and freedom, and liberation on ticket of leave
Brig - ) On a United States man-of-war, the Prison or place of confinement for offenders
Cage - In (Revelation 18:2 ) the (Greek term means a Prison
Panopticon - ) A Prison so contructed that the inspector can see each of the Prisoners at all times, without being seen
e'Bed-me'Lech - (a king's servant ), an Ethiopian eunuch in the service of King Zedekiah, through whose interference Jeremiah was released from Prison
Imprisonment - The act of putting and confining in Prison ...
the act of arresting and detaining in custody. Appropriately, the confinement of a criminal or debtor within the walls of a Prison, or in the custody of a sheriff, &c. False imprisonment is any confinement of the person, or restraint of liberty, without legal or sufficient authority. The arrest or detention of the person by an officer without warrant, or by an illegal warrant, or by a legal warrant executed at an unlawful time, is false imprisonment
Ebed-Melech - (ç'bed-mç'lek), (thing's servant, an Ethiopian eunuch in the service of King Zedekiah, through whose interference Jeremiah was released from Prison
Quaternion - ' Four such parties were told off to guard Peter when in Prison, that they might relieve each other every three hours in the night
Davy, John, Blessed - Martyr, died Newgate Prison, England, 1537. Refusing to take the oath of supremacy, he was imprisoned at Newgate, where he starved to death
John Davy, Blessed - Martyr, died Newgate Prison, England, 1537. Refusing to take the oath of supremacy, he was imprisoned at Newgate, where he starved to death
Salt, Robert, Blessed - Died in 1537 in Newgate Prison, London. Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Robert Salt, Blessed - Died in 1537 in Newgate Prison, London. Imprisoned for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, and starved to death along with Thomas Johnson and the other Carthusians
Rhoda - Peter came there on his release from Prison by the angel ( Acts 12:13 )
Jail - ) A kind of Prison; a building for the confinement of persons held in lawful custody, especially for minor offenses or with reference to some future judicial proceeding. ) To imprison
Dungeon - Different from the ordinary Prison in being more severe as a place of punishment. Like the Roman inner Prison (Acts 16:24 ), it consisted of a deep cell or cistern (Jeremiah 38:6 ). Under the later kings imprisonment was frequently used as a punishment (2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Jeremiah 20:2 ; 32:2 ; 33:1 ; 37:15 ), and it was customary after the Exile (Matthew 11:2 ; Luke 3:20 ; Acts 5:18,21 ; Matthew 18:30 )
Nebushasban - He was one of those whom the king sent to release Jeremiah from Prison in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:13 )
Dungeon - ) A close, dark Prison, common/, under ground, as if the lower apartments of the donjon or keep of a castle, these being used as Prisons
Turnkey - ) A person who has charge of the keys of a Prison, for opening and fastening the doors; a warder
Tollbooth - ) In Scotland, a burgh jail; hence, any Prison, especially a town jail. ) To imprison in a tollbooth
Mary - Mother of John Mark, mentioned in the New Testament only once (Acts 12), where we read that many were gathered together and praying in her house when Peter knocked at the door, after his escape from Prison
Potiphar - He later cast Joseph into Prison because of his wife’s false accusation that Joseph raped her
Barab'Bas - (son of Abba ), a robber, ( John 18:40 ) who had committed murder in an insurrection, (Mark 15:7 ; Luke 28:18 ) in Jerusalem and was lying in Prison the time of the trial of Jesus before Pilate
Phygelus - The contrast with Onesiphorus, who was not ashamed of the imprisoned Paul (2 Timothy 1:16-17 ), suggests that Phygelus abandoned Paul in Prison
Court - The enclosure of the tabernacle (Exodus 27:9-19 ; 40:8 ), of the temple (1 Kings 6:36 ), of a Prison (Nehemiah 3:25 ), of a private house (2 Samuel 17:18 ), and of a king's palace (2 Kings 20:4 )
Dungeon - A close Prison or a deep, dark place of confinement
Treadmill - It is used principally as a means of Prison discipline
Ebed-Melech - ennuch, by whom Jeremiah was released from the pit-prison ( Jeremiah 38:7 ff; Jeremiah 39:15 ff
John - John continued his labors with growing popularity for a year and a half, when he was cast into Prison by Herod, whom he reproved for marrying his brother Philip's wife. In Prison his faith seemed to waver, for he sent to Jesus to know if he were really the Messiah, and received a satisfactory answer. John was beheaded in Prison on Herod's birthday, at the request of the wicked Herodias
John - John continued his labors with growing popularity for a year and a half, when he was cast into Prison by Herod, whom he reproved for marrying his brother Philip's wife. In Prison his faith seemed to waver, for he sent to Jesus to know if he were really the Messiah, and received a satisfactory answer. John was beheaded in Prison on Herod's birthday, at the request of the wicked Herodias
Cage - In Revelation 18:2 it is the rendering of the Greek Phulake , properly a Prison or place of confinement
Ward - A Prison, or an apartment of it
Coroner - ) An officer of the peace whose principal duty is to inquire, with the help of a jury, into the cause of any violent, sudden or mysterious death, or death in Prison, usually on sight of the body and at the place where the death occurred
Hermogenes - ” Follower who deserted Paul, apparently while he was in Prison in Ephesus (2 Timothy 1:15 )
Pallottines - It grew out of the Apostolic labors of its founder who ministered unceasingly to the sick, the poor, and those in Prison
Leo v, Pope - He reigned less than two months, was deposed by an intruder and thrown into Prison
Bailey - ) A Prison or court of justice; - used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester
Malchiah - A member of the royal family, to whom belonged the pit-prison into which Jeremiah was let down ( Jeremiah 38:6 )
Limbus - ) Hence: Any real or imaginary place of restraint or confinement; a Prison; as, to put a man in limbo
Spirits in Prison - in virtue of His divine nature: Romans 1:3-4; 1 Corinthians 15:45; 2 Corinthians 13:4) in which (as distinguished from in person) He went in the person of Noah (compare 1 Peter 1:11 "a preacher of righteousness" (2 Peter 2:5; He went not locally but as Ephesians 2:17, "He came and preached peace," namely, by His ministers) and preached unto the spirits in Prison, namely, the antediluvian unbelievers; their bodies seemed free, but their spirits were in Prison (Psalms 141:9) and they like "prisoners shut up in the Prison" just as the fallen are judicially regarded as in chains of darkness, though for a time at large on the earth (2 Peter 2:4; Isaiah 24:18; Isaiah 24:22-23; Isaiah 61:1; Genesis 7:11, referred to in Isaiah 24:18)
Everard Hanse, Blessed - Shortly afterward he was captured in the Marshalsea Prison while visiting Catholic Prisoners
Marcellian, Saint - They were twin sons of pagan parents, and were cast into Prison for professing Christianity
Mark, Saint Martyr - They were twin sons of pagan parents, and were cast into Prison for professing Christianity
Hanse, Everard, Blessed - Shortly afterward he was captured in the Marshalsea Prison while visiting Catholic Prisoners
Etape - ) In Russia, a Prison or stockade for the confinement of Prisoners in transit
Warden - ) An officer who keeps or guards; a keeper; as, the warden of a Prison
Potiphar - A high officer of Pharaoh, who purchased Joseph of the Midianites, and made him master of his house, but afterwards imprisoned him on a false charge. He is supposed by some to have been the same "captain of the guard" who promoted Joseph in Prison, Genesis 37:36 ; 39:23
Mary - She is only mentioned as having a house at Jerusalem, in which a meeting for prayer was held when Peter was in Prison
Sar hamashkim - Was incarcerated in the same Prison-dungeon as Joseph, where Joseph correctly deciphered a dream he had, interpreting it as a sign that he would be restored to his original post
Pharaoh's butler - Was incarcerated in the same Prison-dungeon as Joseph, where Joseph correctly deciphered a dream he had, interpreting it as a sign that he would be restored to his original post
Cage - The word here is φυλακή,often translated 'prison
Detainer - ) A writ authorizing the keeper of a Prison to continue to keep a person in custody
Feast of Saint Peter in Chains - When the chains which Saint Peter had worn in Prison were later venerated there, the feast received its present name. Pope Saint Leo the Great united them to the chains with which Saint Peter had been fettered in the Mamertine Prison, forming a chain about two yards long which is preserved in a bronze safe and guarded by a special confraternity
Saint Peter in Chains, Feast of - When the chains which Saint Peter had worn in Prison were later venerated there, the feast received its present name. Pope Saint Leo the Great united them to the chains with which Saint Peter had been fettered in the Mamertine Prison, forming a chain about two yards long which is preserved in a bronze safe and guarded by a special confraternity
Martinian, Saint - According to their Acts, they were wardens in the Mamertine Prison in which Saint Peter and Saint Paul were confined
Salome alexandra - After the death of her husband Aristobulus I, she freed his brother, Alexander Jannaeus from Prison, and married him shortly thereafter, in accordance with the laws of yibbum
Shalomtzion - After the death of her husband Aristobulus I, she freed his brother, Alexander Jannaeus from Prison, and married him shortly thereafter, in accordance with the laws of yibbum
Provost - ) The keeper of a Prison
Confine - ) Apartment; place of restraint; Prison
Sheep Gate - Between the tower of Meah and the chamber of the corner, or gate of the guard house or Prison gate
Andronicus - Paul greeted this Jewish Christian as one honored by the church, one who had suffered in Prison for his faith, and one who had been a Christian longer than Paul (Romans 16:7 )
Roundhouse - ) A constable's Prison; a lockup, watch-house, or station house
Quaternion - Of each quaternion probably two were in the Prison, Peter being chained to them, and the other two were sentinels before the gate—the first and second guard
Foul - History reveals the burnings, the tortures, the imprisonments, and the lustful practices of these great religions. The followers are kept in abject slavery, and therefore the verse describes the situation of the wicked leaders as being in a cage and a Prison cell. Luther and others were blessed of GOD in breaking open many of these Prison cells, and setting great multitudes free from the tyranny, the wickedness, the evil of the monster that held them captives
Appeal to Caesar - We do not know the results of Paul's appeal since Acts ends with Paul still in Prison awaiting trial. It is probable that Paul's case was dismissed after two years and he was released from Prison
Betray, Betrayer - , Acts 28:16 ; (b) to deliver to Prison or judgment, e. See BRING , Note (4), CAST , COMMIT , DELIVER , GIVE , HAZARD , PUT (in Prison), RECOMMEND
Black Hole - A dungeon or dark cell in a Prison; a military lock-up or guardroom; - now commonly with allusion to the cell (the Black Hole) in a fort at Calcutta, into which 146 English Prisoners were thrust by the nabob Suraja Dowla on the night of June 20, 17656, and in which 123 of the Prisoners died before morning from lack of air
Quaternion - Thus every precaution was taken against his escape from Prison
Public, Publicly - A — 1: δημόσιος (Strong's #1219 — Adjective — demosios — day-mos'-ee-os ) "belonging to the people" (demos, "the people"), is translated "public" in Acts 5:18 , RV, "public (ward)," AV, "common (prison)
Enfranchise - ) To set free; to liberate from slavery, Prison, or any binding power
Giffard, Bonaventure - A few months later during the Revolution he was thrown into Prison, but was released in 1690, and continued his perilous missionary work till his death
Spirits in Prison - The spirits in Prison are referred to in 1 Peter 3:19-20 , where Peter declares that they disobeyed in the time of Noah and that Christ went and preached to them in Prison. ...
The distinctive characteristic of these spirits is that they were in Prison when Christ traveled to them, since the prepositional phrase is in the attributive position (tois en phulake pneumasin, "the in Prison spirits"). ...
That these spirits are the evil angels of Genesis 6:1-4 (or their offspring) is indicated by their being in Prison, their disobedience in the time of Noah, their mention in 2 Peter 2:4 and Jude 6 , and the New Testament use of the plural noun ("spirits, " pneumasin ) as a reference to evil spirits unless otherwise qualified
Discretion, Age of - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French Prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Martyrs of Corfu - They were converted in Prison by Saint Jason and Saint Sosipater, who had been arrested for preaching the faith throughout the island
Howard, Thomas 15th Century - Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely death, but he remained in Prison till Mary's accession
Age of Discretion - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French Prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Thomas Howard 15th Century - Accused of treason in 1544, his life was saved by Henry VIII's timely death, but he remained in Prison till Mary's accession
Reason, Age of (2) - Thomas Paine wrote his "Age of Reason" in a French Prison, 1794; it is a rough-and-ready presentment of Deism
Evil-Merodach - His friendly treatment of Jehoiachin the captive king of Judah, in releasing him from Prison and variously distinguishing him above other captives, is mentioned to his praise, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 - 34
Longings: of the Soul Often Painful - Have you never seen a caged eagle with its breast or wing bleeding from blows received by dashing against the wire of its cage? The poor creature dreamed of the forest and the craggy rock, and, filled with aspirations for sublimest flight, it stretched its wings and flew upward, only to bring itself into sharp contact with its Prison. Even thus the new-born nature, stirred in its inmost depths with longings suitable to its celestial origin, aspires after the joys of heaven, stretching all its wings to soar towards perfection; but alas! we who are in this body do groan, we find the flesh to be a Prison, and so the more we long the more we pine, and pining we sigh and cry, and wound our hearts with insatiable desires and bleeding discontents
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin was carried to Babylon and kept in Prison thirty-six years; on the accession of Evil-merodach, B. 561, he was released from Prison and exalted above the other captive kings, and he ate bread before the king all the days of his life
Inspection Gate - The Hebrew word is related to that of Jeremiah 52:11 , so some interpreters read, “prison tower” here
Prison - ) To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a Prison; to confine; to restrain from liberty
Prison, Prisoners - ...
Old Testament Imprisonment as a legal punishment is not a feature of ancient law codes. ...
Prisons mentioned in the Old Testament were under the control of the crown. Joseph was put in a royal Prison in Egypt (Genesis 39:20 ), apparently attached to the house of the captain of the guard (Genesis 40:3 ). Asa of Judah (2 Chronicles 16:10 ) and Ahab of Israel (1 Kings 22:26-27 ) made use of Prisons, probably associated with the palace. The experience of Jeremiah, however, provides the most interesting glimpses of Prisons and Prison life. The royal Prisons were apparently not large, as the one in which Jeremiah was initially placed was a converted private house (Jeremiah 37:15 ). ...
Persons were confined in royal Prisons for offending the king (Genesis 40:1-3 ), perhaps by political intrigue. Political Prisoners in Assyrian and Babylonian Prisons included former kings of rebellious nations (2 Kings 17:4 ; 2 Kings 24:15 ; 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:11 ). Samson became a Prisoner in a Philistine Prison (Judges 16:21 ). Prisoners of war were usually either killed or enslaved. ...
The lot of Prisoners was pitiable, sometimes consisting of meager rations (1 Kings 22:27 ) and hard labor (Judges 16:21 ). In some cases, Prisoners were restrained and tortured by the stocks or collar (2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Jeremiah 29:26 ). Jehoiachin was clothed in special Prison garments in Babylon (2 Kings 25:29 ). Prison life became a symbol of oppression and suffering (Psalm 79:11 ), and release from Prison provided a picture of restoration or salvation (Psalm 102:20 ; Psalm 142:7 ; Psalm 146:7 ; Isaiah 61:1 ; Zechariah 9:11-12 ). ...
New Testament In New Testament times, persons could be imprisoned for nonpayment of debt (Matthew 5:25-26 ; Luke 12:58-59 ), political insurrection and criminal acts (Luke 23:19 ,Luke 23:19,23:25 ), as well as for certain religious practices (Luke 21:12 ; Acts 8:3 ). For some of these offenses, public Prisons were also employed (Acts 5:18-19 ). John the Baptist was arrested for criticizing the king (Luke 3:19-20 ) and seems to have been held in a royal Prison attached to the palace (Mark 6:17-29 ). ...
Paul, who imprisoned others (Acts 8:3 ; Acts 22:4 ; Acts 26:10 ), was often in Prison himself (2 Corinthians 11:23 ). His experiences provides the most detail on Prisons in the New Testament world. Excavations at Philippi have uncovered a crypt revered by early Christians as the Prison and adorned with frescos depicting Paul and Silas in Philippi. If the identification is correct, the crypt's small size eliminates any doubt that when Paul and Silas sang hymns, “the Prisoners were listening to them” ( Acts 16:25 NRSV). As he and other Prisoners were transferred to Rome by ship, Paul was again given some freedom (Acts 27:1 ,Acts 27:1,27:3 ); but when shipwreck became imminent, the soldiers resolved to kill them all lest they should escape (Acts 27:42-43 ). Paul considered his imprisonment as for Christ (Ephesians 3:1 ; Ephesians 4:1 ; Philippians 1:13-14 ; Philippians 1:1 , Philippians 1:9 ). ...
The situation for Prisoners remained dismal in New Testament times, and concern for such persons is a virtue expected by Christ of every disciple (Matthew 25:36 ,Matthew 25:36,25:39 ,Matthew 25:39,25:43-44 ). It is Satan who will be imprisoned during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 ,Revelation 20:1-3,20:7 )
Johann Schall Von Bell - In 1664Father Schall was thrown into Prison and narrowly escaped death
Potiphar - Potiphar had Joseph thrown in Prison
Nergal-Sharezer - see), who, with Nebuzaradan and Nebushazban, released Jeremiah from Prison ( Jeremiah 39:3 ; Jeremiah 39:13 )
Schall Von Bell, Johann Adam - In 1664Father Schall was thrown into Prison and narrowly escaped death
Prison - God has given governments the right to send law-breakers to Prison (Romans 13:4), but he forbids brutal or excessive punishments. ...
In Bible times all sorts of places were used as Prisons. In some cases there were official state Prisons (Genesis 39:20; 2 Kings 17:4; Mark 6:17; Acts 12:4; Acts 16:24), though in other cases a Prisoner may have been locked in the soldiers’ barracks at the palace (Jeremiah 32:2), dropped into an old disused well (Jeremiah 38:6), or kept under guard in a private house (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30). Often the Prison conditions were bad (Jeremiah 37:18-20), the food poor (2 Chronicles 18:26) and the treatment cruel (Judges 16:21; Judges 16:25; Jeremiah 52:11; Ezekiel 19:9)
Onesimus - Paul was there in Prison the first time. that he might continue to be serviceable to him in his Prison
Stephen Brinkley - 1550)English confessor of the Faith, imprisoned and tortured as manager of a secret press for the publication of devotional and controversial works. On his release from Prison, he continued to issue Catholic works in France
Martyrs of Gorkum - They threw them into Prison, and, after transferring them to Brielle, cruelly mutilated and hanged them, July 9, for refusing to deny their belief in the Blessed Sacrament and the papal supremacy; this in spite of an order of William of Orange that priests should not be molested
Cage - ]'>[1] , ‘hold’ or ‘prison’ for AV Yard - ...
