What does Pearl mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μαργαρίτην a pearl. / a proverb 1
μαργαρίτῃ a pearl. / a proverb 1
μαργαρίτου a pearl. / a proverb 1

Definitions Related to Pearl

G3135


   1 a Pearl.
   2 a proverb, i.e. a word of great value.
   

Frequency of Pearl (original languages)

Frequency of Pearl (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Pearl
(Heb. gabish, Job 28:18 ; Gr. margarites, Matthew 7:6 ; 13:46 ; Revelation 21:21 ). The pearl oyster is found in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Its shell is the "mother of pearl," which is of great value for ornamental purposes (1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ). Each shell contains eight or ten pearls of various sizes.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Pearl
1: μαργαρίτης (Strong's #3135 — Noun Masculine — margarites — mar-gar-ee'-tace ) "a pearl" (Eng., Margaret), occurs in Matthew 7:6 (proverbially and figuratively); 13:45,46; 1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ; 18:12,16 ; 21:21 (twice).
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Pearl
Matthew 7:6 (b) This represents the precious truths of GOD and the beautiful revelations of His Word which should not be presented to militant atheists nor to hostile, ungodly men.
Matthew 13:45 (b) This gem is a type of the church which is hidden in the world, and sought out by our Lord JESUS CHRIST who paid the great price at Calvary to purchase us with His own Blood.
Revelation 21:21 (b) These gems are probably descriptive of the life experience of the twelve patriarchs. Their names appear on these twelve pearls. (See vvs 12,21). In the Old Testament ( Exodus 28:21), the names of these same men were on stones. Having lived their lives, and the twelve tribes having gone through the terrible experiences of the centuries, these stones were changed into pearls, for pearls are the product of long suffering. The tiny stone in the shell becomes covered with the pearl substance by the oyster because of suffering.
Webster's Dictionary - Pearl-Eyed
(a.) Having a pearly speck in the eye; afflicted with the cataract.
Webster's Dictionary - Pearl
(1):
(v. t.) To fringe; to border.
(2):
(v. i.) To resemble pearl or pearls.
(3):
(n.) A fringe or border.
(4):
(v. t.) To cause to resemble pearls; to make into small round grains; as, to pearl barley.
(5):
(n.) A capsule of gelatin or similar substance containing some liquid for medicinal application, as ether.
(6):
(n.) A whitish speck or film on the eye.
(7):
(n.) One of the circle of tubercles which form the bur on a deer's antler.
(8):
(n.) A light-colored tern.
(9):
(n.) A fish allied to the turbot; the brill.
(10):
(n.) Nacre, or mother-of-pearl.
(11):
(n.) Hence, figuratively, something resembling a pearl; something very precious.
(12):
(n.) A shelly concretion, usually rounded, and having a brilliant luster, with varying tints, found in the mantle, or between the mantle and shell, of certain bivalve mollusks, especially in the pearl oysters and river mussels, and sometimes in certain univalves. It is usually due to a secretion of shelly substance around some irritating foreign particle. Its substance is the same as nacre, or mother-of-pearl. Pearls which are round, or nearly round, and of fine luster, are highly esteemed as jewels, and compare in value with the precious stones.
(13):
(v. t.) To set or adorn with pearls, or with mother-of-pearl. Used also figuratively.
(14):
(n.) A size of type, between agate and diamond.
(15):
(a.) Of or pertaining to pearl or pearls; made of pearls, or of mother-of-pearl.
(16):
(v. i.) To give or hunt for pearls; as, to go pearling.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Pearl
In Job 28:18 the word is gabish, which signifies 'ice' and hence 'crystal.' In the N.T. παργαρίτης is from 'to glisten, shine,' and perhaps refers to pearls, such as are discovered in shells of various species. They are mentioned three times as distinct from precious stones. Revelation 17:4 ; Revelation 18:12,16 . They were worn as an ornament by women. 1 Timothy 2:9 . Metaphorically the term applies to anything costly: things which should not be cast before swine. Matthew 7:6 . The gates of the heavenly Jerusalem were each of one pearl. Revelation 21:21 . In the parable of the one Pearl of Great Price the Lord is represented as selling all that He had (as man and Messiah) in order to become its possessor. Matthew 13:45,46 . It implies the unique character of the church in the eyes of Christ.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price
THIS is one of those travelling jewellers of the East who compass sea and land in their search for goodly pearls. He is never at home. He is always on the look-out for more and more precious pearls. Till one day his long search is signally rewarded. He is engaged in exploring a certain market of precious stones, when suddenly his eye falls on a pearl the like of which he had never supposed to exist. Its great size, its perfect form, its exquisite beauty, its dazzling light-he had never expected to see such a gem. Ascertaining from its owner the great price of the pearl, the merchant man forthwith sells all that he possesses, and buys up on the spot that pearl of great price. We get a well-known word from the honourable name that is here given to this enterprising merchant man. Our Lord calls him an emporium man. And so he is. For he has spent his whole life in the search for the very best pearls, till his emporium is famous for the size, and the beauty, and the value, of its pearls. And his famous emporium is now more famous than ever because of this splendid purchase he has made on his last enterprising journey.
Now, the world of books, to begin with, is not unlike a merchant man seeking goodly pearls. For every really good book that a really good judge of books discovers becomes a pearl of great price to him. Till as his reading life goes on, he as good as sells all his former books for the sake of this and that pearl of books which he has discovered in the course of his reading. A new beginner in books reads everything he comes across. All printed matter interests him, and a poor and passing book will for a time satisfy him, and even entrance him. But as time goes on, and as the real use of a good book, and the real rarity of a good book, become revealed to him, the true reader will be found giving up all his reading time, and all his reading outlay, to the really great and life-long books of the world, and to them alone. As, for instance, Dr. Chalmers.
