What does Praise mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַֽלְלוּ־ to shine. / to praise 15
הַ֥לְלוּ to shine. / to praise 8
הַֽ֝לְל֗וּהוּ to shine. / to praise 7
ἔπαινον approbation 7
אוֹדֶ֣ה to throw 5
הַֽ֭לְלוּהוּ to shine. / to praise 4
תְּהִלָּתֶֽךָ praise 4
ἔπαινος approbation 4
תְּהִלָּתֽוֹ praise 3
יוֹד֣וּךָ to throw 3
יְהַֽלְל֣וּ to shine. / to praise 3
הַֽלְל֣וּ to shine. / to praise 3
הַֽלְל֥וּהוּ to shine. / to praise 3
אוֹדְךָ֣ to throw 3
לִתְהִלָּ֣ה praise 2
תְּהִלַּ֣ת praise 2
הַֽ֝לְלוּ to shine. / to praise 2
וַ֝אֲזַמְּרָ֗ה to sing 2
אֲזַמְּרָ֖ה to sing 2
יְהַלֶּל־ to shine. / to praise 2
הוֹד֣וּ to throw 2
בִּתְהִלָּתֶֽךָ praise 2
וּתְהִלָּתִ֖י praise 2
תְּ֝הִלָּת֗וֹ praise 2
אוֹדֶ֑נּוּ to throw 2
תְהִלָּֽה praise 2
י֝וֹד֗וּךָ to throw 2
αἰνεῖτε to praise 2
αἶνον a saying 2
ἐπαινῶ to approve 2
א֭וֹדְךָ to throw 2
יוֹד֖וּךָ to throw 2
וּלְהַלֵּ֔ל to shine. / to praise 2
אוֹדְךָ֖ to throw 2
וּֽמְהַֽלְלִ֖ים to shine. / to praise 2
לְהַלֵּל֙ to shine. / to praise 2
וּתְהִלָּת֖וֹ praise 2
וְאַנְוֵ֔הוּ to beautify. 1
וּמְשַׁבַּח֙ (Pael) to laud 1
אוֹדְךָ֤ ׀ to throw 1
וּתְהִלָּ֗ה praise 1
תְהִלָּתְךָ֖ praise 1
מְשַׁבַּ֨ח (Pael) to laud 1
וְאוֹדְךָ֥ to throw 1
נוֹדֶ֣ה to throw 1
וְי֘וֹד֤וּ to throw 1
יְשַׁבְּחֽוּנְךָ to soothe 1
יְשַׁבַּ֣ח to soothe 1
יְ֝הוֹדֻ֗ךָ to throw 1
יוֹד֣וּ to throw 1
שַׁבְּחִ֣י to soothe 1
א֤וֹדֶה to throw 1
מַהֲלָלֽוֹ praise 1
יוֹד֬וּךָ to throw 1
תּוֹדֶ֑ךָּ to throw 1
וְ֝יוֹדֻ֗ךָ to throw 1
αἰνέσεως praise 1
לִתְהִלָּ֖ה praise 1
תְּהִלַּ֥ת praise 1
וְתוֹדָ֗ה confession 1
תּוֹדָ֖ה confession 1
תוֹדָ֖ה confession 1
וְלִתְהִלָּ֗ה praise 1
תְּהִלָּ֫תֶ֥יךָ praise 1
תְּהִלָּתֶ֑ךָ praise 1
תְהִלָּתִ֣י praise 1
תְהִלָּ֓ה praise 1
תְּ֭הִלָּתְךָ praise 1
תְּהִלָּ֪ה praise 1
תְּֽהִלָּת֥וֹ praise 1
תְֽהִלָּ֫תִ֥י praise 1
תְּהִלָּ֤ה praise 1
תְ֝הִלָּתִ֗י praise 1
תְּהִלָּת֖וֹ praise 1
؟ תְּהִלָּתֽוֹ praise 1
וּ֝תְהִלָּת֗וֹ praise 1
בִּתְהִלָּ֑ה praise 1
וּתְהִלָּֽה praise 1
תְּהִלָּ֥ה praise 1
(תְּהִלָּ֑ת) praise 1
תְהִלָּתִ֖י praise 1
אוֹדֶ֗נּוּ to throw 1
תְּהִלָּ֖ה praise 1
וּתְהִלָּ֔ה praise 1
תְהִלָּ֔ה praise 1
תְּהִלָּֽה praise 1
תְּהִלָּתִ֖י praise 1
וְלִתְהִלָּ֖ה praise 1
יוֹדֶ֖ךָ to throw 1
הֲיוֹדְךָ֥ to throw 1
וְהִֽלְל֖וּ to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽ֭לְלוּ־ to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽ֭לְלוּ to shine. / to praise 1
יְהַֽלְלוּ־ to shine. / to praise 1
הַ֭לְלוּ to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַֽלְלֶֽנּוּ to shine. / to praise 1
יְהַלְלֽוּהוּ to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽלְלוּיָ֨הּ ׀ to shine. / to praise 1
וִֽיהַלְל֖וּהָ to shine. / to praise 1
יְהַלֶּלְךָ֣ to shine. / to praise 1
לְהַלֵּ֣ל to shine. / to praise 1
וְהִלַּלְתֶּ֗ם to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽלְלוּ֙ to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽלְל֖וּ to shine. / to praise 1
יְהַלְלֶ֑ךָּ to shine. / to praise 1
הַלְלִ֥י to shine. / to praise 1
לְהַלֵּ֨ל to shine. / to praise 1
בְּהַלֵּ֥ל to shine. / to praise 1
לְהַלֵּ֑ל to shine. / to praise 1
לְהַלֵּ֗ל to shine. / to praise 1
וְהַלֵּ֖ל to shine. / to praise 1
וּלְהַלֵּ֖ל to shine. / to praise 1
לְהַלֵּֽל to shine. / to praise 1
הִלּוּלִ֖ים rejoicing 1
ψαλῶ to pluck off 1
ἐπαινεσάτωσαν to approve 1
ἐπαινέσω to approve 1
ἐξομολογήσομαί to confess. 1
ἀνθωμολογεῖτο to reply by professing or by confessing. / to agree mutually (in turn) 1
וַאֲהַלְלָ֥ה to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַלְלָ֣ה to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהוֹדֶֽנּוּ to throw 1
יְזַמֶּרְךָ֣ to sing 1
לְהוֹד֪וֹת to throw 1
אֽוֹדְךָ֗ to throw 1
וְא֘וֹדֶ֤ה to throw 1
אוֹדְךָ֥ to throw 1
וְאוֹדֶ֑ךָּ to throw 1
אוֹדֶ֥ה to throw 1
א֘וֹדֶ֤ה to throw 1
הוֹדוּ֩ to throw 1
αἰνεῖν to praise 1
הוֹד֤וּ to throw 1
לְהֹד֤וֹת to throw 1
אֲזַמְּרָ֣ה to sing 1
וַאֲזַמֵּֽרָה to sing 1
זַמְּר֣וּ to sing 1
הַֽלְלִ֖י to shine. / to praise 1
וּֽ֝נְזַמְּרָה to sing 1
יְֽהַלְל֥וּ to shine. / to praise 1
יְֽ֭הַלְלוּהוּ to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַֽלְלָ֣ה to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַלֵּ֣ל to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַלֵּ֪ל to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַֽלְלֶֽךָּ to shine. / to praise 1
הַֽלְל֗וּהוּ to shine. / to praise 1
אֲהַלְלֶֽךָּ to shine. / to praise 1
תְּהַלֵּ֥ל to shine. / to praise 1
יְהַלְל֤וּ ׀ to shine. / to praise 1
יְֽ֭הַֽלְלוּ to shine. / to praise 1
הַ֝לְל֗וּהוּ to shine. / to praise 1
תּוֹדָ֗ה confession 1

Definitions Related to Praise

H1984


   1 to shine.
      1a (Qal) to shine (fig.
      of God’s favour).
      1b (Hiphil) to flash forth light.
   2 to Praise, boast, be boastful.
      2a (Qal).
         2a1 to be boastful.
         2a2 boastful ones, boasters (participle).
      2b (Piel).
         2b1 to Praise.
         2b2 to boast, make a boast.
      2c (Pual).
         2c1 to be praised, be made praiseworthy, be commended, be worthy of Praise.
      2d (Hithpael) to boast, glory, make one’s boast.
      2e (Poel) to make a fool of, make into a fool.
      2f (Hithpoel) to act madly, act like a madman.
      

G1868


   1 approbation, commendation, Praise.
   

H3034


   1 to throw, shoot, cast.
      1a (Qal) to shoot (arrows).
      1b (Piel) to cast, cast down, throw down.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to give thanks,, laud, Praise.
         1c2 to confess, confess (the name of God).
      1d (Hithpael).
         1d1 to confess (sin).
         1d2 to give thanks.
         

H8416


   1 Praise, song or hymn of Praise.
      1a Praise, adoration, thanksgiving (paid to God).
      1b act of general or public Praise.
      1c Praise-song (as title).
      1d Praise (demanded by qualities or deeds or attributes of God).
      1e renown, fame, glory. 1e1 of Damascus, God. 1e2 object of Praise, possessor of renown (fig).
         

G1867


   1 to approve, to Praise.
   

H2167


   1 to sing, sing Praise, make music.
      1a (Piel).
         1a1 to make music, sing.
         1a2 to play a musical instrument.
         

G134


   1 to Praise, extol, to sing praises in honour to God.
   2 to allow, recommend.
   3 to promise or vow.
   

G5567


   1 to pluck off, pull out.
   2 to cause to vibrate by touching, to twang.
      2a to touch or strike the chord, to twang the strings of a musical instrument so that they gently vibrate.
      2b to play on a stringed instrument, to play, the harp, etc.
      2c to sing to the music of the harp.
      2d in the NT to sing a hymn, to celebrate the praises of God in song.
      

G136


   1 a saying, proverb.
   2 Praise, laudatory discourse.
   

H8426


   1 confession, Praise, thanksgiving.
      1a give Praise to God.
      1b thanksgiving in songs of liturgical worship, hymn of Praise.
      1c thanksgiving choir or procession or line or company.
      1d thank-offering, sacrifice of thanksgiving.
      1e confession.
      

H7624


   1 (Pael) to laud, Praise, adulate, adore.
   

G1843


   1 to confess.
   2 to profess.
      2a acknowledge openly and joyfully.
      2b to one’s honour: to celebrate, give Praise to.
      2c to profess that one will do something, to promise, agree, engage.
      

G437


   1 to reply by professing or by confessing.
   2 to agree mutually (in turn), to make a compact.
   3 to acknowledge in the presence of.
      3a to give thanks.
      

H7623


   1 to soothe, still, stroke.
      1a (Piel) to soothe, still.
      1b (Hiphil) stilling (participle).
   2 to laud, Praise, commend.
      2a (Piel).
         2a1 to laud, Praise (God).
         2a2 to commend, congratulate (the dead).
      2b (Hithpael) to boast.
      

H4110


   1 Praise, boast.
   

H1974


   1 rejoicing, Praise.
      1a rejoicing.
      1b Praise.
      

H5115


   1 to beautify.
      1a (Hiphil) to beautify, adorn.
   2 to dwell.
      2a (Qal) to dwell, abide, keep at home.
   3 (Hophal) rest.
   

G133


   1 Praise, a thank offering.
   

Frequency of Praise (original languages)

Frequency of Praise (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, the Praise And Glory of the Heavens
(Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph. It is also used in the Office of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, observed on the Wednesday preceding the third Sunday after Easter. It was written in the 17th century by an unknown author. There are six translations. The English title given is by A. McDougall.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Praise
A — 1: αἶνος (Strong's #136 — Noun Masculine — ainos — ah'ee-nos ) primarily "a tale, narration," came to denote "praise;" in the NT only of praise to God, Matthew 21:16 ; Luke 18:43 .
A — 2: ἔπαινος (Strong's #1868 — — epainos — ep'-ahee-nos ) a strengthened form of No. 1 (epi, upon), denotes "approbation, commendation, praise;" it is used (a) of those on account of, and by reason of, whom as God's heritage, "praise" is to be ascibed to God, in respect of His glory (the exhibition of His character and operations), Ephesians 1:12 ; in Ephesians 1:14 , of the whole company, the church, viewed as "God's own possession" (RV); in Ephesians 1:6 , with particular reference to the glory of His grace towards them; in Philippians 1:11 , as the result of "the fruits of righteousness" manifested in them through the power of Christ; (b) of "praise" bestowed by God, upon the Jew spiritually (Judah == "praise"), Romans 2:29 ; bestowed upon believers hereafter at the judgment seat of Christ, 1 Corinthians 4:5 (where the definite article indicates that the "praise" will be exactly in accordance with each person's actions); as the issue of present trials, "at the revelation of Jesus Christ," 1 Peter 1:7 ; (c) of whatsoever is "praiseworthy," Philippians 4:8 ; (d) of the approbation by churches of those who labor faithfully in the ministry of the Gospel, 2 Corinthians 8:18 ; (e) of the approbation of well-doers by human rulers, Romans 13:3 ; 1 Peter 2:14 .
A — 3: αἴνεσις (Strong's #133 — Noun Feminine — ainesis — ah'ee-nes-is ) "praise" (akin to No. 1), is found in Hebrews 13:15 , where it is metaphorically represented as a sacrificial offering.
Notes: (1) In 1 Peter 2:9 , AV, arete, "virtue, excellence," is translated "praises" (RV, "excellencies"). (2) In the following the AV translates doxa, "glory," by "praise" (RV, "glory"); John 9:24 , where "give glory to God" signifies "confess thy sins" (cp. Joshua 7:19 , indicating the genuine confession of facts in one's life which gives glory to God); John 12:43 (twice); 1 Peter 4:11 .
B — 1: αἰνέω (Strong's #134 — Verb — aineo — ahee-neh'-o ) "to speak in praise of, to praise" (akin to A, No. 1), is always used of "praise" to God, (a) by angels, Luke 2:13 ; (b) by men, Luke 2:20 ; 19:37 ; 24:53 ; Acts 2:20,47 ; 3:8,9 ; Romans 15:11 (No. 2In some texts); Revelation 19:5 .
B — 2: ἐπαινέω (Strong's #1867 — Verb — epaineo — ep-ahee-neh'-o ) akin to A, No. 2, is rendered "praise," 1 Corinthians 11:2,17,22 : see COMMEND , No. 1.
B — 3: ὑμνέω (Strong's #5214 — Verb — humneo — hoom-neh'-o ) denotes (a) transitively, "to sing, to laud, sing to the praise of" (Eng., "hymn"), Acts 16:25 , AV, "sang praises" (RV, "singing hymns"); Hebrews 2:12 , RV, "will I sing (Thy) praise," AV, "will I sing praise (unto Thee)," lit., "I will hymn Thee;" (b) intransitively, "to sing," Matthew 26:30 ; Mark 14:26 , in both places of the singing of the paschal hymns (Psalm 113-118 ; 136 ), called by Jews the Great Hallel.
B — 4: ψάλλω (Strong's #5567 — Verb — psallo — psal'-lo ) primarily, "to twitch" or "twang" (as a bowstring, etc.), then, "to play" (a stringed instrument with the fingers), in the Sept., to sing psalms, denotes, in the NT, to sing a hymn, sing "praise;" in James 5:13 , RV, "sing praise" (AV, "sing psalms"). See MELODY , SING.
B — 5: ἐξομολογέω (Strong's #1843 — Verb — exomologeo — ex-om-ol-og-eh'-o ) in Romans 15:9 , RV, "will I give praise" (AV, and RV marg., "I will confess"): see CONFESS , A, No. 2 (c).
Note: In Luke 1:64 , AV, eulogeo, "to bless," is translated "praised" (RV, "blessing").
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Praise
One characteristic of the life of God’s people is that they constantly praise him. Praise is an expression of homage, adoration and thanksgiving to God either in prayer or in song, and may be accompanied by various expressions of joy (Exodus 15:1-2; Exodus 15:20-21; Psalms 35:18; Psalms 63:5; Psalms 71:8; Psalms 150; Isaiah 12:2-6; Luke 2:13-14; Acts 2:47; Acts 3:8; Ezra 3:10-11; Revelation 5:9-14; see DANCING; MUSIC; SINGING).
Believers offer praise to God because of who he is and what he has done. Their praise is part of their worship of God, and it will reach its fullest expression in the age to come (Psalms 7:17; Psalms 66:1-4; Psalms 104:1; Psalms 138:1-2; Luke 24:53; Revelation 19:4-5). All living things, and especially God’s people, have a duty to praise God. They offer this praise both individually and collectively (Colossians 3:16; Psalms 34:1-3; Psalms 35:18; Psalms 117; Psalms 135:1-2; Psalms 150:6; Joel 2:26; Acts 16:25; Hebrews 13:15; 1 Peter 2:9). (For fuller discussion on the subject see WORSHIP.)
God’s people should want their lives and actions to bring praise to God. They should not seek praise for themselves (Proverbs 27:2; Matthew 6:2; John 12:43; 2 Corinthians 9:1; Ephesians 1:12; Philippians 1:11; Colossians 1:3-4; 1 Thessalonians 2:6). Yet it is true that, if they live uprightly and behave properly, others will naturally want to give them praise (Proverbs 31:28; Proverbs 31:31; Acts 16:2; 1 Corinthians 11:2; 1 Corinthians 11:17; 1 Peter 2:14).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Praise
One of humanity's many responses to God's revelation of Himself. The Bible recognizes that men and women may also be the objects of praise, either from other people (Proverbs 27:21 ; Proverbs 31:30 ) or from God Himself (Romans 2:29 ), and that angels and the natural world are likewise capable of praising God (Psalm 148:1 ). Nevertheless, human praise of God is one of Scripture's major themes.
Praise comes from a Latin word meaning “value” or “price.” Thus, to give praise to God is to proclaim His merit or worth. Many terms are used to express this in the Bible, including “glory,” “blessing,” “thanksgiving,” and “hallelujah,” the last named being a transliteration of the Hebrew for “Praise the Lord.” The Hebrew title of the book of Psalms (“Praises”) comes from the same root as “hallelujah” and Psalm 113-118 have been specially designated the “Hallel” (“praise”) psalms.
The modes of praise are many, including the offering of sacrifices (Leviticus 7:13 ), physical movement (2 Samuel 6:14 ), silence and meditation (Psalm 77:11-12 ), testimony (Psalm 66:16 ), prayer (Philippians 4:6 ), and a holy life (1 Peter 1:3-9 ). However, praise is almost invariably linked to music, both instrumental (Psalm 150:3-5 ) and, especially, vocal. Biblical songs of praise range from personal, more or less spontaneous outbursts of thanksgiving for some redemptive act of God (Exodus 15:1 : Judges 5:1 ; 1 Samuel 2:1 ; Luke 1:46-55 ,Luke 1:46-55,1:67-79 ) to formal psalms and hymns adapted for corporate worship in the Temple (2 Chronicles 29:30 ) and church (Colossians 3:16 ).
While the Bible contains frequent injunctions for people to praise God, there are also occasional warnings about the quality of this praise. Praise is to originate in the heart and not become mere outward show (Matthew 15:8 ). Corporate praise is to be carried on in an orderly manner (1 Corinthians 14:40 ). Praise is also firmly linked to an individual's everyday life (Amos 5:21-24 ). See Music; Psalms; Worship .
David W. Music
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Praise
Praise, mostly of God, is a frequent theme in the psalms, the Hebrew title of which is "Praises." Yet praise is a theme that pervades the whole of Scripture. Genesis 1 is indirect praise; direct praise is found in hymns scattered throughout the books of Exodus, 2Samuel, Isaiah, Daniel, Ephesians, and Revelation. Words that are often used as synonyms or in parallel with "praise, " and so help point to its meaning, are "bless, " "exalt, " "extol, " "glorify, " "magnify, " "thank, " and "confess." To praise God is to call attention to his glory.
A Vocation of Praise . Praising God is a God-appointed calling. Indeed, God has formed for himself a people "that they may proclaim my [1] praise" (Isaiah 43:21 ; cf. Jeremiah 13:11 ). God's actions, such as Israel's restoration from the exile, are to result in God's "righteousness and praise spring [2] up before all nations" (Isaiah 61:11 ). God has also predestined the church "to the praise of his [1] glorious grace" (Ephesians 1:6 ; cf. Matthew 5:16 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; Philippians 1:11 ; 1 Peter 2:9 ). The future vocation of the redeemed in glory is to sing praise to God and the Lamb (Revelation 4:11 ; 5:12-14 ; 7:12 ). Doxologies are fitting because they capture what God intends for people (Psalm 33:1 ; 147:1 ).
In the light of this calling to praise God, the oft-declared intention, "I will praise you, O God, " and the exhortations for others to praise God take on additional meaning. In giving oneself to praise the worshiper declares his or her total alignment with God's purposes. The environment of those gathering for worship, judged by such admonitions, was one of lavish praise to God. Since God is holy and fully good, God is not to be faulted, as some do, for requiring praise of himself. Praise is fitting for what is the highest good, God himself. Praise is both a duty and a delight (Psalm 63:3-8 ).
Reasons for Praising God . In addition to being the fulfillment of a calling, praise is prompted by other considerations, chief of which is the unique nature of God (1 Chronicles 29:10-13 ). One genre of the psalms, the hymns, is characterized by an initial summons, such as "Praise the Lord, " which is followed by a declaration of praise, introduced by the word "for, " which lists the grounds for offering praise, often God's majesty and mercy. The shortest psalm (117), a hymn, offers a double reason for praise: God's merciful kindness (loyal love) is great, and his truth endures forever. Other hymns point out that God is good (Ezra 3:10-11 ; Psalm 100:5 ; 135:3 ), or that his ordinances are just (Psalm 119:164 ), that he remembers his covenant (Psalm 105:7-8 ), that his love is enduring (Psalm 136 ), or that he is incomparable (Psalm 71:19 ). A basic understanding in the hymns, if not in all the psalms, is captured in the theme "The Lord reigns." God's kingship is pronounced both in his majestic power displayed through the creation of the world (Psalm 29,104 ) and in his royal rule, often as deliverer, over his people (Psalm 47,68 , 98,114 ). As king, God is judge, warrior, and shepherd. Often too, praise is to the name of God (Psalm 138:2 ; 145:2 ; Isaiah 25:1 ). That name, Yahweh, conveys the notion that God is present to act in salvation (Exodus 6:1-8 ).
The biblical examples of praise to God, apart from citing his attributes and role, point to God's favors, usually those on a large scale in behalf of Israel. A hymn in the Isaiah collection exhorts, "Sing praise to the Lord for his glorious achievement" (Isaiah 12:5 ; nab ). Exhortations to praise are sometimes followed by a catalogue of God's actions in Israel's behalf (Nehemiah 9:5 ; Psalm 68:4-14 ). God's most spectacular action involves the incarnation of Jesus, an event heralded in praises by angels in the heavens and shepherds returning to their fields: "Glory to God in the highest" (Luke 2:14,20 ). Praise is the legitimate response to God's self-revelation. Personal experiences of God's deliverance and favor also elicit praise (Psalm 34 ; 102:18 ; 107 ; cf. Daniel 2:20-23 ; Romans 7:25 ; the healed paralytic, Luke 5:25 ; Zechariah, Luke 1:68 ; the response at Nain, Luke 7:16 ; and Jesus himself, Matthew 11:25 ).
An intimate relationship of a person or a people with God is sufficient reason for praise. A psalmist, captivated by the reality of God's choice of Jacob, exhorts, "Sing praise" (Psalm 135 ; cf. Revelation 19:5 ).
Expressions of Praise . The believing community is both a fitting and frequently mentioned context for praise. The author of Hebrews quotes the psalter: "In the midst of the assembly I will praise you" (Hebrews 2:12 ). The audience is enlarged beyond the worshiping community when the worshiper announces, "I will praise you [4], O Lord, among the nations" (Psalm 57:9 ), and more enlarged still, "In the presence of angels [5] I will sing my praise" (Psalm 138:1 ; nab ). While privately spoken praise to God is fitting and right, it is virtually intrinsic to the notion of praise that it be publicly expressed. Indeed, David appointed Levites to ensure the public praise of Israel (1 Chronicles 16:4 ; 23:4,30 ).
The Scriptures offer a language of praise and so are instructive on how expressions of praise might be formulated. Nehemiah leads in praise by saying, "Blessed be your glorious name, and may it be exalted above all blessing and praise. You alone are the Lord" (Nehemiah 9:5-6 a). The chorister Asaph followed David's cue: "Sing praise to him; tell of his wonderful Acts" (1 Chronicles 16:9 ). Persons intent on cultivating spirituality are often helped, at least initially, by repeating and personalizing such lyrics of praise.
Praise to God in Israel took the form of artfully composed lyrics. A significant number of psalms are identified in their headings as "A Psalm, " a technical term meaning "a song of praise." Israel's expressions of praise to God could include shouts (Psalm 98:4 ), the plying of musical instruments (1 Chronicles 25:3 ; 2 Chronicles 7:6 ; Psalm 144:9 ; 150:1-5 ), making melody (Psalm 146:2 ), and dancing (Psalm 149:3 ). A public expression at Jesus' entry into Jerusalem took the form of devotees waving palm branches (Matthew 21:1-11 ). Praise for Israel consisted, in part, of the spoken word, "Open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise" (Psalm 51:15 ) behind which, however, was a total person committed to praise: "I will praise you, O Lord, with my whole heart" (Psalm 9:1 ). Such praise is not tainted with bitterness or in other ways qualified but is from someone who is thoroughly thankful.
The Bible speaks also of persons praising or commending others (Genesis 12:15 ; 49:8 ; Proverbs 31:28,30 ; 2 Corinthians 8:18 ). However, it counsels, even warns, about the giving and receiving of praise lest it be for the wrong reasons or be misconstrued (Psalm 49:18 ; Proverbs 12:8 ; 27:2,21 ; John 5:44 ).
Unquestionably the Book of the Psalms is centerpiece for any discussion about praise. In it the believer's vocation to praise is wonderfully modeled, so that even laments (one-third of all the psalms) contain elements of praise. As a book of praises, the psalms build to a remarkable crescendo of praise (Psalm 145-150 ), in which all creatures are summoned to incessant praise of God, as are the stars and planets in the heavens, and even the angels.
Very appropriately, then, does the Christian community repeatedly resort in its worship to the Gloria Patri, "Glory be to the Father" and in clusters large and small sing, "Praise God from whom all blessings flow."
Elmer A. Martens
See also Worship
Bibliography . W. Brueggemann, Israel's Praise: Doxology Against Idolatry ; L. J. Coppes, TWOT, 2:217-18; J. C. Lambert and B. L. Martin, ISBE, 3:929-31; C. S. Lewis, Reflections on the Psalms ; P. Miller, Jr., Interpreting the Psalms ; H. Schultz and H.-H. Esser, NIDNTT , 3:816-20; G. von Rad, Old Testament Theology ; R. S. Wallace, IBD, 3:1256-57; C. Westermann, The Praise of God in the Psalms .
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Praise
An acknowledgment made of the excellency or perfection of any person or action, with a commendation of the same. "The desire of praise, " says an elegant writer, "is generally connected with all the finer sensibilities of human nature. It affords a ground on which exhortation, counsel, and reproof, can work a proper effect. To be entirely destitute of this passion betokens an ignoble mind, on which no moral impression is easily made; for where there is no desire of praise, there will also be no sense of reproach; but while it is admitted to be a natural and in many respects an useful principle of action, we are to observe that it is entitled to no more than our secondary regard. It has its boundary set, by transgressing which, it is at once transformed from an innocent into a most dangerous passion. When passing its natural line, it becomes the ruling spring of conduct; when the regard which we pay to the opinions of men encroaches on that reverence which we owe to the voice of conscience and the sense of duty; the love of praise, having then gone out of its proper place, instead of improving, corrupts; and instead of elevating, debases our nature." Young's Love of Fame; Blair's Sermons, ser. 6. vol. 2:; Jortin's Dis. dis. 4. passim; Wilberforce's Pract. View, ch. 4: sec. 3; Smith's Theory of Mor. Sent. vol. 1. p. 233; Fitzosborne's Letters, let. 18.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Praise of God
The acknowledging his perfections, works, and benefits. Praise and thanksgiving are generally considered as synonymous, yet some distinguish them thus. Praise properly terminates in God, on account of his natural excellencies and perfections, and is that act of devotion by which we confess and admire his several attributes: but thanksgiving is a more contracted duty, and imports only a grateful sense and acknowledgment of past mercies. We praise God for all his glorious acts of every kind, that regard either us or other men; for his very vengeance, and those judgments which he sometimes sends abroad in the earth; but we thank him, properly speaking, for the instances of his goodness alone, and for such only of these as we ourselves are some way concerned in.
See THANKSGIVING; Bishop Atterbury's Sermon on Psalms 50:14 ; Saurin's Sermons, vol. 1: ser. 14; Tillotson's Sermons, ser. 146. concl.
Webster's Dictionary - Praise-Meeting
(n.) A religious service mainly in song.
Webster's Dictionary - Self-Praise
(n.) Praise of one's self.
Webster's Dictionary - Praise
(1):
(v.) To value; to appraise.
(2):
(v.) Commendation for worth; approval expressed; honor rendered because of excellence or worth; laudation; approbation.
(3):
(v.) Especially, the joyful tribute of gratitude or homage rendered to the Divine Being; the act of glorifying or extolling the Creator; worship, particularly worship by song, distinction from prayer and other acts of worship; as, a service of praise.
(4):
(v.) To extol in words or song; to magnify; to glorify on account of perfections or excellent works; to do honor to; to display the excellence of; - applied especially to the Divine Being.
(5):
(v.) To commend; to applaud; to express approbation of; to laud; - applied to a person or his acts.
(6):
(v.) The object, ground, or reason of praise.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Praise
See SINGING.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Praise
A. Verbs.
Hâlal (הָלַל, Strong's #1984), “to praise, celebrate, glory, sing (praise), boast.” The meaning “to praise” is actually the meaning of the intensive form of the Hebrew verb hâlal, which in its simple active form means “to boast.” In this latter sense hâlal is found in its cognate forms in ancient Akkadian, of which Babylonian and Assyrian are dialects. The word is found in Ugaritic in the sense of “shouting,” and perhaps “jubilation.” Found more than 160 times in the Old Testament, hâlal is used for the first time in Gen. 12:15, where it is noted that because of Sarah’s great beauty, the princes of Pharaoh “praised” (KJV, “commended”) her to Pharaoh.
While hâlal is often used simply to indicate “praise” of people, including the king (2 Chron. 23:12) or the beauty of Absalom (2 Sam. 14:25), the word is usually used in reference to the “praise” of God. Indeed, not only all living things but all created things, including the sun and moon, are called upon “to praise” God (Ps. 148:2-5, 13; 150:1). Typically, such “praise” is called for and expressed in the sanctuary, especially in times of special festivals (Isa. 62:9).
The Hebrew name for the Book of Psalms is simply the equivalent for the word “praises” and is a bit more appropriate than “Psalms,” which comes from the Greek and has to do with the accompaniment of singing with a stringed instrument of some sort. It is little wonder that the Book of Psalms contains more than half the occurrences of hâlal in its various forms. Psalms 113-118 are traditionally referred to as the “Hallel Psalms,” because they have to do with praise to God for deliverance from Egyptian bondage under Moses. Because of this, they are an important part of the traditional Passover service. There is no reason to doubt that these were the hymns sung by Jesus and His disciples on Maundy Thursday when He instituted the Lord’s Supper (Matt. 26:30).
The word hâlal is the source of “Hallelujah,” a Hebrew expression of “praise” to God which has been taken over into virtually every language of mankind. The Hebrew “Hallelujah” is generally translated “Praise the Lord!” The Hebrew term is more technically translated “Let us praise Yah,” the term “Yah” being a shortened form of “Yahweh,” the unique Israelite name for God. The term “Yah” is found in the KJV rendering of Ps. 68:4, reflecting the Hebrew text; however, the Jerusalem Bible (JB) translates it with “Yahweh.” Most versions follow the traditional translation “Lord,” a practice begun in Judaism before New Testament times when the Hebrew term for “Lord” was substituted for “Yahweh,” although it probably means something like “He who causes to be.” The Greek approximation of “Hallelujah” is found 4 times in the New Testament in the form “Alleluia” (Rev. 19:1, 3-4, 6). Christian hymnody certainly would be greatly impoverished if the term “Hallelujah” were suddenly removed from our language of praise.
Yâdâh (יָדָה, Strong's #3034), “to give thanks, laud, praise.” A common Hebrew word in all its periods, this verb is an important word in the language of worship. Yâdâh is found nearly 120 times in the Hebrew Bible, the first time being in the story of the birth of Judah, Jacob’s son who was born to Leah: “And she conceived again and bore a son, and said, This time I will praise the Lord; therefore she called his name Judah” (Gen. 29:35, RSV).
As is to be expected, this word is found most frequently in the Book of Psalms (some 70 times). As an expression of thanks or praise, it is a natural part of ritual or public worship as well as personal praise to God (Ps. 30:9, 12; 35:18). Thanks often are directed to the name of the Lord (Ps. 106:47; 122:4).
The variation in translation may be seen in 1 Kings 8:33: “confess” thy name (KJV, NEB, NASB); acknowledge (RSV); praise (JB, NAB).
B. Nouns.
Tehillâh (תְּהִלָּה, Strong's #8416), “glory; praise; song of praise; praiseworthy deeds.” Tehillâh occurs 57 times and in all periods of biblical Hebrew.
First, this word denotes a quality or attribute of some person or thing, “glory or praiseworthiness”: “He is thy praise, and he is thy God, that hath done for thee these great and terrible things, which thine eyes have seen” (Deut. 10:21). Israel is God’s “glory” when she exists in a divinely exalted and blessed state: “And give him no rest, till he establish, and till he make Jerusalem a praise in the earth” (Isa. 62:7; cf. Jer. 13:11).
Second, in some cases tehillâh represents the words or song by which God is publicly lauded, or by which His “glory” is publicly declared: “My praise [1] shall be of thee in the great congregation …” (Ps. 22:25). Ps. 22:22 is even clearer: “I will declare thy name unto my brethren: in the midst of the congregation will I praise thee.”
In a third nuance tehillâh is a technical-musical term for a song (shir) which exalts or praises God: “David’s psalm of praise” (heading for Ps. 145; v. 1 in the Hebrew). Perhaps Neh. 11:17 refers to a choirmaster or one who conducts such singing of “praises”: “And Mattaniah … , the son of Asaph, was the principal to begin the thanksgiving in prayer [2].…”
Finally, tehillâh may represent deeds which are worthy of “praise,” or deeds for which the doer deserves “praise and glory.” This meaning is in the word’s first biblical appearance: “Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? Who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises [2], doing wonders [4]?” (Exod. 15:11).
Two other related nouns are mahalal and hillulim. Mahalal occurs once (Prov. 27:21) and denotes the degree of “praise” or its lack. Hillulim, which occurs twice, means “festal jubilation” in the fourth year at harvest time (Lev. 19:24, RSV; Judg. 9:27, NASB),
