What does Pomegranate mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הָרִמּ֖וֹן pomegranate. 1
וְרִמּ֔וֹן pomegranate. 1
וְרִמּ֑וֹן pomegranate. 1
וְרִמֹּן֙ pomegranate. 1
וְרִמֹּ֔ן pomegranate. 1
וְהָרִמּ֛וֹן pomegranate. 1
רִמּ֞וֹן pomegranate. 1
הָֽרִמּוֹן֙ pomegranate. 1
הָרִמּוֹן֙ pomegranate. 1
רִמֹּנִֽי pomegranate. 1

Definitions Related to Pomegranate

H7416


   1 Pomegranate.
      1a as tree.
      1b as fruit.
      1c as Pomegranate shaped ornaments in temple.
      

Frequency of Pomegranate (original languages)

Frequency of Pomegranate (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Pomegranate
Pomegranate (pum-gran'nate). The pomegranate has been cultivated from early times in Syria, Numbers 13:23; Deuteronomy 8:8, and the warmer regions of the east. It rarely exceeds ten feet in height, and has small lance-shaped, glossy leaves, of a reddish-green when young, but becoming pea-green and remaining alive through the winter. The flowers are of a brilliant scarlet or orange, and in August or September the fruit ripens. This is of the size of an orange, flattened at the ends like an apple, is of a beautiful brown-red color, Song of Solomon 4:3; Song of Solomon 6:7, has a hard rind and is filled with pulp of a highly grateful flavor. The abundant juice was made into wine, Song of Solomon 8:2, and used for a cooling drink. Some cultivated trees bear sweet and some sour fruit, while the wild pomegranates yield only a small and worthless apple.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Pomegranate
A small tree, the fruit of which has a thick shell, many seeds, and a red pullp. See Plants in the Bible .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Pomegranate
I.e., "grained apple" (pomum granatum), Heb. rimmon. Common in Egypt (Numbers 20:5 ) and Palestine (13:23; Deuteronomy 8:8 ). The Romans called it Punicum malum, i.e., Carthaginian apple, because they received it from Carthage. It belongs to the myrtle family of trees. The withering of the pomegranate tree is mentioned among the judgments of God (Joel 1:12 ). It is frequently mentioned in the Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 4:3,13 , etc.). The skirt of the high priest's blue robe and ephod was adorned with the representation of pomegranates, alternating with golden bells (Exodus 28:33,34 ), as also were the "chapiters upon the two pillars" (1 Kings 7:20 ) which "stood before the house."
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Pomegranate
Exodus 28:34 (c) This fruit was and still is an emblem of fruitfulness. This fruit is quite filled with seeds so that it is able to reproduce itself in a multitude of new plants. It is also a type of sweetness and of satisfaction. These are a fruit of the Spirit of GOD in the life, bringing about these lovely results. (See Song of Solomon 4:13).
Song of Solomon 4:3 (c) Solomon is describing the beauty of the church and indicates that the thoughts in the minds of GOD's people would be beautiful ones and fruitful ones. This of course is true, and perhaps this is the lesson intended.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pomegranate
This was a fruit of Palestine, beautiful in its appearance, and very pleasant in its taste; and therefore Christ, in celebrating the loveliness of the church, compares her temples to "a piece of pomegranate within her locks." (Song of Song of Solomon 4:3) And the church, speaking of the glories of her Husband, saith, "I would lead thee, and bring thee into my mother's house; I would cause thee to drink of spiced wine of the juice of my pomegranate." (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2) The sense is, the church would treat Jesus with her best fare. And as every thing she had and was came from her Lord, surely her Lord should have the best of his own gifts and graces. In a spiritual sense, believers may be said to entertain Christ when, in their exercises of faith in any of the gracious, or providential dispensations of the Lord, our sorrows are so sweetly tinged with the presence and sanctifying blessings of the Lord, that they are like to spiced wine in which is infused the juice of the pomegranate. Jesus sweetens all, as the bitter waters at Marah were sweetened by the tree cast into them. (Exodus 15:23-25)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Pomegranate
rimmon . The tree and the fruit. In Egypt (Numbers 20:5), and in Palestine (Numbers 13:23; Deuteronomy 8:8). Rimmon, Gathrimmon, and En-rimmon, were called from the pomegranate. The cheeks (KJV "temples," i.e. the upper part of the cheek near the temples) of the bride are "like a piece of pomegranate within her locks" (Revelation 19:7-95). When cut it displays seeds in rows, pellucid , like crystal, tinged with red. The church's blush of modesty is not on the surface but within, which Christ sees into (Song of Solomon 4:13). Her "plants are an orchard of pomegranates with pleasant fruits," not merely flowers (John 15:8); Song of Solomon 8:2, "spied wine of the juice of my pomegranate."
