What does Pisidia mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
πισιδίαν a region in Asia Minor bounded by Pamphylia 2

Definitions Related to Pisidia

G4099


   1 a region in Asia Minor bounded by Pamphylia, and the Pamphylian Sea, Phrygia, and Lycaonia.
   Additional Information: Pisidia = “pitchy”.
   

Frequency of Pisidia (original languages)

Frequency of Pisidia (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Pisidia
Pisidia (pî-sĭd'i-ah), pitchy. A district of Asia Minor. The ranges of the Taurus mountains extended through it. Notorious robbers were in this region, and here Paul may have been "in perils of waters, in perils of robbers." 2 Corinthians 11:26. Paul twice visited Pisidia, passing directly north from Perga to Antioch, Acts 13:14, and again returning through Pisidia to Pamphylia. Acts 14:21-24.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Pisidia
Pisidia was a mountainous region in the south of the Roman province of Galatia. Its most important town was Antioch, where Paul established a church that spread the gospel throughout the region (Acts 13:14; Acts 13:49; Acts 14:24). (For map and other details see ANTIOCH IN PISIDIA; GALATIA.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Pisidia
(pih ssih di' uh) Small area in the province of Galatia in southern Asia Minor bounded by Pamphylia, Phrygia, and Lyconia. The territory lay within the Taurus Mountain range and therefore resisted invasion by ancient peoples. Only in 25 B.C. did the Romans gain control over the region through economic diplomacy. Antioch was made the capital, although some historians contend that the city was not actually in Pisidia. Paul and Barnabas came through Antioch (Acts 13:14 ) after John Mark left them in Perga (Acts 13:13 ). The New Testament does not record any missionary activity in Pisidia itself, probably because there were few Jews there with which to start a congregation. See Asia Minor.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Pisidia
Pitch; pitchy
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pisidia
A province in Asia. Here Paul preached the gospel. (See Acts 13:14) The word is Greek, meaning pitch.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Pisidia
District of Asia Minor lying between Pamphylia and Phrygia, through which Paul passed. Acts 13:14 ; Acts 14:24 . Travellers speak of it as wild and rugged.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Antioch, Pisidia
City, situated in Asia Minor, on the south slope of the mountains that separated Phrygia from Pisidia, two miles east of the ruins of Yalo-bach. Acts 13, gives a lengthy account of Paul's stay here, and shows the influence of his and Barnabas's work.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Pisidia
In Asia Minor, bounded on the N. by Phrygia, on the W. by Phrygia and Lycia, S. by Pamphylia, E. by Lycaonia and Cilicia. It stretched along the Taurus range. Paul passed through Pisidia twice on his first missionary tour; in going from Perga to Iconium, and in returning (Acts 13:13-14; Acts 13:51; Acts 14:21; Acts 14:24-25; 2 Timothy 3:11). The wild and rugged nature of the country makes it likely that it was the scene of Paul's "perils of robbers" and "rivers" (2 Corinthians 11:26). Antioch of Pisidia was the scene of Paul's striking sermon, Acts 13:16-41.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Antioch in Pisidia
A Roman colony of Phrygia in Asia Minor, founded by Seleueus Nicator. Its ruins are now called Yalobatch or Yalowaj . Paul's labour here was so successful that it roused the opposition of the Jews and he was driven to Iconium and Lystra; but he returned with Silas. Acts 13:14 ; Acts 14:19-21 ; 2 Timothy 3:11 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pisidia
a province of Asia Minor, having Lycaonia to the north, Pamphylia to the south, Cilicia and Cappadocia to the east, and the province of Asia to the west. St. Paul preached at Antioch in Pisidia, Acts 13:14 ; Acts 14:24 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Antioch of Pisidia