Tôdâh (תּוֹדָה, Strong's #8426), “thanksgiving.” This important noun form, found some 30 times in the Old Testament, is used there in the sense of “thanksgiving.” The word is preserved in modern Hebrew as the regular word for “thanks.” In the Hebrew text tôdâh is used to indicate “thanksgiving” in songs of worship (Ps. 26:7; 42:4). Sometimes the word is used to refer to the thanksgiving choir or procession (Neh. 12:31, 38). One of the peace offerings, or “sacrings,” was designated the thanksgiving offering (Lev. 7:12).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - All Praise to Saint Patrick
Popular hymn written by Rev. F. W. Faber in the 19th century.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Praise
PRAISE is the recognition and acknowledgment of merit. Two parties are involved: the one possessing at least supposed merit, the other being a person who acknowledges the merit.
Men may praise men . Forms of praise may be used without genuine feelings of praise, and extravagant praise may be rendered Intentionally, because of the advantage that will be gained thereby. This is downright hypocrisy, and the whole burden of the moral teaching of the Bible, and especially of Christ, is against hypocrisy. Again, the estimate of values may be so completely false that praise may be felt and expressed genuinely in cases where it is undeserved. And Jesus’ whole influence is directed towards the proper appreciation of values so that only the good shall appear to us good.
In its common Biblical use, however, praise has God for its object . This restriction does not involve an essential difference either in the praise or in the sense of moral values. The difference lies rather in the greater praiseworthiness of God. Praise of God is of course called forth only as He reveals Himself to men, only as men recognize His activity and His power in the event or condition which appears to them adequate to call out praise. Men praise God in proportion as they are religious, and so have conscious relations with God. The praiseworthiness of a god is involved in the very definition of a god. If men postulate a god at all, it is as a being worthy to be praised. Every thought and act by which men come into relation with God is a thought and an act of praise. Petition is justifiable only if behind it is the belief that God is worthy of such approach. If the act is confession of sin, the same is true, for confession is not made to a being who does not hold a place of honour and praise. If some active service is rendered to God, this subjugation of ourselves to Him can be explained only by the conviction that God is in every way entitled to service.
Moreover, as in the case of praise of men, there is a very clear distinction to be drawn between genuine and hypocritical ascription of praise to God. The temptation to the latter is extreme, because of the immense gain presumably to be secured by praise; but the hypocrisy and the sin of it are equally great. Indeed, the seriousness of the offence is evident when one reflects that he who praises God knows full well the praiseworthiness of God, so that if he praises while the genuine feeling is lacking and the sincere act of praise is unperformed, only moral perversity can account for the hypocrisy.
In order to genuineness, praise must be spontaneous It may be commanded by another human being, and the praise commanded may be rendered, but the real impelling cause is the recognized merit of God. God may demand praise from His creatures in commands transmitted to them through prophets and Apostles, but if man praises Him from the heart, it is because of the imperative Inseparable from the very being and nature of God.
We are prepared, then, to find that in the Bible praise to God is universal on the part of all who acknowledge Him. It is the very atmosphere of both dispensations. It is futile to attempt to collate the passages that involve it, for its expression is not measured by special terms or confined to special occasions. The author of Genesis 1:1-31 , like every reader of the chapter, finds the work of creation an occasion for praising God. The chapter is a call to praise, though the word be not mentioned. We have but to turn to the Psalms ( e.g. Psalms 104:1-35 ) to find formal expression of the praise that the world inspires.
The legal requirements of the Law likewise depend for their authority with men upon the recognition of the merit of the Law-giver. ‘Ye shall be holy, for I Jehovah your God am holy,’ has no force except for him who acknowledges holiness in God who commands; and obedience is the creature’s tribute of praise to the holy God.
The whole history of Israel, as Israel’s historians picture it, has in it the constant element of praise to Israel’s God: we turn to the Psalms ( e.g. Psalms 102:1-28 ) or to other songs ( e.g. Exodus 15:1-27 ), and find the praise of the heart rising to formal expression.
In the NT, praise of Christ and of God in Christ is the universal note. It is the song of those who are healed of their sicknesses, or forgiven their sins; of Apostles who mediate on the gospel message and salvation through Christ; of those who rehearse the glories of the New Jerusalem as seen in apocalyptic vision.
We are also prepared by this universality to find that praise cannot form a topic for independent treatment. There is no technical terminology to be examined in the hope that the etymology of the terms used will throw light upon the subject, for in this case etymologies may lead us away from the current meaning of the common words employed. The history of praise in the OT and the NT is the history of worship, temple, synagogue, sacrifice, festivals. The literature of praise is the literature of religion, whether as the product of national consciousness or of personal religious experience.
It will suffice to mention one or two points of Interest which the student may well bear in mind as he studies the Bible and consults the articles on related subjects.
The Heb. word oftenest used for praise is hillçl , perhaps an onomatopoetic Semitic root meaning ‘cry aloud.’ An interesting feature is the use of the imperative in ascriptions of praise. Taken literally, these imperatives are commands to praise; but they are to be taken as real ascriptions of praise, with the added thought that praise from one person suggests praise from all. Cf. the doxology ‘Praise God from whom all blessings flow,’ which consists solely of four imperative sentences.
The imperative of the Hebrew verb, followed by the Divine name, gives us Hallelujah , i.e. ‘Praise ye Jah.’ The word is used at the beginning and end of Psalms, apparently with liturgical value. Cf. also the Hallel Psalms (113 118, 136). The noun from the same root appears as the title of Psalms 145:1-21 . See Hallel.
The form which praise took as an element of worship in Israel varied with the general character of worship. It was called forth by the acts of Jahweh upon which the Israelites were especially wont to dwell in different periods. For personal and family favours they praised Him in early times with forms of their own choosing. When the national consciousness was aroused, they praised Him for His leading of the nation, in forms suitable to this service. As worship came more and more to conform to that elaborated for, and practised in, the royal sanctuary the Temple at Jerusalem the forms of praise could not fail to share the elaboration and to become gradually more uniform. To what extent these modifications took place is to be studied in the history of OT religion.
Praise was certainly a part of the varied service rendered by the Levites in the Temple ritual of later Judaism, and an examination of that ritual will show how far praise was given over to them, and how much was retained by the congregation. The Psalms are certainly adapted to antiphonal rendering. Did the people respond to the priests, or were there two choirs ? [1] only in RVm [2] of Nehemiah 12:8 .] The element of praise in the synagogue worship is an interesting and disputed question. Cf. also Adoration, Hymn.
O. H. Gates.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Praise
1. Ideal of praise.-‘He knows little of himself who is not much in prayer, and he knows little of God who is not much in praise.’ These words express the habitual thought and practice of the Apostolic Church. We must distinguish between praise and thanksgiving. We praise God for what He is, we thank Him for what He has done. It is possible that a strain of selfishness may creep into our thanksgivings-the Pharisee spirit is not easy to eradicate. But a sincere heart is lifted by praise to the highest level of adoration. With angels and archangels we land and magnify, saying ‘Holy, Holy, Holy.’ If we cannot trace the Sanctus of the Eucharist back to the 1st cent., we can affirm that it was based on the teaching of the Apocalypse, and may be said to perpetuate in the highest degree the doxologies so often heard on the lips of apostolic writers.
There are two points to be remembered: (1) the rich inheritance of the traditions of praise derived from the Temple services, and (2) the teaching of the Synagogue that, when one is cut off from participation in sacrifices, praise should take their place. The few scattered hints in the Acts support the paradox that least is said in the NT about that which is most familiar in thought and practice. The preparation of the apostles for Pentecost was to be continually in the Temple praising God (Luke 24:53). Afterwards we read that the apostles ‘did take their food with gladness, … praising God’ (Acts 2:46 f.). Peter and John going to the Temple at the hour of prayer were certainly in accord with the Psalmist: ‘Seven times a day will I praise thee’ (Psalms 119:164); and the lame man, whom Peter healed, instinctively praised God (Acts 3:8). When Peter reported to the apostles and brethren the gift of the Holy Ghost to the Gentile Cornelius and his friends they glorified God (Acts 11:18).
St. Paul goes very deeply into the thought of praise as an essential part of devotion when he speaks of the degradation of the heathen world as in a great measure due to their neglect of praise. ‘Knowing God, they glorified him not as God’ (Romans 1:21)._ His own practice may be illustrated by the fact that when he and Silas had been beaten with rods at Philippi they sang hymns to God (Acts 16:25). And in Romans 1:25 he turns from the loathsome subject of heathen immorality to give glory to God, as if to guard himself from contamination, just as he prepares himself for his impassioned argument on backsliding Israel by an ascription of praise to ‘God blessed for ever’ (Romans 9:5), and passes into another doxology at the end of his argument (Romans 11:35-36). As he pictures Abraham when he received God’s promise of a son giving glory to God (Romans 4:21), so he desires that Gentiles might glorify God for His mercy (Romans 15:9, quoting Psalms 18:49; Psalms 117:1 LXX_).
The Epistle to the Ephesians opens (Ephesians 1:1-14) with a great ascription of praise to God for the blessing of the Church. We are chosen in Christ that we should be ‘holy to the praise of the glory of his grace.’ Again and again he repeats the cadence ‘to the praise of his glory.’
This level is worthily sustained in Hebrews 2:12 : ‘in the midst of the congregation will I sing praise unto thee,’ when the writer quotes Psalms 22:22. As the typical king David comes to his own despite Saul’s persecution, so does Christ the true King in the hour of His victory over pain acknowledge His people as brethren, and the citizens of His Kingdom take the song of praise from the lips of their King.
Again in Hebrews 13:15 it is suggested that our praises are only worthily offered through our great High Priest: ‘Through him let us offer up a sacrifice of praise.’ The phrase is quoted from Leviticus 7:12, where it is used for the highest form of peace offering. B. F. Westcott (ad loc.) adds that the word ‘sacrifice’ in Malachi 1:11 ‘appears to have been understood in the early Church of the prayers and thanksgivings connected with the Eucharist.’ From praise for ‘the revelation of God in Christ (His Name)’ the writer goes on naturally to speak (v. 16) of kindly service and almsgiving, for ‘praise to God is service to men.’
St. Peter also has a characteristic passage on praise (1 Peter 2:9): ‘That ye may tell forth the excellencies of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.’ He is quoting 2 Isaiah 43:21, and his word ‘excellencies,’ standing for Hebrew ‘my praise,’ means an eminent quality in any person or thing, and the idea is blended with that of the impression which it makes on others; ‘the one sense involves the other, for all praises of God must be praises either of His excellencies or of His acts as manifestations of His excellencies’ (F. J. A. Hort, ad loc.). St. Peter does not say how the Asiatic Christians are to tell them forth, but he implies that their lives must correspond to their worship.
There is a fine saying of Rabindranath Tagore to the effect that the future Saviour of India will be known not so much by the light which streams from Him as by the light which is reflected to Him from His people. ‘This calling into God’s light … is thus fitly chosen as the characteristic act of Him whose excellencies the Christians were to tell forth, because it was on their use of the realm of vision thus opened to them that their power of exhibiting Him to men in grateful praise would depend’ (Hort, ad loc.).
The reference to ‘marvellous light’ suggests a reminiscence of the Transfiguration, and the idea is paraphrased in Clement of Rome (36): ‘Through Him [1] let us gaze into the heights of the heavens; through Him we behold as in a mirror His spotless and supernal countenance; through Him the eyes of our heart were opened; through Him our dull and darkened mind burgeons anew into the light’ (quoted by Hort, ib.; cf. 2 Peter 1:16).
It may be of interest to classify (after Westcott) the various doxologies found in the Epistles and the Apocalypse.
(1)Galatians 1:5. To whom [2] be the glory for ever and ever. Amen.
(2)Romans 11:36. To him [3] be the glory for ever. Amen.
(3)Romans 16:27. To the only wise God through Jesus Christ [4] be the glory for ever. Amen.
(4)Philippians 4:20. Unto our God and Father be the glory for ever and ever. Amen.
(5)Ephesians 3:21. Unto him [5] be the glory, in the church and in Christ Jesus unto all generations for ever and ever. Amen.
(6)1 Timothy 1:17. Unto the King eternal … the only God be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.
(7)1 Timothy 6:16. To whom [6] be honour and power eternal. Amen.
(8)2 Timothy 4:18. To whom [3] be the glory for ever and ever. Amen.
(9)Hebrews 13:21. To whom [8] be the glory for ever and ever. Amen.
(10)1 Peter 4:11. To whom [9] is the glory and the dominion for ever and ever. Amen.
(11)1 Peter 5:11. To him [10] be the dominion for ever and ever. Amen.
(12)2 Peter 3:18. To him [11] be the glory both now and for ever. Amen.
(13)Judges 1:25. To the only God our Saviour through Jesus Christ our Lord be glory, majesty, dominion and power before all time, and now, and for evermore. Amen.
(14)Revelation 1:8. Unto him [12] be the glory and the dominion for ever and ever. Amen.
(15)Revelation 5:13. Unto him that sitteth on the throne and unto the Lamb be the blessing and the honour and the glory and the dominion for ever and ever. And the four living creatures said, Amen.
(16)Revelation 7:12. Amen: Blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honour, and power, and might, be unto our God for ever and ever. Amen.
Westcott notes that all except (12) and perhaps (16) are closed by Amen. They vary greatly in detail. We may consider first the address, which in most cases is made to the Father, in two-(3) and (13)-through Christ, and in three to Christ-(8) (12), and (14), possibly also (9) and (10). The richness and variety of the titles in St. Paul’s doxologies contrast with the simplicity of his ascription of ‘glory.’ In one instance he adds ‘honour,’ in another substitutes ‘honour and dominion.’ Enlargement of the ascription is found in Jude, and above all in the central vision of the Apocalypse when the sevenfold theme marks the highest range of praise.
It seemed best to incorporate in the foregoing the formal doxologies of this type in the Apocalypse, but others claim mention. In Revelation 4:8 the living creatures say: ‘Holy, holy, holy, is the Lord God, the Almighty, which was and which is and which is to come.’ In Swete’s words (ad loc.): ‘This ceaseless activity of Nature under the Hand of God is a ceaseless tribute of praise.’ The elders also lay down their crowns of victory before the Throne with their tribute of praise (Revelation 4:11): ‘Worthy art thou, our Lord and our God, to receive the glory and the honour and the power: for thou didst create all things, and because of thy will they were, and were created.’
It is interesting to note how much fuller is the doxology which the angels in Revelation 5:12 offer to the Lamb, adding ‘riches, wisdom, strength, and blessing,’ and showing how ‘they recognize both the grandeur of the Lord’s sacrificial act, and its infinite merit’ (Swete, ad loc.).
A four-fold doxology follows from all creation (no. (15) above), ‘dominion’ taking the place of the angels’ word ‘strength,’ ‘active power being here in view rather than a reserve of secret strength’ (Swete, ad loc.).
The seven-fold doxology of the angels in Revelation 7:12 (no. (16) above) again follows a short doxology of the Church (Revelation 7:10): ‘Salvation unto our God which sitteth on the throne and unto the Lamb.’ But they do not include the Lamb as in Revelation 5:11.
2. Music.-Our study of the ideal of praise in the Apostolic Church would be incomplete without some reference to the music both vocal and instrumental in which pious hearts desired to express it. The earliest Christian hymns were sung, no doubt, like the psalms, but we know very little if anything about the vocal method of the Hebrews. A. Edersheim, however, thinks that some of the music still used in the Synagogue must date back to the time when the Temple was still standing, and traces ‘in the so-called Gregorian tones … a close approximation to the ancient hymnody of the Temple’ (The Temple, p. 81). References to musical instruments are few in number. St. Paul refers to pipes, harps, trumpets, and cymbals. The pipe was a cane pierced with holes for notes, or a bit of wood bored out and played like a flageolet.
The harp (κιθάρα) was an instrument of seven strings akin to a lyre. St. Paul argues (1 Corinthians 14:7) that, unless pipe or harp gives a distinction in the sounds, no clear thought will be conveyed to the hearer, just as a trumpet must give no uncertain sound in a call to arms. He refers also to cymbals, half-globes generally of bronze, giving out a clanging sound which cannot be tuned to accord with other instruments. They are symbolic of a character which makes professions in words but is lacking in love, or, as Edersheim puts it, ‘he compares the gift of “tongues” to the sign or signal by which the real music of the Temple was introduced’ (op. cit. p. 78). Edersheim (ib. p. 75) also draws an ‘analogy between the time when these “harpers” are introduced’ in the heavenly services (Revelation 5:8; Revelation 14:2-3) ‘and the period in the Temple-service when the music began-just as the joyous drink-offering was poured out.’ And again in Revelation 15:2 ‘the “harps of God” ’ are sounded ‘with pointed allusion … to the Sabbath services in the Temple,’ when special canticles (Deuteronomy 32, Exodus 15) were sung, to which the Song of Moses and of the Lamb corresponds when sung by the Church at rest. There was a certain prejudice against the music of flutes, but they seem to have been used at Alexandria to accompany the hymns at the Agape until Clement of Alexandria substituted harps about a.d. 190.
The references to praise in the Apostolic Fathers bring out the same underlying ideas. We find in Clem. Rom. Ep. ad Cor. i. 61: ‘O Thou, who alone art able to do these things, and things far more exceeding good than these for us, we praise Thee through the High Priest and Guardian of our souls, Jesus Christ, through whom be the glory and the majesty unto Thee both now and for all generations and for ever and ever. Amen.’
The ancient homily known as 2 Clement exhorts to give God ‘eternal praise not from our lips only but from our heart’ (ii. 9).
The Epistle of Barnabas (7) bids ‘the children of gladness understand that the good Lord manifested all things to us beforehand, that we might know to whom we ought in all things to render thanksgiving and praise.’ The author of the Odes of Solomon (Ode 6) compares a soul at praise to a harp, as both Philo (i. 374) and Plato (PhCEdo, 86A) had done: ‘As the hand moves over the harp and the strings speak, so speaks in my members the Spirit of the Lord, and I speak of His love.’
Ignatius also writes to the Philadelphians (ad Philippians 1) of their bishop as ‘attuned in harmony with the commandments, as a lyre with its strings.’
Delight in self-surrender quickens adoration. In the beautiful words of J. F. D. Maurice: ‘What we desire for ourselves and for our race, the greatest redemption we can dream of, is gathered up in the words, “Thine is the glory” ’ (The Lord’s Prayer, London, 1848, p. 130).
Literature.-In addition to the Commentaries referred to in the text, see A. J. Worlledge, Prayer, London, 1902; W. Milligan, The Ascension and Heavenly Priesthood of our Lord2, do., 1894, p. 299 f.; A. Edersheim, The Temple: its Ministry and Services as they were at the Time of Jesus Christ, do., n.d.; E. Leyrer, art._ ‘Musik bei den Hebräern’ in PRE_2; J. Stainer, The Music of the Bible, new ed., London, 1914.
A. E. Burn.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Praise (2)
PRAISE
1. Introductory.—Both in the OT and the NT the predominant idea of ‘praise’ is that of a tribute of homage in utterance, publicly expressed and rendered to God by His creatures. It forms the essence of worship, whether as offered by angels (cf. Luke 2:13-14; Luke 2:20, Revelation 14:6 f.). or men (cf. Luke 19:37 f.). The subject of this ‘praise’ is either the excellencies of God’s attributes and revealed nature (cf. esp. Revelation 19) or the beneficent action of His providence, as shown more particularly in creation, revelation, and redemption (thanksgiving); cf. Acts 2:47, Revelation 15:3 f. In the Gospels Jesus is sometimes the object of praise and homage (Matthew 21:16; cf. Luke 4:15), and Himself often dispenses praise for certain qualities of human nature or character (cf. Matthew 8:10; Matthew 11:11 etc.). The praise of man by man is usually applied in the Gospels to unreal and hypocritical commendation, and is condemned by Jesus (Matthew 6:1, Luke 6:26; cf. John 5:41-44; John 12:43).
2. Jewish usage.—In Jewish worship the element of praise occupies a dominant place, and has received rich and manifold expression. The title of the Bk. of Psalms in the Massoretic Text , Sepher Tĕhillîm* [1] (and its variants) = ‘Book of Praises or Praise-Songs,’ is an indication of the emphasis which was laid on the note of praise in later Jewish worship. This note is already prominent in the Psalter itself (cf. e.g. ‘O thou that inhabitest the praises of Israel,’ Psalms 22:3). The close connexion existing between the ideas of praise and thanksgiving (cf. e.g. Psalms 100:4 ‘Enter his gates with thanksgiving, his courts with praise’) has already been pointed out in this work (see art. Blessing, § 1). Indeed, thanksgiving (Heb. hôdâh)—esp. for God’s beneficence in creation, revelation, and providence—is an essential part of praise. If a distinction can be drawn, praise pure and simple is rather to be associated with extolling God’s perfections and holiness, while blessing (thanksgiving) is connected rather with thankful recognition of His goodness, beneficence, and mercy. But this is true only in a general sense; the two conceptions are so intimately related that one passes over into the other almost imperceptibly.
For the Hebrew terms employed with the meaning ‘praise’ and its cognates, reference may be made to the art. ‘Praise (in OT)’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. 33 f. The most frequent are—חִלֵּל ‘praise’ (esp. in the liturgical formula חַללוּ־יָה = Hallelujah), חוֹדָה ‘give thanks’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), בֵּרַךְ ‘bless,’ וִכֵּד ‘make melody’; rare synonyms are—שִׁבַּח’ ‘laud’ (but very frequent in Jewish liturgy), רוֹמֵם ‘exalt,’ נִּרֵּל, חִנְרִּיל ‘magnify.’ Cf. also such phrases as ‘Sing unto J″ [2] a new song.’
In the Synagogue Liturgy the element of praise has received splendid expression. The most classical examples of this are perhaps the great ‘Benediction of Song’ (ברבח חשׁיר)† [3], xv. 93 f.] and the Kaddish.‡ [4] The former of these, in its shortest form, runs thus:
‘Be Thy name lauded for ever, O our King, the great and holy God and King, in heaven and on earth; for unto Thee, O Lord our God and God of our fathers, song and laud are becoming, praise and psalm, strength and dominion, victory, greatness and might, renown and glory, holiness and sovereignty, blessings and thanksgivings, from henceforth, even for ever. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, God and King, great in praises, God of thanksgivings, Lord of wonders, who makest choice of melodious song, O King and God, the Life of all worlds.’
In the Kaddish the following characteristic paragraph occurs:
‘Blessed, lauded, and glorified, exalted, extolled and honoured, magnified and praised be the name of the Holy One, Blessed be He; though He be high above all the blessings and songs, hymns of praise and consolation, which are uttered in the world.’
These are simply specimens of what pervades the entire Jewish Liturgy. In the Gospels the Angels’ Song of Praise (Luke 2:14) is an example of pure praise in worship, parallels to which arc to be found in the Apocalypse (Revelation 4:11; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 11:17; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 19:1 f.). In Rabbinical theology, it is to be noticed, prayer and praise form the spiritual counterpart and fulfilment of the old daily sacrifice in the Temple. The words of Hosea (Hosea 14:2), ‘We shall render as bullocks the offering of our lips,’ were interpreted in this sense. Spiritual worship thus becomes a ‘sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving.’ Cf. Hebrews 13:15 (‘Through him’—i.e. Christ—‘let us otter up a sacrifice of praise’) with Westcott’s note; cf. also our Lord’s application of the words of Hosea 6:6 (‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice’) in Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7.
For the close connexion of prayer and praise—which are sometimes intermingled in the Jewish Liturgy, e.g. in the ‘Eighteen Blessings’—cf. Cheyne’s note on Psalms 42:9 (Book of Psalms [5], p. 118 f.).
3. Usage in the Gospels.—The note of praise so characteristic of Jewish worship also pervades the Gospels. It is esp. prominent in the Third Gospel, where it appears not only in the Jewish-Christian Nativity-narrative (chs. 1, 2) [6], but also elsewhere (cf. Luke 19:37). It is noticeable how often the people (spectators, the assembled multitude) are represented as ‘praising’ or ‘glorifying’ God for some great exhibition of power wrought by Jesus (see below).
The Greek terms for ‘praise’ and its cognates used in the Gospels are—αἰνεῖν ‘praise’* [7] (Cf. διδόναι αἶνον τῷ θεῷ, Luke 18:43), used in LXX Septuagint for חוֹרָה לְ, חִלֵּל לִ; δόξα ‘glory,’ δοξάζειν ‘glorify’ (in LXX Septuagint δόξα most freq. = כָּבו̇ר; several times for חוֹר, חָדָר, etc.; δοξάζω usually = בִּבֵּר in LXX Septuagint ]; διδὀνιαι δόξαν τῷ θεῶ, Luke 17:18; εὐλογεῖν ‘bless’ [8]; ἐξομολογεῖν ‘to celebrate,’ ‘give praise or thanks to,’ Matthew 11:25 and ||. See, further, art. Blessing, §§ 2 and 4.
The following formulas of praise are to be noted:
(a)The Angels’ Hymn (Luke 2:14)—
‘Glory to God in the highest,
And on earth peace among men of his goodwill.’
For the arrangement in two, not three, lines, cf. Plummer, Com. on ‘St. Luke’ in ICC [9] , ad loc. Here ἐν[10] ὑψίστοις = בַּמְרוֹמִים ‘in the heavenly places,’ and refers to the adoration of the angels in heaven (cf. Psalms 148:1 LXX Septuagint : αἰνεῖτε αὐτὸν (τὸν κύριον) ἐν τοῖς ὑψίστοις; cf. Luke 19:38. With this should be compared the doxological form (ᾧ ἡ δόξα … εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας). See below, § 4.
(b)‘Hosanna in the highest’; see art. Hosanna.
(c)‘Blessed is …’; especially in the phrase, ‘Blessed is he that Cometh in the name of the Lord’ (εὐλογημένος ὁ ἐρχόμενος ἐν ὁνόματι Κυρίου), Matthew 2:19; Matthew 23:39, Mark 11:9, Luke 13:35; Luke 19:38, John 12:13. The use of ‘blessed’ (μαχάριος) in the Beatitudes is also notable; cf. also its use in personal address, Matthew 16:17 (Luke 11:27-28). To these may here be added—
(d)The use of the phrase ‘give God (the) praise’ (or ‘glory’): διδόναι δόξαν τῷ θεῷ = שׂים בבור ליהוה (נחן), and has various shades of meaning, according to the context—e.g. of thanksgiving for benefits received, Luke 17:18; by confession (of sin), John 9:24; cf. Joshua 7:19. The phrase is frequent in Rev. of celebrating God’s praises (Revelation 4:9; Ephesians 1:3-14,5; Revelation 19:7).
The frequent mention in the Gospels of the multitudes as ‘praising’ or ‘glorifying’ God, esp. for the wonderful works wrought by Christ, is worth noting. It shows how deeply this element of public worship had impressed itself upon the popular mind and heart in Israel. A typical example is Matthew 9:8 (‘But when the multitudes saw it [4], they were afraid, and glorified God, which had given such power unto men’). Cf. Mark 2:12, Luke 5:25-26, Luke 2:20 (shepherds) Luke 7:16; Luke 18:43, Luke 23:47 (the centurion at the cross); cf. also Luke 13:13 (healing of woman with spirit of infirmity: ‘and … she was made straight, and glorified God’); Luke 17:15 f. (healing of the ten lepers) is esp. notable, because the grateful one who returned to give thanks to Christ, combined his thanksgiving with ‘glorifying God.’ Our Lord’s words in this connexion are striking: ‘Were there none found that returned to give glory to God, save this stranger?’ (Luke 17:18)—words which imply that the duty of grateful praise to God was not always fully recognized in individual practice.
Our Lord’s emphatic word about giving ‘glory’ to God (Luke 17:18) has already been referred to. As the spontaneous expression of a pure religious instinct, this would naturally be encouraged by Him whenever He met with it. According to John 5:41-44, He reproaches the Pharisees with seeking honour from one another rather than from God. But He does not hesitate to accept praise and homage offered to His own person when such is sincere and spontaneous (cf. Matthew 21:16). He dispenses praise in a manner implying a unique claim to appraise and publicly express moral judgments on human character: in this way He expresses His approbation of John the Baptist (Matthew 11:11), all acts of faith (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 15:28; Matthew 16:8, Luke 7:9), good and loyal service (Matthew 25:11; Matthew 25:23, Luke 19:17), all generosity of gift (Mark 12:43; Mark 14:6), self-devotion (Luke 10:41), prudence (Luke 16:8).* [10]9’), whose summary is here adopted.]
Outside the Gospels (viz. in the Epp.) the subject of Christian praise is, as is natural, mainly the great facts of redemption (cf. 1 Peter 2:10, Romans 15:9-11, 1618383780_10 etc.). Creation and redemption are combined in the Christian Liturgies.
4. Ascriptions of praise to Christ outside the Gospels.—It is noticeable that, in at least three (and possibly more) of the Apostolic doxologies, the address is directly to Christ, viz. 2 Timothy 4:18 (’The Lord … to whom be the glory,’ etc.); 2 Peter 3:18 (‘the grace of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. To him be the glory,’ etc.); Revelation 1:6 (‘him that loveth us, and loosed us from our sins, … to him be the glory,’ etc.). Hebrews 13:21 and 1 Peter 4:11 are possible cases also. In two cases the ascription of glory to God is made through Christ, viz. Romans 16:27 (‘to the only wise God, through Jesus Christ’) and Judges 1:25 (‘to the only God our Saviour, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion, power’), etc. See, further, Westcott, Add. Note on Hebrews 13:21 (Com. p. 464 f.).
The doxology of the Lord’s Prayer is probably a later liturgical addition, inserted in the text of the Gospels, perhaps, under the influence of liturgical usage. See Chase, ‘The Lord’s Prayer in the Early Church’ (Texts and Studies), pp. 168–174, and art. Lord’s Prayer, p. 59b.
See, further, Blessing, Hallel, Hosanna, Hymn.
Literature.—In addition to the references in the text, see the Gr. Test. Lexicons of Grimm-Thayer and Cremer (s.v. δοξα).
G. H. Box.