The cup of betrothal He gave her at the last supper, the marriage cup shall be at His return (Matthew 26:29; 1618179658_57). "Spices" are only introduced in the Song of Solomon when he is present, not in his absence. The pomegranate was carved on the tops of the pillars in Solomon's temple (1 Kings 7:18; 1 Kings 7:20), and on the hem of the robe of the ephod (Exodus 28:33-34). The fruit is surmounted with a crown-shaped (compare spiritually 2 Timothy 4:8; 1 Peter 5:4; James 1:12) calyx . The name is from pomum granatum "grained apple," called "Punic" by the Romans as they received it from Carthage. The rind abounds in tannin, which the Moors used in preparing "morocco" leather; the Cordovaners of Spain learned the art from the Moors; hence our word "cordwainers." The order is the Μyrtacae ; the foliage dark green, flowers crimson; the fruit (like an orange) ripens in October.
Webster's Dictionary - Pomegranate
(1):
(n.) The fruit of the tree Punica Granatum; also, the tree itself (see Balaustine), which is native in the Orient, but is successfully cultivated in many warm countries, and as a house plant in colder climates. The fruit is as large as an orange, and has a hard rind containing many rather large seeds, each one separately covered with crimson, acid pulp.
(2):
(n.) A carved or embroidered ornament resembling a pomegranate.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pomegranate
רמון , Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 ; 1 Samuel 14:2 , &c, a low tree growing very common in Palestine, and in other parts of the east. Its branches are very thick and bushy; some of them are armed with sharp thorns. They are garnished with narrow spear-shaped leaves. Its flowers are of an elegant red colour, resembling a rose. It is chiefly valued for the fruit, which is as big as a large apple, is quite round, and has the general qualities of other summer fruits, allaying heat and quenching thirst. The high estimation in which it was held by the people of Israel, may be inferred from its being one of the three kinds of fruit brought by the spies from Eshcol to Moses and the congregation in the wilderness, Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 ; and from its being specified by that rebellious people as one of the greatest luxuries which they enjoyed in Egypt, the want of which they felt so severely in the sandy desert. The pomegranate, classed by Moses with wheat and barley, vines and figs, oil olive and honey, was, in his account, one principal recommendation of the promised land, Deuteronomy 8:8 . The form of this fruit was so beautiful, as to be honoured with a place at the bottom of the high priest's robe, Exodus 28:33 ; Sir_45:9 ; and was the principal ornament of the stately columns of Solomon's temple. The inside is full of small kernels, replenished with a generous liquor. In short, there is scarcely any part of the pomegranate which does not delight and recreate the senses.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Pomegranate
Grained apple, the Punica Granatum of Linnaeus; called also Malum Granatum, in French pomme granate, whence its English name. The tree grows wild in Persia and Syria, as generally in the south of Europe and north of Africa. It is low, with a straight stem, reddish bark, many and spreading branches, dark green lancet-formed leaves, and large and beautiful crimson blossoms. The fruit is of the size of an orange, of a tawny brown, with a thick astringent coat, containing an abundance of seeds, each enveloped in a distinct, very juicy, pink coat, whose flavor, in a wild state, is a pure and very strong acid; but in the cultivated plant, sweet and highly agreeable. The ripe pulp was eaten by itself or with a sprinkling of sugar; or its juice was made into a sherbet. The value of the fruit and the beauty of the flower made the pomegranate welcome in gardens, Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 6:7,11 8:2 Joel 1:12 . It was abundant in Palestine, Numbers 13:23 Deuteronomy 8:8 . Artificial pomegranates were used as ornaments on the robe of the high priest, Exodus 28:33 , and also as an architectural ornament, 1 Kings 7:18 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pomegranate
