What does Parables mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
παραβολαῖς a placing of one thing by the side of another 12
παραβολὰς a placing of one thing by the side of another 3
παραβολῆς a placing of one thing by the side of another 1
؟ מְשָׁלִ֖ים proverb 1

Definitions Related to Parables

G3850


   1 a placing of one thing by the side of another, juxtaposition, as of ships in battle.
   2 metaph.
      2a a comparing, comparison of one thing with another, likeness, similitude.
      2b an example by which a doctrine or precept is illustrated.
      2c a narrative, fictitious but agreeable to the laws and usages of human life, by which either the duties of men or the things of God, particularly the nature and history of God’s kingdom are figuratively portrayed.
      2d a parable: an earthly story with a heavenly meaning.
   3 a pithy and instructive saying, involving some likeness or comparison and having preceptive or admonitory force.
      3a an aphorism, a maxim.
   4 a proverb.
   5 an act by which one exposes himself or his possessions to danger, a venture, a risk.
   

H4912


   1 proverb, parable.
      1a proverb, proverbial saying, aphorism.
      1b byword.
      1c similitude, parable.
      1d poem.
      1e sentences of ethical wisdom, ethical maxims.
      

Frequency of Parables (original languages)

Frequency of Parables (English)

Dictionary

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Parables
From ancient times people have used pictures and stories from nature, history and everyday life to teach moral and spiritual truth. Broadly speaking, these pictures and stories are called parables. The Old Testament contains a number of stories that may be considered parables (Judges 9:8-15; 2 Samuel 12:1-4; 2 Kings 14:9), but by far the majority of parables in the Bible were spoken by Jesus.
Purpose of Jesus’ parables
Jesus’ parables were more than mere illustrations. They were stories designed to make people think, and often the hearers had to work out the meaning for themselves. The crowds that followed Jesus were often a hindrance, as many of the people were more interested in seeing him perform miracles than in making a spiritual response to his ministry. Jesus’ parables helped separate those who were genuinely interested from those who were merely curious (Mark 4:1-2; Mark 4:11-12).
This separation occurred as people exercised their minds to work out the meaning of the parables. Those who desired to know more of Jesus and his teaching found the parables full of meaning. As a result their ability to understand the teaching increased. Those who had no real interest in Jesus’ teaching saw no meaning in the parables at all and so turned away from him. As a result their spiritual darkness became darker, and their hardened hearts harder. Because their wills were opposed to Jesus, their minds could not appreciate his teaching. Their sins therefore remained unforgiven (Matthew 13:10-17; Mark 4:10-12).
Although the teaching of parables may have caused the idly curious to lose interest in Jesus, the basic purpose of a parable was to enlighten, not to darken. A parable was like a lamp, and a lamp was put on a stand to give people light, not hidden under a bowl or a bed to keep people in darkness. The more thought people gave to Jesus’ teaching, the more enlightenment and blessing they received in return. On the other hand the less thought they gave to it, the less chance they had of understanding any spiritual truth at all (Mark 4:21-25).
Parables of the kingdom
Because Jesus’ parables separated between the true and the false, many of them were concerned with the subject of the kingdom of God. God’s kingdom had, in a sense, come in the person of Jesus Christ. He announced the kingdom, and people’s response to his message determined whether they entered the kingdom (Matthew 13:18-23; Matthew 21:28-33; Matthew 21:42-43; Matthew 22:1-14; see KINGDOM OF GOD).
This was seen clearly in the parable of the sower, where the different kinds of soil illustrated the different responses that people made to the teaching of Jesus. Only those who wholeheartedly accepted it were God’s people (Matthew 13:1-9; Matthew 13:18-23). This parable was the key to understanding the others (Matthew 20:1-156). When the Jews, for whom the kingdom was prepared, rejected Jesus, Gentiles were invited and there was a great response (Matthew 22:1-10). Thus Gentiles, who in Old Testament times had not received the preparation for God’s kingdom that the Jews had received, entered into its full blessings along with believing Jews (Matthew 20:1-16).
Jesus pointed out that in the present world there will always be a mixture of those who belong to God’s kingdom and those who do not. When the final judgment comes, however, only the genuine believers will share in the triumphs of the kingdom (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:34-43; Matthew 13:47-50; Matthew 25).
God’s kingdom, then, is assured of final victory. From its insignificant beginnings among the ordinary people of Palestine it spreads throughout the world (Matthew 13:31-33). It is of such value that to enter it is worth any sacrifice (Matthew 13:44-46). It is something that reaches its fulfilment through the work of God himself (Mark 4:26-29).
Further characteristics of the parables
Whether or not Jesus’ parables are directly related to the subject of the kingdom in the manner just outlined, Jesus usually intended them to teach only one or two points. In some cases he mentioned these points (Matthew 21:43; Luke 12:21; Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10), but in others he left the hearers to find out for themselves (Mark 12:12-13; Luke 7:40-43; Luke 19:11-27). Likewise instead of giving a direct answer to a question or criticism, Jesus sometimes told a parable by which the hearer himself could work out the answer (Luke 10:29-30; Luke 15:2-3).
It is therefore important, in reading a parable, to find the chief purpose for which Jesus told it, and interpret the parable according to this purpose (Luke 18:1; Luke 18:9). There is no need to find meanings for all the details within the parable, as these are often nothing more than parts of the framework of the story. Indeed, it can be misleading to interpret some of these details, because in doing so we may miss, or distort, the meaning that Jesus intended.
For example, in the parable of 1618613278_92 Jesus was not teaching that an employer should give his workers equal pay for unequal work. Rather he was showing that even the most unlikely people enter God’s kingdom and, by God’s grace, they receive its full blessings (Matthew 20:16). Similarly in the parable of Luke 16:1-17 he was not advising people to use cunning or dishonesty in their business dealings. Rather he was teaching that if believers use their material possessions wisely, they are guaranteed heavenly riches of permanent value (Luke 16:9-11).
Whatever the main point of each of Jesus’ parables may have been, Jesus was inevitably forcing his hearers to a decision. He wanted people to listen and think (Matthew 18:12; Matthew 21:28; Luke 10:36), but more than that he wanted them to decide and act (Matthew 18:35; Matthew 21:45; Luke 10:37). And the challenge that Jesus brought through his parables is still relevant today (Matthew 13:9; Matthew 13:43).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Spiritualizing of the Parables
SPIRITUALIZING OF THE PARABLES.—‘The legs of the lame,’ says a Hebrew proverb, ‘hang loose; so is a parable in the mouth of fools’ (Proverbs 26:7); but it is possible to err in the opposite direction by pressing a parable too far, and, if the expression may be allowed, riding it to death. Such was the manner of the ancient interpreters, and it has been imitated by not a few in modern times. The error lies in forgetting that a parable is designed to teach one broad lesson, and insisting on discovering some significance in every detail. A glaring instance is Theophilus of Antioch’s exposition, quoted approvingly by St. Jerome,* [1] of the parable of the Steward (Luke 16:1-12), which inculcates simply the duty of being as shrewd in spiritual matters as men are wont to be in worldly affairs. The rich man, according to Theophilus, is Almighty God; the steward, St. Paul; the debtor who owed 100 baths of oil, the Gentiles, ‘qui magna indigebant misericordia Dei’; the debtor who owed 100 cors of wheat, the Jewish people, ‘which had been nourished by the wheat of God’s commandments.’ Euthymius Zigabenus, whose interpretation of ‘the fatted calf’ (Luke 15:23) as ‘the holy body of Christ’ is saved from being blasphemous only by the good monk’s simple piety, makes out that the rich man is God (τὸν φιλάνθρωπον καὶ ἀνενδεῆ θεόν); the steward, every possessor of riches, such being ‘not lords but stewards’; the steward’s dismissal, death. Some modern interpreters have gone quite as far in extravagance. Schleiermacher makes the rich man represent the Romans, the steward the tax-gatherers, the debtors the Jewish people. According to Olshausen, the rich man is ἄρχων τοῦ κόσμου, while the steward is the man who applies earthly riches to spiritual uses.
Origen’s exposition of the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37) is a masterpiece of ill-applied ingenuity. The traveller is Adam; Jerusalem is Paradise; Jericho is the world; the robbers are hostile demons; the Priest is the Law; the Levite is the Prophets; the Samaritan is Christ; the wounds are disobedience; the beast is the Lord’s body; the inn is the Church; the two denarii are the Father and the Son (the New and the Old Covenant, says Euthymius Zigabenus); the innkeeper is the Bishop.* [2]
The parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13) has furnished another fruitful field to spiritualizing interpreters. According to St. Chrysostom the lamps are the grace of virginity (τὸ τῆς παρθενίας χάρισμα); the oil is philanthropy, alms (τὴν φιλανθρωπίαν, τὴν ἐλεημοσύνην); the sellers are the poor, who afford the opportunity for alms-giving; the sleep of the virgins is death; the cry at midnight (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:16) shows that the Resurrection will take place by night. The lesson of the parable is that virginity without philanthropy is darkness. According to Origen and St. Jerome, the five virgins are the five senses. According to the latter, the oil is good works; according to the former, it is teaching, the vessels being the souls of the learners. There is much shrewd sense in Calvin’s caustic remark: ‘Some greatly torment themselves about the lamps, about the vessels, about the oil; but the simple and real gist is that eager zeal for a brief space does not suffice, unless unwearied constancy be added thereto.’ See, further, artt. Parable and Circumstantiality in the Parables.
David Smith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Circumstantiality in the Parables
CIRCUMSTANTIALITY IN THE PARABLES.—A parable consists of two members, viz. an illustration and a didactic part, which, according to the view we hold, may be called either the interpretation or the application. Both members are necessary to make the parable complete, though the didactic part need not be expressly stated, the circumstances in which the illustration is given making its purpose plain. Unfortunately the parables of Christ are mostly preserved only in fragmentary form. We have the illustrations, but not the lessons they were designed to enforce; and as we are uncertain as to the connexion in which those illustrations were given, it is sometimes difficult to make sure what Christ intended to teach by them. But if the Evangelists give little, sometimes even a misleading, light as to the context in which the parables were spoken, they record the illustrative portions of them with much fulness of detail. Particularly is this the case with those parables in which the illustration is in the form of a narrative. The story is told with much circumstantiality. Many little touches are introduced to heighten the effect. We are almost inclined to forget, at times, that the story is told with a purpose, so fully and circumstantially are its details narrated. Among the Evangelists, St. Luke is the most pronounced in the circumstantiality with which he reproduces the stories which Christ introduced in His parables. He likes to linger over them. He elaborates with a fulness of detail that brings the scene vividly before the mind. But though St. Luke is pre-eminent in this respect, all the Synoptists present the illustrative portion of the parables with move or less circumstantiality. And this feature of the parables suggests some questions which we may consider under the following heads:—(1) In how far is the circumstantiality of the narratives authentic? (2) If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we fix a limit beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details? (3) If we reject this principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we meet the objection that the circumstantiality of the illustrations is empty ornament?
1. The question of the authenticity of the circumstantiality of the illustrations is in many cases forced upon us by the fact that details which are recorded by one Evangelist are omitted by another For instance, in the parable of the Sower, St. Matthew and St. Mark say of the seed that fell by the wayside, that the fowls came and devoured it up, but St. Luke adds that it was trodden down (Luke 8:5). Again, in the parable of the Patch on the Old Garment, St. Matthew and St. Mark describe the patch as a piece of undressed cloth, while St. Luke heightens the folly of the proceeding by making the patch first be cut out of a new garment (ἀπὸ ἱματίου καινοῦ σχίσας, Luke 5:36). In many cases we find the explanation of such variations in the details of the parables in the desire of the Evangelists to emphasize the point and heighten the effect of the illustration. Such is possibly the case with the examples just given, and many other instances of the same tendency might be cited. To give a few more,—in the parable of the Supper (Matthew 22:1-14, Luke 14:15-24), St. Matthew merely says that the guests made light of the invitation and went their ways, one to his farm, another to his merchandise (Matthew 27:31-33,7); while St. Luke puts various excuses into the mouth of the guests (Luke 14:18-20). In the parable of the Lost Sheep (Matthew 18:12-14, Luke 15:4-7), St. Luke represents the owner as taking the lost sheep, when he has found it, upon his shoulders. In the parable of the Houses built upon the Rock and upon the Sand (Matthew 7:24-27, Luke 6:47-49), St. Matthew says merely that the wise man built upon the rock and the foolish upon the sand; but St. Luke represents the one as having to dig and go deep to find a foundation, while the other builds without a foundation, upon the earth. But in other cases we must assign a different motive for the variation in the details of the parables. Many seem due to an allegorizing tendency on the part of the Evangelists. They regarded the characters and events of the narratives as the counterparts of like characters and events in the religious sphere, and introduced details from this latter sphere into the illustration. Thus, for instance, when we compare St. Matthew’s version of the parable of the Supper with St. Luke’s (Matthew 22:1-14, Luke 14:15-24), many of the new features in St. Matthew appear to be due to this tendency. The Supper of St. Luke has become the marriage-feast of the king’s son, i.e. the Messiah; the king, in spite of the refusal of the guests, sends them a second invitation (Matthew 22:3-4); they ill-treat and slay the servants who bring the invitation, and the king sends forth his armies to destroy them and to bum their city (Matthew 22:6-7). Evidently these details are suggested by the thought of Israel’s behaviour towards her God, and the fate that overtook her. Again, in the parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, St. Mark relates that they took the son and slew him and cast him out of the vineyard; while St. Matthew and St. Luke reverse the order, and make them first cast him out and then slay him, with evident reference to the fate of Jesus (1618613278_56 cf. Hebrews 13:12). Again, in the parable of the Watchful Servants (Mark 13:33-37, Luke 12:35-38), St. Luke represents the master as girding himself and making them sit down to meat and serving them, though he has himself borne witness (Luke 17:7 ff.) to the unlikelihood of such conduct on the part of any ordinary master. Such extraordinary condescension is probably an allegorical feature introduced with reference to the Parousia.
2. If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ in how far are we justified in seeking to interpret the circumstantial details so largely present in the parables? There are some who insist that every little detail is significant, and who regard that as the true method of interpretation which seeks to find some spiritual truth to correspond to every item of the illustration. ‘Quanto enim plus solidae veritatis,’ says Vitringa (quoted by Trench, ch. iii.) ‘ex Verbo Dei eruerimus, si nihil obstet, tanto magis divinam commendabimus sapientiam.’ Teelman (quoted by Jülicher, Die Gleichnisreden Jesu, i. p. 270) insists that in every parable every word must be significant. And Petersen (ib. p. 271) maintains that Christ never introduces the slightest detail into any parable which is not designed to correspond to something in the interpretation. On the other hand, it has been generally recognized that there are limits beyond which the details of the illustration must not be pressed. ‘Sunt autem quae et simpliciter posita sunt,’ says Tert. (de Pudic. 9), ‘ad struendam et disponendam et texendam parabolam.’ Chrysostom (in Mt. Hom. lxiv. 3) lays down the rule: οὑδὲ χρὴ πάντα τὰ ἐν ταῖς παραβολαῖς κατὰ λέξιν περιεργάζεσθαι, ἀλλὰ τὸν σκοπὸν μαθόντας, διʼ δν συνετέθη, τοῦτον δρέπεσθαι καὶ μηδὲν πολυπραγμονεῖν περαιτέρω. But great difference of opinion exists, even among those who profess to observe Chrysostom’s canon, as to where the πολυπραγμονεῖν begins. Indeed, if the principle of ‘interpretation’ be admitted at all, if the parables, as such treatment of them involves, in spite of all protest to the contrary, are really allegories, it is difficult to see on what ground a line can be drawn beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details. The more perfect the allegory, the more will it admit of interpretation down to the minutest circumstance. And so long as the significance attached to these details is relevant to the tenor of the whole, the interpreter may well demand on what ground it may be objected that the details in question are not to be regarded as symbolical. The artificiality of the method and the unsatisfactoriness of the conclusions may be urged as an objection to the general principle of parabolical ‘interpretation’ underlying such method, but on that principle the method itself appears thoroughly defensible.