Sentence search

Hallelujah - ) Praise ye Jehovah; Praise ye the Lord; - an exclamation used chiefly in songs of Praise or thanksgiving to God, and as an expression of gratitude or adoration
Praise - Praise, mostly of God, is a frequent theme in the psalms, the Hebrew title of which is "Praises. " Yet Praise is a theme that pervades the whole of Scripture. Genesis 1 is indirect Praise; direct Praise is found in hymns scattered throughout the books of Exodus, 2Samuel, Isaiah, Daniel, Ephesians, and Revelation. Words that are often used as synonyms or in parallel with "praise, " and so help point to its meaning, are "bless, " "exalt, " "extol, " "glorify, " "magnify, " "thank, " and "confess. " To Praise God is to call attention to his glory. ...
A Vocation of Praise . Indeed, God has formed for himself a people "that they may proclaim my [1] Praise" (Isaiah 43:21 ; cf. God's actions, such as Israel's restoration from the exile, are to result in God's "righteousness and Praise spring [2] up before all nations" (Isaiah 61:11 ). God has also predestined the church "to the Praise of his [1] glorious grace" (Ephesians 1:6 ; cf. The future vocation of the redeemed in glory is to sing Praise to God and the Lamb (Revelation 4:11 ; 5:12-14 ; 7:12 ). ...
In the light of this calling to Praise God, the oft-declared intention, "I will Praise you, O God, " and the exhortations for others to Praise God take on additional meaning. In giving oneself to Praise the worshiper declares his or her total alignment with God's purposes. The environment of those gathering for worship, judged by such admonitions, was one of lavish Praise to God. Since God is holy and fully good, God is not to be faulted, as some do, for requiring Praise of himself. Praise is fitting for what is the highest good, God himself. Praise is both a duty and a delight (Psalm 63:3-8 ). In addition to being the fulfillment of a calling, Praise is prompted by other considerations, chief of which is the unique nature of God (1 Chronicles 29:10-13 ). One genre of the psalms, the hymns, is characterized by an initial summons, such as "Praise the Lord, " which is followed by a declaration of Praise, introduced by the word "for, " which lists the grounds for offering Praise, often God's majesty and mercy. The shortest psalm (117), a hymn, offers a double reason for Praise: God's merciful kindness (loyal love) is great, and his truth endures forever. Often too, Praise is to the name of God (Psalm 138:2 ; 145:2 ; Isaiah 25:1 ). ...
The biblical examples of Praise to God, apart from citing his attributes and role, point to God's favors, usually those on a large scale in behalf of Israel. A hymn in the Isaiah collection exhorts, "Sing Praise to the Lord for his glorious achievement" (Isaiah 12:5 ; nab ). Exhortations to Praise are sometimes followed by a catalogue of God's actions in Israel's behalf (Nehemiah 9:5 ; Psalm 68:4-14 ). God's most spectacular action involves the incarnation of Jesus, an event heralded in Praises by angels in the heavens and shepherds returning to their fields: "Glory to God in the highest" (Luke 2:14,20 ). Praise is the legitimate response to God's self-revelation. Personal experiences of God's deliverance and favor also elicit Praise (Psalm 34 ; 102:18 ; 107 ; cf. ...
An intimate relationship of a person or a people with God is sufficient reason for Praise. A psalmist, captivated by the reality of God's choice of Jacob, exhorts, "Sing Praise" (Psalm 135 ; cf. ...
Expressions of Praise . The believing community is both a fitting and frequently mentioned context for Praise. The author of Hebrews quotes the psalter: "In the midst of the assembly I will Praise you" (Hebrews 2:12 ). The audience is enlarged beyond the worshiping community when the worshiper announces, "I will Praise you [4], O Lord, among the nations" (Psalm 57:9 ), and more enlarged still, "In the presence of angels [5] I will sing my Praise" (Psalm 138:1 ; nab ). While privately spoken Praise to God is fitting and right, it is virtually intrinsic to the notion of Praise that it be publicly expressed. Indeed, David appointed Levites to ensure the public Praise of Israel (1 Chronicles 16:4 ; 23:4,30 ). ...
The Scriptures offer a language of Praise and so are instructive on how expressions of Praise might be formulated. Nehemiah leads in Praise by saying, "Blessed be your glorious name, and may it be exalted above all blessing and Praise. The chorister Asaph followed David's cue: "Sing Praise to him; tell of his wonderful Acts" (1 Chronicles 16:9 ). Persons intent on cultivating spirituality are often helped, at least initially, by repeating and personalizing such lyrics of Praise. ...
Praise to God in Israel took the form of artfully composed lyrics. A significant number of psalms are identified in their headings as "A Psalm, " a technical term meaning "a song of Praise. " Israel's expressions of Praise to God could include shouts (Psalm 98:4 ), the plying of musical instruments (1 Chronicles 25:3 ; 2 Chronicles 7:6 ; Psalm 144:9 ; 150:1-5 ), making melody (Psalm 146:2 ), and dancing (Psalm 149:3 ). Praise for Israel consisted, in part, of the spoken word, "Open my lips, and my mouth will declare your Praise" (Psalm 51:15 ) behind which, however, was a total person committed to Praise: "I will Praise you, O Lord, with my whole heart" (Psalm 9:1 ). Such Praise is not tainted with bitterness or in other ways qualified but is from someone who is thoroughly thankful. However, it counsels, even warns, about the giving and receiving of Praise lest it be for the wrong reasons or be misconstrued (Psalm 49:18 ; Proverbs 12:8 ; 27:2,21 ; John 5:44 ). ...
Unquestionably the Book of the Psalms is centerpiece for any discussion about Praise. In it the believer's vocation to Praise is wonderfully modeled, so that even laments (one-third of all the psalms) contain elements of Praise. As a book of Praises, the psalms build to a remarkable crescendo of Praise (Psalm 145-150 ), in which all creatures are summoned to incessant Praise of God, as are the stars and planets in the heavens, and even the angels. ...
Very appropriately, then, does the Christian community repeatedly resort in its worship to the Gloria Patri, "Glory be to the Father" and in clusters large and small sing, "Praise God from whom all blessings flow. Brueggemann, Israel's Praise: Doxology Against Idolatry ; L. Westermann, The Praise of God in the Psalms
Unpraise - ) To withhold Praise from; to deprive of Praise
Kudos - ) Glory; fame; renown; Praise. ) To Praise; to extol; to glorify
Ohad - One of the sons Simeon, (Genesis 46:10) The name signifies Praise, from Judah, to Praise
Alleluiah - ) An exclamation signifying Praise ye Jehovah. Hence: A song of Praise to God
Laudatory - ) Of or pertaining Praise, or to the expression of Praise; as, laudatory verses; the laudatory powers of Dryden
Praise - The Bible recognizes that men and women may also be the objects of Praise, either from other people (Proverbs 27:21 ; Proverbs 31:30 ) or from God Himself (Romans 2:29 ), and that angels and the natural world are likewise capable of praising God (Psalm 148:1 ). Nevertheless, human Praise of God is one of Scripture's major themes. ...
Praise comes from a Latin word meaning “value” or “price. ” Thus, to give Praise to God is to proclaim His merit or worth. Many terms are used to express this in the Bible, including “glory,” “blessing,” “thanksgiving,” and “hallelujah,” the last named being a transliteration of the Hebrew for “Praise the Lord. ” The Hebrew title of the book of Psalms (“Praises”) comes from the same root as “hallelujah” and Psalm 113-118 have been specially designated the “Hallel” (“praise”) psalms. ...
The modes of Praise are many, including the offering of sacrifices (Leviticus 7:13 ), physical movement (2 Samuel 6:14 ), silence and meditation (Psalm 77:11-12 ), testimony (Psalm 150:3-5 ), prayer (Philippians 4:6 ), and a holy life (1 Peter 1:3-9 ). However, Praise is almost invariably linked to music, both instrumental (Psalm 66:16 ) and, especially, vocal. Biblical songs of Praise range from personal, more or less spontaneous outbursts of thanksgiving for some redemptive act of God (Exodus 15:1 : Judges 5:1 ; 1 Samuel 2:1 ; Luke 1:46-55 ,Luke 1:46-55,1:67-79 ) to formal psalms and hymns adapted for corporate worship in the Temple (2 Chronicles 29:30 ) and church (Colossians 3:16 ). ...
While the Bible contains frequent injunctions for people to Praise God, there are also occasional warnings about the quality of this Praise. Praise is to originate in the heart and not become mere outward show (Matthew 15:8 ). Corporate Praise is to be carried on in an orderly manner (1 Corinthians 14:40 ). Praise is also firmly linked to an individual's everyday life (Amos 5:21-24 )
Hallelujah - Praise ye Jehovah, frequently rendered "Praise ye the LORD," stands at the beginning of ten of the psalms (106,111-113,135,146-150), hence called "hallelujah psalms. " From its frequent occurrence it grew into a formula of Praise
Allelula - The word ἀλληλούι>α occurs in the LXX, answering to the Hebrew word halal in the Psalms translated 'praise ye the Lord. ' It is an ascription of Praise to God. In Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 the Praise is heard inheaven: through mercy the saint learns to raise his Hallelujahon his way thither
Laud - ) A part of divine worship, consisting chiefly of Praise; - usually in the pl. ) To Praise in words alone, or with words and singing; to celebrate; to extol. ) High commendation; Praise; honor; exaltation; glory
Laud - Praise commendation an extolling in words honorable mention. That part of divine worship which consists in Praise. To Praise in words alone, or with words and singing to celebrate
Hallelujah - Originally the word ‘hallelujah’ was a combination of parts of two Hebrew words, meaning ‘praise’ and ‘Jehovah’ (‘Yahweh’). It has been transliterated into Greek and English as ‘hallelujah’ and means ‘praise the Lord’. It was used mainly to open or close hymns of Praise in public worship (Psalms 106:1; Psalms 106:48; Psalms 112:1; Psalms 113:1; Psalms 115:18; Psalms 146:1; Psalms 146:10; Psalms 147:1; Psalms 147:20; Psalms 150; Revelation 19:1; Revelation 19:3-4; Revelation 19:6; see also Praise)
Praise - Praise is the recognition and acknowledgment of merit. ...
Men may Praise men . Forms of Praise may be used without genuine feelings of Praise, and extravagant Praise may be rendered Intentionally, because of the advantage that will be gained thereby. Again, the estimate of values may be so completely false that Praise may be felt and expressed genuinely in cases where it is undeserved. ...
In its common Biblical use, however, Praise has God for its object . This restriction does not involve an essential difference either in the Praise or in the sense of moral values. The difference lies rather in the greater Praiseworthiness of God. Praise of God is of course called forth only as He reveals Himself to men, only as men recognize His activity and His power in the event or condition which appears to them adequate to call out Praise. Men Praise God in proportion as they are religious, and so have conscious relations with God. The Praiseworthiness of a god is involved in the very definition of a god. If men postulate a god at all, it is as a being worthy to be Praised. Every thought and act by which men come into relation with God is a thought and an act of Praise. If the act is confession of sin, the same is true, for confession is not made to a being who does not hold a place of honour and Praise. ...
Moreover, as in the case of Praise of men, there is a very clear distinction to be drawn between genuine and hypocritical ascription of Praise to God. The temptation to the latter is extreme, because of the immense gain presumably to be secured by Praise; but the hypocrisy and the sin of it are equally great. Indeed, the seriousness of the offence is evident when one reflects that he who Praises God knows full well the Praiseworthiness of God, so that if he Praises while the genuine feeling is lacking and the sincere act of Praise is unperformed, only moral perversity can account for the hypocrisy. ...
In order to genuineness, Praise must be spontaneous It may be commanded by another human being, and the Praise commanded may be rendered, but the real impelling cause is the recognized merit of God. God may demand Praise from His creatures in commands transmitted to them through prophets and Apostles, but if man Praises Him from the heart, it is because of the imperative Inseparable from the very being and nature of God. ...
We are prepared, then, to find that in the Bible Praise to God is universal on the part of all who acknowledge Him. The chapter is a call to Praise, though the word be not mentioned. Psalms 104:1-35 ) to find formal expression of the Praise that the world inspires. ‘Ye shall be holy, for I Jehovah your God am holy,’ has no force except for him who acknowledges holiness in God who commands; and obedience is the creature’s tribute of Praise to the holy God. ...
The whole history of Israel, as Israel’s historians picture it, has in it the constant element of Praise to Israel’s God: we turn to the Psalms ( e. Exodus 15:1-27 ), and find the Praise of the heart rising to formal expression. ...
In the NT, Praise of Christ and of God in Christ is the universal note. ...
We are also prepared by this universality to find that Praise cannot form a topic for independent treatment. The history of Praise in the OT and the NT is the history of worship, temple, synagogue, sacrifice, festivals. The literature of Praise is the literature of religion, whether as the product of national consciousness or of personal religious experience. word oftenest used for Praise is hillçl , perhaps an onomatopoetic Semitic root meaning ‘cry aloud. ’ An interesting feature is the use of the imperative in ascriptions of Praise. Taken literally, these imperatives are commands to Praise; but they are to be taken as real ascriptions of Praise, with the added thought that Praise from one person suggests Praise from all. the doxology ‘Praise God from whom all blessings flow,’ which consists solely of four imperative sentences. ‘Praise ye Jah. ...
The form which Praise took as an element of worship in Israel varied with the general character of worship. For personal and family favours they Praised Him in early times with forms of their own choosing. When the national consciousness was aroused, they Praised Him for His leading of the nation, in forms suitable to this service. As worship came more and more to conform to that elaborated for, and practised in, the royal sanctuary the Temple at Jerusalem the forms of Praise could not fail to share the elaboration and to become gradually more uniform. ...
Praise was certainly a part of the varied service rendered by the Levites in the Temple ritual of later Judaism, and an examination of that ritual will show how far Praise was given over to them, and how much was retained by the congregation. ] The element of Praise in the synagogue worship is an interesting and disputed question
Pesukei dzimra - "verses of Praise"); the bracket of passages of Praise, mainly from Psalms, which appear early in the morning services, opening with Baruch SheAmar and closing with Yishtabach
Doxology - ) In Christian worship: A hymn expressing Praise and honor to God; a form of Praise to God designed to be sung or chanted by the choir or the congregation
Praise - A — 1: αἶνος (Strong's #136 — Noun Masculine — ainos — ah'ee-nos ) primarily "a tale, narration," came to denote "praise;" in the NT only of Praise to God, Matthew 21:16 ; Luke 18:43 . 1 (epi, upon), denotes "approbation, commendation, Praise;" it is used (a) of those on account of, and by reason of, whom as God's heritage, "praise" is to be ascibed to God, in respect of His glory (the exhibition of His character and operations), Ephesians 1:12 ; in Ephesians 1:14 , of the whole company, the church, viewed as "God's own possession" (RV); in Ephesians 1:6 , with particular reference to the glory of His grace towards them; in Philippians 1:11 , as the result of "the fruits of righteousness" manifested in them through the power of Christ; (b) of "praise" bestowed by God, upon the Jew spiritually (Judah == "praise"), Romans 2:29 ; bestowed upon believers hereafter at the judgment seat of Christ, 1 Corinthians 4:5 (where the definite article indicates that the "praise" will be exactly in accordance with each person's actions); as the issue of present trials, "at the revelation of Jesus Christ," 1 Peter 1:7 ; (c) of whatsoever is "praiseworthy," Philippians 4:8 ; (d) of the approbation by churches of those who labor faithfully in the ministry of the Gospel, 2 Corinthians 8:18 ; (e) of the approbation of well-doers by human rulers, Romans 13:3 ; 1 Peter 2:14 . ...
A — 3: αἴνεσις (Strong's #133 — Noun Feminine — ainesis — ah'ee-nes-is ) "praise" (akin to No. ...
Notes: (1) In 1 Peter 2:9 , AV, arete, "virtue, excellence," is translated "praises" (RV, "excellencies"). (2) In the following the AV translates doxa, "glory," by "praise" (RV, "glory"); John 9:24 , where "give glory to God" signifies "confess thy sins" (cp. ...
B — 1: αἰνέω (Strong's #134 — Verb — aineo — ahee-neh'-o ) "to speak in Praise of, to Praise" (akin to A, No. 1), is always used of "praise" to God, (a) by angels, Luke 2:13 ; (b) by men, Luke 2:20 ; 19:37 ; 24:53 ; Acts 2:20,47 ; 3:8,9 ; Romans 15:11 (No. 2, is rendered "praise," 1 Corinthians 11:2,17,22 : see COMMEND , No. ...
B — 3: ὑμνέω (Strong's #5214 — Verb — humneo — hoom-neh'-o ) denotes (a) transitively, "to sing, to laud, sing to the Praise of" (Eng. , "hymn"), Acts 16:25 , AV, "sang Praises" (RV, "singing hymns"); Hebrews 2:12 , RV, "will I sing (Thy) Praise," AV, "will I sing Praise (unto Thee)," lit. , to sing psalms, denotes, in the NT, to sing a hymn, sing "praise;" in James 5:13 , RV, "sing Praise" (AV, "sing psalms"). ...
B — 5: ἐξομολογέω (Strong's #1843 — Verb — exomologeo — ex-om-ol-og-eh'-o ) in Romans 15:9 , RV, "will I give Praise" (AV, and RV marg. ...
Note: In Luke 1:64 , AV, eulogeo, "to bless," is translated "praised" (RV, "blessing")
Commendation - ) That which is the ground of approbation or Praise. ) The act of commending; Praise; favorable representation in words; recommendation
Hymn - A hymn among christians is a short poem,composed for religious service, or a song of joy and Praise to God. To Praise in song to worship by singing hymns. They hymn their maker's Praise. To sing in Praise or adoration
Praise - One characteristic of the life of God’s people is that they constantly Praise him. Praise is an expression of homage, adoration and thanksgiving to God either in prayer or in song, and may be accompanied by various expressions of joy (Exodus 15:1-2; Exodus 15:20-21; Psalms 35:18; Psalms 63:5; Psalms 71:8; Psalms 150; Isaiah 12:2-6; Luke 2:13-14; Acts 2:47; Acts 3:8; Colossians 3:16; Revelation 5:9-14; see DANCING; MUSIC; SINGING). ...
Believers offer Praise to God because of who he is and what he has done. Their Praise is part of their worship of God, and it will reach its fullest expression in the age to come (Psalms 7:17; Psalms 66:1-4; Psalms 104:1; Psalms 138:1-2; Luke 24:53; Revelation 19:4-5). All living things, and especially God’s people, have a duty to Praise God. They offer this Praise both individually and collectively (Ezra 3:10-11; Psalms 34:1-3; Psalms 35:18; Psalms 117; Psalms 135:1-2; Psalms 150:6; Joel 2:26; Acts 16:25; Hebrews 13:15; 1 Peter 2:9). )...
God’s people should want their lives and actions to bring Praise to God. They should not seek Praise for themselves (Proverbs 27:2; Matthew 6:2; John 12:43; 2 Corinthians 9:1; Ephesians 1:12; Philippians 1:11; Colossians 1:3-4; 1 Thessalonians 2:6). Yet it is true that, if they live uprightly and behave properly, others will naturally want to give them Praise (Proverbs 31:28; Proverbs 31:31; Acts 16:2; 1 Corinthians 11:2; 1 Corinthians 11:17; 1 Peter 2:14)
Hallel - �praise�) The 14th step of the Passover seder, which is the recitation of Hallel ...
Hallel: (lit. �praise�) A portion of Psalms (113-118) recited in the prayer service on the festivals and on Rosh Chodesh
Extol - ) To elevate by Praise; to eulogize; to Praise; to magnify; as, to extol virtue; to extol an act or a person
Emerald - Exodus 39:11 (c) This green stone represents Praise, worship and adoration which begins now and lasts throughout eternity. Judah which means "praise" had his name graven on the emerald stone on the breastplate of the high priest. It was "green" to signify eternal Praise
Hod - Praise; confession
Singing - See Praise
India - Praise; law
Hymn - (Greek: hymnos) ...
A song of Praise. From the spiritual contents of such songs it is difficult to distinguish the three kinds of Divine Praise indicated by the different terms, psalms, hymns, and canticles. Saint Augustine, commenting on Psalms 148, defines hymn as "a song with Praise of God," but Praise of God must be understood to include the Praise of His saints
Ammihud - We find it, (Numbers 1:10; Num 34:20; Num 34:28) It is a compound of Amm, people, and Hud, Praise, and with the 1make it the people of my Praise
Ammihud - People of Praise
Hallelujah - Praise the Lord
Alleluia - Praise the Lord
Abiud - Father of Praise
Hymn - See Praise; SINGING
Lavish - ) Expending or bestowing profusely; profuse; prodigal; as, lavish of money; lavish of Praise. ) To expend or bestow with profusion; to use with prodigality; to squander; as, to lavish money or Praise
Praise - ...
Hâlal (הָלַל, Strong's #1984), “to Praise, celebrate, glory, sing (praise), boast. ” The meaning “to Praise” is actually the meaning of the intensive form of the Hebrew verb hâlal, which in its simple active form means “to boast. 12:15, where it is noted that because of Sarah’s great beauty, the princes of Pharaoh “praised” (KJV, “commended”) her to Pharaoh. ...
While hâlal is often used simply to indicate “praise” of people, including the king ( Praise” God (
The Hebrew name for the Book of Psalms is simply the equivalent for the word “praises” and is a bit more appropriate than “Psalms,” which comes from the Greek and has to do with the accompaniment of singing with a stringed instrument of some sort. Psalms 113-118 are traditionally referred to as the “Hallel Psalms,” because they have to do with Praise to God for deliverance from Egyptian bondage under Moses. ...
The word hâlal is the source of “Hallelujah,” a Hebrew expression of “praise” to God which has been taken over into virtually every language of mankind. The Hebrew “Hallelujah” is generally translated “Praise the Lord!” The Hebrew term is more technically translated “Let us Praise Yah,” the term “Yah” being a shortened form of “Yahweh,” the unique Israelite name for God. Christian hymnody certainly would be greatly impoverished if the term “Hallelujah” were suddenly removed from our language of Praise. ...
Yâdâh (יָדָה, Strong's #3034), “to give thanks, laud, Praise. Yâdâh is found nearly 120 times in the Hebrew Bible, the first time being in the story of the birth of Judah, Jacob’s son who was born to Leah: “And she conceived again and bore a son, and said, This time I will Praise the Lord; therefore she called his name Judah” (
Praise, it is a natural part of ritual or public worship as well as personal Praise to God (1 Kings 8:33: “confess” thy name (KJV, NEB, NASB); acknowledge (RSV); Praise (JB, NAB). ...
Tehillâh (תְּהִלָּה, Strong's #8416), “glory; Praise; song of Praise; Praiseworthy deeds. ...
First, this word denotes a quality or attribute of some person or thing, “glory or Praiseworthiness”: “He is thy Praise, and he is thy God, that hath done for thee these great and terrible things, which thine eyes have seen” ( Praise in the earth” ( Praise [1] shall be of thee in the great congregation …” ( Praise thee. ”...
In a third nuance tehillâh is a technical-musical term for a song (shir) which exalts or Praises God: “David’s psalm of Praise” (heading for Ps. 11:17
refers to a choirmaster or one who conducts such singing of “praises”: “And Mattaniah … , the son of Asaph, was the principal to begin the thanksgiving in prayer [2]. …”...
Finally, tehillâh may represent deeds which are worthy of “praise,” or deeds for which the doer deserves “praise and glory. ” This meaning is in the word’s first biblical appearance: “Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? Who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in Praises [3], doing wonders [4]?” ( Hiddai - A Praise; a cry
Jeduthun - His law; giving Praise
Abihud - Father of Praise; confession
Iddo - His band; power; Praise
Loos - ) Praise; fame; reputation
Los - ) Praise
Epenetus - Laudable; worthy of Praise
Eliud - God is my Praise
Laud - ]'>[1] has ‘Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people. ]'>[2] turns ‘laud’ into ‘praise. ’ In the OT, however, ‘laud’ and ‘praise’ are both used in order to distinguish two Heb
Halleluiah - (Hebrew: Praise ye Yahveh) ...
An ejaculation, which motivates or sums up an act of Praise of God. From very early times the liturgy of the Church used this term to express glad Praise of God
Hallelujah - (Hebrew: Praise ye Yahveh) ...
An ejaculation, which motivates or sums up an act of Praise of God. From very early times the liturgy of the Church used this term to express glad Praise of God
Epenetic - ) Bestowing Praise; eulogistic; laudatory
Hodaiah - The Praise of the Lord
Praiseless - ) Without Praise or approbation
Praised - ) of Praise...
Self-Praise - ) Praise of one's self
Jehudijah - The Praise of the Lord
Hallelujah - (praise ye the Lord )
Worship (2) - —See Praise, Prayer, Synagogue, Temple
Praising - ) of Praise...
Judah - The Praise of the Lord; confession
Underpraise - ) To Praise below desert
Renown - ) Report of nobleness or exploits; Praise. ) The state of being much known and talked of; exalted reputation derived from the extensive Praise of great achievements or accomplishments; fame; celebrity; - always in a good sense
Belaud - ) To laud or Praise greatly
Bepraise - ) To Praise greatly or extravagantly
Panegyrical - ) Containing Praise or eulogy; encomiastic; laudatory
Eulogical - ) Bestowing Praise of eulogy; commendatory; eulogistic
Overpraise - ) To Praise excessively or unduly
Laud - To Praise or celebrate
Hode'Vah - (praise ye Jehovah )
Doxology - (Greek: doxe, Praise; logos, word) ...
Tribute of Praise, as in the Gloria in Excelsis (Glory in the highest), hymn of the angels at the Birth of Our Saviour, repeated at every Mass, except at votive and requiem Masses; and in the Gloria Patri (Glory be to the Father), the short doxology
Doxological - ) Pertaining to doxology; giving Praise to God
Encomium - ) Warm or high Praise; panegyric; strong commendation
Hery - ) To worship; to glorify; to Praise
Overpraising - ) The act of praising unduly; excessive Praise
Music - See Praise, and articles on various Musical Instruments
Hallelujah - (hal lih lyoo jah) Exclamation of Praise that recurs frequently in the Book of Psalms meaning, “Praise Yahweh!” In particular, Psalm 146-150 sometimes are designated the Hallelujah Psalms. In the Psalms God is Praised for His power, His wisdom, His blessings, and the liberation of His people
Recommendable - ) Suitable to be recommended; worthy of Praise; commendable
Praisable - ) Fit to be Praised; Praise-worthy; laudable; commendable
Plaudit - ) A mark or expression of applause; Praise bestowed
Plausive - ) Applauding; manifesting Praise
Laudation - ) The act of lauding; Praise; high commendation
Dignity, Dignities - 1: δόξα (Strong's #1391 — Noun Feminine — doxa — dox'-ah ) primarily denotes "an opinion, estimation, repute;" in the NT, always "good opinion, Praise, honor, glory, an appearance commanding respect, magnificience, excellence, manifestation of glory;" hence, of angelic powers, in respect of their state as commanding recognition, "dignities," 2 Peter 2:10 ; Jude 1:8 . See GLORY , HONOR , Praise , WORSHIP
Hallelujah - In the New Testament, ALLELUIAH, Praise ye Jehovah. It was also sung on solemn days of rejoicing, as an expression of joy and Praise, and as such it has been adopted in the Christian church, and is still used in devotional psalmody, Revelation 19:1,3,4,6
Choir - See Praise
Adulation - ) Servile flattery; Praise in excess, or beyond what is merited
Elogy - ) The Praise bestowed on a person or thing; panegyric; eulogy
Laud - * For LAUD (Romans 15:11 , AV) see Praise , B, No
Hallelujah - A Hebrew word, meaning "Praise the Lord"; same asALLELUIA (which see)
Glorify - To Praise to magnify and honor in worship to ascribe honor to, in thought or words. To Praise to honor to extol. To procure honor or Praise to
Alleluia - or HALLELU-JAH ...
הללואּ?יה , Praise the Lord; or, Praise to the Lord: compounded of הללו , Praise ye, and יה the Lord. " This expression of joy and Praise was transferred from the synagogue to the church
Peanism - ) The song or shout of Praise, of battle, or of triumph
Encomiastical - ) Bestowing Praise; praising; eulogistic; laudatory; as, an encomiastic address or discourse
Deification - ) The act of deifying; exaltation to divine honors; apotheosis; excessive Praise
Laud - To extol, by words of Praise or in song, Romans 15:11
Adulatory - ) Containing excessive Praise or compliment; servilely praising; flattering; as, an adulatory address
Praiseworthy - ) Worthy of Praise or applause; commendable; as, Praiseworthy action; he was Praiseworthy
Vani'ah - (Jehovah is Praise ), one of the sons of Bani, ( Ezra 10:36 ) (B
Eli'ud - (God his Praise ), son of Achim in the genealogy of Christ
Hallel - A song of Praise. The name derives from the Hebrew “Praise Thou. ” The singing of psalms of Praise was a special duty of the Levites (2 Chronicles 7:6 ; Ezra 3:11 )
Demerit - ) To deserve Praise or blame. ) To deserve; - said in reference to both Praise and blame
Puffingly - ) In a puffing manner; with vehement breathing or shortness of breath; with exaggerated Praise
Abi'ud - (father of Praise ), descendant of Zorobabel in the genealogy of Jesus Christ
Doxologize - ) To give glory to God, as in a doxology; to Praise God with doxologies
Flattering - Gratifying with Praise pleasing by applause wheedling coaxing. Practicing adulation uttering false Praise as a flattering tongue
Flattery - False Praise commendation bestowed for the purpose of gaining favor and influence, or to accomplish some purpose. ...
Just Praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present
Commendation - The act of commending Praise favorable representation in words declaration of esteem. Ground of esteem, approbation or Praise that which presents a person or thing to another in a favorable light, and renders worthy of regard, or acceptance
Mahalaleel - Fourth from Adam in Seth's line, Cainan's son ("the Praise of God"
Hoda'Iah - (Praise ye Jehovah ), son of the royal line of Judah
Praise (2) - PRAISE...
1. —Both in the OT and the NT the predominant idea of ‘praise’ is that of a tribute of homage in utterance, publicly expressed and rendered to God by His creatures. The subject of this ‘praise’ is either the excellencies of God’s attributes and revealed nature (cf. In the Gospels Jesus is sometimes the object of Praise and homage (Matthew 21:16; cf. Luke 4:15), and Himself often dispenses Praise for certain qualities of human nature or character (cf. The Praise of man by man is usually applied in the Gospels to unreal and hypocritical commendation, and is condemned by Jesus (Matthew 6:1, Luke 6:26; cf. —In Jewish worship the element of Praise occupies a dominant place, and has received rich and manifold expression. of Psalms in the Massoretic Text , Sepher Tĕhillîm* [1] (and its variants) = ‘Book of Praises or Praise-Songs,’ is an indication of the emphasis which was laid on the note of Praise in later Jewish worship. ‘O thou that inhabitest the Praises of Israel,’ Psalms 22:3). The close connexion existing between the ideas of Praise and thanksgiving (cf. Psalms 100:4 ‘Enter his gates with thanksgiving, his courts with Praise’) has already been pointed out in this work (see art. for God’s beneficence in creation, revelation, and providence—is an essential part of Praise. If a distinction can be drawn, Praise pure and simple is rather to be associated with extolling God’s perfections and holiness, while blessing (thanksgiving) is connected rather with thankful recognition of His goodness, beneficence, and mercy. ...
For the Hebrew terms employed with the meaning ‘praise’ and its cognates, reference may be made to the art. ‘Praise (in OT)’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. The most frequent are—חִלֵּל ‘praise’ (esp. ’...
In the Synagogue Liturgy the element of Praise has received splendid expression. ]'>[4] The former of these, in its shortest form, runs thus:...
‘Be Thy name lauded for ever, O our King, the great and holy God and King, in heaven and on earth; for unto Thee, O Lord our God and God of our fathers, song and laud are becoming, Praise and psalm, strength and dominion, victory, greatness and might, renown and glory, holiness and sovereignty, blessings and thanksgivings, from henceforth, even for ever. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, God and King, great in Praises, God of thanksgivings, Lord of wonders, who makest choice of melodious song, O King and God, the Life of all worlds. ’...
In the Kaddish the following characteristic paragraph occurs:...
‘Blessed, lauded, and glorified, exalted, extolled and honoured, magnified and Praised be the name of the Holy One, Blessed be He; though He be high above all the blessings and songs, hymns of Praise and consolation, which are uttered in the world. In the Gospels the Angels’ Song of Praise (Luke 2:14) is an example of pure Praise in worship, parallels to which arc to be found in the Apocalypse (Revelation 4:11; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 11:17; Revelation 14:7; Revelation 19:1 f. In Rabbinical theology, it is to be noticed, prayer and Praise form the spiritual counterpart and fulfilment of the old daily sacrifice in the Temple. Spiritual worship thus becomes a ‘sacrifice of Praise and thanksgiving. Christ—‘let us otter up a sacrifice of Praise’) with Westcott’s note; cf. ...
For the close connexion of prayer and Praise—which are sometimes intermingled in the Jewish Liturgy, e. —The note of Praise so characteristic of Jewish worship also pervades the Gospels. ...
The Greek terms for ‘praise’ and its cognates used in the Gospels are—αἰνεῖν ‘praise’* [8]; ἐξομολογεῖν ‘to celebrate,’ ‘give Praise or thanks to,’ Matthew 11:25 and ||. ...
The following formulas of Praise are to be noted:...
(a)The Angels’ Hymn (Luke 2:14)—...
‘Glory to God in the highest,...
And on earth peace among men of his goodwill. To these may here be added—...
(d)The use of the phrase ‘give God (the) Praise’ (or ‘glory’): διδόναι δόξαν τῷ θεῷ = שׂים בבור ליהוה (נחן), and has various shades of meaning, according to the context—e. of celebrating God’s Praises (Revelation 4:9; Revelation 11:13; Revelation 19:7). ’ Our Lord’s words in this connexion are striking: ‘Were there none found that returned to give glory to God, save this stranger?’ (Luke 17:18)—words which imply that the duty of grateful Praise to God was not always fully recognized in individual practice. But He does not hesitate to accept Praise and homage offered to His own person when such is sincere and spontaneous (cf. He dispenses Praise in a manner implying a unique claim to appraise and publicly express moral judgments on human character: in this way He expresses His approbation of John the Baptist (Matthew 11:11), all acts of faith (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 15:28; Matthew 16:8, Luke 7:9), good and loyal service (Matthew 25:11; Matthew 25:23, Luke 19:17), all generosity of gift (Mark 12:43; Mark 14:6), self-devotion (Luke 10:41), prudence (Luke 16:8). 38 (‘Praise [in NT]'>[12]’), whose summary is here adopted. ) the subject of Christian Praise is, as is natural, mainly the great facts of redemption (cf. Ascriptions of Praise to Christ outside the Gospels
Eulogize - ) To speak or write in commendation of (another); to extol in speech or writing; to Praise
Jehudi - The servant of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 36:14) His name signifies, the Lord is my Praise
Flatter - To soothe by Praise to gratify self-love by Praise or obsequiousness to please a person by applause or favorable notice, by respectful attention, or by any thing that exalts him in his own estimation, or confirms his good opinion of himself. We flatter a woman when we Praise her children. To Praise falsely to encourage by favorable notice as, to flatter vices or crimes. To wheedle to coax to attempt to win by blandishments, Praise or enticements
Commend - ) Commendation; Praise. ) To mention with approbation; to Praise; as, to commend a person or an act
Carol - ) To Praise or celebrate in song. ) A song of Praise of devotion; as, a Christmas or Easter carol
Harp - Isaiah 5:12 (b) This is a symbol of joy, Praise and worship. They are full of joy, Praise and worship for their false gods
Eulogistical - ) Of or pertaining to eulogy; characterized by eulogy; bestowing Praise; panegyrical; commendatory; laudatory; as, eulogistic speech or discourse
Beslobber - : as, to beslobber with Praise
Plausibility - ) Something worthy of Praise
Hodaviah - (1 Chronicles 5:24) His name is compounded of Hod, Praise, and Jah, the Lord
Hil'Lel - (praise ), a native of Pirathon in Mount Ephraim, father of Abdon, one of the judges of Israel
Alleluia - A Hebrew word meaning "Praise ye the Lord
Complimentary - ) Expressive of regard or Praise; of the nature of, or containing, a compliment; as, a complimentary remark; a complimentary ticket
Elu'za-i - (God is my Praise ), one of the warriors of Benjamin who joined David at Ziklag
Shiggaion - Psalm 7:1-17 , title, and SHIGGIONOTH, Habakkuk 3:1 ; probably song, or song of Praise; perhaps some particular species of ode
Lory - ) That quality in a person or thing which secures general Praise or honor; that which brings or gives renown; an object of pride or boast; the occasion of Praise; excellency; brilliancy; splendor. ) Praise, honor, admiration, or distinction, accorded by common consent to a person or thing; high reputation; honorable fame; renown
Lory - ) That quality in a person or thing which secures general Praise or honor; that which brings or gives renown; an object of pride or boast; the occasion of Praise; excellency; brilliancy; splendor. ) Praise, honor, admiration, or distinction, accorded by common consent to a person or thing; high reputation; honorable fame; renown
Alleluia - The Greek form (Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 ) of the Hebrew Hallelujah = Praise ye Jehovah, which begins or ends several of the psalms (106,111,112,113, etc
Flattery - ) The act or practice of flattering; the act of pleasing by artiful commendation or compliments; adulation; false, insincere, or excessive Praise
Commendable - That may be commended or Praised worthy of approbation or Praise laudable
Wonderfully - ...
I will Praise thee, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made
Jehudijah - (See 1 Chronicles 4:18) The name is very striking in the Jah twice—to the Praise of the Lord
Melody - , "to sing with a harp, sing psalms," denotes, in the NT, "to sing a hymn, sing Praise;" in Ephesians 5:19 , "making melody" (for the preceding word ado, see SING). Elsewhere it is rendered "sing," Romans 15:9 ; 1 Corinthians 14:15 ; in James 5:13 , RV, "let him sing Praise" (AV, "let him sing psalms")
Praise of God - Praise and thanksgiving are generally considered as synonymous, yet some distinguish them thus. Praise properly terminates in God, on account of his natural excellencies and perfections, and is that act of devotion by which we confess and admire his several attributes: but thanksgiving is a more contracted duty, and imports only a grateful sense and acknowledgment of past mercies. We Praise God for all his glorious acts of every kind, that regard either us or other men; for his very vengeance, and those judgments which he sometimes sends abroad in the earth; but we thank him, properly speaking, for the instances of his goodness alone, and for such only of these as we ourselves are some way concerned in
Palilogy - ) The repetition of a word, or part of a sentence, for the sake of greater emphasis; as, "The living, the living, he shall Praise thee
Pean - ) A song of Praise and triumph
Commendatory - ) Serving to commend; containing Praise or commendation; commending; praising
Applause - ) The act of applauding; approbation and Praise publicly expressed by clapping the hands, stamping or tapping with the feet, acclamation, huzzas, or other means; marked commendation
Chenani - ” A Levite who led Israel in a prayer of renewal and Praise (Nehemiah 9:4 )
Judah - Praise, the fourth son of Jacob by Leah. The name originated in Leah's words of Praise to the Lord on account of his birth: "Now will I Praise Hosanna - When the word was joined to the name of God, Yahweh, the expression became both a prayer and an exclamation of Praise: ‘Save us, O Lord’. The scene is one of triumph, as Israel’s king enters the temple for a public ceremony of Praise to God for a recent victory in battle. ‘Hosanna’ later became an expression of Praise in expectation of the great Saviour-Messiah. When people in Jerusalem welcomed Jesus as their Saviour-Messiah, they shouted Praises of ‘Hosanna’ and waved palm branches. In the temple also he was greeted with shouts of ‘Hosanna’, and again Jesus accepted the Praise
Epaenetus - (ih pee' neh tuhss) Personal name meaning, “praise
Worship - See Adoration, Praise, Prayer, Preaching, Synagogue, Temple
Mahalaleel - Praise of God
Panegyrize - ) To Praise highly; to extol in a public speech; to write or deliver a panegyric upon; to eulogize
Confess - Yâdâh (יָדָה, Strong's #3034), “to confess, Praise, give thanks. ” The root, translated “confess” or “confession” about twenty times in the KJV, is also frequently rendered “praise” or “give thanks. ...
Yâdâh overlaps in meaning with a number of other Hebrew words implying “praise,” such as halal (whence halleluyah). Hence, a confession of sin may be articulated in the same breath as a confession of faith or Praise and thanksgiving. God is even to be Praised for His judgments, by which He awakens repentance (e. So one is not surprised to find Praises in penitential contexts, and vice versa (1 Kings 8:33ff. If Praise inevitably entails confession of sin, the reverse is also true: The sure word of forgiveness elicits Praise and thanksgiving on the confessor’s part. ...
The vista of yâdâh expands both vertically and horizontally—vertically to include all creation, and horizontally stretching forward to that day when Praise and thanksgiving shall be eternal (e
Glorify - ...
...
Spoken of God to "shew forth his Praise" (1 Corinthians 6:20 ; 10:31 )
Admirable - ) Having qualities to excite wonder united with approbation; deserving the highest Praise; most excellent; - used of persons or things
Benedictus - ” The first word in Latin of Zacharias' psalm of Praise in Luke 1:68-79 and thus the title of the psalm
Lavish - He was lavish of expense lavish of Praise lavish of encomiums lavish of censure lavish of blood and treasure. To expend or bestow with profusion as, to lavish Praise or encomiums
Panegyric - ) An oration or eulogy in Praise of some person or achievement; a formal or elaborate encomium; a laudatory discourse; laudation
Jah - " It is part of the compound words "Adonijah" ("God is my Lord") and "hallelujah" ("Praise the Lord")
Nunc Dimittis - ” The first words in Latin of Simeon's psalm of Praise in Luke 2:29-32 and thus the title of the psalm
Dispraise - ) To withdraw Praise from; to notice with disapprobation or some degree of censure; to disparage; to blame
Thaddaeus - (See Matthew 10:3) If his name was derived from Jaduh or Thaduh, it signifies Praise
Alose - ) To Praise
Jah - one of the names of God, which we meet with in the composition of many Hebrew words; as, Adonijah, Allelujah, Malachia; that is, "My Lord," "Praise the Lord," "The Lord is my King
Jehud - (jee' huhd) Place name meaning, “praise
Cassia - Psalm 45:8 (c) This tells of the sweet worship and adoration which proceeds from the lips of GOD's people (probably the ivory palaces), to the Praise and the glory of the Lord JESUS
Resound - ) To Praise or celebrate with the voice, or the sound of instruments; to extol with sounds; to spread the fame of. ) To echo or reverberate; to be resonant; as, the earth resounded with his Praise
Maker - ...
The universal Maker we may Praise
Endless - Perpetual incessant continual as endless Praise endless clamor
Ambition - ...
See Praise
Fulsome - , offensive from excess of Praise; as, fulsome flattery
Psalms - ‘Psalms’ in the Apostolic Church included OT Psalms and similar hymns of Praise to God, as sung to musical accompaniment. Paul contemplates impromptu utterances under the influence of the Spirit, and appeals for the use of the reason in Praise no less than in prayer. Forceful hymns, full of noble indignation against Roman oppression and Jewish secularity, in their Praise of patience and resignation they express the feeling that Israel deserves chastening
Flatter - ) To use flattery or insincere Praise. ) To treat with Praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp
Emulation - The act of attempting to equal or excel in qualities or actions rivalry desire of superiority, attended with effort to attain to it generally in a good sense, or an attempt to equal or excel others in that which is Praise-worthy, without the desire of depressing others. An ardor kindled by the Praise-worthy examples of others, inciting to imitate them, or to equal or excel them
Anacreontic - ) A poem after the manner of Anacreon; a sprightly little poem in Praise of love and wine
Appraise - ) To Praise; to commend. ) To set a value; to estimate the worth of, particularly by persons appointed for the purpose; as, to appraise goods and chattels
Reproof - Those best can bear reproof, who merit Praise
Romamti-Ezer - Some scholars recognize a prayer of Praise behind the names of the Temple musicians Hananiah through Mahazioth (1 Chronicles 25:4 )
Praise - Ideal of Praise. -‘He knows little of himself who is not much in prayer, and he knows little of God who is not much in Praise. We must distinguish between Praise and thanksgiving. We Praise God for what He is, we thank Him for what He has done. But a sincere heart is lifted by Praise to the highest level of adoration. ...
There are two points to be remembered: (1) the rich inheritance of the traditions of Praise derived from the Temple services, and (2) the teaching of the Synagogue that, when one is cut off from participation in sacrifices, Praise should take their place. Peter and John going to the Temple at the hour of prayer were certainly in accord with the Psalmist: ‘Seven times a day will I Praise thee’ (Psalms 119:164); and the lame man, whom Peter healed, instinctively Praised God (Acts 3:8). Paul goes very deeply into the thought of Praise as an essential part of devotion when he speaks of the degradation of the heathen world as in a great measure due to their neglect of Praise. And in Romans 1:25 he turns from the loathsome subject of heathen immorality to give glory to God, as if to guard himself from contamination, just as he prepares himself for his impassioned argument on backsliding Israel by an ascription of Praise to ‘God blessed for ever’ (Romans 9:5), and passes into another doxology at the end of his argument (Romans 11:35-36). ...
The Epistle to the Ephesians opens (Ephesians 1:1-14) with a great ascription of Praise to God for the blessing of the Church. We are chosen in Christ that we should be ‘holy to the Praise of the glory of his grace. ’ Again and again he repeats the cadence ‘to the Praise of his glory. ’...
This level is worthily sustained in Hebrews 2:12 : ‘in the midst of the congregation will I sing Praise unto thee,’ when the writer quotes Psalms 22:22. As the typical king David comes to his own despite Saul’s persecution, so does Christ the true King in the hour of His victory over pain acknowledge His people as brethren, and the citizens of His Kingdom take the song of Praise from the lips of their King. ...
