What does Portraiture mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Portraiture
(1):
(v. t.) To represent by a portrait, or as by a portrait; to portray.
(2):
(n.) Pictures, collectively; painting.
(3):
(n.) The art or practice of making portraits.
(4):
(n.) A portrait; a likeness; a painted resemblance; hence, that which is copied from some example or model.

Sentence search

Iconography - ) The art or representation by pictures or images; the description or study of Portraiture or representation, as of persons; as, the iconography of the ancients
Description - ) A sketch or account of anything in words; a Portraiture or representation in language; an enumeration of the essential qualities of a thing or species
Domenichino Zampieri - He excelled in Portraiture and in the landscapes introduced into his religious pictures
Domenico Zampieri - He excelled in Portraiture and in the landscapes introduced into his religious pictures
Zampieri, Domenichino - He excelled in Portraiture and in the landscapes introduced into his religious pictures
Zampieri, Domenico - He excelled in Portraiture and in the landscapes introduced into his religious pictures
Giorgio Giorgione - His skill in Portraiture is shown in "The Knight of Malta," of the Uffizi gallery
Giorgione, Giorgio Barbarelli - His skill in Portraiture is shown in "The Knight of Malta," of the Uffizi gallery
Quentin Massys - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Quentin Matsys - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Quentin Metsys - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Metsys, Quentin - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Massys, Quentin - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Matsys, Quentin - " His skill in Portraiture is evident in "The Banker and His Wife," in the Louvre
Domenico Ghirlandajo - They furnish a marvelous picture of contemporary life and the Portraiture is remarkable
Ghirlandajo, Domenico Bigordi - They furnish a marvelous picture of contemporary life and the Portraiture is remarkable
Dyck, Anthony Van - In Portraiture he is esteemed next to Titian
Dyck, Anthoon Van - In Portraiture he is esteemed next to Titian
Anthony Van Dyck - In Portraiture he is esteemed next to Titian
Anthoon Van Dyck - In Portraiture he is esteemed next to Titian
Raphael Santi - His skill in Portraiture is evident in the portraits of Pope Julius II in the Uffizi, and Pope Leo X in the Pitti
Hans Holbein the Younger - His portrait of Anne of Cleves is now in the Louvre, and his reputed masterpiece of Portraiture, "The Duchess of Milan," of the National Gallery, was done when she was a princess of Denmark and a prospective candidate for Henry's hand
Isaiah - Especially is this so with the prophetic conception of ‘Immanuel,’ an ideal figure in whom we find the earliest Portraiture of the Messianic King (Isaiah 7:14; Isaiah 8:8; Isaiah 8:10; Isaiah 9:6-7)
Jesus Christ - The world had never produced, nor even conceived of such a character, and its Portraiture in the gospels is a proof of their divine origin, which the infidel cannot gainsay
Isaiah - Especially is this so with the prophetic conception of ‘Immanuel,’ an ideal figure in whom we find the earliest Portraiture of the Messianic King (Isaiah 7:14; Isaiah 8:8; Isaiah 8:10; Isaiah 9:6-7)
Thirst - One result of these and such like incidents in the course of His life is to be seen in the vivid Portraiture by Jesus of the great Day of final judgment
Christ in Art - and became thereafter exceedingly common, was in no sense an attempt at Portraiture. Pictures of the Good Shepherd have become popular again in our own time, but they are attempts at Portraiture and very far from the idealistic type—it may almost be called a symbol—of the early ages, which represents a shepherd as Christ, and does not attempt to portray Christ as a shepherd. —The earliest pictures of Christ are not attempts at Portraiture, but represent His figure only as occurring in scenes from the Gospels: the figure is needed to explain the subject, but it is the figure of a man of varying type, and, as in all early Christian art, without attributes; the character is determined only by its position and by the fact that Christ, like the Apostles and generally other Scripture characters, is always represented as wearing the pallium of the philosopher (not the toga), a convention which has survived down to our own time, though realists like Tissot have begun its destruction
Hunger - We have in them a vivid Portraiture of that essential and spiritual oneness upon which the writer of the Fourth Gospel lays such emphasis (cf
Essenes - According to the Portraiture of them, given by Philo, the Alexandrian, in his separate treatise concerning the "True Freedom of the Virtuous," we should take the Essenes for men of an entirely practical religious turn, far removed from all theosophy and all idle speculation; and we should ascribe to them an inward religious habit of mind, free from all mixture of superstition and reliance on outward things
Diognetus, Epistle to - ...
Probably an old copy exhibited three works of Ambrosius—an avowal of Christianity, and answers To Greeks and To Diognetus , each a brave act as well as a solid work, the first now lost, the second a fine sample of a class of controversial works of which samples are numerous, the third, To Diognetus , preserved in fragments only, but unique, not apologetic merely, but catechetical, a Portraiture of early Christianity not in its manifestation only, but in its springs, bringing us to the gates of the Paradise of God
John, Gospel of - ...