3. If we reject the principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ does not the circumstantiality of the illustrations become mere useless ornament? This is an objection raised against those who contend that the parables are not to be regarded as allegories of which we have to seek the interpretation, but as comparisons between the principle involved in some case taken from everyday life and a similar principle which it is desired to establish in the spiritual sphere. Those who maintain this view insist that it is only the principles or relations involved in the two different spheres that are compared, not the details on either side. There is only the one point of comparison between the two cases, only the one lesson enforced by the parable. In answer to the objection that this seems to reduce the fulness of detail with which the illustrations are elaborated to mere useless ornament, it is replied that though the details are not regarded as significant in the symbolical sense, they are yet full of significance as serving to bring out with force and clearness the thought which it is the purpose of the parable to enforce. Were the illustrations not presented with such circumstantiality, they would not be so convincing as they are. The scene is brought vividly before our eyes; our interest is awakened, our sympathy enlisted. Many of the details which cause such trouble to the allegorical interpreters, as, e.g., the injustice of the Judge (Luke 18:1-8) and the fraudulence of the Steward (Luke 16:1-12), may easily be explained from this point of view. The injustice of the Judge serves to bring out more forcibly that it was the importunity of the widow that overcame him; the fraud of the Steward emphasizes the fact that it was for his wisdom alone that he was commended. And so with all the details with which the parables are supplied. There is no useless ornament. Every little touch serves to bring out more clearly the central thought enforced by the illustration, and so contributes to the effect of the parable.
Literature.—See the list at the end of article Parable.
G. Wauchope Stewart.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible
PARABLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Trees choosing a king. Judges 9:7-15.
Samson's riddle. Judges 14:14.
Nathan and the eve lamb. 2 Samuel 12:1-6.
Woman of Tekoah. 2 Samuel 14:6-11.
Escaped prisoner. 1 Kings 20:35-40.
Thistle and cedar. 2 Kings 14:9.
The vine. Psalms 80:8-16.
Vineyard. Isaiah 6:1-7.
Eagle and vine. Ezekiel 17:3-10.
Lion's whelps. Ezekiel 19:2-9.
Boiling pot. Ezekiel 24:3-5.
Cedar in Lebanon. Ezekiel 31:3-18.
MIRACLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Enoch translated. Genesis 5:24 : Genesis 7:11-24.
The flood. Hebrews 11:5.
Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed. Genesis 19:24.
Lot's wife made a salt pillar. Luke 5:1-115.
Burning bush. Exodus 3:2-4.
Aaron's rod. Exodus 7:10-12.
Ten plagues of Egypt, Exodus 7:1 to Exodus 12:51 :
Waters turned to blood. Exodus 7:19-25.
Frogs. Exodus 8:6-14.
Lice. Exodus 8:17-18.
Flies. Luke 16:1-89.
Murrain, (cattle plague). Exodus 9:3-6.
Boils. Exodus 9:8-11.
Thunder, hail, etc. Exodus 9:22-26.
Locusts. Exodus 10:12-19.
Darkness. Exodus 10:21-29.
Death of the firstborn. Exodus 12:29-30.
Crossing of the Red Sea. Exodus 14:21-31.
Marah's waters sweetened. Exodus 15:23-25.
Giving the manna. Exodus 16:14-35.
Water from the rock at Horeb. Exodus 17:5-7.
Nadab and Abihu. Leviticus 10:1-2.
Fart of Israel burned. Numbers 11:1-3.
Korah and his company. Numbers 16:32.
Aaron's rod budding. Numbers 17:1, etc.
Water from the rock. Meribah. Numbers 20:7-11.
Brazen serpent. Numbers 21:8-9.
Balaam's ass speaks. Numbers 22:21-35.
River Jordan crossed. Joshua 3:14-17.
Walls of Jericho fall. Joshua 6:6-20.
Jeroboam's hand withered. Matthew 18:23-340; Mark 13:34-3647.
Widow's meal and oil increased. 1 Kings 17:14-16.
Widow's son raised. 1 Kings 17:17-24.
Elijah calls fire from heaven. 1 Kings 18:28.
Ahaziah's captains consumed by fire. 2 Kings 1:10-12.
Jordan divided by Elijah and Elisha. 2 Kings 2:7-8; 2 Kings 2:14.
Elijah carried to heaven, 2 Kings 2:11.
Waters of Jericho healed. 2 Kings 2:21-22
The widow's oil multiplied. 2 Kings 4:2-7.
Shunammite's son raised. 2 Kings 4:32-37.
Naaman and Gehazi. 2 Kings 5:10-27.
The iron axe-head swims. 2 Kings 6:5-7.
Syrian army's blindness. 2 Kings 6:18; 2 Kings 6:20.
Dead man raised. 2 Kings 13:21.
Sennacherib's army destroyed. 2 Kings 19:35.
Sun-dial of Ahaz. 2 Kings 20:9-11.
Uzziah struck with leprosy. 2 Chronicles 26:16-21.
Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego in the furnace. Daniel 3:19-27.
Daniel in the den of lions. Daniel 6:16-28.
Jonah and a great fish. Jonah 2:1-10.
PARABLES IN THE GOSPELS
1. Found in Matthew only (and not found in any other Gospel).—2.
The tares. Matthew 13:1-24.
Hid treasure. Matthew 13:44.
Pearl of great price. Matthew 13:46.
Dragnet. Matthew 13:47-48.
Unmerciful servant. 1618613278_36.
Laborers in the vineyard. Matthew 20:1-16.
The two sons. Matthew 21:28-32.
Marriage of king's son. Matthew 22:1-14.
Ten virgins. Matthew 25:1-13.
Ten talents. Matthew 25:14-30.
Sheep and goats. Matthew 25:31-46.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
The seed. Mark 4:26-29.
Householder. John 5:1-9.
3. Found in Luke only.—17.
Two debtors. Luke 7:41-43.
Good Samaritan. Luke 10:25-37.
Friend at midnight. Luke 11:5-8.
Rich fool. Luke 12:16-21.
Servants watching. Luke 12:35-40.
The servant on trial. Luke 12:42-48.
Barren fig tree. Luke 13:6-9.
Great supper. Luke 14:16-24.
Tower and warring king. Luke 14:28-33.
The lost silver. Luke 15:8-10.
Prodigal (lost) son. Luke 15:11-32.
The shrewd steward. 1618613278_70.
Rich man and Lazarus. Luke 16:19-31.
Unprofitable servants. Luke 17:7-10.
Unjust Judge. Luke 18:1-8.
Pharisee and publican. Luke 18:9-14.
Ten pounds. Luke 19:12-27.
4. In Matthew and Luke only.—3.
House on rock and sand. Matthew 7:24-27; Luke 6:48-49.
The leaven. Matthew 13:33; 1 Kings 13:4.
Lost sheep. Matthew 18:12; Luke 15:3-7.
5. In Matthew, Mark and Luke only.—7.
Light under a bushel. Matthew 5:15 : Mark 4:21; Luke 8:16.
Cloth and garment. John 11:38-446; Mark 2:21; Luke 5:36.
Wine and bottles. Matthew 9:17 : Mark 2:22; Luke 5:37.
The sower. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 8:1-56.
Mustard seed. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 13:1-35.
Wicked husbandmen. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 12:1-44; Luke 20:1-47.
The fig tree and the trees. Matthew 24:1-51; Mark 13:1-37; Luke 21:1-38.
MIRACLES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
A. In the Gospels.
1. Found in Matthew only (not in any other Gospel).—3.
Two blind men see. Matthew 9:27-31.
Dumb demoniac. Matthew 9:32-33.
Money (shekel) in the fish. Matthew 17:24-27.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
Deaf and dumb cured. Mark 7:31-37.
Blind man made to see. Mark 8:22-26.
3. Found in Luke only.—6.
Draught of fishes. 1618613278_56.
Raising widow's son. Luke 7:11-15.
Infirm woman healed. Luke 13:11-15.
Dropsy cured. Luke 14:1-6.
Ten lepers cleansed. Luke 17:11-19.
Malchus' ear healed. Luke 22:50-51.
4. Found in John only.—6.
Water made wine at Cana. John 2:1-11.
Nobleman's son healed. John 4:46-54.
Impotent man at Bethesda. 1618613278_1.
Sight to man born blind. John 9:1-7.
Lazarus raised to life. 1618613278_67.
Draught of 153 fishes. John 21:1-14.
5. In Matthew and Mark only.—3.
Syrophœnician's daughter. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 7:1-37.
Four thousand fed. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 8:1-38.
Withered fig tree. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 11:1-33.
6. In Matthew and Luke only.—2.
Centurion's servant.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Parables
Stories, especially those of Jesus, told to provide a vision of life, especially life in God's kingdom. Parable means a putting alongside for purposes of comparison and new understanding. Parables utilize pictures such as metaphors or similes and frequently extend them into a brief story to make a point or disclosure. Nevertheless, a parable is not synonymous with an allegory.
The difference between a parable and an allegory turns on the number of comparisons. A parable may convey other images and implications, but it has only one main point established by a basic comparison or internal juxtaposition. For example, the parable of the mustard seed (Mark 4:30-32 ; Matthew 13:31-32 ; Luke 13:18-19 ) compares or juxtaposes a microscopically small seed initially with a large bush eventually.
An allegory makes many comparisons through a kind of coded message. It correlates two areas of discourse, providing a series of pictures symbolizing a series of truths in another sphere. Each detail is a separate metaphor or what some call a cryptogram. If you are an insider who knows, you receive the second or intended message. Otherwise, you can follow only the surface story. Jonathan Swift's Guilliver's Travels is an allegory as is John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress . In the Old Testament, Ezekiel recounts an incident in nature about great eagles and vines (Luke 17:3-8 ) and then assigns a very allegorical application to each of the details (Luke 17:9-18 ).
The word allegory never appears in the Gospels. Parable is the basic figure Jesus used. Though no parable in the Synoptic Gospels is a pure allegory, some parables contain subordinated allegorical aspects, such as the parable of the wicked tenants ( Mark 12:1-12 ; Matthew 21:36-46 ;
Luke 20:9-19 ). Even in the parable of the Mustard Seed the passing reference to the birds of heaven nesting in the branches (Mark 4:32 ) may be an allegorical detail, but the distinction of the parable establishing a basic, single comparison remains and aids interpretation. See Allegory .
Parables Prior to Jesus Though Jesus perfected the oral art of telling parables, their background can be found in the Old Testament and in secular sources. The Old Testament employs the broader category of mashal , which refers to all expressions that contain a comparison. A mashal can be a proverb ( 1 Samuel 10:12 ), a taunt (Micah 2:4 ), a dark riddle (Mark 11:12-14,11 ), an allegory (Ezekiel 24:3-4 ), or a parable. The stories of Jesus are linked with the heritage of the prophetic parables in the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:23-29 ; Isaiah 5:1-7 ; 1 Kings 20:39-43 ; Ecclesiastes 9:13-16 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-4 ).
Perhaps the most interesting antecedent of the parables of Jesus comes from Nathan's word to David. Nathan told the unsuspecting David the seemingly harmless story of a rich man and a poor man living in the same city (2 Samuel 12:1-4 ). The poor man owned only a single little ewe lamb he loved as a household pet while the rich man possessed large flocks; yet when the wealthy farmer had a guest to serve, he seized the poor man's single lamb for the dinner! The teller of the story was living dangerously as he seized a teachable moment to confront the life of the most famous king of Israel. He sought to get inside David's guard and cut the iron bonds of his self-deception to strike a moral blindness from his eyes. In a sense, it was a well-laid trap since David responded with moral outrage, thus condemning himself. Nathan then applied the parable to the king's affair with Bathsheba (2 Samuel 12:5-14 ). This eventful parable and others in the Old Testament belong to the same tradition in which our Lord stood.
The parable was also recognized as a literary type before the time of Jesus in the writings of the Greeks concerning rhetoric. The famous writer Homer included 189 parables in The Illiad and 39 more in The Odyssey . Plato's poetic speech was rich in similitudes interwoven into his speech, but not so much independent unities like those of Jesus. Some of the illustrations of Socrates were parabolic. Aristotle recognized the place of parable in his writings.
Stormy debate rages among Bible students regarding the further question of parables from the rabbis before and during the ministry of Jesus. Scholars like C. A. Bugge and Paul Fiebig pointed to numerous rabbinic parables deriving from the beginning of the first century A.D. Others, such as Jeremias, found almost none until after the days of Jesus. We do know of parables from the rabbis soon after the time of Jesus, and we do recognize that the parables of Jesus are not only far more compelling but center in the coming kingdom of God rather than in exposition of the Law or Torah as the rabbinic parables.
Jesus' Special Use of Parables Many of the parables grew out of the conflict situations when Jesus answered His religious critics. These answering parables, usually for Pharisees and sinners simultaneously, expose and extol. Jesus exposed the self-righteousness of His critics and extolled the kingdom of God. When John the Baptizer was accosted for being too serious and Jesus for being too frivolous, Jesus came back with the parable of the playing children (Matthew 11:16-19 ; Luke 7:31-35 ) to expose the inconsistency of the criticism. In His most famous parable, He extolled the forgiving love of the father and exposed the hostile criticism of the unforgiving elder brother (Luke 15:11-32 ).
In fact, Jesus interpreted His ministry and its place in salvation history by means of parable. He addressed different audiences such as the crowds, the disciples, and the critics with definite purposes. Indeed, the Teller as well as the tale is important. That is, the fact that Jesus was the author affects the meaning. As Jesus interpreted His ministry through parables, these sometimes have a “Christological penetration.” Jesus Himself appears indirectly in the story (Mark 3:23-27 ). The parables are not merely clever stories but proclamation of the gospel. The hearer must respond and is invited by the story to make a decision about the kingdom and the King. The parable of the wicked tenants (Mark 12:1-12 ) represented a blatant confrontation.
These stories got Jesus in trouble as He made veiled claims of kingliness and exposed the hypocrisy regnant in the religious hierarchy. One of the reasons they crucified Jesus was because of His challenging parables and the claims of his Kingdom.
Jesus' Different Kinds of Parables Jesus could turn people's ears into eyes, sometimes with a still picture and then again with a moving picture. He uttered (1) parabolic sayings referring to the salt of the earth (Matthew 5:13 ) or throwing pearls before swine (Matthew 7:6 ). These parable germs or incipient parables were generally one liners with a picturesque appeal to the imagination. Remarkably, the Gospel of John has no parables as such; it does include thirteen parabolic sayings.
