What does Pray mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
προσεύχεσθε to offer prayers 13
נָ֥א I (we) pray 6
προσεύξασθαι to offer prayers 6
נָ֖א I (we) pray 6
προσεύχεσθαι to offer prayers 5
נָא֙ I (we) pray 4
נָ֔א I (we) pray 3
נָ֤א I (we) pray 3
נָ֛א I (we) pray 3
אָנָּ֣א ah now! I/we beseech you 2
εὐχόμεθα to pray to God. / to wish 2
וְהִתְפַּֽלְל֣וּ to intervene 2
לְהִתְפַּלֵּ֣ל to intervene 2
προσεύξωμαι to offer prayers 2
יִֽתְפַּֽלְל֖וּ to intervene 2
לְהִתְפַּלֵּ֖ל to intervene 2
δεήθητε to want 2
προσευχέσθω to offer prayers 2
אָנָּ֤ה ah now! I/we beseech you 2
נָ֭א I (we) pray 2
נָא֩ I (we) pray 2
προσεύχησθε to offer prayers 2
δεήθητι to want 1
וְהִֽתְפַּלְל֖וּ to intervene 1
וְהִֽתְפַּלְל֞וּ to intervene 1
וְאֶתְפַּלֵּ֥ל to intervene 1
הִתְפַּלֵּ֧ל to intervene 1
וְהִֽתְפַּֽלְל֣וּ to intervene 1
וְהִֽתְפַּֽלְל֞וּ to intervene 1
וְהִתְפַּֽלְל֧וּ to intervene 1
תִּתְפַּלֵּל֙ to intervene 1
וְהִֽתְפַּֽלְל֗וּ to intervene 1
תִּתְפַּלֵּ֣ל ׀ to intervene 1
שַׁ֭אֲלוּ to ask 1
וּמְצַלַּ֕יִן (Pael) to pray. 1
אֶתְפַּלָּֽל to intervene 1
יִתְפַּלֵּ֬ל to intervene 1
הִתְפַּלֵּל֙ to intervene 1
מִתְפַּלֵּ֨ל to intervene 1
יִתְפַּלֵּ֖ל to intervene 1
הִתְפַּלֵּ֣ל to intervene 1
וְיִֽתְפַּֽלְלוּ֙ to intervene 1
מִתְפַּלֵּ֛ל to intervene 1
וְהִתְפַּלֵּ֤ל to intervene 1
הִתְפַּלֶּל־ to intervene 1
וְהִתְפַּלַּלְתֶּ֖ם to intervene 1
וְהִתְפַּֽלְל֥וּ to intervene 1
תִּתְפַּלֵּ֛ל to intervene 1
וּמִתְפַּלְלִ֔ים to intervene 1
וְיִתְפַּלֵּ֥ל to intervene 1
וְהִֽתְפַּֽלְל֧וּ to intervene 1
נָ֜א I (we) pray 1
וְהִתְפַּלֵּ֣ל to intervene 1
προσευξάσθωσαν to offer prayers 1
δέομαί to want 1
ἐρωτῶ to question. 1
εὔχομαί to pray to God. / to wish 1
εὔχεσθε to pray to God. / to wish 1
προσευχόμεθα to offer prayers 1
προσεύχονται to offer prayers 1
προσεύξηται to offer prayers 1
προσεύχῃ to offer prayers 1
πρόσευξαι to offer prayers 1
προσεύχωμαι to offer prayers 1
προσεύξομαι to offer prayers 1
προσευξώμεθα to offer prayers 1
προσεύχομαι to offer prayers 1
אָנָּ֣ה ah now! I/we beseech you 1
נִפְגַּע־ to encounter 1
אָֽנָּ֤א ah now! I/we beseech you 1
אָֽנָּ֥א ah now! I/we beseech you 1
לְחַלּ֖וֹת to be or become weak 1
לְחַלּוֹת֙ to be or become weak 1
וּלְחַלּ֖וֹת to be or become weak 1
נָּ֗א I (we) pray 1
נָּ֥א I (we) pray 1
נָ֨א I (we) pray 1
נָּא־ I (we) pray 1
נָּ֤א I (we) pray 1
נָ֗א I (we) pray 1
נָ֣א I (we) pray 1
יֶעְתַּ֤ר to pray 1
אָשִׂ֣יחָה to put forth 1

Definitions Related to Pray

G4336


   1 to offer prayers, to Pray.
   

H577


   1 ah now! I/we beseech you, oh now!, Pray now! (participle of entreaty usually followed by the imperative verb).
   

H6419


   1 to intervene, interpose, Pray.
      1a (Piel) to mediate, judge.
      1b (Hithpael).
         1b1 to intercede.
         1b2 to Pray.
         

G1189


   1 to want, lack.
   2 to desire, long for.
   3 to ask, beg.
      3a the thing asked for.
      3b to Pray, make supplications.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 154, aiteo; and 2065, erotao.
      See entry 5802 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G2065


   1 to question.
   2 to ask.
      2a to request, entreat, beg, beseech.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 154, aiteo; and 1189, deomai.
      See entry 5802 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G2172


   1 to Pray to God.
   2 to wish, to Pray, to Pray for.
   

H2470


   1 to be or become weak, be or become sick, be or become diseased, be or become grieved, be or become sorry.
      1a (Qal) to be weak, be sick.
      1b (Piel).
         1b1 to be or become weak, feel weak.
         1b2 to become sick, become ill.
         1b3 (CLBL) to entreat, Pray, beg.
      1c (Niphal).
         1c1 to make oneself sick.
         1c2 to be made sick.
         1c3 to be tired.
      1d (Pual) to be made weak, become weak.
      1e (Hithpael) to make oneself sick.
      1f (Hiphil).
         1f1 to make sore.
         1f2 to make sick.
         1f3 to show signs of sickness, become sick.
         1f4 to grieve.
      1g (Hophal).
         1g1 to be made sick.
         1g2 to be wounded.
         

H7878


   1 to put forth, mediate, muse, commune, speak, complain, ponder, sing.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to complain.
         1a2 to muse, meditate upon, study, ponder.
         1a3 to talk, sing, speak.
      1b (Polel) to meditate, consider, put forth thoughts.
      

H7592


   1 to ask, enquire, borrow, beg.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to ask, ask for.
         1a2 to ask (as a favour), borrow.
         1a3 to enquire, enquire of.
         1a4 to enquire of, consult (of deity, oracle).
         1a5 to seek.
      1b (Niphal) to ask for oneself, ask leave of absence.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to enquire, enquire carefully.
         1c2 to beg, practise beggary.
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to be given on request.
         1d2 to grant, make over to, let (one) ask (successfully) or give or lend on request (then) grant or make over to.
         

H6739


   1 (Pael) to Pray.
   

H6293


   1 to encounter, meet, reach, entreat, make intercession.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to meet, light upon, join.
         1a2 to meet (of kindness).
         1a3 to encounter, fall upon (of hostility).
         1a4 to encounter, entreat (of request).
         1a5 to strike, touch (of boundary).
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to light upon.
         1b2 to cause to entreat.
         1b3 to make entreaty, interpose.
         1b4 to make attack.
         1b5 to reach the mark.
         

H6279


   1 to Pray, entreat, supplicate.
      1a (Qal) to Pray, entreat.
      1b (Niphal) to be supplicated, be entreated.
      1c (Hiphil) to make supplication, plead.
      

Frequency of Pray (original languages)

Frequency of Pray (English)

Dictionary

Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Pray, Prayer
A — 1: εὔχομαι (Strong's #2172 — Verb — euchomai — yoo'-khom-ahee ) "to pray (to God)," is used with this meaning in 2 Corinthians 13:7 ; 2 Corinthians 13:9 , RV, "pray" (AV, "wish"); James 5:16 ; 3 John 1:2 , RV, "pray" (AV, wish). Even when the RV and AV translate by "I would," Acts 26:29 , or "wished for," Acts 27:29 (RV, marg., "prayed"), or "could wish," Romans 9:3 (RV, marg., "could pray"), the indication is that "prayer" is involved.
A — 2: προσεύχομαι (Strong's #4336 — Verb — proseuchomai — pros-yoo'-khom-ahee ) "to pray," is always used of "prayer" to God, and is the most frequent word in this respect, especially in the Synoptists and Acts, once in Romans 8:26 ; Ephesians 6:18 ; Philippians 1:9 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; Hebrews 13:18 ; Jude 1:20 . For the injunction in 1 Thessalonians 5:17 , see CEASE , C.
A — 3: ἐρωτάω (Strong's #2065 — Verb — erotao — er-o-tah'-o ) "to ask," is translated by the verb to pray in Luke 14:18,19 ; 16:27 ; John 4:31 ; 14:16 ; 16:26 ; 17:9,15,20 ; in Acts 23:18 , RV, "asked" (AV "prayed"); in 1 John 5:16 , RV, "should make request" (AV "shall pray"). See ASK , A, No. 2.
A — 4: δέομαι (Strong's #1189 — Verb — deomai — deh'-om-ahee ) "to desire," in 2 Corinthians 5:20 ; 8:4 , RV, "beseech" (AV, "pray"): see BESEECH , No. 3.
Notes: (1) Parakaleo, "to call to one's aid," is rendered by the verb "to pray" in the AV in the following: Matthew 26:53 (RV, "beseech"); so Mark 5:17,18 ; Acts 16:9 ; in Acts 24:4 , RV, "intreat;" in Acts 27:34 , RV, "beseech." See BESEECH , No. 1. (2) In 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ; 2 Timothy 4:16 , there is no word in the original for "I pray," see the RV.
B — 1: εὐχή (Strong's #2171 — Noun Feminine — euche — yoo-khay' ) akin to A, No. 1, denotes "a prayer," James 5:15 ; "a vow," Acts 18:18 ; 21:23 . See VOW.
B — 2: προσευχή (Strong's #4335 — Noun Feminine — proseuche — pros-yoo-khay' ) akin to A, No. 2, denotes (a) "prayer" (to God), the most frequent term, e.g., Matthew 21:22 ; Luke 6:12 , where the phrase is not to be taken literally as if it meant, "the prayer of God" (subjective genitive), but objectively, "prayer of God." In James 5:17 , "He prayed fervently," RV, is lit., "he prayed with prayer" (a Hebraistic form); in the following the word is used with No. 3: Ephesians 6:18 ; Philippians 4:6 ; 1 Timothy 2:1 ; 5:5 ; (b) "a place of prayer," Acts 16:13,16 , a place outside the city wall, RV.
B — 3: δέησις (Strong's #1162 — Noun Feminine — deesis — deh'-ay-sis ) primarily "a wanting, a need" (akin to A, No. 4), then, "an asking, entreaty, supplication," in the NT is always addressed to God and always rendered "supplication" or "supplications" in the RV; in the AV "prayer," or "prayers," in Luke 1:13 ; 2:37 ; 5:33 ; Romans 10:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:11 ; 9:14 ; Philippians 1:4 (in the 2nd part, "request"); 1:19; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; Hebrews 5:7 ; James 5:16 ; 1 Peter 3:12 .
B — 4: ἔντευξις (Strong's #1783 — Noun Feminine — enteuxis — ent'-yook-sis ) is translated "prayer" in 1 Timothy 4:5 ; see INTERCESSION.
Notes: (1) Proseuche is used of "prayer" in general; deesis stresses the sense of need; it is used sometimes of request from man to man. (2) In the papyri enteuxis is the regular word for a petition to a superior. For the synonymous word aitema see PETITION; for hiketeria, Hebrews 5:7 , see SUPPLICATION.
(3) "Prayer is properly addressed to God the Father Matthew 6:6 ; John 16:23 ; Ephesians 1:17 ; 3:14 , and the Son, Acts 7:59 ; 2 Corinthians 12:8 ; but in no instance in the NT is prayer addressed to the Holy Spirit distinctively, for whereas the Father is in Heaven, Matthew 6:9 , and the Son is at His right hand, Romans 8:34 , the Holy Spirit is in and with the believers, John 14:16,17 .
"Prayer is to be offered in the Name of the Lord Jesus, John 14:13 , that is, the prayer must accord with His character, and must be presented in the same spirit of dependence and submission that marked Him, Matthew 11:26 ; Luke 22:42 .
"The Holy Spirit, being the sole interpreter of the needs of the human heart, makes His intercession therein; and inasmuch as prayer is impossible to man apart from His help, Romans 8:26 , believers are exhorted to pray at all seasons in the Spirit, Ephesians 6:18 ; cp. Jude 1:20 ; James 5:16 , the last clause of which should probably be read "the inwrought [1] supplication of righteous man availeth much' (or 'greatly prevails' ischuo, as in Acts 19:16,20 ).
"None the less on this account is the understanding to be engaged in prayer, 1 Corinthians 14:15 , and the will, Colossians 4:12 ; Acts 12:5 (where 'earnestly' is, lit., 'stretched out') and so in Luke 22:44 .
"Faith is essential to prayer, Matthew 21:22 ; Mark 11:24 ; James 1:5-8 , for faith is the recognition of, and the committal of ourselves and our matters to, the faithfulness of God.
"Where the Jews were numerous, as at Thessalonica, they had usually a Synagogue, Acts 17:1 ; where they were few, as at Philippi, they had merely a proseuche, or 'place of prayer,' of much smaller dimensions, and commonly built by a river for the sake of the water necessary to the preliminary ablutions prescribed by Rabbinic tradition, Acts 16:13,16 ." * [2]
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Prayer: For Help to Pray
In Dr. Ryland's memoir of Andrew Fuller is the following anecdote. At a conference at Sobam, a friend of slender abilities being asked to pray, knelt down, and Mr. Fuller and the company with him, when he found himself so embarrassed, that, whispering to Mr. Fuller, he said, 'I do not know how to go on.' Mr. F. replied in a whisper, 'Tell the Lord so.' The rest of the company did not hear what passed between them, but the man taking Mr. Fuller's advice began to confess his not knowing how to pray as he ought to pray, begging to be taught to pray, and so proceeded in prayer to the satisfaction of all the company.
Webster's Dictionary - Pray
(1):
(v. t.) To effect or accomplish by praying; as, to pray a soul out of purgatory.
(2):
(v. t.) To ask earnestly for; to seek to obtain by supplication; to entreat for.
(3):
(v. t.) To address earnest request to; to supplicate; to entreat; to implore; to beseech.
(4):
(v. i.) To make request with earnestness or zeal, as for something desired; to make entreaty or supplication; to offer prayer to a deity or divine being as a religious act; specifically, to address the Supreme Being with adoration, confession, supplication, and thanksgiving.
(5):
(n. & v.) See Pry.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Pray
A. Verb.
Pâlal (פָּלַל, Strong's #6419), “to pray, intervene, mediate, judge.” Found in both biblical and modern Hebrew, this word occurs 84 times in the Hebrew Old Testament. The word is used 4 times in the intensive verbal form; the remaining 80 times are found in the reflexive or reciprocal form, in which the action generally points back to the subject. In the intensive form pâlal expresses the idea of “to mediate, to come between two parties,” always between human beings. Thus, “if a man sins against a man, God will mediate for him …” (1 Sam. 2:25, RSV). “To mediate” requires “making a judgment,” as in Ezek. 16:52: “Thou also, which hast judged thy sisters.…” In the remaining 2 references in which the intensive form is used, pâlal expresses “making a judgment” in Gen. 48:11 and “coming between” in Ps. 106:30.
The first occurrence of pâlal in the Old Testament is in Gen. 20:7, where the reflexive or reciprocal form of the verb expresses the idea of “interceding for, prayer in behalf of”: “… He shall pray for thee.…” Such intercessory praying is frequent in the Old Testament: Moses “prays” for the people’s deliverance from the fiery serpents (Num. 21:7); he “prays” for Aaron (Deut. 9:20); and Samuel “intercedes” continually for Israel (1 Sam. 12:23). Prayer is directed not only toward Yahweh but toward pagan idols as well (Isa. 44:17). Sometimes prayer is made to Yahweh that He would act against an enemy: “That which thou hast prayed to me against Sennacherib king of Assyria I have heard” (2 Kings 19:20).
Just why this verb form is used to express the act of praying is not completely clear. Since this verb form points back to the subject, in a reflexive sense, perhaps it emphasizes the part which the person praying has in his prayers. Also, since the verb form can have a reciprocal meaning between subject and object, it may emphasize the fact that prayer is basically communication, which always has to be two-way in order to be real.
B. Noun.
Tephillâh (תְּפִלָּה, Strong's #8605), “prayer.” This word, which appears 77 times in biblical Hebrew, is the most general Hebrew word for “prayer.” It first appears in 1 Kings 8:28: “Yet have thou respect unto the prayer of thy servant, and to his supplication.…” In the eschaton God’s house will be a house of “prayer” for all peoples (Isa. 56:7); it will be to this house that all nations will come to worship God. The word can mean both a nonliturgical, non-poetical “prayer” and a liturgical, poetical “prayer.” In the latter special meaning tephillâh is used as a psalm title in 5 psalms and as the title of Habakkuk’s prayer (Hab. 3:1). In these uses tephillâh means a prayer set to music and sung in the formal worship service. In Ps. 72:20 the word describes all the psalms or “prayers” of Psalms 1- 72, only one of which is specifically called a “prayer” (17:1).