Beside the Syrian capital, there was another Antioch visited by St. Paul when in Asia, and called, for the sake of distinction, Antiochia ad Pisidiam, as belonging to that province, of which it was the capital. Here Paul and Barnabas preached; but the Jews, jealous, as usual, of the reception of the Gospel by the Gentiles, raised a sedition against them, and obliged them to leave the city, Acts 13:14 , to the end. There were several other cities of the same name, sixteen in number, in Syria and Asia Minor, built by the Seleucidae, the successors of Alexander in these countries; but the above two are the only ones which it is necessary to describe as occurring in Scripture.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Pisidia
A province of Asia Minor, separated from the Mediterranean by Pamphylia, lying on Mount Taurus and the high table land north of it, and running up between Phrygia and Lycaonia as far as Antioch its capital. The Pisidians, like most of the inhabitants of the Taurus range, were an unsubdued and lawless race; and Paul in preaching the gospel at Antioch and throughout Pisidia, Acts 13:14 ; 14:24 , was in peril by robbers as well as by sudden storms and floods in the mountain passes. Churches continued to exist here for seven or eight centuries.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pisidia
PISIDIA . The name applied to a district about 120 miles long and 50 miles broad, immediately N. of the plains of Pamphylia. It is entirely occupied by the numerous ranges into which the Taurus here breaks, with the deep intersecting valleys. The name was not applied to a definite political division, and nothing is known of the race inhabiting Pisidia. Until the time of Augustus they were wild mountaineers and brigands. Augustus began their reduction about b.c. 25 by establishing a chain of Roman posts which included on the N. side Antioch and Lystra, reconstituted as colonies. The name ‘Pisidian Antioch’ ( Acts 13:14 ) would seem to record this fact, since Antioch was never included in Pisidia. The civilization of the district seems to have been effected by about a.d. 74. Until then it was dealt with as part of the province of Galatia, but at that date Vespasian attached a considerable portion of it to Pamphylia, in which province no great military force was maintained.
Paul and Barnabas traversed the district twice in the first missionary journey (Acts 13:13 ; Acts 14:24 ). It was probably still a dangerous locality, and it is plausibly conjectured that St. Paul refers to it when he speaks of ‘perils of robbers’ ( 2 Corinthians 11:26 ). The route which they followed is uncertain, but the most likely theory is that of Prof. Ramsay (see Church in the Roman Empire , ch. 2 Corinthians 2:2 ), that they went through Adada, the ruins of which bear the name Kara Bavlo ( i.e. Paulo). The dedication of the church to St. Paul may have been due to some surviving tradition of his passing by that way, but we are not informed that he preached at all in Pisidia. There is no evidence that Christianity made any progress in Pisidia before the time of Constantine. From the time of Diocletian we find the name Pisidia applied differently, namely, to a Roman province including Phrygia Galatica, Lycaonia, and the part of Phrygia round Apamea.
A. E. Hillard.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pisidia
(Πισιδία)
Pisidia was a rugged and mountainous country in the south of Asia Minor, bounded on the N. by Phrygia, on the S. by the coast-land of Pamphylia, on the W. by Lycia, and on the E. by Isauria. Its length from W. to E. was about 120 miles, and its breadth 50 miles. It was a land of beautiful lakes-Limnai, Caralis, Ascania, and others-and of torrents growing into rivers-the Cestrus, the Eurymedon, and the Melas-which discharged themselves into the Pamphylian Sea. The semi-savage Pisidians, wholly untouched by the Hellenizing influences which were gradually affecting the other Anatolian races, had their homes in the upper valleys and strong fastnesses of this secluded region. Strabo (XII. vii. 1-3) gives details which enable us to realize their life. ‘Among the summits of Taurus is a very fertile tract capable of maintaining many thousand inhabitants. Many spots produce the olive and excellent vines, and afford abundant pasture for animals of all kinds. Above and all around are forests containing trees of various sorts.’ The mountaineers were ‘governed by hereditary chieftains,’ and followed ‘a predatory mode of life,’ carrying on a continual warfare with the kings to the N. and the S. of their territories.