Jesus also spoke (2) simple parables which represent a picture elaborated into a story. These extended pictures portray a general situation growing out of a typical experience and appealing to common sense. They are often specifically concerning the kingdom of God and are introduced with a saying, “The Kingdom of God is like.” Examples are the paired parables of the treasure and the pearl (Matthew 13:44-46 ), the tower builder and the warring king (Luke 14:28-32 ), and the lost sheep and lost coin (Luke 15:3-10 ). They are extended similes.
Additionally, Jesus told his famous (3) narrative parables that represent a specific situation and often include in the first sentence reference to a certain person. While Matthew reported a great many parabolic sayings, Luke contains numerous narrative parables, such as the parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ), the compassionate Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37 ), and the rich fool (Luke 12:16-21 ). A narrative parable is a dramatic story composed of one or more scenes, drawn from daily life yet focused on an unusual, decisive circumstance.
Special Literary Considerations Narrative parables and the simple parables total more than forty examples. Certain metaphors recur in the different parables. For example, seed parables such as those of the sower, the seed growing of itself, and the mustard seed in Mark 4:1 focus on the nature of the coming kingdom. Master/servant parables reflect a time of critical reckoning. Kingly parables, especially in Matthew, portray the sovereignty of the divine judgment and grace. Householder parables feature an authority figure whose purpose is resisted or rejected yet whose will is finally achieved. This latter category points to the realism of rejection of the will of God fully allowable on the one hand by the divine provision of freedom, yet on the other hand the divine insistence of the eventual triumph of His loving purpose.
Attention to parable form also brings up the prominence of the question format, the refusal parables, and the place of direct discourse. Jesus intended to involve His hearers, and so He constructed many parables that amount to one big question. The parable of the servant and his wages moves by means of two questions (Luke 17:7-10 ). The parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ) includes four questions. These interrogatives within parables often define a dilemma (Luke 12:20 ; Mark 12:9 ) or call for an agreeing nod in one area of life that carries over to another.
The refusal parables are those that express the intention of a character not to do what is requested: “I do not will.” The elder brother refused to enter the festivities in honor of the prodigal son (Mark 4:26-297 ), and wedding guests rejected the invitation to attend the festivities of a wedding (Matthew 22:3 ). These and other examples of the refusal to do the will of God recognize the reality of human pride, stubbornness, hypocrisy, and rejection Jesus encountered during His proclaiming ministry.
Direct discourse is also immensely important in many of the parables because it brings the stories to life. Through the human conversation the parable often makes its point, especially in the last speech. Surely Jesus delivered these lines from each of the parabolic characters in a most animated fashion and even interpreted His parables by the tone of His voice.
Common Theme of Jesus' Parables Jesus' great thesis centers on the kingdom of God (Mark 1:15 ). Each parable explores and expands the theme. The kingship of God or Yahweh may be found first in the Old Testament (Psalm 24:9-10 ; Isaiah 6:5 ). Daniel 4:1 proclaims the divine sovereignty over the secular kingdoms, and the Ten Commandments require full obedience to God.
Jesus lifted the theme to new heights and through His parables portrayed the nature of the kingdom (1618613278_63 ), the grace of the kingdom (Luke 18:9-17 ), the crisis of the kingdom (Luke 12:54-56 ), and the conditions of the kingdom such as commitment (Luke 14:28-30 ), forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35 ), and compassion (Luke 10:25-37 ).
The parables further proclaim the kingdom as ethical, experiential or existential, eschatological, and evangelistic. Several parables accentuate ethical concerns such as attitude toward one's fellows (Luke 18:9-14 ; Luke 15:25-32 ; Matthew 18:23-35 ). —Jesus insisted on being religious through relationships. The rousing call to repentance embodied in many parables requires a moral and spiritual reorientation of life around the kingdom.
Many parables reach the watertable of common experience and illumine existence or life. Jesus could expose a pale or petrified life. He could convey the moving experience of being lost in the far country and then to come to oneself and go home (Luke 15:17 ). His parables exposed the inauthentic life aggressively self-centered and greedy (Luke 12:13-21 ; Luke 16:19-31 ).
As Jesus proclaimed through parables, God was bursting into history, the hinge of history had arrived. He announced it with urgency. He brought an otherwordly perspective to bear in the parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21 ). He foresaw the full future coming of the kingdom (Matthew 13:8 ,Matthew 13:8,13:30 ,Matthew 13:30,13:32 ,Matthew 13:32,13:39 ).
The parables are evangelistic because they sought to stimulate a decision and change a life. They invited the audience to repent and believe. The parables intended to awaken faith. The Teller's faith was contagious. The segment about the elder brother (Luke 15:25-32 ) is unfinished and open-ended. He could choose to swallow his pride, activate his own forgiving spirit, put on his dancing shoes, and join the party.
Unspoken Parables Like the prophets, Jesus enacted some of His intended message. His parabolic acts were boldly done. For example, He chose from His larger following a special group of twelve disciples (Mark 3:13-19 ), symbolizing His creation of a new Israel. Throughout His ministry, Jesus graciously received spiritual and social outcasts as the Friend of sinners, indicating the Father's loving grace. He cursed the fig tree (Mark 11:12-14 ,Psalm 78:2:20-21 ), pointing to the divine judgment on Israel. He rode into Jerusalem in regal humility on the first Psalm Sunday, calling forth Zechariah's expectation. He cleansed the Temple (Mark 11:15-19 ), enacting God's will for Israel to be a light to the nations. At the last supper as He broke the bread and poured the wine, He enacted with miniparables the loving sacrifice of Calvary.
Parables Perspective on Life Some of the stories carry a pastoral and others a prophetic relevance. They have both sugar and steel. The parable of the mustard seed speaks pastorally about ending despair, and the parable of the persistent widow (Luke 18:1-8 ) encourages to hang in there. The parable of the barren fig tree (Luke 13:6-9 ) speaks prophetically concerning national priorities; the parable of the wicked tenants accosts arrogant religious leaders; and the parable of the rich fool confronts false confidence in materialism. Through the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector, grace peers down on two people praying in the Temple, and appearances take a pounding. Grace shines on worship, and revelation happens! See Kingdom of God ; Jesus.
Peter Rhea Jones

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Parable - Jesus used Parables extensively. Some of the OT Parables are Trees Making a King (2 Samuel 12:1-4); The Thistle and the Cedar (2 Kings 14:9); Israel, a Vine Planted by Water (Ezekiel 24:1014), etc. Some NT Parables are The Sower (Luke 8:5-8); the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13); The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37); The Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32), etc. See Parables
Samaritan, the Good - See Parables
Mishal - Parables; governing
Parabolist - ) A narrator of Parables
Illustration - See Imagery ; Parables ; Proverb; Wise Saying
Parable - In the New Testament, (1) a proverb (Mark 7:17 ; Luke 4:23 ), (2) a typical emblem (Hebrews 9:9 ; 11:19 ), (3) a similitude or allegory (Matthew 15:15 ; 24:32 ; Mark 3:23 ; Luke 5:36 ; 14:7 ); (4) ordinarily, in a more restricted sense, a comparison of earthly with heavenly things, "an earthly story with a heavenly meaning," as in the Parables of our Lord. Instruction by Parables has been in use from the earliest times. A large portion of our Lord's public teaching consisted of Parables. He himself explains his reasons for this in his answer to the inquiry of the disciples, "Why speakest thou to them in Parables?" (Matthew 13:13-15 ; Mark 4:11,12 ; Luke 8:9,10 ). ...
The Parables uttered by our Lord are all recorded in the synoptical (i. (See List of Parables in Appendix
Mishlei - The book of Tanach containing Solomon's wise sayings and Parables
Parables - Parables utilize pictures such as metaphors or similes and frequently extend them into a brief story to make a point or disclosure. Though no parable in the Synoptic Gospels is a pure allegory, some Parables contain subordinated allegorical aspects, such as the parable of the wicked tenants ( Mark 12:1-12 ; Matthew 21:36-46 ;...
Luke 20:9-19 ). ...
Parables Prior to Jesus Though Jesus perfected the oral art of telling Parables, their background can be found in the Old Testament and in secular sources. The stories of Jesus are linked with the heritage of the prophetic Parables in the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:23-29 ; Isaiah 5:1-7 ; 1 Kings 20:39-43 ; Ecclesiastes 9:13-16 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-4 ). ...
Perhaps the most interesting antecedent of the Parables of Jesus comes from Nathan's word to David. The famous writer Homer included 189 Parables in The Illiad and 39 more in The Odyssey . ...
Stormy debate rages among Bible students regarding the further question of Parables from the rabbis before and during the ministry of Jesus. Bugge and Paul Fiebig pointed to numerous rabbinic Parables deriving from the beginning of the first century A. We do know of Parables from the rabbis soon after the time of Jesus, and we do recognize that the Parables of Jesus are not only far more compelling but center in the coming kingdom of God rather than in exposition of the Law or Torah as the rabbinic Parables. ...
Jesus' Special Use of Parables Many of the Parables grew out of the conflict situations when Jesus answered His religious critics. These answering Parables, usually for Pharisees and sinners simultaneously, expose and extol. As Jesus interpreted His ministry through Parables, these sometimes have a “Christological penetration. The Parables are not merely clever stories but proclamation of the gospel. One of the reasons they crucified Jesus was because of His challenging Parables and the claims of his Kingdom. ...
Jesus' Different Kinds of Parables Jesus could turn people's ears into eyes, sometimes with a still picture and then again with a moving picture. These parable germs or incipient Parables were generally one liners with a picturesque appeal to the imagination. Remarkably, the Gospel of John has no Parables as such; it does include thirteen parabolic sayings. ...
Jesus also spoke (2) simple Parables which represent a picture elaborated into a story. ” Examples are the paired Parables of the treasure and the pearl (Matthew 13:44-46 ), the tower builder and the warring king (Luke 14:28-32 ), and the lost sheep and lost coin (Luke 15:3-10 ). ...
Additionally, Jesus told his famous (3) narrative Parables that represent a specific situation and often include in the first sentence reference to a certain person. While Matthew reported a great many parabolic sayings, Luke contains numerous narrative Parables, such as the parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ), the compassionate Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37 ), and the rich fool (Luke 12:16-21 ). ...
Special Literary Considerations Narrative Parables and the simple Parables total more than forty examples. Certain metaphors recur in the different Parables. For example, seed Parables such as those of the sower, the seed growing of itself, and the mustard seed in Mark 4:1 focus on the nature of the coming kingdom. Master/servant Parables reflect a time of critical reckoning. Kingly Parables, especially in Matthew, portray the sovereignty of the divine judgment and grace. Householder Parables feature an authority figure whose purpose is resisted or rejected yet whose will is finally achieved. ...
Attention to parable form also brings up the prominence of the question format, the refusal Parables, and the place of direct discourse. Jesus intended to involve His hearers, and so He constructed many Parables that amount to one big question. These interrogatives within Parables often define a dilemma (Luke 12:20 ; Mark 12:9 ) or call for an agreeing nod in one area of life that carries over to another. ...
The refusal Parables are those that express the intention of a character not to do what is requested: “I do not will. ...
Direct discourse is also immensely important in many of the Parables because it brings the stories to life. Surely Jesus delivered these lines from each of the parabolic characters in a most animated fashion and even interpreted His Parables by the tone of His voice. ...
Common Theme of Jesus' Parables Jesus' great thesis centers on the kingdom of God (Mark 1:15 ). ...
Jesus lifted the theme to new heights and through His Parables portrayed the nature of the kingdom (Mark 4:26-29 ), the grace of the kingdom (Luke 18:9-17 ), the crisis of the kingdom (Luke 12:54-56 ), and the conditions of the kingdom such as commitment (Luke 14:28-30 ), forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35 ), and compassion (Luke 10:25-37 ). ...
The Parables further proclaim the kingdom as ethical, experiential or existential, eschatological, and evangelistic. Several Parables accentuate ethical concerns such as attitude toward one's fellows (Luke 18:9-14 ; Luke 15:25-32 ; Matthew 18:23-35 ). The rousing call to repentance embodied in many Parables requires a moral and spiritual reorientation of life around the kingdom. ...
Many Parables reach the watertable of common experience and illumine existence or life. His Parables exposed the inauthentic life aggressively self-centered and greedy (Luke 12:13-21 ; Luke 16:19-31 ). ...
As Jesus proclaimed through Parables, God was bursting into history, the hinge of history had arrived. ...
The Parables are evangelistic because they sought to stimulate a decision and change a life. The Parables intended to awaken faith. ...
Unspoken Parables Like the prophets, Jesus enacted some of His intended message. At the last supper as He broke the bread and poured the wine, He enacted with miniparables the loving sacrifice of Calvary. ...
Parables Perspective on Life Some of the stories carry a pastoral and others a prophetic relevance
Maggid of dubna (r. yaakov wolf krantz) - Rabbi Yaakov Krantz, 1741-1804; famous European preacher, best known for his Parables ...
Proverbs - Proverbs, the Book of: The book of Tanach containing Solomon's wise sayings and Parables
Parable - This single insight could have saved the history of interpretation of the Parables of Jesus from several key misconceptions. From Jülicher on, based on the Aristotelian Greek idea of parable as "pure comparison" conveying only a single point, there has been a significant school of interpretation that has regarded all allegorical traits as foreign to the Parables of Jesus and has insisted that each parable has only one point. This narrow definition of parable has led interpreters to regard the allegorical interpretations of Parables in the Gospels (e. For many Parables, such as the prodigal son, limiting the interpretation to "one point" has proved to be a procrustean bed. ...
Nathan's parable of the ewe lamb in 2 Samuel 12:1-4 foreshadows in several respects many of Jesus' Parables. Similarly, many of Jesus' Parables elicit a judgment that invites repentance, such as the good Samaritan. His Parables lead us to a new way of seeing life and invite us to adopt a whole new perspective that changes how we live. " Thus, the allegorical interpretations of Jesus' Parables in the Gospels follow the pattern in the Old Testament, a pattern that is abundantly exemplified in rabbinic literature as well. ...
Jesus' narrative Parables are probably best understood as extended metaphors. Understanding the message of a parable is more than identifying its "point, " though many Parables do have a focal point that is reinforced by the parable as a whole. Such a combination of cursing and blessing seems to have been typical of Jesus' contrast Parables: eschatological blessing for those who respond properly to God's invitation, but cursing for those who do not. ...
Of Jesus' fifty-two recorded narrative Parables, twenty seem to depict him in imagery that in the Old Testament metaphorical use typically referred to God. In the vast corpus of rabbinic Parables there seems to be none in which a rabbi depicted himself. This distinctiveness, like the distinctive artistry of Jesus' Parables, is further evidence that the Parables recorded in the Gospels are authentic to Jesus. ...
The imagery that Jesus used to depict himself is an integral and often necessary part of the Parables in which they occur. Furthermore, these symbols for God applied by Jesus to himself in the Parables are not interpreted in the Gospels as divine claims. ...
The argument implicit in many of these Parables depends on the hearer's making an association that equates Jesus' act with God's act. ...