Prison yard, primarily an inclosure about a Prison, or attached to it. Hence liberty of the yard, is a liberty granted to persons imprisoned for debt, of walking in the yard, or within any other limits prescribed by the law, on his giving bond not to go beyond those limits
Potiphar - When Joseph was accused, his master contented himself with casting him into Prison
Leslie, John - He spent several years in Prison at Ely and the Tower for having favored the projected marriage of Mary with Norfolk, but in 1573 was exiled to the continent
John Leslie - He spent several years in Prison at Ely and the Tower for having favored the projected marriage of Mary with Norfolk, but in 1573 was exiled to the continent
Barabbas - ") A contrast to the true Son of the Father! The Jews asked the murderous taker of life to be given as a favor to them (it being customary to release one Prisoner at the passover), and killed the Prince of life! (Acts 3:14-15. ) A robber (John 18:40) who had committed murder in an insurrection (Mark 15:7) and was cast into Prison (compare Matthew 27:15-26)
Epaphroditus - He had delivered to Paul a gift from the church at Philippi while the apostle was in Prison
Evilmerodach - In his first year he had compassion upon Jehoiachin king of Judah, who had been in Prison thirty-seven years, raised him to honour, and appointed him to sit at his own table for the rest of his life
Newdigate, Sebastian, Blessed - Arrested in 1535 for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, he was imprisoned in the Marshalsea Prison where he was subjected to torture
Herodias - For this he was "cast into Prison," in the castle probably of Machaerus (q
Potiphar - Believing the false accusation which his profligate wife brought against Joseph, Potiphar cast him into Prison, where he remained for some years
Sternness - It is said of that eminent saint and martyr, Bishop Hooper, that on one occasion a man in deep distress was allowed to go into his Prison to tell his tale of conscience, but Bishop Hooper looked so sternly upon him, and addressed him so severely at first, that the poor soul ran away, and could not get comfort until he had sought out another minister of a gentler aspect
Edmund Bonner - An opponent of the Reformation, he was imprisoned till Mary's accession, 1553. Under Elizabeth, he was deprived of his office, and, April 20, 1560, was imprisoned in the Marshalsea. He steadfastly refused to take the Oath of Supremacy, and died in Prison
Sebastian Newdigate, Blessed - Arrested in 1535 for refusing the Oath of Supremacy, he was imprisoned in the Marshalsea Prison where he was subjected to torture
Pot'Iphar, - When Joseph was accused, his master contented himself with casting him into Prison
John de Feckenham - Cranmer threw him into Prison, but he was released under Mary and later made Abbot of Westminster
John Howman - Cranmer threw him into Prison, but he was released under Mary and later made Abbot of Westminster
Howman, John - Cranmer threw him into Prison, but he was released under Mary and later made Abbot of Westminster
Sheep-Gate, the, - (Nehemiah 12:39 ) Authorized Version, "prison-gate
Commitment - ) A warrant or order for the imprisonment of a person; - more frequently termed a mittimus. , the act of committing to Prison
Miphkad Gate - Suggested meanings include: inspection (NAS, NIV); muster (REB, NRSV); or Prison (compare Jeremiah 52:11 )
Samaria - It seems to have taken its name from Shamar, and hence called Shomeron by the Israelites: so that his Shamar might mean his Prison or his guard
Joseph - He landed in Egypt, where, after enduring slavery and Prison, he interpreted Pharaoh’s puzzling dreams and became viceroy of the land
Jug - ) To commit to jail; to imprison. ) A Prison; a jail; a lockup
Inner - 1, denotes "inner," Acts 16:24 (of a Prison); Hebrews 6:19 , with the article, and practically as a noun, "that which is within (the veil)," lit
Barabbas - A noted criminal at Jerusalem who was in Prison for sedition and murder when Christ was condemned. It was a custom of the Romans to release one Prisoner at the time of the Jewish Passover. The Jews were permitted to name any Prisoner whose release they desired; and when the choice lay between Barabbas and Christ, they chose the robber
Alexander, Bishop of Jerusalem - 204, and was thrown into Prison, where he continued some years. He was still a Prisoner at the commencement of Caracalla's reign, A. The next year he was released from Prison, and, in fulfilment of a vow, visited Jerusalem, where he was chosen coadjutor to the aged bp. Alexander was again thrown into Prison at Caesarea in the Decian persecution, where he died A
John Sarkander, Blessed - He died in Prison
o'Brien, William - Prosecuted nine times for political offenses, he spent over two years in Prison
Hanameel - Son of Shallum, Jeremiah's cousin, from whom the prophet in Prison bought a field in Anathoth while Jerusalem was being besieged by the Chaldeans, as a token to assure the Jews that a time of security would hereafter come when their land would once more be a safe possession (Jeremiah 32:7-12; Jeremiah 32:44)
Quaternion of Soldiers - ) ...
When therefore Herod, who adopted the Roman customs, is said to have delivered Peter to four quaternions of soldiers, it is to be understood that he was guarded by four men at a time, namely, two in the Prison with him, and two before the doors, and that they were relieved every three hours by four others; making in all sixteen men
Sarkander, John, Blessed - He died in Prison
Limit - , the extent of the liberties of a Prison
William o'Brien - Prosecuted nine times for political offenses, he spent over two years in Prison
ma'ry, Mother of Mark, - The fact that Peter went to that house on his release from Prison indicates that there was some special intimacy, (Acts 12:12 ) between them
Earthquake - An earthquake at Philippi shook the Prison in which Paul and Silas were imprisoned (Acts 16:26 )
Cell - ) A very small and close apartment, as in a Prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit
Agatha, Saint - According to her Latin Acts, which, however, are not older than the 6th century, she was annoyed by the Senator Quintianus with avowals of love; as his proposals were rejected, he had her subjected to various cruel tortures, including the cutting-off of her breasts; she died in Prison
Adversary - The angel takes the lost sinner to hell, which is GOD's Prison house. Since the Prisoner can never pay the debt he must remain there forever
Earthquake - When Paul and Barnabas were in the Prison at Philippi there was a great earthquake that shook the Prison, which led to the conversion of the jailer
Henricians - at a council assembled at Rheims, he was committed to a close Prison in 1148, where he soon ended his days
Eonians - Eon was, however, solemnly condemned by the council at Rheims, in 1148, and ended his days in a Prison
Descent to Hades - 1 Peter 3:19 says Christ “went and preached unto the spirits in Prison. The Prison may have been Sheol or Hades according to Old Testament thinking, a special place of captivity for sinners, a place of punishment for fallen angels, a place of security for such angels where they thought they could escape Christ's power, or a place on the way to heaven where the faithful of old waited to hear the message of Christ's final atoning victory
Marshal - ...
Knight marshal, or marshal of the king's house, formerly an officer who was to execute the commands of the lord steward, and have the custody of Prisoners committed by the court of verge hence, the name of a Prison in Southwark. ...
Marshal of the king's bench, an officer who has the custody of the Prison called the king's bench, in Southwark. He attends on the court and has the charge of the Prisoners committed by them
Martinianus, a Martyr at Rome - They were converted by him in Prison, and for their baptism, Peter, by making the sign of the cross, caused a fountain, still shewn in the Mamertine Prison, miraculously to spring from the rock
Jailor - The Authorized Version translates δεσμοφύλαξ in Acts 16:23 ‘jailor,’ and in Acts 16:27; Acts 16:36 ‘keeper of the Prison. The person so designated occupied the position of supreme authority as governor of the Prison (cf. Paul and Silas, owing to their arrest and imprisonment, the narrator would, of necessity, proceed to describe the subsequent events, when he was no longer in their company, in the third person. ...
Leaving aside the alleged improbabilities, it must be admitted that the description of the night-scene in the Prison is most vivid and life-like. Luke or another) is not describing an ‘escape’ from Prison, miraculous or otherwise, for the release of the captives takes place next morning
Ivo of Chartres, Saint - His opposition to the adulterous marriage of Philip I won him a Prison cell, 1092
Imbert, Lawrence Mary Joseph, Blessed - These three devoted themselves entirely to the evangelization of the heathen until 1839, when they gave themselves up to the government, were cast into Prison, and beheaded on September 21, of that year
Hanani - Hanani reproved Asa for entering into alliance with Syria, and the angry king cast him into Prison ( 2 Chronicles 16:7 )
Amon - Governor of Samaria when Jehoshaphat was king of Judah, who followed orders from the king of Israel and put the prophet Micaiah in Prison (1 Kings 22:26 )
Felix - Paul was remanded to Prison, and kept there two years in hopes of extorting money from him
Spirits in Prison - Christ went and preached to the spirits in Prison “who in former times did not obey, when God waited patiently in the days of Noah” (1 Peter 3:20 , NRSV). Yet if they were already “in Prison,” what precisely could further defeat and subjection mean? A possible answer to this question is provided by Revelation 18:2 , where “Babylon the great” (or Rome) is seen under God's final judgment as “a haunt for every unclean spirit” (REB). The word translated “haunt” in the RSV is the same word translated “prison” in 1 Peter 3:19 . Peter's point is not that the disobedient spirits were “imprisoned” in the sense of being inactive when Christ came to them, but that He came to them in their “haunts” or “havens” to notify them that their power over humanity was finally broken and that now they must surrender to His universal dominion
Rhoda - Peter’s miraculous deliverance from Herod’s Prison he went to the house of Mary the mother of Mark
Hell - A dungeon or Prison
Cistern - When dry, they might be used as a Prison, Genesis 37:22; Jeremiah 38:6; the "pit" was doubtless a cistern, or a granary, as at this day; and to drink water only from one's own domestic cistern means, to content one's self with the lawful enjoyments of his own home
Roch, Saint - Returning to Montpellier he was arrested as a spy and cast into Prison, where he died
Keeper - One who retains in custody one who has the care of a Prison and the custody of Prisoners
Aretas - 39, at the instigation of the Jews, attempted to put Paul in Prison, 2 Corinthians 11:32
Affliction: Endears the Promises - We all of us value those golden words, 'When thou walkest through the fire thou shall not be burned, neither shall the flame kindle upon thee' but few if any of us have read them with the delight of the martyr Bilney, to whom this passage was a stay, while he was in Prison awaiting his execution at the stake
Philippi - On his casting out a spirit of divination from the young woman who followed him, a tumult was raised, and Paul and Silas were scourged and cast into Prison; but this happily led to the conversion of the jailer and his household
fe'Lix - He was remanded to Prison, and kept there two years in hopes of extorting money from him
Machaerus - John the Baptist was probably cast into the Prison connected with this castle by Herod Antipas, whom he had reproved for his adulterous marriage with Herodias
Micaiah - He was sent for from Prison, where he had been confined, probably on account of some prediction disagreeable to Ahab; and he condemned the expedition, and prophesied that it would end, as it did, in disaster
Silas, Silvanus - In Philippi the two were imprisoned (Acts 16:19-24 ), but they later won the jailer and his family to the Lord after God delivered them from Prison
Stocks - When Paul and Silas were thrown into the inner dungeon of the Prison at Philippi, the jailer, who was charged by the Roman magistrates (known as the Duumviri) to keep the Prisoners safely, for greater security took the precaution of enclosing their feet in the stocks (Acts 16:24)
Rating - ) A partition, covering, or frame of parallel or cross bars; a latticework resembling a window grate; as, the grating of a Prison or convent
Carpus - Paul writes from his Prison to Timothy, and asks him to bring the cloak, books, and parchments which he had left at Troas with Carpus (2 Timothy 4:13)
Vault - ) An arched apartment; especially, a subterranean room, use for storing articles, for a Prison, for interment, or the like; a cell; a cellar
Rating - ) A partition, covering, or frame of parallel or cross bars; a latticework resembling a window grate; as, the grating of a Prison or convent
Keeper - ) One who retains in custody; one who has the care of a Prison and the charge of Prisoners
Jehoiachin - Nevertheless, he was ultimately released from Prison by Evil-merodach of Babylon and accorded some honor in the land of his captivity (2 Kings 25:27-30 )
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - In sacred Scripture he appears among the persons who, by command of Nebuchadnezzar, released Jeremiah from Prison
Stocks - (An instrument of punishment, consisting of two beams, the upper one being movable, with two small openings between them, large enough for the ankles of the Prisoner. The prophet Jeremiah was confined in the first sort, (Jeremiah 20:2 ) which appears to have been a common mode of punishment in his day, (Jeremiah 29:26 ) as the Prisons contained a chamber for the special purpose, termed "the house of the pillory. " (2 Chronicles 16:10 ) (Authorized Version "prison-house")
Baruch - Being accused by his enemies of favouring the Chaldeans, he was cast, with Jeremiah, into Prison, where he remained till the capture of Jerusalem (B
Chapel - ) A place of worship not connected with a church; as, the chapel of a palace, hospital, or Prison
Stocks - Prisons had usually a chamber for the purpose called "the house of the pillory" (2 Chronicles 16:10, KJV "prison house")
Mark, Marcus - ' When Peter was miraculously delivered from Prison he resorted to the house of Mary, who was Mark's mother. He was with Peter at Babylon, and when Paul was a second time a Prisoner at Rome, he asked for Mark, saying he was serviceable for the ministry
Nerva, Roman Emperor - The crowd of delatores , who had preferred accusations of treason, atheism, and Judaism, which fell most heavily on the Christians, were banished, and those who had been sent to Prison or exile on these charges were recalled and set at liberty
Fructuosus (1), m., Bishop of Tarragona - This was Sunday, and they remained in Prison till Friday, enjoying, however, some intercourse with the brethren outside. Fructuosus even baptized a catechumen within the Prison
Isaacus, Donatist Martyr - Having been first scourged with "plumbata," a whip armed with leaden bullets, and then beaten with sticks, they were both cast into Prison, but Isaac disappointed the further violence of his tormentors by death. Crowds immediately flocked to the Prison, singing hymns as if it were the eve of Easter, and they watched beside the corpse to ensure it Christian burial. To execute this command, the soldiers were obliged to clear the way from the Prison by force, and many persons were wounded in the struggle
Mill - " (Exodus 11:5) Hence when the Philistines had put out Samson's eyes, they bound him in fetters of brass, and compelled him "to grind in the Prison-house
Hypocrisy: Easy But Dangerous - But be quiet, for a detective may be near, a coarse-minded minion of unpoetic law, who may cruelly block up your road, or even lead you into Prison
Peter, Festival of Saint - Peter is variously represented, with a keyin his hand; with a key and church; with keys and cross; in chainsand in Prison, etc
Felix - Yet he kept Paul imprisoned for two years, simply to please the Jews and so prevent any further unrest (Acts 24:23; Acts 24:27). Paul refused to cooperate, so the heartless Felix left him in Prison
Jehoiachin - ...
In 561 BC a new Babylonian king released Jehoiachin from Prison and treated him with special favour
Pothinus, Bishop of Lyons, Martyr - " The blows and ill-usage of the crowd as he was carried back to Prison caused his death two days later
Jehoahaz - Necho threw Jehoahaz into Prison and later took him to Egypt, where he eventually died (2 Kings 23:29-34)
Hospitality - Jesus hath already left it upon record, what he will say in that day when he cometh to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all that believe me in; naked, and ye clothed me; I was sick, and ye visited me; I was in Prison, and ye came unto me. "And when the conscious sense of the littleness of services, and the unworthiness of the doer, shall make the souls of Christ's people exclaim,"Lord, when saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in; or naked, and clothed thee; or when saw we thee sick, or in Prison, and came unto thee? The Lord Jesus will graciously explain the seeming impossibility in manifesting, before a congregated world, the oneness between himself and his redeemed
Nob - After being supplied with the sacred loaves of showbread, and girding on the sword of Goliath, which was brought forth from behind the ephod, David fled from Nob and sought refuge at the court of Achish, the king of Gath, where he was cast into Prison
Loan - The Roman or else the oriental law detaining the debtor in Prison until he paid the uttermost farthing, and even giving him over to torturers, is alluded to in Matthew 5:26; Matthew 18:34
Felix, Antonius - ), but kept him in Prison, first in hope of a bribe, one of many details showing that St. Paul was a Prisoner of social importance, and, finally, to please the Jews
Hoshea - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed to the court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vassal, shut up in Prison, and apparently treated with the utmost Indignity
Ephesians - 62, while he was in Prison at Rome, and forwarded by Tychicus, a beloved brother and faithful minister
Liberty - ) Freedom from imprisonment, bonds, or other restraint upon locomotion. ) A certain amount of freedom; permission to go freely within certain limits; also, the place or limits within which such freedom is exercised; as, the liberties of a Prison
Felix - Nevertheless he kept him a Prisoner, though with many alleviation's, in hopes that his friends would purchase his liberty by a heavy bribe. 60, he was recalled to Rome; and left Paul in Prison, in order to appease the Jews
Potiphar - Joseph was sold to Potiphar, on whose wife’s accusation he was cast into the king’s Prison (in Potiphar’s own house), to which Pharaoh afterwards committed his chief butler and chief baker
Hoshe'a - The alliance did him no good; it was revealed, to the court of Nineveh by the Assyrian party in Ephraim, and Hoshea was immediately seized as a rebellious vasal, shut up in Prison, and apparently treated with the utmost indignity
Chrysogonus, Martyr Under Diocletian - He was of "great Rome," "a man that feared God," "teacher of the Christians"; "and when persecution was set on foot he was arrested and cast into Prison. Hence, when by the second edict, not long after, all the clergy were committed to jail, he exercised great influence from his Prison on the faithful, still for the most part unscathed and at large. By the third edict, on the great anniversary festival of the emperor on the 21st, the clergy were to sacrifice if they were to be included in the general release of Prisoners; if not, torture was to be employed to induce them
Joannes Iii, Bishop of Jerusalem - The prefect Anastasius surprised the unsuspicious bishop and threw him into Prison until he should fulfil his promise. Zacharias, one of the leading men of Caesarea, gaining a secret interview with the imprisoned bishop, persuaded him to feign assent to Anastasius's requirements and promise, if he would release him from Prison, to publicly signify, on the following Sunday, his agreement to the original conditions
Spirits in Prison - ) that 1 Peter 3:19 alludes to a preaching by the pre-incarnate Christ to the contemporaries of Noah, imprisoned in the darkness of ignorance, who were afterwards overwhelmed in the Flood for their sins. It was after Christ had been ‘put to death in the flesh’ that He was ‘quickened in the spirit,’ in which He ‘went and preached unto the spirits in Prison. 1, where the fallen angels in the second heaven are described as ‘the Prisoners suspended, reserved for the eternal judgement,’ So also Apoc. Again, the ‘spirits in Prison’ of 1 Peter 3:19 must be included among the νεκροί of 1 Peter 4:6 to whom the gospel was preached, and these cannot be angels. Luke 24:37; Luke 24:39), and φυλακή of Sheol or Hades, in which after death they are imprisoned, according to Jewish belief. 2 Es 7:85, 95 and Isaiah 42:7; Isaiah 49:9; Isaiah 61:1 for phrases out of which the idea of Sheol as a Prison might have grown (see, further, Descent into Hades, 3). Ἅδης) ὡς φρούριον ἀπενεμήθη ψυχαῖς, and describes Hades as divided into two compartments, for the good and the evil both guarded by angels, the unrighteous being haled to their own place as Prisoners (ὡς δἐσμιοι ἑλκόμενοι). The ‘spirits in Prison’ of 1 Peter 3:19 are, therefore, human souls in Hades or the abode of the departed, to whom Christ ‘preached’ after His Passion, a further allusion to the same mysterious ministry being found in 1 Peter 4:6. But in 1 Peter 3:19, where alone in the NT the phrase ‘spirits in Prison’ is found, it is immediately followed by the words ‘which aforetime were disobedient, when the long-suffering of God waited in the days of Noah,’ etc. Of the countless souls imprisoned there, the writer recalls, naturally and immediately, those who were carried to its depths in that overwhelming visitation of God’s wrath. The Spirits in Prison, London, 1887; R
Jehonathan - Scribe whose house King Zedekiah transformed into Prison where he jailed Jeremiah (Jeremiah 37:15 ), a place Jeremiah did not like (Jeremiah 37:20 ; Jeremiah 38:26 )
Prisoner - 1: δέσμιος (Strong's #1198 — Adjective — desmios — des'-mee-os ) an adjective, primarily denotes "binding, bound," then, as a noun, "the person bound, a captive, Prisoner" (akin to deo, "to bind"), Matthew 27:15,16 ; Mark 15:6 ; Acts 16:25,27 ; 23:18 ; 25:14 , RV (AV, "in bonds"),27; 28:16,17; Ephesians 3:1 ; 4:1 ; 2 Timothy 1:8 ; Philemon 1:1,9 ; in Hebrews 10:34 ; 13:3 , "in bonds. ...