During my Christmas holiday I have been renewing my acquaintance with that true pearl of a book, Dr. Hanna's Memoirs of Dr. Chalmers. And among a multitude of lessons I learned and laid up for myself and for my classes out of that treasure-house, Dr. Chalmers's ever-growing appreciation of the very best books was one of the best lessons I again learned. "Butler made me a Christian," said Chalmers, somewhat hyperbolically, to one of his early friends. "Pascal's," he wrote to another friend, "is more than all Greek and Roman fame." Before his eyes were opened, and before his taste was refined to distinguish pearl from paste, Chalmers actually denounced John Newton, and Richard Baxter, and Philip Doddridge, from the pulpit, and as good as forbade his people to read them. But the day was fast coming when this great merchant man of ours was to sell all that he had in order to buy the very pearls he had so scouted in the days of his disgraceful and guilty ignorance. For as I read on I came on such entries in his private journal as these: "Began Richard Baxter, which I mean to make my devotional reading in the evenings." "Sept. 13.-I have begun Baxter's Call to the Unconverted, and intend it for circulation." And writing the same year to a younger brother of his, he says, "I look upon Baxter and Doddridge as two most impressive writers, and from whom you are likely to carry away the impression that a preparation for eternity should be the main business and anxiety of time." "Nov. 11.-Finished this day the perusal of Foster's Essays, which I have read with great relish and excitement. His profoundly evangelical views are most congenial to me. O my God, give me of the fulness of Christ! May I never lose sight of Christ, that through Him I may pass from death unto life." "March 14.-I am much impressed with the reality and business-like style of Doddridge's intercourse with God. O Heavenly Father, convert my religion from a name to a principle!" You may remember that there is an old evangelical classic entitled The Marrow. Sell a whole shelf of your juvenile books and buy it, and you will be wise merchant men, if Dr. Chalmers is a good judge.-"Sunday, August 23.-I am reading The Marrow, and derive from it much light and satisfaction. It is a masterly performance. August the 24th.-Finished The Marrow. I feel a growing delight in the fulness and sufficiency of Christ. O my God, bring me nearer and nearer to Thy Son!" And of another masterpiece of another master mind, he writes-"Read Edwards on the Religious Affections. He is to me the most exciting and interesting of all theological writers." "Who taught you to preach in that way?" asked David Maclagan one day long ago at Dr. Rainy in the vestry behind me here. "John Owen," was all the answer. Now, writing to Dr. Wardlaw, Dr. Chalmers says, "I am reading Owen just now on The Person of Christ. May the Spirit more and more take of the things of Christ and show them to me." And again, "Have finished Owen on Spiritual-Mindedness. O my God, give me the life and the power of those who have made this high attainment!" And again, "Have you read Owen on the Hundred and Thirtieth Psalm? This is my last great book, and I would strongly recommend it as eminently conducive to a way of peace and holiness." And of the very Doddridge against whom he had at one time warned his parishioners, he now writes-"I have been reading more of Doddridge, and do indeed find myself to be a very alienated and undone creature. But let me cleave to Christ so as to receive all my completeness from Him." And of another goodly pearl, whose title at least you all know, he writes, "I am on the eve of finishing Guthrie, which, I think, is the best book I ever read." And at a later date-"I still think it the best human composition I ever read relating to a subject about which it is my earnest prayer that we may all be found on the right side of the question." Romaine also, was such a favourite with Chalmers as he grew in years and in grace that I cannot begin to quote his constant praise of that fine spiritual writer. And to sum up with an extract from his Journal that bears on this whole question-"I breathe with delight in the element of godly books, and do fondly hope that their savour, at one time wholly unfelt by me, argues well for my regeneration." And at the very end of his saintly and splendid life-"I am reading Ebenezer Erskine on The Assurance of Faith, and I specially like it. Its doctrine is very precious to me." Such are some samples of the kind of books that Dr. Chalmers sold all in order to buy a taste for them, and a life-long enjoyment of them. Let every divinity student read Chalmers's Memoirs just before he is ordained, and once again every three or four years all his ordained days.
You may not be much of a merchant man in the world of books, and yet this parable may be found entirely true of you in some other world of your own. "I have no books," said Jacob Behmen, "but I have myself." And Apollo did not say, Know many books. What he kept saying continually was this, "Know thyself." Now, you may be this kind of a merchant man that not some book, but some doctrine, of the kingdom of heaven may be to you your pearl of great price. The true and full doctrine of New Testament faith, for instance. What New Testament, and evangelical, and justifying, and sanctifying, faith really is. What its true object really is, and what its true acts and operations really are. The true nature of Gospel faith has been a perfect pearl of great price to some great men when at last they found it. It was so to John Wesley. "Preach faith till you find it," said Peter Bohler, Wesley's Moravian master, to him; "and then preach it because you have found it." And all the world knows how John Wesley sold, so to speak, every other doctrine in order to hold and to preach immediate and soul-saving faith, and with what immediate and soul-saving results. Another will find his pearl of great price in the spiritual doctrine of holy love, as was the case with John Wesley's English master, William Law. As Law did also in a whole world of doctrines, and habits, and practices, connected with secret prayer. And as George Whitefield, John Wesley's predecessor in field-preaching, discovered such unsearchable riches to him in the Pauline doctrines of election, and assurance, and perseverance to the end. And as so many men of the Owen, and Goodwin, and Edwards type have discovered in the deep, spiritual doctrines connected with the entrance into their hearts of the holy law of God, and connected with the consequent sinfulness of sin, and then connected with the work of the Holy Ghost continually carried on within their hearts. And so on. Till every genuine merchant man has his own special pearls of divine truth; not to the denying or the despising of other men's purchases; but because his own pearls of great price have so attracted him, and have so enriched him.