Not only do these Parables depict Jesus as performing the work of God; they implicitly apply various titles of God to Jesus: the Sower, the Rock, the Shepherd, the Bridegroom, the Father, the Lord, and the King. Each of these Parables adds to the overall impression that Jesus implicitly claimed to be God. Most parable studies that deal with the sort of implicit claim Jesus was making through the Parables assume that it is a messianic claim, but most of this imagery was not used in the Old Testament to depict the Messiah. Even those symbols that were occasionally also used of the Messiah in the Old Testament (shepherd, king, stone) in Jesus' Parables refer more naturally to God. ...
However, could Jesus' use of these symbols for God mean simply that he saw himself, as all of the prophets did, as doing God's work and speaking God's word? A few of these Parables, like the two houses and the two sons, with their particular focus on obedience to Jesus' word, could be interpreted in this way. But three points support the view that Jesus was in fact presenting himself as God: ...
None of the prophets applied symbols for God to himself in the way that Jesus did so consistently in his Parables. Yet it is precisely these things that Jesus so often depicted himself as doing in the Parables: forgiving sin, sowing the kingdom, sowing his word in men's hearts, graciously welcoming undeserving sinners into the kingdom, seeking out and rescuing his lost sheep, directing the harvest of the great judgment, and dividing between those who will and those who will not enter the kingdom. Did he really understand himself to be deity? Here in the Parables, the most assuredly authentic of all the traditions about Jesus, is a clear, implicit affirmation of Jesus' self-understanding as deity. ...
Jesus' Parables depict many aspects of the kingdom of God. Blomberg, Interpreting the Parables ; C. Dodd, The Parables of the Kingdom ; J. Jeremias, The Parables of Jesus ; P. Stein, An Introduction to the Parables of Jesus ; D. Wenham, The Parables of Jesus
Aggadah - "lore or narrative"); the portions of the Talmud and Midrash which contain homiletic expositions of the Bible, Parables, stories, maxims, etc
Parables - Broadly speaking, these pictures and stories are called Parables. The Old Testament contains a number of stories that may be considered Parables (Judges 9:8-15; 2 Samuel 12:1-4; 2 Kings 14:9), but by far the majority of Parables in the Bible were spoken by Jesus. ...
Purpose of Jesus’ Parables...
Jesus’ Parables were more than mere illustrations. Jesus’ Parables helped separate those who were genuinely interested from those who were merely curious (Mark 4:1-2; Mark 4:11-12). ...
This separation occurred as people exercised their minds to work out the meaning of the Parables. Those who desired to know more of Jesus and his teaching found the Parables full of meaning. Those who had no real interest in Jesus’ teaching saw no meaning in the Parables at all and so turned away from him. ...
Although the teaching of Parables may have caused the idly curious to lose interest in Jesus, the basic purpose of a parable was to enlighten, not to darken. ...
Parables of the kingdom...
Because Jesus’ Parables separated between the true and the false, many of them were concerned with the subject of the kingdom of God. ...
Further characteristics of the Parables...
Whether or not Jesus’ Parables are directly related to the subject of the kingdom in the manner just outlined, Jesus usually intended them to teach only one or two points. ...
Whatever the main point of each of Jesus’ Parables may have been, Jesus was inevitably forcing his hearers to a decision. And the challenge that Jesus brought through his Parables is still relevant today (Matthew 13:9; Matthew 13:43)
Parable - A fable or allegorical instruction, founded on something read or apparent in nature or history, from which a moral is drawn, by comparing it with something in which the people are more immediately concerned: such are the Parables of Dives and Lazarus, or the prodigal son, of the ten virgins, &c. Blair observes, that "of Parables, which form a part of allegory, the prophetical writings are full; and if to us they sometimes appear obscure, we must remember, that, in those early times, it was universally the mode throughout all the eastern nations, to convey sacred truths under some mysterious figures and representations
Hidden Treasure, Parable of the - One of the Parables of the lakeside reproduced by Saint Matthew; in which different aspects of the Kingdom of Heaven are brought out by Our Lord. This parable is followed by that of the pearl of great price and that of the fishing net and forms with those a group of Parables found only in the Gospel of Saint Matthew. The two Parables of the hidden treasure and of the pearl of great price are closely related and teach the same lesson, namely the supreme value of the Kingdom of Heaven, for which all else must, be sacrificed without any hesitation. The lesson comes out so clearly that Our Lord does not give an explanation of these two Parables to the disciples
Parable - "Both kingdoms develop themselves according to the same laws; Jesus' Parables are not mere illustrations, but internal analogies, nature becoming a witness for the spiritual world; whatever is found in the earthly exists also in the heavenly kingdom. ) The Parables, earthly in form heavenly in spirit, answer to the parabolic character of His own manifestation. Jesus' purpose in using Parables is judicial, as well as didactic, to discriminate between the careless and the sincere. ...
In His earlier teaching, as the Sermon on the Mount, He taught plainly and generally without Parables; but when His teaching was rejected or misunderstood, He in the latter half of His ministry judicially punished the unbelieving by parabolic veiling of the truth (Matthew 13:11-16), "therefore speak I to them in Parables, because they seeing see not . The disciples' question (Luke 15:1-2), "why speakest Thou unto them in Parables?" shows that this is the first formal beginning of His parabolic teaching. The Parables found earlier are scattered and so plain as to be rather illustrations than judicial veilings of the truth (Matthew 7:24-27; Matthew 9:16; Matthew 12:25; Mark 3:23; Luke 6:39). The change of mode would awaken attention, and judgment thus end in mercy, when the message of reconciliation addressed to them first after Jesus' resurrection (Acts 3:26) would remind them of Parables not understood at the time. When explained, the Parables would be the clearest illustration of truth. On the other hand, enlightening the diligent seeker, who asks what means this parable? and is led so to "understand all Parables" (Mark 4:13; Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 16:11), and at last to need no longer this mode but to have all truth revealed plainly (John 16:25). Hebrew, Matthew 13:3); the commonness of their use was His first reason for employing them, He consecrated Parables to their highest end. Even the disciples, through Jewish prejudices, were too weak in faith impartially to hear gospel truths if presented in naked simplicity; the Parables secured their assent unawares. As in the prophecies, so in Parables, there was light enough to guide the humble, darkness enough to confound the willfully blind (John 9:39; Psalms 18:26). Parables were repositories of truths not then understood, even when plainly told (Luke 18:34), but afterward comprehended in their manifold significance, when the Spirit brought all Jesus' words to their remembrance. The first four Parables have a mutual connection (Matthew 13:3; Matthew 13:24; Matthew 13:31; Matthew 13:33), and were spoken to the multitude on the shore; then Matthew 13:34 marks a break. On His way to the house He explains the parable of the sower to the disciples; then, in the house, the tares (Matthew 13:36); the three last Parables (Matthew 13:44-52), mutually connected by the thrice repeated "again," probably in private. The second group of Parables are less theocratic, and more peculiarly represent Christ's sympathy with all men, and their consequent duties toward Him and their fellow men. )...
Thirdly, toward the close of His ministry, the theocratic Parables are resumed, dwelling on the final consummation of the kingdom of God. Mark, the Gospel of Jesus' acts, has (of the three) fewest of the Parables, but alone has the parable of the grain's silent growth (Mark 4:26). John, who soars highest, has no parable strictly so-called, having reached that close communion with the Lord wherein Parables have no place. Jesus' explanation of two Parables, the sower and the tares, gives a key for interpreting other Parables. , had each a meaning, so we must in other Parables try to find the spiritual significance even of details. ...
(3) The context also introducing the parable, as Matthew 13:10 is the starting point of the three Parables, the lost sheep, etc
Garden - 1: κῆπος (Strong's #2779 — Noun Masculine — kepos — kay'-pos ) "a garden," occurs in Luke 13:19 , in one of the Lord's Parables; in John 18:1,26 , of the garden of Gethsemane; in John 19:41 , of the garden near the place of the Lord's crucifixion
Parable - ) A comparison; a similitude; specifically, a short fictitious narrative of something which might really occur in life or nature, by means of which a moral is drawn; as, the Parables of Christ
Parable - Of this sort were the Parables of Christ. The direct teaching was met with scorn unbelief hardness, and he seemed for a time to abandon it for that which took the form of Parables. The worth of Parables as instruments of teaching lies in their being at once a test of character and in their presenting each form of character with that which, as a penalty or blessing, is adapted to it. In most of the Parables it is possible to trace something like an order. ...
When the next Parables meet us they are of a different type and occupy a different position. ...
Toward the close of our Lord's ministry the Parables are again theocratic but the phase of the divine kingdom on which they chiefly dwell is that of its final consummation. In interpreting Parables note-- (1) The analogies must be real, not arbitrary; (2) The Parables are to be considered as parts of a whole, and the interpretation of one is not to override or encroach upon the lessons taught by others; (3) The direct teaching of Christ presents the standard to which all our interpretations are to be referred, and by which they are to be measured
Seed - Our Lord in His Parables has immortalized its metaphorical meaning, likening the Word of God to a seed (Matthew 13; Mark 4; Luke 8)
Symbol - Hence symbols are of various kinds; as hieroglyphics, types, enigmas, Parables, fables, &c
Proverbs - The Eastern method of teaching by similitudes, and figures, and Parables, was the most general: hence Solomon's whole book is to this amount. When we read, therefore, the Parables, or indeed any other of the blessed sayings which dropped from Christ's mouth, when we are alone with Jesus we should ask the indulgent Lord to do the same by us, and make the word doubly sweet and blessed by unfolding and explaining all things to us himself
Fishing Net, Parable of the - This is one of the Parables concerning the Kingdom of Heaven which Saint Matthew has grouped together among the Parables spoken by Our Lord by the sea, ride (Matthew 13)
Hermas, Shepherd of - It is an ethical rather than a theological work, preaching repentance, and consisting of five visions, twelve mandates, and two Parables; particularly valuable as a contemporary record of 2century Christianity in Rome
Shepherd of Hermas - It is an ethical rather than a theological work, preaching repentance, and consisting of five visions, twelve mandates, and two Parables; particularly valuable as a contemporary record of 2century Christianity in Rome
Parable - ...
Christ's "parables" most frequently convey truths connected with the subject of the kingdom of God. ...
Two dangers are to be avoided in seeking to interpret the "parables" in Scripture, that of ignoring the important features, and that of trying to make all the details mean something. "parables") and "proverb
Tares, - See Parables
Protevangelium - ’ Such comparison lies at the base of many proverbs as well as Parables; in fact many proverbs are only condensed Parables; and a proverb usually sets up a single case as the type of a whole class. πκραβολή; Trench, Parables, ch
Kingdom of Heaven - Our Lord's Parables designate several aspects and phases of it by the one common phrase, "the kingdom of the heavens," or "of God, is like," etc
Ring (2) - For the allegorical fancies that have clustered round this ring, see the works on the Parables; cf
Ezekiel - His prophecy is full of symbo and imagery: he not only stated some of his Parables, but acted them, that they might be seen as well as heard
Circumstantiality in the Parables - CIRCUMSTANTIALITY IN THE Parables. Unfortunately the Parables of Christ are mostly preserved only in fragmentary form. But if the Evangelists give little, sometimes even a misleading, light as to the context in which the Parables were spoken, they record the illustrative portions of them with much fulness of detail. Particularly is this the case with those Parables in which the illustration is in the form of a narrative. Luke is the most pronounced in the circumstantiality with which he reproduces the stories which Christ introduced in His Parables. Luke is pre-eminent in this respect, all the Synoptists present the illustrative portion of the Parables with move or less circumstantiality. And this feature of the Parables suggests some questions which we may consider under the following heads:—(1) In how far is the circumstantiality of the narratives authentic? (2) If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we fix a limit beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details? (3) If we reject this principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we meet the objection that the circumstantiality of the illustrations is empty ornament?...
1. In many cases we find the explanation of such variations in the details of the Parables in the desire of the Evangelists to emphasize the point and heighten the effect of the illustration. But in other cases we must assign a different motive for the variation in the details of the Parables. If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ in how far are we justified in seeking to interpret the circumstantial details so largely present in the Parables? There are some who insist that every little detail is significant, and who regard that as the true method of interpretation which seeks to find some spiritual truth to correspond to every item of the illustration. Indeed, if the principle of ‘interpretation’ be admitted at all, if the Parables, as such treatment of them involves, in spite of all protest to the contrary, are really allegories, it is difficult to see on what ground a line can be drawn beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details. If we reject the principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ does not the circumstantiality of the illustrations become mere useless ornament? This is an objection raised against those who contend that the Parables are not to be regarded as allegories of which we have to seek the interpretation, but as comparisons between the principle involved in some case taken from everyday life and a similar principle which it is desired to establish in the spiritual sphere. And so with all the details with which the Parables are supplied
Allegory - Semitic Parables, including the Gospel Parables, have varying amounts of allegorical elements. )...
The Parables of Jesus have a wide range of degrees of allegorical reference. If the Gospel tradition progressively allegorized the Parables, as many allege, it is surely odd that the earliest Gospels (Mark, Matthew) contain the most allegorical elements, whereas the later Gospels contain progressively less (Luke, John)
Parable - de Colonia calls it a rational fable; but it may be founded on real occurrences, as many Parables of our Saviour were. The Hebrews call it משל , from a word which signifies either to predominate or to assimilate; the Proverbs of Solomon are by them also called משלים , Parables, or proverbs. Nor has our Saviour himself disdained to adopt the same method of instruction; of whose Parables it is doubtful whether they excel most in wisdom and utility, or in sweetness, elegance, and perspicuity. Lowth has briefly explained some of the primary qualities of the poetic Parables; so that, by considering the general nature of them, we may decide more accurately on the merits of particular examples. If the Parables of the sacred prophets are examined by this rule, they will not be found deficient. As the imagery from natural objects is in this respect superior to all others, the Parables of the sacred poets consist chiefly of this kind of imagery. Of all these excellencies, there cannot be more perfect examples than the Parables that have been just specified; to which we may add the well known parable of Nathan, 2 Samuel 12:1-4 , although written in prose, as well as that of Jotham, Judges 9:7-15 , which appears to be the most ancient extant, and approaches somewhat nearer to the poetical form
Birds - The Greek is πετεινόν,the same in the two Parables
Kingdom of God - " That this phrase is used to signify the Church on earthcan be seen most plainly in the various Parables in which our Lordlikens the "kingdom of heaven" to such things as of necessity belongto the present time. See the Parables in St
Parable - ...
What we call the Proverbs of Solomon, which are moral maxims and sentences, the Greeks call the Parables of Solomon. The parabolical, enigmatical, figurative, and sententious way of speaking, was the language of the Eastern sages and learned men, Psalm 49:4 78:2 ; and nothing was more insupportable than to hear a fool utter Parables, Proverbs 26:7 . ...
The prophets employed Parables the more strongly to impress prince and people with their threatening or their promises. Our Savior frequently addressed the people in Parables, thereby verifying the prophecy of Isaiah 6:9 , that the people should see without knowing, and hear without understanding, in the midst of instructions. ...