The task of subjugating them was at first entrusted by the Romans to Amyntas, a brave and capable Galatian officer whom Mark Antony made king of Galatia in 36 b.c. His work was advancing towards success, when he lost his life in an expedition against the Homonades, to the W. of Lycaonia (25 b.c.). The Romans themselves were then obliged to complete the task of reducing the refractory highlanders. About 6 b.c. Augustus established a series of garrison towns on the flanks of Pisidia and Isauria. Supplying Antioch with veterans and re-organizing it in Roman fashion, he built one military road to connect it with the coloniae which he planted in Olbasa, Comama, and Cremna for the control of the western region, and another to join it with Parlais and Lystra, which were intended to hold the eastern tribes in check.
‘The newly-founded towns remained indeed unimportant, but still notably restricted the field of the free inhabitants of the mountains, and general peace must at length have made its triumphal entrance also here’ (T. Mommsen, The Provinces of the Roman Empire2, Eng. tr._, 1909, i. 337).
In St. Paul’s time Pisidia formed part of the province of Galatia. In his first missionary journey he traversed this wildly picturesque region (Acts 13:14), then comparatively settled, but still by no means free from ‘perils of robbers’ (see 2 Corinthians 11:26). His route through it can only be conjectured. Conybeare and Howson (The Life and Epistles of St. Paul, new ed., 1877, i. 204) think that he chose the steep pass leading from Attalia to Lake Ascania (Buldur Göl). W. M. Ramsay (The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. 19) holds that ‘the natural, easy, and direct course is along one of the eastern tributaries of the Cestrus to Adada.’ On the return journey St. Paul and Barnabas ‘passed through Pisidia’ (διελθὀντες τὴν Πισιδίαν, Acts 14:24), a phrase which, according to Ramsay, implies that some missionary work was attempted on the way. But it must have been difficult to get into touch with mountain tribes who did not know the Greek language, and apparently no church was founded in this part of Roman Galatia till a much later date. Yet a trace of the journey seems to be found in the name of Kara Bavlo-the modern equivalent of ‘Paul’-which is borne by the ruins of Adada. It is impossible to decide whether the name is based upon a genuine tradition or is merely a conjecture hazarded after the town was Christianized, but the latter supposition is perhaps the more likely. In a forest about 1 mile S. of Adada stand the ruins of a church of early date. The modern town, 5 miles S. of the ancient site, is also called Bavlo.
In a.d. 74 Vespasian transferred a great part of Pisidia to the new double province of Lycia-Pamphylia. The name Pisidia was gradually extended northward till it included most of Southern Phrygia. Thus Antioch, which in St. Paul’s time was not strictly ‘Pisidian’ (though St. Luke so describes it in Acts 13:14) but only ‘Antioch towards Pisidia’ (Ἀντιόχεια, ἡ πρὸς Πισιδίᾳ [1]), was at a later time correctly designated ‘Antioch of Pisidia’ (τῆς Πισιδίας; so the TR_ of Acts 13:14, following the Codex Bezae, which reflects the usage of the 2nd century).
The mountainous parts of the country are today inhabited by Karamanians who are as wild and rapacious as the Pisidians of two thousand years ago.
Literature.-C. Lanckoronski, Les Villes de la Pamphylie et de la Pisidie, 1890; W. M. Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire5, 1897, p. 18 ff.
James Strahan.
PIT
See Abyss.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Antioch in Pisidia
Pisidia was the traditional name of a highland district in Asia Minor. When the Romans took control of Asia Minor, they replaced the many local districts with a smaller number of Roman provinces. Pisidia now fell within the Roman province of Galatia. Antioch lay within Galatia, on the border area between the two smaller districts of Pisidia and Phrygia (Acts 13:14; Acts 16:6; for map see GALATIA). It is usually referred to as Pisidian Antioch to distinguish it from Syrian Antioch.
When Paul and Barnabas first came to Antioch, they preached in the Jewish synagogue on the Sabbath and there was a good response, both from Jews and from Gentiles (Acts 13:14; Acts 13:42-43). The next Sabbath almost the whole Gentile population of Antioch came to the synagogue to hear the missionaries preach. The Jewish leaders became jealous and angry, and drove Paul and Barnabas from the city (Acts 13:44-50; 2 Timothy 3:11). The two missionaries, not lacking in courage, returned to the city soon after (Acts 14:21).
