What does Philip mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
φίλιππος an apostle of Christ. / an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church. / tetrarch of Trachonitis 14
φίλιππον an apostle of Christ. / an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church. / tetrarch of Trachonitis 9
φιλίππου an apostle of Christ. / an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church. / tetrarch of Trachonitis 5
φιλίππῳ an apostle of Christ. / an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church. / tetrarch of Trachonitis 5
φίλιππε an apostle of Christ. / an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church. / tetrarch of Trachonitis 1

Definitions Related to Philip

G5376


   1 an apostle of Christ.
   2 an evangelist and one of the seven deacons of the Jerusalem church.
   3 tetrarch of Trachonitis, was brother to Herod Antipas, by the father’s, but not by the mother’s side.
   Philip was born of Cleopatra, of Jerusalem, and Herod of Malthace, a Samaritan: he died in the twentieth year of Tiberias, five years after his mention in Lk. 3:1.
            He built Caesarea Philippi.
            His step brother Herod Antipas, married his wife unlawfully.
            (Gill).
   4 see 2542, Caesarea Philippi.
   Additional Information: Philip = “lover of horses”.
   

Frequency of Philip (original languages)

Frequency of Philip (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Philip
Philip (fĭl'ip), lover of a horse. 1. One of the apostles, a native of Bethsaida; he had been a disciple of John the Baptist. John 1:43-48; John 6:5-7; John 12:21-22; John 14:8-9; Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:14. He was with the rest of the apostles and disciples who had assembled for prayer in the upper room in Jerusalem, after the ascension of our Lord. Acts 1:13; Acts 14:2. One of the seven deacons of the church at Jerusalem; also called "the Evangelist." Acts 6:5; Acts 21:8. He preached the gospel in Samaria with great success. Acts 8:6-13. He was directed of the Spirit to proceed toward Gaza, where he preached Christ to the treasurer of Candace, queen of Ethiopia. After a short stay at Azotus, Philip preached the gospel from town to town till he came to Cæsarea, where he probably settled. Acts 8:26-40. He had four daughters who were endued with the gifts of prophecy. Acts 21:8; Acts 9:3. A tetrarch of Trachonitis, and Ituræa. Luke 3:1. He was the son of Herod the Great, by his wife Cleopatra: and at his death his tetrarchy was annexed to Syria. Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27. 4. A son of Herod the Great by Mariamne the daughter of Simon the high priest. He was the first husband of Herodias, who was taken from him by his brother Herod Antipas. Matthew 14:3; Mark 6:17; Luke 3:19.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Deacon, Philip the, Saint
Born Caesarea, Palestine; died there c58 Also known as Philip the Deacon. One of the seven deacons (Acts 6), he first preached in Samaria with great success, and confirmed his preaching with miracles (Acts 8). He converted many who "received the Holy Ghost" (Acts 8) and, commanded by an angel, travelled from Jerusalem to Gaza, on the way converting and baptizing the eunuch of Candace, Queen of Ethiopia (Acts 8). From there he was transported by Divine power to Azotus, and preached to all the cities until he came to Caesarea (Acts 8), where he lived with his four daughters, virgins with the gift of prophecy (Acts 21). Represented baptizing the eunuch of Ethiopia or with his four daughters. Feast, June 6,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Neri, Philip, Saint
Confessor; apostle of Rome; founder of the Oratory; born Florence, 1515; died Rome, 1595. He engaged in commercial activity at Monte Cassino, 1534-1551, but abandoned it to go to Rome, where he distinguished himself by his erudition. Foregoing his worldly interests, he devoted himself to the care of the poor and sick. Ordained priest in 1551, he founded the Congregation of the Oratory, approbation of which was granted by Pope Gregory XIII, 1575. It spread rapidly through Italy and Philip was elected superior general. His life was remarkable for singular devotion to the Blessed Sacrament. Patron of Rome. Emblems: altar, chasuble, and vial. Canonized, 1622. Body in a shrine in Chiesa Nuova. Feast, Roman Calendar, May 26,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Benizi, Philip, Saint
Confessor; fifth general of the Servite Order; born Florence, 1233; died Todi, Italy, 1285. He exhibited a startling precocity in learning, studied at the University of Paris, finished his medical course at Padua, and practised medicine in Florence for one year. Obeying a vision of the Blessed Virgin, he entered the Servite Order, 1253, and was elected superior general, 1267. He assisted at the Council of Lyons, 1274, where he possessed the gift of tongues; and acted as peace-maker between the Guelphs and the Ghibellines. Canonized, 1671. Relics at Todi. Feast, Roman Calendar, August 23,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Oratory of Saint Philip Neri
Founded by Saint Philip Neri at Rome, 1575, and promoted by Pope Gregory XIII. The rule, not officially constituted till 17 years after Saint Philip's death, was approved by Pope Paul V, 1612. The Congregation of Rome is composed of independent communities of secular priests under obedience but not bound by vows. The threefold object is prayer, preaching, and the sacraments. In close connection with communities of the Oratory is the Brotherhood of the Little Oratory, a confraternity of clerics and laymen whose exercises are a focus of spiritual life. The seat of the government is the church of Vallicella at Rome and there are Italian, Spanish and English foundations, the latter made by Cardinal Newman at Edgbaston, near Birmingham, in 1847. The London Oratory became known largely through the preaching and publications of Father Faber, that of Birmingham through the influence of Cardinal Newman. The French Congregation, though taking its origin and some of its rules from that of Saint Philip, is a distinct institution founded at Paris, 1611, by Cardinal de Berulle with the official title, "Congregation des Prêtres de l'Oratoirede N.S.J.C." Approved by Pope Paul V, 1613, and by Pope Innocent X, 1654, it was suppressed by the Revolution in 1792; reconstituted, 1852; approved, 1864, and its constitution confirmed, 1893; revised and again approved, 1925. It now exists as the "Congregatio Oratorii Jesu et Mariae Immaculatae." The Superior General resides at Paris. See also the congregation's web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jesus, Philip of, Saint
Martyr; born Mexico; died Nagasaki, Japan, 1597. He joined the Discalced Franciscans of the province of Saint Didacus, founded by Saint Peter Baptist, but left the order in 1589 to engage in mercantile affairs which later brought him to the Philippines where he was re-admitted to the order, 1590. He was arrested with Peter Baptist and companions, tortured, and crucified. Patron of Mexico City. Canonized, 1862. Feast, February 6,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fisher, Philip
Real name: Thomas Copley. Jesuit missionary, born Madrid, Spain, 1595; died Maryland, 1652. In 1637 he took charge of the Maryland mission, but eight years later he was sent to England in chains. After much suffering he was released and returned to his missionary work.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Herod Philip i.
(Mark 6:17 ), the son of Herod the Great by Mariamne, the daughter of Simon, the high priest. He is distinguished from another Philip called "the tetrarch." He lived at Rome as a private person with his wife Herodias and his daughter Salome.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Philip
Lover of horses.
One of the twelve apostles; a native of Bethsaida, "the city of Andrew and Peter" (John 1:44 ). He readily responded to the call of Jesus when first addressed to him (43), and forthwith brought Nathanael also to Jesus (45,46). He seems to have held a prominent place among the apostles (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; John 6:5-7 ; 12:21,22 ; 14:8,9 ; Acts 1:13 ). Of his later life nothing is certainly known. He is said to have preached in Phrygia, and to have met his death at Hierapolis.
One of the "seven" (Acts 6:5 ), called also "the evangelist" (21:8,9). He was one of those who were "scattered abroad" by the persecution that arose on the death of Stephen. He went first to Samaria, where he laboured as an evangelist with much success (8:5-13). While he was there he received a divine command to proceed toward the south, along the road leading from Jerusalem to Gaza. These towns were connected by two roads. The one Philip was directed to take was that which led through Hebron, and thence through a district little inhabited, and hence called "desert." As he travelled along this road he was overtaken by a chariot in which sat a man of Ethiopia, the eunuch or chief officer of Queen Candace, who was at that moment reading, probably from the Septuagint version, a portion of the prophecies of (Isaiah 53:6,7 ). Philip entered into conversation with him, and expounded these verses, preaching to him the glad tidings of the Saviour. The eunuch received the message and believed, and was forthwith baptized, and then "went on his way rejoicing." Philip was instantly caught away by the Spirit after the baptism, and the eunuch saw him no more. He was next found at Azotus, whence he went forth in his evangelistic work till he came to Caesarea. He is not mentioned again for about twenty years, when he is still found at Caesarea (Acts 21:8 ) when Paul and his companions were on the way to Jerusalem. He then finally disappears from the page of history.
Mentioned only in connection with the imprisonment of John the Baptist (Matthew 14:3 ; Mark 6:17 ; Luke 3:19 ). He was the son of Herod the Great, and the first husband of Herodias, and the father of Salome. (See HEROD PHILIP I.)
The "tetrarch of Ituraea" (Luke 3:1 ); a son of Herod the Great, and brother of Herod Antipas. The city of Caesarea-Philippi was named partly after him (Matthew 16:13 ; Mark 8:27 ). (See HEROD PHILIP II.)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Herod Philip ii.
The son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra of Jerusalem. He was "tetrarch" of Batanea, Iturea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. He rebuilt the city of Caesarea Philippi, calling it by his own name to distinguish it from the Caesarea on the sea-coast which was the seat of the Roman government. He married Salome, the daughter of Herodias (Matthew 16:13 ; Mark 8:27 ; Luke 3:1 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Philip
There were two men named Philip among the early disciples of Jesus. These are commonly referred to as Philip the apostle and Philip the evangelist. (Concerning two other men named Philip, who were members of Herod’s family, see HEROD.)
Philip the apostle came from the fishing town of Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee. When Jesus first went to Galilee at the beginning of his ministry, Philip was among the first to respond to his call. Immediately, he brought Nathanael to Jesus (John 1:43-46). Later, Jesus appointed Philip one of his twelve apostles (Matthew 10:3). Philip features in the story of Jesus’ feeding of the five thousand (John 6:5-7), but he was slow to understand how Jesus’ miraculous works demonstrated the unique relationship between Jesus and his Father (John 14:8-11). Just before the last Passover, Philip helped a group of visiting Greek worshippers to meet Jesus (John 12:20-22). A few weeks later he witnessed Jesus’ return to his Father (Acts 1:9-13).
Philip the evangelist was one of the seven men whom the Jerusalem church chose to administer its welfare program (Acts 6:1-6). After the killing of Stephen and the expulsion of Christians from Jerusalem, Philip went to Samaria, where many responded to his preaching (Acts 8:4-13). He then travelled south towards Gaza and led a God-fearing Ethiopian official to faith in Jesus Christ (Acts 8:26-39). From there he moved north along the Mediterranean coast, preaching in all the towns as far as Caesarea (Acts 8:40). The next mention of Philip is about twenty-five years later, when Paul’s party stayed with him in Caesarea for a few days. He had four daughters who had the gift of prophecy (Acts 21:8-9).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Philip
(fihl' ihp) Personal name meaning, “fond of horses.” 1. A respected member of the church at Jerusalem who was chosen as one of the seven—first deacons (Acts 6:5 ). Following Stephen's martyrdom, Philip took the gospel to Samaria, where his ministry was blessed (Acts 8:5-13 ). Subsequently, he was led south to the Jerusalem-Gaza road where he introduced the Ethiopian eunuch to Christ and baptized him (Acts 8:26-38 ). He was then transported by the Spirit to Azotus (Ashdod) and from there conducted an itinerent ministry until he took up residence in Caesarea (Acts 8:39-40 ). Then, for nearly twenty years, we lose sight of him. He is last seen in Scripture when Paul lodged in his home on his last journey to Jerusalem (Acts 21:8 ). He had four unmarried daughters who were prophetesses (Acts 21:9 ). See Acts ; Deacon ; Evangelism .
2. One of twelve apostles (Matthew 10:3 ). From Bethsaida, he led his brother Nathanael to Jesus (John 1:43-51 ). Jesus tested Philip concerning how to feed the multitude (John 6:5-7 ). He and Andrew took inquiring Gentiles to Jesus (John 12:21-22 ). Philip asked Jesus to show them the father (John 14:8-9 ), opening the way for Jesus' teaching that to see Him is to see the Father. See Disciples , Apostles .
3. Tetrarch of Itaraea and Trachonitis (Luke 3:1 ). See Herod .
Paul Powell
Holman Bible Dictionary - Philip, Herod
See Herods.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Philip
Warlike; a lover of horses
Webster's Dictionary - Philip
(1):
(n.) The European hedge sparrow.
(2):
(n.) The house sparrow. Called also phip.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Philip
The apostle. (See John 1:43-44) There was also a Philip who was ore of the seven deacons. (Acts 6:5)
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Philip: Deacon And Evangelist
THE more we are mown down by you, the more we multiply among you,' said Tertullian in his proud Apology. 'Every single drop of our blood springs up, in some thirty, in some sixty, and in some an hundred-fold.' And thus it was that the banishment of Philip from Jerusalem was the salvation of Samaria, and thus it was also that the martyrdom of Stephen was the conversion of Saul. Semen est sanguis Christianorum.
Stephen was the first martyr, and Philip was the first missionary. The deaconship adorned itself and did nobly in those early days. Stephen and Philip were not apostles to begin with; they were simply deacons. They were not ordained, like the apostles, to prayer and to the ministry of the Word. But you cannot limit, and narrow, and bind down to the serving of tables two powerful and original men like Stephen and Philip. Paul had Stephen and Philip in his mind when he said to Timothy long afterwards, that they who have used the office of a deacon well, purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus. All of which both Stephen and Philip had emphatically done.
"And," writes Luke to Theophilus, "at that time there was a great persecution against the Church which was at Jerusalem; so that they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria. And Philip went down to the city of Samaria, and preached Christ unto them. And there was great joy in that city." Now, just suppose for a moment that you had been Philip. Suppose that you had been scattered abroad like Philip and his colleagues. And suppose that you had escaped with the Gospel in your hands, and were chased into some half-heathen city that had just been touched on the surface with the knowledge of Christ. You would be sure to seek out those who had been so touched, and you would throw yourself on their hospitality and protection. And thus it was that Philip would certainly seek out the woman of Samaria that all the world knows about now, and in whose heart, and in whose house, there was now a well of water springing up unto everlasting life. Peter and John would give Philip an introduction to her; and to reassure him about his reception, they would tell him, John especially, all about that oft-remembered day when their Master must needs go through Samaria, and when, being wearied with His journey, He sat thus on the well. And the woman would welcome Philip, and would say to him, Come in, thou blessed of the Lord, for when I was thirsty He gave me drink. And when Philip said to her, Sit down, woman, sit down and eat, she only served his table all the more hospitably, and said, I have meat to eat that thou knowest not of. Come to my house, she said also to all her neighbours, and see and hear a man who has come to my house from the very risen Christ Himself. And, taking his text from the woman's words, Philip preached the risen Christ in Sychar till there was great joy in that city. Luke is a scholar, and so is Theophilus. Luke is a student and an artist in his words, and Theophilus attends to what Luke writes. And thus it is that when Luke tells Theophilus that Philip preached 'Christ' to the Samaritans, and then that the same evangelist preached 'Jesus' to the Ethiopian eunuch, it is not for nothing; it is not of no consequence what Luke says, or how he says it. It is not without good reason that such a scrupulous composer as Luke is selects his names and his titles in this exact way for our Lord. Bengel is the very commentator for such a composer as Luke. And Bengel writes with his needle-pointed pen and says that "from the Old Testament point of view, progress is made from the knowledge of Christ to the knowledge of Jesus; while from the New Testament point of view, the progress is made from the knowledge of Jesus to the knowledge of Christ." "Not a single syllable," says Basil, "of all that is written concerning Jesus Christ should be left uninvestigated. The men who trace the hidden meaning of every word and even of every letter in the New Testament are those who understand best the end and nature of our Scriptural calling." Let our theological students, then, study out the fact of Philip's preaching 'Christ' in the city, and 'Jesus' in the desert, and make an Ellicott-like thesis for themselves and for their people on this subject taking in Romans 8:11.
Now, I must stop for a moment at this point to say how much I feel both impressed and rebuked by the noble conduct of Peter and John. Both Stephen and Philip were by far the subordinates or Peter and John. And there is no sin that so easily besets some of us ministers as just the sudden success of those who are by far our subordinates. There is nothing that more tries us and brings to the surface what we are made of at heart than just to be outstripped and extinguished by those who but yesterday were mere boys beside us. And it takes the strongest man among us and the holiest man all his might to behave himself with humility and with generosity to his late subordinates at such a time. But let us stop at this point and see how well both Peter and John came out of that furnace of theirs. They did not grudge, nor resent, nor suspect, nor despise the success of Stephen in Jerusalem, nor of Philip in Samaria. They did not say, The deacon has his proper place. They did not complain that he had so soon left the serving of tables. They did not say that Philip should attend to his proper work, and let preaching alone. They did not shake their heads and forecast that it would soon turn out to be all so much Samaritan excitement. They did not have it reported to them every word that Philip had at any time spoken that was out of joint. Far no. To their great honour be it told, they behaved themselves in all this temptation of theirs in a way altogether worthy of their apostolic office. They did not wait to see if the awakening was real and would last, as we would have done. But the twelve sent down Peter and John, their two best men, to assist Philip to gather in the results of his so suddenly successful mission. And Peter and John set to work with all their might to found a church out of Philip's converts, to be called the Church of the Evangelist, after the name of their deacon and subordinate. I, for one, must lay all that Samaria episode well to heart. I, for one, must not forget it.
Both Stephen and Philip have made this impression also upon me that they were born preachers, as we say. Born, not made. Born, not collegebred. Born, and not simply ordained. And if a man is a born preacher, you may set him to serve tables, or, for that matter, to make tables, but he will preach in spite of you. You may suborn men to bear him down. You may banish him away to Samaria, but I defy you to shut his mouth. Stephen and Philip were born with such a fire in their bones that no man could put it out. There is a divine tongue in their mouth that you cannot silence. The more you persecute them and cast them out, and the more tribulation you pass them through, they will only preach all that the better. Now, that there were two men of such rare genius among the first seven deacons is a remarkable proof of the insight of the congregation that elected them, as well as of the wealth of all kinds of talent in the Apostolic Church. I have often wished that I could have been one of the two Emmaus-men whose hearts burned within them as their risen Lord expounded unto them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself. And, then, after that I would fain have been the servant of the Ethiopian eunuch, so as to have sat beside him and heard him reading the prophet Esaias till Philip came up and said to him, Understandest thou what thou readest? How can I, except some man should guide me? And he desired Philip that he would come up and sit with him. And Philip opened his mouth, and began at the 53 rd of Isaiah, and preached unto him Jesus. All this took place in the primitive, simple, unsophisticated east, and we must not measure any part of all this history by our western habits of intercourse. It would be resented as the height of intrusion and incivility among us if one man were to say to another over his book on the deck of a steamer or in a railway carriage, Are you understanding what you are reading? But look at it in this way. Suppose you sat beside a foreigner who was struggling with one of our English guide-books, and was evidently missing the sense, till he was starting off in a wrong direction; it would be no intrusion or impertinence if you made up to him and said to him something like this: 'I fear our barbarous tongue is not easily mastered by foreign scholars, but it is my native language, and I may be able to be of some use to you in it.' "How can I?" said the humble-minded eunuch, "except some man should guide me?" Now, we all think, because we know the letters of it, and are familiar with the sounds of it, that we understand the Bible: Isaiah, and John, and Paul. But we never made a more fatal mistake. There is no book in all the world that is so difficult to read, and to understand, and to love, as the Bible. Not having begun to understand it, some of you will turn upon me and will tell me that even a little child can understand it. And you are perfectly right. "A lamb can wade it," said a great Greek expositor of it. But he went on to add that "an elephant can swim in it." And thus it was that, over and above the apostles, all the deacons of intellect and experience were drawn on to expound the Scriptures, first to the learned Council of Jerusalem, then to the sceptical men of Samaria, and then to the Ethiopian neophyte in his royal chariot. And thus it is still that the Church collects into her colleges the very best minds she can lay hold of in all her families, and trains them up under her very best teachers, and then when they are ready says to them, Go join thyself to this and that vacant pulpit, and make the people to understand what they read. And you must often have both felt it and confessed it to be so. How different the most superficially familiar chapter looks to us ever after some great expounder, by tongue or by pen, has opened it up to us! A book of the Bible read in routine chapters in the pulpit or at family worship, how dull, and unmeaning, and immediately forgotten it is! Whereas, let an interpreter, one of a thousand, open it up to us, and we never forget either the chapter or him. "The Spirit of God maketh the reading, but especially the expounding of the Word, an effectual means of convincing and converting sinners, and of building them up in holiness and comfort, through faith, unto salvation." "It is mainly by the institution of expounding and preaching," says John Foster, "that religion is kept a conspicuous thing, a public acknowledged reality. If we are told that we should rather say that it is public worship that has this effect, we have to answer that public worship, apart from expounding and preaching, has a very small effect in favour of religion. It is quite certain that where the conductors of that worship have not knowledge and religion enough to expound and preach, that worship will be little more than a ceremonial routine of idle forms."
Years and years and years pass on. Philip has for long been a married man, and is now the father of four grown-up daughters. His wife is a good woman. She is a grave woman, as Paul exhorted her to be. And, between them, Philip and his grave and faithful wife both ruled themselves well, and thus their four extraordinarily-gifted daughters. And with such a father and such a mother, I do not wonder that when such things were abroad in those days as gifts of tongues, and gifts of healing, and gifts of prophecy, and many other operations of the Holy Ghost, a double portion of some of those miraculous things came to Philip's four daughters. Luke has a quick eye for everything of that kind, and thus it is that he interpolates this footnote in his history of Paul. "And the next day we came to Cæsarea, and we entered the house of Philip the evangelist, which was one of the seven; and abode with him. And the same man had four daughters, virgins, which did prophesy. And as we tarried there many days, there came down from Judea a certain prophet, named Agabus. And when he was come to us, he took Paul's girdle, and bound his own hands and feet, and said, Thus saith the Holy Ghost, so shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man that owneth this girdle," and so on. And thus it was that this strange Agabus was the last sanctification of Philip and his wife and his four prophetical daughters. To begin with, his own children had been gifted and employed and honoured far above Philip himself. And then Agabus arrived just at the moment to be gifted and employed and honoured far above them all. In the rich grace and manifold wisdom of God, outwardly and ostensibly and on the surface, Agabus's errand was to foretell Paul about his future arrest at Jerusalem. But, far deeper than that, Agabus had a finishing work of the Holy Ghost to perform on Philip, and on his four daughters, and on their mother, that grave woman. A work of humility. A work of resignation. An evangelical work. A work far above the best prophecy. A work of lowly-mindedness. A work of esteeming others better than themselves. A work of saying, Agabus must increase, and I must decrease. And a work that, no doubt, began by reproaches and rebukes and charging Gold foolishly, like this. 'Why were not my prophetical daughters employed to deliver this prophecy to Paul? Why was a stranger brought in over our heads in this way? We cannot ever again have the same standing and esteem in Cæsarea after this so open slight. What a strength it would have been to us in our pulpit and pastoral work had my daughters been honoured of the Holy Ghost to utter this prophecy concerning the Apostle. It would have established us and honoured us in our work in Cæsarea like nothing else.' Agabus was an evil enough messenger to Paul; but he was such a staggering blow to Philip and to his whole household that it took all Paul's insight, and skill in souls, and authority with Philip, and power with God, to guide and direct Philip so as that he should get all God's intended good to himself and to all his house out of it.
Now, Agabus does not come to your house and mine in such open and such dramatic ways as he came to Philip's house; but he comes. Agabus of Jerusalem came to Jonathan Edwards's grave and godly wife in Northampton in the shape of a young preacher. "On Monday night, Mr. Edwards being gone that day to Leicester, I heard that Mr. Buell was coming to this town. At that moment I felt the eye of God on my heart to see if I was perfectly resigned with respect to Mr. Buell's expected success among our people. I was sensible what great cause I had to bless God for the use He had made of my husband hitherto, and I thought that if He now employed other ministers more I could entirely acquiesce in His will. On Tuesday night there seemed to be great tokens of God's presence at Mr. Buell's meeting; and when I heard of it, I sat still in entire willingness that God should bless his labours among us as much as He pleased, even though it were to the refreshing of every saint and the conversion of every sinner in the whole town. These feelings continued afterwards when I saw his great success. I never felt the least rising of heart against him, but my submission to God was even and uniform and without interruption or disturbance. I rejoiced when I saw the honour God had put upon him, and the respect paid to him by the people, and the greater success attending his preaching than had now for some time past attended my husband's preaching. I found rest and rejoicing in it, and the sweet language of my soul continually was, Amen, Lord Jesus. Amen, Lord Jesus. I had an overwhelming sense of the glory of God, and of the happiness of having my own will entirely subdued to His will. I knew that the foretaste of glory I then had in my soul came from God, and that in His time I shall be with Him, and be, as it were, swallowed up in Him." Agabus, and Mr. Buell, and another. But who is that other? And what is his name?
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Apostle, Philip the
(Greek: lover of horses)
Apostle. Native of Bethsaida on Lake Genesareth, like Peter and Andrew. He occupies fifth place in the list of the twelve Apostles. The legends concerning him are uncertain, confusing him with Philip the Deacon; however the general opinion is that he, with his two daughters, died at Hierapolis. The Fourth Gospel mentions him at the miracle of the loaves and fishes (John 6), and again in conversation with Christ (John 14), portraying him as a shy, naive, sober-minded man. Emblems: crucified man; a dragon. Relics in Church of the Apostles, Rome. Feast, Roman Calendar, May 1,.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Philip the Evangelist
Acts 6. Out of the seven Grecian (as the Greek names of all the seven imply) superintendents of the distribution of alms, appointed in consequence of the complaints of partiality to the Hebrew Christian widows, made by the Grecians or Hellenist Christians. (See DEACON.) Philip stands in the list next Stephen, they two being prominent and the only ones noticed subsequently. He like the rest was chosen by the multitude of disciples as "full of the Holy Spirit and wisdom." Philip was among those scattered by the great persecution against the church at Jerusalem (Acts 8). Philip, breaking through Jewish anti-Samaritan prejudice, was the first to follow Jesus' steps (John 4) and His command (Acts 1:8) to preach the gospel as a witness in Samaria; so he was virtually a forerunner of Paul "the apostle of the Gentiles" in his field of labour, as Stephen was in his doctrine. Jesus had declared cf6 "the fields (in Samaria) are white already to (the spiritual) harvest." Philip (by an undesigned coincidence marking genuineness) finds it so.
"The people with one accord gave heed unto those things which Philip spoke (Acts 8:6) ... they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ ... were baptized, both men and women" (Acts 8:12). The Samaritans were looking for Messiah (John 4:25), which paved the way; still more the two days of Jesus' presence and the conversions which He made. John, who had called for fire from heaven to consume them, now joins with Peter in confirming them (Acts 8:14; Acts 8:17). Even Simon Magus believed and was baptized, and continued with Philip wondering at the miracles and signs which were done. By the direction of the angel of the Lord Philip went down from Jerusalem to Gaza by the less frequented way, which was the usual one for chariots. In one an Ethiopian eunuch or chamberlain of Candace, a" proselyte of righteousness" (not as Cornelius, for whose admission to Christian fellowship a special revelation was needed, a "proselyte of the gate"), was returning from worship at Jerusalem.
By the Spirit's intimation Philip joined him as he read aloud Isaiah 53, and asked "understandest thou what thou reddest?" a question always needed in reading Scripture. The eunuch replied, "how can I, except some man guide me?" (the minister's office secondarily, but the Holy Spirit's mainly: John 16:13). Jesus, Philip explains, is the Lamb led to the slaughter. "In His humiliation His judgment (i.e. legal trial) was taken away," the virtual sense of Isaiah 53:8, "He was taken away by oppression (so in Psalms 107:39) and by judgment" (not as KJV "from prison." for He was never incarcerated), i.e. by an oppressive judicial sentence; He was treated as one so mean that a fair trial was denied Him (Matthew 26:59; Mark 14:55-59). "Who shall declare His generation?" i.e., who can declare the wickedness of His generation?
Philip so preached of the fulfillment of prophecy in Jesus that the eunuch believed and was baptized in a stream on the way. The Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus manuscripts omit Acts 8:37, the confession of Jesus required before baptism, an early Christian usage (1 Peter 3:21 end). The Spirit then caught away Philip, as Elijah of old. At Azotus (Ashdod) and the cities along the Philistine sea coast he preached all the way to Caesarea. Here Paul was entertained by him 19 years subsequently. His title now was "evangelist" besides being "of the seven." His four daughters had the gift of prophecy or inspired teaching (Acts 21:8-9). Here Philip, who had preached to the schismatic Samaritans, the dark African, and the hostile Philistine, would hail the apostle of the Gentiles who was carrying out to its world wide consequences the work initiated by the evangelist deacon. Here too Luke during his residence would hear from his own lips the details which he records concerning Philip.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Philip the Apostle
Of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter ("by dwelling", apo ; but of Capernaum "by birth", ek ; Greswell): John 1:44-45. Associated with Andrew; both, alone of the apostles, have Greek names. Jesus Himself called Philip. When "wishing (Greek) to go forth into Galilee. He findeth Philip and saith (with His deeply significant call), Follow Me." The first instance of Jesus calling a disciple: it was on the morrow after the naming of Peter, and the next but one after Andrew's and the other disciple's visit, the fourth day after John the Baptist's witness concerning Christ (John 1:19; John 1:35; John 1:40). The Lord probably knew Philip before, as the latter knew Hint as "son of Joseph" (expressing the ordinary belief), John 1:45. Converted himself, Philip sought to convert others; "Philip findeth Nathanael and saith ... We have found Him (implying his sharing with Andrew, whose words he repeats, in the hope of Messiah, John 1:41) of whom Moses in the law did write, Jesus of Nazareth."
Sincere in aim, defective in knowledge; for it was Christ who found him, not he Christ (Isaiah 65:1); and Jesus was Son of God, not of Joseph His reputed father, husband of Mary. To Nathanael's objection, "can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Philip replied with the best argument, experimental proof, "come and see" (Psalms 66:16; Psalms 34:8). Probably they had before communed together of the divine promise of Messiah. Philip stands at the head of the second group of the twelve (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:14); coupled with his friend and convert Nathanael, Bartholomew. (See BARTHOLOMEW.) Clemens Alex. (Strom. 2:25) identifies him with the disciple who said, "suffer me first to go and (wait until my father dies, and) bury my father" (Matthew 8:21); but Jesus said, cf6 "let the dead (in sin) bury their (literal) dead: follow thou Me" (the same words as at his first call), cf6 "go thou and preach the kingdom of God" (1 Kings 19:20; Leviticus 10:3; Leviticus 10:6; Ezekiel 24:16-18).