Sentence search

Litany of Loreto - Perhaps the most popular Prayer in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary known to Catholic piety. "Queen of Peace, Pray for us!" added by Pope Benedict XV. ...
Holy Mary, Pray for us. ...
Holy Mother of God, Pray for us. ...
Holy Virgin of virgins, Pray for us. ...
Mother of Christ, Pray for us. ...
Mother of divine grace, Pray for us. ...
Mother most pure, Pray for us. ...
Mother most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Mother inviolate, Pray for us. ...
Mother undefiled, Pray for us. ...
Mother most amiable, Pray for us. ...
Mother most admirable, Pray for us. ...
Mother of good counsel, Pray for us. ...
Mother of our Creator, Pray for us. ...
Mother of our Savior, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most venerable, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most renouned, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most powerful, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most merciful, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most faithful, Pray for us. ...
Mirror of justice, Pray for us. ...
Seat of wisdom, Pray for us. ...
Cause of our joy, Pray for us. ...
Spiritual vessel, Pray for us. ...
Vessel of honor, Pray for us. ...
Singular vessel of devotion, Pray for us. ...
Mystical rose, Pray for us. ...
Tower of David, Pray for us. ...
Tower of ivory, Pray for us. ...
House of gold, Pray for us. ...
Ark of the covenant, Pray for us. ...
Gate of heaven, Pray for us. ...
Morning star, Pray for us. ...
Health of the sick, Pray for us. ...
Refuge of sinners, Pray for us. ...
Comforter of the afflicted, Pray for us. ...
Help of Christians, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Angels, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Patriarchs, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Prophets, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Apostles, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Martyrs, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Confessors, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Virgins, Pray for us. ...
Queen of all Saints, Pray for us. ...
Queen conceived without original sin, Pray for us. ...
Queen assumed into heaven, Pray for us. ...
Queen of the most holy Rosary, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Peace, Pray for us. Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. ...
LET US Pray: Grant, we beseech Thee, O Lord God, unto us Thy servants, that we may rejoice in continual health of mind and body; and, by the glorious intercession of Blessed Mary ever Virgin, may be delivered from present sadness, and enter into the joy of Thine eternal gladness
Loreto, Litany of - Perhaps the most popular Prayer in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary known to Catholic piety. "Queen of Peace, Pray for us!" added by Pope Benedict XV. ...
Holy Mary, Pray for us. ...
Holy Mother of God, Pray for us. ...
Holy Virgin of virgins, Pray for us. ...
Mother of Christ, Pray for us. ...
Mother of divine grace, Pray for us. ...
Mother most pure, Pray for us. ...
Mother most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Mother inviolate, Pray for us. ...
Mother undefiled, Pray for us. ...
Mother most amiable, Pray for us. ...
Mother most admirable, Pray for us. ...
Mother of good counsel, Pray for us. ...
Mother of our Creator, Pray for us. ...
Mother of our Savior, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most venerable, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most renouned, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most powerful, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most merciful, Pray for us. ...
Virgin most faithful, Pray for us. ...
Mirror of justice, Pray for us. ...
Seat of wisdom, Pray for us. ...
Cause of our joy, Pray for us. ...
Spiritual vessel, Pray for us. ...
Vessel of honor, Pray for us. ...
Singular vessel of devotion, Pray for us. ...
Mystical rose, Pray for us. ...
Tower of David, Pray for us. ...
Tower of ivory, Pray for us. ...
House of gold, Pray for us. ...
Ark of the covenant, Pray for us. ...
Gate of heaven, Pray for us. ...
Morning star, Pray for us. ...
Health of the sick, Pray for us. ...
Refuge of sinners, Pray for us. ...
Comforter of the afflicted, Pray for us. ...
Help of Christians, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Angels, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Patriarchs, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Prophets, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Apostles, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Martyrs, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Confessors, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Virgins, Pray for us. ...
Queen of all Saints, Pray for us. ...
Queen conceived without original sin, Pray for us. ...
Queen assumed into heaven, Pray for us. ...
Queen of the most holy Rosary, Pray for us. ...
Queen of Peace, Pray for us. Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. ...
LET US Pray: Grant, we beseech Thee, O Lord God, unto us Thy servants, that we may rejoice in continual health of mind and body; and, by the glorious intercession of Blessed Mary ever Virgin, may be delivered from present sadness, and enter into the joy of Thine eternal gladness
Joseph, Litany of Saint - It is a time-honored Prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. ...
Holy Mary, Pray for us. ...
Holy Joseph, Pray for us. ...
Noble Son of the House of David, Pray for us. ...
Light of the Patriarchs, Pray for us. ...
Husband of the Mother of God, Pray for us. ...
Chaste Guardian of the Virgin, Pray for us. ...
Foster-father of the Son of God, Pray for us. ...
Sedulous Defender of Christ, Pray for us. ...
Head of the Holy Family, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most just, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us. ...
Mirror of patience, Pray for us. ...
Lover of poverty, Pray for us. ...
Model of all who labor, Pray for us. ...
Glory of family life, Pray for us. ...
Protector of Virgins, Pray for us. ...
Pillar of families, Pray for us. ...
Consolation of the afflicted, Pray for us. ...
Hope of the sick, Pray for us. ...
Patron of the dying, Pray for us. ...
Terror of the demons, Pray for us. ...
Protector of the holy Church, Pray for us
Litany of Saint Joseph - It is a time-honored Prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. ...
Holy Mary, Pray for us. ...
Holy Joseph, Pray for us. ...
Noble Son of the House of David, Pray for us. ...
Light of the Patriarchs, Pray for us. ...
Husband of the Mother of God, Pray for us. ...
Chaste Guardian of the Virgin, Pray for us. ...
Foster-father of the Son of God, Pray for us. ...
Sedulous Defender of Christ, Pray for us. ...
Head of the Holy Family, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most just, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us. ...
Mirror of patience, Pray for us. ...
Lover of poverty, Pray for us. ...
Model of all who labor, Pray for us. ...
Glory of family life, Pray for us. ...
Protector of Virgins, Pray for us. ...
Pillar of families, Pray for us. ...
Consolation of the afflicted, Pray for us. ...
Hope of the sick, Pray for us. ...
Patron of the dying, Pray for us. ...
Terror of the demons, Pray for us. ...
Protector of the holy Church, Pray for us
Saints, Litany of the - Then come in order the invocation of the angels, apostles, patriarchs, martyrs, pontiffs, confessors, and virgins as well as the Prayers of the Church for preservation from the evils of the world and of life, followed by the petitions for the preservation of the faith and the Church. It is used at the approaching death of the Christian, and resignation to the Holy Will of God is the tenor of the Prayers and ceremonies preceding and following it. Pray for us. ...
Saint Michael, Pray for us. ...
Holy angels of God, Pray for us. ...
Saint Joseph, Pray for us. ...
Saint John the Baptist, Pray for us. ...
Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Pray for us. ...
Saint Andrew, Pray for us. ...
Saint John, Pray for us. ...
Saint Mary Magdalene, Pray for us. ...
Saint Stephen, Pray for us. ...
Saint Ignatius, Pray for us. ...
Saint Lawrence, Pray for us. ...
Saint Perpetua and Saint Felicity, Pray for us. ...
Saint Agnes, Pray for us. ...
Saint Gregory, Pray for us. ...
Saint Augustine, Pray for us. ...
Saint Athanasius, Pray for us. ...
Saint Basil, Pray for us. ...
Saint Martin, Pray for us. ...
Saint Benedict, Pray for us. ...
Saint Francis and Saint Dominic, Pray for us. ...
Saint Francis Xavier, Pray for us. ...
Saint John Vianney, Pray for us. ...
Saint Catherine, Pray for us. ...
Saint Theresa, Pray for us. ...
All you saints of God, Pray for us. ...
Be merciful to us sinners, Lord, hear our Prayer. ...
Guide and protect Your Holy Church, Lord, hear our Prayer. Lord, hear our Prayer. Lord, hear our Prayer. Lord, hear our Prayer
Imprecate - imprecor in and precor, to Pray. See Pray. ...
To invoke, as an evil on any one to Pray that a curse or calamity may fall on one's self or on another person
Praying - ) of Pray...
(2):...
a. from Pray, v
Prayer: For Help to Pray - At a conference at Sobam, a friend of slender abilities being asked to Pray, knelt down, and Mr. Fuller's advice began to confess his not knowing how to Pray as he ought to Pray, begging to be taught to Pray, and so proceeded in Prayer to the satisfaction of all the company
Daven - (Yiddish) to Pray...
Oremus - (Latin: let us Pray) ...
An invitation to Pray occurring continually in Roman Rite especially before Collects, Office, Offertory, Pater Noster, and Post-Communion in the Mass, and Collects in the Office
Prayed - ) of Pray...
Hosanna - Save I Pray thee; keep; preserve
Prithee - ) A corruption of Pray thee; as, I prithee; generally used without I
Caaba - ) The small and nearly cubical stone building, toward which all Mohammedans must Pray
Despitefully - ...
Pray for them that despitefully use you
Bede - ) To Pray; also, to offer; to proffer
Bedehouse - ) An almshouse for poor people who Pray daily for their benefactors
Vigil - The eve or day before any solemn feast, because then Christians were want to watch, fast and Pray in their churches
Sherezer - One of the messengers whom the children of the Captivity sent to Jerusalem "to Pray for them before the Lord" (Zechariah 7:2 )
Abba chilkiah - His Prayers were known to be highly effective; during droughts, the rabbis would ask him to Pray for rain
Bedesman - ) A poor man, supported in a beadhouse, and required to Pray for the soul of its founder; an almsman
Job - Ezekiel 14:14 (a) An example of one who can and did Pray the Prayer of faith which moved GOD to perform miracles
Idolomacy - Zechariah encouraged his contemporaries to Pray to God since the teraphim were “utter nonsense
Enclitic - ) A word which is joined to another so closely as to lose its proper accent, as the pronoun thee in prithee (pray thee)
Deprecate - ) To Pray against, as an evil; to seek to avert by Prayer; to desire the removal of; to seek deliverance from; to express deep regret for; to disapprove of strongly
Bidding Prayer - Agreeable to this ancient practice is the form "Let us Pray, " repeated before several of the Prayers in the English liturgy. 20, has preserved the form as it was in use before the reformation, which was this:...
After the preacher had named and opened his text, he called on the people to go to their Prayers, telling them what they were to Pray for: Ye shall Pray, says he, for the king, the pope, &c
Inscriptions - On the tombs of the martyrs we find such expressions as "Pray for us, because we know that thou art in Christ"; "Atticus, thy spirit is in bliss, Pray for thy parents"; "May thy spirit, Victoria, be refreshed in the good God"; and "Eternal light shine upon thee, Timothea, in Christ
Wish - , "prayed"); so Romans 9:3 ; in 2 Corinthians 13:9 ; 3 John 1:2 , RV, "pray:" see Pray
Prayers For the Dead - Prayers for the departed are in accordancewith the devout instinct and loving heart of man, and are sanctionedby all the Liturgies of the Primitive Church. In these we findthat the commemorations of the departed were not only generalcommemorations, but that names of persons who were to be Prayedfor were read out from the DIPTYCHS (which see). The devoutmind does not argue about "Prayers for the Dead," he Prays them. ...
  "How can I cease to Pray for thee? Somewhere    In God's great universe thou art to-day.    Can He not reach thee with His tender care?    Can He not hear me when for thee I Pray?"...
Bidding-Prayer - (Anglo-Saxon: biddan, to Pray) The Prayer just before the sermon in the Anglican Church. Originally the bidding of Prayers signified the Praying of Prayers; later it came to signify the special Prayer before the sermon
Prayer - Prayer is that activity of believers whereby they communicate with God, worshipping him, praising him, thanking him, confessing to him and making requests of him. This article will be concerned mainly with those aspects of Prayer connected with requests, whether personal or for others. Concerning other aspects of Prayer see CONFESSION; FASTING; PRAISE; WORSHIP. ...
God’s power and human helplessness...
Believers Pray because they know that God is the source of all good, the controller of all events and the possessor of supreme power (Nehemiah 1:4-5; Nehemiah 9:6; Matthew 6:9). By Praying they acknowledge that they have no power to bring about the things they Pray for, but God has. They have no right to try to force God to do what they want, but by their Prayers they are admitting their own helplessness and their complete dependence on God (Mark 9:17-24; Romans 9:20; Romans 11:33-34). They are, in effect, inviting God to work his solution to the matter concerning which they are Praying. ...
The answer to a Prayer depends not upon the will-power, zeal or emotions of the person Praying, but upon the wisdom and power of God. The merit is not in the Prayer, but in God who answers the Prayer. Only when believers recognize their helplessness can they really Pray in the right spirit; for then they acknowledge that God can do what they cannot (John 15:5). ...
Faith and God’s will...
Faith, therefore, is a basic requirement of all true Prayer (Matthew 8:13; Mark 9:23; Mark 11:24; Hebrews 11:6; James 1:6-8). ...
Since faith is part of the very nature of Prayer, it is impossible for people to use Prayer to get their own way. Those who try to use Prayer in such a way are not really Praying at all. ...
Long and impressive Prayers will not persuade God; neither will an outward show of zeal and earnestness (Matthew 6:5-8; Mark 12:38-40). If believers expect to have their Prayers answered, they must Pray in the name of Jesus, not in their own name. That is, they must Pray for what Jesus wants, not what they want. ...
Answers to Prayer...
God promises to answer the Prayers of his people, but only if they offer those Prayers out of pure motives, according to his will, and with a genuine desire to glorify God (Numbers 14:13-20; Matthew 6:10; Colossians 1:9-11; John 14:13; 1 John 5:14-15). ...
Although God’s people can Pray with assurance, they have no guarantee that God will immediately give the things they Pray for. If people Pray in the right spirit and with the sincere desire that God’s will be done, they are assured God will answer their Prayers. ...
If believers live righteous and godly lives, they can have confidence that God hears and answers their Prayers. But disobedience, unconfessed sin and an unforgiving spirit are hindrances to Prayer (Psalms 66:18-19; Isaiah 1:15-17; Mark 11:25; Hebrews 5:7; James 5:16; 1 Peter 3:12; 1 John 3:22). ...
Believers are to Pray with the mind as well as with the spirit (1 Corinthians 14:15; cf. However, they may not always know how exactly to express their Prayers or what exactly to Pray for. In such cases the Spirit of Christ, who operates through them in all true Prayer, presents the Prayers to God on their behalf (Romans 8:26-27; Romans 8:34; Ephesians 6:18; Hebrews 7:25; 1 John 2:1; Judges 1:20). ...
Matters for Prayer...
Prayer is an exercise for Christians collectively as well as individually. ...
The Bible gives many examples of the matters believers are to Pray about. In their concern for the world, they are to Pray that the kingly rule of God will have its rightful place in people’s lives (Matthew 6:10; Romans 10:1; 1 Timothy 2:1-4). They are to Pray that God will send his servants into the world to bring people to know God (Matthew 9:37-38), and that God will protect and guide those servants to make their work fruitful (Acts 12:5; Romans 15:30-31; 2 Corinthians 1:11; Ephesians 6:19; Philippians 1:19). ...
Concerning the church, Christians should Pray that they and their fellow believers might know God and his purposes better, be strengthened by God’s power, have unity among themselves, grow in love, develop wisdom, exercise right judgment, endure hardship with joy, and bring glory to God by lives of fruitfulness and uprightness (John 17:20-23; Ephesians 1:16-23; Ephesians 3:14-19; Ephesians 6:18; Philippians 1:9-11; Matthew 18:19; Colossians 4:12). They should Pray also for the physical well-being of each other (James 5:16). ...
Believers are to Pray for those who treat them unkindly (Matthew 26:36-462; Matthew 5:44), and ask for mercy on those who have sinned and brought disgrace on themselves and on God (Exodus 32:11-13; Exodus 34:9; 1 Samuel 12:23). They are to Pray for civil rulers, so that God’s will might be done on earth and people might live in peace (Matthew 6:10; 1 Timothy 2:1-2). ...
In relation to themselves, believers should Pray in times of temptation and when they have spiritual battles (Matthew 6:13; 1618166310_14). They are to Pray for God’s guidance (Luke 6:12-13; Acts 1:24-25), for wisdom (James 1:5-8), for protection (Nehemiah 4:8-9; Psalms 57:1-3), and for the necessities of life (Deuteronomy 26:15; Matthew 6:11). By Prayer they can overcome anxiety (Philippians 4:6; 1 Peter 5:6-7). ...
Praying always...
People can engage in Prayer anywhere and at any time (Genesis 24:12-13; Nehemiah 2:4; Luke 5:16; Luke 6:12; Luke 18:10; Acts 10:9; 1 Timothy 5:5). In addition to developing the habit of speaking to God freely regardless of time or place, believers should set aside certain times when they can be alone with God and Pray. Even Jesus recognized the need for set times of Prayer (Daniel 6:10; Matthew 14:23; Mark 1:35). A person may Pray in any position, such as standing or kneeling, with hands stretched out or hands lifted up, with head bowed or head uplifted (1 Samuel 1:26; 1 Kings 8:54; 1 Kings 18:42; Ezra 9:5; Luke 18:11; Luke 18:13; John 11:41; Ephesians 3:14; 1 Timothy 2:8). ...
Praying in faith does not mean that persistence in Prayer is unnecessary. Believers do not have to beg from a God who is unwilling to give; nevertheless they Pray constantly, since their Prayers are an expression of their unwavering faith
Double-Minded - ...
James urged those who Pray to do so without doubting. This doubting is not so much intellectual doubt (Does God exist?), but doubt about commitment (Am I committed to this God to whom I Pray? Will I make use of this wisdom for which I Pray?)
Prayer - We are commanded to Pray (1 Thessalonians 5:17). ...
Some personal requirements of Prayer are a pure heart (Psalms 66:18), belief in Christ (John 14:13), and that the Prayer be according to God's will (1 John 5:13). We can Pray standing (Nehemiah 9:5), kneeling (Ezra 9:5), sitting (1 Chronicles 17:16-27), bowing (Exodus 34:8), and with lifted hands (1 Timothy 2:8)
Displayed - ) With wings expanded; - said of a bird of Pray, esp
Beseech - ...
To entreat to supplicate to implore to ask or Pray with urgency followed by a person as, "I Paul beseech you by the meekness of Christ,", 2 Corinthians 10 or by a thing as, I beseech your patience
Hermit - ) A beadsman; one bound to Pray for another
Plead - ]'>[1] ‘plead’ always means to ‘argue for or against a cause’ as in a court of justice, never to ‘pray’ or ‘beseech
Sharezer - Sharezer may be a man sent to the house of God (beth-el in Hebrew) to Pray (KJV). The town of Bethel may have sent Sharezer to Pray (NAS, NIV, NRSV, TEV)
Lord's Prayer, the - The Prayer which our Blessed Lord taught Hisdisciples when He said, "After this manner, therefore, Pray ye," oras given in another place, "When ye Pray, say Our Father," etc. TheChurch has always taken these words literally, so that in all herservices—Daily Prayer, Litany, Baptism, Confirmation, HolyCommunion, Marriage, Visitation of the Sick, etc. , the Lord's Prayeris always an integral part. In the Communion Office the Lord'sPrayer occurs twice, but it is to be noted that the rubric directsthe first to be said by the Priest alone, as a part of his privatepreparation. With regard to the second there is the followingrubric: "Then shall the Minister say the Lord's Prayer, the peoplerepeating after him every petition
Bell, Passing - In England when it was Catholic, and in other countries as well, there was a pious custom of ringing the church bell slowly when a death was imminent in the parish, that the faithful might be reminded to Pray for the dying person
Praetorian Guard - (pray taw' ih uhn) Roman imperial bodyguard or troops assigned to a Roman provincial governor (Philippians 1:13 NAS, RSV)
Jehucal - He was one of the two persons whom Zedekiah sent to request the prophet Jeremiah to Pray for the kingdom (Jeremiah 37:3 ) during the time of its final siege by Nebuchadnezzar
Confession - James 5:16; "confess your faults one to another (the apostle does not say to the priest), and Pray one for another, that ye may be healed. Confession is desirable...
(1) in case of wrong done to a neighbor, Matthew 18:15;...
(2) to a Christian adviser, ordained or unordained, anyone who can apply God's written word suitably to one's need, and "pray for" and with one, James 5:16;...
(3) open confession of any wrong done to the church, which has caused scandal to religion, in token of penitence
Pray, Prayer - A — 1: εὔχομαι (Strong's #2172 — Verb — euchomai — yoo'-khom-ahee ) "to Pray (to God)," is used with this meaning in 2 Corinthians 13:7 ; 2 Corinthians 13:9 , RV, "pray" (AV, "wish"); James 5:16 ; 3 John 1:2 , RV, "pray" (AV, wish). , "prayed"), or "could wish," Romans 9:3 (RV, marg. , "could Pray"), the indication is that "prayer" is involved. ...
A — 2: προσεύχομαι (Strong's #4336 — Verb — proseuchomai — pros-yoo'-khom-ahee ) "to Pray," is always used of "prayer" to God, and is the most frequent word in this respect, especially in the Synoptists and Acts, once in Romans 8:26 ; Ephesians 6:18 ; Philippians 1:9 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 ; Hebrews 13:18 ; Jude 1:20 . ...
A — 3: ἐρωτάω (Strong's #2065 — Verb — erotao — er-o-tah'-o ) "to ask," is translated by the verb to Pray in Luke 14:18,19 ; 16:27 ; John 4:31 ; 14:16 ; 16:26 ; 17:9,15,20 ; in Acts 23:18 , RV, "asked" (AV "prayed"); in 1 John 5:16 , RV, "should make request" (AV "shall Pray"). ...
A — 4: δέομαι (Strong's #1189 — Verb — deomai — deh'-om-ahee ) "to desire," in 2 Corinthians 5:20 ; 8:4 , RV, "beseech" (AV, "pray"): see BESEECH , No. ...
Notes: (1) Parakaleo, "to call to one's aid," is rendered by the verb "to Pray" in the AV in the following: Matthew 26:53 (RV, "beseech"); so Mark 5:17,18 ; Acts 16:9 ; in Acts 24:4 , RV, "intreat;" in Acts 27:34 , RV, "beseech. (2) In 1 Thessalonians 5:23 ; 2 Timothy 4:16 , there is no word in the original for "I Pray," see the RV. 1, denotes "a Prayer," James 5:15 ; "a vow," Acts 18:18 ; 21:23 . 2, denotes (a) "prayer" (to God), the most frequent term, e. , Matthew 21:22 ; Luke 6:12 , where the phrase is not to be taken literally as if it meant, "the Prayer of God" (subjective genitive), but objectively, "prayer of God. " In James 5:17 , "He Prayed fervently," RV, is lit. , "he Prayed with Prayer" (a Hebraistic form); in the following the word is used with No. 3: Ephesians 6:18 ; Philippians 4:6 ; 1 Timothy 2:1 ; 5:5 ; (b) "a place of Prayer," Acts 16:13,16 , a place outside the city wall, RV. 4), then, "an asking, entreaty, supplication," in the NT is always addressed to God and always rendered "supplication" or "supplications" in the RV; in the AV "prayer," or "prayers," in Luke 1:13 ; 2:37 ; 5:33 ; Romans 10:1 ; 2 Corinthians 1:11 ; 9:14 ; Philippians 1:4 (in the 2nd part, "request"); 1:19; 2 Timothy 1:3 ; Hebrews 5:7 ; James 5:16 ; 1 Peter 3:12 . ...
B — 4: ἔντευξις (Strong's #1783 — Noun Feminine — enteuxis — ent'-yook-sis ) is translated "prayer" in 1 Timothy 4:5 ; see INTERCESSION. ...
Notes: (1) Proseuche is used of "prayer" in general; deesis stresses the sense of need; it is used sometimes of request from man to man. ...
(3) "Prayer is properly addressed to God the Father Matthew 6:6 ; John 16:23 ; Ephesians 1:17 ; 3:14 , and the Son, Acts 7:59 ; 2 Corinthians 12:8 ; but in no instance in the NT is Prayer addressed to the Holy Spirit distinctively, for whereas the Father is in Heaven, Matthew 6:9 , and the Son is at His right hand, Romans 8:34 , the Holy Spirit is in and with the believers, John 14:16,17 . ...
"Prayer is to be offered in the Name of the Lord Jesus, John 14:13 , that is, the Prayer must accord with His character, and must be presented in the same spirit of dependence and submission that marked Him, Matthew 11:26 ; Luke 22:42 . ...
"The Holy Spirit, being the sole interpreter of the needs of the human heart, makes His intercession therein; and inasmuch as Prayer is impossible to man apart from His help, Romans 8:26 , believers are exhorted to Pray at all seasons in the Spirit, Ephesians 6:18 ; cp. ...
"None the less on this account is the understanding to be engaged in Prayer, 1 Corinthians 14:15 , and the will, Colossians 4:12 ; Acts 12:5 (where 'earnestly' is, lit. ...
"Faith is essential to Prayer, Matthew 21:22 ; Mark 11:24 ; James 1:5-8 , for faith is the recognition of, and the committal of ourselves and our matters to, the faithfulness of God. ...
"Where the Jews were numerous, as at Thessalonica, they had usually a Synagogue, Acts 17:1 ; where they were few, as at Philippi, they had merely a proseuche, or 'place of Prayer,' of much smaller dimensions, and commonly built by a river for the sake of the water necessary to the preliminary ablutions prescribed by Rabbinic tradition, Acts 16:13,16
Orate Fratres - (Latin: Pray, brethren) ...
The exhortation addressed to the people by the celebrant immediately after the Offertory and ablutions in the Mass and immediately preceding the Secrets, the server responding in the name of the congregation. In this Prayer the priest Prays that his sacrifice and that of those attending may be acceptable to God
Prayer: And Activity - A school companion, who was idly inclined, said to her one day, 'How is it that you always say your lessons so perfectly?' She replied, 'I always Pray that I may say my lessons well. ' 'Do you?' replied the other, 'then I'll Pray too. 'I Prayed,' said she, 'but I could not repeat a word of my lesson. I didn't know I needed to learn it, when I Prayed that I might say it. ' She loved her idleness, poor girl; and her Praying was but a mockery
Prayer: Simile of - Prayer pulls the rope below and the great bell rings above in the ears of God. Some scarcely stir the bell, for they Pray so languidly; others give but an occasional pluck at the rope; but he who wins with heaven is the man who grasps the rope boldly and pulls continuously, with all his might
Closet - A private room in a dwelling where Jesus encouraged people to Pray (Matthew 6:6 )
Election - Andrew Fuller remarks, in a letter to two relatives:: ' I used to think that the doctrine of election was a reason why we need not Pray, and I fear there are many who split upon this rock, who think it is to no purpose to Pray, as things will be as they will be. But I now see that the doctrine of election is the greatest encouragement instead of a discouragement to Prayer. He that decreed that any one should be finally saved, decreed that it should be in the way of Prayer; as much as he that has decreed what we shall possess of the things of this life, has decreed that it shall be in the way of industry; and as we never think of being idle in common business, because God has decreed what we shall possess of this world's good, so neither should we be slothful in the business of our souls, because our final state is decreed
Jehucal - ” Messenger King Zedekiah sent to ask Jeremiah to Pray for him as he began to rule
Mercy, Corporal And Spiritual Works of - ...
The Corporal are: ...
feed the hungry
give drink to the thirsty
clothe the naked
harbor the homeless
visit the sick
visit prisoners, and ransom captives
bury the dead
The Spiritual: ...
instruct the ignorant
counsel the doubtful
admonish sinners
be patient with wrongdoers
forgive offenses
comfort the affiicted
pray for the living and dead
Clemency - I Pray thee that thou wouldest hear us of thy clemency a few words
Spiritual Works of Mercy - ...
The Corporal are: ...
feed the hungry
give drink to the thirsty
clothe the naked
harbor the homeless
visit the sick
visit prisoners, and ransom captives
bury the dead
The Spiritual: ...
instruct the ignorant
counsel the doubtful
admonish sinners
be patient with wrongdoers
forgive offenses
comfort the affiicted
pray for the living and dead
Acoemetae - This practice the founded upon that passage, "pray without ceasing, " 1 Thessalonians 5:17
Hosanna - "Save, we Pray!" the cry of the multitudes as they thronged in our Lord's triumphal procession into Jerusalem
Orans - (Latin: orare, to Pray) ...
One of the most frequently depicted figures in the Roman Catacombs is this female figure, Praying with out-stretched arms. This ideal figure is regarded as a symbol of the soul in heaven Praying for friends on earth
Orante - (Latin: orare, to Pray) ...
One of the most frequently depicted figures in the Roman Catacombs is this female figure, Praying with out-stretched arms. This ideal figure is regarded as a symbol of the soul in heaven Praying for friends on earth
Consistency (2) - ' Lead us not into temptation,' let children Pray; for are they not often led there? ...
Temptation - We are commanded to Pray to be delivered from temptation (Matthew 6:13) for the Lord is capable of delivering us from it (2 Peter 2:9)
Hail Mary - Most familiar Prayer used by the Church in honor of the Mother of God, made up of the salutation of Angel Gabriel, the greeting of Saint Elizabeth (Luke 1), and a petition framed by the Church. Holy Mary, Mother of God, Pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death
Sherezer - One of the messengers sent to the house of God in the fourth year of king Darius, to Pray and to enquire concerning the continuation of fasting in the fifth month (probably in commemoration of the destruction of the temple, etc
Saint Joseph, Scapular of - It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide)
Scapular of Saint Joseph - It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide)
Aspirations - (Latin: aspiro, to breathe) ...
Any Prayer said in a breath, containing therefore not more than 12 or 15 words; another term for ejaculatory Prayers. It is always applied to very short a Prayers, containing lofty sentiments, expressed in choice language, sometimes in rhyme, similar to proverbs, e. , "My Jesus mercy"; "O Sweetest Heart of Jesus I implore, that I may ever love Thee more and more"; "O Mary conceived without sin Pray for us who have recourse to thee
Legion - He also said to Peter, who drew his sword to defend him in the olive garden: "Thinkest thou that I cannot now Pray to my Father, who shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?" Matthew 26:53
Carmathites - Carmath their prophet was a person of great austerity of life; and said that God had commanded him to Pray not five times, with the Mussulmans, but fifty times a day
Entreat - ) To beseech or supplicate successfully; to prevail upon by Prayer or solicitation; to persuade. ) To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or Pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune
Salutation - It is common also in the Liturgy, as when at Mass the priest salutes the congregation with "Dominus vobiscum" (The Lord be with you) or "Orate, fratres" (Brethren, Pray)
Oration - oratio, from oro, to Pray, to utter
Headlong - ...
2: πρηνής (Strong's #4248 — Adjective — prenes — Pray-nace' ) an adjective denoting "headlong, prone," is used with the verb ginomai, "to become," in Acts 1:18 , of the death of Judas, "falling headlong;" various suggestions have been made as to the actual details; some ascribe to the word the meaning "swelling up
Temptation - 1: πειρασμός (Strong's #3986 — Noun Masculine — peirasmos — pi-ras-mos' ) akin to A, above, is used of (1) "trials" with a beneficial purpose and effect, (a) of "trials" or "temptations," Divinely permitted or sent, Luke 22:28 ; Acts 20:19 ; James 1:2 ; 1 Peter 1:6 ; 4:12 , RV, "to prove," AV, "to try;" 2 Peter 2:9 (singular); Revelation 3:10 , RV, "trial" (AV, "temptation"); in James 1:12 , "temptation" apparently has meanings (1) and (2) combined (see below), and is used in the widest sense; (b) with a good or neutral significance, Galatians 4:14 , of Paul's physical infirmity, "a temptation" to the Galatian converts, of such a kind as to arouse feelings of natural repugnance; (c) of "trials" of a varied character, Matthew 6:13 ; Luke 11:4 , where believers are commanded to Pray not to be led into such by forces beyond their own control; Matthew 26:41 ; Mark 14:38 ; Luke 22:40,46 , where they are commanded to watch and Pray against entering into "temptations" by their own carelessness or disobedience; in all such cases God provides "the way of escape," 1 Corinthians 10:13 (where peirasmos occurs twice)
Mater Admirabilis - A fresco in the Trinita dei Monti, the Sacred Heart convent in Rome, painted by a novice in 1844 and entitled "Mater Admirabilis," is beautifully enshrined in a chapel, and numbers come to Pray there, receiving remarkable heavenly favors
Legion - Matthew 26:53, "thinkest thou that I cannot now Pray to My Father, and He shall presently give Me more than twelve legions of angels," against this band from the Roman "legion"; not merely My twelve apostles, but twelve "legions," and these "angels?" (compare 2 Kings 6:17; Daniel 7:10
Temptation - ' The worst temptation that ever overtakes us, is, in some respects, preferable to our becoming carnally secure and neglecting to watch and Pray
Comely - ...
It is comely that a woman Pray to God uncovered? 1 Corinthians 11
Pray - ) To effect or accomplish by Praying; as, to Pray a soul out of purgatory. ) To make request with earnestness or zeal, as for something desired; to make entreaty or supplication; to offer Prayer to a deity or divine being as a religious act; specifically, to address the Supreme Being with adoration, confession, supplication, and thanksgiving
Admirabilis, Mater - A fresco in the Trinita dei Monti, the Sacred Heart convent in Rome, painted by a novice in 1844 and entitled "Mater Admirabilis," is beautifully enshrined in a chapel, and numbers come to Pray there, receiving remarkable heavenly favors
Bidding Prayer - The 55th canon of the English Church in 1603enjoined a Bidding Prayer in the form of an Exhortation to be usedbefore all sermons, each petition or exhortation beginning, "Let uspray for," or "Ye shall Pray for," to which the people responded. The term "Bidding" is from the old Saxon word "Bede," meaningprayer. The Litany and, also, the Prayer for the Church Militantin the Communion Office bear some resemblance to the Bidding Prayer,especially in the enumeration of the objects Prayed for. The BiddingPrayer is now very rarely used, although attempts have been made torevive its use, especially in purely preaching services
Beseech - 6, Note (2), COMFORT, DESIRE, EXHORT, INTREAT, Pray. It is used of Prayer to God, in Matthew 9:38 ; Luke 10:2 ; 21:36 ; 22:32 ; Acts 4:31 ; 8:22,24 ; 10:2 ; Romans 1:10 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:10 . See Pray , REQUEST
Miraculous Medal - It bears on one side an image of our Blessed Mother, with the words "O Mary, Conceived without Sin, Pray for Us Who Have Recourse to Thee
Medal, Miraculous - It bears on one side an image of our Blessed Mother, with the words "O Mary, Conceived without Sin, Pray for Us Who Have Recourse to Thee
Tongue - To Pray to him for what we want
Praetorium - (pray taw' ih uhn) The barracks where Jesus was taken and mocked by the soldiers before His crucifixion (Mark 15:16 )
Collect - A short Prayer. In the liturgy of the church of England, and the mass of the Romanists, it denotes a Prayer accommodated to any particular day, occasion, or the like. In general, all the Prayers in each office are called collects, either because the priest speaks in the name of the whole assembly, whose sentiments and desires he sums up by the word "Oremus. " "Let us Pray, " or because those Prayers are offered when the people are assembled together
Sabbath: Need to be Awakened For - At Harzburg, in the Hartz Mountains, we were awakened early in the morning, according to an ancient custom, by the sound of a trumpet, which made us Pray that when the last trumpet sounds it may awaken us to an endless Sabbath. Sleepy hearing, Praying, and singing are terrible; sleepy preaching and teaching are worse, yet how common they are, and how needful is the trumpet at the ear of many! ...
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Feign - I Pray thee, feign thyself to be a mourner
Hosanna - 1: ὡσαννά (Strong's #5614 — — hosanna — ho-san-nah' ) in the Hebrew, means "save, we Pray. " The word seems to have become an utterance of praise rather than of Prayer, though originally, probably, a cry for help
Would - (3) Euchomai, "to Pray," with the particle an, expressing a strong desire with a remote possibility of fulfillment, is used in Acts 26:29 , "I would (to God, that)
Heresy. Heretic - The Church regards the trueFaith as of such vital importance to her life and to the life ofeach individual soul, she bids us to Pray in the Litany, "From allfalse doctrine, heresy, and schism, Good Lord, deliver us
Prayer: Success in - These lads to gain the fruit must shake the tree, Good reader, mark the lesson writ for thee! If from the tree of promis'd mercy thou Wouldst win the good which loadeth every bough, Then urge the promise well with pleading cries, Move heaven itself with vehemence of sighs; Soon shall celestial fruit thy toil repay: 'Tis ripe, and waits for him who loves to Pray
Alms - ...
Tenure by free alms, or frank-almoign, in England, is that by which the possessor is bound to Pray for the soul of the donor, whether dead or alive a tenure by which most of the ancient monasteries and religious houses in England held their lands, as do the parochial clergy, and many ecclesiastical and eleemosynary establishments at this day
Zephaniah - Priest whom King Zedekiah sent asking Jeremiah to Pray for the nation threatened by Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 21:1-7 ; Jeremiah 37:3 )
Faith: Stimulating Endeavour - He who bids us Pray and work will aid our efforts an guide us in his Providence in a right way
Pious - 32:6: “For this shall every one that is godly Pray unto thee in a time when thou mayest be found
Call - To cry to another for help; and hence, to Pray. In both the Old and New Testament, to call upon the name of the Lord, imports invoking the true God in Prayer, with a confession that he is Jehovah, that is, with an acknowledgment of his essential and incommunicable attributes
Mar - I Pray you, mar no more trees by writing songs in their barks
Blessing - Making happy wishing happiness to praising or extolling consecrating by Prayer. Benediction a wish of happiness pronounced a Prayer imploring happiness upon another. Take, I Pray thee, my blessing that is brought to thee
Prayer - ...
Old Testament Israel is a nation born of Prayer. By Prayer Joshua discerned sin in the conquest community (Joshua 7:6-9 ), but was tricked when he did not discern God's opinion by Prayer (Joshua 9:1 ). David's spiritual acumen is seen in his Prayers of confession (2 Samuel 12:13 ; Psalm 51:1 ). Solomon fulfilled the promises made to David after Praying for wisdom (1 Kings 3:5-9 ) and dedicated the Temple in Prayer (1 Kings 8:1 ). God worked miracles through the Prayers of Elijah and Elisha (1 Kings 17:19-22 ; 1 Kings 18:20-40 ). The writing prophets noted that genuine Prayer calls for accompanying moral and social accountability (Hosea 7:14 ; Amos 4:4-5 ). Isaiah's call reflected the intense cleansing and commitment involved in Prayer (Isaiah 6:1 ). Jeremiah's dialogue and intercession frequently voiced reservation and frustration (Jeremiah 1:1 ; Jeremiah 20:7-18 ), teaching honesty in Prayer. The Psalms teach variety and honesty in Prayer are permissible; they proclaim praise, ask pardon, seek such things as communion (63), protection (57), vindication (107), and healing (6). Psalm 86:1 provides an excellent pattern for Prayer. Daily patterned Prayer becomes very important to exiles denied access to the Temple ( Daniel 6:10 ). ...
New Testament Jesus' example and teaching inspire Prayer. Mark emphasized that Jesus Prayed in crucial moments, including the disciples' appointment (2 Corinthians 12:8-95 ), their mission (Mark 6:30-32 ), and the transfiguration (Mark 9:2 ). Jesus displayed a regular and intense Prayer life (Matthew 6:5 ; Matthew 14:23 ; Mark 1:35 ). John reported that Jesus sometimes Prayed aloud for the benefit of those present (John 11:41-42 ). He also reported Jesus' Prayer of intercession for the first disciples and future believers (John 17:1 ). Both Prayers display Jesus' unity with the Father and desire to give Him glory (John 11:4 ; John 17:1 ). ...
The Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13 ; Luke 11:2-4 ) is taught to disciples who realize the kingdom's inbreaking, yet await its full coming. Significantly, the disciples asked Jesus to teach them to Pray after watching Him Pray (Luke 11:1 ). The Prayer also provides a contrast to hypocritical Prayers (Matthew 6:5 ). Although it is permissible to repeat this Prayer, it may be well to remember Jesus was emphasizing how to Pray, not what to Pray. See Lord's Prayer. ...
Jesus also corrected some abuses and misunderstandings regarding Prayer. (1) Prayer is not to be offered to impress others. Disciples should rather seek a storage closet or a shed and Pray in private. Jesus did not reject group Prayer, but his warning might apply to a believer who Prays to impress a congregation (1618166310_2 ). While Jesus Prayed for long periods of time (Luke 6:12 ; Mark 1:35 ) and repeated Himself (Mark 14:36-42 ), He called for people to trust their Father and not their own eloquence or fervor. ...
Jesus' teaching on persistence in Prayer is linked to the inbreaking kingdom (Luke 11:5-28 ; Luke 18:1-8 ). The ironies of Prayer are evident: God knows our needs, yet we must ask; God is ready to answer, yet we must patiently persist. Thus Prayer in Jesus' name is Prayer that is seeking His will and submissive to His authority (John 14:13 ; 1 John 5:14 ). ...
The church remembered Jesus' teaching regarding the Spirit, Prayer, and the kingdom mission. The disciples Prayed awaiting the Holy Spirit's outpouring (Acts 1:14 ). The early church is characterized by Prayer (Acts 2:42 ). They Prayed regarding selection of leaders (Acts 1:24 ; Acts 6:6 ; Acts 13:3 ), during persecution (Acts 4:24-30 ; Acts 12:5 ,Acts 12:5,12:12 ), and in preparing to heal (Matthew 5:23-24 ; Acts 28:8 ). Calling upon God's name—prayer—is the first act and true mark of a believer (Acts 2:21 ; Acts 9:14 ,Acts 9:14,9:21 ; Acts 22:16 ). ...
Paul's ministry reflected his constant Prayer of intercession and thanksgiving (1 Timothy 2:1 ; Ephesians 1:16 ; Ephesians 5:4 ; Acts 9:11 ). The Lord spoke to Paul in Prayer (Matthew 26:38-39 ). Prayer is crucial to continuing in the Christian life (Romans 12:12 ). The Spirit must intercede because our Prayers are weak; apart from the Spirit Christians Pray without discernment. ...
Answered Prayers—Unanswered Petitions Not every petition is granted. ...
Jesus, with His soul sorrowful to the point of death, Prayed three times that His cup of suffering might pass, but He was nevertheless submissive to God's will (Acts 22:17 ,1618166310_79:42 ,Matthew 26:42,26:45 ). (2) Also we must not go through the motions of Prayer without faith. Believers do not receive what they Pray for because they Pray from selfish motives (James 4:2-3 ). Prayers are also hindered by corrupted character (James 4:7 ) or injured relationships (Acts 9:40 ). ...
Theological Insights Dialogue is what is essential to Prayer. Prayer makes a difference in what happens (James 4:2 ). Our understanding of Prayer will correspond to our understanding of God. When God is seen as desiring to bless (James 1:5 ) and sovereignly free to respond to persons (Jonah 3:9 ), then Prayer will be seen as dialogue with God. Prayer will lead to a greater communion with God and a greater understanding of His will
Magus, Simon - He begged the Apostles to Pray for him (Acts 9). By magic he rose into the air, but the Prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Beghards - (probably Flemish: beghen, to Pray) Communities of laymen founded in the Netherlands in the 12th century
Eliphaz - They were directed to take seven bullocks and seven rams and offer them as a burnt offering: Job, His servant, should Pray for them, and God would accept him
Simonans - He begged the Apostles to Pray for him (Acts 9). By magic he rose into the air, but the Prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Simon Magus - He begged the Apostles to Pray for him (Acts 9). By magic he rose into the air, but the Prayers of the Apostles Peter and Paul caused him to fall, a scene depicted in the attached image
Prayer - ...
In all ages God has delighted in the Prayers of his saints. It consisted in offering the evening and morning sacrifices, every day, accompanied with Prayers by the priests and Levites in that holy edifice. Every day also the priests offered sacrifices, incense, offerings, and first fruits for individuals; they performed ceremonies for the redemption of the firstborn, or for purification from pollution; in a word, the people came thither from all parts to discharge their vows and to perform their devotions, not only on great and solemn days, but also on ordinary days; but nothing of this was performed without Prayer, 1 Chronicles 23:30 Nehemiah 11:17 Luke 1:10 . ...
Pious men were accustomed to Pray thrice in the day, at fixed hours, Psalm 55:7 Daniel 6:10 . Social, family, and secret Prayer were all habitual with Bible saints; as well as brief ejaculations in the midst of their ordinary business, Nehemiah 2:4 . No uniform posture in Prayer is enjoined in the Bible; standing with the hands outspread, 1 Kings 8. Prayer should be offered with submission to God's will, fervently, perseveringly, and with a confiding reliance on God in Christ; it should be accompanied by humble confession and hearty thanksgiving, and with supplications for all living men, as well as for our friends and those nearest to us. Habitual Prayer to God is duty enjoined upon us by sound reason and by right affections; and he who lives without it thereby reveals the atheism of his heart. It is often said that Prayer cannot alter the unchangeable purposes of God; but the great scheme of his providence embraces every Prayer that shall be offered, as well as the answer it shall receive. It is objected that Prayer cannot increase his knowledge of our wants, nor his readiness to supply them; and that in any case he will do what is for the best. But he deems it best to grant many blessings in answer to Prayer, which otherwise he would withhold; "He will be very gracious unto thee at the voice of thy cry; when he shall hear it, he will answer thee. " The words of David will be those of every truly Praying man: "This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and delivered him out of all his troubles," Psalm 34:6 . ...
False and formed religion makes a merit of its Prayers, as though "much speaking" and "vain repetitions" could atone for heartlessness. Hypocrites also are wont to Pray chiefly that they may have praise of men. These sins Christ reproves in Matthew 6:5-15 , and gives to his disciples the form of the Lord's Prayer as a beautiful model. In Ephesians 6:18 1 Thessalonians 5:17 1 Timothy 2:8 , Paul directs that believers should Pray in all places and at all times, lifting up pure hands towards heaven, and blessing God for all things, whether in eating, drinking, or what ever they do; and that every thing be done to the glory of God, 1 Corinthians 10:31 . In a word, our Savior has recommended to us to Pray without ceasing, Luke 18:1 21:36
Levitical Priesthood - The original duties of the priests were the following: ...
to offer the daily sacrifice in the court of the Tabernacle or Temple (Exodus 29; 3Kings 8)
to sprinkle the blood of the victims on the altar (Leviticus 1)
to burn the victims on the altar (Leviticus 1)
to renew the loaves of proposition every Sabbath (Leviticus 24)
to offer incense morning and evening (Exodus 30)
to supply the lamps in the sanctuary with oil every day (Exodus 27)
to inspect the lepers (Leviticus 14)
to purify women after childbirth (Leviticus 12)
to teach and interpret the Law to the people (Leviticus 10)
to Pray for the people (Leviticus 5)
Maranatha - Having Prayed that those who do not love Christ (compare 1 Corinthians 13:1 ) would be anathema (see anathema ), Paul used a formula probably used in celebration of the Lord's Supper to Pray that Christ would come
Dayspring - It occurs in Job 38:12 ‘Hast thou … caused the dayspring to know his place?’; Wis 16:28 ‘at the dayspring Pray unto thee’ (RV Intercession - The Holy Spirit also, when they know not what to Pray for as they ought, makes intercession for the saints with groanings which cannot be uttered. It is remarkable that a substantive (ἔντευξις) formed from the above verb is used in 1 Timothy 4:5 , where food is sanctified bythe word of God and 'prayer,' or, as it there means, reverent intercourse with Him
Saints' Days - It has always been characteristic of the devotionalsystem of the Christian Church to commemorate before God the gracegiven to His faithful servants whereby they were enabled to liverighteously and to bear witness to His Truth, and to Pray that wemay follow the good examples of these His servants and with them bemade partakers of Everlasting Life. According to the Prayer-book the Saints commemorated in thisChurch are the Twelve Apostles; St
Watchfulness - In the New Testament three basic emphases are found: (1) be prepared for the Lord's return; (2) be on guard against temptation; and (3) struggle in Prayer. The petition in the Lord's Prayer to be able to stand against temptation points not only toward the eschatological future, but to the daily enablement needed by believers (Matthew 6:9-13 ). ...
Watch and Pray . They fail to hear and obey their master's warning to watch and Pray so as not to fall into temptation (Matthew 26:41 ). ...
Paul urges the church to Pray with unfailing perseverance. The actions of watchfulness and Prayer are indissolubly united. Prayer is an act of vigilance and vigilance a consequence of Prayer (Ephesians 6:18-19 )
Oratory - (Latin: oratorium, from orare, to Pray) ...
As a general term, signifies a place of Prayer, but in canon law means a structure, other than a parish church, set aside by ecclesiastical authority for Prayer and the celebration of Mass
Galileans - They pretended that god alone should be owned as master and lord, and in other respects were of the opinion of the Pharisees; but as they judged in unlawful to Pray for infidel princes, they separated themselves from the rest of the Jews, and performed their sacrifices apart
Hosanna - In the Hebrew ceremonies, a Prayer which they rehearsed on the several days of the feast of tabernacles. It signifies, "save us now;" or "save us, we Pray. Hosanna Rabba, or Grand Hosanna, is a name they give to their feast of tabernacles, which lasts eight days; because during the course thereof, they are frequently calling for the assistance of God, the forgiveness of their sins, and his blessing on the new year; and to that purpose they make great use of the Prayers above mentioned
Perseverance: in Doing Good - He was permitted to enter the room of the aged sufferer, to read the Bible, and Pray by his bedside
Prayer: Its Power to Soften Asperities - The cooper was the first to perceive its unprofitable and injurious tendency, and remarked, 'We are springing apart from each other, let us put on another hoop: let us Pray. ' They kneeled down and Prayed together, after which they spent the remainder of the evening lovingly together, conversing on the things of the kingdom in which they both felt an equal interest
Hermit - (Greek: eremites, inhabitants of a desert) ...
A man who dwelt alone in retirement to Pray and meditate
Extreme Unction - A Sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ, in which the sick who are seriously ill,by the anointing with holy oil, and by the Prayer of the priest, receive the grace of God for the good of their souls and often also for the good of their bodies. The Apostle James (5) writes: ...
"Is any man sick among you? Let him bring in the priests of the church, and let them Pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord
Blessing - Sometimes men bless their fellow-creatures, when they express their gratitude for favors received, Pray for a blessing upon them, or predict their prosperity
Unction, Extreme - A Sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ, in which the sick who are seriously ill,by the anointing with holy oil, and by the Prayer of the priest, receive the grace of God for the good of their souls and often also for the good of their bodies. The Apostle James (5) writes: ...
"Is any man sick among you? Let him bring in the priests of the church, and let them Pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord
Prayer - An examination of the Old and New Testaments and of the early Church Fathers reveals certain "minimal" beliefs or assumptions that underlie the practice of Christian Praying. This is not to deny that there was a development in the conception of Prayer, though this development is more pronounced in the Old Testament than it is in the New Testament and early church. The consistency in the latter case is seen in the close correspondence between Jesus' Prayer life and the Prayer life of the New Testament church. This consistency extended into the patristic period, for the early Father's understanding of Prayer was thoroughly shaped and limited by the Lord's Prayer, particularly through mutually influencing exegetical literature on it, devotional and liturgical use of it, and the catechetical tradition that employed it. Though Prayer also includes adoration (e. , Psalm 75 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:2 ), Christian Prayer has always been essentially petitionary. Indeed, the simple and almost naive petitioning that marks New Testament Prayer is reflected in all its humanness in the psalms—the liturgical inheritance of the early Christiansas well as in the rest of the early church's Scriptures. In fact, most Hebrew terms used in the Old Testament for Prayer refer in some sense to petition; Prayer in the Old Testament more frequently expressed supplication than anything else. ...
Christian Prayer, then, shared a simple belief that God could be petitioned to intervene and effect changes in nature and in the course of world events. The immediate source of this confidence came from the teachings and examples of Jesus himself, such as the model Prayer he offered (Matthew 6:9-13 ; Luke 11:2-4 ) and his assurance that one had only to ask the Father in order to receive what was needed (Matthew 7:7 ; Luke 11:9 ). We can readily document that Jesus' instructions were taken to heart by his early followers: there were Prayers for the selection of leaders, for deliverances from prisons, for the spread of the gospel, for healings, and so on (e. Thus, Prayer was unquestioningly believed to be an effective cause of God's actions such that a difference resulted in human events. In fact, a notable characteristic of New Testament Prayer (and its predecessor) was its spontaneity. Prayer was to be placed in the midst of everyday life, not just reserved for liturgical contexts. Accordingly, petitions were to cover the entire gamut of one's life, including material and spiritual needs, though by the time we reach the New Testament period the former has been subordinated to the latter, as the pattern of the Lord's Prayer suggested. The Pray-er should feel free to make requests of God, which, according to biblical material is equivalent to letting God know the desires of one's heart (see Job 6:8 ; Psalm 21:2 ; Philippians 4:6 ). ...
At this point we must guard against equating Christian belief in the efficacy of Prayer and magic. Christian Prayer involves a struggle of wills in which the Pray-er attempts to persuade God, all the time seeing Prayer as a divinely given means whereby the Pray-er can participate in God's agenda. One's understanding of Prayer varies in accordance with one's conception of the two parties involvednamely, the divine and the humanand their relation to each other. The view of Prayer found in the Old Testament, the soil for that in the New Testament, was founded on the Hebraic conception of God as both immanent and transcendent. ...
The Prayers of Israel reveal their fundamental belief that they were talking to a God who, though mysterious, was immediately and actively present. ...
This immanent God of Israel was addressed as "you who hear Prayer" (Psalm 65:2 ). This personal relationship established in Prayer recurs in almost every book of the Old Testament (especially in Jeremiah). This understanding of Prayer as personal confrontation with a responsive objective referent continues into the New Testament and makes Christian Prayer distinctive from merely reverencing an impersonal sacred object that can never be Prayed to, petitioned, or thanked. Christian Prayer is possible only if it is an event between two persons in an essential reciprocal relationship. This sense of reciprocity, which is found in the Judeo-Christian concept but is lost in a monistic understanding of Prayer, allows us to speak of Prayer as talking to God. ...
The essence of Judeo-Christian Prayer conceives of this fellowship between God and humans as a communion reflecting the forms of the social relations of humanity (friendship, master-servant, groom-bride, father-child). (One implication is that anyone capable of conventional interhuman discourse is capable of Praying. The community did Pray to God as Father, and the individual occasionally spoke of God as his heavenly Father; but this was rare before the diaspora, and other titles for God were far more frequent in Jewish Prayers. (Jesus always addresses God in Prayer as "Father" except for the "cry of dereliction" on the cross. ) With the word "abba" Jesus introduced a new way of Prayingtalking to God as naturally, intimately, and sincerely as a child talks to his or her father. Indeed, by giving the disciples the paradigm Prayer with the address "Our Father, " Jesus invited his followers to share in the same relationship with God he had, for it was customary in the Judaism of that time for individual religious groups to be united and characterized by a particular Prayer (hence the disciples' request in Numbers 14:12-202 ). ...
The Christian tradition also conceives of God as susceptible to human influence by means of Prayer. The conception of a real influence of humans on God lies at the root of the prophetic belief that God hears or answers Prayer. God can let himself be determined by the Pray-er and grant what is asked for or, because God is Person, he can refuse the petitioner and deny the request. But while this belief is presupposed by those who Pray and teach about Prayer in the Gospels and the New Testament church, in two prominent cases God's will is precisely not changed by human petitioning: in Jesus' Gethsemane Prayer and in Paul's thrice-prayed request to have his "thorn in the flesh" removed. (Again, though, even in these cases Pray-ers must have presupposed that God's will could be influenced in order to Pray such Prayers. ) In fact, the New Testament emphasis seems not to be on changing God's will through Prayer, but on changing the human's will. Nonetheless, in Christian Prayer the human response to the Word of God has an effect on God. ...
While the immanence of God formed much of the basis for Prayer in the Judeo-Christian tradition, God's transcendence is important as well. We have already implied it by noting that God maintains the prerogative of denying the Pray-er's request. In fact, even the intimacy of the "abba" in the Lord's Prayer is mitigated by the following phrase, "who are in heaven, " to insure that petitioners remember that they and the addressee are not on a par with each other. He can perform what is asked, but he stands over against the Pray-er and, as such, he is sovereign over the petitioner, in providential control of the universe, and the source and bestower of all that we receive. The divine-human relationship is understood to have its origin and the determination of its character entirely from the divine side, so that Prayer is but a trusting response in a relationship that has been initiated by God. Prayer's form, content, and efficacy belong to the divine economy of human salvation. ...
Christian Prayer has traditionally also expressed the human's freedom to play its essential role in Prayer. Prayer in the Old Testament often pictures the Pray-er as an active cooperator. Such Prayer is a dynamic dialogue that expresses the history Immanuel wills to have with humans. Prayer thus becomes one of the ways in which the creature cooperates with God in order to bring about God's plan. This is evident in God's history of salvation when many significant events include the Prayers of mediators such as Abraham, Moses, Samuel, David, and others. ...
This Old Testament emphasis is not as clearly set forth in the New Testament, which may account, for example, for some disagreements about the intention of the first three petitions in the Lord's Prayerwhether they are a call for God to act alone (Lohmeyer, for example) or a call to God for help (Augustine, Luther). This raises two important Judeo-Christian themes regarding Prayer. ...
First, while Prayer is a kind of work, the corollary is not necessarily (nor even usually ) true. We must guard against the reductionistic motto "To work is to Pray. " It should be obvious that work cannot be a substitute for Prayer, for no matter how faithful one has been in planning and toil, the harvest ultimately depends on factors outside of human control. The reduction of work to Prayer may even be a manifestation of the human proclivity toward self-justification. ...
Second, both Testaments insist that while Prayer and service are not to be equated with each other, they are also not to be separated from each other. With this insistence goes the belief that only the Prayer of the righteous is efficacious (Proverbs 15:29 ). This set of convictions is particularly a prophetic emphasis in the Old Testament, beginning as early as Samuel's intercession for Saul, which leads to the conclusion that Prayer must result in obedience (1 Samuel 7:12,15 ; 15:22-23 ). It was especially the eighth-century prophets who emphasized the necessity for moral goodness of the one who Prayed. Prayer was not to be substituted for righteousness. There can only be true Prayer if one is simultaneously actively seeking good; insincere Prayer cannot be a substitute for justice and responsible action. ...
These twin virtues of service and Prayer were also inseparably linked in the New Testament. Prayer in the early church is depicted as producing encouragement (Acts 18:9-10 ; 23:11 ), guidance (Acts 8:26-40 ; 10-11 ; 13:1-3 ), and power (Acts 16:25-26 ) in one's work. And again, effective Prayer in such cases is not to be disassociated from righteousness (e. ...