Again in Hebrews 13:15 it is suggested that our Praises are only worthily offered through our great High Priest: ‘Through him let us offer up a sacrifice of Praise. ’ From Praise for ‘the revelation of God in Christ (His Name)’ the writer goes on naturally to speak (v. 16) of kindly service and almsgiving, for ‘praise to God is service to men. Peter also has a characteristic passage on Praise (1 Peter 2:9): ‘That ye may tell forth the excellencies of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light. ’ He is quoting 2 Isaiah 43:21, and his word ‘excellencies,’ standing for Hebrew ‘my Praise,’ means an eminent quality in any person or thing, and the idea is blended with that of the impression which it makes on others; ‘the one sense involves the other, for all Praises of God must be Praises either of His excellencies or of His acts as manifestations of His excellencies’ (F. ‘This calling into God’s light … is thus fitly chosen as the characteristic act of Him whose excellencies the Christians were to tell forth, because it was on their use of the realm of vision thus opened to them that their power of exhibiting Him to men in grateful Praise would depend’ (Hort, ad loc. ’ Enlargement of the ascription is found in Jude, and above all in the central vision of the Apocalypse when the sevenfold theme marks the highest range of Praise. ): ‘This ceaseless activity of Nature under the Hand of God is a ceaseless tribute of Praise. ’ The elders also lay down their crowns of victory before the Throne with their tribute of Praise (Revelation 4:11): ‘Worthy art thou, our Lord and our God, to receive the glory and the honour and the power: for thou didst create all things, and because of thy will they were, and were created. -Our study of the ideal of Praise in the Apostolic Church would be incomplete without some reference to the music both vocal and instrumental in which pious hearts desired to express it. ...
The references to Praise in the Apostolic Fathers bring out the same underlying ideas. 61: ‘O Thou, who alone art able to do these things, and things far more exceeding good than these for us, we Praise Thee through the High Priest and Guardian of our souls, Jesus Christ, through whom be the glory and the majesty unto Thee both now and for all generations and for ever and ever. ’...
The ancient homily known as 2 Clement exhorts to give God ‘eternal Praise not from our lips only but from our heart’ (ii. ...
The Epistle of Barnabas (7) bids ‘the children of gladness understand that the good Lord manifested all things to us beforehand, that we might know to whom we ought in all things to render thanksgiving and Praise. ’ The author of the Odes of Solomon (Ode 6) compares a soul at Praise to a harp, as both Philo (i
Frugality - ) A sparing use; sparingness; as, frugality of Praise
Praise - ) To value; to appraise. ) Especially, the joyful tribute of gratitude or homage rendered to the Divine Being; the act of glorifying or extolling the Creator; worship, particularly worship by song, distinction from prayer and other acts of worship; as, a service of Praise. ) The object, ground, or reason of Praise
Magnificat - ” The first word in Latin of Mary's psalm of Praise (Luke 1:46-55 ) and thus the title of the psalm
Alleluiatic Psalms - Title derived from the opening word of several of these psalms, "Halleluiah" or Hallelu (Praise ye)
Mahal'Ale-el - (praise of God )
Hosanna - Joyful Aramaic exclamation of Praise, apparently specific to the major Jewish religious festivals (especially Passover and Tabernacles) in which the Egyptian Hallel (Psalm 113-118 ) was recited. hosia na, Please save Psalm 118:25 ), it came in liturgical usage to serve as an expression of joy and Praise for deliverance granted or anticipated. In him the age-old cry, "Lord, save us, " has become the glad doxology, "Hosanna, " which equals: "Praise God and his Messiah, we are saved. In similar fashion, John transliterated "Hallelujah" in Revelation 19:1,3 , 4,6 because it had become an exclamation of Praise whereas originally it was a call to Praise ("Praise the Lord")
Egotism - ) The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings
Hosanna - ...
An exclamation of Praise to God, or an invocation of blessings
Tersanctus - ) An ancient ascription of Praise (containing the word "Holy" - in its Latin form, "Sanctus" - thrice repeated), used in the Mass of the Roman Catholic Church and before the prayer of consecration in the communion service of the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal Church
Renown - ...
Fame celebrity exalted reputation derived from the extensive Praise of great achievements or accomplishments
Sacrifice - A solemn offering made to God according to His ordinance,for His honor and for the benefit of sinners, as in the HolyCommunion which is called "our sacrifice of Praise and thanksgiving,"and in which the merits and death of Christ are pleaded for theremission of our sins
Benedic, Anima Mea - The canticle beginning, "Praise the Lord, O mysoul," which the Latin words mean
Gloria Tibi - The Latin title of the words of Praise sung when theHoly Gospel is announced in the Holy Communion, viz
Puff - ) To Praise with exaggeration; to flatter; to call public attention to by Praises; to Praise unduly. ) An exaggerated or empty expression of Praise, especially one in a public journal
Gratitude - Gratitude recognizes benefits with Praise and thanksgiving, returning them according to opportunity and means
Endless - ) Without end; having no end or conclusion; perpetual; interminable; - applied to length, and to duration; as, an endless line; endless time; endless bliss; endless Praise; endless clamor
Hannah - Her song of Praise on this occasion, 1 Samuel 2:1-10, is a magnificent hymn to the holiness and justice of Jehovah, and has been compared with the song of Mary
Gladden - ...
Churches will every where gladden his eye, ...
and hymns of Praise vibrate upon his ear
Hannah - She is famous for the song of Praise she composed after this event
Sing, Singing - 1: ᾄδω (Strong's #103 — Verb — ado — ad'-o ) is used always of "praise to God," (a) intransitively, Ephesians 5:19 ; Colossians 3:16 ; (b) transitively, Revelation 5:9 ; 14:3 ; 15:3
Deserving - Worthy of reward or Praise meritorious possessed of good qualities that entitle to approbation as a deserving officer
Calves of the Lips - Modern translations supply different vowels to the consonants of the Hebrew text and read “fruit of the lips,” which means giving Praise to God
Cheek - Song of Solomon 5:13 (c) Solomon is pouring out his love and Praise to his Lord
Extol - ...
To raise in words or eulogy to Praise to exalt in commendation to magnify
Aldhelm, Saint - His chief prose work was a treatise in Praise of virginity
Praise - "The desire of Praise, " says an elegant writer, "is generally connected with all the finer sensibilities of human nature. To be entirely destitute of this passion betokens an ignoble mind, on which no moral impression is easily made; for where there is no desire of Praise, there will also be no sense of reproach; but while it is admitted to be a natural and in many respects an useful principle of action, we are to observe that it is entitled to no more than our secondary regard. When passing its natural line, it becomes the ruling spring of conduct; when the regard which we pay to the opinions of men encroaches on that reverence which we owe to the voice of conscience and the sense of duty; the love of Praise, having then gone out of its proper place, instead of improving, corrupts; and instead of elevating, debases our nature
Singing - we find there were courses of singers, and there were some who were 'taught to sing Praise. Singing and Praise naturally go together. The same word is translated 'sang Praises' unto God, when Paul and Silas were in prison, Acts 16:25 ; and the Lord sings Praise in the midst of the assembly
Lauds - (Latin: laus, Praise) ...
In the Divine Office, the canonical hour which follows Matins; sometimes however reckoned with the latter as forming one Canonical Hour. Originally the conclusion of the night vigil in the early Christian assembly was called matutinae laude, (morning Praises) because it was sung at dawn and comprised the Praise Psalms 148,149, 150. Lauds is preeminently the hour in the Office in which the Church Praises God, the Light of the World
Hymn - The generic term given to vocal Praise in the Bible. In this sense a hymn expresses the congregation's Praise of God's greatness and majesty, usually addressing members of the congregation and inviting them to Praise God. A hymn usually includes a call to the congregation to join in Praise (Psalm 33:1-3 ), a list of reasons to Praise God (Psalm 33:4-19 ), and a concluding call to Praise or statement of trust (Psalm 33:20-22 ). In another New Testament reference, Acts 16:25 , the mention of singing “praises” to God obviously means that Paul and Silas sang hymns in prison. The author of the Book of Hebrews stressed in Acts 2:12 (a quotation of the messianic Psalm 22:22 ) that Jesus will declare His name to the church, that He will “sing Praise,” or hymns
Deserve - ) To earn by service; to be worthy of (something due, either good or evil); to merit; to be entitled to; as, the laborer deserves his wages; a work of value deserves Praise
Earthly - ) Pertaining to the earth; belonging to this world, or to man's existence on the earth; not heavenly or spiritual; carnal; worldly; as, earthly joys; earthly flowers; earthly Praise
Deify - ) To Praise or revere as a deity; to treat as an object of supreme regard; as, to deify money
Shem - His conduct toward his father on one occasion is noted with Praise
Hallel - Praise, the name given to the group of Psalm 113118-118 , which are preeminently psalms of Praise
Exalt - To elevate in estimation and Praise to magnify to Praise to extol
Thirst - ...
Thirst of Praise. ...
But for is now more generally used after thirst as a thirst for worldly honors a thirst for Praise
Benedicite - The Prelude, contained in the first verse, is a call to all theworks of the Lord to "praise Him and magnify Him forever. All Mankind, from verse 26 to the end; this last division beinga call to mankind in general—the people of Israel, Priests andservants of the Lord, Spirits and Souls of the Righteous, and all"holy and humble men of heart," to Praise the Lord and magnify Himforever,—followed in Christian Worship by the Gloria Patri, as anact of high Praise of the holy, blessed and adorable Trinity, madeknown to us by the Revelation of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ
Doxology - Derivedfrom the Greek word Doxologia, from doxa, Praise and logos,meaning word
Mahalaleel - (muh hay' luh lee ehl) KJV form of Mahalelel, a personal name meaning “God shines forth” or “praise God
Psalm - ) To extol in psalms; to sing; as, psalming his Praises. ) A sacred song; a poetical composition for use in the Praise or worship of God
Injustice - The withholding from another merited Praise, or ascribing to him unmerited blame
Itching - 2 Timothy 4:3 (b) This refers to teachers who utter things which they know will please the people so that the people will Praise them for their messages and their ministry
Calf - The calves of the lips, in Hosea, signify the pure offerings of prayer, Praise and thanks-giving
Hodavi'ah - (Praise ye Jehovah )
Postures in Public Worship - While to the stranger in the Church thevarious postures taken in the services seem complicated, yet therule for them is very simple, which is this: We stand in Praise,kneel in prayer and are seated during the hearing of the Word
Joseph, the Praise And Glory of the Heavens - (Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph
Invitatory - The opening summons, or prayer, of the Divine Office, calling on all who recite it to adore and Praise God with joy
Caelitum Joseph Decus, Atque Nostre - (Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph
Common Prayer - So we make our commonsupplications, confess our common sins, and offer our commonsacrifice of Praise and thanksgiving, of alms and devotion
Extravagant - ) Exceeding due bounds; wild; excessive; unrestrained; as, extravagant acts, wishes, Praise, abuse
Compliment - ) To Praise, flatter, or gratify, by expressions of approbation, respect, or congratulation; to make or pay a compliment to
Revenue - ) Hence, return; reward; as, a revenue of Praise
Evil-Merodach - His friendly treatment of Jehoiachin the captive king of Judah, in releasing him from prison and variously distinguishing him above other captives, is mentioned to his Praise, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 - 34
Hymn - A — 1: ὕμνος (Strong's #5215 — Noun Masculine — humnos — hoom'-nos ) denotes "a song of Praise addressed to God" (Eng. " ...
B — 1: ὑμνέω (Strong's #5214 — Verb — humneo — hoom-neh'-o ) akin to A, is used (a) transitively, Matthew 26:30 ; Mark 14:26 , where the "hymn" was that part of the Hallel consisting of Psalm 113-118 ; (b) intransitively, where the verb itself is rendered "to sing Praises" or "praise," Acts 16:25 ; Hebrews 2:12
Responsive Service - Peter, inhis First General Epistle, writing to the Baptized, says of them,"But ye are a chosen generation, a royal Priesthood, an holy nation,a peculiar people, that ye should show forth the Praise of Him whohath called you out of darkness into His marvelous Light. The whole system ofresponsive worship is founded upon the Priesthood of the Laity,and enables them to show forth the Praise of Him who hath calledthem out of darkness into His marvelous Light
Blessing - ) Grateful Praise or worship
Odor - ...
Revelation 5:8 (b) This type describes the sweetness of the prayers of GOD's people as their Praise ascends to His throne
Benefactor - This was a term of Praise and flattery often used towards the rulers who loved to hear themselves spoken well of
Generally - Men are generally more disposed to censure than to Praise,as they generally suppose it easier to depress excellence in others than to equal or surpass it by elevating themselves
Loud - laudo, to Praise, and with a prefix, plaudo
Doxology - A brief formula for expressing Praise or glory to God. Doxologies generally contain two elements, an ascription of Praise to God (usually referred to in third person) and an expression of His infinite nature. The doxologies which have been and still are used most commonly in the Christian church are the Gloria in excelsis Deo (“Glory to God in the highest,” an expansion of Luke 2:14 which is often called the “Greater Doxology”), the Gloria Patri (“Glory be to the Father,” the “Lesser Doxology”), and Thomas Ken's “Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow” (familiarly known simply as “The Doxology”)
Hillel - (hihl' lehl) Personal name meaning, “praise
Sacrifice - Hebrews 13:16 (a) By this word is described any Praise or worship rendered to GOD from a grateful heart
Luke - The beloved physician, whose Praise is in the gospel
Boasting - " The basic meaning of the word is "to Praise, " as in the English word "hallelujah, " which means "praise Jehovah. The Hebrew word mahalel [1] also conveys the idea of chanting loud Praises. Some scholars have suggested that the loudness of the Praise was intended to drive away evil spirits, but that is unlikely. The hampering of Satan, however, may be a byproduct of Praise since Satan cannot accomplish his purposes where God is exalted. ...
The Scriptures encourage us to engage in proper boasting or Praise of other human beings: "Let another Praise you, and not your own mouth" (Proverbs 27:2 ); "a woman who fears the Lord is to be Praised" (Proverbs 31:30 ). After saying that we have received everything from God, Paul poses the question, "Why do you boast as though you did not?" ( 1 Corinthians 4:7 ), clearly implying that any time we boast in ourselves we are taking Praise that belongs to God alone
Fume - ) To Praise inordinately; to flatter. ) The incense of Praise; inordinate flattery
Vocal - Uttered or modulated by the voice as vocal melody vocal prayer vocal Praise
Majesty - ...
2: μεγαλωσύνη (Strong's #3172 — Noun Feminine — megalosune — meg-al-o-soo'-nay ) from megas, "great," denotes "greatness, majesty;" it is used of God the Father, signifying His greatness and dignity, in Hebrews 1:3 , "the Majesty (on high)," and Hebrews 8:1 , "the Majesty (in the Heavens);" and in an ascription of Praise acknowledging the attributes of God in Jude 1:25
Glory - “To give glory” is to Praise, to recognize the importance of another, the weight the other carries in the community. ) Human Praise to God can be false, not truly recognizing His importance (Isaiah 29:13 ; compare 1 Samuel 2:30 ). Glory is thus that side of God which humans recognize and to which humans respond in confession, worship, and Praise. In classical Greek doxa means opinion, conjecture, expectation, and then Praise. They only look to receive Praise and honor from Christ (Romans 2:7 ; Romans 5:2 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:19 ; Philippians 2:16 )
Heresy - The Greek word properly designates any sect or party, without implying Praise or censure
am'Mihud - (people of Praise )
Commend, Commendation - A — 1: ἐπαινέω (Strong's #1867 — Verb — epaineo — ep-ahee-neh'-o ) "to Praise," is an intensive form of aineo, Luke 16:8 . It is elsewhere translated by the verb "to Praise," in the RV, Romans 15:11 ; 1 Corinthians 11:2,17,22 . See LAUD , Praise
Psalms, Book of - A collection of songs of Praise that are theological statements and poetically represent human dialogue with God. The basic pattern includes an invocation of God, a description of the petitioner's complaint(s), a recalling of past salvation experiences (usually community laments), petitions, a divine response (or oracle), and a concluding vow of Praise. ...
The thanksgiving or psalms of narrative Praise are also spoken by the community (see 106; 124; 129) and the individual (see 9; 18; 30). They are expressions of joy and are fuller forms of the lament's vow of Praise. ...
The hymn (see 8; 19; 29) is closest in form to a song of Praise as sung in modern forms of worship. The hymn normally includes a call to Praise. Psalm 150:1 closes Psalms with a symphony of Praise. A look at the major types helps us understand how many different functions prayer and Praise can serve as we communicate with and worship God. They vow to Praise God and give thanks for deliverance. The psalmist promises to fulfill vows made to God during the distress and invites the congregation to join in thanksgiving and Praise to God. Hymns lift the congregation's Praise to God, describing God's greatness and majesty. In the hymn, worshipers invite one another to Praise God and to provide reasons for such Praise. From them we learn to pray for and respect the role of government officials as well as Praise God's Messiah. Enthronement psalms Praise Yahweh as the King enthroned over His universe. Songs of Zion Praise God indirectly by describing the Holy City where He has chosen to live among His people and be worshiped
Rainbow - Green is the color that represents Praise and worship. Because of this we shall spend eternity in adoring Praise and worship
Hallel - The word Hallel means ‘Praise,’ and the name was given on account of the oft-recurring word Hallelujah (‘Praise ye the Lord’) in these psalms
Anna - When she was eighty-four years old, she entered the temple at the moment when the aged Simeon uttered his memorable words of Praise and thanks to God that he had fulfilled his ancient promise in sending his Son into the world (Luke 2:36,37 )
Text - The translation we have in English is among the first, if not the very first work ever accomplished by man, and demands the daily tribute of Praise for it to Almighty God
Jah - The grand Anthem hymn is called Hallel-Jah, Praise the Lord, which we pronounce Hallelujah
Tongues - The other form of the gift of tongues is thought to have been an ecstatic form of worship, chiefly Praise, but requiring interpretation
Canticle of the Sun - In these eleven glorious lines of mystic Praise, Saint Francis reveals an aspect of faith ever manifest in his attitude toward nature: that the creature's dependence on God is a corollary of God's bounty, and since creatures are formed in God's image, tbey are bound to dispense, as well as receive, His bounty
Vanity - It is often applied to the man who wishes you to think more highly of him than what he really deserves; hence the vain man flatters in order to be flattered; is always fond of Praise, endeavours to bribe others into a good opinion of himself by his complaisance, and sometimes even by good offices, though often displayed with unnecessary ostentation
Air Machine Blessing - A formula for blessing air machines, approved by the Congregation of Rites, March 24, 1920, and inserted in the Roman Ritual, as follows: ...
"O God who hast ordained all things for Thine own, and devised all the elements of this world for the human race; bless, we beseech thee, this machine consigned to the air; that it may serve for the Praise and glory of Thy Name and, free from all injury and danger, expedite human interests and foster heavenly aspirations in the minds of all who use it
Salvation - A term of Praise or benediction
Hallelujah - 1: ἁλληλουϊά (Strong's #239 — N/A — hallelouia — al-lay-loo'-ee-ah ) signifies "Praise ye Jah
Hymnal, the - As the Church has a book for her Common Prayer, soalso she has a book for her Common Praise, and this is known asTHE HYMNAL
Versicles - And our mouth shall show forth Thy Praise
Alleluia - ("Praise ye Jehovah". As the full choir of Levites in the temple service took up the Alleluia, so in heaven the multitude in mighty chorus respond Alleluia to the voice from the throne, "Praise our God, all ye His servants," etc
Allelujah - This word which is become so general in use, in our churches and places of worship, is preserved to us in many parts of Scripture, as it is in the original Hebrew, compounded of Hallelu, Praise ye, and Jab, Lord. (Revelation 19:1-3) And it is worthy remark, that the five last Psalms begin and end with this expressive word, Hallelujah; as if to teach the church, that the first and great end of man is the Praise of God
Add - 71:14: “… and will yet Praise thee more and more [3]’ or literally, “And I will add to all Thy Praises. ” In such cases, more than an additional quantity of joy or Praise is meant. The author is referring to a new quality of joy or Praise — i
Equanimity - The excellency of this disposition is beyond all Praise
Zimri - Praise-worthy
Glory - Praise, or honour, attributed to God, in adoration or worship
Magnify - To make great in representation to extol to exalt in description or Praise
Hallel - (Hebrew: Praise) ...
A Jewish ritualistic term to designate Psalms 113-118 (Vulgate 112-117) inclusively, known as the "Hallel of Egypt
Comely - Praise is comely for the upright
Tail - By his evil sayings he becomes the object of contempt instead of the object of Praise and honor
te Deum - In its English form, commencing with words, "We Praise thee, O God," it forms a part of the regular morning service of the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal Church in America
Sensibility - ) The capacity of emotion or feeling, as distinguished from the intellect and the will; peculiar susceptibility of impression, pleasurable or painful; delicacy of feeling; quick emotion or sympathy; as, sensibility to pleasure or pain; sensibility to shame or Praise; exquisite sensibility; - often used in the plural
Bewitch - 1: βασκαίνω (Strong's #940 — Verb — baskaino — bas-kah'ee-no ) primarily, "to slander, to prate about anyone;" then "to bring evil on a person by feigned Praise, or mislead by an evil eye, and so to charm, bewitch" (Eng
Terrible - Deuteronomy 7 ...
Let them Praise thy great and terrible name, for it is holy
Scriptures in the Prayer Book - Again, that one-half of this Divine Serviceis Praise; one-fourth, Prayer; and one-fourth, Reading of theBible
Thanksgiving - Thanksgiving is part of Praise, prayer and worship (Psalms 95:1-7; Psalms 116:17; Colossians 4:2; Revelation 7:12; Revelation 11:17). (See also Praise; PRAYER; WORSHIP
Zechariah - Upon regaining his speech, Zechariah immediately began to Praise God. His first words of Praise were for the promised Messiah (Luke 1:67-75). He then offered Praise for his son John, who would prepare the people for the Messiah’s arrival by calling them to repentance (Luke 1:76-79)
Oration, Orator - ” Herod Agrippa's oration found Praise for the rhetorical skill (Acts 12:22 ); Herod was judged for failure to give God the glory (Acts 12:23 ). The epideictic mode concerns Praise and blame. Examples include Paul's Praise of love (1 Corinthians 13:1 ) and his censure of the Galatians (Galatians 1:6-9 ; Galatians 3:1-5 )
Jesuats - The name was popularly given them because of their constant use of the words: "Praise be to Jesus
Tongue - To sing his Praises. To Praise that which is good in others
Churching - 3:16); and therefore, as bearing specialreference to the cause of all other misery, the Church hasappointed a special office of Praise in acknowledgment of theprimeval curse converted into a blessing
Tribute - ) A personal contribution, as of money, Praise, service, etc
Personate - ) To celebrate loudly; to extol; to Praise
Hosanna - " The word seems to have become an utterance of Praise rather than of prayer, though originally, probably, a cry for help
Lip - The "fruit of the lips" (Hebrews 13:15 ) is Praise, and the "calves of the lips" thank-offerings (Hosea 14:2 )
Melody - ...
To make melody in the heart, to Praise God with a joyful and thankful disposition, ascribing to him the honor due to his name
Example - ...
David, the model of Praise
Seth - This sense of frailty led the Sethites to calling on God in His covenant relation to His believing people; thus began the church as a people separated from the world, and its service of prayer and Praise
Magnify - ) To Praise highly; to land; to extol
Zebulun - The conduct of the tribe during the struggle with Sisera, when they fought with desperate valor, was such as to draw the special Praise of Deborah
Scriptural Patriarchs - First there are the three great patriarchs, to whom all render special Praise: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Revenue - Return reward as a rich revenue of Praise
Jasher - "the Book of the Upright One," by the Vulgate "the Book of Just Ones," was probably a kind of national sacred song-book, a collection of songs in Praise of the heroes of Israel, a "book of golden deeds," a national anthology
Jeduthun - JEDITTHUN; ("who gives Praises". "The sons of Jeduthun" had the office to "prophesy with the harp, to give thanks, and to Praise the Lord" (1 Chronicles 25:1; 1 Chronicles 25:3). He wasa Merarite Levite, along with the Kohathite Heman and the Gershonite Asaph directing the music of the sanctuary; 4,000 in all, divided into courses, "praising the Lord with the instruments which I made, said David, to Praise therewith" (1 Chronicles 23:5-6). Praise is a most effective way of obtaining God's help
Mahalath - Praise songs are the comfort of the afflicted. Psalm 88 is the most gloomy throughout of all the psalms, therefore the title (shir ) Praise song must refer to Psalm 89, which forms the latter part of one whole, of which Psalm 88 is the first part
Judah - Judah (jû'dah), Praise. His conduct is worthy of all Praise, and his plea for Benjamin's liberty is one of the most touching speeches in the Bible
Commend - To Praise to mention with approbation
Hallelujah - ‘Hallelujah,’ ‘Praise ye Jahweh,’ is used as a doxology in some OT Psalms, e
Bashemath - ) Bashemath is doubtless a name of Praise conferred on her at marriage
Graces: Should be Seasonable - It is said in Praise of the tree planted by the rivers of water, that it bringeth forth its fruit in ifs season; good men should aim to have seasonable virtues
Bless - ) To Praise, or glorify; to extol for excellences
Deserve - A work of value deserves Praise
Hail - The hail is called upon to Praise Jehovah, because it fulfils His word
Magnificat - Luke I:46-56, and is the song of Praise which theBlessed Virgin Mary gave utterance to "at the very season when theDivine overshadowing brought about the Incarnation of the Word
Bless - To Praise to glorify, for benefits received. To Praise to magnify to extol, for excellencies
Bless, Blessed, Blessedness, Blessing - , "to speak well of" (eu, "well," logos, "a word"), signifies, (a) "to Praise, to celebrate with Praises," of that which is addressed to God, acknowledging His goodness, with desire for His glory, Luke 1:64 ; 2:28 ; 24:51,53 ; James 3:9 ; (b) "to invoke blessings upon a person," e. The present participle Passive, "blessed, Praised," is especially used of Christ in Matthew 21:9 ; 23:39 , and the parallel passages; also in John 12:13 ; (c) "to consecrate a thing with solemn prayers, to ask God's blessing on a thing," e. the synonym aineo, "to Praise. " See Praise. ...
B — 1: εὐλογητός (Strong's #2128 — Adjective — eulogetos — yoo-log-ay-tos' ) akin to A, 1, means "blessed, Praised;" it is applied only to God, Mark 14:61 ; Luke 1:68 ; Romans 1:25 ; 9:5 ; 2 Corinthians 1:3 ; 11:31 ; Ephesians 1:3 ; 1 Peter 1:3 . , "good speaking, Praise," is used of (a) God and Christ, Revelation 5:12,13 ; 7:12 ; (b) the invocation of blessings, benediction, Hebrews 12:17 ; James 3:10 ; (c) the giving of thanks, 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; (d) a blessing, a benefit bestowed, Romans 15:29 ; Galatians 3:14 ; Ephesians 1:3 ; Hebrews 6:7 ; of a monetary gift sent to needy believers, 2 Corinthians 9:5,6 ; (e) in a bad sense, of fair speech, Romans 16:18 , RV, where it is joined with chrestologia, "smooth speech," the latter relating to the substance, eulogia to the expression
Song - ), in Praise of God or Christ; in Ephesians 5:19 ; Colossians 3:16 the adjective "spiritual" is added, because the word in itself is generic and might be used of songs anything but spiritual; in Revelation 5:9 ; 14:3 (1st part) the descriptive word is "new" (kainos, "new," in reference to character and form: see NEW), a "song," the significance of which was confined to those mentioned (ver
Doxology - A hymn used in Praise of the Almighty, distinguished by the titles of the Greater and the Less
Providence: the Guardian of Our Weakness - ' ...
Unable to defend myself and apparently undefended, yet guarded by omnipotent love, I would fain pour out a perfume of Praise to the Great Invisible who watches over me, and would feel that under the care of Providence I may claim the sweetness of the poet's next stanza
Glory - , Praise, admiration; honor, celestial honor, splendor, or brightness
Another - Any other any different person, indefinitely as, "Let another Praise thee and not thy own mouth
High Places - See (1 Kings 22:43) Of good king Josiah, much Praise was due to him on this account
Jedaiah - Personal name meaning, “praise Yah” or “Yah has performed a merciful deed
Itch - A constant teasing desire as an itch for Praise an itch for scribbling
Porters - By night also they cheered the lonely hours with songs of Praise, Psalm 134:1-3
Organs - Musical instruments have been used in the worship of Godfrom the time when, after the passage of the Red Sea, Moses andMiriam sang their song of Praise accompanied by timbrels
Harp - It was used as an accompaniment to songs of cheerfulness as well as of Praise to God ( Genesis 31:27 ; 1 Samuel 16:23 ; 2 Chronicles 20:28 ; Psalm 33:2 ; 137:2 )
Esteem - Our esteem of God manifests itself in never mentioning his name without reverence; in bowing the knee; in prayer and Praise; in all the several forms of outward devotion, and in quick resentment of any dishonour done to him. Our high esteem or veneration of any man appears in an humble, respectful behaviour toward him, speaking his Praises, imitating his excellencies, and resenting his dishonour
Angle - ) To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for Praise
Jah - Ηallelu-Jah (or Ηallelu-Υah ) is "Praise ye Jah (or Υah )"
Wisdom of God - This doctrine should teach us admiration, Revelation 15:3-4 ; trust and confidence, Psalms 9:10 ; prayer, Proverbs 3:5-6 ; submission, Hebrews 12:1-29 ; Praise, Psalms 107:7
Hallel - This term, which signifies 'praise,' is used by the Jews in reference to certain of the Psalms
Abrech - Egyptian hitherto has furnished two that are possible: (1) ‘Praise!’ but the word is rare and doubtful; (2) abrak , apparently meaning ‘Attention!’ ‘Have a care!’ (Spiegelberg)
Trumpet - One who Praises or propagates Praise, or is the instrument or propagating it. A great politician was pleased to be the trumpet of his Praises
te Deum - The Latin title of the hymn beginning "We Praise Thee, OGod," sung after the First Lesson at Morning Prayer
Glory - Praise ascribed in adoration honor. Honor Praise fame renown celebrity
Discipline - Through Praise and correction, God led His people. The rabbi would discipline his disciples (talmidim ) through a procedure of Praise and correction. Such discipline involved both Praise and criticism, affirmation and rebuke. Through Praise and correction, their lives are shaped into a pattern of consistent obedience and love
Nabuchodonosor ii - God punished him for his pride "Therefore, Nabuchodonosor, do now Praise, and magnify, and glorify the King of heaven: because all his works are true, and his ways judgments, and them that walk in pride he is able to abase" (Daniel 4)
Centurion - " "The centurions mentioned in the New Testament are uniformly spoken of in terms of Praise, whether in the Gospels or in the Acts
Acclamations - The people were not only permitted, but sometimes even exhorted, by the preacher himself, to approve his talents by clapping of hands, and loud acclamations of Praise
Virtue - 1: ἀρετή (Strong's #703 — Noun Feminine — arete — ar-et'-ay ) properly denotes whatever procures preeminent estimation for a person or thing; hence, "intrinsic eminence, moral goodness, virtue," (a) of God, 1 Peter 2:9 , "excellencies" (AV, "praises"); here the original and general sense seems to be blended with the impression made on others, i. , renown, excellence or Praise (Hort); in 2 Peter 1:3 , "(by His own glory and) virtue," RV (instrumental dative), i
Deborah - Deborah incited Barak to deliver his people from the oppression of Jabin; at his desire accompanied him, though with a rebuke, and after the victory uttered a triumphal song of Praise
Less - The less a man Praises himself, the more disposed are others to Praise him
Dancing - Hence we read, (Psalms 149:3) "Let them Praise his name in the dance. It should seem to have been used among the people of God in a solemn manner, though, no doubt, accompanied with bursts of holy joy and Praise. " (Exodus 15:20-21) Some have thought, that the holy dances of the Scripture were by way of resembling the motions of the heavenly bodies, as if in the joy of the heart, in any renewed instances of God's grace and mercy manifested to the people, they looked up to heaven, and endeavoured by action of the body, as well as the going forth of the soul in Praise, to testify their sense of the divine goodness
Death (2) - When my spirit departs, if God finds me hymning his Praise, I shall hymn it in heaven; if he finds me breathing out oaths, I shall follow up those oaths in hell
Depths - The biblical message is that the sovereign God controls the fearsome, mysterious, tragic, and unknown elements of human existence and that even these inanimate aspects of existence can be called on to Praise Him
Allow - ) To Praise; to approve of; hence, to sanction
Zimri - (zihm' ri) Short form of personal name meaning, “Yah helped,” “Yah is my protection,” or “Yah is my Praise
Washing of Regeneration - ...
The words "saved us by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost," show that there is a present escape and deliverance from the world and its course, and an entrance into those things which characterise the world to come, of which the Holy Ghost is now the revealer and power, even as Israel escaped from Egypt and its shame through the Red Sea, and anticipated Canaan in their song of Praise
Trumpet - ) One who Praises, or propagates Praise, or is the instrument of propagating it
Curse - And the apostle's hymn of Praise becomes the hymn of every regenerated believer, that "as sin hath reigned unto death, even so doth grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life, by Jesus Christ our Lord
Blessing - Sometimes creatures are said to bless their Creator, when they acknowledge his kindnesses and seek to show forth his Praise
Morality - ) A kind of allegorical play, so termed because it consisted of discourses in Praise of morality between actors representing such characters as Charity, Faith, Death, Vice, etc
Allow - ) To Praise; to approve of; hence, to sanction
Jeduthun - (jih duh' thuhn) Personal name meaning, “praise
Good Works - Such good works will be of benefit to themselves as well as to others, and will be the means of bringing Praise to God (Matthew 5:16; Titus 2:7; Titus 3:8; 1 Peter 2:12). They should be concerned with bringing Praise to God, not to themselves (Romans 13:8-10; 1 Corinthians 10:31; Hebrews 13:18)
Frame - "If our frames are comfortable, " says one, "we may make them the matter of our Praise, but not of our pride; we may make them our pleasure, but not our portion; we may make them the matter of our encouragement, but not the ground of our security
Create - The people which shall be created, shall Praise the Lord
Creature - Great princes thus, when favorites they raise, to justify their grace, their creatures Praise
Certain - Virtue that directs our ways ...
Through certain dangers to uncertain Praise
Bless - 9:26) is an expression of Praise. 14:20) is mingled Praise and thanksgiving. When a “blessing” was directed to God, it was a word of Praise and thanksgiving, as in: “Stand up and bless the Lord your God for ever and ever: and blessed be thy glorious name, which is exalted above all blessing and Praise” ( Apocalypse - It is full of prophetic grandeur, and awful in its hieroglyphics and mystic symbols: seven seals opened, seven trumpets sounded, seven vials poured out; mighty antagonists and hostile powers, full of malignity against Christianity, and for a season oppressing it, but at length defeated and annihilated; the darkened heaven, tempestuous sea, and convulsed earth fighting against them, while the issue of the long combat is the universal reign of peace and truth and righteousness-the whole scene being relieved at intervals by a choral burst of Praise to God the Creator, and Christ the Redeemer and Governor. It exhibits his glory as Redeemer and Governor, and describes that deep and universal homage and Praise which the "Lamb that was slain" is forever receiving before the throne
the Angel of the Church in Sardis - THEMISTOCLES, Plutarch tells us, could not get to sleep at night so loud was all Athens in the Praises of Miltiades. Thou hast much Praise before men, but not before God. For Praise and popularity is the most dangerous of all drugs to a minister. Dose a minister sufficiently with Praise, and you will soon drown his soul in perdition, if God does not interpose to save him. He is as happy as a king all that day after a sufficient draught of your soul-intoxicating Praise. To him who lives on Praise all the world is as dark as midnight and as cold as mid-winter to him when he cannot get his Praise. The wings of an angel sprout in his soul as long as he gets enough Praise, but he is as good as in his grave when he opens his mouth wide and you do not fill it. I feel it infinitely despicable at the very moment the passion for Praise is excited, and I hope by degrees, as time goes on, to be substantially delivered from it. To seek the Praise that comes from God only, is the true nobleness of character; and if a due solicitude to obtain this Praise were thoroughly established in the soul, all human notice would sink into insignificance, and would vanish from our regard. None of his neighbour ministers, not the most accepted of God and the most Praised of God of them all, could preach half so well. Strengthen it in the time you take to it, in the intensity you put into it, and in the way you work it up into your sermons, both in their composition, and in their delivery, and in the way you continue to wait and to pray after your sermons; to wait, that is, not for the applause of the hearers, but for their profit and My Praise. Scott in his youth had been ambitious to be an author, but he was now beginning to see that preaching was second to nothing on the face of God's earth; and that it had Praise of God as nothing else had when it was well done
Hodaviah - (hoh duh vi' uh) Personal name meaning, “praise Yah
Divine - ) Appropriated to God, or celebrating his Praise; religious; pious; holy; as, divine service; divine songs; divine worship
Accord - ) To grant as suitable or proper; to concede; to award; as, to accord to one due Praise
Blow - To “strike” one’s hands in Praise or triumph ( Amaziah - In the matter of religion he receives qualified Praise from the author of Kings ( 2 Kings 14:3 f
Anthony of Padua, Saint - He later won a reputation as a preacher and teacher of theology and received the Praise of Saint Francis; made numerous converts and performed many miracles; and was made provincial of the monastery at Limousin, France, 1226
Means of Grace - Denote those duties we perform for the purpose of improving out minds, affecting our hearts, and of obtaining spiritual blessings; such as hearing the Gospel, reading the Scriptures, self-examination, meditation, prayer, Praise, Christian conversation, &c
Dragon, - As one of God's creatures the dragon is called upon to Praise Jehovah
Anna - Anna was fourscore years of age when the holy virgin came to present Jesus in the temple; and entering accidentally, while Simeon was pronouncing his thanksgiving, she likewise began to Praise God, and to speak of the Messiah to all those who waited for redemption in Jerusalem
Alms - Alms-giving is a subject of Praise in the Old Testament—e
Amen - Also after ascriptions of Praise, Psalms 106:48; and in A
Amen - It was used as a formula expressing agreement to a variety of statements or announcements; for example, an oath (Numbers 5:19-22), a blessing or curse from God (Deuteronomy 27:11-26; Jeremiah 11:5), an announcement (1 Kings 1:36), a prophecy (Jeremiah 28:6), an expression of Praise (1 Chronicles 16:36; Psalms 41:13; Judges 1:24-25), a prayer (1 Corinthians 14:16), a statement (Revelation 1:7) or a promise (Revelation 22:20)
Cup - The "cup" of blessing, 1 Corinthians 10:16 , is so named from the third (the fourth according to Edersheim) "cup" in the Jewish Passover feast, over which thanks and Praise were given to God
Dancing - Dancing was part of Israel’s public expression of Praise to God after the crossing of the Red Sea (Exodus 15:20-21) and during the bringing of the ark of the covenant to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 6:14-15)
Hymn - The Greek word signified specifically a poem in Praise of a god or hero, but it is used, less exactly, also for a religious poem, even one of petition. The free introduction of hymns of Praise in the Apocalypse, in description of the worship of the new Jerusalem, points to their use by the early Church
Glory - Hence, when the Lord is speaking of the great works of creation, in creating the heavens and stretching them out, and spreading forth the earth; and also of the wonders of redemption by his Son; he confirms the oneness in nature, work, and design of Christ, and the adoration due to him as one with himself; and saith, "I am the Lord, that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my Praise to graven images. For in the same moment that JEHOVAH declares his jealousy of his name and glory, and that he will not give his glory to another, neither his Praise to graven images, he commands both Praise and glory to be given to his dear Son, whom he gives as a covenant to the people, that he may have all the Praise and glory of redemption
Glory - " The words of the Jews to the blind man, "Give God the Praise" (John 9:24 ), are an adjuration to confess
Detraction - Nothing can be more incongruous with the spirit of the Gospel, the example of Christ, the command of God, and the love of mankind, than a spirit of detraction; and yet there are many who never seem happy but when they are employed in this work: they feed and live upon the supposed infirmities of others; they allow excellence to none; they depreciate every thing that is Praise-worthy; and, possessed of no good themselves, they think all others are like them
Anna - At the Presentation of the Infant Messiah ( Luke 2:22-24 ) she entered the sacred court, and, hearing Simeon’s benediction and prophecy, took up the refrain of Praise and talked about the Holy Child to her godly intimates, quickening their hope and preparing a welcome for the Saviour when He should by and by be manifested unto Israel
Blessing - This is God blessing us, and for which we in return bless God by giving thanks, by Praise and worship
Access - He is our peace, our cause, both of access and acceptance: for it is "to the Praise of the glory of JEHOVAH'S grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the Beloved
Zacharias - He is known to us by his pious and blameless life; his vision of Gabriel in the temple, promising him a son in his old age; his hesitancy in believing, for which he was visited by a temporary dumbness; his miraculous restoration at the circumcision of his son; and his noble and prophetic song of Praise, Luke 1:52 ; 67-79
Seed - Praise of great acts he scatters as a seed
Paulinus, Bishop of Tyre - Eusebius of Caesarea lavishes unstinting Praise on his fellow-partisan, dedicates to him his Ecclesiastical History (Eus
Dancing - The mood behind the dance was one of celebration and Praise. The psalmist exhorted others to Praise God with music and dancing (Psalm 149:3 ; Psalm 150:4 )
Hallelujah - A Hebrew expression, used liturgically in Hebrew worship as a short doxology, meaning ‘praise ye Jah. ]'>[5] , however, render ‘Praise ye the Lord
Jahaziel - So, according to their faith, "when they began to sing and Praise, the Lord set ambushments against Ammon, Moab,
Divine - Appropriated to God, or celebrating his Praise as divine service divine songs divine worship
Ananias - He wanted this same Praise without paying the same price
Aloes - Psalm 45:8 (c) This perfume represents the worship and Praise, the adoration and thanksgiving that emanates from a heart that has been touched by the love of GOD. ...
It probably is considered as part of those perfumes which we living saints may send up to Heaven as our Praises to fill the golden vials in the hands of the four and twenty elders
Vine - ...
And as the church, taught by the Holy Ghost, sings her Epithalamium, or nuptial song, to the Praise of Jesus, under the similitude, the Lord Jesus sings his love-song to the same figure: "I am the vine, saith Jesus, and ye are the branches
Ebenezer - And should the Lord give him also a right view of the subject, he will discover that the mercy was not confined to the days of Samuel, but in all ages of the church, the faithful can, and do, find causes daily to set up their Ebenezers, "to the Praise of the glory of his grace, who maketh them accepted in the Beloved
Predestination - God has "predestinated" believers "unto the adoption of sons by Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the good pleasure of His will, to the Praise of the glory of His grace. in it being "the Praise of the glory of His grace" (Ephesians 1:6; Ephesians 1:12; Ephesians 1:14)
Blessing (2) - —The main underlying idea of the characteristic New Testament word for ‘blessing’ (εὐλογεῖν) seems to be that of goodwill, which, on the part of man towards God, has its appropriate expression in Praise and thanksgiving. God ‘blesses’ man and his world by His ever active, beneficent Providence; man ‘blesses’ God by thankful recognition of this, and by pure acts of Praise; man ‘blesses’ man by invoking the Divine favour for his fellows’ benefit (cf. ...
εὐλογεῖν is used—...
(A) of men: (1) as in Greek writings, in the sense of ‘to Praise,’ ‘celebrate with Praises,’ viz. αἰνεῖν, ‘to Praise,’ and δοξάζειν, ‘to glorify’; see under αἰνεῖν, below]'>[1]. With this compare also—...
(c) ἐξομολογεῖν, ‘to celebrate,’ ‘give Praise or thanks to’ (τινί): Matthew 11:25 and, || and—...