To Philip Jesus put the question concerning the crowd faint with hunger, "from whence shall we buy bread that these may eat? to prove Philip (so Deuteronomy 8:2; Matthew 4:4) for Jesus Himself knew what lie would do" (John 6:5-9). Philip failed, on being tested, through unbelief; "two hundred pennyworth of bread is not sufficient for them that every one of them may take a little" (Numbers 11:21-22). Philip was probably the one whose duty was to provide for the daily sustenance of the twelve; or rather Luke's (Luke 9:10) notice that the desert where Jesus fed the multitude "was belonging to Bethsaida" gives us the key to the query being put to Philip; he belonged to Bethsaida (John 1:44): who then was so likely as Philip to know where bread was to be got? An undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness. Andrew here (John 6:8) as in John 1 appears in connection with Philip.
In John 12:20-22 Greek proselytes coming to Jerusalem for the Passover, attracted by Philip's Greek name, and his residence in Galilee bordering on the Gentiles, applied to him of the twelve, saying, We would see Jesus. Instead of going direct to Jesus, he first tells his fellow townsman Andrew (a mark of humility and discreet reverence), who had been the first to come to Jesus; then both together tell Jesus. The Lord then spoke of His Father as about to honour any who would serve Jesus, and cried: "cf6 Father, glorify Thy name; a voice came, I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again"; "He that seeth Me seeth Him that sent Me" (John 12:28; John 12:45).
This saying sank deep into Philip's mind; hence when Jesus said, cf6 "if ye had known Me ye should have known the Father, henceforth ye know and have seen Him," Philip in childlike simplicity asked,"Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us" (John 14:8-11). As he had led Nathanael and the Greeks to "see" Jesus, so now Jesus reveals to Philip himself what, long as he had been with Jesus, he had not seen, namely,cf6 "he that hath seen Me hath seen the Father ... I am in the Father, and the Father in Me " (Hebrews 1:3; Colossians 1:15, "the image of the invisible God"; John 1:18). He was probably of the fishing party with his friend and convert Nathanael (John 21:2). He was in the upper room with the praying disciples after the ascension (Acts 1:13).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evangelist, Philip the, Saint
Born Caesarea, Palestine; died there c58 Also known as Philip the Deacon. One of the seven deacons (Acts 6), he first preached in Samaria with great success, and confirmed his preaching with miracles (Acts 8). He converted many who "received the Holy Ghost" (Acts 8) and, commanded by an angel, travelled from Jerusalem to Gaza, on the way converting and baptizing the eunuch of Candace, Queen of Ethiopia (Acts 8). From there he was transported by Divine power to Azotus, and preached to all the cities until he came to Caesarea (Acts 8), where he lived with his four daughters, virgins with the gift of prophecy (Acts 21). Represented baptizing the eunuch of Ethiopia or with his four daughters. Feast, June 6,.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Philip
1. One of the twelve apostles: he was a native of Bethsaida. It was in Galilee that the Lord met him; and said to him, 'Follow me.' Philip at once announced to Nathanael that he had found the One of whom Moses and the prophets had written. He was the apostle who asked the Lord to show them the Father, when the Lord said, "He that hath seen me hath seen the Father . . . . Believe me, that I am in the Father, and the Father in me." Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:14 ; John 1:43-48 ; John 6:5-7 ; John 12:21,22 ; John 14:8,9 ; Acts 1:13 .
2. One of the seven chosen to look after the poor saints at Jerusalem. He is also called 'Philip the evangelist.' When the church was scattered from Jerusalem by persecution, Philip went to Samaria and preached Christ and wrought miracles, and men and women believed and were baptised. The apostles at Jerusalem hearing that Samaria had received the word of God, sent thither Peter and John. Then Philip was directed by an angel of the Lord to meet the eunuch of Ethiopia in the desert towards Gaza. Philip obeyed and preached unto him Jesus. On the eunuch asking what hindered him from being baptised, he was at once baptised by Philip. On coming out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, and he was found at Azotus, and he preached in all the cities till he came to Caesarea. Much later Philip was residing at Caesarea and received Paul and those with him into his house. He had four daughters, virgins, who prophesied. Philip is a beautiful instance of one being under the immediate guidance of God in his service for Him. Acts 6:5 ; Acts 8:5-40 ; Acts 21:8 .
3. Son of Herod the Great: he married Herodias, who deserted him to live with his brother, Herod Antipas. Matthew 14:3 ; Mark 6:17 ; Luke 3:19 .
4. Another son of Herod the Great: he was tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis. Luke 3:1 . He was the founder of Caesarea Philippi. Matthew 16:13 ; Mark 8:27 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Philip
the Apostle, was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus Christ having seen him, said to him, "Follow me," John 1:43-44 . Philip followed him; he was present at the marriage of Cana in Galilee. Philip was called at the beginning of our Saviour's mission. He is mentioned, Luke 6:13 ; Matthew 10:3 ; John 6:5-7 . Some Gentiles having a curiosity to see Jesus, a little before his passion, addressed themselves to Philip, John 12:21-22 , who mentioned it to Andrew, and these two to Christ. At the last supper Philip desired the Saviour to show them the Father, John 14:8-10 . This is all that we find concerning Philip in the Gospel.
2. PHILIP, the second of the seven deacons, Acts 6:5 , was, some say, of Caesarea in Palestine. It is certain his daughters lived in that city, Acts 21:8-9 . After the death of Stephen all the Christians, except the Apostles, having left Jerusalem, and being dispersed in several places, Philip went to preach at Sebaste or Samaria, where he performed several miracles, and converted many persons, Acts 8:1-3 , &c. He baptized them; but informed the Apostles at Jerusalem that Samaria had received the word of God, that they might come and communicate the Holy Ghost to them. Peter and John came thither for that purpose. Philip was, probably, at Samaria, when an angel commanded him to go on the road that leads from Jerusalem to old Gaza. Philip obeyed, and there met with an Ethiopian eunuch, belonging to Candace, queen of Ethiopia, whom he converted and baptized, Acts 8:26 . Being come out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord took away Philip, and the eunuch saw him no more.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Philip
1. The Tetrarch, a son of Herod the Great, by his wife Cleopatra. In the division of Herod's kingdom, he was made tetrarch of Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis, Luke 3:1 . See HEROD 1. From him the city of Caesarea Philippi took its name.
2. Herod Philip, another son of Herod the Great by Mariamne the daughter of Simon, not his favorite Mariamne. Josephus calls him Herod. He lived a private life, having been disinherited by his father; and was the former husband of Herodias, Matthew 14:3 . See HERODIAS.
3. The Apostle, a native of Bethsaida, a disciple at first of John the Baptist, and one of the twelve who were earliest called to follow Christ, Matthew 10:3 John 1:43-48 Acts 1:13 . He is several times mentioned in the gospel in Phrygia, and died at Hierapolis in Syria.
4. The Deacon and Evangelist, Acts 6:5 21:8 Ephesians 4:11 ; a resident of Caesarea, at least during one portion of his life, having four daughters who were endowed with the gift of prophecy, Acts 2:17 21:8-9 . After the death of Stephen when the Christians were driven from Jerusalem, except the apostles, he preached the gospel in Samaria with great success, and wrought many miracles. From the midst of these happy scenes he was called away to labor in a distant spot, with a single soul; but the gospel light was carried by the Ethiopian eunuch into the darkness of Africa, and is supposed to have there enlightened multitudes. In the narrative of Luke, Philip is incidentally distinguished from the apostles, Acts 8:1,14,16 . He preached the gospel in the cities on the coast, from Ashdod to Caesarea, where at a later period Paul and his companions were his guests for "many days," Acts 21:8-16 . His subsequent history is unknown.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Wesdin, Philip
Carmelite missionary, philologist and Orientalist. Born Hoff, Lower Austria, 1748; died Rome, Italy, 1806. In 1774 he went as missionary to India (Malabar), and was appointed vicar-general of his order and Apostolic visitor. He has contributed much to the study and knowledge of Indian life and literature by his history of the missions in India. Composed an early European grammar of the Sanskrit tongue, using part of Hanxleden's manuscript. Wrote various works bearing on linguistics.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Philip
PHILIP (Apocr. [1] ). 1 . Father of Alexander the Great ( 1M Malachi 1:1 ; 1Ma 6:2 ). 2. A friend or foster-brother ( 2Ma 9:29 ) of Antiochus Epiphanes, who received the charge (previously given to Lysias) of bringing up the young Antiochus Eupator ( 1Ma 6:14 ). On the death of Antiochus Epiphanes, Lysias took upon himself to proclaim young Eupator king (b.c. 164). The jealousy over this matter led to open hostilitles between Lysias and Philip. Philip was overcome by Lysias at Antioch and put to death. He is by many regarded as identical with 3. A Phrygian who (in b.c. 168). when left in charge of Jerusalem by Antiochus Epiphanes, was remarkable for the cruelty of his government ( 2Ma 5:22 ; 2Ma 6:11 ). Little more is known of him unless the details of his life he filled up by assuming his identity with the former Philippians 4 Philippians 4 . A king of Macedonia (b.c. 220 179) overthrown by the Romans ( 1Ma 8:5 ).
T. A. Moxon.
PHILIP (NT)
1. The Apostle ( Matthew 10:3 = John 14:8-9 = Luke 6:14 ); one of the disciples whom Jesus won at Bethany beyond Jordan in the morning of His ministry ( John 1:28-51 ). He was a fellow-townsman of Andrew and Peter ( John 1:44 ), and seems to have had a special friendship with the former ( John 6:8 ; John 12:21-22 ). He was of a timid and retiring disposition. He did not, like Andrew and John, approach Jesus, but waited till Jesus accosted him and invited him to join His company. Andrew and John found Jesus ( John 12:41 ); Jesus found Philip ( John 12:43 ). This characteristic gives some countenance to the tradition that the disciple who would fain have declined the Lord’s call that he might ‘go and bury his father’ ( Luke 9:59-60 = Matthew 8:21-22 ), was none other than Philip. Though somewhat slow of heart and dull in spiritual understanding (cf. Mark 3:18 ), he had his aptitudes. He had a turn for practical affairs, and, just as Judas was treasurer to the Apostolic company, so Philip was purveyor, attending to the commissariat (Bengel on John 6:5 ). If Andrew was the first missionary of the Kingdom of heaven, bringing his brother Simon to Jesus ( John 1:40-42 ). Philip was the second, bringing his friend Nathanael ( John 1:45-46 ). It is said that after the departure of Jesus he laboured in Asia Minor and was buried at Hierapolis.
2. The Evangelist. It was soon found necessary in the Apostolic Church that there should be a division of labour; and that the Twelve might give themselves without distraction to prayer and the ministry of the word, seven of the brethren were set apart for the management of the business matters of the Church ( Acts 6:1-6 ). Philip was one of these. He seems to have been a Hellenist, i.e . a Greek-speaking Jew; at all events he was a man of liberal sympathies, and he greatly helped in the extension of the gospel to the Gentiles. He was in fact the forerunner of St. Paul. During the persecution which followed the martyrdom of Stephen, he preached in Samaria ( Acts 8:4-8 ). He was instrumental in the conversion of the chamberlain of Candace, queen of Ethiopia, thus introducing Christianity into that historic heathen country ( Acts 8:26-39 ). On parting from the chamberlain he went to Azotus (Ashdod), and travelled along the sea-board, preaching from city to city, till he reached Cæsarea ( Acts 8:40 ). There he settled, and there he was still residing with his four unmarried daughters, who were prophetesses, when Paul visited Cæsarea on his last journey to Jerusalem. The two men were like-minded, and it is no wonder that Paul abode with him during his stay at Cæsarea ( Acts 21:8-9 ).
3. Herod Philip. See Herod.
David Smith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Philip the Evangelist
‘Philip the Evangelist,’ or ‘Philip one of the Seven,’ or ‘Philip the Deacon’-these are the three names by which Philip is called, each of them intended to distinguish him from Philip the Apostle, with whom in both ancient and modern times he has often been confounded. As in Stephen’s case, so in Philip’s-we have no previous mention of him till he was elected to be one of the Seven (Acts 6:5). In the list of the Seven he comes second, next to Stephen. The same emphatic praise is not accorded to him by the author of the Acts as to Stephen, and probably while Stephen lived Philip was overshadowed by his more striking personality. It seems, however, probable that the account we have of the appointment of the Seven, of the trial of Stephen (though not his speech, which was more probably derived from the reminiscences of St. Paul), and of Philip’s own subsequent doings, was derived from Philip himself, who may well have communicated it to St. Luke during one of his two visits to Caesarea (Acts 21:8-14; Acts 27:1). As with respect to Stephen so with respect to Philip we should infer that he was a Hellenist, and therefore a suitable agent for extending the gospel to those who were not strictly Jews; but the inference is not certain in either case. Philip belonged to a band who were scattered from Jerusalem in consequence of the persecution which followed on the death of Stephen (Acts 8:4). He began his preaching among the Samaritans apparently in the principal city of the district, in Sebaste or Samaria itself. Here he encountered a famous magician resident in the city, named Simon. This Simon subsequently became the founder of one of those religio-philosophical sects, resulting partly from the break-up of the old religions, partly from the contact of the older religious faiths or philosophies with Judaism, which are known by the general name of Gnosticism. The object of all these systems was to suggest some intelligible scheme through which the God of philosophy might be brought into relations with the God of the OT and the God who was active in creation. This they generally effected by imagining some arbitrary hierarchy of emanations, among which, and by the help of which, a place might be found for the God of the OT, the Giver of the Mosaic Law, and for the Creator of the universe, and generally also for our Lord Jesus Christ. In his system he assigned to himself and the prophetess Helena, whom he associated with himself, a high position; he described himself as the power of or emanation from God which is called ‘Great.’ But at the moment he seems to have been completely over-awed by the spiritual energy of Philip, received baptism at his hands, and joined the band of his disciples and associates.
The conversions of Simon and his fellow-Samaritans represented a great step in advance in the widening of the Christian Church. True, our Lord had made converts among the Samaritans partly through the testimony of the Samaritan woman, partly by His own teaching and influence (John 4:39-42), but it is not clear that they were actually admitted to baptism, and they were directly excluded from those to whom during the continuance of His ministry the disciples were to address themselves (Matthew 10:5). Though partially akin to the Jews in blood and in religious faith, the Jews would have no dealings with them (John 4:9) and used the name ‘Samaritan’ as a term of the deepest reproach (John 8:48), so that to proclaim that they too were to be included within the Kingdom of God was an innovation of the most startling kind. How startling the innovation was we may gather from the fact that St. Peter and St. John were dispatched by the Church of Jerusalem to inquire into the matter, and it was only when, in answer to the apostles’ prayers and the laying on of their hands, the Holy Ghost had descended on them, that Philip’s action was regarded as fully ratified (Acts 8:17; Acts 8:25).
The next step was taken under the direct prompting of the Spirit. Philip was moved by the Spirit to take the southern route to Jerusalem, which led to Gaza, then, in consequence of its overthrow by the Maccabees, ‘deserted’ (cf. G. A. Smith, HGHL_, 1897, p. 186 f.). In this neighbourhood he fell in with an Ethiopian eunuch of Queen Candace, whom he converted by explaining to him part of Isaiah 53, and received at once to baptism (perhaps also to confirmation). From Gaza, Philip was snatched away by the Spirit and carried off to Ashdod, from which he passed through the various coast towns and villages till he reached Caesarea, where he settled down, and is found still living some twenty years later.
It is on the occasion of St. Paul’s last visit to Jerusalem that Philip is brought before us once more in the Acts. At his house, St. Paul, and apparently St. Luke also, stayed on their way from Ptolemais to the capital (Acts 21:8). Philip had now ‘four daughters, virgins, which did prophesy,’ and they, along with Agabus, the prophet who came down from Jerusalem, attempted to divert St. Paul from continuing his journey thitherward, but unavailingly (Acts 21:10-14). St. Luke collected, probably partly during this visit, and partly at a later date, the details of Philip’s earlier life contained in the passage in Acts already considered. At this point Philip disappears from the Acts. What little more we know about him is derived from ecclesiastical tradition; but this tradition is rendered uncertain from a tendency there is among ecclesiastical writers to identify Philip the Apostle with Philip the Evangelist. This was due to their having the same name, to both having daughters, and to both having settled in later years in Asia Minor, possibly both at Hierapolis. Yet there can be no doubt that the author of the Acts distinguishes the two, and the tradition does not really confound them, but distinguishes the three daughters of Philip the Apostle (one of whom was married and settled at Ephesus) from the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist, who were all virgins (see Polycrates, quoted in Eusebius, HE_ iii. 31). And then tradition makes Philip the Evangelist settle not at Hierapolis but at Tralles (AS_, June 6).
Literature.-W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller, 1895; R. B. Rackham, Acts of the Apostles, 1901; J. B. Lightfoot, Colossians and Philemon3, 1879; A. Harnack, The Acts of the Apostles, Eng. tr._, 1909.
W. A. Spooner.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Philip (st.) And st. James' Day
A Festival observed on May 1st inmemory of two Apostles of our Lord, St. Philip and St. James. Thereason for coupling together the names of these two Apostles is notquite clear, but it may be taken as an illustration of the manner inwhich our Lord sent forth His Apostles, two and two. St. Philip wasa native of Bethsaida, a town bordering on the Sea of Tiberias andwas one of the first of our Lord's disciples and was His constantcompanion and follower. He brought Nathanael, a person of great noteand eminence, to the knowledge of the Messiah; and it was to St.Philip that certain Greeks went with the request, "Sir, we wouldsee Jesus." St. Philip is said to have carried the Gospel toNorthern Asia, where by his preaching and miracles he mademany converts; his name has also been connected with the Church inRussia. He suffered martyrdom at Hieropolis, a city of Phrygia,where he was crucified and stoned on the cross. In ecclesiasticalart St. Philip is variously represented; with a basket in his hand;with two loaves and a cross; with a tall cross and book, etc. Fornotice of St. James see article on James (St.) the Less.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Philip
PHILIP (φίλιππος, ‘lover of horses’).
1. Philip the Apostle.—For the little that we know regarding him, beyond the mere mention of his name in the lists of the Twelve (Matthew 10:3, Mark 3:18, Luke 6:14), we are wholly dependent upon a few scattered notices in the Fourth Gospel.
(1) The first of these tells the story of his call, which took place on the day after the call of Andrew and John with their respective brothers (John 1:43 ff.). And the fact that it is expressly mentioned that Philip, like these men, belonged to Bethsaida, would seem to point to a certain amount of friendship as having already existed between them, while his Greek name (a peculiarity which among the Apostles he shared with Andrew) makes it at least possible that he himself was originally of Greek descent. This accords entirely with what we know of the mixed Gentile population of Bethsaida. Whether, however, this was so or not, Philip would seem to have belonged to the growing class of devout souls throughout the land who were ‘waiting for the consolation of Israel,’ even if he had not, along with the previously named disciples, been an open follower of John the Baptist. For when Jesus ‘finds’ him—evidently not by accident but as the result of a deliberate search—and addresses to him the first direct call which, so far as we know, He addressed to any man, ‘Follow me,’ Philip immediately responds, and once and for all throws in his lot with his new Master. So complete indeed is his surrender, that though as yet his knowledge of Jesus is very imperfect (cf. John 1:45 ‘the son of Joseph’), he shows himself endued with the genuine missionary spirit in proceeding in his turn to ‘find’ Nathanael, that together they may rejoice in the discovery of the promised Messiah. The very precision and minuteness of the terms, moreover, in which Philip announces that discovery, bring before us another aspect of his character, for they show him to have been a man of an anxious and careful turn of mind, asking for no conviction on the part of others until he has been first convinced himself, and ever ready to submit all doubts and prejudices to the test of actual experience (John 1:46 ‘Come and see’).
(2) Of this latter trait of the Apostle’s character we have further confirmation, from a somewhat different point of view, in the next incident in which he is specially mentioned. For at the feeding of the Five Thousand in the wilderness it was to Philip that Jesus addressed the question, ‘Whence are we to buy bread, that these may eat?’ (John 6:5). Some have thought that the reason of this was that Philip had charge of the commissariat of the Apostolic band, just as Judas acted as their treasurer; but of this there is no proof, and St. John expressly adds that Jesus said this to ‘prove’ him. The Master knew His disciple’s cautious and deliberate disposition, and how little he had yet shown himself able to make any of the bolder efforts of faith. And He evidently hoped that on this occasion Philip would rise from the manifest inadequacy of the existing material resources to the thougnt of the unseen powers which He (the Christ) had at His command. But the hope was to be disappointed. Philip was so occupied with his own careful calculations as to what the actual feeding of the multitude meant, that he could think of nothing else. And even the matter-of-fact Andrew showed more imagination when, after the mention of the lad’s little store, he at least hazarded the suggestion, ‘But what are they amongst so many?’
(3) The case is similar when we turn to another occasion when we find the two Apostles together. It is in entire accord not only with Philip’s (possible) Greek origin, but with his sympathetic, inquiring disposition, that the Greek visitors to the Temple should select him as their ambassador to Jesus (John 12:20 ff.). But it is equally characteristic that, as he realized the greatness and significance of the request, coming as it did from pure Gentiles, he should hesitate to act upon it on his own responsibility. He would do nothing until he had consulted Andrew. And even when Andrew had approved, it was only in conjunction with him, and leaving him to occupy the foremost place (‘Andrew and Philip’), that Philip went to tell Jesus.
(4) This ‘faith without confidence’ is even more marked in the last glimpse which St. John gives us of his brother Apostle. When, in His farewell discourse to the Twelve, Jesus announced that He was going to the ‘Father,’ and that no one could come to the ‘Father’ except by Him, it was left to Philip to say, ‘Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us’ (John 14:8). With him ‘seeing’ was ‘believing.’ He could not believe that any real knowledge of the Father was possible except such as resulted from an actual theophany; and so proved how blinded he had been to that higher manifestation of which he had for so long been witness in the words and the acts of the Son.
(5) With the pathetic personal appeal to him which this dulness of spiritual vision called forth (John 14:9), Philip disappears from the Gospel story. And we hear nothing more of him in the NT except for the mention of his name amongst the Apostles who assembled in the upper room at Jerusalem after their Lord’s Ascension (Acts 1:13). Various traditions have, however, gathered round his memory.
The most interesting of these is the account preserved by Clement of Alexandria (Strom, iii. 4, § 25), which identifies him with the unknown disciple who, when the Lord’s call came to him, asked that he might first go and bury his father—an identification at least in keeping with what we have seen of Philip’s character. The apocryphal Journeyings of Philip the Apostle (3rd cent.) represent him as travelling through Lydia and Asia, and finally settling in Hierapolis. And it was there, according to Polycrates (bishop of Ephesus c. 190 a.d.), that he was ‘buried’ ‘along with his two aged virgin daughters’ (Eus. Historia Ecclesiastica iii. 31; cf. Lightfoot, Colossians 2 [1] , p. 45 ff.). The same authority adds that another daughter who ‘lived in fellowship with the Holy Spirit’ was huried at Ephesus—a circumstance that may perhaps point to Philip’s own residence there for a time, and consequently to a renewed intercourse with his old friend the Apostle John. If so, we have an additional reason why St. John should have introduced Philip’s name so freely in the ‘memoirs’ on which at the time he was engaged. Of the later connexion with Hierapolis already alluded to we have now interesting confirmation in the discovery of an inscription showing that the church there was dedicated to the memory ‘of the holy and glorious Apostle and theologian Philip’ (τοῦ ἀγίου κὲ ἑνδεξου ἀποστόλου κἑ θεολόγου Φιλίππου: see Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i. p. 552 f.).
In the West, St. Philip’s Day is observed along with that of St. James the Lesson May 1st. In the East, St. Philip’s Day is Nov. 14th, St. James’, Oct, 23rd.
Literature.—In addition to what has been noted above, see Westcott, The Gospel of St. John, p. lxxiii f.; A. B. Bruce, The Training of the Twelve (see ‘Philip’ in the Index); H. P. Liddon, University Sermons, 2nd ser., i. ‘Prejudice and Experience’ (John 1:46); J. B. Lightfoot, Cambridge Sermons, p. 129 ff. ‘Show us the Father’ (John 14:8-9); R. C. Trench, Studies in the Gospels, p. 68; A. Maclaren, A Year’s Ministry, ii. 155; J. D. Jones, The Glorious Company of the Apostles, p. 109; R. H. Lovell, First Types of the Chr. Life, p. 514; and the present writer’s The Twelve Apostles (Dent), p. 49 ff.
2. Herod Philip.—See vol. i. p. 722b.
George Milligan.

Sentence search

Philip - There were two men named Philip among the early disciples of Jesus. These are commonly referred to as Philip the apostle and Philip the evangelist. (Concerning two other men named Philip, who were members of Herod’s family, see HEROD. )...
Philip the apostle came from the fishing town of Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee. When Jesus first went to Galilee at the beginning of his ministry, Philip was among the first to respond to his call. Later, Jesus appointed Philip one of his twelve apostles (Matthew 10:3). Philip features in the story of Jesus’ feeding of the five thousand (John 6:5-7), but he was slow to understand how Jesus’ miraculous works demonstrated the unique relationship between Jesus and his Father (John 14:8-11). Just before the last Passover, Philip helped a group of visiting Greek worshippers to meet Jesus (John 12:20-22). ...
Philip the evangelist was one of the seven men whom the Jerusalem church chose to administer its welfare program (Acts 6:1-6). After the killing of Stephen and the expulsion of Christians from Jerusalem, Philip went to Samaria, where many responded to his preaching (Acts 8:4-13). The next mention of Philip is about twenty-five years later, when Paul’s party stayed with him in Caesarea for a few days
Philip - Philip followed him; he was present at the marriage of Cana in Galilee. Philip was called at the beginning of our Saviour's mission. Some Gentiles having a curiosity to see Jesus, a little before his passion, addressed themselves to Philip, John 12:21-22 , who mentioned it to Andrew, and these two to Christ. At the last supper Philip desired the Saviour to show them the Father, John 14:8-10 . This is all that we find concerning Philip in the Gospel. Philip, the second of the seven deacons, Acts 6:5 , was, some say, of Caesarea in Palestine. After the death of Stephen all the Christians, except the Apostles, having left Jerusalem, and being dispersed in several places, Philip went to preach at Sebaste or Samaria, where he performed several miracles, and converted many persons, Acts 8:1-3 , &c. Philip was, probably, at Samaria, when an angel commanded him to go on the road that leads from Jerusalem to old Gaza. Philip obeyed, and there met with an Ethiopian eunuch, belonging to Candace, queen of Ethiopia, whom he converted and baptized, Acts 8:26 . Being come out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord took away Philip, and the eunuch saw him no more
Philippi - Same as Philip
Herodias - She was first married to the half brother of her father, identified in Mark 6:17 as Philip. By Philip she bore a daughter named Salome. Antipas, however, who was Philip's brother, divorced his own wife and wooed Herodias away from Philip
Philip - ' Philip at once announced to Nathanael that he had found the One of whom Moses and the prophets had written. He is also called 'Philip the evangelist. ' When the church was scattered from Jerusalem by persecution, Philip went to Samaria and preached Christ and wrought miracles, and men and women believed and were baptised. Then Philip was directed by an angel of the Lord to meet the eunuch of Ethiopia in the desert towards Gaza. Philip obeyed and preached unto him Jesus. On the eunuch asking what hindered him from being baptised, he was at once baptised by Philip. On coming out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, and he was found at Azotus, and he preached in all the cities till he came to Caesarea. Much later Philip was residing at Caesarea and received Paul and those with him into his house. Philip is a beautiful instance of one being under the immediate guidance of God in his service for Him. He was the founder of Caesarea Philippi
Ethiopian Eunuch - As he traveled, he met Philip the evangelist. Philip had come to the desert area in response to God's call. Philip declared the gospel to the eunuch, and the eunuch received Christian baptism at Philip's hands
o.s.f.n. - = Confederation of the Oratory of Saint Philip of Neri; Oratorians ...
Philip the Apostle - Jesus Himself called Philip. He findeth Philip and saith (with His deeply significant call), Follow Me. The Lord probably knew Philip before, as the latter knew Hint as "son of Joseph" (expressing the ordinary belief), John 1:45. Converted himself, Philip sought to convert others; "Philip findeth Nathanael and saith . To Nathanael's objection, "can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Philip replied with the best argument, experimental proof, "come and see" (Psalms 66:16; Psalms 34:8). Philip stands at the head of the second group of the twelve (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:14); coupled with his friend and convert Nathanael, Bartholomew. ...
To Philip Jesus put the question concerning the crowd faint with hunger, "from whence shall we buy bread that these may eat? to prove Philip (so Deuteronomy 8:2; Matthew 4:4) for Jesus Himself knew what lie would do" (John 6:5-9). Philip failed, on being tested, through unbelief; "two hundred pennyworth of bread is not sufficient for them that every one of them may take a little" (Numbers 11:21-22). Philip was probably the one whose duty was to provide for the daily sustenance of the twelve; or rather Luke's (Luke 9:10) notice that the desert where Jesus fed the multitude "was belonging to Bethsaida" gives us the key to the query being put to Philip; he belonged to Bethsaida (John 1:44): who then was so likely as Philip to know where bread was to be got? An undesigned coincidence and mark of genuineness. Andrew here (John 6:8) as in John 1 appears in connection with Philip. ...
In John 12:20-22 Greek proselytes coming to Jerusalem for the Passover, attracted by Philip's Greek name, and his residence in Galilee bordering on the Gentiles, applied to him of the twelve, saying, We would see Jesus. ...
This saying sank deep into Philip's mind; hence when Jesus said, cf6 "if ye had known Me ye should have known the Father, henceforth ye know and have seen Him," Philip in childlike simplicity asked,"Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us" (John 14:8-11). As he had led Nathanael and the Greeks to "see" Jesus, so now Jesus reveals to Philip himself what, long as he had been with Jesus, he had not seen, namely,cf6 "he that hath seen Me hath seen the Father
Philip the Evangelist - ) Philip stands in the list next Stephen, they two being prominent and the only ones noticed subsequently. " Philip was among those scattered by the great persecution against the church at Jerusalem (Acts 8). Philip, breaking through Jewish anti-Samaritan prejudice, was the first to follow Jesus' steps (John 4) and His command (Acts 1:8) to preach the gospel as a witness in Samaria; so he was virtually a forerunner of Paul "the apostle of the Gentiles" in his field of labour, as Stephen was in his doctrine. " Philip (by an undesigned coincidence marking genuineness) finds it so. ...
"The people with one accord gave heed unto those things which Philip spoke (Acts 8:6) . they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ . Even Simon Magus believed and was baptized, and continued with Philip wondering at the miracles and signs which were done. By the direction of the angel of the Lord Philip went down from Jerusalem to Gaza by the less frequented way, which was the usual one for chariots. ...
By the Spirit's intimation Philip joined him as he read aloud Isaiah 53, and asked "understandest thou what thou reddest?" a question always needed in reading Scripture. Jesus, Philip explains, is the Lamb led to the slaughter. , who can declare the wickedness of His generation?...