The Basis of Prayer . The true basis of Prayer in the Judeo-Christian tradition is the recollection of God's acts in history. This is especially seen in Deuteronomy where appropriate Prayer is prompted by the recollection of God's mighty deeds (4:9,32-39; 9:25-29; 32:1-43). In fact, failure to recall God's past Acts might prevent a favorable response to Prayer (Jeremiah 2:5-13 ). Thus, Prayer in the Old Testament must be discussed in the light of God's covenantal relationship with Israel. The grounding of Prayer in the recollection of God's nature and deeds contains the seeds of New Testament liturgical practice and teaching (e. ...
"Christian" Prayer . If Prayer is based on God's Acts, then Prayer is ultimately a response to the prior activity of God. In Christian Prayer, the primary divine act is God's new revelation in Jesus Christ, in whom all the promises of God find their "yes. " Christian Prayer is, thus, a sequel in a relationship that begins before the idea of Praying even occurs to us. One is summoned to continue the dialogue by the God who offers the gift of Prayer, who guarantees its reality, and who calls on men and women to Pray through the instrumentality of human speech. Thus, Christian Prayer is not conceived of as the natural human's own achievement. Though our own endeavors are not precluded, ultimately the believer is impelled to Pray by the indwelling God at work in the deepest places of his or her soul. In the New Testament, this understanding of Prayer as God's work focuses on the roles of Christ and the Holy Spirit. ...
First, Christian Prayer is to be Prayed "in the name of Christ" (John 14:13-14 ; 16:23-28 ). To Pray "in his name" is therefore to Pray in a manner consistent with our new identity effected by the reconciliation of God and humans in Jesus Christ. That is to say, the use of Jesus' name in Prayer is effective not as some sort of password that can be used indiscriminately by every petitioner. It is only effective to Pray "in Jesus' name" if we are truly living in the name of Jesus. This phrase, then, has more to do with the identification of the person who Prays than it does with right methods or conditions of Prayer (e. Such Prayer guards against a misreading of God's nature and will, and saves Prayer from human selfishness and presumption. ...
Prayer "in Christ's name" is usually associated with Prayer that is in keeping with God's will. Indeed, the patristic exegesis of the third petition of the Lord's Prayer insisted that God's will is expressed by the divine economy in Christ. In the third petition we ask not only for God's will to be done; we Pray that it may be done among and through usthat we may become obedient participants in its accomplishments. By so Praying, we also guard against the self-centered request for personal gain, away from which biblical Prayer seems to move, at least in the New Testament. ...
Second, Christian Prayer is mediated by Christ, a theme that is particularly found in John's Gospel and the letter to the Hebrews. The role of mediator in Prayer was prevalent in the Old Testament (as in Abraham, Moses, David, Samuel, Amos, Solomon, Hezekiah, Elijah, Elisha, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Israel). But Christ is pictured in the New Testament as the ultimate intercessor, and, because of this, all Christian Prayer becomes intercession since it is presented through and by Christ to God. In fact, Calvin insisted that without Christ's intercession we are cut off from the benefits of Prayer, for the only hope that our Prayers are heard lies in the fact that Christ causes them to be heard in his mediatorial role. ...
Third, Christian Prayer is prompted and guided by the Holy Spirit. ...
Wrestling in Prayer . We have established that Prayer is a dialogue between two distinct partners. In fact, Prayer in the Judeo-Christian tradition is often a struggle between two willsbetween two covenant partners. Other outstanding Old Testament examples of contention with God in Prayer include the prophets Jeremiah (see Jeremiah 12:1 ) and Habakkuk (see Habakkuk 1:2-4 ). Somewhat paralleling these prophets, especially with regard to the subsequent submission of the suppliant, the exemplary New Testament models of the engagement of two wills in Prayer are Jesus' Gethsemane Prayer (Matthew 26:36-46 , ; par. ) and Paul's "thorn-in-the-flesh" Prayer (2 Corinthians 12:7-10 ). ...
The New Testament passages that are more difficult to explain include those that seem to teach importunity in Prayer (e
Paul as a Man of Prayer - INTELLECTUALLY as well as spiritually, as a theologian as well as a saint, Paul is at his very best in his Prayers. The full majesty of the Apostle's magnificent mind is revealed to us nowhere as in his Prayers. After Paul has carried his most believing and his most adoring readers as high as they are able to rise, Paul himself still rises higher and higher in his Prayers. Paul is caught up so high into paradise in his Prayers, that when he returns back into the body, he is not able to tell the half of the things that he has seen and heard in the presence of God. Now, Paul's great Prayers and great praises are the best examples possible of a devotion that is theological and Christological to the core. Let us put our very profoundest Christology into our Prayers. One reason why so many of our Prayers, both in public and in private, are so dry, and so cold, and so full of repetition, is just because there is so little Christology in them; so little New Testament Scripture, that is. I do not mean that there is too little New Testament language in our Prayers; but there is too little both Old and New Testament language meditated on, understood, believed, realised, and felt. There is too little Scripture substance, Scripture strength, Scripture depth, and Scripture height, in our Prayers. If your Prayers hitherto have been a weariness to yourself, and to all men who have had to do with you, and to the Hearer of Prayer Himself, get Paul's great Epistles well down into your understanding, and into your imagination, and into your heart henceforth, and out of your heart, and out of your mouth, there will flame up doxologies and adorations as seraphic and as acceptable as Paul's own doxologies and adorations in his greatest Epistles. ...
The absolute unceasingness also of Paul's Prayers immensely impresses us. In his own well-known words about himself Paul was "praying always with all Prayer and supplication in the spirit. " Now that, read literally, may well look to us like the language of a man gone into absolute exaggeration and extravagance about Prayer. Do you ever employ an horology in your devotional life? You will find an excellent specimen of that apparatus and assistance to unceasing Prayer on page 155 of Oliphant's edition of Andrewes's Private Devotions. Now just as if he had an horological tablet like that page hung up, now on his workshop-wall, and now on his prison-wall, Paul Prayed night and day, and all the hours of every night and of every day, without ceasing. Like the genuine horologist he was, Paul introduced every day of his life with praise and Prayer. He had fallen asleep last night full of praise and Prayer, and in the morning he just began again where he had left off last night. Everything to Paul was another call to Prayer and praise. Till literally, and without any exaggeration or hyperbole whatsoever, Paul Prayed and sang praises unceasingly. Until you are as old as Paul you will have no idea what a large liberty, what a rich variety, what an inexhaustible resource, and what a full range and reward, there is in Prayer. Instead of the life of Prayer being a monotony and a weariness, as we think it, there is simply no exercise of the body, and no operation of the mind, and no affection of the heart, for one moment to compare with Prayer, for interest, and for variety, and for freshness, and for elasticity, and for all manner of intellectual and spiritual outlet and reward. And all that because Andrewes is a man after Paul's own heart, for the freshness, and for the fulness, and for the richness of his Prayers. What a rich, fruitful, nobly intellectual, and nobly spiritual, life Paul secured to himself, just by his habits and his hours of meditation and Prayer. And many more who have given themselves to Prayer as Paul and Andrewes gave themselves. And just because, with all that, we will not learn to Pray, what a wilderness we all make this life to be to ourselves, till we lie down weary of it, and die and are buried in it. Lord, teach us to Pray!...
Now, just as Paul Prayed always and without ceasing, so will we, if we take Paul for our master in divinity and in devotion; and if, like Paul, we go on, in all that, to make Jesus Christ our continual atonement for our sins, and our continual sanctification from our sinfulness. If we know sin at all aright, and Christ at all aright, then this will be the proof that we do so,-we will Pray for pardon and for a holy heart, literally, without ceasing. How can any man cease, for a single moment, from repentance and Prayer who has a heart full of sin in his bosom, and that heart beating out its sinfulness into his body and into his mind every moment of the day and the night? That man will never cease from Prayer till he has ceased from sin, any more than Paul ceased. Those men may never have hurt a hair of your head; they will never suspect what a temptation they are to you; but such is the rooted and ineradicable malice of your heart towards them, that, as long as you and they live in this world, you will have to Pray for yourself and for them without ceasing. When you cease to Pray for those men, you, that moment, begin again to sin against them; and that continually drives you back to the blood of Christ both for yourselves and for them. You will never acquit Paul of having gone extravagant, and of being beside himself about Prayer, till you equal and exceed him in unceasing Prayer, both for yourselves and for all men. ...
And I will be bold, and particular, and personal, at this point, and will say one thing of the foremost importance to you and to myself,-we must imitate Paul in this, and take far more time to Prayer than we have ever yet taken. I am as certain as I am standing here, that the secret of much mischief to our own souls, and to the souls of others, lies in the way that we stint, and starve, and scamp our Prayers, by hurrying over them. Prayer worth calling Prayer: Prayer that God will call true Prayer and will treat as true Prayer, takes far more time, by the clock, than one man in a thousand thinks. After all that the Holy Ghost has done to make true Prayer independent of times, and of places, and of all kinds of instruments and assistances,-as long as we remain in this unspiritual and undevotional world, we shall not succeed, to be called success, in Prayer, without time, and times, and places, and other assistances in Prayer. Take good care that you are not spiritual overmuch in the matter of Prayer. If you find your life of Prayer to be always so short, and so easy, and so spiritual, as to be without cost and strain and sweat to you, you may depend upon it, you are not yet begun to Pray. As sure as you sit there, and I stand here, it is just in this matter of time in Prayer that so many of us are making shipwreck of our own souls, and of the souls of others. Were some of us shut up in prison like Paul, I believe we have grace enough to become in that sequestered life men of great and prevailing Prayer. And, perhaps, when we are sufficiently old and set free from business, and are sick tired of spending our late nights eating and drinking and talking: when both the church and the world are sick tired of us and leave us alone and forget us, we, yet, short of Blackness or the Bass-rock, may find time for Prayer, and may get back the years of Prayer those canker-worms have eaten. ...
And now to come to the last and the best kind of all Prayer and the crown and the finish of all Paul's Prayer, intercessory Prayer, namely. We have little else indeed of the Prayer-kind drawn out into any length from Paul's pen but Prayer for other people. If you were to collect together and tabulate by themselves all Paul's Prayers of all kinds, as Dr. What a quiet conscience Paul must have had, and what a happy heart, in this matter of intercessory Prayer, compared with the most of us. For, how many people, first and last, have asked us to Pray to God for them, whom we have clean forgot. Speaking of Paul's physician, I shall close with a few lines on this subject, out of the private papers of Sir Thomas Browne, a man of Prayer, not unworthy to be named with the Apostle himself: "To Pray in all places where quietness inviteth; in any house, highway, or street; and to know no street in this city that may not witness that I have not forgotten God and my Saviour in it: and that no parish or town where I have been may not say the like. To take occasion of Praying upon the sight of any church which I see, or pass by, as I ride about. To Pray daily and particularly for my sick patients, and for all sick people under whose care soever. After a sermon to make a Prayer and desire a blessing, and to Pray for the minister. Upon the sight of beautiful persons to bless God for His creatures; to Pray for the beauty of their souls, and that He would enrich them with inward grace to be answerable to the outward. Upon sight of deformed persons, to Pray Him to send them inward graces, and to enrich their souls, and give them the beauty of the resurrection. " Had Sir Thomas Browne lived in Paul's day the Praying Apostle would have ranked him with Luke and would have called them his two beloved physicians. ...
Brethren, Pray for me, said Paul. Pray for my soul, said Arthur also,-Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by PrayerThan this world dreams of. For what are men better than sheep or goatsThat nourish a blind life within the brain,If, knowing God, they lift not hands of PrayerBoth for themselves and those who call them friend?For so the whole round earth is, every way,Bound by gold chains, about the feet of God. Take more time to Prayer, my brethren. And, if you cannot fill up the time out of your own heart, take David, or Paul, or Andrewes, to assist you, and to show you how to Pray in secret; for it is a rare, and a difficult, but an absolutely indispensable, art
Request - See PrayER , SUPPLICATION. 2, "to beseech, Pray, request," is translated "to make request" in Romans 1:10
Bid - ) To Pray
Hosanna - "Save we Pray": the multitude's cry at Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:9; Matthew 21:15; Mark 11:9-10; John 12:18)
Footstool - ...
Psalm 99:5 (b) This figure represents the attitude of one who comes into the presence of GOD to Pray, to worship and to, commune
Peradventure - ...
This word meaning “peradventure or perhaps” usually expresses a hope: “Behold now, the Lord hath restrained me from bearing: I Pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her” ( Brotherhood of st. Andrew - The members have two rules for their guidance (1) TheRule of Prayer; to Pray daily that the object of the Society may beaccomplished, and (2) The Rule of Service; to make an earnest efforteach week to bring at least one man within the hearing of the Gospelof Jesus Christ
Daniel - It was the largeness, and the expansiveness, and the hospitality of Daniel's fine mind, all combined with his extraordinary nobility and beauty of character, that gave Daniel such an unparalleled position in the court of Chaldea, and which has gained for Daniel such a famous and such a proverbial name in all subsequent literature, Ezekiel, a contemporary prophet, has heard so much of the wisdom of Daniel, that, to a proud enemy of Israel, he exclaims in irony: Thou art wiser than Daniel! We see the popular belief about Daniel strikingly illustrated also in the Apocryphal addition that was made to the Book of Daniel by its Greek translator and editor, and which was called the story of Susannah and the judgment of Daniel, And we are gratified to read in our own tongue a tribute to the same noble tradition in Shylock's exclamation;-...
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!The prophet Daniel became a great proficient both in penitential and in intercessory Prayer also as the years went on. Lord, teach us to Pray, said a disciple on one occasion to our Lord. But not even our Lord with all His willingness, and with all His ability, can teach any of us off-hand to Pray. Every man must find out the best ways of Prayer for himself. There is no royal road; there is no short or easy road to proficiency in Prayer. You must also have special and extraordinary seasons of Prayer, as Daniel had, over and above his daily habit of Prayer. Special and extraordinary, original and unparalleled seasons of Prayer, when you literally do nothing else day nor night but Pray. You must Pray an your very dreams. Till you will come at last to live, and move, and have your whole being in Prayer. Now, it is plain that you cannot teach a lifetime of experiment and attainment like that to any chance man: and, especially, you cannot teach it to a man who still detests the very thought of such Prayer. It was his yoke in his youth that first taught Daniel to Pray. And Babylon taught Daniel and his three friends all to Pray, and to Pray together in their chambers, as we read. To be arrested in their fathers' houses by Nebuchadnezzar's soldiers; to have Babylonian chains put on their hands and their feet: to see the towers of Zion for the last time: to be asked to sing some of the songs of Zion to amuse their masters as they toiled over the Assyrian sands-you would have become experts yourselves in a school of Prayer like that. You would have held little Prayer-meetings yourselves with your class-fellows and your companions, if you had come through the half that Daniel and his three companions came through. It is because you are not being emptied from vessel to vessel all the week that we never see you at the Prayer-meeting. Jeremiah, a great authority on why some men Pray, and why other men never Pray, has this about you in his book: 'Moab hath been at his ease from his youth up: he hath settled on his lees: he hath not been emptied from vessel to vessel: neither hath he gone into captivity; and, therefore, his taste remaineth in him, and his scent is not changed. '...
'Why,' asks Pascal, 'has God established Prayer?' And the first answer out of the three that Pascal gives to himself is this,-'To communicate to His creatures the dignity of causality. For Daniel, just because he read in Jeremiah that deliverance was at the door, all the more set himself to Pray as if his Prayer was to be the alone and predestinated cause of the coming deliverance. Daniel put on sackcloth, and fasted, and Prayed, and went back upon all his own and all his people's sins in a way that confounds us to our face. He Prayed, and fasted, and returned to an agony of Prayer, as if he had never heard of the near deliverance: he Prayed in its very presence as if he despaired of ever seeing it. He fasted and Prayed as he had not done all those seventy fasting and Praying years. Read, all you experts in Prayer, with all your mind, and with all your heart, and with all your experience, and with all your imagination this great causality chapter. Read it and practise it till you know by experiment and by experience that decree, and covenant, and prophecy, and promise, and all, however sure, and however near, are only fulfilled in immediate and dependent answer to penitential and importunate Prayer. Read it and Pray as never before after the answer has actually begun. See the answer out to the last syllable before you begin to restrain penitence and Prayer. Read Daniel's greatest Prayer and...
Know thy dread power-a creature, yet a cause
Lord's Prayer (ii) - LORD’S PrayER (II. )—This name for the Prayer which Jesus taught His disciples (Matthew 6:9-13, Luke 11:2-4), though used so generally by Christians, does not occur in the NT, and objection to it has sometimes been offered. It might suggest that the Prayer was one which Jesus Himself employed, while not only is there no evidence of His having done so, but the petition for forgiveness is a sufficient assurance that He cannot have made it His own. ‘When ye Pray,’ He said to His disciples, ‘pray thus’; but His own manner of Praying would be different—how different we may judge from the recollections preserved in the Fourth Gospel of one of His Prayers (John 17). And so it has sometimes been suggested that we should speak not of ‘The Lord’s Prayer,’ but of ‘The Disciples’ Prayer,’ or that we should content ourselves with designating it by its first two words, calling it the ‘Our Father,’ just as German Protestants call it the ‘Vaterunser’ and Roman Catholics the ‘Paternoster. ’ But apart from the consecration of long and hallowed use, the name is appropriate as giving expression to the fact that the Prayer comes to us from the very lips of our Lord. In this sense it is the Lord’s Prayer. respectively, of the occasion when Christ gave the Prayer, it is generally agreed that if we must choose between them, Lk. It may be that the author of the First Gospel, after recording the Lord’s injunctions with regard to the spirit and manner of Prayer (Matthew 6:5-8), thought this a suitable opportunity to set down the Prayer-form which was really given at a different time. ’s statement as to the connexion at least in which the Prayer was spoken. If Jesus gave a form of Prayer at all, and meant it to be used as He gave it, it seems likely that He would repeat it, more especially when dealing with different sets of hearers. And if it was natural that He should impart it when one of His disciples, not necessarily one of the Twelve, asked to be taught to Pray, it was also natural that, when He had just been warning His disciples against hypocrisy in Prayer and the vain repetitions of the Gentiles, He should instruct them to Pray after the brief, simple, and filial manner of this model of approach to God. Because of this the Prayer has often been compared to the Decalogue with its summation of human duty first to God and then to man (cf. But beneath this resemblance there lies a great difference between the Ten Words and the Lord’s Prayer, the familiar difference between law and grace, between the Old Testament and the New. ...
When we examine the Prayer more closely, a beautiful continuity and symmetry of thought becomes apparent. In the invocation God is addressed by His new name of ‘Father’; and it is with a petition for the hallowing of this name that the Prayer proper begins. For the Prayer for bread naturally suggests the request of the child to the Father, the Prayer for forgiveness the petition of the subject to the King, and the Prayer for deliverance from the Tempter the cry of one who feels in the presence of the world’s evil his utter dependence upon the strong and holy will of his Master and Lord. ’ These words mark a new epoch not only in the history of Prayer, but in the history of revelation. It is for those who are the children of God by Christian faith that this Prayer is meant, those who turn to Him with filial hearts, prepared to say: ‘Hallowed be thy name. But just as there is a special sonship, the sonship of believers, so there is a distinctive brotherhood, the brotherhood of saints; and it is this brotherhood that finds immediate expression in the invocation of the Lord’s Prayer. To Pray that it may be hallowed is to Pray that God as revealed to us by Christ may be accepted and honoured by ourselves and others—that we may turn to Him as our Father with loving, trustful hearts, and give Him the honour that is due. And so, when we Pray for the coming of God’s Kingdom, we are Praying that Christ the King may enter into our hearts, that He may take full possession of them, that the gospel of the Kingdom may spread throughout the world, and that its principles may work in human society with subduing power. But we are Praying also for the hour of the final consummation when the Lord Himself shall appear in His glory, when the kingdom of this world shall become the Kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ, when out of that Kingdom there shall be cast all things that offend, and God shall be all in all. ’ This may be described as the dominant note of the Lord’s Prayer. We frequently use these words as if they were nothing more than a Prayer of submission and resignation in the day of sorrow, an echo of the Saviour’s cry in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39 ||). This is the Prayer of active rather than of passive obedience, an obedience like that of God’s angels who excel in strength and do His commandments. When we Pray this Prayer we are asking that we and all men, being delivered from the spirit of wilfulness, may attain to a joyful alacrity like that of angels in doing the will of God. ’ We pass now from the God ward to the manward aspects of the Prayer. The first petition of this second group shows that it is right and proper to Pray for material as well as for spiritual blessings. The Prayer is not to be spiritualized, with most of the Fathers, into a request for the Bread of Life; it is literal bread, bread for bodily sustenance, that Jesus means us to ask for. If this rendering is accepted, Chase’s view (‘Lord’s Prayer in Early Church,’ Texts and Studies, Cambridge [3], in loc. ) is plausible, that the word was a liturgical insertion intended to adapt the Prayer for use at evening service. If this is the proper rendering of the word, the petition would correspond almost exactly with the Prayer of Agur, ‘Feed me with the food that is needful for me’ (Proverbs 30:8 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ). Prayer is substituted for ‘debts’ in the Lord’s Prayer itself. Those who Pray for forgiveness must be ready to forgive. On this Jesus placed great emphasis, so great that He does for the fifth petition what He does for no other, adding at the end of the Prayer (Matthew 25:14-15) a sentence of explanation and enforcement, in which He makes it perfectly clear that if we will not forgive those who have trespassed against us, neither will our Father in heaven forgive our trespasses. He hangs out a red lamp of warning on the dark and crooked road along which we have to pass, and summons us to ‘watch and Pray’ (cf. ...
And yet temptations must come, we cannot hope to escape meeting them, and this petition, like every other in the Lord’s Prayer, is subject to the rule of the guiding petition of all, ‘Thy will be done. ’ But ‘Deliver us from the evil one’ is a Prayer that Satan may not gain the victory over our souls. From him we may well Pray to be delivered. Jesus Himself Prayed for Simon that in the hour of Satan’s sifting his faith might not fail (Luke 22:31 f. —(1) This is a breviary of Christian Prayer, in which all Christian petitions are summarily comprehended. As the commandments of the moral law are all gathered up in the two tables of duty to God and to man, so the petitions of the gospel are all represented in the two divisions of this little Prayer. ...
(2) It is a model or directory of Prayer. ’s account, Jesus, when He gave it, had just been warning His disciples against the formalisms of hypocrites and the vain repetitions which the Gentiles use (Matthew 6:5-8), and it was in contrast with these that He said, ‘After this manner Pray ye. ’ Looking at the manner of the Prayer we are struck by its direct sincerity, its brevity, its simplicity, its calmness and quietness of spirit, its entire submission to the will of God. It teaches us that we are not heard for our much speaking, that long and elaborate Prayers are unnecessary, that a simple request like that of a child to a father is enough. It teaches also the right relation and proportion in Prayer between what belongs to God and what concerns ourselves. ...
(3) It is a form of Prayer. The Prayers which John the Baptist taught his disciples (Luke 11:1) must have been forms; and when a disciple of Jesus, reminding Him of John’s custom, said, ‘Lord teach us to Pray,’ it was doubtless a Prayer-form for which he asked. And Jesus justified the request by replying, ‘When ye Pray, say, Our Father,’ etc. , we do not hear of the Lord’s Prayer in the NT again. The recorded Prayers of the Apostolic Church bear no resemblance to it. When God sent forth the Spirit of His Son into men’s hearts, they Prayed with freedom as the Spirit gave them utterance. And yet from the first this must have been, and must ever continue to be, a specially consecrated form of Prayer, which no one can sincerely use without being conscious that, in presenting his petitions in the very words that Christ has given, he is asking according to the will of God (cf. ...
(4) It is a Prayer especially for social use. There are Prayers which can be offered only in secret, and Jesus had already spoken of these. ‘Thou, when thou Prayest, enter into thy closet,’ He said (Matthew 6:6). But this was a Prayer for the whole Christian society: ‘After this manner Pray ye,’ ‘When ye Pray, say. ’ And so this Prayer, which is an appeal to the Fatherhood of God, is also a constant reminder of our human and especially of our Christian brotherhood. It teaches us to join our desires with those of the universal Church as we Pray for the coming of the Kingdom. It teaches us when we ask for bread, or forgiveness, or guidance and deliverance, to bear the needs of others along with our own on our hearts before God, and to remember that the unspeakable privilege of intercession is of the very essence of Christian Prayer
Decision For Christ - I Pray God that after this style we may witness for Christ
Free - 2 Thessalonians 3:1 ‘Pray for us that the word of the Lord may have free course’ (Gr
Sabbath-Day's Journey - The Lord perhaps referred to this custom when He bade the disciples Pray that, in the judgement of Jerusalem, their flight should not be "on the Sabbath-day
Call -
To cry for help, hence to Pray (Genesis 4:26 )
Hide - ...
To Pray, “Hide thy face from my sins” ( Reconcile - ...
We Pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God
Would - ...
Would has the sense of wish or Pray, particularly in the phrases, would to God, would God we had died in Egypt, I would that ye knew what conflict I have that is, I could wish such a thing, if the wish could avail
Schism - The Church regards her unity as of such vital importance to her ownlife and to the life of each individual soul, she bids us Pray inthe Litany, "From all false doctrine, heresy, and Schism, Good Lord,deliver us
Lord's Prayer, the - Words Jesus used to teach His followers to Pray. Three forms of the Lord's Prayer exist in early Christian literature—two in the New Testament (Matthew 6:9-13 ; Luke 11:2-4 ) and the other in the Didache Luke 8:2 , a non-canonical Christian writing of the early second-century from northern Syria. First, it is the same Prayer in all three cases. Second, the Didache likely uses the form of the Prayer found in Matthew. Also, study of the Greek manuscripts shows that the doxology that appears at the end of the Matthean form in some translations is not original; the earliest form of the Prayer with a doxology in Didache Luke 8:2 . It is likely that each Evangelist gave the Prayer as it was generally used in his own church at the time. ...
Matthew and Luke used the Lord's Prayer in different ways in their Gospels. In Matthew the Prayer appears in the Sermon on the Mount where Jesus spoke about a righteousness that exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees (Luke 5:20 ). Almsgiving, Praying, and fasting are for God's eyes and ears. When Praying one should not make a public display (Luke 6:5-6 ) nor heap up empty phrases, thinking that one will be heard for many words (Luke 6:7 ). Prayer should be private and brief. The Lord's Prayer serves as an example or how to Pray briefly. It is seen as a substitute for the wrong kind of Prayer. ...
In Luke the Prayer comes in the midst of Jesus' journey to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-19:46 ). In His behavior Jesus is an example of one who Prays. His Prayer life caused one of His disciples to ask for instruction in Prayer, as John the Baptist had given his disciples. What follows (Luke 11:2-13 ) is a teaching on Prayer in which the disciples are told what to Pray for (Luke 11:2-4 ) and why to Pray (Luke 11:5-13 ). Here the Lord's Prayer is a model of what to Pray for. To Pray in this way is a distinguishing mark of Jesus' disciples. ...
Although all three versions of the Prayer exist only in Greek the thought pattern and expressions are Jewish. ” One Jewish Prayer begins: “Forgive us, Our Father” (Eighteen Benedictions, 6). The Ahaba Rabba (Great Love) Prayer, which formed part or the morning worship in the Jerusalem Temple, began: “With great love hast thou loved us, O Lord, our God, with great and exceedingly great forbearance hast thou ruled over us. The first two, “Hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come,” echo the language of the Jewish Prayer, the Kaddish. ” The third, “Your will be done,” is similar to a Prayer of Rabbi Eliezer (about A. ” The accompanying phrase, “as we also have forgiven,” reflects the Jewish teaching found in Sirach 28:2 : “Forgive the wrong of your neighbor, and then your sins will be forgiven when you Pray. ” The third petition, “Cause us to go not into temptation,” is similar to a petition in the Jewish Morning and Evening Prayers. The Lord's Prayer seems to be Jesus' synopsis of various Jewish Prayers of the time. ...
If the language of the Lord's Prayer and that of various Jewish Prayers is similar, the meaning must be determined from Jesus' overall message. Within this world of thought, the Lord's Prayer must be understood. They constitute a Prayer for the final victory of God over the devil, sin, and death. The concern about the shift of the ages in the Prayer sets it apart from the Jewish Prayers whose language was so similar. ...
The Lord's Prayer in the New Testament is a community's Prayer: “Our Father,” “Give us our bread,” Forgive us our debts,” “as we forgive our debtors,” “Cause us ,” “Deliver us . ” It is the Prayer of the community of Jesus' disciples. ...
The Lord's Prayer is a Prayer of petition. It is significant that the Model Prayer for Christians is not praise, thanksgiving, meditation, or contemplation, but petition. ...
This Prayer of petition seeks two objects. First, one who Prays in this way implores God to act so as to achieve His purpose in the world. Second, one who Prays in this manner requests God to meet the physical and spiritual needs of the disciples. ...
Such a Prayer of petition assumes a certain view of God. A God to whom one Prays in this way is assumed to be in control; He is able to answer. The Father to whom Jesus taught His disciples to Pray is One who is both in control and good
Mass, Saints of the - Before the Consecration, in the Prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the Prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we Pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome. Outside the Canon, the Blessed Virgin, Saint John the Baptist, Saint Peter the Apostle and Saint Paul the Apostle are mentioned in the Confiteor and in the Prayer before the Orate Fratres, Saint Michael the Archangel, in the Confiteor
Invocation - A calling upon God in Prayer. A making mention of one or more of the names or titles of God, indicative of the object to who we Pray. In the church of Rome, invocation also signifies adoration of, and Prayers to the saints. The council of Trent expressly teaches, that the saints who reign with Jesus Christ offer up their Prayers to God for men, and condemn those who maintain the contrary doctrine. The Protestants censure and reject this opinion, as contrary to Scripture; deny the truth of the fact; and think it highly unreasonable to suppose that a limited, finite being, should be in a manner omnipresent, and, at one and the same time, hear and attend to the Prayers that are offered up to him in England, China, and Peru; and from hence infer, that, if the saints cannot hear their request, it is inconsistent with common sense to address any kind of Prayer to them
Master - Pray with them and for them, Joshua 24:15
Saints of the Mass - Before the Consecration, in the Prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the Prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we Pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome. Outside the Canon, the Blessed Virgin, Saint John the Baptist, Saint Peter the Apostle and Saint Paul the Apostle are mentioned in the Confiteor and in the Prayer before the Orate Fratres, Saint Michael the Archangel, in the Confiteor
Walls - Hence they assemble here every Friday, and more or less on other days, to weep and wail with every token of the sorest grief, and to Pray for the coming of the Messiah
the Importunate Widow - She teaches our sin-tortured souls how to Pray. O sin! O sin! How thou hast persecuted my soul down to the ground! How thou hast robbed and desolated my soul! How thou hast made my life a burden to me! How thou hast driven me sometimes beside myself with thy cruel and bitter bondage! How my soul sometimes seeks death to escape from thee! O thou foul and cruel tyrant, I will surely be revenged upon thee yet!...
And He spake this parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to Pray. We are not to Pray against a besetting sin for a time, and then to despair and let it have its own way with us. We are to Pray always. We are to Pray on till we need to Pray no longer. No sooner is one such Prayer offered than we are to begin another. No sooner have we said, Amen! than we must say with our very next breath, O Thou that hearest Prayer; to Thee shall all flesh come. When you lay your head down on your pillow say, if only out of respect to your sainted mother, This night I lay me down to sleep, I Pray the Lord my soul to keep. And I am safe and certain to say that whether homœopathy is sound medicine or no, it holds in divinity, and especially in this department of divinity, unfainting Prayer for sanctification. If you are fainting in Prayer for sanctification I recommend and prescribe to you Samuel Hahnemann's dictum similia similibus curantur. Small doses in Prayer will be your death. The very thing that has caused your whole head to be sick, and your whole heart to be faint,-hitherto unanswered Prayer, answered or unanswered, Pray you on. It is importunate and unfainting Prayer that is your only business. And, always, more and more importunate and unfainting Prayer. In plain words, when you faint in Prayer for a holy heart continue all the more instant in that Prayer. Pray always for a holy heart, with all Prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watch thereunto with all perseverance. The next time you feel your heart ready to faint in that kind of Prayer, call to mind Who says this to you, and where He says it. This, that men ought always to Pray against this adversary, and not to faint. ...
Nevertheless, when the Son of Man cometh, shall He find such Prayer on the earth? I do not know. My matter is, shall He find such Prayer in me? Shall He find me in my bed, or on my knees? Shall I be reading this parable of His for the ten thousandth time to keep my heart from fainting? Shall, Avenge me of mine adversary, be on my lips at the moment when the judgment-angel puts the last trump to his lips? And shall I be found of him on my knees, and with my finger on this scripture, when the trumpet shall sound, and I shall be changed?...
Raskolnik - " the Judaizers; the Molokane, who refuse to recognize civil authority or to take oaths; the Dukhobortsy, or Dukhobors, who are communistic, marry without ceremony, and believe that Christ was human, but that his soul reappears at intervals in living men; the Khlysty, who countenance anthropolatory, are ascetics, practice continual self-flagellation, and reject marriage; the Skoptsy, who practice castration; and a section of the Bezpopovtsy, or priestless sect, which disbelieve in Prayers for the Czar and in marriage. "Obnoxious:" the Bezpopovtsy, who Pray for the Czar and recognize marriage
Remain - 19:2, where it is used twice: “Behold now, my lords, turn in, I Pray you, into your servant’s house, and tarry all night
Pardon - I Pray thee, pardon my sin
Hosanna - Originally the word ‘Hosanna’ was a combination of parts of two Hebrew words that meant ‘save’ and ‘pray’. When the word was joined to the name of God, Yahweh, the expression became both a Prayer and an exclamation of praise: ‘Save us, O Lord’
Senochus, Saint - Martin, according to tradition, had been wont to Pray
Temptation - They may be wisely permitted to show us our weakness, to try our faith, to promote our humility, and to learn us to place our dependence on a superior power: yet we must not run into them, but watch and Pray; avoid sinful company: consider the love, sufferings, and constancy of Christ, and the awful consequences of falling a victim to them
Excuse - I Pray thee have me excused
Money-Changers - The following extract from Buckingham's Travels among the Arabs, is illustrative:—"The mosque at the time of our passing through it was full of people, though these were not worshippers, nor was it at either of the usual hours of public Prayers. Some of the parties were assembled to smoke, others to play at chess, and some apparently to drive bargains of trade, but certainly none to Pray
Pray - ...
Pâlal (פָּלַל, Strong's #6419), “to Pray, intervene, mediate, judge. 20:7, where the reflexive or reciprocal form of the verb expresses the idea of “interceding for, Prayer in behalf of”: “… He shall Pray for thee. …” Such intercessory Praying is frequent in the Old Testament: Moses “prays” for the people’s deliverance from the fiery serpents ( Prayer is directed not only toward Yahweh but toward pagan idols as well ( Prayer is made to Yahweh that He would act against an enemy: “That which thou hast Prayed to me against Sennacherib king of Assyria I have heard” (2 Kings 19:20). ...
Just why this verb form is used to express the act of Praying is not completely clear. Since this verb form points back to the subject, in a reflexive sense, perhaps it emphasizes the part which the person Praying has in his Prayers. Also, since the verb form can have a reciprocal meaning between subject and object, it may emphasize the fact that Prayer is basically communication, which always has to be two-way in order to be real. ...
Tephillâh (תְּפִלָּה, Strong's #8605), “prayer. ” This word, which appears 77 times in biblical Hebrew, is the most general Hebrew word for “prayer. ” It first appears in 1 Kings 8:28: “Yet have thou respect unto the Prayer of thy servant, and to his supplication. …” In the eschaton God’s house will be a house of “prayer” for all peoples ( Prayer ( Prayer set to music and sung in the formal worship service. 72:20 the word describes all the psalms or “prayers” of Psalms 1- 72, only one of which is specifically called a “prayer” (17:1)
Brother - This word represents a full brother or a half-brother: “And he said to him, Go, I Pray thee, see whether it be well with thy brethren …” ( Pray you, brethren, do not so wickedly” ( Flight - Pray ye that your flight be not in winter
Devotion - "Wherever the vital and unadulterated spirit of Christian devotion prevails, its immediate objects will be to adore the perfections of God; to entertain with reverence and complacence the various intimations of his pleasure, especially those contained in holy writ; to acknowledge our absolute dependence on and infinite obligations to him; to confess and lament the disorders of our nature, and the transgressions of our lives; to implore his grace and mercy through Jesus Christ; to intercede for our brethren of mankind; to Pray for the propagation and establishment of truth, righteousness, and peace, on earth; in fine, to long for a more entire conformity to the will of God, and to breathe after the everlasting enjoyment of his friendship
Mark, John - He was the son of Mary in whose home the Jerusalem believers met to Pray when Peter was imprisoned by Herod Agrippa I (Acts 12:12 )
Abba - Jesus addressed God as Abba in Prayer ( Mark 14:36 ) and taught His disciples to Pray in the same terms (Luke 11:1-2 )
Armenians - They believe that the souls of the righteous shall not be admitted to the beatific vision till after the resurrection, notwithstanding which they Pray to departed saints, adore their pictures, and burn lamps before them
Gadarenes - It forms a most interesting miracle, in the account of Christ's ministry, (See Mark 5:1-30) Who can say, but that the Lord Jesus directed his steps to this very spot, purposely for the salvation of this poor man, and him only? For we are told, that while he sat at the feet of Jesus, (after that the Lord had dispossessed the evil spirit) clothed, and in his right mind: the Gadarenes began to Pray Jesus to depart out of their coasts
Gerizim - Herod the Great having rebuilt Samaria, and called it Sebaste, in honor of Augustus, would have compelled the Samaritans to worship in the temple which he had erected; but they constantly refused and have continued to this day to guard their sacred Scriptures, to keep the law, to Pray towards their holy place on the summit of Gerizim, and to worship God there four times in the year
Jude, the Book of - ...
He tells the believers to:...
(1) Pray in the Spirit (2) keep themselves in the love of God (3) await the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. Pray in the Holy Spirit (20b)
Hobab - Moses' entreaty, "Leave us not, I Pray thee, forasmuch as thou knowest how we are to encamp in the wilderness, and thou mayest be to us instead of eyes," implies that Hobab was younger than Moses' father-in-law could now have been. " Moses replied: "Leave us not, I Pray thee
Messalians - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Filthy, the - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Sobriety - It is necessary on all occasions: when we read, when we hear, when we Pray, when we converse, when we form schemes, when we pursue them, when we prosper, when we fail
Mosque - About every mosque there are six high towers, called minarets, each of which has three little open galleries one above another: these towers as well as the mosques are covered with lead, and adorned with gilding and other ornaments; and from thence, instead of a bell, the people are called to Prayers by certain officers appointed for that purpose. Each mosque has also a place called tarbe, which is the burying-place of its founders; within which is a tomb six or seven feet long, covered with green velvet or satin; at the ends of several seats for those who read the Koran, and Pray for the souls of the deceased
Adelphians - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Euchites - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Adelphians - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Messalians - They denied that the Sacraments give grace and declared that the only spiritual power is Prayer. Prayer, they said, drives out the evil spirit and brings into the soul the Holy Spirit, and thus unites the soul to God and gives perfect control over the passions. The fervor of their Prayers was supposed to bring them into immediate contact with God; so they neglected everything but Prayer and conformed to the religious and civilcustoms of a place only in order to escape persecution. They said that after a period of constant Prayer they saw the Trinity; that the Three Divine Persons became one and dwelt within them; and that they were then able to stamp upon the evil spirits that they saw prowling about the world. They were also called "Praying Folk" or Euchites from the Greek translation (euchomai, Pray), of their Oriental name
Ahithophel - And David said, O Lord, I Pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness. How, then, have you always acted toward those of your former friends who have injured you and yours? Did you shut your door this morning and Pray in secret, saying, Forgive me my trespasses against God and man, as I forgive him-naming him-who has so trespassed against me? When you stood here Praying tonight, did you forgive some enemy? Ahithophel should have conquered himself. Yes, Ahithophel, like the oracle of God he was, should have called to mind this psalm of David, and said: It shall be an excellent oil, which shall not break my head; for yet my Prayer shall be for David in all his calamities. But what would you think if the first thing you saw tomorrow morning was the suicide of some one who has been the victim of your lust or your lies? Pray, man, Pray. In God's name, Pray. Pray, you great sinner; Pray, you great fool, Pray. Pray, lest the newspaper run blood on your hands some morning, as the letters from Giloh ran Ahithophel's blood on David's hands. Pray for your Ahithophel without ceasing, and for all your Ahithophel's house
Foot - Hence we daily Pray, "give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as," etc
Eton College - It was founded, 1440, by Henry VI, "to show like his ancestors his devotion to the Church," to be known as "the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton beside Windsor," and to consist of a provost, ten priests, four clerks, six chorister boys, twenty-five poor and needy scholars "to learn grammar," and twenty-five poor and disabled men "to Pray for the souls of his father and mother and all his forefathers and all the faithful departed
Dativus, Celebrated Senator - He went on Praying and begging Jesus Christ for patience. " They again thrust the irons into his side; and Dativus, repeating his Prayer, continued to say, "O Christ, I Pray Thee let me not be confounded
Teach - Isaiah 2 ...
Lord, teach us to Pray, as John also taught his disciples
Prayer - "Prayer," proseuchee , for obtaining blessings, implying devotion; "supplication," deesis , for averting evil. "Prayer" the general term; "supplication" with imploring earnestness (implying the suppliant's sense of need); enteuxis , intercession for others, coming near to God, seeking an audience in person, generally in another's behalf. Thanksgiving should always go with Prayer (1 Timothy 2:1; Ephesians 6:18; Philippians 4:6). "...
The name Enos embodies the Sethites' sense of human frailty urging them to Prayer, in contrast to the Cainites' self sufficient "pride of countenance" which keeps sinners from seeking God (1 John 5:14-152). On this revealed divine character of grace and power believers fasten their Prayers (Psalms 119:49; Proverbs 18:10). The sceptic's objections to Prayer are:...
(1) The immutability of nature's general laws. But nature is only another name for the will of God; that will provides for answers to Prayer in harmony with the general scheme of His government of the world. ...
(2) God's predestinating power, wisdom and love make Prayer useless and needless. But man is made a free moral agent; and God who predestines the blessing predestines Prayer as the means to that end (Matthew 24:20). ...
Prayer produces and strengthens in the mind conscious dependence on God, faith, and love, the state for receiving and appreciating God's blessing ordained in answer to Prayer. Moreover Prayer does not supersede work; Praying and working are complementary of each other (Nehemiah 4:9). Our cf6 "Father knoweth what things we have need of before we ask Him"; "we know not what things we should Pray for as we ought" (Matthew 6:8; Romans 8:26). Yet "the Spirit helpeth our infirmities," and Jesus teaches us by the Lord's Prayer how to Pray (Luke 11). Nor is the blessing merely subjective; but we may Pray for particular blessings, temporal and spiritual, in submission to God's will, for ourselves. Every truly believing Prayer contains this limitation. God then grants either the petition or something better than it, so that no true Prayer is lost (2 Corinthians 12:7-10; Luke 22:42; Hebrews 5:7). God promises blessings in answer to Prayer, as the indispensable condition of the gift (Matthew 7:7-8). Examples confirm the command to Pray. None Prayed so often as Jesus; early in the morning "a great while before day" (Mark 1:35), "all the night" (Luke 6:12), in Gethsemane with an "agony" that drew from Him "sweat as it were great drops of blood falling to the ground" (Luke 22:44); "when He was being baptized, and Praying, the heaven was opened" (Luke 3:21); "as He Prayed" He was transfigured (Luke 9:29); "as He was Praying in a certain place" (Daniel 9:3-23) one disciple struck by His Prayer said, "Lord teach us to Pray as John also taught his disciples" (Luke 11:1) (an interesting fact here only recorded). " "He that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit," and so casts off all that is imperfect and mistaken in our Prayers, and answer s the Spirit who speaks in them what we would express aright but cannot (Romans 8:26-27; Romans 8:34). Then our Intercessor at God's right hand presents out Prayers, accepted on the ground of His merits and blood (John 14:13; Acts 4:24-30; John 16:23-27). His will, with our individual freedom, and His predestination with our Prayers. Prayer is presupposed as the adjunct of sacrifice, from the beginning (Genesis 4:4). Jacob's wrestling with the divine Angel and Prayer, in Genesis 32, is the first full description of Prayer; compare the inspired continent on it, Hosea 12:3-6. ...
Moses' law prescribes sacrifice, and takes for granted Prayer (except the express direction for Prayer, Deuteronomy 26:12-15) in connection with it and the sanctuary, as both help us to realize God's presence; but especially as Prayer needs a propitiation or atonement to rest on, such as the blood of the sacrifices symbolizes. The temple is "the house of Prayer" (Isaiah 56:7). Toward it the Prayer of the nation, and of individuals, however distant, was directed (1 Kings 8:30; 1 Kings 8:35; 1 Kings 8:38; 1 Kings 8:46-49; Daniel 6:10; Psalms 5:7; Psalms 28:2; Psalms 138:2). Men used to go to the temple at regular hours for private Prayer (Luke 18:10; Acts 3:1). Prayer apparently accompanied all offerings, as did the incense its symbol (Psalms 141:2; Revelation 8:3-4; Luke 1:10; Deuteronomy 26:12-15, where a form of Prayer is prescribed). ...
The housetop and mountain were chosen places for Prayer, raised above the world. The threefold Aaronic blessing (Numbers 6:24-26), and Moses' Prayer at the moving (expanded in Psalm 68) and resting of the ark (Numbers 10:35-36), are other forms of Prayer in the Mosaic legislation. The regular times of Prayer were the third (morning sacrifice), sixth, and ninth hours (evening sacrifice); Psalms 55:17; Daniel 6:10; 2 Samuel 24:17-18; Acts 3:1; Acts 10:3; Acts 2:15. ...
The spiritual songs in the Pentateuch (Exodus 15:1-19; Numbers 21:17-18; Deuteronomy 32) and succeeding books (Judges 5; 1 Samuel 2:1-10; 1 Samuel 2:2 Samuel 22; 1 Kings 8:23-53; Nehemiah 9:5-38) abound in Prayer accompanied with praise. The Psalms give inspired forms of Prayer for public and private use. Hezekiah Prayed in the spirit of the Psalms. The prophets contain many such Prayers (Isaiah 12; 25; 26; Isaiah 37:14-20; Isaiah 38:9-20; Acts 27:35). "...
THE LORD'S PrayER, (Matthew 6:9-13) couched in the plural, cf6 "when ye Pray, say, Our Father . lead us" shows that forms suit public joint Prayer. cf6 "Thou when thou Prayest, enter into thy closet . shut thy door, Pray to thy Father [1] in secret" (Genesis 18:23-32,); in enjoining private Prayer Christ gives no form. The Lord's Prayer is our model. The invocation is the plea on which the Prayer is grounded, God's revealed Fatherhood. ...
Prayer was the breath of the early church's life (Acts 2:42; Acts 1:24-25; John 15:16; Acts 6:4; Acts 6:6; Acts 12:5; Acts 13:2-3; Acts 16:25; Acts 20:36; Acts 21:5). The kind of Prayer in each dispensation corresponds to its character: simple, childlike, asking for the needs of the family, in the patriarchal dispensation (Genesis 15:2-3; Genesis 17:18; Genesis 25:21; Genesis 24:12-14; Matthew 6:6 which however is a larger Prayer, namely, for Sodom; Genesis 20:7; Genesis 20:17). In the Mosaic dispensation the range of Prayer is wider and loftier, namely, intercession for the elect nation. Prayer for individuals is rarer: Hannah (1 Samuel 1:12), Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:2), Samuel for Saul (1 Samuel 15:11; 1 Samuel 15:35). In the New Testament Prayer is mainly for spiritual blessings: the church (Acts 4:24-30), the apostles (Acts 8:15), Cornelius (Acts 10:4; Acts 10:31), for Peter (Acts 12:5), Paul (Acts 16:25; 2 Corinthians 12:7-9); in connection with miraculous healings, etc. Intercessions, generally of prophets or priests, are the commonest Prayer in the Old Testament. God's acceptance of Prayer is taken for granted (Job 33:26; Job 22:27), provided it be Prayer of the righteous (Proverbs 15:8; Proverbs 15:29; John 9:31), "in an acceptable time" (Psalms 69:13; Isaiah 49:8; Isaiah 61:2), in the present day of grace (2 Corinthians 6:2). ...
Confession of sin, and the pleading God's past mercies as a ground of future mercies, characterize the seven (the perfect number) Prayers given in full in the Old Testament: of David (2 Samuel 7:18; 2 Samuel 7:29), Solomon (2 Chronicles 6), Hezekiah (2 Kings 19), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:16), Daniel (Daniel 9:3), Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1; Nehemiah 9). He endorses our Prayers so that they find acceptance with God. ...
Requirements in Prayer. Doing His will, and asking according to His will, are the conditions of acceptable Prayer (1 John 3:22; 2 Kings 4:33; James 5:16); also persevering importunity in Prayer for ourselves, taught in the parable of the importunate widow; as importunity in intercession for others, that the Lord would give us the right spiritual food to set before them, is taught in that of the borrowed loaves (Luke 18:1, etc. ...
Modes of Prayer. ...
(1) Sighing meditation (hagigiy ), intense Prayer of the heart (margin Isaiah 26:16). ...
(3) Prayer "set in order" ("direct," 'atak ), as the wood upon the altar, the shewbread on the table (Psalms 5:1-3; Genesis 22:9). Prayer is not to be at random; God has no pleasure in the sacrifice of fools (Ecclesiastes 5:1). The answer is to be "looked for," otherwise we do not believe in the efficacy of Prayer (Habakkuk 2:1; Micah 7:7)
Lord's Prayer - LORD’S PrayER...
Matthew 6:9-13 . ...
Matthew 6:8 Thus therefore Pray ye:...
(1) Our Father which art in the heavens;...
(2) Hallowed be thy name. ...
Luke 11:2 Whensoever ye Pray, say,...
(1) [3] Father [4];...
(2) Hallowed be thy name. ...
The request of one of the disciples ‘Lord, teach us to Pray’ (Luke 11:1 ) expresses a desire which doubtless found a place in the hearts of all. Great teachers were expected to give their disciples a form of Prayer. Because John had taught his disciples to Pray, Christ was petitioned to do the same for His followers. ...
The Lord’s Prayer has been delivered to us in two forms, one by Mt. ...
‘Thus,’ ‘after this manner’ (Matthew 6:9 ) introduces the Prayer as a model of acceptable devotion. ‘Whensoever’ ( Luke 11:2 ) enjoins the use of the words which follow, and implies that the Prayers of Christ’s disciples should be conceived in the spirit of the form He was giving them. If we go behind these witnesses, and, in spite of their evidence, accept the shorter Lukan form, it will perhaps follow that the rejected clauses were never parts of the Prayer, as taught by Christ, but are later amplifications, which obtained a place in Mt. It cannot be, as is sometimes stated in devotional exegesis, that we are to Pray God to measure His boundless pity by our imperfect attempts to forgive; but we plead that we have endeavoured to remove what would be a bar to His grant of pardon; and this is expressed clearly in Lk. Some of the Fathers, in commenting on the Lord’s Prayer, take no account of a Doxology; but Chrysostom and others recognize it, and note its connexion with the preceding petitions. If we adopt the derivation from ienai ‘to come,’ the bread epiousios will be (i) whatsoever is needed for the coming day, to be sought in daily morning Prayer ‘give us to-day’; (ii) whatsoever is needed for the coming days of life. The petition becomes a Prayer for the presence of Him who has revealed Himself as ‘the Bread. ...
We have already observed that the longer readings in the Lukan form of the Prayer may be due to the attempts of copyists to harmonize the text with the form found in their days in Mt. But if it be admitted that the Evangelists were accurate and well-informed historians, there is no ground for identifying the Prayer in Lk. records the Prayer as part of a discourse. It was delivered unasked, as a specimen of right Prayer, in contrast to the hypocritical and superstitious habits which the Master condemned; and it is followed by an instruction on forgiveness. Christ had been engaged in Prayer; then, in response to a request, He delivered a form for the use of His disciples, and enforced the instruction by a parable and exhortations teaching the power of earnestness in Prayer. ...
The Prayer is rightly named ‘the Lord’s,’ because it owes to the Master its form and arrangement; but many of the sentiments may be paralleled in Jewish writings, and are ultimately based on the teachings of the OT. ]'>[9] Hillel said of a skull floating on the water (2:7), ‘Because thou drownedst, they drowned thee, and in the end they that drowned thee shall be drowned’; which illustrates clause 6 of the Prayer. From Talmudic Prayers are quoted (p. ...
It is remarkable that there is no instance in the NT of the use of the Prayer by the disciples; but the scantiness of the records forbids an adverse conclusion. The first word of the Prayer in our Lord’s vernacular and in the Evangelists’ translation is alluded to in Romans 8:15 , Galatians 4:6 . It is doubtful whether an Oriental would consider that he had satisfied the requirements of the ‘thus’ and the ‘whensoever’ by ex tempore or other devotions, which merely expressed the sentiments of the Prayer
Forty Hours' Adoration - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Forty Hours' Devotion - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Forty Hours' Prayer - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Quarantore - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Quarant' Ore - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Devotion, Forty Hours' - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Prayer: Believing - Is it not a sad thing that we should think it wonderful for God to hear Prayer? Much better faith was that of a little boy in one of the schools in Edinburgh, who had attended a Prayer-meeting, and at last said to his teacher who conducted it, 'Teacher, I wish my sister could be got to read the Bible; she never reads it. ' ...
'Do you think so, Johnny?' ...
'Yes, I do, sir, and I wish the next time there's a Prayer-meeting, you would ask the people to Pray for my sister that she may begin to read the Bible. ' ...
So the teacher gave out that a little boy was very anxious that Prayer should be offered that his sister might begin to read the Bible. The teacher thought it very rude of the boy to disturb the people in a crowded room, and so the next day when the lad came, he said, 'John, I thought it was very rude of you to get up in the Prayer-meeting and go out. ' ...
Thus we ought to believe, and watch with expectation for answers to our Prayer
Prophecy, Prophet - God said to Abimelech concerning Abraham, "He is a prophet, and he shall Pray for thee
Abyssinian Church - Women are obliged to the legal purifications, Brothers marry brothers' wives, & 100: On the other hand, they celebrate the Epiphany with peculiar festivity; have four Lents; Pray for the dead; and invoke angels