Note: The Prison at Jerusalem (Acts 5 ) was controlled by the priests and probably attached to the high priest's palace, or the Temple. Paul was imprisoned at Jerusalem in the fort Antonia, Acts 23:10 ; at Caesarea, in Herod's Praetorium, 23:35; probably his final imprisonment in Rome was in the Tullianum dungeon. ...
3: συναιχμάλωτος (Strong's #4869 — Noun Masculine — sunaichmalotos — soon-aheekh-mal'-o-tos ) "a fellow Prisoner," primarily "one of fellow captives in war" (from aichme, "a spear," and haliskomai, "to be taken"), is used by Paul of Andronicus and Junias, Romans 16:7 ; of Epaphras, Philemon 1:23 ; of Aristarchus, Colossians 4:10 , on which Lightfoot remarks that probably his relations with the Apostle in Rome excited suspicion and led to a temporary confinement, or that he voluntarily shared his captivity by living with him
Familiars of the Inquisition - Persons who assist in apprehending such as are accused, and carrying them to Prison. When several persons are to be taken up at the same time, these familiars are commanded to order matters that they may know nothing of one another's being apprehended; and it is related, that a father and his three sons and three daughters, who lived together in the same house, were carried Prisoners to the inquisition without knowing any thing of one another's being there till seven years afterwards, when they that were alive were released by an act of faith
Escape - ) The unlawful permission, by a jailer or other custodian, of a Prisoner's departure from custody. ) To get free from that which confines or holds; - used of persons or things; as, to escape from Prison, from arrest, or from slavery; gas escapes from the pipes; electricity escapes from its conductors
Ambassador - ...
Paul saw himself even in Prison as an ambassador sent by the divine King to proclaim salvation through Christ to the world (Ephesians 6:20 ; compare 2 Corinthians 5:20 )
Eusebius (48), Bishop of Laodicea - Dionysius had been banished from Alexandria, Eusebius remained, ministering to those in Prison and burying the martyrs, a faithful service gratefully commemorated in a letter of Dionysius (apud Eus: H
Release - To set free from restraint of any kind, either physical or moral to liberate from Prison, confinement or servitude
Watch - ...
Mishmereth (מִשְׁמֶרֶת, Strong's #4931); Mishmâr (מִשְׁמָר, Strong's #4929), “watch; guard; post; confinement; Prison; custody; division. In Job 7:12 mishmâr means “watch” or “guard” in general (over a potentially dangerous criminal): “Am I a sea, or a whale, that thou settest a watch over me?”...
Mishmâr can also represent a “place of confinement,” such as a jail: “And he put them in ward in the house of the captain of the guard, into the Prison, the place where Joseph was bound” ( Prisons where people were held for extended periods after being convicted of a crime
Guard - Modern translation frequently use the expression “court of the guard” where the KJV used “court of the Prison” (Nehemiah 3:25 ; Jeremiah 32:2 )
Prisoners - Job 3:18 (a) He speaks of the grave as a Prison. ...
Isaiah 10:4 (b) This difficult passage may mean that the unrighteous rulers shall eventually be punished by making such wicked devices that they themselves shall fall, and those who have been their Prisoners will become their masters, and they themselves will become the Prisoners
Singing - The same word is translated 'sang praises' unto God, when Paul and Silas were in Prison, Acts 16:25 ; and the Lord sings praise in the midst of the assembly
Hell - The "spirits in Prison" (1 Peter 3:19) mean the ungodly antediluvians shut up in this earth, one vast Prison, and under sentence of death and awaiting execution (Isaiah 24:22); not the Prison of Ηades . (See SPIRITS IN Prison
Micaiah - ...
Ahab had Micaiah already in Prison, as 1 Kings 22:26 implies, "carry him back . Prison. 6) says that it was Micaiah who predicted ("in the word of Jehovah," Haggai 1:13) death by a lion to the neighbor who would not smite him, and who, disguised with ashes, under the parable of one letting go a Prisoner entrusted to him made Ahab in his hour of triumph, when the mortification would be the greater, condemn himself out of his own mouth, to lose his life for letting Benhadad escape (1 Kings 20:35-43). in the Prison, feed him with bread and water of affliction (in more severe imprisonment than before) until I come in peace
John the Baptist - ...
While in Prison John's faith or patience seems in measure to have failed him, and he sent two of his disciples to the Lord with the question, "Art thou he that should come, or do we look for another?" He evidently had not apprehended the humiliation and rejection of the Messiah, and expected to have been delivered from Prison by the power which he knew had been exercised in grace by the Lord. ...
It was because of John's faithfulness in reproving the sins of Herod Antipas that he had been by him cast into Prison
Herod Agrippa i. - He put the apostle James the elder to death, and cast Peter into Prison (Luke 3:1 ; Acts 12:1-19 )
Gaza - Here he was afterwards a Prisoner, and "did grind in the Prison house
Pit - Sometimes they were used as dungeons or Prisons (Genesis 37:24 ; Exodus 12:29 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ). In addition, it is used metaphorically for an underworld dungeon: a gloomy Prison for the fallen angels (2 Peter 2:4 ) or a bottomless abyss for Satan during the millennium (Revelation 20:1-3 )
Help - ) To furnish with the means of deliverance from trouble; as, to help one in distress; to help one out of Prison
Fleet - ) A former Prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up)
John the Apostle - In the Acts of the Apostles John was with Peter when the lame man was healed, and they were both cast into Prison
Micah - When he told Ahab that a coming battle would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into Prison
Self-Righteousness: Destroyed by Conviction of Sin - Some of the martyrs were shut up in a dungeon called Little-ease; the counterpart of that Prison- house I well remember
Ercole Consalvi - When the French entered Rome, 1798, and proclaimed a republic, Consalvi was thrown into Prison but subsequently released
Burst - Hence it is generally used to signify the sudden rupture of a thing by internal force,and a liberation from confinement as, to burst from a Prison the heart bursts with grief
Jeremiah - The fidelity of the prophet often endangered his life, and he was in Prison when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar
Hell - It is a Prison (1 Peter 3:19 ), with gates and bars and locks (Matthew 16:18 ; Revelation 1:18 ), and it is downward (Matthew 11:23 ; Luke 10:15 )
Nergal-Sharezer - " He was one of those who were sent to release Jeremiah from Prison (Jeremiah 39:13 ) by "the captain of the guard
Mark - It was in his mother's house that Peter found "many gathered together praying" when he was released from Prison; and it is probable that it was here that he was converted by Peter, who calls him his "son" (1 Peter 5:13 ). He, however, was evidently at length reconciled to the apostle, for he was with him in his first imprisonment at Rome (Colossians 4:10 ; Philippians 1:24 ). At a later period he was with Peter in Babylon (1 Peter 5:13 ), then, and for some centuries afterwards, one of the chief seats of Jewish learning; and he was with Timothy in Ephesus when Paul wrote him during his second imprisonment (2 Timothy 4:11 )
Preexistence of Souls - Though the Greeks longed to free their souls from the Prison of the body, the Hebrews feared separation from the body as the end of personal existence
Prison - ...
Isaiah 53:8 (a) This refers to the fact that our Lord JESUS was bound by His enemies in Gethsemane, and was kept as a Prisoner until He was nailed to the Cross. One place was a place of comfort, and those in that place were called Prisoners of hope, as in Zechariah 9:12. It is a permanent Prison, from which there is no escape
Heraclides Cyprius, Bishop of Ephesus - He was deposed by the party in power, and put in Prison at Nicomedia, where, when Palladius wrote, he had been already languishing for years
Counter - ) A Prison; either of two Prisons formerly in London
Dativus, Celebrated Senator - Many of his companions were also tortured, and most of them were starved to death in Prison
Moses - When they had been a year in Prison ( Ep
Pionius, Martyr at Smyrna - ...
When taken to Prison, Pionius and his companions, Asclepiades and Sabina, found there already another Catholic presbyter, named Lemnus, and a Montanist woman named Macedonia. The Acts give a long report of exhortations delivered by Pionius to his fellow-prisoners
Theodorus of Amasea - From Prison, where he was visited at night by angels who filled the cell with light and song, he passed to death in a furnace
Pamphilus, Presbyter of Caesarea - Pamphilus proved his affection for the memory and fame of Origen by devoting the last two years of his life to composing, in Prison, with the assistance of Eusebius, an Apology , or Defence of Origen, addressed to the "Confessors condemned to the mines in Palestine. ...
In 307 Pamphilus was committed to Prison by Urbanus, the persecuting governor of the city, and for two years was closely confined, cheered by the companionship of his second self, Eusebius (Hieron
Love-Feasts - He tells us that when Peregrinus, a Christian, was in Prison, "you might have seen, early in the morning, old women, some widows, and orphans, waiting at the Prison. Their presidents bribed the guards, and lodged in the Prison with him
On - The legend of the wonder-bird Phoenix, early used to illustrate the doctrine of the resurrection, arose here; to this city Joseph, delivered from Prison, came with royal honors to marry the daughter of Potipherah, "dedicated to Ra
Mark, Saint Evangelist - Mark, whom Saint Peter calls his son, is the son of Mary, whose house was a meeting-place for the Apostles, to which Saint Peter turned on his release from Prison
Daniel o'Connell - Eventually the Repeal Movement made mighty strides, monster meetings were held throughout the country, O'Connell was flung into Prison but was released on appeal
Philippi - When the missionaries healed a demonized girl, their opponents stirred up trouble and had them thrown into Prison (Acts 16:16-24). He probably visited Philippi again after release from his first Roman imprisonment (1 Timothy 1:3)
o'Connell, Daniel - Eventually the Repeal Movement made mighty strides, monster meetings were held throughout the country, O'Connell was flung into Prison but was released on appeal
Ebed-Melech - So shall they be rewarded who have visited Christ, in the person of His servants, in Prison (Matthew 25:34 ff)
Minister - When saw we thee hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in Prison, and did not minister unto thee? ...
Matthew 25 ...
2
Asa - Asa, alas, did not humble himself, but put Hanani in Prison, and oppressed some of the people
Copper - 16:21: “But the Philistines took [3], and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza, and bound him with fetters of [4]; and he did grind in the Prison house
Commend, Commendation - See BETRAY , BRING , B, Note (4), CAST , COMMIT , DELIVER , GIVE , HAZARD , PUT (in Prison), RECOMMEND
Thomas Edessenus - Refusing to do either, he was exiled, and venturing to return to his see without the king's permission, was cast into Prison, and died there, 552
Baruch - 3398, Jeremiah having been thrown into Prison, the Lord commanded him to commit to writing all the prophecies that he had delivered until that time. After his return to Jerusalem, Baruch continued his constant attendance on Jeremiah; and when Jerusalem was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar, and Jeremiah thrown into Prison, Baruch also was confined with him: but when the city had surrendered, Nebuzaraddan showed him much kindness, granted him his liberty, and permitted him to go with Jeremiah wherever he chose
Baruch - He was the friend to whom Jeremiah in Prison entrusted the papers of the purchase of his uncle's field at Anathoth, the year before Jerusalem's destruction, to assure the Jews of the certainty of their return from Babylon
Beard - In consonance with this Egyptian usage, Scripture, with the undesigned propriety of truth, represents Joseph as having "shaved his beard," which he had allowed to grow in Prison, before entering Pharaoh's presence (Genesis 41:14)
Timothy - Later when Paul was in Prison, he sent Timothy to Philippi (Philippians 2:19 ). At some point in his life, Timothy was imprisoned; but he was released (Hebrews 13:23 )
Captain of the Temple - ’...
In Acts 5:24; Acts 5:26 the captain of the Temple re-arrested Peter and John, who had escaped from Prison the previous night
Commit - To put or sent to, for confinement as, to commit an offender to Prison. Hence for the sake of brevity, commit is used for imprison
Gate - The Prison at Jerusalem had an outer gate of iron, the only iron one we read of
Lent - Lent was thought the proper time for exercising more abundantly every species of charity: thus what they spared of their own bodies by abridging them of a meal, was usually given to the poor: they employed their vacant hours in visiting the sick and those that were in Prison; in entertaining strangers, and reconciling differences
Media - The geographical position of Media was wisely chosen for the distribution of the great body of the captives; for, it was so remote, and so impeded and intersected with great mountains and numerous and deep rivers, that it would be extremely difficult for them to escape from this natural Prison, and return to their own country
Marcellinus, Flavius - In 413 occurred the revolt of Heraclian, suppressed by Marinus, count of Africa, who, bribed by the Donatists, as Orosius insinuates, arrested and imprisoned Marcellinus and Apringius. Several African bishops joined in a letter of intercession on behalf of the Prisoners, whose prayer Caecilianus affected to support, and he even paid an express visit to Augustine, giving him the strongest hope that they would be released, with solemn asseverations of absence of hostility on his own part. Augustine mentions their edifying behaviour in Prison
Mark - ) Mark’s house must have been a regular meeting place for the apostles and other Christians in Jerusalem, as Peter, on escaping from Prison, knew that he would find the Christians there (Acts 12:12). ...
Mark was still in Rome when Paul arrived as a Prisoner the first time (Philem 23-24). Paul was back in Prison after a brief time of freedom and travel, and he wanted to see Timothy and Mark before he was executed (2 Timothy 4:11)
Guard - Arrested by the high priest Annas, and put ‘in public ward’ (Acts 5:18 : ἐν τηρήσει δημοσίᾳ), Peter and John were not chained; their keepers merely shut the Prison-house (δεσμωτήριον) and stood on guard outside. Peter was arrested by Herod Agrippa, and imprisoned in the fortress of Antonia or the adjoining barracks, he was chained to two soldiers, while other two kept watch at the door of the Prison (φυλακή, Vulgate carcer). The station of the latter two was apparently ‘the first ward’ (φυλακή, Vulgate custodia) which the Prisoner had to pass before he could effect his escape. ...
(2) The above-named Agrippa himself, having incurred the displeasure of Tiberius, once had the experience of being chained as a Prisoner for six months to soldiers of the Imperial bodyguard in Rome. Paul probably received better treatment than an ordinary Prisoner; but the fact remained that in his own hired house he was the δέσμιος of Christ Jesus, always wearing galling ‘bonds’ (δεσμοί, Philippians 1:7; Philippians 1:13-14; Philippians 1:16, Colossians 4:18, Philemon 1:10; Philemon 1:13, 2 Timothy 2:9), called also a ‘chain’ (ἅλυσις, Ephesians 6:20, 2 Timothy 1:16). Great good, however, resulted from his imprisonment; for through the frequent relief of the guard, and the Apostle’s skill in changing an enforced fellowship with armed men into a spiritual communion, the real significance of his bonds-their relation to his faith in Christ-gradually became known among all ‘the Praetorians,’ the finest regiment of the Roman army (Philippians 1:12-13). 57) indicates that the proper course to take with a certain Bithynian Prisoner is to hand him over in chains ‘ad praefectos praetorii mei,’ and the case seems to be parallel to that of the Apostle, who made an appeal unto Caesar (Acts 25:11; Acts 25:21)
Ark - Jubilees, 5), imagines Christ, as a bodiless spirit, preaching, in the days between His Passion and His Resurrection, to the spirits in Prison. Peter (himself like a spirit in Prison during those three days), unhappy children of the unlawful union between angels and the daughters of men, condemned rebels who in vain sought the intervention of Enoch on their behalf in that time of Divine long-suffering when Noah was preparing the ark in which he saved himself and his family (see R
Onesimus - In his wanderings he came to Rome, when Paul was there imprisoned the first time; and knowing the apostle while in his master's service, he visited the apostle in the Prison. And as we find the Epistle to the church of the Colossians was sent from Rome by Onesimus, there is reason to conclude that Philemon sent him back to Paul to minister to him in the Prison. How truly blessed doth the epistle open, after subscribing himself as the Prisoner of the Lord, in praying that grace and peace to Philemon might flow from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ! And how blessedly doth the apostle close his letter, in a similar prayer, that the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ might be with his spirit! Amen
Philippians - It is one of the Prison Epistles (along with Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon). Paul wrote to thank the church for a gift it had recently sent to Paul in Prison and to inform them of his circumstances and of Timothy's and Epaphroditus' travel plans. ...
The date of the letter depends on which imprisonment Paul was enduring. ...
Origin of Philippians Where was Paul when he wrote Philippians? The letter itself reveals only that he was in Prison. Acts records Pauline imprisonments in Caesarea and in Rome. Some evidence indicates that Paul was also in Prison in Ephesus (Acts 19:1 ; 2 Corinthians 11:23 ; 1 Corinthians 15:30-32 ). Reference to Caesar's household (Philippians 4:22 ), the praetorium or palace guard (Philippians 1:13 NIV), as well as the ability to receive visitors ( Acts 28:16 ,Acts 28:16,28:30-31 ) like Epaphroditus and the possibility of execution (Philippians 1:20-26 ) seem to mesh well with the imprisonment described in the closing verses of Acts. ” An Ephesian imprisonment and origin for Philippians makes sense of Paul's stated intent to visit Philippi upon his release (Philippians 2:24 ; from Rome Paul intended to go to Spain, Romans 15:23-24 ). The large number of trips implied in Philippians is difficult to fit into a two-year Roman imprisonment, but is less problematic even in a much shorter Ephesian imprisonment. The severity of Paul's imprisonment is reflected in Philippians 1:19-26 . The church has sent him to take a gift to Paul (see Philippians 4:10-20 ) and minister to him in his imprisonment
Keep, Keeping - 1, denotes (a) "a watching," and hence, "imprisonment, Prison," Acts 4:3 ; 5:18 , "ward," RV (AV, "hold" and "prison"); (b) "keeping," 1 Corinthians 7:19 . See HOLD , Prison
Norway - Churches were destroyed and their lands confiscated by kings and nobles, many monasteries were suppressed, and, in the persecution of Catholics Mogens Lawridtzen, Bishop of Hamar, died in Prison, and Bishop Jon Arason was executed
Rome - The Mamertine Prison where legend makes Peter and Paul to have been fellow Prisoners for nine months is still under the church of Giuseppe dei Falegnani ; but see 2 Timothy 4:11
Hesychius (3), Egyptian bp - 296) when the authors were in Prison and Peter of Alexandria alive
Help - To assist to succor to lend means of deliverance as, to help one in distress to help one out of Prison
Compassion, Compassionate - , "sympathy"), to have "compassion" upon, Hebrews 10:34 , of "compassionating" those in Prison, is translated "be touched with" in Hebrews 4:15 , of Christ as the High Priest
Pit - Prison]'>[2]), 1 Samuel 13:6 (RVm Watch, Watchers, Watchful, Watchings - See CAGE , HOLD , IMPRISONMENT, Prison
Peregrinus, Called Proteus - He was imprisoned for the faith, and Lucian's words are a valuable and truthful description of the conduct of the Christians towards confessors generally. Crowds attended at the Prison and ministered to Peregrinus, bribing the gaolers to obtain admission
Perpetua, Vibia - She and her fellow-martyrs were baptized after their arrest, possibly before their transference to the public Prison (cf. They were attended in Prison, according to the ancient discipline of the Carthaginian church, by the deacons Tertius and Pomponius (Cypr
Oates, Titus - " Later "he slipped into Orders," but his dishonesty again brought him into trouble on several occasions, and he was finally sent to Prison at Dover to await trial
Catholic Church Extension Society of England And w - The Ransom Guild is responsible for organizing annual processions through the streets in about 40 parishes in Greater London, and also the famous "Tyburn Walk" from the site of old Newgate Prison to Marble Arch, in honor of the martyrs who there suffered for the faith
Hoshea (2) - "Shalmaneser" therefore invaded Israel and shut up Hoshea in Samaria, and after a siege of upward of two years (not "three "full years, for it began in Hoshea's seventh and ended in his ninth year of reign) "the king of Assyria," Sargon, Shalmaneser's successor, who usurped the throne (according to the Assyrian monuments), took him and "bound him in Prison" (2 Kings 17:4-6), the sixth year of Hezekiah's reign, 722 B. Hoshea's imprisonment was not before the capture of Samaria, but the sacred writer first records the eventual fate of Hoshea himself, then details the invasion as it affected Samaria and Israel. " Sargon in the inscriptions describes his transporting Prisoners from Babylon to "the land of the Hittites" (Samaria), exactly as 2 Kings 17:24
Guild of Our Lady of Ransom - The Ransom Guild is responsible for organizing annual processions through the streets in about 40 parishes in Greater London, and also the famous "Tyburn Walk" from the site of old Newgate Prison to Marble Arch, in honor of the martyrs who there suffered for the faith
Felix (4) iv, Bishop of Rome - , had died in Prison at Ravenna, into which he had been thrown by Theodoric the Ostrogoth, who then ruled the West as king of Italy
Aristarchus - Paul’s arrest, and seems to have remained in Syria during the two years of the Apostle’s imprisonment in Caesarea, for we find him embarking with the Prisoner on the ship bound for the West (Acts 27:2). In the former (Colossians 4:10) he is called the ‘fellow-prisoner’ (συναιχμάλωτος) of the writer, and we find the same term, which usually indicates physical restraint, applied to Epaphras (q. Paul’s Prison in Rome, either as a suspected friend of the Prisoner or voluntarily as the Apostle’s slave-a position which he and Epaphras may have taken alternately
Common, Commonly - ...