The following Parables of our Lord are recorded by the evangelists
Luke, Gospel of Saint - Among the characteristics of this Gospel are: the portrayal of Our Lord's mercy towards sinners; the prominence given the Mother of Jesus and other pious women; the clear and vivid delineations of characters; the frequent and beautiful Parables of Jesus. Chapters specially commendable for reading are: ...
1-2, the five joyful mysteries
6, the sabbath day, choice of the Apostles
10, Good Samaritan
12,13, 14, instructions on following Christ
15, Parables of mercy
22-24, Passion and Glory of Jesus
Gospel of Saint Luke - Among the characteristics of this Gospel are: the portrayal of Our Lord's mercy towards sinners; the prominence given the Mother of Jesus and other pious women; the clear and vivid delineations of characters; the frequent and beautiful Parables of Jesus. Chapters specially commendable for reading are: ...
1-2, the five joyful mysteries
6, the sabbath day, choice of the Apostles
10, Good Samaritan
12,13, 14, instructions on following Christ
15, Parables of mercy
22-24, Passion and Glory of Jesus
Illustrations - He spoke in similes and metaphors and Parables; general rules He illustrated by examples or stated in concrete instances. ‘In theology,’ it is said to be an axiom that ‘parables do not act as arguments’ (Trench15 [1] , p. And the form of His teaching—His Parables, similes, metaphors, concrete instances—was a means to serve that end. ...
Many of Jesus’ Parables and pictures are more than mere illustrations; they have in them the imagination’s power of interpretation, the revealing vision of the poet. Many of the Parables have this quality, such as the Seed Growing in Secret, the Good Samaritan, the Unmerciful Servant, the Prodigal Son, the Two Debtors. ...
In the Synoptic Gospels there is an explanation of Jesus’ use of Parables which is a startling paradox. It is that He spake to those without in Parables, and that He did so to hide His meaning (Matthew 13:10-15, Mark 4:11-12, Luke 8:10). ‘Parables’) rejects this conception, placed on the lips of Jesus, as quite unhistorical. That is exemplified in Jesus’ latest Parables. These are Parables of judgment; the shadow of the Cross rests on them. Parables. —Books on the Parables, by Trench, Arnot, Dods, Bruce; Steinmeyer, Die Parabeln des Herrn; Julicher, Die Gleichnisreden Jesu; Fiebig, Altjüdische Gleichnisse und die Gleichnisse Jesu; Wendt, The Teaching of Jesus, English translation vol. ‘Parables’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Sanday, Outlines of the Life of Christ, or art ‘Jesus Christ’ in DB Parable - For list of Parables of Christ see Appendix
Parable - The Lord said on one occasion that He spoke in Parables, so that the multitude should not understand His teaching: they had virtually rejected their Messiah, and were not morally in a condition to be taught. Some, however, of the Lord's Parables were so pointed that they were understood even by His enemies, which doubtless was His intention; they were laid bare as in His presence. ...
From the fact of the Lord connecting 'the mysteries of the kingdom' with the Parables He uttered, we may be sure that there is much instruction to be gathered from them if rightly interpreted: they need the teaching of the Spirit of God as much as any other part of scripture. ...
It will be seen by the annexed list that some of the Parables are recorded only by Matthew; two 'similes' are found in Mark only; several Parables are given only by Luke; and none are recorded by the evangelist John. ...
Some of the Parables are grouped together. Thus in Matthew 13 there are seven Parables, four of which were delivered in the hearing of the multitude, and three in private. The next three Parables give the outward aspect of the kingdom during Christ's absence, that which man has made of it. ...
Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and in private explained first to His disciples the parable of the Wheat and the Tares, and then added Parables that show the divine object and intent in the kingdom. ...
Another group of Parables is in Luke 15 , or in one sense a parable in three sections (Luke 15:3 ). ...
Another arrangement of the principal Parables has been suggested, namely, in three groups corresponding to different periods of the Lord's ministry. These Parables will be easily distinguished in the following table. The Parables are now of a differenttype, and are drawn from the life of men rather than from the world of nature. "...
Parables AND SIMILES IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
Doctrine - He taught them many things by Parables, and said to them in his doctrine
Usury - is in the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds, where the master blamed the servant for not putting the gifts into use, so that he might have received his own with interest, or increase
Lake of Genesareth - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the Parables (Matthew 13)
Laborers in the Vineyard, Parable of the - One of the Parables of Christ (Matthew 20), in which the householder hiring men at different hours of the day even up to the eleventh, or last, gives each of them the same wage, "a penny" meaning a piece of money, as if the one hour laborer was entitled to as much as the full day laborer
Millennium - , in the Parables of the leaven and the mustard-seed
Sow, Sower - , Matthew 13:3,4 ; Luke 19:21,22 ; John 4:37 ; 2 Corinthians 9:6 (b) in the interpretation of Parables, e
Galilee, Sea of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the Parables (Matthew 13)
Genesareth, Lake of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the Parables (Matthew 13)
Sea of Galilee - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the Parables (Matthew 13)
Sower, Parable of the - Title applied to one of the few Parables recorded concurrently by all three Synoptists (Matthew 13; Mark 4; Luke 8). It belongs to that group of Parables dealing with the Kingdom of Heaven
Prodigal Son - ...
The parable thus emphasizes one aspect of the great commandment of our Lord, that men should love one another; and in this respect shows a close resemblance to several of His other Parables. —Goebel, Parables of Jesus; A. Dods, Parables of Our Lord; Trench, Notes on the Parables; Arnot, Parables of Our Lord; W. Taylor, Parables of Our Saviour; also F
Excuse - The first had bought a field, he was elated by his already acquired possessions (Trench, Parables), and alleged a necessity (ἕχω ἁνάγκην); ‘saepe concurrunt tempora gratiae acceptissima et mundana negotia urgentissima’ (Bengel). ; works of Trench, Bruce, and Dods on Parables; Thomson, LB Matthew, Gospel by - He gives a series of Parables showing the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven. The first four Parables were spoken to the people — that of the Tares being peculiar to this gospel. " The last three Parables were spoken to the disciples in private, and are peculiar to this gospel. The gospel net gathers good and bad, but at the completion of the age a discriminating judgement will sever the "wicked from among the just," See Parables. The Parables had dealt with the kingdom in mystery , but some who stood there should at once have a glimpse of the kingdom in glory, which was vouchsafed to them in seeing Jesus transfigured before them on the mount. Farther on, the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard maintains the sovereignty of the Lord in dispensing His own things: both of these Parables being peculiar to Matthew. ...
Matthew 25 is peculiar to Matthew; Matthew 25:1-30 , the Parables of the Ten Virgins and of the Talents, apply to professing Christians
Allegory - ...
While Jesus never made allegorical interpretations of the Old Testament, some of His Parables were interpreted as allegories. Other Parables draw on obvious Old Testament images (such as the vineyard representing Israel). In general, however, Parables are to be distinguished from allegories because of their simplicity, sharp focus, and direct imagery
Tares - Trench makes the "tares" into degenerate wheat (Parables, 91); sin is not a generation but a degeneracy
Gain - These passages fall into three groups: (1) The parallel records of a saying repeated by all the Synoptists (Matthew 16:26, Luke 9:25, Mark 8:36); (2) the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds (Matthew 25:17; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22, Luke 19:15-16; Luke 19:18); (3) the single record of the saying in Matthew 18:13. ’ The thought finds its simplest and at the same time its fullest expression in the Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price, whose finder sells ‘with joy’ all that he has, to buy what he has discovered. The Parables of the Talents and the Pounds express the gain to character which comes of faithful use of powers and abilities
Forty Days, the Great - From many of our Lord's Parables as wellas from other utterances by Him in His Teaching we learn that thewords "Kingdom of God" mean His Church
Vine - In one of his Parables also (Matthew 21:33 ) our Lord compares his Church to a vineyard which "a certain householder planted, and hedged round about," etc
Parable - Such mysterious figures are characteristic of Ezekiel, and he is reproached as ‘a speaker of Parables’ ( Luke 11:5-13 ). His Parables stand as a type, and it is convenient to attach a technical sense to the word, as describing this special type. ‘The qualities and properties of the first are transferred to the last, and the two thus blended together, instead of being kept quite distinct and placed side by side, as is the case in the parable’ (Trench, On Parables , ch. It is not so in most of the Parables; the lesson rests on the true analogy which exists between the natural and the spiritual world. OT Parables . There are five passages in the OT which are generally quoted as representing the nearest approach to ‘parables’ in the technical sense. It should be noted that post-Biblical Jewish literature makes a wide use of parable, showing sometimes, alike in spirit, form, and language, a remarkable resemblance to the Parables of the NT. In the Parables of Christ the usual form is that of a complete story running parallel to the stages and divisions of a totally different subject. This effect of contrasting couples formed a literary feature in some of Christ’s Parables where opposing types of character were introduced side by side ( Matthew 21:28 ; Matthew 25:2 , Luke 18:10 ). In Christ’s Parables, as distinct from the ordinary fable which they otherwise completely resembled in form, the illustrations were always drawn from occurrences that were possible, and which might therefore have belonged to the experience of the hearer. The special need of Parables in Christ’s teaching . Of this Kingdom and its mysteries Christ spoke in Parables. In the Sermon on the Mount those mysteries of the Kingdom were indicated in outline, and in the Parables the theme was still the same, whether the story started from the initiative of the Teacher in the presence of the multitude, or was suggested by some incident of the hour. The following selection from Christ’s Parables Indicates some of the points of relationship to the Kingdom
Good Shepherd, Parable of the - This parable resembles very closely that in Luke 15, and so quite naturally the two Parables are commonly identified
Usury - Hence it is referred to by our Lord in Parables, apparently as a lawful as well as recognized usage (Matthew 25:27; Luke 19:23)
Lost Sheep - This parable resembles very closely that in Luke 15, and so quite naturally the two Parables are commonly identified
Leprosy - Jesus even made a leper the hero of one of His Parables (Luke 16:19-31 )
Householder - It is rendered ‘householder’ in the Parables of the Tares and the Wheat (Matthew 13:27), of the Owner bringing forth his treasures new and old (Matthew 13:52), of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1), of the Vineyard let out to husbandmen (Matthew 21:33), with special application to Christ as Head of the Church
Kingdom, Kingdom of God, Kingdom of Heaven - ...
The Parables in the gospels describe the form and objects of the kingdom while the Lord is away. In Matthew 13 the Lord spoke four Parables to the multitude; then He dismissed the people and explained the parable of the Wheat and the Tares to His disciples and added three Parables bearing on the secret character of the kingdom
Seed (2) - Mark 12:19-24, Luke 1:55, John 7:42), we find it exclusively employed in the Parables of Jesus as an apt symbol for Divine influence, or for the expansion of the moral and religious life in communities or individuals. Consequently we find that in two other Parables the seed represents not the Kingdom, but the word (cf. ...
Both of the latter Parables, in so far as they emphasize the nature of God’s word or message as seed, thus touch wisely and earnestly on its mysterious power of growth. —In addition to the critical editors on the passages above cited, and writers on the Parables (especially Trench, Bruce, Jülicher, and Godet), cf
Parable - Matthew (Matthew 13:35), who sees in Jesus’ use of Parables the fulfilment of Psalms 78:2. Deducting parallels, there are 20 passages in the Synoptic Gospels that are spoken of as Parables. How far short this comes of full enumeration is made evident by noting the number of Parables recognized by modern expositors: e. So Bruce distinguishes (1) Theoretic Parables, or those embodying a general teaching regarding the Kingdom of God; (2) the Parables of Grace; (3) the Parables of Judgment. Parables of this kind have been happily called Similitudes. In the pair of Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price we have two illustrations of like character to enforce the one truth, that to gain a possession of greatest value no sacrifice is too great. Since such proverbs are the concise and pointed formulations of the truths of common experience, we need not differentiate these Parables from those last discussed—no further, at least, than to make them a subdivision of the Similitudes. Expositors have not, however, generally made paradoxes a distinct group in their treatment of the Parables. It seems, nevertheless, more correct to class them as allegories than to call them Parables with an allegorical interpretation, or collections of related metaphors. Jülicher maintains that they looked on all Parables as allegories. , Luke 8:9-10), they think of Parables as always veiling a hidden meaning, one hard to be understood and intelligible to the disciples themselves only after interpretation
Talents - It is therefore necessary to begin with an investigation of the relations between the two Parables. It is, in fact, held by many that in the parable of the Pounds we have two Parables blended together, one of which described how a nobleman was opposed in his efforts to obtain a kingdom by his fellow-citizens, and how, having received the kingdom, he executed vengeance upon them. ...
It will be clear, then, from this comparison, that the two Parables presuppose different situations, each of which is harmoniously worked out in detail, and that each has different lessons to teach. Another lesson, common to both Parables, Is that reward for work is more work, but work on a larger scale with ampler opportunities. The question remains as to the relation between these two Parables and the Second Coming. It is, however, noteworthy that the main point of both Parables is not the explanation of the delay in the Second Coming. There the unfaithful servant abuses his trust precisely because his lord delays his coming, and there are other closely related sayings and Parables which bear on the need for watchfulness and on the suddenness of the Second Coming. There is no need to suppose that the Parables of the Pounds and the Talents are a development of Mark 13:34-37, or to think that the experience of delay in the early Church created the Parables. may have accurately stated the occasion of the parable of the Pounds, though there are other Parables that would suit better the particular situation. Discussions in works on New Testament Theology, Teaching of Jesus, and Lives of Christ, and especially the works on the Parables by Trench, Bruce, Dods, Jülicher, and Bugge
Invitation - This is one of the reasons why He clothed so many of His doctrines in Parables and figures centred in the idea of hospitality. It was a sign of His insight and wisdom as well as of His broad sympathies, that in a community so eminently sociable as that in which He moved, He should make such free use of the machinery of hospitality for His Messianic purpose, and devise many Parables and illustrations drawn from the customs of the day, and from the etiquette that ruled the relations of hosts and guests, from the highest circles of life to the lowest. But the Parables of invitation have a wider appeal, for the relationships from which they were drawn are universal, and belong to all nations and communities where the customs of social life are honoured. These Parables are a kind of Esperanto of the spiritual life, and appeal to the universal intelligence and sympathies of mankind. His Parables are full of the sound of wedding-bells, of the voice of laughter, of the joy of a great deliverance, of the discovery of a precious and unsuspected happiness. ’ Jesus in the ‘parables of grace’ teaches us that the gospel contains something infinitely precious which is given to us, but which we could never deserve or buy. The idea of an invitation thus merges into that of response; and it is important to notice that great stress is laid on this side of the question in the Parables. The care with which Jesus developed these situations in His Parables, and proclaimed the doom that followed, shows how deeply He felt the importance of a right attitude towards spiritual realities
Gnashing of Teeth - ]'>[2] The expression occurs in every case but one in Parables of the Last Judgment, and even that exception (Matthew 8:12) may be called a parabolic representation
Scribe - That there were exceptions is manifest, for Jesus speaks of scribes being sent of God, Matthew 23:34, and one of his Parables relates to a scribe "instructed unto the kingdom of heaven
Imagery - ...