Adoration, Forty Hours' - A plenary indulgence is granted to all persons who, being truly contrite and having received the Sacraments of Penance and the Eucharist, visit a church in which the exposition is held on one of the three days and Pray there for the intentions of the Holy Father. A partial indulgence of 10 years and 10 times 40 days may be gained for each visit, provided a short time be spent in Prayer at each of these visits
Hosanna - The meaning is, "Save me, I beseech you;" from Jahash, to save; and Na, I Pray you. (Compare Zechariah 9:9 with Matthew 21:1-11) It was prohesied also by David, that "prayer should be made for him continually. " (Psalms 72:15) And here we find the unceasing cry Hosanna, which is a form of blessing and Prayer included; as if they had said, "Preserve, Lord, this son of David!" And the spreading of their garments in the way, and strewing the road with branches of trees, were all figurative of laying every thing at the feet of Jesus
Proseuchae - That the Jews had houses, or places for Prayer, called προσευχαι , appears from a variety of passages in Philo; and, particularly in his oration against Flaccus, he complains that their προσευχαι were pulled down, and there was no place left in which they might worship God and Pray for Caesar. In synagogues, he says, the Prayers were offered up in public forms in common for the whole congregation; but in the proseuchae they Prayed, as in the temple, every one apart for himself. And thus our Saviour Prayed in the proseucha into which he entered. Yet, after all, the proof in favour of this notion is not so strong, but that it still remains a question with some, whether the synagogues and the proseuchae were any thing more than two different names for the same place; the one taken from the people's assembling in them, the other from the service to which they were more immediately appropriated, namely, Prayer. Nevertheless, the name proseuchae will not prove that they were appropriated only to Prayer, and therefore were different from synagogues, in which the Scriptures were also read and expounded; since the temple, in which sacrifices were offered, and all the parts of divine service were performed, is called οικος προσευχης , a house of Prayer, Matthew 21:13
Repetitions in Prayer - Richardson mentions an old man who travelled with him, who was thought to be of peculiar sanctity, and most devout in Prayer; "Certainly he did not Pray in secret, communing with his heart, but called aloud with all his might, and repeated the words as fast as his tongue could give them utterance. The form and words of his Prayer were the same with those of the others; but this good man had made a vow to repeat certain words of the Prayer a given number of times, both night and morning. The word rabboni, for example, answering to our word Lord, he would bind himself to repeat a hundred or two hundred times, twice a day; and, accordingly, went on in the hearing of all the party; and, on his knees sometimes with his face directed steadily to heaven, and at other times bowing down to the ground, and calling out rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, &c, as fast as he could articulate the words after each other, like a school boy going through his task, not like a man who, Praying with the heart and the understanding also, continues longer on his knees, in the rapture of devotion, whose soul is a flame of fire, enkindled by his Maker, and fixing upon his God, like Jacob, will not let him go until he bless him
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - ...
Our Lord, says the evangelist, was Praying in a certain place. Our Lord was always Praying, and in every place, and the evangelist knew that quite well. Whoever he was, that disciple went up to his Master and said to Him, Lord, teach us to Pray, as Thou Thyself so often Prayest. And not the Lord's Prayer only; but that richly-favoured disciple got for himself and for his fellow-disciples and for us also, what we call the parable of the friend at midnight. Our Lord not only taught His disciples that Prayer of Prayers that day but-to enforce the lesson, He told them a story out of His rich treasure-house of such stories; a story that has all the freshness, and all the lifelikeness, and all the pointedness, of a personal experience. Think shame! Or if you will still presume to Pray for forgiveness, at any rate, wait a little. " These are her very identical words to us in this matter: "Never let any one leave off Prayer on any pretence whatsoever; great sins committed, or any pretence whatsoever. I tell you again that the leaving off of Prayer after sin was the most devilish temptation I was ever met with. "...
Importunity, then, and shameless importunity, and that in midnight Prayer, is the great lesson of this scripture. It is a story of midnight importunity, and it is told to teach us the great lesson of midnight and importunate Prayer. Travelling, with all its accompanying incidents such as this, takes place mostly at night in the East, and importunate Prayer in the West. And this lesson that our Lord gives us is quite as much to teach us to Pray at night as it is to Pray with importunity, and for excellent reasons. The Psalms, when we begin to attend to what we read and sing, are full of night, and midnight, and early morning, Prayer. As soon as we get all the best teaching of the New Testament about Prayer, we return and find it all already in the Psalms. We would not have found it in the Psalms but for the New Testament; only, once we have the whole doctrine of New Testament Prayer taught to us, we come to our full astonishment at David and his companions in Prayer. With David, then, and with David's Son, both teaching us to Pray, we ourselves should surely come to some success and proficiency in Prayer. With these, and with such a wealth of other experiences and testimonies and examples of Praying men as we possess, and of Praying men at night, we should surely learn to Pray. "When Praying at night," he says to his people, "do not forget to confess with all importunity, and sincerity, and contrition, those sins into which you have fallen during the past day. Often during the day I myself have been a great sinner, and at night, after importunate Prayer, I have gone to rest washed and restored, and with the deepest joy and the most perfect peace filling my heart
Prayer - -Prayer was to the Apostolic Church the very secret of a ‘life hid with Christ in God’ (Colossians 3:3). It was to them the most natural thing in the world to Pray for guidance in perplexity, for strength and blessing when the will of God was manifest. Petition for themselves invariably grew into intercession for others and was never the last word of Prayer. Alike when the apostles were about to choose a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24) and when the Church of Antioch sent forth Barnabas and Paul on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:3), Prayer was offered. When Paul was kept in prison, he desired and expected such earnest Prayer of the Church unto God for him as was offered by the Church of Jerusalem for Peter (Acts 12:5). They clung to it as ‘the house of Prayer,’ and used ‘the Prayers’ (Acts 3:1) of Jewish devotion at the customary hours. The third hour was marked by the gift of the Spirit (Acts 2:15), the ninth by the miracle of the healing of a lame man by Peter and John on their way to Prayer (Acts 3:1), the sixth by the vision which taught Peter to receive Gentile converts. The ill-will of priests and Sadducees only drove them to more earnest Prayer for grace to speak God’s word ‘with all boldness’ (Acts 4:24-30). There is a deep thought in 1 John 3:22 where Prayer is spoken of as the boldness with which a son appears before the Father to make requests. Every such Prayer is answered ‘not as a reward for meritorious action, but because the Prayer itself rightly understood coincides with God’s will’ (Westcott, ad loc. ...
The chief characteristic of Christian Prayer is the new power which the fellowship of the Spirit brought to Christians, and the grace of perseverance (Ephesians 6:18). _ And, when we are weak and know not what to Pray for, ‘the Spirit itself entreats for us with groans which are not to be expressed in words,’ ‘bears His part in our present difficulties’ and makes ‘our inarticulate longings for a better life … audible to God … and acceptable to Him since they are the voice of His Spirit’ (H. And we find the clue to the great Prayers of Paul. He lays stress on the need of intelligence if Prayer is to edify (Hebrews 12:22-231 ff. And along with intelligence he demands from the Christian soldier the resolute perseverance which characterizes his own Prayers. -The universality of the duty as to mode, times, and persons is enforced by the words ‘all Prayer,’ ‘at all seasons,’ ‘in all perseverance’, ‘for all the saints. -As elsewhere, Paul begins with thankfulness, offering all Prayer through the one Mediator, to whom he commends all the service of the Roman Christians, remembering them, no doubt by name, and desiring to see them both to impart and to receive grace. Knowledge and power are the keynotes in the second Prayer, in which there is remarkable social teaching. ’...
In Philippians 1:9-11 Paul Prays that love may abound in knowledge and in all perception. ’...
These Prayers of Paul throw a bright light on the meaning of the different words for Prayer which are often discussed from a philological rather than from a religious point of view. ): ‘I exhort therefore, first of all, that supplications (δεήσεις), Prayers (προσευχαί), intercessions (ἐντεύξεις), thanksgivings (εὐχαριστίαι), be made for all men; for kings and all that are in high place; that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and gravity. ’ Here προσευχή means Prayer in general, always as addressed to God, whereas εὐχή means more often a vow than Prayer; δέησις is Prayer for particular benefits; ἔντευξις (lit. ...
While all Christians are exhorted to Pray without ceasing (1 Thessalonians 5:17) it was regarded as a special privilege of those who had leisure, such as ‘widows indeed’ (1 Timothy 5:5), to continue in supplications and Prayers night and day. Thus the apostles enlisted the help of the Seven in order to give themselves to Prayer and to the ministry of the Word (Acts 6:4). ...
There is a deep meditation on the hearing of Prayer in Hebrews 5:7, with reference to our Lord’s Prayers. ‘True Prayer-the Prayer which must be answered-is the personal recognition and acceptance of the divine will (John 14:7 : comp. It follows that the hearing of Prayer, which teaches obedience, is not so much the granting of a specific petition, which is assumed by the petitioner to be the way to the end desired, but the assurance that what is granted does most effectively lead to the end. These pregnant sentences go to the very root of the problem of Prayer. The ordinary posture of Prayer was standing with arms outstretched, like the Pharisee of our Lord’s parable (Luke 18:11), and the earliest paintings of Orantes in the Roman Catacombs. 30): ‘Gazing up heavenward we Christians Pray with hands extended because they are innocent, with the head uncovered because we are not ashamed; finally, without a guide because we Pray from the heart. ’ The value attached by Ignatius to the influence of Prayer is expressed in the words (Ephesians 5): ‘For if the Prayer of one and another hath so great force, how much more that of the bishop and of the whole Church. Prayers for the departed. -The possible references to Prayers for the departed in the NT taken by themselves are ambiguous, nor is it easy to deal with this subject without reference to authors who wrote outside the limits of this Dictionary. 160, includes: ‘Let every friend who observeth this Pray for me. 217), in de Monogamia, 10, Tertullian describes a Christian widow as one ‘who Prays for his
The reference in 2 Maccabees 12:43-45 to sacrifices offered for the dead by Judas Maccabaeus may be taken to prove that Prayers for the dead were not unknown in our Lord’s time. And the Sadducees who controlled the Temple services did not believe in any resurrection, so we cannot suppose that they would have approved of such Prayers. ’ They are living and they are interested in both our faith and conduct, and the least response of our loyalty to them will naturally find expression in our Prayers for their peace and progress. Worlledge, Prayer, do
John - Mind is the highest thing, and meditation is the highest use of mind; it is the true root, and sap, and fatness of all faith and Prayer and spiritual obedience. We Pray sometimes, or we pretend to Pray; but do we ever set ourselves to prepare our hearts for the mercy-seat by strenuous meditation on who and what we are; on who and what He is to whom we pretend to Pray; and on what it is we are to say, and do, and ask, and receive? We may never have heard of Philo, but we all belong to his barren school. We cannot Pray aright without it
Prayer (2) - PRAYER. —For the Christian what is said in the Gospels is absolute as to the duty of Prayer for himself and for others; but he need not fear that in fulfilling this duty he is doing what reason cannot approve. It does not fall within the scope of this article to attempt to find a scientific basis for Prayer; nor need more be said about the reasonableness of Prayer than to point out two considerations: (1) The practice of countless races of mankind throughout countless generations is not likely to be based upon a complete delusion. Untold millions of human beings, including a majority of the most gifted and enlightened, have Prayed and continue to Pray, because they believe that experience has taught them that Prayer is efficacious. There is, therefore, nothing unreasonable in believing that the world has been so ordered that some of the blessings which are within our reach cannot be enjoyed unless we Pray for them. Consequently there is nothing illogical or unscientific in believing that in those laws provision has been made for the operation of men’s Prayers. The cases are not completely parallel, because demonstration is possible in the one case but not in the other; for the connexion between work and its results can be proved, while the connexion between Prayer and its results cannot, for the obvious reason that faith is an essential condition of Prayer, and proof would destroy faith. Nevertheless, the analogy between the two cases is sufficiently complete to show that there is no necessary antagonism between knowledge of the reign of law and belief in the efficacy of Prayer. ...
In discussing the subject of Prayer in reference to Christ and the Gospels, we may consider these topics: (1) the words used to express the idea of Prayer; (2) places and times of Prayer; (3) attitude in Prayer; (4) Christ’s example; (5) Christ’s doctrine. There are a few words for ‘prayer’ in the NT which are not found in the Gospels: εὔχομαι, εὐχή, ἐντυγχάνω, ἔντευξις, ὑπερεντυγχάνω, ἱκετηρία. Of these four sets of words, the first alone is specially appropriated to the worship of God: it implies that the person addressed in Prayer is Divine. Places and times of Prayer. —The chief place was the Temple: ‘My house shall be called a house of Prayer’ (Matthew 21:13, Mark 11:17, Luke 19:46). There is also the inner chamber (ταμεῖον, Matthew 6:6), and the guest-chamber (κατάλυμα, Mark 14:14, Luke 22:11) or upper room (ἀνάγαιον, Mark 14:15, Luke 22:12), in which the Prayer of the great High Priest seems to have been offered (John 17, although some would place the scene of this in the Temple, cf. Nathanael’s fig-tree (John 1:48) and Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36, Mark 14:32) lead us to think of gardens as places of retirement for Prayer. Luke tells us was ascended for the purpose of Prayer. ...
Not much is said in the Gospels about times of Prayer; but we read of Christ rising up before daylight and going to a desert spot to Pray (Mark 1:35), and of His continuing all night in Prayer before the choosing of the twelve Apostles (Luke 6:12). The common attitude in Prayer among the Jews was standing; and this our Lord assumes in His teaching (Matthew 6:5, Mark 11:25, Luke 18:11; Luke 18:13). Outside the Gospels no other posture for Prayer is mentioned. —Much more important than terminology, or the mention of places, times, and postures for Prayer, is the fact that Jesus Christ, by His own example, has taught us the duty of Prayer. Not that we need suppose that He Prayed merely in order to set us an example: Prayer was one of those things which became Him, in order that He might ‘fulfil all righteousness’ (Matthew 3:15). If in such a life as His there was not only room but need for Prayer, much more must there be room and need in such lives as ours. Nor were His Prayers always Prayers for others. In most cases we are not told why or for what He Prayed: this we have to gather from the context. On one great occasion, in the garden, just before His Passion, we know that He Prayed for Himself (Matthew 26:39, Mark 14:35, Luke 22:41). An hour or two before this, just after the Supper, we know that He Prayed for His disciples (John 17:6-19) and for the whole Church (John 17:20-26); and a few hours later He Prayed for those who nailed Him to the Cross (Luke 23:34, a verse which is historically true, whether St. ...
It should be noticed that the instances of Christ’s Praying which are recorded in the Gospels are found just before or just after leading events in the Lord’s life; also that the majority of them are given us by St. Luke, whose Gospel is sometimes called ‘the Gospel of Prayer. ’ There are, indeed, three recorded instances of His Praying which are omitted by St. Mark (Mark 1:35) mentions His retirement for Prayer after healing multitudes at Capernaum, where St. Matthew (Matthew 14:23) record His retirement for Prayer after the feeding of the 5000, where St. Luke (Matthew 9:17) omits both retirement and Prayer. John (John 12:27-28) tells of His Prayer when certain Greeks were brought to Him, where St. As we might expect, the Prayer for Himself in the garden of Gethsemane is recorded by all three Synoptists (Matthew 26:39, Mark 14:35, Luke 22:41). Nothing in the Gospels is stronger evidence of the reality of our Lord’s humanity than that Prayer, and it evidently established itself firmly in the earliest traditions respecting Him. Luke is alone in relating that Jesus Prayed: at His baptism (Luke 3:21); before His first collision with the Jewish hierarchy (Luke 5:16); before choosing the Twelve (Luke 6:12); before the first prediction of His Passion (Luke 9:18); at His Transfiguration (Luke 9:29); before teaching the Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:1); and on the Cross (Luke 23:34; Luke 23:46). ...
There are three other cases where Prayer on the part of Christ seems to be implied, although it is not expressly stated. We venture to count all three of these as occasions on which Jesus Prayed. To say with Victor of Antioch (Swete on Mark 1:35), that Christ Prayed οὐκ αὐτὸς ταύτης δεομενος … ἀλλʼ οἰκονομικῶς τοῦτο ποιῶν, is not adequate, even if in some sense true. We ought to beware of suggesting that our Lord’s Prayers were in any way unreal. —In addition to His weighty example as to the duty and blessedness of Prayer, we have Christ’s frequent sayings on the subject. That men ‘ought always to Pray and not to faint’ was evidently a marked feature in His teaching, and it appears in three different forms: (1) On two occasions, apparently, once spontaneously (Matthew 6:5-15), and once at the request of a disciple (Luke 11:14), Christ gave His followers a definite form of Prayer. ...
(1) The Lord’s Prayer is the subject of separate articles, to which the reader is referred. ...
(2) There are five parables, three of which bear directly and two indirectly on the subject of Prayer. Luke only, teach that Prayer must be importunate and persevering. These are the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:5-8), which follows the giving of the Lord’s Prayer, and the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-8). So far as the two parables differ, the former teaches that Prayer is never out of season, the latter that it is sure to bring a blessing and not a curse. But we must beware of supposing that either parable teaches that by constant Prayer we at last overcome God’s unwillingness. ’ God’s desire to help is always present; by perseverance in Prayer we appropriate it. Luke alone, and is placed by him immediately after that of the Unjust Judge, teaches the frame of mind in which God must be approached in Prayer, viz. The parable indicates that downcast eyes and beating of the breast are natural accompaniments of a penitent’s Prayer. The lost son’s Prayer, as planned before his return and as actually uttered, is touching in its humility. ...
In both these cases, the Publican and the Prodigal, the chief thing Prayed for is forgiveness, as must constantly be the case with sinful man. And there is yet another parable which teaches what is requisite, if this most necessary of all Prayers is to be rightly offered: the sinner himself must have a forgiving spirit. ...
(3) Besides the parables, there are frequent sayings of Christ on the subject of Prayer, and these are found in all four Gospels. The necessity of a forgiving spirit is repeated in Matthew 6:14-15 and Mark 11:25, with obvious reference to the Lord’s Prayer. Two other things are stated as necessary accompaniments of Prayer: watchfulness (Mark 13:33; Mark 14:38, Matthew 26:41) and faith (Mark 11:24, Matthew 21:22). And we may be all the more sure of success in our Prayers if others join with us in making them (Matthew 18:19). Prayers which are approved by many are more likely to be right. Repetition of Prayers, even in the same form of words, is encouraged by our Lord, both by precept (Luke 18:1-8) and by example (Matthew 26:44). ...
Instruction is also given as to the right objects of Prayer. We are to Pray for spiritual progress (Luke 11:13) in ourselves, in others, and in the world at large. We are to Pray that we ourselves may be delivered from temptation (Matthew 6:13; Matthew 26:41, Mark 14:38, Luke 11:4; Luke 22:40; Luke 22:46), and that evil may be cast out from others (Matthew 17:21, Mark 9:29), and that missionaries for the conversion of the world may be multiplied (Matthew 9:38, Luke 10:2). About temporal blessings we are not to be over anxious; yet Prayer for them is not merely allowed but enjoined (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3); as also is Prayer against temporal calamities (Mark 13:18, Matthew 24:20). The Prayer of the disciples for help in the storm was heard (Matthew 8:26, Mark 4:39, Luke 8:24). But there is one point with regard to the method of Prayer which is absolutely new. Men had been taught to worship God and even to Pray to Him as a Father: now they are told to Pray to the Father in the name of the Son (John 16:23-24; John 16:26). Any request which is consistent with His character and office, as represented by His name, may be made to His Father, with confidence that the Prayer will be heard (John 15:7; John 15:16). The Prayer of the sons of Zebedee for the right and left hand places in the Kingdom (Matthew 20:21, Mark 10:37) was not of this character, and was not commended. Nor, for the same reason, were they allowed to Pray for a special judgment on the inhospitable Samaritans (Luke 9:54-55). It confirms our trust in the historical fidelity of the Fourth Gospel, that this remarkable development in the teaching of Christ respecting Prayer in His name occurs in the farewell discourses. —Works on the reasonableness and the efficacy of Prayer abound, but they are outside the sphere of this article. on ‘Prayer’ in Hastings, iv
Conversion: a Radical Change - But suppose this man can be so changed, that just as freely as he was wont to curse he now delights to Pray, and just as heartily as he hated religion he now finds pleasure in it, and just as earnestly as he sinned he now delights to be obedient to the Lord; ah! then, this is a wonder, a miracle which mat cannot accomplish, a marvel which only the grace of God can work, and which gives to God his highest glory
Lord's Prayer - Some have urged that the second and fourth petition of that Prayer could be intended only for a temporary use; but it is answered, that such a sense may be put upon those petitions as shall suit all Christians in all ages; for it is always our duty to Pray that Christ's kingdom may be advanced in the world, and to profess our daily dependence on God's providential care. It is, however, a most excellent summary of Prayer, for its brevity, order, and matter; and it is very lawful and laudable to make use of any single petition, or the whole of it, provided a formal and superstitious use of it be avoided. 48; Archbishop Leighton's Explanation of it; West on the Lord's Prayer; Gill's Body of Divinity, vol. 11, 12; Mendlam's Exposition of the Lord's Prayer
Simon - He was terrified when Peter announced a horrible judgment upon him, and asked Peter to Pray on his behalf for God’s mercy (Acts 8:9-24)
Frankincense - ...
Frankincense, with its sweet perfume, symbolizes Prayer accepted before God (Psalms 141:2; Revelation 5:8; Revelation 8:3-4). The angel does not provide the incense; it is "given" to him by Christ, whose meritorious obedience and death and intercession are the incense rendering the saints' Prayers well pleasing to God. They do not Pray to the angel; he is but the king's messenger, and did not dare to appropriate what, is the king's alone (Malachi 1:11). The time of offering the incense, morning and evening, was the chosen time for Prayer (Luke 1:10). The bride too comes up with Him from the wilderness, exhaling frankincense-like graces, faith, love, joy, peace, Prayer, praise; of her too it is asked, "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved?" (Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 7:13-17
Conduct - The title of two clergymen appointed to read Prayers at Eton College in England. Pray receive them nobly, and conduct them into our presence
Evening - For when the disciples suggested that Jesus send the multitude away, that they might go into the villages and buy themselves food, Jesus said they need not depart; and the feeding of the five thousand and the sending away of the multitude followed before ‘he went up into the mountain apart to Pray. In the latter case, Jesus, after seeing His disciples off (John 6:15), evidently sought the mountain solitude, as He did on other occasions, to spend much of the night in Prayer (Matthew 14:25)
Step - 10:17 the word bears this emphasis: “Now therefore forgive, I Pray thee, my sin only this once, and entreat the Lord your God
Prayer - The object of this article will be to touch briefly on --
The doctrine of Scripture as to the nature and efficacy of Prayer; ...
Its directions as to time, place and manner of Prayer; ...
Its types and examples of Prayer. ...
Scripture does not give any theoretical explanation of the mystery which attaches to Prayer. The difficulty of understanding real efficacy arises chiefly from two sources: from the belief that man lives under general laws, which in all cases must be fulfilled unalterably; and the opposing belief that he is master of his own destiny, and need Pray for no external blessing. Yet while this is so, on the other hand the instinct of Prayer is solemnly sanctioned and enforced on every page. At the same time it is clearly implied that such a reconcilement exists, and that all the apparently isolated and independent exertions of man's spirit in Prayer are in some way perfectly subordinated to the one supreme will of God, so as to form a part of his scheme of providence. So also is it said of the spiritual influence of the Holy Ghost on each individual mind that while "we know not what to Pray for, "the indwelling" Spirit makes intercession for the saints, according to the will of God. ...
There are no directions as to Prayer given in the Mosaic law: the duty is rather taken for granted, as an adjunct to sacrifice, than enforced or elaborated. It is hardly conceivable that, even from the beginning public Prayer did not follow every public sacrifice. But, besides this public Prayer, it was the custom of all at Jerusalem to go up to the temple, at regular hours if possible, for private Prayer, see (Luke 18:10 ; Acts 3:1 ) and those who were absent were wont to "open their windows toward Jerusalem," and Pray "toward" the place of God's presence. (1 Kings 8:46-49 ; Psalm 5:7 ; 28:2 ; 138:2 ; Daniel 6:10 ) The regular hours of Prayer seem to have been three (see) (Psalm 55:17 ; Daniel 6:10 ) "the evening," that is the ninth hour (Acts 3:1 ; 10:3 ) the hour of the evening sacrifice, (Daniel 9:21 ) the "morning," that is, the third hour (Acts 2:15 ) that of the morning sacrifice; and the sixth hour, or "noonday. See (Matthew 15:36 ; Acts 27:35 ) The posture of Prayer among the Jews seems to have been most often standing, (1 Samuel 1:26 ; Matthew 6:5 ; Mark 11:25 ; Luke 18:11 ) unless the Prayer were offered with especial solemnity and humiliation, which was naturally expressed by kneeling, (1 Kings 8:54 ) comp. (Joshua 7:6 ; 1 Kings 18:42 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ) ...
The only form of Prayer given for perpetual use in the Old Testament is the one in (26:5-15) connected with the offering of tithes and first-fruits, and containing in simple form the important elements of Prayer, acknowledgment of God's mercy, self-dedication and Prayer for future blessing. To this may perhaps be added the threefold blessing of (Numbers 6:24-26 ) couched as it is in a precatory form, and the short Prayer of Moses, (Numbers 10:35,36 ) at the moving and resting of the cloud the former of which was the germ of the 68th Psalm. But of the Prayers recorded in the Old Testament the two most remarkable are those of Solomon at the dedication of the temple, (1 Kings 8:23-58 ) and of Joshua the high priest, and his colleagues, after the captivity. (Nehemiah 9:5-38 ) It appears from the question of the disciples in (Luke 11:1 ) and from Jewish tradition, that the chief teachers of the day gave special forms of Prayer to their disciples as the badge of their discipleship and the best fruits of their learning. All Christian Prayer is, of course, based on the Lord's Prayer; but its spirit is also guided by that of his Prayer in Gethsemane and of the Prayer recorded by St. The influence of these Prayers is more distinctly traced in the Prayers contained in the epistles, see (Romans 16:25-27 ; Ephesians 3:14-21 ; Philippians 1:3-11 ; Colossians 1:9-15 ; Hebrews 13:20,21 ; 1 Peter 5:10,11 ) etc. The public Prayer probably in the first instance took much of its form and style from the Prayers of the synagogues. In the record on Prayer accepted and granted by God, we observe, as always, a special adaptation to the period of his dispensation to which they belong. It would seem the intention of Holy Scripture to encourage all Prayer more especially intercession, in all relations and for all righteous objects
Feel - ...
Come near, I Pray thee, that I may feel thee, my son
Intercession - ...
(2) In a special sense, for His believing people alone: "I Pray not for the world, but for them which Thou hast given Me" (John 17:9). His Prayer of compassion is for self destroying sinners. The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of Prayer in every one below for whom Christ pleads above. " Knowing our needs better than we, He breathes in our Prayers spiritual desires which find utterance in inarticulate sighings; these the Searcher of hearts knoweth, and interprets and answers accordingly; for whatever aspirations the Holy Spirit breathes in us are "according to the will of God. Paul often asks the Prayers of, Christians in behalf of himself and other ministers, and the extension of Christ's kingdom (2 Thessalonians 3:1; Ephesians 6:18-19)
Foreknowledge of God - "...
To deny this is, (says Saurin, ) to degrade the Almighty; for what, Pray, is a God who created beings, and who could not foresee what would result from their existence? A God, who formed spirits united to bodies by certain laws, and who did not know how to combine these laws so as to foresee the effects they would produce? A God forced to suspend his judgment? A God who every day learns something new, and who doth not know to-day what will happen to-morrow? A God who cannot tell whether peace will be concluded or war continue to ravage the world; whether peace will be received in a certain kingdom, or whether it will be banished; whether the right heir will succeed to the crown, or whether the crown will be set on the head of an usurper? For according to the different determinations of the wills of men, of king, or people, the prince will make peace, or declare war; religion will be banished or admitted; the tyrant or the lawful king will occupy the throne: for if God cannot foresee how the volitions of men will be determined, he cannot foresee any of these events
Mind - They must use their minds to Pray and sing intelligently (1 Corinthians 14:15; Colossians 3:16; see PrayER; SINGING), to understand Christian teaching (Proverbs 2:1-5; 1 Corinthians 2:11-13; Acts 19:8-100; see INTERPRETATION), to find out God’s will (Romans 12:2; Ephesians 5:17; Colossians 1:9; see GUIDANCE), to preach the gospel effectively (Acts 17:2-4; 1618166310_12; see PREACHING), and to teach the Scriptures in a way that builds up the hearers (Colossians 1:28; Titus 1:9; see TEACHER)
Ask - Since Prayer often includes petition, shâ'al is sometimes used in the sense of "praying for" something: "Pray for the peace of Jerusalem" (Psalm 122:6)
Face - ...
Hence, to seek the face, that is, to Pray to, to seek the favor of
Burn, Burning - ...
A — 5: ἐμπρήθω (Strong's #1714 — Verb — empipremi — em-pray'-tho ) or empretho, "to burn up," occurs in Matthew 2:7
Church Year - Similarly, the fifty-day period after Easter was one of triumph during which fasting and kneeling to Pray were forbidden
Temptation - In expounding the Prayer ‘Bring us not into temptation,’ and other passages in which the word has a wider meaning than enticement to sin, the difficulty is partially, but only partially, to be ascribed to the narrowing of the significance of the English word since 1611. ’ Can a Christian Pray to he exempted from the testing without which sheltered innocence cannot become approved virtue? Can he ask that he may never be exposed to those trials upon the endurance of which his blessedness depends ( James 1:12 )? The sufficient answer is that He who was ‘in all points tempted like as we are’ ( Hebrews 4:15 ) has taught us to Pray ‘after this manner. ’ His own Prayer in Gethsemane ( Matthew 26:42 ), and His exhortation to His disciples ( Matthew 26:41 ), prove, by example and by precept, that when offered in subjection to the central, all-dominating desire ‘Thy will be done,’ the petition ‘Bring us not into temptation’ is always fitting on the lips of those who know that ‘the flesh is weak. ’ Having thus Prayed, those who find themselves ringed round ( James 1:2 , peri ) by temptations will be strengthened to endure joyfully
Prayer - It is a divine injunction that men should always Pray, and not faint, Luke 18:1 . We shall here consider the object, nature, kinds, matter, manner, and forms of Prayer, together with its efficacy, and the objections made against it. The object of Prayer is God alone, through Jesus Christ, as the Mediator. Nor are we to Pray to the Trinity, as three distinct Gods; for though the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost be addressed in various parts of the Scripture, 2 Corinthians 13:14 . ) It has been generally divided into adoration, by which we express our sense of the goodness and greatness of God, Daniel 4:34-35 ; confession, by which we acknowledge our unworthiness, 1 John 1:9 ; supplication, by which we Pray for pardon, grace, or any blessing we want, Matthew 7:7 ; intercession, by which we Pray for others, James 5:16 ; and thanksgiving, by which we express our gratitude to God, 1 Samuel 3:1-21 . To which some add invocation, a making mention of one or more of the names of God; pleading, arguing our case with God in an humble and fervent manner; dedication, or surrendering ourselves to God; deprecation, by which we desire that evils may be averted; blessing, in which we express our joy in God, and gratitude for his mercies: but, as all these appear to me to be included in the first five parts of Prayer, I think they need not be insisted on. The different kinds of Prayer, are, ...
1. It is derived from the word ejaculor, or dart or shoot out suddenly, and is therefore appropriate to describe this kind of Prayer, which is made up of short sentences spontaneously springing from the mind. The Scriptures afford us many instances of ejaculatory Prayer, Exodus 14:15 . It is one of the principal excellencies of this kind of Prayer, that it can be practised at all times, and in all places; in the public ordinances of religion; in all our ordinary and extraordinary undertakings; in times of affliction, temptation, and danger; in seasons of social intercourse, in worldly business, in travelling, in sickness, and pain. Secret or closet Prayer is another kind of Prayer to which we should attend. As closet Prayer is calculated to inspire us with peace, defend us from our spiritual enemies, excite us to obedience, and promote our real happiness, we should be watchful lest the stupidity of our frame, the intrusion of company, the cares of the world, the insinuations of Satan, or the indulgence of sensual objects, prevent us from the constant exercise of this necessary and important duty. Family Prayer is also another part not to be neglected. Family Prayer, indeed, may not be essential to the character of a true Christian, but it is surely no honour to heads of families to have it said that they have no religion in their houses. The objection often made to family Prayer is, want of time; but this is a very frivolous excuse, since the time allotted for this purpose need be but short, and may easily be redeemed from sleep or business. As to the season for family Prayer, every family must determine for itself; but before breakfast every morning, and before supper at night, seems most proper: perhaps a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes may be sufficient as to the time. Social Prayer is another kind Christians are called upon to attend to. Special Prayer- meetings are such as are held at the meeting and parting of intimate friends, especially churches and ministers; when the church is in a state of unusual deadness and barrenness; when ministers are sick, or taken away by death; in times of public calamity and distress, &c. Stated meetings for social Prayer are such as are held weekly in some places which have a special regard to the state of the nation and churches: missionary Prayer-meetings for the spread of the Gospel: weekly meetings held in most of the congregations which have a more particular reference to their own churches, ministers, the sick, feeble, and weak of the flock. Christians are greatly encouraged to this kind of Prayer from the consideration of the promise, Matthew 18:20 ; the benefit of mutual supplications; from the example of the most eminent primitive saints, Malachi 3:16 . Acts 12:12 ; the answers given to Prayer, Acts 12:1-12 . We now come, lastly, to take notice of public Prayer, or that in which the whole congregation is engaged, either in repeating a set form, or acquiescing with the Prayer of the minister who leads their devotions. Of the matter of Prayer. Watts, "to furnish ourselves with proper matter, that we may be able to hold much converse with God; to entertain ourselves and others agreeably and devoutly in worship; to assist the exercise o our own grace and others, by a rich supply of divine thought and desires in Prayer, that we may not be forced to make too long and indecent pauses whilst we are performing that duty; nor break off abruptly as soon as we have begun for want of matter; nor pour out abundance of words to dress up narrow and scanty sense for want of variety of devout thoughts. We should labour after a large acquaintance with all things that belong to religion; for there is nothing that relates to religion but may properly make some part of the matter of our Prayer. We should express our sins, our wants, and our sorrows, with a particular sense of the mournful circumstances that attend them: it will enlarge our hearts with Prayer and humiliation if we confess the aggravations that increase the guilt of our sins, viz. Our petitions and thanksgivings, in a special manner, should be suited to the place and circumstances of ourselves, and those that we Pray with, and those that we Pray for. If we find our hearts, after all very barren, and hardly know how to frame a Prayer before God of ourselves, it has been oftentimes useful to take a book in our hand, wherein are contained some spiritual meditations in a petitionary form, some devout reflections, or excellent patterns of Prayer; and, above all, the Psalms of David, some of the prophecies of Isaiah, some chapters in the Gospels, or any of the Epistles. We must not think it absolutely necessary to insist upon all the parts of Prayer in every address to God; though in our stated and solemn Prayers there are but few of them that can be well left out. We should let those parts of Prayer have the largest share in the performance for which our spirits is best prepared, whether it be adoration, petition, confession, or thanksgiving. We should suit the matter of our Prayers to the special occasion of each particular duty, to the circumstances of the time, place, and persons with and for whom we Pray. This will direct us to the choice of proper thoughts and language for every part of Prayer. We should not affect to Pray long for the sake of length, or to stretch out our matter by labour and toil of thought, beyond the furniture of our own spirit. Sometimes a person is betrayed by an affectation of long Prayers into crude, rash, and unseemly expressions; we are tempted hereby to tautologies, to say the same thing over and over again. We exceed the season that is allotted for us in Prayer, especially when others are to succeed in the same work. Of the method of Prayer. Watts, "is necessary to guide our thoughts, to regulate our expressions, and dispose of the several parts of Prayer in such an order, as is most easy to by understood by those that join with us, and most proper to excite and maintain our own devotion and theirs. The general rules of method in Prayer are these three: ...
1. Let the general and the particular heads in Prayer be well distinguished, and usually let generals be mentioned first, and particulars follow. Let things of the same kind, for the most part, be put together in Prayer. We should not run from one part to another by starts, and sudden wild thoughts, and then return often to the same part again, going backward and forward in confusion: this bewilders the mind of him that Prays, disgusts our fellow-worshippers, and injures their devotion. Let those things, in every part of Prayer, which are the proper objects of our judgment, be first mentioned, and then those that influence and move our affections; not that we should follow such a manner of Prayer as is more like preaching, as some imprudently have done, speaking many divine truths without the form or air of Prayer. Yet it must be granted that there is no necessity of always confining ourselves to this, or to any other set method, no more than there is of confining ourselves to a form in Prayer. Sometimes the mind is so divinely full of one particular part of Prayer, that high expressions of gratitude, and of devoting ourselves to God, break out first. I am persuaded, however, that if young Christians did not give themselves up to a loose and negligent habit of speaking every thing that comes uppermost, but attempted to learn this holy skill by a recollection of the several parts of Prayer, and properly disposing their thoughts, there would be great numbers in our churches that would arrive at a good degree of the gift of Prayer, and that to the great edification of our churches, as well as of their own families. " ...
As to expression in Prayer, it may be observed, that though Prayer be the proper work of the heart, yet in this present state, in secret as well as in social Prayer, the language of the lips is an excellent aid in this part of worship. We should Pray for the gift of utterance, and seek the blessing of the Spirit of God upon the use of proper means to obtain a treasure of expressions for Prayer; for the wise man tells us, that "the preparation of the heart in man, and the answer of the tongue, is from the Lord, " Proverbs 16:1 . An excessive fondness of elegance and finery of style in Prayer discovers the same pride and vanity of mind, as an affection to many jewels and fine apparel in the house of God: it betrays us into a neglect of our hearts, and of experimental religion, by an affection to make the nicest speech, and say the finest things we can, instead of sincere devotion, and Praying in the spirit. We should, therefore, avoid such a sort of style as looks more like preaching, which some persons that affect long Prayers have been guilty of to a great degree: they have been speaking to the people rather than speaking to God; they have wandered away from god to speak to men; but this is quite contrary to the nature of Prayer, for Prayer is our own address to God, and pouring out our hearts before him with warm and proper affections. We should not always confine ourselves to one set form of words to express any particular request; nor take too much pains to avoid an expression merely because we used it in Prayer heretofore. We need not be over fond of a nice uniformity of words, nor of perpetual diversity of expression in every Prayer: it is best to keep the middle between these two extremes. As to the voice in Prayer: in the first place, our words should be all pronounced distinct, and ought not to be made shorter by cutting off the last syllable, nor longer by the addition of hems and o's, of long breaths, affected groanings, and useless sounds, &c. Some persons have got a habit of beginning their Prayers, and even upon the most common family occasions, so loud as to startle the company; others begin so low in a large assembly, that it looks like secret worship, and as though they forbid those that are present to join with them. As to gesture in Prayer: all indecencies should be avoided. Prostration may be sometimes used in secret Prayer, under a deep and uncommon sense of sin; but kneeling is the most frequent posture; and nature seems to dictate and lead us to it as an expression of humility, of a sense of our wants, a supplication for mercy, and adoration of and dependence on him before whom we kneel. "Standing is a posture not unfit for this worship, especially in places where we have not conveniency for the humbler gestures: but sitting, or other postures of rest and laziness, ought not to be indulged, unless persons are aged or infirm, or the work of Prayer be drawn out so long as to make it troublesome to human nature to maintain itself always in one posture. As to forms of Prayer. We find this has been a matter of controversy among divines and Christians, whether such ought to be used, or whether extempore Prayers are not to be preferred. Those who are advocates for forms, observe, that it prevents absurd, extravagant, or impious addresses to God, as well as the confusion of extemporary Prayer; that forms were used under the Old Testament dispensation; and, in proof thereof cite Numb. If we look to the authority and example of Christ and his apostles, every thing is in favour of extempore Prayer. The Lord's Prayer, it is observed, was not given to be a set form, exclusive of extemporary Prayer. ...
See LORD'S PrayER. ...
It is farther argued, that a form cramps the desires; inverts the true order of Prayer, making our words to regulate our desires, instead of our desires regulating our words; has a tendency to make us formal; cannot be suited to every one's case; that it looks as if we were not in reality convinced of our wants, when we want a form to expess them; and, finally, in answer to the two first arguments, that it is seldom the case that those who are truly sensible of their condition, and Pray extempore, do it in an impious and extravagant manner; and if any who have the gift of Prayer really do so, and run into the extreme of enthusiasm, yet this is not the case with the generality, since an unprejudiced attention to those who Pray extempore must convince us, that, if their Prayers be not so elegantly composed as that of a set form, they are more appropriate, and delivered with more energy and feeling. The efficacy of Prayer
Mountain - Jesus went up to a mountain to Pray (Luke 6:12 ), and healed the Gerasene demoniac near a mountain site (Mark 5:11 )
Hedge - He had seen their misery as He stole to silent midnight Prayer, up the hillsides with their mosaic of fields, along whose hedges and through the gaps of which He passed to Pray to the Father in secret
Build - Sarai said to Abram, “I Pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her” ( Pray thee, glory to the Lord God of Israel …” ( Intercession - ’ But the modern use of the Word, which limits the meaning to Prayer for others, need not obliterate the original meaning. It is in proportion as the person Praying for others is able to enlarge his own intercourse with God that he can be, like Moses, Samuel, Elijah, able to uphold others. The apostles and brethren Pray for guidance in the appointment of a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24), as when they appoint the Seven (Acts 6:6; cf. Acts 13:3), or Pray for the deliverance of St. The farewell Prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:36), and the whole congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services. ...
The teaching and the practice of the mother Church in Jerusalem are reflected in the Epistle of James (James 5:14), where the Prayers of the elders of the Church on behalf of the sick are definitely enjoined; nor is sickness of the soul forgotten in Prayer for forgiveness (James 5:16). Making mention of the Thessalonians in his Prayers, he refers to their faith, hope, and love (1 Thessalonians 1:2-3), and their acceptance of his message as the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 2:13), ‘praying exceedingly that he may see their face and may perfect that which is lacking in their faith’ (1 Thessalonians 3:10). So in 2 Thessalonians 1:11 he Prays that God may count them worthy of His calling and the name of the Lord Jesus Christ be glorified in them. There is a striking phrase in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when he has received the good news from Corinth, and pictures their Prayers for his deliverance from peril: ‘Ye also helping together on our behalf by your supplication; that, for the gift bestowed upon us by means of many, thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf. Paul writes that he makes mention of them unceasingly (Romans 1:8-12), praising God for their faith, and Praying that he may be enabled to come and impart to them some spiritual gift of grace. , rejoicing, as always, in what is fairest in the character of his friends, he Prays that they may have ‘a spirit of wisdom and revelation,’ growth in that knowledge of God which alike proves our efficiency and increases it in our use of His revelation, when our eyes are opened to see the wealth of the glory of His inheritance in the saints, and the greatness of His power. ...
In his next Prayer (Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 3:14-19) St. So he Prays that Christ may dwell in each heart, for the strength of Christ is conveyed only to those who are fully strong enough to know the love of Christ. ), he Prays that they may be ‘endowed with all wisdom to apprehend [1] verities and all intelligence to follow His processes, living in the mind of the Spirit-to the end that knowledge may manifest itself in practice’ (J. Having this sure grasp of principle, he can dare to Pray for them as patient and long-suffering, and always thankful despite discouragement. ...
In Philippians 1:9-11 he Prays that love and knowledge and discernment may inspire them to approve things that are excellent with a pure conscience that offends none, and a life filled with the fruits of righteousness. Paul is exactly parallel to the method of our Lord’s High-Priestly Prayer (John 17:9), in which intercession is concentrated first on the needs of those given to Him out of the world. Paul Prays most earnestly. he exhorts that ‘supplications, Prayers, intercessions, thanksgivings, be made for all men, for kings and all that are in high place,’ a direction which, as we shall see presently in the letter of Clement, was fervently followed in the Church in Rome, from which city he wrote this last Epistle. Paul that Josephus should actually ascribe the origin of the war which ended with the destruction of Jerusalem to the refusal of the Jews, at the instigation of Eleazar, to offer Prayer for Gentile rulers (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) Prayers of his readers (Hebrews 13:18 f. In 1 John (1 John 5:14) intercession is regarded as the expression of perfect boldness in Prayer which consciousness of a Divine life brings to believers: ‘The energy of Christian life is from the first social’ (Westcott, ad loc. And he shows what a prominent place in the eucharistic Prayers of the Church was given to intercessions (lix. ’...
The Prayer for rulers and governors may also be quoted (lxi. As the vine seeks the support of the elm, let him help the poor man, who is rich in intercession, and gain the support of his Prayers. He requests Prayer for the Church in Syria in all his letters. ‘For, if the Prayer of one and another hath so great force, how much more that of the bishop and of the whole Church’ (ib. To the Romans he writes: ‘Only Pray that I may have power within and without’ (ib. 29): ‘[2] has no delegated grace to avert any sense of suffering; but it supplies the suffering, and the feeling, and the grieving, with endurance: it amplifies grace by virtue, that faith may know what she obtains from the Lord, understanding what-for God’s name’s sake-she suffers. Worlledge, Prayer, 1902; W. Paul, 1907; see also under Prayer
Intercession - ’ But the modern use of the Word, which limits the meaning to Prayer for others, need not obliterate the original meaning. It is in proportion as the person Praying for others is able to enlarge his own intercourse with God that he can be, like Moses, Samuel, Elijah, able to uphold others. The apostles and brethren Pray for guidance in the appointment of a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24), as when they appoint the Seven (Acts 6:6; cf. Acts 13:3), or Pray for the deliverance of St. The farewell Prayers with the elders of Ephesus (Acts 20:36), and the whole congregation of Tyre (Acts 21:5-6), are typical in all probability of many similar services. ...
The teaching and the practice of the mother Church in Jerusalem are reflected in the Epistle of James (James 5:14), where the Prayers of the elders of the Church on behalf of the sick are definitely enjoined; nor is sickness of the soul forgotten in Prayer for forgiveness (James 5:16). Making mention of the Thessalonians in his Prayers, he refers to their faith, hope, and love (1 Thessalonians 1:2-3), and their acceptance of his message as the Word of God (1 Thessalonians 2:13), ‘praying exceedingly that he may see their face and may perfect that which is lacking in their faith’ (1 Thessalonians 3:10). So in 2 Thessalonians 1:11 he Prays that God may count them worthy of His calling and the name of the Lord Jesus Christ be glorified in them. There is a striking phrase in 2 Corinthians 1:11, when he has received the good news from Corinth, and pictures their Prayers for his deliverance from peril: ‘Ye also helping together on our behalf by your supplication; that, for the gift bestowed upon us by means of many, thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf. Paul writes that he makes mention of them unceasingly (Romans 1:8-12), praising God for their faith, and Praying that he may be enabled to come and impart to them some spiritual gift of grace. , rejoicing, as always, in what is fairest in the character of his friends, he Prays that they may have ‘a spirit of wisdom and revelation,’ growth in that knowledge of God which alike proves our efficiency and increases it in our use of His revelation, when our eyes are opened to see the wealth of the glory of His inheritance in the saints, and the greatness of His power. ...
In his next Prayer (Ephesians 3:1; Ephesians 3:14-19) St. So he Prays that Christ may dwell in each heart, for the strength of Christ is conveyed only to those who are fully strong enough to know the love of Christ. ), he Prays that they may be ‘endowed with all wisdom to apprehend [1] verities and all intelligence to follow His processes, living in the mind of the Spirit-to the end that knowledge may manifest itself in practice’ (J. Having this sure grasp of principle, he can dare to Pray for them as patient and long-suffering, and always thankful despite discouragement. ...
In Philippians 1:9-11 he Prays that love and knowledge and discernment may inspire them to approve things that are excellent with a pure conscience that offends none, and a life filled with the fruits of righteousness. Paul is exactly parallel to the method of our Lord’s High-Priestly Prayer (John 17:9), in which intercession is concentrated first on the needs of those given to Him out of the world. Paul Prays most earnestly. he exhorts that ‘supplications, Prayers, intercessions, thanksgivings, be made for all men, for kings and all that are in high place,’ a direction which, as we shall see presently in the letter of Clement, was fervently followed in the Church in Rome, from which city he wrote this last Epistle. Paul that Josephus should actually ascribe the origin of the war which ended with the destruction of Jerusalem to the refusal of the Jews, at the instigation of Eleazar, to offer Prayer for Gentile rulers (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) Prayers of his readers (Hebrews 13:18 f. In 1 John (1 John 5:14) intercession is regarded as the expression of perfect boldness in Prayer which consciousness of a Divine life brings to believers: ‘The energy of Christian life is from the first social’ (Westcott, ad loc. And he shows what a prominent place in the eucharistic Prayers of the Church was given to intercessions (lix. ’...
The Prayer for rulers and governors may also be quoted (lxi. As the vine seeks the support of the elm, let him help the poor man, who is rich in intercession, and gain the support of his Prayers. He requests Prayer for the Church in Syria in all his letters. ‘For, if the Prayer of one and another hath so great force, how much more that of the bishop and of the whole Church’ (ib. To the Romans he writes: ‘Only Pray that I may have power within and without’ (ib. 29): ‘[2] has no delegated grace to avert any sense of suffering; but it supplies the suffering, and the feeling, and the grieving, with endurance: it amplifies grace by virtue, that faith may know what she obtains from the Lord, understanding what-for God’s name’s sake-she suffers. Worlledge, Prayer, 1902; W. Paul, 1907; see also under Prayer
Prayer - There are twelve different words used for Prayer in the O. In the synoptic Gospels the word used in connection with Christ is that most commonly employed for "praying," but in John's gospel the word is that generally rendered, 'ask' or, 'demand. ...
God hears and encourages Prayer. A cry to God is the mark of a soul truly turning to Him: "Behold, he Prayeth," was said of Saul of Tarsus. To the saints it is said, "Pray without ceasing;" "ask and ye shall receive. " "All things whatsoever ye shall ask in Prayer believing ye shall receive. ...
The above passages demonstrate that to receive what is Prayed for, requests must be in faith, they must be according to the light of God's will, and hence made in the name of the Lord Jesus. While Prayer is always to God, it is suggested that requests would naturally be made to the Father in respect of all that tends to the promotion of Christ in believers, as well as in things referring to their discipline in the pathway here. On the other hand Prayer would be made to the Lord in relation to that over which He is set as administrator, such as the service of the gospel, the saints, the house of God, etc. ...
The attitudes in Prayer which are recorded are: 'standing,' 1 Samuel 1:26 ; Mark 11:25 ; 'kneeling,' Daniel 6:10 ; Luke 22:41 ; and 'falling down,' Deuteronomy 9:25 ; Joshua 7:6
Affliction - ...
To endure during times of affliction, Christians should: (1) Pray to the Lord (Psalm 25:18 ; Lamentations 1:9 ; James 5:13 ); (2) comfort others (James 1:27 ; Philippians 4:14 ); (3) remain faithful through the patient endurance of suffering (2 Corinthians 6:4 ; 1 Timothy 4:5 ; James 1:2 ,James 1:2,1:12 ; 1 Peter 4:13 ); (4) cultivate an attitude of joy (James 1:2 ); and (5) follow the example of Jesus Christ (1618166310_73 )
Devil - ; dragon, Revelation 12:7; Revelation 20:2; the god of this world, 2 Corinthians 4:4; the evil one, from whom, in the Lord's Prayer, we are to Pray to be delivered, Matthew 6:13; Matthew 13:19; Matthew 13:38; Luke 11:4, A
World - I Pray not for the world, but for them that thou hast given men
Interpret, Interpretation, Interpreter - , "being interpreted" (of Tabitha, as meaning Dorcas); in 1 Corinthians 12:30 ; 14:5,13,27 , it is used with reference to the temporary gift of tongues in the churches; this gift was inferior in character to that of prophesying unless he who spoke in a "tongue" interpreted his words, 1 Corinthians 14:5 ; he was, indeed, to Pray that he might interpret, 1 Corinthians 14:13 ; only two, or at the most three, were to use the gift in a gathering, and that "in turn" (RV); one was to interpret; in the absence of an interpreter, the gift was not to be exercised, 1 Corinthians 14:27
Persecution - ...
Both Jesus and the New Testament writers taught Christians that they should Pray for their persecutors
Sin Unto Death - The expression "sin unto death" (1 John 5:16-17 ) appears in a context concerning confident, effective Prayer (cf. In this setting, the community is commanded to intercede for fellow believers who occasionally sin, but it is not commanded to Pray for the deadly sins of those outside the community
Merits - Would you have the goodness to stand here and hold hard on this rope; Pray do not leave it, but pull as hard as ever you can till I tell you to let it go
Rahab - (See Matthew 1:1-17) What subjects of wonder the glorious redemption by the Lord Jesus Christ involves in it! Here, as in a thousand instances beside, we learn that the Lord's ways are not our ways, nor his thoughts as our thoughts! I Pray the reader to give a diligent attention to her history, Joshua 2:1-24 throughout
Soul, Spirit - The apostle Prayed for the Thessalonians that spirit (which is probably viewed as the seat of God's work), as well as soul and body might be sanctified. ...
The Holy Spirit being given to the Christian, as the spring in him of life in Christ, he is exhorted to Pray with the spirit, sing with the spirit, walk in the Spirit, so that in some cases it is difficult to distinguish between the Spirit of God and the Christian's spirit
Fo - As they build temples for Fuh, which are filled with images, so also monasteries for his priests, providing for their maintenance, as the most effectual means to partake of their Prayers. These priests pretend to know into what bodies the dead are transmigrated; and seldom fail of representing their case to the surviving friends as miserable, or uncomfortable; that they may extort money from them to procure for the deceased a passage into a better state, or Pray them out of purgatory, which forms a part of their system
