What does Pergamus mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pergamus
a city of Troas, very considerable in the time of John the evangelist, Revelation 2:12-13 . This city was, for the space of one hundred and fifty years, the capital of a kingdom of the same name founded by Philetaerus, B.C. 283; who treacherously made use of the treasures committed to his care by Lysimachus after the battle of Ipsus, and, seizing on Pergamus, established an independent kingdom. After Philetaerus were five kings of the same race; the last of whom, Attalus Philopater, left his kingdom, which comprehended Mysia, AEolis, Ionia, Lydia, and Caria, to the Roman empire; to which it belonged when the first Christian church was established there. This church early became corrupted by the Nicolaitans, for which it was reproved by St. John, and charged quickly to repent, Revelation 2:14-16 . Pergamus, now called Bergamo, like most other places which have been cursed by the presence of the Turks, is reduced to comparative decay, containing a poor population, who are too indolent or too oppressed to profit by the richness of their soil and the beauty of the climate. The number of inhabitants, however, is still said to amount to thirty thousand, of whom three thousand are Greek Christians. Many remains of former magnificence are still to be found; among which are those of several Christian churches. It is about sixty miles north of Smyrna. The celebrated physician Galen was a native of this place.

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Pergamum - PERGAMUM , or Pergamus , was an ancient city of Mysia, the seat of an independent kingdom from about b. As the capital of a kingdom, Pergamus had acquired a somewhat factitious importance. At Pergamus there were splendid temples of Zeus and Athene, where these gods were worshipped in the ordinary Greek way, but others also of Dlonysos and Asklepios. ...
The only allusion to Pergamus in the NT is in the Apocalypse, where (Revelation 1:11 ; Revelation 2:12 ) it is included among the seven churches of Asia. The message to it speaks of Pergamus as the place ‘where Satan’s seat is. Christians would be brought to Pergamus for trial from any northern part of the province, and the mention of one martyr, Antipas , as having suffered there does not prove that he belonged to Pergamus. The Church at Pergamus is charged with having ‘them that hold the doctrine of Balaam , who taught Balak to cast a stumbling-block before the children of Israel, to eat things sacrificed unto idols, and to commit fornication’; and also ‘them that hold the doctrine of the Nic olaitans. ’ We must gather from this that a definite section of the church at Pergamus maintained that, Inasmuch as heathen ceremonies’ meant nothing’ (cf. From its official and religious character there can be little doubt that Antipas was but one of many martyred at Pergamus. ...
Pergamus was the seat of a bishopric, but its subsequent history is obscure. The name of Pergamus survives in the word ‘parchment,’ i
Attalia - It was founded by Attalus king of Pergamus: now called Adalia
Eumenes ii - The king of Pergamus, to whom Rome gave a large slice of the territory of Antiochus III
Attalia - The city was founded by and named from Attalus Philadelphus, king of Pergamus, as a port at the mouth of the river Catarrhactes, for the commerce of Egypt and Syria, as Troas was for that of the AEgean
Seven Churches in Asia - They are Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamus, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea, mentioned in Apocalypse, 1-3, where Saint John, on the island of Patmos, was commanded to send to their bishops instructions and admonitions, in which the Church is praised or blamed with reference to past trials and told of a greater one to come in connection with the coming of Christ
Lyd'ia - king of Pergamus
Lyd'ia - king of Pergamus
Asia - Attalus, king of Pergamus, left it to the Romans 138 B
Pergamus - 283; who treacherously made use of the treasures committed to his care by Lysimachus after the battle of Ipsus, and, seizing on Pergamus, established an independent kingdom. Pergamus, now called Bergamo, like most other places which have been cursed by the presence of the Turks, is reduced to comparative decay, containing a poor population, who are too indolent or too oppressed to profit by the richness of their soil and the beauty of the climate
Heliodorus - Heliodorus murdered Seleucus, and attempted to seize the Syrian crown; but he was driven out by Eumenes of Pergamus and his brother Attalus; and Antiochus Epiphanes, brother of Seleucus, ascended the throne
Aristion - 22, the same day as that of Papias at Pergamus
Mysia - In this country stood the ancient city of Troy; as also that of Pergamus, one of the seven churches of Asia
Asia - Philometor, king of Pergamus or king of Asia, B
Philadelphia - ...
Philadelphia was founded and named by Attalus Philadelphus of Pergamus before b. ’ Doubtless there is a reference here, as in the message to Pergamus, to the new name taken at baptism, and apparently sometimes kept secret
Galatia - of Syria, hence called Soter (Savior), and Attahs I of Pergamus, hence, designating himself "king
Galenus, Physician - 130 at Pergamus, flourished chiefly at Rome under the Antonines, and died in 200 or 201
Philadelphia - of Sardis; built by Attalus II, Philadelphus, king of Pergamus, who died
Pamphylia - Pamphylia was in turn subject to Persia, Macedonia, Syria, Pergamus, and Rome
Praedestinatus, an Author - We are thus told of a number of personages whom no one else mentions—Diodorus of Crete who refuted the Secundians, Philo the Alogi, Theodotus of Pergamus the Colorbasians, Crato, a Syrian bishop, who refuted the Theodotians, Tranquillus the Noetians, Euphranon of Rhodes the Severians, and a host of others of whom we should expect to hear elsewhere if they were not imaginary personages
Philippi - Other explanations are that it means ‘the first city we arrived at’ (which the Greek could scarcely mean), or that Philippi claimed a pre-eminence in much the same way that Pergamus, Smyrna, Ephesus all claimed to be the ‘first city’ of Asia
Apocalypse - The second and third chapters contain seven epistles to the seven churches in Asia; namely, of Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamus, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and Laodicea, which relate chiefly to their then respective circumstances and situation
Phrygia - ...
When the Romans inherited the kingdom of Pergamus in b
Anitipas - He is said to have been one of our Saviour's first disciples, and to have suffered martyrdom at Pergamus, of which he was bishop
Feasting - Ramsay, article Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) on ‘Pergamus,’ ‘Thyatira,’ etc
Antiochus - " He "came into the kingdom by flatteries" to Eumenes and to Attalus of Pergamus, and to the Syrians high and low
Book - For the king of Pergamus, in collecting his library, was led to the invention of parchment made of those skins. The form which obtains among us is the square, composed of separate leaves; which was also known, though little used, among the ancients; having been invented by Attalus, king of Pergamus, the same who also invented parchment: but it has now been so long in possession, that the oldest manuscripts are found in it
Philippi - 3702) thinks that Philippi was a ‘first’ city in the same sense in which Ephesus, Pergamus, and Smyrna bore that distinction-a ‘first-class’ city; but it does not appear that this phraseology was used outside the Commune of Asia
Persecution - Among many nameless sufferers, history has preserved from oblivion Pothinus, the respectable bishop of Lyons, who was then more than ninety years of age; Sanctus, a deacon of Vienne; Attalus, a native of Pergamus; Maturus, and Alexander; some of whom were devoured by wild beasts, and some of them tortured in an iron chair made red hot
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - " The date of Papias used to be regarded as determined by a notice in the Paschal Chronicle , which was thought to record his martyrdom at Pergamus under a
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - The fame of the wisdom of Aedesius first attracted Julian to Pergamus but he, being old and infirm, recommended him to his pupils, Chrysanthius and Eusebius