Philip so preached of the fulfillment of prophecy in Jesus that the eunuch believed and was baptized in a stream on the way. The Spirit then caught away Philip, as Elijah of old. Here Philip, who had preached to the schismatic Samaritans, the dark African, and the hostile Philistine, would hail the apostle of the Gentiles who was carrying out to its world wide consequences the work initiated by the evangelist deacon. Here too Luke during his residence would hear from his own lips the details which he records concerning Philip
Philip the Evangelist - ‘Philip the Evangelist,’ or ‘Philip one of the Seven,’ or ‘Philip the Deacon’-these are the three names by which Philip is called, each of them intended to distinguish him from Philip the Apostle, with whom in both ancient and modern times he has often been confounded. As in Stephen’s case, so in Philip’s-we have no previous mention of him till he was elected to be one of the Seven (Acts 6:5). The same emphatic praise is not accorded to him by the author of the Acts as to Stephen, and probably while Stephen lived Philip was overshadowed by his more striking personality. Paul), and of Philip’s own subsequent doings, was derived from Philip himself, who may well have communicated it to St. As with respect to Stephen so with respect to Philip we should infer that he was a Hellenist, and therefore a suitable agent for extending the gospel to those who were not strictly Jews; but the inference is not certain in either case. Philip belonged to a band who were scattered from Jerusalem in consequence of the persecution which followed on the death of Stephen (Acts 8:4). ’ But at the moment he seems to have been completely over-awed by the spiritual energy of Philip, received baptism at his hands, and joined the band of his disciples and associates. John were dispatched by the Church of Jerusalem to inquire into the matter, and it was only when, in answer to the apostles’ prayers and the laying on of their hands, the Holy Ghost had descended on them, that Philip’s action was regarded as fully ratified (Acts 8:17; Acts 8:25). Philip was moved by the Spirit to take the southern route to Jerusalem, which led to Gaza, then, in consequence of its overthrow by the Maccabees, ‘deserted’ (cf. From Gaza, Philip was snatched away by the Spirit and carried off to Ashdod, from which he passed through the various coast towns and villages till he reached Caesarea, where he settled down, and is found still living some twenty years later. Paul’s last visit to Jerusalem that Philip is brought before us once more in the Acts. Philip had now ‘four daughters, virgins, which did prophesy,’ and they, along with Agabus, the prophet who came down from Jerusalem, attempted to divert St. Luke collected, probably partly during this visit, and partly at a later date, the details of Philip’s earlier life contained in the passage in Acts already considered. At this point Philip disappears from the Acts. What little more we know about him is derived from ecclesiastical tradition; but this tradition is rendered uncertain from a tendency there is among ecclesiastical writers to identify Philip the Apostle with Philip the Evangelist. Yet there can be no doubt that the author of the Acts distinguishes the two, and the tradition does not really confound them, but distinguishes the three daughters of Philip the Apostle (one of whom was married and settled at Ephesus) from the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist, who were all virgins (see Polycrates, quoted in Eusebius, HE_ iii. And then tradition makes Philip the Evangelist settle not at Hierapolis but at Tralles (AS_, June 6)
Philip (st.) And st. James' Day - Philip and St. Philip wasa native of Bethsaida, a town bordering on the Sea of Tiberias andwas one of the first of our Lord's disciples and was His constantcompanion and follower. Philip that certain Greeks went with the request, "Sir, we wouldsee Jesus. Philip is said to have carried the Gospel toNorthern Asia, where by his preaching and miracles he mademany converts; his name has also been connected with the Church inRussia. Philip is variously represented; with a basket in his hand;with two loaves and a cross; with a tall cross and book, etc
Philip - (See John 1:43-44) There was also a Philip who was ore of the seven deacons
Bartholemew - In Matthew’s list of the apostles, which groups the apostles in pairs, Bartholemew is linked with Philip (Matthew 10:3). In the lists of Mark and Luke, Bartholemew comes after Philip (Mark 3:18; Luke 6:14). In John 1:45 Nathanael is linked with Philip, and in John 21:2 Nathanael is among the group of apostles, but there is no mention of Bartholemew
Philippus, the Arabian - Philippus (5) , "the Arabian," emperor, a native of Bostra in Trachonitis and a man of low birth. In the summer of 249 Philip was defeated by Decius near Verona and slain. 34) gives without vouching for its truth, namely, that Philip being a Christian wished at Easter to join in the prayers with the congregation, but that on account of the many crimes be had committed the bishop of the place refused to admit him until he had confessed and taken his place among the penitents, and that he willingly obeyed. We are also told that Origen wrote to Philip and the empress (Eus. 54) calls Philip the first of all Christian emperors, in which he is followed by Orosius; and Dionysius of Alexandria (Eus. (2) No event, except his alleged penitence at Antioch, is recorded of Philip that implies he was a Christian. (6) A year before Decius issued his edict against the Christians, and therefore while Philip was still reigning, a violent persecution had broken out at Alexandria (Eus. 51) that Philip was not a Christian. Is there, then, any foundation for the story of Philip and St Babylas? Philip may very possibly have been at Antioch at Easter, a. Philip was the first emperor who tried to check the grosser forms of vice at Rome (Lampridius, V
Philippize - ) To support or advocate the cause of Philip of Macedon. ) To write or speak in the style of a Philippic
Otto iv, Emperor - Son of Henry the Lion and nephew of Richard Coour de Lion, his succession, 1198, was contested by Philip of Swabia, the nominee of the Hohenstaufens. Philip's seizure of the See of Mainz caused Innocent III to support Otto who, in return, made generous concessions to the Holy See, thus aiding Innocent's ambition to be overlord of Italy. Public opinion turned toward Philip, however, 1204-05, and Innocent deserted Otto; Philip, triumphant, was murdered at Bamberg and Otto, by marrying his daughter, overcame all opposition
Philippus of Tralles - Philippus (1) , of Tralles, asiarch at the time of the martyrdom of POLYCARP. The historic reality of this Philip has been confirmed by an inscription found at Olympia, and Lightfoot (Ignatius , i. 613) printed two new inscriptions relating to him, and also by means of his full name, Caius Julius Philippus, there given, has assigned to him three other previously known inscriptions. Philip is thus proved to have been a well-known man of great wealth and munificence. ) shews that the date of his tenure of office indicated by these inscriptions is quite reconcilable with the date, otherwise determined, of Polycarp's martyrdom, without need of recourse to the perfectly admissible supposition, that Philip held the office of asiarch more than once
Philip - Philip (Apocr. The jealousy over this matter led to open hostilitles between Lysias and Philip. Philip was overcome by Lysias at Antioch and put to death. Little more is known of him unless the details of his life he filled up by assuming his identity with the former Philippians 4 Philippians 4 . ...
Philip (NT)...
1. Andrew and John found Jesus ( John 12:41 ); Jesus found Philip ( John 12:43 ). This characteristic gives some countenance to the tradition that the disciple who would fain have declined the Lord’s call that he might ‘go and bury his father’ ( Luke 9:59-60 = Matthew 8:21-22 ), was none other than Philip. He had a turn for practical affairs, and, just as Judas was treasurer to the Apostolic company, so Philip was purveyor, attending to the commissariat (Bengel on John 6:5 ). Philip was the second, bringing his friend Nathanael ( John 1:45-46 ). Philip was one of these. Herod Philip
Evangelist - This title is applied to Philip (Acts 21:8 ), who appears to have gone from city to city preaching the word (8:4,40). Judging from the case of Philip, evangelists had neither the authority of an apostle, nor the gift of prophecy, nor the responsibility of pastoral supervision over a portion of the flock
Bartholomew - In the synoptic gospels Philip and Bartholomew are always mentioned together, while Nathanael is never mentioned; in the fourth gospel, on the other hand, Philip and Nathanael are similarly mentioned together, but nothing is said of Bartholomew
Tetrarch - Thus Philip of Macedon divided Thessaly into four districts called ‘tetrarchies. ’ Later, however, the title came to be used in a loose sense of any petty ruler, and in this sense it is applied in the NT to Herod Antipas, Philip, and Lysanias
Tetrarch - ) As Archelaus was "ethnarch" over half of Herod the Great's whole kingdom, so Philip and Antipus had divided between them the remaining half, and were each "tetrarch" over the fourth; Herod over Galilee; Philip over Ituraea and Trachonitis; Lysanias over Abilene
Tetrarch - Thus Philip of Macedon divided Thessaly into four districts called ‘tetrarchies. ’ Later, however, the title came to be used in a loose sense of any petty ruler, and in this sense it is applied in the NT to Herod Antipas, Philip, and Lysanias
Philippic - ) Any one of the series of famous orations of Demosthenes, the Grecian orator, denouncing Philip, king of Macedon
Hegemonides - An officer left in command of the district from Ptolemais to the Gerrenians, by Lyslas when he was forced to return to Syria to oppose the chancellor Philip (b
Tetrarch - ...
B — 1: τετραρχέω (Strong's #5075 — Verb — tetraacheo | tetrarcheo — tet-rar-kheh'-o ) "to be a tetrarch," occurs in Luke 3:1 (thrice), of Herod Antipas, his brother Philip and Lysanias. Antipas and Philip each inherited a fourth part of his father's dominions
Salome - (Hebrew: peaceful) ...
(1) Daughter of Herod Philip and Herodias, at whose request John the Baptist was beheaded
Trachonitis - A district forming part of the tetrarchy of Philip
Bartholomew - And as in John 1:45 , Philip and Nathanael are mentioned together as coming to Jesus, so in the other evangelists Philip and Bartholomew are constantly associated together. The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Philip - PHILIP (φίλιππος, ‘lover of horses’). Philip the Apostle. And the fact that it is expressly mentioned that Philip, like these men, belonged to Bethsaida, would seem to point to a certain amount of friendship as having already existed between them, while his Greek name (a peculiarity which among the Apostles he shared with Andrew) makes it at least possible that he himself was originally of Greek descent. Whether, however, this was so or not, Philip would seem to have belonged to the growing class of devout souls throughout the land who were ‘waiting for the consolation of Israel,’ even if he had not, along with the previously named disciples, been an open follower of John the Baptist. For when Jesus ‘finds’ him—evidently not by accident but as the result of a deliberate search—and addresses to him the first direct call which, so far as we know, He addressed to any man, ‘Follow me,’ Philip immediately responds, and once and for all throws in his lot with his new Master. The very precision and minuteness of the terms, moreover, in which Philip announces that discovery, bring before us another aspect of his character, for they show him to have been a man of an anxious and careful turn of mind, asking for no conviction on the part of others until he has been first convinced himself, and ever ready to submit all doubts and prejudices to the test of actual experience (John 1:46 ‘Come and see’). For at the feeding of the Five Thousand in the wilderness it was to Philip that Jesus addressed the question, ‘Whence are we to buy bread, that these may eat?’ (John 6:5). Some have thought that the reason of this was that Philip had charge of the commissariat of the Apostolic band, just as Judas acted as their treasurer; but of this there is no proof, and St. And He evidently hoped that on this occasion Philip would rise from the manifest inadequacy of the existing material resources to the thougnt of the unseen powers which He (the Christ) had at His command. Philip was so occupied with his own careful calculations as to what the actual feeding of the multitude meant, that he could think of nothing else. It is in entire accord not only with Philip’s (possible) Greek origin, but with his sympathetic, inquiring disposition, that the Greek visitors to the Temple should select him as their ambassador to Jesus (John 12:20 ff. And even when Andrew had approved, it was only in conjunction with him, and leaving him to occupy the foremost place (‘Andrew and Philip’), that Philip went to tell Jesus. When, in His farewell discourse to the Twelve, Jesus announced that He was going to the ‘Father,’ and that no one could come to the ‘Father’ except by Him, it was left to Philip to say, ‘Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us’ (John 14:8). ...
(5) With the pathetic personal appeal to him which this dulness of spiritual vision called forth (John 14:9), Philip disappears from the Gospel story. 4, § 25), which identifies him with the unknown disciple who, when the Lord’s call came to him, asked that he might first go and bury his father—an identification at least in keeping with what we have seen of Philip’s character. The apocryphal Journeyings of Philip the Apostle (3rd cent. The same authority adds that another daughter who ‘lived in fellowship with the Holy Spirit’ was huried at Ephesus—a circumstance that may perhaps point to Philip’s own residence there for a time, and consequently to a renewed intercourse with his old friend the Apostle John. John should have introduced Philip’s name so freely in the ‘memoirs’ on which at the time he was engaged. Of the later connexion with Hierapolis already alluded to we have now interesting confirmation in the discovery of an inscription showing that the church there was dedicated to the memory ‘of the holy and glorious Apostle and theologian Philip’ (τοῦ ἀγίου κὲ ἑνδεξου ἀποστόλου κἑ θεολόγου Φιλίππου: see Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, i. Philip’s Day is observed along with that of St. Philip’s Day is Nov. Bruce, The Training of the Twelve (see ‘Philip’ in the Index); H. Herod Philip
Nathanael - (1) When told by Philip, ‘We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph,’ Nathanael hesitated. Philip thereupon conducted him to meet Jesus, and, when he looked on that wondrous face, his doubt vanished, and he hailed Him as the Messiah, ‘the Son of God, the King of Israel. John’s narrative as a friend of Philip, and Bartholomew is coupled with Philip in the lists of the Apostles
Ethio'Pian Eunuch, the, - , who was treasurer of Candace queen of Ethiopia, but who was converted to Christianity on a visit to Jerusalem, through Philip the evangelist
Herod Philip i. - He is distinguished from another Philip called "the tetrarch
Benedict xi, Blessed, Pope - When Master General of the Dominican Order he arranged an armistice between King Philip IV of France and King Edward I of England. As pope he removed the papal censure from Philip and France, and absolved the cardinals favoring the Colonna
Reading - The eunuch was probably thus reading when Philip overheard him, and finding that he was reading the Scriptures, said, "Understandest thou what thou readest?"...
Gezireh, Mesopotamia, Iraq, Diocese of - There has been no bishop since Philip Abraham, shot by the Turks, 1915
Apotheosis - (Greek: deification) ...
Elevation of a human being to the rank of a god; especially among the Greeks (Philip of Macedon; Alexander the Great), and the Roman emperors
Seven Holy Brothers - Januarius, Felix, and Philip were scourged to death; Silvanus was thrown over a precipice; Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis were beheaded
Nathanael - He was led by Philip to Jesus, He went doubting, with the words on bis lips, "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Jesus, however, at once convinces him that he is the Messiah by the exhibition of his knowledge, declaring that he had seen Nathanael under the fig tree before ever Philip had called him
Ethiopian Eunuch - According to Acts 8:27 , an Ethiopian eunuch, minister of Candace , queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, was met shortly after the martyrdom of Stephen by the deacon Philip when returning from a religious journey to Jerusalem, and converted to Christianity. Assuming the Lukan authorship of the Acts, the source of the above narrative may have been personal information received from Philip (cf
Herod, Family of - Philip, Matthew 14:3 ; Mark 6:17 ; Luke 3:19 . Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis
Gaza - Mentioned in Acts 8, when the eunuch of Candace, Queen of Ethiopia, returning from Jerusalem where he had gone to worship, met Philip the Deacon and invited him into his chariot, that he might explain the writings of the prophet Isaias as they drove along; Philip "preached unto him Jesus," baptized him at his own request, "and the eunuch went on his way rejoicing
Trachonitis - It was in the tetrarchy of Philip, and is now called the Lejah
Philipists - A sect or party among the Lutherans, the followers of Philip Melancthon. He had strenuously opposed the Ubiquists, who arose in his time; and, the dispute growing still hotter after his death, the university of Wittemburg, who espoused Meiancthon's opinion, were called by the Flaccians, who attacked it, Philipists
Hobart, Australia, Archdiocese of - Fathers Philip Connolly, Cotham, and John Therry carried on missionary work in the 19th century
Candace - Her chamberlain or treasurer, a eunuch, was met by Philip the evangelist on the road between Jerusalem and Gaza, and converted
Bethsa'Ida - (house of fish ) of Galilee, ( John 12:21 ) a city which was the native place of Andrew, Peter and Philip, (John 1:44 ; 12:21 ) in the land of Gennesareth, (Mark 6:46 ) comp. The fact is that Bethsaida was a village on both sides of the Jordan as it enters the sea of Galilee on the north, so that the western part of the village was in Galilee and the eastern portion in Gaulonitis, part of the tetrarchy of Philip. This eastern portion was built up into a beautiful city by Herod Philip, and named by him Bethsaida Julias , after Julia the daughter of the Roman emperor Tiberius Caesar
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - ' And thus it was that the banishment of Philip from Jerusalem was the salvation of Samaria, and thus it was also that the martyrdom of Stephen was the conversion of Saul. ...
Stephen was the first martyr, and Philip was the first missionary. Stephen and Philip were not apostles to begin with; they were simply deacons. But you cannot limit, and narrow, and bind down to the serving of tables two powerful and original men like Stephen and Philip. Paul had Stephen and Philip in his mind when he said to Timothy long afterwards, that they who have used the office of a deacon well, purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus. All of which both Stephen and Philip had emphatically done. And Philip went down to the city of Samaria, and preached Christ unto them. " Now, just suppose for a moment that you had been Philip. Suppose that you had been scattered abroad like Philip and his colleagues. And thus it was that Philip would certainly seek out the woman of Samaria that all the world knows about now, and in whose heart, and in whose house, there was now a well of water springing up unto everlasting life. Peter and John would give Philip an introduction to her; and to reassure him about his reception, they would tell him, John especially, all about that oft-remembered day when their Master must needs go through Samaria, and when, being wearied with His journey, He sat thus on the well. And the woman would welcome Philip, and would say to him, Come in, thou blessed of the Lord, for when I was thirsty He gave me drink. And when Philip said to her, Sit down, woman, sit down and eat, she only served his table all the more hospitably, and said, I have meat to eat that thou knowest not of. And, taking his text from the woman's words, Philip preached the risen Christ in Sychar till there was great joy in that city. And thus it is that when Luke tells Theophilus that Philip preached 'Christ' to the Samaritans, and then that the same evangelist preached 'Jesus' to the Ethiopian eunuch, it is not for nothing; it is not of no consequence what Luke says, or how he says it. " Let our theological students, then, study out the fact of Philip's preaching 'Christ' in the city, and 'Jesus' in the desert, and make an Ellicott-like thesis for themselves and for their people on this subject taking in Romans 8:11. Both Stephen and Philip were by far the subordinates or Peter and John. They did not grudge, nor resent, nor suspect, nor despise the success of Stephen in Jerusalem, nor of Philip in Samaria. They did not say that Philip should attend to his proper work, and let preaching alone. They did not have it reported to them every word that Philip had at any time spoken that was out of joint. But the twelve sent down Peter and John, their two best men, to assist Philip to gather in the results of his so suddenly successful mission. And Peter and John set to work with all their might to found a church out of Philip's converts, to be called the Church of the Evangelist, after the name of their deacon and subordinate. ...
Both Stephen and Philip have made this impression also upon me that they were born preachers, as we say. Stephen and Philip were born with such a fire in their bones that no man could put it out. And, then, after that I would fain have been the servant of the Ethiopian eunuch, so as to have sat beside him and heard him reading the prophet Esaias till Philip came up and said to him, Understandest thou what thou readest? How can I, except some man should guide me? And he desired Philip that he would come up and sit with him. And Philip opened his mouth, and began at the 53 rd of Isaiah, and preached unto him Jesus. Philip has for long been a married man, and is now the father of four grown-up daughters. And, between them, Philip and his grave and faithful wife both ruled themselves well, and thus their four extraordinarily-gifted daughters. And with such a father and such a mother, I do not wonder that when such things were abroad in those days as gifts of tongues, and gifts of healing, and gifts of prophecy, and many other operations of the Holy Ghost, a double portion of some of those miraculous things came to Philip's four daughters. "And the next day we came to Cæsarea, and we entered the house of Philip the evangelist, which was one of the seven; and abode with him. And thus it was that this strange Agabus was the last sanctification of Philip and his wife and his four prophetical daughters. To begin with, his own children had been gifted and employed and honoured far above Philip himself. But, far deeper than that, Agabus had a finishing work of the Holy Ghost to perform on Philip, and on his four daughters, and on their mother, that grave woman. ' Agabus was an evil enough messenger to Paul; but he was such a staggering blow to Philip and to his whole household that it took all Paul's insight, and skill in souls, and authority with Philip, and power with God, to guide and direct Philip so as that he should get all God's intended good to himself and to all his house out of it. ...
Now, Agabus does not come to your house and mine in such open and such dramatic ways as he came to Philip's house; but he comes
Candace - (can' duh cee) In Acts 8:27 , the queen of Ethiopia whose servant became a believer in Christ and was baptized by Philip
Ituraea - A province on the east of the upper Jordan of which Herod Philip was made tetrarch
Nathanael - Three or four days after the temptation, Jesus when intending to "go forth into Galilee findeth Philip and saith, Follow Me. " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Giles of Rome - In 1295 he was named Archbishop of Bourges by Boniface VIII, and, despite the protests of the French nobles, his appointment was approved by Philip IV, his former pupil. Colonna favored Boniface VIII in his struggle with Philip IV, and may have written the famous Bull "Unam Sanctam
Egidio Colonna - In 1295 he was named Archbishop of Bourges by Boniface VIII, and, despite the protests of the French nobles, his appointment was approved by Philip IV, his former pupil. Colonna favored Boniface VIII in his struggle with Philip IV, and may have written the famous Bull "Unam Sanctam
Rome, Giles of - In 1295 he was named Archbishop of Bourges by Boniface VIII, and, despite the protests of the French nobles, his appointment was approved by Philip IV, his former pupil. Colonna favored Boniface VIII in his struggle with Philip IV, and may have written the famous Bull "Unam Sanctam
Bethsaida - A city in Galilee, on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, a little north of Capernaum; it was the birthplace of the apostles Philip, Andrew, and Peter, and was often visited by our Lord, Matthew 11:21 ; Mark 6:45 ; 8:22 . This town was enlarged by Philip, tetrarch of that region, Luke 3:1 , and called Julias in honor of Julia, the daughter of Augustus
Philip - The one Philip was directed to take was that which led through Hebron, and thence through a district little inhabited, and hence called "desert. Philip entered into conversation with him, and expounded these verses, preaching to him the glad tidings of the Saviour. " Philip was instantly caught away by the Spirit after the baptism, and the eunuch saw him no more. (See HEROD Philip I. The city of Caesarea-Philippi was named partly after him (Matthew 16:13 ; Mark 8:27 ). (See HEROD Philip II
Philip - Following Stephen's martyrdom, Philip took the gospel to Samaria, where his ministry was blessed (Acts 8:5-13 ). Jesus tested Philip concerning how to feed the multitude (John 6:5-7 ). Philip asked Jesus to show them the father (John 14:8-9 ), opening the way for Jesus' teaching that to see Him is to see the Father
Salome - Though not mentioned by name in scripture, this Salome is therein spoken of as the daughter of Herodias (by her first husband, Herod Philip). She became wife of her uncle Philip, tetrarch of Trachonitis, and afterwards of Aristobulus the king of Chalcis, Mark 6:22-28 , etc
Bibles, Rhymed - Among English rhymed versions, mostly of the Psalms, are those of Thomas Brampton (1414), Sir Philip Sydney (1580), and Lord Bacon (1600)
Ethiopian Eunuch - He was converted to Christianity through the instrumentality of Philip (Acts 8:27 )
Athanasius, Bishop of Scythopolis - who succeeded Philip in the see of Scythopolis, c
Tetrarch - in reference to Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea; Philip, tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis; and Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene
Bartholomew - He is named in connection with Philip, and seems to have been the same person whom John calls Nathanael, John 1:45-51, and mentions among the other apostles, John 21:2
Rhymed Bibles - Among English rhymed versions, mostly of the Psalms, are those of Thomas Brampton (1414), Sir Philip Sydney (1580), and Lord Bacon (1600)
Ituraea - A district in the north-east of Palestine, forming, along with the adjacent territory of Trachonitis, the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1 )
Bethsaida - " It was the native place of Peter, Andrew, and Philip, and was frequently resorted to by Jesus (Mark 6:45 ; John 1:44 ; 12:21 ). It stood within the region of Gaulonitis, and was enlarged by Philip the tetrarch, who called it "Julias," after the emperor's daughter
Salome - Herodias' daughter by her former husband Herod Philip (Josephus Philip, tetrarch of Trachonitis, her paternal uncle; then Aristobulus, king of Chalcis
Philip'pi - (named from Philip of Macedonia), a city of Macedonia about nine miles from the sea, to the northwest of the island of Thasos which is twelve miles distant from its port Neapolis, the modern Kavalla . The Philippi which St. Paul visited was a Roman colony founded by Augustus after the famous battle of Philippi, fought here between Antony and Octavius and Brutus and Cassius, B. The original town, built by Philip of Macedonia, was probably not exactly on the same site. Philip, when he acquired possession of the site, found there a town named Datus or Datum , which was probably in its origin a factory of the Phoenicians, who were the first that worked the gold-mines in the mountains here, as in the neighboring Thasos. The proximity of the goldmines was of course the origin of so large a city as Philippi, but the plain in which it lies is of extraordinary fertility. Paul's visits to Philippi, see the following article. At Philippi the gospel was first preached in Europe. ( Acts 16:23 ) The Philippians sent contributions to Paul to relieve his temporal wants
Thessalonica - Stephen of Byzantium says that it was improved and beautified by Philip, king of Macedon, and called Thessalonica in memory of the victory that he obtained over the Thessalians
Third Crusade - Under Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who started 1189, and Philip Augustus of France and Richard Creur de Lion of England, who left the following year, the armies finally won Saint Jean d'Acre, 1191, and Richard concluded a truce with Saladin, 1192
Douai, University of - Founded by Philip II of Spain, 1562, with five faculties, theology, canon and civillaw, medicine, and arts; sanctioned by Bulls of Paul IV, 1559, and Pius IV, 1560
Candace - A eunuch belonging to her, in charge of her treasure, was baptized by Philip ( Acts 8:27 )
Herodias - She first married Herod Philip I
University of Douai, France - Founded by Philip II of Spain, 1562, with five faculties, theology, canon and civillaw, medicine, and arts; sanctioned by Bulls of Paul IV, 1559, and Pius IV, 1560
Hero'Dias, - She first married Herod Philip I
Herod - Herod Antipas, the son of Herod the Great, first married a daughter of Aretas, "king of Arabia Petræa," but afterward Herodias, the wife of his half brother, Herod Philip. Herod Philip I. , Philip, Mark 6:17, was the son of Herod the Great and Mariamne. Herod Philip II. He built a new city on the site of Paneas, near the sources of the Jordan, which he called Cæsarea Philippi, Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27, and raised Bethsaida to the rank of a city under the title of Julias, and died there a. He married Salome, the daughter of Herod Philip I. Caligula made him king, first of the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias; afterward the dominions of Antipas were added, and finally Judea and Samaria. 52 the emperor gave him the tetrarchies formerly held by Philip and Lysanias, with the title of king
Ingeborg - 1176;died Corbeil, France, c1237 She was a Danish princess whom Philip Augustus of France married in 1193. As she refused to go, she was 'shut up' in a monastery and some courtier bishops declared her marriage invalid, under pretext of a distant relationship with Philip's first wife. Innocent III then intervened in her behalf, but it was only after a resistance of 20 years (1193-1213) and after Agnes's death that Philip gave back to Ingeborg the place that belonged to her as wife and queen
Ituraea - With Trachonitis Ituraea formed the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1). , who bequeathed it to his son Philip
Candace - The queen of the Ethiopians whose "eunuch" or chamberlain was converted to Christianity by the instrumentality of Philip the evangelist (Acts 8:27 ). (See Philip
Philippus, Bishop of Heraclea - Philippus (6) , bp. Philip was arrested and examined by a president Bassus, who then committed him to the free custody of one Pancratus (c. After some time Justinus brought them to Adrianople, and there burned Philip and Hermes on the same day (Ruinart, Acta Sincera , p
Oratorio - Said to have originated in Saint Philip Neri's oratory, the first of these sacred dramas, the "Anima e Corpo" by Emiglio del Cavaglieri, was performed in the oratory of the church of Santa Maria in Vallicella, 1600, and the name "Oratorio" applied to the new form about 60 years later
Trachonitis - At the time Jesus began his public ministry, the governor of Trachonitis was Philip, a son of Herod the Great (Luke 3:1)
Trachonitis - Herod the Great subdued the robbers that infested it; and after his death it was governed by Philip his son, and then by Herod Agrippa
Abila - At his death the southern part was added to Trachonitis and Ituraea, as a tetrarchy for his son Philip. " The division of Abilene between Lysanias and Philip accounts for the seeming difference between Luke who assigns it to Lysanias, and Josephus who assigns it to Philip
Celestine Iii, Pope - Although lenient with Henry, he was firm with Alfonso IX of Leon and Philip Augustus of France in defense of the ecclesiastical marriage laws
Caesarea - Caesarea Philippi, supposed to have been built by Philip, no great distance from Zidon
Bartholomew - He is named in connection with Philip, and seems to have been the same person, whom John calls Nathanael, John 1:45-51 , and mentions among the other apostles, John 21:2
Giacinto Bobone - Although lenient with Henry, he was firm with Alfonso IX of Leon and Philip Augustus of France in defense of the ecclesiastical marriage laws
Bethsaida - ” The home of Andrew, Peter, and Philip (John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ), located on the northeast side of the Sea of Galilee. This town was rebuilt under Philip the tetrarch, one of Herod the Great's sons, who named it Julius in honor of the Emperor Augustus' daughter
Ethiopians - Acts 8:27, where Candace, queen of (the) Ethiopians, and her εὐνοῦχος δυνάστης are mentioned in connexion with Philip the Deacon (see articles Candace, Ethiopian Eunuch, and Philip)
Deacons, Seven - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
Herod Arippa ii. - The emperor Claudius made him tetrarch of the provinces of Philip and Lysanias, with the title of king (Acts 25:13 ; 26:2,7 ). He enlarged the city of Caesarea Philippi, and called it Neronias, in honour of Nero
Anagni, Italy - On September 7, 1303, Nogaret and Sciarra Colonna, emissaries of Philip the Fair of France, at the head of several hundred soldiers, invaded the town where Boniface was then residing, plundered the papal palace, and offered all sorts of indignities to the pontiff who refused to abdicate or to convoke a general council
Caesarea Philippi - The former name of this city was Panium, but Herod Philip, the tetrarch, enlarged it and named it after Caesar and himself
Evangelist - Such was Philip, Acts 21:8
Seven Deacons - They were Saint Stephen the Martyr, Saint Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas (Acts 6)
Bethsaida -
City, home of Saint Peter the Apostle, Saint Andrew the Apostle, and Saint Philip (John 1:12), possibly west of the Jordan or else identical with (1)
Moriscos - Philip II tried to make them renounce their dress and language, whereupon they revolted and engaged in a bloody struggle against Spain, 1567-1570
League, Holy - Supported by Catherine de' Medici, Philip of Spain, Pope Gregory XIII, and led by King Henry III, it was finally disbanded in 1595 after the conversion of Henry IV
Felicitas, Saint 23 Nov - She was a holy Roman widow martyred during the reign of Emperor Antoninus, with seven sons (Januarius, Felix, Philip Pius, Silvanus, Alexander, Vitalis, and Martialis), because of their defense of Christianity
Nicholas Sanders - In 1579 he went to Ireland as papal agent through the connivance of Philip II of Spain
Spiritual Warmth: How to Maintain it - Philip Henry's advice to his daughter: 'If you would keep warm in this cold season (January, 1692), take these four directions: 1
Holy League - Supported by Catherine de' Medici, Philip of Spain, Pope Gregory XIII, and led by King Henry III, it was finally disbanded in 1595 after the conversion of Henry IV
Sanders, Nicholas - In 1579 he went to Ireland as papal agent through the connivance of Philip II of Spain
Caesarea Philippi - According to the biblical record, Caesarea Philippi was the most northerly town of Palestine that Jesus visited. It was given the additional name Philippi in honour of Herod Philip, the provincial governor in whose territory it was located (cf
Bethsaida - Luke 9:10 ), and where He healed a blind man ( Mark 8:22 ); the home of Philip, Andrew, and Peter ( John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ). The town was advanced by Philip the tetrarch from a village to the dignity of a city, and named Julias, in honour of Cæsar’s daughter
John of Austria, Don - The natural son of Charles V, by Barbara Blomberg, daughter of an affiuent family, he was recognized later by his half-brother, Philip II, as a member of the royal family. The great victory of Lepanto, Greece, when 35,000 Turks were slain and 15,000 Christian slaves freed, inspired Don Juan to work for his own and Christianity's establishment in non-Christian countries, but he was thwarted by the jealous Philip, and made governor-general of the Netherlands, 1576, only to encounter the opposition of William of Orange, all-powerful there
Austria, John of, Don - The natural son of Charles V, by Barbara Blomberg, daughter of an affiuent family, he was recognized later by his half-brother, Philip II, as a member of the royal family. The great victory of Lepanto, Greece, when 35,000 Turks were slain and 15,000 Christian slaves freed, inspired Don Juan to work for his own and Christianity's establishment in non-Christian countries, but he was thwarted by the jealous Philip, and made governor-general of the Netherlands, 1576, only to encounter the opposition of William of Orange, all-powerful there
Palsy - Whether the paralytics who were healed by Philip in Samaria were brought to him on beds, were visited by him, or were able to come to him with others who were suffering from bodily disturbance, we are not told. The healings by Philip brought to an end the practice of sorcery by Simon and led to his conversion; the healing of aeneas showed anew the power which resided in ‘the name of Jesus’ (cf
Froissart, Jean - During his travels through France, England, and Italy, he gathered the materials for his "Chronicles" which deal mostly with the conflict between France and England from Philip VI to Charles VI
Jean Froissart - During his travels through France, England, and Italy, he gathered the materials for his "Chronicles" which deal mostly with the conflict between France and England from Philip VI to Charles VI
Philippi - Philippi (fĭ-lĭp'pî). Krenides (also Datos), by Philip king of Macedon, and made a strong military station. From the New Testament history Philippi appears to have been the first city in Europe which heard the gospel
Apostles - Their names are as follows (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6): ...