Antioch was one of the churches of Galatia that Paul addressed in his Letter to the Galatians (Galatians 1:2; see GALATIANS, LETTER TO THE). Paul visited the churches of Galatia again on his second and third missionary journeys (Acts 16:6; Acts 18:23).

Sentence search

Pisidia - Pisidia (pî-sĭd'i-ah), pitchy. Paul twice visited Pisidia, passing directly north from Perga to Antioch, Acts 13:14, and again returning through Pisidia to Pamphylia
Pisidia - Pisidia was a mountainous region in the south of the Roman province of Galatia. (For map and other details see ANTIOCH IN Pisidia; GALATIA
Pisid'ia - Thus Antioch in Pisidia was sometimes called a Phrygian town. Paul passed through Pisidia twice, with Barnabas, on the first missionary journey, i. 2 Timothy 3:11 It is probable also that he traversed the northern part of the district, with Silas and Timotheus, on the second missionary journey, ( Acts 18:8 ) but the word Pisidia does not occur except in reference to the former journey
Pisidia - Pisidia . The name was not applied to a definite political division, and nothing is known of the race inhabiting Pisidia. The name ‘Pisidian Antioch’ ( Acts 13:14 ) would seem to record this fact, since Antioch was never included in Pisidia. Paul may have been due to some surviving tradition of his passing by that way, but we are not informed that he preached at all in Pisidia. There is no evidence that Christianity made any progress in Pisidia before the time of Constantine. From the time of Diocletian we find the name Pisidia applied differently, namely, to a Roman province including Phrygia Galatica, Lycaonia, and the part of Phrygia round Apamea
Pamphylia - by Pisidia, from which it was separated by the Taurus range, W. His "peril of robbers" was in crossing Taurus, the Pisidians being notorious for robbery. " Also Acts 13:13-14, "from Perga to Antioch in Pisidia," and Acts 14:24, "after Pisidia
Pisidia - Paul passed through Pisidia twice on his first missionary tour; in going from Perga to Iconium, and in returning (Acts 13:13-14; Acts 13:51; Acts 14:21; Acts 14:24-25; 2 Timothy 3:11). Antioch of Pisidia was the scene of Paul's striking sermon, Acts 13:16-41
Pisidia - Antioch was made the capital, although some historians contend that the city was not actually in Pisidia. The New Testament does not record any missionary activity in Pisidia itself, probably because there were few Jews there with which to start a congregation
Pisidia - Paul preached at Antioch in Pisidia, Acts 13:14 ; Acts 14:24
Antioch, Pisidia - City, situated in Asia Minor, on the south slope of the mountains that separated Phrygia from Pisidia, two miles east of the ruins of Yalo-bach
Antioch in Pisidia - Pisidia was the traditional name of a highland district in Asia Minor. Pisidia now fell within the Roman province of Galatia. Antioch lay within Galatia, on the border area between the two smaller districts of Pisidia and Phrygia (Acts 13:44-50; Acts 16:6; for map see GALATIA). It is usually referred to as Pisidian Antioch to distinguish it from Syrian Antioch
Lycia - A province in the southwest of Asia Minor bounded west by Caria, east by Pamphylia, north by Phrygia and Pisidia, and south by the Mediterranean
Pamphylia - Lycia west, Pisidia north, and the Mediterranean south
Phrygia - The towns of Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 13:14 ), Colosse, Hierapolis, Iconium, and Laodicea were situated in it
Pamphylia - To the south it is bounded by the Mediterranean, and to the north by Pisidia; having Lycia to the west, and Cilicia to the east
Pisidia - (Πισιδία)...