(d) αἰνεῖν, ‘to Praise, extol’ God: Luke 2:13; Luke 2:20; Luke 19:37; Luke 24:53 (reading doubtful). —According to Jewish ideas, God is the sole source of all blessing, both material and spiritual; and to Him alone, therefore, Praise and thanksgiving are due (cf. —The feeling of Praise and thanksgiving, which is so striking and prominent a feature of Jewish devotional life and worship, has crystallized itself into a regular form of benediction known as Bĕrâkhâh (lit. It is notable that here the element of petition accompanies that of Praise and thanksgiving (for text of these in English see Singer’s Heb. The central thought of God as the sole object of Praise, of God’s favour as the highest form of felicity (cf. the regular Jewish periphrasis, ‘The Holy One,’ ‘Blessed be He’), and once in a liturgical ascription of Praise, Luke 1:68 (opening line of the Benedictus). ]'>[4]3 to God save this stranger?’)...
(c) and (d) The use of the terms ἐξομολογεῖν, ‘thank,’ and αἰνεῖν, ‘praise’ (cf
Election of Grace - The ultimate end of election is the Praise of God's grace (Ephesians 1:6,12 )
Bull - Hosea 14:2; "so shall we render the calves of our lips;" instead of sacrifices of calves, which we cannot offer to Thee in exile, we present the Praises of our lips. The exile, by its enforced cessation of sacrifices during Israel's separation from the temple, the only lawful place of offering them, prepared the people for the superseding of all sacrifices by the one great antitypical sacrifice; henceforth "the sacrifice of Praise continually, the fruit of our lips," is what God requires (Hebrews 13:15)
Heman - Colleague of Asaph and Ethan or Jeduthun ("the Praise man") in arranging the vocal and instrumental music of the temple service, under David "after that the ark had rest" (1 Chronicles 15:16-22; 1 Chronicles 25:1-3)
Transformations of Grace - Where fetid exhalations of vice alone ascended, prayer and Praise are to be found; where moral miasmata had their lair, righteousness and temperance pitch their tent
Harp - ...
They used it, not as the Greeks, for expressing sorrow, but on occasions of joy and Praise (Genesis 31:27; 2 Chronicles 20:28; Psalms 33:2); therefore, it was hung on the willows in the Babylonian captivity (Psalms 137:2; Job 30:31)
People - "Oh! bless, our God, ye people, and make the voice -of his Praise to be heard
Babylon - Who that considers this, and connects with it what the prophets declared concerning it, years before the event took place, but must be struck with wonder and Praise! I beg the reader to look again at Isaiah's prophecy, Zeb'Ulun - The conduct of the tribe during the struggle with Sisera, when they fought with desperate valor side by side with their brethren of Naphtali, was such as to draw down the special Praise of Deborah, who singles them out from cell the other tribes
Robert Grosseteste - His insistence on experiment in science won the Praise of Roger Bacon, and in addition to a commentary on Aristotle's "Physics," he wrote original treatises in meteorology and optics, and pointed out the defects of the Julian calendar
Elias Bonibarone - He is perhaps the most difficult character to estimate in all Franciscan history, owing to the excess of Praise and blame that he has received
Elias Bonusbaro - He is perhaps the most difficult character to estimate in all Franciscan history, owing to the excess of Praise and blame that he has received
Elias of Cortona - He is perhaps the most difficult character to estimate in all Franciscan history, owing to the excess of Praise and blame that he has received
Liberal - ...
Liberal has of before the thing bestowed, and to before the person or object on which any thing is bestowed as, to be liberal of Praise or censure liberal to the poor
Jealousy - The jealousy of a student is awakened by the apprehension that his fellow will bear away the palm of Praise
Doxology - —An ascription of Praise to God in forms of words more or less fixed by usage. In the Song of Deborah Praise is given to Jehovah for national deliverance (Judges 5:2; Judges 5:9; cf. The words and attendant conditions of the life of Jesus so impressed the people that a new hope was born in them, and they Praised God for signs of His returning favour to Israel through this prophet. ...
(a) The Person to whom Praise is given. Attributes are often added, usually to emphasize the Divine blessing which has occasioned the Praise. The amplitude of the doxologies in the Apocalypse deserves attention, the Praise being threefold (Revelation 4:11; Revelation 19:1), fourfold (Revelation 5:13), or sevenfold in its perfection (Revelation 7:12). ‘It calls attention to this that He to whom the kingdom belongs, also has the power to hear the prayer which primarily has in view the establishing of that kingdom, and that He is therefore to be Praised for ever’ (Weiss)
Doxology - —An ascription of Praise to God in forms of words more or less fixed by usage. In the Song of Deborah Praise is given to Jehovah for national deliverance (Judges 5:2; Judges 5:9; cf. The words and attendant conditions of the life of Jesus so impressed the people that a new hope was born in them, and they Praised God for signs of His returning favour to Israel through this prophet. ...
(a) The Person to whom Praise is given. Attributes are often added, usually to emphasize the Divine blessing which has occasioned the Praise. The amplitude of the doxologies in the Apocalypse deserves attention, the Praise being threefold (Revelation 4:11; Revelation 19:1), fourfold (Revelation 5:13), or sevenfold in its perfection (Revelation 7:12). ‘It calls attention to this that He to whom the kingdom belongs, also has the power to hear the prayer which primarily has in view the establishing of that kingdom, and that He is therefore to be Praised for ever’ (Weiss)
Wisdom, the, of Solomon, - The first part contains the Praise of wisdom as the source of immortality, in contrast with the teaching of sensualists; and next the Praise of wisdom as the guide of practical and intellectual life, the stay of princes, and the interpreter of the universe
Amen - So when David brought up the ark, and delivered a psalm of thanksgiving, all the people said, Amen, and Praised the Lord. it is often added to the ascription of Praise and to benedictions, as in Hebrews 13:21,25 . As there are responses in heaven, as seen in some of the above texts, so there should be responses on earth in the assemblies of the saints, and not simply a hearing of prayer and Praise
New; New Moon - 42:10 a new saving act of God will bring forth a new song of Praise to Him: “Sing unto the Lord a new song, and his Praise from the end of the earth
Virtue - But it was also the Septuagint translation of הוֹד (‘magnificence,’ ‘splendour,’ Habakkuk 3:3, Zechariah 6:13) and תְּהִלָּה (‘glory,’ ‘praise,’ Isaiah 42:12; Isaiah 43:20). In Philippians 4:8 (‘Whatsoever things are true … if there be any virtue, and if there be any Praise, think on these things’) and in 2 Peter 1:5 (‘In your faith supply virtue; and in your virtue knowledge’) the reference is to a human attribute, and the sense is the ordinary classical one of moral excellence possibly coloured with its Septuagint meaning of ‘praiseworthiness. In the other two NT passages (2 Peter 1:3, 1 Peter 2:9) the reference is to an attribute of God or Christ, and the Septuagint senses of ‘glory’ and ‘praise’ are more appropriate. ) contends that ἀρετή sometimes signifies neither the righteousness nor the Praise of God, but the manifestation of His power
Fathers - ):...
Let me now Praise godly men,...
Our fathers in their generations. ...
The fathers Praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah. The Hebrew heading of these chapters, ‘Praise of the fathers of the world,’ or, as Cowley and Neubauer render, ‘Praise of the patriarchs,’ cannot be urged, as it may be of much later date
Pit - There is no thanksgiving, Praise, or hope there (Psalm 38:1-8 )
Empty - Pleased with empty Praise
Pentecost - They hear an oration in Praise of the law, and read from the Pentateuch and prophets lessons which have a relation to this festival, and accommodate their prayers to the same occasion
Wanton - How does your tongue grow wanton in her Praise! ...
7
Yield - To give, as claimed of right as, to yield due honors to yield due Praise
Tongue - On confession itself great emphasis was naturally placed (Romans 14:11; see also article Mouth); it is felt that the truth of the inner life will instinctively utter itself in the testimony of the spoken word: ‘As the fountain gushes out its water, so my heart gushes out the Praise of the Lord and my lips utter Praise to Him, and my tongue His psalms’ (Odes of Solomon, xl
Sing - ” It occurs approximately 50 times in the Hebrew Old Testament, with about half of these uses being in the Book of Psalms, where there is special emphasis on “singing” and “shouting” Praises to God. ”...
Rânan is often used to express joy, exultation, which seems to demand loud singing, especially when it is Praise to God: “Cry out and shout, thou inhabitant of Zion: for great is the Holy One of Israel in the midst of thee” ( Praise to God in singing
Mamertus, Claudianus Ecdicius - Sidonius also mentions with warm Praise a hymn he had written, and represents him as a great centre of intellectual discussion, "hominum aevi, loci, populi sui ingeniosissimus," full of learning, eager for argument, patient with those who could not understand, and, in his work as a priest, thoughtful for all, open-handed, humble, not letting his benevolence be known, the adviser and helper of his brother in all diocesan matters. ) mentions with special Praise a hymn by Claudian, but does not give its name. two short hexameter poems entitled "Laus Christi" and "Carmen Paschale," some short epigrammatic Praises of the paradox of the Incarnation, an elegiac account of Christ's miracles, an elegiac appeal to a friend not to criticize his verses too severely, and two short Greek hexameter addresses to Christ, Εἰς τὸν σωτῆρα and Εἰς τὸν δεσπότην Χριστόν
Tongue - On confession itself great emphasis was naturally placed (Romans 14:11; see also article Mouth); it is felt that the truth of the inner life will instinctively utter itself in the testimony of the spoken word: ‘As the fountain gushes out its water, so my heart gushes out the Praise of the Lord and my lips utter Praise to Him, and my tongue His psalms’ (Odes of Solomon, xl
Judah - And Leah his mother made this remarkable observation on his birth, she said: "Now I Praise the Lord:" therefore, that is, on that account, she called his name Jehudah, that is, (as the margin of the Bible renders it) Praise. "Judah, thou art he whom thy brethren shall Praise. " This reading doth not convey to us the expression as strongly though the sense is the same, as by reading it thus: Thou, Judah, thy brethren shall (confessor,) or Praise, (as Jehudah;) "thy father's children shall bow down to thee:" that is, they shall acknowledge thee to be the Jeehudah, and as such shall bow down to thee. It were needless to remark after what was said before concerning Judah, that the name means, the Praise of the Lord
Glorify - "Whoso offereth me Praise, saith JEHOVAH, he glorifieth me. God is all-glorious in himself, whether his creatures Praise him, or do not. When a poor believing soul can say, it is the glory and perfection of a God in Christ to be laying out upon his redeemed of his infinite and inexhaustible fulness; and Christ in God is as much glorified by my poor heart, when passively receiving from his grace bestowed upon me, as when I actively Praise him with joyful lips, when by his Holy Spirit he enables me to bring my poor boon of love and thankfulness. " (Colossians 2:9) But what angels or men can describe this? And in Christ's ministry, offices, character, work, and relations in the accomplishment, who shall undertake to set forth the glory of the Father in the Son, and the glory of the Son by the Father, through the efficient operation of God the Holy Ghost?...
I will only add, that it forms a part of that glory which all the persons of the GODHEAD are concerned in, and will be loved, and Praised, and adored for, to all eternity by the church, when the church is glorified and made everlastingly happy, from her union with her glorious Head Christ Jesus, and brought home through a life of grace here, to a life of unspeakable nearness, felicity, and glory in Christ Jesus hereafter, and to rest in the uninterrupted enjoyment of it for evermore
Sacrifice - A — 1: θυσία (Strong's #2378 — Noun Feminine — thusia — thoo-see'-ah ) primarily denotes "the act of offering;" then, objectively, "that which is offered" (a) of idolatrous "sacrifice," Acts 7:41 ; (b) of animal or other "sacrifices," as offered under the Law, Matthew 9:13 ; 12:7 ; Mark 9:49 ; 12:33 ; Luke 2:24 ; 13:1 ; Acts 7:42 ; 1 Corinthians 10:18 ; Hebrews 5:1 ; 7:27 (RV, plural); 8:3; 9:9; 10:1,5,8 (RV, plural),11; 11:4; (c) of Christ, in His "sacrifice" on the cross, Ephesians 5:2 ; Hebrews 9:23 , where the plural antitypically comprehends the various forms of Levitical "sacrifices" in their typical character; Hebrews 9:26 ; 10:12,26 ; (d) metaphorically, (1) of the body of the believer, presented to God as a living "sacrifice," Romans 12:1 ; (2) of faith, Philippians 2:17 ; (3) of material assistance rendered to servants of God, Philippians 4:18 ; (4) of Praise, Hebrews 13:15 ; (5) of doing good to others and communicating with their needs, Hebrews 13:16 ; (6) of spiritual "sacrifices" in general, offered by believers as a holy priesthood, 1 Peter 2:5
Thanksgiving - David employed Levites “to invoke, to thank, and to Praise the Lord” (1 Chronicles 16:4 ; also 1 Chronicles 23:30 ; Nehemiah 12:46 )
Victory - Israel’s victory songs were marked by great Praise to God, because Israelites acknowledged that God was the one who gave them victory (Exodus 15:1-18; Judges 5; Psalms 18; see also WAR)
Communicate - ...
But Diamede desires my company, ...
And still communicates his Praise with me
Tabernacle - ...
Psalm 84:1 (b) In this way the Lord describes the holiness and the blessedness of the gatherings of the people of GOD for worship, Praise and service
Sanctify - ...
To sanctify God, to Praise and celebrate him as a holy being to acknowledge and honor his holy majesty, and to reverence his character and laws
Psalms, Book of - It expresses sentiments produced by the Spirit of Christ, whether of prayer, sorrow, confession, or Praise, in the hearts of God's people, in which the ways of God are developed, and become known, with their blessed issue, to the faithful. ' They commence with "Blessed is the man ," and end with "Praise ye Jehovah. " Man is blessed on earth, and Jehovah is Praised from earth. The writers were not Christians, and could not express christian experience; though their piety, their confidence in God , and the spirit of Praise may often be the language of a Christian, and even put a Christian to shame. Each book ends with an ascription of Praise or doxology. In Psalm 88 is the bitter cry of a soul expressive of being subject under a broken law to the wrath of God; and in Psalm 89 Praise is rendered for Jehovah's unchangeable covenant with David, extending to the Holy One of Israel as their King. The restoration of Israel amid dangers and difficulties is alluded to; the exaltation of Messiah to God's right hand till His enemies are made His footstool; God's ways with Israel; their whole condition, and the principles on which they stand with God, His law being written in their hearts; ending with full and continued Praise after the destruction of their enemies, in which they have part with God
Iddo - Personal name perhaps meaning, “his Praise
Desiderius Erasmus - He has been called the intellectual father of the Reformation, a title justified by such works as his "Praise of Folly" (1509), his notes for his edition of the Greek New Testament (1516), and his "Colloquia' Familiaria" (1518)
Vincentius - All Rome and Italy, he reported, had been delivered; and his Praise of Theophilus of Alexandria as having by his letter to the pope Anastasius procured this deliverance is communicated to that prelate in Jerome's letter ( Ep
Luke (Evangelist) - Chrysostom and Jerome take him for ‘the brother whose Praise in the gospel’ is spread abroad ( 2 Corinthians 8:18 ; see art
Jael - " And Deborah, in her song of Praise, pronounced Jael to be "blessed above women
Music, Musicians, Musical Instruments - As these were indited under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, we may conclude that this way of celebrating the Praises of God was in accordance with the dispensation that then was. Such an exhortation as "Praise him with the psaltery and harp," is beautifully in place in the Psalms; but in the N
Abigail - She was Praised for wisdom in contrast to Nabal, her arrogant and overbearing husband, who was a large landowner and successful shepherd. As soon as she met David, she impressed him with her beauty, humility, Praise, and advice (1 Samuel 25:32-33 )
Flowers - But in spite of the comparative infrequency of Scripture allusions to them or Praise of their beauty, the Jews were lovers of flowers
Erasmus, Desiderius - He has been called the intellectual father of the Reformation, a title justified by such works as his "Praise of Folly" (1509), his notes for his edition of the Greek New Testament (1516), and his "Colloquia' Familiaria" (1518)
Honey - " (Proverbs 16:24) And when Jesus's name and salvation are the gracious themes of the believer's exercise; whether in prayer or Praise or reading the word, or religious conversation; every act, like the sweetness of honey, is grateful
Marvelous, To Be - Praise is constantly due God for all His wonderful deeds ( Anna - —When His parents brought the infant Jesus to the temple to present Him to the Lord, two aged representatives of the OT Church received Him with songs of Praise, Simeon and Anna (Luke 2:25 ff
Constans i - The most favourable evidence for Constans is the Praise of St
Buy - To procure by a consideration given, or by something that is deemed worth the thing bought to procure at a price as, to buy pleasure with Praise to buy favor with flattery
Merom - All kinds of grain grow on it, with very little labor; and it still merits the Praise accorded to it by the Danite spies; "We have seen the land; and behold, it is very good,
Ephesus - Christ gives the church at Ephesus a high degree of Praise, coupled with a solemn warning, Revelation 2:1-5 , which seems not to have prevented its final extinction, though it remained in existence six hundred years
Continual, Continually - ...
A — 2: διαπαντός (Strong's #1275 — Adverb — dia pantos — dee-ap-an-tos' ) is used of a "period throughout or during which anything is done;" it is said of the disciples' "continuance" in the Temple after the ascension of Christ, Luke 24:53 ; of the regular entrance of the priests into the first tabernacle, Hebrews 9:6 , RV (AV "always"); of the constant sacrifice of Praise enjoined upon believers, Hebrews 13:15
Thank, Thanks, Thankful, Thankfulness, Thanksgiving, Thankworthy - in Revelation 3:5 ); this is the significance in the Lord's address to the Father, "I thank (Thee)," in Matthew 11:25 ; Luke 10:21 , the meaning being "I make thankful confession" or "I make acknowledgment with Praise. ...
B — 3: ἀνθομολογέομαι (Strong's #437 — Verb — anthomologeomai — anth-om-ol-og-eh'-om-ahee ) "to acknowledge fully, to celebrate fully (anti) in Praise with thanksgiving," is used of Anna in Luke 2:38
Psalms, Theology of - Psalms, on the other hand, serve to articulate the hope and despair, the faith and fear, the Praise and invective of those who express themselves to God in the vicissitudes of life. These collections would have included psalms associated in the Hebrew Bible with the likes of David (3-9; 11-32; 34-41; 51-65; 68-70; 86; 101; 103; 108-110; 122; 124; 131; 133; 138-145), Solomon (72; 127), the Korahites (42; 44-49; 84-85; 87-88), and Asaph (50; 73-83); psalms of the so-called Elohistic Psalter (42-83) in which the generic term for Israel's deity, elohim [1], translated "God, " came to be substituted for his personal name, "Yahweh, " which Jews were increasingly disinclined to pronounce; the Hallelujah Psalms (105-106; 111-118; 135-136; 146-150) which usually begin and/or end with that expression of Praise; and the Songs of Ascent (120-134), ostensibly sung by pilgrims on their way to celebrate the great festivals at the temple in Jerusalem. ...
Finally, in conjunction with this assurance concerning Yahweh's favorable response to suppliant requests, there is normally a proclamation of Praise or a vow that Praise will be forthcoming once deliverance has been experienced (7:17; 13:5-6; 22:22-31; 28:6-7; 35:9-10,18, 28; 43:4; 51:13-15; 54:6; 56:12; 69:30-31; 79:13; 109:30; 140:13). Praise is surely the appropriate expression of trusting petitioners who have left their complaints with the Lord. Third, God expects that his servants will trust him to help, a faith to which they are expected to testify in their declarations of confidence and Praise even as they articulate their complaints and petitions. ...
Typically, thanksgiving psalms begin with an expression of Praise or thanksgiving to Yahweh and a short reference to what it is that he has accomplished (18:1-3; 30:1-3; 65:1-2; 107:1-3; 116:1-2; 118:1-4; 138:1-2). ...
What usually follows is an utterance of Praise and thanksgiving to Yahweh and/or a call for others to join in worship of him (18:46-50; 30:12b; 32:11; 40:3-5,9-10; 140:12-16,21-22,31-32; 116:12-19; 118:19-29; 124:6a; 138:4-6). The hymnic psalms focus on the Praise of Yahweh for his majesty and his sovereignty and beneficence in the realms of creation, history, and human affairs. The introduction typically contains a summons to sing Yahweh's Praise or an expression of Praise to him. The body provides the motivation for Praise in the recitation of Yahweh's attributes and actions. The conclusion frequently recapitulates sentiments expressed in the introduction that means a renewed outpouring of Praise. The poet has woven the themes touched on in the preceding paragraphs into a song of Praise for the king (vv
Hallel - HALLEL (‘praise’). —A technical Hebrew liturgical term, applied in Rabbinical literature to certain Psalms and psalm-pieces of Praise, which characteristically have as their keynote the expression Hallelujah (‘Praise ye Jah’). Thus Psalms 118:25-29 seems to be an old song of Praise for the Feast of Tabernacles
Set On, Set Up - 3:19: “… And I will get them Praise and fame [2] in every land where they have been put to shame. ” To set glory and Praise to the Lord is to establish it by stating it ( Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament - , "O Salutaris," is sung at the beginning of the exposition, and a hymn of Praise, e. Other hymns and prayers are permitted before the "Tantum Ergo"; and nowadays the Divine Praises are generally recited by priest and people after the blessing, before the Blessed Sacrament is replaced
Tongue - The tongue could be used to Praise God (Psalm 35:28 ; Psalm 51:14 ; Psalm 71:24 ; Romans 14:11 ; Philippians 2:11 )
Jasher - So Septuagint "the book of the upright one"; Vulgate "the book of just ones"; the Syriac, "the book of Praise songs," from Hebrew yashir
Melchizedek - A song of lavish Praise, extravagant when applied to David, was fitting when applied to Jesus Christ
Calf - ...
Hosea 14:2 (b) From this we learn that the offering of Praise, thanksgiving and worship from their lips would bring joy to the heart of GOD, as though Israel offered a calf on the altar
Clap - To applaud to manifest approbation or Praise by striking the hands together as, to clap a performance on the stage
Hosanna - "Have ye never read, Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected Praise?" (Matthew 21:16; Psalms 8:2)...
Blood - Our ascription of Praise is: "Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood
Calf - , "So will we render as bullocks, the offerings of our lips," that is, we will offer Praise, as animals are offered in sacrifice
Benediction - in a general sense, the act of blessing in the name of God, or of giving Praise to God
Porters of the Temple - Psalms 134, seems to be addressed to these watchmen of the temple, "who by night stand in the house of the Lord;" in which they are exhorted to employ their waking hours in acts of Praise and devotion
Remember - To bear in mind with Praise or admiration to celebrate
Nemesius, Bishop of Emesa - The treatise is an interesting work which will well reward perusal, and has received much Praise from able judges of style and matter
Holy Communion - It is called the Holy Eucharist, as being thegreat act of Praise and thanksgiving rendered by the Church inacknowledgment of the blessings of Redemption
Hymns - In early times anything sung to thepraise of God was called a hymn. Pliny shows that in the year 62 theChristians instituted a custom of meeting together before sunriseto sing hymns of Praise
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all Praise, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of Praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, world without end
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all Praise, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of Praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, world without end
Psalms - David first taught the Church to sing the Praises of the Lord. hymnos, a hymn), meaning a song of Praise; a song the prominent thought of which is the Praise of God
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Heart of Jesus, most worthy of all Praise, have mercy on us. Almighty and everlasting God, look upon the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son and upon the acts of Praise and satisfaction which He renders unto Thee in the name of sinners; and do Thou, in Thy great goodness, grant pardon to them who seek Thy mercy, in the name of the same Thy Son, Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with Thee, world without end
Worship, Worshiping - A consideration of the above verbs shows that it is not confined to Praise; broadly it may be regarded as the direct acknowledgement to God, of His nature, attributes, ways and claims, whether by the outgoing of the heart in Praise and thanksgiving or by deed done in such acknowledgment
Worship - The greater the appreciation that believers have of God’s holy character and gracious works, the more they adore him and Praise him. They bring him homage, adoration and Praise because of who he is and what he has done (Psalms 103:1-5; Psalms 104:1-4; Matthew 8:2; Revelation 4:8-11; Revelation 5:9-14). God’s deeds, whether in creation, history or redemption, are a cause for unceasing worship and Praise from men and women everywhere (Psalms 33:1-19; Psalms 99:1-5; Romans 11:33-36; Ephesians 3:14-21; 1 Corinthians 14:40)
Tongues, Gift of - Such instance of the gift recorded in the Acts connects it not with the work of teaching, but with that of Praise and adoration; not with the normal order of men's lives but with exceptional epochs in them. ( 1 Chronicles 25:1 ; Ezekiel 13:9 ) (d) The "tongues" were used as an instrument not of teaching, but of Praise. (g) The gift of tongues, the ecstatic burst of Praise, is definitely asserted to be a fulfillment of the prediction of (Joel 2:28 ) We are led, therefore, to look for that which answers to the gift of tongues in the other element of prophecy which is included in the Old Testament use of the word; and this is found in the ecstatic Praise, the burst of sang
Jael - The Praise, therefore, accorded to Jael and her deed in the Song of Deborah ( Judges 5:24-27 ) must be accounted for on the questionable moral principle that an evil deed, if productive of advantage, may be rejoiced over and commended by those who have not taken part in it. ’ The spirit which Praises such an act as Jael’s is, in some sense, akin to that of a Jewish custom (Corban) which grew up in later days, and which received the condemnation of Christ, Mark 7:11 ; in each case a contemptible act is condoned, and even extolled, because of the advantage (of one kind or another) which it brings
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, Praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, Praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Self-Denial - The honours of the world, and Praise of men, when they become a snare, Hebrews 11:24-26
Singing - It should be an expression of Praise to God that arises from a heart filled with joy and thanks. Only in this way will God be truly Praised and the singers be truly built up in their Christian faith (1 Corinthians 14:15; Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16)
Benediction - In a general sense the act of blessing, or giving, Praise to God, or returning thanks for his favours
Meekness - He never made a show to attract Praise for himself, and never damaged the faith of even the weakest believer (Matthew 12:19-20; Matthew 18:5-6; Matthew 21:5)
Lord - " (Exodus 20:7) So again (Isaiah 42:8) "I am the Lord; that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my Praise to graven images
Frankincense - The bride too comes up with Him from the wilderness, exhaling frankincense-like graces, faith, love, joy, peace, prayer, Praise; of her too it is asked, "Who is this that cometh up from the wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved?" (Song of Solomon 8:5; Revelation 7:13-17
Zephaniah, the Book of - The Lord her God shall rejoice over her with joy, and make her a Praise among all people," who in consequence shall "all call upon Him and serve Him with one consent" (Zephaniah 3:8-20)
Faction - Paul’s great-mindedness is similar to that expressed in Browning’s Paracelsus:...
‘Lo, I forget my ruin, and rejoice...
In thy success, as thou! Let our God’s Praise...
Go bravely through the world at last! What care...
Through me or thee?’...
James Strahan
Ascension of Christ - He was parted from his disciples while he was solemnly blessing them; and multitudes of angels attended him with shouts of Praise, Psalms 68:17 ; Psalms 47:5-6
Jude, Epistle of - The Epistle closes with a full ascription of Praise to Him who is able to keep His saints from stumbling and set them with exultation blameless before His glory
Lion - " It is the distinguishing feature of Jesus, that while bringing hell and all his foes under his feet, his redeemed bend in holy adoration, and love, and Praise before him. "He is the Praise of all his saints
Altar - It is typical also of the consecrated life of the believer from which there ascends to GOD as a sweet odor the sacrifices of our lips in thanksgiving, worship and Praise. ...
Christian Matthew 5:23 (b) This probably teaches us that there is a place of worship called "the altar" to which the believer goes for worship, Praise and prayer
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - ...
Now, there is nothing so sweet, either among angels or among men, as to be appreciated and Praised. To be appreciated and Praised is the wine that maketh glad the heart of God and man. And then as His all-seeing and all-rewarding way always is, His Lord descended to instances and particulars in His appreciation and Praise of His servant. And to all who among ourselves have preached and prayed and have examined themselves in and after their preaching and praying, as it would seem that this angel at one time did, and as Thomas Shepard always did, their Master will signalise and appreciate and Praise their "painfulness" in their own so expressive old English, and they will appreciate and appropriate His so suitable word and will appreciate and Praise Him back again for it. ...
His patience is another of the Praises that his Master gives to this once happy minister. Had you heard his Praise so generously spread abroad at first both by God and man you would have felt absolutely sure of that minister's spiritual prosperity and Praise to the very end. 'With all my past Praise of thee, I give thee this warning,' said that Voice which is as the sound of many waters, 'that unless thou returnest to thy first life of closet communion with Me, I will come to thee quickly and will remove thy candlestick out of its place
Predestination - They are to be seen in the world as his people (Deuteronomy 7:6 ; Psalm 33:11-12 ), holy and obedient to him, living to his Praise (Isaiah 43:21 ), a priestly nation bringing the knowledge of God to other nations (Exodus 19:5-6 ). In terms similar to those applied to Israel, the people of God in the New Testament are chosen to be holy, to be obedient, to live to God's Praise (Ephesians 1:6,11 , 12,14 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 ; 1 Peter 1:2 ), and, going beyond anything in the Old Testament, "predestined to be conformed to the likeness" of God's Son (Romans 8:29 ). On certain things Scripture is clear: (1) we all, because of our sinfulness, deserve only God's condemnation; (2) our salvation is entirely because of God's grace and God's initiative; (3) the dominant emphasis is not on the fact that some are chosen by God and some are not, but on what is the purpose of God for those chosen: "to be conformed to the likeness of his Son" (Romans 8:29 ), or, "adoption as his children through Jesus Christ to the Praise of his glorious grace" (Ephesians 1:5-6 ; NRSV )
Feasts - " (Revelation 20:5) And is not God the Holy Ghost glorified and honoured in the Christian sabbath, at the renewal of the sacred day, in that then is celebrated his first open and visible display of his love and mercy over the church, when at Pentecost he came down upon the people? Doth not every regenerated child of God here also, as in the other instances, testify, that it is by the sovereignty of his power and grace, he is quickened to a new and spiritual life, and now waits again on the Lord, in his holy ordinance of the sabbath, for the renewing of the Holy Ghost to be shed on him abundantly, through Jesus Christ our Lord? (Titus 3:5-6)...
Surely, these are very clear and incontestible evidences of the true commemoration of the Christian sabbath, when, in the observance, special and distinct acts of Praise and honour, are given to each glorious person of the GODHEAD, as they are represented to us in the Scriptures of truth, in the several character-offices of their divine agency. And thus while each and every one hath the special and distinct acts of Praise given to them, for the special acts of grace and mercy shewn to the church in Christ, the whole form one and the same glorious object of adoration, love, and Praise, as the eternal undivided JEHOVAH, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, both to the church on earth, and in heaven, to all eternity
Music, Instruments, Dancing - A variety of hymns offering divine Praise or designed to or for kings and temples, many with musical terms, have survived and are joined by actual discoveries of instruments at the ancient site of Ur, in biblical tradition the ancestral home of Abraham (Genesis 11:31 ). As a hymn proclaiming the future rule of God in all the earth, Psalm 98:1 calls for the employment of music in Praise:...
”Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth; break forth into joyous song and sing Praises! Sing Praises to the Lord with the lyre, with the lyre and the sound of melody! With trumpets and the sound of the horn make a joyful noise before the King, the Lord!” (Psalm 98:4-6 RSV). ...
Worship featured trumpet calls (compare Numbers 10:10 ) and songs of thanksgiving, expressions of Praise and petition sung after the offering of sacrifices (1618383780_94 ). ...
The Psalms show not only the emotional range of music from lament to Praise but also provides words for some of the songs used in Temple worship. Representatives of this classification are titles that identify psalms with persons or groups of persons (see Psalm 3:1 ; Psalm 72:1 ; Psalm 90:1 ); titles purporting to indicate historical information concerning the psalm, particularly with respect to David (see Psalm 18:1 ; Psalm 34:1 ); titles containing musical information (see Psalm 4:1 ; Psalm 5:1 ); titles with liturgical information (see Psalm 92:1 ; Psalm 100:1 ); and titles designating the “type” of psalm in question (see Psalm 120:1 , “a song of ascents”; Psalm 145:1 , “a song of Praise”). Some thirty Psalms include in their heading the word song (Hebrew shir ), with “song of Praise,” “Prayer,” “a song of love,” and “a song of ascent” also occurring. Psalm 150:4 calls God's people to Praise Him with the dance
Tychicus - It is possible that the reference in 2 Corinthians 8:18 to ‘the brother whose Praise in the gospel is spread through all the churches,’ and who was deputed along with Titus and another unnamed Christian to carry the Second Epistle to the Corinthians from Ephesus to Corinth, may be Tychicus, and the other unnamed deputy may be Trophimus
Confusion of Tongues - God's justice in punishing of those who, in idolizing their own fame, forget him to whom Praise is due
Tychicus - Luke seems more probably the former, as "his Praise in the Gospel" as Paul's companion was "throughout all the churches
Lip - In Isaiah 57:18 ‘the fruit of the lips’ = Praise
More - Greater in quality, degree or amount in a general sense as more land more water more courage more virtue more power or wisdom more love more Praise more light
Og - God's special interposition for Israel against Og is the theme of Praise (Psalms 135:11; Psalms 136:20)
Ask - It was a place to be dreaded, not only because it meant the end of physical life on earth, but also because there was no Praise of God there (Psalm 6:5)
Philadelphia - It and Smyrna alone of the seven, the most afflicted, receive unmixed Praise
Ascension of Christ - He was parted from his disciples while he was solemnly blessing them; and multitudes of angels attended him with shouts of Praise, Psalms 68:17 ; Psalms 47:5-6
Want - Nor think, though men were none, that heaven would want spectators, God want Praise
Blessing - These occurrences of "bless" are usually translated "praise" or "extol" in modern versions. As in the Old Testament, when these words are ascribed to God they are rendered "praise" (Romans 1:25 ; 9:5 ; 2 Corinthians 11:31 )
Letter Form And Function - Letters may be distinguished according to the predominate purpose of the communication: letters of Praise or blame, letters of exhortation and advice, or letters of mediation. The letters to the churches at Smyrna and Philadelphia serve as examples of letters of Praise ( Revelation 2:8-11 ; Revelation 3:7-13 )
Hezekiah - This latter achievement won him Praise as being Judah’s greatest king to that time (2 Kings 18:1-8). In gratitude to God, Hezekiah wrote a song of Praise for his recovery (Isaiah 38:9-22)
Hymns - The word ‘hymn’ might be used of a song of Praise to God whether accompanied or not. The rest express generally the Praise which the Church offers to God and to Christ. ’...
The writings of the Apostolic Fathers add nothing to our knowledge, though Ignatius delights in the thought of the hymn of Praise for his martyrdom which the Church in Rome will sing (ad Romans 2): ‘that forming yourselves into a chorus in love ye may sing to the Father in Jesus Christ, for that God has vouchsafed that the bishop from Syria should be found in the West, having summoned him from the East’ (cf. The seers shall come before Him and they shall be seen before Him, and they shall Praise the Lord for His love: because He is near and beholdeth, and hatred shall be taken from the earth, and along with jealousy it shall be drowned: for ignorance has been destroyed, because the knowledge of the Lord has arrived
Hosanna - Didache 10:6 ‘Hosanna to the God of David’), as an interjection of Praise and joy, and was developed on these lines
Judas - (jyoo' duhss) Greek transliteration of Hebrew personal name Judah meaning, “Praise Yahweh
Reward - ...
If Christians look for their reward in the form of Praise from fellow believers, they will miss out on the eternal reward from God (Matthew 6:1; Matthew 6:5; 1 Corinthians 4:5)
Priest - " As priests they have free access into the holiest of all, and offer up the sacrifices of Praise and thanksgiving, and the sacrifices of grateful service from day to day
Kohathites - When Jehoshaphat sought deliverance from the Moabites and Ammonites, the Kohathites led the people in prayer and Praise (2 Chronicles 20:19 )
Palace - This passage may refer to the Christian's mouth from which there pours forth worship, Praise, adoration, and thanksgiving, which are compared to the fragrant, sweet incense of the golden altar in the temple
Hedge - Ellerton’s hymn—...
‘Praise to our God, whose hounteous hand...
Prepared of old our glorious land,...
A garden fenced with silver sea
Sacrifice - He offers by Christ the sacrifice of Praise to God, and even to do good and to communicate are sacrifices well pleasing to God
Crown of Thorns - God thus makes the wrath of man to Praise Him
Idleness - The time which should be sacred to Jehovah is lost; and thus he enjoys no fellowship with God, nor any way devotes himself to his Praise
Babe - It is used also with θηλάζοντες, ‘sucklings,’ in Matthew 21:16, in which passage the root meaning of νήπιος is specially suggestive, ‘Out of the mouth of speechless (babes) thou hast perfected Praise
Glory - The word is used of one’s renown: “… And to make thee high above all nations which he hath made, in Praise, and in name, and in honor [2]” ( Might - These characterizations are found either in the context of “praise”: “… which by his strength setteth fast the mountains; being girded with power” ( Sun - 1:16) and are summoned to Praise Him ( Red Sea - He and the Israelites could then sing the song of redemption, and Praise Him who had purchased them
Think - ...
If there by any virtue,and if there by any Praise, think on these things
Heaven - ...
What is our hope or joy, or crown of rejoicing? Are not even ye in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ at his coming? for ye are our glory and joy; which seems to argue, that he apprehended their happiness in heaven should contribute, or be an addition to his, as he was made an instrument to bring them thither; even so, by a parity of reason, every one who has been instrumental in the conversion and building up others in their holy faith, as the apostle Paul was with respect to them, these shall tend to enhance their Praise, and give them occasion to glorify God on their behalf. Some think that there shall; and that, as persons of all nations and tongues shall make up that blessed society, so they shall Praise God in the same language which they before used when on earth; and that this worship may be performed with the greatest harmony, and to mutual edification, all the saints shall, by the immediate power and providence of God, be able to understand and make use of every one of those different languages, as well as their own. But though the apostle speaks by a metonymy of different tongues, that is, persons who speak different languages being subject to Christ, he probably means thereby persons of different nations, whether they shall Praise him in their own language in heaven, or no. And when the inhabitants of heaven are described in the Revelations as praising God, there is one word used by which their Praise is expressed, namely, Hallelujah, which is Hebrew; the meaning whereof is, Praise ye the Lord
Eldad - They probably declared God's will in extempore hymns of Praise; so Saul, 1 Samuel 10:11
Psalms - The book of Psalms is called by the Jews Sepher Tihillim, which more particularly signifies, the book of psalms, or hymns of Praise
Euphrates - ...
In one of Jeremiah's typical actions he hid his girdle by the Euphrates then found it spoiled and useless; so should the pride of Judah and Jerusalem be marred (Jeremiah 13:4-11 ) — a figure of the carrying away to Babylon of those who should have cleaved to the Lord for His Praise, as a girdle to the loins of a man
Gaal - ...
At the vintage ingathering feast they made Praise offerings" (hillulim ), KJV made merry, margin songs; compare Isaiah 15:9-10) of their fruits, which newly planted vineyards bore in the fourth year, eating and drinking in the house of their god Baal-berith ("Baal in covenant"), answering to Jehovah's feast (Leviticus 19:2;Leviticus 19:3-35)
Continually - 16:8); “… his Praise shall continually be in my mouth” ( Generation - The psalmist recognized the obligation of one “generation” to the “generations” to come: “One generation shall Praise thy works to another, and shall declare thy mighty acts” ( Names - " The majority of compound names have special religious or social significance being compounded either (1) with terms denoting relationship, as Abi or Ab father, as Abihud, "father of Praise," Abimelech "father of the king;" Ben son, as Benoni, "son of my sorrow," Benjamin, "son of the right hand;" or (2) nouns denoting natural life, as am, "people," melech "king;" or (3) with names of God and Jah or Ja , shortened from "Jehovah
Judah - The fourth son of Jacob and Leah, and the head of the tribe bearing his name, which signifies 'praise
Deborah - The Praise, "blessed above women in the tent (i. " All should join in "speaking" His Praise: the upper classes "who ride upon white-spotted asses," and those "that sit upon coverings" (middin , the rich, Matthew 21:7) spread upon the asses; also the humbler "who walk on the way," foot travelers
Sacrifice - ...
The term sacrifice is often used in a secondary or metaphorical sense, and applied to the good works of believers, and to the duties of prayer and Praise, as in the following passages: "But to do good, and to communicate, forget not; for with such sacrifices God is well pleased," Hebrews 13:16 . "By him, therefore, let us offer the sacrifice of Praise to God continually; that is, the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to his name,"...
Hebrews 13:15
Worship - ’* If we use the word ‘prayer’ in the widest sense, as including Praise as well as petition and intercession, the words agree with the opinion of Döllinger: ‘When the attention of a thinking heathen was directed to the new religion which was spreading in the Roman Empire, the thing to strike him as extraordinary would be that a religion of prayer was superseding the religion of ceremonies and invocations of gods; that it encouraged all, even the humblest and the most uneducated, to pray, or, in other words, to meditate and exercise the mind in self-scrutiny and contemplation of God. ” ’¶ ...
The elements of such worship-prayer and Praise and instruction-combined to make what Duchesne in a happy phrase calls ‘a Liturgy of the Holy Ghost after the Liturgy of Christ, a true liturgy with a Real Presence and communion. These had their roots in the Synagogue services, but were distinguished by the new fervour which the gift of the Holy Spirit stamped upon them, so that while the keynote of the Synagogue service was instruction the new keynote was Praise. ...
If the early date is allowed, we find here anticipation of the great thanksgiving of the later liturgies, mention of God’s work in creation and in redemption, a thanksgiving after Communion and prayer for the Church with the germ of the act of Praise which grew into the Gloria in excelsis. Bread and a cup of wine mingled with water are then brought to the president of the brethren: and he, taking them, gives Praise and glory to the Father of the Universe, through the Name of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, and offers thanks at considerable length for our being counted worthy to receive these things at His hands. In the evolution of the primitive liturgy we can discern a close adherence to the apostolic combination of prayer and Praise with instruction and intercession leading up to the gift of sacramental grace. So it is the privilege of the Church in the Eucharist to show the Lord’s death till He come, to offer in this memorial sacrifice of Praise and thanksgiving ‘the one true pure immortal sacrifice
Almsgiving - contains the incidents of the Rich Young Man whom He told, ‘Yet one thing thou lackest: go, sell all that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven’ (Mark 10:21); the Widow’s Mite (Mark 12:43); and the emphatic Praise of Mary of Bethany (Mark 14:7). Certainly He endorses and very much enhances the Praise of Almsgiving which we find in the OT (e. our Lord’s injunction to the Twelve, ‘Freely ye have received, freely give’ (Matthew 10:8); His own compassionate feeding of the hungry multitudes (Matthew 14:18; Matthew 15:32, Mark 6:37; Mark 8:3, Luke 9:13); His rebuke of the Rabbis’ rule, that when sons had rashly or selfishly taken the vow of Corban, they must no longer be suffered to do aught for their father or their mother (Matthew 15:5, Mark 7:11); His acceptance of the Jews’ intercession for the Gentile who had built them a synagogue (Luke 7:5); the Praise of the women who ministered unto Him of their substance (Luke 8:3); His advice, when we make a feast, to invite the poor (Luke 14:13); and the vow of the penitent Zacchaeus, ‘The half of my goods I give to the poor’ (Luke 19:8)