(5) In Acts 5:18 , demosios (AV, "common," with reference to the Prison) signifies "public," belonging to the people, demos, (RV, "public")
Titus Oates - " Later "he slipped into Orders," but his dishonesty again brought him into trouble on several occasions, and he was finally sent to Prison at Dover to await trial
Luke - ...
Luke travelled with Paul on the eventful sea voyage to Rome (Acts 27:1; Acts 28:16) and remained with him during his two years imprisonment there (Acts 28:30; Colossians 4:14; Philem 24). When the aged Paul, after being released and later recaptured, sat cold and lonely in Prison awaiting his execution, Luke alone stayed with him (2 Timothy 4:11)
Paulus, the Black - Thus they "fell into communion" with the deceitful "synodite," and on their loading him with reproaches the severity of their treatment was increased and they were thrown into Prison in the monastery of Beth Abraham in Constantinople, where their sufferings continued
Petrus, Saint, Archbaptist of Alexandria - (2) Those who as Peter phrases it had endured only the "siege of imprisonment," not the "war of tortures," and therefore deserved less pity yet gave themselves up to suffer some affliction for "the Name," although in Prison they were much relieved by Christian alias may be received after another year's penance. (8) Those who having lapsed returned to the conflict and endured imprisonment and tortures are to be "joyfully received to communion alike in the prayers and the reception of the Body and Blood and oral exhortation. Requests for prayer on behalf of those who gave way after imprisonment and torture ought to be granted: "no one could be the worse "for sympathizing with those who were overcome by the devil or by the entreaties of their kindred (cf. Paul was constrained to leave Gaius and Aristarchus in the hands of the mob of Ephesus (Act_19:29-30); Peter escaped from Prison and his guards died for it; the Innocents died in place of the Holy Child. (14) Imprisoned confessors in Libya and elsewhere had mentioned persons who had been compelled by sheer force to handle the sacrifices. of Thmuis, and three other bishops were imprisoned at Alexandria; and then, according to the Maffeian documents, Meletius, being himself at large, held ordinations in their dioceses without their sanction "or that of the archbishop," and without necessity ( Hist. and shewn his craving for pre-eminence by ordaining certain persons in Prison; take care not to communicate with him until I meet him in company with wise men, and see what it is that he has in mind
Peter - " ...
After the miracle at the temple gate (Acts 3 ) persecution arose against the Christians, and Peter was cast into Prison. A fresh outburst of violence against the Christians (5:17-21) led to the whole body of the apostles being cast into Prison; but during the night they were wonderfully delivered, and were found in the morning teaching in the temple. Next we hear of his being cast into Prison by Herod Agrippa (12:1-19); but in the night an angel of the Lord opened the Prison gates, and he went forth and found refuge in the house of Mary
Sennacherib - Ashkelon and Ekron were captured, and Hezekiah had to restore Padi to the throne of Ekron after keeping him some time in Prison. Then Sennacherib devastated Judæa, capturing 46 cities and 200,150 Prisoners
Devil - "And when the thousand years are expired, Satan shall be loosed out of his Prison and shall go out to deceive the nations
Simon Peter - After his deliverance from Prison by an angel he left Jerusalem and began his Apostolic journeys
Philippians, Epistle to the, - Strangely full of joy and thanksgiving amidst adversity, like the apostle's midnight hymn from the depth of his Philippian dungeon, this epistle went forth from his Prison at Rome
Consider - 1, used as the aorist tense of sunorao, to see with one view, to be aware, conscious, as the result of mental perception, is translated "considered" in Acts 12:12 , of Peter's consideration of the circumstances of his deliverance from Prison
Jehoiachin - ...
Jehoiachin wore Prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Jeremiah 52:15; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of Prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his Prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death
Salvation - , "salvation" (text, "deliverance"); (2) personal, as from the sea, Acts 27:34 ; RV, "safety" (AV, "health"); Prison, Philippians 1:19 ; the flood, Hebrews 11:7 ; (b) of the spiritual and eternal deliverance granted immediately by God to those who accept His conditions of repentance and faith in the Lord Jesus, in whom alone it is to be obtained, Acts 4:12 , and upon confession of Him as Lord, Romans 10:10 ; for this purpose the gospel is the saving instrument, Romans 1:16 ; Ephesians 1:13 (see further under SAVE); (c) of the present experience of God's power to deliver from the bondage of sin, e
Babylas, Bishop of Antioch - 250 or 251, under Decius, either by death in Prison for the faith (Eus
Serve - time of punishment; as, to serve a term in Prison
Silas - In the public witness for Christ confirmed by the Pythoness at Philippi, and in the scourging for His name's sake, and the prayers and praises sung in the Prison to God, and in the jailer's conversion, Silas bore a part second only to Paul (Acts 16:19; Acts 16:25; Acts 16:29)
Onesiphorus - (Ὀνεσίφορος, ‘profit-bringer’)...
This is the name of a Christian convert belonging to Ephesus who had visited Rome during the apostle Paul’s imprisonment and had sought out the Prisoner and ministered to his wants: ‘He off refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain’ (2 Timothy 1:16). When in Rome during his second imprisonment the Apostle sends greetings to the household of Onesiphorus (2 Timothy 4:19); and in 2 Timothy 1:16 he expresses the desire that the Lord may give mercy to the ‘house of Onesiphorus. Plumptre, The Spirits in Prison, do
John the Baptist - Antipas replied by throwing John into Prison (Mark 6:17-20; Luke 3:19-20). ...
Shut up in Prison, John received only irregular, and possibly inaccurate, reports of Jesus’ ministry
Joseph - At length a false charge having been brought against him by Potiphar's wife, he was at once cast into the state Prison (39; 40), where he remained for at least two years. After a while the "chief of the cupbearers" and the "chief of the bakers" of Pharaoh's household were cast into the same Prison (40:2). Each of these new Prisoners dreamed a dream in the same night, which Joseph interpreted, the event occurring as he had said. At his suggestion Joseph was brought from Prison to interpret the king's dreams
John the Baptist - " His public ministry was suddenly (after about six months probably) brought to a close by his being cast into Prison by Herod, whom he had reproved for the sin of having taken to himself the wife of his brother Philip (Luke 3:19 )
Lydia - First came her faith, then her leading all around her to Christ, then her and their baptismal confession, then her love evidenced in pressing hospitality (Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9; 1 Timothy 5:10), finally her receiving into her house Paul and Silas after their discharge from Prison; she was not "ashamed of the Lord's Prisoners, but was partaker of the afflictions of the gospel
Hold - ) A place of confinement; a Prison; confinement; custody; guard
Hell - " It was in this realm that our Lord "preached to the spirits in Prison
Street - Craftsmen plied their trade on certain “streets” named after the guild—for example, the Bakers’ Street: “Then Zedekiah the king commanded that they should commit Jeremiah into the court of the Prison, and that they should give him daily a piece of bread out of the bakers’ street, until all the bread in the city were spent” ( Pilate Pontius - The context is a prayer of the early believers on the release of Peter and John from Prison, which proceeds upon a Messianic interpretation of Psalms 2 and its application to the death of Christ
Angels - When Peter was delivered from Prison, and knocked at the door, those who had been praying for his release said, "It is his angel. They supposed Peter was still in Prison, and that the one at the door was his representative, his spirit personified, perhaps with very vague ideas of what they really meant
Sheol - Christ is said ( Revelation 1:18 ) to have ‘the keys of death and Hades,’ and in 1 Peter 3:18 He is said to have preached to ‘spirits in Prison,’ i
Mary - The mother of John Mark, Acts 12:12, and aunt to Barnabas, Colossians 4:10, a godly woman residing at Jerusalem at whose house the disciples were convened the night Peter was miraculously delivered from Prison
Joseph - By a wonderful providence of God he was raised from a Prison to be the chief ruler of Egypt under Pharaoh. "The story of his father's fondness, of his protest against sin among his brothers, of their jealous hostility and his prophetic dreams, of his sale by his brethren to Midianites and by them to Potiphar in Egypt, of the divine favor on his pure and prudent life, his imprisonment for three to twelve years for virtue's sake, his wonderful exaltation to power and his wise use of it for the good of the nation, of his tender and reverent care of his father, his magnanimity to his brethren, and his faith in the future of God's chosen people, is one of the most pleasing and instructive in the Bible, and is related in language inimitably natural, simple, and touching
Conscience - He could say that he had lived in all good conscience before God, and yet he had been haling men and women to Prison because they were Christians
Smyrna - ...
When urged to recant he said, "four-score years and six I have served the Lord, and He never wronged me; how then can I blaspheme my King and Saviour?" The accuser, the devil, cast some of the Smyrna church into Prison, and "it had tribulation ten days," a short term (Genesis 24:55; Numbers 11:19), whereas the consequent joy is eternal (many Christians perished by wild beasts or at the stake because they refused to throw incense into the fire to sacrifice to the genius of the emperor): a sweet consolation in trial
Peter - He was miraculously delivered out of Prison
Nonconformists - The Conventicle Act, in 1663 and 1670, forbade the attendance at conventicles; that is, at places of worship other than the establishment, where more than five adults were present beside the resident family; and that under penalties of fine and imprisonment by the sentence of magistrates without a jury. ...
Such were the dreadful consequences of this intolerant spirit, that it is supposed that near eight thousand died in Prison in the reign of Charles II
Commit, Commission - , to Prison, Acts 8:3 ; to the grace of God, Acts 14:26 ; to God, 1 Peter 2:23 ; by God to pits of darkness, 2 Peter 2:4
Joseph - He is memorable for the wonderful providence of God, which raised him from a Prison to be the grandvizier of Egypt, and made him the honored means of saving countless human lives
Liberty - A space in which one is permitted to pass without restraint, and beyond which he may not lawfully pass with a plural as the liberties of a Prison
Mark, - 44, after his deliverance from Prison (Acts 12:12 ) This fact accounts for St. Notwithstanding this, we find him at Paul's side during that apostle's first imprisonment at Rome, A. 61-63, and he Is acknowledged by him as one of his few fellow laborers who had been a "comfort" to him during the weary hours of his imprisonment. From Babylon he would seem to have returned to Asia Minor; for during his second imprisonment A
Kings, First And Second Books of, - , the liberation of Jehoiachin from his Prison at Babylon --and a still further extension to Jehoiachin's death, the time of which is not known, but which was probably not long after his liberation
Jeremiah - The princes, in their anger at such a message by Jeremiah, cast him into Prison ((37:15-38:13)
Ahab - When he told Ahab that the coming war would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into Prison (1 Kings 22:1-28)
Water - “Water” of oppression or affliction is so designated because it is drunk in Prison: “Put this fellow in the Prison, and feed him with bread of affliction and with water of affliction, until I come in peace” (1 Kings 22:27)
Severus, l. Septimius - By a strange inconsistency Origen was allowed to visit the martyrs in Prison and to be present at their trial, and even to accompany them on their way to execution, apparently without being molested by the government, though several times in great danger from mob violence. Deacons were allowed to visit the imprisoned Christians, unmolested, to alleviate their sufferings, and even to procure their removal to a better part of the Prison
Eye - The hapless youth was cast into Prison, and deprived of the light by some adhesive plaster put upon his eyes, for the space of three years; after which the seal was taken away, that he might with freedom enjoy the light; but he was still detained in Prison. For this reason the hapless Zedekiah was punished with the loss of sight, because he had rebelled against the king of Babylon, and endeavoured to recover the independence of his throne: "Then he put out the eyes of Zedekiah; and the king of Babylon bound him in chains, and carried him to Babylon, and put him in Prison till the day of his death," Jeremiah 52:11
Base - A rustic play, called also bays, or Prison bars
Hymn - In another New Testament reference, Acts 16:25 , the mention of singing “praises” to God obviously means that Paul and Silas sang hymns in Prison
Gate (2) - The litigant was urged to come to terms with the adversary ‘in the way’ before the gate was reached, for there the judge sat, and behind him were the officer, the Prison, and the official exactors (Matthew 5:25-26)
Towel - In like manner when Peter was in Prison, (Acts 12:8) the angel commanded him to cast his garments (that is this hyke) about him, for he was with his tunic only before
Cheerfulness - Whereas we might expect depression and sighing, we find everywhere singing at midnight in the Prison houses (Acts 5:41; Acts 16:25, Romans 8:35-37, 1 Peter 1:6; 1 Peter 1:6, etc. Paul’s very imprisonment is having happy results-the Imperial guards have thereby heard of Christ, and other brethren have been inspired by St
Friends - Their doctrines were first promulgated in England, by George Fox, about the year 1647; for which he was imprisoned at Nottingham, in the year 1649, and the year following at Derby. It is said, that the appellation of Quakers was given them in reproach by one of the magistrates, who, in 1650, committed Fox to Prison, on account of his bidding him, and those about him, to quake at the word of the Lord. In New- England they were treated with peculiar severity, imprisoned, scourged, (women as well as men,) and at Boston four of them were even hanged, among whom was one woman; and this was the more extraordinary and inexcusable, as the settlers themselves had but lately fled from persecution in the parent country! During these sufferings, they applied to King Charles II, for relief; who, in 1661, granted a mandamus, to put a stop to them. Neither were the good offices of this prince in their favour confined to the colonies; for, in 1672, he released, under the great seal, four hundred of these suffering people who were imprisoned in Great Britain
Manasseh - Manasseh was probably delivered out of Prison by Saosduchin, the successor of Esar-haddon, 2 Chronicles 33:13-14 , &c
Praetorium - It was a fortress and Prison, and served as the headquarters of the garrison at Jerusalem. When sentence was pronounced, Jesus was led away by the soldiers to Antonia, where they were themselves quartered, and where Prisoners were ordinarily detained
Praetorium - It was a fortress and Prison, and served as the headquarters of the garrison at Jerusalem. When sentence was pronounced, Jesus was led away by the soldiers to Antonia, where they were themselves quartered, and where Prisoners were ordinarily detained
James the Brother of Jesus - James again appears as a prominent leader of the Jerusalem church in the story of Peter’s escape from Prison (Acts 12:17). Although their suggestion was intended to help Paul, it resulted in his imprisonment (Acts 21:20-24)
Timothy - In Philippi Timothy seems to have escaped imprisonment; in Berœa he stays on with Silas to finish the work, and later joins Paul in Corinth. In the Second Epistle Paul, who is represented as being in Prison, abandoned by his friends, his death impending, urges Timothy to return to Rome at once and bring Mark with him. The last glimpse that we get of Timothy is in Hebrews 13:23, where it is announced that he has just been set free from Prison, into which he may possibly have been thrown on his visit to the dying Paul
Capital Punishment - Protection: Capital punishment protects other Prisoners and guards from killers sentenced to life in Prison. Economics: It is cheaper to execute than to imprison. Yet, are there more humane ways of punishment than execution? Many see that life in Prison without possibility of parole is a greater punishment than death
Peter, First, Theology of - His resurrection and ascension affirm the church's ultimate triumph over her enemies, just as Jesus announced his triumph to the spirits in Prison on his journey through the heavens (3:18-22). Ericson...
See also Capstone ; Cornerstone ; Persecution ; Peter, Second, Theology of ; Spirits in Prison ...
Bibliography
Decius, Emperor - They were dragged before the prefects and other magistrates questioned as to their faith required to sacrifice exposed to insults and outrages if they refused thrust into Prison and in many instances ill-treated till they died. Others languished in Prison like the sufferers at Rome of whom Cyprian tells "sine solatio mortis
Base - ) A rustic play; - called also Prisoner's base, Prison base, or bars
Hell - a Prison, 1 Peter 3:19
Hell - a Prison, 1 Peter 3:19
Gaza - Its trade in grain is considerable, and still is heard the "grinding" of grain with millstones such as Samson was forced to work with in his Prison house at Gaza
Ananias - " How striking that Ananias, whom Saul would have seized for Prison and death, should be the instrument of giving him light and life
Philip the Evangelist - legal trial) was taken away," the virtual sense of Isaiah 53:8, "He was taken away by oppression (so in Psalms 107:39) and by judgment" (not as KJV "from Prison
Jeremi'ah - The approach of an Egyptian army, and the consequent departure of the Chaldeans, made the position of Jeremiah full of danger, and he sought to effect his escape from the city; but he was seized and finally thrown into a Prison-pit to die, but was rescued
Spirit - ...
The "spirits in Prison," 1 Peter 3:19 , it is generally thought, are the souls of antediluvian sinners now reserved unto the judgment-day, but unto whom the Spirit preached by the agency of Noah, etc
Prince - Philistines, 1 Samuel 18:30 ), of the chief butler and baker ( Genesis 40:2 ; Genesis 40:16 ), of the keeper of Prison ( Genesis 39:21 ), of the taskmaster ( Exodus 1:11 ), of the prince of the eunuchs ( Daniel 1:7 )
Jeremi'ah - The approach of an Egyptian army, and the consequent departure of the Chaldeans, made the position of Jeremiah full of danger, and he sought to effect his escape from the city; but he was seized and finally thrown into a Prison-pit to die, but was rescued
Officer (2) - In Luke 12:58 ‘officer’ is the translation of a still humbler term, πράκτωρ, a Prison official, described in (Revised Version margin) as ‘exactor’ from his duty of collecting fines
Joseph the Son of Jacob - ...