Pisidia was a rugged and mountainous country in the south of Asia Minor, bounded on the N. The semi-savage Pisidians, wholly untouched by the Hellenizing influences which were gradually affecting the other Anatolian races, had their homes in the upper valleys and strong fastnesses of this secluded region. Augustus established a series of garrison towns on the flanks of Pisidia and Isauria. Paul’s time Pisidia formed part of the province of Galatia. Paul and Barnabas ‘passed through Pisidia’ (διελθὀντες τὴν Πισιδίαν, Acts 14:24), a phrase which, according to Ramsay, implies that some missionary work was attempted on the way. 74 Vespasian transferred a great part of Pisidia to the new double province of Lycia-Pamphylia. The name Pisidia was gradually extended northward till it included most of Southern Phrygia. Paul’s time was not strictly ‘Pisidian’ (though St. Luke so describes it in Acts 13:14) but only ‘Antioch towards Pisidia’ (Ἀντιόχεια, ἡ πρὸς Πισιδίᾳ [1]), was at a later time correctly designated ‘Antioch of Pisidia’ (τῆς Πισιδίας; so the TR_ of Acts 13:14, following the Codex Bezae, which reflects the usage of the 2nd century). ...
The mountainous parts of the country are today inhabited by Karamanians who are as wild and rapacious as the Pisidians of two thousand years ago
Lycaonia - It was separated from Phrygia, and bounded north by Galatia, east by Cappadocia, south by Cilicia, and west by Pisidia and Phrygia
Lycaonia - a province of Asia Minor, accounted a part of Cappadocia, having Pisidia on the west, and Cilicia on the south
Lycaonia - , Pisidia and Phrygia W. toward Antioch in Pisidia; Derbe was on the E
Phrygia - Within its limits were the cities of Laodicæa, Hierapolis, Colossæ, and Antioch of Pisidia
Phrygia - The area remained relatively undefined but contained Antioch of Pisidia, Laodicea, and at times, Iconium
Iconium - City in Lycaonia in the centre of Asia Minor, visited by Paul and Barnabas when they had been driven from Antioch of Pisidia
Perga - Its inhabitants retreat during the unhealthy summer heats up to the cool hollows (the Yailahs) in the Pisidian hills. Paul came in May when the passes would be cleared of snow, and would join a Pamphylian company on their way to the Pisidian heights (Acts 13:13), and would return with them on his way from Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 14:24-25)
Cilicia - Cilicia (sĭ-lĭsh'ĭ-ah), the southeasterly province of Asia Minor, having Cappadocia on the north, Syria on the east, the Mediterranean Sea on the south, and Pamphylia and Pisidia (?) on the west
Iconium - It was first visited by Paul and Barnabas from Antioch-in-Pisidia during the apostle's first missionary journey (Acts 13:50,51 )
Margaret, Saint - Virgin, martyr, one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers; died Pisidia, Asia Minor, c275 She was the daughter of a pagan priest, but was brought up a Christian by her nurse, was disowned by her father, refused to marry a Roman prefect, Olybrius, was subjected to tortures which left her unharmed, and was decapitated
Pisidia - The Pisidians, like most of the inhabitants of the Taurus range, were an unsubdued and lawless race; and Paul in preaching the gospel at Antioch and throughout Pisidia, Acts 13:14 ; 14:24 , was in peril by robbers as well as by sudden storms and floods in the mountain passes
Justina, Saint - Overpowered by a greater strength than his own, Cyprian became converted to the Faith, entered the priesthood, and was made Bishop of Antioch in Pisidia
Pamphyl'ia - Paul's time it was not only a regular province, but the emperor Claudius had united Lycia with it, and probably also a good part of Pisidia
Phrygia - The Taurus range separated Phrygia from Pisidia on the S
Ico'Nium - ( Acts 14:1,3,21,22 ; 16:1,2 ; 18:23 ) Paul's first visit here was on his first circuit, in company with Barnabas; and on this occasion he approached it from Antioch in Pisidia, which lay to the west
Iconium - The provinces of Asia Minor varied so much at different times, that Iconium is assigned by different writers to Phrygia, to Lycaonia, and to Pisidia
Asia - The Asia spoken of in the Bible is Asia Minor, a peninsula which lies between the Euxine or Black sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean, and which formerly included the provinces of Phrygia, Cilicia, Pamphylia, Caria, Lycia, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Galatia, Lycaonia, and Pisidia
Antioch - ANTIOCH IN Pisidia: Also founded by Seleucus Nicator. In 2 Timothy 3:11 he refers to Timothy's acquaintance with his trials at Antioch of Pisidia; and Timothy's own home was in the neighborhood (Acts 16:1)
Lascivious, Lasciviousness - Some have derived the word from a, negative, and selge, "a city in Pisidia
Phrygia - was Pisidian Phrygia (Ptol. 4) or Phrygia towards Pisidia (πρὸς Πισιδίᾳ [1]), the most important town of which was called Antioch towards Pisidia; but as Pisidia gradually extended northwards this Antioch ceased to be Phrygian and was called Pisidian Antioch (q. While the eastern part of Phrygia (with Iconium) and the southern (with Pisidia) were attached to the province of Galatia, the western part, which was much the larger, was included in the province of Asia
Antioch - ...