Andrew
Bartholomew
James the Greater
James the Lesser
John
Matthew
Matthias (elected in place of Judas)
Philip
Simon Peter
Simon
Thaddeus or Jude
Thomas
Though not one of the twelve Apostles, Saint Paul is numbered as an Apostle of the first rank
Ashdod - Here Philip preached the gospel, Acts 8:40
Niccolo Sfondrati - He was Bishop of Cremona, a participant in the sessions of the Council of Trent, cardinal-priest, and friend of Saint Charles Borromeo and Saint Philip Neri. As pope he supported the Holy League in its struggle against Henry of Navarre, ordered the abolition of Indian slavery in the Philippine Islands, and appointed commissions for the revision of the Sixtine Bible and the Pian Breviary
Herodias - While residing at Rome with her husband Herod Philip I
Evangelist - Of this kind were Philip the deacon, Mark, Silas, &c
Gregory Xiv, Pope - He was Bishop of Cremona, a participant in the sessions of the Council of Trent, cardinal-priest, and friend of Saint Charles Borromeo and Saint Philip Neri. As pope he supported the Holy League in its struggle against Henry of Navarre, ordered the abolition of Indian slavery in the Philippine Islands, and appointed commissions for the revision of the Sixtine Bible and the Pian Breviary
Sfondrati, Niccolo - He was Bishop of Cremona, a participant in the sessions of the Council of Trent, cardinal-priest, and friend of Saint Charles Borromeo and Saint Philip Neri. As pope he supported the Holy League in its struggle against Henry of Navarre, ordered the abolition of Indian slavery in the Philippine Islands, and appointed commissions for the revision of the Sixtine Bible and the Pian Breviary
Philippi - Philip of Macedonia fortified the old Thracian town of Crenides, and called it after his own name Philippi (B. ...
...
When Philip the tetrarch, the son of Herod, succeeded to the government of the northern portion of his kingdom, he enlarged the city of Paneas, and called it Caesarea, in honour of the emperor. But in order to distinguish it from the Caesarea on the sea coast, he added to it subsequently his own name, and called it Caesarea-Philippi (q
Mary Tudor - She was popular at first, but her projected marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion. She was long an invalid; her passionate love for Philip II was unrequited and when there was no further hope of having an heir, he abandoned her and England; in the last year of her life Calais was lost to France, and this was followed by difficulties with the Holy See
Tudor, Mary - She was popular at first, but her projected marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion. She was long an invalid; her passionate love for Philip II was unrequited and when there was no further hope of having an heir, he abandoned her and England; in the last year of her life Calais was lost to France, and this was followed by difficulties with the Holy See
Phil'ip the Evangelist - The teachers who had been most prominent were compelled to take flight, and Philip was among them. The scene which brings Philip and Simon the sorcerer into contact with each other, (Acts 8:9-13 ) which the magician has to acknowledge a power over nature greater than his own, is interesting. A brief sentence tells us that Philip continued his work as a preacher at Azotus (Ashdod) and among the other cities that had formerly belonged to the Philistines, and, following the coast-line, came to Caesarea
Philippus, of Side - Philippus (9), of Side, an ecclesiastical historian at the commencement of 5th cent. We find Philip at Constantinople enjoying the intimacy of Chrysostom, by whom he was admitted to the diaconate. 425, by whom he had been ordained presbyter, Philip was a candidate for the vacant see, and found a number of influential supporters (Socr. Philip, when again a candidate, both after the death of Sisinnius, a. Another considerable fragment is reported to exist in the Imperial Library at Vienna, entitled de Christi Nativitate, et de Magis , giving the acts of a disputation held in Persia concerning Christianity between certain Persians and Christians, at which Philip was himself present
Agrippa i. - The Roman emperor Caligula made him governor first of the territories of Philip, then of the tetrarchy of Lysanias, with the title of king ("king Herod"), and finally of that of Antipas, who was banished, and of Samaria and Judea
Alva, Fernando Alvarez de Toledo, Duke of - Sent by King Philip II of Spain to subdue the rebellious Netherlands in 1557, his stern measures caused him to be known as the Iron Duke
Apostle, Philip the - The legends concerning him are uncertain, confusing him with Philip the Deacon; however the general opinion is that he, with his two daughters, died at Hierapolis
Herodias - She was first married to her Uncle Herod Philip, but afterwards abandoned him and connected herself with his brother Herod Antipas
Oratorians - Founded by Saint Philip Neri at Rome, 1575, and promoted by Pope Gregory XIII. The rule, not officially constituted till 17 years after Saint Philip's death, was approved by Pope Paul V, 1612. The French Congregation, though taking its origin and some of its rules from that of Saint Philip, is a distinct institution founded at Paris, 1611, by Cardinal de Berulle with the official title, "Congregation des Prêtres de l'Oratoirede N
Oratory of Saint Philip Neri - Founded by Saint Philip Neri at Rome, 1575, and promoted by Pope Gregory XIII. The rule, not officially constituted till 17 years after Saint Philip's death, was approved by Pope Paul V, 1612. The French Congregation, though taking its origin and some of its rules from that of Saint Philip, is a distinct institution founded at Paris, 1611, by Cardinal de Berulle with the official title, "Congregation des Prêtres de l'Oratoirede N
Bethsaida - BETHSAIDA OF GALILEE, a town from whence came Philip, Andrew, and Peter, John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ; and against which the Lord pronounced a 'woe' because it had not repented at His mighty works. It was called 'Julias,' because Philip the tetrarch enlarged the town, giving it the above name in honour of Julia, daughter of Augustus
Archelaus - , his sons Herod Antipas and Philip were named tetrarchs; but his son Archelaus was the principal successor. The brothers presented their case to the emperor Augustus, who gave Archelaus one half of his father Herod's land and split the remainder between Antipas and Philip
Herod - ...
The second Herod we meet with in the Bible, is Herod called Philip. This man was also son of Herod the Great, and brother to Philip. And this was he who, during the life of his brother, had married Herodias, his brother's wife; and John the Baptist faithfully reproving him for the shameful deed, Herod, at the instance of her daughter, whom she had by Philip her first husband, caused John to be beheaded
Oetinga - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Oettingen - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Leo xi, Pope - Philip Neri was his adviser in many important matters
Juliana Falconieri, Saint - In 1285 she received from Saint Philip Benizi, General of the Servites, the habit of the Third Order of the Servites
Falconieri, Juliana, Saint - In 1285 she received from Saint Philip Benizi, General of the Servites, the habit of the Third Order of the Servites
Jan Van Eyck - He entered the service of Philip of Burgundy in 1425, as an artist and a trusted envoy on delicate diplomatic missions, living at Lille until 1431 when he settled in Bruges
Cantalice, Felix of, Saint - Though illiterate, he was so advanced in the spiritual life that Saint Philip Neri selected him to assist Saint Charles Borromeo in drawing up the constitutions for his Oblates
Aretas - His daughter returned to him on the occasion of her husband's entering into an adulterous alliance with Herodias, the wife of Herod-Philip, his half-brother (Luke 3:19,20 ; Mark 6:17 ; Matthew 14:3 )
Agrippa ii. - He was afterwards raised to the rank of king, and made governor over the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias (Acts 25:13 ; 26:2,7 )
Altotting - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Eyck, Jan Van - He entered the service of Philip of Burgundy in 1425, as an artist and a trusted envoy on delicate diplomatic missions, living at Lille until 1431 when he settled in Bruges
Nathanael - He was introduced by Philip to Jesus, who on seeing him pronounced that remarkable eulogy which has rendered his name almost another word for sincerity: "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile
an'Drew - (John 1:41 ) His place among the apostles seems to have been fourth, next after the three Peter, James and John, and in company with Philip
Bethsaida - Three of the Apostles, Philip, Andrew, and Peter, were born in this city. It is not mentioned in the Old Testament, though it frequently occurs in the New: the reason is, that it was but a village, as Josephus tells us, till Philip the tetrarch enlarged it, making it a magnificent city, and gave it the name of Julias, out of respect to Julia, the daughter of Augustus Caesar. The solution is, that, though Philip had exalted it to the rank of a city, to which he gave the name of Julias, yet, not long afterward, this Julia, in whose honour the city received its name, was banished from the country by her own father. Should he not know to what province his birthplace belonged?" Philip only governed the eastern districts by the sea of Tiberias; but Galilee was the portion of his brother Antipas. Bethsaida or Julias could therefore not have been built by Philip, as the case is; or it did not belong to Galilee, as John alleges
Philip - Philip (fĭl'ip), lover of a horse. After a short stay at Azotus, Philip preached the gospel from town to town till he came to Cæsarea, where he probably settled
Trachonitis - Philip was tetrarch of Trachonitis and Ituraea. (See Philip
Neri, Philip, Saint - It spread rapidly through Italy and Philip was elected superior general
Abyssinia - According to legend, Christianity was introduced by the eunuch Candace baptized by Philip the Deacon, and was firmly established in the 4th century under Saint Frumentius, the first bishop
Caesarea - Philip the evangelist lived there, Acts 8:40; Acts 21:8; and Cornelius, 10:1-24
Trachonitis - Herod Philip succeeded to the tetrarchy
Caesarea Philippi - Philip, the youngest son of Herod the Great, made it the capital of his tetrarchy, enlarged and embellished it, and gave it the name of Caesarea Philippi
Deacon - Of the seven there named, Philip and Stephen are afterwards found laboring as evangelists
Archela'us - 4) his kingdom was divided between his three sons, Herod Antipas, Archelaus and Philip
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Baronius, Cesare - He studied in Rome, became a follower of Philip Neri, and was ordained in 1564. His great work, Annales Ecclesiastici, conceived by Philip as a reply to the attempt to Protestantize history in the Centuries of Magdeburg, was published in twelve volumes, 1588-1607
Dragon - It is an emblem of ...
Saint Adelard
Saint Beatus of Lungern
Saint Donatus
Saint George
Saint John of Reomay
Saint Juliana of Nicomedia
Saint Magnus of Fussen
Saint Margaret of Antioch
Saint Martha, symbolizing victory over tempation
Michael the Archangel
Saint Philip the Apostle
Saint Servatus
Saint Tudwal
Deacon, Philip the, Saint - Born Caesarea, Palestine; died there c58 Also known as Philip the Deacon
Lawrence of Brindisi, Saint - He was sent by the pope, 1605, to evangelize Germany, and induced Philip III to join the Catholic League
Trachonitis - Mentioned in Luke 3:1 as the name of the tetrarchy of Philip. Philip’s rule, on the other hand, he describes as just and gentle ( Ib
Salo'me - ...
The daughter of Herodias by her first husband, Herod Philip
Ituraea - ” Region over which Herod Philip was governor when John the Baptist began his public ministry (Luke 3:1 )
Nathanael - ...
Philip announced to Nathanael that Jesus was the promised Messiah (John 1:45 )
Giordano Bruno - A restless wanderer, he was favored by Elizabeth, and when in England, dedicated to Sir Philip Sidney his book: "The Expulsion of the Triumphant Beast," viz
Apostle - The twelve apostles of Jesus were Simon Peter, Andrew, James the son of Zebedee, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot. ...
Apostles established churches (Romans 15:17-20), exposed error (Galatians 1:6-9), and defended the truth of the gospel (Philippians 1:7; Php 1:17)
Ethiopia - A eunuch, minister of Candace, Queen of Ethiopia, was converted to Christianity by the deacon Philip (Acts 8)
Evangelist, Philip the, Saint - Born Caesarea, Palestine; died there c58 Also known as Philip the Deacon
Nathan'Ael - If was Philip who first brought Nathanael to Jesus, just as Andrew had brought his brother Simon
James (st.) the Less - Philip and St
Charles v, Emperor - He was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella. Having transferred the government of the Netherlands and the Spanish Crown to his son Philip, in 1556 he abdicated the imperial throne in favor of his brother Ferdinand and retired to the monastery of Yuste
Ituraea - ITURÆA [1], with Trachonitis, constituted the tetrarchy of Philip ( Luke 3:1 ). According to Cicero ( Philipp . 20, whereupon a part of his territory fell into the hands of Herod the Great; and when Herod’s kingdom was divided, it became the possession of Philip (Jos
Emperor Charles v - He was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella. Having transferred the government of the Netherlands and the Spanish Crown to his son Philip, in 1556 he abdicated the imperial throne in favor of his brother Ferdinand and retired to the monastery of Yuste
Philip - From him the city of Caesarea Philippi took its name. Herod Philip, another son of Herod the Great by Mariamne the daughter of Simon, not his favorite Mariamne. In the narrative of Luke, Philip is incidentally distinguished from the apostles, Acts 8:1,14,16
Phil'ip - Philip apparently was among the first company of disciples who were with the Lord at the commencement of his ministry at the marriage at Cana, on his first appearance as a prophet in Jerusalem, John 2 . (John 6:5-9 ; 12:20-22 ; 14:8 ) No other fact connected with the name of Philip is recorded in the Gospels
Andrew - So well known was his love for souls, that when certain Greeks desired to see Jesus, Andrew was the person to whom Philip (whose name also is Greek, and who, like Andrew, when called, in turn called Nathanael) brought them. Then he and Philip (the two whose names imply connection with the Greeks; an interesting coincidence, and who had shown their zeal for conversions) brought them to Jesus (John 1:43-46; John 12:20-22). In Matthew 10:2 and Luke 6:14 Andrew is next after Peter; but in Mark 3:10; Acts 1:14, after the first and foremost three, Peter, James, and John, and before his Greek-named associate Philip
Benincasa, Ursula, Venerable - Rumors of her visions and ecstasies excited complaint and she was called to Rome and questioned by Gregory XIII, who placed her under the direction of Saint Philip Neri
Ivo of Chartres, Saint - His opposition to the adulterous marriage of Philip I won him a prison cell, 1092
Bethzur - The adjoining spring traditions made the scene of the eunuch's baptism by Philip
Bartholomew - It occurs in all four lists of the apostles in the New Testament (Matthew 10:2-4 ; Mark 3:16-19 ; Luke 6:14-16 ; Acts 1:13 ); in each of the Gospels it immediately follows the name of Philip. In the first chapter of John, however, the account of Philip's call to discipleship is closely related to the call of a person named Nathanael (John 1:43-51 )
Aloysius Gonzaga, Saint - The son of a princely family, he was educated at the courts of the Medici of Florence and of Philip II of Spain
Gonzaga, Aloysius, Saint - The son of a princely family, he was educated at the courts of the Medici of Florence and of Philip II of Spain
Bartholomew, Saint - Bartholomew was introduced to Christ by his friend, Saint Philip; his missionary labors brought him to India, Mesopotamia, Parthia, and Lycaonia
Nathanael - He appears to have been a pious Jew who waited for the Messiah: and upon Jesus saying to him, "Before Philip called thee, I saw thee under the fig tree," Nathanael, convinced, by some circumstance not explained, of his omniscience, exclaimed, "Master, thou art the Son of God, and the King of Israel
Candace - the name of an Ethiopian queen, whose eunuch coming to Jerusalem to worship the Lord, was baptized by Philip the deacon, near Bethsura, in the way to Gaza, as he was returning to his own country, Acts 8:27
Ursula Benincasa, Venerable - Rumors of her visions and ecstasies excited complaint and she was called to Rome and questioned by Gregory XIII, who placed her under the direction of Saint Philip Neri
Candace - The name of an Ethiopian queen, whose high treasurer was converted to Christianity under the preaching of Philip the evangelist, Acts 8:27
Bethsaida - Another disciple, Philip, was also from Bethsaida (John 1:44)
Magus, Simon - According to the testimony of Saint Justin, a native of Gitta, he was converted by the preaching of Philip in Samana and was baptized
John the Baptist, Saint - Publicly censoring Herod Antipas for having taken to himself Herodias, the wife of his brother, Philip, he was imprisoned and beheaded at the request of the dancing daughter of Herodias (Mark 6)
Candace - Her eunuch or treasurer was converted to Christ by Philip the evangelist, through the power of the word (Isaiah 53), and the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:27, etc
Hauran (1) - Upon his death they fell to Philip ( Luke 3:1 )
Hauran - Afterwards it became the province, including Ituraea, ruled over by Philip
Baptist, John the, Saint - Publicly censoring Herod Antipas for having taken to himself Herodias, the wife of his brother, Philip, he was imprisoned and beheaded at the request of the dancing daughter of Herodias (Mark 6)
Simonans - According to the testimony of Saint Justin, a native of Gitta, he was converted by the preaching of Philip in Samana and was baptized
Simon Magus - According to the testimony of Saint Justin, a native of Gitta, he was converted by the preaching of Philip in Samana and was baptized
Macedonia - Down to the time of Philip (b. Under Philip, through his organization of an army and his diplomatic skill, they became masters of Greece, and under his son Alexander conquered the East. See Philippi, Thessalonica, Berœa. The province at that time included Thessaly, and stretched across to the Adriatic; but Philippi was a colony, not subject to the governor of the province, and Thessalonica was also a ‘free city,’ with the right of appointing its own magistrates. Paul’s journey was along this from Neapolis through Philippi, Amphipolis, Apollonia, to Thessalonica
Benedetto Gaetani - To combat Philip the Fair of France who was taxing his dependents unjustly, he promulgated his famous Bull Unam Sanctam, which defined the relations of the powers of Church and State. Philip, unwilling to correct his misuse of power, resolved to summon a general council against the pope
Gaetani, Benedetto - To combat Philip the Fair of France who was taxing his dependents unjustly, he promulgated his famous Bull Unam Sanctam, which defined the relations of the powers of Church and State. Philip, unwilling to correct his misuse of power, resolved to summon a general council against the pope
Simon Magus - BUT who, to begin with, was Simon Magus? And how did it come about that he believed, and was actually baptized by Philip the evangelist; and then was detected, denounced and utterly reprobated by the Apostle Peter? How did all that come about?...
Well, you must know that Samaria, where Simon Magus lived and carried on his astounding impositions, was a half-Hebrew, half-heathen country. But when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done. "...
Philip had extraordinary success in his evangelising mission to Samaria. For the people with one accord gave heed unto those things that Philip spake, hearing and seeing the miracles which he did. 'The very devil himself has been converted and has been baptized by me,' Philip telegraphed to Jerusalem. Only, Simon Magus was all the time such an impostor that in his conversion and baptism he had completely deceived Philip. Nay, I think it but fair to Simon Magus to say that he had completely deceived himself as well as Philip. Now, though Philip was a prince of evangelistic preachers, and a good and an able man, at the same time he was far too easily satisfied with his converts. Philip was far better at preaching than he was at catechising. And thus it was that it fell to Peter and John to purge Philip's communion-roll of Simon Magus immediately on their arrival in Samaria. For, still greater crowds used to take him up and carry him on their shoulders in the days of his great power before Philip came to Samaria. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your miracles like you, I have plenty of money, and I know where there is plenty more. I must not allow myself to say a single word as to Philip's mismanagement of his catechumens' and young communicants' classes. Only, the sorcerer must have sadly bewitched the evangelist before Philip put Simon Magus's name down on his communion-roll. Philip knew his business and his own heart. Now, what he should have done, and what Philip should have insisted on him to do, was to discover to himself and to confess to himself his besetting sin, and every day to drive another nail of self-crucifixion into it. " Now, answer this, as we shall all answer it one day-What about the thoughts of your heart? Are the self-seeking, self-exalting thoughts of your heart dwelt on and indulged, or are they the greatest shame to you, and the greatest torment to you, of your life? Do you hate your own heart as you would hate hell itself, if you were about to be cast down into it? Do you beat your breast and cry out, Oh, wretched man that I am! Has the law entered, and is the law-work deep enough, and spiritual enough, to make all the Simon Magus-like thoughts of your hearts to be an inward pain and shame to you past all knowledge, and past all belief about you, of mortal man? His thoughts, that is, of self-advertisement, self-exaltation, and self-congratulation? Does the praise of men puff you up, and make you very happy? And is their silence, or their absence, something you cannot get over? Is he a good man who follows you about, and believes in you, and applauds you: and is he an unpardonably bad man who prefers Philip, and Peter, and John to Simon Magus? Then, be not deceived, God is not mocked, and neither are the self-discerning men round about you
Antipas - He beheaded John the Baptist (Matthew 14:1-12 ) at the instigation of Herodias, the wife of his half-brother Herod-Philip, whom he had married
Tetrarch - , Herod Philip, the brother of Antipas, who ruled over the Ituræan and Trachonitic territory; and Lysanias, who was Tetrarch of Abilene ‘in the fifteenth year of Tiberius’ (see Schürer, HJP Catholic Record Society - About 30 volumes have thus far been issued, including several diaries of the English College at Douai; a volume of documentary evidence concerning the English martyrs; annals of the English community of Blue Nuns in Paris from 1658 to the dissolution in 1792; documents relating to the Venenerable Philip Howard; and 16 volumes of "Miscellanea" which have proved of great value to serious students of history and others
Nathanael - ) He lived in Galilee and was introduced to Jesus by Philip (John 1:43-45; John 21:2)
Prayers: of a Father - Philip James Spener had a son of eminent talents, but perverse and extremely vicious
Chance - " Compare the meeting of Philip with the Ethiopian (Acts 8:26,27 )
Andrew - He and Philip brought some Greeks to see Jesus (John 12:22 )
Escorial - It was begun by Philip II in 1563 to commemorate the victory of Saint Quentin, August 10, 1557
Philippi - It was founded by Philip the father of Alexander the Great, from whom it derived its name. To the church gathered there the Epistle to the Philippians was written. Philippians 1:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:2
Samaria - The Gospel seems to have been preached there first by Philip (Acts 8)
Religious Congregations - , the Oratorians of Saint Philip Neri, 1566; or such as, though bound by simple vows, remained secular, e
Caesare'a Philip'pi - It was enlarged by Herod Philip, and named after Caesar, with his own name added to distinguish it from Caesarea. Caesarea Philippi has no Old Testament history, though it has been not unreasonably identified with Baal-gad
Bartholomew - Brought by Philip to Jesus. It is in undesigned accordance with this that Philip is coupled with Bartholomew in the first three lists, as Philip is coupled with Nathanael in John 1
Quito, Ecuador, City of - The university founded by Sixtus V and Philip II and opened in 1621 by the Jesuits, was reorganized 1895 and is now a State institution
Andrew - The order in which Andrew is named varies in different places; but generally he stands next after the three chiefs, and is associated with Philip
Caesarea-Philippi - It was enlarged and embellished by Philip the tetrarch of Trachonitis, and called Caesarea in honor of Tiberius Caesar; and the name Philippi was added to distinguish it from Caesarea on the Mediterranean
Smalkaldic League - The League included six German princes, among them the notorious Philip of Hesse and the Elector John of Saxony; and eleven cities, including Strasbourg, Constance, and Bremen
Florence, Italy, City of - The city was the seat of the Seventeenth AEcumenical Council (1438-1445), the home of many saints (Catherine de' Ricci, Mary Magdalen de Pazzi, Philip Neri), and the birthplace of Dante, Giotto, Fra Angelico, Donatello, and of six popes
Naples, Italy, City of - Its famous churches, among which are the Gothic Cathedral of Saint Januarius, begun in 1272, which shelters the martyr's relics, the baroque church of Saint Philip Neri, the Church of Saint Clare and the Monastery of San Domenico Maggiore (1255), containing the cell of Saint Thomas Aquinas, are rich in art treasures, and the secular buildings, including the royal palace and the museum have interesting archmological collections
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Lame, Lameness - Acts tells of the early church continuing Jesus' healing ministry to the lame: Peter and John (Acts 3:2 ); Philip (Acts 8:7 ); Paul (Acts 14:8-10 )
Sir - It is the salutation of servants (slaves) to their masters (‘Sir, didst thou not sow good seed?’ Matthew 13:27); of a son to a father (‘I go, sir,’ Matthew 21:30); of the priests and Pharisees to Pilate (‘Sir, we remember that that deceiver said,’ Matthew 27:63); of the Greeks to Philip (‘Sir, we would see Jesus,’ John 12:21)
Glastonbury Abbey - 63, on the Island of Ynyswitrin; he was sent to Britain from Gaul by Saint Philip, Apostle
Abbey, Glastonbury - 63, on the Island of Ynyswitrin; he was sent to Britain from Gaul by Saint Philip, Apostle
Herod Antipas - He had married a daughter of Aretas king of Arabia, but subsequently induced Herodias the wife of Philip, his own half-brother, to leave her husband and live with him
Candace - The expression in Acts 8:27 that the εὐνοῦχος δυνάστης, whom Philip baptized, ‘was over all her treasure’ suggests that this monarch was powerful and wealthy
c Sarea-Philippi - Cæsarea-Philippi (sĕs-a-rç'ah-fĭ-lĭp'pî), now called Banias by the Arabs, is a town at the base of Mount Hermon, about 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee and 45 miles southwest of Damascus. It was near two important sources of the Jordan; its ancient classical name was Paneas, in commemoration of the sanctuary of the god Pan: it was enlarged by Philip the tetrarch, and named Cæsarea-Philippi to distinguish it from the other Cæsarea, on the Mediterranean; later on it was called Neronias by Herod Agrippa II
Roman Empire - The empire of Rome succeeded the Macedonian empire founded by Philip and Alexander
Edward Pusey - The son of Philip Bouverie of Pusey, he assumed the name of the manor upon his succession
Tetrarch - Herod Antipas and Philip, with the title of tetrarchs
Evangelist - Philip, one of the Seven, is so called in one of the ‘we’ sections of Acts (Acts 21:8), which may mean that he was the evangelist out of the Seven, i. Philip was a travelling missionary. and Philip ‘the evangelist’ is one of these preachers. An evangelist would know the gospel narrative thoroughly, and would be capable of explaining it, as Philip did to the eunuch. Philip was called ‘the evangelist’ because of his good work in preaching to the heathen
Evangelist - Philip, one of the Seven, is so called in one of the ‘we’ sections of Acts (Acts 21:8), which may mean that he was the evangelist out of the Seven, i. Philip was a travelling missionary. and Philip ‘the evangelist’ is one of these preachers. An evangelist would know the gospel narrative thoroughly, and would be capable of explaining it, as Philip did to the eunuch. Philip was called ‘the evangelist’ because of his good work in preaching to the heathen
Herod - After the death of Herod, half of his kingdom, including Judea, Ideumaea, and Samaria, was given to his son Archelaus, with the title of Ethnarch; while the remaining half was divided between two of his other sons, Herod Antipas and Philip, with the title of Tetrarchs; the former having the regions of Galilee and Perea, and the latter Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. HEROD Philip. He first married a daughter of Aretas, and Arabian king; but afterwards becoming enamoured of Herodias, the wife of his brother Herod Philip, and his own niece, he dismissed his former wife, and induced Herodias to leave her husband and connect herself with him. 38, the title of king, together with the provinces which had belonged to his uncle Philip the tetrarch Lysanias
Bartholomew - In the Gospels he comes next after Philip (who in all four lists heads the second quaternion), and is followed by Matthew and Thomas: in Acts the order is ‘Philip and Thomas, Bartholomew and Matthew. John never mentions Bartholomew; (3) the Synoptists in their lists place Bartholomew next to Philip, as James next to his probable caller John, and Peter (in Mt
Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da - Said to have been a pupil of Jacob Arcadelt, he owed his training in liturgy to Saint Philip Neri
Juan Mariana - His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants
Mariana, Juan - His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants
Latin - Philip ) a Latin form like the name of St
Evangelist, - Philip is the only one so called in the N. Though there was and is an especial gift to some to proclaim the gospel, we read of others who helped to spread the good news, as when there was persecution at Jerusalem, all were scattered abroad except the apostles, and they went everywhere 'announcing' the glad tidings of, or evangelising, the word, Acts 8:4 ; and Paul speaks of some women who 'laboured with him in the gospel,' Philippians 4:3 ; this they could have done in various ways without preaching publicly
Evangelist - Thus Philip, "one of the seven," is called an "evangelist
Macedonia - Alexander the Great, son of Philip, king of Macedonia, having conquered Asia, and subverted the Persian empire, the name of the Macedonians became very famous throughout the east; and it is often given to the Greeks, the successors of Alexander in the monarchy. Here he laid the foundation of the churches of Thessalonica and Philippi
Virgin - 1: παρθένος (Strong's #3933 — Noun Feminine — parthenos — par-then'-os ) is used (a) of "the Virgin Mary," Matthew 1:23 ; Luke 1:27 ; (b) of the ten "virgins" in the parable, Matthew 25:1,7,11 ; (c) of the "daughters" of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9 ; (d) those concerning whom the Apostle Paul gives instructions regarding marriage, 1 Corinthians 7:25,28,34 ; in 1 Corinthians 7:36-38 , the subject passes to that of "virgin daughters" (RV), which almost certainly formed one of the subjects upon which the church at Corinth sent for instructions from the Apostle; one difficulty was relative to the discredit which might be brought upon a father (or guardian), if he allowed his daughter or ward to grow old unmarried
Caesare'a - Here also lived Philip the deacon and his four prophesying daughters
Theognostus, a Priest of Alexandria - Philip of Side says that he presided over the school of Alexandria after Pierius a
Caesarea Philippi - (cawehss uh ree' uh fihl' ihp pi) About 1,150 feet above sea level, Caesarea Philippi is located on a triangular plain in the upper Jordan Valley along the southwestern slopes of Mt. ...