POMEGRANATE ( rimmôn , Arah. rummân ). Tree and fruit ( Exodus 28:33 f., Exodus 39:24-26 , Numbers 13:23 ; Numbers 20:5 , Deuteronomy 8:8 , 1 Samuel 14:2 ; 1 Samuel 14:1 k 7:18, 20, 42, 2 Kings 25:17 , 2Ch 3:16 ; 2 Chronicles 4:13 , Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Song of Solomon 6:7 ; Song of Solomon 7:12 ; Song of Solomon 8:2 , Jeremiah 52:22 f., Joel 1:12 , Haggai 2:19 ). The pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) is one of the familiar fruit trees of the OT; it is usually a shrub, hut may attain the height of a tree ( 1 Samuel 14:2 ); it was much admired for its beauty ( Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 6:11 ), and its flower was copied in ornamentation ( Exodus 28:33 , 1 Kings 7:13 ). Its dark green leaves and brilliant scarlet blossom make it a peculiarly attractive object, especially when growing in orchards ( Song of Solomon 4:13 ), mixed with trees of other shades of green; its buds develop with the tender grapes ( Song of Solomon 7:12 ), and the round, reddish fruit, with its hrilliant crimson, juicy seeds, ripens at the time of the vintage. The fruit is a favourite food, and the hark a valued astringent medicine.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Pomegranate
The pomegranate tree, Punicu granatum , derives its name from the Latin pomum granatum , "grained apple." The Romans gave it the name of Punica, as the tree was introduced from Carthage. It belongs to the natural order Myrtaceae (Myrtle), being, however, rather a tall bush than a tree, The foliage is dark green, the flowers are crimson, the fruit, which is about the size of art orange, is red when which in Palestine is about the middle of October. It contains a quantity of juice. Mention is made in ( Song of Solomon 8:2 ) of spiced wine of the juice of the pomegranate. The rind is used in the manufacture of morocco leather, and together with the bark is sometimes used medicinally. Mr. Royle (Kitto's Cyc., art "Rimmon") states that this tree is a native of Asia and is to be traced from Syria through Persia, even to the mountains of northern India. The pomegranate was early cultivated in Egypt; hence the complaint of the Israelites in the wilderness of Zin, (Numbers 20:5 ) this "is no place of figs, or of vines, or of pomegranates." Carved figures of the pomegranate adorned the tops of the pillars in Solomon's temple, (1 Kings 7:18,20 ) etc.; and worked representations of this fruit, in blue, purple and scarlet, ornamented the hem of the robe of the ephod. (Exodus 28:33,34 )

Sentence search

Rimmon - Exalted; Pomegranate
Gath - So Gathrimmon, the press of the Pomegranate, from Garb, a press; and Rimmon, a Pomegranate tree
Remmon - Greatness; elevation; a Pomegranate-tree
Tabrimon - Good Pomegranate; the navel; the middle
Ranatin - ) Mannite; - so called because found in the Pomegranate
Rem'Mon - (pomegranate ), a town in the allotment of Simeon, ( Joshua 10:7 ) elsewhere accurately given in the Authorized Version as Rimmon
Rimmon-Parez - A Pomegranate breach, or Rimmon of the breach, one of the stations of the Israelites in the wilderness (Numbers 33:19,20 )
Rimmon-Perez - (rihm muhn-pee' rehz) Place name meaning, “pomegranate of the pass
Balaustine - ) The Pomegranate tree (Punica granatum)
Pomegranate - The Pomegranate tree, Punicu granatum , derives its name from the Latin pomum granatum , "grained apple. Mention is made in ( Song of Solomon 8:2 ) of spiced wine of the juice of the Pomegranate. The Pomegranate was early cultivated in Egypt; hence the complaint of the Israelites in the wilderness of Zin, (Numbers 20:5 ) this "is no place of figs, or of vines, or of Pomegranates. " Carved figures of the Pomegranate adorned the tops of the pillars in Solomon's temple, (1 Kings 7:18,20 ) etc
Tabrimon - (1 Kings 15:18) His name is compounded of Job, good—and Rimmon, the fruit Pomegranate
Rimmon Parez - A station in Israel's marches (Numbers 33:19-20) ("the Pomegranate of the breach
Gath-Rimmon - Press of the Pomegranate