The other city, also found by Seleucus Nicator, was called Antioch of Pisidia, because it was attached to that province, although situated in Phrygia, Acts 13:14 14:19,21 2 Timothy 3:11
Galatia - Rome made Galatia a province of the empire and extended its borders, adding Lycaonia, Isauria, and Pisidia with Ancyra serving as the governmental center
Antioch - ...
...
In the extreme north of Pisidia; was visited by Paul and Barnabas on the first missionary journey (Acts 13:14 )
Antioch - Antioch in or near Pisidia was also founded or rebuilt by Seleucus Nicator
Lycaonia - by Phrygia, Pisidia, and Isauria; but its limits were very uncertain and liable to change, especially in the N. , but transferred it in 36 to King Amyntas of Pisidia, who at the same time became king of all Galatia
Iconium - Paul with Barnabas first visited it from Antioch in Pisidia which lay on the W
Antioch - Possessed with a mama for building cities and calling them after himself or his relatives, he founded no fewer than 37, of which 4 are mentioned in the NT (1) Antioch of Syria ( Acts 11:19 ), (2) Seleucia ( Acts 13:4 ), (3) Antioch of Pisidia ( Acts 13:14 ; Acts 14:21 , 2 Timothy 3:11 ), and (4) Laodicea ( Colossians 4:13-16 , Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 3:14 ). ...
ANTIOCH (Pisidian). The expression ‘Antioch of Pisidia’ or ‘Antioch in Pisidia’ is incorrect, as the town was not in Pisidia. Its official title was ‘Antioch near Pisidia,’ and as it existed for the sake of Pisidia, the adjective ‘Pisidian’ was sometimes loosely attached to it
Antioch - In Pisidia (Acts 13:14 Revised Version , Ἀ. τὴν Πισιδίαν, ‘Pisidian Antioch,’ which is the correct reading, instead of Ἀ. Its importance increased when the first emperors found it necessary to pacify the ‘barbarian’ high-landers of Pisidia. The city was not yet ‘Antioch in Pisidia’ (Authorized Version ), being correctly styled by Strabo ‘Antioch towards Pisidia’ (Ἀ. Luke already calls it ‘Pisidian Antioch,’ to differentiate it from Antioch in Syria. The boundaries of Pisidia gradually moved northward till it included most of Southern Phrygia, and then ‘Antioch of Pisidia’ became the usual designation of the city. At a still later period Pisidia was constituted a Roman province, with Antioch as its capital
Lycia - by Phrygia and Pisidia, on the N
an'Tioch - ...