History Caesarea Philippi seems to have been a religious center from its earliest days. After Herod's death, it passed to his son Philip who ruled there from 4 B. Philip rebuilt the city into a beautiful place and renamed it Caesarea Philippi in honor of Tiberias Caesar and himself. ...
The transfiguration, which occurred about a week after the confession at Caesarea Philippi, was probably also in the area. Caesarea Philippi, which had been the center for pagan worship, thus became an important site for Christians because of Jesus' association with it. See Agrippa II; Augustus ; Baal ; Herod the Great; Herod Philip; Nero
Hierapolis - ...
There is a trustworthy tradition which connects the name of Philip the Apostle with Hierapolis. 31)-states that Philip, ‘one of the twelve,’ was among ‘the great lights of Asia,’ and that he was ‘buried at Hierapolis along with his two virgin daughters. ’ Theodoret (Commentary on Psalms 116) says that ‘the Apostle Philip controverted the error of the Phrygians
Alexander - The Great, the famous son and successor of Philip, king of Macedon
Armada, the Spanish - Philip II had grievances against England in the buccaneering voyages of Drake and other privateers and in the subsidizing of the Protestants in the Netherlands
Thessalonica - She was so called by her father, Philip, because he first heard of her birth on the day of his gaining a victory over the Thessalians
Feasts or Festivals - Philip and St
Woman - Several women are mentioned in Scripture as having been endowed with prophetic gifts, as Miriam (Exodus 15:20 ), Deborah (Judges 4:4,5 ), Huldah (2 Kings 22:14 ), Noadiah (Nehemiah 6:14 ), Anna (Luke 2:36,37 ), and the daughters of Philip the evangelist (Acts 21:8,9 )
Caesarea Philippi - CÆSAREA PhilipPI . His son Philip refounded the city, and changed its name from Paneas to Cæsarea in honour of Augustus adding his own name to distinguish the town from the similarly named city founded by his father on the sea-coast
His - In this instance, his does not express what belongs to the antecedent of his, Philip, but the fear which others entertained of him
Caesara Philippi - This town was afterwards enlarged and embellished by Herod Philip, the tetrarch of Trachonitis, of whose territory it formed a part, and was called by him Caesarea Philippi, partly after his own name, and partly after that of the emperor Tiberius Caesar
Index, Expurgatory - The Trent index being thus published, Philip II
Spanish Armada, the - Philip II had grievances against England in the buccaneering voyages of Drake and other privateers and in the subsidizing of the Protestants in the Netherlands
the Ethiopian Eunuch - " If that accusation was laid against the readers of 1792, how much more have we laid ourselves open to it in 1899?...
But, all this time Philip is wandering up and down the wilderness, thinking that he must have mistaken his own imagination for the voice of the Lord. But, at last, a chariot of distinction comes in sight, and as it comes within earshot Philip hears with the utmost astonishment the swarthy master of the chariot reading aloud. Philip was not astonished at the distinguished man reading aloud, but his astonishment and admiration were unbounded when he began to make out at a distance what the dark-skinned stranger was reading. " "Understandest thou what thou readest?" said Philip, as the chariot came to a standstill. Can I be of any use to you?' "How can I," said the eunuch, "except some man should guide me?" And he desired Philip that he would come up and sit with him. Had the eunuch come to Jerusalem last year at this passover time, as he had been urged to come, and as he had at one time intended to come, he might have had Philip's Master sitting beside him today and reading Isaiah with him. Only, it strikes me, and it struck Philip, as a remarkable fact that out of the whole Old Testament this utter stranger to the Old Testament was pondering over its most central chapter, and its most profound prophecy, as he rode home in his chariot. 'Oh, no!' said Philip. Philip, at any rate, set himself in the first place, and with all his might, to do full justice to his great subject. Only, the eunuch did not wait for Philip's exhortation. He did not give Philip time to wind up and round off his doctrine. Philip's sermon on the fifty-third of Isaiah is not finished to this day. And my prayer lies there to this day, like Philip's sermon, never finished, and that is five-and-twenty years ago. But the backslider returned, and, as I was told, died in raptures, exclaiming, "I see it! I see it!" "See, here is water!" exclaimed the eunuch, cutting short Philip's sermon. ...
"And when they were come up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught away Philip, that the eunuch saw him no more; and he went on his way rejoicing. And who can tell but that Queen Candace, and a great multitude of her black, but comely people, will yet be seen by us stretching out their hands and casting their crowns at His feet of whom Isaiah spake, and of whom Philip preached!...
Let it no longer be a forlorn hopeTo wash an Ethiope;He's washed: his gloomy skin a peaceful shadeFor his white soul is made
Innocent Iii, Pope - He reasserted the papal suzerainty over Sicily, which he ruled conscientiously during the minority of his ward Frederick II; was arbiter in Germany between Otto and Philip of Swabia; secured the election of Frederick II, 1211; and formed a truce between France and England
Deacon - Both Philip and Stephen, who were of "the seven," preached; they did "the work of evangelists
Lotario de' Conti - He reasserted the papal suzerainty over Sicily, which he ruled conscientiously during the minority of his ward Frederick II; was arbiter in Germany between Otto and Philip of Swabia; secured the election of Frederick II, 1211; and formed a truce between France and England
Grain of Wheat - A parable occurring in John 12, given as an explanation, when after the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, Philip and Andrew presented to Jesus the request of some Gentiles to see Him, of why He must suffer and die before His glorification
Eunuch - The man of Ethiopia baptised by Philip was a eunuch of great authority under the queen
Bethsaida - The eastern city was beautified by Philip the tetrarch, and called Bethsaida Julias (in honor of a daughter of the emperor Augustus), perhaps to distinguish it from the western Bethsaida, in Galilee
Simon - Simon (sî'mon), a hearing, contracted from Simeon, a sorcerer, who professed to be a convert to the Christian faith, and was baptized by Philip at Samaria, but was severely rebuked by Peter as a hypocrite, because he desired to buy the gift of the Spirit
Apostle - The Greek word ἀπόστολοςsignifies 'a messenger,' 'one sent,' and is used in this sense for any messenger in 2 Corinthians 8:23 ; Philippians 2:25 ; and as 'one sent' in John 13:16 . ...
5 Philip and 5 Philip. 5 Philip. 5 Philip
Macedonia - There a golden sarcophagus, supposedly of King Philip II (father of Alexander), was found in a vaulted tomb. ...
Philip II (359-336 B. There he founded the city of Philippi in place of the Thracian colony Crenides. Philip II also subjected Thessaly to his rule and incorporated the Chalcidice peninsula into his realm. Its military strength and the wealth established by Philip II enabled his son Alexander to defeat the Persian Empire and to conquer the entire realm from the eastern Mediterranean to the Indus River (including today's Turkey, Egypt, Syria, Palestine, Iraq, Iran, and parts of Afghanistan and Pakistan). During the time of Augustus, some of the Macedonian cities were refounded as Roman colonies: Dion, at the foot of Mount Olympus, became Colonia Julia Augusta Diensis; Philip pi , where Marc Antony had defeated the assassins of Caesar—Brutus and Cassius—was settled with Roman veterans and renamed Colonia Augusta Julia Philip pensium . A female deity of Thracian origin appears under the Greek name Artemis; numerous rock reliefs of this Artemis have been discovered on the Acropolis of Philippi where she sometimes appears with a tree of life in one hand. In the cities of Thessalonica and Philippi, one Cabirus was venerated as the founding hero of the city. An Egyptian sanctuary was also excavated on the slope of the acropolis of Philippi and in the Roman colony Dion. Roman veterans who were settled in the newly founded colonies brought their gods to Macedonia; a sanctuary dedicated to the Italian god Silvanus was found on the acropolis of Philippi. An inscription (still unpublished) recently found in Philippi mentions a synagogue. Paul and his associates, sailing from Troas via Samothrace, arrived in Neapolis (today Kavalla), the most important port of eastern Macedonia, and went inland to Philippi where, according to the account of Acts 16:14-15 , they were received by Lydia, a God-fearer from Thyatira, and founded the first Christian community in Europe, probably in the year A. The correspondence of Paul with this church, now preserved in the Epistle to the Philippians, gives testimony to the early development, organization, and generosity of this church. Forced to leave Philippi after an apparently brief stay (Acts 16:16-40 reports the incident of the healing of a possessed slave girl and Paul's subsequent imprisonment), Paul went to the capital Thessalonica via Amphipolis on the Via Egnatia ( Acts 17:1 ). 100, bishop Polycarp of Smyrna wrote to the Philippians who had asked him to forward copies of the letters of the famous martyr Ignatius of Antioch. Polycarp also wrote to advise the Philippians with respect to the case of a presbyter who had embezzled funds
First Crusade - The regular crusade, however, was well organized, and contained four principal armies, under the command of Godfrey of Bouillon, Hugh of Vermandois, brother of King Philip I of France; Raymond of Saint-Gilles, and Tancred
Magdeburg, Centuriators of - This purpose, however, was not to discover and state the truth, but to convict the papacy of having corrupted the teaching of Christ and to justify the religious opinions which the Lutheran Matthias Flacius opposed to the views of another Lutheran, Philip Melanchthon
Centuriators of Magdeburg - This purpose, however, was not to discover and state the truth, but to convict the papacy of having corrupted the teaching of Christ and to justify the religious opinions which the Lutheran Matthias Flacius opposed to the views of another Lutheran, Philip Melanchthon
Magic - Simon, a magician, was found by Philip at Samaria ( Acts 8:9-24 ); and Paul and Barnabas encountered Elymas, a Jewish sorcerer, at Paphos (13:6-12)
Hierapolis - Legend declares that the Apostles Philip and John preached there, and this appears trustworthy
Ashdod - AZOTUS, where Philip was found after baptising the eunuch
Antipope - The following is a list of the antipopes whose histories will be found in this document under their respective names: ...
Abert
Adalbert
Aleric
Amadeus VIII, Duke of Savoy
Anacletus II
Anastasius Bibliothecarius
Baldassare Cossa
Benedict X
Benedict XIII
Benedict XIV
Bernard Garnier
Boniface Franco
Boniface VII
Boccadipecora, Teobaldo
Bourdin, Maurice
Buccapecuc, Thebaldus
Cadalous, Pietro
Callistus III
Celestine II
Christopher
Clement III
Clement VII
Clement VIII
Clemente Domínguez y Gómez
Constantine II
Conti, Gregorio
Cossa, Baldassare
Crema, Guido of
Dioscorus
Eulalius
Franco, Boniface
Frangipani, Lando dei
Felix II
Felix V
Filagatto, John
Gil Sanchez Muñoz
Giovanni of Struma
Gregorio Conti
Gregory VI
Gregory VIII
Gregory XVII
Guibert of Ravenna
Guido of Crema
Hippolytus, Saint
Honorius II
Innocent III
Jean Carrier
John
John XVI
John XXIII
John, Abbot of Struma
John, Bishop of Sabina
John Filagatto
John Mincius
John of Sabina
John of Struma
John Philagathus
Lando dei Frangipani
Lanzo of Sezza
Laurentius
Leo
Luna, Pedro de
Maginulf
Manuel Alonso Corral
Maurice Bourdin
Maurice Burdanus
Mincius, John
Muñoz, Gil Sanchez
Nicholas V
Novatian
Octavius
Ottavio di Montecelio
Paschal
Paschal III
Peter II
Pietro Cadalous
Pedro de Luna
Philagathus, John
Philip
Pierleone, Pietro
Pietro Cadalus
Pietro Philarghi Alexander V
Pietro Pierleone
Pietro Rainalducci
Rainalducci, Pietro
Ravenna, Guibert of
Robert of Geneva
Sabina, John of
Struma, John of
Sylvester III
Sylvester IV
Teobaldo Boccadipecora
Thebaldus Buccapecuc
Theodore
Theodoric
Theofylact
Tiberius
Ursicinus
Ursinus
Victor IV (1159-1164)
Anti-Pope - The following is a list of the antipopes whose histories will be found in this document under their respective names: ...
Abert
Adalbert
Aleric
Amadeus VIII, Duke of Savoy
Anacletus II
Anastasius Bibliothecarius
Baldassare Cossa
Benedict X
Benedict XIII
Benedict XIV
Bernard Garnier
Boniface Franco
Boniface VII
Boccadipecora, Teobaldo
Bourdin, Maurice
Buccapecuc, Thebaldus
Cadalous, Pietro
Callistus III
Celestine II
Christopher
Clement III
Clement VII
Clement VIII
Clemente Domínguez y Gómez
Constantine II
Conti, Gregorio
Cossa, Baldassare
Crema, Guido of
Dioscorus
Eulalius
Franco, Boniface
Frangipani, Lando dei
Felix II
Felix V
Filagatto, John
Gil Sanchez Muñoz
Giovanni of Struma
Gregorio Conti
Gregory VI
Gregory VIII
Gregory XVII
Guibert of Ravenna
Guido of Crema
Hippolytus, Saint
Honorius II
Innocent III
Jean Carrier
John
John XVI
John XXIII
John, Abbot of Struma
John, Bishop of Sabina
John Filagatto
John Mincius
John of Sabina
John of Struma
John Philagathus
Lando dei Frangipani
Lanzo of Sezza
Laurentius
Leo
Luna, Pedro de
Maginulf
Manuel Alonso Corral
Maurice Bourdin
Maurice Burdanus
Mincius, John
Muñoz, Gil Sanchez
Nicholas V
Novatian
Octavius
Ottavio di Montecelio
Paschal
Paschal III
Peter II
Pietro Cadalous
Pedro de Luna
Philagathus, John
Philip
Pierleone, Pietro
Pietro Cadalus
Pietro Philarghi Alexander V
Pietro Pierleone
Pietro Rainalducci
Rainalducci, Pietro
Ravenna, Guibert of
Robert of Geneva
Sabina, John of
Struma, John of
Sylvester III
Sylvester IV
Teobaldo Boccadipecora
Thebaldus Buccapecuc
Theodore
Theodoric
Theofylact
Tiberius
Ursicinus
Ursinus
Victor IV (1159-1164)
Alexan'Der Iii - (helper of men--brave ) king of Macedon, surnamed the Great, the son of Philip and Olympias, was born at Pella B
Evangelists - Philip, who was one of the seven deacons, is called "the evangelist" in Acts 21:8 ; and that St
Treasures - But a few years since, some workmen digging in a garden at Sidon, discovered several copper pots, filled with gold coin from the mint of Philip of Macedon and his son Alexander, unmixed with any of later date
Rubens, Peter Paul - On a mission to Spain, 1628, he met Velasquez, and painted the portrait of Philip IV
Evangelist - Philip, one of the Seven (cf. We conclude, therefore, that the evangelist as such was not an official, but one who, without having the higher powers of Apostleship or prophecy, or any special talent for teaching or pastoral work, had a gift for proclaiming the gospel as a message of saving love a gift which was chiefly exercised, no doubt, by moving as Philip had done from place to place
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P. MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Gaza - Philip is here told to take the road from Jerusalem to Gaza (about 6 miles south-west of Jerusalem), "which is desert", i
Salome - But he had not anticipated for his guests the rare luxury of seeing a princess, his own niece, a grand-daughter of Herod the Great and of Mariamne, a descendant, therefore, of Simon the high priest and the great line of Maccabean princes, a princess who afterwards became the wife of a tetrarch [1] and the mother of a king, honouring them by degrading herself into a scenic dancer
Guelphs And Ghibellines - When Otho of Bavaria and Philip of Swabia fought for the imperial crown in Germany and in Italy, at the close of the 12th century, the names of the rival parties were introduced into Italy, Guelfo and Ghibellino being the Italian forms of Well and Waiblingen; the former designated the partisans of the pope and the latter the partisans of the German emperor
Ethiopians - It was a pious Ethiopian, of great authority with his queen, to whom Philip preached of Jesus, and then baptised him
Philippi - one of the chief cities of Macedonia, lying on the north-west of Neapolis, and formerly called Datum or Datos, but afterward taking its name from Philip, the celebrated king of Macedon, by whom it was repaired and beautified. He was at Philippi a second time, but nothing which then occurred is recorded. The Philippian Christians having heard of St. As the Apostle tells the Philippians that he hoped to see them shortly, Php_2:24 , and there are plain intimations in this epistle of his having been some time at Rome, Php_1:12 ; Php_2:26 , it is probable that it was written A. ...
"It is a strong proof," says Chrysostom, "of the virtuous conduct of the Philippians, that they did not afford the Apostle a single subject of complaint; for, in the whole epistle which he wrote to them,...
there is nothing but exhortation and encouragement, without the mixture of any censure whatever
Servant - Philip, and the rest, were servants of Jesus Christ
Caesarea - ...
It is noted in gospel history as the residence of Philip the evangelist, Acts 8:40 21:8 ; and of Cornelius the centurion, the first fruits from the Gentiles, Acts 10:1-48 11:1-18 Here Herod Agrippa was smitten by the angel of God, Acts 12:20-23
Ghibellines, Guelphs And - When Otho of Bavaria and Philip of Swabia fought for the imperial crown in Germany and in Italy, at the close of the 12th century, the names of the rival parties were introduced into Italy, Guelfo and Ghibellino being the Italian forms of Well and Waiblingen; the former designated the partisans of the pope and the latter the partisans of the German emperor
John the Apostle - John was associated with Peter in visiting the Samaritans, who had received the word preached by Philip, and through the laying on of their hands the Holy Spirit was given
Theodorus Lector - have given some quotations from a Theodorus Lector relating to the statues with which Constantinople was adorned, one containing an incident which proves the writer to have lived in the reign of Philip, 711–713 (Combef
Orsini - Later he supported Pope Boniface VIII against Philip the Fair
Theatines - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Order of Clerks Regular - In France they built the church of Saint Anne la Royale; in Spain under Philip II, the Theatine cardinal Paolo Burali d'Arezzo filled various embassies at the command of the vIceroy of Naples; in Portugal John IV, 1648, gave them a house and a college for the education of noble youth; in England, under Henry VIII, Thomas Goldwell, bishop of Saint Asaph, entered the order
Herod the Great - Of these, Philip had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, Antipas had Galilee and Peraea, while Archelaus had Judea and Samaria
Bethsaida - Andrew, Peter, and Philip belonged to it, Near Capernaum and Chorazin (Matthew 11:21; Luke 10:13). Thus, Caesarea Philippi is mentioned presently after, Bethsaida being on the road to it; and the mount of the transfiguration, part of the Hermon range, above the source of the Jordan (Mark 9:2-3); the snow of Hermon suggested the image, "His raiment became white as snow
Apostle - The names of the twelve are, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James, the son of Zebedee, called also "the greater;" John, his brother; Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew, or Levi; Simon the Canaanite; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, also called Judas or Jude; James, "the less," the son of Alphaeus; and Judas Iscariot, Matthew 10:2-4 Mark 3:16 Luke 6:14
ir-ha-Heres - Queen Candace's chamberlain whom Philip met on his return from worshipping at Jerusalem, is an earnest of a fuller conversion to come (Zephaniah 3:9; Zechariah 14:9; Revelation 7:9)
Ashdod - Visited by Philip the evangelist, who preached there on his way from Gaza to Caesarea (Acts 8:40)
Agrippa - 37, declared Agrippa to be the successor of' Philip the Tetrarch, who had died three years previously
Philippi - A city of proconsular Macedonia, so called from Philip king of Macedon, who repaired and beautified it; whence it lost its former name of Dathos. Luke appears to have remained here, and to have rejoined Paul when he again visited Philippi on his fifth journey to Jerusalem, A. ...
Paul's EPISTLE TO THE PhilipPIANS, written during his first imprisonment at Rome, A. 62, gratefully and warmly acknowledges the receipt of their gift by the hand of Epaphroditus, and their continued affection towards him; also their irreproachable Christian walk, and their firmness under persecution, Philippians 1:7 4:23 2:12 4:10-15
Macedo'Nia - Of the space thus enclosed, two of the most remarkable physical features are two great plains, one watered by the Axius, which comes to the sea, at the Thermaic Gulf, not far from Thessalonica; the other by the Strymon, which after passing near Philippi, flows out below Amphipolis. This general sketch sufficiently describes the Macedonia which was ruled over by Philip and Alexander and which the Romans conquered from Perseas. Paul's peculiar affection, (1 Thessalonians 2:8,17-20 ; 3:10 ) and the Philippians, besides their general freedom from blame, are noted as remarkable for their liberality and self-denial. (Philippians 4:10 ; 14-19 ) see 2 Corinthians 9:2 ; 11:9
Caesarea - ...
When the Jews persecuted the early Christians and forced them to leave Jerusalem (Acts 8:1; Acts 8:4), Philip the evangelist went to live in Caesarea (Acts 8:40; Acts 21:8). ...
This coastal city of Caesarea is not to be confused with the inland town of Caesarea Philippi. The latter was in the hill country of northern Galilee (Matthew 16:13; see CAESAREA PhilipPI)
Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus - He appeals to the authority of the great luminaries which the Asian church could boast, and whose bodies lay among them, Philip, one of the twelve apostles, and his three daughters, John, who lay on our Lord's breast, a priest who wore the πέταλον , Polycarp of Smyrna, Thraseas of Eumenia, Sagaris, Papirius, Melito, all of whom had observed the 14th day, according to the Gospel, walking according to the rule of faith
Caesarea - The residence of Philip the deacon and his four prophesying daughters (Acts 8:40; Acts 21:8; Acts 21:16). Caesarea Philippi. The streams which flow from beneath a limestone rock unite in one stream near Caesarea Philippi. ) Herod's son Philip, tetrarch of Trachonitis, enlarged and called it from himself, as well as Caesar, Caesarea Philippi. which rears its majestic head 7,000 feet above Caesarea Philippi. The allusion to "snow" agrees with this, and the mention of Caesarea Philippi in the context (Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27; Mark 9:3). The remoteness and privacy of Caesarea Philippi fitted it for being the place where Jesus retired to prepare His disciples for His approaching death of shame and His subsequent resurrection; there it was that Peter received the Lord's praise, and afterward censure
Nathanael - The place at which Nathanael was found by Philip and brought to Jesus is not mentioned; but it is not improbable that Nathanael was returning from listening to the preaching of the Baptist. Philip, like Nathanael, was a Galilaean, the one of Bethsaida, time other of Cana (John 21:2): they were therefore neighbours, and evidently friends. Like Andrew and John, Philip no sooner finds, or is found by, Christ, than he seeks to make Him known to others. , seems to imply that Philip, with Andrew and Peter and John and James, was now a disciple of Jesus. ’ It looks as if Nathanael and Philip had at times discussed the OT descriptions of the Messiah. At this time Philip would know nothing of the virgin birth at Bethlehem: he quite naturally describes Jesus as He was commonly known. ...
Philip’s ‘Come and see’ is in harmony with the practical bent of his mind (John 12:21; John 14:8), and is the best answer to anything like prejudice. It is part of his guilelessness that he is willing to have any prejudice removed, and he at once accepts Philip’s proposal; cf
Samaria - Philip preached here ( Acts 8:5 )
Philippi - The city of Philippi was an important administrative centre in Macedonia, the northern part of Greece. ) It was named after Philip of Macedon (the father of Alexander the Great), who conquered it about 356 BC and made it into one of his strategic cities. During the Roman civil war, Philippi was the scene of a vital battle in 31 BC, after which the victor gave the city the status of a Roman colony (Acts 16:12). )...
Philippi was on the main route from Rome to Asia Minor. Paul and Silas visited Philippi on Paul’s second missionary journey, and found their first converts among a group of God-fearing Gentiles who met for prayer at the river bank (Acts 16:13-15). Though released the next day, Paul and Silas had to leave the city, but they left behind the beginnings of the church in Philippi (Acts 16:39-40). ...
Paul appears to have visited Philippi twice on his third missionary journey – once when travelling through Macedonia south to Achaia (Acts 20:1-2), and once when returning through Macedonia to Troas (Acts 20:6). He probably visited Philippi again after release from his first Roman imprisonment (1 Timothy 1:3). ...
The Philippian church saw itself as a partner with Paul in his missionary work and helped support him financially (Philippians 1:7-8; Philippians 4:14-18). The church brought Paul much joy and drew from him warm expressions of true friendship (Philippians 1:4; Philippians 4:1; see PhilipPIANS, LETTER TO THE)
Trachonitis - —A Roman province of Eastern Palestine over which Herod Philip held rule when John the Baptist entered upon his public ministry (Luke 3:1). The line of the western border is not definitely given, but it probably extended to the eastern limit of Gaulanitis (Jaulan), which is frequently alluded to as a separate district of Herod Philip’s dominion
Ethiopian Eunuch - Philip the Deacon’s convert (Acts 8:27 ff
Bardaisan, Syrian Theologian - Scarcely anything survives of his writings, for a Dialogue concerning Fate, extant in Syriac under the title "Book of the Laws of the Countries," is by his disciple Philip
Prophecy, Prophet - we read that Philip had four virgin daughters who 'prophesied;' and Agabus foretold that Paul would be bound at Jerusalem and be delivered to the Gentiles
Caesarea - Philip the evangelist resided here with his four daughters (21:8)
Gaza - ...
Gaza is mentioned once in the NT (Acts 8:26): ‘Arise,’ said the angel of the Lord to Philip, ‘and go toward the south (marg. (l) If the former interpretation, which is the ordinary one, is right, the tract which the road traversed was ‘desert’ only in a qualified sense, for the writer expressly states that in passing through it Philip came upon water, in which he baptized the eunuch. The guiding angel’s words may refer merely to the solitariness of the road, being spoken ‘to bring out Philip’s trustful obedience, where he could not foresee the end in view’ (J
Asiarch - 155), where two separate persons named Philippos have been confused: (1) Philip of Smyrna, Asiarch, who superintended the games; (2) Philip of Tralles, who was high priest of Asia (the latter had been an Asiarch a year or two before)
Simon Magus - ’ When Philip reached Samaria, and, preaching the gospel, gathered many into the Church, Simon also fell under the influence of his message. He therefore sought baptism, and, being baptized, continued with Philip. The Apostles Peter and John came down to Samaria to establish the work begun by Philip, and by the laying on of their hands gave the Holy Ghost to the converts
Angel - ...
Acts 8:26 (b) This one was probably the Holy Spirit who directed Philip as to his new place of service. Philip had just conducted a great campaign which was most successful, but now the Spirit took him away from that work to deal with one man down on the road to Gaza. Verse Acts 8:29 indicates clearly that it was the Holy Spirit who was directing Philip in all his service and ministry
Andrew - ...
Still more interesting, however, as illustrating Andrew’s character, are the two occasions on which he is specially associated with Philip, the only other Apostle who bore a Greek name. The first incident occurred at the Feeding of the Five Thousand, when, in contrast to the anxious, calculating Philip, the downright, practical Andrew thought it worth while to draw the Saviour’s attention to the lad’s little store, even though he too was at a loss as to what it could effect (John 6:5 ff. And the second occurred when to Philip, again perplexed by the desire of certain Greeks (Gentiles, therefore) to see Jesus, Andrew suggested that the true course was at least to lay the request before Jesus Himself, and leave Him to decide whether or not it could be granted (John 12:20 ff
Herod - His final one designated Archelaus to succeed him as king of Judea (Matthew 2:22 ), another son Antipas to be tetrarch (governor) of Galilee and Perea, and another son Philip as tetrarch of the Northeastern Districts. ...
Herod Philip was the son of Herod the Great and Cleopatra of Jerusalem (Luke 3:1 ). He built Caesarea Philippi and was governor of the Northeastern districts of Iturea, Gaulinitis, Trachonitis, and Decapolis. ...
A Herod Philip is mentioned in Mark 6:17 as the first husband of Herodias. She was married to Philip
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Jersey - Augustinian missions were established at Cape May and Trenton in 1803,1805, and a member of that order, Father Philip Lariscy of New York, was an active missionary in New Jersey, c1821The German Catholic settlement at Macopin (now Echo Lake) had a rude plank chapel in 1803
Aristotle - Recalled to Stagira by Philip of Macedon, he acquired influence with the young prince Alexander who aided him liberally in getting books and opportunities for research in natural science
Simon - He had misled the people at Samaria by his magical arts, but he professed to believe at the preaching of Philip
Fountain - Philip built Tiberias at the sulphureous hot springs S
Ethiopia - The treasurer of its queen, Candace was baptized by Philip
Macedonia - The Macedonian Empire is traced back some four hundred years before the Famous Philip, under whom, and especially under his son Alexander the Great, it reached the summit of its power. Of the cities of Macedonia proper, there are mentioned in the New Testament, Amphipolis, Apollonia, Berea, Neapolis, Philippi, and Thessalonica
Reductions of Paraguay - The colonists opposed the movement, but Philip III of Spain aided the Jesuits with subsidies and legal measures
John (the Apostle) - Later, he and Peter were sent to Samaria to those who had received the word of God under Philip’s ministry, and ‘they prayed for these that they might receive the Holy Ghost’ (Acts 8:14; Acts 8:16). Polycarp’s letter is to the Philippian Church, and calls for no reference to John. If, then, anyone came who had been a follower of the elders, I questioned him in regard to the words of the elders—what Andrew or what Peter said, or what was said by Philip, or by Thomas, or by James, or by John, or by Matthew, or by any other of the disciples of the Lord, and what things Aristion and the presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, say. (2) The other counter-statement is derived from the notice given of Philip in this same letter. The whole question turns upon the allusion to the daughters of Philip. Papias, the earliest witness, places Philip among the Apostles (Historia Ecclesiastica iii. Then he goes on to relate a wonderful tale which he heard from the daughters of Philip. There is no indication whatever that this is not the same Philip just referred to. Polycrates now follows with his testimony that among those who had died in Asia was ‘Philip, one of the Twelve Apostles, who sleeps in Hierapolis, and his two virgin daughters and another daughter who lived in the Holy Spirit and now rests at Ephesus’ (Historia Ecclesiastica iii. Clement of Alexandria declares that the Apostles Peter and Philip had children, and that Philip gave his daughters to husbands (Strom. From all this it is clear that the Apostle Philip had daughters. If this comes in at all, it appears in a statement of Proclus, who, speaking of the death of Philip and his daughters, says: ‘After this arose four prophetesses, the daughters of Philip, at Hierapolis in Asia. The close resemblance of this record to the statement in Acts 21:9 makes it appear that the Evangelist is referred to; but even if the identification of the two Philips be here allowed, it is made comparatively late, and need not involve Polycrates
Navarre - In 1276 Navarre passed to France and remained until 1328, when the Navarrese proclaimed independence and awarded the crown to Philip of Evreux
Way (2) - Thomas and Philip gave expression to the perplexity of the rest
Australia - Therry and Philip Conolly were appointed chaplains; but they were hampered by numerous restrictions
Catholic Church Extension Society of England And w - Founded in London, 1887, by the Reverend Philip Fletcher and Lister Drummond, a metropolitan police magistrate
Simon - He afterwards became a professed convert to the faith under the preaching of Philip the deacon and evangelist (12,13)
Thessalonica - He founded the city in that year, naming it after his wife who was the daughter of Philip II and half sister of Alexander. ...