Pomegranate - This was a fruit of Palestine, beautiful in its appearance, and very pleasant in its taste; and therefore Christ, in celebrating the loveliness of the church, compares her temples to "a piece of Pomegranate within her locks. " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:3) And the church, speaking of the glories of her Husband, saith, "I would lead thee, and bring thee into my mother's house; I would cause thee to drink of spiced wine of the juice of my Pomegranate. In a spiritual sense, believers may be said to entertain Christ when, in their exercises of faith in any of the gracious, or providential dispensations of the Lord, our sorrows are so sweetly tinged with the presence and sanctifying blessings of the Lord, that they are like to spiced wine in which is infused the juice of the Pomegranate
Pomegranate - Rimmon, Gathrimmon, and En-rimmon, were called from the Pomegranate. the upper part of the cheek near the temples) of the bride are "like a piece of Pomegranate within her locks" (Song of Solomon 4:3). Her "plants are an orchard of Pomegranates with pleasant fruits," not merely flowers (John 15:8); Song of Solomon 8:2, "spied wine of the juice of my Pomegranate. The Pomegranate was carved on the tops of the pillars in Solomon's temple (1 Kings 7:18; 1 Kings 7:20), and on the hem of the robe of the ephod (Exodus 28:33-34)
Tophel - It is surrounded by apple, apricot, fig, Pomegranate, and olive trees
en-Rim'Mon - (fount of the Pomegranate ), one of the places which the men of Judah reinhabited after their return from the captivity
Uava - The fruit or berry is shaped like a Pomegranate, but is much smaller
Pomegranate - Pomegranate (pum-gran'nate). The Pomegranate has been cultivated from early times in Syria, Numbers 13:23; Deuteronomy 8:8, and the warmer regions of the east. Some cultivated trees bear sweet and some sour fruit, while the wild Pomegranates yield only a small and worthless apple
Gath-Rim'Mon - (press of the Pomegranate )
A city given out of the tribe of Dan to the Levites
Rimmon - Pomegranate. In Joshua 15:32 Ain and Rimmon are mentioned separately, but in 19:7 and 1 Chronicles 4:32 (Compare Nehemiah 11:29 ) the two words are probably to be combined, as forming together the name of one place, Ain-Rimmon=the spring of the Pomegranate
Rim'Mon - (pomegranate ) the name of several towns. ...
Rimmon-parez (pomegranate of the breach ), the name of a march-station in the wilderness
Rim'Mon - (pomegranate ) the name of several towns. ...
Rimmon-parez (pomegranate of the breach ), the name of a march-station in the wilderness
Pomegranate - ) A carved or embroidered ornament resembling a Pomegranate
en-Rimmon - EN-RIMMON (‘spring of [1] Pomegranate’)
en-Rimmon - (ehn-rihm' mohn) Place name meaning, “spring of the Pomegranate
Pomegranate - Pomegranate ( rimmôn , Arah. The Pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) is one of the familiar fruit trees of the OT; it is usually a shrub, hut may attain the height of a tree ( 1 Samuel 14:2 ); it was much admired for its beauty ( Song of Solomon 4:3 ; Song of Solomon 6:11 ), and its flower was copied in ornamentation ( Exodus 28:33 , 1 Kings 7:13 )
Bells - They were on Aaron's robes, "a bell and a Pomegranate," testimony and fruit were to mark all his goings, as they should accompany the Christian's walk through being attached to Christ
Pomegranate - The withering of the Pomegranate tree is mentioned among the judgments of God (Joel 1:12 ). The skirt of the high priest's blue robe and ephod was adorned with the representation of Pomegranates, alternating with golden bells (Exodus 28:33,34 ), as also were the "chapiters upon the two pillars" (1 Kings 7:20 ) which "stood before the house
Pomegranate - The Pomegranate, classed by Moses with wheat and barley, vines and figs, oil olive and honey, was, in his account, one principal recommendation of the promised land, Deuteronomy 8:8 . In short, there is scarcely any part of the Pomegranate which does not delight and recreate the senses
Coffer - In architecture, a square depression or sinking in each interval between the modillions of the Corinthian cornice, ordinarily filled with a rose, a Pomegranate or other enrichment
Rimmon - Pomegranate, ...