IN Pisidia , (Acts 13:14 ; 14:19,21 ; 2 Timothy 3:11 ) on the borders of Phrygia, corresponds to Yalobatch , which is distant from Aksher six hours over the mountains
Dispersion - The apostles in every city followed God's order, as Paul told the Jews at Antioch in Pisidia, "it was necessary that the word of God should first have been spoken unto you" (Acts 3:26; Acts 13:46); so Romans 1:16, "to the Jew first, and also to the Greek
Pamphylia - , more properly called Pisidia, but until that time it was used only in the narrower sense
Pilate Pontius - With this reference may be taken that (Acts 13:28) in Paul’s address at Antioch in Pisidia, which somewhat resembles the earlier speech of Peter
Antioch - A city in Pisidia, Asia Minor, west of Iconium
Pamphylia - Landing at the river-harbour of Perga, they merely ‘passed through from’ the city (Acts 13:14), hastening northward over the Taurus to Antioch in Pisidia
Galatians, Epistle to the - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Epistle to the Galatians - Galatia, however, was also the name of the Roman province embracing Galatia Proper and the region to the south of it in which were Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, the cities evangelized by Paul on his first missionary journey; many hold that the epistle was addressed to these southern churches
Phrygia - along the difficult mountain road to Antioch, here called ‘Pisidian Antioch’ (see Pisidia)
Paul - ...
Paul's convention...
Sojourn in Arabia...
37-40...
First journey to Jerusalem after his conversion, Galatians 1:18; sojourn at Tarsus, ana afterward at Antioch, Acts 11:26...
Second journey to Jerusalem, in company with Barnabas, to relieve the famine...
Paul's first great missionary journey, with Barnabas and Mark; Cyprus, Antioch in Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, Derbe; return to Antioch in Syria
Mark, John - The Colossians, 110 miles distant from Perga, 20 from Pisidia, knew of Mark's past unfaithfulness, and so needed the recommendation to "receive" him as a true evangelist, ignoring the past
Boldness - Paul and Barnabas at Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:46), of Apollos at Ephesus (Acts 18:26), of St
Habakkuk - Paul quotes Habakkuk 1:5 in his warning to the unbelieving Jews at Antioch in Pisidia
Joy - After the work of Paul and Barnabas in Antioch of Pisidia, “the diciples were filled with joy, and with the Holy Ghost” (Acts 13:52 )
Iconium - 295, when Diocletian formed the province Pisidia, with Antioch as its capital and Iconium as its ‘second metropolis
Lasciviousness - The old derivation was from Selge, a city in Pisidia regarded by some as remarkably addicted to wantonness (Suidas, s
Barnabas - delegates of the church (Acts 14:14), (Paul was also counted with the Lord's apostles by a special call: Galatians 1:1-17) they made their first missionary journey to Cyprus and Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, and back to Antioch, A
Colossae - ’ About a century later, Theodoret, commenting on Colossians 2:18, says: ‘This disease (τοῦτο τὸ πάθος) remained long in Phrygia and Pisidia … and even to the present time oratories (εὐκτήρια) of the holy Michael may be seen among them and their neighbours
Galatia - The large central province, which the Romans named Galatia, included parts of the ancient regions of Galatia in the north, Phrygia in the south-west, Pisidia in the south and Lycaonia in the south-east...
Galatia - 40, and at the same time gave Amyntas a kingdom comprising Pisidic Phrygia and Pisidia generally. (The effect of taking ‘Galatia’ in the other sense would be to leave out certain Pauline churches, Derbe, Lystra, Iconium, and Pisidian Antioch, and perhaps these alone, in all that vast region: which is absurd. ’ This can be none other than that section of the province Galatia which was known as Phrygia Galatica, and which contained Pisidian Antioch and Iconium, exactly the places we should expect St. ‘The Galatian region,’ then, will cover Derbe and Lystra; ‘Phrygia’ will include Iconium and Pisidian Antioch. We conclude then that, whether any other churches are comprised in the address of the Epistle to the Galatians or not, and a negative answer is probably correct, the churches of Derbe, Lystra, Iconium, and Pisidian Antioch are included
Aetius, Arian Sect Founder And Head - The party triumphed, but its founder was sent into banishment, first to Mopsuestia, then to Amblada in Pisidia
Severus, Patriarch of Antioch - 512–519, a native of Sozopolis in Pisidia, by birth and education a heathen, baptized in the martyry of Leontius at Tripolis (Evagr