The Portraiture of persons and incidents characteristic of the Gospel is noteworthy. The conversations recorded, the scene of the feet-washing, the representation of the Samaritan woman, of the man born blind, the Portraiture of Peter, of Pilate, of the priests and the multitude, the questionings of the disciples, the revelation of secret motives and fears, the interpretations of Christ’s hidden meanings and difficult sayings may , as an abstract possibility, have been invented
Kindness (2) - The whole Gospel Portraiture shows us that in Jesus the kindness and pity of God fully dwelt
Infancy - If it be so, it cannot detract from the supreme value of the Portraiture of Christ in the Gospels
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - The full description of hell and paradise, and also the graphic Portraiture of Satan, are especially noteworthy as the earliest in Christian literature, and so probably of great influence upon later art and literature
Inspiration - The Spirit was needed to qualify the writers for giving what they have given, a condensed yet full and clear Portraiture of Messiah, calculated to affect all hearts in every nation, and to sow in them seeds of faith, hope, and love
Messiah - We shall have to note how profoundly the Deutero-Isaianic Portraiture of the Suffering Servant came in later times to modify the Hebrew ideal of the Messiah, and to constitute an entirely new conception which the Hebrew race only partially and very slowly assimilated, and whose leaven worked powerfully in the Messianic ideal of the ‘Son of Man’ in the consciousness of Christ and His immediate followers
Gospel - 7]'>[5] gathered together and concentrated in a single Portraiture
Humility - This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s Portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are humility, prayer, and confession of sin
Lord's Supper. (i.) - With respect to this also we must assume that Jesus was a creator of spiritual truth, for the consistency of the Synoptic Portraiture of Jesus, and the purity of His own views as to His mission, demand that our interpretation of His outlook into the future of the Kingdom should not be limited by the current ideas of Jewish apocalypses, or by the literal symbolism of OT prophecy
Dependence - See also Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45, where, in His solemn Portraiture of the Judgment Day, Jesus emphasizes the great truth of His self-identification with all who have their lives grounded in Him (cf
Atonement - Here at length the ideas of prophecy and those of sacrificial law coincide, and, though there is no second instance of like clear and detailed Portraiture, it is not difficult to recognize the recurrence of the same ideas in later prophecies, e
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - The countenance has an inexpressiveness which may have belonged to him in a special degree, but extends to most Portraiture after the 3rd cent
Jesus Christ - ) Sinless Himself, yet merciful to sinners; meek under provocation, yet with refined sensibility; dignified, yet without arrogance; pure Himself, yet with a deep insight into evil; Christ is a character of human and divine loveliness such as man could never have invented; for no man has ever conceived, much less attained, such a standard; see His Portraiture, Matthew 12:15-20
Humility - This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s Portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are humility, prayer, and confession of sin
Quakers - of the Puritans; Claridge's Life and Posthumous Works; Bevan's Defence of the Doctrines of the Quakers; Adams's View of Religions; Tuke's Principles of Religion as professed by the Quakers; Gough's History of Quakers; Clarkson's Portraiture of Quakerism
Apocalyptic Literature - ...
The term ‘apocalypse’ is also sometimes used, with an effort at greater precision, to designate the pietorial Portraiture of the future as foreshadowed by the seer
Science (2) - Among the fine qualities of the Hebrew mind were: (1) a sanity and sobriety of thought which preserved their religion and literature from all those offensive and extravagant traits which mark the popular religions of Syria, Asia Minor, and Arabia; (2) an extraordinary gift for the observation of individual incidents and facts, as appears in the inimitable narratives of the historical books of the OT; the vivid Portraiture, satire, and denunciation of the prophets; and the marvellous, if often trivial, minuteness of Rabbinic discussions; (3) unparalleled energy of feeling and sense of individuality; and (4) a strength of will that alone can account for the vitality of a people which has been exposed to a more bitter persecution and more relentless fate than any other race in history
Divinity of Christ - There are other Portraitures of Jesus in the NT besides that of Him as Messiah; and even those writers who set forth to portray Him solely as Messiah cannot be restrained from bursting through their self-imposed limits, in fidelity to the facts, and portraying Him as more than they meant. Subsequent theology accepted the assurance, departed widely from the purely Messianic Portraiture, yet claimed, and with perfect justice, that the new departures were in no sense new additions to the original Gospel, but fresh interpretations, designed to recover and vitalize truths discernible in the Gospels, but imperfectly understood by the Gospel writers
Incarnation (2) - The answer to them must he sought in the Portraiture of the historic Christ, and in the impression which His personality made on those who came under its influence
Character of Christ - (1) The first is the trustworthiness of the Gospels as Portraitures of Christ. Belief in the Godhead of Christ, if it is to be more than a mere theologoumenon, must be rooted in acquaintance with Him; and that acquaintance is informed and enriched, made close, luminous, and full, through the medium of the Portraiture in which the character of Christ is disclosed to our reverent gaze
Criticism - ...
But Keim’s Portraiture of Jesus is marred by many inconsistencies
Clement of Alexandria - Other traits are added to the Portraiture of "the gnostic" (55–88); and Clement then meets the general objection urged against Christianity from the conflict of rival sects (89–92)
Person of Christ - These are features of the Synoptic Portraiture of Jesus which it is impossible to eliminate; and while they do not amount to a doctrine of His Person, they insist on doctrinal interpretation