In spite of his blameless behaviour, Joseph ended up in Prison. Because of his good conduct, he was given a position of responsibility that proved to be of benefit to the other Prisoners, but he waited in vain for anyone to help him (Genesis 39; Genesis 40)
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - In Paul's Prison at Rome, just before his martyrdom. Paul at his first imprisonment lodged in his own hired house, guarded by a single soldier, and having liberty to receive all comers; but now he was so closely confined that Onesiphorus with difficulty found him; he was chained, forsaken by friends, and had narrowly escaped execution by the Roman emperor. The access however of Onesiphorus, Linus, Pudens, and Claudia to him proves he was not in the Mamertine or Tullianum Prison, with Peter, as tradition represents; but under military custody, of a severer kind than at his first imprisonment (2 Timothy 1:16-18; 2 Timothy 2:9; 2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:16-17). 64; that event took place the year after his liberation from the first imprisonment, A. Paul's leaving of his cloak and parchments at Troas (2 Timothy 4:13) cannot have been at his visit in Acts 20:5-7, for seven years elapsed between this visit and his first imprisonment. Again, when he wrote to the Colossians (Colossians 4:14) during his first imprisonment (Philemon 1:24) Demas was with him; but when he is writing 2 Timothy (2 Timothy 4:10) Demas had forsaken him and gone to Thessalonica, all have deserted him (2 Timothy 1:15). ...
Not so in his first imprisonment (Acts 28:30), nor in writing from it epistles to Ephesians, Colossians, Philippians, Philemon; in these he anticipates liberation, but in 2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:16, immediate death, having been once already tried. Paul now had shortly before been at Corinth and left Erastus there (2 Timothy 4:20), but Paul had not been at Corinth for several years before his first imprisonment, and in the interval Timothy had been with him; so Paul did not need to write to Timothy about that visit. The writer of Hebrews 13:23-24, doubtless Paul, was at liberty and in Italy; liberated from his first imprisonment at Rome, Paul must have resumed his apostolic journeyings, then was imprisoned at Rome again; thence just before his death he wrote 2 Timothy (See PAUL. ) Shortly before his second imprisonment Paul visited Ephesus, where new elders governed the church (Acts 20:25, most of the old ones had passed away), say in the latter end of 66 or 67 A
Zedekiah - Zedekiah sent and took him out of Prison, and asked, Is there any word from the Lord? to which the prophet, without regard to his personal interests, replied, "there is, for thou shalt be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon. However, in consequence of his prophesying death to those that remained in the city and life to those who should go forth to the Chaldaeans, who had returned to the siege in the tenth month of Zedekiah's ninth year (Jeremiah 52:4), Jeremiah was again imprisoned. " Zedekiah was put "in Prison," literally, "the house of visitations" or "punishments," where there was penal work enforced on the Prisoners, as grinding, from whence Septuagint reads "in the house of the mill
Mediator - "Thus saith God the Lord, he that created the heavens and stretched them out, he that spread forth the earth, and that which cometh out of it, he that giveth bread unto the people upon it, and spirit to them that walk therein, I the Lord have called thee in righteousness, and will hold thine hand, and will keep thee, and give thee for a covenant to the people, for a light to the Gentiles, to open the blind eyes, to bring out the Prisoners from the Prison, and them that sit in darkness out of the Prison house
Head - It can also denote the release of someone from Prison: “… Evilmerodach king of Babylon in the year that he began to reign did lift up the head of Jehoiachin king of Judah out of Prison” (2 Kings 25:27)
Rome, - (Acts 28:30,31 ) It is generally believed that on his "appeal to Caesar" he was acquitted, and after some time spent in freedom, was a second time imprisoned at Rome. , those to the Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians, that to Philemon, and the Second Epistle to Timothy, were in all probability written from Rome, the latter shortly before his death (2 Timothy 4:6 ) the others during his first imprisonment. We may mention especially-- (4) The Mamertine Prison, of Tullianum, built by Ancus Martius near the Forum. Paul were fellow Prisoners here for nine months. [2] The story, however, of the imprisonment in the Mamertine Prison seems inconsistent with (2 Timothy 4:11 ) (5) The chapel on the Ostian road which marks the spot where the two apostles are said to, have separated on their way to martyrdom
John the Baptist - )...
From the Prison John had sent two (the Sinaiticus and Vaticanus manuscripts read Matthew 11:2 "by," dia , for duo , two) disciples to Jesus to elicit from Himself a profession of His Messiahship, for their confirmation in the faith. John in Prison fell into the same dejection concerning the failure of the Messianic kingdom, because it did not come in outward manifestation, as Elijah under the juniper
Brownists - He died in Prison in 1630. ...
The laws were executed with great severity on the Brownists; their books were prohibited by queen Elizabeth, their persons imprisoned, and some hanged. Brown himself declared on his death-bed that he had been in thirty-two different Prisons, in some of which he could not see his hand at noon-day
Peter, Letters of - It seems also that Peter was in Prison, most likely in Rome, and expected to be executed soon (2 Peter 1:14-15)
Southcotters - The following is the conclusion of a communication which she had at Stockfort: "As wrong as they are, saying thou hast children brought up by the parish, and that thou art Bonaparte's brother, and that thou hast been in Prison; so false is their sayings, thy writings came from the devil or any spirit but the SPITIT OF THE LIVING GOD; and that every soul in this nation shall know before the FIVE YEARS I mentioned to thee in 1802 are expired; and then I will turn as a DIADEM of beauty to the residence of my people, and they shall praise the GOD OF THEIR SALVATION
Adam - Davis, Paradise to Prison ; L
Sam'Son - His enemies put out his eyes, and led him down to Gaza, bound in brazen fetters, and made him grind in the Prison
Chaff - The Christ would come as Malachi (Malachi 3:1-5) predicted, with searching and striking condemnation of all that was worthless and injurious; and the comparative slowness and indirectness of our Lord’s method was the moving cause of his perplexed question, when he heard in the Prison the works of Christ, and sent his disciples to ask, ‘Art thou he that should come, or look we for another?’ (Matthew 11:3, Luke 7:19)
Door - The examples of the concrete use of θύρα, ‘door,’ are all found in Acts, and may be treated under three heads: (1) house doors, (2) Prison doors, (3) Temple doors. With one exception (Acts 12:6) the doors of Prisons are found in the plural (Acts 5:19; Acts 5:23; Acts 16:26-27)
Millennium - And no sooner will Satan, released from his Prison, go forth to deceive the nations, than he will be readily listened to
Lucianus, Priest of Antioch, Martyr - Lucian became afterwards more conservative, and during Diocletian's persecution he encouraged the martyrs to suffer courageously, but escaped himself till Theotecnus was appointed governor of Antioch, when he was betrayed by the Sabellian party, seized and forwarded to Nicomedia to the emperor Maximinus, where, after delivering a speech in defence of the faith, he was starved for many days, tempted with meats offered to idols, and finally put to death in Prison, Jan
Door - The examples of the concrete use of θύρα, ‘door,’ are all found in Acts, and may be treated under three heads: (1) house doors, (2) Prison doors, (3) Temple doors. With one exception (Acts 12:6) the doors of Prisons are found in the plural (Acts 5:19; Acts 5:23; Acts 16:26-27)
Paul as Sold Under Sin - " Agrippa was shut up in a cruel and shameful Prison for Gaius's sake; but no sooner did Gaius ascend the throne than he had his friend instantly released and conferred upon him an office both of riches and renown. Moreover Gaius presented Agrippa with a chain of gold of double the weight with the chain of iron that he had worn in the Prison for Gaius's sake. You will soon hear His voice speaking in anger to your jailors at your Prison door and saying how displeased He is over all your affliction. ...
He comes the Prisoners to releaseIn Satan's bondage held,The gates of brass before him burst,The iron fetters yield
Mark - Peter is released from Prison, he turns naturally to this place, and on his arrival finds a company of Christians at worship. ), it is as the ‘fellow-labourer’ of Paul, who had by this time become completely reconciled to him, and had found him a comfort (παρηγορία, Colossians 4:11) in his imprisonment. His services to the Apostle in Prison probably concerned his comfort and convenience
Irish Martyrs - Nevertheless, in spite of the most careful investigation of their claims to martyrdom, and with the elimination of most of those who died in Prison rather than by actual martyrdom, the following list has been retained and their names presented for beatification
Martyrs, Irish - Nevertheless, in spite of the most careful investigation of their claims to martyrdom, and with the elimination of most of those who died in Prison rather than by actual martyrdom, the following list has been retained and their names presented for beatification
Troas - But those who believe in the Apostle’s release from Prison hold that Troas was one of the places to which he returned
New Testament - John 2:13-22 ...
John cast into Prison. James beheaded Acts 12:2 ...
Peter's imprisonment and release Acts 12:3-19 ...
44 Death of Herod Agrippa
Mary - Hither Peter, when delivered from Prison by the angel, came and knocked at the gate, Acts 12:12
Descent Into Hades - ...
Thus we find the way prepared for explanation of the difficult passage 1 Peter 3:18-20 : ‘Because Christ also suffered for sins once, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God; being put to death in the flesh, but quickened in the spirit; in which also he went and preached unto the spirits in Prison, which aforetime were disobedient, when the long-suffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing’; cf
Herod - ) On the accession of Caligula to the imperial throne, Agrippa was taken from Prison, where he had been confined by Tiberius, and received from the emperor, A
Joseph - He was brought very low, being cast into Prison, under a false accusation against him because he would not sin: his feet were 'made fast in the stocks,' and the iron entered his soul: in all these circumstances he was foreshadowing the Lord in His humiliation
Maximinus ii., Emperor - Hesychius and Lucian, the latter a presbyter, famous for learning and saintliness, were summoned to the emperor's presence at Nicomedia, half starved to death, and then tempted with a luxurious banquet as the price of their apostasy, and on their refusal to deny their faith were thrown into Prison and put to death (ix
Joseph - Potiphar controlled the king's Prison (Genesis 39:20), which was in "the house of the captain of the guard" (Potiphar's successor according to some, but Potiphar, where also Joseph was Prisoner (Genesis 40:3). ...
It cannot have been he but another who entrusted the Prisoners to Joseph; for if Potiphar believed him innocent, as the committing of Prisoners to him would imply, he would not have left him in Prison. The keeper of the Prison, however, discovered his trustworthiness, and committed to him all the Prisoners, "the Lord giving him favor in the keeper's sight" (Proverbs 16:7). After a time the chief of Pharaoh's cupbearers (Hebrew), and the chief of his bakers or confectioners, were cast into Prison by the king; the captain of the guard committed them as men of rank to Joseph's custody. ...
Like the Antitype (Luke 3:23), Joseph was 30 in entering on his public ministry, so that he was 13 years in Egypt, in Potiphar's house and in Prison, before his elevation. Tremblingly they told the steward as to their money, for they feared on being brought into the house they should be imprisoned there
Toleration Act - That every justice of the peace may, at any time, require any person that goes to any meeting for exercise of religion, to make and subscribe the declaration aforesaid, and also to take the said oaths or declaration of fidelity hereinafter mentioned: in case such person scruples the taking of an oath, and upon refusal, such justice of the peace is required to commit such person to Prison, and to certify the name of such person to the next General or Quarter Sessions of the Peace, &c. and in default of such sureties, shall be committed to Prison, there to remain till the next General or Quarter Sessions; and, upon conviction of the said offence at the said General or Quarter Sessions, shall suffer the pain and penalty of 20l
Mill - It displays, also, the vindictive contempt which suggested the punishment of Samson, the captive ruler of Israel, that the Philistines, with barbarous contumely, compelled him to perform the meanest service of a female slave; they sent him to grind in the Prison, Judges 16:21 , but not for himself alone; this, although extremely mortifying to the hero, had been more tolerable; they made him grinder for the Prison, perhaps while the vilest malefactor was permitted to look on, and join in the mockery
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - Numbers were accused; the Prisons teemed with victims of every rank; and a permanent inquisition was established for their trial. Elisha, John of Ephesus was imprisoned in the patriarch's palace. Meanwhile they were kept under close guard; the patriarch's creatures stripped them of everything; friends were denied admittance to their Prison; and their personal followers were also confined in the dungeons of the palace. Our historian touchingly describes the sorrow of himself and his companions over this fraud; even their opponents pitied them, until they once more faced them with galling taunts, which led to a second imprisonment (i. As he lay in his filthy Prison, it seemed to him that his feverish thirst was slaked and his misery comforted by a heavenly visitant, whose coming he describes with much pathos and simplicity. By another imprisonment Eutychius wrung from him the resignation of a property which Callinicus, a chief officer of the court, had bestowed, and which John had largely improved and converted into a monastery. He and his friends were incarcerated at Christmas in a miserable Prison called the Cancellum (A
Joseph - On false accusations of Potiphar's wife, Joseph was thrown in the royal Prison, where he interpreted the dreams of two officials who had offended the pharaoh (Genesis 39-40 )
Prayer - ...
"The believers in Jerusalem prayed, and God opened the Prison doors and set Peter at liberty, when Herod had resolved upon his death (Acts 12:1-12 )
Mark, Gospel by - As soon as John was cast into Prison the Lord began His unceasing work, taking up the testimony that the kingdom of God was at hand
Eleutherus, Bishop of Rome - 3), their own judgment, with that of their martyrs while in Prison, respecting the claims of Montanus to inspiration
Anitipas - John the Baptist exclaiming against this incest, was seized by order of Antipas, and imprisoned in the castle of Machaerus. The evangelists, who were better informed than Josephus, as being eye witnesses of what passed, and particularly acquainted with John and his disciples, assure us, that the true reason for imprisoning John was the aversion of Herod and Herodias against him, on account of his liberty in censuring their scandalous marriage, Matthew 14:3-4 ; Mark 6:14 ; Mark 6:17-18 ; Luke 3:19-20 . " The king was afflicted at this request; but in consideration of his oath, and of the persons at table with him, he sent one of his guards, who beheaded John in Prison
Ephesians, Letter to the - Paul saw that the church in Ephesus would be troubled by false teaching (Acts 20:29-30), and such teaching seems to have arisen by the time Paul was first imprisoned in Rome (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30; cf. From Prison Paul wrote to these churches in an effort to correct the false teaching and the wrong conduct that had resulted from it
Pound - ), where one servant wastes the goods of his lord among harlots and flute-players, another multiplies the pound, while a third conceals it; in the end, one is acknowledged, another reproved, and the third committed to Prison
Preach, Proclaim - However, in his distinctive account of Jesus' sermon at Nazareth (4:16-30), Luke records Jesus' own quotation of Isaiah 61:1-2 a, which contains the statement of his (the Servant's) task as "to proclaim freedom to the Prisoners" (4:18) and "to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor" (4:19). ...
Finally, in the last verse of Acts (28:31), Luke summarizes Paul's Prison ministry in Rome. ...
Two of Paul's letters from Prison use the term "proclaim
Jeremiah, Book of - Jeremiah was put in Prison by Zedekiah,but he bought a field in token of his assurance of the captives' return. Jeremiah was about to leave the city, but was arrested, beaten, and put into Prison
Herod - Antigonus was taken Prisoner and put to death, which opened the way to Herod's quiet possession of the kingdom. His rage was unbounded; he put Joseph to death for communicating the secret entrusted to him alone, and he threw his mother-in-law, Alexandra, into Prison. He also caused his son Antipater to be slain in Prison, and his remains to be treated with every species of ignominy
Hell - Sometimes, Sheol is pictured as a hunter setting snares for its victim, binding them with cords, snatching them from the land of the living (2 Samuel 22:6 ; Job 24:19 ; Psalm 116:3 ); Sheol is a Prison with bars, a place of no return (Job 7:9 ; Job 10:21 ; Job 16:22 ; Job 21:13 ; Psalm 49:14 ; Isaiah 38:10 )
Body - , the Scriptures never represent the physical body as a Prison from which the spirit must be freed
Egypt - Egypt is a place of oppression, as Joseph is initially enslaved, eventually ending up in Prison
Miracles, Signs, Wonders - ” John the Baptist heard of the “works” of Jesus while he was in Prison (Matthew 11:2 )
Miletus - Paul, released from his Roman Prison, resumed his work in the East, and after all revisited the scene of his pathetic farewell
Joseph - They sold Joseph for a slave, for twenty pieces of silver, and he was carried down into Egypt, and from the pit and the Prison he arose, by divine favour, to be Governor over the whole land
Caecilianus, Archdeacon And Bishop of Carthage - Caecilian himself was charged with unnecessary and heartless severity to those who had visited the confessors in Prison; he was denounced as a "tyrannus" and a "carnifex
Soul - At death the disembodied soul passes to a ‘middle state’ (Hades), where, if righteous, it experiences rest and refreshment in ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ or ‘Paradise’; or, if unrighteous, expiatory punishment (symbolized as a tormenting flame) in a limbus or ‘prison,’ which is separated by an impassable barrier from the abodes of the righteous. personal) union with His disembodied human spirit, descended to Hades, and there preached to the disobedient spirits in Prison (1 Peter 3:18, cf. 4; Mason, Purgatory; Plumptre, Spirits in Prison; Luckock, After Death; Pusey, What is of faith as to Everlasting Punishment?; C
Soul - At death the disembodied soul passes to a ‘middle state’ (Hades), where, if righteous, it experiences rest and refreshment in ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ or ‘Paradise’; or, if unrighteous, expiatory punishment (symbolized as a tormenting flame) in a limbus or ‘prison,’ which is separated by an impassable barrier from the abodes of the righteous. personal) union with His disembodied human spirit, descended to Hades, and there preached to the disobedient spirits in Prison (1 Peter 3:18, cf. 4; Mason, Purgatory; Plumptre, Spirits in Prison; Luckock, After Death; Pusey, What is of faith as to Everlasting Punishment?; C
Hell - -(1) In Revelation 9:1 ‘the pit of the abyss’ (see Abyss) is regarded as the special Prison-house of the devil and his attendant evil spirits. 7 it is said: ‘Confess that ye have the Lord, lest denying Him ye be delivered into Prison (εἰς δεσμωτήριον). ’ There can be no doubt here that ‘prison’ is meant to signify the place of punishment beyond death. The imagery may be derived from the saying in Matthew 5:25-26, but we must remember that ‘bonds and imprisonment’ were frequently the terms in which the apocalyptic literature figured future punishment. 3 we read:...
‘They also believe that souls have an immortal vigour in them, and that under the earth there will be rewards or punishments, according as they have lived virtuously or viciously in this life; and the latter are to be detained in an everlasting Prison, but that the former shall have power to revive and live again
Hell - -(1) In Revelation 9:1 ‘the pit of the abyss’ (see Abyss) is regarded as the special Prison-house of the devil and his attendant evil spirits. 7 it is said: ‘Confess that ye have the Lord, lest denying Him ye be delivered into Prison (εἰς δεσμωτήριον). ’ There can be no doubt here that ‘prison’ is meant to signify the place of punishment beyond death. The imagery may be derived from the saying in Matthew 5:25-26, but we must remember that ‘bonds and imprisonment’ were frequently the terms in which the apocalyptic literature figured future punishment. 3 we read:...