In His Parables, Jesus continued the Old Testament practice of using vivid images for God: a shepherd seeking one lost sheep (Luke 15:4-7 ); a woman seeking one lost coin (Luke 15:8-10 ); a father waiting patiently for the return of one son and taking the initiative to reconcile the other (Luke 15:11-32 ). See Anthropomorphism ; Parables
Spiritualizing of the Parables - SPIRITUALIZING OF THE Parables. Parable and Circumstantiality in the Parables
Lost - also John 17:12 ‘None of them is lost, but the son of perdition’; see Judas Iscariot); but as a participle used passively, the form in which we find it in Luke 19:10, and in the group of Parables in Luke 15, which bear especially on this subject, it signifies simply a condition of peril, grave, yet with the glad prospect of recovery. ...
But the delicate shades of meaning which Christ imparted to the word may best be appreciated from it use in the trilogy of Parables in Luke 15. Spurgeon, Parables of our Lord, Nos
Lazarus And the Rich Man - One of the most graphic Parables of Christ (Luke 16), describing the beggar at the rich man's table
Galenus, Physician - An Arabic writer has preserved a fragment of Galen's lost work, de Republicâ Platonis , which reads: "We know that the people called Christians have founded a religion in Parables and miracles
Discourse - His Teaching, Parables, Sermon on the Mount, etc. (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short Parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Mark 8:31 to Mark 9:1, Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (Luke 10:1-24); teaching as to Prayer, with parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (Luke 17:1-10); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19). Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (Luke 11:14-36); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, Parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:14-31); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with Parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Matthew 21:23 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50). Only a few of the great discourses of our Lord are reported in extenso: the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7, Luke 6:17-49)—in a sense public, though addressed primarily to the disciples; discourse at the feast in Jerusalem on His Relations with the Father (John 5:19-47); on John the Baptist and suggested topics (Matthew 11:7-30, Luke 7:24-35); the first great group of Parables, the Sower, etc. (Matthew 13:1-53, Mark 4:1-34, Luke 8:4-16); discourse in the synagogue at Capernaum on the Bread of Life (John 6:22-65); colloquy in the Temple on His Mission (John 7, 8); second great group of Parables, the Lost Sheep, etc
Matthew, Gospel of Saint - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, Parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection
Heat - ...
The first meaning seems preferable in Matthew 20:12, though Trench (Parables) and others incline to (Revised Version margin)
Gospel of Saint Matthew - Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, Parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection
Chrysologus, Petrus, Archbishop of Ravenna - His sermons are almost all on subjects from the gospels, usually the Parables and miracles, commencing with a course of six on the prodigal son
Hireling - The following passage from Morier's Travels in Persia, illustrates one of our Lord's Parables: "The most conspicuous building in Hamadan is the Mesjid Jumah, a large mosque now falling into decay, and before it a maidan or square, which serves as a market place
Lazarus - The helpless beggar who lay at the rich man's gate in one of Christ's most solemn and instructive Parables
Carpenter - … They shall not sit high in the congregation … and they shall not be found where Parables are spoken. ’ Possibly this reference explains why the people were specially offended at Jesus the carpenter for presuming to speak in the synagogue and in Parables. ...
Attempts have been made to find in Christ’s Parables and other utterances some reference to the trade in which for so many years He was actively engaged
Haggadah, Halakah - ...
Haggadah consists of a variety of amplifications of biblical texts primarily in the form of illustrative stories, Parables or allegories, or, frequently, poetry
Mustard - The Lord in his popular teaching," says Trench ("Notes on Parables", 108), "adhered to the popular language;" and the mustard-seed was used proverbially to denote anything very minute; or may mean that it was the smallest of all garden seeds, which it is in truth
Profit - The analogy of profitable trading gives force to the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds (Matthew 25:14 ff
Luke, Gospel According to - ) ...
There are seventeen of our Lord's Parables peculiar to this Gospel. (See List of Parables in Appendix
Loans - In Parables any relations may hold which the story demands. ...
Apart from incidental references in Parables, there is one saying of Jesus which calls for fuller notice
Drunkenness (2) - Elsewhere He warns against it indirectly, as in the Parables where He holds up drunken servants to reprobation (Matthew 24:49 = Luke 12:45). Nevertheless, that He did not overlook the fact that excess was common, and that He had an open eye for the obtrusive evils of over-indulgence, is abundantly evident from other references, as in the Parables
Adversary (2) - ; Trench, Parables, 488, etc. ἀντίδικος, ἀντικείμενος; Trench, Notes on the Parables; Bruce, The Parabolic Teaching of Christ: comm
Like, Liken - , "and the (things) similar to these;" 1 John 3:2 ; Revelation 13:4 ; 18:18 ; 21:11,18 ; (c) of comparision in Parables, Matthew 13:31,33,44,45,47 ; 20:1 ; Luke 13:18,19,21 ; (d) of action, thought, etc. 1), is used (a) especially in the Parables, with the significance of comparing, "likening," or, in the Passive Voice, "being likened," Matthew 7:24,26 ; 11:16 ; 13:24 ; 18:23 ; 22:2 (RV, "likened"); 25:1; Mark 4:30 ; Luke 7:31 ; 13:18 , RV, "liken" (AV, "resemble"); Luke 13:20 ; in several of these instances the point of resemblance is not a specific detail, but the whole circumstances of the parable; (b) of making "like," or, in the Passive Voice, of being made or becoming "like," Matthew 6:8 ; Acts 14:11 , "in the likeness of (men)," lit
Publishing - His use of Parables was to avoid the casting of pearls before swine. He explained the meaning of His Parables to His disciples in private (Mark 4:34). Towards the end of His ministry He dispensed with Parables in speaking to them (John 16:25; John 16:29)
Trades - These occupations are seldom directly mentioned in the Gospels, but the implements or wares connected with many of them are referred to, or are used as illustrations in Parables of our Lord = ploughs and yokes, work of the carpenter, Luke 9:62, Matthew 11:29; of the mason, Luke 23:53, Matthew 21:42; of the weaver, Matthew 3:4, John 19:23; of the tailor, Mark 2:21; the fuller, Mark 9:3; of digging, Luke 16:3; of spinning, Matthew 6:28
Ear (2) - ’ Indeed, the general principle of speaking in Parables is in these passages connected with ‘ears dull of hearing’ (Matthew 13:13-15)
Mystery - Mark 4:11 seems to be earlier in form than its parallels; for the context shows that the thing given or withheld is not certain elements of the gospel, conceived as μυστήρια and therefore uttered only in Parables (understood as enigmas; cf. The teaching in Parables is regarded by Mk. In answer to the question (Matthew 13:10), ‘Why speakest thou to them (the motley Galilaean multitude) in Parables?’ (i. Manifestly an interpretation of parabolic utterance which supposes it adopted in order to fulfil the prophetic sentence of judicial blindness on Israel cannot be attributed to Jesus, since the end sought in the Parables themselves is the reverse of intentional obscurity. Mark 4:10 ‘asked of him the Parables’)
Questions And Answers - The use of a rhetorical question to introduce Parables or parabolic utterances is characteristic of Luke, but is found also in Matthew and Mark. ...
This investigation throws an interesting side-light on the Synoptic problem: one of the four Parables recorded by Mk. is introduced by a very striking interrogative formula, and many Parables in the non-Markan document used by Mt. Christ often asked a question also in order to make men draw their own conclusions from His Parables: cf
Jesus Christ - He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of Parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected. In Peræa, on his way to Jerusalem, he uttered the Parables of the lost sheep, the unjust steward, the rich man and Lazarus, and the pharisee and the publican; five precepts concerning divorce: blessed little children; taught the rich young ruler. At the beginning of the last week before the crucifixion Jesus made a public entry into the city, spoke Parables and warnings, lamented over Jerusalem, praised the widow's mite, met certain Greeks and predicted his second coming with solemn warnings confirmed by the Parables of the ten virgins, the five talents, and the sheep and the goats
Kingdom of God - More than a hundred references to the kingdom appear in the Gospels, many in Jesus' Parables. ...
In His Parables Jesus spoke of the kingdom in many different ways. ...
Jesus spoke Aramaic; the Gospel writers translated Jesus' sermons and Parables into Greek
Selfishness - ...
That the denial of selfish desires is not to be regarded as an end in itself, is made clear by a whole series of Parables uttered by our Lord upon the subject of labour. Parables of the Talents, Matthew 25:14-30; the Pounds, Luke 19:11-27; the Servants Watching, Luke 12:36-48; the Ten Virgins, Matthew 25:1-13; the Labourers in the Vineyard, Matthew 20:1-15). on the NT; standard works on the Parables; Beyschlag’s and Weiss’ NT Theology; Müller, Christian Doct
Naphtali, Tribe of - Here most of his Parables were spoken and his miracles wrought
Mercy - ...
Jesus’ Parables and other teachings are a constant reminder that God takes notice of the way people treat others
Chamber - " probably, it might mean into the knowledge of covenant of redemption, the doctrines of his gospel, which Jesus calls "the mysteries of his kingdom," and of which he saith to his disciples, "It is given unto you to know, but to others in Parables
Leaven - " The same statement, as made in other Parables, shows that it is the whole parable which constitutes the similitude of the kingdom; the history of Christendom confirms the fact that the pure meal of the doctrine of Christ has been adulterated with error; (2) of corrupt practices, Mark 8:15 (2nd part), the reference to the Herodians being especially applied to their irreligion; 1 Corinthians 5:7,8 ; (b) literally, in Matthew 16:12 , and in the general statements in 1 Corinthians 5:6 ; Galatians 5:9 , where the implied applications are to corrupt practice and corrupt doctrine respectively
Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the - It is one of a trinity of Parables which describe the Kingdom of God on earth, the others being the "Sower" and the "Mustard Seed
Way - Butler’s remark that religion is a practical thing is quite in the spirit of the whole of Scripture, as seen in the Prophets, the Sermon on the Mount, the Parables, and the Epistles, ‘Every one … which heareth these words of mine, and doeth them … and doeth them not’ (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 7:26); ‘Inasmuch as ye did it … did it not’ (Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45)
Hedge - —This word belongs to the vocabulary of the Parables of Jesus
Mark, Gospel by - ...
Of the discourses that followed the Lord's entry into Jerusalem, the Parables of the Two Sons and the Marriage of the King's Son are not found in this gospel; nor the Parables of the Ten Virgins, the Talents, and the Sheep and the Goats
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Another time, when the religious authorities murmured that “This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them” (Luke 15:2 ), Jesus told three Parables of God's inexhaustible love for those who are “lost” and of God's unbridled joy when the lost are found (the Parables of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the lost son; Luke 15:3-32 ). Twice He traveled through Samaria (Luke 9:51-56 ; John 4:4 ); once He stayed in a Samaritan village for two days, calling a Samaritan woman and a number of other townspeople to faith (John 4:5-42 ), and once He made a Samaritan the hero of one of His Parables (Luke 10:29-37 ). From that time Jesus began to speak in Parables to make the truth about God's kingdom clear to His followers while hiding it from those blind to its beauty and deaf to its call (Mark 4:10-12 ; notice that Jesus is first said to have spoken in Parables in Mark 3:23 , in immediate response to the charge of demon possession)
Galilee - " "It is noteworthy that of his thirty-two beautiful Parables, no less than ninteen were spoken in Galilee
Fish - Christ's sermon and Parables (Matthew 13) were delivered from a fishing boat; so Luke 5:3
Prayer (2) - (2) He devoted certain Parables to the subject. (3) He uttered a variety of sayings, enforcing and completing the teaching of the Parables. ...
(2) There are five Parables, three of which bear directly and two indirectly on the subject of prayer. So far as the two Parables differ, the former teaches that prayer is never out of season, the latter that it is sure to bring a blessing and not a curse. The argument in both Parables is a fortiori, and is strongest in the second. a deep sense, not only of need (as in the other two Parables), but of unworthiness. ...
(3) Besides the Parables, there are frequent sayings of Christ on the subject of prayer, and these are found in all four Gospels
Olves, Mount of - Here he gave them the beautiful Parables of the ten virgins and the five talents (25); here he was wont to retire on each evening for meditation, and prayer, and rest of body, when weary and harassed by the labours and trials of the day (Luke 21:37 ); and here he came on the night of his betrayal to utter that wonderful prayer, 'O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt' (Matthew 26:39 )
Symbol - The Parables of Jesus are rich in symbols: grain, weeds, various kinds of soil, a lost sheep, a lost coin, and a lost son
Leading - The OT metaphor of Jehovah as a Shepherd leading His people like a flock (Psalms 23:1; Psalms 80:1) is repeated in the Parables representing Christ as a Shepherd whose sheep recognize and obey Him (John 10:3-4; John 10:27)
Coins - It is referred to in two other Parables of Jesus (Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15; see TALENT)
Obscurity - In teaching by Parables there was necessarily an element of obscurity; but this stumbling-block Christ frequently removed (Matthew 13:11), and promised the clearance of all hindrances to the perfect knowledge of God (John 16:13; John 16:25)
Understanding - The former ‘does not recognize himself as standing in any relation to the word which he hears or to the kingdom of grace which that word proclaims’ (Trench, Parables, in loc. In Matthew 13:51, concluding the series of Parables, Jesus asks His disciples if they have apprehended the meaning of all that He has said
Dives - ...
The noticeable circumstances that in this alone of all His Parables our Lord names one of the characters, i. Closely connected with this opinion is another which has the support of Ambrose, Augustine, Teclman (quoted by Trench, Parables), and others, according to which, while Lazarus is Christ, Dives is the Jewish people who despised and rejected Him who for their sakes was poor and afflicted
Matthew, Gospel According to - ...
In the above sketch of the picture drawn for us in the First Gospel of the Person and teaching of the Messiah, we have purposely omitted the Parables. Most of the Parables in this Gospel are Parables of the Kingdom. Luke’s Parables, inculcate some Christian virtue or practice, such as love of one’s neighbour, or earnestness in prayer, but convey some lesson about the nature of the Kingdom and the period of preparation for it. ...
The Parables of the Mustard Seed and of the Leaven describe the way in which the good news of the Kingdom spreads rapidly and penetrates deeply into human society. ...
Of the other Parables in the Gospel, Matthew 18:21-35 does not bear directly upon the doctrine of the Kingdom, but emphasizes forgiveness as a qualification in all who wish to enter it. ...
Of several of these Parables it will rightly be felt that, as originally spoken, they had a wider meaning and scope than that here given, and one which is inconsistent with the narrow limits of the Kingdom to be inaugurated immediately after the fall of Jerusalem. But the question is not, What did these Parables mean when they were originally spoken? but, What interpretation did the editor put upon them when he incorporated them into his Gospel? He everywhere seems to use the phrase ‘kingdom of the heavens’ in its eschatological sense
Woman - ...
As a master teacher, Jesus used Parables to teach about the kingdom of God. By capturing their attention and commitment through Parables, He offered them a place in the kingdom. ...
God's seeking activity is the theme of two Parables, the lost sheep begins, “What man of you” and the parable of the lost coin, “What woman. ...
The twin Parables in Luke 13:18-20 point to the way the kingdom of God grows. His Parables taught that both women and men would be involved in the kingdom work
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - And He had started to collect His materials with something like this as one of His guiding principles:-...