Name - Renown fame honor celebrity eminence Praise distinction
Salvation - John 4:22 (see SAVIOR); (h) in ascriptions of Praise to God, Revelation 7:10 , and as that which it is His prerogative to bestow, Revelation 19:1 (RV)
Elect - The lost will lay all the blame of their perdition on themselves because "they would not come to Jesus that they might have life"; the saved will ascribe all the Praise of their salvation to God alone (Revelation 1:5; Matthew 22:12)
Kindness - The Psalms developed this theme with thanksgiving for divine kindness and Praise for its endurance (Psalm 86:5 ; Psalm 89:2 ,Psalms 89:2,89:28 ; Psalm 100:5 ; Psalm 103:8 ,Psalms 103:8,103:11 ,Psalms 103:11,103:17 ; Psalm 106:1 ; Psalm 107:1 ; etc
Euphrates - Referring to Genesis 15:18 he says that the river of Egypt represents the body and the river Euphrates the soul, and that the spiritual man’s jurisdiction extends from the world of change and destruction to the world of interruption, the two terms ‘river of Egypt’ and ‘river Euphrates’ being thus opposed as blame and Praise are opposed, so that man may choose the one and eschew the other
Commendation - (4) The verb, reflexively used to convey the idea of self-praise, occurs in 2 Corinthians 3:1; 2 Corinthians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 10:12; 2 Corinthians 10:18 (where the pronoun coming before the verb occupies the prominent position); (5) but in 2 Corinthians 4:2; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 7:11 (where the pronoun follows the verb) the reference is to legitimate demonstration of one’s faith and work; e
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat’s people plundered the defeated army and returned in triumph to Jerusalem to Praise God for hearing their prayers (2 Chronicles 20:18-30)
Amen - Many times Paul's letters burst into Praise of God the Father or God the Son and seal the confession with the amen (Romans 1:25 ; 9:5 ; 11:36 ; Galatians 1:3-5 ; Ephesians 3:21 ; Philippians 4:20 ; 1 Timothy 1:17 ; 6:16 ; 2 Timothy 4:18 ). Amen also closes spontaneous doxologies in Revelation; there, however, the object of Praise is more often the Son than the Father (1:6-7; 5:14; 7:12; 19:4). But they surpass it in the sheer spontaneity and enthusiasm of their Praises. As in Paul, these final words often recapitulate the main themes of the letter, which the writer seals with the amen that both declare and pleads, "So be it! May God indeed be Praised for bestowing the gifts his people need
Go Down - This “going down” is much more of a removal from the world of conscious existence: For the grave cannot Praise thee, death cannot celebrate thee: they that go down into the pit cannot hope for thy truth. The living, the living, he shall Praise thee …” ( Popularity - The latter belongs to him who makes the Praise of men his object, and seeks it by ostentatious piety and hypocritical charity (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16); the former is the accompaniment of that behaviour whose ruling aim is to do the will of God regardless of all worldly ends (Matthew 6:3-4; Matthew 6:7-8; Matthew 6:17-18; Matthew 6:20-21). Fasting and prayer that flow from a desire to hold communion with God, charity that is the outcome of gratitude to the Heavenly Father for His wondrous mercy, are ever done in secret, so that there can be no suspicion of any unworthy motive; but the effect of these things is revealed in the man’s whole life and character; it must win for him the Praise and love of all good men, and for God the glory
Popularity - The latter belongs to him who makes the Praise of men his object, and seeks it by ostentatious piety and hypocritical charity (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16); the former is the accompaniment of that behaviour whose ruling aim is to do the will of God regardless of all worldly ends (Matthew 6:3-4; Matthew 6:7-8; Matthew 6:17-18; Matthew 6:20-21). Fasting and prayer that flow from a desire to hold communion with God, charity that is the outcome of gratitude to the Heavenly Father for His wondrous mercy, are ever done in secret, so that there can be no suspicion of any unworthy motive; but the effect of these things is revealed in the man’s whole life and character; it must win for him the Praise and love of all good men, and for God the glory
Devotion - The intellectual element is a recognition of the dignity and patient grace of God, the sensitive a feeling of gratitude and desire to please, the volitional a strong resolve to carry out that desire; and these three pass together quickly into appropriate action, the whole man in the harmony of all his powers indicating by Praise or service the depth of his loving regard. This is exhibited in various loving acts and exercises, such as prayer and Praise. ...
(c) The exercises appropriate to devotion, which, however, so far from confining itself to them, enriches the entire nature and affects every relation of life, are Praise and prayer (see sep. The prayer and Praise are not exactly such as accompany public worship, but assume rather the character of communion or reverent conversation, the element of specific supplication being often, not always, absent. In the case of Christ the Praise is illustrated in such passages as Luke 10:21 f
Hymn - ...
In Colossians 3:16 and Ephesians 5:19 the three terms ὑμνος (‘hymn’), ψαλμός (‘psalm’), and ᾠδή (‘song’) are found together as descriptive of the acts of Praise offered to God in the early Christian assemblies. Praise to God, ᾠδή is the general word for a song, whether accompanied or unaccompanied, whether of Praise or on any other subject. ...
(b) The Hosanna-hymn, or cry of Praise of Palm Sunday, with which Jesus was greeted on His last entry into Jerusalem,¶ Deaf And Dumb - It is no wonder, therefore, that the astonishment of the multitude passed into Praise. Students of the Psalter and of the Prophets will bear in mind the denunciations poured, both for spiritual deafness and dumbness, upon a people which refused to listen to the voice of Jehovah, and which was silent when the Divine Name and His Praise were concerned (Psalms 81:11 etc. On the other hand, again, through both Testaments, from Samuel to St John the Divine, a commendation and blessing has ever attended the ear willing to receive, the lips open to prayer and to Praise
Hypocrisy - They were more interested in human Praise when they gave alms, prayed, and fasted than in God's reward
Passover - Again, the use of wine (Luke 22:17,20 ), of sauce with the bitter herbs (John 13:26 ), and the service of Praise were introduced
Judah - (jyoo' duh) Personal, tribal, and territorial name meaning, “Praise Yahweh,” but may have originally been related to the mountain of Jehud
Evangelist - " The transition step appears in 2 Corinthians 8:18-19, "the brother, whose Praise is in the gospel throughout all the churches," probably Luke, well known throughout the churches as Paul's companion in evangelistic work, and at that time with Paul (Acts 20:6)
Power - They should be humble and dependent on God, so that he alone may be the one in whom people trust and to whom they give Praise (Acts 3:12-16; 1 Corinthians 2:4-5; 2 Corinthians 4:7; Philippians 4:13; 1 Thessalonians 1:5; 2 Peter 1:3)
Tabor - Their existence and majestic appearance are a silent hymn to their Creator's Praise; the view from Tabor comprises as much of natural beauty and sacred interest as any in the Holy Land
Urim And Thummim - Music then, instead of visions, became the help to the state of prayer and Praise in which prophets revealed God's will (1 Samuel 9:9)
Saints - Saints Praise the Lord for His lifelong favor ( Psalm 30:4 ), rejoice in goodness (2 Chronicles 6:41 ), and know that God keeps their paths (1 Samuel 2:9 )
Jehoshaphat - Praise was given to Jehovah
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - The King of Israel, even Jehovah, will be in her midst, and she shall have a name and a Praise among all the people of the earth
Trees - ...
Psalm 148:9 (b) Those Praise GOD in song and worship who are living fruitful, useful, valuable lives for their Lord. They should have rendered to Him Praise, worship and obedience
Synagogue - Of others we read that many of the chief rulers believed on the Lord, but feared to confess Him lest they should be cast out, "for they loved the Praise of men more than the Praise of God
Sheol - The dead experience no remembrance (Psalm 6:5 ; Psalm 88:12 ), no thought (Ecclesiastes 9:10 ), no speech (Psalm 31:17 ; Psalm 94:17 ), especially no words of Praise (Psalm 6:5 ; Psalm 30:9 ), and no work (Ecclesiastes 9:10 )
Noah - ...
On leaving the ark Noah's first act was to erect an altar, the first of which there is any mention, and offer the sacrifices of adoring thanks and Praise to God, who entered into a covenant with him, the first covenant between God and man, granting him possession of the earth by a new and special charter, which remains in force to the present time (Genesis 8:21-9:17 )
Prov'Erbs, Book of - 1-9 form a connected didactic Wisdom is Praised and the youth exhorted to devote himself to her. 1-6, and an alphabetical acrostic in Praise of a virtuous woman, which occupies the rest of the chapter
Jonathan - Saul would have had Jonathan put to death, but the people spoke in Praise of Jonathan and ransomed him from death (1 Samuel 14:27-46 )
Humility - Nor does it oblige a man to treat himself with contempt in his words or actions: it looks more like affectation than humility, when a man says such things in his own dispraise as others know, or he himself believes, to be false: and it is plain, also, that this is often done merely as a bait to catch the Praises of others. In not assuming more of the Praise of a quality or action than belongs to us
Jude, the Book of - Conclusion: Praise for the Only God and Savior (24-25)...
David S
Therapeutae - Then the speaker, rising, sung a hymn of Praise to God; in the last verse of which the whole assembly joined
Matter - Subject thing treated that about which we write or speak that which employs thought or excites emotion as, this is matter of Praise, of gratitude, or of astonishment
Sheol - Descriptions are bleak: There is no light (Job 10:21-22 ; 17:13 ; Psalm 88:6,12 ; 143:3 ), no remembrance (Psalm 6:5 ; 88:12 ; Ecclesiastes 9:5 ), no Praise of God (Psalm 6:5 ; 30:9 ; 88:10-12 ; 115:17 ; Isaiah 38:18)— ;in fact, no sound at all (Psalm 94:17 ; 115:17 )
Deborah - The Song is divided into four distinct sections:...
Praise to Jahweh, and the terror of His approach, Judges 4:2-5
Preparation - How blessedly the church sings to this note of Praise, for the preparing and disposing grace of the Spirit, when she cried out: "Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib!" (Song of Song of Solomon 6:12) As if she had said, before I had the least apprehension of the mercy, my Lord my Husband made me willing, by the swift manifestations of his love, and the awakenings of his grace in my heart, as rapid as the chariot wheels of a princely people
Sardis - Smyrna and Philadelphia, the most afflicted, alone receive unmixed Praise
Worship - Worship is thus distinguished from ascriptions of Praise and thanksgiving: it is the homage of love
Ecclesiasticus - In the second part God is Praised in the lives of the heroes of Israel. The conclusion, 50,24 to 51,38, is an exhortation to Praise God and seek wisdom
Covenant - (Ephesians 1:4) And from this appointment, before all worlds, result all the after mercies in time, by which the happy partakers of such unspeakable grace and mercy are regenerated, called, adopted, made willing in the day of God's power, and are justified, sanctified, and, at length, fully glorified, to the Praise of JEHOVAH'S grace, who hath made them accepted in the Beloved
Naphtali - I would ask, are not many of the dying patriarch's benedictions to his children considered more with reference to Christ, than to the twelve patriarchs? Do we not consider the blessing of Judah, as one whom his brethren shall Praise, and as one from whom the sceptre shall not depart, as having respect principally, if not altogether, to the person of Christ? And are not the several blessings prophesied of Joseph, on the dying bed of his father, spoken directly with an eye to Joseph's Lord? And if so, why may we not with equal safety, in the blessing of Naphtali discover Christ also? Is Naphtali an hind let loose? And can we overlook that hind of the morning, even Jesus, whom the hunters pursued, and the dogs of Bashan compassed around? (See Psalms 22:1-31 in the title of it, and throughout the Psalm
Mount Zion - ) Who but must exclaim, in the language of inspiration, "Praise waiteth for thee, O Lord, in Zion: and unto thee shall the vow be performed!" (Psalms 65:1
Fruit - The fruit of the lips is the sacrifice of Praise or thanksgiving, Hebrews 13:15
Blessing - A blessing could therefore become an expression of Praise, and in this sense grateful people can bless God (Psalms 28:6; Psalms 31:21; Psalms 41:13; Daniel 2:19-20; Mark 11:9-10; Luke 1:68; Romans 1:25; Ephesians 1:3)
Jovinianus, Heretic - His Praise of virginity seemed to do some wrong to marriage
Humility - ...
Those who look for status and Praise may gain what they seek, but their reward will be short-lived (Matthew 6:1-5; Matthew 6:16)
Apocrypha - The final section is a hymn of Praise to God. The second section is a hymn of Praise to wisdom. Sirach 44-50 are a Praise of the great fathers of Israel, somewhat similar to Hebrews 11:1 . The second section is poetry and a Praise of wisdom
Psalms the Book of - The "praise" or hymn-book of Jew and Christian for thousands of years. The Psalms were called "Sepher Tʾhellim," or "Book of Praises. Some are termed Shir, a solo for the voice; Mizmor, song of Praise accompanied with an instrument; Maschil, ode or didactic song; Michtam, a catch-word poem (Delitzsch); Shiggaion, an excited ode; Tephillah, a prayer-song; Shir jedidoth, a song of loves; Shir hammaʾaloth, a song of ascent or pilgrim songs; Kinah, dirge or elegy
Tongues, Gift of - Fathers understood the matter; but Tertullian apparently judged the gift to be an ecstatic utterance of Praise ( adv. ...
To sum up, it seems probable that the gift of tongues was an ecstatic utterance of Praise, not only in poetic and symbolic speech, but also in languages or dialects not ordinarily spoken by those who had the gift; a power given at a time of great enthusiasm and excitement, at a critical period of the world’s history, but not meant to be a permanent gift for the Church, and not ranking so high as other charismata , especially not so high as prophecy
Lamb, Lamb of God - When he took the scroll, the prayers of the saints were fulfilled (5:8) and all heaven erupted in Praise: "Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain, to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and Praise!" (5:12)
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - Jerome as a well-known student, and his work is Praised by a decree of pope Gelasius in 495 or 496. They are mentioned with Praise by Venantius Fortunatus (viii. It is a call to Praise Christ with a description of the chief facts of His birth, life, and death
Jehoshaphat - The Levites stood up to Praise the God of Israel with a loud voice. In strong faith he ordered singers to "praise the beauty of holiness" ("to Praise, clad in holy ornaments," Keil) already for the promised victory
Reward - In other places, the rewards are spoken of as "treasures in heaven" (Matthew 6:20 ), a share in Christ's future role (Revelation 2:26-27 ), and additional responsibilities and words of Praise ("Well done, good and faithful servant" Matthew 25:21,23 ; Luke 19:17,19 ). For example, if they seek the Praise of others, they can have that Praise but receive no reward from God later (Matthew 6:1-18 )
Mary, Sister of Lazarus - ...
She may not have been fully conscious of the significancy of her act; but He unfolds it to her Praise, and her name has been and ever will be cited as an example of self sacrifice to Christendom; so that when John 11:2 was written it had already become her characteristic designation
Caesarea - The remoteness and privacy of Caesarea Philippi fitted it for being the place where Jesus retired to prepare His disciples for His approaching death of shame and His subsequent resurrection; there it was that Peter received the Lord's Praise, and afterward censure
Song of Songs - ...
Contents...
In the opening poem the girl longs for her distant lover (1:1-7), after which each speaks in Praise of the other (1:8-2:7). First the girl imagines her shepherd-lover coming to visit her at her home (2:8-17), then she recalls a dream she had about him (3:1-5), and finally she imagines her wedding day, when he comes and Praises her beauty (3:6-5:1)
Tongue - The Spirit teaches them to control the tongue and makes them realize the inconsistency of using the same tongue to bless God and curse their fellows (Galatians 5:17; Galatians 5:22; Ephesians 4:30-31; Colossians 4:6; Titus 2:8; James 1:26; James 3:9-12; see BLESSING; CURSE; MALICE; Praise)
Thanksgiving - ’ The Ignatian Epistles are redolent of the spirit of thanksgiving, especially for the Revelation in Christ and ‘the love of the churches’ (Romans 9) (see Epistle of Barnabas, 7, quoted under Praise)
Mass - The value of this offering is infinite from the application of the merits of Christ's Passion and Death, giving adequate Praise and thanksgiving to God
Fear - Such healthy fear enables one to Praise God (Psalm 22:23 ; Revelation 14:7 ); to enjoy benefits and blessings at his hand (Psalm 34:9 ; 103:11,13 , 17 ); to rest in peace and security (Psalm 112:7-8 ); and to experience length of days (Proverbs 10:27 ; 19:23 )
Widow - It should not be forgotten in practical applications of this incident and of our Lord’s Praise of the widow, that she cast in ‘all her living,’ that is to say, her day’s entire income, or ‘all that she had to live upon until more should be earned’ (Swete), and that consequently the phrase ‘widow’s mite’ is incorrectly applied to small sums deducted, and more or less easily spared, from a daily income
Greatness - Creation records his greatness and leads to our Praise (Psalm 145:6 )
Gate (2) - In the prophetic picture of Zion restored and comforted, the gates were to be called ‘Praise,’ and those which John saw in the New Jerusalem bore on their fronts the names of the ‘twelve tribes of the children of Israel’ (Revelation 21:12)
Gennadius (10), Bishop of Constantinople - ...
Gennadius died in 471, and stands out as an able and successful administrator, for whom no historian has anything but Praise, if we except the criticism naturally aroused by his attack in his younger days against Cyril of Alexandria, an attack which the unmeasured language of Cyril perhaps excuses
Gennadius (11) Massiliensis, Presbyter of Marseilles - ...
If we accept his de Viris Illustribus as it is commonly published, we are warranted in classing Gennadius of Marseilles with the semi-Pelagians, as he censures Augustine and Prosper and Praises Faustus. Daily reception of holy communion he will neither Praise nor blame (53)· Evil was invented by Satan (57)
Gregorius Baeticus, Saint, Bishop of Eliberi - This theory is supported by the terms of Praise applied to him by the Luciferians Faustinus and Marcellus in their Libellus Precum ad Imperatores (c
Temple - The first marker is the addition “of the Lord”: “And when the builders laid the foundation of the temple of the Lord, they set the priests in their apparel with trumpets, and the Levites the sons of Asaph with cymbals, to Praise the Lord, after the ordinance of David king of Israel” (Ezra 3:10)
Calf - The "calves of the lips," mentioned by Hosea 14:2 , signify the sacrifices of Praise which the captives of Babylon addressed to God, being no longer in a condition to offer sacrifices in his temple
Josiah - Josiah won unqualified Praise for his reforms (2 Kings 23:25), but few people were genuinely converted
Mouth Lips - This confession elsewhere appears as ‘a sacrifice of Praise,’ ‘the fruit of lips which make confession to his name’ (Hebrews 13:15; cf
Thanksgiving - ’ The Ignatian Epistles are redolent of the spirit of thanksgiving, especially for the Revelation in Christ and ‘the love of the churches’ (Romans 9) (see Epistle of Barnabas, 7, quoted under Praise)
Benediction - ...
εὐλογεῖν properly means to ascribe (to God) Praise and honour (benedicere). ’ It is of the nature of thanksgiving and Praise to God for His goodness, and differs essentially from that kind of benediction which is a prayer that Divine favour may be shown to those whom the speaker ‘blesses. ...
It is not easy to draw a line in principle between the thanksgiving of God which is benediction and that which is denoted by the word ‘praise’ (αἰνεῖν)
Benediction - ...
εὐλογεῖν properly means to ascribe (to God) Praise and honour (benedicere). ’ It is of the nature of thanksgiving and Praise to God for His goodness, and differs essentially from that kind of benediction which is a prayer that Divine favour may be shown to those whom the speaker ‘blesses. ...
It is not easy to draw a line in principle between the thanksgiving of God which is benediction and that which is denoted by the word ‘praise’ (αἰνεῖν)
Work - ...
Nevertheless, true workers for God do not seek Praise for themselves. Always God’s works are a cause for people everywhere to worship and Praise him (Psalms 92:5; Psalms 103:22)
Psalms, the Book of - The Hebrew name for this book is TEHILLIM, Praises, though many of the psalms are rather elegiac. Hymns in Praise of Jehovah; tehillim in the proper sense. Luther, in his prefaces to the Psalter, has the following beautiful language; "Where canst thou find nobler words of joy, than in the psalms of Praise and thanksgiving? There thou mayest look into the hearts of all good men, as into beautiful and pleasant gardens, yea, as into heaven itself
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - Already in Moses' hymn of victory, God's eternal reign is the basis for Praise: "The Lord will reign for ever and ever" (Exodus 15:18 ). The place of God's dwelling is "secure forever" (Psalm 48:8 ); his "praise reaches to the ends of the earth for this God is our God for ever and ever; he will be our guide even to the end" (vv. In keeping with the sober historical integrity of the four Gospels and Acts, the accounts of Jesus' life and ministry are not studded with lofty ascriptions of Praise to Christ. He is Praised "forever" or "for ever and ever. " Other Epistles imply the same Praise by extolling the Lord's eternal rewards: "a crown that will last forever" (1 Corinthians 9:25 ); life "with the Lord forever" (1 Thessalonians 4:17 ; cf. John's vision begins with Praise to God "for ever and ever" (1:6)
Cry - To decry to depreciate by words or in writing to dispraise to condemn. To Praise to applaud to extol as, to cry up a mans talents or patriotism, or a womans beauty to cry up the administration
Tongues - They were a gift that the Holy Spirit gave to certain people to exercise in their Praise to God (1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:30; 1 Corinthians 14:2)
Nebuchadnezzar - In the worship of Merodach, my god, I did not sing his Praise, nor did I provide his altar with sacrifices, nor clean the canals
Breath - Those who breathe are expected to be responsive to God by offering Him Praise (Psalm 150:6 )
Circoncelliones - Their shout was Praise be to God
Gain - In it life is not a period of aspiration for an unutterable beatitude, but a time of training, in expectation of the gain of the Master’s Praise and ultimate ability to do more and greater work for Him
Redeemer - So that both redemption itself, and the glorious person by whom it is brought, gives a double relish to all the purposes of it, and lifts the heart to all the acts of adoration and Praise to the great Author of our felicity
Lollards - Abelly says, that the word signifies "praising God, " from the German loben "to Praise, " and herr, "lord;" because the Lollards employed themselves in travelling about from place to place, singing psalms and hymns
Unperfect - Every thing is perfect in Him who is himself the perfection of beauty, and the Praise of all his saints
Nebuchadnezzar, or Nebuchadrezzar - He now said, "I Nebuchadnezzar Praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase
Bless - We are then not to suppose that the divine Being, who is over all, and, in himself, blessed for evermore, is capable of receiving any augmentation of his happiness, from all the creatures which he has made: such a supposition, as it would imply something of imperfection in the divine nature, must ever be rejected with abhorrence; and, therefore, when the creatures bless the adorable Creator, they only ascribe to him that Praise, and dominion, and honour, and glory, and blessing, which it is equally the duty and joy of his creatures to reader
Offer, Offering - ...
A — 2: ἀναφέρω (Strong's #399 — Verb — anaphero — an-af-er'-o ) primarily, "to lead" or "carry up" (ana), also denotes "to offer," (a) of Christ sacrifice, Hebrews 7:27 ; (b) of sacrifices under the Law, Hebrews 7:27 ; (c) of such previous to the Law, James 2:21 (of Isaac by Abraham); (d) of Praise, Hebrews 13:15 ; (e) of spiritual sacrifices in general, 1 Peter 2:5
Prayer - Hypocrites also are wont to pray chiefly that they may have Praise of men
Religion - ...
To be sure, the Bible speaks of all creatures, resounding to God: they do his bidding (angels, Psalm 103:20 ; Hebrews 1:14 ; storm winds, Matthew 28:18-200 ; 148:8 ) and they rejoice before him with songs of joy and Praise (Job 38:7 ; Psalm 89:12 ; 96:11-13 ; 98:7-9 ; Isaiah 44:23 ; 49:13 ; 55:12 ; see especially Psalm 103:22 ; 145:10 ; 148 ). ...
Third, certain activities or life expressions fall within its sphere: worship, prayer, and Praise, both private and communal, and proclamationtelling the story of what the one true God has done (Isaiah 43:10,12 ; 44:8 ; 1618383780_50 ; Acts 1:8 ). ...
In biblical perspective, no human activity is any less "religious" (how humans relate to God) than worship, prayer, and Praise
the Unmerciful Servant - He got some promotion, or some Praise, that we had not friendship enough to him to stomach. We wrote a book, we preached a sermon, we made a speech, we sang a song, and he did not Praise us to the top of our bent. He had damned Halyburton's sermon with faint Praise
Deliver - ...
Nâthan can be used of “giving” or “ascribing” something to someone, such as “giving” glory and Praise to God ( Praise glorifieth me: and to him that ordereth his conversation aright will I show the salvation of God
Rod - ...
Jeremiah 10:16 (a) By means of Israel the Lord would get Praise, honor and worship through their ministrations and activities
Proverbs - The final section is an anonymous poem in Praise of the perfect wife (31:10-31)
Preaching - At all times their concern is to gain God’s approval, not to win people’s Praise (2 Timothy 2:15; cf
Southcotters - The following is the conclusion of a communication which she had at Stockfort: "As wrong as they are, saying thou hast children brought up by the parish, and that thou art Bonaparte's brother, and that thou hast been in prison; so false is their sayings, thy writings came from the devil or any spirit but the SPITIT OF THE LIVING GOD; and that every soul in this nation shall know before the FIVE YEARS I mentioned to thee in 1802 are expired; and then I will turn as a DIADEM of beauty to the residence of my people, and they shall Praise the GOD OF THEIR SALVATION
Priesthood of the Believer - The question immediately arises, “What are these spiritual sacrifices?” Hebrews 13:15-16 lists Praise of God in prayer and song, doing good, sharing with others
Lord of Hosts - Hence we get the summit of the OT creed in the angelic song of Praise, Isaiah 6:3 , ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts: the fulness of the whole earth is his glory
Magnificat - No personal fear of the reproach of shame, which might be, and indeed was, levelled against her, no personal pride in the destiny vouchsafed to her, mar our impression of a soul accustomed to commune with God, and therefore never lacking words of Praise. (Luke 1:46-47 ) she Praises God with all the powers of soul and spirit
si'Mon - [1] ...
Son of Onias the high priest, whose eulogy closes the "praise of famous men" in the book of Ecclesiasticus, ch
Necessity - That necessity doth not render actions less morally good, is evident; for if necessary virtue be neither moral nor Praise-worthy, it will follow that God himself is not a moral being, because he is a necessary one; and the obedience of Christ cannot be good because it was necessary
Call, Calling - The one who experiences God's calling can only break forth in Praise with Paul: “O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!” (Romans 11:33 )
Kohath, Kohathites - (4) Under Jehoshaphat they led the song of Praise at the battle of En-gedi ( 2 Chronicles 20:19 )
Edification - ); (c) glossolalia or tongues (γένη γλωσσῶν), which were probably incomprehensible utterances expressive of prayer or Praise (1 Corinthians 14:13)
Bartimaeus - Thus, in the case of Bartimaeus himself, we have a notable instance of a determination that resolved to let no opportunity of being healed escape it; of a perseverance that continued its efforts notwithstanding the difficulties placed in its path; of an eagerness that cast off all that hindered its free approach; of a faith that recognized in Jesus the Divinely-appointed Messiah (‘Thou Son of David’) before and not after the cure; and of a thankfulness that showed itself in ready obedience and triumphant Praise when the cure was complete (‘followed him, glorifying God’)
Archangel - So that, what is said of angels and archangels, together in hymns of Praise, seems to be founded in a misapprehension of Scripture in relation to one arch-angel only, for the word of God speaks of no more, and the name is not plural
Nose - 12:1: “O Lord, I will Praise thee: though thou wast angry with me
Caesarea - Here it was that Herod Agrippa was smitten of the Lord for not giving God the glory, when the people were so extravagant in his Praise
Salvation - It is to spend eternity in the most noble and hallowed employments, in viewing and contemplating the wonderful works of God, admiring the wisdom of his providence, adoring his infinite love to the sons of men, reflecting on our own inexpressible happiness, and singing everlasting hymns of Praise, joy, and triumph to God and our Lord Jesus Christ for vouchsafing all these blessings
Hospitality - ...
Says Niebuhr, "the hospitality of the Arabs has always been the subject of Praise; and I believe that those of the present day exercise this virtue no less than their ancestors did
Glory - ...
Mere human beings cannot add to God’s glory (in the sense of his majesty and power) but they can give him glory (in the sense of honour and Praise)
Tongues, Gift of - Still Praise, not teaching, was the invariable use made of the gift. The ecstatic songs of Praise in the Old Testament, poured out by the prophets and their disciples, and the inspired musicians of the sanctuary, correspond (1 Samuel 10:5-13; Mark 16:17; 1 Chronicles 25:3)
Samuel, Books of - He expresses Praise for God not pride in personal achievement (2 Samuel 7:18-29 ). The call for covenant commitment and obedience, the forgiveness and mercy of God, the sovereignty of God in human history, the significance of prayer and Praise, the faithfulness of God to fulfill prophecy, the need for faithfulness to human leaders, the holy presence of God among His people, the nature of human friendship, and the importance of family relationships all echo forth from these books. God's servant Praises the incomparable God (2 Samuel 7:18-29 )
Spirituality - The Psalter, for instance, supplied worshipers with prayers to express petitions, Praise, thanksgiving, and repentance, just as the Psalter would do for Christians. Life is to be lived in the consciousness of God's presence; death (sheol ) usually means the loss of consciousness, the absence of God, and the cessation of the Praise of God (Psalm 6:4-5 ; 88:3-6 ; Ecclesiastes 9:5-6,10 )
Glory (2) - Reputation, Praise, honour (true and false), splendour, light, perfection, rewards (temporal and eternal)—all these varying conceptions seem covered by the same word. And the familiar ascription ‘Glory to God’ would imply not only a right human Praise, but the assigning to God of what He truly is, for nothing higher can be given Him
Proverbs, the Book of - ...
(5) Proverbs 31 consists of king Lemuel's words (Proverbs 31:1-6), and an alphabetical acrostic in Praise of a virtuous woman. ) Lemuel's mother suggested the model of the closing acrostic in Praise of a virtuous woman, "a looking glass for ladies" (M
Triumphs - before, the army, "and to say, Praise the Lord, for his mercy endureth for ever. " After the discomfiture of their enemies, he assembled his array in the valley of Beracha, near the scene of victory, where they resumed the anthem of religious Praise: "Then they returned, every man of Judah and Jerusalem, and Jehoshaphat in the fore front of them, to go again to Jerusalem with joy; for the Lord had made them to rejoice over their enemies. Instead of celebrating his own heroism, or the valour of his troops, on this memorable occasion, that excellent prince sung with his whole army the Praises of the Lord of hosts, who disposes of the victory according to his pleasure. After the general followed the consuls and senators, on foot; and the whole procession was closed by the victorious army drawn up in order, crowned with laurel, and decorated with the gifts which they had received for their valour, singing their own and their general's Praises
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus - O, LORD Jesus Christ, Who has said, 'Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you!' mercifully attend to our supplications and grant us the gift of your divine charity, that we may ever love you with our whole heart and never desist from Thy Praise
Litany of the Holy Name - O, LORD Jesus Christ, Who has said, 'Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you!' mercifully attend to our supplications and grant us the gift of your divine charity, that we may ever love you with our whole heart and never desist from Thy Praise
Holy Name, Litany of the - O, LORD Jesus Christ, Who has said, 'Ask and you shall receive, seek and you shall find, knock and it shall be opened unto you!' mercifully attend to our supplications and grant us the gift of your divine charity, that we may ever love you with our whole heart and never desist from Thy Praise
Glory - Christians in acknowledging this, and owning that from Him come all their blessings, joyfully ascribe unto Him "Praise and honour, glory and power, for ever and ever
Gregorius, Saint., the Illuminator - The venerable patriarch greatly rejoiced on reading them, and exclaimed, "Now let us Praise Him Who was before the worlds, worshipping the most Holy Trinity and the Godhead of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, now and ever, world without end, Amen," which words are said after the Nicene Creed in the Armenian church (Malan
Get - We get favor by kindness we get wealth by industry and economy we get land by purchase we get Praise by good conduct and we get blame by doing injustice
Wicked - The person who has sinned against the law is guilty: “They that forsake the law Praise the wicked: but such as keep the law contend with them” ( Dionysius (19), Monk in Western Church - Cassiodorus speaks of his moral and intellectual qualities with well-deserved Praise
Name - ...
B — 1: ὀνομάζω (Strong's #3687 — Verb — onomazo — on-om-ad'-zo ) denotes (a) "to name," "mention," or "address by name," Acts 19:13 , RV, "to name" (AV, "to call"); in the Passive Voice, Romans 15:20 ; Ephesians 1:21 ; 5:3 ; to make mention of the "Name" of the Lord in Praise and worship, 2 Timothy 2:19 ; (b) "to name, call, give a name to," Luke 6:13,14 ; Passive Voice, 1 Corinthians 5:11 , RV, "is named" (AV, "is called"); Ephesians 3:15 (some mss
Poetry, Hebrew - 10-31, of the book of Proverbs is an alphabetical acrostic in Praise of "the virtuous woman
Feasts - Those who brought sacrifices and offerings to the temple were wont to feast upon them there, with joy and Praise to God, Deuteronomy 12:6,7 1 Samuel 16:5 2 Samuel 6:19
Jesus Christ - Every crown of glory and every meed of Praise would be given to Him who alone is worthy-for perfection of character, for love to mankind, for sacrifices endured, and for benefits bestowed
Giving - He is not pleased with those who give in a way designed to deceive people or win people’s Praise (Matthew 6:19-20; Acts 5:4)
Luciferus i, Bishop of Calaris - Hearing of his arrival in Egypt, Athanasius sent a letter from Alexandria, full of Praise and congratulations, asking him to let him see a copy of his work After receiving it, Athanasius thanked him in a still more laudatory letter, and calls him the Elias of the age
Obedience - ...
‘To all good works, which have a special ground of Praise-worthiness, a special virtue is assigned. … The act we are considering has, however, a special ground of Praiseworthiness on account of its special object
Psalms - ) The Hebrew designation tehillim , "praises" or hymns," occurring only in the title of Psalm 145 and about 30 times in the body of the Psalms, applies only to some not to all the psalms. The glorification of God is the design of them all, even the penitentiary and precatory psalms; but tehilliym applies strictly to Praise songs alone, tephillowt to the prayer songs; Psalm 17; Psalm 72 end, closing the second book of Psalms, Psalm 86; 90; 102 title. The various kinds are specified in Ephesians 5:19; "psalms (accompanied by an instrument), hymns (indirect Praise of God), . They are a treasury from which we can draw the inner experiences of Old Testament saints and express our corresponding feelings, under like circumstances, in their divinely sanctioned language of Praise and prayer. ...
(1) Psalms of joy and gratitude, shir , lethodah "for confession" or ascription of Praise (Psalm 100), tehillah (Psalm 145). The title ascribes the psalm to "the sons of Korah," just as in 2 Chronicles 20:19 the Korahites are in front of the Jews' army "to Praise the Lord God of Israel with a loud voice on high"; so Psalms 47:5 answers to 2 Chronicles 20:26. Thus in the arrangement the Jehovah psalms (Jehovah being the fundamental name) enclose the Elohim psalms; so the first book doxology begins with Jehovah; the second has, let Jehovah Elohim be Praised; the third, let Jehovah be Praised
Ark of the Covenant - ...
The altar of burnt offering where the sacrifices were offered continued separate from it at Gibeon, the "great high place" (1 Kings 3:4) (in the tabernacle of the ark on Zion the service was song and Praise alone) until the two were reunited in the temple of Solomon, a type of the gospel separation of the spiritual service of prayer and Praise going on here below, from the priestly intercession being carried on above by our Lord Jesus
Judah - Judah ("praise"), Leah having Praised Jehovah for giving him; Jacob similarly refers to the meaning of Judah, "thou art he whom thy brethren shall Praise" (Genesis 29:35; Genesis 49:8)
Ephesians, Book of - He began with a literary pattern of a poem or song to Praise God for what He has done in providing salvation for sinful humanity. A refrain “to the Praise of the glory of His grace” repeats itself after each section, each with a slight variation. This is the wise path avoiding spirits that make one drunk but turning to the one Spirit which leads to Praise and worship
Peter - Our Lord speaks oftener to Peter than to any other of His disciples; sometimes in blame and sometimes in Praise. His Master spoke words of approval, and Praise, and even blessing to Peter the like of which He never spoke to any other man. Well may those mariners Praise the Lord for His goodness whose ships come home sinking with the merchandise they have made in the deep waters
Judah - JUDAH (‘he is to be Praised’; the popular etymologies seem to regard the name as an unabbreviated Hoph. of jâdâh , ‘to Praise’)
Harp - The victors over the beast, his image, and his mark, who stand by ‘the glassy sea mingled with fire’ and sing the the song of Moses, have ‘harps of God’ to sing His Praise (Revelation 15:2)
Aaron - Between God and man He stands continuously, the medium of access on either side, the channel of Divine grace and of human prayer and Praise
Fire - " Nadab and Abihu probably intended to accompany the people's shouts with an incense offering to the Praise of God
Blessedness - The various forms of εὐλογέομαι refer, literally, to being ‘well spoken of,’ and apparently always contain at least the latent thought of Praise being conferred or happiness ascribed; μακάριος, however, expresses simply the possession of a quality, and for the ascription of this by others the verb μακαρίζω is needed
Ever, Everlasting - 61:8, where it appears by itself: “So will I sing Praise unto thy name for ever, that I may daily perform my vows
Mark, Gospel by - All Praise to His holy name! For a list of the principal events in the gospel history see NEW TESTAMENT
Eleusius, Bishop of Cyzicus - The people of his diocese are described by Theodoret as zealous for the orthodox faith, and well instructed in the Holy Scriptures and in church doctrines, and he himself as a man worthy of all Praise (Theod
Earth - ...
Because God is “the possessor of heaven and earth,” the whole universe is to reverberate in the Praise of His glory, which is “above heaven and earth” ( Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - Sidonius Apollinaris is loud in the Praise of his friend as a layman, and compares him (Ep
Babylon - In Isaiah 13:19; Isaiah 14:4, it is called "the glory of kingdoms," "the golden city," and in Jeremiah 51:41 "the Praise of the whole earth," etc
Babylon - Justly therefore might the prophets call her "the great," Daniel 4:20 ; "the Praise of the whole earth," Jeremiah 51:41 ; "the beauty of the Chaldees' excellency," Isaiah 13:19 ; "the lady of kingdoms," Isaiah 47:5 ; but also "the tender and delicate," and "given to pleasures," Isaiah 47:1,8
Mourning (2) - The following is the prescribed prayer before meat to be used in the house of the mourner after burial:—...
‘Blessed art thou, O God our Lord, King of the universe, God of our Fathers, our Creator, our Redeemer, our Sanctifier, the Holy One of Jacob, the King of Life, who art good and doest good; the God of truth, the righteous Judge who judgest in righteousness, who takest the soul in judgment, and rulest alone in the universe, who doest in it according to His will, and all His ways are in Judgment, and we are His people and His servants, and in everything we are bound to Praise Him and to bless Him, who shields all the calamities of Israel and will shield us in this calamity, and from this mourning will bring us to life and peace
Ephesians, Letter to the - ...
Contents of the letter...
In an opening expression of Praise to God, Paul reminds his readers of the great blessings that they have because of their union with Christ
Galatians, Letter to the - In Galatians 1:1-5 Paul gave greetings to the churches, but he omitted the statement of Praise or thanksgiving which normally followed. Paul was too disturbed to give thanks or Praise
Simple, Simplicity - Thus they lived a double life, loving the Praise of men more than the Praise of God
Twelve - The word means Praise of GOD. The one who is wholly devoted to the Lord finds much occasion for Praise, worship, gladness and thanksgiving
Joannes ii, Bishop of Jerusalem - Anastasius speaks of the splendour of his holiness and his divine virtues; his eminence and his Praise are so conspicuous that he cannot find words equal to his merits. He accounts it an honour to have received Praise from one of so serene and heavenly a disposition, the splendour of whose episcopate shines throughout the world (see Vallarsi's Rufnus , pp
Rejoice - 1) exulting;" (b) of Christ's "rejoicing" (greatly) "in the Holy Spirit," Luke 10:21 , RV; said of His Praise, as foretold in Psalm 16:9 , quoted in Acts 2:26 (which follows the Sept
Body - The voice articulates prayer, raised hands express Praise, bowing low reflects humble adoration and worship
Sardis - All the more warm and tender are the words of Praise addressed to the few who have kept themselves unspotted ‘even in Sardis
Presence of God - The downcast seek him and find encouragement and strength to Praise him (Psalm 42:5 )
Honour - The two words are also used together in the description of the triumph of faith’s trial ‘that it might be found unto … glory and honour at the revelation of Jesus Christ’ (1 Peter 1:7), and in doxologies ascribing ‘praise, honour, and glory’ to Christ (Revelation 5:12-13), and to God (1 Timothy 1:17, Revelation 4:9; Revelation 11; Revelation 7:12)
Son of David - Indeed, the Hosannas of the people were in Praise of very different qualities
Profane - But in the fourth year all the fruit thereof shall be holy to Praise the Lord withal
Abba - κύριε, κύριε), it is also expressed by such phrases as ναὶ ἀμήν, ‘Hallelujah, Praise the Lord,’ where the terms are different
Will - This is clearly indicated in David's prayer for an "undivided" heart for both fear and Praise of God (Psalm 86:11-12 )
Joseph - Of him, indeed, might the prophecy of Jacob respecting Judah be fully applied: "Thou art he whom thy brethren shall Praise: thy hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies, and thy father's children shall bow down be fore thee
Think, Devise - David could Praise God for forgiveness because the Lord will not “impute” iniquity after he had confessed his sin ( Ambition - , Luke 19:15-19, Matthew 25:14-23), in order to win the truest Praise and most lasting success
Anointing - Philo’s Praise of oil for imparting vigour to the flesh (Somn
Moses - This is no unmeaning Praise; the "wisdom" of the Egyptians, and especially of their priests, was then the profoundest in the world
Marcellinus, Bishop of Rome - 2) speaks apparently with Praise of the conduct of Marcellinus in the persecution: τὸν ἐν τῷ διωγμῷ διαπρέψαντα
Resurrection - The psalmist then asks the rhetorical questions: "Do you work wonders for the dead? Do the shades rise up to Praise you? Is your steadfast love declared in the grace, or your faithfulness in Abaddon? Are your wonders known in the darkness, or your saving help in the land of forgetfulness?" (vv. As with Psalm 6:4-6 the point is that one must be alive in order to Praise God. ...
Psalm 6:5 says, "For in death there is no remembrance of you; in Sheol who can give your Praise?" (NRSV)
Tithes - In formulating his scheme for the collection of funds for the poor ‘saints’ of Jerusalem, he laid down the rule for the guidance of the Corinthian Christians: ‘upon the first day of the week let each one of you lay by him in store, as he may prosper’ (1 Corinthians 16:2); and his enthusiastic Praise of the Macedonian Churches for their earnest and liberal response to his appeal he justifies by the circumstances in which their single-minded generosity (τὸ πλοῦτος τῆς ἁπλότητος αὐτῶν, 2 Corinthians 8:2) displayed itself. We are reminded of Jesus’ words in Praise of the widow’s giving ‘all the living that she had’ (πάντα τὸν βίον, Luke 21:4; cf
David - For the chief Praise in the songs of the women was given to David. And, though we cannot with precision point out all he wrote, or describe the times and circumstances under which those were penned that we know did come from him, yet we delight to couple particular compositions with various crises of David's life—as Psalms 42:1-11 with his flight across the Jordan in Absalom's rebellion; Psalms 24:1-10 with the bringing up of the ark to Jerusalem; Psalms 18:1-50 with David's deliverance from his enemies, and to see his emotions of Praise, and hope, and repentance, and gratitude, and faith, at the wonderful dealings of God with him