‘They also believe that souls have an immortal vigour in them, and that under the earth there will be rewards or punishments, according as they have lived virtuously or viciously in this life; and the latter are to be detained in an everlasting Prison, but that the former shall have power to revive and live again
Demon - Rome, the corrupt capital of the heathen world, designated ‘Babylon,’ is the habitation of demons, the Prison of every unclean spirit, the Prison of every unclean and hateful bird (Revelation 18:2)
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - Proteus was on this account cast into Prison, and this very circumstance was the foundation of all the consequence and reputation which he afterwards gained, and of that glory for which he had always been so ambitious; for when he was in bonds the Christians, considering it as a calamity affecting the common cause, did everything in their power to release him, which when they found impracticable, they paid him all possible deference and respect; old women, widows, and orphans were continually crowding to him; some of the most principal of them even slept with him in the Prison, having bribed the keepers for that purpose; there were costly suppers brought in to them; they read their sacred books together, and the noble Peregrinus (for so he was then called) was dignified by them with the title of the New Socrates. Peregrinus being made a Prisoner on their account, they collected money for him, and he made a very pretty revenue of it
Smyrna - Some are even to be sent to Prison as a prelude to execution, and to have suffering for a time
Philippians, the Epistle to the - 7) instances the mention of the object of Epaphroditus' journey to Rome, his sickness; the Philippian contribution to Paul's wants (Philippians 1:7; Philippians 2:25-30; Philippians 4:10-18); Timothy's having been long with Paul at Philippi (Philippians 1:1; Philippians 2:19); Paul's being for long a Prisoner at Rome (Philippians 1:12-14; Philippians 2:17-28); his willingness to die for Christ (Philippians 1:23, compare 2 Corinthians 5:8); the Philippians having seen his maltreatment at Philippi (Philippians 1:29-30; Philippians 2:1-2). Address: his state as a Prisoner, theirs, his sending Epaphroditus to them (Philippians 1; 2). Epaphroditus probably was a presbyter of the Philippian church, who cheered Paul in iris imprisonment by bringing the Philippian token of love and liberality. Paul writes from Rome in his first imprisonment (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:20; Acts 28:30-31). It was toward the close of the first imprisonment, for...
(1) he expects his cause to be immediately decided (Philippians 2:23). ...
(2) Enough time had elapsed for the Philippians to hear of his imprisonment, to send Epaphroditus, and to hear of his arrival and sickness, and send word to Rome of their distress (Philippians 2:26). In Ephesians 6:19-20 he is free to preach; but, here in Philippians 1:13-18 he dwells on his "bonds"; not Paul himself but others preach and make his imprisonment known; instead of anticipating release (Philemon 1:22) he knows not but that death is near. ...
(4) A long time has elapsed since his imprisonment began, for his" bonds" known far and wide have furthered the gospel (Philippians 1:13). ...
(5) His imprisonment is more rigorous (compare Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30-31 with Philippians 1:29-30; Philippians 2:27). Like his midnight song of praise in the Philippian Prison, this epistle from his Roman confinement has a joyous tone throughout
Georgius, Arian Bishop of Alexandria - ), "virgins were imprisoned, bishops led away in chains" (some 26 are named in Hist. "He was severe," says Sozomen, "to the adherents of Athanasius," not only forbidding the exercise of their worship, but "inflicting imprisonment and scourges on men and women after the fashion of a tyrant"; while, towards all alike, "he wielded his authority with more violence than belonged to the episcopal rank and character. The shout arose, "Away with George!" and "in a moment," says the Fragmentist, they threw him into Prison, with Diodorus and Dracontius, the master of the mint, who had overthrown a pagan altar which he found standing there (Ammian
Cut - A man in another country or in Prison is cut off from his country or his friends
Ananias - Paul continued two years in Prison in that city, Acts 24
Persecution - "To banish, imprison, plunder, starve, hang, and burn men for religion, " says the shrewd Jortin, "is not the Gospel of Christ; it is the Gospel of the Devil. The fourth was under Antoninus, when the Christians were banished from their houses, forbidden to show their heads, reproached, beaten, hurried from place to place, plundered, imprisoned, and stoned. These two beautiful and amiable young women, mothers of infant children, after suffering much in Prison, were exposed before an insulting multitude to a wild cow, who mangled their bodies in a most horrid manner: after which they were carried to a conspicuous place, and put to death by the sword. In the city of Meaux they threw above two hundred into gaol; and after they had ravished and killed a great number of women, and plundered the houses of the Protestants, they executed their fury on those they had imprisoned; and calling them one by one, they were killed, as Thuanus expresses, like sheep in a market. If any, to escape these barbarities, endeavoured to save themselves by flight, they pursued them into the fields and woods, where they shot at them, like wild beasts, and prohibited them from departing the kingdom (a cruelty never practised by Nero or Dioclesian, ) upon pain of confiscation of effects, the galleys, the lash, and perpetual imprisonment. Besides these, there were fifty-four more under prosecution, seven of whom were whipped, and sixteen perished in Prison. If any one refused to consent to the least ceremony in worship, he was cast into Prison, where many of the most excellent men in the land perished. Leighton, for writing a book against the hierarchy, was fined ten thousand pounds, perpetual imprisonment, and whipping. He continued in Prison till the long parliament set him at liberty. About four years afterwards, William Prynn, a barrister, for a book he wrote against the sports on the Lord's day, was deprived from practising at Lincoln's Inn, degraded from his degree at Oxford, set in the pillory, had his ears cut off, imprisoned for life, and fined five thousand pounds. In 1645 an ordinance was published, subjecting all who preached or wrote against the Presbyterian directory for public worship to a fine not exceeding fifty pounds; and imprisonment for a year, for the third offence, in using the episcopal book of common prayer, even in a private family. Then followed the conventicle act, and the Oxford act, under which, it is said, eight thousand persons were imprisoned and reduced to want, and many to the grave. In this reign also, the Quakers were much persecuted, and numbers of them imprisoned
Maccabees - , who had been released from imprisonment by the same nation. The latter, however, put his mother in Prison, where she starved to death, established his brother Antigonus as joint-ruler, and threw his other three brothers into Prison. After the death of Aristobulus, his widow Alexandra (Salome) released his three brothers from Prison, and married the oldest of them, Alexander Jannæus (or Jonathan), making him king and high priest. Aristobulus was taken Prisoner, and Hyrcanus was re-established as high priest, but without the title of ‘king. Hyrcanus was carried away Prisoner by the Parthians, and his ears were cut off, so that he could no longer act as high priest. Aristobulus retreated to Machærus, but after two years’ siege was compelled to surrender, and went again as Prisoner to Rome, where he was poisoned (b
John - After Peter healed the man, they were arrested, imprisoned, and then released. ” Luke recorded that John was thrown in Prison before he said that Jesus also was baptized ( Luke 3:20-21 ), and John told of the baptism of Jesus but only through the testimony of John the Baptist himself. While John was in Prison, he sent two of his disciples to inquire whether Jesus was the coming One (Matthew 11:2-3 ; Luke 9:54 )
Kings, 1 And 2 - The last recorded incident in 2Kings is the release of Jehoiachin from Prison by Evil-merodach in about 560 B. ...
This hope is illustrated in 2 Kings 25:27-30 with the release of Jehoiachin from Prison. Perhaps the writer was encouraging the exiles with the possibility that God would bless them again and raise Israel above all peoples ( Deuteronomy 28:1 ) just as Jehoiachin was given preference above other Prisoners in captivity (2 Kings 25:28 )
Peter - Peter was fully warned by his divine Master of his approaching danger; but confident in his own strength, he declared himself ready to accompany his Lord to Prison and even to judgment. Peter into Prison
Vision(s) - Angelic visions freed Peter from Prison (12:9), called Paul to a European ministry (16:9), and encouraged Paul in his ministry at Corinth (18:9)
Deliver, Deliverance, Deliverer - In Mark 1:14 , RV, it is used of "delivering" John the Baptist to Prison. ...
B — 2: ἄφεσις (Strong's #859 — Noun Feminine — aphesis — af'-es-is ) denotes "a release, from bondage, imprisonment, etc
Hussites - However, his enemies so far prevailed, that, by the most scandalous breach of public faith, he was cast into Prison declared a heretic, because he refused to plead guilty against the dictates of his conscience, in obedience to the council, and burnt alive in 1415; a punishment which he endured with unparalleled magnanimity and resolution
Colosse - He hoped to visit Colosse when he should be delivered from his Roman Prison (Philemon 1:22; compare Philippians 2:24). Paul appears in both a Prisoner
Nonconformists - For the first offence the penalty was three months imprisonment, or pay five pounds; for the second offence, six months imprisonment, or ten pounds; and for the third offence, to be banished to some of the American plantations for seven years, or pay one hundred pounds; and in case they returned, to suffer death without benefit of clergy. " Such were the dreadful consequences of this intolerant spirit, that it is supposed near eight thousand died in Prison in the reign of Charles II
Keep, Watch, Guard - ” In the first of its 22 occurrences mishmâr means “guard”: “And he put them in ward [3] in the house of the captain of the guard, into the Prison …” ( Acts of the Apostles - The Acts ends with the two years' imprisonment of the apostle Paul at Rome: it could not therefore have been written before the end of that time, and was probably written very soon afterwards or it would have given the issue of Paul's trial. Herod Agrippa however soon began to persecute the church; he killed James the brother of John, and put Peter into Prison, who was however miraculously delivered. We read no more of any of his labours, and the Acts leaves him a Prisoner
Agrippa - But the desire of pleasing them, and a mistaken zeal for their religion, induced him to put to death the Apostle James, and to cast Peter into Prison with the same design; and, but for a miraculous interposition, which, however, produced no effect upon the mind of the tyrant, his hands would have been imbrued in the blood of two Apostles, the memory whereof is preserved in Scripture
jo'Seph - (Genesis 39:7-13 ) he was falsely accused and thrown into Prison, where he remained at least two years, interpreting during this time the dreams of the cupbearer and the baker
Cast - (4) For paradidomi, Matthew 4:12 (AV, "cast into Prison"), see DELIVER
Hebrews, Letter to the - They knew Timothy and no doubt were pleased to hear that he had just been released from Prison and would visit them soon (Hebrews 13:23)
John the Baptist - 'Art thou He that should come, or do we look for another? Why dost thou eat and drink with Scribes and Pharisees, and leave me lying here in this Prison-house of Herod and his harlots? Why dost thou eat and drink and make wine out of water for weddings? Rather, surely, should all God's true servants put on sackcloth and ashes and mourn apart, every family apart, and their wives apart. Why,' we are often tempted to complain, 'Why is God's Kingdom so long in coming? What hinders it, if indeed Christ is on His throne and has all things in His hand? Why does He not burst open my Prison-house and redress my cause? Why is my sanctification so postponed? Art thou He that should come, or do we look for another?' "Go and show John again those things that ye do see, and hear
Timothy, Letters to - ...
Background to 1 Timothy...
Towards the end of the book of Acts, Paul was taken Prisoner to Rome and kept there for two years (1 Timothy 1:19-20; Acts 28:30). )...
Paul was lonely in Prison. Various friends and fellow workers had gone to different places in the service of God, though Demas, who had been faithful to him during his previous imprisonment, had now left him for no good reason (2 Timothy 4:10; 2 Timothy 4:12; cf
Transmigration - It appears that among the Essenes it was held that the soul was immortal, and its life upon earth due to its being drawn from its native ether and entangled in the body as in a Prison cell (Josephus BJ ii
Cast - To thrust as, to cast into Prison
Antioch - Julian undertook to restore the ancient honours and usages of the place; but it was first necessary to take away the pollution occasioned by the dead bodies of the Christians, which were disinterred and removed! Among these was that of Babylas, a bishop of Antioch, who died in Prison in the persecution of Decius, and after resting near a century in his grave within the walls of Antioch, had been removed by order of Callus into the midst of the grove of Daphne, where a church was built over him; the remains of the Christian saint effectually supplanting the former divinity of the place, whose temple and statue, however, though neglected, remained uninjured
Jeremiah - Therefore Zedekiah shut him up in the court of the Prison. Then the princes smote and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the scribe. Zedekiah committed him to the court of the Prison (the open space occupied by the guard, Jeremiah 32:2, where his friends had access to him: Jeremiah 32:12; Jeremiah 37:12-21), and commanded bread to be supplied to him until all in the city was spent (Psalms 37:19; Isaiah 33:16). Jeremiah stayed in the court of the Prison until Jerusalem was taken. ...
Even among the captives at Babylon were false prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return
Paul - ) The leading facts of his life which appear in that history, subsidiary to its design of sketching the great epochs in the commencement and development of Christ's kingdom, are: his conversion (Acts 9), his labours at Antioch (Acts 11), his first missionary journey (Acts 13; 14), the visit to Jerusalem at the council on circumcision (Acts 15), introduction of the gospel to Europe at Philippi (Acts 16),: visit to Athens (Acts 17), to Corinth (Acts 18), stay at Ephesus (Acts 19), parting address to the Ephesian elders at Miletus (Acts 20), apprehension at Jerusalem, imprisonment at Casesarea, and voyage to Rome (Acts 21-27). But stern bigotry stifled all such doubts by increased zeal; "he made havock of (elumaineto , 'ravaged as a wild beast') the church, entering into the houses (severally, or worship rooms), and haling men and women committed them to Prison" (Acts 8:3). Ananias, whom he would have seized for Prison and death, is the instrument of giving him light and life. As Peter at midnight was miraculously delivered from Herod's Prison, so Paul at Philippi was loosed from his chains with an earthquake
Paul as a Believing Man - The men and the women and the children he had haled to Prison; the holy homes he had desolated with his temple hordes; the martyrdoms he had instigated, the blood of which would never in this world be washed off his hands; in these, and in a thousand other things, Paul was a child of wrath even as others. "I, through the law," he said, or tried to say, every time the law clutched at him as its Prisoner-"I through the law am dead to the law. A dead man is not easily put to shame, and no jailor carries a corpse to Prison. As it is, though nobody will believe it, or make sense of how it can so be, your unspeakable sinfulness never gets the length even of darkening your mind or imprisoning your conscience
Paul Apprehended of Christ Jesus - "As for Saul, he made havoc of the Church, entering into every house, and haling men and women, committed them to Prison. Which thing I also did in Jerusalem; and many of the saints did I shut up in Prison, and punished them oft in every synagogue, and compelled them to blaspheme. The temple officers had each his own story to tell when they returned without any Prisoners to Jerusalem: only, none of them needed to be led by the hand into Damascus, and none of them were baptized by Ananias, but Saul only
Ephesians, Book of - It is one of four epistles classified as “Imprisonment Epistles” and has been called “The Queen of the Epistles. He was imprisoned in Caesarea for two years (Acts 21:15-26:32 ). He was sent to Rome where he was imprisoned for another two years (Acts 27:1-28:31 ). These two imprisonments of Paul are the only ones which might bear on the question of where and when the Imprisonment Epistles were written. In all four of these epistles, Paul mentioned his imprisonment. The case for Caesarea has been posited on speculative questions such as: (1) Would it be easier for Paul to get letters to the three places involved (Ephesus, Colosse, and Philippi) from Caesarea or from Rome? (2) Would it be easier for the runaway slave, Onesimus, to meet Paul in a Prison in faraway Rome or the much closer Caesarea?...
A third opinion has grown out of Colossians 4:16 in which Paul urged the church at Colosse to exchange letters with the church at neighboring Laodicea so both might get the benefit of both letters. This opinion, which was never widely held, took the position that Paul was writing from an imprisonment in Ephesus and that the “Laodicean” letter was what we have as “Ephesians. ” This view requires an imprisonment in Ephesus for which we have no solid evidence. ...
Careful review of this very extensive and complex issue leaves the subjective opinion that all four Prison Epistles were written by Paul during his imprisonment in Rome about A
Patience - "Patience, " says an eminent writer, "is apt to be ranked by many among the more humble and obscure virtues, belonging chiefly to those who grown on a sick bed, or who languish in a Prison; but in every circumstance of life no virtue is more important both to duty and to happiness
Library - ...
When Paul was in Prison in Rome, he requested “the books but especially the parchments” (2 Timothy 4:13 )
Ate - ...
Prison Gate Nehemiah 12:39 (c) This reminds us that there is a rebel within each of us, who is to be kept down under lest he injure and harm the work of GOD
England - In 1679 eight Jesuits, two Franciscans, five secular priests, and seven laymen were put to death, and many more died in Prison for their faith
Angels - Peter in the Prison, a light shone in the cell (Acts 12:7). This is the office of angels which is most prominent in the NT; see Acts 7:35; Acts 7:38 (Moses) Acts 8:26 (Philip) Acts 10:3; Acts 10:7; Acts 10:22; Acts 10:30 (Peter, Cornelius) Acts 11:13 (Peter) Acts 12:7-11 (Peter in Prison) Acts 23:9 (Paul) Acts 27:23 (Paul on his voyage), Hebrews 13:2 (reference to Abraham, Genesis 18), and frequently in Rev
Baptism, Christian - How is their case to be treated? How, for example, are Lydia and her neighbour the keeper of the city Prison to be treated? Both have been converted
Servant of the Lord - The servant opens the eyes of the blind and frees captives from Prison (42:7; Nahum, Theology of - Later, when John was in Prison, he began to doubt Jesus' identity; so John sent two of his followers to question Jesus (Matthew 11:1-19 )
Titus, Theology of - Since 1Timothy and Titus do not reflect, as a background, any imprisonment at all and since 2Timothy implies a more serious imprisonment than is reflected by the Prison epistles written earlier, many evangelical scholars believe that Paul suffered two imprisonments. Had Luke, the author of the Book of Acts, added to his book later, he undoubtedly would have described this release and second imprisonment
Millennium - But that this last supposition is a mistake, the very next verse but one assures us; for we are there told, that, "when the thousand years are expired, Satan shall be loosed out of his Prison, and shall go out to deceive the nations which are in the four quarters of the earth;" and we have no reason to believe that he will have such power or such liberty in "the new heavens and the new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness
Judgment, Last - They shall receive their final sentence, and be shut up in the Prison of hell, Revelation 20:10
Deliver - 14:7) or into Prison ( Acceptance - Paul in Prison (Philippians 4:18; cf
Prudence - When He came from the temptation in the wilderness to take up His mission, hearing that Herod had put John in Prison, He departed from Jordan to Galilee (Matthew 4:12). Galilee was within the dominion of Herod Antipas, but it was remote, away from the palace where John was imprisoned, away also from the place where John had baptized, and whither the crowds had come
Paul as a Man of Prayer - Now just as if he had an horological tablet like that page hung up, now on his workshop-wall, and now on his Prison-wall, Paul prayed night and day, and all the hours of every night and of every day, without ceasing. Were some of us shut up in Prison like Paul, I believe we have grace enough to become in that sequestered life men of great and prevailing prayer
Manicheans - Meanwhile the Powers of Darkness had succeeded in swallowing part of the luminous essence of the primeval heavenly man, which they proceeded to shut up in material bodies, as in a Prison. The Divine Spirit is only enclosed in the material Prisons for a time and with a view to final deliverance. To prevent this gradual despiritualization the powers of darkness resolve to produce a being in whom the soul of nature, which was ever striving after liberty, might be securely imprisoned. Likewise their theory about the creation of the material part of man determined their view of the Incarnation, which they regarded as wholly Docetic; if a material body was a Prison and a burden to the spirit of man, Christ could scarcely voluntarily imprison His divine Spirit in the same
Peter - ) By the time he wrote his Second Letter he was in Prison, awaiting the execution that Jesus had spoken of about thirty years earlier (2 Peter 1:13-15; cf
Typology - Baptism as a fulfillment of the type Peter, after discussing Christ's work in preaching in the spiritual realm to spirits in Prison, mentioned Noah's ark and the flood: “Into which ark a few [2] were saved through water, which water [3] as a fulfullment of the type now saves you through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, not through removing of dirt from the body but as a pledge of a good conscience towards God” (1 Peter 3:20-21 )
Herod - The first (Acts 12:1-19) occurs in the thanksgiving of the early disciples over the release of Peter and John from imprisonment, and indicates their view of Herod’s relation to the tragedy of Calvary. 36, and shortly afterwards was committed to Prison for an incautious remark that had reached the ears of Tiberius
Jesus Christ - Presently the Baptist was thrown into Prison and the Saviour withdrew to Galilee
Hold - A Prison a place of confinement
Ephesians Epistle to the - Paul is a Prisoner at the time (Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 4:1; Ephesians 6:20), and writes from Prison to ‘the saints which are in Ephesus. ’ His imprisonment has lasted long enough to give rise to grave anxiety among the Christian communities (Ephesians 1:12-142; Ephesians 6:22). He speaks or himself as ‘the Prisoner’ (Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 4:1), as though that were a title of honour consecrated by long use. The section passes into a request for prayer for the writer in Prison (Ephesians 6:19-20), and thus it naturally leads up to a commendation of Tychicus, the bearer of the letter, and then to a final greeting. Peter’s life are not convincing; but could even a close disciple have coined the beautiful and simple phrase, ‘I Paul, the Prisoner of Christ Jesus’? Or would he have been likely to refer to his great master as ‘less than the least of all saints’ (Ephesians 3:8) even with 1 Corinthians 15:9 before him? On the other hand, there are one or two phrases, apart from questions of style and doctrine, which will he discussed later, which seem to some critics to be ‘watermarks of a later age’ (Moffatt, Introd
Universalism (2) - Plumptre, Spirits in Prison, 1884, with full and interesting references; Plumptre’s brother-in-law, F. Deity ‘cannot annihilate, but the sentence of condemnation is indeterminate rather than eternal (like sentences of committal to Elmira reformatory Prison, N
Temptation, Trial - The angel of the church in Smyrna is warned that some of them will be cast into Prison that they may be ‘tried’ (Revelation 2:10)
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - " They were then told to separate, the names and sees of the bishops of each party were taken down, and they were all sent to Prison
Colossians - It is one of the Prison Epistles (along with Ephesians, Philemon, and Philippians). The letter itself does not name the place where Paul was imprisoned, and Caesarea and Ephesus have been suggested as alternatives to Rome
Lactantius - Donatus he tells us himself had lain in Prison six years when the edict of Galerius published a
Gospels - ...