But after all that has been said about pearls of great price and their purchase, every merchant man's own soul is his most precious pearl. And our Lord counsels us all to sell all our other pearls, good and bad, great and small, and buy up our own soul unto everlasting life. "What is a man profited," our Lord demands of every man among us, "if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" Our Lord was the last to undervalue the world which He had made, and of which He is the Heir, and yet He says that if any man should have this whole world in one hand, and his immortal soul in the other hand, he will be a fool of the first water if he holds to the whole world and lets go his immortal soul. Yes. The pearl of all pearls to you and to me is our own immortal soul. And we do not have to compass sea and land in search of this pearl of great price. We have it in our hand already, and all we have to do in order to be the richest of merchant men, is to keep a good hold of it. Unless, indeed, we have already lost hold of it. As we have. Alas, as we all have. Oh, what a fatal market is that which goes on all around every man who has a soul to sell to his everlasting loss, or to keep to his everlasting enriching. Oh, what a mad market that is in which men's souls, worth more than the whole world, are sold away every day for nought, and for far less than nought. And thus it was that our Lord was not content with warning us as to the value of our souls; but He entered the soul-market Himself, and bought back our souls at a price that has for ever put His immense estimate upon them. He who alone knows the exchangeless value of our immortal souls, He came and redeemed our souls at a price which was worth far more than the whole world, and all our souls to the bargain. For He redeemed our souls at the price of His own precious blood.
But then all that only ends, as every parable of His has ended, in making our Blessed Lord Himself the Pearl of all pearls to us. All these partial, and, as it were, preliminary, pearls take their value to us entirely from Him. They all run up their values into Him. All good books are really good books to us, just in the measure that they speak to us about Jesus Christ. If they speak not to us about Him-take them away. Light the fire with them. They are not worth their house-room. All our doctrines also of whatever kind; doctrines of science, of politics, of letters, of art, of theology, of morals-all are sound and safe for a man to go by himself, and to teach his children to go by, only in the measure that Jesus Christ is in them. It was really, and all the time, the Preacher Himself who was the goodly Pearl of that sermon and that day. "To whom can we go," said Peter when he was under the illumination of the Father,-"but unto Thee? Thou hast the words of eternal life." All of you, then, who are seeking for goodly pearls, whether in the world of books, or of doctrines, or of any other kind of good things; here, under your very eye; here, to your very hand, is the greatest and the best Pearl in all the world. For Jesus Christ gathers up into Himself all the truth, and all the beauty, and all the satisfaction, that your heart has for so long been seeking in vain. He is the Father's Pearl of great price. He is the one perfect Chrysolite of heaven on sale on earth. Who, then, on the spot will sell all that he has, and will be for ever after the wisest of merchant men? Nay, who will take away with him tonight God's greatest Pearl as God's free gift, without money and without price? For the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Pearl
gabish . Job 28:18. Literally, "ice"; "what is frozen", as in Ezekiel 13:11; Ezekiel 13:13; Ezekiel 38:22 with "stones." So translated "crystal." In Ezekiel 38:17, zekukit translated "glass" for "crystal." The orientals anciently valued the rock crystal for its beauty and pure luster. In the New Testament margaritoee mean "pearls" (Matthew 13:45-46; 1 Timothy 2:9; Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:12; Revelation 18:16; Revelation 21:21). In Matthew 7:16, "neither cast your pearls before swine," the pearls resemble peas or acorns, their natural food; so the swine, finding them not so, turn against the giver and rend him. Saving counsels offered to the swinish sensualist only provoke his filthiness and profanity (Proverbs 23:9; Proverbs 9:8).
The godly love even the sharp rebuke which heals their souls (Proverbs 15:31; Psalms 141:5; Job 13:23; Isaiah 39:8, Hezekiah; the Virgin, John 2:4-5; Galatians 2:14; 2 Peter 3:16. Peter). He that is filthy must be filthy still. Pearls are accidental concretions within certain molluscs, especially the Αvicula margaritifera found in the Indian ocean and Persian gulf and Pacific. Some foreign substance, introduced naturally or artificially, as a sandgrain, an egg, a parasite, or minute shell, forms the nucleus round which the surface of the mantle deposits nacreous or calcareous matter in thin layers, which hardening forms a shelly coat on the inner side of the valves. A pearl is an abnormal shell, reversed, i.e. the lustrous nacreous coat is external.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pearl
a hard, white, shining body, usually roundish, found in a shell fish resembling an oyster. The oriental pearls have a fine polished gloss, and are tinged with an elegant blush of red. They are esteemed in the east beyond all other jewels.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pearl
PEARL.—This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46). A distinction should be observed in the choice of this jewel as a metaphorical expression. In the case of coined money such as talents or pounds, the side of religion emphasized is the active life of good works, and the lesson conveyed is that of duty. The value of the pearl is not primarily a commercial value; it is something which appeals to its possessor as a unique and priceless possession, precious for its own inherent qualities of beauty and rarity, something for which all that a man has may be sold, itself to be jealously treasured, not to be cast at the feet of those to whom it has no meaning. The pearl is not, from the purchaser’s point of view, merely a counter of commerce, it has a beauty which is its own, and which can be appreciated only by him who knows. It stands not for any utilitarian aspect of religion, but for the secret shared between the soul and God, which loses its beauty and its value if it is paraded before those who do not understand its sanctity. The main points of the two passages would seem to be the transcendent beauty and preciousness of personal religion, and the need of reticent reverence to guard it.
M. R. Newbolt.
Webster's Dictionary - Mother-of-Pearl
(n.) The hard pearly internal layer of several kinds of shells, esp. of pearl oysters, river mussels, and the abalone shells; nacre. See Pearl.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pearl
PEARL. References in OT are uncertain. In Job 28:10 gâbîsh is in AV [1] tr. [2] ‘pearls,’ but in RV [3] ‘ crystal ,’ while pĕnînîm in same verse is in AV [1] tr. [2] ‘rubies,’ hut in RVm [6] ‘pearls.’ In Esther 1:6 dar should perhaps he rendered ‘pearl’ or ‘mother-of-pearl.’ In NT pearls (Gr. margaritai ) are mentioned in Matthew 7:8 ; Mat 13:45 f., 1 Timothy 2:9 , Revelation 21:21 . The last ref. must be to mother-of-pearl. Pearls are a pathological production of the mollusc Avicula. margaritifera .