Nathanael - Christ Praises him as truly an Israelite, i. ...
Nathanael overhears the Praise of himself, and the question with which he replies to it has been criticised as arguing a want of modesty on his part. But his reply does not mean, ‘I know that I am all that; but how do you know it?’ Rather, he exhibits surprise that a total stranger should express any opinion about him, lie somewhat coldly intimates that he doubts the value of Praise which can hardly be based upon experience
Jephthah - " So it became "a custom in Israel that the daughters of Israel went yearly to Praise (timah ; Judges 5:11, not 'to lament') the daughter of Jephthah . " Her willingness to sacrifice herself and her natural aspirations as a virgin, who as the conqueror's daughter might have held the highest place among Israel's matrons, to become like a Gibeonite menial of the sanctuary (Joshua 9:23), as the price of her country's deliverance, is what the virgins used yearly to come to celebrate in Praises. ...
They would never have come to Praise a human sacrifice; Scripture would never have recorded without censure an anti-theocratic abomination
Song of Solomon - Like many Psalms which Praise God and also teach, the Song's main purpose is to celebrate rather than to instruct
Glory - The first use of this word is to express the exalted honour or Praise paid either to things, or to man, or to God
Philippians, the Epistle to the - Like his midnight song of Praise in the Philippian prison, this epistle from his Roman confinement has a joyous tone throughout
Sabbath - (Genesis 8:9)...
The Sabbath was instituted, from the first dawn of the creation; for when JEHOVAH had called into existence the several works of his almighty hand, which his sovereign will and pleasure gave being to "he is said to have rested from his works which he had made;" and reviewing with complacency what his hands had wrought, beholding their number and order in the several ranks and disposals of his design, he sanctified the day of his rest, and commanded every seventh day to be hallowed for his more immediate worship, adoration love, and Praise, by all his intelligent creatures
Ausonius, Decimus Magnus, Poet - The Mosella is a poem in Praise of his favourite river
Holy Ghost - And thus the church is taught to give equal and undivided Praise and glory to the united source of all her mercies, in the Father's love, the Son's grace, and the Spirit's fellowship
Passover - " The repast was usually closed by a fourth cup and psalms of Praise, Psalm 136:1-26 145:10 Matthew 26:30
Paul as a Man of Prayer - Now, Paul's great prayers and great Praises are the best examples possible of a devotion that is theological and Christological to the core. Like the genuine horologist he was, Paul introduced every day of his life with Praise and prayer. He had fallen asleep last night full of Praise and prayer, and in the morning he just began again where he had left off last night. Everything to Paul was another call to prayer and Praise. Till literally, and without any exaggeration or hyperbole whatsoever, Paul prayed and sang Praises unceasingly
David - in His Races - Your meekness, and your humility, and your industry, and so on, proceeds the incomparable Puritan preacher, must spring up, not only out of your constitution and your temperament; it must spring up out of your heart, as your heart is more and more softened, and tamed, and humbled, and sweetened by the grace of God and by the indwelling Spirit of Christ, Many a man, the sometime President of Magdalene is continually warning us, may live and die a model and a Praise of 'civil virtues,' who never all his days comes within sight of the first principles of gospel holiness. Let us not forget to Praise Him for the innocent mirth and pleasure we have met with since we met together. ' Would you know? asks William Law in his beautiful chapter on singing psalms-would you know who is the greatest saint in the world? Well, it is not he who prays most or fasts most; it is not he who gives most alms, or is most eminent for temperance, chastity, or justice; but it is he who is always thankful to God, who wills everything that God wills, and who receives everything as an instance of God's goodness, and has a heart always ready to Praise God for His goodness
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - If you are constantly pluming yourself on your own performances, and on your high deservings of Praise and what not at all men's hands, depend you upon it your humiliation will not tarry. My friends, expect nothing for yourselves and you will not be disappointed; demand nothing for yourselves and you will be continually surprised how Praise and promotion will pour in upon you, and that at the most unexpected times and from the most unexpected people
Levites - The Levites were among his schools of the prophets, whose training consisted in Praise, prayer, and study of the law. , "and to stand every morning to thank and Praise Jehovah, and likewise at even, and to offer (i. They Praised the Lord as singers before his army, and their beginning to sing was the signal of victory from the Lord over the Moabite and Ammonite invaders (2 Chronicles 20:19-22). Jehovah Praises Levites as to the past: "My covenant was with him of life and peace; and I gave them to him for the fear wherewith he feared Me and was afraid before My name
Gospel - ...
The joy that attends the gospel finds ultimate expression in the Praise of God. "Praise be to the Lord your God!" exclaims Ahimaaz in reporting victory to David (2 Samuel 18:28 )
Poetry - Thus, for emotions as diverse as laments, oracles of judgment, and paeans of Praise, poetry is perfectly suited. Poetry serves the psalmist with equal dexterity as he expresses lament, Praise, or thanksgiving
Providence of God - Providence, then, is the sovereign, divine superintendence of all things, guiding them toward their divinely predetermined end in a way that is consistent with their created nature, all to the glory and Praise of God. This should evoke from us, not curiosity and speculation, but faith, Praise, and submission
Elijah - We Praise one man and we blame another man in our prayers. The Bible naturally shows a preference for men of like passions with itself; and the more of his passions any man puts into his prayer, the more space and the more Praise the Bible gives to that man. So we sit and say after the triumphs, and the Praises, and the hopes of our youth are all past, and our early successes are all over
Give - To pay or render as, to give Praise, applause or approbation
Kiss - " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:2) And as those kisses of Jesus are meant to imply every thing in Christ, and with Christ, Jesus in his person, and Jesus in his fulness, suitableness, and all-sufficiency, so on our part the kiss of grace implies every thing that can denote love, adoration, faith, dependance, homage, subjection, and Praise
Supremacy - He accepts, indeed, with Praise the confession of the centurion (Matthew 8:5-13), that such authority belongs naturally to Him; yet He does not represent these wonders as being the chief purpose of His ministry
Damascus - How is the city of Praise not left, the city of my joy!" By the time of the Mede-Persian supremacy Damascus had not only been rebuilt, but was the most famous city in Syria (Strabo, 16:2,19)
Providence - God directs the seasons (Psalm 104:19 ); the clouds are His chariot, the winds His messenger (Psalm 104:3 ); He stills the storms and girds the mountain ranges (Psalm 107:29 ; Psalm 65:6 ); everything that hath breath is exhorted to Praise the Lord “for his mighty acts” (Psalm 150:2 ,Psalms 150:2,150:6 )
Exaltation - God's powerful help leads people to Praise him and to exalt his name, for he alone deserves the glory (Psalm 148:13 ; Isaiah 24:15 ; 25:1 ). Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon did conquer Jerusalem and was overcome with pride, but after God struck him down with insanity, Nebuchadnezzar Praised and exalted the King of heaven (Daniel 4:30,37 )
Titus - Luke was probably the "brother" sent with him, "whose Praise is in the Gospel throughout all the churches
Greatness - Indeed, to share in their Lord’s greatness will involve not Praise but persecution (John 15:20)
Zerubbabel - ...
They used the same psalm of Praise, "because Jehovah is good, for His mercy endureth forever toward Israel" (Psalms 136:1; 2 Chronicles 5:13; 1 Chronicles 16:7-34), as David had delivered to Asaph for public liturgy, and as Solomon had used at the dedication of His temple; making use also probably of the same style of instrument, to some extent affected by their Babylonian and Assyrian experience
Acacius (7), Patriarch of Constantinople - ...
The first important measures of Acacius carried with them enthusiastic popular support and earned for him the Praise of pope Simplicius
Version, the Authorised - Hugh Broughton, described as the greatest Hebrew scholar of the age, but who had not been invited to help in the work, declared he "would rather be torn in pieces by wild horses than impose such a version on the poor churches of England"! This is a verdict that has been annulled by the Praise bestowed upon it by thousands of learned men ever since, who, without saying that the translation is perfect, have yet spoken in the highest terms of its excellence as a whole, and indeed this opinion is evidenced in that it has held its ground fornearly 400 years, and has been the means of carrying the gospel and God's revealed truth wherever in the world the English language is spoken, to the salvation of lost sinners, and to the comfort and edification of believers
Balaam - When Balaam is brought in sight of Israel, he breaks out into a burst of Praise ( Numbers 24:5-9 ) which rouses the wrath of Balak
Philip the Evangelist - The same emphatic Praise is not accorded to him by the author of the Acts as to Stephen, and probably while Stephen lived Philip was overshadowed by his more striking personality
Have - , "praise shall be," or come to pass
Creation - ...
The universe exists, above all, for the Praise and glory of God
Hebrews, Letter to the - Christians must demonstrate the practical worth of their faith in the everyday matters of life (13:1-6), and offer the sacrifice of Praise, obedience and good works, not the ritual sacrifice of animals (13:7-16)
Theodosius ii., Emperor - His palace was so regulated that it differed little from a monastery; for he, together with his sisters, rose early in the morning and recited responsive hymns in Praise of the Deity
Luke, the Gospel According to - ...
The allusion in 2 Corinthians 8:18, "the brother whose Praise is in the Gospel throughout all the churches," may be to Luke. Luke either by his written Gospel or by his evangelistic labours was one "whose Praise in the Gospel was throughout the churches
Tabernacle - Once admitted within the courts by the propitiation of Christ, we as king priests can offer incense of prayer and Praise, as the priests burnt incense with holy fire on the altar of incense within (Psalms 141:2; Malachi 1:11). The tabernacle represents God dwelling in the midst of Israel, and Israel drawing nigh to God through atonement and with offerings, prayers, and Praises. The church having passed through the outer court, where atonement has been once for all made, ministers in the holy place, as consisting of king priests (1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10) without earthly mediator, with prayer, Praise, and the light of good works; and has access in spirit already (Hebrews 10:19), and in body finally, into the heavenly holiest
Joel, Theology of - It is in the Lord that they are to rejoice (2:23) and it is his name they are to Praise (2:26). Quite exceptionally, prophesying may be thanksgiving and Praise to the Lord (1 Chronicles 25:3 )
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - And we who were in the bloody pass, and were stripped, and wounded, and half-dead, we are the proof of it, and will for ever be the proof and the Praise of it. ...
And now, my brethren, is it not a cause of the profoundest Praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God that peace has come, and that there is not a man on the face of the whole earth that we any more wish to see wounded and half-dead? And must it not be a sweet thing to our King to think about on his bed, and to all his Royal House, that he has no enemy now to his throne and sceptre and crown in all the wide world
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - At every talent that has been committed to you; at every added talent that you make for yourself and for the Church and for Christ; at every sweet word of Praise that sounds around your honoured name; at every step you are summoned to take up to higher service; there are men all around you eyeing you with an evil eye. And even had James and John got their two thrones, would they, do you think, have got one-thousandth part of the pleasure out of their thrones that Peter and the nine would have got pain? And your own cup of honour, and Praise, and what not, is not half so sweet to you as it is bitter as blood to the Peters and the Judases who see it in your hand
Prayer - ...
The spiritual songs in the Pentateuch (Exodus 15:1-19; Numbers 21:17-18; Deuteronomy 32) and succeeding books (Judges 5; 1618383780_43; 1 Kings 8:23-53 Samuel 22; 1 Samuel 2:2; Nehemiah 9:5-38) abound in prayer accompanied with Praise. The Praise and the reading and expounding of the law constituted the service of the synagogue under the sheliach hatsibbur , "the apostle" or "legate of the church
Heaven - ...
As God's creation, the heavens Praise Him and display His glory and His creativity (Psalm 19:1 ; Psalm 69:34 ) and righteousness (Psalm 50:6 )
le'Vites - " They were, besides this, "to stand every morning to thank and Praise Jehovah, and likewise at even
Incense - unto God" (Romans 12:1); the "broken and contrite heart" (Psalms 51:17); "praise, the fruit of the lips"; "doing good," and imparting to the needy (Hebrews 13:10; Hebrews 13:15-16; 1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:12)
Sabbath - As a day of Praise, Psalms 116:12 ; Psalms 116:14
Child, Children - ‘He maketh the barren woman to keep house and to be a joyful mother of children’ ( Psalms 113:9 ), cries the Psalmist as the climax of his Praise
Jealousy (2) - (Deuteronomy 6:5); ‘I am the Lord, that is my name; and my glory will I not give to another, neither my Praise unto graven images’ (Isaiah 42:8)
Servant - This doctrine, if it were capable of being opened and explained if all the multiform instances of it, would unfold such a display of wisdom, and of glory, as would call up the everlasting and increasing admiration, love, and Praise, of all the intelligent creatures of God to all eternity
Galatians, the Epistle to the - Reproof in Galatians predominates over Praise and thanksgiving
Gift, Giving - Almsgiving is restored to its proper place; the true gift is not given to win merit from God, or to gain the Praise of men, but proceeds from love, hoping for nothing again ( Matthew 6:1 , Luke 6:32 ; see Almsgiving)
Heart - 21, 29); “I will Praise thee, O Lord my God, with all my heart …” ( Angels of the Seven Churches - The fact that in the Apocalypse these ‘angels’ are to such a degree the recipients of Praise and blame would seem to put both these simple interpretations out of court
Psalmody - After six years more, they agreed to sing on the thanksgiving days; but it required still fourteen years more before he could persuade them to sing every Lord's day; and then it was only after the last prayer, that those who chose it might withdraw without joining in it! Nor did even this satisfy these scrupulous consciences; for, after all, a separation took place, and the inharmonious seceders formed a new church in May's Pond, where it was above twenty years longer before singing the Praises of God could be endured. The Presbyterians, it seems, were not quite so unmusical; for the Directory of the Westminster divines distinctly stated, that "it is the duty of Christians to Praise God publicly by singing of Psalms together in the congregation
Proverbs, Book of - Between the two a little piece ( Proverbs 27:23-27 ) Praises the life of a farmer. It does not so much give wise counsel of a concrete kind, as Praise the wisdom illustrated in the concrete counsels of the following sections
Music - We have in Scripture canticles of joy, of thanksgiving, of Praise, of mourning; also mournful elegies or songs, as those of David on the death of Saul and Abner, and the Lamentations of Jeremiah on the destruction of Jerusalem; so, too, songs of victory, triumph, and gratulation, as that which Moses sung after passing the Red Sea, that of Deborah and Barak, and others
Palm Tree - " (Psalms 90:10) What a lovely palm tree then is the real follower of the Lord Jesus, if thus living to extreme old age he still brings forth fruit to the Praise of the Lord's grace, "some thirty fold, some sixty fold, some au hundred fold!" So speaks the Holy Ghost concerning the faithful: "Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God; they shall still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be fat and flourishing; to shew that the Lord is upright: he is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him
Election - Since they belong to God, they are to be separate from sin and uncleanness, bringing Praise to him (Isaiah 43:21; Ephesians 1:12; 2 Thessalonians 2:13; see HOLINESS)
Olympias, the Younger - 383), "but it exhibits a highly-wrought complimentary" tone, full of "bold and lavish Praise" of her many signal virtues which is "too widely remote from the mind and taste of our own times to be fairly estimated by us
Death of Christ - Life, as long as it lasts on earth, is to be lived to the Praise of the crucified and risen Lord, and the Praise of heaven is of "the Lamb who was slain" as "worthyto receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honour and glory and Praise" (Revelation 5:12 )
Synagogue - 2), by the recital of the Shema‛ (Deuteronomy 6:4-9; Deuteronomy 11:13; Deuteronomy 11:21, Numbers 15:37-41), was preceded by two benedictions, one containing the Praise of the Lord as the Giver of light in view of the rising sun each morning, and of the Withdrawer of the light of day each evening, and another containing the Praise of the Lord as Giver of the Law to Israel, His chosen people, and followed by one benediction beginning with a solemn attestation of the monotheistic truth proclaimed in the Shemâ‛, and ending with the Praise of God as the Redeemer of Israel with reference to the deliverance from Egypt mentioned in the closing verse of the Shemâ‛ chapters (Numbers 15:41)
Lois And Eunice - But he is a Jew who is one inwardly: and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit, and not in the letter whose Praise is not of men but of God. I will reprehend them in private, and Praise them in public
Simon Magus - With Simon Magus it was the Praise of men, and their crowding round him, and their adulation of him. " Now, answer this, as we shall all answer it one day-What about the thoughts of your heart? Are the self-seeking, self-exalting thoughts of your heart dwelt on and indulged, or are they the greatest shame to you, and the greatest torment to you, of your life? Do you hate your own heart as you would hate hell itself, if you were about to be cast down into it? Do you beat your breast and cry out, Oh, wretched man that I am! Has the law entered, and is the law-work deep enough, and spiritual enough, to make all the Simon Magus-like thoughts of your hearts to be an inward pain and shame to you past all knowledge, and past all belief about you, of mortal man? His thoughts, that is, of self-advertisement, self-exaltation, and self-congratulation? Does the Praise of men puff you up, and make you very happy? And is their silence, or their absence, something you cannot get over? Is he a good man who follows you about, and believes in you, and applauds you: and is he an unpardonably bad man who prefers Philip, and Peter, and John to Simon Magus? Then, be not deceived, God is not mocked, and neither are the self-discerning men round about you
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - "-And this Epistle pays the same Praise to the minister of Philadelphia for the way he preached his Master's name, and his Master's name only, in every sermon of his. Even with as little strength as there was in Philadelphia and Kirriemuir, a minister will win great Praise, both from God and from God's people, if he keeps close to God's word and more and more holds up God's name
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - This is he who thinks that sermons are provided by God and man for him to Praise or blame as suits his fancy. ' And, then, to keep His ministers from being puffed up with such idle Praise as yours, God says to them-"Thou son of man, the children of thy people are still talking of thee by the walls and in the doors of their houses
Christ - But it is of Christ, as Christ, the Christ of God, both natures united, and forming one glorious Mediator, suited to make up (and which, to the Praise of the riches of his grace, he hath most completely done), the deadly breach which sin had made between God and man. And now having accomplished redemption by his blood, he is, and ever will be, the One glorious object of adoration, love, and Praise, to all the creation of God, angels, and men, to all eternity
Barnabas - He will thus win the battle, and then he will not mind much either the Praise or the blame that comes to him for his successful act of disobedience. " To have the heart to discover a more talented man than yourself, and then to have the heart to go to Tarsus for him, and to make way for him in Antioch, is far better than to have all Saul's talents, and all the Praise and all the rewards of those talents to yourself. The evening Praises the day, and the chief grace of the theatre is the last scene
Jude, Theology of - Through him Praise is offered to God (v
Malachi - The "incense and pure offering from the rising to the setting of the sun" points on to the spiritual sacrifices of self devotion, prayer, and Praise under the gospel, based on the once for all completed sacrifice of Messiah (Psalms 141:2; Revelation 8:3; Hebrews 13:10; Hebrews 13:15-16; Romans 12:1; 1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:12); in every place (John 4:21-24; 1 Timothy 2:8)
Expiation, Propitiation - The only sacrifices now required of the Christian are those of Praise and thanksgiving, which take the form of worship in spirit and in truth and the obedience of discipleship (Romans 12:1 ; Hebrews 13:15-16 ; 1 Peter 2:5 )
Prayer - The Psalms teach variety and honesty in prayer are permissible; they proclaim Praise, ask pardon, seek such things as communion (63), protection (57), vindication (107), and healing (6)
Gestures - Dancing shows joy (Exodus 15:20 ; Judges 11:34 ) and celebration in Praise (2 Samuel 6:16 ; Psalm 149:3 )
Creation - Unlike the works of art, the more it is examined, the more it opens to us sources of admiration of its great Author; the more it calls for our inspection, and the more it demands our Praise
Sign - The sign of the healing of a lame man led to the Praise of God in Acts 4:16 ,Acts 4:16,4:21
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - The Old Testament lacks an independent vocabulary of thanksgiving or gratitude; it uses the verb yada [1], and the cognate noun toda [2], both ordinarily translated as "praise, " to convey the concept
Gods - Joshua, ‘In what manner is the Resurrection of the dead proved from the Law?’ with the answer that it is said in Psalms 84:4 ‘They shall Praise thee’; not ‘they have Praised thee
Samaritan Pentateuch - I Praise Jehovah
Ate - ...
Psalm 100:4 (b) By this expression we understand that we come in prayer and Praise by faith before GOD to worship and to adore Him
Dionysius of Alexandria - of Caesarea in his Praise (Steph
Gather - 62:9): “But they that have gathered [1] it [2] shall eat it and Praise the Lord; and they that have brought it [3] together shall drink it in the courts of my holiness
Patience - 1, which is all in Praise of patience (μακροθυμία): ‘In patience the Lord dwells, but in hot wrath the devil’ (v
Joannes Cappadox, Bishop of Constantinople - The vaults resounded with acclamations in Praise of God, the emperor, St
Manes, Called Also Mani - It is a most important document, and well deserves the Praise the learned editor lavishes upon it in his introduction
Patience - 1, which is all in Praise of patience (μακροθυμία): ‘In patience the Lord dwells, but in hot wrath the devil’ (v
Grace - ...
In Ephesians 1:6 Paul speaks of the "glorious grace" of God, which should garner our Praise. Of course, once again, Paul is not expecting us to Praise an abstract comment, but he is thinking of the grace of God working so mightily in his life that it becomes a metonymy for God. All of this elective work is so that we might "praise his glorious grace
Job, the Book of - Others have seen similarities between Job and the Egyptian poems concerning “The Protest of the Eloquent Peasant” and “A Dispute Over Suicide” or the Babylonian poems of “The Babylonian Theodicy” and “I Will Praise the Lord of Wisdom. This should lead Job to confess his sin and Praise God
Heresy - In the two former of these passages, the term heresy seems to be adopted by the sacred historian merely for the sake of distinction, without the least appearance, of any intention to convey either Praise or blame. When it is used along with the proper name, by way of distinguishing one party from another, it conveys neither Praise nor reproach
Predestination - The Divine choice rested upon them and took effect in them not because of their merits or attainments, not because God foresaw in them a holiness and a faith marking them out as recipients of eternal favour and blessing, but ‘according to the good pleasure of his will, to the Praise of the glory of his grace. So shall this doctrine afford matter of Praise, reverence, and admiration of God, and of humility, diligence, and abundant consolation to all that sincerely obey the Gospel
Joel - God will replace fear and shame with joy and Praise (Chronicles 15:11,1 )
Timothy - The Praise and the censure agree with Timothy's character, as it appears in Acts and the epistles
Worship - ...
The Psalms with expressions of lament, confession, thanksgiving, Praise, teaching, and celebration show the breadth of Old Testament worship
Malachi, Theology of - Ultimately, offerings and Praise will be brought to the Lord from all over the world (1:11), a prediction that especially looks forward to the inclusion of Gentiles in the New Testament church
Rock - The rock was to be spoken to the second time, which indicates that we are only to come to Him m prayer and Praise With our petitions and receive again the abundance of forgiveness, and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit
Nahum, Theology of - ...
The book begins with a hymn of Praise to God the divine warrior. It Praises the Lord, who brings judgment against his enemies (1:2-6) and salvation to h is people (1:7-8)
Gentiles (2) - In His public teaching He showed no prejudice in favour of the Jews in His assignment of Praise and blame: the grateful leper whom He blessed was a Samaritan (Luke 17:16 ff
Providence - ...
The Lord maketh the wrath of man to Praise him, as he maketh the hail and the rain obey his word
Burial - 2 Chronicles 35:25, Jeremiah 9:17), who lamented for the dead in some such strains as are preserved in Jeremiah 22:18, and skilfully improvised verses in Praise of his virtues
Simeon - Has Mary's Son, then; has God's Son, been a stumbling stone to me? Or, has He been the one foundation laid in Zion for me? Has He, to my everlasting salvation, and to His everlasting Praise, lifted me up from all my falls and made me to stand upon His righteousness as upon a rock? Simeon himself had at one time stumbled and been broken on this child, and on His too great name
Ephesians, Epistle to the - Jews and Gentiles are the subjectsof salvation according to the purpose of God, believers from among both beingsealed by the Holy Spirit, who is also the earnest of their inheritance — aninheritance which will be to the Praise of God's glory when everything is headed up in Christ
Judgment, Last - "But it is supposed by others, that though the making known of sin that is subdued and forgiven, tends to the advancement of divine grace, yet it is sufficient to answer this end, as far as God designs it shall be answered, that the sins which have been subdued and forgiven, should be known to themselves, and thus forgiveness afford matter of Praise to God
Mediator - " And then, as if to put to silence the ignorance of foolish men, who allow Jesus Christ to be the Mediator, but deny him that GODHEAD by which alone the Lord Christ could be competent to this high office of Mediator, be adds "I am the Lord, that is my name, and my glory will I not give to another, neither my Praise to graven images:" hereby plainly proving, that as this office of Mediator is carried on and exercised to the glory of JEHOVAH, so none but one in JEHOVAH could be competent to perform it
Righteous, To Be - … And my tongue shall speak of thy righteousness and of thy Praise all the day long” ( Necessitarians - They insist that necessity doth not render actions less morally good; for, if necessary virtue be neither moral nor Praiseworthy, it will follow that God himself is not a moral being, because he is a necessary one; and the obedience of Christ cannot be good, because it was necessary. It is also agreed that some actions deserve Praise, and afford an inward satisfaction; but for this, there would be no foundation, if we were invincibly determined in every volition: so that approbation and blame are consequent on free actions only
Petrus ii., Archbaptist of Alexandria - Peter was commanded to withdraw; he refused; the church doors were forced, and the brutal orgies described in Athanasius's Encyclical were repeated: a youth in female dress danced upon the altar; another sat naked on the throne, and delivered a mock sermon in Praise of vice (cf
Vigilantius - He wrote with a certain zeal for religion; but was led astray by the Praise of men, and presumed beyond his strength; and being a man of elegant speech but not trained in discerning the sense of the Scriptures, interpreted in a perverse manner the second vision of Daniel, and put forth other works of no value, which must be placed in the catalogue of heretical writings
Apocrypha - Jerusalem is to be scourged for her children’s works, but she is to give Praise to the everlasting King that ‘afterwards his tabernacle may be builded’ in her ‘again with joy. All generations shall Praise her with great joy. ‘And all her streets shall say Hallelujah; and they shall Praise him, saying, Blessed be God, which hath exalted it for ever’ (To 13:9–18). In a fine passage she celebrates her own Praises, glorying in the midst of her people, saying—...
‘I came forth from the mouth of the Most High,...
And covered the earth as a mist. For instance, the opening passage, describing how Wisdom stood up in the congregation of the Most High to celebrate her own Praises, would lose all its force of appeal if it were taken in prosaic literalness. —The eloquent celebration of the Praises of wisdom in this book, which probably dates from the 1st cent
Song of Songs - ’ The opening words of the Targum are equally strong: ‘Songs and Praises which Solomon the prophet, the king of Israel, spake by the Holy Spirit before Jahweh, the Lord of the whole world. Ten songs were sung in that day, but this song was more to be Praised than they all. ’ The Midrash asserts that ‘Canticles is the most excellent of songs, dedicated to Him who one day will cause the Holy Ghost to rest on us; it is that song in which God Praises us and we Him. In Song of Solomon 1:9 to Song of Solomon 2:8 we have their Praise of each other; in Song of Solomon 2:4-7 her experience of love. ( Song of Solomon 5:2 to Song of Solomon 6:9 ): Song of Solomon 5:2-8 a dream, Song of Solomon 5:8 to Song of Solomon 6:8 wasf sung by bride; Song of Solomon 5:4-9 his Praise of her
Church, the - With regard to the order of worship, the early church incorporated into its worship the main elements of the synagogue service: Praise in prayer (Acts 2:42,47 ; 3:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 1:2 ; 5:17 ; 1 Timothy 2:1-2 ; etc. ); and the sacrifice of one's Praise to God (Acts 16:25 ; 1 Corinthians 14:26 ; Ephesians 5:19 ; Colossians 3:16 ; Hebrews 13:16 ; James 5:13 ; etc
Collection - It is instructive, too, to note how he stimulates each community by mentioning the others in terms of generous Praise (cf. It is satisfactory to note that this intense and proud independence was met by a complete reconciliation; and the success of his mission was such that he was moved to exclamations of thankfulness and Praise (2 Corinthians 9:15)
Sarah - Admire, Hagar, and Praise. And when He had humbled thee, and tried thee, and utterly broken and silenced thee, He came near at the well of Shur to thee, and these, to His everlasting Praise, were His words to thee, 'Fear not, for thou shalt not be confounded
Word - Creation in turn speaks words of Praise to its Creator (Psalm 19:1-4 ). Accordingly, God's word demands proper human response; it is to be obeyed (Joshua 24:27 ; Deuteronomy 11:18-21 ; Ezekiel 33:32 ), feared (Exodus 9:20-21 ; Ezra 9:4 ; Psalm 119:161 ; Isaiah 66:2,5 ), Praised (Psalm 56:4,10 ), preserved (Jeremiah 23:36 ), and proclaimed to others (Deuteronomy 5:5 ; 1 Samuel 3:31-4:1 ; Nehemiah 8:14-15 ; Jeremiah 11:6 ). The righteous speak truth and wisdom to the Praise and glory of God (2 Samuel 22:1 ; Job 33:3 ; Psalm 15:2 ; 19:14 ; Proverbs 16:23 ), but the wicked speak folly and lies (Proverbs 12:23 ) and blaspheme God (2 Kings 19:6 ) and his Spirit (Matthew 12:31-32 )
David - in His Services - But David was as much Praised and as much paid for his good intention to build the temple as if he had lived to see the golden towers of God's house shining in the Sabbath sun. Because Thy loving-kindness is better than life, my lips shall Praise Thee. My soul shall be satisfied as with marrow and fatness, and my mouth shall Praise Thee with joyful lips when I remember Thee upon my bed, and meditate on Thee in the night watches
Preaching - Then he offered up prayer and Praise to God. Those writers whom we call the fathers, however, held up to view by some as models for imitation, do not deserve that indiscriminate Praise ascribed to them
Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
Allow, Luke 11:48—to Praise; to approve
Jeremiah - At the same time he sang hymns of Praise to his God (Jeremiah 20:13 )
Prayer - Concerning other aspects of prayer see CONFESSION; FASTING; Praise; WORSHIP
Election - It is rather a stronghold in time of trial and a confession of Praise to God's grace and to His glory
Cherub (1) - In Revelation they reveal who and what they are, and sing the song of Praise for their redemption (Revelation 5:8-9)
Bible, Methods of Study - The final test to an adequate interpretation of the Bible is whether it leads to gratitude and Praise, to service and mission
Herod - The fact, however, that God over-ruled their evil intentions for good, and caused their wrath to Praise Him, though it redounds to His own glory and augments the wonder of His working, is not regarded as any alleviation of their guilt
Slave, Slavery (2) - Supreme Praise is passed upon service marked by absolute submission (Mark 10:44)
Bible, - ...
This is but a brief and incomplete sketch of the contents of the Bible, for who can in few or indeed in many words describe that wonderful God-made Book? It is an inexhaustible mine: the more it is explored, the more is the finger of God manifest everywhere, and new treasures are revealed to the devout, calling forth their Praise and adoration
Exodus - Israel offers thanks in a hymn of Praise ( Exodus 15:1 ); but soon in the wilderness tempts Jahweh by murmuring for water ( Exodus 15:22-25 a, Exodus 15:27 , Exodus 17:3 ; Exodus 17:2 b, Exodus 17:7 )
Fruit - The list may be supplemented, for example, by Hebrews 13:15, where ‘praise’ is the fruit of a thankful heart expressed by the lips, and Romans 15:28, where the generosity of the Gentile Christians towards the Judaea n poor is the fruit of the spiritual blessing which St
Drunkenness - ’ Yet even Omar Khayyam, after all his Praise of the Vine, is obliged to confess that he has ‘drowned his glory in a shallow cup’; and, in the light of Christianity, drunkenness stands condemned as a sin against the body which is a ‘member of Christ
Ecbatana - " The following is the corresponding inscription on the sarcophagus of Esther: "I Praise thee, O God, that thou hast created me! I know that my sins merit punishment, yet I hope for mercy at thy hands; for whenever I call upon thee, thou art with me; thy holy presence secures me from all evil
Priest - bids us offer to God the sacrifice of Praise ( Hebrews 13:15 ), or declares that God is well pleased with such sacrifices as kindly deeds and gifts of Christian liberality ( Hebrews 13:16 ); and the seer of the Apocalypse speaks of the prayers of all the saints as rising up like incense from the golden altar before the throne ( Revelation 8:3 )
Paulus of Samosata, Patriarch of Antioch - 129), and to have introduced others in Praise of himself, which were sung in full church on Easter Day by a choir of women, causing the hearts of the faithful to shudder at the impious language which extolled Paul as an angel from heaven
Dead Sea Scrolls - The longest is the Thanksgiving Scroll (1QH), a collection of psalms of thanksgiving and Praise. The songs seem to follow a certain progression over the thirteen-week cycle: songs 1-5 focus on the earthly worshiping community; songs 6-8 shift the attention to the heavenly worship, highlighting the number seven, which is developed elaborately in Song of Solomon 7 in seven calls to Praise directed to the seven angelic priesthoods; and songs 9-13 center on the features of the heavenly sanctuary and the participants in the heavenly worship
Ephesians Epistle to the - ...
But neither of these dangers has come to the front in any special form, and the dominant note of the Epistle is not one of warning, but one of Praise and thanksgiving. This section falls into three strophes, marked by the refrain ‘unto the Praise of his glory,’ and corresponding to the three Persons of the Trinity
Revelation of John, the - All Praise falls short of its merits. Smyrna and Philadelphia alone receive unmixed Praise, as faithful in tribulation and rich in works of love
Holy, Holiness - All of heaven's hosts, Israel, and the church ascribe Praise to a holy God because that idea sets him apart from everything else (Exodus 15:11 ; Isaiah 6:3 ; Revelation 4:8 ). Sexual purity within and without marriage, real and submissive lifestyle commitments that cause unbelievers to reflect on the nature of the Christian God, blamelessness of heart, good works, contentment, and constant Praise are but a few of the results of the new nature God both imputes and imparts to the New Testament believer
Election - Israel was chosen to spread abroad the Divine glory, and God designates them by His prophet ‘My chosen, the people which I formed for myself, that they might set forth my Praise’ (Isaiah 43:20-21). Paul in the Epistle to the Ephesians, where the spiritual blessings enjoyed in such abundance by them are traced up to their election by God-‘even as he chose us in him (Christ) before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blemish before him in love: having foreordained us unto adoption as sons through Jesus Christ unto himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the Praise of the glory of his grace’ (Ephesians 1:4-6)
Eli - What Eli is to be Praised for is this-not that he felt no envy of Samuel; but that, feeling envy every day, as he could not fail to feel it, he kept his envy down, and did not let it come out in his treatment of Samuel. If the Baptist had no envy and no jealousy of his fast-rising Cousin, then he has all that the less Praise for his noble reply to his envious and jealous disciples. What! not know the Lord, and they born and brought up within the very precincts of the Lord's house! Were not the first sounds they heard the Praises of God in His sanctuary? Were not the first sights they saw their father in his robes beside the altar with all the tables, and the bread, and the sacrifices, and the incense round about him? And yet, there it is in black and white; there it is in blood and tears-'The sons of Eli were sons of Belial; they knew not the Lord. The sorrows of death compassed me, and the pains of hell gat hold on me; but Thou hast brought up my life from the pit that I might show forth Thy Praise
Temptation, Trial - Those whose faith withstands manifold temptations shall receive Praise and glory and honour (1 Peter 1:6 f
Abraham - Thus Christians can speak confidently of Abraham as "the father of the faithful, " and Praise a merciful God because it was through his fidelity in remote ages that our eternal salvation has become an actuality
Sacrifice - The typical sense of the meat offering or peace offering is less connected the sacrifice of Christ himself than with those sacrifices of Praise, thanksgiving, charity and devotion which we, as Christians, offer to God, and "with which he is well pleased," (Hebrews 13:15,16 ) as with an odor of sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable to God
Appreciation (of Christ) - ...
But the simplest appreciation of all—as natural as a bird’s song or a child’s Praise—is that which threads its way through every page of the Gospels
Brother - Thou art he whom thy brethren shall Praise; thine hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies; and all thy Father's children shall bow down before thee
Psalms, Book of, - The present Hebrew name of the book is Tehill'im , "Praises;" but in the actual superscriptions of the psalms the word Tehillah is applied only to one, ( Psalm 145:1 ) . which is indeed emphatically a Praise-hymn
Methodius - As in Plato's Symposium the Praises of Love are celebrated, so here are proclaimed the glories of Virginity. Eubulius, or Eubulium, receives from a virgin Gregorion an account of a banquet in the gardens of Areté, not under Plato's plane-tree, but under an agnus-castus, in which ten virgin guests, at their hostess's command, pronounce ten successive discourses in Praise of chastity
Worship - The command to publish the Gospel includes the obligation of assembling to hear it; the name by which a Christian society is designated in Scripture is a church; which signifies an assembly for the transaction of business; and, in the case of a Christian assembly, that business must necessarily be spiritual, and include the sacred exercises of prayer, Praise, and hearing the Scriptures. Praise calls forth the grateful emotions, and gives cheerfulness to piety; and that instruction in righteousness which is so perpetually repeated, diffuses the principles of morality and religion throughout society; enlightens and gives activity to conscience; raises the standard of morals; attaches shame to vice, and Praise to virtue; and thus exerts a powerfully purifying influence upon mankind
Woman - Perhaps the paradigm of God's sovereignty through the grace of unlikely heroines is the story of Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, who believes in the God of the Israelites, protects their spies from her own officials (Joshua 2 ), and becomes one of the great persons of faith Praised in Hebrews 11 (v. In two instances their faith is particularly Praised (the hemmorhaging woman Matthew 9:22 ), even when one is not a Jew but a Syrophoenician (Matthew 15:21-28 anticipating the church's ministry to Gentiles ). The later, similar actions of Mary of Bethany elicit Jesus' Praise in language evocative of the memorializing of Jesus himself in the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:9 )!...
Women play an important role among Jesus' followers. Jesus specifically Praises Mary of Bethany for choosing to "sit at his feet" and learn from him (Luke 10:38-42 )a quasi-technical reference to a disciple being trained by a rabbi and a practice usually denied to women in Jewish circles. Both Elizabeth and Zechariah Praise under the Spirit's inspiration (Luke 1:41-45,67-79 ). Paul calls Euodia and Syntyche his fellow workers ( Philippians 4:2-3 ) and frequently Praises women as co-laborers in ministry (Romans 16:6,12 )
Holiness Purity - In Revelation 4:8 it is the ζῷα who offer the ascription of Praise in the form of the Trisagion. ’...
‘In its primary sense the word Implies no moral Praise or merit; but it came, not unnaturally, to be connected with the idea chesed as “loving-kindness” between man and man, and to be used of the character which reflected that love of which it was itself the object; and finally was applied oven to God Himself
Adam - ...
Praise to the Holiest in the height,And in the depth he Praise;In all His words most wonderful,Most sure in all His ways
Creation - ...
The psalmists' concerns with God as Creator were related to people's place in creation (Psalm 8:3-4 ), to God's redemptive activity (Psalm 74:17 ; Psalm 95:5 ), and to Praise for the Creator (Psalm 100:3 ; Psalm 104:1 ; Psalm 24:1-2 )
Daniel, Book of - Interpretation and fulfillment of the king's dream leads the king to Praise God (Daniel 4:1-37 )
Apostles - Ultimately Paul proved his apostleship not by asserting personal authority or demanding Praise from other people
Lord's Prayer, the - It is significant that the Model Prayer for Christians is not Praise, thanksgiving, meditation, or contemplation, but petition
Ezra, Book of - God's people Praise Him in success or in disappointment. God blesses His workers and expects to be Praised
Daemoniac - Should any person, in compliance with popular opinions, talk in serious language of the existence, dispositions, declarations, and actions of a race of beings whom he knew to be absolutely fabulous, we surely could not Praise him for integrity: we must suppose him to be either exulting in irony over the weak credulity of those around him, or taking advantage of their weakness, with the dishonesty and selfish views of an impostor
Philistim - How is the wrath of man made to Praise his Creator! Hath he not said, and shall he not do it? The oracle was delivered by the mouth of the prophet more than five hundred years before the Christian era, and we beheld its accomplishment eighteen hundred years after that event
Individualism - The State is, when it keeps to its own sphere, simply the big policeman, ‘a terror to evil-doers,’ and also, in so far as it kindly lets them alone, ‘a Praise to them that do well. To suppose that He was tempted merely by His own hunger and love of success and love of Praise, is to ascribe to Him motives which had no power over Him at other times
Preaching - Then he offered up prayer and Praise to God, the people bowing their heads, and worshipping the Lord with their faces to the ground; and, at the close of the prayer, with uplifted hands, they solemnly pronounced, Amen, Amen. Those writers whom we call the Fathers, however, imitation, do not deserve that indiscriminate Praise ascribed to them
Judas Iscariot (2) - Judah (יהוּדָה), which in Genesis 29:35 is derived from the verb ‘to Praise’ (יָדָה), and is taken as meaning ‘one who is the subject of Praise’ (cf
Rufinus of Aquileia - 28), and whom he Praises in his Ecclesiastical History (ii. " Jerome also, early in their stay at Jerusalem, spoke of Rufinus with highest Praise, mentioning in his Chronicle ( sub ann. He pointed out also that he was not the first translator of Origen, but that Jerome, whom he did not name but clearly indicated, and of whom he spoke in high Praise, had in the time of Damasus translated many of Origen's works, and in the prefaces (especially that to the Song of Songs) had Praised Origen beyond measure. If the Praises he bestows are not, as Jerome called them, "fictae laudes," they are certainly used for a purpose to which Jerome would not have given his sanction, and their use in view of the controversy at Jerusalem, without any allusion to Jerome's altered attitude towards Origen, was ungenerous and misleading