What surmounts the reachOf human sense, I shall delineate so,By likening spiritual to corporal forms,As may express them best; though what if EarthBe but the shadow of Heaven, and things thereinEach to other like, more than on Earth is thought?Our Lord knowing that to be the case, and taking that for one of His guiding principles in His preaching, it came about that what we call His Parables, were, in reality, not so much Parables of His at all, as they were His observations of human life, and His experiences of human life, with His divine intuitions of grace and truth irradiating and illuminating them all. In our artificial and superficial way we think of our Lord as making up His Parables as He went on with His sermons, and throwing them in just as they occurred to Him at the moment. For, not seldom His Parables were His own personal experiences, and His own immediate observations, collected and laid up in His mind and in His memory and in His heart, and to be afterwards worked up into His sermons
People - In the first place, He embedded all the truths of moral unity and universality referred to in His Parables, which He spoke as illustrative of the rich and diversified order of ideas presented by Him under the designation of ‘the kingdom of God. Such was His reason for speaking of the Kingdom of heaven in Parables. But, on the other hand, the Parables, He knew, would preserve the essence of the truth as He had taught it, and to all who were of the truth the latter would in due time become revealed
People - In the first place, He embedded all the truths of moral unity and universality referred to in His Parables, which He spoke as illustrative of the rich and diversified order of ideas presented by Him under the designation of ‘the kingdom of God. Such was His reason for speaking of the Kingdom of heaven in Parables. But, on the other hand, the Parables, He knew, would preserve the essence of the truth as He had taught it, and to all who were of the truth the latter would in due time become revealed
Watchfulness - He employs a variety of Parables and illustrations to paint word portraits of watchfulness (see Matthew 24:32-51 )
Perseverance - In one of his Parables Jesus showed that some people profess to be believers, but later, by their lack of perseverance, prove not to be (Mark 4:15-20)
Wages - on the Parables, esp
Olivet Discourse, the - Concluding Parables teach the necessity of remaining watchful
Leaven - ...
In one of Jesus’ Parables, by contrast, leaven is used figuratively in a good sense
Steward, Stewardship - Some would add the Parables of the Prodigal and of Dives as illustrations of wealth wrongly used. —Commentaries: works on the Parables; Stirling, Stewardship of Life; Hartman, The Business Aspect of Christian Stewardship; F
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - Parables IN OLD TESTAMENT...
Trees choosing a king. ...
PARABLES IN THE GOSPELS...
1
Equality - In the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds the servants are not in a condition of equality during their period of probation or afterwards (Matthew 25:14-30, Luke 19:11-27)
Napkin (2) - Mackie, Bible Manners and Customs; Trench, Notes on the Parables (Parable of the Pounds)
Messianic Secret - The Parables of Jesus were offered in order to keep “outsiders” from learning the secret (Mark 4:11-12 )
Bill - ; see also the various commentators on the Parables
Apostle - They generally, however, accompanied their Master, witnessed his mighty works, heard the explanation of his Parables, ana were the selected company at the institution of the last supper
Solomon's Song - Its majestic style, its power on men's conscience to promote holiness and purity the harmony of its language with that of Christ's Parables and the books of Revelation, the sincerity of the bride in acknowledging her faults, and its general reception by the Jewish and Christian church, sufficiently prove it inspired of God
Enoch Book of - ’...
We have only to take the single example of the unique portrait of the ‘Son of Man’ in the Parables-eternally pre-existent with God, recognized now by the righteous, and hereafter to be owned and adored by all, even His foes-to be assured of the truth of this verdict. ...
-The Parables. 1 commences ‘the second vision … of wisdom’; till the present day such wisdom has never been given as is embodied in these three Parables recounted to those that dwell on the earth (xxxvii. Enoch gives Noah these secrets in the book of Parables (lxviii. : The Parables (formerly known as ‘the Similitudes’)...
There are three Parables (xxxviii. Behind the Parables proper lie two sources, as Beer (Kautzsch’s Apok. Parables)
Joy (2) - ...
In the Parables in which the secret of the Kingdom is itself set forth by our Lord, we meet the word ‘joy’ several times. In the three famous Parables that fill that chapter, the joy of God’s own heart is set forth under the images of the shepherd with his sheep, the woman with her precious coin, and the father with his restored son. Many of the Parables, other than those already named, set forth the inherent joy of the Kingdom, as, for example, those of the Wedding Supper and the Ten Virgins. All these more or less exuberant outbursts of spontaneous joy greatly offended the Pharisees and other formal religionists; and while it would not be correct to say that our Lord designedly arranged circumstances in which the contrasts would be clearly manifested, still the conditions in which they were so displayed were admirable Parables in action of some of the deepest truths of His kingdom
Sermon on the Mount - 10); the kingdom explained in Parables (chap. ...
The Beatitudes with their initiatory "blessed" (5:3-11) prepare for this title given first to the apostles as those who have heard and understood the Parables (13:16) and then to Peter who confesses Jesus as Christ (16:17). The sermon's parable of the two houses (7:24-27), a brief apocalypse in its own right, sets the literary tone for the second discourse with its Parables (chap
Debt, Debtor (2) - There are pictures of indebtedness in the Parables of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41-42), the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27). See Lord’s Prayer), and the Supreme Creditor’s way with men in this regard, especially as depicted in certain well-known Parables. on the passages referred to, and the standard works on the Parables, the following may be consulted:—Edersheim, Life and Times, ii
Matthew, the Gospel According to - For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Matthew 3:3); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in Parables (Matthew 13:14 ff). Matthew 13: Parables of the hidden treasure, the pearl, and the drag-net. Matthew 25: Parables of the ten virgins, talents, and sheep and goats at the judgment. of his own household" Micah 7:5-6 Matthew 11:5 "Blind receive sight" Isaiah 35:5 Matthew 11:10 "Behold, I send My messenger" Malachi 3:1 Matthew 11:14 "Elias, which was for to come " Malachi 4:5 Matthew 12:3 "Have ye not read what David did?" 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Matthew 12:5 "Priests profane sabbath" Numbers 28:9 Matthew 12:7 "Mercy, not sacrifice" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 12:18-21 "Behold My Servant" Isaiah 42:1-4 Matthew 12:40 "Jonas three days in whale's belly"...
Jonah 1:17 Matthew 12:42 "Queen of the south came" 1 Kings 10:1 Matthew 13:14-15 "Hearing ye shall hear" Isaiah 6:9-10 Matthew 13:35 "I will open my mouth in Parables" Psalms 37:11 Matthew 15:8 "This people draweth nigh . Appointment of apostles; doubts of John's disciples; cavils of the Pharisees; on the other hand His loving invitations, miracles, series of Parables on the kingdom; effects of His ministry on Herod and various classes; prophecy to His disciples of His coming death (Matthew 10 - 18:35)
Account - This is in harmony with the teaching of our Lord in the Synoptics, especially in the Parables of service and reward (Luke 19:18-20 etc
Toleration, Tolerance - The great Parables of Luke 15, besides being a rebuke of the leaders in religion for neglecting to minister to publicans and sinners, are a gracious appeal to share in the delight of seeing men saved,—an appeal to the benevolence latent in the hearts of Christ’s unscrupulous critics
Widow - ...
In addition to these four widows, who were actual persons, a widow is a character in one of our Lord’s Parables (Luke 18:1-8), who, having no power to enforce the justice she claims, obtains it at length by her importunity; and from this our Lord draws His a fortiori conclusion that God will hear and answer those who cry day and night unto Him
Fable - , see Trench, Parables , p
Debt - the two Parables Matthew 18:23 , Luke 7:41 ; and Colossians 2:14 )
Ambassage - ...
It is further notable that commentators are able to refer the suggestion of both these Parables to contemporary history
Kingdom of God - ...
Parables of the kingdom...
Jesus emphasized this mystery of the kingdom in the Parables recorded in Matthew 13 (Matthew 13:11; see PARABLE). ...
The Parables of the mustard seed and the yeast illustrate that although the kingdom may appear to have insignificant beginnings, it will one day have worldwide power and authority (Matthew 13:31-33). The Parables of the hidden treasure and the valuable pearl illustrate that when people are convinced of the priceless and lasting value of the kingdom of God, they will make any sacrifice to enter it (1618613278_65)
Parousia (2) - Such are the Parables of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-12) and the Tyrannical Upper Servant (Luke 12:42-46 and Mark 13:35). , the two Parables already mentioned (Matthew 25:1-12 and Luke 12:42-46), and also the parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-7). We find, besides, that in a particular group of Parables—the Mustard Seed, the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and the Growing Grain of Corn (Mark 4:26-29)—the Kingdom He came to establish is represented as subject to the law of growth
Teacher - He taught the masses publicly and his disciples privately (Mark 6:34; Mark 13:3), delivering his messages through discussions, arguments, Parables and direct teaching (Matthew 13:10; Matthew 22:41-46; 1618613278_42; 1618613278_22; John 16:29; see Parables)
Matthew, Gospel of - The first of these sections concerns behaviour (Chapters 5-7), the second deals with spreading the message of the kingdom (Chapter 10), the third consists of Parables of the kingdom (Chapter 13), the fourth concerns attitudes to others (Chapter 18), and the fifth discusses the coming of the end (Chapters 24-25). A number of Parables emphasized that Christ’s kingdom was the only way to life
Prophet, Christ as - He taught the people in "parables" and uttered "hidden things, things from of old" (Psalm 78:2 ). Matthew concluded that this prediction was fulfilled after he recorded that long chapter of the Parables of Jesus (Matthew 13:35 )
Doctrines - ...
Διδαχή, the common word for the act of teaching or that which is taught, occurs more frequently, It is used with reference to the teaching of Jesus in a general sense, as where the people contrast His methods with those of the scribes (Matthew 7:28, Mark 1:22), and again of His preaching, as in connexion with the parable of the Sower, where St Mark says (Mark 4:2), ‘And he taught them many things in Parables, and said unto them in his doctrine. In this capacity He not only, as in His Parables, explains and illustrates the principles of His government, but, as in the Sermon on the Mount, appears as the authoritative expositor of the Law of God. Again He spoke of the Kingdom as future, and that in connexion with the final coming, the Parousia, of the Son of Man; so in the Parables of the Great Supper (Luke 14:15; Luke 14:24), of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14), of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13). We recognize this in several conspicuous Parables, and no less in the practical means which Jesus adopted of founding and developing His Church, notably in His choice and training of the Twelve as the nucleus of that society of which the Kingdom should consist. Of the former, the most important in this connexion are the Parables of the Sower (Matthew 13:3-23 || Mark 4:1-20 || Luke 8:5-15), of the Seed growing secretly (Mark 4:26-29), of the Mustard Seed and the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33 || Mark 4:30-32)
Teaching of Jesus - ]'>[5] of which His use of Parables deserves special notice. , Jesus is said to have ‘taught in Parables’ (John 12:39-40,4 Matthew 13:3; Mark 3:23, Luke 5:36; Luke 6:39 do not prove the contrary), but also from the fact that His disciples ask Him as to the meaning of the first recorded parable, plain as its meaning is to us (Mark 4:10; Mark 4:13). That in itself is significant; and its significance is enhanced by the scene which precedes the first Parables, when He dwells on the spiritual ties binding Him to the disciples, in contrast even to His own blood relations. : ‘He proceeded to teach them in Parables many things, and to say to them in his teaching, Listen (Mark 4:2) … He who has ears to listen, let him listen (Mark 4:9). Then, after two more Parables,† [7] we read: ‘And with such Parables, and many of them, he used to speak to them the word just as they were able to listen; but without parable used he not to speak to them, whilst privately to his own disciples he used to resolve (the meaning of) all things’ (Mark 4:33 f
Jordan River - There He performed new miracles, and spoke to the multitudes in Parables, especially those of the collection in Luke 12-18
Understanding - Jesus used Parables because of his audience's slowness to understand (Matthew 13:13 )
Sinners - Thus Peter in Luke 5:8; ‘sinners’ and ‘righteous’ people are placed in antithesis in Matthew 9:13, Mark 2:17, Luke 5:32; in Mark 8:38 the word is associated with μοιχαλίς; so also in the story of the sinful woman, Luke 7:37 : so in the great Parables of Luke 15, and esp
Judas - This is illustrated by one of his Parables, Matthew 13:24-30; and it is no more than we continually see,—ungodly men in place and power, both in the world and in the church, with gifts which they abuse and responsibilities which increase their condemnation
Foolishness - This foolishness of believers is the formative thought of the Parables of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:3-9) and of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13)
Wealth (2) - This is implied in such Parables as those of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-8), all of which deal with the uses of money, without any disapprobation of its possession being indicated. And it is accepted by Jesus and illustrated in the Parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21). This view of wealth is presented in the Parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 6:30), the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21), the Unjust Steward and Christ’s comments on it (Luke 16:1-13), Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), and in the picture of the Judgment of Men (Matthew 25:31-46)
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - OUR LORD'S Parables are all so many applications of what we sometimes call the Sacramental Principle. That is to say, in all His Parables our Lord takes up something in nature and makes it a lesson in grace, and a means of grace. Our Lord so lived in heaven: He had His whole conversation so completely in heaven: His whole mind and heart and life were so absolutely absorbed in heaven, that everything He saw on earth, in some way or other, spoke to Him about heaven, and thus supplied Him with His daily texts, and sermons, and Parables, about heaven
Matthew, Gospel According to - 10), a large number of Parables (ch. 24), the Parables which specially speak of the Passion and of the End of the World ( Matthew 20:1 ff. Then, again, many of the Parables in Mt. ]'>[6] ]; thus Matthew 7:28 (Sermon on the Mount), Matthew 11:1 (Charge to the Twelve), Matthew 13:58 (group of Parables), Matthew 19:1 , Matthew 26:1 (groups of warnings)
Gentiles (2) - ); it was a good Samaritan who was set forth as an example in one of His most famous Parables (Luke 10:30 ff. With this, too, coincides the teaching of His many Parables about the Kingdom of heaven and that recorded in the Fourth Gospel—in this Gospel particularly all His utterances are in accord with His declaration to the Samaritan woman concerning the true worshippers (John 4:23), and with the impression produced on the Samaritans that He was the Saviour of the world (John 4:42); for in this Gospel especially His words of warning, of encouragement, and of hope embrace all mankind: ‘God so loved the world … that whosoever believeth … shall have eternal life’ (John 3:16)
Separation - ); and that the Parables of the Tares and the Drag Net were intended to guard against any attempt in that direction. But the evil element referred to in the Parables is not that which has always existed in the world, and must be expected to continue, but that which has entered the Kingdom in the course of, and as the result of, its own operations, which tend to gather within its pale spurious adherents as well as genuine (Matthew 13:47)
Wisdom Literature - They recounted stories and experiences from real life (Proverbs 24:30-34; Ecclesiastes 4:13-16; Ecclesiastes 9:13-18) and they told Parables (2 Samuel 12:1-6)
Ignorance (2) - The chosen race, wilfully blinding themselves to the true meaning of the Scriptures (John 5:45) and to the signs of the times (Matthew 16:3), especially the testimony of the Baptist (John 3:26; John 3:32) and the words and works of Jesus (Matthew 11:20, John 10:38; John 14:11; John 15:24), were punished by having the truth hidden from them in Parables (Matthew 13:13), and by having their spiritual understanding darkened (Matthew 13:15, 2 Corinthians 3:14)
Call, Calling - The meaning “invite/summon” is encountered principally in the Parables of the great banquet (Luke 14:16-25 ) and the marriage feast (Matthew 22:2-10 )
Courtesy - The incidents of Christ’s life, together with His sayings and Parables, show us the marked deference paid to authority, position, and learning (Matthew 17:14; Matthew 22:16; Matthew 22:24; Matthew 23:6-7 etc
Tares - ‘On that day’ (Matthew 13:1) of the Parables, or at least a short time before it, the Pharisees had shown their true colours by charging that Jesus cast out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of the demons (Matthew 12:22-32). Weiss thinks that the idea of gradual development is not in this or its sister Parables. ; Arnot (Parables) may be compared as a pioneer of the correct interpretation
Retribution (2) - There are in the Gospels no ‘poetic justice’ Parables, no limelight scenes of sensational punishments of evil-doers or dramatic vindication of virtue. The doctrine of personal responsibility is indeed fundamental to Christianity, and it is necessary to refer to only a few typical passages: Parables (Matthew 13:24; Matthew 18:23; Matthew 22:2; Matthew 22:25, Luke 12:16; Luke 12:16), Rewards (Matthew 19:28, Luke 14:14), Punishments (Matthew 5:26; Matthew 10:28; Matthew 12:36, Mark 9:42; Mark 14:21, John 5:29). In the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds, neglect of opportunity brings unfitness for trust; use of opportunity automatically opens the door to the reward of greater opportunity
Bethany - ...