Judge - Judge in yourselves is it comely that a woman Pray unto God uncovered? 1 Corinthians 11 ...
JUDGE, To hear and determine a case to examine and decide
Jehoshaphat - He called the people to the temple to Pray (2 Chronicles 20:1-6; 2 Chronicles 20:13) and in reply received God’s assurance of victory (2 Chronicles 20:14-17). Jehoshaphat’s people plundered the defeated army and returned in triumph to Jerusalem to praise God for hearing their Prayers (2 Chronicles 20:18-30)
Bread - So Abraham said to his three guests, “Let a little water, I Pray you, be fetched … and I will fetch a morsel of bread, and comfort ye your hearts …” ( Pray thee, let us detain thee, until we shall have made ready a kid for thee
Hierocles of Alexandria, a Philosopher - "Let us unite Prayer with work. We must Pray for the end for which we work, and work for the end for which we Pray; to teach us this our author says, 'Go to your work, having Prayed the gods to accomplish it'" (p
Popularity - The hypocrites who sound a trumpet before them when they do their alms, who Pray at the corners of the streets for all to see, who disfigure their faces that they may appear to men to fast, are examples of those who seek and obtain the reward of false popularity. Fasting and Prayer that flow from a desire to hold communion with God, charity that is the outcome of gratitude to the Heavenly Father for His wondrous mercy, are ever done in secret, so that there can be no suspicion of any unworthy motive; but the effect of these things is revealed in the man’s whole life and character; it must win for him the praise and love of all good men, and for God the glory. ‘By this,’ He says, ‘shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another’ (John 13:35); and again—‘(I Pray) that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me’ (John 17:21)—Among the disciples there must be no selfish striving for place or power
Popularity - The hypocrites who sound a trumpet before them when they do their alms, who Pray at the corners of the streets for all to see, who disfigure their faces that they may appear to men to fast, are examples of those who seek and obtain the reward of false popularity. Fasting and Prayer that flow from a desire to hold communion with God, charity that is the outcome of gratitude to the Heavenly Father for His wondrous mercy, are ever done in secret, so that there can be no suspicion of any unworthy motive; but the effect of these things is revealed in the man’s whole life and character; it must win for him the praise and love of all good men, and for God the glory. ‘By this,’ He says, ‘shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another’ (John 13:35); and again—‘(I Pray) that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me’ (John 17:21)—Among the disciples there must be no selfish striving for place or power
Elijah - A passion of scorn and contempt; a passion of anger and revenge; a passion of sadness and dejection and despair; a passion of preaching; a passion of Prayer. That man among ourselves who has the most human nature in him and the most heart; the most heart and the most passion in his heart; the most love and the most hate; the most anger and the most meekness; the most scorn and the most sympathy; the most sunshine and the most melancholy; the most agony in Prayer, and the most victorious assurance that, all the time, his Prayer is already answered-that man is the likest of us all to the prophet Elijah; that man has Elijah's own mantle fallen upon him. You know the story of the play-actor who scouted the minister because he dawdled over his Prayers and his sermons as if he was ashamed of his message. And enable me, O my God, to bend all my passions of faith, and love, and hate, and fear, revenge, and remorse, and what not, in upon my own salvation, and the salvation of my people!'...
And then in Prayer. The translators of the New Testament tell us that they have preserved the Apostle James's passionate idiom in the margin of the text, 'Elias with all his passions Prayed in his Prayer. It touches my heart; it speaks to my conscience and that because, after all these years of Prayer, how seldom it is that we really 'pray in our Prayers,' as the apostle tells us that the prophet Prayed. We repeat choice passages of scripture in our Prayers. We praise one man and we blame another man in our Prayers. We pronounce appreciations and we pass judgments in our Prayers. We do everything in our Prayers but truly Pray. The Bible naturally shows a preference for men of like passions with itself; and the more of his passions any man puts into his Prayer, the more space and the more praise the Bible gives to that man. Jacob was a prince in the passionateness of his Prayer all that night at the Jabbok. Jacob's raging passions really tore him to pieces that terrible night in his Prayer. There was not on the face of the earth another night of passion in Prayer like that for the next two thousand years. Now, let any man among ourselves henceforth Pray in his Prayers like Jacob and Elijah: let any man among ourselves determine to put his passions into his Prayers like Jacob and Elijah, and it will make him a new man. Nothing in the world so renews a man as putting his passions into his Prayers. O why do we ministers not preach more about Prayer, and about the employment of our own and our people's passions in Prayer! But if your ministers do not so preach, and do not know the way-you are independent of them. There is a great literature of Prayer, and it would splendidly and immediately repay and reward you and your households to have it in your hands every day. ...
But Elijah would not be the great lesson to us that he is if he were always Elijah, with all his passions at all times at a flame in his Prayers. It is our passions coming out of our Prayers and coming in between us and our despisers, opposers, and persecutors. Samuel's wisdom and sweetness and absolute heavenly-mindedness never came out more than in his solitary and superseded old age, when he counselled and comforted the people, and said, God forbid that I should sin against the Lord in ceasing to Pray for you; but I will still teach you the good and the right way. And it was Prayer that did it; and it was putting all his remaining passions still into his Prayers to his very end; and it was in that way that Samuel did it, and that Elijah at last learned to do it also. For, what was the chariot of Israel to Elijah that day, but Elijah's heart already in heaven? And what were those horses of fire that day, but all Elijah's passions all harnessed, in all their heaven-bounding strength, to that heavenly chariot? His faith, his fearlessness, his scorn of evil, his Prayerfulness, his devotion to Israel and to God
Lydia - Many women, and among them Lydia, resorted to the place by the river Gangites or Gaggitas "where Prayer was wont to be made"; possibly a proseuchee was there, "the meeting place of Jewish congregations in Greek cities" (Winer), or "a place of Prayer as opposed to a synagogue or house of Prayer" (Conybeare and Howson, Life of Paul). The seashore was esteemed by the Jews a place most pure, and therefore suited for Prayer; at their great fast they used to leave their synagogues and Pray on every shore in Tertullian's (de Jejun
Justice - In order that public justice may be upheld, too, the Christian is urged to Pray for kings and all in high places of authority (1 Timothy 2:1 f
Anthropomorphitae - ) teach that God in order to be an object of love must be the highest beauty and consequently have a body since there is no beauty without form; nor could we Pray to a God Who was mere spirit. anthropomorphism was held independently by many Egyptian monks in the Scetic desert who with Pachomius at their head were the most violent opponents of the spiritualistic theology of Origen and were likewise called Anthropomorphites; they felt the need of material conceptions in their Prayers and ascetic exercises
Compassion, Merciful - So men Pray: “Remember, O Lord, thy tender mercies and thy loving-kindnesses” ( Neomenia - In the Prayers of the synagogue, they read from Psalm 113, to 118. On the evening of the Sabbath which follows the new moon, or some other evening following, when the new moon first appears, they assemble and Pray to God, as the Creator of the planets, and the restorer of the new moon; raising themselves toward heaven, they entreat of God to be preserved from misfortune; then, after mentioning David, they salute each other, and separate
Fatherhood of God - They were to Pray, "Father, hallowed by your name" ( Luke 11:2 ). " (Matthew 6:9 is not an exception, for here Jesus is teaching his disciples how they [4] should Pray. It occurs in blessings (Romans 1:7 ; 1 Corinthians 1:3 ), doxologies (Romans 15:6 ), thanksgivings (2 Corinthians 1:3 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:2-3 ), Prayers (Colossians 1:12 ), exhortations (Ephesians 5:20 ), and creeds (1 Corinthians 8:6 ; Ephesians 4:6 ). These include the disciples; the earliest congregations ( Romans 8:15 ; Galatians 4:6 ); the earliest church councils ("I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth "); and Christian churches all over the globe who over the centuries have Prayed together "Our Father who art in heaven, Hallowed by thy name. Jeremias, The Prayers of Jesus ; J
Greeting - ...
The greetings of Hellenistic letters typically contained a Prayer for the health of the recipients. 3 John 1:2 provides the best New Testament example: “Beloved, I Pray that all may go well with you and that you may be in good health, just as it is well with your soul” (NRSV). Paul greatly expanded his opening Prayers. Most of his letters begin with a Prayer of thanksgiving, usually for the recipients. Ephesians begins with a benediction rather than a Prayer of thanksgiving (also 1 Peter 1:3-5 ; Revelation 1:4-6 ). In the Pauline corpus only Galatians lacks an opening Prayer. Closing greetings often included a Prayer or benediction
Family - 16:2: “And Sarai said unto Abram … I Pray thee, go in unto my maid
Temptation - Jesus taught His disciples to Pray: “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil” ( Matthew 6:13 )
Directory - It was designed to supply the place of the Liturgy, or Book of Common Prayer, the use of which they had abolished. It consisted of some general heads, which were to be managed and filled up at discretion; for it prescribed no form of Prayer, or circumstances of external worship, nor obliged the people to any responses, excepting Amen. It prescribes heads for the Prayer before sermon; it delivers rules for preaching the word; the introduction to the text must be short and clear, drawn from the words or context, or some parallel place of Scripture. ...
The Directory recommends the use of the Lord's Prayer, as the most perfect model of devotion; it forbids private or lay persons to administer baptism, and enjoins it to be performed in the face of the congregation; it orders the communion-table at the Lord's supper to be so placed, that the communicant may sit about it. It also orders, that the sabbath be kept with the greatest strictness, both publicly and privately; that marriage be solemnized by a lawful minister of the word, who is to give counsel to, and Pray for the parties; that the sick be visited by the minister under whose charge they are; the dead to be buried without any Prayers or religious ceremonies; that days of fasting are to be observed when the judgments of God are abroad, or when some important blessings are desired; that days of thanksgiving for mercies received be also observed; and, lastly, that singing of Psalms together in the congregation is the duty of Christians
Tiberias, Sea of - And He went up into a mountain apart to Pray
Zedekiah - When he asked Jeremiah to Pray that God would remove the Babylonians, Jeremiah replied that God would not remove them
Orphan - They are no longer spiritual orphans but can begin to Pray, "Our Father" (Matthew 6:9 )
Book (2) - Our Lord said to His Apostles (Luke 10:20), ‘Rejoice because your names are written in heaven’; and in the OT (Exodus 32:32) there is express mention of a book which God had written: ‘If not, blot me, I Pray thee, out of thy book which thou hast written
Day (That) - ‘In that day’ the disciples shall recognize their Lord’s Divinity, and Pray to the Father in His name
Fear - Jacob Prayed: “Deliver me, I Pray thee, from the hand of my brother, from the hand of Esau: for I fear him, lest he will come and smite me, and the mother with the children” ( Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - 116), and that nothing remained but to Pray for their conversion (v
Nation - ...
The word ‘am, “people, nation,” suggests subjective personal interrelationships based on common familial ancestry and/or a covenantal union, while gôy suggests a political entity with a land of its own: “Now therefore, I Pray thee, if I have found grace in thy sight, show me thy way, that I may know thee, that I may find grace in thy sight: and consider that this nation is thy people” ( House - ...
Outside the house, steps led up to the roof, which was a flat area used as a place to relax, sleep, Pray and worship (Jeremiah 32:29; Mark 2:4; Mark 13:15; Acts 10:9)
Montanus, Bishop of Toledo - " An expression of thanks "to the glorious king Amalaric," with regard to whom the bishops Pray that "throughout the unnumbered years of his reign he may continue to afford us the licence of carrying through all that pertains to the cultus fidei," concludes the Acts
Vengeance (2) - Others may hate and persecute him; he must love and Pray for them, and do them good. We must remember, not only Christ’s ‘resist not,’ but also His ‘pray for,’ and His ‘love. He taught His disciples to Pray that they might be forgiven as they forgave others (Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4). On the other hand, we have His patient endurance of all manner of personal abuse, His heart-broken lament over Jerusalem (Matthew 23:37 ||), His bearing during and after His trial (Matthew 26, 27), and above all, His Prayer on the cross: ‘Father, forgive them: for they know not what they do’ (Luke 23:34). It would mean an utter absence of the love which Christ inculcates, which desires and Prays for the good of the enemy
God, Name of - People call on, pronounce blessings, minister, preach, speak, Pray, believe, take oaths, and wage war in his Name. Solomon goes on to Pray that when the Israelites direct their Prayers toward the temple, God would "hear from heaven, your dwelling place" (vv. God's name is the theme and basis for worship, Prayer, and actions just as it was in the Old Testament. People are to believe on Jesus' name (John 1:12 ; 2:23 ) and to Pray in his name (14:13-14 )
Prayer - Prayer is in itself a becoming acknowledgment of the all-sufficiency of God, and of our dependence upon him. A sense of want excites desire, and desire is the very essence of Prayer. " Prayer without desire is like an altar without a sacrifice, or without the fire from heaven to consume it. When all our wants are supplied, Prayer will be converted into praise; till then Christians must live by Prayer, and dwell at the mercy seat. "O thou that hearest Prayer; unto thee shall all flesh come," Psalms 65:2 . Prayer is a spiritual exercise, and can only be performed acceptably by the assistance of the Holy Spirit, Romans 8:26 . "The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord, but the Prayer of the upright is his delight. " The Holy Spirit is the great agent in the world of grace, and without his special influence there is no acceptable Prayer. All acceptable Prayer must be offered in faith, or a believing frame of mind. Prayer is to be offered for "things agreeable to the will of God. Our Prayers must therefore be regulated by the revealed will of God, and come within the compass of the promises. These are two necessary ingredients in acceptable Prayer. "I Prayed," says the Prophet Daniel, "and made confession. From them we learn only, that God has appointed it; that he enjoins it to be offered in faith, that is, faith in Christ, whose atonement is the meritorious and procuring cause of all the blessings to which our desires can be directed; and that Prayer so offered is an indispensable condition of our obtaining the blessings for which we ask. That reason has sometimes been said to be the moral preparation and state of fitness produced in the soul for the reception of the divine mercies which the act and, more especially, the habit of Prayer must induce. What is it that fits man for forgiveness, but simply repentance? Yet that is expressly said to be the "gift" of Christ, and supposes strong operations of the illuminating and convincing Spirit of truth, the Lord and Giver of spiritual life; and if the mere acts and habit of Prayer had efficiency enough to produce a Scriptural repentance, then every formalist attending with ordinary seriousness to his devotions, must, in consequence, become a penitent. Again: if we Pray for spiritual blessings aright, that is, with an earnestness of desire which arises from a due apprehension of their importance, and a preference of them to all earthly good, who does not see that this implies such a deliverance from the earthly and carnal disposition which characterizes our degenerate nature, that an agency far above our own, however we may employ it, must be supposed? or else, if our own Prayers could be efficient up to this point, we might, by the continual application of this instrument, complete our regeneration, independent of that grace of God, which, after all, this theory brings in. It may indeed be said, that the grace of God operates by our Prayers to produce in us a state of moral fitness to receive the blessings we ask. But this gives up the point contended for, the moral efficiency of Prayer; and refers the efficiency to another agent working by our Prayers as an instrument. Still, however, it may be affirmed, that the Scriptures no where represent Prayer as an instrument for improving our moral state, in any other way than as the means of bringing into the soul new supplies of spiritual life and strength. In fact, all genuine acts of Prayer depend upon a grace previously bestowed, and from which alone the disposition and the power to Pray proceed. So it was said of Saul of Tarsus, "Behold, he Prayeth!" He Prayed in fact then for the first time; but that was in consequence of the illumination of his mind as to his spiritual danger, effected by the miracle on the way to Damascus, and the grace of God which accompanied the miracle. By whatever means God may be pleased to fasten the conviction of our spiritual danger upon our minds, and to awaken us out of the long sleep of sin, that conviction must precede real Prayer, and comes from the influence of his grace, rendering the means of conviction effectual. Thus it is not the Prayer which produces the conviction, but the conviction which gives birth to the Prayer; and if we pursue the matter into its subsequent stages, we shall come to the same result. We Pray for what we feel we want; that is, for something not in our possession; we obtain this either by impartation from God, to whom we look up as the only Being able to bestow the good for which we ask him; or else we obtain it, according to this theory, by some moral efficiency being given to the exercise of Prayer to work it in us. We ask for pardon of sin, for instance; but this is an act of God done for us, quite distinct from any moral change which Prayer may be said to produce in us, whatever efficiency, we may ascribe to it; for no such change in us can be pardon, since that must proceed from the party offended. We ask for increase of spiritual strength; and Prayer is the expression of that want. And if it be urged, that Prayer at least produces in us a fitness for the supply of spiritual strength, because it is excited by a sense of our wants, the answer is, that the fitness contended for consists in that sense of want itself which must be produced in us by the previous agency of grace, or we should never Pray for supplies. There is, in fact, nothing in Prayer simply which appears to have any adaptation, as an instrument, to effect a moral change in man, although it should be supposed to be made use of by the influence of the Holy Spirit. The word of God is properly an instrument, because it contains the doctrine which that Spirit explains and applies, and the motives to faith and obedience which he enforces upon the conscience and affections; and although Prayer brings these truths and motives before us, Prayer cannot properly be said to be an instrument of our regeneration, because that which is thus brought by Prayer to bear upon our case is the word of God itself introduced into our Prayers, which derive their sole influence in that respect from that circumstance. Prayer simply is the application of an insufficient to a sufficient Being for the good which the former cannot otherwise obtain, and which the latter only can supply; and as that supply is dependent upon Prayer, and in the nature of the thing consequent, Prayer can in no good sense be said to be the instrument of supplying our wants, or fitting us for their supply, except relatively, as a mere condition appointed by the Donor. ...
If we must inquire into the reason of the appointment of Prayer, and it can scarcely be considered as a purely arbitrary institution, that reason seems to be, the preservation in the minds of men of a solemn and impressive sense of God's agency in the world, and the dependence of all creatures upon him. " It is then equally in mercy to us, as in respect to his own honour and acknowledgment, that the divine Being has suspended so many of his blessings, and those of the highest necessity to us, upon the exercise of Prayer; an act which acknowledges his uncontrollable agency; and the dependence of all creatures upon him; our insufficiency, and his fulness; and lays the foundation of that habit of gratitude and thanksgiving which is at once so meliorating to our own feelings, and so conducive to a cheerful obedience to the will of God. And if this reason for the injunction of Prayer is no where in Scripture stated in so many words, it is a principle uniformly supposed as the foundation of the whole scheme of religion which they have revealed. One has been grounded upon a supposed predestination of all things which come to pass; and the argument is, that as this established predetermination of all things cannot be altered, Prayer, which supposes that God will depart from it, is vain and useless. The answer which a pious predestinarian would give to this objection is, that the argument drawn from the predestination of God lies with the same force against every other human effort, as against Prayer; and that as God's predetermination to give food to man does not render the cultivation of the earth useless and impertinent, so neither does the predestination of things shut out the necessity and efficacy of Prayer. It would also be urged, that God has ordained the means as well as the end; and although he is an unchangeable Being, it is a part of the unchangeable system which he has established, that Prayer shall be heard and accepted. The Scriptures represent God, for instance, as purposing to inflict a judgment upon an individual or a nation, which purpose is often changed by Prayer. ...
In this case either God's purpose must be denied, and then his threatenings are reduced to words without meaning; or the purpose must be allowed; in which case either Prayer breaks in upon predestination, if understood absolutely, or it is vain and useless. To the objection so drawn out it is clear that no answer is given by saying that the means as well as the end are predestinated, since Prayer in such cases is not a means to the end, but an instrument of thwarting it; or is a means to one end in opposition to another end, which, if equally predestinated with the same absoluteness, is a contradiction. ...
Prayer is in Scripture made one of these conditions; and if God has established it as one of the principles of his moral government to accept Prayer, in every case in which he has given us authority to ask, he has not, we may be assured, entangled his actual government of the world with the bonds of such an eternal predestination of particular events, as either to reduce Prayer to a mere form of words, or not to be able himself, consistently with his decrees, to answer it, whenever it is encouraged by his express engagements. ...
A second objection is, that as God is infinitely wise and good, his wisdom and justice will lead him to bestow "whatever is fit for us without Praying; and if any thing be not fit for us, we cannot obtain it by Praying. Paley very well replies, "that it may be agreeable to perfect wisdom to grant that to our Prayers which it would not have been agreeable to the same wisdom to have given us without Praying for. " This, independent of the question of the authority of the Scriptures which explicitly enjoin Prayer, is the best answer which can be given to the objection; and it is no small confirmation of it, that it is obvious to every reflecting man, that for God to withhold favours till asked for, "tends," as the same writer observes, "to encourage devotion among his rational creatures, and to keep up and circulate a knowledge and sense of their dependency upon him. "...
But it is urged, "God will always do what is best from the moral perfection of his nature, whether we Pray or not. All that can be rationally meant by such a phrase is, that, in the circumstances of the case, God will always do what is most consistent with his own wisdom, holiness, and goodness; but then the disposition to Pray, and the act of Praying, add a new circumstance to every case, and often bring many other new circumstances along with them. ...
But if the efficacy of Prayer as to ourselves be granted, its influence upon the case of others is said to be more difficult to conceive. Those who bow to the authority of the Scriptures will see, that the duty of Praying for ourselves and for others rests upon the same divine appointment; and to those who ask for the reason of such intercession in behalf of others, it is sufficient to reply, that the efficacy of Prayer being established in one case, there is the same reason to conclude that our Prayers may benefit others, as any other effort we may use. Whatever reason, therefore, might lead him to connect and interweave the interests of one man with the benevolence of another, will be the leading reason for that kind of mutual dependence which is implied in the benefit of mutual Prayer. That all Prayer for others must proceed upon a less perfect knowledge of them than we have of ourselves, is certain; that all our petitions must be, even in our own mind, more conditional than those which respect ourselves, though many of these must be subjected to the principles of a general administration, which we but partially apprehend; and that all spiritual influences upon others, when they are subject to our Prayers, will be understood by us as liable to the control of their free agency, must also be conceded; and, therefore, when others are concerned, our Prayers may often be partially or wholly fruitless. He who believes the Scriptures will, however, be encouraged by the declaration that "the effectual fervent Prayer of a righteous man," for his fellow creatures, "availeth much;" and he who demands something beyond mere authoritative declaration, as he cannot deny that Prayer is one of those instruments by which another may be benefited, must acknowledge that, like the giving of counsel, it may be of great utility in some cases, although it should fail in others; and that as no man can tell how much good counsel may influence another, or in many cases say whether it has ultimately failed or not, so it is with Prayer. It is a part of the divine plan, as revealed in his word, to give many blessings to man independent of his own Prayers, leaving the subsequent improvement of them to himself. They are given in honour of the intercession of Christ, man's great "Advocate;" and they are given, subordinately, in acceptance of the Prayers of Christ's church, and of righteous individuals
Jacob - And here is his Prayer that night, preserved word for word to us his sons; his instant Prayer after the scouts came back: 'l am not worthy of the least of all the mercies, and of all the truth, which Thou hast showed to Thy servant: for with my staff I passed over this Jordan; and now I am become these twl bands. Deliver me, I Pray Thee, from the hand of my brother Esau, lest he smite me, and the women with. It is points like that in a Prayer and in a psalm that touch and take captive both God and man. And now, at the return to Jabbok, with that staff he made his Prayer and praise to God, as if it had been some sacred instrument of a priest which had power with God. And, no doubt, we all have a staff, or a pen, or a ring, or book, or a Bible, or something or other that has gone with us through all our banishments, migrations, ups and downs in life, and when our hearts are soft and our Prayers come upon us we again take that old companion by the hand. Prayer, such Prayer as Jacob Prayed that night, is the princeliest act any man can possibly perform. The noblest, the grandest, the boldest, the most magnificent act a human being can perform on this earth is to Pray; to Pray, that is, as Jacob Prayed at Peniel. Few men-one here and another there-ever come to any princeliness at all, either in their Prayers or in anything else. Jacob had twenty years, and more, of sin and of sorrow, of remorse and of repentance, of gratitude for such a miraculous past, and of beaten-back effort after a better life, and then, to crown all, he had that unparalleled night of fear and Prayer at the Jabbok; a night's work such that even the Bible has nothing else like it till our Lord's night in Gethsemane,-and it is only after all that, and far more than Moses with all his honesty and all his subtlety has told us,-it is only then that Jacob is proclaimed of God a prince with God. You must understand that Prayer, to be called Prayer, is not what you hear people all about you calling Prayer. That is not Prayer. Prayer is colossal work. Prayer takes all our heart, and all our soul, and all our strength, and all our mind, and all our life, sleeping and waking. Prayer is the princeliest, the noblest, the most unearthly act on this side heaven. Only Pray, then; only Pray aright, and enough, and it will change your whole nature as it changed Jacob's
Sermon on the Mount - He taught his disciples how to Pray (Matthew 6:7-15; Matthew 7:7-12), how to have new attitudes of trust in God for all life’s material needs (Matthew 6:19-34), how to examine their attitudes (Matthew 7:1-5) and how to be wise in deciding what is wholesome and what is not (Matthew 7:6; Matthew 7:15-23)
Hand - Bishops in confirming and ordaining now can only Pray for the gift of the Holy Spirit to be bestowed on the candidates, not give it
Find - Pray, sir, how do you find yourself this morning
Right Hand - In other contexts yâmı̂yn signifies “direction toward”: “Is not the whole land before thee? Separate thyself, I Pray thee, from me: if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left” ( Joel, Book of - Priests and all are called to weep and Pray
Johanan - ) Johanan consulted the prophet that Jehovah, Jeremiah's God, might show the Jewish remnant "the way wherein to walk, and the thing to do" (Jeremiah 42); imitating pious Hezekiah's request for Isaiah's intercession (Isaiah 37:4), "lift up thy Prayer for the remnant that is left. Jeremiah reminds Johanan and his company that Jehovah is their God as well as his (wholehearted obedience is therefore their part: Exodus 19:5-6; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20); and that He will Pray, and whatsoever Jehovah shall answer he will declare, "keeping nothing back" (Acts 20:20)
Praedestinatus, an Author - They might fast, Pray, and give alms, but nothing could avail them, because they had not been predestined to life. , write against Heracleon, who lived in the latter half of the century; the Tertullianists are condemned by Soter, who must have been dead 30 years before Tertullian separated from the church; the imaginary heresiologist, Hesiod of Corinth, is made to be the bishop who first opposed Arius, and in answer to whose Prayers that heretic died
Head, Headship - A man may Pray to God in public but not dressed so that he shows allegiance to another, namely, with head covered. A woman may Pray and prophesy in public if her dress shows submission to her husband's authority (1 Corinthians 11:5-6 ). ...
If people do not treat each other with respect, their Prayers may be hindered (1 Peter 3:7 )
Sorcery - ] ...
From the word בִּשׁף, not used in the Qal, but evidently meaning ‘to Pray,’ we have the Piel בּשֵף, which means ‘to Pray intensely and effectively. ]'>[2] The participle of this word מְבַשֵׁף means one who by intense Prayer, or spell, achieves supernormal results
Job, Book of - He said, "Enquire, I Pray thee, of the former age, and prepare thyself to the search of their fathers. They must take a sacrifice, and Job must Pray for them: Job was God's servant, and him God would accept
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Let us Pray
Office, Divine - As contained in approved Breviaries, the group of psalms, hymns, Prayers, readings from the Old and New Testaments, patristic homilies, and lives of saints, arranged and formulated by the Church, whereby daily public or liturgical Prayer is offered to God. It is the public and official Prayer by which the Church, as a visible society and as the Mystical Body of Christ, offers in union with her Divine Founder, adoration and supplication to God. In consequence, the regulation of this official Prayer depends upon the supreme authority in the Church who deputes certain representatives (the priesthood) to fulfill this obligation in the name of the universal Church. "It is the common Prayer which is offered to God by the minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas). It follows from these dogmatic principles that all the faithful habitually Pray in the recitation of the Office and that a priest, even though he recite the Office privately, Prays in the name of the entire Church. From Apostolic days, the Church dedicated certain fixed hours to public Prayer. ), which previously had been hours of private Prayer, had become a public fixed custom. From the earliest days it was the Book of Psalms that furnished the groundwork of this public Prayer. As contained in the Breviary, the Office is divided into: rubrics or directions for the recitation of the Office; the Ordinary, or the normal framework of the Office; the Psalter, or the psalms assigned to each hour of each day; the Proper of the Season, or the Prayers and current scriptural reading and patristic homilies; the Proper of the Saints, or the Prayers and historical lessons for the Office of the saints; the Common of the Saints, or certain variable parts of the Office which may be used for many saints according to their classification; a Supplement, containing the Office of B
Divine Office - As contained in approved Breviaries, the group of psalms, hymns, Prayers, readings from the Old and New Testaments, patristic homilies, and lives of saints, arranged and formulated by the Church, whereby daily public or liturgical Prayer is offered to God. It is the public and official Prayer by which the Church, as a visible society and as the Mystical Body of Christ, offers in union with her Divine Founder, adoration and supplication to God. In consequence, the regulation of this official Prayer depends upon the supreme authority in the Church who deputes certain representatives (the priesthood) to fulfill this obligation in the name of the universal Church. "It is the common Prayer which is offered to God by the minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas). It follows from these dogmatic principles that all the faithful habitually Pray in the recitation of the Office and that a priest, even though he recite the Office privately, Prays in the name of the entire Church. From Apostolic days, the Church dedicated certain fixed hours to public Prayer. ), which previously had been hours of private Prayer, had become a public fixed custom. From the earliest days it was the Book of Psalms that furnished the groundwork of this public Prayer. As contained in the Breviary, the Office is divided into: rubrics or directions for the recitation of the Office; the Ordinary, or the normal framework of the Office; the Psalter, or the psalms assigned to each hour of each day; the Proper of the Season, or the Prayers and current scriptural reading and patristic homilies; the Proper of the Saints, or the Prayers and historical lessons for the Office of the saints; the Common of the Saints, or certain variable parts of the Office which may be used for many saints according to their classification; a Supplement, containing the Office of B
Hezekiah - Isaiah warned the king to prepare for his approaching death, but Hezekiah Prayed that God would intervene. Hezekiah, dressed in sackcloth and ashes, went to the Temple to Pray. Hezekiah took the letters to the Temple and Prayed for God's help
Intercession - "At that day ye shall ask in my name, and I say not unto you, that I will Pray the Father for you; for the Father himself loveth you, because you have loved me, and have believed that I came out from God. And it is highly important to remark, and a point that should never be lost sight of, that Christ in all his intercessions never once Prayeth for the Father's love to the church, but for the fruits and effects of that love and his own merits and death
Repetitions - —The word ‘repetitions’ is found in the Gospels only in the phrase ‘vain repetitions’ in Matthew 6:7 ‘When ye Pray (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘in Praying’), use not vain repetitions, as the heathen (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘the Gentiles’) do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking. That the later Jews were liable to wordiness in Prayer might be inferred from the Lord’s warnings, and is put beyond doubt by a number of passages in the Talmud. 32b) that the righteous of an earlier age used to devote three hours a day to Prayer and six-hours to waiting, an hour before and an hour after each hour of Prayer. Jochanan ben Zakai, warned his hearers against formalism: ‘When thou Prayest, make not thy Prayer an ordinance, but an entreaty before God’ (’Abôth, ii
Purgatory - ...
And this is what he is taught concerning purgatory, which, though he know not where it is, of what nature the pains are, or how long each soul is detained there, yet he believes that those who are in this place are relieved by the Prayers of their fellow-members here on earth, as also by alms and masses offered up to God for their souls. And as for such as have no relations or friends to Pray for them, or give alms or procure masses for their relief, they are not neglected by the memoration of all the faithful departed in every mass, and in every one of the canonical hours of the divine office
Advocate - ‘I will Pray the Father, and another Advocate he will give you, that he may be with yon for ever the Spirit of Truth
Anglo-Saxon Church - Aldhelm and Alcuin sang her praises in Latin, Cynewulf in Anglo-Saxon; a 10th-century litany contains the following supplications to the Blessed Virgin (in Latin): ...
Holy Queen of the World,...
Holy Saviouress of the World,...
Holy Redemptress of the World,...
Pray for us
Tithes - And on this ground he was to Pray for the divine blessing on Israel
Elisha - For we read, that the men of the city said unto the prophet, "Behold, I Pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth, but the water is naught, and the ground barren
Purgatory - And this is what he is taught concerning purgatory; though he know not where it is, of what nature the pains are, or how long each soul is detained there, yet he believes that those who are in this place are relieved by the Prayers of their fellow members here on earth, as also by alms and masses offered up to God for their souls. And as for such as have no relations or friends to Pray for them, or give alms to procure masses for their relief, they are not neglected by the church, which makes a general commemoration of all the faithful departed, in every mass, and in every one of the canonical hours of the divine office
Mennonites - In their private meetings every one has the liberty to speak, to expound the Scriptures, and to Pray. Their common method is this: The person to be baptized kneels, the minister holds his hands over him, into which the deacon pours water, so that it runs on the head of the baptized; after which follow imposition of hands and Prayer
Naaman - He also requested the prophet, that he might have two mules' load of earth to carry home with him from the land of Israel, most probably intending to build an altar with it in his own country; which seems, indeed, to be implied in the reason with which he enforces his request: "Shall there not, I Pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules' burden of earth; for thy servant will henceforth offer neither burnt-offering nor sacrifice to other gods but unto Jehovah
Throne - " And Stewart observes, "We marched toward the emperor with our music playing, till we came within about eighty yards of him, when the old monarch, alighting from his horse, prostrated himself on the earth to Pray, and continued some minutes with his face so close to the earth, that, when we came up to him, the dust remained upon his nose
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Let us Pray
Peace - " And blessedly doth he open his commission, when acting as the servant of his royal master, he adds,"Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us we Pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God
Curse, Cursing, Cursed, Accursed - A — 1: ἀρά (Strong's #685 — Noun Feminine — ara — ar-ah' ) in its most usual meaning, "a malediction, cursing" (its other meaning is "a Prayer"), is used in Romans 3:14 (often in the Sept. 2, primarily signifies "to Pray against, to wish evil against a person or thing," hence "to curse," Matthew 25:41 ; Mark 11:21 ; Luke 6:28 ; Romans 12:14 ; James 3:9
Tongue - 14 gives instruction concerning the use of the gift, the paramount object being the edification of the church; unless the "tongue" was interpreted the speaker would speak "not unto men, but unto God," 1 Corinthians 14:2 ; he would edify himself alone, 1 Corinthians 14:4 , unless he interpreted, 1 Corinthians 14:5 , in which case his interpretation would be of the same value as the superior gift of prophesying, as he would edify the church, 1 Corinthians 14:4-6 ; he must Pray that he may interpret, 1 Corinthians 14:13 ; if there were no interpreter, he must keep silence, 1 Corinthians 14:28 , for all things were to be done "unto edifying," 1 Corinthians 14:26
Oil (Olive) - -With this must be connected in some sense the much-discussed passage (James 5:14) where the elders of the Church are directed to Pray over the sick brother, ‘anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. that in James the healing of the sick is ascribed directly to ‘the Prayer of faith’ (v. After the Reformation we find that the First Prayer Book of Edward VI. ’ In the Prayer Book of 1552 this provision disappears
Paul the Aged - As Paul says about Prayer, read in your New Testament without ceasing. ...
And, not only read your very best, but Pray your very best also, and that literally without ceasing. If for no other reason than just to make up a little before you die for ever, for your long life, now for ever past, and in which you have found time for everything but Prayer, and for every one but God. Or, when you go back with Paul and take a turn up and down in your unregenerate state, do you ever come upon slain souls who are now under the altar, and who cry continually concerning you-How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost Thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth! Pray, O unforgiven old man! Pray without ceasing, all the time that is now left you. Up, and read Paul without ceasing, and Pray without ceasing, till you also shall stand on tiptoe with expectation and with full assurance of faith
Samuel - ' Good Sir Joshua has helped multitudes of good mothers to teach their children to Pray. And she said to Eli: O my lord, as thy soul liveth, I am the woman that stood by thee here, Praying unto the Lord. For this child I Prayed: therefore also I have lent him to the Lord: as long as he liveth he shall be lent to the Lord. And all that must have worked powerfully together to make young Samuel the pure, Prayerful, holy child before God and man that he early was and continued to be. ...
And all happy children who have mothers like Hannah, and who all their days keep themselves pure in heart and Pray like Samuel, they see God clearer and clearer all their days. And never lie down in your own bed without Prayer for them till you are sure that they see God. ...
But, crowning all and sanctifying all was Samuel's life of Prayer. Samuel was a proverb of Prayer. The tradition of Hannah's psalm and Prayer was well known to every young prophet in Samuel's school, and her best memories were perpetuated and transmitted in the devotional life and labours of her son. ' As much as to say that Samuel stands at the head of all the men of Prayer in Israel, just as Moses and Aaron stand at the head of all the prophets and priests in Israel. The successors of Moses and Aaron were a glorious enough succession; but all that fades and vanishes away before the far greater glory of pure and unceasing Prayer, and especially of unceasing intercessory and undeserved Prayer. 'As for me,' said Samuel, 'God forbid that I should sin against the Lord in ceasing to Pray for you. Samuel, then, among them that Pray for their enemies and for them that despitefully use them. Samuel among them that cease not to Pray for the prosperity of those who have taken their place in the world and in the Church, and in the hearts and the mouths of men. Samuel among them who have such a pure heart that nothing will ever turn their heart to gloom, or bitterness, or discontent, or retaliation, or to anything else, but to still more Prayer
Jonah, Theology of - Sailors Pray but also throw out cargo, cast lots, row, and interrogate (1:5-13). ...
While life still remains, it is never too late to Pray for salvation. As Jonah is at the point of losing consciousness, he remembers, and his Prayer leads to his deliverance (2:1,6, 8)
Holy Spirit, the - David Prays "take not Thy Holy Spirit from me" (Revelation 1:4-5,). ...
He is invoked in Prayer to revive Israel long dead spiritually and politically (Ezekiel 37:9): "Come, O Life breath, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live. His office is distinguished from that of Christ, and yet identified with it: "I will Pray the Father, and He shall give you ANOTHER Comforter . ...
As Christ intercedes for us in heaven, so the Holy Spirit intercedes in us on earth, "for we know not what we should Pray for as we ought, but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered
Priesthood of the Believer - Any believer can be the channel of God's Spirit and mediate the grace of God in Prayer, confession, or witness in particular situations. The question immediately arises, “What are these spiritual sacrifices?” Hebrews 13:15-16 lists praise of God in Prayer and song, doing good, sharing with others. Biblical examples of that ministry include:...
(1) We are urged to Pray for one another, offering the priestly ministry of intercessory Prayer
Call, Calling - ...
Second, the verb can have the sense of “calling on God,” hence, to Pray
Ministry - Bishop), whose duties are to feed the flock and help the weak ( Acts 20:17 ; Acts 20:28 ; Acts 20:35 , 1 Peter 5:2 ) to visit and Pray for the sick ( James 5:14 ), to rule and teach ( 1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 3:5 )
Reap - They will have some kind of arrangement whereby they can get alone to Pray when the Spirit offers that suggestion
Law - 13:14), and “Receive, I Pray thee, the law from his mouth, and lay up his words in thine heart” (Job 22:22)
Demon - In a similarway the Roman Catholics Pray to the Virgin and the saints to intercede for them
Joannes Talaia, Bishop of Nola - Shortly afterwards John was sent by the Catholics of Alexandria to the emperor Zeno, to thank him for the restoration of Salofaciolus, and to Pray that when a vacancy occurred in the see they might choose his successor. Acacius, taking offence at not receiving a synodic from John, joined the Monophysites in their appeal to the emperor against him, and prevailed upon Zeno to write to Simplicius, Praying him not to acknowledge John (Simplic. , who cited Acacius to answer certain charges brought against him by Talaia, and wrote to the emperor Praying him to withdraw his countenance from Mongus and restore John ( Libell
Call, Calling - But it can mean more broadly to Pray (Psalm 17:6 ; John 1:6 ; Matthew 26:53 ), and indeed can signify a whole act of cultic worship (Genesis 12:8 ; 1 Chronicles 21:26 ). Because they bear his name, Paul Prays that "the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you" (2 Thessalonians 1:12 ). "We constantly Pray for you, that our God may count you worthy of his calling" (2 Thessalonians 1:11 )
Spirituality - ...
The individual appropriated this history and identity, especially in his or her Prayer life. The Psalter, for instance, supplied worshipers with Prayers to express petitions, praise, thanksgiving, and repentance, just as the Psalter would do for Christians. ...
Israel's Prayer life went beyond the Psalter, though. God is even argued with, particularly to persuade God that the Pray-er's cause is just and that God would be benefited if the request were granted (Genesis 18:25 ; Exodus 32:11-12 ). ...
Developing and keeping this single focus is accomplished by spiritual disciplines like Bible reading, meditation, Prayer, fasting, church attendance, giving things away, and serving others. Initially, this begins by repenting (metanoia [1] turning our spiritual eyes away from our former conceptions of the world to see life from Christ's vantage point), followed by concentrating on, focusing on, conceptualizing, and even imaging Christ's character and God's presence and activity primarily through Scripture reading and Prayer in the context of the fellowship of believers. Bloom, Beginning to Pray ; R
Joseph - " How natural was it now for his brethren to think that the tie by which alone they could imagine Joseph to be held to them was dissolved, that any respect he might have felt or feigned for them must have been buried in the cave of Machpelah, and that he would now requite to them the evil they had done! "And they sent a messenger unto Joseph, saying, Thy father did command before he died, saying, So shall ye say unto Joseph, Forgive, I Pray thee now, the trespass of thy brethren, and their sin; for they did unto thee evil. " And then they add of themselves, as if well aware of the surest road to their brother's heart, "Forgive, we Pray thee, the trespass of the servants of the God of thy father
Litany of the Holy Name - ...
Let us Pray
Delight - ...
God is also delighted with honesty in business (Proverbs 20:23 ), a blameless life (11:20), truthfulness (12:22), and the Prayers of the upright (15:8). Faith is essential if we are to please God (Hebrews 11:6 ), and God is especially delighted when we Pray to those in authority (1 Timothy 2:3 )
Holy Name, Litany of the - ...
Let us Pray
King, Christ as - When we Pray “Your kingdom come” as we do in the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6:10 ), we have in mind this present rule of Christ the King
Godly, Godliness - Communion with God is to be zealously cultivated: "Let everyone who is godly Pray to you while you may be found" (Psalm 32:6 )
Adoption - This drives out the fear sinners experience in the presence of the holy God and provides power to Pray trustingly to God as our “Abba,” or “Daddy
Famine - " (Hosea 3:4-5) But let not the reader close up his view of this spiritual famine as it relates to the Jews, without going farther, and enquiring whether the threatening may not belong equally to the Gentile church? yea, and whether it is not now in the present hour accomplishing in the earth? Is there not a famine of hearing the word of the Lord in numberless places which are called Christian countries, as well as idolatrous lands? Are there not multitudes who call themselves after Christ, but yet know no more of him than the name? Yea, to come nearer home, are there not villages and country places in this kingdom where the spiritual famine prevails, notwithstanding our land is called, a land of Bibles, and societies for disseminating the word of God are every where opening? Alas! while the grand and distinguishing principles of the faith of Christ are so openly and impudently denied; while God the Father's gracious purposes in the gift of salvation by his dear Son, is thought nothing of; while the GODHEAD of Christ, and redemption wholly by his blood, is daringly opposed; and while the person, work, and influence of God the Holy Ghost is not made the very foundation of a sinner's hope, in reading the sacred word to make wise unto salvation; while these things are kept in the back ground, and the object with many in teaching is but to introduce a flimsy system of morality to supply the place of vital godliness, is there not still a famine, yea, with many, with the Bible in their hand? Pious regenerated Christians see this, and find cause to mourn in secret over it; while they can only Pray the Lord to take away the reproach of our land, and remove this spiritual famine from our people
Wicked - Facing the terrible force of the “wicked,” the righteous Prayed for God’s deliverance and for His judgment upon them. 6:37: “Yet if they bethink themselves in the land whither they are carried captive, and turn and Pray unto thee in the land of their captivity, saying, We have sinned, we have done amiss, and have dealt wickedly
Colosse - Paul assures them, that since he had heard of their faith in Christ Jesus, and of their love to all Christians, he had not ceased to return thanks to God for them, and to Pray that they might increase in spiritual knowledge, and abound in every good work; he describes the dignity of Christ, and declares the universality of the Gospel dispensation, which was a mystery formerly hidden, but now made manifest; and he mentions his own appointment, through the grace of God, to be the Apostle of the Gentiles; he expresses a tender concern for the Colossians and other Christians of Phrygia, and cautions them against being seduced from the simplicity of the Gospel, by the subtlety of Pagan philosophers, or the superstition of Judaizing Christians; he directs them to set their affections on things above, and forbids every species of licentiousness; he exhorts to a variety of Christian virtues, to meekness, veracity, humility, charity, and devotion; he enforces the duties of wives, husbands, children, fathers, servants, and masters; he inculcates the duty of Prayer, and of prudent behaviour toward unbelievers; and after adding the salutations of several persons then at Rome, and desiring that this epistle might be read in the church of their neighbours the Laodiceans, he concludes with a salutation from himself, written, as usual, with his own hand
Mary - To adore her as the "queen of heaven," and the "mother of God," is, in the light of the Bible, blasphemous idolatry; and to Pray to her as divine, or even as a mediator with God implies that she possesses the attribute of omnipresence, and degrades the only and sufficient Mediator, 1 Timothy 2:5 Hebrews 4:16 . Many such hospitable Christian homes, and places of social Prayer, even in troublous times, are forever enshrined in the remembrances of the people of God
Nehemiah - He Prayed a confession (Nehemiah 1:5-11 ). They Prayed a long Prayer of confession (Nehemiah 9:6-37 ). Note his Prayers and how practical they were (Nehemiah 1:4-11 ; Nehemiah 2:4 ; Nehemiah 4:4-5 ,Nehemiah 4:4-5,4:9 ; Nehemiah 5:19 ; Nehemiah 8:9-12 ,Nehemiah 6:9,6:14 ; Nehemiah 13:14 ,Nehemiah 13:14,13:22 ,Nehemiah 13:22,13:29 ,Nehemiah 6:9:31 ). God's leaders must be responsive spiritually to needs in God's work and must Pray (1618166310_98 ). God's leaders will Pray in the face of ridicule and insult (Nehemiah 4:1-9 ). God's leaders must encourage weary workers with practical, Prayerful faith (Nehemiah 4:13-15 ). God's people give practical expression to Prayerful repentance (Nehemiah 9:6-37 )
Maxentius, Joannes, Presbyter And Archimandrite - " They further Pray the papal legates to hear their accusations against Victor and Paternus (May 30, 519, Labbe, iv. The four departed for the West early in May 519, and Justinian and the Roman legates duly notify their departure to Hormisdas, and Pray him to reject their appeal
the Rich Man And Lazarus - "Let there be no strife, I Pray thee, between me and thee, and between my herdmen and thy herdmen; for we be brethren. Is not the whole land before thee? Separate thyself, I Pray thee, from me: if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will take the right: or if thou depart to the right hand, I will go to the left. He admitted that his five brothers had the Prayerbook and the Bible. Among my father's servants we had a man in black who read Prayers morning and night: but I seldom was present, and when I was present, I always fell asleep. Now, my sons and my daughters, what are your good things? And what are your evil things? What is your treasure? And where is it? On what is your heart set day and night? When you Pray to your Father in secret, for what do you most importunately and unceasingly ask? Child of God, I will answer for you
the Ten Virgins - "What things soever ye desire, when ye Pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them. " That is to say, as soon as in Prayer you ask the Father for the Holy Spirit, immediately believe that your Prayer is answered. And the Holy Ghost is best to be bought, is only to be bought, in secret Prayer. " And again: "But thou, when thou Prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, Pray to thy Father which is in secret, and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly. "What," demanded his Master, in shame and pain at Peter's sloth and indifference in this very same matter, "What, could ye not watch with Me one hour?" Watch and Pray for the Holy Spirit, He means. And had Peter but spent that one hour with Him who hears Prayer and thus sells His oil, he would have played a far better part all through the thick darkness of that dark night, and all through the still thicker darkness of tomorrow and tomorrow night. That "hour" of Prayer, which is now so haunting you, will never all your days let you alone. Not till the door is shut will that secret "hour" of Prayer give over pursuing you. As Seneca says, "Nothing is so dear as that which is bought by Prayer. All the time of supper and Prayers at home they will be hiding this terrible parable in their hearts. After supper and Prayers I petitioned for another half-hour's reading of the notes he had preserved of Dr. "but we always take our candles immediately after Prayers
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - Now, there was one special kind of Prayer that Daniel Cormick was greatly noted for among those who were intimate with him. All ministers Pray much and earnestly before preaching. The minister of Sardis, who never Prayed at any other time in all the week, to be called Prayer, was always in real anxiety and earnestness before he entered the pulpit, because he had such a name for preaching to keep up. They are so afraid that they may forget or displace things, or in other ways disappoint your expectations, that they Pray with all their heart till God, according to His promise, hears them and carries them through again without a stumble. The difference with Daniel Cormick was that he would get, now Robert M'Cheyne, and now Andrew Bonar, and now John Baxter, to Pray both with him and for him after his preaching. As if He had said, 'Hold fast by thy temptations, and thy meditations, and thy Prayers both before and after preaching
Intercession - (ihn tuhr cehss' shuhn) The act of intervening or mediating between differing parties; particularly the act of Praying to God on behalf of another person. Old Testament The heroes of Old Testament faith are in most cases heroes of intercessory Prayer. After the people built the golden calf, Moses Prayed for God's mercy, calling on God to remember His reputation among the nations and His promises to the patriarchs. Through intercessory Prayer, Moses sought to make an atonement for sin, identifying himself so completely with the people that he asked to be blotted out of God's book if God would not forgive the people's sin (Exodus 32:30-34 ). When God rejected Saul, Samuel Prayed in grief (1 Samuel 15:11 ). ...
In dedicating the Temple, Solomon asked God to hear the Prayers of the sinful people and forgive them (1 Kings 8:1 ; compare 1 Kings 3:3-14 ). Elijah accused God of bringing “evil upon the widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son” (1 Kings 17:20 ) and Prayed successfully that the child would live again. Hezekiah took Sennacherib's letter to the Temple and opened it before God, Praying for deliverance from the Assyrians (Isaiah 37:14-20 ). Amos Prayed that God's word would not come to pass (Amos 7:5-6 ). Lamentations is filled with Prayers for the nation. God told Jeremiah to forsake the prophetic duty of intercession: “Pray not thou for this people, neither lift up cry nor Prayer for them, neither make intercession to me: for I will not hear thee” (Jeremiah 7:16 ). Paul in his letters constantly referred to his Prayers for the readers, and Jesus set forth the supreme example of intercession (Luke 22:32 ; Luke 23:34 ; John 17:1 ). Romans 8:26-27 shows that the Holy Spirit works to sustain the burdened believer, to intercede to carry even inexpressible Prayers to God. God accepts a believer's Prayers and praises through Christ's intercession. See Prayer
Exhortation - To grasp the meaning of ‘exhort’ and ‘exhortation,’ as technical terms, it should be noticed that the verb παρακαλέω is, in many cases, translated ‘pray’ or ‘desire’ in Authorized Version , and ‘beseech’ or ‘intreat’ in Revised Version when, however, the appeal so expressed springs from some personal wish or judgment, whereas the terms ‘exhort’ and ‘exhortation’ are retained for instances where the basis of appeal is some Divinely-given truth or revelation (cf
Peace - Psalm 122 is one of those great psalms in celebration of and in Prayer for the “peace of Jerusalem”: “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: they shall prosper that love thee” ( Stretch Out - The Levite was asked to “comfort thine heart, I Pray thee
House - This word can even be applied to a one-room dwelling: “And he [1] said [2], Behold now, my lords, turn in, I Pray you, into your servant’s house …” ( Satan - The writer Prayed concerning those who were “adversaries” to his soul: “Let them be confounded and consumed that are adversaries to my soul; let them be covered with reproach and dishonor that seek my hurt” ( Pray for them ( Prayed: “Set thou a wicked man over him: and let Satan stand at his right hand” ( Call - In a theological sense, to Pray to or worship as, to call on the name of the Lord
Jude, the Epistle of - " Insubordination, self seeking, and licentiousness, resulting from antinomian teachings, are the evils stigmatized, against which Jude gives the only safeguards, namely, that believers should "build themselves in their most holy faith, and Pray in the Holy Spirit