1
Rimmon - Others from Hebrew rimmon , a "pomegranate," sacred to Venus; the fertilizing principle in nature; tree worship anciently having prevailed, a perverted relic of the tradition of Eden's tree of life. Ηadadrimmon may be the full name, from Ηadad "the sun god" and Rimmon the Pomegranate" ripened in the autumn. Um-er-rumamin , "mother of Pomegranates," four hours N. From the neighboring hill region the spies brought Pomegranates and figs (Numbers 13:23)
Knop - ...
(1) Κaphtor , Pomegranate-like knops or balls, associated with flowers in architectural ornamentation, also a boss from which, as crowning the stem, branches spring out
Rimmon - (Rihm' mohn) Place and divine name meaning, “pomegranate
Rimmon - Rimmon (rĭm'mon), Pomegranate
Gath-Rimmon - (gath-rihm' muhn) Place name meaning, “winepress on the Pomegranate tree
Bell - The bells of ‘pure gold’ ( Exodus 39:25 ), which alternated with Pomegranate ornaments on the skirt of the high priest’s robe ( Exodus 28:33 f
Shechem - The whole country is thickly studded with villages, the plains clothed with grass or grain, and the rounded hills with orchards of olive, fig, Pomegranate, and other trees. In this respect I know no city with which to compare it except Brusa; and, like that city, it has mulberry, orange, Pomegranate, and other trees mingled in with the houses, whose odoriferous flowers load the air with delicious perfume during the months of April and May
Drink, Strong - Strong drink was extracted from other fruit also, as the Pomegranate (Song of Solomon 8:2)
Pomegranates, Rimmon - The temples, or cheeks, of the bride in the Canticles are compared to 'a piece of a Pomegranate
Lintel - Zephaniah 2:14, "the capitals of her columns," margin "the knops" ("pomegranate like at the tops of the houses," Grotius) or chapiters (capitals)
Migron - In 1 Samuel 14:2 Samaul, whose army was encamped south of the Wady es-Suwçnît , is said to have dwelt in ‘the uttermost part of Geba (so read) under the Pomegranate tree which is in Migron
Valley - (See Ezekiel 37:1-14) I would only beg to call the reader's attention to a beautiful instance in point, where Jesus, speaking of visiting his church, useth this figure, "I went down (said Christ) into the garden of nuts, to see the fruits of the valley; and to see whether the vine flourished, and the Pomegranate budded
Pomegranate - The value of the fruit and the beauty of the flower made the Pomegranate welcome in gardens, Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 6:7,11 8:2 Joel 1:12 . Artificial Pomegranates were used as ornaments on the robe of the high priest, Exodus 28:33 , and also as an architectural ornament, 1 Kings 7:18
Gethsem'a-ne - There was a "garden," or rather orchard, attached to it, to which the olive, fig and Pomegranate doubtless invited resort by their hospitable shade
Gardens - Doubdan found a very fruitful vineyard, full of olives, fig trees, and vines, about eight miles south-west from Bethlehem, enclosed with a hedge; and that part of it adjoining to the road, strongly formed of thorns and rose bushes, intermingled with Pomegranate trees of surpassing beauty and fragrance. A hedge composed of rose bushes and wild Pomegranate shrubs, then in full flower, mingled with other thorny plants, adorned in the varied livery of spring, must have made at once a strong and beautiful fence. The wild Pomegranate tree, the species probably used in fencing, is