Peter, the Epistles of - Men of Cappadocia, as well as of "Pontus" and "Asia" (including Mysia, Lydia, Curia, Phrygia, Pisidia, and Lycaonia), were among Peter's hearers on Pentecost; these brought home to their native lands the first tidings of the gospel. In Pisidia was Antioch, where Paul preached (Acts 13) so effectively, but from which he was driven out by the Jews
Galatians, Letter to the - ” In Acts 13:14-14:24 (first missionary journey) Paul founded churches at Antioch of Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, cities in the southern part of the Roman province
Paul - ) In Antioch in Pisidia, as in Cyprus, they began their preaching in the synagogue on the Sabbath. " From Pisidia they came to Perga and Attalia; thence to Antioch, where they reported at what may be called the first missionary meeting or covention "all that God had done with them, opening the door of faith unto the Gentiles"; and so ended Paul's first missionary tour
Asia Minor, Cities of - Luke's “Antioch of Pisidia ” carried the title of Colonia Caesarea Antiocheia , a colony established in 25 B
Galatia - , and four years later his dominions were bestowed by Mark Antony on Amyntas, the Roman client-king of Pisidia, who had formerly been the secretary of Deiotarus. Galatia proper (the country of the three Galatian tribes), part of Phrygia (including Antioch and Iconium), Pisidia, Isauria, and part of Lycaonia (with Lystra and Derbe)
Synagogue - Occasionally, it would seem, a synagogue might have two or more rulers, as at Antioch of Pisidia ( Acts 13:15 )
Mediation Mediator - At Antioch in Pisidia St
Paul - The two then proceeded about 100 miles inland, passing through Pamphylia, Pisidia, and Lycaonia. The towns mentioned in this tour are the Pisidian Antioch, where Paul delivered his first address of which we have any record (13:16-51; comp 10:30-43), Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe
Election - Paul’s preaching for the first time to Gentiles at Antioch of Pisidia, ‘as many as were ordained to eternal life believed’ (Acts 13:48)
Trade And Commerce - Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia Roman Law in the nt - The colonics mentioned in the NT are; Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:14), Lystra (Acts 14:6), Philippi (Acts 16:12, where alone of NT passages κολωνία is found), Corinth (Acts 18:1), Ptolemais (Acts 21:7)
Gospels - "...
These not being bound under the ceremonial yoke, as the original Jews, formed a connecting link with the Gentiles; and hence at Antioch in Pisidia, when the Jews rejected the preaching of Paul and Barnabas, these proselytes, with the Gentiles, "besought that these words might be preached to them the next sabbath,
Thecla - Paul is represented as being on his way to Iconium after having been driven from Antioch of Pisidia; but whether his flight from Antioch related in Act_13:15 is meant and consequently whether the ensuing events are to be taken as belonging to his first visit to Iconium is not clear. Even if we regard Iconium as of Lycaonia, and the Antioch meant to be the Pisidian, in neither city would so high an official as the proconsul of Asia be resident, as the Acts represent
Trade And Commerce - Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia Atonement - The discourse at Antioch in Pisidia may illustrate the character of his reference to it: ‘through this man is preached unto you forgiveness of sins’ (Acts 13:38); but nothing is defined more closely
Paul - 45, and preached the Gospel successively at Salamis and Paphos, two cities of the isle of Cyprus, at Perga in Pamphylia, Antioch in Pisidia, and at Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, three cities of Lycaonia
Paul - From Perga they travelled on to a place obscure in secular history, but most memorable in the history of the Kingdom of Christ --Antioch in Pisidia. Here again, as in Pisidian Antioch, the envy of the Jews was excited, and the mob assaulted the house of Jason with whom Paul and Silas were staying as guests, and, not finding them, dragged Jason himself and some other brethren before the magistrates
Paul - But, if its recipients were the churches of Antioch-in-Pisidia, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, evangelized during the first missionary journey, and if the visit to Jerusalem mentioned in Galatians 2 be identified with a visit to Jerusalem preceding the Council held there-these two being the conclusions of what is called the South Galatian theory (see below)-it seems a natural inference that the Epistle was written before the commencement of the second missionary journey and before the Council of Jerusalem