E. W. G. Masterman.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Pearl
See Jewels and Jewelry; Minerals and Metals .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Pearl
(Heb. gabish ). The Hebrew word in ( Job 28:18 ) probably means "crystal." Pearls, however are frequently mentioned in the New Testament, (Matthew 13:45 ; 1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ; 21:21 ) and were considered by the ancients among the most precious of gems, and were highly esteemed as ornaments. The kingdom of heaven is compared to a "pearl of great price." In (Matthew 7:6 ) pearls are used metaphorically for anything of value, or perhaps more especially for "wise sayings." (The finest specimens of the pearl are yielded by the pearl oyster (Avicula margaritifera ), still found in abundance in the Persian Gulf and near the coasts of Ceylon, Java and Sumatra. The oysters grow in clusters on rocks in deep water, and the pearl is found inside the shell, and is the result of a diseased secretion caused by the introduction of foreign bodies, as sand, etc., between the mantle and the shell. They are obtained by divers trained to the business. March or April is the time for pearl fishing. A single shell sometimes yields eight to twelve pearls. The size of a good Oriental pearl varies from that of a pea to about three times that size. A handsome necklace of pearls the size of peas is worth ,000. Pearls have been valued as high as ,000 or ,000 apiece.--ED.)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pearl
The pearl of great price, mentioned, (Matthew 13:46) being a figurative expression to denote the preciousness of Jesus and his salvation, may serve, to explain wherefore it is that the glories of Christ's person, and the beauty of his church in him, are so often set forth in Scripture under the similitude of pearls, and rubies, and precious stones. The Hebrews called pearls peninim, (Job 28:18 and Proverbs 20:15) the same word is translated rubies. Some have considered them therefore as one and the same; but certainly they are very distinct things; however, the spiritual sense in that which relates to Christ and his church may be called both. Hence the description of the New Jerusalem. (Revelation 21:21) And indeed it is very blessed to eye Jesus under all the loveliness of everything we meet with in the whole compass of creation, both in the kingdoms of nature, providence, grace, and glory. All that is lovely, or beautiful, or useful, or ornamental, all derive their exellency from him. Jesus and his salvation surpasseth the gold of Ophir, the topaz of Æthiopia, and all the pearls and rubies of the world. So Jesus hath said, and so all his redeemed know it to be true: "Riches and honour are with me; (saith Christ) yea, durable riches and righteousness. My fruit is better than gold, yea, than fine gold; and my revenue than choice silver." (Proverbs 8:18-19)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pearl
PEARL.—This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46). A distinction should be observed in the choice of this jewel as a metaphorical expression. In the case of coined money such as talents or pounds, the side of religion emphasized is the active life of good works, and the lesson conveyed is that of duty. The value of the pearl is not primarily a commercial value; it is something which appeals to its possessor as a unique and priceless possession, precious for its own inherent qualities of beauty and rarity, something for which all that a man has may be sold, itself to be jealously treasured, not to be cast at the feet of those to whom it has no meaning. The pearl is not, from the purchaser’s point of view, merely a counter of commerce, it has a beauty which is its own, and which can be appreciated only by him who knows. It stands not for any utilitarian aspect of religion, but for the secret shared between the soul and God, which loses its beauty and its value if it is paraded before those who do not understand its sanctity. The main points of the two passages would seem to be the transcendent beauty and preciousness of personal religion, and the need of reticent reverence to guard it.
M. R. Newbolt.

Sentence search

Nacre - ) A Pearly substance which lines the interior of many shells, and is most perfect in the mother-of-pearl. ]'>[1] See Pearl, and Mother-of-pearl. ) Having the peculiar iridescence of nacre, or mother-of-pearl, or an iridescence resembling it; as, nacre ware
Pearlaceous - ) Resembling Pearl or mother-of-pearl; Pearly in quality or appearance
Mother-of-Pearl - ) The hard Pearly internal layer of several kinds of shells, esp. of Pearl oysters, river mussels, and the abalone shells; nacre. See Pearl
Pearl - ) To resemble Pearl or Pearls. ) To cause to resemble Pearls; to make into small round grains; as, to Pearl barley. ) Nacre, or mother-of-pearl. ) Hence, figuratively, something resembling a Pearl; something very precious. ) A shelly concretion, usually rounded, and having a brilliant luster, with varying tints, found in the mantle, or between the mantle and shell, of certain bivalve mollusks, especially in the Pearl oysters and river mussels, and sometimes in certain univalves. Its substance is the same as nacre, or mother-of-pearl. Pearls which are round, or nearly round, and of fine luster, are highly esteemed as jewels, and compare in value with the precious stones. ) To set or adorn with Pearls, or with mother-of-pearl. ) Of or pertaining to Pearl or Pearls; made of Pearls, or of mother-of-pearl. ) To give or hunt for Pearls; as, to go Pearling
Pearl - Pearl. ]'>[2] ‘pearls,’ but in RV [3] ‘pearls. ’ In Esther 1:6 dar should perhaps he rendered ‘pearl’ or ‘mother-of-pearl. ’ In NT Pearls (Gr. must be to mother-of-pearl. Pearls are a pathological production of the mollusc Avicula
Pinon - Pearl; gem; that beholds
Perlaceous - ) Pearly; resembling Pearl
Madreperl - ) Mother-of-pearl
Peninnah - Pearl; precious stone; the face
Marasritaceous - ) Pertaining to, or resembling, Pearl; Pearly
Margaric - ) Pertaining to, or resembling, Pearl; Pearly
Pearls - Their modest splendor still charms the Orientals, and a string of Pearls is a favorite decoration of eastern monarchs. The kingdom of heaven is compared to a goodly Pearl, so superior to all others that the Pearl merchant sold all others that he could obtain for it the highest price, Matthew 13:45,46 . The gates of heaven are described as consisting of Pearls; "every several gate was one Pearl," Revelation 21:21 . The Savior forbade his apostles to cast their Pearls before swine, Matthew 7:6 ; that is, to expose the precious truths of the gospel unnecessarily to those who reject them with scorn and violence. ...