much more prickly than the other variety; and when mingled with other thorny bushes, of which they have several kinds in Palestine, some of whose prickles are very long and sharp, must form a hedge very difficult to penetrate. Chandler visited, consisted only of a very small spot of ground, walled in, and containing only two vines, a fig and a Pomegranate tree, and a well of excellent water. And, it would seem, the garden of an ancient Israelite could not boast of greater variety; for the grape, the fig, and the Pomegranate, are almost the only fruits which it produced
Rimmon (1) - ]'>[1] air-, weather-, and storm god assimilated by popular etymology to the word for ‘pomegranate
Breastplate, High Priest's - THE ROBE, made of blue, worn over the coat, on the edge of which were alternately a bell and a Pomegranate (testimony and fruit): the colour is heavenly, indicating the character of the priesthood of Christ
Gardens - Gardens were inclosed by walls, or by hedges of rose bushes, wild Pomegranate trees, or to her shrubs, many of which in Palestine have long and sharp thorns, 2 Samuel 23:6,7 Job 1:10 Proverbs 15:19 Hosea 2:6
Olives - Some of these still remain; and on part of the hill are corn-fields; and in a few half-cultivated gardens are fig and Pomegranate trees
Garden - In the irrigated garden, vines, fig, walnut, Pomegranate, lemon, and other trees are grown for the sake of ornament, shade, and fruit
Wine - Wine was also made from Pomegranate as well as grape. The wine "mingled with myrrh," given to Jesus, was designed to deaden pain, Mark 15:23, and the spiced Pomegranate wine prepared by the bride, Song of Solomon 8:2, may well have been of a mild character
Grove - Some trees are specially-noted: the tamarisk (eeshel ) under which Saul abode in Gibeah (1 Samuel 22:6); the terebinth in Shechem under which Joshua, after writing the law of God, set up (Joshua 24:26) a great stone as a witness; the palm tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5); the terebinth of enchantments (Judges 9:37 margin, (See MEONENIM); of wanderers (Judges 6:11, (See ZAANAIM)); 1 Samuel 14:2, "a Pomegranate tree in Migron" (1 Samuel 10:3)
Wine - [1] The only other plant whose fruit is noticed as having been converted into wine was the Pomegranate. (Proverbs 23:30 ; Isaiah 5:22 ) At the same time strength was not the sole object sought; the wine "mingled with myrrh," given to Jesus, was designed to deaden pain, (Mark 15:23 ) and the spiced Pomegranate wine prepared by the bride, (Song of Solomon 8:2 ) may well have been of a mild character
Lydda - ...
Lydda is now ‘a flourishing little town, embosomed in noble orchards of olive, fig, Pomegranate, mulberry, sycamore, and other trees, and surrounded every way by a very fertile neighbourhood
Gaza - These gardens are filled with a great variety of choice fruit trees, such as the fig, the mulberry, the Pomegranate, the apricot, the peach, and the almond; together with a few lemon and orange trees
Flowers - ...
(14) Pomegranate blossoms (Exodus 28:33 , Numbers 13:23 ; 1 Samuel 14:2 ; 1 Kings 7:18 ) from the Pomegranate tree (Punica granatumro ) had dark green leaves with large orange-red blossoms. Decorators carved Pomegranates on public buildings
High Priest - The skirt of this robe had a remarkable trimming of Pomegranates in blue, red and crimson, with a bell of gold between each Pomegranate alternately
Plants in the Bible - ...