When the apostle Paul visited the city, it was larger than Philippi which reflected a predominantly Roman culture
Brothers - Luke mentions that Herod and Philip are brothers ( Luke 3:1 ). In fact, in most of the New Testament passages where brethren is used to designate the entire Christian community (male and female), the word may be better translated as “fellow Christians” ( Philippians 4:1-9 )
Gallicanism - Political Gallicanism is traceable to the Byzantine emperors who interfered constantly in ecclesiastical affairs, to the German emperors of the Middle Ages and their neo-Cresarism, and to Philip the Fair of France and his struggle with Boniface VIII
Guild of Our Lady of Ransom - Founded in London, 1887, by the Reverend Philip Fletcher and Lister Drummond, a metropolitan police magistrate
Anitipas - To Antipas, Augustus gave Galilee and Peraea; and to Philip, Herod's other son, the Batanaea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis, with some other places. 33, that he might marry his sister- in-law, Herodias, the wife of his brother Philip, who was still living
Disciple (2) - ...
 ...
Andrew...
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Philip. ...
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Philip. ...
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Philip. ...
 ...
Philip. Within the groups the order of the names varies, save as regards the first name of each of the three groups, which in all the lists is the same—the first, fifth, and ninth places being occupied in all by Simon (Peter), Philip, and James of Alphaeus respectively. He leads them away from the crowds, taking them now to ‘a desert place’ (Mark 6:31), and again to the remote ‘parts of Caesarea Philippi’ (Matthew 16:13)
Ethiopia - The Ethiopian eunuch to whom Philip explained the gospel was a minister of “the Candace, queen of the Ethiopians” (Acts 8:27 RSV)
Archelaus - But at Herod's death the kingdom, by a change in the will, was divided between his three sons, Antipus, Archelaus, and Philip
Philippi - Paul did missionary work in Philippi (Acts 16:12 ) and later wrote a letter to the church there (Philippians 1:1 ). , Philip II of Macedon seized the mines, fortified the city, and named it for himself. Philippi, along with the rest of Macedonia, came under Roman control after 200 B. , Philippi was the site of a decisive battle that sealed the fate of Rome as a republic and set the stage for the establishment of an empire. In honor of the victory, Antony settled some Roman soldiers there and made Philippi a Roman colony. , the victorious Octavian dispossessed the supporters of Antony from Italy, but he allowed him to settle in places like Philippi. Octavian refounded Philippi as a Roman colony. ...
Paul and Philippi Paul first visited Philippi on his second missionary journey in response to his Macedonian vision (Acts 16:9 ). Then they journeyed a few miles inland to “Philippi, which is the chief city of that part of Macedonia, and a colony” (Acts 16:12 ). The fact that he did not do this in Philippi probably shows that Philippi had no synagogue. ...
The Roman character of the city is apparent from Paul's other experiences in Philippi. See Paul ; Roman Law ; Philippians
Mediterranean Sea, the - ...
Philip Lee...
...
Catch - 1: ἁρπάζω (Strong's #726 — Verb — harpazo — har-pad'-zo ) "to snatch or catch away," is said of the act of the Spirit of the Lord in regard to Philip in Acts 8:39 ; of Paul in being "caught" up to paradise, 2 Corinthians 12:2,4 ; of the Rapture of the saints at the return of the Lord, 1 Thessalonians 4:17 ; of the rapture of the man child in the vision of Revelation 12:5
Dead Sea Scrolls - ...
Philip R
Deacon - " Philip, too, was an "evangelist. The "young men" (Acts 5:6; Acts 5:10, neoteroi ) imply a subordinate ministration answering to the "deacons" (Philippians 1:1; 1 Timothy 3:8, etc
Macedonia - There are two great plains, one watered by the Axius entering the sea near Thessalonica, the other by the Strymon which passes near Philippi and empties itself below Amphipolis. Philip (from whom Philippi is named) and Alexander were its most famous kings. The great Ignatian Road joined Philippi and Thessalonica, and led toward Illyricum (Romans 15:19). Philippi had supplanted Amphipolis in importance. Mention of Macedonia in this wide sense occurs Acts 16:9-12; Acts 18:5; Acts 19:21-22; Acts 19:29; Acts 20:1-3; Acts 27:2; Romans 15:26; 1 Corinthians 16:5; 2 Corinthians 1:16; 2 Corinthians 2:13; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 8:1; 2 Corinthians 9:2; 2 Corinthians 9:4; 2 Corinthians 11:9; Philippians 4:15; 1 Thessalonians 1:7-8; 1 Thessalonians 4:10; 1 Timothy 1:3 (which last passage proves Paul accomplished the wish expressed in his first imprisonment, Philippians 2:24). ...
The Macedonian Christians are highly commended; the Bereans for their readiness in receiving the word, and withal diligence in testing the preached word by the written word (Acts 17:11); the Thessalonians for their "work of faith, labor of love, and patience of hope in our Lord Jesus," so that they were "examples" to all others (1 Thessalonians 1:3; 1 Thessalonians 1:7); the Philippians for their liberal contributions to Paul's sustenance (Philippians 4:10; Philippians 4:14-19; 2 Corinthians 9:2; 2 Corinthians 11:9). Lydia was the first European convert, and women were Paul's first congregation (Acts 16:13-14); so the female element is prominent at Philippi in the epistle to the Philippians as working for Christ (Philippians 4:2-3)
Leading - The imperative ‘Follow me’ is addressed to individuals, as Peter and Andrew, James and John (Matthew 4:19; Matthew 4:21), Matthew (Matthew 9:9), and Philip (John 1:43); and to unnamed disciples or listeners (Matthew 8:22; Matthew 19:21)
Babylas, Bishop of Antioch - The great act of his life was the compelling the emperor Philip, when at Antioch shortly after the murder of Gordian, to place himself in the ranks of the penitents, and undergo penance, before he was admitted to church privileges ( κατέχει λόγος , according to Eus
Evangelist - ...
Men such as Peter, John, Philip, Barnabas, Paul, Silas and Timothy were evangelists
Greece - Philip II came to the throne of Macedonia, a territory in what is now largely northern Greece. In the years that followed Philip brought all the Greek peninsula under his control, only to be assassinated in 336 B. Philippi, in Macedonia, was the first church founded by Paul on European soil (Acts 16:1 ). It would become Paul's special favorite among his churches and would be the recipient of his most intimate and loving letter, the Epistle to the Philippians. At least five New Testament books are written to churches in Greek cities (Philippians, 1,2Thessalonians, 1,2Corinthians)
Home - So also we may paraphrase Philippians 3:20 thus: ‘Our home (πόλις) is in heaven, while on earth we are only travellers and passers-by. We have several distant glimpses of devout Christian homes in the NT-of Timothy with his mother and grandmother at Lystra, of Philip with his daughters at Caesarea, and of some others, for which see Family. Peter (Acts 10:6), Lydia at Philippi shows hospitality to St. Paul (Acts 16:15; Acts 16:40), the jailer there brings the apostles into his house and sets meat before them (Acts 16:34); Titus Justus at Corinth (Acts 18:7), Philip at Caesarea (Acts 21:8), Mnason of Cyprus at Jerusalem, or at a village between Caesarea and Jerusalem (Acts 21:16; see W
Lysanias - He makes an error in defining the limits of the realm of Philip, Ituraea. Luke’s text, or that it should be connected with Φιλίππου, making Philip the ‘tetrareh of Ituraea, Trachonitis, and the Abilene of Lysanias,’ i
Deposing Power, Papal - Pope Gregory VII deposed Henry IV; Pope Innocent III deposed John Lackland; Innocent IV deposed Emperor Frederick II; Boniface VIII deposed Philip the Fair
John the Baptist - " His public ministry was suddenly (after about six months probably) brought to a close by his being cast into prison by Herod, whom he had reproved for the sin of having taken to himself the wife of his brother Philip (Luke 3:19 )
Evangelist - " Philip had been set apart as one of the seven (Acts 7; 8; 21) by the laying on of the apostles' hands
Allegory - ...
Philip Barton Payne...
See also Parable ...
Bibliography
Oratory - Philip proceeded to establish a hospital for the reception of poor pilgrims, who, coming to Rome to visit the tombs of St
Names - Φίλιππος, Philip (John 1:45), and Ἀνδρέας, Andrew (Matthew 4:18)
Desert, Wilderness - The evangelist Philip is instructed by the Spirit to go to meet the Ethiopian eunuch on the road from Jerusalem to Gaza, and the statement follows, ‘which is desert’ (Acts 8:26). If this refers to the road which passed through the desert, there is no difficulty; but the natural application of the words is to Gaza itself, which in the time of Philip was a prosperous town
Herod - He married the daughter of Aretas, king of Arabia Petraea; but afterwards, meeting at Rome, he became enamoured of and took, his half-brother Herod Philip's wife, and his own niece, daughter of Aristobulus, Herodias. HEROD Philip I. Distinct from the tetrarch Herod Philip II. He married Herodias, sister of Agrippa I, by whom he had Salome, the daughter who by dancing pleased Herod ANTIPAS (see above), the paramour of her own mother and dishonourer of her father! Owing to his own mother Mariamne's treachery, Herod Philip I was excluded from all share in his father's dominions, and lived privately. HEROD Philip II. He built Caesarea Philippi at the site of Paneas, near the sources of the Jordan (Matthew 16:13). His wife was Salome, daughter of Herod Philip I and Herodias. 37, on his accession set him free, and gave him the governments formerly held by the tetrarchs Philip and Lysanias, Abilene, etc. 52) he was transferred to the tetrarchies formerly held by Philip and Lysanias with the title "king
Easter Controversy - Although they claimed to have received this practise from the Apostles, John and Philip, they were called by the Westerners "Quartodecimans" (quartus decimus, fourteenth) and "Observants," since, while they did not keep the festival of the Jewish Pasch, still they "observed" the day
Quartodeciman Controversy - Although they claimed to have received this practise from the Apostles, John and Philip, they were called by the Westerners "Quartodecimans" (quartus decimus, fourteenth) and "Observants," since, while they did not keep the festival of the Jewish Pasch, still they "observed" the day
Maryland - Within a few years Father John Brock was stationed at Saint Inigoes, southeast of Saint Mary's, where tradition says the colonists had made a preliminary stop, Father Altham on Kent Island, Father Philip Fisher (Thomas Copley) at Saint Mary's, and Father White at Kittamaquindi, capital of Piscataway, an Indian village about 15 miles south of Washington
Temptation - Jesus asked Philip a question “to prove (peirazo ) him: for he himself knew what he would do (John 6:6 )
Love Feast - ...
Philip H
Fabianus, Bishop of Rome - Pontius, that the emperor Philip and his son became Christians, and were baptized by Fabianus. Apostle - " These twelve were arranged in three groups, Simon Peter and his brother Andrew, with James and John, the two sons of Zebedee; then Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, and Matthew; and, lastly, James, the son of Alpheus, Lebbeus (called Thaddeus, Judas, and Jude), Simon Zelotes or the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot
Ptolemais - Philip the Evangelist, who laboured in Caesarea, has been suggested
Alexander - , son of Philip, king of Macedon; not named, but described prophetically: "an he-goat" )symbol of ogility, the Graeco-Macedonian empire) coming from the W. " Alexander's natural brother, Philip Aridaeus, and his two sons Alexander AEgus and Hercules, in 15 months were murdered; "and for it the he-goat came up four notable ones, toward the four winds of heaven": Seleucus in the E
Caesarea - (Καισάρεια or Καισάρεια Σεβαστή, named in honour of Augustus; known also as Caesarea Palaestinae, and in modern Arabic as el-Kaiṣârîyeh; to be distinguished clearly from Caesarea Philippi)...
Caesarea was situated on the Mediterranean coast, 32 miles N. Philip the deacon seems to have resided at Caesarea (Acts 8:40; Acts 21:8; Acts 21:16)
Alexander the Great - ...
Alexander the Great, son of Philip II
Caius, Ecclesiastical Writer - ...
In the short fragments preserved, Proclus defends the prophesyings of his sect by appealing to the four daughters of Philip, who with their father were buried at Hierapolis; Caius, on the other hand, offers to shew his antagonist at the Vatican and on the Appian Way the tombs of the apostles "who founded this church
Virgin Virginity - -(a) In Acts 21:9 we read of Philip the evangelist at Caesarea and his four virgin daughters who were prophetesses. 30 says: ‘For Peter and Philip begat children; and Philip also gave his daughters to husbands’ (τὰς θυγατέρας ἀνδράσιν ἐξέδωκεν). It is possible, however, that Philip the apostle is referred to (ib
Samaria - While Philip, and afterwards Peter and John, probably laboured in the city of Samaria-now called Sebaste-itself (Acts 8:5), others evangelized in ‘many villages of the Samaritans’ (Acts 8:25), and their efforts were not without success. This is the view of Weiss, Wendt, Blass, Knowling, and others, and, if they are right, the character of the city chosen by Philip for a Christian mission is a matter of interest. ...
If this was the city which Philip went to evangelize, and in which he was joined by Peter and John (Acts 8:14), it is probable that their gospel was heard chiefly, if not solely, by members of the Samaritan race, whose faith did not essentially differ from that of the Jews by whom they were counted heretical
Apostle - Philip heads the second division, i. to the Ethiopian eunuch by Philip, Jerusalem is its center, and Peter' the prominent figure, who opened the kingdom of heaven (according to Jesus' promise to him, Matthew 16:18-19) to the Jews and also to the Gentiles (Acts 2; 10). ...
"Apostle" is used in a vaguer sense of "messengers of the churches" (2 Corinthians 8:23; Philippians 2:25)
Offices in the New Testament - Very few prophets are mentioned specifically; among them are the four daughters of Philip (Acts 21:8-9 ). The term evangelist is used only three times in the New Testament, with reference to Timothy ( 2 Timothy 4:5 ), to Philip (Acts 21:8 ), and to a kind of spiritual gift (Ephesians 4:11 )
Decius, Emperor - Messius Decius Trajanus first appears in history it is with a grown-up son, himself between fifty and sixty, as a member of the Roman senate, in the last year of the reign of Philip the Arabian. Near Verona they encountered Philip, who was defeated and slain (June 17, a
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - In most of them the bishop of the church addressed is mentioned with honour; Palmas in Pontus, Philip and Pinytus in Crete, Soter at Rome. Philip had found it necessary to compose a treatise against Marcion
Alexander - commonly called the Great, son and successor of Philip, king of Macedon, is denoted in the prophecies of Daniel by a leopard with four wings, signifying his great strength, and the unusual rapidity of his conquests, Daniel 7:6 ; and by a one-horned he-goat running over the earth so swiftly as not to touch it, attacking a ram with two horns, overthrowing him, and trampling him under foot, without any being able to rescue him, Daniel 8:4-7 . ...
Alexander succeeded his father Philip, A
Thom'as - In the catalogue of the apostles he is coupled with Matthew in (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ) and with Philip in (Acts 1:13 ) All that we know of him is derived from the Gospel of St
Jordan River - ...
Philip Lee...
...
Samaria - In the New Testament the only mention of it is in Acts 8:5-14 , where it is recorded that Philip went down to the city of Samaria and preached there
Thomas - In Acts 1:13 he is sixth, and is coupled with Philip
Lebanon - ...
Philip Lee...
...
Gaza - The words "which is desert" are the angel's words (not Luke's), to inform Philip, then in Samaria, on what route he would find the eunuch, namely, on the S
Philippi - PhilipPI was a city situated E. Pangæus; but one of the early acts of Philip of Macedon was to assure himself of revenue by seizing these mines and strongly fortifying the city, to which he gave his own name. Philippi passed with the rest of Macedonia to the Romans in b. Pangæus to Philippi and then turned S. to Neapolis, which was the port of Philippi. Philippi stood on the steep side of a bill, and immediately S. ...
The Church at Philippi was founded by St. With Silas, Timothy, and Luke he landed at Neapolis, and proceeded to Philippi, which St. ’ Philippi was not the capital city of either of the regions into which Macedonia had been divided in 168, but the most natural explanation of the phrase ‘first of the district’ is that the province had at this time a division for official purposes of which we do not know. Other explanations are that it means ‘the first city we arrived at’ (which the Greek could scarcely mean), or that Philippi claimed a pre-eminence in much the same way that Pergamus, Smyrna, Ephesus all claimed to be the ‘first city’ of Asia. It had become a Roman colony after the battle of Philippi, b. ...
It is probable that the Church at Philippi was left in charge of St. Philippians [2], which was probably written during his first imprisonment at Rome. From 1 Timothy 1:3 we assume at least one later visit of the Apostle to Philippi. 117 Ignatius passed through Philippi on his journey from Antioch to his martyrdom in Rome. Polycarp wrote his Epistle to the Philippians in answer. In the 4th and 5th centuries we read of the bishop of Philippi as present at Councils, but apart from this the Church passes out of history
Pavement - 6) reports that Philip the tetrarch similarly carried his tribunal with him (τοῦ θρόνου εἰς δν ἔκρινε καθεζύμενος ἐν ταῖς ὁδοῖς ἑπομένου), but there is no reference to a portable mosaic
Seventy (2) - Philip ‘the evangelist’ was probably, from this designation (Acts 21:8), one of them. One, as we have seen, became an Apostle; Philip became one of the ‘Seven ‘of Acts 6; a considerable number were probably included in one or other of the orders of evangelists, prophets, pastors, and teachers (Ephesians 4:11). ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
si'Mon - " ( Acts 8:10 ) The preaching and miracles of Philip having excited his observation, he became one of his disciples, and received baptism at his hands, A
Diet - The Roman Catholics were, Julius Phlug, John Gropper, and John Eckius; the Protestants were, Philip Melancthon, Martin Bucer, and John Pistorius; but, after a whole month's consultation, they could agree upon no more than five or six articles; which the emperor consented the Protestants should retain, forbidding them to solicit any body to change the ancient religion
Caesarea - Christianity early found its way here, Philip probably being the founder of the Church ( Acts 8:40 ), while Paul passed through after his first visit to Jerusalem ( Acts 19:31 )
Deacon - ]'>[1] is always translated ‘servant’ or ‘minister’ except in Philippians 1:1 , 1 Timothy 3:8-13 , where it is rendered ‘deacon,’ these being the only two passages where it is evidently used in a technical sense. Acts 6:5 ) are higher than those laid down in 1 Timothy for the office of the deacon; and Stephen and Philip, the only two of their number of whom we know anything, exercise functions far above those of the later diaconate ( 1 Timothy 6:8 ff. Acts 11:29 ; Acts 12:25 , Romans 15:25 ; Romans 15:31 , 2Co 8:4 ; 2 Corinthians 9:1 ; 2 Corinthians 9:12-13 ), makes it natural to find in their appointment the germ of the institution of the diaconate as it meets us at Philippi and Ephesus, in two Epp. ...
It is in these Greek cities, then, that we first find the deacon as a regular official, called to office after probation (1 Timothy 3:10 ), and standing alongside the bishop in the ministry of the Church ( Philippians 1:1 , 1 Timothy 3:1-13 ). We can only infer that the diakonia of the deacons in Philippi and Ephesus, like the diakonia of the Seven in Jerusalem, was in the first place a ministry to the poor
Decapolis - When our Lord returned from Tyre and Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, He crossed the upper Jordan and passed south through the district governed by the tetrarch Philip to the eastern shore of the Lake
Caesarea - Peter, resided here, Acts 10:1 , &c; and also Philip the deacon, with his four maiden daughters
Servant - Thus Joshua was the servant of Moses; Elisha of Elijah; and Peter, Andrew, Philip, and Paul were servants of Jesus Christ. Meanwhile the Bible give directions as to the mutual duties of masters and servants, Ephesians 6:5-9 Colossians 3:22 4:1 Titus 2:9 Philippians 1:1-25 1 Peter 2:18 ; and proclaims the great truths of the common origin of all men, the immorality of every human soul, and its right to the Bible and to all necessary means of knowing and serving the Saviorthe application of which to all the relations of master and servant, superior and inferior, employer and employed, would prevent all oppression, which God abhors, Deuteronomy 24:14 Psalm 103:6 Isaiah 10:1-3 Amos 4:1 Malachi 3:5 James 5:4
Continue, Continuance - 3), "to continue along still to adibe," is used of "continuing" to ask, John 8:7 ; to knock, Acts 12:16 ; in the grace of God, Acts 13:43 ; in sin, Romans 6:1 ; in God's goodness, Romans 11:22 ; in unbelief, Romans 11:23 (AV, "abide"); in the flesh, Philippians 1:24 ; in the faith, Colossians 1:23 ; in doctrine, 1 Timothy 4:16 ; elsewhere of abiding in a place. 3), hence, "to continue or persevere in anything," is used of the inability of Levitical priests to "continue," Hebrews 7:23 ; of persevering in the law of liberty, James 1:25 ; it is translated "abide" in Philippians 1:25 (2nd clause, in the best mss. , "to be strong towards" (pros, "towards," used intensively, and kartereo, "to be strong"), "to endure in, or persevere in, to be continually steadfast with a person or thing," is used of "continuing" in prayer with others, Acts 1:14 ; Romans 12:12 ; Colossians 4:2 ; in the Apostles' teaching, Acts 2:42 ; in the Temple, Acts 2:46 ("continuing steadfastly," RV), the adverb representing the intensive preposition; in prayer and the ministry, Acts 6:4 (RV, "will continue steadfastly"); of Simon Magus with Philip, Acts 8:13 . ) John 11:54 ; Acts 15:35 (RV, "tarried"); histemi, "to stand," Acts 26:22 (RV, "stand"): kathizo, "to sit down," Acts 18:11 (RV, "dwelt"): parateino, "to extend, stretch," Acts 20:7 (RV, "prolonged"); parameno, "to abide together with," Philippians 1:25 , RV, "abide with;" the AV, "continue," translating sumparameno (in some mss
Macedonius, Bishop of Constantinople. - Philip the prefect executed the fresh orders of the emperor in hurrying Paul into exile to Thessalonica, and in reinstating Macedonius, but not without bloodshed (Socr
Herod - His sons were set up in power, Archelaus over Judæa and Idumæa, Antipas over Galilee and Peræa, Philip over Batanæa, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. Philip ( Luke 3:1 ) seems to have been the best among the sons of Herod. Another Philip (son of Herod the Great and Mariamme) is mentioned in Matthew 14:3 || Mark 6:17 as the first husband of Herodias
Apocrypha, New Testament - These include the Gospel of the Twelve Apostles and the gospels of Philip, Thomas, Matthias, Judas, and Bartholomew. ...
Other later apocryphal acts include: the Apostolic History of Abdias , the Fragmentary Story of Andrew , the Ascents of James , the Martyrdom of Matthew ; the Preaching of Peter, Slavonic Acts of Peter , the Passion of Paul , Passion of Peter, Passion of Peter and Paul ; the Acts of Andrew and Matthias, Andrew and Paul , Paul and Thecla, Barnabas, James the Great, Peter and Andrew, Peter and Paul , Philip , and Thaddaeus . ”...
Other important apocryphal epistles include the Correspondence of Christ and Abgar , the Epistle to the Alexandrians , the Epistle of Titus , of Peter to James , of Peter to Philip , and of Mary to Ignatius
Herod - The new Emperor bestowed on him the eastern tetrarchy of his half-uncle Philip, which had been vacant for three years, with the title of king, and added to it Abilene, the former tetrarchy of Lysanias in north-eastern Palestine (Luke 3:1); at the same time he commanded the Senate to decree him praetorian honours, and gave him a golden chain of the same weight and pattern as that which he had worn in his captivity. A year before his death, Claudius allowed Agrippa to exchange the meagre principality of Chalcis for those parts of his father’s dominions, east and north-east of the Sea of Galilee, which had formerly been the tetrarchies of Philip and Lysanias (Batanaea, Gaulonitis, Trachonitis, and Abila). Agrippa showed his gratitude by changing the name of his capital from Caesarea Philippi to Neronias, in honour of the Emperor, on whose birthday also he had Greek plays annually performed in a theatre which he erected at Berytus
Deacon - ” Only a few times in the New Testament (Philippians 1:1 ; 1Timothy 3:8,1 Timothy 3:12 , and, in some translations, Romans 16:1 ) is it translated “deacon” and used to denote one holding a church office. ...
Although Philippians 1:1 and 1 Timothy 3:1 clearly indicate that the office of deacon existed in New Testament times, no explicit Bible reference describes the duties of deacons or refers to the origin of the office. In Philippians 1:1 and in numerous references in early Christian literature outside the New Testament, bishops and/or elders and deacons are mentioned together, with deacons mentioned last. On the other hand, two of the seven, Stephen and Philip, are known to us as prominent preachers and evangelists, roles which may not have been common for deacons
Roads - The latter is supposed to be the way taken by Philip (Acts 8:26), because tradition has it that the eunuch was baptized in the vicinity of Hebron
Nag Hammadi - In this category are such works as The Gospel of Philip , The Gospel of Truth , and perhaps the most important work found at Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Thomas , which purports to be a collection of sayings of Jesus
Philippi - Paul from the port Neapolis (Kavalla) on the coast (Acts 16:11) reached Philippi by an ancient paved road over the steep range Symbolum (which runs from the W. ) Dyed goods were imported from Thyatira to the parent city Philippi, and were dispersed by pack animals among the mountaineers of Haemus and Pangaeus. The "damsel with the spirit of divination" may have belonged to this shrine, or else to Apollo's (as the spirit is called "Pythoness," Greek), and been hired by the Philippians to divine for hire to the country folk coming to the market. Philippi was founded by Philip of Macedon, in the vicinity of the famed gold mines, on the site "the springs" (Kremides). , close to the ancient site, on the main road from Europe to Asia by Brundusium, Dyrrachium, across Epirus to Thessalonica, and so forward by Philippi. Philippi was "the first (i. Paul visited Philippi again on his way from Ephesus into Macedon (Acts 20:1), and a third time on his return from Greece (Corinth) to Syria by way of Macedon (Acts 20:3; Acts 20:6). The community of trials for Christ's sake strengthened the bond which united him and the Philippian Christians (Philippians 1:28-30). They alone supplied his wants twice in Thessalonica soon after he left them (Philippians 4:15-16); a third time, through Epaphroditus, just before this epistle (Philippians 4:10; Philippians 4:18; 2 Corinthians 11:9). ...
Few Jews were in Philippi to sow distrust between him and them. The check to his zeal in being forbidden by the Spirit to enter Asia, Bithynia, and Mysia, and the miraculous call to Macedon, and his success in Philippi and the love of the converts, all endeared it to him. Yet the Philippians needed to be forewarned of the Judaizing influence which might assail their church at any time as it had crept into the Galatian churches (Philippians 3:2). The epistle (Philippians 4:2-3), in undesigned coincidence with the history (Acts 16:13-14), implies that females were among the prominent church members. ...