Mark, the Gospel According to - Jesus' rebuke of Peter is recorded, but His preeminent Praise of him is omitted (Mark 8:32-33; compare Matthew 16:18; Matthew 16:23)
Sea - In Revelation 5:13, also, by a sweep of prophetic imagination, even sea-monsters join with departed spirits in a doxology of Praise to the Lamb; while in Revelation 10:6 the thought of God’s creatorship, of earth and heaven and sea, prepares the way for the announcement that the God of creation and providence is also a God of judgment
Apocalyptic - 13), with this final shout of Praise echoed by an "Amen!" back at the center
Covenant - The special end of the covenant of works was the manifestation of the holiness, goodness, and justice of God; but the special end of the covenant of grace, is the Praise of the glory of his grace, and the revelation of his unsearchable and manifold wisdom
Leviticus - Offer Yourself in Praise and Adoration to God (Leviticus 1:1-7:38 )
Altar - This altar alone appears there, namely, that of prayer and Praise
Mary - " If, as we have before noticed, and from the authority of Scripture, Christ's body was the Father's gift, (Hebrews 10:5) and if the Holy Ghost, in his overshadowing power, was the almighty: worker in the dark place of the virgin's womb, here called "the lowest parts of the earth," what blessedness is given to the view of the subject amidst all the mysteriousness of it, and how are we taught to honour, reverence, love, and Praise the whole united persons of the GODHEAD for those wonders of redemption by Jesus Christ
Feasts - , 17), and the rich courting the Praise of liberality
Discipline - ‘If there be any virtue, and if there be any Praise,’ the brethren are to ‘think on,’ or ‘take account of,’ ‘whatsoever things are true, honourable, just, pure, lovely, of good report
Timothy, Epistles to - The mention of it calls forth a burst of Praise from Paul
Prophets - The title of prophets is given also to the sacred musicians, who sung the Praises of God, or who accompanied the song with musical instruments. Thus the Heathen poets, who sung or composed verses in Praise of their gods, were called by the Romans vates, or prophets; which is of the same import with the Greek προφητης , a title which St
Predestination - to be ‘made a heritage,’ and this ‘to the end that we should be unto the Praise of his glory’ (v
Inspiration And Revelation - The beneficent ordering of Nature turned his thoughts to thankfulness and Praise (Psalms 65, 104). ; Psalms 77:11-20; Psalms 105; Psalms 106, Habakkuk 3 are typical retrospects of the hand of God in Israel’s history; Proverbs 8:22-31, Job 28, Sirach 24, Wisdom 7, 8 are equally typical examples of the Praise of Divine Wisdom as expressed in creation and in the ordering of human life
Ideas (Leading) - In the former passage, the whole subject of rewards and motives is dealt with, and the end which is to govern our religious life (Matthew 6:1-18) and our secular life (Matthew 6:19-29) is declared to be, not the Praise of men (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16), not earthly rewards (Matthew 6:19; Matthew 6:25), but God’s Kingdom and God’s righteousness (Matthew 6:33). First, the prevailing wrong motives are pointed out: the Praise of men which too often destroys the reality of the religious life (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16; Matthew 6:18); greed of gain, the laying up of earthly treasures (Matthew 6:19-24), which makes the ‘single eye’ impossible; anxiety for the necessaries of life, food and clothing, things that will surely be given us if we live a true life (Matthew 6:25-34)
Complacency - Luke record—Christ’s ascription of Praise to the Father who ‘hid these things from the wise and prudent, and revealed them unto babes’ (Matthew 11:25 ff. || Luke 9:47-48); while the value which He attached to their faith and devotion is clearly shown in the incident of the children in the Temple, when Jesus silenced the cavils of the Pharisees and priests, and demanded, ‘Have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected Praise?’ (Matthew 21:16)
Peter Epistles of - ...
(b) Praise to God for the surety of ultimate salvation (1 Peter 1:3-12). Moreover, by a correct and cautious mode of conduct they may hope to gain the favour of the governor who is thought capable of giving Praise to them that do well (1 Peter 2:14), while even their accusers may be silenced and put to shame by the Christians’ good manner of life in Christ (1 Peter 2:15, 1 Peter 3:16)
Nehemiah, Theology of - Their manner of Praise and worship goes back to the commandments of David and Solomon
Jerusalem - The walls will be called salvation, and its gates Praise
Sacrifice - Christians offer to God the sacrifices of worship, Praise and service (Romans 15:16; Philippians 4:18; Hebrews 13:15)
Exodus, Book of - Moses' father-in-law Jethro brought Moses' wife and children back to him in the wilderness and Praised God for all that He had done for Moses and the people. God's people Praise Him for their deliverance (Exodus 15:1-21 )
the Penitent Thief - It was of the thief, and of his alone and so transcendent faith, that our Lord spoke in such Praise and in such reproof to Thomas eight days afterwards, and said, 'Blessed is he in heaven with Me this day, who saw nothing but shame, and defeat, and death in Me, and yet so believed in Me, and so cheered Me that day
Animals - Because they are created by God, all creation, including animals, should Praise God (Psalm 148:7-10 ; Romans 14:1-43 ; cf
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - To correct these defects, to Praise their graces, and to testify his love, is Paul's aim in this epistle
Reward - Here, too, the reward is homogeneous with the service; it simply consists in this, that faith is recognized, and receives glory, Praise, and honour at the return of Christ (1 Peter 1:7)
Kings, 1 And 2 - ...
Of the kings of Judah, only Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:3-7 ) and Josiah (1 Kings 1:1-27 ) were Praised without reservation because they adhered to these two principles. Asa (1 Kings 15:11-14 ), Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:41-43 ), Jehoash (2 Kings 12:2-3 ), Azariah (2 Kings 15:3-4 ), and Jotham (2 Kings 15:34-35 ) were Praised as having done what was right in the eyes of the Lord, but their Praise is qualified with the addition that they allowed the worship of foreign gods to continue in Judah
Life - It is for this reason that the psalmist concludes, "Let everything that has breath Praise the Lord" (Psalm 150:6 ; cf
Salvation - The psalms are replete with Praise for God's salvation, which is experienced as joy (51:12)
Lord's Supper, the - ...
The key theological elements of the Lord's Supper as it was celebrated in the early church are: (1) the proclamation of the death of Jesus through "memorial" and "remembrance" and a sacrifice of Praise and thanksgiving; (2) the inauguration of the new covenant in the sacrificial blood of Jesus; (3) the participation and fellowship in Christ unto the Father, and with one another in Christ; (4) the experiencing the firstfruit of the joy of the eschatological kingdom of God; (5) the presence of the Spirit of the Father to vivify; and (6) the presence of faith, which is faithful and obedient, in the hearts of believers
Hosanna - Matthew, the dative is used alike in the OT (Psalms 3:8 ‘Salvation belongeth unto the Lord’) and in the NT in a passage based upon that Psalm (Revelation 7:10 ‘Salvation unto our God; and unto the Lamb’); while there is surely nothing ‘senseless’ in the thought that the salvation which God gives, or sends, to men should fill the highest heaven with rejoicings in His Praise
Glory - ...
As applied to men and things, δόξα has two principal meanings: (1) honour, Praise, good repute (2 Corinthians 6:8, 1 Thessalonians 2:6); (2) that which by exciting admiration brings honour or renown; a natural perfection (1 Peter 1:24 : ‘the glory of flesh’; 1 Corinthians 15:40-41 : ‘glory of the celestial … the terrestrial,’ etc
Kindness (2) - God’s goodness and graciousness are gratefully celebrated in the Psalms; witness the refrain of Psalms 107, ‘Oh that men would Praise the Lord for his goodness (הַסרּוֹ)!’ Stress on this Divine quality is the great characteristic of Hosea
the Widow With the Two Mites - "O God, thou art my God," she kept saying to herself all the way up from her own impoverished house with the two mites in her hand; "my soul shall be satisfied as with marrow and fatness; and my mouth shall Praise Thee with joyful lips, when I remember Thee upon my bed, and meditate on Thee in the night watches
Holiness - When Isaiah saw Christ's glory, (see Isaiah 6:1-13 compared with John 12:41) the acclamations of the heavenly host resounded to the Praises of JEHOVAH, under thrice ascriptions of the same, to the holiness of the Lord. (Psalms 96:9) And Moses's song celebrates the Lord's Praise, in being glorious in holiness. "Ye are (saith Peter) a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people, that ye should shew forth the Praises of Him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light
David - ...
The women's song in Praise of David raised the jealousy of Saul, who had more sense of his own importance than care for the Lord's people
Daniel, Book of - Now he could say, "I Nebuchadnezzar Praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase
Prayer - In a word, their intercourse with God passed through the whole scale of feeling from the low note of penitence to the highest notes of thanksgiving and Praise
Monnica - Ambrose fully understood Monnica's strength of Christian character and delighted to Praise her to her son (ib
Vincentius Lirinensis - The Praise given by Casaubon to the principles of the English Reformation, the challenge of Jewel, and a large consensus of 17th-cent
Gospels (Apocryphal) - Psalms 148:7 reads: ‘Praise the Lord from the earth, ye dragons’; accordingly, in pseudo-Matthew dragons are represented as coming out of a cave and worshipping the child Christ. On the other hand, their contemporaries, Zeno of Verona, and Prudentius, the greatest poet of early Christian times, drew from the Protevangelium in their works in Praise of Mary
Koran - ...
"The first Praise of all the productions of genius (continues this author) is invention; that quality of the mind, which, by the extent and quickness of its views, is capable of the largest conceptions, and of forming new combinations of objects the most distant and unusual. To this description who can refuse the Praise of magnificence? Part of that magnificence, however, is to be referred to that verse of the psalmist whence it was borrowed: 'He that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep, ' Psalms 121:4
Christianity - With them many great moral principles, being indistinctly apprehended, were matters of doubt and debate; to us, the explicit manner in which they are given excludes both:...
for it cannot be questioned, whether we are commanded to love our neighbour as ourselves; to do to others as we would that they should do to us, a precept which comprehends almost all relative morality in one plain principle; to forgive our enemies; to love all mankind; to live righteously and soberly, as well as godly; that magistrates must be a terror only to evil doers, and a Praise to them that do well; that subjects are to render honour to whom honour, and tribute to whom tribute, is due; that masters are to be just and merciful, and servants faithful and obedient. But we may ask farther, What success has it had on the mind of man, as it respects his eternal welfare? How many thousands have felt its power, rejoiced in its benign influence, and under its dictates been constrained to devote themselves to the glory and Praise of God! Burdened with guilt, incapable of finding relief from human resources, the mind has here found peace unspeakable in beholding that sacrifice which alone could atone for transgression
Jonah - His prayer, which fills the greater part of the chapter, is rather a psalm of Praise ( Jonah 2:2-9 )
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The New Testament reflects the continuing presence of a covenant consciousness in Zechariah's hymn of Praise (Luke 1:67-79 ) and the Epistle of Hebrews
Corinth - Also to Praise them for obeying his first epistle, and to charge them to pardon the transgressor, as already punished sufficiently (2 Corinthians 2:1-11; 2 Corinthians 7:6-16)
Time, Meaning of - Every time that Israel met for worship, it Praised God for that great day at the beginning of their history, when He delivered them from Egypt; it Praised Him also for every day of divine intervention. ...
The Temple is long since destroyed, yet Jews and Christians gather in holy places and at holy seasons to continue their Praise and renew their prayers
Ezekiel - ...
Besides Israel's spiritual relation to Christ as her Savior, she will perform a perfect outward service of sacrifice, (retrospectively referring to Christ's one propitiatory offering, lest this should be lost sight of in the glory of His kingdom), prayer, and Praise as a nation to her then manifested King reigning in the midst of her; and all nations shall join in that service, recognizing His divine kingship over themselves also
Election - They are ‘made a heritage, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his will’ ( Ephesians 1:11 ); or, as in an earlier verse, ‘according to the good pleasure of his will, to the Praise of the glory of his grace’ ( Ephesians 1:6 )
Sacrifice And Offering - The book ends with an encouragement to offer sacrifices of Praise to God through Christ
Revelation, Idea of - Here is the first instance of revelation, as it is by speech that the Creator orders his time-space universe from the beginning of its creaturely existence; "Praise the Lord, for he has spoken, " as the hymn notes, and in response to these first statements by Creator to creation, "Worlds his mighty voice obeyed
Paul as Sold Under Sin - And I accordingly admonish you, as many as need this admonition, and will take it at my hands, not to Praise yourselves because you are not yet sold under sin
Church Government - The ritual which Jewish and Christian elders regulate is similar-praise, reading of Scripture, exposition, and prayer
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - I Praise Thee, O Father, for all Thy soul-saving benefits. What is it, O Lord? what do we imagine to get by pleasing worms like ourselves, or by being Praised by them! What about being blamed by all men, if only we stand at last blameless before Thee
Thomas - That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, might be found unto Praise, and honour, and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - " Romaine also, was such a favourite with Chalmers as he grew in years and in grace that I cannot begin to quote his constant Praise of that fine spiritual writer
the Importunate Widow - When you cannot sleep, say At midnight will I rise and Praise Thee
Angel - , Three 26), and they Praise God ( 2Es 8:21 , Three 37)
Apostle - He says that to be an apostle at all is a great thing, and therefore to be illustrious amongst such persons is very high Praise; and ‘how great is the devotion of this woman, that she should be even counted worthy of the appellation of apostle!’ (Sanday-Headlam, ad loc
Jeroboam - Ahijah watched Jeroboam at his work, and he saw, till he could not be silent, that Jeroboam was fast undermining the walls of Jerusalem in his heart, all the time that he was receiving Praise and promotion for building those walls up with his hands
Naaman - And all a sinner's life, and all his greatness, and all his honour, and all his Praise is but dressing a dead body with rich ornaments, and sprinkling a sepulchre with sweet smells
Ananias And Sapphira - And Ananias was like Themistocles because of the Praises poured upon Barnabas by Peter, and by all the apostles, and by all the poor. Think of Ananias and Sapphira when all men Praise your generosity, or your Shakesperian genius, or your enormous emoluments. Be sure of this, that all Peter's Praises of Barnabas did not refresh Barnabas's heart half so much as they caused that sinful sleeplessness, and all its consequences, to Ananias and Sapphira
Alexander the Coppersmith - " And nothing but the nearness of eternity and the nothingness of time, and the still more nothingness of either the Praise or the blame of such men as Alexander; nothing but the constant presence of such things as these could support Paul and could keep his heart quiet and sweet under the malice and maltreatment of such a wicked man as the coppersmith
Psalms - The Jewish title for the whole book was ‘Book of Praises’: this referred directly to the subject-matter of the poems, and less directly than the Greek title to their musical character. Both titles take into account the majority of the poems rather than the whole; not all the Psalms were sung to musical accompaniment, and not all of them consist of Praise
Take - Each wit may Praise it for his own dear sake, ...
And hint he writ it, if the thing should take
Presence - The NT, indeed, enforces and illustrates the truth that the presence of God is often most vividly apprehended when a community of disciples, whether they be few or many, meet in His name for fellowship, Praise, and edification
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - and Hymns, including the poem of Secundinus in his Praise , in Eng
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - ...
From the first his poems were held in great honour; they are quoted with high Praise by Sidonius Apollinaris, Avitus, Leo, Isidore, Rabanus Maurus, Alcuin, etc
Sanctification, Sanctify - He ‘bought’ men with the ‘price’ of His blood the bodily ‘limbs’ along with the inner self so that we are no longer ‘our own’ and may not ‘live for ourselves,’ but are, from the hour we know this, men ‘living for God in Christ Jesus’; and Christ ‘presents’ His redeemed ‘to God as holy’ and makes them God’s ‘sure possession,’ destined ‘for the Praise of His glory’ (1 Corinthians 6:19 f
Sympathy - There is a tendency to prize feeling qua feeling, and to Praise and admire its possessor
Elect, Election - ...
God's elect are chosen specifically to show both God's Praise (1 Peter 2:9 ) and to live in obedience to Christ (1 Peter 1:2 )
Croisade, or Crusade - Their childish folly was encouraged by the monks and schoolmasters; and thousands of those innocents were conducted from the houses of their parents on the superstitious interpretation of these words: "Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings hast thou perfected Praise
Reality - —Though disdaining to flatter, Jesus was ever ready to recognize good, even when found in unexpected quarters, as we see in His Praise of the faith of the centurion at Capernaum (Matthew 8:10), and of the offering of the poor widow at the Temple (Mark 12:42-44)
Matthew, the Gospel of - Prayer is private seeking of forgiveness, not public search for Praise (Matthew 6:5-15 )
Gennesaret, Land of - All travelers—Seetzen, von Schubert, Ritter, Burckhardt, Robinson, Wilson, and Thomson—praise the fertility of this Plain, and all except Stanley (cf
Essenes - … And when they begin and when they end, they Praise God
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - Or he got some promotion, or Praise, or reward, that you had not humility and love enough to stomach
Call, Calling - ...
Another important section of the OT for our terminology is the ‘Praise of Wisdom,’ Proverbs 1-9
the Disobedient Prophet - Some temperaments are tempted at such times to eat and drink and smoke and talk all night to any listener if they have done well; and the same temperaments are just as much tempted to silence, and gloom, and bad temper if they have not done well: if they have not come up to themselves, and have not got the Praise they worked for and expected
the Ethiopian Eunuch - OUR Lord gave the Pharisees of His day this Praise, that they would compass sea and land to make one proselyte
Paul's Great Heaviness And Continual Sorrow of Heart - Right or wrong; Praise Paul or blame him; try to understand him, and to feel with him and for him, or no; the thing is as clear as day, that some iron or other has so entered Paul's soul, and an iron such, that it will never depart from his soul in this world
the Queen of Sheba - Oh that men would Praise the Lord for His goodness, and for His wonderful works to the children of men!' And, then, at the Name of the Lord, and without being told to do it, all the seamen standing on the shore lifted up their hands to heaven and proclaimed the Name of the Lord, and worshipped, saying, 'The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious
Sanballat - Violence shall no more be heard in thy land, wasting nor destruction within thy borders; but thou shalt call thy walls Salvation, and thy gates Praise
Agony - If the love of Christ has constrained many martyrs for His name to face rack and block, water and flame, and many other painful modes of death without shrinking, and even with the song of Praise upon the lips, is it at all likely that He Himself shrank back?...
(2) A more ingenious view, which has an apparent verbal justification in Matthew 26:38, Mark 14:34 (‘even unto death’), and Hebrews 5:7 (‘to save him from death’), is that Jesus felt Himself dying, and that He feared He would die before He could offer the great sacrifice for the sin of the world
Joab - O sacred chronicler, look well to your laurels! If once we take pen in hand, where would you be-Shimei, and Joab, and Absalom, and Ahithophel and all! O Lord, open Thou my lips, and I will show forth Thy Praise
Absalom - In all Israel there was none to be so much Praised as Absalom for his beauty. 'Praise them openly, reprehend them secretly,' is the second of Lord Burleigh's ten precepts to his son concerning his children
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - And more than that, Peter certified to the whole congregation that, when many who had been baptized, apostatised and went back and walked no more with John and Jesus, Matthias, said Peter, has this to his Praise, that he has endured and has persevered up to this very present
Nabal - ' Yes, constant fault-finding; constant correction, and that before strangers; gloomy looks; rough words and manners; all blame and no Praise-with these things we are all driving one another to the brink of the pond every day
Providence - The Lord maketh the wrath of man to Praise him," as he maketh the "hail and rain to obey his word
Lot - All our trades, professions, occupations in life have, each one, its own perils and temptations and snares to the soul; as well as its own opportunities of gain, and honour, and Praise, and service
Talents - In that parable the two slaves have unequal capacity, but they have exhibited the same zeal for their master, and achieved a similar result; that is, each has doubled his capital: accordingly they receive the same reward with the same warmth of Praise
Romans, Book of - ...
In the conclusion to the letter (Romans 15:14-16:27 ), Paul summarized his ministry and his plans for the future, requesting their prayers (Romans 15:14-33 ); then he commended Phoebe (Romans 16:1-2 ), sent greetings to individual Christians (Romans 16:3-24 ), and ended his letter with Praise for God—“to the only wise God through Jesus Christ be glory for endless ages! Amen” (Romans
Sacrifices - So not in a worldly but in a spiritual manner those who go out unto Jesus without the camp have the highest, happiest enjoyment of the friendship of God; Christ Himself by His sacred and faithful life and death is their temple, and there they ‘offer the sacrifice of Praise to God continually
Winter - Charles on this passage of Enoch is too significant to be omitted: ‘The Praise of wisdom was a favourite theme
Isaiah, Book of - 180, refers to Isaiah as one of the godly men of Israel, worthy of Praise, and, as afterwards (Isaiah 49:6-8 ) In the case of Ezekiel and of Jeremiah, he cites, or alludes to, certain sections which now stand in the book that bears the prophet’s name
God, Names of - Praise Jah). His name is to be Praised (Psalm 7:17 ; 9:2 )
Grace - ’† Samson - 'What profit is there in my blood,' our Samson cries, 'when I go down to the pit? Shall the dust Praise Thee? Shall it declare Thy truth? Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - Be like Bacon's uncle with his family; reprehend them in private and Praise them in public. Is it possible I should desire any one to speak any good of me, or to think it, when so many ill things were thought and spoken of Thee! What is this, Lord what do we imagine to get by pleasing worms, or by being Praised by creeping things! What about being blamed by all men, if only we stand at last blameless before Thee!"...
Zechariah, Theology of - It is good to worship God both with loud Praises and with silent devotion. Also, instead of the blood of dead animals, God desires us to offer our bodies as "living sacrifices" (Romans 12:1 ) and to offer continually the "sacrifice of Praise" (Hebrews 13:15 )
Nehemiah - ...
And let it not be overlooked, to their Praise, that all the builders builded every man with his sword by his side because of the deadly envy and ill-will of their enemies round about
Michal, Saul's Daughter - For when we Praise God at last, and say, To Him who loved us! we will not forget you
Joseph - More and more chaste, temperate, patient, enduring, forgiving; full of mind and full of heart; and full, no man ever fuller, of a simple and a sincere piety and Praise of God, till he became a very proverb both in the splendour of his services, and in the splendour of his rewards
Psalms - The book of Psalms is a collection of hymns, or sacred songs, in Praise of God, and consists of poems of various kinds
Temple - All the Jewish writers Praise this temple exceedingly for its beauty and the costliness of its workmanship
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - self by an improvised poem in Praise of a book by secretary Peter
Baptism - From baptism results the obligation of repentance, love to Christ, and perpetual devotedness to his Praise
Calvinists - They maintain that God hath chosen a certain number of the fallen race of Adam in Christ, before the foundation of the world, unto eternal glory, according to his immutable purpose, and of his free grace and love, without at least foresight of faith, good works, or any conditions performed by the creature; and that the rest of mankind he was pleased to pass by, and ordain to dishonour and wrath, for their sins, to the Praise of his vindictive justice
Ethics - Discussion of ethical problems would be out of place in a worship manual, but a much deeper sense of personal consecration and concern for social righteousness is evident in Judah's Praise and prayer
Ethics - As to (1), we mark the upward look, His readiness to let the heat of His love burst into the flame of Praise and prayer, His dutifulness and submissiveness: He lived ‘in the bosom of the Father,’ and wished to do only that which God desired
Jerusalem - " The poet has drawn on Canaanite imagery to enhance Praise of the Lord
Hypocrisy - Not only is no trumpet to be sounded before us in the street; our Praise is not even to find an echo in our own heart
Hebrews, Epistle to the - Sacrifices of Praise and of doing good should be rendered to God
Family - also 2 Corinthians 8:18 (‘the brother whose Praise in the gospel is spread through all the churches’: but some translate ‘his brother’-i
Peter, the Epistles of - Smyrna received unqualified Praise
Priest - Finally, Moses "filled their hands" with three kinds of bread used in ordinary life, unleavened cakes, cakes of oil bread, and oiled wafers (Leviticus 8:2; Leviticus 8:26; Exodus 29:10; Exodus 29:23), put on the fat and right shoulder, and putting his own hands under their hands (so the Jewish tradition) made them wave the whole mass to and fro, expressing the nation's Praise and thanksgiving, testified by its gifts
Angels (2) - The angel who brought the ‘tidings of great joy’ (Luke 2:10) clearly felt the joy himself; and the song which the heavenly host sang in Praise to God was the outcome of joyous hearts
Jacob - And now, at the return to Jabbok, with that staff he made his prayer and Praise to God, as if it had been some sacred instrument of a priest which had power with God
Nebuchadnezzar - And at the end of the days I, Nebuchadnezzar, lifted up mine eyes to heaven, and mine understanding returned to me, and I blessed the Most High, and I Praised and honoured Him who liveth for ever, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and His kingdom is from generation to generation: and all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing: and He doeth according to His will in the army of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth: and none can stay His hand, or say to Him, What doest Thou? Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, Praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and His ways judgment; and those that walk in pride He is able to abase
Jonath - And the sea herself will yet be found to ebb and flow, and toss and storm, according to fixed and foreseen laws, without thereby blotting out God's footprints in the deep, or causing any less Praise to arise to Him from a smooth sea or any less prayer from a storm
Jonathan - Grudge not your neighbour his divinely ordained promotion or Praise
Grace - ’† Hypocrisy - Not only is no trumpet to be sounded before us in the street; our Praise is not even to find an echo in our own heart
Preaching - In these spiritual communities meetings for edification were held, in which every one who had a ‘gift’-whether of prophecy or interpretation, or ‘tongues,’ or Praise (1 Corinthians 14:26 f
Psalms of Solomon - -Happy is the man whom God chastiseth: Israel shall Praise Him for His goodness
David - The service of Praise was for the first time introduced into public worship
Temple of Jerusalem - The spirit of Israel's prayer and Praise is to be found in the Psalms and in the worship experiences such as that of Isaiah when he surrendered to his prophetic call experience in the forecourt of the Temple (Isaiah 6:1-8 ). Then the king blessed the assembly, Praised God for His covenant mercies in fulfilling Nathan's promise to David, and gave a long, fervent prayer on behalf of seven different situations in which the prayers of his people should arise to the heavenly throne of God from His earthly temple, closing with a benediction
Hezekiah - )...
Hezekiah did not disbelieve in a future state, but regarded the disembodied state as one wherein men cannot declare the Praises of God before men, it is as to this world an unseen land of stillness, the living alone can Praise God on earth
Union With God - He is eloquent, too, in Praise of love as that which ‘unites men to God’ (ch
Canon of the Old Testament - His Praise of the famous men in Israel (chs
Living (2) - Compare the Praise of the virtuous woman, Proverbs 31:14 (LXX Septuagint συνάγει δὲ αὔτη τὸν βίον)
Emperor-Worship - ’ As noted above, Caesar’s Praise was celebrated in phrases closely parallel to the Praises of Messiah in Isaiah or the Psalms
Old Testament - , even to its last remains (compare Psalms 75:8) it serves as a weapon to gird Thyself with for their destruction (Hengstenberg); or, "those left of the foe, who vented their wrath against Thee, Thou girdest Thyself with, making them acknowledge and Praise Thy power" (Maurer): Psalms 75:11; Isaiah 49:18; Psalms 68:30
Descent Into Hades - It was the region to which all souls passed after death, there to live a shadow-like existence, incapable of the higher forms of spiritual activity, such as the Praise of Jahweh (Psalms 6:5)
Sacrifice - ...
Our peace offerings are sacrifices of Praise, almsgiving, and love (Philippians 4:18; Hebrews 13:15-16)
Offerings, the - He lived not to men or for their Praise: hence all the frankincense was to ascend from the altar
Anthropology - The conclusion of the psalmist in Praise to God is “Thou knowest me right well” ( Psalm 139:14 RSV)
Organization (2) - Each member was to offer sacrifices of Praise and thanks (Hebrews 13:15), might teach (James 3:1), and pray with immediate access to God (Ephesians 3:12), and would receive direct illumination (John 1:9, 1 John 2:27)
Property (2) - Mary’s action in ‘wasting’ the costly cruse of ointment (Matthew 26:12) was justified and Praised. The centurion who had built a synagogue for the Jews in Capernaum (Luke 7:1; Luke 7:10) received the highest Praise, but nothing was said about his wealth, evidently considerable
Teaching - In the latter the teaching came between the ‘psalm’ (or hymn of Praise) and the prophetic ‘revelation’ (1 Corinthians 14:26)
Marriage - Judges 7:1-7 in particular would seem to be the chorus in Praise of the bride’s beauty, such as is now chanted, while she herself in a sword dance
Revelation, the Book of - Next appears typically some form of exhortation: to those who received criticism, the usual exhortation is to repent; however, to the churches of Smyrna and Philadelphia, for whom the Lord had only Praise, the exhortation is one of assurance (compare Revelation 2:10 ; Revelation 3:10-13 )
Righteousness - Similarly, the technical usage in Philippians is accompanied by the non-technical expression in Ephesians 1:11, where the Apostle prays that the life of these Christians may be ‘covered with that harvest of righteousness Jesus Christ produces to the glory and Praise of God
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - God's people are to reverence (Psalm 86:11 ), love (Psalm 5:11 ), Praise (Psalm 97:12 ), trust (Isaiah 50:10 ), call upon (Isaiah 12:4 ), and hope in the divine name (Psalm 52:9 ). Romans 9:5 speaks of "Christ, who is God over all, forever Praised!" Grammatical rules permit rending 2 Thessalonians 1:12 as " the grace of our God and Lord, Jesus Christ
Sin - From a postresurrection perspective, sin indirectly gives opportunity to Praise the creating and redeeming Lord for his gracious deliverance (Romans 11:33-36 )
Holy Spirit - Paul commands all believers to be continually or repeatedly "filled" with the Spirit (Ephesians 5:18 ), defined as including musical Praise of God, thanksgiving, and mutual submission (vv
Gospels - Compare 2 Corinthians 8:18, "the brother whose Praise is in the Gospel throughout all the churches
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - Gregory Praises Origen for his Socratic discipline, and for the way in which his teacher probed his inmost soul with questions, pruned his native wildness and repressed his exuberance. ) in which Gregory offers his Praise to the Father, and then to "the Champion and Saviour of our souls, His first-born Word, the Creator and Governor of all things,
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - After embracing one another with many florid compliments Basil asked him how it was that knowing no Greek he had twice cheered the sermon and repeated sentences of it to the multitude? And Ephrem answered "It was not I who Praised and repeated but the Holy Ghost by my mouth. His personal character deserves high Praise
Prayer - When all our wants are supplied, prayer will be converted into Praise; till then Christians must live by prayer, and dwell at the mercy seat
Peter, First Epistle of - To God our Father is ascribed all Praise, because by raising Jesus Christ from the dead He has begotten us into a living hope certain to be soon realized
Parousia - There will be rewards for those whose work abides, and those whose work is consumed will themselves be saved, but as through fire; 1 Corinthians 4:5 : when the Lord comes, in contrast with man’s day (ἀνθρωπίνης ἡμέρας) the secrets will be revealed, and Praise will be from God; 1 Corinthians 5:5 : the incestuous man is delivered to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, that his spirit may be saved in ‘the day of the Lord Jesus; 1 Corinthians 6:2; 1 Corinthians 6:8 : a time is coming when the saints will judge the world, and even the angels; 1 Corinthians 7:29 : ‘the time is short’ (ὁ καιρὸς συνεσταλμένος ἐστί), probably meaning that the interval of waiting for the Parousia has been shortened; cf
Priest - All alike are called upon to offer spiritual sacrifices of Praise and prayer (Revelation 10:3), of body and soul (Romans 12:1, Hebrews 13:15), with such actual gifts in charity and helpfulness as are prompted by love to God (Hebrews 13:16, 2 Corinthians 9:7, Philippians 4:18)
Resurrection - At times the writer seems to be controverting the denial of a resurrection, as when he stops to Praise the action of Judas in offering sacrifices and prayers for those who had fallen in battle, on the ground that he did so because ‘he took thought for a resurrection’ ( 2Ma 12:43 )
Biblical Theology - His hymns of Praise, contrition, and instruction (the psalms, not all attributable to David) are timely yet timeless models of spiritual insight and thus central to the focus of biblical theology
Temple - ) David cherished the design of superseding the tent and curtains by a permanent building of stone (2 Samuel 7:1-2); God Praised him for having the design "in his heart" (1 Kings 8:18); but as he had been so continually in wars (1 Kings 5:3; 1 Kings 5:5), and had "shed blood abundantly" (1 Chronicles 22:8-9; 1 Chronicles 28:2-3; 1 Chronicles 28:10), the realization was reserved for Solomon his son. As the sacrificial serrate at the tabernacle at Gibeon and the ark service of sacred song for the 30 years of David's reign, before separate (2 Samuel 6:17; 2 Chronicles 1:3-4; called "the tabernacle of David" Amos 9:11-12; Acts 15:16; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 16:37; 1 Chronicles 16:39), were combined in Solomon's temple, so the priestly intercessory functions of our High priest in heaven and our service of prayer and Praise carried on separately on earth, during our Judaeo universal dispensation, shall in the millennial temple at Jerusalem be combined in perfection, namely, Christ's priesthood manifested among men and our service of outward and inward liturgy
Religion (2) - His people have gone forth, indifferent to Praise or blame, favour or persecution, and even suspending their judgment of one another on the ground that to their own Master they stand or fall, before whose judgment-seat all must appear (Romans 14:4; Romans 14:10 f
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - It is quite apparent upon reading 1-2Samuel (which was originally one book) that the unknown author used "The Song of Hannah" (1 Samuel 2:1-10 ) at the beginning of his narrative and "David's Song of Praise" (2 Samuel 22 ) and "Last Words" (2 Samuel 23:1-7 ) at its end to frame the entire book, and in so doing to indicate the theological underpinnings on which the entire presentation rests
Second Coming of Christ - There will be "praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed" (1 Peter 1:7 ; cf
Gospels - To those who are Christ’s disciples the gates of prayer are ever open, and they live in an atmosphere where Praise is upon their lips and joy in their hearts
Sirach - He claims to have travelled, and this may also be inferred from his Praise of travel (Sirach 31:10-12), and in both passages he asserts that he had many times been in great danger; in the Prayer he specifies an occasion when he had been falsely accused before a king
Terah - With a father like Terah to talk to, to pray and to Praise with, and to walk arm in arm with at the head of the emigrant household, Abram's face shone like the sun as he turned his back on the land of his nativity
Job - … Who could understand the counsel of the gods in heaven?’ The poem ends with a song of Praise for deliverance from sin and disease ( Der Alte Orient , vii
Faith - This exalted Praise of love is the more remarkable because St
Ascension of Isaiah - There is an angel over the Praise-giving of the sixth heaven, however, who challenges Isaiah when proceeding to the seventh (9:1, 4)
Annunciation, the - ...
But, while this is admitted because it admits of something like proof, we are not compelled to admit the unproved assertion that the hymns of Praise with which these chapters are enriched have been composed by St
Mahometanism - The first Praise of all the productions of genius is invention; but the Koran bears little impression of this transcendent character
Faith - This exalted Praise of love is the more remarkable because St
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - Jerome exhorts him and Therasia to persevere in their self-denial, and Praises highly his panegyric on the emperor Theodosius, a work which he himself mentions but which has perished (Hieron. Seventeen are more or less directly in Praise of Felix, all of them dated Jan
Psalms (2) - ’ The NT follows the LXX Septuagint , which reads ‘praise’ instead of the Hebrew ‘strength,’ ‘bulwark’; but the essential meaning of the psalm is finely brought out by the citation—the power, on the one hand, or the insight, on the other, of the children (cf
Sanctification - Paul, Jesus is alive in this particular relationship, in the midst of His Church, leader of their Praise, prototype of their faith, united to them by ties of flesh and blood
Vicarious Sacrifice - The psalm does not mean abandonment by God, but abandonment to suffering, for later it increasingly expresses the confidence of the sufferer that he will be heard and delivered by God, so that he shall yet come to Praise Him; nor does Jesus mean that He is abandoned by God and, substitutionally, under the crushing load of His displeasure, for He stays Himself on the fact that in His agony God is His God
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ...
God asks nothing of man but contrition, prayer, and Praise (lii. We offer our Praises to the Almighty Father ‘through the High Priest and Guardian of our souls, Jesus Christ’ (lix-lxi
Arabia - Gibbon, unwilling to pass by an opportunity of cavilling at revelation, says, "The perpetual independence of the Arabs has been the theme of Praise among strangers and natives; and the arts of controversy transform this singular event into a prophecy and a miracle in favour of the posterity of Ishmael
Polycarp - … For this cause therefore, brethren, we Praise not those who deliver themselves up, since the Gospel doth not so teach us
Paul - 13, the Praise of unity in ch
Possession - But the success which in many cases they achieved merited and won its need of Praise
Passover - The compositions, ‘How many are the benefits which God has conferred upon us?’ ‘And it came to pass at midnight,’ ‘Ye shall say, “It is the sacrifice of Passover,” ’ ‘To Him Praise has ever been and ever will be due,’ and others, must be dated long after apostolic times
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - He regarded the OT with much more real reverence than did the scribes, and, indeed, He spoke of it in a way that might almost sound extravagant in its Praise, but He also treated its message with a freedom that was surprising, and broke through the husk of the letter till He found for men the strength and the sweetness of the kernel they had not before tasted
Poet - ...
Thus it came to pass that the Kingdom of God which He established was proclaimed as the Kingdom of the child (Matthew 19:14); He quoted a prophetic verse in confirmation of His saying that the Praise of God was made perfect by passing through infant lips (Psalms 8:2, Matthew 21:16); He thanked His Father specially for revealing to the instinctive minds of babes, truths which were unattainable by the wise and prudent (Luke 10:21); and, in the finest reference of all, He told how the angels of the children dwell in heaven, always beholding the face of the Father (Matthew 18:10)
Ambrosius of Milan - These discourses, in the third year after his ordination, he digested into three books, de Virginibus , which were addressed in their new form to his sister, and which contain, besides much Praise of Marcellina, the address made to her at her consecration by the bp. In the next year (392) a funeral oration was delivered at Milan by Ambrose (de Obitu Valentiniani ), in which he Praises the piety as well as the many virtues of the departed. He Praises his brother Satyrus for having tied a portion of the consecrated elements in a napkin round his neck when he was shipwrecked, and adds, that having found the benefit of "the heavenly mystery" in this form, he was eager to receive it into his mouth—"quam majus putabat fusum in viscera, quod tantum sibi tectum orario profuisset!" (de Exc
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - ) on the Praises of the Desert, chiding him for not having embraced the perfect life of solitude. " (See in his Praises the preface to the commentary on Ephesians. The crowds who came from all parts seem to them to be so many choirs, engaged in services of Praise, each in their own tongue
Criticism - ]'>[9]5 But it will be noticed that Pfleiderer has nothing but Praise for Keim’s treatment of the Fourth Gospel, which in 1867 he places between 100 and 117, and a few years after (1873) as late as a. Bousset, in his little but important book, Was wissen wir von Jesus?, is loud in his Praises of the way in which modern research as to the original sources of the Synoptics harmonizes so strikingly with the famous statement of Papias
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Another royal female correspondent, cultivated and flattered with a similar purpose, and one more worthy of the Praise conferred, was Theodelinda the Lombard queen
Methodists, Protestant - This, which one should have thought would have been attended with Praise instead of censure, quickly drew upon them a kind of persecution; some of the seniors of the university began to interfere, and it was reported "that the college censor was going to blow up the godly club
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - His speeches were listened to with delight, and were highly Praised by Libanius, no mean judge of rhetoric. After the departure of Arcadius Chrysostom delivered a second enthusiastic homily in Praise of his piety and humility ( Homil
Babylon - How is the Praise of the whole earth surprised!"—...
"In their heat I will make their feasts, and I will make them drunken, that they may rejoice and sleep a perpetual sleep, and not awake, saith the Lord
Bible - However, after the time of Moses, several prophets, and other writers divinely inspired, composed either the history of their own times, or prophetical books and divine writings, or psalms appropriated to the Praise of God
Neology - " Pfaff thus describes the previous state of doctrinal theology: "All the compendia of holy doctrines, which have hitherto appeared, are of such a character, that, though their excellence has been hitherto extolled by the common Praise of our countrymen, and they still enjoy considerable reputation, ( sua utique luce niteat, ) they can even on this ground not be satisfactory to our age,—that since one system was extracted and worked out of the other, with a very few variations, they dwell uniformly on the same string; and that metaphysical clang of causes, which sounds somewhat harshly and unpleasantly to well cultivated ears, constantly reverberates in them, the same terms uniformly recurring in all
Person of Christ - And, in the second place, should we have thought more highly of one who calmly accepted the facile word of Praise? Are not even we pained by careless eulogy?...
Many recent writers, in view of the apparently negative character of the term ‘sinlessness,’ have preferred to predicate of Jesus absolute fidelity to His vocation
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - 39); by Ibas of Edessa, who in 433 wrote his famous letter to Maris in Praise of Theodore; by John, who in 429 succeeded to the see of Antioch
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - The Christians worship as a God, Jesus whom you Praise: do yon, therefore, condemn Him as you do our gods? We are quite willing to let our gods be treated as you treat Him. ...
Mohammed here confounds the term ‘Parakletos,’ the Comforter promised by Jesus to His disciples, with the word ‘Periklytos,’ which has somewhat the same meaning as Ahmad, from the root of which his own name Mohammed (‘praised’) also is derived