The juicy fruit of the Pomegranate ( Punica granatum ), about the size of a tennis ball, is full of seeds and sweet pulp. Pomegranate bushes were often grown in gardens and beside houses (Deuteronomy 8:8 ; Song of Song of Solomon 6:11 ). Moses was instructed to embroider Pomegranate fruits on the hem of the priests' robes (Exodus 28:33 ), and their form ornamented the columns of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem (1 Kings 7:18 ; 2 Chronicles 3:16 )
Locust - These were no sooner hatched, in June, than each of the broods collected itself into a compact body of a furlong or more square, and marching afterwards in a direct line towards the sea, they let nothing escape them; eating up every thing that was green and juicy, not only the lesser kinds of vegetables, but the vine likewise, the fig-tree, the Pomegranate, the palm, and the apple-tree, even all the trees of the field, Joel 1:12 ; in doing which, kept their ranks like men of war, climbing over, as they advanced, every tree or wall that was in their way; nay, they entered into our very houses and bedchambers like thieves
Money - the first year of Jewish independence, namely, under the Maccabees); the reverse has "Jerusalem the holy," and a branch with three flowers, possibly Aaron's rod that budded or the Pomegranate
Food - Some of the better known fruits were figs, grapes, olives, Pomegranates, apples, dates, sycamore, pistachio nuts and almonds (Genesis 43:11; Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 34:3; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8; Deuteronomy 14:9-10; Amos 7:14; Matthew 7:16; see FIGS; GRAPES; OLIVES). Pomegranate juice made another kind of popular drink (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2)
Wine - ...
Shekar (sikera in Luke 1:15), "strong wine," "strong drink," (Numbers 28:7; Psalms 69:12 drinkers of shekar ,") including palm wine, Pomegranate wine, apple wine, honey wine; our "sugar" may be a cognate word to shekar , syrup
Samaria, Samaritans - Here they are for the most part covered with fruit trees of every kind, chief among which are the olive, the fig, the mulberry, the orange, the apricot, and the Pomegranate. 110) when he says: ‘One may be excused for becoming somewhat enthusiastic over this pretty vale of Nâblus, sparkling with fountains and streams, verdant with olive groves and fig orchards, interspersed with walnut, apple, apricot, orange, quince, Pomegranate, and other trees and shrubs
Adam (1) - Any fruit tree (some have supposed, from Egyptian representations still extant, the Pomegranate) would suffice as a test of obedience or disobedience, by the eating of which the knowledge of evil as well as of good would result
Meals - In NT times the Passover lamb had always to be roasted in an oven, suspended by a spit of Pomegranate laid across the mouth
Passover (i.) - It was to be roasted, in an earthenware oven; a spit of Pomegranate wood was to be put in at the mouth and to pass through at the vent; Justin Martyr (Tryph
Food - ...
For other less important fruits, such as the Pomegranate, the much discussed tappûach the ‘apple’ of AV Passover - The Pesachim (7:1) say a wooden (pomegranate) spit was thrust lengthwise through the lamb; Justin Martyr says (Trypho, 40) another spit was put crosswise, to which the front feet were attached; so do the modern Samaritans in roasting the Passover lamb; type of the cross, it was roasted thoroughly in an earthen beehive-shaped oven, but not touching the sides, that the roasting might be wholly by fire (Exodus 12:9; 2 Chronicles 35:6-13)
Canaan - Among other indigenous productions may be enumerated the cedar and other varieties of the pine, the cypress, the oak, the sycamore, the mulberry tree, the fig tree, the willow, the turpentine tree, the acacia, the aspen, the arbutus, the myrtle, the almond tree, the tamarisk, the oleander, the peach tree, the chaste tree, the carob or locust tree, the oskar, the doom, the mustard plant, the aloe, the citron, the apple, the Pomegranate, and many flowering shrubs
Palesti'na - (Besides these are the almond, Pomegranate, orange, pear, banana, quince and mulberry among fruit trees
Sea of Galilee - The hills and the valleys on both shores become clothed in a luxuriant greenness, while, as the season advances, the fresh bursting buds of the olive, the fig, the vine, and the Pomegranate, with here and there a palm tree, add variety and pleasantness to the landscape
Christ in Art - , but they came to be used rather as emblems of Christ’s Mother than of our Lord Himself, and often as badges of the royal houses in England and France: the Pomegranate, split open, originally a type of Divine grace, became similarly common as a Tudor badge