Its people were poor, but most liberal (2 Corinthians 8:1-2); persecuted, but faithful: only there was a tendency to dissension which Paul reproves (Philippians 1:27; Philippians 2:1-4; Philippians 2:12; Philippians 2:14; Philippians 4:2). Immediately after Polycarp wrote to the Philippians, sending at their request a copy of all the letters of Ignatius which the church of Smyrna had; so they still retained the same sympathy with sufferers for Christ as in Paul's days
New Testament - Philip tetrarch of Ituraea, Trachonitis
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - And if ever any one came who had been a follower of the elders, I would inquire as to the discourses of the elders, what was said by Andrew, or what by Peter, or what by Philip, or what by Thomas or James, or what by John or Matthew or any other of the disciples of the Lord; and the things which Aristion and the elder John, the disciples of the Lord, say. Eusebius tells that Philip the apostle (some suppose that he ought to have said Philip the deacon) came to reside at Hierapolis with his daughters; and that Papias, on the authority of these daughters, tells a story of Philip raising a man from the dead. John's Gospel, placing Andrew before Peter, and includes some such as Thomas and Philip, who outside that Gospel have little prominence in the Gospel record, and that it gives to our Lord the Johannine title, the Truth
Simon Magus - … But when they believed Philip preaching good tidings concerning the kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women. And Simon also himself believed: and being baptized, he continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great miracles wrought, he was amazed. ’ And Simon is said to have been specially struck with the ‘signs and great miracles’ wrought by Philip (Acts 8:13). Simon, it is true, after baptism, “continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great wonders wrought, he was amazed” (ἐζίστατο). The separation between Simon and the Christians would probably be widened by the departure of Philip soon after the apostles left Samaria. Philip had been the agent of the Christian movement, and it is not unlikely that on his withdrawal many Samaritans might easily fall again under the spell of Simon, especially if he were offering himself as a Christian leader
Apostles - On starting, He called Philip to follow Him, and the instant obedience rendered suggests that Philip had already believed that Jesus was the Messiah, probably through his friends and fellow-citizens Andrew and Peter. On the way Philip encountered his friend Nathanael, who lived in the village of Cana, at no great distance from his own home at Bethsaida, and informed him of the discovery of the Messiah, in the person of Jesus of Nazareth. Nathanael hesitated, but he came and saw and heard, and the knowledge which Jesus displayed of his character and of his inmost life convinced him that He was indeed what Philip had declared Him to be (John 1:43 ff. Simon, Andrew, James, John, Philip, and Levi or Matthew are already known to us. The second is made up of Philip, Nathanael, Thomas, and Matthew
Croisade, or Crusade - The princes engaged in this first crusade were, Hugo, count of Vermandois, brother to Philip I. During these transactions, Philip Augustus, king of France, and Richard I. Soon after, the king of Sicily coming up with a good fleet, and joining Philip the bold, son and successor of Lewis, the king of Tunis, after several engagements with the Christians, in which he was always worsted, desired peace, which was granted upon condition advantageous to the Christians; after which both princes embarked to their own kingdoms
Simon Magus - " We are further told that he was so impressed by the miracles wrought by Philip that he asked and obtained admission to Christian baptism; but that he subsequently betrayed the hollowness of his conversion by offering money to Peter to obtain the power of conferring the gift of the Holy Ghost. In Acts 8 the power of bestowing the Holy Ghost which Philip does not appear to have exercised is clearly represented as the special prerogative of the apostles. he interpolates the episode of Philip's adventures and does not return to speak of Paul until his reader's attention has been drawn off so as not to be likely to recognize Paul under the mask of Simon. If we read Acts 8 , which relates, the preaching of Philip, in connexion with c. , which tells of several days spent by Luke in Philip's house, we have the simple explanation of the insertion of the former chapter, that Luke gladly included in his history a narrative of the early preaching of the gospel communicated by an eye-witness
Joy - After Philip preached in Samaria, the people believed and “there was great joy in that city” (Acts 8:8 ). After the conversion of the Philippian jailer, he “rejoiced, believing in God with all his house” (Acts 16:34 ). They can rejoice because they are in the Lord (Philippians 4:4 ). They rejoice in family (Proverbs 5:18 ), food (1 Timothy 4:4-5 ), celebrations (Deuteronomy 16:13-15 ), fellowship (Philippians 4:1 )
Caesarea - Philip, having witnessed to the Ethiopian eunuch, is mentioned as arriving at Caesarea after a preaching mission
Deacon, Deaconess - That these men served in a manner transcending the traditional notion of deacon is clearly seen in the prophetic teaching activity of Stephen (Acts 6-7 ) and the evangelistic ministry of Philip (Acts 8 ). (In Philippians 1:1 ; it is only mentioned as being an office along with that of the bishops
Thomas - Coupled with Matthew in Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15; but with Philip in Acts 1:13
Aretas - One of his first imperial acts was to give the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias to Agrippa (Ant
Political Conditions - Tetrarchy of Philip. Under the pressure of various palace intrigues, and with a view to separate elements between which at the time there was no possible cohesion, Herod left Judaea to Archelaus, Galilee and Peraea to Antipas, and the north-eastern districts beyond Jordan to Philip. To Philip, with the title of tetrarch, which originally implied the government of a fourth part of a tribe or kingdom, but gradually came to be used of any petty dependent prince, were assigned the comparatively poor districts lying to the east of the Sea of Galilee, and extending northwards as far as Mt. The population was predominantly Syrian and Greek, with Jewish settlements in the south-west; and though Philip’s sympathies were entirely Roman, he respected the sentiments of the different classes of the people, and his long reign was disturbed by no outbreak of popular feeling, and no peremptory interference from Rome. Like most of the Herods, he had a passion for building; and to the quiet and well-governed city of Caesarea Philippi, near the alleged source of the Jordan, Jesus withdrew (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27) when the multitudes were crowding upon Him and His enemies tempting Him (Matthew 16:1); just as Bethsaida, another of Philip’s cities, was His refuge when news reached Him of the Baptist’s death (Luke 9:10, cf
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - Historical notions were rethought when it was discovered that Christianity did not originally come to Africa through Western missionaries, but more likely from the dispersion after Pentecost, the influence of the powerful government official whom Philip baptized (Acts 8:26-37 ), and from the early church fathers
Samaria, Samaritans - Philip, a deacon, opened a mission in Samaria (Acts 8:5 )
Macedonia - When Greece lay weakened by the mutual jealousy of her city-states and consequent incapacity for concerted action, the genius of Philip of Macedon unified and consolidated a group of free and hardy races, fostered their national spirit, and created the most effective fighting-machine known to antiquity. ...
It has been supposed that a reference to this partition is contained in Acts 16:12, where Philippi is described as πρώτη τῆς μερίδος Μακεδονίας πόλις, κολωνία. This cannot mean that Philippi was the first city of Macedonia reached by St. For the best explanation of the difficult phrase ‘the first of the district’ see Philippi. Paul founded Macedonian churches in Philippi, Berœa, and Thessalonica; to two of them he wrote letters that are extant; and all of them were conspicuous for their loyalty to, and affection for, their founder. He loved to re-visit his first European mission-field (Acts 19:21; Acts 20:1-3, 1 Corinthians 16:5, 2 Corinthians 1:20; 2 Corinthians 2:13; 2 Corinthians 7:5; 2 Corinthians 8:1; 2 Corinthians 9:2; 2 Corinthians 9:4), and among other ‘men of Macedonia’ who aided and cheered him were Gaius and Aristarchus (Acts 19:29), Secundus of Thessalonica (Acts 20:4), Sopater of Berœa (Acts 20:4), and Epaphroditus of Philippi (Philippians 2:25). Lightfoot, Philippians4, 1878, p
Matthew (2) - Along the north end of the Sea of Galilee there was a road leading from Damascus to Acre on the Mediterranean, and on that road a customs-office marked the boundary between the territories of Philip the tetrarch and Herod Antipas
Caligula - Herod Agrippa received the tetrarchy of his uncle Philip, along with Abilene
John the Baptist - This brought John into conflict with Herod Antipas, whom he rebuked for marrying the wife of his brother, Herod Philip
Victor, Bishop of Rome - He resolutely upholds the Asian tradition, supporting it by the authority of Philip the apostle, who, with his two aged virgin daughters, was buried at Hierapolis; of another saintly daughter of his who lay at Ephesus; of St
Roman Empire - Philip, king of Macedonia, had been an ally of Hannibal. The Romans at the close of the First Macedonian War (214-205) made peace with Philip, so that they might be left free to deal with Africa. Discontent among Rome’s Greek allies led to war with the Seleucid king Antiochus, ally of Hannibal and Philip, who crossed to Greece by invitation. Perseus, son of Philip and his successor as king of Macedon, had been making preparations against Rome
Antiochus - He also joined with Philip of Macedonia to...
capture other portions of the dominions of Ptolemy
Eat, Eat With, Eating - 2, above, may be seen perhaps in the fact that whereas in the Lord's question to Philip in ver
Elder - As the Jewish character of the Jerusalem church increased with the departure of Philip, Peter, and others more amenable to preaching to Gentiles, the synagogue pattern probably became even more pronounced in Jerusalem
Antiochus - The complete conquest of Judæa was prevented by the rise of the pretender Philip, who, however, was conquered
Friends Friendship - In some cases, as in earlier days with Peter and John, Andrew and Philip, the friendship preceded and was sanctified by the Christian tie, in others it grew out of that bond
Acts of the Apostles - Philip preached Christ to the Samaritans and many believed. During the above period Paul wrote the two epistles to the Thessalonians, the two to the Corinthians, to the Galatians, Romans, Colossians, Philemon, Ephesians, and Philippians
Name - This figure, from the diadem on the head, and other circumstances which accompany it, Philip Bonarota, the editor of that work, supposes to have been designed for some Etrurian deity
Agrippa - Soon after this, Tiberius dying, and Caius Caligula succeeding him, the new emperor heaped many favours and much wealth upon Agrippa, changed his iron fetters into a chain of gold, set a royal diadem on his head, and gave him the tetrarchy which Philip, the son of Herod the Great, had been possessed of, that is, Batanaea and Trachonitis
Philemon, Epistle to - , Philipp. This plural address appears, quite naturally, in Philippians 1:22 and Philippians 1:25 (‘you’); otherwise the letter is to Philemon alone (‘thee’). Paul is a ‘prisoner’ ( Philippians 1:1 ; Philippians 1:9 ; Philippians 1:13 ) a first link of connexion between this letter and Philippians ( Philippians 1:7 ; Philippians 1:18 etc. Onesimus had in some way become known to the Apostle, who had won him to the Christian faith ( Philippians 1:10 ). Paul regards him as his ‘child,’ his ‘very heart,’ a ‘brother beloved’ ( Philippians 1:10 ; Philippians 1:12 ; Philippians 1:16 ), and would fain keep his helpful ministry ( Philippians 1:13 ; Philippians 1:11 ). Paul, can be accepted by him only of his friend’s free will ( Philippians 1:14 ). Paul sends the slave back, with this letter to secure his forgiveness and the welcome of one Christian brother for another ( Philippians 1:15-17 ). He founds his appeal on what he has heard of Philemon’s love ‘toward all the saints’ ( Philippians 1:4-7 ; Philippians 1:9 ); yet makes it also a personal request from ‘Paul the aged and now a prisoner,’ who has claims upon Philemon’s service ( Philippians 1:9-14 ; Philippians 1:17 ; Philippians 1:20 ), with just a hint of an authority which he will not press ( Philippians 1:8 ; Philippians 1:19 ; Philippians 1:21 , ‘obedience’). A wistful humour appears in the play on the meaning of the name Onesimus ; ‘I beseech thee for Profitable, who was aforetime unprofitable, but now is profitable … Yea, let me have profit of thee’ ( Philippians 1:11 ; Philippians 1:20 ); also when at Philippians 1:19 St. whether Philippians or the group Eph. is the earlier (see Lightfoot, Philip . 60 62, and the later date is suggested by Philippians 1:21-22 (see Colossians and Philippians)
Simon Maccabaeus - The only contemporary document which mentions him is the Acts of the Apostles; and we there read, that, when Philip the deacon preached the Gospel in Samaria after the death of Stephen, "there was a certain man, called Simon, which beforetime in the same city used sorcery, and bewitched the people of Samaria, giving out that himself was some great one; to whom they all gave heed, from the least to the greatest, saying, This man is the great power of God. We are then told that "Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the miracles and signs which were done," Acts 8:13
Nation (2) - For Herod’s kingdom was divided among three sons: Philip having the newly added territories of Trachonitis, Ituraea (Luke 3:1), etc. The advent of Jesus apparently raised no political excitement in the regions under Philip, because the bulk of the population was non-Jewish
Libertines - Philip at Caesarea (cf
Roman Empire - procurators of Judaea; the "tetrarchs" Herod, Philip, and Lysanias (Romans 16:12-35); "king Agrippa" (Acts 25:13); Roman soldiers, legions, centurions, publicans; "tribute money" (Matthew 22:19); the "taxing of the whole world" (Luke 2:1); Italian and Augustan cohorts (Acts 10:1; Acts 27:1); an "appeal to Caesar" (Acts 25:11). Nero is alluded to as "Augustus" and "Caesar" (Acts 25:10-11-21-25-26; Philippians 4:22), and "my lord" (compare also 1 Peter 2:17; Romans 13:1). Politarchs ("rulers of the city") and the demos ("people") are mentioned at Thessalonica (Acts 17:5-8); the "town clerk" (grammateus ) and "assembly" at Ephesus (Acts 19:35-39); "colonies" also, as Philippi, i
Lamb, Lamb of God - Luke provides the interpretation of Isaiah 53:7-8 in the early church, through the preaching of Philip to the Ethiopian official ( Acts 8:26-40 )
Stephen - But to this work Stephen, like others of the Seven, notably Philip, by no means restricted himself
Cosmopolitanism - Paul’s Roman citizenship stood him in good stead in Philippi as in Jerusalem (Acts 16:21; Acts 22:25). Traces of a cosmopolitan atmosphere may be detected in Mark 15:21 (‘Simon, father of Alexander and Rufus’), in the Greek names of two of the disciples (Andrew and Philip), and the trilingual ‘title’ on the cross (John 19:20). Paul (Acts 15:5): but it reaches its full statement in Romans 10:12, Galatians 3:28, Colossians 3:11 (‘neither Jew nor Greek, bond nor free’), and Philippians 3:20 (‘our citizenship is in heaven’)
Circumcision - ]'>[1] ) by Philip; the admission of Cornelius and his friends by St. ...
In the Epistle to the Philippians, St. He speaks of the rite, when thus insisted on, not as circumcision but as ‘concision’ (κατατομή, Philippians 3:2). In contrast to this, Christians have the true circumcision (Philippians 3:3), not of the flesh but of the heart, purified in Christ from all sin and wickedness
Prophets - There are several prophetesses mentioned in Scripture; as Miriam, Deborah, and Huldah; and in the New Testament, Anna, Elisabeth, and Mary, and the four daughters of Philip seem to have partaken for a time of prophetic inspiration
Ptolemae'us, - "Many stood up against the king of the south" under Antiochus the Great and Philip III of Macedonia, who formed a league for the dismemberment of his kingdom
Circumcision - ]'>[1] ) by Philip; the admission of Cornelius and his friends by St. ...
In the Epistle to the Philippians, St. He speaks of the rite, when thus insisted on, not as circumcision but as ‘concision’ (κατατομή, Philippians 3:2). In contrast to this, Christians have the true circumcision (Philippians 3:3), not of the flesh but of the heart, purified in Christ from all sin and wickedness
James And John, the Sons of Zebedee - De Boor’s discovery of the excerpts, probably going back to Philip of Side, in Cod. ...
The fact that Polycarp never mentions him in his Epistle to the Philippians has very little bearing on the question. 190), regards as the son of Zebedee the John whom he places-no doubt in the chronological order of their deaths-after Philip ‘the Apostle. And the natural interpretation of the passage is that Andrew first finds his (own) brother Simon, and next day, when wishing to return home to Galilee, Philip, to whom Jesus says, ‘Follow me
Caesarea Philippi - CaeSAREA PhilipPI. —The town called Caesarea Philippi in the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27, cf. Situated to the north of the Sea of Galilee on a plateau at the southern foothills of Mount Hermon, it lay in the territory that Philip received from his father, Herod the Great. Philip enlarged and beautified Panias, and called it Caesarea (Καισάρεια) in honour of Augustus. 146–147) that Philip built Panias, and called it Caesarea, in the reign of Tiberius, is rendered improbable by coins which show that Caesarea had an era dating from b. To distinguish it from Caesarea on the seacoast (Καισάρεια Στράτωνος or Καισάρεια τῆς Παλαιστίνης), it was commonly called Caesarea Philippi (Καισάρεια ἡ Φιλίππου). alike represent Jesus’ arrival in the region of Caesarea Philippi as part of a course decided upon shortly after that event. For Jesus withdrew again, this time going north into the region of Caesarea Philippi. The period has fittingly been called, from its chief characteristic, the Training of the Twelve, and in no incident does this characteristic more clearly appear than in the events of Caesarea Philippi. ), and retires from Galilee for the second time, coming with His disciples into the region of Caesarea Philippi. There can, moreover, be no doubt that Jesus so designated Himself during the conversation with the disciples at Caesarea Philippi. They had seen opposition arise and develop into bitter hostility; but when Jesus withdrew into the region of Tyre and Sidon, and again into the region of Caesarea Philippi, they still companied with Him
Baptism - As to the mode, they observe that the meaning of the word βαπτιζω signifies to immerse or dip, and that only; that John baptized in Jordan; that he chose a place where there was much water; that Jesus came up out of the water; that Philip and the eunuch went down both into the water; that the terms, washing, purifying, burying in baptism, so often mentioned in the Scriptures, allude to this mode; that immersion only was the practice of the Apostles and the first Christians; and that it was only laid aside from the love of novelty, and the coldness of climate. Again: it is urged that Philip and the eunuch went down both into the water. To this it is answered, that here also is no proof of immersion: for, if the expression of their going down into the water necessarily includes dipping, then Philip was dipped, as well as the eunuch
Individuality - Andrew and Nathanael, Philip and Thomas are mere names and shadows in the other Gospels, while in John they have each one his own characteristic note. It does not lean on Abraham, or fashion itself on the accepted model, but, like Nathanael, it seeks God under the fig-tree, like Philip it is ready to say to conventional questions, ‘Come and see
Call, Calling - John, Christ’s first disciples were Galilaeans who, like Himself, had visited the Jordan in order to be baptized by John: Andrew, John, Simon Peter, Philip, Nathanael (presumably = Bartholomew; see art. The only one mentioned as called with a ‘follow me’ is Philip (John 1:43); and it is possible that this is rather an invitation to follow on the journey to Galilee than through life (and death)
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - "Understandest thou what thou readest?" said Philip the once deacon, and now the evangelist, to the dark treasurer of Queen Candace. And Philip went up into the chariot and sowed the seed of the Kingdom of Heaven in the understanding and in the heart of that black but comely convert to the cross of Christ
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - 14, 18: ‘We now assembled, Peter and Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus who is surnamed Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, and Matthias who instead of Judas was numbered with us, and James the brother of our Lord and bishop of Jerusalem, and Paul … and have written to you this catholic doctrine [1] we have sent by our fellow-minister Clement. ’ The collective apostolic authorship is recalled to the reader’s mind from time to time by casual phrases such as ‘we twelve,’ ‘Philip our fellow-apostle’; while by a curious device, from time to time, without any break in the discourse, one or other of the apostles takes the word out of the common mouth and speaks in his own name, especially at points where the reference is to his personal experience; as ii
Apostle - Their names were, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the greater, the son of Zebedee; and John his brother, who was the beloved disciple; Philip of Bethsaida; Bartholomew; Thomas, called Didymus, as having a twin brother; Matthew or Levi, who had been a publican; James, the son of Alpheus, called James the less; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, and who was also called Judas or Jude, the brother of James; Simon, the Canaanite, so called, as some have thought, because he was a native of Cana, or, as Dr. Heraclion, cited by Clemens Alexandrinus, reckons among the Apostles who did not suffer martyrdom, Matthew, Thomas, Philip, and Levi, probably meaning Lebbeus. Paul, writing to the Philippians, tells them, that Epaphroditus, their Apostle, had ministered to his wants, Php_2:25
Individuality - Andrew and Nathanael, Philip and Thomas are mere names and shadows in the other Gospels, while in John they have each one his own characteristic note. It does not lean on Abraham, or fashion itself on the accepted model, but, like Nathanael, it seeks God under the fig-tree, like Philip it is ready to say to conventional questions, ‘Come and see
Caesar - To Archelaus were assigned Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea—not as king, but as ethnarch; to Antipas, Galilee and Peraea as tetrarch; Batanaea, Trachonitis, Auranitis, Gaulanitis, and Paneas to Philip, also as tetrarch (Josephus Ant
Pantaenus, of Alexandria - But Philip of Side (c
Servant of the Lord - It was also Luke who related Philip's encounter with the Ethiopian eunuch, who was reading Isaiah 53:6-7 ( Acts 8:32-33 ). Answering the eunuch's question, Philip preached "the good news about Jesus" from this passage about the lamb who was sacrificed (Acts 8:34-35 )
Samaria - The woman of Samaria and several of her townsmen (John 4) were the firstfruits gathered into Christ; the fuller harvest followed under Philip the evangelist deacon (Acts 8, compare John 4:35)
Shechem (1) - ) Jesus remained at Shechem two days and won many converts, the firstfruits, followed by a full harvest under Philip the evangelist (Acts 8; John 4:35-43)
John - ...
How did John sink so deep into the unsearchable things of his Master, while all the other disciples stood all their discipleship days on the surface? What was it in John that lifted him so high above Peter, and Thomas, and Philip, and made him first such a disciple, and then such an apostle, of wisdom and of love? For one thing it was his gift and grace of meditation
Preaching - Other expressions, such as ‘proclaim Christ’ (καταγγέλλειν Χριστόν, Philippians 1:17 f. The effective preaching of Philip to the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:35) may be quoted as an earlier example of this ‘hand-to-hand work’ in Christian evangelization. Among those who under stress of persecution went about ‘preaching the word’ was Philip, who in Samaria ‘proclaimed unto them the Christ’ (ἐκήρυσσεν τὸν Χριστόν, Acts 8:4 f. Paul warns the Corinthians against anyone who ‘preacheth another Jesus, whom we did not preach’ (ἐκηρύξαμεν, 2 Corinthians 11:4) and he rejoices when, even under conditions of faction, ‘Christ is proclaimed’ (Χριστὸς καταγγέλλεται, Philippians 1:18)
Church Government - Women also might prophesy ( 1 Corinthians 11:5 ), like Philip’s daughters ( Acts 21:9 ) at Cæsarea, or perhaps the mystic Jezebel ( Revelation 2:20 ) at Thyatira. We have (1) the appointment of the Seven at Jerusalem ( Acts 6:1-15 ); (2) elders at Jerusalem in the years 44, 50, 58 ( Acts 11:30 ; Acts 15:8 ; Acts 15:22 ; Acts 21:18 ), appointed by Paul and Barnabas in every church about 48 ( Acts 14:23 ), mentioned James 5:14 ; at Ephesus in 58 ( Acts 20:17 ), mentioned 1 Peter 5:1 ; (3) Phœhe a deaconess at Cenchreæ in 58 ( Romans 16:1 ), bishops and deacons at Philippi in 63 ( Philippians 1:1 ). Acts 21:8 Philip the evangelist, one of the Seven). Paul does not mention any; and at Philippi we have bishops and deacons in 63
Questions And Answers - ) relates that Christ asked a similar question of Philip on the same occasion, ‘Whence are we to buy loaves, that these may eat?’ But the Evangelist is careful to show that he does not understand this to be simply a request for information, by adding, ‘And this he said to prove him: for he himself knew what he would do
Reproach (2) - Was He not speaking reproachfully when He said, ‘How is it that ye do not understand?’ (Matthew 16:11); ‘How long shall I be with you? how long shall I bear with you? (Matthew 17:17); ‘Have I been so long time with you, and dost thou not know me, Philip?’ (John 14:9)
Following - ]'>[2] adopted a tradition that this man was Philip (τοῦ Κυρίου λέγοντος τῷ Φιλἰππῳ, ἄφες τοὺς νεκροὺς, κ
Samaria - After the death of Stephen, Acts 8:1-3 , when the disciples were dispersed through the cities of Judea and Samaria, Philip made several converts in this city
Jordan - The Jewish historian, Josephus, on the contrary, places its source at Phiala, a fountain which rises about fifteen miles from Caesarea Philippi, a little on the right hand, and not much out of the way to Trachonitis. The secret of its subterranean course was first discovered by Philip, the tetrarch of Trachonitis, who cast straws into the fountain of Phiala, which came out again at Panion
Judea - Philip, a strong place on the road to Hebron, ten miles south of Jerusalem; Ziph, a small town between Hebron and the Dead Sea; Zoar, at the southern extremity of the Dead Sea, near the situation of Sodom; Hebron, formerly Kirjath-arba, a very ancient town in a hilly country, twenty-five miles south of the capital; Arad, about twenty- four miles southward from Hebron, and near the Ascensus Avrabim, or Scorpion Mountains, on the border of Arabia Petraea; and Thamar, on the southern limit of the province, near the south extremity of the Dead Sea. Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district. Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus
John the Baptist - ...
Herod Antipas, having married his brother Philip's wife while Philip was still living, occasioned great scandal. Peter were sent by the other Apostles to the Samaritans, whom Philip the deacon had converted to the Gospel, that through them they might receive the Holy Ghost, Acts 8:14-15
Antiochus - The city was ready to fall into his hands when Lysias received the news that Philip, whom Antiochus Epiphanes had entrusted with the regency of the kingdom, had come to Antioch to take the government, according to the disposition of the late king. He therefore proposed an accommodation with the Jews, that he might return speedily to Antioch and oppose Philip
Surname - May Arimathaea have been the name not of a town but of an estate or even a farm?]'>[19] Philip ἀπὸ Βηθσαιδά,20 Parable - ...
Philip Barton Payne...
See also Allegory ; Jesus Christ ; Kingdom of God ...
Bibliography
New Creation - ...
Philip H
Athens - 43) pictures them bustling about the Agora inquiring if any newer thing is being told (πυνθανόμενοι κατὰ τὴν ἀγοράν εἴ τι λέγεται νεώτερον), the tragedy being that, while they were talking, Philip was acting
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - ’ It was the native town of Peter and Andrew, of James and John,—all four fishermen,—as well as of Philip, whose occupation is unknown to us
Peter - ...
He repeated this testimony at Caesarea Philippi (Matthew 16:16). Peter with John confirmed by laying on of hands the Samaritan converts of Philip the deacon. )...
Insofar as the bishops represent the apostles, they rightly follow the precedent of Peter and John in confirming after an interval those previously baptized and believing through the instrumentality of lower ministers as Philip. All the authority of Acts and epistle to the Romans and 1 and 2 Peter is against Peter having been at Rome previous to Paul's first imprisonment, or during its two years' duration (otherwise he would have mentioned Peter in the epistles written from Rome, Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon, and Philippians), or during his second imprisonment when he wrote to Timothy. 3:448) says that Peter's and Philip's wives helped them in ministering to women at their homes, and by them the doctrine of the Lord penetrated, without scandal, into the privacy of women's apartments
Apostles - Simon, James, John, Andrew, and Philip with differing orders compose the first five in all lists
Peter - His native town was Bethsaida, on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee, to which also Philip belonged. It is he who utters that notable profession of faith at Capernaum (John 6:66-69 ), and again at Caesarea Philippi (1618449322_4 ; Mark 8:27-30 ; Luke 9:18-20 )
Preach, Proclaim - Acts 8:5 states that Philip began to proclaim the Christ in Samaria. In Philippians 1:15 Paul discusses the different motives that lead to the proclamation of Christ
Antiochus - ," Epiphanes, namely, Philip of Macedon and "robbers of the people," factious Jews, who, revolting from Ptolemy, helped Antiochus unconsciously, "establishing the vision," i
Miracles - ]'>[3] ), though it is not said that he was dead (the reverse seems to be implied in Acts 20:10); in Acts 21:9 of the prophesying of Philip’s daughters; in Acts 21:11 of the prophecy of Agabus; in Acts 28:5 of St. In Acts 6:8 Stephen works wonders and signs; in Acts 8:6; Acts 8:13 Philip works signs and powers at Samaria
Demon - Yet in four passages of Acts we read of possession by unclean or evil spirits: at Jerusalem (Acts 5:16); in Samaria, where they were expelled at the preaching of Philip (Acts 8:7); at Philippi, where the ventriloquist maiden is said to have a spirit, a Python (Acts 16:16 : πνεῦμα πύθωνα is the best reading); and at Ephesus, where by St
Simeon - Born at the Samaritan village (Gittim, according to Justin Martyr), Simeon was converted nominally and baptized through Philip at Sichem or Sychar, where Christ's ministry (John 4) had already prepared the way
John - A fifth-century writer, Philip of Side, and George the Sinner, of the ninth century, report that Papias (second century) wrote that James and John were killed by the Jews (Acts 12:2 ), but these reports are generally dismissed as fabrications based on interpretations of Mark 10:39
Angel - Philip was ordered by an angel to meet an Ethiopian official (8:26-28), while another celestial being appeared to Cornelius (10:3)
Mercy - He saw with great sensitivity that even seemingly mundane events were actually manifestations of God's helping mercy (Philippians 2:27 ). ...
Philip H
Mind/Reason - ...
Primarily through the nous
Philip H
Martyr - 47-8) to establish the allegation of Philip of Side that Papias had said that John the Apostle was slain with his brother
Heracleon, a Gnostic - The first confession may be made by a hypocrite: and it is one not required of all; there are many who have never been called on to make it, as for instance Matthew, Philip, Thomas, Levi [1]; the other confession must be made by all
Evangelist (2) - It is applied to Philip (Acts 21:8), either because of the labours described in Acts 8, or because he belonged to a class or order of Christian labourers whose function was to go abroad proclaiming the gospel to those who had not heard it
Nazarene - " (Mark 1:24) Next we find the apostles giving in their testimony to the same blessed truth, John 1:45 "We have found him (saith Philip) of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - To take the word “prophetess’ first, we find in Luke 2:36 Anna described as a prophetess, in Acts 21:9 the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist, and in Revelation 2:20 Jezebel, ‘which called herself a prophetess
Roads And Travel - It was doubtless by a branch road going off to the right that Philip found his way to Azotus (Ashdod) (Acts 8:40). Philip proceeded from Azotus through Joppa and Antipatris to Caesarea (Acts 8:40) on the coast. ...
On arriving at Neapolis, the port of Philippi in Macedonia, they made their way by the Via Egnatia to Philippi itself (Acts 16:12). The complete course of the Via Egnatia was as follows: Dyrrhachium, Clodiana (where the branch from Apollonia met it), Scampa, Lychnidus, Scirtiana, Nicaea, Heraclea, Cellae, Edessa, Pella (where Alexander the Great was born), Thessalonica, Apollonia, Amphipolis, Philippi, Neapolis, Porsulae, Brendice, Tempyra, Doriscus, Dyme, Cypsela, Syracellae, Apri, Bisanthe, Heraeum, Perinthus, Selymbria, Melantia, Byzantium (later Constantinople)
Gospels, Apocryphal - Gospels according to Peter, Philip, pseudo-Matthew, the Twelve Apostles, Basilides). The Gospel of Philip
Dates (2) - and BJ, in which are found indications of the dates of Herod’s accession and death, and of the dates of his predecessor Antigonus, and of his immediate successors, Archelaus, Herod Philip, and Herod Antipas. (2) Herod Philip died in the 20th year of Tiberius, having been tetrarch of Trachonitis and Gaulanitis 37 years (Ant
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - A later stage was Philippi, and to the church there Polycarp wrote afterwards a letter still extant, sending them copies of the letters of Ignatius and inquiring for information about Ignatius, the detailed story of whose martyrdom appears not yet to have reached Smyrna. Some of the topics on which the Ignatian letters lay most stress are absent from that of Polycarp; in particular, Polycarp's letter is silent about episcopacy, of which the Ignatian letters speak so much, and it has consequently been thought probable either that episcopacy had not yet been organized at Philippi, or that the office was then vacant. Paul had written to the church of Philippi, to which Polycarp's epistle is addressed. Polycarp states, however, that his own letter had been invited by the church of Philippi. Philip the asiarch or president of the games was called on to loose a lion on Polycarp but refused saying the wild beast shows were now over. ...
Then follows by way of appendix a note, stating that the martyrdom took place on the 2nd of the month Xanthicus, the 7th before the calends of March [3], on a great sabbath at the 8th hour; the arrest having been made by Herod; Philip of Tralles being chief priest, Statius Quadratus proconsul, and Jesus Christ King for ever
Language of the nt - The strong hand of Philip of Macedon brought Hellas under one rule; his son, the great Alexander, carried victorious Hellenism far out into the world beyond
Unconscious Faith - Such was the case when the Greeks who were introduced by Andrew and Philip seemed to Him the first-fruits only of a far greater harvest, and He looked on to the time when, ‘being lifted up,’ He ‘would draw all men unto himself’ (John 12:32)
Baptism - ’ At Samaria, ‘when they believed Philip preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women’ ( Acts 8:12 ), the earliest express statement that women were admitted to the rite. ’ At Philippi Lydia was baptized ‘and her household’; there also the jailor, ‘and all that were his’ ( Acts 16:15 ; Acts 16:33 ); at Corinth, Crispus and Gaius, and ‘the household of Stephanas’ ( 1 Corinthians 1:14 ; 1 Corinthians 1:16 ). Luke records so simply that when Lydia believed, she was baptized ‘with her household’; when the Philippian jailor believed, he was baptized, and all those belonging to him
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - " Before his eyes were opened, and before his taste was refined to distinguish pearl from paste, Chalmers actually denounced John Newton, and Richard Baxter, and Philip Doddridge, from the pulpit, and as good as forbade his people to read them
Philippi - (Φίλιπποι)...