Theodotus, Martyr at Ancyra - Before he would eat, Theodotus sent some of their number to summon the presbyter from the neighbouring village of Malus to dine with them, Pray with them before they started afresh on their journey, and ask a blessing on their food, for, says the Acts, "the saint never took food unless a presbyter blessed it. " The presbyter, whose name was Fronto, or, according to the Bollandist Papebrochius, Phorto, was just leaving the church after the midday hour of Prayer. He Prayed with the brethren, and told them to give his relics to Fronto if he brought a ring as a token
Isaac - ...
His contemplative character appears in his "going out to meditate" or Pray "in the field at the eventide. " The death of his mother Sarah just before (Genesis 23) naturally pressed upon his spirit, and his resource in affliction was Prayerful meditation, a type of Him who "went out into a mountain apart to Pray" (Matthew 14:23), his calm and submissive temper also prefiguring the meek and lowly Lamb of God Isaiah 53:7). Solitude and Prayer suit best the wounded spirit. ...
The gift from God of the twin sons was the answer to Isaac's Prayer, after 20 years of childless marriage; for God in giving the greatest blessings delays fulfilling His promise in order to call forth His people's persevering, waiting, Prayerful faith (Genesis 25:21). As Abraham is associated with morning Prayer, and Jacob associated with night Prayer, so Isaac with evening Prayer (Genesis 19:27; Genesis 28:11; Genesis 28:32; Genesis 24:63)
Deliver - Believers are to Pray for deliverance from the threat of evil that dominates the world (Matthew 6:13 ; Luke 11:4 )
Remember - ...
Because of this God’s people Pray, as Moses: “Turn from thy fierce wrath
Anointing - Instances of the second occur in John 9:6; John 9:11, Revelation 3:18 ‘eyesalve to anoint thine eyes,’ and are generally found in Mark 6:13 ‘they anointed with oil many that were sick, and healed them,’ and James 5:14 ‘Is any among you sick? let him call for the elders of the church; and let them Pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. The anointing oil was not merely medicinal, but consecrated the patient to God, and, together with Prayer, was the means of conveying to him the Divine healing life
Dinooth, Dinothus, Abbat of Bangor Iscoed - Being about to give battle, he observed their "priests," who were there to Pray for the soldiers, drawn up apart in a place of greater safety, and under the military protection of prince Brocmail
Ask - See BESEECH , DESIRE , INTREAT , Pray , REQUEST
Gifts of the Spirit - ...
At the same time individual Christians should desire spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 14:1) and should Pray for them (Romans 12:3-5), especially the more important gifts (1 Corinthians 12:31)
Saul - 'Tell me, I Pray thee,' said Saul to a stranger he met on his way when he was in despair about his father's lost asses, 'where is the Seer's house. When his sin found him out, and when salvation was at his very door, the poor graceless castaway had no higher request to make of Samuel than this: 'Honour me, I Pray thee, before the people. Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and Pray for them that despitefully use you and persecute you
Prayer - PrayER . Prayer in the Bible is the uplifting of the heart to God with whatever motive. But the apparent failure of Prayer may be more instructive than its outward success. (Apart from Christ’s Prayer in Gethsemane
(5) Other terms regard the suppliant’s state of mind: Prayer is ‘an outpouring of soul’ ( e. Unlike most OT words, this is used for Prayer to God only. Romans 9:3 ), and needs supplementing to mean ‘prayer’ ( e. Acts 18:18 ); but ‘prayer’ in James 5:15 . ...
(2) ‘To call on the Name’ or invoke in Prayer ( e. ...
(5) Prayer is a ‘struggle’ ( e. But, later, the Temple was the place where ( Isaiah 37:14 ff; Isaiah 56:7 ) or (in absence) ‘toward’ which Prayer was offered ( 1 Kings 8:29-30 etc. Synagogues afforded, in later times, local Prayer-centres. Where there was no synagogue, a spot outside the town was chosen, near some stream, for hand-washing before Prayer ( Acts 16:13 ; Deuteronomy 26:5-11 ). Distinctively Christian worship was held in ordinary buildings ( 1 Kings 17:20-213 ; Job 42:1-66 ; Acts 12:12 , Colossians 4:15 ) a practice made natural by Jewish arrangements for private Prayer ( Daniel 6:10 , Jdt 8:6 ; Jdt 10:2 , Matthew 6:8 , Acts 10:9 ; Acts 10:30 ) or for Passover celebration ( Matthew 26:16 ). Ostentatious Praying at street corners is discouraged by Christ ( Matthew 6:5 ). It became a custom to Pray thrice daily, i. ...
(2) Forms of Prayer : ( a ) formulæ ( Deuteronomy 21:7-8 ; Deuteronomy 26:5-15 ); ( b ) the Lord’s Prayer; ( c ) allusion to the Baptist’s ( Luke 11:1 ); ( d ) Christ’s repeated Prayer ( Matthew 26:44 ); ( e ) allusion to ‘vain repetitions’ or ‘battology’ ( Matthew 6:7 , cf. Real incense was (certainly in later OT period) in use at sacrificial ceremonies, with which Prayer was probably always associated (cf. Incense typifies Prayer ( Psalms 141:2 ; cf. Being appropriate for times of solicitude and sorrow, fasting naturally became associated with Prayer ( Psalms 35:13 ), especially after the Exile ( Nehemiah 1:4 , Daniel 9:3 ; cf. ]'>[10] allusions to fasting coupled with Prayer are absent from RV
(i. Prayer is (1) colloquy with God ( e. The reticence as to Prayer might suggest that it is voluntary and not patient of legislation; but in OT it is less a general duty (ct. (1) Moses pre-eminently a man of Prayer and an intercessor ( e. Jeremiah 15:1 ): colloquy with God ( Romans 8:27 ; Exodus 4:1-31 ; Exodus 5:22 ; Sir 28:1-4 ; Exodus 6:10 ; Exodus 6:12 ; Exodus 6:28-30 , Deuteronomy 3:23-25 ), appeal in crises ( Genesis 14:22 , Numbers 11:11 ), prophetic blessing ( Deuteronomy 33:6-11 ); (2) Joshua’s Prayer after defeat ( Joshua 7:7-9 ), and in battle ( Joshua 10:14 ); (3) Gideon’s colloquy ( Judges 6:11-24 ); (4) Israelites’ frequent cry for help ( Judges 3:9 ; Judges 3:15 ; Judges 6:6 etc. 1618166310_58 ); (2) David : apart from the Psalms, with which his connexion is dubious, the following Prayers may be noted, especially the last: for guidance ( 1 Samuel 23:2 ; 1 Samuel 30:8 [15]), on behalf of child ( 2 Samuel 12:18 ), Prayer of asseveration ( 1 Samuel 24:12-15 ; 1 Samuel 25:22 [13] 1 Kings 8:63 ) sacrifice is not mentioned! The Temple is a house of Prayer); (4) Elijah’s intercession ( 1 Kings 18:36-37 ), colloquy ( 1 Kings 19:9-11 ), Prayer before miracle ( 1618166310_59 ), so also Elisha ( 2 Kings 4:33 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ); (5) Hezekiah Prays in national crisis ( 2 Kings 19:15 ) and in illness ( 2 Kings 20:3 ); note his assertion of righteousness. Hence comes Prayerful expectancy ( e. 1618166310_29 ; Amos 7:5-6 , Isaiah 63:9-17 , and vividly Jeremiah 14:15 [18]), combined with Prayer in view of personal difficulty ( e. In this period Prayer looms large, owing to the cessation of sacrificial worship and the realization of chastisement. Further, note the personal Prayer-habit of Jewish leaders ( Daniel 6:1-28 , Ezra 8:21-23 ). Nehemiah’s Prayer is often ejaculatory ( Nehemiah 2:4 ; Nehemiah 4:4 ), and sometimes betrays self-complacency ( Nehemiah 5:13 ; Nehemiah 13:14 ; Nehemiah 13:22 ). The Book of ‘Praises’ might be appropriately called also the Book of ‘Prayers. ) (1) Throughout the Psalms, Prayer whether of the poet as an individual or as representing the nation is specially an outpouring artless and impulsive of varied experiences, needs, desires. The trend of the whole collection is indicated by its ready and natural adaptation to NT ideals of Prayer. John 15:4 , Jdt 8:31 , Sir 35:16 , James 5:10 ), and Agur’s Prayer ( Proverbs 30:7-9 ). As a ‘cry in the dark’ the book re-echoes Prayers like Ezra 9:5 ; but the conflict of doubt culminates in the colloquy between God and Job, in which the latter expresses the reverent submission of faith ( 1618166310_68 ). Prayer in the Apocrypha . ]'>[12] books of fiction, fable, history, with apocalyptic and sapiential writings are of very unequal value, but contain many Prayers. The ideas are on the whole admirable, sometimes reaching a distinctively NT level; the thought in 2Ma 12:44 as to Prayer in relation to the dead is noteworthy (cf. Zerubbabel’s thanksgiving (4:68 69); Prayer for journey, with confession (8:78 90). Prevailing Prayer of Tobit and Sarah ( Tob 3:1-15 ); Tobias urged to Pray ( Tob 4:19 ) Prays in nuptial room ( Tob 8:4-8 ); thanksgiving of Raguel ( 1618166310_25 ), Tobit ( Tob 11:14-15 ; Tob 11:17 ; Tob 11:13 ). Except where general supplication is made ( Jdt 4:9 to Jdt 13:16 ; Exodus 5:22 ; Jdt 7:29 ), or where Judith’s intercession is sought ( Jdt 8:31 ), Prayer in this romance is of a very unworthy kind: Prayer for the success of a trick (ch. 9); Prayer and the plans of Holofernes ( Jdt 11:17-18 ); Prayer before slaying him ( Jdt 13:4-5 ). Prayers of Mordecai (13:8 18) and Esther (14:3 19) in national peril. 9 19 are in Prayer-form. Note the picturesque illustration of manna and the morning Prayer ( Wis 16:27-28 ). In this book Prayer reaches heights: value of Prayer ( Sir 21:5 ), true Prayer heard of God ( Proverbs 15:6 ), Prayer in sickness ( Sir 38:8 ; Sir 38:14 , cf. James 5:14-16 ), for deliverance from sin ( 1618166310_55 ), Prayer and alms ( Sir 7:10 ), ‘battology’ ( Sir 7:14 , cf. Matthew 6:7 ), Prayer and revenge ( Exodus 6:1 , cf. Matthew 6:14 ; Matthew 18:21-22 ), national Prayer against foe ( Sir 36:1-17 ), thanksgiving, led by Simon ( Sir 50:21-24 ), author’s closing Prayer ( Sir 51:1-12 ). Jews of Babylon ask those of Jerusalem to Pray for welfare of Nebuchadnezzar (1:11; cf. Ezra 6:10 , Jeremiah 29:7 , 1 Timothy 2:2 ); Prayer and confession of captive Israelites (1:15 3:8, where note Prayer by the dead, 3:4, but see RVm the Publican - The Pharisee came up to the temple not caring who saw him or who heard him when he was at his Prayers. He had nothing to say in his Prayers of which he had any reason to be ashamed. But all the same, there was One teaching and healing in the temple that day who not only saw both the Pharisee and the publican, but who, without listening, heard them both Pray, and read all that was in both their hearts. It was because Solomon's Prayer, offered long ago at the dedication of the temple, was fulfilled in the publican. The whole of the publican's case is explained beforehand in that one profound petition of Solomon's Prayer. Justification was but the half of the publican's Prayer, and it was not the most poignant and most pressing half. And, as many of yourselves know, it takes many a visit to the temple, and many a far-off stand in the temple, and many a penitent Prayer both in the temple and in your own house, and many a beat of the breast everywhere, before the exceedingly complex work of sanctification can be safely said to be begun in you, not to say finished in you. You are not to suppose that this was the first time, much less the one and the only time, those two men had come up in that way to the temple to Pray
Day - Prayer is offered for daily bread (Matthew 6:9-13,31-34 ). Since within the larger span of history, any one person's days are like a shadow (1 Chronicles 29:15 ; Psalm 102:11 ), it is appropriate to Pray for wisdom (Psalm 90:12 )
Samuel - Samuel showed his authority among his people by demanding that they get rid of their foreign gods and by leading them in Prayer and confession to God (1 Samuel 7:3-6). But he was still their spiritual leader, and he continued to teach them and Pray for them (1 Samuel 12:23-25)
Synagogue - A typical service consisted of the recitation of the Shema (confession of faith in the one God), Prayers, Scripture readings from the Law and the Prophets, a sermon, and a benediction. He warned against giving and Praying in order to be seen and praised (Matthew 6:2 ,Matthew 6:2,6:5 ). Paul, therefore, went to a place where faithful Jews met to Pray on the Sabbath (Acts 16:13 )
Carmel - " From it Ahab "went up" to the sides of Carmel to take part in the sacrificial feast; Elijah went up to "the top" of the mountain to Pray for rain: while Gehazi seven times climbed the highest point from whence the Mediterranean is to be fully seen over the W
Servant of the Lord, the - This led the early church to Pray that as God's servants they would speak with boldness and perform miracles through the name of “your holy servant Jesus” ( Acts 4:29-30 NIV)
Foreigner - Solomon's Prayer at the inauguration of the temple implied that it was to be a house of Prayer for all peoples, as Israelite and foreigner could both Pray to its Lord (1 Kings 8:41-43 ; cf. They must live in hope and faith, Praying for the invasion of the kingdom and waiting patiently for the gift of a new Canaan, a new Eden, where they can reside with their God (Revelation 21-22 )
Spirit - The psalmist Prays for a steadfast spirit (Psalm 51:10 ). Weakness of flesh can prove stronger than the spirit's will to Pray (Mark 14:38 )
Sabbath - And perhaps in allusion to this it might be that our Lord, speaking of the destruction of Jerusalem, enjoined his disciples to Pray that their flight might not be in the winter, neither on the Sabbath day
Bless - When expressed by men, a “blessing” was a wish or Prayer for a blessing that is to come in the future: “And [3] give thee the blessing of Abraham, to thee, and to thy seed with thee; that thou mayest inherit the land wherein thou art a stranger, which God gave unto Abraham” ( Pray thee, my blessing that is brought to thee; because God hath dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough
Arminians - The Arminians are also called Remonstrants, because, in 1611, they presented a remonstrance to the states-general, wherein they state their grievances, and Pray for relief
Borrow - For when she brought Samuel to the temple, she tells Eli, for this child (said she) I Prayed, and the Lord "hath given me my petition which I asked of him;" therefore also, I have lent him to the Lord; as long as he liveth he shall be lent to the Lord. And I would ask, Is not that day, yea, that very day, at hand? Hath not the Lord, even now, been planting the gospel in Egypt? Hath not our God, when working by terrible things in righteousness, as he doth in the present awful war, caused even the Musselmen and inhabitants of Egypt to look on the congregations and Prayer meetings of some of our pious soldiers who have been there? The writer of this hath himself received testimony to this striking providence of our God from a faithful soldier of the Lord Jesus Christ, as well as a faithful servant of his king and country, who was there, and an eye-witness to such characters looking in upon them, when he and a few of his devout comrades met together to read the Scriptures, and Pray, and sing praises to the Lord
Land - A further variation of this nuance refers to the actual soil itself: “Shall there not then, I Pray thee, be given to thy servant two mules’ burden of earth [3]?” (2 Kings 5:17)
Philippians, Theology of - Romans 12:1-2 ); doxologies are to be sung to God (4:20); Prayer is to be directed to God (1:3,9). This realization gives Paul great incentive to Pray for his friends (1:9) and strong confidence to encourage his friends to do the sameto worry about nothing but to Pray about everything (4:6). ...
He urges the Philippians to Pray with thanksgiving so that they might keep their equilibrium and direction in a world heaving with anxiety-creating situations (4:6)
Nebuchadnezzar - For, said the wise and prescient judges, if that little savage does that to a tame bird when he is still young, what will he not do to the men who are in his power when he is hardened in vice? And they put him to death, and paid no attention to the Prayers of his mother. ...
But Nebuchadnezzar would not have needed to be made to eat grass as an ox if he had early enough and often enough asked Daniel to teach him to Pray. Prayer would have done it to Nebuchadnezzar also. For, was not Nebuchadnezzar, with all his power and with all his pride, prostrate again and again at Daniel's feet? Did not king Nebuchadnezzar fall upon his face, and worship Daniel, and command that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours to Daniel? What could it have been, then, that kept Daniel's heart so sweetly humble through all that, till Daniel was a man greatly beloved of Him who resisteth the proud and giveth grace to the humble? It was Prayer that did it. It was secret Prayer that did it. It was his place of secret Prayer three times a day every day he lived that did it. Seneca says somewhere that nothing is bought so dear as that which is bought with Prayer-that is to say, you must sell all if you would truly Pray. You must begin with selling all your pride, and everything else as you proceed in Prayer, down to your whole soul. I am dust and ashes, said Abraham, not at the beginning, but as he went on in Prayer. We are dust and ashes, and far worse than that, says Hooker also, as he went on in Prayer. Count the cost, then, before you propose to be a man of Prayer. But, then, on the other hand, if any man has come to this, that he would fain, if it were possible, put on humility before both God and man, then let that man Pray without ceasing. Enough Prayer will work all possible humility into the proudest heart. Prayer every day, and many times every day, and all the day, would bring down and would abase into the very dust very Lucifer himself
David - in His Services - Think, people of God, of the honour to David, higher far than all the thrones on earth and in heaven,-the unparalleled and immortal honour of being able to teach Jesus Christ to sing and to Pray. For, when the Holy Child said to Mary, Mother, teach Me to sing and to Pray, what did Mary do, hiding all that in her heart, but put into her Child's hands David's golden Psalm beginning thus: The Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not want. And when I think also of the multitudes that no man can number to whom David's Psalms have been their constant song in the house of their pilgrimage; in the tabernacle as they fell for the first time hot from David's heart and harp; in the temple of Solomon his son with all the companies of singers and all their instruments of music; in the synagogues of the captivity; in the wilderness as the captives returned to the New Jerusalem; in the New Jerusalem every Sabbath-day and every feast-day; in the upper room, both before and after supper; in Paul's prison at Philippi; in the catacombs; in Christian churches past number; in religious houses all over Christendom at all hours of the day and the night; in deserts, in mountains, in dens and caves of the earth; in our churches; in our Sabbath-schools; in our families morning and evening; in our sickrooms; on our death-beds; and in the night-watches when the disciples of Christ watch and Pray lest they enter into temptation
Necessity - John 6:39); John 6:44 ‘No man can come unto me, except the Father draw him’ (ἑλκύσῃ αὐτον); John 10:28 ‘they shall never perish, and no one shall snatch them out of my hand’; John 12:39 ‘for this cause they could not believe, for that Isaiah saith again, He hath blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart’; John 17:9 ‘I Pray for them, I Pray not for the world’; John 17:12 ‘not one of them perished, but the son of perdition, that the scripture might be fulfilled’ (cf. no hostile power) shall snatch them out of my hand’ (John 10:28) does not preclude the possibility that they may snatch themselves out of Christ’s hand by unfaithfulness; that the ‘drawing’ of the Father (John 6:44) is the attraction of Divine Love, not the Irresistible Call of Calvinism; that the ‘I Pray not for the world’ of John 17:9 is to be read in the light of John 17:23, that the ‘blinding’ and ‘hardening’ of John 12:40 are a penalty for past sin; and that even the case of Judas was not one of individual predestination
Keeping - The last usage of the word ‘keep’ refers to the Divine care of men, and occurs in our Lord’s Intercessory Prayer (17). And now that He is to be ‘no more in the world,’ He Prays the Father to keep them in the name of Himself as Father. That the disciples’ faith in God as Father might be characterized by assurance, is the burden of Christ’s Prayer (see Westcott, ad loc. (b) John 15:15 shows us another aspect of the meaning of the Divine ‘keeping’: ‘I Pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world, but that thou shouldest keep them from (Gr. The point to notice is that the experience, and the only experience, of Divine ‘keeping’ which Christ by His example encourages men to Pray for and anticipate, consists not in immunity from adversity, injuries, suffering, sorrow, and death, but in maintenance in a condition of certitude with regard to the Father’s love and of perseverance in the path and practice of goodness—freedom from evil
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - Have a good half-hour to read and think and Pray. And then take a moment or two at the Table to Pray for those who are as dear to you as your own soul. At peace also with all men, and full of love and Prayer for all men. And amid all these things you will henceforth be one of the most watchful, and Prayerful, and humble-minded, and easy to live with, of men
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - The first said unto the servant, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go to see it; I Pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to prove them; I Pray thee have me excused
Ephesians, Epistle to - It contains (1) the salutation (1:1,2); (2) a general description of the blessings the gospel reveals, as to their source, means by which they are attained, purpose for which they are bestowed, and their final result, with a fervent Prayer for the further spiritual enrichment of the (Ephesians (1:3-2:10);); (3) "a record of that marked change in spiritual position which the Gentile believers now possessed, ending with an account of the writer's selection to and qualification for the apostolate of heathendom, a fact so considered as to keep them from being dispirited, and to lead him to Pray for enlarged spiritual benefactions on his absent sympathizers" ((2:12-3:21);); (4) a chapter on unity as undisturbed by diversity of gifts (4:1-16); (5) special injunctions bearing on ordinary life ((4:17-6:10);); (6) the imagery of a spiritual warfare, mission of Tychicus, and valedictory blessing (6:11-24)
Simon Magus - Peter rebuked him in language of such sternness as to lead him to beg of the Apostle to Pray that the judgment of God might not fall upon him for his sin. He is reported to have flown for a certain distance over Rome, but, through Peter’s Prayers, to have fallen and broken his leg, and to have been ultimately stoned to death by the populace. Another form of the tradition represented Paul as a companion of Peter in the contest, and as Praying while Peter adjured the demons that supported Simon in his flight, in the name of God and of Jesus Christ, to uphold him no longer
Unwritten Sayings - , commenting on the words ‘Watch and Pray,’ addressed to St
Esther - When Esther prepares herself to present herself unrequested into the presence of the king, Prayer does not accompany fasting. God's people must act and Pray in times of danger (Esther 4:5-17 )
Ignorance - Hence Christians knew not what to Pray for as they should at particular moments (Romans 8:26), but in this ignorance the Holy Spirit helped within the heart by unutterable groanings
Nonconformists - So great was the severity of these times, says Neale, that they were afraid to Pray in their families, if above four of their acquaintance, who came only to visit them, were present: some families scrupled asking a blessing on their meat if five strangers were at table
Rebels - If I err, I Pray the Lord to forgive me, and to preserve the reader from following my opinion
Zerubbabel - The decree was found at Achmetha ((See ECBATANA), a delicate proof of Scripture accuracy, that being Cyrus' court residence; and Darius decreed anew the building of the temple with three rows of great stones and a row of new timber at the king's expense, and the restoration of the golden and silver vessels, and the supply of young bullocks, rams, and lambs for burnt offerings, and wheat, salt, wine, and oil, that they might offer sacrifices of sweet savours unto the God of heaven, and Pray for the life of the king and of his sons
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - 398 conversed with Isaacus to whom he assigns the 9th and 10th of his Conferences (Collationes) which treat of Prayer. In the former Isaacus distinguishes four kinds of Prayer according to 1Ti_2:1 (Collat. Then he expounds at length the Lord's Prayer (cc. The highest type however is Prayer "unuttered unexpressed," like that of Christ on the mountain or in the garden (c. Isaacus proceeds to shew how to attain to perfect and unceasing Prayer. 10 gives as a Prayer suited to all emergencies the verse Psa_70:1. Ill Prays he who only Prays when upon his knees. He Prays never who even upon his knees is distracted by wandering thoughts. Such as we would be found when Praying such should we be before we Pray
Synagogue - Prayers also were doubtless offered, but how far these resembled the modern Jewish ritual is not known. The Lord spoke of the hypocrites who loved to Pray standing in the synagogues, where they also ostentatiously offered their alms
Jephtha - And it may be farther asked, Is not the expression in the vow, "shall surely be the Lord's," similar to that of Hannah's, in dedicating the child she asked of God in Prayer. And when she had weaned him, she brought him into the house of the Lord in Shiloh, and brought the child to Eli: and she said, For this child I Prayed, and the Lord hath given me my petition; therefore also I have lent him to the Lord: as long as he liveth he shall be lent unto the Lord. (See Judges 11:34-40) But having now stated all I think necessary to state on the subject, I leave the reader to his own opinion, taught, as I Pray he may be, by the grace of God, only adding one short observation: how blessed is the condition of God's Israel now, freed from vows and sacrifices, while looking to, and wholly depending upon that glorious, all-sufficient, all effectual offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all, "whereby he has perfected for ever them that are sanctified
Separate - “When they had sent unto the home of God Sherezer and Regemmelech, and their men, to Pray before the Lord, And to speak unto the priests which were in the house of the Lord of hosts, and to the prophets, saying, Should I weep in the fifth month, separating myself [1], as I have done these so many years?” ( Government - If that is the case, they must, like Christ, accept suffering without retaliation, Praying for their persecutors and committing their cause to God (1 Peter 2:20-23; cf. In such countries Christians can not only Pray for God’s will to be done on earth, but they can actively work for those values of justice, freedom, morality, honesty and compassion that God desires for human society (Matthew 6:10)
Eli - But if the Forerunner had to fast from his locusts to help him to subdue his pride; if it was only after many unwitnessed days and nights of sweat and Prayer and blood that he was enabled to hand over John and Andrew to Jesus whom he had baptized but yesterday beyond Jordan; then John the Baptist is of some use to you and to me. ' Our old ministers when they had a father at the pulpit-foot were used to make him swear that he would Pray 'both with and for' his children. We scold and scowl at them, and we beat and bruise and lock them up, when we should Pray both with them and for them. If, when they tell a lie, or steal, or speak bad language, or strike one another, or defiantly disobey us, we would neither lift a hand nor a tongue at them, but would take them to our place of Prayer, and there Pray both with and for them,-as sure as I stand here and you sit there,-there would be fewer sons and daughters of Belial in our houses
Balaam - Just listen to some passages out of Balaam's Prayers and prophecies and exhortations, and judge for yourselves whether he was a man of divine gifts or no. ...
Balaam's importunity in Prayer: Balaam on his knees all night to know God's will, when he knew it all the time-a great deal of our own anxiety, and perplexity, and Prayer, and importunity in Prayer is made up out of the same self-deceit. And with a profanity and an impudence that might well have made Balaam blush and become a new man, Balak said to Balaam, Let nothing, I Pray thee, hinder thee from coming to me. Come, therefore, I Pray thee, curse me this people. And thus it is that as often as Balaam's insincerity, hesitation, sleepless anxiety about duty, Prayer, and importunity in Prayer are seen in us, He who gave way to Balaam gives way to us also, and says, Yes, surely. Do you remember how James Stuart dragged Robert Bruce about, seeking a place and a point of view from which that great preacher and great patriot might be got to preach and to Pray to the king's dictation? If our young ministers would have a life-long lesson and illustration in fearlessness, in fidelity, and in a good conscience to the end of a life of bribes on the one hand, and of persecution and banishment on the other, let them read themselves deeply into those two narratives so unsurpassable in effectiveness for a minister, the Life of Balaam in the history of Israel, and the Life of Bruce in the history of Scotland and of England. You can live a life of uttermost selfishness, and worldliness, and wicked tempers, and idleness, and vanity, and vice, and total and absolute neglect of Prayer in one church, and under one minister, that you could not long live under another
Luke, the Gospel According to - "...
Luke is fullest of the evangelists in describing our Lord's private Prayers. There are eight such instances: Luke 3:21, "Jesus Praying, the heaven was opened" at His baptism; Luke 5:16, "in the wilderness"; Luke 6:12, "continued all night in Prayer to God before ordaining the twelve; Luke 9:18, as He was alone Praying, His disciples were with Him, and He asked whom say the people that I am?" Luke 9:28 Luke 9:29, at the transfiguration, "He went up into a mountain to Pray, and as He Prayed the fashion of His countenance was altered;" Luke 11:1, "as He was Praying in a certain place, when He ceased one of His disciples said (struck with the holy earnestness of His tone, words, and gestures), Lord teach us to Pray" (Luke 22:32; Luke 22:41-42; Luke 22:44-46; Luke 23:46)
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - He kept much at home, writ notes upon Homer and Plautus, and sometimes thought it hard to be called to Pray by any poor body's bedside when he was just in the midst of one of Homer's battles. Teach her the catechism, hear her read and exhort her to Pray
Disciple (2) - Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he send forth labourers into his harvest’ (Matthew 9:36 ff. That summons to Prayer becomes more urgent and pressing in the light of St. Luke’s record, that immediately prior to His choosing the Apostles our Lord ‘went out into the mountain to Pray; and he continued all night in Prayer to God
Alexander the Coppersmith - ' Instead of cursing Alexander to God, William Law would the more have Prayed for him late every night, according to that great man's life-long practice-'if you Pray for a man sufficiently often, and sufficiently fervently, and sufficiently in secret, you cannot but love that man, even were he Alexander the coppersmith. "At my first answer no man stood with me, but all men forsook me: I Pray God that it may not be laid to their charge
Elijah - At the city gate he met with a widow woman gathering sticks, from whom he desired a little water, adding, "Bring me, I Pray thee, also a morsel of bread. After this he Prayed, and, in answer to his Prayer, the Lord sent fire from heaven, and consumed the wood, the burnt sacrifice, the stones, and dust of the place, and even dried up the water in the trench. In the evening, being exhausted with fatigue, he laid himself down under a juniper tree, and Prayed God to take him out of the world. " "I Pray thee," said Elisha, "let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me;" that is, obtain the gift of prophecy from God for me, in the same measure that thou possessest it
Wealth - He showed that He desired that all should have a sufficiency, by bidding all, rich and poor alike, Pray for ‘daily bread
Prophesy - The first occurrence of nâbı̂y' does not help to clearly define it either: “Now therefore restore the man [5] his wife; for he is a prophet, and he shall Pray for thee, and thou shalt live …” ( Incense - were Praying without, at the time of incense," silently, which accords with Revelation 8:1; Revelation 8:3. It is this, when it is by faith made the accompanying foundation of our Prayers, which makes them rise up to God as a sweet and acceptable perfume. )...
So Christ intercedes now in the heavenly sanctuary as He died for us outside; and the believer's Prayer ascends from his inner heart to God within the heavenly veil, Because it rests on Christ's atoning sacrifice once for all offered "without the gate" (Hebrews 13:12). Incense symbolizes not merely Prayer, but Prayer accepted before God because of atonement: "let my Prayer be set forth before Thee as incense, and the lifting up (answering to the rising up of the incense smoke) of my hands as the evening sacrifice" (Psalms 141:2). ...
For Prayer was offered by the pious Jews at the times of the morning and evening sacrifices on the altar of burnt offering, which were accompanied with the incense on the altar of incense, thus marking that Prayer rests upon propitiation By sacrifice. ...
The incense which shall yet be offered "in every place" is Prayer accepted through Christ (1 Timothy 2:8). In Revelation 5:8 it is the golden vials not the incense odors (not thumiamata but fialas , hai ) which are the Prayers of saints. In Revelation 8:3-4 the incense is distinct from, yet offered with, their Prayers, the angel presenting them before God. It is not said he intercedes for us, still less that we should Pray to him to do so; nay this is expressly forbidden (Revelation 19:10; Revelation 22:8-9)
Monotheism - ), and so the disciples are taught to Pray that it may come upon earth, as it is in heaven (Matthew 6:10)
Flesh - He enjoined them to watch and Pray lest they enter into temptation for “the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak” (Matthew 26:41 ; Mark 14:38 )
Blessing And Cursing - The Lord was the source of all blessing, and people sought to express gratitude for that blessing; indeed, to Pray for the continuation of such blessing: “Bless the Lord, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name
Travel (2) - In Matthew 24:20 Jesus says, ‘Pray that your flight be not in the winter time,’ which means the rainy season, when roads are practically impassable, and food difficult to obtain en route
Kingdom of God - Third, they can Pray for the rule of God to come soon: “Thy kingdom come” (Matthew 6:10 ; compare 1 Corinthians 16:22 ). ...
The Lord's Prayer contains three requests, as follows: “Hallowed be thy name. ” See Lord's Prayer
Galerius, Emperor - In return, the Christians are told to Pray to their God for the recovery of Galerius
Good - …” Ṭôb can be applied to scenic beauty, as in 2 Kings 2:19: “Behold, I Pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth: but the water is naught, and the ground barren
Zabii - They are obliged to Pray three times a day, and they fast three times a year
Kingdom - ...
"Concerning the future, the Lord taught His disciples to Pray, "Thy Kingdom come," Matthew 6:10 , where the verb is in the point tense, precluding the notion of gradual progress and development, and implying a sudden catastrophe as declared in 2 Thessalonians 2:8
Merciful, Mercy - Hence they are to Pray boldly for mercy, Hebrews 4:16 , and if for themselves, it is seemly that they should ask for mercy for one another, Galatians 6:16 ; 1 Timothy 1:2 . In the NT the word never means to conciliate God; it signifies (a) "to be propitious, merciful," Luke 18:13 , in the Prayer of the publican; (b) "to expiate, make propitiation for," Hebrews 2:17 , "make propitiation
Compassion - God's people should Pray for Him to “spare” them (Joel 2:17 )
Assumption of Moses - At the end of the 77 years’ captivity, one who is over them (Daniel) will Pray for them. Matthew 9:36), or who will Pray for them, not omitting a single day?’ In 12:6 Moses is ‘appointed to Pray for their (Israel’s) sins and make intercession for them’ (cf
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - Peter himself had wellnigh gone down into the same horrible pit with Judas: and he also would have been in his own place by this time, had it not been that his Master Prayed for Peter that his faith might not fail. And then one of the eleven led the congregation in Prayer in these well-remembered words-"Lord, Thou knowest the hearts of all men: show whether of these two Thou hast chosen. You may never so much as have heard him once open his mouth either to Pray or to preach. And, with all that, you may with some assurance, put your hand to his call, after you have made your importunate and personal Prayer about this whole momentous matter to Him who knows the hearts of all men. Now, if there were a divinity student here I would ask and demand of him out of this Scripture for students-Are you so companying with Christ while you are still at college? Do you see with all your inward eyes what you read in your New Testament? Do you believe and believe and believe your way through the four Gospels? Is your faith the very substance itself of the things you hope for, and the absolute and conclusive evidence of the things you do not as yet see? Do you Pray your way through the life of Christ? Do you put the lepers, and the sick, and the possessed with devils, and the dead in their graves, out of their places, as you read about them; and do you put yourself into their places, and say what they say, and hear and accept what is said to them? For, if so, then you will receive, all your preaching and pastoral days, the end of your faith, the salvation of your own soul, and the salvation of the souls of your people
Night (2) - —Before Jesus called His disciples, He went out into a mountain to Pray, and continued all night in Prayer (διανυκτερεύων, Luke 6:12). After the ‘feeding of the five thousand’ also He departed into a mountain to Pray (Mark 6:46 || Matthew 14:23), and not till the fourth watch did He come to the disciples, spent with their ‘bootless toil. ’ From these and other references it is clear that Jesus often made the night His season of Prayer. ...
‘Save in the recorded hours of our Lord’s Praying, the history of Galilee has no intervals of silence and loneliness; the noise of a close and busy life is always audible; and to every crisis in the Gospels and in Josephus we see crowds Immediately swarm’ (G. ...
It may be urged that Jesus teaches by His example the value of Prayer in the silence of night. There are many references to such Prayer in the Psalms (cf. Psalms 119:62); and it is not without significance that the time is midnight in the parable in which Jesus teaches the lesson of ‘shameless’ Prayer (ἀναιδία, Luke 11:8)
Tongues Gift of - It is an open question whether it was deliberate, on the ground that ordinary language was unsuitable for Prayer or fellowship or testimony regarding the spiritual life, or was produced apart from the volition of the speaker under the influence of spiritual excitement or emotion. It was used only in Prayer (1 Corinthians 14:2; 1 Corinthians 14:14). Nor to the believer was it of real benefit unless there was an interpretation (1 Corinthians 14:13); and the speaker-with-tongues was counselled to Pray for such an interpretation, as if his utterance per se were of little value
Gestures - Standing to Pray indicates respect to God (1 Samuel 1:26 ; 1 Kings 8:22 ; Mark 11:25 ). Kneeling and bowing express honor, devotion, and submission in worship (1 Kings 19:18 ; Isaiah 45:23 ; Revelation 4:10 ; Revelation 5:8 ) and reverence in Prayer (1 Kings 8:54 ; 1 Kings 18:42 ; Daniel 6:10 ; Luke 22:41 ). Bowing of one's head shows reverence in worship and Prayer (Genesis 24:26 ; Nehemiah 8:6 ). The eyes, when uplifted in Prayer, signify not only respectful acknowledgment of God, but also devotion to Him (Mark 6:41 ; Luke 9:16 ). To fail to lift one's eyes up to God while Praying indicates one's sense of unworthiness (Luke 18:13 ). The raising of hands in Prayer is a gesture signifying one's request is unto God (Psalm 141:2 ; 1 Timothy 2:8 )
Beatitudes - The believer Praying Psalm 1:1 becomes the beatitude's subject. In the fifth petition of the Lord's Prayer Christians Pray that God will forgive them, just as they forgive others (Matthew 6:12 )
Abercius, Bishop of Hierapolis - the sacred writings, the Sacraments of Holy Baptism and Holy Communion, the miraculous birth of our Lord (the most probable reference of παρθένος ἁγνή ), His omnipresent and omniscient energy, the fellowship of the members of the church, not only in Rome but elsewhere—all these (together with the mixed cup, wine and water; the Prayer for the departed; the symbolic ΙΧΘΥΣ, one of its earliest instances) have a place in the picture of early Christian usage and belief gained from this one epitaph; however widely Abercius travelled, to the far East or West, the same picture, he assures us, met his gaze. 502, on Avircius and Prayers for the departed. who is also an anti-Montanist, so Ramsay; Lightfoot and Farrar simply 'fellow Christian') Pray for him ( i
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - The king also began to pay scrupulous respect to Catholic feeling and belief and to Catholic saints, and to Pray in Catholic churches (Greg
Terah - With a father like Terah to talk to, to Pray and to praise with, and to walk arm in arm with at the head of the emigrant household, Abram's face shone like the sun as he turned his back on the land of his nativity. Say, I Pray thee, that thou art my sister, that it may be well with me for thy sake, and my soul shall live because of thee. Let there be no strife, I Pray thee, between me and thee, for we be brethren
Lot - Hear, then, what the first peacemaker in the Bible said, and go and say and do likewise, 'And Abraham took Lot and said to him, Let there be no strife, I Pray thee, between me and thee, and between my herdmen and thy herdmen; for we be brethren. Is not the whole land before thee? Separate thyself,' I Pray thee, from me. He had often heard his uncle Praying and plotting with God with all his might for Sodom
Sermon on the Mount - Thus the encouragements to Prayer and the warnings against anxiety are alien to the main topic in which the principles of the new order are contrasted with the old laws and customs. has the Lord’s Prayer following warnings against hypocrisy in Prayer, which are associated with other cases of hypocrisy (Matthew 6:1-18). (Luke 11:1-4) the Lord’s Prayer is introduced after Christ’s disciples have asked Him to teach them to Pray, as John had taught his disciples to Pray. Thus it comes appropriately as a model Prayer, while in Mt. no form of Prayer is immediately required when the subject is privacy in Prayer as against public display. Thus he gives 7 clauses in the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13), 7 parables (ch
Will of God - As Jesus Prayed to the Father, he acknowledged both the strength of his own will and his commitment to God's: "My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from me. The Prayer that Jesus taught them made God's will a central concern in the life of discipleship. At its most basic level, belief in an all-encompassing will of God means the belief that things are moving in a direction such as Romans 1:9-10 ("I remember you in my Prayers at all times; and I Pray now at last by God's will the way may be opened for me to come to you"), Romans 15:32 ("so that by God's will I may come to you"), and James 4:15 ("Instead, you ought to say, If it is the Lord's will, we will live and do this or that'"). Consequently, the Christian's aim is to live according to the perfect will of God and to Pray according to it (1 John 5:14 ). His Prayer for believers was that they "be filled with a knowledge of God's will" (Colossians 1:9 ; 4:12 ). We are left "in the middle, " knowing that we are to seek God's guidance through the Scriptures, Prayer, the counsel of Christian leaders, and wise assessment of the options before us and knowing that he promises to guide us, but not being able to limit his means for doing this. Lohmeyer, The Lord's Prayer ; D
Greek Church - They deny that there is any such place as purgatory; notwithstanding they Pray for the dead, that God would have mercy on them at the general judgment
Worship - The response may be private and intensely personal, in the form of Prayers, confessions, silence, and meditative experiences of various sorts. Jesus, leaving the disciples behind in a place called Gethsemane, went a ways from them to fall on the ground and Pray alone to the Father (Mark 14:32-35 ). According to Matthew 26:39 (NRSV), he “threw himself on the ground and Prayed”; according to Luke 22:41 , he “knelt down, and Prayed” (NRSV). Each of these is a physical posture considered appropriate for worship in Prayer. The early Christian meetings seem to have been joyful occasions for teaching, prophesying, singing, Praying, reading apostolic letters, and the “breaking of bread” in the Lord's Supper (Acts 2:42 ,Acts 2:42,2:46 ; 1 Corinthians 14:26 ; Ephesians 5:19-20 ; Colossians 3:16 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 )
Persecution - Love: "Love your enemies and Pray for those who persecute you" (Matthew 5:44 )
Remember, Remembrance - When, however, God is the One who is remembered in Prayer and ritual, or, when it is believed by the faithful that God himself is actually remembering his own relation to his people, then "to remember" with its appropriate nouns becomes a special verb in the religious vocabulary of Israel and the church of God. In contrast, remembering in terms of keeping someone in mind to Pray and to care for them is also present (e. For example, there is a remembering in Prayer before God
Zedekiah - Still while the issue between the Chaldaeans and Pharaoh Hophra was undecided, he sent begging Jeremiah, Pray now unto the Lord our God for us
Moses - After this Moses besought the Lord saying "I Pray thee, let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan, that goodly mountain, and Lebanon
John, Gospel of - He then Prayed at length to his Father, not only for himself and his disciples, but also for those who would yet believe (17:1-26). ...
Upon going to Gethsemane to Pray again, Jesus was arrested and taken to the high priest (18:1-27)
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Let us have done with such feuds, and in penitence Pray God to restore our former harmony (xlviii. ...
God asks nothing of man but contrition, Prayer, and praise (lii. Remember how Moses fasted and Prayed forty days on the mountain, offering his life for the life of his people (liii. ...
(5) Prayer for all mankind: final admonition and benediction. -We Pray that God will keep His elect intact. We Pray for inward light, for all who need, for the Gentiles’ conversion, for pardon and cleansing, for peace and concord, for deliverance from those who hate us wrongfully, for the grace of obedience to temporal authority, for earthly rulers, that they may govern in accordance with God’s will in peace and gentleness
Polycarp - There ‘night and day he did nothing but Pray for all men and for the churches of the inhabited world (τῶν κατὰ τὴν οἰκουμένην ἐκκλησιῶν), as he had been accustomed to do’ (v. The bishop requested one hour to Pray before following them; they consented. Then Polycarp ‘stood up and Prayed, being so full of the grace of God, that for two hours he could not hold his peace’ (vii. 3), and in his Prayer he mentioned ‘all who at any time had come in his way, small and great, high and low, and all the universal Church throughout the world’ (καὶ πάσης τῆς κατὰ τὴν οἰκουμένην καθολικῆς ἐκκλησίας). The account goes on to say that the bishop then repeated in a loud voice a very remarkable Prayer, for it is in the manner of a eucharistic Prayer, and gives the impression of what we call a praefatio (xiv. While dying, the bishop Prayed in the ritual from which the liturgy is derived. We have a letter of Ignatius to the Smyrnaeans, in which the prisoner, on arriving at Troas, thanks them for the kindness with which they received him: ‘You have lavished all kinds of comforts on me: may Jesus Christ reward you for it! Both far and near you have shown me your kindness: I Pray God to recompense you’ (ad Smyrn
Ham - What an inexpiable curse is a defiled mind! Well might Bishop Andrewes Pray every night of the week for all his life, and that too, with sweat and tears, that his transgressions might not be retained upon him as his punishment. '...
It is not in as many words in Moses, but I have read it elsewhere, that there was a woman who clung to the door of the ark which was in the side thereof; and the woman cried and Prayed. And then he kneeled in Prayer and in thanksgiving, and he blessed the God of his fathers that she had gone down, and that the waters still prevailed. Only, ever after that terrible day, with what watchfulness did those two brothers go out and come in! With what wistfulness did they look at their father as he ate and drank! With what solicitude, and with what Prayer, and not for their father only, did Shem and Japheth lie down at night and rise up in the morning! It brought Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth back again to Moses' mind when he received and read and transcribed the Fifth Commandment on Mount Sinai: Honour thy father and thy mother, that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee. If a father would Pray every day to God to inspire his children with true piety, great humility, and strict temperance, what could be more likely to make the father himself become exemplary in these virtues? How naturally would he grow ashamed of wanting such virtues as he thought necessary for his children
Messiah - His dynasty would not fail (Psalm 132:17 ), and the people were encouraged to Pray to God on his behalf (Psalm 72:11-15 ; Psalm 84:9 )
Tongues, Gift of - The possessor of the tongue "spoke mysteries," Praying, blessing, and giving thanks, but no one understood him; the "spirit" (pneuma ) but not "understanding" (nous ) was active (Acts 19:1). ...
He who spoke (praying) in a tongue should Pray that he might (be able to) interpret for edification of the church (1 Corinthians 14:13; 1 Corinthians 14:26-27)
Consecrate, Consecration (2) - ’ The exception in the Authorized and Revised Versions is the first petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9 = Luke 11:2)—‘Hallowed be thy name. And as for the sake of His disciples Jesus consecrates Himself, He Prays for them, knowing that the future of His kingdom depends on their having the same spirit of complete consecration to the Divine will. The consecration of Jesus is His own act, but He does not Pray that apart from Him the disciples may follow His example and consecrate themselves; His consecration is the pattern of theirs, therefore the same word is used of the Master and of His disciples; but without His consecration ‘for their sakes’ (ὑτὲρ αὑτῶν), their consecration would be impossible, therefore it is said of the Master alone that He consecrates Himself on behalf of others. ...
If ἀγιάζειν be uniformly rendered ‘consecrate’ in our Lord’s intercessory Prayer, it will be seen that He twice expresses His yearning desire for the consecration of the men whom His Father had given Him out of the world: (1) John 17:17 ‘Consecrate them in the truth’; as Jesus sends forth His disciples on the same mission which brought Him into the world at His Father’s bidding, He asks that they also may be set apart for holy service, and may be divinely equipped for their task, even as He was, by the indwelling of the Father’s love (John 17:26). It is because Jesus desires intensely that the world may know and believe, that He so fervently Prays for the consecration of the men whose faith and knowledge qualify them to speak in the world the word which He has given them
Persia - The women after childbirth undergo it and have actually to drink a little of it! The Parsees Pray 16 times a day
Worship - Paul and the member of the early Christian brotherhood the whole of life was a continuous worship, and the one great feature of that worship was Prayer. ’* If we use the word ‘prayer’ in the widest sense, as including praise as well as petition and intercession, the words agree with the opinion of Döllinger: ‘When the attention of a thinking heathen was directed to the new religion which was spreading in the Roman Empire, the thing to strike him as extraordinary would be that a religion of Prayer was superseding the religion of ceremonies and invocations of gods; that it encouraged all, even the humblest and the most uneducated, to Pray, or, in other words, to meditate and exercise the mind in self-scrutiny and contemplation of God. ’* ‘Clement of Rome has the idea of Christ as “the high-priest of our offerings,” but the ideas of the heavenly Priesthood of our Lord, and the “Lamb standing as slain” of the Apocalypse, found only very isolated expression in liturgical Prayers before the 4th century. again the Didache Prayers. The “thankoffering” idea was expanded into the glorious eucharistic Prayer found in its largest and fullest range in the liturgy of the Apostolic Constitutions. The idea of the One Body explains the emphasis and concentration of thought in the pre-Nicene Prayers on “communion,” as opposed to worship of the Lamb standing as slain, which is the feature of the Greek liturgy from the time of Cyril of Jerusalem. One of the brethren began to Pray; then another and another; one began the Lord’s Prayer, and all joined; each Prayer was followed by a hearty and fervent “Amen. When the prophets were silent, first one, then another, and sometimes two at once, began strange ejaculatory Prayers, in sentences so rugged and disjointed that the audience for the most part could not understand, and had to wait till some of their number, who could follow the strange utterances, were ready to translate them into intelligible language. ” ’¶ ...
The elements of such worship-prayer and praise and instruction-combined to make what Duchesne in a happy phrase calls ‘a Liturgy of the Holy Ghost after the Liturgy of Christ, a true liturgy with a Real Presence and communion. Putting together the scattered hints in the Epistles along with the references in Clement of Rome and Justin Martyr, we may suppose that it followed a service such as that described above and that it always included the following elements: a Prayer of thanksgiving (Luke 22:19, 1 Corinthians 11:24; 1 Corinthians 14:16, 1 Timothy 2:1); the blessing of the bread and wine, with the recital of the words of Institution (1 Corinthians 10:16, Matthew 26:26-28, Mark 14:22-24, Luke 22:19-20, 1 Corinthians 11:23);* Prayers, remembering Christ’s death (Luke 22:19, 1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 11:25-26); the people eat and drink the consecrated bread and wine (Matthew 26:26-27, Mark 14:22-23, 1 Corinthians 11:28-29). Some suppose that it contains Prayers for the Agape rather than the Eucharist. ...
If the early date is allowed, we find here anticipation of the great thanksgiving of the later liturgies, mention of God’s work in creation and in redemption, a thanksgiving after Communion and Prayer for the Church with the germ of the act of praise which grew into the Gloria in excelsis. ’...
It contains also quotations from a wonderful Prayer of intercession and thanksgiving (qq. 7: ‘And attempt not to think anything right for yourselves apart from others: but let there be one Prayer in common, one supplication, one mind, one hope, in love and in joy unblameable, which is Jesus Christ, than whom there is nothing better. 65: ‘But we [1], after that we have thus washed him who has been convinced and has assented [2], lead him to the place where those who are called brethren are assembled, in order that we may offer hearty Prayers in common for ourselves and for the illuminated [4] as common bread and common drink, but in like manner as Jesus Christ our Saviour, having been made flesh by the word of God, bad both flesh and blood for our salvation, so likewise have we been taught that the food which is blessed by the Prayer of the word which comes from Him, and from which our blood and flesh are nourished by transmutation, is the flesh and blood of that Jesus who was made flesh. In the evolution of the primitive liturgy we can discern a close adherence to the apostolic combination of Prayer and praise with instruction and intercession leading up to the gift of sacramental grace. Constant reference to the mediation of Christ in the familiar ending of Prayers ‘through Jesus Christ our Lord’ kept this ever in mind
Abraham - Humanly speaking, Sodom and Gomorrah would have been destroyed, and God's heart which was so full of answer to intercessory Prayer would never have been discovered, had it not been for Abraham's so friendly part performed that day both to God and to the doomed cities of the plain. And while Abraham was seeking first his own ends and the ends of the two cities in his persevering Prayer, he was at the same time without knowing it serving God's greatest ends still more. For God's greatest ends always are that His great Name may be known; His great grace helped down and experienced; and His great heart drawn out to all its depth; and that, too, by persevering and importunate Prayer. And Abraham was the opportune and importunate friend of the Hearer of Prayer when he said, Peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and peradventure, and again, peradventure, and when God in friendly answer reduced the price of Sodom from fifty righteous men to ten. If any of you is a father, and has a son of your old age; a son of much faith and of much Prayer on your part, and of much pure miracle on God's part; then add to that, that your only son is the one and only instrument and chosen vessel of all God's remaining promises to you: and then, that he lies at the point of death. ' And then, to His Father, this: 'Neither Pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on Me through their word. Do this and that which He commands you to do, and you will be as much-ay, and more, His friend than if you preached and Prayed and praised His blood and righteousness day and night, and did nothing else. Enter your heart, then, and Pray to your Father, whose true temple is the Praying man's heart
Lamentations - The fifth elegy has 22 stanzas, but not beginning alphabetically, the earnestness of Prayer with which the whole closes breaking through the trammels of form. ...
The fifth elegy (Lamentations 5) is Prayer to Jehovah to consider "our reproach," slaves ruling His people, women ravished, young men grinding, children sinking under burdens of wood, "the crown" of the kingdom and priesthood "fallen," and Zion desolate. So they Pray, "turn Thou us unto Thee, O Lord, and we shall be turned," "for wouldest Thou utterly reject us?" Impossible
James, the Letter - The actual purpose of the discussion is to stress the effectiveness of the earnest Prayer of a righteous man ( James 5:15-16 ). This is illustrated by a reference to Elijah, whose Prayers were sufficient alternately to shut up the heavens and then to open them (James 5:17-18 ). ...
Whatever else may be intended, clearly the Prayer of faith “saves the sick. God heals, when He chooses to heal (James 4:14 ), as a response to the fervent Prayers of righteous men. True Religion Is Expressed in Prayer (James 5:13-20 ). Prayer, including intercession, is a significant part of true religion (James 5:13-16 ). Prayer is a proper response to suffering and illness (James 5:13-14 ). Prayers are to be offered in faith, with right motives (James 5:15 ). Prayer includes confession of sins (James 5:16 ). The righteousness of the person Praying is related to the effectiveness of the Prayer (James 5:16 ). All humans can Pray and be heard (1618166311_92 )
John, the Letters of - Christians are to Pray for one another, but there is sin that is “mortal” (1 John 5:16 )
Blood - They were to Pray for the Lord's forgiveness by atonement: “Be merciful, O Lord, unto thy people Israel, whom thou hast redeemed, and lay not innocent blood unto thy people of Israel's charge
Love - ...
In Matthew 5:43-48 , Jesus gave the radical command to love one's enemies and to Pray for those who persecute. In his Prayer for love to increase and abound, Paul indicated that this increase of love has the end that the hearts of Christians might be established “unblameable in holiness” before God when Jesus returns with all his saints (1 Thessalonians 3:13 )
Lord's Prayer, the - Jesus teaches this Prayer to his disciples as a paradigm of proper Prayer as he trains them for the missionary task of the messianic age that he is inaugurating in his own person as the incarnate Son of God and Son of man. The Prayer needs to be seen in the larger contexts of the Sermon on the Mount and the Gospel of Matthew. The shorter version in Luke 11:2-4 appears in a different setting; during Jesus' itinerant ministry he paraphrased important teachings in training his followers for Prayer and mission. Both versions of the Lord's Prayer imply the importance of a vertical dimension of personal purity in worship of the Father as a prerequisite of valid missionary activity on the Lord's behalf. While his relation to the Father and the spirit is unique in view of his oneness and equality within the Triune Family, as incarnate Son he also exemplifies direct address, passionate intent and purity, unostentatious setting in Prayer, and concern with the two dimensions of proper Prayer—honoring the Father vertically and asking for help in realizing the Father's will in the present mission horizontally. These two dimensions constitute the heart of the Sermon on the Mount and the Lord's Prayer. ...
The immediate context of the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6 is the triple teaching of Jesus on alms (vv. 1-4), Prayer (vv. This has to do not so much with privacy and isolation (" Our Father" indicates a communal Prayer), but Praying with pure intent for the honor and pleasure of the Father, not for selfish and transient approval from the world. ...
With the crucial matter of proper intent established at the outset, Jesus instructs his disciples as to the priority and content of the ideal Prayer. The Prayer is not necessarily given for strict liturgical use, for Jesus says, "This, then, is how you should Pray. " If used as a set Prayer, the conditions of the teaching unit are to be observed, especially the warning not to "keep on babbling like pagans" (6:7). The significance of the Lord's Prayer lies in the fact that every Prayer directed to God should function in two spheres. The basic format of the Prayer is accordingly divided into two sections. Glorification of God must be given pride of place in Prayer and takes precedence over "us" petitions. ...
Examining the opening vertical unit of the Prayer we notice its poetic arrangement in the following sentence flow of verse 9-10 : ...
Πατερ ημων ο εν τοις ουρανοις, (Our Father who art in heaven), αγιασθητω το ονομα σου, (Let thy name be hallowed). The opening line of the Prayer is a declarative statement; it affirms that God is (implied), that he is in heaven (distant and sovereign), and that he is also our Father (near, familial, and personal). In Praying the disciples are in effect serving notice that they want to be part of this great, ongoing, glorifying ministry, desiring that all humankind will come to honor God as he deserves to be honored. ...