Pearls are a stony concretion in a species of oyster, found in the Persian gulf, on the coast of Ceylon, Java, Sumatra, etc. It is not known whether the Pearl is a natural deposit, or the consequence of disease, or of the lodging of some foreign body, as a grain of sand, within the shells. The Pearl oyster grows in clusters, on rocks in deep water; and is brought up by trained divers, only during a few weeks of calm weather in spring. The shell itself yields the well- known "mother of Pearl
Pearl - " Pearls, however are frequently mentioned in the New Testament, (Matthew 13:45 ; 1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ; 21:21 ) and were considered by the ancients among the most precious of gems, and were highly esteemed as ornaments. The kingdom of heaven is compared to a "pearl of great price. " In (Matthew 7:6 ) Pearls are used metaphorically for anything of value, or perhaps more especially for "wise sayings. " (The finest specimens of the Pearl are yielded by the Pearl oyster (Avicula margaritifera ), still found in abundance in the Persian Gulf and near the coasts of Ceylon, Java and Sumatra. The oysters grow in clusters on rocks in deep water, and the Pearl is found inside the shell, and is the result of a diseased secretion caused by the introduction of foreign bodies, as sand, etc. March or April is the time for Pearl fishing. A single shell sometimes yields eight to twelve Pearls. The size of a good Oriental Pearl varies from that of a pea to about three times that size. A handsome necklace of Pearls the size of peas is worth ,000. Pearls have been valued as high as ,000 or ,000 apiece
Pearl - The Pearl oyster is found in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea. Its shell is the "mother of Pearl," which is of great value for ornamental purposes (1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ). Each shell contains eight or ten Pearls of various sizes
Penin'Nah - (coral or Pearl ), one of the two wives of Elkanah
Baroque - of a Pearl
Bdellium - It has been identified as a gum or resin, Pearl, or stone. In droplet form, the gum may have the appearance of a Pearl or stone
Bdellium - The word bedolach has been interpreted to signify both a white transparent oily gum, and a white Pearl. The white Pearl seems the more probable allusion, for the manna is in Exodus 16:14 compared also to the hoar frost
Pearlfish - ) Any fish whose scales yield a Pearl-like pigment used in manufacturing artificial Pearls, as the bleak, and whitebait
Ruby - Some render it "red coral;" others, "pearl" or "mother-of-pearl
Darda - Pearl of wisdom, one of the four who were noted for their wisdom, but whom Solomon excelled (1 Kings 4:31 )
Brill - ) A fish allied to the turbot (Rhombus levis), much esteemed in England for food; - called also bret, Pearl, prill
Margarite - ) A mineral related to the micas, but low in silica and yielding brittle folia with Pearly luster. ) A Pearl
Aphthae - ) Roundish Pearl-colored specks or flakes in the mouth, on the lips, etc
Avicula - ) A genus of marine bivalves, having a Pearly interior, allied to the Pearl oyster; - so called from a supposed resemblance of the typical species to a bird
Pearly - ) Containing Pearls; abounding with, or yielding, Pearls; as, Pearly shells. ) Resembling Pearl or Pearls; clear; pure; transparent; iridescent; as, the Pearly dew or flood
Tharos - ) A small American butterfly (Phycoides tharos) having the upper surface of the wings variegated with orange and black, the outer margins black with small white crescents; - called also Pearl crescent
Pearl - 1: μαργαρίτης (Strong's #3135 — Noun Masculine — margarites — mar-gar-ee'-tace ) "a Pearl" (Eng
Fierasfer - One species inhabits the gill cavity of the Pearl oyster near Panama; another lives within an East Indian holothurian
Peninnah - (pih nihn' nuh) Personal name perhaps meaning, “woman with rich hair,” “coral,” or “pearl
Abalone - The shell is lined with mother-of-pearl, and used for ornamental purposes; the sea-ear
Pearl - PEARL. —This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your Pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46). The value of the Pearl is not primarily a commercial value; it is something which appeals to its possessor as a unique and priceless possession, precious for its own inherent qualities of beauty and rarity, something for which all that a man has may be sold, itself to be jealously treasured, not to be cast at the feet of those to whom it has no meaning. The Pearl is not, from the purchaser’s point of view, merely a counter of commerce, it has a beauty which is its own, and which can be appreciated only by him who knows
Pearl - PEARL. —This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your Pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46). The value of the Pearl is not primarily a commercial value; it is something which appeals to its possessor as a unique and priceless possession, precious for its own inherent qualities of beauty and rarity, something for which all that a man has may be sold, itself to be jealously treasured, not to be cast at the feet of those to whom it has no meaning. The Pearl is not, from the purchaser’s point of view, merely a counter of commerce, it has a beauty which is its own, and which can be appreciated only by him who knows
Biloxi, Mississippi, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Jackson, Harrison, Hancock, George, Stone, Pearl River, Greene, Perry, Forrest, Lamar, Marion, Walthall, Wayne, Jones, Covington, Jefferson Davis, and Lawrence
Pearl - παργαρίτης is from 'to glisten, shine,' and perhaps refers to Pearls, such as are discovered in shells of various species. The gates of the heavenly Jerusalem were each of one Pearl. In the parable of the one Pearl of Great Price the Lord is represented as selling all that He had (as man and Messiah) in order to become its possessor
Darda - (dahr' duh) Personal name possibly meaning, “pearl of knowledge
Rubies - (Job 28:18 ) see also Proverbs 3:15 ; 8:11 ; 31:10 Some suppose "coral" to be in tended; others "pearl," supposing that the original word signifies merely "bright in color," or "color of a reddish tinge
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - THIS is one of those travelling jewellers of the East who compass sea and land in their search for goodly Pearls. He is always on the look-out for more and more precious Pearls. He is engaged in exploring a certain market of precious stones, when suddenly his eye falls on a Pearl the like of which he had never supposed to exist. Ascertaining from its owner the great price of the Pearl, the merchant man forthwith sells all that he possesses, and buys up on the spot that Pearl of great price. For he has spent his whole life in the search for the very best Pearls, till his emporium is famous for the size, and the beauty, and the value, of its Pearls. ...