Philippi was a city in the E. by Philip of Macedon, who made it one of his frontier strongholds. Philippi was included in the first region, of which Amphipolis was the capital. the Roman Republic made its last stand on the plains of Philippi, and to commemorate the victory of Imperialism the city was re-founded by Octavian under the name of Colonia Julia Augusta Victrix Philippensium. ...
Christianity first came to Philippi in the autumn of a. ...
Philippi is described as ‘a city of Macedonia, the first of the district, a Roman colony’ (Acts 16:12 RV_). the first he came to in the district; but this seems a feeble observation for a first-rate historian to make, and moreover one not strictly accurate, as Neapolis, which had just been left behind, belonged to the same μέρις as Philippi. 68) and others emend the text (though it is found in àAC) into πρώτης μερίδος, so that Philippi would be described as ‘a city of the first region of Macedonia’; but it is unlikely that St. 3702) thinks that Philippi was a ‘first’ city in the same sense in which Ephesus, Pergamus, and Smyrna bore that distinction-a ‘first-class’ city; but it does not appear that this phraseology was used outside the Commune of Asia. Afterwards Philippi quite outstripped its rival; but it was at that time in such a position that Amphipolis was ranked first by general consent, Philippi first by its own consent’ (Ramsay, St. ...
Had there been a synagogue in Philippi, St. But a military colony did not offer the same attractions as a commercial city to the Jews of the Diaspora, and apparently the sojourners in Philippi were few. Only women attended the Philippian προσευχή, whereas the presence of at least ten adult male persons was required for the conduct of the regular worship of the synagogue. The Philippian worshippers had doubtless some enclosure which marked off their meeting-place as sacred, but no roofed building like a synagogue. ...
Another Philippian woman, who was attracted by the Apostle and his message, was well known in the city as a soothsayer (Acts 16:16). She was irresistibly drawn to the evangelists, rightly divining that they had brought to Philippi another and greater power than that of Apollo. Philippians 1:30]'>[4]). Or who will blame him if he sometimes chose to suffer in silence-τρὶς ἐρραβδίσθην (2 Corinthians 11:25)-like ordinary Christians, who could not shelter themselves under the aegis of the Roman citizenship?...
The magistrates of Philippi are first called ἄρχοντες (Acts 16:19) and then στρατηγοί (Acts 16:20; Acts 16:22; Acts 16:35-36; Acts 16:38). Luke knew no doubt that in a colonia like Philippi the highest governing power was in the hands of duumviri (see inscriptions in J. Lightfoot, Philippians, p. His use of στρατηγοί, therefore, does not prove either that the magistrates of Philippi had duly received the dignity of the praetorship, or that they had assumed it without leave, as provincial duumviri were said sometimes to do (Cicero, de Leg. Luke is characteristically careful to make it clear that the majesty of Roman law might have been invoked against the Philippian authorities and on behalf of the apostles. Paul re-visited Macedonia, giving the believers ‘much exhortation’ (Acts 20:2); and in the spring of the following year, having unexpectedly to begin his journey from Greece to Palestine by land instead of by sea, he had the happiness of keeping the Passover with the brethren of Philippi (Acts 20:6). None of his converts gave him the same unalloyed satisfaction as the Philippians, his ‘beloved and longed for,’ his ‘joy and crown’ (Philippians 4:1). To Thessalonica, and again to Corinth, their messengers followed him with the tokens of their love (Philippians 4:16, 2 Corinthians 11:9); and when he was a prisoner in Rome, Epaphroditus of Philippi made a journey of 700 miles over land and sea to bring him yet another gift, which was acknowledged in the most affectionate letter St. Paul ever wrote (see Philippians, Epistle to the). ...
The prestige of women in the Church of Philippi, as in the other Macedonian churches (Acts 17:4; Acts 17:12) is a striking fact, only to be compared with their prominence at an earlier date in the personal ministry of our Lord’ (Lightfoot, op. Paul’s first Philippian audience consisted entirely of women (Acts 16:13); his first convert was a woman of influence, whose familia was baptized with her, and who became his hostess (Acts 16:14-15); and the only element in the Philippian Church which called for reproof in his letter was the variance of two prominent Christian ladies, both of whom he remembered gratefully as his fellow-workers in the gospel (Philippians 4:2-3). 117-Philippi became a stage in the triumphal progress of St. His visit made so deep an impression on the Philippian Church that they soon after requested the martyr’s young friend Polycarp to write them and send them copies of St. Polycarp’s Epistle to the Philippians was the response, and it is still extant. The writer congratulates the Church of Philippi on ‘the sturdy root of their faith, famous from the earliest days’ (1), warns them against certain doctrinal and practical errors, and sets before them the example of apostles and saints who have gone to their rest. ...
The village of Filibedjik (Little Philippi) is all that remains of the once famous city. Lightfoot, Philippians4, 1878, p
Joannes Presbyter - What concerns us here is that Papias, speaking of his care in collecting oral traditions of the apostolic times, says, "on any occasion when a person came in my way, who had been a follower of the elders, I would inquire about the discourses of the elders—what was said by Andrew, or by Peter, or by Philip, or by Thomas or James, or by John or Matthew or any other of the Lord's disciples, and what Aristion and the Elder John, the disciples of the Lord say" (Lightfoot's trans
John, Gospel of (Critical) - , and is in turn probably based on the Chronicle of Philip of Sidé (circa (about) a. Moreover, if met with anyone on any occasion who had attended the elders, I used to inquire about the words of the elders; what Andrew or what Peter said, or what Philip, or what Thomas, or James or John or Matthew, or any other of the disciples of the Lord said, and what Aristion and the elder John, disciples of the Lord, say
Jews - Herod Antipas, called Herod the Tetrarch, who afterward beheaded John the Baptist, succeeded to Galilee and Peraea; and Philip, to Trachonitis, and to the neighbouring region of Iturea. Philip continued tetrarch of Trachonitis thirty-seven years, and died in the twentieth year of the reign of Tiberius
Demon - Philip, not an apostle, exercised Christ's authority over demons in Samaria (8:6-7). Our weapons in this ongoing struggle include our authority as seated with Christ at the right hand of God, far above every power (Ephesians 1:15-2:6 ), the name of Jesus (Philippians 2:10 ), our spiritual armor (Ephesians 6:18 ), prayer (a must in some cases, Mark 9:29 ), simple resistance (James 4:7 ), forgiveness (Ephesians 4:26-27 ), and exhibiting the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23 ; Ephesians 4:22-29 ; 6:10-18 )
Galilee - received the tetrarchy of Galilee, in addition to the territories of Philip and of Lysanias which he had previously obtained
Lord (2) - (1) Without the article, it is employed in direct address, as the salutation of a son to a father, ‘I go, sir’ (Matthew 21:30); of servants to their master, ‘Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field?’ (Matthew 13:27); ‘Lord, let it alone this year also’ (Luke 13:8); of the Greeks to Philip, ‘Sir, we would see Jesus’ (John 12:21); of the Pharisees and priests to Pilate, ‘Sir, we remember that this deceiver said’ (Matthew 27:63). the words of Paul and Silas to the Philippian jailer as they are given in אAB, and accepted by Westcott and Hort, Tischendorf, and other critical editors, ‘Believe on the Lord Jesus (i. Also, ‘No man can say that Jesus is Lord but by the Holy Ghost’ (1 Corinthians 12:3), and ‘every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father,’ Philippians 2:11)
Capernaum - Chorazin is certainly Kerâzeh, and Bethsaida Julias, built by the tetrarch Philip, is pretty certainly et-Tell
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - " "Begone! all ye self-ignorant and false flatterers," shouted Philip Neri at them; "I am good for nothing but to do evil
Peter - Philip was phlegmatic, perhaps
Wealth - Philip rebukes Simon Magus for thinking the power of the Holy Spirit could be bought (8:18-20). This is one of Paul's reasons for not seeking support from the churches to which he ministers (1 Corinthians 9 ), while still accepting such support when it comes unsolicited (Philippians 4:10-19 ), and encouraging Christians to support others who teach or lead them (Galatians 6:6 ; 1 Timothy 5:17-18 ; 2 Timothy 2:6 )
Atonement - In the Acts of the Apostles, the following words of Isaiah are, by Philip the evangelist, distinctly applied to Christ, and to his death: "He was led as a sheep to the slaughter; and like a lamb dumb before his shearer, so opened he not his mouth
Greece, Religion And Society of - From his father Philip II, Alexander inherited a unified Greek homeland with an increased economic order
Evangelize, Evangelism - And in the same context where the work of Philip the evangelist is highlighted, believers dispersed by persecution following Stephen's death "preached the word wherever they went" (8:4). The response looked for is an understanding and believing of the good news that leads to a calling on the Lord for salvation and an active obedience to that same Lord Jesus in this new relationship (Romans 1:5,16-17 ; 10:14 ; Ephesians 1:13 ; Philippians 1:5 ). It is also a "traditioning" (1 Corinthians 15:1-3 ) and a controversial activity for which one will suffer persecution and at the same time offer a defense (Philippians 1:7,16 ; 2 Timothy 1:8,12 ; 2:9 ). For them such proclamation holds up a standard for their Christian conduct (2Col 9:13; Galatians 2:14 ; Philippians 1:27 ) and strengthens them in their faith (Romans 16:25 ; Colossians 1:23 ; 2 Timothy 4:2,5 )
Woman - Philippians 4:2-3, 1 Corinthians 1:11; the numerous salutations to women in Romans 16). the prophesying of the four daughters of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9; the virginity of these, as of the daughters named in 1 Corinthians 7:36, does not yet constitute an ‘order’)
Minister, Ministration - Evidently the ritual sense of this group of words is always present to the mind of the Apostle when he has occasion to use them (Romans 15:16 ‘Paul the ministering priest, the preaching of the gospel his priestly function, the believing Gentiles his offering’ [5], Romans 15:27, 2 Corinthians 9:12, Philippians 2:17 ‘the Philippians the priests, their faith the sacrifice, the apostle’s life-blood the accompanying libation’ [6], Philippians 2:25; Philippians 2:30; cf. 377a; Lightfoot, Philip. It led to there being given Him by God ‘the name which is above every name’ (Philippians 2:9, cf. of Ethics, 120), but this was really inconsistent with the hard isolation of the individual that was the fundamental basis of Stoicism (Lightfoot on Philippians 2, ‘St
the Pharisee - Philip Neri who, when some one praised him, cried out, Begone! I am a devil, and not a saint! And who, when going to communicate, would protest before his Lord that he was good for nothing but to do evil Such utter self-prostration, I say, is the very badge and token of the servant of Christ; and this indeed is conveyed in His own words when He says, I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance
Will of God - ...
Philip H
Baptism - (Cornelius and his friends), Acts 16:15 (Lydia and her household), Acts 16:33 (the Philippian jailer ‘and all his’), Acts 18:8 (Crispus and his house, and many Corinthians), Acts 19:5 (about twelve Ephesians), 1 Corinthians 1:14; 1 Corinthians 1:16 (Crispus, Gaius, and the household of Stephanas). Philip instructed the Samaritans and the Eunuch before baptism (Acts 8:5 f. And no instruction that can be properly so called is mentioned in the case of Saul (Acts 9:18; Acts 22:16), or the Philippian jailer (Acts 18:8; note ‘immediately’), or the twelve Ephesians (Acts 19:5)
Dispersion - The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
Angels - In Philippians 2:25, 2 Corinthians 8:23 ἀπόστολος is translated ‘messenger. This is the office of angels which is most prominent in the NT; see Acts 7:35; Acts 7:38 (Moses) Acts 8:26 (Philip) Acts 10:3; Acts 10:7; Acts 10:22; Acts 10:30 (Peter, Cornelius) Acts 11:13 (Peter) Acts 12:7-11 (Peter in prison) Acts 23:9 (Paul) Acts 27:23 (Paul on his voyage), Hebrews 13:2 (reference to Abraham, Genesis 18), and frequently in Rev
Palestine - ...
For the purposes of this article, Palestine extends to the north ten to fifteen miles beyond the ancient site of Dan and New Testament Caesarea Philippi into the gorges and mountains just south of Mount Hermon. In the New Testament era, it was a part of the territory of Philip, the Tetrarch, son of Herod the Great
Dispersion - The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
Hannah - 'Begone!' shouted the aged Philip, 'Begone! you do not know me. Had He said anything about the men of Cæsarea Philippi who took Him to be Jeremias, I am mistaken if He would not have said that they were not far from the kingdom of heaven. And the land was full of such houses in the days of our Lord, and thus it was that He was what the observing men of Cæsarea Philippi saw that He was
Miracle - Many different believers perform miracles, not just the twelve (Stephen and Philip in Acts 6:8 and Acts 8:13 ), and they continue with about the same frequency throughout the book
Leadership - ...
In the first mention of persons called deacons (Philippians 1:1 ), we find them linked with the overseers and mentioned after them. There the Twelve led the congregation to select seven men for that Job (though Stephen and Philip at least were also known as preachers and teachers of the Word)
Influence - He has difficulties to overcome which he had frankly stated to Philip when he ran in with the same great news that Andrew had told Peter
Foresight - Westcott on John 1:47), Peter (John 1:42), Philip (John 1:43), Nathanael (John 1:47), Mary (John 2:4), Nicodemus (John 2:3), the woman of Samaria (John 2:4)
Persecution - It has been said, and with some probability, that the Christians were involved in this persecution by their attachment to the family of the Emperor Philip
Pronunciation of Proper Names - Phil′ippi (accent on the first) is due to the analogy of Philip, and Ene′as ‘to the analogy of Virgil’s hero
Saviour (2) - Paul’s writings, apart from the Pastoral Epistles, σωτήρ is found only twice—Ephesians 5:23 and Philippians 3:20. In Philippians 3:20 the word σωτήρ has a specific eschatological reference: Christ is σωτήρ, because at the resurrection He will transform the body of believers into the likeness of His own glorious body. The first trace of its application to men appears in Thucydides, where it is given to Brasidas, and in Polybins, where Philip of Macedon is called σωτήρ
Christ, Christology - The importance of this identification is illustrated by the exposition of Isaiah 53:7 given by Philip to the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:35 ‘beginning from this scripture he preached unto him Jesus’); and the same interpretation probably underlies St
John the Apostle - In Acts 8:15 we read that the two were sent by their brother-Apostles to Samaria, after Philip had exercised his evangelistic ministry there. Polycarp in his letter to the Philippians, and Ignatius in writing to the Ephesians, refer to Paul and his writings, but not to John or his ministry
Doctrines - And although, when He received the first disciples, John and Andrew, Peter, Nathanael and Philip, He accepted their confession that in Him they had found the Messiah (John 1:41-51), it was in but few cases that He declared Himself in so many words to be the Christ of God; as, for example, in that of His conversation with the woman of Samaria (John 4:26); again when He declared to His townsmen in Nazareth that Isaiah’s prophecy of the Messiah as the great preacher and healer was fulfilled in Himself (Luke 4:21); and again when He answered the doubting question of the Baptist, ‘Art thou he that should come, or do we look for another?’, by pointing to the testimony of His teaching and of His works of mercy (Matthew 11:2-6 || Luke 7:19-23)
Roman Law in the nt - Herod Philip was tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias of Abilene (Luke 3:1). Luke gives the former as the translation of ‘praetores’ at Philippi, a Roman colony), in colonies there was no Senate (βουλή), but there were decuriones (Ramsay, Gal. The colonics mentioned in the NT are; Antioch of Pisidia (Acts 13:14), Lystra (Acts 14:6), Philippi (Acts 16:12, where alone of NT passages κολωνία is found), Corinth (Acts 18:1), Ptolemais (Acts 21:7)
Holy Spirit - Samaritans "believed Philip as he preached" (v. The word of God contains dynamic, Spirit-induced power to overwhelm the forces of evil (Ephesians 6:17 ), and the Spirit may bring physical deliverance (Philippians 1:19 ). Corporately, the Spirit indwells his church to make her holy, like the temple of old (1 Corinthians 3:16 ; 6:19 ), and to build her up like a dwelling (Ephesians 5:23 ), creating unity and fellowship out of former enemies (Ephesians 2:18 ; 4:3-4 ; Philippians 2:1 )
Gospels - Philippi, where Luke was left behind, was perhaps the center from which he circulated it among the Greek churches. " Mark probably wrote while having the opportunity of Peter's guidance in Palestine, between his return from Perga and his second journey with Barnabas in or for Caesarea, the second center of gospel preaching as Jerusalem was the first and Antioch the third, the scene of Cornelius' conversion by Peter, Mark's father in the faith, the head quarters of the Roman forces in Palestine, where Philip the evangelist resided. For other instances of omitting what tends to Peter's honour compare Matthew 14:29; Philippians 4:3; Mark 9:30-33; Mark 14:47; John 18:10; Luke 5:10; Luke 24:34
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - show clearly that He did not choose to support His claim by an appeal to fleshly parentage; while the words of Philip (John 1:45 ‘We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph’), and of the crowd at Capernaum (John 6:42 ‘Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know?’), left, as they are, without comment by the Evangelist, suggest that he was unacquainted with the story of the birth at Bethlehem, and laid no stress on the Davidie descent
Assumption of Moses - -The date of composition is clearly fixed by the words in 6:7 ‘and he (Herod) shall beget children who succeeding him shall rule for shorter periods,’ As this is a prediction which was falsified by the event, for Antipas reigned forty-three years and Philip thirty-seven (while Herod reigned thirty-four), we must postulate a date earlier than thirty-four years from Herod’s death, i
Atonement (2) - For He who dwelt within them was the Spirit of Christ Jesus (Acts 16:7, Romans 8:9, Philippians 1:19, 1 Peter 1:11), the promise of the Father (Acts 1:4), whereby they had themselves attained the adoption, and were enabled to cry, ‘Abba, Father’ (Romans 8:15-17, Galatians 4:6). 1 Corinthians 15:3; 1 Peter 1:11), leaves no room for doubt that Philip the Evangelist was not alone in beginning from the picture of Jehovah’s Suffering Servant to preach Jesus (Acts 8:35), but that the Apostles gave their witness to the Resurrection by preaching what St. Paul gives in the Epistle to the Philippians of the exaltation of Jesus, is neither the assumption of human flesh nor the suffering of death, but the obedience which accepted the humiliation of the Cross as the act whereby He fulfilled, not the general, but the particular will of God (Philippians 2:5-11, cf
Missions - It is also seen that they preached it among the Samaritans, towards whom Jews had as strong an antipathy as they had towards Gentiles (‘Philip went down to the city of Samaria and preached Christ unto them
Miracles - The effect of Philip's ministry on the Samaritans, in opposition to Simon Magus (Acts 8), proves this. ...
But Philip could not impart it; Peter and John must come to confer on his Samaritan converts miraculous gifts, by laying on of hands (Acts 8:15-20; Acts 10:44-46; Acts 19:6; Mark 16:17-18)
Marriage - , 1 Corinthians 9:5); so were the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist who ‘prophesied’ (Acts 21:9); St
Mark, Gospel According to - Even after Peter’s confession at Caesarea Philippi, when the Galilaean ministry was nearly ended, the disciples were charged to tell no man (Mark 8:30). , which makes the Baptist begin by calling Jesus the Lamb of God and the Son of God, and makes Andrew, Philip, and Nathanael at once recognize Him as Messiah (John 1:29; John 1:34; John 1:41; John 1:45; John 1:49), bears all the marks of probability
Acts of the Apostles - Others (Ramsay, Renan) believe the writer to have been a Macedonian of Philippi, since he took so great an interest in the claims of that colony ( Acts 16:12 ). On the other hand, it must be said that against his having been a native of Philippi are the facts that he had no home there, but went to lodge with Lydia ( Acts 16:15 ), and that he only supposed that there was a Jewish place of prayer at Philippi ( Acts 16:13 RV Acts of the Apostles (2) - For, in spite of his advanced speculations on the subject of Christ, in spite of his doctrine of pre-existence and his cosmological Christology, the Apostle holds fast in Romans 1:4 and Philippians 2:9 to the notion that Jesus became ‘Son of God in power’ through His resurrection from the dead, and was invested with the title ‘Lord’ at His exaltation. Such an element is entirely lacking in these chapters, for in the passage from Isaiah 53 about the Suffering Servant, which Philip expounded to the Ethiopian ennuch, it is precisely the expressions about bearing our sins that are wanting
Oracle - He alleges, that Cicero, speaking of the Delphic oracle, the most revered of any in the Heathen world, declares, that nothing was become more contemptible, not only in his days, but long before him; that Demosthenes, who lived about three hundred years earlier, affirmed of the same oracle, in a public speech to the people of Athens, that it was gained to the interests of King Philip, an enemy to that city; that the Greek historians, tell us, how, on several other occasions, it had been corrupted by money, to serve the views of particular persons and parties, and the prophetess sometimes had been deposed for bribery and lewdness; that there were some great sects of philosophers, who, on principle, disavowed the authority of all oracles; agreeably to all which Strabo tells us, that divination in general and oracles had been in high credit among the ancients, but in his days were treated with much contempt; lastly, that Eusebius also, the great historian of the primitive church, declares, that there were six hundred writers among the Heathens themselves who had publicly written against the reality of them
Aristion (Aristo) - He ‘used to inquire of those who came his way what had been said (τί εἶπεν) by Andrew, Peter, Philip, Thomas, James, John or Matthew, or any other of the Lord’s disciples; as well as what was being said (ἅτε λέγουσιν) by Aristion and the Elder John
Mediator - When Philip meets the Ethiopian eunuch he finds that he is reading Isaiah 53, and resolves his doubts by explaining that the vicarious sufferer is Jesus. The last two facts are fundamental in the next group of Epistles (1618449322_74 Philippians 2:5-11). Philippians 2:5-11 lays special stress upon the self-sacrifice involved in the Son of God taking ‘the form of a servant
Hellenism - Again, it was the Hellenists who spread the gospel, not only among the Samaritans (Philip the Deacon, Acts 8:5-25) but also among the Greeks in Antioch (Acts 11:20). Born in the Diaspora, at Tarsus in Cilicia, he was nevertheless ‘a Hebrew of Hebrews’ (Philippians 3:5); he had Pharisaic surroundings, and was brought up in the spirit of the Palestinian Rabbis: he even went to Jerusalem to complete his Rabbinical education
Colossians, Epistle to the - ...
A short passage follows in which brief words of counsel are addressed to wives, husbands, children, fathers, servants, masters (Colossians 3:18 to Philippians 1:12-147), and one or two general exhortations lead up to the salutations with which the letter closes (Colossians 4:2-18). If, with Bleek and Lightfoot (Philippians4, 1878, p. And, on the other hand, the allusions in Philippians 1:7; Philippians 1:12-13; Philippians 1:20-25; Philippians 2:23 point to a date near the very close of the Roman imprisonment. Finally, it would be most remarkable, in a letter written from Caesarea, that there should be no salutation from Philip
Boyhood - Even in after life the sacred Book is always read aloud, and so Philip (Acts 8:30) heard the eunuch reading his roll of Isaiah
Faith - Paul enjoins the Philippian jailer: ‘Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ’ (Acts 16:31). More generally the gift of the Holy Spirit follows baptism and the laying on of hands, as in the case of the disciples of John the Baptist (Acts 19:2) and the Samaritans whom Philip had led to believe in Jesus Christ (Acts 8:17). Even when Christians are perfect (τέλειοι, Philippians 3:15), possessors of a mature faith as well as full knowledge, they have not reached the goal, but they must still press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:14)
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - -After rejecting as apocryphal the Acts of Andrew, Thomas, Peter, and Philip, the writer goes on to give a list of Apocryphal Gospels, and then continues: ‘Libri omnes quos fecit Leucius discipulus diaboli, apocryphi. ...
(7) In Philippi. -The most important incident connected with Philippi is a correspondence with the Corinthians, dealing with certain heretical views, of which the main tenets are (a) a denial of the resurrection of the flesh; (b) the human body is not the creation of God; (c) the world is not the creation of God; (d) the government of the universe is not in the hands of God; (e) the crucifixion was not that of Christ, but of a docetic phantasm; (f) Christ was not born of Mary, nor was he of the seed of David
Canaan - On the death of Herod, Archelaus, his eldest son, succeeded to the government of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, with the title of tetrarch; Galilee being assigned to Herod Antipas; and Perea, or the country beyond Jordan, to the third brother, Philip
Faith - Paul enjoins the Philippian jailer: ‘Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ’ (Acts 16:31). More generally the gift of the Holy Spirit follows baptism and the laying on of hands, as in the case of the disciples of John the Baptist (Acts 19:2) and the Samaritans whom Philip had led to believe in Jesus Christ (Acts 8:17). Even when Christians are perfect (τέλειοι, Philippians 3:15), possessors of a mature faith as well as full knowledge, they have not reached the goal, but they must still press on toward the goal unto the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus (Philippians 3:14)
Peter - According to Mark 3:16, Luke 6:14, early in his Galilaean ministry Jesus set apart the Twelve to be His helpers and gave Simon the surname Peter (καὶ ἐπέθηκεν ὄνομα τῷ Σίμωνι Πἐτρον) In referring to the same incident, Matthew (Matthew 10:2) speaks of ‘the so-called Peter’ (ὁ λεγόμενος Πέτρος), but seemingly intends to make the Apostle’s famous confession at Caesarea Philippi the occasion for the Messiah to bestow upon him the name ‘Peter’ and to designate him formal head of the Church (Matthew 16:17-19). Paul’s ancestry entitles him to a full share in that advantage (Romans 11:1, 2 Corinthians 11:22, Philippians 3:5). In copying Mark’s account of the Caesarea-Philippi incident, Luke omits the closing verses which tell of Jesus’ upbraiding Peter for his presumption in attempting to regulate the Messiah’s conduct (Mark 8:32 ff. He is next seen in Samaria, where he represents the Jerusalem Church in supervising and bringing to completion the evangelistic work of Philip (Acts 8:14-25)
Ordination - Whatever their exact office was-and it is not likely, in view of the solemn procedure adopted, to have been only an office of serving tables, a supposition which seems also to be contrary to the evidence of evangelistic activity by Stephen, Philip, and the rest-the people (‘the whole multitude’) elected (ἐξελέξαντο, ‘chose for themselves,’ Acts 6:5) the Seven and presented them to the apostles (Acts 6:6), who after election ‘appointed’ them (Acts 6:3, καταστήσομεν) and prayed and laid their hands on them (Acts 6:6)
Sacrifice (2) - ) Philip overhears the Ethiopian reading the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah and interprets it for him, though this chapter above all others seems to speak of Messiah’s vicarious suffering and death, the all-important passage—‘He was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities,’ etc
Sea of Galilee - There was nothing in the rule of the tetrarchs Antipas and Philip to discourage perseverance, so that the land was coming more and more under cultivation
Gospels - Even after Peter’s confession at Cæsarea Philippi at the end of the Galilæan ministry, the disciples are charged to tell no man ( Mark 8:30 ). , the Baptist begins by calling Jesus ‘the Lamb of God’ and ‘the Son of God’ ( John 1:29 ; John 1:34 ); Andrew, Philip, and Nathanael at once recognize him as Messiah ( John 6:1-71 ; John 1:45 ; John 1:49 ). It is true that there would be a difficulty if the Twelve first learned about the Messiahship of Jesus at Cæsarea Philippi
Education - No doubt it was a roll of this translation which the Ethiopian eunuch was carrying back with him to his home far up the Nile, when Philip the Evangelist joined him in his chariot on the Gaza road (Acts 8:27 ff
Jesus Christ - ...
(2) ‘If ye exalt not your low things, and transfer to your right hand the things on your left, ye shall not enter into my kingdom’ ( Acta Philippi , ch. Herod Antipas and Philip continued to rule as vassal princes, with the title of tetrarchs, over Galilee and Ituræa respectively
Polycarp - the following words in his letter to the Philippians
Polycarp addressed this letter to the Philippians a short time after hearing of the reception which the Church of Philippi had given Ignatius and his companions in captivity: ‘I rejoiced with you greatly in our Lord Jesus Christ, for that ye received the followers of the true Love and escorted them on their way, as befitted you-those men encircled in saintly bonds which are the diadems of them that be truly chosen of God and our Lord’ (i. He exhorts the Philippians to show that enduring patience which they have seen ‘in the blessed Ignatius and Zosimus and Rufus’ (ix. The Philippians invited Polycarp to write to them (iii. These last words prove that Polycarp did not know the fate of Ignatius at the time when he wrote to the Philippians, and it has been concluded from this that Ignatius had quite recently left Philippi en route for Rome
Papias - But if haply one also who had been a companion of the Elders came (my way), I used to make careful inquiry into the discourses of the Elders—what had been said by Andrew, or what by Peter, or what by Philip, or what by Thomas or by James, or what by John or Matthew, or by any other of the Lord’s disciples, and what things Aristion and the Elder John, disciples of the Lord, have to say (λέγουσιν). ad Philippians 2, ‘remembering what things the Lord said when teaching’)
Gnosticism - Peter; gospels were in circulation among them which purported to have been written by Philip, Thomas, and other apostles; and they professed to be able to find their doctrines in the canonical scriptures by methods of allegorical interpretation which, however forced, could easily be paralleled in the procedure of orthodox writers
Reformation - Maurice, who had so basely betrayed him, was now declared elector of Saxony; and, by his entreaties, Philip, langrave of Hesse, the other chief of the Protestants, was persuaded to throw himself on the mercy of the emperor, and to implore his pardon
Christ in the Early Church - The blood of Jesus Christ is ‘eternal and abiding joy’ (Philippians 1). ‘There is one flesh of our Lord Jesus Christ, and one cup unto union with His blood’ (Philippians 4). How then can I blaspheme my King and Saviour!’ And the apparently contemporary record of the martyrdom of polycarp closes with the significant words: ‘The blessed Polycarp was apprehended by Herodes, when Philip of Tralles was high priest, in the proconsulship of Statius Quadratus, but in the reign of the Eternal King, Jesus Christ
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - to the Philippians ( Haer. 25) reckons Irenaeus, with Philip of Gortyna and Modestus, among authors who had written against Marcion
Holy Ghost - " How impossible is it here to extort, by any process whatever, even the shadow of a personification of either any attribute of God, or of the doctrine of the Gospel! So again: "The Spirit said unto Philip, Go near, and join thyself to this chariot
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - is proved by its antagonists in numerous countries: Dionysius in Corinth writing to Nicomedia, Philip in Crete, Theophilus in Antioch, besides Modestus (Eus