The second unit in the Prayer comprises three parallel "us" petitions that request divine help in the mission to which Jesus' followers are being called: "give us"; "forgive us"; "deliver us. Hence epiousion is best translated "what is sufficient" "Give us food sufficient for the day, " remembering that the setting of the Gospel of Matthew, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Lord's Prayer (in Luke as well) is one of eschatological urgency and preparation for mission in the new exodus inaugurated by Jesus, and of traveling light; it is not a general Prayer for common grace. Thus the third petition is best understood if it focuses on the Prayer "deliver us from the evil one, " taking the clause "and lead us not into temptation" as explanatory of what is involved in the petition: protection from the adversary who would keep us from salvation and from sharing it with others. This is essentially the Prayer Jesus Prays in Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39 ; 4:7 ) as he resists the temptation not to drink the cup of redemptive suffering, thus again foiling the devil who is seeking to divert the image-keeper from his redemptive role. ...
With the exception of the petition for forgiveness of sins (Jesus is the sinbearer who provides forgiveness), the eschatological themes of the Lord's Prayer would have been Prayed by Jesus throughout his ministry; they are thus fitting for his followers, who are given the honor and responsibility of sharing in his mission by proclaiming the coming of the kingdom and doing the will of God, to his glory. ...
Royce Gordon Gruenler...
See also Jesus Christ ; Prayer ...
Bibliography . Barclay, The Beatitudes and the Lord's Prayer for Everyman ; A. Pink, The Beatitudes and the Lord's Prayer
King - In 1 Timothy 2:2 the injunction is given to Pray for kings and for all in authority
Confession (of Sin) - ), and Prayers like those of Ezra (Ezra 10:1), Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:6-7), and Daniel (Daniel 9:4 ff. The Prayer which He gave His disciples as a pattern for all Prayer includes a petition for forgiveness (Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4); and such a petition is equivalent, of course, to a confession of sin. It was the total absence of the element of confession from the Pharisee’s Prayer, and the presence instead of a self-satisfied and self-exalting spirit, that made his Prayer of no effect in the sight of God; while it was the publican’s downcast eyes, his smitten breast, his cry, ‘God be merciful to me a sinner!’ that sent him down to his house ‘justified rather than the other’ (Luke 18:10-14; cf. ...
But, above all, it is to be noted that while Jesus taught His disciples to Pray for the forgiveness of sins, we never find Him humbling Himself before God on account of sin, and asking to be forgiven. And the complete silence of the Gospels upon this point acquires a fuller significance when we observe that there is not the slightest evidence that He ever engaged in common Prayer with the Apostles. When Jesus Prayed to the Father, He seems always to have Prayed alone (Matthew 14:23; Matthew 26:36 ||, Luke 9:18; Luke 11:1; cf. John 1:7, where He Prays in the presence of the disciples, but not with them). The reason probably was that while the attitude of a sinful suppliant and the element of confession, whether uttered or unexpressed, are indispensable to the acceptableness of ordinary human Prayer, these could find no place in the Prayers of Jesus
Athens - She did not beckon him like Rome; he did not see her in his dreams, or Pray that he might be prospered to come to her; he never exclaimed, with a sense of destiny, ‘I must see Athens
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - A few days afterwards those who had taken the oath were told that, as they had infringed the precept of the Gospel, the king banished them to the country, assigning them land to cultivate, on condition that they should not chant, Pray, baptize, ordain, or receive any into the church
Brother - And is not this personal love and grace of Jesus intended to excite and call up personal affections towards him? Doth he not seem thereby as if to bid us approach him, in a peculiar manner, under this sweet character? Yea, doth he not say in language similar to his illustrious type, the patriarch"Joseph, to his brethren, when under a conscious sense of their crimes in having sold him for a slave they feared to approach him; doth not our Almighty Joseph say to us, under all our tremblings, and fears, and misgivings, in having nailed him to the cross by our sins: "Come near to me I Pray you, I am Jesus your brother, whom ye sold into Egypt?" (Genesis 45:3-4) Oh! thou glorious, gracious, all-lovely, and all-loving Brother! thou art a brother indeed, born for adversity; a friend that loveth at a11 times; one that sticketh closer than a brother
Redeem - 30:18, Hezekiah Prays for God to “pardon” those who were not ritually prepared for the Passover. Jeremiah once uses kâphar to Pray bitterly that Yahweh not “forgive” the iniquity of those plotting to slay him ( Serve - 18:3: “… Pass not away, I Pray thee, from thy servant” (cf
Euphemius, Patriarch of Constantinople - He asked Euphemius in confidence to beg the bishops at Constantinople (there were always bishops coming and going to and from the metropolis) to Pray for peace and thus furnish him with an opportunity of entering on negotiations
Dead - Muffled in this way, the mourner goes for seven days, during which the rest of his friends come twice every twenty-four hours to Pray with him
Habits - To Pray with the head covered, was, in their estimation, a higher mark of respect for the majesty of heaven, as it indicated the conscious unworthiness of the suppliant to lift up his eyes in the divine presence
Turn - ...
I Pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness
Pity - On the contrary, He said to the women, ‘Daughters of Jerusalem, weep not for me’ (Luke 23:28); and to the disciple peter, ‘Thinkest thou that I cannot now Pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?’ (Matthew 26:53)
Simon Magus - ’ The news of the movement in Samaria brought Peter and John from Jerusalem, and through their Prayers and the laying on of their hands, the believers received the Holy Spirit. Repent therefore of this thy wickedness, and Pray the Lord if perhaps the thought of thy heart shall be forgiven thee. And Simon answered and said, Pray ye for me to the Lord, that none of the things which ye have spoken come upon me. But in answer to Peter’s Prayers he fell, broke his thigh, and was taken to Terracina, where he died. Paul was distressed, and Prayed. It abashed him, and made him penitent to the extent of asking humbly for the Apostle’s Prayers. ” He is described, not as repenting, but only as asking in fear of the future that Peter should Pray for him
Ambrosius of Milan - Ambrose began to Pray with bitter tears that the cause of the church might not be stained with blood; and sent presbyters and deacons, who succeeded in rescuing the prisoner unhurt. But the soldiers were in awe of Ambrose, and, learning that he had threatened them with excommunication, they began to crowd in, protesting that they came to Pray and not to fight. He and Paulinus record simply that the emperor performed public penance, stripping himself of his royal insignia, and Praying for pardon with groans and tears; and that he never passed a day afterwards without grieving for his error (Paulinus, 24; Amb. It became known that his strength was failing, and the count Stilicho, saying that the death of such a man threatened death to Italy itself, induced a number of the chief men of the city to go to him, and entreat him to Pray to God that his life might be spared. " For some hours before his death he lay with his hands crossed, Praying; as Paulinus could see by the movement of his lips, though he heard no voice. He argues for the daily reception of the Eucharist from the Prayer, Give us this day our daily bread ( de Sacr
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - ...
The tract ad Martyres depicts men and women in prison, visited and relieved by the brethren, exhorted to unity, and prepared by fasting and Prayer for the death which should be a victory for the church. "We battle with your cruelty," he cries; but his weapons are the "offensive" weapons which Christ had put in his hands—prayer for the persecutors love for enemies (Mat_5:44 d). We meet as a congregation and Pray to God in united supplication. We Pray for the emperors, their ministers, and those in authority, for the welfare of the world, for peaceful times, and for the delaying of the end (see c. The flock looked to their pastors for guidance: Prayer, baptism, repentance, and the discipline connected with them; woman's dress and woman's life, married or unmarried; pleasures, amusements, how far lawful or unlawful,—all were matters upon which direction was desirable, and to all does Tertullian apply himself. ( a ) Of the Lord's Prayer specifically (cc. ); (b ) of Prayer generally—times, places, and customs (cc. ...
(a ) As Christ was Spirit, Word, and Reason, so His Prayer was formed of three parts: the word by which it was expressed, the spirit by which alone it had power, the reason by which it was appropriated (the reading is disputed); and the practice of Prayer was recommended with three injunctions: that it should be offered up in secret, marked by modesty of faith," and distinguished by brevity. He approves of other Prayers being used corresponding with the special circumstances of him who Prays, but never to the omission of this, the regular and set form of Prayer. ...
(b ) Certain ceremonies, "empty" (vacuae ) Tertullian calls them, but illustrative of many an interesting point of ritual and practice of the time, are next considered: Washing the hands before Prayer; Praying with the cloak taken off; sitting after Prayer; the kiss of peace; the "Stations" (c. ; see Oehler's note); the dress of women, and veiling or non-veiling of virgins; kneeling in Prayer; place and time of Prayer; Prayer when brethren met or parted; Prayer and psalm. The closing chapter, dealing with the power and effect of Prayer, is one of the gems of Tertullian's writings. "Never," he cries, "let us walk unarmed by Prayer. Under the arms of Prayer guard we the standard of our emperor; in Prayer await we the angel's trump. Angels Pray; every creature Prays
Sanctify, Sanctification - It occurs also in the Lord’s Prayer in the sentence, ‘Hallowed be thy name’ (Matthew 6:9). ...
(a) By Prayer. Jesus was a man of Prayer. There are fifteen references to His Prayers in the Gospels. It is specially noteworthy that He betook Himself to Prayer when any fierce temptation assailed Him (Luke 5:16; Luke 9:28, John 12:27, Matthew 26:36 ||), when any work of critical importance had to be undertaken (Luke 6:12, John 11:41; John 11:17), or when He was exhausted with toil (Mark 1:35, Matthew 14:23); and that it was while He was Praying that He was anointed with the Holy Spirit (Luke 3:21), and that He was transfigured (Luke 9:29). But it is clear also that He was accustomed to Pray on all occasions (cf. It is instructive, therefore, that He urged men to Pray (Matthew 5:44; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 26:41 ||, Luke 11:2; Luke 18:1; Luke 21:36). He encouraged Prayer by promising large blessing (Matthew 7:7-11, Mark 11:24). He declared that true Prayer ‘justified’ a man (Luke 18:14) All these references seem to make it clear that Prayer ministers to our sanctification. Jesus Prayed for His disciples, ‘Sanctify them in the truth: thy word is truth
Holy Spirit - The Spirit will be the preeminent good gift for which they can Pray (Luke 11:13 ; cf. Individually, he aids in believers' Prayers, bringing a newfound intimacy with God (1 Chronicles 28:12 ; Galatians 4:6 ). He is the characteristic mark of Christians (Jude 19 ) who Pray in him (v
Will - " The most pious of those who lived under the Mosaic dispensation often acknowledged the necessity of extraordinary assistance from God: David Prays to God to open his eyes, to guide and direct him; to create in him a clean heart, and renew a right spirit within him, Psalms 51:10 ; Psalms 119:18 ; Psalms 119:33 ; Psalms 119:35 . "We know not what to Pray for as we ought, but the Spirit helpeth our infirmities," Romans 8:26 . " And Cyprian says, "We Pray day and night that the sanctification and enlivening, which springs from the grace of God, may be preserved by his protection. And surely the confessions, the Prayers, the repentance, and the sacrifices of the humble and pious of all ages show that they felt, not only that they were themselves to blame for their actions, and therefore that they might have done otherwise, that is, they had a free will, but that, to make this will operative in spiritual matters, they required an aid beyond the reach of mere human attainment
Jeremiah - Zedekiah in the tenth year, through Jehucal and Zephaniah, begged Jeremiah, "pray for us," as the issue between Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) was at that time as yet undecided. ...
Jeremiah wrote too an epistle to the exiles at Babylon, carried away with Jeconiah (Jeremiah 29), similar in form and style to the New Testament epistles, advising them to settle quietly in Babylon and Pray for its peace, for the captivity must last 70 years
Apostles - They sent Peter and John to represent them in Samaria, see the result of evangelistic work there, and Pray for the Holy Spirit to come upon the new converts (Acts 8:14-15 )
Temptation - ’ This statement seems to be contradicted by Jesus’ quotation from Deuteronomy 6:16 in His answer to the second temptation in Matthew 4:7, as well as by the sixth petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:13); but tempting God does not mean soliciting Him to sin, but trying His justice and patience, challenging Him to give proof of His perfection to such a degree as to incur His displeasure, and to expose oneself to His judgment; and the temptations into which God is asked not to lead us, are the circumstances or the states of mind which, though to the strong they might prove the opportunities of winning ‘the crown of life’ (James 1:12), to weakness may be the occasions of failure and transgression. Peter, too, was warned against the temptation that threatened him (Luke 22:31-32); and Jesus, who feared his fall through his self-confident weakness, hoped for his recovery, and the help he could be to others after his recovery, because He believed in the power of His own intercessory Prayer. ; Dods, The Prayer that Teaches to Pray, 143 ff
Psalms, Book of - Psalms has been understood as both the “hymnal” and Prayerbook of the postexilic congregation of Israel with its final compilation and its inclusion within the canon. Both types of laments are Prayers or cries to God on the occasion of distressful situations. In some cases (such as Psalm 72:1 ), Prayers were made to intercede on behalf of the king. What devoted students of God's Word have discovered is the limited number of types of Prayer represented in the Psalms. A look at the major types helps us understand how many different functions Prayer and praise can serve as we communicate with and worship God. Such psalms show Prayer as an honest communication with God in life's worst situations. From them we learn to Pray for and respect the role of government officials as well as praise God's Messiah
Repentance (2) - He never Prays for forgiveness. Though He teaches insistently that all others must repent and become sons, and even then must Pray for the forgiveness of their sins, yet He Himself knows nothing but that He is the Son of His Heavenly Father, and He never loses by any act the consciousness of the Father’s approval
Sermon on the Mount - Where Matthew's Sermon has the Lord's Prayer as part of a general instruction given by Jesus to the disciples (6:9), Luke has the disciples asking Jesus to follow the example of John the Baptist who taught his disciples to Pray (11:1). Disparaging remarks about Gentiles Praying empty phrases (6:7) would hardly fit a situation where they had become the majority (cf. Directives for the worshiping community are set down (6:1-18): giving to the needy is to be done in secret (6:1-4); rubrics on Prayer include reciting the Lord's Prayer and avoiding long repetitions (6:5-15); and fasting remains part of Christian piety, but must be unannounced (6:16-18). Then follow general directives (6:19-7:12): treasures are to be laid up in heaven (6:19-21); the eye as the body's organ of light must remain uncontaminated (6:22-23); anxiety, the enemy of faith, must be avoided (6:25-34); condemnation of the brother is forbidden (7:1-5); faith believes God answers Prayers (7:7-11); and the "Golden Rule" requires the same behavior one desires from others (7:12). Even when the believer Prays alone (6:6), he does so as a member of the community in saying "Our Father" (6:9). Its Beatitudes (5:3-11), Lord's Prayer (6:9-13), and Golden Rule (7:12), along with other sections belong to common Christian piety
Inn - Ishmael bar Jose declared that his father used to Pray in an inn (Ber. During a considerable part of the year it would be no hardship to spend the night in the open air, and apparently Jesus often preferred this, that He might have opportunity for quiet Prayer, and more privacy than would be possible in a house or an inn
Head - Paul argues against the Corinthian practice of allowing women publicly to Pray or prophesy with unveiled heads, on three grounds (1 Corinthians 11:3 f
Twelve - The Mohammedans who are the descendants of Ishmael always face eastward when they Pray
Ave Maria - ’ As thus recited, it cannot be called a Prayer, but may be considered either as a memorial of thanksgiving for the Incarnation; or as one of those devotional apostrophes of departed saints which are found even in the writings of the Christian Fathers and in early Christian inscriptions. ) alludes to it as forming part of the preliminary Prayers said privately by the worshipper before the office began. (1568), it is directed to be said with the Lord’s Prayer at the beginning of each office, and after Compline. But as it stands now in the Breviary, it ends with a direct Prayer addressed to the Virgin, said to date from the middle of the 15th cent. : ‘Holy Mary, mother of God, Pray for us sinners, now and in the hour of our death. —Addis and Arnold, A Catholic Dictionary, 1897; Wright and Neil, A Protestant Dictionary, 1904; Bodington, Books of Devotion, 1903; Procter, A History of the Book of Common Prayer, 1884; Maskell, Monumenta Ritualia, 1846; the Breviarium Romanum; The Hours of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Preface), Percival & Co
Temptation - ’ This statement seems to be contradicted by Jesus’ quotation from Deuteronomy 6:16 in His answer to the second temptation in Matthew 4:7, as well as by the sixth petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:13); but tempting God does not mean soliciting Him to sin, but trying His justice and patience, challenging Him to give proof of His perfection to such a degree as to incur His displeasure, and to expose oneself to His judgment; and the temptations into which God is asked not to lead us, are the circumstances or the states of mind which, though to the strong they might prove the opportunities of winning ‘the crown of life’ (Luke 22:31-32), to weakness may be the occasions of failure and transgression. Peter, too, was warned against the temptation that threatened him (James 1:12); and Jesus, who feared his fall through his self-confident weakness, hoped for his recovery, and the help he could be to others after his recovery, because He believed in the power of His own intercessory Prayer. ; Dods, The Prayer that Teaches to Pray, 143 ff
Head - Paul argues against the Corinthian practice of allowing women publicly to Pray or prophesy with unveiled heads, on three grounds (1 Corinthians 11:3 f
Anger (2) - What stirred His indignation here was in part the profanity to which sacred places and their proper associations had lost all sacredness; in part, the covetousness which on the pretext of accommodating the pilgrims had turned the house of Prayer into a den of thieves; in part, again, the inhumanity which, by instituting a market so noisy in the Court of the Gentiles, must have made worship for these less privileged seekers after God difficult, if not impossible. that men are directed in 1 Timothy 2:8 to Pray χωρἰς ὀργῆς: an angry man cannot Pray
Son - ...
"The Lord Jesus used huios in a very significant way, as in Matthew 5:9 , 'Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the sons of God,' and Matthew 5:44,45 , 'Love your enemies, and Pray for them that persecute you; that ye may be (become) sons of your Father which is in heaven. ]'>[4] ...
In addressing the Father in His Prayer in John 17 He says, "Thou lovedst Me before the foundation of the World
Saul - ...
...
The son of Kish (probably his only son, and a child of Prayer, "asked for"), of the tribe of Benjamin, the first king of the Jewish nation. , the "height", where sacrifice was to be offered; and in answer to Saul's question, "Tell me, I Pray thee, where the seer's house is," Samuel made himself known to him
King, Christ as - The disciple is told to Pray, "Your kingdom come" (Matthew 6:10 ; Luke 11:2 ), implying that the kingdom is not fully realized
Sabbath - ...
The "holy convocation" on it (Leviticus 23:2-3) was probably a meeting for Prayer, meditation, and hearing the law in the court of the tabernacle before the altar at the hour of morning and evening sacrifice (Leviticus 19:30; Ezekiel 23:38). Christ tells His disciples, as retaining Jewish feelings, in Jerusalem to Pray that their flight might not be on the Sabbath, when they could only go 2,000 paces front the city walls (Matthew 24:20)
Simeon - " When Jesus' parents brought Him into the temple to redeem Him as the firstborn with five shekels according to the law (Numbers 18:15), and to present Him to the Lord, Simeon took Him up in his arms, and blessing God said, "Lord, now Thou dost let Thy servant depart in peace (not a Prayer, but a thanksgiving; again like Jacob, Genesis 46:30); for mine eyes (not another, Job 19:27) have seen (1 John 1:1) Thy (Isaiah 28:16; Luke 3:6) salvation: which Thou hast prepared before the face of all people (the universality of the gospel): a light to lighten the Gentiles (Isaiah 9:2), and (not only light, but also) the glory of Thy people Israel" (Isaiah 60:1-3). Simeon in his Prayer, "pray that none of these things which ye have spoken come upon me," shows that fear of punishment, not hatred of sin, influenced him as Pharaoh (Exodus 8:8)
Widow - Similarly, the church must persistently Pray for eschatological justice, the redressing of all wrongs against her (Luke 18:1-8 )
Evil (2) - For the coming of this Kingdom every Christian is directed to Pray (Matthew 6:10) and to watch (Matthew 24:42, Matthew 25:13)
Timothy, Epistles to - Prayers were to be made for all men, that the saints might lead quiet and tranquil lives in all piety, in view of liberty for God's testimony. Hence he willed that men should Pray, holding up holy hands; that women should adorn themselves modestly and with good works; they were to learn in silence, and not to teach or usurp authority over man. ...
After a salutation in which he desires mercy for Timothy, as well as grace and peace, Paul thanks God, whom he had served from his forefathers with pure (not always enlightened) conscience, having Timothy in unceasing remembrance in Prayer, calling to mind his unfeigned faith and that of his maternal ancestors; and he desires that Timothy would rekindle the gift that he had received by the imposition of Paul's hands, for God had given, not a spirit of cowardice, but of power, of love, and of a wise discretion. Paul had made his first defence before Nero, and all had forsaken him (he Prays for them), but the Lord stood by and strengthened him
Abram - " I Pray the reader to turn to the following Scriptures by way of confirmation. And being in the path of duty, and no doubt, constantly in the path of faith and Prayer; the whole terminated at length to the divine glory, and to his faithful servant's happiness
Work - The emphasis here is on an ongoing mutual relationship between two parties obligating them to a reciprocal act: “O Lord God of my master Abraham, I Pray thee, send me good speed this day, and show kindness unto my master Abraham” ( Prayer of the psalmist includes the request that the “works” of God’s people might be established: “And let the beauty of the Lord our God be upon us: and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it” ( Elisha - ' And Elisha said, 'I Pray thee, let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me. I can easily imagine Elijah seeking of God in Prayer that his successor should be twofold, should be tenfold, more gifted and more successful than he had been
Hebrews Epistle to the - Obey your rulers; Pray for us that we may be restored to you, even as we Pray for you that God may make you perfect in obedience and every good thing (Hebrews 13:17-21)
Calendar, the Christian - This appears to come from the original Didascalia, and it is emphatically said that the Lord’s Day is the great time for the Christian assembly, for Prayer, Eucharist, and instruction; and this emphasis is all the greater as it was not yet customary to have public daily Prayers for all men. The result arrived at does not mean, however, that the Christians were not bidden to Pray daily; from a very early period, certainly from about a. 200 onwards, regular daily hours of Prayer were prescribed (e. But private Prayers are here meant, even though sometimes they were said in church. ?), which is probably based on the Testament, mentions explicitly Wednesday and Friday as the two fast days of the week, and says that when a festival falls on these days they shall Pray and not receive the holy mysteries, and shall not interrupt the fasting till the ninth hour Old Testament (i. Christ as Fulfilment of) - ’ These were expressions of an ideal as yet unformed; passing through the mind of Jesus, they appear in the form, ‘Love your enemies, and Pray for them that persecute you’ (Matthew 5:44), or more completely in Luke 6:27 b, Luke 6:28 ‘Love your enemies, do good to them that hate you, bless them that curse you, Pray for them that despitefully use you. ’ And they are exemplified in His Prayer on the cross, Luke 23:34 ‘Father, forgive them: for they know not what they do’ (on this verse see Westcott-Hort, Gr
Nehemiah, Theology of - ...
Prayer . The Book of Nehemiah probably contains the shortest Prayer in the Bible and one of the longest. The shortest Prayer occurs in 2:4 between the king's question about what Nehemiah wants from him and this man's reply. The longest Prayer takes up most of chapter 9. ...
This Prayer came after the festivals of Yom Kippur and Sukkoth. ...
In the Greek text of the Septuagint this is said to be Ezra's Prayer but the Hebrew text is indefinite about the speaker in 9:6. The entire Prayer is a national confession of sin and a plea for mercy in the midst of oppression and disgrace. ...
There are thirteen instances of Prayer in Nehemiah. The book opens with a Prayer and closes with one (1:4-11; 13:31). The recorded Prayer of the first chapter is the culmination of many days of Praying and fasting for the ruined city of Jerusalem. Nehemiah has been Praying night and day for this city. He closes his Prayer by requesting success and compassion before the king. This is truly one of the great intercessory Prayers of the Bible. ...
At many points of crisis Nehemiah's short Prayers are recorded. When news of conspiracy is heard, they Pray and set up a guard (5:19). After five attempts to ambush him he breathes a brief Prayer that is only three words in the Hebrew text: "Now strengthen my hands" (6:9). This man is possibly one of the most Prayerful persons in the Bible outside of Christ. He realized there were times for long, sustained Prayer and times for hard work and quick, whispered Prayer
John - His disciples practiced fasting (Mark 6:14-29 ), and he taught them to Pray (Luke 11:1 )
Revelation of God - Yet, the creatures who worship, Pray, build temples, idols and shrines, and seek after God in diverse ways do not glorify God as God nor give Him thanks (1618166311_2 )
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - Ignatius, ad Polycarp 1, Ephesians 10, says "pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17); so Polycarp, and Philippians 4. The same Prayer ("may God Himself," etc. )...
(3) 2 Thessalonians 3:1-16; exhorts to orderly conduct, Prays the God of peace in their behalf, autograph salutation and blessing
Census - The deliverance was the answer to David's Prayer, Jehovah at the same time interceding; for while we Pray below our Intercessor is pleading above (compare Psalms 30:8-10 with 1 Chronicles 21:15-18)
Life - In such circumstances, the lowly Pray for divine mercy and help. In Psalm 71:9 the psalmist Prays in his old age, not that he might escape death, but rather that the Lord would not forsake him as his strength fades and death approaches
Popery - But under all the penalties which are inflicted or threatened in the Romish church, it has provided relief by its indulgences, and by its Prayers or masses for the dead, performed professedly for relieving and rescuing the souls that are detained in purgatory. Hence he finds a convenience in saying his Prayers with some devout pictures before him, he being no sooner distracted, but the sight of these recalls his wandering thoughts to the right object; and as certainly brings something good into his mind, as an immodest picture disturbs his heart with filthy thoughts. ) so almost every sick man desires the congregation to be his mediators, by remembering him in their Prayers. And so the Papist desires the blessed in heaven to be his mediators: that is, that they would Pray to God for him
Hardening - He confesses again and again that he has sinned (Exodus 9:27, Exodus 10:16), and he asks Moses to forgive his sin and Pray for him (Exodus 10:17)
Jerusalem - On Fridays and feast days they assemble in numbers; they kiss the stones and weep, and Pray for the restoration of their city and temple, being, alas, still blind to the only true way of blessing through the Lord Jesus whom they crucified
the Unmerciful Servant - How did your reckoning time come to you? What was it that brought your debt to a head? What was it that brought you up to God's judgment seat before the time? What great trespass was it of yours? What great accumulation of debt was it of yours? And did you do like this Galilean procurator? Did you fall down and worship God and appeal to His patience? Did you promise to pay all the debt if only He would let you have sufficient time in which to pay it? Did you swear to Him that you would never commit that great trespass again? Did you engage also that you would watch, and Pray, and would crucify your flesh, with its affections and lusts, if only He would not deliver you to the tormentors. ...
I feel sure you all say the Lord's Prayer every night before you sleep
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - And never for a day forget to Pray for them in secret, and by name, and by the name of their inward battle-field
Devil - It is one of the serious circumstances of our probation on earth, that we should be exposed to this influence of Satan, and we are therefore called to "watch and Pray that we enter not into temptation
Peter - Peter was one of the three Apostles whom Jesus admitted to witness the resurrection of Jairus's daughter, and before whom he was transfigured, and with whom he retired to Pray in the garden the night before he suffered
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - ’ It was evidently a function in which women might share, as we gather from 1 Corinthians 11:5, where public prophecy and public Prayer are associated as gifts of Christian women. 1), while Polycarp is to Pray for them (Polyc
Monnica - Augustine was born when Monnica was 23 years old, and when, as we gather from his language about her whole influence, she was already a Christian in the noblest sense, strong in the power of spiritual holiness, and ardently Prayerful for the salvation of her child, and therefore for his personal acceptance of the faith. At Milan she was a most devout and diligent worshipper; liberal in alms; daily attending the Eucharist ("nullum diem praetermittebat oblationem ad altare [3]"), and was twice daily in the church, not to gossip there ("non ad vanas fabulas et aniles loquacitates") but to hear the word and Pray ( ib. During the struggle of Ambrose with the Arian empress-mother Justina (385) Monnica was the most devout among the host of worshippers who gathered for vigils and Prayers in the church ( ib. He records his Prayers for the departed soul, and begs those of the reader
Messiah - Whereas the Jews, in their synagogues, were wont to Pray for the Grand Seignior, he orders those Prayers to be forborne for the future, thinking it an indecent thing to Pray for him who was shortly to be his captive; and, instead of Praying for the Turkish emperor, he appoints Prayers for himself
Moses - " In answer to this haughty tyrant, they styled the Lord by a more ancient title, which the Egyptians ought to have known and respected, from Abraham's days, when he plagued them in the matter of Sarah: "The God of the Hebrews hath met with us: Let us go, we Pray thee, three days' journey into the desert, and sacrifice unto the Lord our God, lest he fall upon us with pestilence or with the sword:" plainly intimating to Pharaoh, also, not to incur his indignation, by refusing to comply with his desire. " He Prayed that God would blot him out of his book, that is, take away his life, if he would not forgive "the great sin of his people;" and prevailed with God to alter his determination of withdrawing his presence from them, and sending an inferior angel to conduct them to the land of promise. So wonderful was the condescension of God to the voice of a man, and so mighty the power of Prayer. How severely Moses felt his deprivation, appears from his humble, and it should seem repeated, supplications to the Lord to reverse the sentence: "O Lord of gods, thou hast begun to show thy servant thy greatness, and thy mighty hand; for what god is there in heaven or in earth that can do according to thy works, and according to thy might? I Pray thee let me go over and see the good land beyond Jordan, even that goodly mountain Lebanon," or the whole breadth of the land
Jonah - When a violent storm comes on, and the Prayers of the mariners to their gods are of no avail, they conclude that there is some one on board who has offended some deity, and cast lots to discover the culprit. ]'>[3] , and remains in its belly 3 days and 3 nights ( Psalms 18:1-50 ), during which time he Prays ( Jonah 2:1 ). His Prayer, which fills the greater part of the chapter, is rather a psalm of praise ( Jonah 2:2-9 ). King and people repent, and show their repentance in a public fast (which includes even the domestic animals), and Pray ( Jonah 3:5-9 ). Their penitence and Prayer are accepted, to the prophet’s disgust ( Jonah 3:10 to Jonah 4:4 ). Smith); (2) that it was used by him but not written by him (Baudissin); (3) that it was inserted by an editor who missed the Prayer referred to in Jonah 2:1 (Nowack, Marti, Cheyne, Kautzsch, and perhaps Horton). Cheyne puts the psalm as late as the Prayer in the appendix to Sirach
Children (Sons) of God - It is the appeal of Christ to His disciples against hypocrisy, unforgivingness, lack of faith ( Matthew 6:1 ; Matthew 6:15 ; Matthew 6:26 ); it stands as symbol of the Divine providence, forgiveness, redemption in a word, of the Divine love ( Luke 6:36 ; Luke 11:13 , Mark 11:25 ), and hence it gives the ground and manner of all access to God, ‘Whensoever ye Pray, say, Father’ ( Luke 11:2 )
Sepulchre - to Marcella, expresses a hope that they might Pray together in the mausoleum of David (Ep
Parable - The UNJUST JUDGE: the Lord's point was that men "ought always to Pray and not to faint
Paul in Arabia - To Paul to read, and to meditate, and to Pray, is Jesus Christ
Thomas - What we live for and hope to see, what we love with our whole heart, what we Pray for night and day, what our whole future is anchored upon, that we easily believe, that we are ready to welcome. You do not wait for Christ's coming, either to judge the world, or to take you to Himself, or to sanctify you, and comfort you, and answer your Prayers
Barzillai - Then come the two chapters about the successful battle; after which, when David sets out to return to Jerusalem, the sacred writer takes up the noble name of Barzillai again in this fine passage: 'And Barzillai the Gileadite came down from Rogelim, and went over Jordan with the king, to conduct him over Jordan, And the king said to Barzillai, Come thou over with me, and I will feed thee with me in Jerusalem, And Barzillai said unto the king, How long have I to live that I should go up with the king to Jerusalem? I am this day fourscore years old, and can I discern between good and evil? Can thy servant taste what I eat or what I drink? Can I hear any more the voice of singing men and singing women? Wherefore, then, should thy servant be yet a burden to my lord the king? Thy servant will go a little way over the Jordan with the king; and why should the king recompense it me with such a reward? Let thy servant, I Pray thee, turn back again, that I may die in mine own city, and be buried by the grave of my father and my mother
Mediator - Christ, then, having thus "humbled himself, and become obedient to death, even the death of the cross; God, also, hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name;" hath commanded us to Pray in his name; constituted him man's advocate and intercessor; distributes his grace only through him, and in honour of his death; hath given all things into his hands; and hath committed all judgment unto him; "that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow," and "that all men should honour the Son even as they honour the Father," Php_2:8-10 ; John 3:35 ; John 5:22-23 . He is "the great High Priest of our profession," who, having "offered himself without spot to God," has entered the holiest to make intercession for us, and to present our Prayers and services to God, securing to them acceptance by virtue of his own merits
Synagogue - Accordingly we find that the praises of God were sung, at a very ancient period, in the schools of the prophets; and those who felt any particular interest in religion, were assembled by the seers on the Sabbath, and the new moons, for Prayers and religious instruction, 1 Samuel 10:5-11 ; 1 Samuel 19:18-24 ; 2 Kings 4:23 . A person likewise was denominated the messenger, or angel, αγγελλος , της αγγελλος εκκλησιας , &c, who was selected by the assembly to recite for them the Prayers; the same that is called by the Jews of modern times the synagogue singer, or cantilator, Revelation 2:1 ; Revelation 2:8 ; Revelation 2:12 ; Revelation 2:18 ; Revelation 3:1 ; Revelation 3:7 ; Revelation 3:14 . Individuals sometimes offered their private Prayers in the synagogue. The meeting, as far as the religious exercises were concerned, was ended with a Prayer, to which the people responded Amen, when a collection was taken for the poor. Furthermore, the forms of Prayer that are used by the Jews at the present time do not appear to have been in existence in the time of Christ; unless this may perhaps have been the case in respect to the substance of some of them, especially the one called שמפּ? קרי , concerning which the Talmudists, at a very early period, gave many precepts. Prayer succeeded, which was followed by the commemoration of the Saviour's death in the breaking and distribution of bread. ...
Those who held some office in the church were the regularly qualified instructers in these religious meetings; and yet laymen had liberty to address their brethren on these occasions the same as in the synagogues; also to sing hymns, and to Pray; which, in truth, many of them did, especially those who were supernaturally gifted, not excepting the women. The reader and the speaker stood; the others sat; all arose in the time of Prayer
Philippi - There was, however, a προσευχή, or place of Prayer, outside the gate by the side of the river-the Ganges or Gangites, a tributary of the Strymon-where some women were in the habit of meeting on the Sabbath (Acts 16:13; Acts 16:16). Philo (in Flaccum, 14) mentions the instinctive desire of Jews residing in a foreign city to Pray ἐν καθαρωτάτῳ, in the purest place they could find
Name (2) - When Jesus teaches His disciples in the Lord’s Prayer to say, ‘Hallowed be thy name’ (Matthew 6:9 = Luke 11:2), it is that Divine quality of Fatherhood which He has just set in the very forefront of the Prayer that He desires them to hallow. And when He says in the Intercessory Prayer, ‘I have manifested thy name’ (17:6, cf. Matthew 7:22)—but of a service and worship and Prayer undertaken for His sake or inspired by faith in His Person. In James 5:14 the elders of the Church are told to Pray over the sick man, ‘anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. And as for the Apostolic Church, while it is clear that the name of Jesus was invoked by both Peter and Paul before the performance of a miracle, Peter’s Prayer, after the miracle at the Temple gate, that God would accompany the use of the name by stretching forth His hand to heal (Acts 4:29-30), points to the conclusion that the name of Jesus was invoked by the Apostles in these cases simply because every appeal to God was made through the Person of the Mediator. James, after enjoining the use of the Lord’s name at a sick-bed, adds that ‘the Prayer of faith shall heal the sick’ (James 5:15)
Enoch Book of - The power of Prayer-whether that of the angels, the departed holy ones, or the righteous on earth-is recognized, especially in the bringing in of judgment. ]'>[1] A whirlwind carries off Enoch to the end of the heavens; he views the dwelling-places of the holy who Pray for mankind, and the Righteous One’s abode under the wings of the Lord of Spirits (xxxix. ‘In those days’ the Prayer of the righteous united with angelic intercession was heard (xlvii. ...
(a) Vision of earth’s destruction: Mahalalel bids Enoch Pray that a remnant may remain (lxxxiii. 1-9); Prayer of Enoch for survival of plant of eternal seed (= Israel) (lxxxiii. 1-3); their Prayer heard (xcvii. ); the righteous are to raise Prayers and place them before the angels, who are to place the sin of sinners for a memorial before the Most High (xcix
Inspiration - John, when our Lord took a solemn farewell of the disciples, after eating the last passover with them, he said, "And I will Pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever; even the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it seeth him not, neither knoweth him. That this inspiration was vouchsafed to them, not for their own sakes, but in order to qualify them for the successful discharge of their office as the messengers of Christ, and the instructers of mankind, appears from several expressions of that Prayer which immediately follows the discourse containing the promise of inspiration; particularly from these words: "Neither Pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word; that they all may be one, as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee; that they may be one in us; that the world may believe that thou hast sent me," John 17:20-21 . In conformity to this Prayer, so becoming him who was not merely the friend of the Apostles, but the light of the world, is that charge which he gives them immediately before his ascension: "Go ye, therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world," Matthew 28:19-20 ; I am with you alway, not by my bodily presence; for immediately after he was taken out of their sight; but I am with you by the Holy Ghost, whom I am to send upon you not many days hence, and who is to abide with you for ever
Neology - The bishops are abrogated, but ministers are still introduced or cast out at will; simony came into ill repute, but who now rejects a hand laden with gold? the monks were reproached for indolence,—as if there were too much study at our universities; the monasteries were dissolved,—to stand empty, or to be stalls for cattle; the regularly recurring Prayers are abolished, yet so that now most Pray not at all; the public fasts were laid aside, now the command of Christ is held to be but useless words; not to say any thing of blasphemers, adulterers, extortioners," &c. ...
But the mercy of God has begun to answer the Prayers of the few faithful who are left as the gleanings of grapes after the vintage; and to revive, in some active, learned, and influential men, the spirit of primitive faith and zeal. Tittman of Dresden, on the neological interpreters: "What is the interpretation of the Scriptures, if it relies not on words, but things, not on the assistance of languages, but on the decrees of reason, that is, of modern philosophy? What is all religion, what the knowledge of divine things, what are faith and hope placed in Christ, what is all Christianity, if human reason and philosophy is the only fountain of divine wisdom, and the supreme judge in the matter of religion? What is the doctrine of Christ and the Apostles more than some philosophical system? But what, then, I Pray you, is, to deny, to blaspheme Jesus the Lord, to render his divine mission doubtful, nay, vain and useless, to impugn his doctrine, to disfigure it shamefully, to attack it, to expose it to ridicule, and, if possible, to suppress it, to remove all Christianity out of religion, and to bound religion within the narrow limits of reason alone, to deride miracles, and hold them up to derision, to accuse them as vain, to bring them into disrepute, to torture sacred Scripture into seeming agreement with the fancies of human wisdom, to alloy it with human conjectures, to bring it into contempt, and to break down its divine authority, to undermine, to shake, to overthrow utterly the foundations of Christian faith? What else can be the event than this, as all history, a most weighty witness in this matter, informs us, namely, that when sacred Scripture, its grammatical interpretation and a sound knowledge of languages are, as it were, despised and banished, all religion should be contemned, shaken, corrupted, troubled, undermined, utterly overturned, and should be entirely removed and reduced to natural religion; or that it should end in a mystical theology, than which nothing was ever more pernicious to the Christian doctrine, and be converted into an empty μυχιλαγε , or even into a poetical system, hiding every thing in figures and fictions, to which latter system not a few of the sacred orators and theologians of our time seem chiefly inclined
Sanctification, Sanctify - ...
(1) Adopting the language of Leviticus 22:32 and of the prophets, Jesus bids the disciples Pray, ‘Our Father … hallowed be thy name … on earth’ ( Matthew 6:9 f. the Apostle Prays that God will ‘sanctify to full completeness’ his readers, who are still lacking in many respects ( 1 Thessalonians 3:10 ), so that their ‘spirit, soul, and body in full integrity may be preserved,’ and thus found ‘blameless in holiness before God at the coming of our Lord Jesus’ ( 1 Thessalonians 3:13 )
Nehemiah - Sorrow at the news drove him to fasting in expression of sadness, and Prayer before the God of heaven, who alone could remedy the evil. ...
His Prayer (Nehemiah 1:4-11) was marked by importunate continuity, "day and night" (compare Isaiah 62:6-7; Luke 18:7), intercession for Israel, confession of individual and national sin, pleading that God should remember His promises of mercy upon their turning to Him, however far cast out for transgression; also that He should remember they are His people redeemed by His strong hand, therefore His honour is at stake in their persons; and that Nehemiah and they who Pray with him desire to fear God's name (Isaiah 26:8; contrast Psalms 66:18; compare Daniel 9, Leviticus 26:33-39; Deuteronomy 4:25-31); lastly he asks God to dispose Artaxerxes' heart to "mercy" (Proverbs 21:1). hear the Prayer," is an allusion to Solomon's Prayer (1 Kings 8:28-29). After four months (Nehemiah 1:1; Nehemiah 2:1), from Chisleu to Nisan, of Praying and waiting, in Artaxerxes' 20th year Nehemiah with sad countenance ministered as his cupbearer. " Nehemiah used means, "setting a watch day and night," at the same time "praying unto our God" to bless the means. His Prayer often repeated is "think upon me, my God, for good according to all that I have done for this people" (Nehemiah 5:19; Nehemiah 13:14; compare Hebrews 6:10; Acts 10:4; Nehemiah 12:1-26). ...
While he pleads his efforts, not feigning a mock humility, he closes with "remember me, O my God, and spare me according to the greatness of Thy mercy" (Nehemiah 13:22-31), the publican's and the dying thief's Prayer. His safeguard was Prayer; "strengthen my hands, my God, think Thou upon" my enemies (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14)
Ephesians, Book of - ...
Paul turned to Prayer to conclude this section and reveal the goal of redemption (Ephesians 3:14-21 ). His Prayer was that Christ may dwell in the believers who will be rooted in love and can grasp the marvelous greatness of that love. This will lead to a life of Prayer for self and for other servants of God. As usual, Paul concluded his letter with a benediction, Praying for peace, love, faith, and grace for his beloved readers. Pray for boldness for Christian leaders (Ephesians 6:18-20 )
Unpardonable Sin - ]'>[3] In 1 John 5:16 the writer distinguishes between ‘a sin unto death’ and ‘a sin that is not unto death’; and while urging Christians to Pray for one another with respect to the latter, says that he does not bid them make request to God concerning the former
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - When Solomon Prayed at the dedication of the temple, he acknowledged, "the heavens, even the highest heaven, cannot contain you" (1 Kings 8:27 ). So, those who Pray, "Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven" (Matthew 6:10 ) are obliged to live from a heavenly vantage point
Gestures - We cannot put under this head the hand outstretched in Matthew 14:31; Matthew 26:23, as there it does not express emotion; but we may compare with the above gesture the hands outstretched in Prayer (1 Kings 8:22, Psalms 28:2; Psalms 134:2, 1 Timothy 2:8). ), in His last Prayer before going to Gethsemane (John 17:1), at the healing of the deaf man with an impediment (Mark 7:34), and the raising of Lazarus (John 11:41). The gesture is one of Prayer, and implies that Prayer accompanied the actions described (see Job 22:26; cf. As standing was the usual attitude for Prayer* Golden Rule - Interpreted in the spirit of Christ, the rule, ‘Do as you would be done by,’ implies the embodiment in action of the Prayer, ‘Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth’; they who walk by this rule are doing all that in them lies to bring in the Golden Age. Yet Bengel’s pithy comment, ‘Imitate the Divine goodness,’ suggests a natural link with the previous verse: as the Father gives ‘good things’ to His children in response to the Prayer which expresses desire to receive them, so the motive of His children’s actions should be a wish that others may share in the enjoyment of those good things from above. Another interpretation which preserves the unity of the Sermon on the Mount is that our Lord followed His encouragement to Prayer by the reminder that if Prayer is to be heard there must be a good life (Chrysostom). It is equally true, however, that the good life is impossible without Prayer; the Father hears us when we ask His help, ‘ the most difficult duties of unselfish brotherly love to men become possible to us’ (Dykes, of the King, p. If we are doing unto others as Christ would have us do, He assures us that His Father will hear our Prayers; on the other hand, if we will Pray, He assures us that His Father will bestow the gifts of grace which will enable us to walk in love
House - Peter goes to the roof to Pray (Acts 10:9)
Lord (2) - This word occurs only once in the Gospels, in the Prayer of Simeon, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word’ (Luke 2:29). It is noteworthy that the only instances in the Gospels where the title is used in direct address to God, are found in the Prayers of Jesus: ‘I thank thee, Father, Lord of heaven and earth’ (Matthew 11:25 || Luke 10:21). ‘Perform unto the Lord thine oaths’ (Matthew 5:33); ‘Tell how great things the Lord hath done for thee’ (Mark 5:19); ‘Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest’ (Luke 10:2)
Metaphors - One who truly exhibits the law of righteousness (which is unselfishness and love) does not let his left hand know what his right hand doeth (Matthew 6:3); but these men blow a trumpet before them, not only when they give alms, but when they Pray (cf. They make long Prayers and ‘devour windows’ houses (Matthew 23:14 or 13?)
Confession - James records, it would seem, the practice of the Church in Jerusalem in relation to visits of the elders of the Church to sick persons whom they anointed with Prayer; ‘Confess therefore your sins one to another, and Pray one for another, that ye may be healed’ (James 5:16). 175), who supposes reference ‘merely to such mutual confidences as would give a right direction to the Prayers offered,’ the practice in the sickroom corresponds to the common practice of the Church in the next generation. ...
‘This confession is a disciplinary act of great humiliation and prostration of the man; it regulates the dress, the food; it enjoins sackcloth and ashes; it defiles the body with dust, and subdues the spirit with anguish; it bids a man alter his life, and sorrow for past sin; it restricts meat and drink to the greatest simplicity possible; it nourishes Prayer by fasting; it inculcates groans and tears and invocations of the Lord God day and night, and teaches the penitent to cast himself at the feet of the presbyters, and to fall on his knees before the beloved of God, and to beg of all the brethren to intercede on his behalf’ (de Pœn
the Prodigal Son - When we are just beginning to remember that we have a Father; when we are just beginning to repent toward Him; when we are just beginning to Pray to Him; when we are just beginning to believe on Him, and on His Son Jesus Christ our Saviour; when we are still at the very first beginnings of a penitent, returning, obedient, pure, and godly, life; ay, when we are yet a great way off from all these things, our Father sees us, and has compassion on us, and comes to meet us
Christian (the Name) - ‘He who can Pray the Lord’s Prayer sincerely must surely be a Christian,’ says Rothe; while Martineau’s definition, in reference to a church, runs thus: ‘imbued with Christ’s spirit, teaching His religion, worshipping His God and Father, and accepting His law of self-sacrifice
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - It was only after He was more than thirty years of age that we come on the Son of God Himself giving up whole nights at a time to secret Prayer. It is as if the ministers should preach, and hold their Prayer-meetings, and teach their classes, and visit their sick, and should then wait in confidence till the seed should spring up, they know not how. Why is it that I am so slow in growing any better? Why is my heart as wicked as ever it was, and sometimes much more so? You Pray, in a way. You watch unto Prayer, now and then
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - He consequently kept much at home, writ notes upon Homer and Plautus, and sometimes thought it hard to be called to Pray by any poor body's bedside when he was just in the midst of one of Homer's battles. But upon giving up myself to Prayer, and reading Mr. Kinchin's plan, and generally divided the day into three parts; eight hours for study and meditation, eight hours for sleep and meals, and eight hours for reading Prayers, catechising and visiting the parish. ...
And then the field of Prayer. And then, the enterprise of Prayer, the exploration of it, the ventures in it, the sure successes of it. No mention shall be made of coral or of pearls; for the price of Prayer is above rubies
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - In that house, after the psalm and the scripture and the Prayer, the head of the house remains on his knees for, say, five or six seconds after he utters the Amen. He has been meditating the order, evidently, all the time of the Prayer. The Professor's text was this,-"Lord, teach us to Pray. Have you Prayed more these last three weeks? Have you been oftener, and longer at a time, on your knees? Have you been like Halyburton's mother-have you Prayed more, both with and for your son, these three weeks? I did not hear the sermon, and I could not get anybody to tell me very much about it, beyond-O the eloquence and the delight of it! But some of you heard it, and God's demand of you tonight is,-with what result on your heart, on your temper, on your walk and conversation, on your character? Or, is it written in heaven about you since that Sabbath night,-'This is he who hears sermons with such applause, but has never had any root in himself
the Ethiopian Eunuch - "I Pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other mar?" What struck the imagination and the conscience of the eunuch was this: the absolutely unearthly picture that the prophet draws of his own character and conduct: if indeed it is of his own character and conduct the prophet speaks. "I see it!" broke in a young Forfarshire farmer in the middle of my Prayer with him in the minister's study late that night after a fine revival meeting conducted by Mr. And my Prayer lies there to this day, like Philip's sermon, never finished, and that is five-and-twenty years ago. "I see it!" and we both sprang to our feet; and, instead of the rest of my Prayer to God I said to the farmer, "Never lose sight of it, then. "I see it!" exclaimed the farmer, cutting short my Prayer
Peter - The son of Jonas was, to begin with, a man of the strongest, the most wilful, and the most wayward impulses; impulses that, but for the watchfulness and the Prayerfulness of his Master, might easily have become the most headlong and destructive passions. Let us take Peter, come to perfection, for our pattern and our prelate; and, especially, let us watch, and work, and Pray against a cold heart, a chilling temper, a distant, selfish, indifferent mind
the Queen of Sheba - Bishop Lancelot Andrewes has no more private devotion than that is where we come upon him Praying to God to be delivered from his envy of another man's grace. She had Solomon's Prayer at the dedication of the temple in her hand. And the place in the Prayer which she reads and Prays all the way from Jerusalem to the south is this-'Moreover, concerning a stranger, that is not of Thy people Israel, but cometh out of a far country for Thy Name's sake. When the stranger shall come and Pray toward this house, hear Thou in heaven Thy dwelling-place, and do according to all that the stranger calleth to Thee for, that all people of the earth may know Thy Name, to fear Thee, as do Thy people Israel
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - His preaching was perfect; but his motives in it, his aims and his ends in it, the sources from which he drew his pulpit inspiration, his secret Prayers both before his sermons were begun, and all the time they were under his hand, and while they were being delivered, and still more after they were delivered,-in all these things,-"thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead. 'It is good to study, only strengthen it with much faith and with much Prayer before God. And above all else, and with a view to all else, and as a means to all else, strengthen thy closet-prayer before God. Strengthen it in the time you take to it, in the intensity you put into it, and in the way you work it up into your sermons, both in their composition, and in their delivery, and in the way you continue to wait and to Pray after your sermons; to wait, that is, not for the applause of the hearers, but for their profit and My praise. " There is a certain note of terror in that warning which is here addressed to all ministers, the most watchful, the most Prayerful before God, and the best. " I did not ask her, but I suppose she meant that the thought of her son in his constant danger made her life of intercessory Prayer in his behalf perfect before God, and all Spurgeon's readers will bear her out about his sermons
Paul as a Controversialist - But we must both learn, and labour, and Pray, to be delivered from the dominion of those wicked tempers, as much as may be
Wealth - The ideal is to Pray for enough possessions to avoid the temptation to steal but not enough to feel independent of God (Proverbs 30:8-9 )
Adoption - The context in these passages shows that the Spirit leads us to the Father by making us realize our sonship; He teaches us how to Pray, and puts into our mouth the words ‘Abba, Father’ (cf
Agony - ...
The state of Jesus in Gethsemane is described in the following phrases: Matthew 26:37 ‘he began to be sorrowful and sore troubled’; Mark 14:33 ‘he began to be greatly amazed and sore troubled’; Luke 22:44 ‘And being in an agony he Prayed more earnestly: and his sweat became as it were great drops of blood falling down upon the ground. That He regarded the experience as a temptation is suggested by His warning words to His disciples: ‘Watch and Pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak’ (Matthew 26:41, Mark 14:38; cf. That He was conscious of human weakness, and desired Divine strength for the struggle, is evident from the Prayers, in reporting the words of which the Evangelists do not verbally agree, as the following comparison shows:—...
Matthew 26:39. Luke give the words of one Prayer only, although the former evidently intends to report three distinct acts of Prayer (Luke 22:35; Luke 22:39; Luke 22:41), and the latter apparently only two (Luke 22:41; Luke 22:44). Matthew gives the words of the second Prayer, which he reports as repeated the third time (Luke 22:42; Luke 22:44): ‘O my Father, if this cannot pass away, except I drink it, thy will be done. At first He Prayed for the entire removal of the cup, if possible (Mt. ); and then, having been taught that it could not be taken away, He Prayed for strength to take the cup. It is not necessary for us to decide which of the reports is most nearly verbally correct, as the substance of the first Prayer is the same in all reports. Much more confident can we be that Gethsemane is referred to in Hebrews 5:7-8 ‘Who in the days of his flesh, having offered up Prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and having been heard for his godly fear; though he was a Son, yet learned obedience by the things which he suffered. ...
(4) The only view that seems to the present writer at all adequate is that what Jesus dreaded and Prayed to be delivered from in the experience of death was the sense of God’s distance and abandonment. His Prayer was answered, for He was saved from death, inasmuch as the experience of darkness and desolation was momentary, and ere He gave up the ghost He was able to commit Himself with childlike trust unto His Father. Although He at first Prayed to be delivered from this, to Him, most terrible and grievous experience, yet He afterward submitted to God’s will, as God’s purpose in the salvation of mankind was dearer to Him than even the joy of His filial communion with God His Father