Now, the world of books, to begin with, is not unlike a merchant man seeking goodly Pearls. For every really good book that a really good judge of books discovers becomes a Pearl of great price to him. Till as his reading life goes on, he as good as sells all his former books for the sake of this and that Pearl of books which he has discovered in the course of his reading. ...
During my Christmas holiday I have been renewing my acquaintance with that true Pearl of a book, Dr. " Before his eyes were opened, and before his taste was refined to distinguish Pearl from paste, Chalmers actually denounced John Newton, and Richard Baxter, and Philip Doddridge, from the pulpit, and as good as forbade his people to read them. But the day was fast coming when this great merchant man of ours was to sell all that he had in order to buy the very Pearls he had so scouted in the days of his disgraceful and guilty ignorance. " And of another goodly Pearl, whose title at least you all know, he writes, "I am on the eve of finishing Guthrie, which, I think, is the best book I ever read. " Now, you may be this kind of a merchant man that not some book, but some doctrine, of the kingdom of heaven may be to you your Pearl of great price. The true nature of Gospel faith has been a perfect Pearl of great price to some great men when at last they found it. Another will find his Pearl of great price in the spiritual doctrine of holy love, as was the case with John Wesley's English master, William Law. Till every genuine merchant man has his own special Pearls of divine truth; not to the denying or the despising of other men's purchases; but because his own Pearls of great price have so attracted him, and have so enriched him. ...
But after all that has been said about Pearls of great price and their purchase, every merchant man's own soul is his most precious Pearl. And our Lord counsels us all to sell all our other Pearls, good and bad, great and small, and buy up our own soul unto everlasting life. The Pearl of all Pearls to you and to me is our own immortal soul. And we do not have to compass sea and land in search of this Pearl of great price. ...
...
But then all that only ends, as every parable of His has ended, in making our Blessed Lord Himself the Pearl of all Pearls to us. All these partial, and, as it were, preliminary, Pearls take their value to us entirely from Him. It was really, and all the time, the Preacher Himself who was the goodly Pearl of that sermon and that day. " All of you, then, who are seeking for goodly Pearls, whether in the world of books, or of doctrines, or of any other kind of good things; here, under your very eye; here, to your very hand, is the greatest and the best Pearl in all the world. He is the Father's Pearl of great price. Who, then, on the spot will sell all that he has, and will be for ever after the wisest of merchant men? Nay, who will take away with him tonight God's greatest Pearl as God's free gift, without money and without price? For the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord
Agate - ) A kind of type, larger than Pearl and smaller than nonpareil; in England called ruby
Agate - ) A kind of type, larger than Pearl and smaller than nonpareil; in England called ruby
Mother - Hence mother of Pearl, the matrix of Pearl. MOTHER of Pearl, n. The matrix of Pearl the shell in which Pearls are generated a species of Mytilus or Mussel
Gold: Places of Its Abundance Undesirable - More or less this is true of all gold mining regions, and Humboldt, when writing of the Pearl Coast, says that it presents the same aspect of misery as the countries of gold and diamonds
Hidden Treasure, Parable of the - This parable is followed by that of the Pearl of great price and that of the fishing net and forms with those a group of parables found only in the Gospel of Saint Matthew. The two parables of the hidden treasure and of the Pearl of great price are closely related and teach the same lesson, namely the supreme value of the Kingdom of Heaven, for which all else must, be sacrificed without any hesitation
Pearl - Their names appear on these twelve Pearls. Having lived their lives, and the twelve tribes having gone through the terrible experiences of the centuries, these stones were changed into Pearls, for Pearls are the product of long suffering. The tiny stone in the shell becomes covered with the Pearl substance by the oyster because of suffering
Resurrection - ' Rent from the ignoble shell the Pearl is gone to deck the crown of the Prince of Peace; buried beneath the sod the seed is preparing to bloom in the King's garden
Orient - ) A Pearl of great luster
East - We speak of the riches of the east, the diamonds and Pearls of the east, the kings of the east. The gorgeous east, with richest hand, ...