He also supplies the interval, omitted in them, from the temptation to Jesus' second return to Galilee when His public ministry began, after John was cast into Prison. He inserts in this interval Jesus' "earlier" return to Galilee (Mark 9:30-336) and visit to Jerusalem (John 2:13) and Judea (John 3:22; John 3:24), before the Baptist's imprisonment. 63, the date of the close of Paul's imprisonment with which it abruptly breaks off). " Peter, after escaping from Herod's Prison, went to the house of John Mark's mother first (Acts 12:12)
Captivity - ...
Secondly, in the reign of Hoshea of Israel, Shalmaneser king of Assyria, after letting him remain as a tributary prince for a time, at last when Hoshea omitted to send his yearly "present," and made a league with So or Sabacho II of Egypt (of which the record still exists on clay cylindrical seals found at Koyunjik), put Hoshea in Prison and besieged Samaria three years, and in the ninth year of Hoshea's reign (721 B
Genesis - There God mysteriously works even in a Prison cell to raise Joseph to power, demonstrating His authority over the highest political authority of the world
Intercession - Peter from Prison (Acts 12:5). ): ‘Save those among us who are in tribulation; have mercy on the lowly; lift up the fallen; show Thyself unto the needy; heal the ungodly; convert the wanderers of Thy people; feed the hungry; release our Prisoners; raise up the meek; comfort the fainthearted
Amen - So great was the superstition which attached to it that many of the later Rabbis treated it almost as a fetish, able to win blessings not only in this life but in the next; and one commentator, Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, went so far as to declare that by its hearty pronunciation in chorus the godless in Israel who lay in the penal fires of Gehenna might one day hope for the opening of their Prison gates and a free entrance into the abode of the blessed, though Hogg suggests that this sentiment was extracted from a pun on Isaiah 26:2 (Elijahu Zutta, xx
Philemon Epistle to - 22), and (3) he had more reason to expect early release from Caesarean than from Roman imprisonment. He then indicates that something which he might have boldly enjoined he prefers to plead for as a favour; ‘old man_ as he now is,’ and ‘a Prisoner of Jesus Christ,’ he is to be indulged. He not only persecuted but ‘ontraged’ (ἐλυμαίνετο) the Church, dragging (σύρων) even women to Prison, and breathing out slaughter (Acts 8:3; Acts 9:1)
Intercession - Peter from Prison (Acts 12:5). ): ‘Save those among us who are in tribulation; have mercy on the lowly; lift up the fallen; show Thyself unto the needy; heal the ungodly; convert the wanderers of Thy people; feed the hungry; release our Prisoners; raise up the meek; comfort the fainthearted
Atonement - The picture is a slave market or Prison
the Publican - For by that time he was like the Prisoner in Plutarch who received a chain of gold with as many links in it, and each link as heavy, as had been that chain of iron, bound with which he had lain so long in Prison for his exiled sovereign's sake
Carpocrates, Philospher - " If he found that there were acts left undone, he delivered it to another angel, "the officer," to shut it up "in Prison"—i. In this way they escape the dominion of the finite mundane spirits; their souls are freed from imprisonment in matter, and they obtain a state of perfect repose (corresponding to the Buddhist Nirwana) when they have completely ascended above the world of appearance
Socinians - David persisted, as he had, upon the ground which he had taken, good reason to do, in asserting the doctrine which he had announced; and he was soon after this thrown by the prince of Transylvania into Prison, where he lingered for several years, and then died at an advanced age
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - Justinian had resolved to enforce the Chalcedonian decrees universally, and the bishops and clergy who refused them were punished with imprisonment, deprivation, and exile. A considerable number of Monophysite bishops from all parts of the East, including Theodosius of Alexandria, Anthimus the deposed patriarch of Constantinople, Constantius of Laodicea, John of Egypt, Peter, and others, who had come to Constantinople in the hope of mitigating the displeasure of the emperor and exciting the sympathies of Theodora, were held by Justinian in one of the imperial castles in a kind of honourable imprisonment. Paul and the other three leading bishops of the Monophysites had been summoned to Constantinople under colour of taking measures for restoring unity to the church, and, proving obstinate in the adherence to their own creed, were thrown into Prison for a considerable time and subjected to the harshest treatment
Jesus Christ - John's denunciation of Herod Antipas's illegal marriage to his brother's wife provoked her ire, his imprisonment, and ultimately his death. Jesus spoke in the highest possible terms of John and his ministry, in spite of John's troubled questionings while in Prison at Machaerus. Second, when John the Baptist asked Jesus from Prison if he was the Messiah, Jesus replied with a definition of messiahship that was one of service and suffering rather than of immediate triumph (Matthew 11:2-19 ). Pilate made a series of attempts to release Jesus, including the offer to release a Prisoner (they chose Barabbas instead) and the flogging of Jesus as punishment, but death by crucifixion was their ultimate demand
Man - The body of flesh is found to be, for a reason other than that of Plato’s dualism, the Prison-house of the soul. The Petrine reference to ‘the spirits in Prison’ (John 8:44; 1 Peter 4:5) has afforded a basis for much speculation on the possibility of moral change after death
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - ...
(6) Paul in Prison in the mines. Presumably he ultimately escaped from his imprisonment, but the text is incomplete. According to it, Paul preached without any hindrance, and there is no suggestion that he was a Prisoner. In Prison Paul converted the prefect Longinus and the centurion Cestus, and prophesied to them life after death, Longinus and Cestus were told to go to his grave on the next day, when they would be baptized by Titus and Luke
Cooking And Heating - ) Jeremiah received a bread ration from the local bakery while he was in Prison (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Timothy, Epistles to - Paul in Rome in Prison (a. 61), we must conclude, if we accept the Pastorals as genuine, that the Apostle visited Ephesus, Macedonia, and Crete after a release from imprisonment. Indeed, even if we had not the distinct statements of the Pastorals, we should consider it extremely likely that he was thus released; for it is clear that he anticipated being set at liberty when, from his imprisonment, he wrote to the Philippians that he hoped shortly to come to them (Philippians 2:24 ), and when he bid Onesimus prepare him a lodging at Colossæ ( Philippians 1:22 ). When, therefore, we add the further facts, that the Muratorian Fragment states that the Apostle fulfilled his expressed wish of visiting Spain ( Romans 15:24 ; Romans 15:28 ), a journey which certainly necessitates his release from his Roman imprisonment and that Clement of Rome tells of his reaching ‘the bounds of the West,’ a phrase which, used by one resident, as Clement, in Rome, can only mean Spain we may hold without misgiving that St
Angel - ...
In Acts, the imprisoned apostles were released by an angel (5:19). The angel of the Lord released Peter from Prison (12:7-11), and subsequently afflicted Herod with a fatal illness (12:23). The first consists of unimprisoned, evil beings working under Satan's leadership, and generally regarded as demons (Luke 4:35 ; 11:15 ; John 10:21 ). The second were imprisoned (2 Peter 2:4 ; Jude 6 ) spirits because they forsook their original positions in heaven. Presumably the imprisoned angels are the ones who will be judged by the saints (1 Corinthians 6:3 )
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - After imprisonment and scourging at Philippi, Paul (1 Thessalonians 2:2) passed on to Thessalonica. Still later, the epistles from his Roman Prison, Ephesians, Colossians, and Philippians confirm the same. Aristarchus was his "companion in travel," and shared his perils at Ephesus and his shipwreck, and was his "fellow Prisoner" and "fellow labourer" at Rome (Acts 27:2; Colossians 4:10; Philemon 1:24)
Salutations - ]'>[3] But this presupposes a second imprisonment-a point in dispute-and it is not wise to assume it unless necessary. Paul with the imprisonment of which we know. ’ This universality of Christian interest, or inclusiveness of brotherhood, appears often: ‘Salute every saint in Christ Jesus’ (Philippians 4:21); ‘The brethren which are with me salute you’ (Philippians 4:21), where all the Christians who were wont to assemble in Prison or in his hired rooms (Acts 28:30) to console St
Babylon, History And Religion of - Ultimately released from Prison, Jehoiachin was treated as a king in exile (2 Kings 25:27-30 ; Jeremiah 52:31-34 )
Hell - The New Testament describes hell as a place: a furnace (Matthew 13:42,50 ), a lake of fire (Revelation 19:20 ; 20:14-15 ; 21:8 ), and a Prison (Revelation 20:7 ). The wicked are imprisoned here so they cannot harm God's people (Matthew 5:25-26 ; 13:42,50 ; 18:34 ; Jude 6 1618450074_39 )
Heal, Health - ...
Luke shows Jesus announcing in similar terms the arrival of God's kingdom—"freedom for the Prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to release the oppressed" (the healing of society, Luke 4:18 ). And when the Baptist, hearing in Prison of Jesus' ministry, sent someone to ask Jesus if he was indeed the Messiah, Jesus sent back the message, "The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cured, the deaf hear, the dead are raised Blessed is the man who does not fall away on account of me" (Matthew 11:4-6 )
Martyr - Imprisonment, beating, and even death, the Romans presumably conniving, were the penalties incurred (Acts 22:4-5; Acts 22:19). James the son of Zebedee fell, and Peter was cast into Prison
the Unmerciful Servant - And then after telling Peter and all the Twelve this story of Cæsar and his degraded and imprisoned procurator, our Lord added this application to the story-So likewise shall My Heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your heart forgive not every one his brother their trespasses. When the fellow-servants of this unmerciful servant saw him so forget his own ten thousand talents as to take his hundred-pence debtor by the throat and cast him into Prison, they were both sorry and angry, and went and told their Lord what had taken place
Versions of the Scripture, English - He lingered in Prison several months and then suffered martyrdom in 1536
Manichees - Manes having undertaken to cure the king of Persia's son, and not succeeding, was put in Prison upon the young prince's death, whence he made his escape; but he was apprehended soon after, and flayed alive. The earth was created by God out of this corrupt mass of matter, in order to be a dwelling for the human race, that their captive souls might by degrees be delivered from their corpreal Prisons, and the celestial elements extricated from the gross substance in which they were involved
Divination - All their resources failing, God's man in the Prison was called forth to show the dream, and this proved the occasion of working out God's purposes respecting Joseph
Prayer - When Paul was kept in Prison, he desired and expected such earnest prayer of the Church unto God for him as was offered by the Church of Jerusalem for Peter (Acts 12:5)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - -In all troubles, God was with him-his brethren hated him but God loved him, he was enslaved and God freed him, sick and the Lord visited him, in Prison and his God showed him favour (i. In Prison he thanked God for deliverance from her (iii
Jerusalem - It is reasonable to seek in proximity to the Council House the Prison of Acts 4:3; Acts 5:18; that of Acts 12:4 was probably in connexion with the Palace of Herod, where presumably Agrippa I. ...
(2) James the Great, the brother of John, is supposed to have been beheaded in a Prison now marked by the W
Messiah - He entered into a city of Arabia Felix, and there he greatly oppressed the Christians; but he was taken Prisoner, and put to death by Elesban, and AEthiopian general. The emperor sent an army against them, killed great numbers of them, took their pretended Messiah Prisoner, and immediately put him to death. He raised an army against the king, but was taken and imprisoned; and, having made his escape, was afterwards seized again, and beheaded. The Visier, upon the news, sends for him, and confines him in a loathsome Prison. " Sabatai remained a Prisoner in Constantinople for the space of two months. The Jews flocked in great numbers to the castle where he was a Prisoner; not only those that were near, but from Poland, Germany, Leghorn, Venice, and other places: they received Sabatai's blessing, and promises of advancement. He was also, during this imprisonment, visited by pilgrims from all parts, that had heard his story. They added, that, though the Prison where Sabatai lay was barred and fastened with strong iron locks, yet he was seen to walk through the streets with a numerous train; that the shackles which were upon his neck and feet did not fall off, but were turned into gold, with which Sabatai gratified his followers
Paul - ( Acts 18:13,14 ) At Philippi Paul and Silas were arrested, beaten and put in Prison, having cast out the spirit of divination from a female slave who had brought her masters much gain by her power. (Acts 16:26-34 ) In the morning the magistrates sent word to the Prison that the men might be let go; but Paul denounced plainly their unlawful acts, informing them moreover that those whom they had beaten and imprisoned without trial; were Roman citizens. Paul's imprisonment: Jerusalem . Paul was rescued from the violence of the multitude by the Roman officer, who made him his own Prisoner, causing him to be chained to two soldiers, and then proceeded to inquire who he was and what he had done. The chief captain set him free from bonds, but on the next day called together the chief priests and the Sanhedrin, and brought Paul as a Prisoner before them. From thence a smaller detachment conveyed him to Caesarea, where they delivered up their Prisoner into the hands of the governor. Imprisonment at Caesarea. After hearing St, Paul's accusers and the apostle's defence, Felix made an excuse for putting off the matter, and gave orders that the Prisoner should be treated with indulgence and that his friends should be allowed free access to him. The unprincipled governor had good reason to seek to ingratiate himself with the Jews; and to please them, be handed over Paul, as an untried Prisoner, to his successor, Festus. The appeal having been allowed, Festus reflected that he must send with the Prisoner a report of "the crimes laid against him. Accordingly Paul conducted his defence before the king; and when it was concluded Festus and Agrippa, and their companions, consulted together, and came to the conclusion that the accused was guilty of nothing that deserved death or imprisonment. After a while arrangements were made to carry "Paul and certain other Prisoners," in the custody of a centurion named Julius, into Italy; and amongst the company, whether by favor or from any other reason, we find the historian of the Acts, who in chapters 27,28 gives a graphic description of the voyage to Rome and the shipwreck on the Island of Melita or Malta. After a three-months stay in Malta the soldiers and their Prisoners left in an Alexandria ship for Italy. ) First imprisonment of St. --On their arrival at Rome the centurion delivered up his Prisoners into the proper custody that of the praetorian prefect. --To that imprisonment to which St. Luke has introduced us --the imprisonment which lasted for such a tedious time, though tempered by much indulgence --belongs the noble group of letters to Philemon, to the Colossians, to the Ephesians and to the Philippians. According to the general opinion the apostle was liberated from imprisonment at the end of two years, having been acquitted by Nero A. Second imprisonment at Rome . --The apostle appears now to have been treated not as an honorable state Prisoner but as a felon, ( 2 Timothy 2:9 ) but he was allowed to write the second letter to Timothy, A
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - - The writer was at the time in Prison (Hebrews 13:3; Hebrews 13:19), had been formerly imprisoned in Palestine (Hebrews 10:34, "ye had compassion on me in my bonds. " So the Sinaiticus and the Vaticanus manuscripts, but Alexandrinus manuscript "on the Prisoners". Paul's first imprisonment at Rome ended A
Marriage - John the Baptist had been in Prison for daring to rebuke Herod, and spiteful Herodias successfully plotted John's execution because of this (Mark 6:14-29 ; Matthew 14:1-12 )
Thessalonians, First And Second, Theology of - These texts in turn were followed by Ephesians, Philippians, and Colossians, which have generally been regarded as the Prison Epistles and which treat various implications of Christology for the life of the church
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - At his first coming to his little village, it was as disagreeable to him as a Prison, and every day seemed too tedious to be endured in so retired a place
Paul in Arabia - The souls of all the men and women and children he had haled to Prison, and had compelled to blaspheme, and had slain with the sword
Exorcism - ]'>[2] σε κατὰ τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ζῶντος (Matthew 26:63), he thereby brought the Prisoner into such effective touch with Jahweh that the latter could punish him if he did not speak the truth. The word here employed is used in the papyri thus: ‘I am being harshly treated in Prison, perishing with hunger,’ and indicates the physical suffering arising from possession (Moulton and Milligan, loc
Alexander the Coppersmith - And such men among us are sent to school, not to David on his deathbed, nor to Paul in his Prison, but to Jesus Christ on His Cross; Who, when He was reviled, reviled not again; when He suffered, He threatened not; leaving us an example, that we should follow His steps
Mediator - They suppose, therefore, that persons in former times who believed in a Saviour that was to come, and who obtained justification with God by this faith, were detained after death in a place of the infernal regions, which received the name of limbus patrum; a kind of Prison where they did not endure punishment, but remained without partaking of the joys of heaven, in earnest expectation of the coming of Christ: who, after suffering on the cross, descended to hell that he might set them free
Philippi - Paul and Silas were dragged before the magistrates, scourged without a hearing, and flung into the innermost Prison. The scourging and imprisoning were acts of high-handed violence. In the end the magistrates saved themselves by begging the Prisoners to leave the town quietly, and the historian’s point is that in acceding to this request the apostles forfeited the unquestionable right to appeal against a gross maladministration of justice. The older view is defended by Ramsay, whose acquaintance with Turkish Prisons helps him to remove some of the difficulties of the narrative (St. To Thessalonica, and again to Corinth, their messengers followed him with the tokens of their love (Philippians 4:16, 2 Corinthians 11:9); and when he was a Prisoner in Rome, Epaphroditus of Philippi made a journey of 700 miles over land and sea to bring him yet another gift, which was acknowledged in the most affectionate letter St
Enoch Book of - 1-7), which is the final Prison of the fallen angels (xxi. ); vision of fallen angels in Prison (lxiv. 1-3); God will imprison the angels, who had taught men how to sin, in the burning valley, which Enoch had shown Noah; thence proceed waters which now heal the bodies of the kings and the mighty (lxvii
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - 14–41) that Peregrinus was made a Prisoner in Syria. The Christians of Asia Minor sent messengers and money to him according to their usual custom when persons were imprisoned for their faith. Perpetua and Saturus wrote in Prison narratives as long as the epistles of Ignatius (Acta SS. A ten days' sojourn would amply meet the necessities of the case; and there is nothing in the treatment to which the letters witness inconsistent with that used to other Christian Prisoners, e. The numberless libelli pacis , written by martyrs in Prison, and the celebrations of the holy mysteries there with their friends, shew that the liberty given Ignatius was not extraordinary; especially as the word εὐεργετούμενοι which he applies to his guard points, doubtless, to money given them by the Christians
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - ...