Absalom - Let us collect into a secret and solemn book all such instances; and let us, husband and wife, minister and people, and one anxious parent with another, let us meet together, and confer together, and Pray together, saying, This one thing will we do. How did they come so well and so soon to understand their children? How early did they discover what manner of heart was already in their children? And at what age did they begin to deal with the hearts of their children? What amount of time did they set aside and keep sacred for reflection and for Prayer to God for their child; naming their child and describing him; and how did God's answer begin to show itself first in the parents and then in the child? When did your child first begin to show some sure signs of saving grace? And how did that grace show itself to your satisfaction and thanksgiving; first in one child and then in another? Tell us about the Sabbath-how it was observed, occupied, and sanctified as your children grew up? About the church also and the Sabbath-school? About the books that were read on Sabbath-days and week days; both by your children alone and of their own accord, as also with you all reading together; one reading and all the rest listening? Things like that
Nabal - And all the time it is not that he does not Pray to love his own, like Andrewes; but there is a law of obstinacy in his heart that still makes him a devil at home
Job - That he did not live at an earlier period, may be collected from an incidental observation of Bildad, who refers Job to their forefathers for instruction in wisdom:—...
"Inquire, I Pray thee, of the former age, ...
And prepare thyself to the search of their fathers:" ...
assigning as a reason the comparative shortness of human life, and consequent ignorance of the present generation:—...
"For we are but of yesterday, and know nothing; Because our days upon earth are a shadow
Roman Catholics - In favour of extreme unction, or anointing the sick with oil, they argue from James 1:14-15 , which is thus rendered in the Vulgate: "Is any sick among you? Let him call for the priests of the church, and let them Pray over him, anointing him with oil," &c. They also believe that souls are released from purgatory by the Prayers and alms which are offered for them, principally by the holy sacrifice of the mass. That the saints reigning with Christ (and especially the blessed virgin) are to be honoured and invoked; that they offer Prayers unto God for us; and that their relics are to be had in veneration. " This document commences with reciting the Nicene Creed, which, as it is admitted by the Protestant church of England, and inserted in the Common Prayer Book, need not be here repeated. Likewise, that the saints reigning together with Christ are to be honoured and invocated; that they offer Prayers to God for us, and that their relics are to be venerated
Trinity - The foundation of the Christian idea of the Godhead is that of the One Supreme Almighty Spirit whom we worship, to whom we Pray, from whom we receive grace, and whom we serve
Romans, Book of - He probably looked for support in Prayer, some financial assistance, and perhaps the designating of a Roman Christian who knew the western area to travel with Paul. ...
Finally, Paul urged the church to Pray for him as he went to Jerusalem (Romans 15:30-31 ). Taking these facts seriously, scholars now feel that Paul knew much more about the Roman Christians than earlier scholars realized and wrote to the church with several purposes in mind: (1) to request their Prayers as he faced the threatening situation in Jerusalem, (2) to alert them to his intended visit, (3) to acquaint them with some of his understanding of what God had done in Christ, (4) to instruct them in areas where the church faced specific problems, and (5) to enlist their support in his planned missionary venture to Spain. ...
In the conclusion to the letter (Romans 6:5:27 ), Paul summarized his ministry and his plans for the future, requesting their Prayers (Romans 15:14-33 ); then he commended Phoebe (Romans 16:1-2 ), sent greetings to individual Christians (Romans 16:3-24 ), and ended his letter with praise for God—“to the only wise God through Jesus Christ be glory for endless ages! Amen” (Romans
God, Names of - It is the word for God in the Lord's Prayer (Luke 11:2 ). Jesus instructed us to Pray, "Hallowed be your name" (Luke 11:2 )
Samson - Samson's father and mother never saw another happy day after that day when their son-miraculous birth, Nazarite vow and all-went down to Timnath and saw a woman, a daughter of the Philistines, and said, Get her for me to wife! Then his father and his mother said to Samson, Is there never a woman of the daughters of thy brethren, that thou goest to take a wife of the uncircumcised Philistines? Was it for this day they had sanctified their unborn child? In his misery Manoah declared that he would never all his days Pray for anything after this, lest it should turn to his bane, as his Prayer for a son had so turned. You work hard for God at your books and your visiting as a minister or as a Sabbath-school teacher, but you restrain Prayer. You do not touch wine, but how do you stand to all Samson's other sins? Death and hell will come still more surely into your hearts through the gates of envy, and ill-will, and hatred, and pride, and revenge, and malice, and unbelief, and neglect of God in Prayer, than at those more yawning gates that all decently living men make a defence at. That dark cell in Gaza-in Gaza, the scene of some of Samson's greatest sins-that shameful cell was a house of God, and a place of Prayer and repentance to Manoah's overtaken and overwhelmed son
Saul - honour me now, I Pray thee, before the elders of my people and before Israel" (John 5:44; John 12:43)
Antichrist - The ultimate authority for our thoughts on the subject must be found in the words of Jesus when He teaches us to Pray for deliverance from ‘the evil one’ (Matthew 6:13), and warns us against false Christs and false prophets who proclaim a kingdom that is not His own (Matthew 24:24)
Miriam - For yet my Prayer also shall be for them in their infirmities. Pray for them
Bride - The marriage ceremony was commonly performed in a garden, or in the open air; the bride was placed under a canopy, supported by four youths, and adorned with jewels according to the rank of the married persons; all the company crying out with joyful acclamations, "Blessed be he that cometh!" It was anciently the custom, at the conclusion of the ceremony, for the father and mother and kindred of the woman, to Pray for a blessing upon the parties
Psalms - Were the Messiah not concerned in the Psalms, it would have been absurd to celebrate twice a day, in their public devotions, the events of one man's life, who was deceased so long ago, as to have no relation now to the Jews and the circumstances of their affairs; or to transcribe whole passages from them into their Prayers for the coming of the Messiah. Do we Pray for victory over Moab, Edom, and Philistia; or for deliverance from Babylon? There are no such nations, no such places in the world
Temple - It was into this court also that the Pharisee and the publican went to Pray, Luke 18:10-13 , and hither the lame man followed Peter and John, after he was cured- the court of the women being the ordinary place of worship for those who brought no sacrifice, Acts 3:8 . From thence, after Prayers, he went back with them, through the "Beautiful gate" of the temple, where he had been lying, and through the sacred fence, into the court of the Gentiles, where, under the eastern piazza, or Solomon's porch, Peter preached Christ crucified
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - There is also a letter to Agricola, mingling tender feeling with quiet humour, excusing himself from joining a fishing excursion as his daughter Severiana was alarmingly ill, on whose behalf, as well as his own, he begs Agricola's Prayers. of Troyes, who wrote to congratulate him on his appointment, to Pray for him ( Epp. During this temporary cessation of hostilities a report became current that Euric had invaded the Roman territory of Auvergne, and Sidonius summoned his people to join in acts of fasting and Prayer conducted like the Rogations instituted, or rather revived and reorganized, some years previously by Mamertus, bp. He also begs the Prayers of the bishop and his flock for the people of Auvergne, and as a claim upon their attention mentions the transfer to Vienne at some previous time of the remains of Ferreolus and the head of Julian, both of them martyrs and natives of Auvergne
Mission - A river (as the Nile) may not originate in the land that it waters, and yet may be indispensable thereto; similarly Christ’s Kingdom is the blessing the world needs most, and its coining must be uppermost in Prayerful minds (Matthew 6:9-10), yet it takes its rise in the unseen heaven (John 18:36). Union with Him, harmony with Him, would bring about union and harmony among the races of mankind, and earth according to the great Prayers (Matthew 6:9-10, John 17:20-21), would be a province of heaven. In all its particulars—its purity, might, obedience, joyful loyalty, friendliness, Prayerfulness, catholicity—the Kingdom of God is the life of Christ expanded. ), in His readiness to Pray (John 17:1) and to serve (Mark 6:34, cf
Kingdom of God - Matthew 4:17 ; Luke 4:42-43 ); the Prayer Jesus taught his disciples, "your kingdom come" (Matthew 6:10 ); in the Beatitudes, "for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 5:3,10 ); at the Last Supper, "I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew in the kingdom of God" (Mark 14:25 ); and in many of Jesus' parables (Matthew 13:24,44 , 45,47 ; Mark 4:26,30 ; Luke 22:35-389 ). In the Lord's Prayer we Pray "Your kingdom come" ( Luke 11:2 ), and the kingdom must as a result be future. Having tasted of the firstfruits that are already realized, the believer Prays all the more earnestly "your kingdom come" (Matthew 6:10 ) and "Marana tha" ( 1 Corinthians 16:22 ; cf
Lord's Prayer (i) - LORD’S PrayER (I)...
1. The former passage has been more influential in the later history of the Lord’s Prayer, but the latter seems to give it in a more historical setting. In the Sermon on the Mount, the Prayer is, to all appearance, a later insertion; Lk. Robinson, ‘On the Locality in which the Lord’s Prayer was given,’ in F. Chase, ‘The Lord’s Prayer in Early Church’ (TS
The Lord’s Prayer has been frequently published in Polyglot editions; the oldest at Rome, 1591, in 26 languages; then by II. Adelung (Mithridates, 1804–1817) made the Lord’s Prayer the basis of a scientific classification of languages. Apostolides (London, no date, in 100 languages, published for the benefit of the poor Cretan refugees now in Greece); The Lord’s Prayer in Three Hundred Languages … with a Preface by Heinrich Rost, 1891; in 300 dialects of Africa, 1900. A pleasant task would be for a united band of scholars to trace the historic development of those languages for which this is possible, on the basis of the Lord’s Prayer, and to show the character of the rest on the same basis. The Lord’s Prayer has also been frequently turned into metre and rhyme. Scripture, ‘A Record of the Melody of the Lord’s Prayer,’ in Die neueren Sprachen, ed. ...
For early English translations of the Lord’s Prayer, see Albert S. Cook, ‘Study of the Lord’s Prayer in English’ (Amer. Cook refers to Wanley’s Catalogus, where separate versions of the Lord’s Prayer are either given or their existence noted, pp. Three poetical paraphrases of the Lord’s Prayer of uncertain date are given by Greiss in his Bibliothek der Angelsächsischen Poesie, ii. 147, Cook gives the Lord’s Prayer from aelfric’s Homilies, and an isolated quotation in Cnut’s Laws (Schmid, Gesetze der Angelsachsen, p. ’...
In the new and enlarged edition of The Lord’s Prayer in Five Hundred Languages, comprising the Leading Languages and their Principal Dialects throughout the World, with the Places where Spoken; with a Preface by Reinhold Rost (London, Gilbert & Rivington, 1905), the Lord’s Prayer is given in English in sixteen forms, namely: Charles 11. Prayer-Book, 1662; Edward VI. Prayer-Book, 1549; as sent from Rome by Pope Adrian, an Englishman, about 1160; from two Manuscripts of the 13th cent. ...
A disciple—it is not said whether one of the Twelve—asked Jesus, as He was Praying in a certain place, when He ceased, ‘Lord, teach us to Pray, as John also taught his disciples. ’ That the disciples of John were wont to make Prayers or supplications, besides their fasting, is told by St. On a form of Prayer ascribed to John, see ‘Lord’s Prayer’ (by present writer) in EBi
‘ “The five Old Uncials” (אABCD) falsify the Lord’s Prayer as given by St. ...
The chief question about the Lord’s Prayer in Lk. Arrangement of the Lord’s Prayer. the Lord’s Prayer in 2 × 3 stichi, in Lk. Prayer Book. Aramaic , אֲבוּנָא in Galilaean), is shown by Dahman, Worte Jesu, 157, though for the beginning of a Prayer the more solemn form appears to him more probable. Paul and his churches with the Lord’s Prayer may be concluded, see Gerh. 137: ‘As in the Lord’s Prayer, so in the ancient Greek Liturgies the aor. It is the true tense for “instant” Prayer. SE*
Paul as a Pastor - Did Paul make it a rule to read, and expound, and Pray, in every house, and on every visit? Did he send word by the deacon of the district that he was coming? Or did he just, in our disorderly way, start off and drop in here and there as this case and that came up into his overcrowded mine? Till the learned Professor comes upon Paul's private note-book, for myself I will continue to interpret Paul's farewell address to the kirk-session of Ephesus with some liberality
Sarah - Lift up thy heart and Pray
Children of God - ...
Jesus gave immortal expression to the desires characteristic of the children of God, in ‘the Lord’s Prayer. ’ That Prayer is put into the lips of those who can say ‘Our Father which art in heaven. The Prayer ‘Thy will be done’ lifts us to the loftiest level of obedience. Only those who trust God can Pray ‘Give us our daily bread,’ and can limit their desires for material good to such humble bounds. The Prayer breathes throughout the spirit of love: that spirit is the warp into which the weft of the petition is woven
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - He tells us that Constantine built a house of Prayer on the site of the Resurrection and beautified the caves connected with our Lord's Birth and Ascension, and that he did so in memory of his mother, who had built two churches, one at Bethlehem, the other on the Mount of Ascension. 430) claims good authority for his account, and states that Constantine, in gratitude for the council of Nicaea, wished to build a church on Golgotha; that Helena about the same time went to Palestine to Pray and to look for the sacred sites
Solomon - A board or two of rare and precious wood, indeed; and some of them richly worked and overlaid with silver and gold-it was Solomon with his sermons, and his Prayers, and his proverbs, and his songs, and his temple. And, then, with a tutor and governor like Nathan-Judge, I Pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard. But the dedication Prayer that Solomon offered on the opening day before the altar is a far better Prayer to us today than it was that day on which it first fell from Solomon's lips. No doubt it may be said in suspicion and in depreciation of Solomon that kings are wont to get their speeches and their Prayers written for them by their ministers, secular and sacred; and that what falls from a king's lips before his people need not have come from his heart. If Solomon actually, and all of himself, made and offered that wonderful Prayer, then when we think of it, he is more a mystery of perdition to us than ever. 'The Prayer of Solomon,' says a scholar of no less grace and genius than of scholarship, 'so fully reproduced, and so evidently precomposed, may well have been written under Nathan's guidance. Had Solomon lived up to that Prayer; no, I must not say that, for no man could do that, not Nathan himself; but if Solomon in all his unspeakable sensualities and idolatries had ever given the least sign or symptom that he felt shame for his life, or remorse when he remembered his Prayer: had it not been for that, I, for one, could never have let it light on my mind that any one but Solomon himself composed what is here called Solomon's Prayer. But I must say it is both a relief and an edification to my mind that the greatest castaway in the Bible may not have been the original and real and only author of one of the greatest and best Prayers in the Bible. I can hold up my head better when I am opening a church and am reading and expounding this Prayer, when I think of Nathan's pure and noble soul rather than of Solomon, who is so soon to be such a scandal and reprobation. But I shall always return to that splendid Prayer with the author of the parable of the one little ewe lamb before my mind, rather than the reprobate lover of no end of strange women, and the fatal father of Rehoboam. I can imagine many open-minded young men here, and many open-minded old men like Jonathan Edwards, who will go back to the prophetic precomposition and the prophetic reproduction of this great Prayer with thankfulness to God for the splendid service that Christian scholarship is doing to Holy Scriptures, and not least to Solomon's psalms and songs and Prayers and proverbs in our open-eyed, believing, and truly reverential day. Only, how happy it would have made us had Nathan found among Solomon's parchments, and in Solomon's own handwriting, a psalm or Prayer like that which Bacon's executors found in his dead desk. Will you join me in the following petitions out of Bacon's prostrate Prayer: 'Most gracious Lord God, my merciful Father from my youth up, my Creator, my Redeemer, my Comforter
Blessing (2) - During this year they took the boy to the priests and learned men that they might bless him, and Pray for him that God might think him worthy of a life devoted to the study of the Torah and pious works. In its technical sense the term denotes a set form of Prayer, which opens with the words, ‘Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe, who,’ etc. Prayer-Book, pp. ‘Benedictions,’ or the Prayer-Books. Of these there are now four (see Singer’s Prayer-Book, p. Details and text of Prayers can he read in Singer, pp. ‘Benedictions,’ or the Prayer-Books
Achan - My son, said Joshua, give, I Pray thee, glory to the Lord God of Israel, and make confession to Him; and tell me what thou hast done; hide it not from me
Angels (2) - In Luke 1:19 the angel who appears to Zacharias says: ‘I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God’; as in Tobit 12:15 the angel says to Tobit: ‘I am Raphael, one of the seven holy angels, which present the Prayers of the saints and go in before the glory of the Holy One. ’ Hence we find that they are frequently described as ‘holy’ (Matthew 25:31, Mark 8:38, Luke 9:26, Job 5:1; Job 15:15, Daniel 8:13), and by implication we learn that angels obey God’s will in heaven, since we are taught by our Lord to Pray that God’s holy will may be done on earth as it is in heaven (Matthew 6:10, cf
Esau - And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I Pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint
Jonath - And the sea herself will yet be found to ebb and flow, and toss and storm, according to fixed and foreseen laws, without thereby blotting out God's footprints in the deep, or causing any less praise to arise to Him from a smooth sea or any less Prayer from a storm. Every disobedient sinner suddenly startled out of his sleep at midnight is wiser than all his teachers when he repents, and Prays, and vows, and refuses to be comforted by the most correct barometric calculations. There is the making of a rare man of science in that young transgressor who wakens with a start, and cannot sleep for fear as the Great White Throne flashes into his Prayerless room, and the last trump makes his sinful bed to shake. ...
After the terrible tempest, and the still more terrible outcome of the sin-discovering lots, and after his being taken up and cast out by the mariners into the raging sea, and by God into the belly of hell, and after his life was brought up from corruption, and his Prayer came into God's holy temple; after all that you would have said that Jonah, so purified in such a furnace, would now be the best prophet that God had ever had. But far poorer, and far more to be both blamed and pitied, you and I who have to make our choice between that same arrest and imprisonment and a life of service and of continual Prayer and good-will for all our enemies. 'I beseech Thee now, O God'-they are Augustine's words-'to reveal me to myself still more than Thou hast yet done; so that I may confess myself to my brethren, who have promised to Pray for me
Preaching - They wept, fasted, Prayed, preached, prophesied, and at length prevailed. Houses were now opened, not for ceremonial worship, as sacrificing, for this was confined to the temple; but for moral and religious instruction, as Praying, preaching, reading the law, divine worship, and social duties. These houses were called synagogues; the people repaired thither for morning and evening Prayer; and on Sabbaths and festivals, the law was read and expounded to them. Then he offered up Prayer and praise to God. The people bowing their heads and worshipping the Lord with their faces to the ground; and at the close of the Prayer, with uplifted hands, they solemnly pronounced, "Amen! Amen!" Then all standing, Ezra, assisted at times by the Levites, read the law distinctly, gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading. Before preaching, the preacher usually went into a vestry to Pray, and afterward to speak to such as came to salute him. He Prayed with his eyes shut in the pulpit
Psalms of Solomon - -Happy is the man who Prays. A Prayer for preservation from sin, from beautiful but beguiling women, and for strength to bear affliction with cheerfulness. 23-51) with a long description of the Messianic king, for whose advent the author Prays. The (alien) nations (2:2, 6, 20, 24, 7:3, 6, 8:16) who attack Jerusalem, and by whom the Jewish captives are led away, and against whom the writer Prays for deliverance, are the Romans. With this hope the righteous Pray that they may, and the writer claims that they already do, accept with patience the present passing chastisement of God
Christ, Christology - ...
Yet another of the contrasts generally accepted as genuine is Jesus' saying, "Love your enemies and Pray for those who persecute you" (Matthew 5:44 ). Thus the petition in the Lord's Prayer, "Forgive us our sins, as we ourselves herewith forgive everyone who has sinned against us" implies not only the presence of forgiveness in Jesus the Messiah but acknowledges that his disciples are to carry on the messianic mission by sharing the good news of forgiveness with others
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - ) The ministry of the gospel is furthered by rightly ordered public Prayer and worship (" translation="">1 Timothy 2:1-15). Since Timothy is to preach the gospel of salvation for all, constant Prayer must be made for all sorts and conditions of men, who have one Father and one Mediator of His will for men, Christ Jesus, who gave Himself as a ransom for all. She is not to teach or Pray in public, but is to be modest in apparel and to adorn herself with good works, performing her function in salvation by her maternal calling, whereby she will, in a life of faith, love, and holy restraint, redress the balance against her through the sin of Eve. But by the gospel the old Jewish distinctions of clean and unclean and heathen asceticism have been abolished, and the Christian may sanctify by Prayer, and possibly by a psalm, any meat set before him, and thankfully partake of it
Thessalonians Epistles to the - Joy, Prayer, thanksgiving are the basis of the Christian life. ...
The Epistle ends with a Prayer for their complete sanctification, a request for their intercessions, a command to circulate the Epistle itself, and a final benediction (1 Thessalonians 5:23-28). ...
(3) Let them Pray for their teachers, who have full confidence in their sincerity. 1 Thessalonians 2:14), as the object of Prayer (1 Thessalonians 3:11, 2 Thessalonians 2:16), as the giver of supreme blessings (2 Thessalonians 1:2; 2 Thessalonians 3:18, 1 Thessalonians 5:28)
Restoration - But in that Kingdom once established He placed His hope, and He taught us to Pray for its coming as the equivalent of the Divine will being done on earth as it is in heaven
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - One may seek and Pray for certain gifts (12:31a; 14:1,12), but God makes no guarantees that he will give any one particular gift as requested. ...
Glossolalia may be practiced as a private, Prayer language (vv. A spiritual gift of healing should be distinguished from both a miraculous healing that God works in answer to Prayer (as in James 5:13-18 ) and the ordinary therapeutic work of physicians
Election - ...
From this passage apparently comes the thought of the ‘number’ of the elect an in the Book of Common Prayer (‘Order for the Burial of the Dead’): ‘that it may please Thee to accomplish the number of Thine elect. ’ The thought appears early in the sub-Apostolic Church, For in Clement’s Epistle to the Corinthians he urges them to ‘pray with earnest supplication and intercession that the Creator of all would preserve unharmed the constituted number of His elect in all the world through His beloved Son, Jesus Christ, through whom He called us from darkness to light, from ignorance to knowledge of the glory of His name’ (lix
Pharaoh - Show your children after every sermon and every Prayer of his how much better their father could preach and Pray. Read books of Prayer and repentance and obedience
Cures - The customary association of Prayer with His works of healing was proof of His uttermost dependence upon God. The power of Prayer, which He marked as the condition of all human victory, He indicates as vital also to His own action (Mark 9:29). The Prayer He desiderates is no slack and formal petitioning of a far-distant Deity, but a close absorption of life in a very-present Helper. He felt the throbbing in His own life of that Mighty Will and Love which animated all being, and therefore He intimated that the true value of Prayer, for Himself and for mankind, was that it established in man a close sympathy with, and an absolute dependence upon, the Source of all healing and life. ‘He went out into the mountain to Pray’ (Matthew 14:23, Mark 6:46, Luke 6:12)
Dependence - This hope finds expression in the universal desire for communion with that Power by Prayer, worship, sacrifice, and so on. He, the Man Jesus, succeeded in bringing His human will into absolute conformity with that of His Father, and so He teaches men to Pray, ‘May thy will be done … on earth’ (Matthew 6:10; cf
Ebionism And Ebionites - John prostrated himself at the feet of Jesus "I Pray Thee Lord baptize me," but Jesus forbade him saying "Suffer it to be so," etc
Aaron - You may rely upon it that many an Israelite whose sin had found him out had a Prayer offered for him and for his case at the altar such that the penitent never knew where all the compassion, and all the sympathy, and all the humility, and all the holiness, and all the harmlessness of his high priest came from. By these things priests Pray, by these things prophets preach, by these things psalmists sing, and l by things like these there comes to all sinful men the best life of their souls
Parable - His last act towards such imperviousness was to Pray for it and to die for it ( Luke 23:34 ; Luke 23:37 , Romans 5:8 )
Organization (2) - ...
In founding this first great order in His Church, a whole night of Prayer significantly precedes the all-important choice. These signs of the perfect member of the body of Christ will be the gradual outcome of the hidden inward life: no school can make it; It will spring from the inner sincerity of devotion and character, the ‘prayer, alms, fasting’ ‘in secret’ of Matthew 6:1-18. While He organized Prayer to the extent that it should be always in His name (Matthew 18:20, John 14:13; John 15:16; John 16:26), and showed the spirit of that command in the Prayer taught to His disciples, He would have it liberated from the formalism and ‘vain repetitions’ of the past and of the heathen (Matthew 6:7). For outward helps they have the institutions of Judaism, with the baptism of John; the continual remembrance of Christ through Praying in His name, and in the Prayer He had given; and in the communion of the Lord’s Supper. Here were held gatherings for common Prayer, for the breaking of bread, for Apostolic teaching and fellowship (Acts 2:42), and for the moral edification of those present. The Apostles continued to spend themselves in preaching and in Prayer; and as they needed assistance in these, they would naturally turn to their ‘helps’ (1 Corinthians 12:28), those ‘men of good report, full of the Spirit and of wisdom’ (Acts 6:3), who would thus, by giving occasional instruction and spiritual guidance, become practising ministers of the word, though their almonry would remain the distinctive duty of these ‘deacons,’ and the key Co their expected morality (1 Timothy 3:8 ff. Each member was to offer sacrifices of praise and thanks (Hebrews 13:15), might teach (James 3:1), and Pray with immediate access to God (Ephesians 3:12), and would receive direct illumination (John 1:9, 1 John 2:27). Here would be the gathering for common Prayer, of the form of which we know nothing, the Epistles quoting no regular Prayer, referring to no liturgical order, and not even alluding to the Lord’s Prayer
Synagogue (2) - ), and to lead the Prayers (Jer. (b) What Prayers originally followed the recitation of the Shema‘, it is impossible at present to say. From the example of the Baptist in teaching his disciples to Pray, and from the request for similar instruction addressed to Jesus (Luke 11:1), it may be inferred that forms of Prayer were not yet familiar to the Jews, and possibly that a disposition towards the adoption of such forms was now arising
Sanctification - Jesus taught us to Pray, "Our Father hallowed [3] be your name" (Matthew 6:9 ). Praying in Jesus' name sanctifies our Prayers (John 15:16 ). Jesus, therefore, Prayed concerning his own, "Sanctify them by the truth" (John 17:17 ). The Bible indicates that there are other means at the disposal of believers to promote the direct faiththe Word, Prayer, the church, and providence. Prayer allows the believer to apply faith to every area of life
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - But Ephrem induced the aged bishop James to mount the walls and Pray for the Divine succour. The next year was one of great plenty, and Ephrem resumed his solitary life amidst the Prayers and gratitude of all classes. In this hymn, written in heptasyllabic metre, after playing upon his own name and professing his faith, he commands his disciples not to bury him beneath the altar, nor in a church, nor amongst the martyrs, but in the common burying-ground of strangers, in his gown and cowl, with no spices nor waxlights, but with their Prayers. ...
From his intense devotion and piety, his hymns were largely adopted into the services of the church, and Prayers also composed by him are found in most Oriental liturgies
Preaching - They wept, fasted, Prayed, preached, prophesied, and at length prevailed. Houses were now opened, not for ceremonial worship, as sacrificing, for this was confined to the temple; but for moral obedience, as Praying, preaching, reading the law, divine worship, and social duties. These houses were called synagogues; the people repaired thither morning and evening for Prayer; and on sabbaths and festivals the law was read and expounded to them. Then he offered up Prayer and praise to God, the people bowing their heads, and worshipping the Lord with their faces to the ground; and, at the close of the Prayer, with uplifted hands, they solemnly pronounced, Amen, Amen. Before preaching, the preacher usually went into a vestry to Pray, and afterwards to speak to such as came to salute him. He Prayed with his eyes shut in the pulpit
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - 104) with which he owns that when he has tried to Pray for them who have deliberately injured him he has found himself doing so "with his lips only
Esther - I leave you to imagine what were the Prayers and psalms that Mordecai offered up with his window open towards Jerusalem, as he saw all Esther's election, and promotion, and coronation, and all her splendour and all her power. And he who with love and Prayer and sweet civility keeps a door in God's house, has a far easier and a far safer life of it; he has his salvation at far less risk than he who has to work out his own salvation, and the salvation of so many others, on the slippery floor of a popular pulpit. Even we who will never now fill it-unless it is with tears and Prayers night and day-we see, when it is too late, the incomparable life it at one time held out to us, and now holds out to you. Then Esther bade them return to Mordecai this answer: Fast ye, and Pray for me, and so will I go in unto the king
Temple - Solomon dedicated the temple with Prayer and thank offerings of 20,000 oxen and 120,000 sheep (1 Kings 8; 2 Chronicles 5 to 7). The stranger was not only permitted but encouraged to Pray toward the temple at Jerusalem; and doubtless the thousands (153,600) of strangers, remnants of the Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, and Jebusites, whom Solomon employed in building the temple, were proselytes to Jehovah (2 Chronicles 2:17; 1 Chronicles 22:2). As the sacrificial serrate at the tabernacle at Gibeon and the ark service of sacred song for the 30 years of David's reign, before separate (2 Samuel 6:17; 1618166311_50; called "the tabernacle of David" Amos 9:11-12; Acts 15:16; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39), were combined in Solomon's temple, so the priestly intercessory functions of our High priest in heaven and our service of Prayer and praise carried on separately on earth, during our Judaeo universal dispensation, shall in the millennial temple at Jerusalem be combined in perfection, namely, Christ's priesthood manifested among men and our service of outward and inward liturgy
Jesus Christ - ...
Jesus' agony began in the garden of Gethsemane where he was arrested after going there to Pray. He Prayed forgiveness for his tormentors, went through a sense of abandonment by God, and expired with "It is finished; Father, into your hands, I commit my spirit
Matthew, Gospel According to - In relation to God, they were to Pray to Him for their daily needs, for His forgiveness, and for deliverance from the evil that is in the world (Matthew 6:9-13, Matthew 7:7-11). Luke’s parables, inculcate some Christian virtue or practice, such as love of one’s neighbour, or earnestness in Prayer, but convey some lesson about the nature of the Kingdom and the period of preparation for it
Sirach - 51), which has the heading ‘A Prayer of Jesus the son of Sirach,’ contains some biographical details, but they are too vague and obscurely worded to convey much information. He claims to have travelled, and this may also be inferred from his praise of travel (Sirach 31:10-12), and in both passages he asserts that he had many times been in great danger; in the Prayer he specifies an occasion when he had been falsely accused before a king. The true explanation seems to be that he is projecting himself into the period of national independence for the restoration of which he Prays, and indeed Jewish authors of a much later period do the same; in the Tanna d’Be Eliahu of about the 10th cent. The author expresses himself with great caution, and implies that what the physician can do is to Pray for the patient
Son of God - The consciousness to which they give expression is that of a personal relationship, as when, in Gethsemane, He Prays, ‘O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as thou wilt’; and, farther on, ‘O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done’ (1618166311_41); or when, on the cross, He cries, ‘Father, forgive them: for they know not what they do’; and, farther on, ‘Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit’ (Luke 23:34; Luke 23:46). He showed, it is remarked, the true pathway to this position, and the one by which He had reached it Himself, in such sayings as the following: ‘Love your enemies, and Pray for them that persecute you; that ye may be sons of your Father which is in heaven; for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and the unjust’ (Matthew 5:44 f. ’ Of this difference Holtzmann makes light in the same way in which he lays down the wholly unsupported assumption that Jesus Prayed the Lord’s Prayer with the disciples, including the fifth petition; but the fact is a radical one; and the conclusion to which it points is not without other confirmation
Death of Christ - Through the discipline of experience and through Prayer He became strong enough to be obedient even unto death. From the moment that He began to Pray in Gethsemane till the moment when He said ‘It is finished,’ on the cross, He endured unspeakable suffering, physical and moral, altogether unparalleled in His antecedent experience
John, Epistles of - The assured tone of the Epistle allows no room for doubt or hesitation or conflict one who is guided by its teaching has no need to Pray
Psalms - The glorification of God is the design of them all, even the penitentiary and precatory psalms; but tehilliym applies strictly to praise songs alone, tephillowt to the Prayer songs; Psalm 17; Psalm 72 end, closing the second book of Psalms, Psalm 86; 90; 102 title. This imitation of David's title, and still more the correspondence of his Prayer to David's psalms (Psalms 102:24; Psalms 27:13; Psalms 49:1; Psalms 6:5; Psalms 30:9), is a presumption for the authenticity of David's and his singers' psalms and their titles. Hence Hezekiah's Prayer (Isaiah 38) and Jonah's thanksgiving are excluded as too personal. They are a treasury from which we can draw the inner experiences of Old Testament saints and express our corresponding feelings, under like circumstances, in their divinely sanctioned language of praise and Prayer. ...
(2) Psalms under sorrow, giving birth to Prayer: tephillah , "prayer song" (Psalm 90), lehazkir "to put God in remembrance" of His people's needs (Psalm 38; 70), leanot "concerning the affliction" (Psalm 88), altaseheeth "destroy not" (Psalm 57; 58; 59). The decalogue has its form determined by number; also the genealogy in Matthew; so the Lord's Prayer, and especially the structure of the Apocalypse. The subscription, Psalms 72:20, "the Prayers of David, the son of Jesse, are ended," distinguishes the detached from the serial psalms of David; so Job 31:40 is not contradicted by his again speaking in Job 40; Job 42. If the psalm Prays, Pray thou; if it mourns, mourn thou; if it hopes, hope thou; if it fears, fear thou
Apocalyptic Literature - The Prayer of Joseph. Yohai, The Prayer of R. After the destruction of all impiety upon earth, the righteous shall flourish and live long, the earth shall yield abundantly, all people shall Pray to God, and all evil shall be banished from the earth (11)
Methodists - They state the nature and design of a Methodist society in the following words: "Such a society is no other than a company of men, having the form and seeking the power of godliness: united, in order to Pray together, to receive the word of exhortation, and to watch over one another in love, that they may help each other to work out their own salvation. By attending on all the ordinances of God: such are, the public worship of God; the ministry of the word, either read or expounded; the supper of the Lord; family and private Prayer; searching the Scriptures, and fasting and abstinence
Book - A book of Livy or of Tacitus might be erased, to make room for the legendary tale of a saint, or the superstitious Prayers of a missal. Sometimes a book was given to a monastery, on condition that the donor should have the use of it for his life; and sometimes to a private person, with the reservation that he who receives it should Pray for the soul of his benefactor
Ordination - Whatever their exact office was-and it is not likely, in view of the solemn procedure adopted, to have been only an office of serving tables, a supposition which seems also to be contrary to the evidence of evangelistic activity by Stephen, Philip, and the rest-the people (‘the whole multitude’) elected (ἐξελέξαντο, ‘chose for themselves,’ Acts 6:5) the Seven and presented them to the apostles (Acts 6:6), who after election ‘appointed’ them (Acts 6:3, καταστήσομεν) and Prayed and laid their hands on them (Acts 6:6). In the appointment of Matthias to the apostolate, the people did indeed choose two (Joseph Barsabbas, surnamed Justus, and Matthias) from among the personal witnesses of our Lord’s life and resurrection, but took the lot which (after Prayer had been offered) was cast between these two as an indication of the purpose of God (Acts 1:15-26). The Prayer is noteworthy both as being the first recorded act of public worship of the disciples after the Ascension, and as containing words which are characteristic of later ordinations: ‘thou which knowest the hearts of all men’ (καρδιογνῶστα πάντων, Acts 1:24; cf. Acts 15:8), though it is uncertain whether the Prayer in Acts is addressed to the Father or to the Son. ) as indicating an apostolic utterance or Prayer-i. the ordination Prayer. (we need not stop to inquire whether these words were addressed to the Ten or to a larger number of disciples) our Lord is said to have ‘breathed’ on those present, whereas the apostles and those who came after them used, without any known exception, laying on of hands as an outward sign, and to have pronounced a declaratory and imperative formula, whereas the disciples always (till the Middle Ages) used by way of ‘form’ a Prayer only. The apostles used it when Praying for the gift of the Holy Ghost for the baptized (Acts 8:17; Acts 19:6), and also when setting men apart for the ministry. The ordination Prayer. -All the passages in Acts mentioned above (Acts 1:24; Acts 6:6; Acts 13:3; Acts 14:23) tell us of Prayer being used, but, except in the case of the choosing of Matthias (where the words are no guide to us for the general case), we have no indication as to the nature of the Prayer. The Prayer preceded the laying on of hands (Acts 6:6). The earliest ordination Prayer that we can even provisionally arrive at dates from perhaps the beginning of the 3rd century. By a careful comparison of the ordination Prayers in the parallel Church Orders of the 4th cent. , which are derived from a common original that is perhaps of the time of Hippolytus, we can conjecturally determine the ordination Prayer of the lost original. But even this gives us only one out of what was doubtless a very large number of such Prayers in use throughout the Church; and, further, those used at ordinations, like those used at the Eucharist, were probably at the first in a very fluid condition, if not extemporaneous. The great characteristic of all ordinations for many centuries after the Ascension was their extreme simplicity, no matter to what office a person was ordained; a Prayer and laying on of hands were practically all, except that the kiss of peace, and, in the case of a bishop, enthronization, were added. , the Christian ordinations invariably took the form of a Prayer. The introduction in the West, in the Middle Ages, of the declaratory form, in addition to (not instead of) the ordination Prayer, was very probably due to a desire to follow our Lord’s example exactly. They themselves believed that their own proper course was to Pray that God would give the commission to the ordinands by their instrumentality. The same feeling comes out in the fact that in the early ages the eucharistic consecration by the Church was always conceived as effected by a Prayer, and not by a declaratory form of words. In Acts 14:23 ‘fastings,’ as well as Prayer, accompany the appointment of presbyters ‘in every church’ by Paul and Barnabas. ...
Fasting was frequently in early ages associated with solemn Prayer (Psalms 35:13, Daniel 9:3, Mark 9:29 [5], Luke 2:37); and so with baptism and the Eucharist. Then, when they had fasted and Prayed and laid their hands on them, they sent them away. ] Prayed and laid hands on Barnabas and Saul, and sent them away. They then fasted and-apparently on a second occasion-prayed, laid on hands, and sent the two missionaries away
Omnipresence - It is always a presence to the religious consciousness, trust, Prayer, and fellowship. He is actively present with those who ‘give alms’ in secret (Matthew 6:4), who ‘pray’ in secret (Matthew 6:6), and who ‘fast’ in secret (Matthew 6:18)
Elijah - ...
Elijah's "effectual" Prayer, not recorded in 1 Kings but in James 5:17, was what moved God to withhold rain for three years and a half; doubtless, Elijah's reason for the Prayer was jealousy for the Lord God (1 Kings 19:10; 1 Kings 19:14), in order that Jehovah's chastening might lead the people to repentance. )...
Amidst Elijah's ironical jeers they cried, and gashed themselves, in vain repetitions Praying from morning until noon for fire from their god Baal, the sun god and god of fire (!), and leaped upon (or up and down at) the altar. Repairing Jehovah's ruined altar (the former sanctity of which was seemingly the reason for his choice of Carmel) with 12 stones to represent the tribes of all Israel, and calling upon the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to let it be known that He is the Lord God, he brought down by Prayer fire from heaven consuming the sacrifice, wood, stones, and dust, and licking up the water in the trench. ...
The rain, beginning with the small hand-like cloud, and increasing until the whole sky became black (Luke 12:54; Luke 13:19), returned as it had gone, in answer to Elijah's effectual Prayer, which teaches us to not only Pray but also wait (James 5:17-18; 1 Kings 18:41-45)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - He believes in the Resurrection and in angels, and lays great stress on Prayer, almsgiving, and fasting. -He implores his brethren and children to avoid fornication; for his own sin he was smitten with a sore disease for seven months, and would have perished but for the Prayer of his father Jacob. In a second vision-that of the Ship of Jacob in a storm-Joseph flees in a boat, Levi and Judah keep together; at Levi’s Prayer they reach land (v. One should love from the heart and forgive, whether a man repents or not; and Pray for him who prospers more than oneself (v. He resisted his mistress’s wiles by strict fasting and abstinence, and Prayers for himself and her
Sinlessness - Not only did He spend a great deal of His activity in the denunciation of sin, but He taught His own intimate disciples to Pray habitually for deliverance from it; no fewer than three of the petitions of the Lord’s Prayer being to this effect. Of His intimate life of Prayer we possess pretty ample records; but in none of these are there any confessions of sin. Thus the Psalmist says: ‘Behold, I was shapen in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me’ (Psalms 51:5); Isaiah says: ‘Woe is me; for I am undone; for I am a man of unclean lips’ (Isaiah 6:5); Job groans: ‘I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes’ (Job 42:6); Ezra Prays: ‘O my God, I am ashamed and blush to lift up my face to thee, my God: for our iniquities are increased over our heads, and our guiltiness is grown up unto the heavens’ (Ezra 9:6)
Ignatius - 2, he writes: ‘Pray for the church which is in Syria, whence I am led a prisoner to Rome-I who am the very last of the faithful there’; in Rom. 1: ‘Remember in your Prayers the church which is in Syria, which hath God for its shepherd in my stead. on his arrival in Troas-Ignatius seems to have given up all anxiety about the Church of Antioch: ‘Seeing that in answer to your Prayer and to the tender sympathy which ye have in Christ Jesus, it hath been reported to me that the church which is in Antioch of Syria hath peace, it is becoming for you as a church of God, to appoint a deacon to go thither as God’s ambassador, that he may congratulate them when they are assembled together, and may glorify the Name’ (Philad. He writes to Polycarp: ‘Seeing that the church which is in Antioch of Syria hath peace, as it hath been reported to me, through your Prayers, I myself also have been the more comforted since God hath banished my care’ (vii. 2); and he adds: ‘It seemed to me a fitting thing that ye should send one of your own people with a letter, that he might join with them in giving glory for the calm which by God’s will had overtaken them, and because they were already reaching a haven through your Prayers’ (xi
Holy Spirit (2) - The allusion in Mark 1:35 to His rising early and going away to a desert place to Pray suggests that, Divine as this power was, it wrought in, and in accordance with the laws of, a human nature which was capable of spiritual exhaustion, and had to recruit its strength with God
Socialism - ...
If we turn to another central part of Christ’s teaching, the Lord’s Prayer, we find again the social side interwoven with the spiritual. It was given as a private Prayer (Matthew 6:6), yet it begins, ‘Our Father,’ and is throughout a Prayer for the human brotherhood. It asks for the hallowing of God’s name, the coming of His Kingdom, and the doing of His will upon earth,—in other words, it teaches the Christian to Pray for Utopia, and it makes incumbent upon him the duty of considering all social and political schemes with a view to the perfecting of society in this world. The Prayer for daily bread asks that all may have the necessities of material life, and this again involves far-reaching social considerations. The Prayer for forgiveness is accompanied by a special clause guarding it against an individualist interpretation. As for the Prayer against temptation, the temperance movement alone shows that British Christianity has appreciated the social significance of that clause; and in other matters it is clear that, if the worship of Mammon be the antithesis of the worship of God, a society based upon commercial competition is constantly leading its members into the gravest temptation of all
Freedom of the Will - Acts 2:4), whose coming, however, may he hastened or caused by Prayer (Acts 8:18). Yet he must watch and Pray, and ‘buffet his body’ (1 Corinthians 9:27): his salvation is not complete; it needs working out
Jews - Three thousand of them were cut off for worshipping the golden calf; and for loathing the manna, they were punished with a month's eating of flesh, till a plague brake out among them; and for their rash belief of the ten wicked spies, and their contempt of the promised land, God had entirely destroyed them, had not Moses's Prayers prevented. Judah was invaded by Sennacherib; but Hezekiah's piety, and Isaiah's Prayer, were the means of their preservation: but under Manasseh, the Jews abandoned themselves to horrid impiety: for which they were punished by Esarhaddon, king of Assyria, who invaded and reduced the kingdom, and carried Manasseh prisoner to Babylon. Their service consists chiefly in reading the law in their synagogues, together with a variety of Prayers. They repeat blessings and particular praises to God, not only in their Prayers, but on all accidental occasions, and in almost all their actions. They go to Prayers three times a day in their synagogues. ...
The Jews Pray for the souls of the dead, because they suppose there is a paradise for the souls of good men, where they enjoy glory in the presence of God
Forgiveness (2) - They are: (a) the petition in the Lord’s Prayer, ‘Forgive us our debts,’ Matthew 6:12 (‘our sins,’ Luke 11:3), combined with Matthew 6:14-15, Mark 11:25, which assert God’s willingness to forgive under certain conditions. (c) Our Saviour’s Prayer on the cross, ‘Father, forgive them,’ etc. ’...
Putting these passages together, we are warranted in concluding that Christ taught the readiness of the Father always to hear the Prayer of the truly penitent and in His mercy to pardon their sins, the chief questions being, What is the exact nature of forgiveness? Is it free to all mankind, or to those only who are in covenant relation with Him? Is any condition besides that of repentance laid down?...
The meaning of the word ‘forgiveness,’ and the relation between God and man implied in it, must be gathered largely from the OT. ’ With this explanation harmonizes the Saviour’s Prayer in Luke 23:34 ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. In the last passage, as well as in Matthew 5:23-24, the duty of being ‘in love and charity with our neighbours,’ and ‘in perfect charity with all men,’ is laid down as a condition of acceptable Prayer to God. There are some states of mind in which a worshipper is not fit to Pray, in which he asks for blessings that he is not capable of receiving
Paul - Sometimes he went on to express his thankfulness to God for their steadfastness in the faith and their progress in grape, and to Pray for their further development
Pharisees (2) - 5), and had their Prayers introduced alongside the sacrifices. 8), to look past the present legal life to a future world of grace and glory, to make proselytes, to have baptisms and holy suppers in their brotherhood, to Pray, to fast and give alms—these three were ‘the chief pillars of the Jewish religion’ (Bousset, Relig. 87); and on the ground of such consciousness forgave sins, wrought miracles, and answered Prayers
Incarnation (2) - He who taught others to Pray for forgiveness, and never besought it of the Divine mercy for Himself; He who proclaimed the necessity of regeneration for all men, and Himself never passed through any such phase of experience; He who in tenderest sympathy drew close to the sinner’s side, and yet always manifested a singular aloofness of spirit, and never included Himself among the objects of the Divine compassion; He who made it His vocation to die for the remission of sins, must have been, in actual fact, sinless:—either that, or He must have been sunk in a moral darkness more profound than sin ordinarily produces, even in the worst of men
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - Not the day only but the night also was divided into definite portions, the intervals being filled with Prayers, hymns, and alternate psalmody. The food of his monks was limited to one meal a day of bread, water, and herbs, and he allowed sleep only till midnight, when all rose for Prayer ( Ep. The emperor, in abject alarm, sent the chief military officials of the court, Terentius and Arinthaeus, who were known to be his friends, to entreat Basil to come and Pray over the sick child. He Prayed over the boy, and the malady was alleviated. Even while a presbyter he arranged forms of Prayer ( εὺχῶν διατάξεις ), probably a liturgy, for the church of Caesarea (Greg
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - He then set himself by fasting and Prayer to learn its meaning, and after about a fortnight was gratified. After his first two visions Hermas watched eagerly for new revelations, and set himself to obtain them by fasting and Prayer. After this he begins to fast and Pray and look out eagerly for more revelations. 11) that certain persons were then recognized in the church as having prophetic gifts and that at the Christian meetings for worship if after Prayer ended one of them were filled with the Holy Spirit he might speak unto the people as the Lord willed
Methodists, Protestant - ...
They state the nature and design of a Methodist society in the following words: "Such a society is no other than a company of men having the form and seeking the power of godliness; united, in order to Pray together, to receive the word of exhortation, and to watch over one another in love, that they may help each other to work out their salvation. "It is expected of all who desire to continue in these societies, that they should continue to evidence their desire of salvation, "Thirdly, By attending on all the ordinances of God: such are, ...
The public worship of God; the ministry or the word, either read or expounded; the supper of the Lord; family and private Prayer; searching the Scriptures; and fasting and abstinence. "A proper time for doing this is at a conference, after solemn fasting and Prayer; every person proposed is then to be present, and each of them may be asked
Worship - The command to publish the Gospel includes the obligation of assembling to hear it; the name by which a Christian society is designated in Scripture is a church; which signifies an assembly for the transaction of business; and, in the case of a Christian assembly, that business must necessarily be spiritual, and include the sacred exercises of Prayer, praise, and hearing the Scriptures. The Lord's Supper was celebrated by the body of believers collectively: and this Apostle prescribes to the Corinthians regulations for the exercises of Prayer and prophesyings, "when they came together in the church,"—the assembly. Prayers and intercessions are offered for national and public interests; and while the benefit of these exercises descends upon a country, all are kept sensible of the dependence of every public and personal interest upon God. The communion of Prayer and devotion was thought a source of sanctification, inasmuch as men knew that the Lord was present by his Spirit among those who were gathered together in his name; but then they were far from ascribing any peculiar sacredness and sanctity to the place of assembly. Origen says, "The place where believers come together to Pray has something agreeable and useful about it;" but then he only says this in respect to that spiritual communion. At first the churches assembled every day; as, for instance, the first church of Jerusalem, which assembled daily for Prayer in common, and for the public consideration of the divine word, for the common celebration of the Lord's Supper and the agapae, as well as to maintain the connection between the common head of the spiritual body of the church and themselves, and between one another as members of this body. Thus in the week the Sunday was the joyful festival; and the preparation for it was a day of penitence and Prayer, consecrated to remembrance of the sufferings of Christ and the preparations for them, and this was celebrated on the Friday; and thus also the yearly festivals were to celebrate the resurrection of Christ, and the operations of the Redeemer after he had risen again; the preparation for this day was in commemoration of the sufferings and fastings of our Saviour. Allusion is made to Sunday under the character of a festival, as a symbol of a new life, consecrated to the Lord in opposition to the old Sabbath, in the epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians: "If they who were brought up under the Old Testament have attained to a new hope, and no longer keep [3] Sabbaths holy, but have consecrated their life to the day of the Lord, on which also our life rose up in him, how shall we be able to live without him?" Sunday was distinguished as a day of joy by the circumstances, that men did not fast upon it, and that they Prayed standing up and not kneeling, as Christ had raised up fallen man to heaven again through his resurrection. Such fasts, joined with Prayer, were considered as the watches of the milites Christi [4] on their post by the Christians, who compared their calling to a warfare, the militia Christi, and they were stationes, and the days on which they took place were called dies stationum, [5] The churches, which were a graft of a Christian on a Jewish spirit, although they received the Sunday, retained also that of the Sabbath; and from them the custom spread abroad in the oriental church of distinguishing this day, as well as the Sunday, by not fasting and by Praying in an erect posture; in the western churches, particularly the Roman, where opposition to Judaism was the prevailing tendency, this very opposition produced the custom of celebrating the Saturday in particular as a fast day. This festival originally embraced the whole season of fifty days from Easter, and was celebrated like a Sunday, that is to say, no fasts were kept during the whole of it, and men Prayed standing, and not kneeling; and perhaps also in some places assemblies of the church were held, and the communion was celebrated every day
Synods - As the Christians, in the consciousness that they are nothing, and can do nothing, without the Spirit from above, were accustomed to begin all important business with Prayer, they prepared themselves here, also, for their general deliberations by common Prayer, at the opening of these assemblies, to Him who has promised that he will enlighten and guide, by his Spirit, those who believe in him, if they will give themselves up to him wholly, and that he will be among them, where they are gathered together in his name. Lastly, if, as the historian Sozomen says, the Sardican synod wrote to Julius, bishop of Rome, to apprize him of what they had done, and of their decrees being drawn up in the spirit of the council of Nice, the purport of the letter was not so strong as that which they addressed to the church of Alexandria, in which they Pray it to give its suffrage to the determination of the council, additional suspicions are created
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - relates to fasting and Prayer. Neither must they Pray as the hypocrites but as the Lord ordered in His Gospel. The Lord's Prayer is given in conformity with St. " This Prayer is to be used thrice daily. " But the forms themselves are more like what we should expect in Prayers before and after an ordinary meal than the Eucharist proper. The supposition that we have here private Prayers to be said before and after reception is excluded by the direction that "prophets" should be permitted to offer thanks as they pleased where it is plain that public thanksgiving is intended. (4) The benedictory Prayer contains a petition that as the broken bread had been scattered on the mountains and had been brought together and made one so might the church be collected together from the ends of the earth. (5) The thanksgiving Prayer after reception is directed to be said "after being filled" (μετὰ τὸ ἐμπλησθῆναι) words answering better to the conclusion of an Agape than of a Eucharistic celebration (cf
Paul (2) - But even these were not free from vindictiveness; they were not prepared to say, ‘Love your enemies, and Pray for them that persecute you,’ or ‘If thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him to drink’ (Matthew 5:44, Romans 12:20)
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - Jesus made the ceremonial ablutions, recited the names of God, and then said the prescribed Prayers. Jesus, after two prostrations in Prayer, said: ‘O certain one, rise by the order of God. ’ Jesus made two prostrations in Prayer and Prayed to God. ’ Jesus wished to Pray for his life, but Shem said: ‘Again I must die, I have no wish to live on, if you will ask God to have mercy on me. ’ Then the man confessed that a neighbour had by his Prayers provided all. ...
It is said that at the last day, when Dajjal the cursed, with Imam Mahdi, collects the people at morning Prayers, Jesus will appear on the Mosque at Jerusalem, and will descend to join Imam Mahdi, and kill Dajjal. When Jesus dies again, the burial Prayers (namaz-i-Janazah) will be said over him, and he will be buried in the tomb of Mohammed at Medina