Pours on her kings barbaric,pearl and gold
Union - ) A large, fine Pearl
Pearl - The Pearl of great price, mentioned, (Matthew 13:46) being a figurative expression to denote the preciousness of Jesus and his salvation, may serve, to explain wherefore it is that the glories of Christ's person, and the beauty of his church in him, are so often set forth in Scripture under the similitude of Pearls, and rubies, and precious stones. The Hebrews called Pearls peninim, (Job 28:18 and Proverbs 20:15) the same word is translated rubies. Jesus and his salvation surpasseth the gold of Ophir, the topaz of Æthiopia, and all the Pearls and rubies of the world
Pearl - In the New Testament margaritoee mean "pearls" (Matthew 13:45-46; 1 Timothy 2:9; Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:12; Revelation 18:16; Revelation 21:21). In Matthew 7:16, "neither cast your Pearls before swine," the Pearls resemble peas or acorns, their natural food; so the swine, finding them not so, turn against the giver and rend him. Pearls are accidental concretions within certain molluscs, especially the Αvicula margaritifera found in the Indian ocean and Persian gulf and Pacific. A Pearl is an abnormal shell, reversed, i
Cost, Costliness, Costly - 1), is used of a Pearl, Matthew 13:46 ; of spikenard, John 12:3 (RV, "very precious," AV "very costly")
Lord's Prayer, - It embodies every possible desire of a praying heart, a whole world of spiritual requirements; yet all in the most simple, condensed and humble form, resembling, in this respect, a Pearl on which the light of heaven plays
Wisdom: to Win Souls - He knows that his trade will be better pushed by homely remarks and cutting sentences than by the prosiest prettinesses which were ever delivered; and he gains his end, which is more than those of you will do who talk to people about their souls with as much richness of diction as: ...
'The girl who at each pretty phrase let drop A ruby comma, or Pearl full-stop, Or an emerald semicolon
Gate - The gates of the New Jerusalem are described as Pearls: "every several gate was of one Pearl," Revelation 21:12-25 : the entrances must be in keeping with the rest of the city. The Pearls represent the glories of Christ as seen in the church: cf
Water - The color or luster of a diamond or Pearl, sometimes perhaps of other precious stones as a diamond of the first water, that is, perfectly pure and transparent
Rich - The gorgeous East with richest hand pours on her sons barbaric Pearl and gold
Theodotus, Patriarch of Antioch - He is described by Theodoret, at one time one of his presbyters, as "the Pearl of temperance," "adorned with a splendid life and a knowledge of the divine dogmas" (Theod
Ear-Rings - These rings are of gold, and have commonly two Pearls and one ruby between them, placed in the ring; I never saw a girl, or young woman in Arabia, or in all Persia, who did not wear a ring after this manner in her nostril. Chardin observed two sorts of rings in the east; one so small and close to the ear, that there is no vacuity between them; the other so large, as to admit the fore finger between it and the ear; these last are adorned with a ruby and a Pearl on each side, strung on the ring
Damascus - Damascus is called by the Arabs "the Eye of the Desert" and the "Pearl of the East
Minerals And Metals - ” In Job 28:18 , KJV has “pearls”; the NIV, “jasper”; but NRSV, NAS, read, “crystal,” while REB has “alabaster. Pearl (Job 28:18 NAS, NRSV; KJV, NIV, “rubies”; REB, “red coral”) Formed around foreign matter in some shellfish. In the New Testament, Pearl serves as a simile for the kingdom of God ( Matthew 13:46 ), a metaphor for truth (Matthew 7:6 ), and a symbol of immodesty (1 Timothy 2:9 ; Revelation 17:4 ; Revelation 18:16 ). Pearl is also material for the gates of the New Jerusalem (Revelation 21:21 )
Kingdom of God - He said that the kingdom is like a farmer (Matthew 13:24 ), a seed (Matthew 13:31 ), a yeast (Matthew 13:33 ), a treasure (Matthew 13:44 ), a Pearl merchant (Matthew 13:45 ), a fishnet (Matthew 13:47 ), an employer (Matthew 20:1 ), a king inviting people to a marriage feast (Matthew 22:2 ), and ten young women (Matthew 25:1 ). It is a Pearl of such value that they should sell everything else they have in order to be able to purchase it (Matthew 13:44-46 )
Gain - ’ The thought finds its simplest and at the same time its fullest expression in the parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price, whose finder sells ‘with joy’ all that he has, to buy what he has discovered
Parable - ...
Pearl of great price, Matthew 13:45-46
Parable - The second is the Pearl OF GREAT PRICE. The merchant-man seeks goodly Pearls, and having found one Pearl of great price, sells all that he has to be possessed of it. The LEAVEN; the HIDDEN TREASURE; the Pearl OF GREAT PRICE; and the NET
Moth - The clothes moth is the tinea argentea; of a white, shining silver, or Pearl colour
Parable - The veil was so transparent as to allow the spiritual easily to see the truth underneath; the unspiritual saw only the sacred drapery of the parable in which He wrapped the Pearl so as not to cast it before swine. ...
Seven denotes "completeness"; they form a perfect prophetic series: the sower, the seedtime; the tares, the secret growth of corruption; the mustard and leaven, the propagation of the gospel among princes and in the whole world; the treasure, the hidden state of the church (Psalms 83:3); the Pearl, the kingdom prized above all else; the net, the church's mixed state in the last age and the final separation of bad from good
Ambition - He compared the earnestness of true followers with the ambition of a Pearl-merchant (Matthew 13:45), and encouraged the religious ambition of the young ruler by trying to turn it into a new and deeper channel (Matthew 19:21): ‘If thon wouldest be perfect, sell … give … and thou shalt have treasure in heaven
Treasure - This and the parable of the Pearl of Great Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Pearl of great price
Leper - Sometimes one limb alone is affected with a dead Pearl-like whiteness (compare Exodus 4:6, "Moses' hand was leprous as snow;" Numbers 12:10; Numbers 12:12, "as one dead, of whom the flesh is half consumed when he cometh out of his mother's womb;" 2 Kings 5:27)
Jewels, Jewelry - Pearls were highly valued in New Testament time and thus a fitting metaphor for the kingdom of God (Judges 8:21 ). In 1 Timothy 2:9-10 , women are reminded that the best adornment is not braids, gold, or Pearls, but good deeds. Each of the twelve gates is made of a single Pearl
Tears - One is reminded of the lines of Erasmus Darwin—...
No radiant Pearl which crested Fortune wears,...
No gem that, twinkling, hangs from Beauty’s ears,...
Not the bright stars which Night’s blue arch adorn,...
Nor rising stars that gild the vernal morn,...