The tract ad Martyres depicts men and women in Prison, visited and relieved by the brethren, exhorted to unity, and prepared by fasting and prayer for the death which should be a victory for the church. (2) They were Christian athletes whose Prison was their training-school (palaestra) where "virtus duritia extruitur mollitia vero destruitur. On the monthly day appointed each gives to the chest what he likes; the money is disbursed not in feasting and drinking, but in supporting and burying the poor, in providing for destitute orphan boys and girls, in supporting the aged, the infirm, and the shipwrecked, and in succouring those sent to the mines or incarcerated in Prisons ex causa Dei sectae
Eternal Punishment - —(D) Maintaining the ‘larger hope’: Cox, Salvator Mundi; Farrar, Eternal Hope, and Mercy and Judgment; Plumptre, Spirits in Prison, includes art
Eschatology - Two well-known passages in 1 Peter bear upon this point: the ‘preaching to the spirits in Prison’ (1 Peter 3:19), and the ‘preaching to the dead’ (1 Peter 4:5)
House - For a house-gate πύλη is not ordinarily used; it is the gate of a city, and so of a public building like the Temple or a Prison (Acts 3:10; Acts 12:10, but Acts 3:2 has θύρα)
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - "At his first coming to his little village, Ouranius felt it as disagreeable to him as a Prison, and every day seemed too tedious to be endured in so retired a place
Judgments of God - Some time after he came to the throne, he was taken Prisoner by Sapor, king of Persia, and used like a slave and a dog; for the Persian monarch, from time to time, obliged this unhappy emperor to bow himself down, and offer him his back, on which to set his foot, in order to mount his chariot or his horse. The Romans, however, fought him, and obtained a complete victory, taking him and his sons Prisoners, whom they put to death. Elpidius was stripped of his effects in 365, and shut up in Prison, where, after having continued for some time, he died without reputation and honour, cursed of all the world, and surnamed the apostate
Plan - As a disciple of John, He took up the Baptist’s work after he had been cast into Prison, and awoke gradually to a new conception of the Kingdom of God and to a sense of His own special calling. There is no indication that the two teachers ever met before the Baptism, and John’s, imprisonment must have followed almost immediately afterwards
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - The count Chaereas as civil governor of Osrhoene, but with secret instructions from Constantinople emanating from Chrysaphius and Eutyches, was deputed to arrest and imprison him and reopen the suit. He was forbidden to enter Edessa, apprehended and treated as the vilest of criminals, dragged about from province to province, changing his quarters 40 times and being in 20 different Prisons (Labbe, iv. Ibas was not cited to appear, being then in Prison at Antioch (Labbe, iv
Paul the Apostle - ...
Paul's arrival in Jerusalem was followed quickly by arrest and a two-year imprisonment in Caesarea Maritima. There (see Acts 28 ) he apparently wrote his so-called Prison letters: Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. Assuming release from imprisonment Paul may have managed a fourth journey, perhaps as far west as Spain and then back into the Aegean area
Samson - Prison within Prison,Inseparably dark!Nothing of all these evils hath befall'n meBut justly; I myself have brought them on,Sole author I, sole cause
Joseph - And then Joseph's intellectual gifts were such that, taken along with the purity and the nobility of his character, they lifted him up out of a pit, and out of a Prison, and set him in a seat of power and of honour scarcely second to the seat of Pharaoh himself. The Lord was with him to more imprisonment, and then to more promotion; to more and more honour, and place, and power, till this world had no more to bestow upon Joseph
Philippians, Epistle to - The Apostle is a Prisoner ( Philippians 1:7 ; Philippians 1:13-14 ; Philippians 1:17 ). It appears that his imprisonment had become more rigorous since the Philippians received their first word concerning him; and it must have been of some duration, because there had been several communications between them ( Philippians 2:25-30 , Philippians 4:10 ). But this imprisonment, instead of hindering the gospel, has really led to a more eager preaching of Christ by the Christians of the city of Rome. Paul was at the time imprisoned in Rome; but some say in Cæsarea. The chief reasons for the Roman imprisonment are (1) that the wide-spread activity on behalf of the gospel by friends and enemies of the Apostle involves a larger Church than seems to have been in Cæsarea; and (2) his own conviction that his acquittal is near. ...
Assuming that the letter was written from a Roman Prison, what is its relationship to Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon the other letters of the captivity? Some hold that these were written from Cæsarea while Philippians was sent from Rome, but most assign all these Captivity Epistles to Rome. Paul’s imprisonment seems to be nearer its end than in the other letters. Paul’s imprisonment is involved by the communications of the Philippians and their anxiety at the change in the rigour of his captivity. His imprisonment has, contrary to expectation, led to the spread of the gospel, partly by his being chained to the Prætorian guards, partly through a new courage among his friends, and partly through envious rivalry. He, however, rejoices because he is assured that in answer to their prayers the Spirit of Christ will enable him to glorify his Lord whatever be the issue of his imprisonment; he does not know what to desire, though he believes that he will be acquitted and will work for their Christian welfare. Paul uses the occasion of his return to set their mind at rest about his own imprisonment for the gospel, and to deal with some affairs about which they had informed him. His union with Christ fills him with love and contentment, and thrills the lonely Prisoner with joy , which may be called the note of the Epistle, and he hopes by this letter to Impart some of this spirit to the Philippians also
Song of Songs - Castellio was driven out of Geneva by Calvin for asserting it, and Luis de Leon was thrown into Prison by the Inquisition for the same cause
Paul - ) Rescued from their violence by the Roman commandant, he was conveyed as a Prisoner to Caesarea, where, from various causes, he was detained a Prisoner for two years in Herod's praetorium (Acts 23:35 ). This privilege was accorded to him, no doubt, because he was a Roman citizen, and as such could not be put into Prison without a trial. His rooms were resorted to by many anxious inquirers, both Jews and Gentiles (Acts 28:23,30,31 ), and thus his imprisonment "turned rather to the furtherance of the gospel," and his "hired house" became the centre of a gracious influence which spread over the whole city. ...
This first imprisonment came at length to a close, Paul having been acquitted, probably because no witnesses appeared against him. Paul was siezed, and once more conveyed to Rome a Prisoner. During this imprisonment he probably wrote the Second Epistle to Timothy, the last he ever wrote. On the judgment-seat, clad in the imperial purple, sat a man who, in a bad world, had attained the eminence of being the very worst and meanest being in it, a man stained with every crime, a man whose whole being was so steeped in every nameable and unnameable vice, that body and soul of him were, as some one said at the time, nothing but a compound of mud and blood; and in the Prisoner's dock stood the best man the world possessed, his hair whitened with labours for the good of men and the glory of God
Colossians, Theology of - This letter is known as one of the "Prison Epistles" (along with Ephesians, Philemon, and Philippians). Although some believe it was written by a student of Paul, it has traditionally been associated with Paul and his imprisonment at Rome, dating from around a
Mission - Messengers came from the Machaerus Prison, saying, ‘John the Baptist hath sent us unto thee, saying, Art thou he that cometh, or look we for another?’ In that hour Jesus wrought miracles which He adduced, together with His habit of announcing good tidings to the poor, as proofs of His Messiahship (Luke 7:18-22)
Ethics - Illustrations of its practical meaning are the cup of (scarce) water, visiting the sick, helping any mugged victim, clothing the naked, befriending the ill-deserving in Prison, doing good, lending without interest
Joseph - By means of an entirely false charge she secured the removal of Joseph to the State Prison, which was under the control of Potiphar ( Genesis 40:3 ), and where again he was soon raised to the position of overseer or under-keeper
Jeremiah - And, for his pains, Jeremiah was cast into Prison again and again, and was maltreated as only the offscourings of the city were maltreated. And your prophets who say Peace, peace!-like Law, he called all such preachers so many dancing-masters; and, like Leighton, he called them so many mountebanks, till they smote him, and imprisoned him in the dungeon, and put his feet in the stocks
Jonath - Nineveh, as Jonah knew, was predestinated and prepared, and prophesied of God to he the fast-coming scourge and the cruel Prison-house of the conquered and captive Israel. But far poorer, and far more to be both blamed and pitied, you and I who have to make our choice between that same arrest and imprisonment and a life of service and of continual prayer and good-will for all our enemies
David - in His Services - And when I think also of the multitudes that no man can number to whom David's Psalms have been their constant song in the house of their pilgrimage; in the tabernacle as they fell for the first time hot from David's heart and harp; in the temple of Solomon his son with all the companies of singers and all their instruments of music; in the synagogues of the captivity; in the wilderness as the captives returned to the New Jerusalem; in the New Jerusalem every Sabbath-day and every feast-day; in the upper room, both before and after supper; in Paul's Prison at Philippi; in the catacombs; in Christian churches past number; in religious houses all over Christendom at all hours of the day and the night; in deserts, in mountains, in dens and caves of the earth; in our churches; in our Sabbath-schools; in our families morning and evening; in our sickrooms; on our death-beds; and in the night-watches when the disciples of Christ watch and pray lest they enter into temptation. Let the Prisoners hear you
Persecution - The venerable bishops of Jerusalem and Antioch died in Prison, the most cruel tortures were employed, and the numbers that perished are by all parties confessed to have been very considerable
Pre-Existence of Christ - that the ‘spirit’ in which Christ was ‘quickened’ and ministered to the ‘spirits in Prison’ is represented as something assumed by Him no less than the ‘flesh’ in which He was ‘put to death,’ and that, therefore, Christ is conceived as having existed before the beginning of His human life
Christ, Christology - Jesus evinces a characteristic eschatological power that reveals his messianic self-understanding: in him the reign of God is personified; he is acting as the anointed agent in a powerful invasion to rescue Satan's Prisoners, one by one. In a passage that is distinctly messianic, John the Baptist, hearing in Prison what Christ was doing, inquires of Jesus through his disciples, "Are you the one who was to come, or should we expect someone else?" (Matthew 11:2-3 ). The new and forceful arrival of the redemptive reign of God is embodied in the ministry of Jesus, who binds Satan and plunders his stronghold, releasing his Prisoners: "But if I drive out demons by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you. In these declarations of messianic intention Jesus shows that he is conscious of being the stronger man who, with the Father and the Spirit, is despoiling satanic power and redeeming Prisoners from spiritual bondage
Kings, the Books of - , down to the 37th year of Jehoiachin's exile and imprisonment. The book, in happy consonance with its design, closes with Jehoiachin's elevation from the Prison to the highest throne of the vassal kings at Babylon, an earnest of brighter days to the covenant people, the first ray of the dawn of God's returning favor, and of His restoring the Jews, and of His fulfilling His promise that the kingdom and seed of David shall be forever
Worship - ’...
‘And the well-to-do and the willing give what each person thinks fit, and the collection is deposited with the president, who succours orphans and widows, and those who are in want through sickness or any other cause, and those who are in Prison, and the strangers sojourning among us, and, in a word, he takes care of all who are in any need
Restoration - On the same or kindred lines, but with truer exegesis, are Farrar, Eternal Hope (1878), Mercy and Judgment (1881); Cox, Salvator Mundi: Is Christ the Saviour of all Men? (1877); Jukes, The Second Death and the Restitution of all Things (1888); Plumptre, Spirits in Prison (see pp
Parable - ‘I was sick, and in Prison, and ye visited me not’ ( Matthew 25:43 )
Jeru'Salem - (Nehemiah 12:39 ) ...
Prison gate
Wisdom of Solomon - Warsaw, 1879), the substance of 18:4 is thus given: ‘they [1] thought to bind them [2] in the Prison-house; He brought upon them the darkness
Jerusalem - Prison gate
Thecla - The governor committed him to Prison until it was convenient to hear him more attentively. Thecla made this imprisonment her opportunity
Jerusalem - ...
(16) Prison gate. Taking Amaziah Prisoner he brought him to Jerusalem and there broke down the wall from the Ephraim or Benjamin gate to the corner gate (N
Herod - His first downward step was, he cast John his faithful reprover into Prison (compare Asa, 2 Chronicles 16:10). Imprisoned by Tiberius for an unguarded speech. To "please the Jews" he slew James the brother of John, and imprisoned Peter with the intention of bringing him forth to the people for execution after the Passover ("Easter"
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - ) releases from Prison various clerical persons concerned in popular tumults in Constantinople, but expels them, with all other foreign bishops and clergy, from the city
Arminianism - For this purpose he got the leading men cast into Prison. Barnevelt, whose long and faithful services deserved a better fate, died on the scaffold: and Grotius and Hoogerbeets, under pretexts more plausible than solid, were unjustly condemned to perpetual imprisonment, from which, however, the former afterward escaped, and fled into France. Refusing to submit to the two last of these hard decrees, they were subjected to fines, imprisonments, and various other punishments
Old Testament - Its purpose was not to save men, but to hold them in ward or Prison until the true faith should be revealed (Galatians 3:23)
Nestorian Church - , would never allow his execution, but feared also to protect him efficiently, and for 7 of the 9 years of his tenure of office he was in Prison, ruling his flock thence
Rufinus of Aquileia - Rufinus himself was thrown into Prison, and afterwards, with many other confessors, banished from Egypt ( H
Wandering Stars - The soldiers bullied the Prisoners, in order to get money from them for certain privileges and slight relaxations of the Prison regime
Hermas Shepherd of - ...
Hermas also teaches that the first apostles and teachers who had died, went like Christ, and preached unto the Spirits in Prison (ix
Colossians, Epistle to the - Paul, then in Prison for the faith (Colossians 1:24; Colossians 4:10; Colossians 4:18). And, on the other hand, the allusions in Philippians 1:7; Philippians 1:12-13; Philippians 1:20-25; Philippians 2:23 point to a date near the very close of the Roman imprisonment. Epaphras, is given the place of honour as ‘my fellow-prisoner
Work - Devoted to God, Joseph is blessed in everything he does, whether living at home, serving in slavery, or working in Prison. ...
In order for human beings to be restored to their rightful place as masters of the universe instead of its Prisoners, individuals must trust in Jesus Christ, God's work, and not in themselves
Methodists - They then began to visit the sick in different parts of the town, and the Prisoners also, who were confined in the castle. By doing good; by being in every kind merciful after their power, as they have opportunity; doing good of every possible sort, and, as far as possible, to all men; to their bodies, of the ability which God giveth, by giving food to the hungry, by clothing the naked, by visiting or helping them that are sick or in Prison; to their souls, by instructing, reproving, or exhorting all we have any intercourse with; trampling under foot that enthusiastic doctrine of devils,—that we are not to do good unless our hearts be free to it: by doing good, especially to them that are of the household of faith, or groaning so to be; employing them preferably to others; buying one of another; helping each other in business, and so much the more as the world will love its own, and them only; by all possible diligence and frugality, that the Gospel be not blamed; by running with patience the race set before them, denying themselves, and taking up their cross daily; submitting to bear the reproach of Christ; to be as the filth and offscouring of the world, and looking that men should say all manner of evil of them falsely for the Lord's sake
Mahometanism - Hence, that romantic fable of the angel of death, whose peculiar office it is, at the destined hour, to dissolve the union between soul and body, and to free the departing spirit from its Prison of flesh
Babel - , who in the beginning of his reign "did lift up the head of Jehoiachin, king of Judah, out of Prison" (2 Kings 25:27; Jeremiah 52:31)
Trial-at-Law - ), or the removal by banishment or imprisonment of good citizens whose presence was obnoxious to the king (e. As holder of the imperium, he had full powers of coercion by imprisonment, scourging, or death; and no appeal could be made, except by a Roman citizen, against his decisions. The proceedings of king Herod were still more summary, the ignominious death of James and imprisonment of Peter being carried through apparently without either accusation or trial (Acts 12:1 ff. In the exercise of their official coercitio, the magistrates (στρατηγοί, praetores) stripped and beat the accused, leaving them in Prison till the case might be formally tried, or the riot otherwise quelled
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
‘The Gospel which has come down to us in Hebrew characters gave the threat as made not against him who hid (his talent), but against him who lived riotously; for (the parable) told of three servants, one who devoured his lord’s substance with harlots and flute-girls, one who gained profit many fold, and one who hid his talent; and how in the issue one was accepted, one merely blamed, and one shut up in Prison’ (Euseb
Dates (2) - For Mark 1:14 (‘Now after that John was put in Prison Jesus came into Galilee preaching’) refers to an event, the imprisonment of the Baptist, which was clearly later than
Montanus - We cannot be sure how long Montanus had been teaching, or how long the excesses of his prophetesses had continued; but in 177 Western attention was first called to these disputes, the interference being solicited of the martyrs of Lyons, then suffering imprisonment and expecting death for the testimony of Christ. ...
Were the Gallic churches consulted by the orthodox, by the Montanists, or by both? and what answer did the Gallic Christians give? Eusebius only tells us that their judgment was pious and most orthodox, and that they subjoined letters which those who afterwards suffered martyrdom wrote while yet in Prison to the brethren in Asia and Phrygia and also to Eleutherus, bp. Another of Apolinarius's authorities adds weight to his signature by appending the title martyr, then commonly given to those who braved imprisonment or tortures for Christ. The justice of this previous condemnation Praxeas could confirm from his own knowledge of the Montanist churches and their prophesyings; and his testimony had the more weight because, having suffered imprisonment for the faith, he enjoyed the dignity of a martyr
Rome - ...
Beyond this are the remains of the Mamertine Prison, where the Catilinarian conspirators Lentulus and Cethegus were strangled by order of the consul Cicero. Some represent legionary soldiers leading Prisoners from the East in chains
Ambrosius of Milan - Ambrose began to pray with bitter tears that the cause of the church might not be stained with blood; and sent presbyters and deacons, who succeeded in rescuing the Prisoner unhurt. Justina, in her irritation, treated the rich men of the city as responsible for a tumult, and threw many of them into Prison. The next day the soldiers were withdrawn, and the merchants who had been imprisoned were released
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - Through fear of hell, I had condemned myself to Prison; I had scorpions and wild beasts for my only companions
Apostles - The Baptist had just been imprisoned (Mark 1:14 and ||), and He seemed to regard his imprisonment as a call to attempt more than He had yet done. Now that he was in Prison, our Lord proceeded to develop a ministry of His own
Methodists, Protestant - They then began to visit the sick in different parts of the town, and the Prisoners also, who were confined in the castle. "...
Secondly, By doing good; by being in every kind merciful after their power, as they have opportunity; doing good of every possible sort, and as far as possible to all men; to their bodies, of the ability which God giveth; by giving food to the hungry, by clothing the naked, by visiting or helping them that are sick, or in Prison; to their souls, by instructing, reproving, or exhorting all we have any intercourse with; trampling under foot that enthusiastic doctrine of devils, that, 'We are not to do good, unless our hearts be free to it
Clement of Alexandria - of Cappadocia, who was in Prison for the faith
Person of Christ - ...
Our Lord’s reply to the Baptist’s message from Prison (Matthew 11:2 ff
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - ’...
Some say that the Jews, by the advice of that bad king, and by means of an old Apostle, seized Jesus and imprisoned him all night, and in the morning prepared a cross on which to crucify him. Then great darkness fell, and angels released Jesus from Prison and carried him up on high, and took the old man Prisoner. ...
Others say the Jews imprisoned him with eighteen men in a house. ’ The Prisoners said Jesus had gone on high; but the Jews saw one like Jesus and crucified him