Shine with such lustre as the tear that flows...
Down Virtue’s manly cheek for others’ woes
Matthew, Gospel by - Christ buys the field in view of the treasure hidden there, and also buys the Pearl of great price for its value in His eye
Premeditation - The parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price are the records of those who thoughtfully weigh all lesser things against the great adventure (Matthew 13:44-45)
Parable - In the pair of parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price we have two illustrations of like character to enforce the one truth, that to gain a possession of greatest value no sacrifice is too great. The attempt to discover resemblances between the Kingdom of heaven and the treasure or the Pearl may be homiletically admissible, but it is exegetically beside the mark
Hymns - There are many phrases which arrest attention, like the first words of Ode 34, which Harnack calls the ‘pearl of the collection’: ‘No way is hard when there is a simple heart
Bethlehem - Olive wood, and mother-of-pearl obtained from the Red Sea, with basaltic stone from the neighbourhood of the Dead Sea, are carved and wrought into useful and ornamental articles with no small degree of skill and taste. 91) that an increasing number of the inhabitants go abroad with their products,—their mother-of-pearl carvings and other wares,—and, especially in America, find a good return for their enterprise
Bethlehem - The village of Bethlehem contains about three hundred inhabitants, the greater part of whom gain their livelihood by making beads, carving mother-of-pearl shells with sacred subjects, and manufacturing small tables and crucifixes, all which are eagerly purchased by the pilgrims
Philemon Epistle to - 226) describes it as ‘full of grace and wit, of earnest, trustful affection,’ gleaming ‘among the rich treasures of the NT as a Pearl of exquisite fineness
New Jerusalem - And the twelve gates were twelve Pearls; each one of the several gates was of one Pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass’ (cf. What was exclusively for the high priest’s breastplate is now for the whole city of the New Jerusalem-the foundation stones with the names of the apostles are brilliant with all manner of sparkling gems, and each gate consists of a single monster Pearl
Nineveh - A picture represents him receiving from Jewish captives tribute of Jehu king of Israel, gold, Pearl, and oil
Parables - He uttered (1) parabolic sayings referring to the salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13 ) or throwing Pearls before swine (Matthew 7:6 ). ” Examples are the paired parables of the treasure and the Pearl (Matthew 13:44-46 ), the tower builder and the warring king (Luke 14:28-32 ), and the lost sheep and lost coin (Luke 15:3-10 )
Eternal Punishment - —The incomparable worth of the Kingdom, as the richest ‘treasure,’ and ‘pearl of great price’ (Matthew 13:44-45), and the supreme quest of it as the first duty and sovereign wisdom of life (Matthew 6:33), have, as their converse, the incomparable loss which the rejection of the gospel must inevitably entail
Absalom - Let us search the Scriptures up to the top and down to the bottom for this Pearl of great price
Nicodemus - Nicodemus saw the Pearl, and knew something of the value of it, but he could not make up his mind to sell all he possessed so as to pay the price
Kingdom of God - The parables of the hidden treasure and the valuable Pearl illustrate that when people are convinced of the priceless and lasting value of the kingdom of God, they will make any sacrifice to enter it (Matthew 13:44-46)
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Matthew 13: parables of the hidden treasure, the Pearl, and the drag-net
Justification - It may better be compared to a gem† Christ, Christology - In the twin parables of the treasure hidden in a field and the Pearl of great price (Matthew 13:44-46 ) Jesus describes the surprise and joy of discovering and acquiring great treasure, implying that the saving reign of God is present to be discovered and acquired
Parable - (7) Cost and recompense of citizenship: Hid Treasure ( Matthew 13:44 ), Pearl of Great Price ( Matthew 13:45 ); self is eliminated, but ‘all things are yours
Organization (2) - Christ imbued His disciples with an ideal; they accepted His declaration of a Kingdom of God unfettered in plan and method and time; they knew it was to come imperceptibly (‘the wind bloweth where it listeth,’ John 3:8), and to one the Kingdom will appear with the surprise of a treasure found in a field (Matthew 13:44), while to another it will be the Pearl gained at the willing cost of all else (Matthew 13:45)
High Priest - On it were the 12 stones in four rows, with the 12 tribes engraven in the order of the encampment; just as the names of the 12 tribes were on the 12 Pearl gates, and in the 12 foundations (of precious stones) of the New Jerusalem wall the names of the 12 apostles of the Lamb
Asceticism (2) - Thus a man must sell all that he has in order to purchase the field with the treasure, or the Pearl of great price (Matthew 13:44-46)
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - The last seven of these are called sermons upon the Pearl, which Ephrem takes as an emblem of the Christian faith, working out the idea with great beauty, though with that diffuseness which is the common fault of his writings
Religious Experience - —Nevertheless, as compared even with the best religious experiences of the Old Covenant, those of the New seemed like ‘new wine’ (Mark 2:22), like newly discovered treasure (Matthew 13:34), like a wedding day (Matthew 9:15), like the ‘one Pearl of great price’ (Matthew 13:46), like a king’s banquet (Matthew 22:2), like the rising of the sun (Luke 1:79, cf
Matthew, Gospel According to - Those of the Hid Treasure and of the Goodly Pearl emphasize its value, and teach the lesson that a man must give up all else to enter into it
Work - A merchant discovers a valuable Pearl (Matthew 13:45-46 )
Babylon - "The ground is extremely soft, and tiresome to walk over, and appears completely exhausted of all its building materials; nothing now is left, save one towering hill, the earth of which is mixed with fragments of broken brick, red varnished pottery, tile, bitumen, mortar, glass, shells, and pieces of mother of Pearl,"—worthless fragments, of no value to the poorest
Lutherans - Congruous merit was universally esteemed a Pearl above all price, the intrinsic value of which attracted the regard, and conciliated the benevolence, of the Almighty