"In the morning" they proceeded by the same route as before (as appears from their seeing the dried up fig tree), and therefore from Bethany to Jerusalem (Mark 11:27; Mark 12:41) and the temple, where He spoke Parables and answered cavils, and then "went out of the temple" (Mark 13:1), to return again to Bethany, as appears from His speaking with Peter, James, Jehu, and Andrew privately "upon the mount of Olives" (Mark 13:3), on the S
Fulfill - Jesus' command of secrecy (Matthew 12:16 ) and His habit of teaching in Parables (Matthew 13:35 ) likewise fulfilled Scripture (Isaiah 42:1-3 ; Psalm 78:2 ), as did His humble entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:4-5 ; Zechariah 9:9 ) and His arrest as a bandit (Matthew 2:17-187 )
Church - This is "the kingdom of heaven," whose character and progress are set forth in the Parables recorded in Matthew 13
Joy - Luke places three Parables together in which God, in two instances with the angels, rejoices at the redemption
Lie - Fiction, or a false statement or representation, not intended to deceive, mislead or injure, as in fables, Parables and the like, is not a lie
Christ, Christology - ...
The Parables of the kingdom shed further light on Jesus' Christology of inaugurated eschatology, since a true metaphor is more than a sign because it bears the reality to which it refers. In the twin Parables of the treasure hidden in a field and the pearl of great price (Matthew 13:44-46 ) Jesus describes the surprise and joy of discovering and acquiring great treasure, implying that the saving reign of God is present to be discovered and acquired. The Parables of the lost sheep and the lost coin (Luke 15:3-10 ) bear out the same theme of searching, finding, and rejoicing that characterizes Jesus' inauguration of the messianic time of salvation, as do the Parables of the great supper (Matthew 22:1-14 ; Luke 14:16-24 ) and the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-9 ), which emphasize the importance of immediate decision
Vengeance (2) - It is in this light that we must read all Christ’s words of denunciation, His Parables of Judgment, His judicial acts (such as the cleansing of the Temple), His lament over impenitent Jerusalem. on Sermon on the Mount; Goebel, Parables; Sanday-Headlam, Romans; Moule, Romans; Stevens, Teaching of Jesus; Wendt, Teaching of Jesus; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , artt
Hearing - For example, referring to the multitude generally, Jesus said to the disciples, ‘Therefore speak I to them in Parables: because seeing they see not, and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand’ (Matthew 13:13, Mark 4:12, Luke 8:10). ‘With many such Parables spake he the word unto them, as they were able to hear it’ (Mark 4:33), etc
Matthew, the Gospel of - Jesus continued His teaching in Parables to those who were willing to listen (Matthew 13:10-13 ). Jesus answered with Parables and other teachings (Matthew 21:28-22:46 ). Jesus' use of Parables fulfills Scripture (Matthew 13:34-35 )
Samaritan, the Good - ; the works of Trench, Bruce, Dods, and Taylor on the Parables; Edersheim, Life and Times, ii
Joy - Then Jesus told three Parables—the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the loving father
Zeal - In the NT God’s zeal for man is the motive of the Incarnation (John 3:16), and is set forth in Parables, such as the Lost Sheep and the Wicked Husbandman
Wealth And Materialism - Jesus' references to money in the New Testament consist mainly of stories or Parables which show the dangers of wealth
Responsibility - ...
Jesus told several Parables in which responsibility and accountability are at the center
Sleep - Sleep is also used as a symbol of spiritual torpor and death, especially in several of our Lord’s Parables; hence the duty of watchfulness (Matthew 25:1-13, etc
Blessedness (2) - —The articles ‘Blessedness’ and, in particular, ‘Sermon on the Mount’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; the articles in this Dictionary on Beatitudes, Kingdom of God, Eternal Life, Parables, etc
Pound - —Trench and Bruce in their works on the Parables, in loc
Sleep - Sleep is also used as a symbol of spiritual torpor and death, especially in several of our Lord’s Parables; hence the duty of watchfulness (Matthew 25:1-13, etc
Mammon - ’...
The Lukan setting is as apt in its own way, placing the same logion amid a cluster of characteristic (see Theophilus) sayings and Parables on the dangers and abuse of money (cf. —See the commentators on Matthew and Luke, the various Lives of Jesus, and the current works upon the Parables, in all of which the mammon passages are handled; also Zahn’s Einleitung, i
Seeing - Thus the miracles of giving sight to the blind become peculiarly significant; but we need not, therefore, assume that, though they are in this way acted Parables, the narratives of such miracles are not to be regarded as of any historical value, but as mere pictorial representations of the spiritual truths they are meant to convey
Leaven - —Trench, Dods, Bruce, Orelli on the Parables; Winterbotham, Kingdom of Heaven, 70; Drummond, Stones Rolled Away, 144; Scott-Holland, God’s City, 143; Macmillan, Two Worlds are Ours, 153; R
Anthropomorphism - His Parables especially speak of God in anthropomorphic terms
Leaven - —Trench, Dods, Bruce, Orelli on the Parables; Winterbotham, Kingdom of Heaven, 70; Drummond, Stones Rolled Away, 144; Scott-Holland, God’s City, 143; Macmillan, Two Worlds are Ours, 153; R
Physician (2) - ), Parables of a spiritual healing (Luke 5:24; Luke 5:31 f
Sermon on the Mount - Thus he gives 7 clauses in the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 5:1), 7 Parables (ch. , His disciples may have discerned in them a deeper meaning, knowing that He was accustomed to speak in Parables; or He Himself may have explained them, for we must remember that in the Gospels we have excerpts from the teachings of Jesus, pregnant sayings, Parables, and aphorisms that stuck in the memory, while the fuller exposition which must often have followed is rarely given, perhaps n
Jesus Christ - To help earthly people understand heavenly things, He spoke in Parables. These Parables were from realistic, real-life settings
Apocalyptic - In most cases the visions are just related, so that the reader is challenged to provide the interpretation, as in the case of the majority of Jesus' Parables. It is not by accident that each of the letters to the churches ends with the appeal associated with the Parables: "He who has an ear, let him hear
King, Christ as - Consistently in the Parables of the kingdom, God is understood as the master and owner or the King. In the Parables of the judgment, the kingdom will be a future, eternal inheritance prepared for those who have done the will of God, a reward for those who have worked in God's vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16 ) and for those to whom God chooses to show his mercy
Energy - Such are diligence (parables of Talents and Pounds, Matthew 25, Luke 19), readiness (Luke 12:35), use of opportunities (John 9:4), watchfulness (Mark 13:33), perseverance and importunity of prayer (Luke 11:5; Luke 18:1), constancy and continuance of service (Luke 12:42; Luke 17:10)
Covetousness - —The standard works on the Sermon on the Mount and on the Parables
Harmony of the Gospels - This source contained at least an infancy story and many Parables. Streeter's “M” and “L” sources involved the implausibility of sources containing, for example, infancy narrative, assorted Parables, and nothing else
Mark, the Gospel of - The messianic secret is part of the mystery of the kingdom of God, understood only by insiders—”to them that are without all these things are done in Parables” (Mark 8:29-309 ,Mark 4:11,4:33-34 ). Even Gentiles demonstrated that they belonged to the community of faith when they understood Jesus' Parables and recognized Him as the Christ
Imagination - In the narrative portions and the Parables there is also a striking dramatic element, which gives them wonderful life and movement. All spoken discourse should aim at the qualities of simplicity, concreteness, vividness, and brevity of expression, which are so remarkable a feature in the discourses and Parables of Christ
Kindness (2) - ...
If explicit statements of the character of that now considered are not multiplied in our Lord’s teaching, it is to be pointed out that the same conception of God is necessarily implied in a considerable group of the Parables—those, in particular, that illustrate the Divine grace. The great trilogy of Luke 15, exhibiting the Divine concern for man as τὸ ἀπολωλός; the Parables which show how royally and wonderfully God pities and forgives, whether that forgiveness is gratefully realized (the Two Debtors, Luke 7:36-50) or is strangely disregarded (the Unmerciful Servant, Matthew 18:23-35); the parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24), with its comprehensive ‘welcome for the sinner’—these and other such are full of the wide-reaching kindness of God
Laughter - 149):...
‘With pathos often goes humour, and so it is in the Parables. It were a false propriety which took for granted that an expositor was necessarily off the track, because in his interpretation of these Parables an element of holy playfulness appears blended with the deep seriousness which pervades them throughout
Excommunication (2) - From the two Parables of the Tares and the Wheat (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43) and the Draw-net (Matthew 13:47-50) we may further gather that Christ would have His people to exercise a wise patience and caution in the use even of a necessary instrument. But from the two Parables referred to we learn the impossibility of the Donatist dream of an absolutely pure Church
Esther - Thus it would be comparable to Jesus' Parables
Treasure - on the NT; standard works on the Parables; Beyschlag’s and Weiss’ NT Theol
Confession - This meets us at many points in our Lord’s teaching in His calls to repentance, in which confession is involved ( Matthew 4:17 = Mark 1:15 , Luke 11:29 ; Luke 11:32 ; Luke 24:47 ), in the petition for forgiveness in the Lord’s Prayer ( Matthew 6:12 , Luke 11:4 ), in the Parables of the Prodigal Son ( Luke 15:17-18 ; Luke 15:21 ) and the Pharisee and the Publican ( Luke 18:10 f
Graciousness - His Parables (e
Guest - ...
Some of the Parables of Jesus reflect this aspect of Oriental life
Fasting (2) - This is brought out clearly in the succeeding Parables of the Old Garment and the Old Wineskins
Coins - ...
From two Parables told by Jesus we get the impression that the word “talent” had come in New Testament times to represent a large sum of money instead of just a measure of weight
Oneness - This is the subject of the three Parables in ch
Claims (of Christ) - It is further implied in the Parables of the Wise and Foolish Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13) and the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and is set forth in detail in that solemn picture of the Last Judgment by which these Parables are immediately followed (Matthew 25:31-46)
Multitude - The Parables of Matthew 13 give a very sober estimate of the value of the professions of the multitude. ); the first three Parables of the Kingdom (Matthew 13); the passage showing the need of renunciation and of counting the cost (Luke 14:25 f
Wealth - Further, in the Parables of the Pounds and the Talents ( Luke 19:12 , Matthew 25:14 ) He teaches, under the symbolism of money, that men are not owners but stewards of all they possess; while in the parable of the Unjust Steward He points out one of the true uses of wealth namely, to relieve the poor, and so to insure a welcome from them when the eternal tabernacles are entered ( Luke 16:9 )
Gnostics - The Gnostics confessed, that these aeons, or emanations, were no where expressly delivered in the sacred writings; but insisted that Jesus Christ had intimated them in Parables to such as could understand them
Mark, Gospel of - He illustrated the nature of that kingdom by dealing with critics (3:20-35), telling Parables (4:1-34), overcoming storms, evil spirits, sickness, hunger and death (4:35-6:56), demanding moral rather than ceremonial cleanliness (7:1-23), and demonstrating by teachings and miracles the importance of faith (7:24-8:26)
Slave, Slavery - Jesus frequently used slave motifs in his Parables because such images were the common stock of his audiences
Kill, Killing - It could also be used figuratively (2Col 3:6; Ephesians 2:16 ; sin forces one into a conflict that ends in death ), in Parables (Matthew 23:37 ; Mark 12:5-12 ), or in prophetic narratives (with reference to the disciples in Matthew's apocolypse [24:9]'>[4])
Galilee - His Parables in John and in the three Synoptists correspond to the features of Judaea and Galilee respectively
Husbandman - ...
But chiefly in the exquisite Parables do we see that power of observation in the material world which makes Jesus so engaging as a child of nature, who lived much, and lived free, in the open air of Palestine
Field - ...
A knowledge of certain peculiarities of the fields of Palestine is helpful to the full understanding of several of the Parables of our Lord and some other passages in the Gospels
Luke - This Gospel contains many things which are not found in the other Gospels; among which are the following: the birth of John the Baptist; the Roman census in Judea; the circumstances attending Christ's birth at Bethlehem; the vision granted to the shepherds; the early testimony of Simeon and Anna; Christ's conversation with the doctors in the temple when he was twelve years old; the Parables of the good Samaritan, of the prodigal son, of Dives and Lazarus, of the wicked judge, and of the publican and Pharisee; the miraculous cure of the woman who had been bowed down by illness eighteen years; the cleansing of the ten lepers; and the restoring to life the son of a widow at Nain; the account of Zaccheus, and of the penitent thief; and the particulars of the journey to Emmaus
Vine - Scripture alludes to the fragrance of the "vines with the tender grapes," Song of Song of Solomon 2:13 , and draws from the vineyard many illustrations and Parables, Judges 9:12 Matthew 20:1 21:28
bi'Ble - They contain logical arguments, poetry, songs and hymns, history, biography, stories, Parables, fables, eloquence, law, letters and philosophy
Luke, Gospel of - Jesus’ teaching in Parables (8:1-21) is followed by demonstrations of his power over storms, demons and sickness (8:22-56)
Law (2) - Luke relates the Parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Drachma, and the Lost Son (Luke 15). The Parables are difficult; the lesson taught is clearly the incompatibility of the new with the old, and the disaster that will inevitably follow any attempt to combine them. But it is by no means clear with what ‘old’ and ‘new’ should be identified, nor again can we assume that both Parables express the same truth. Weiss, however, considers that both Parables constitute a defence of the attitude of John’s disciples, they cannot be expected to combine the spirit of the Gospel with their legalist and ascetic habit of life (Bibl
Missions - Many of the Parables have references to or suggestions of a future extension of work among the Gentiles. In the interpretation of the parable of the Tares (one of the earlier Parables) it is said that ‘the field is the world’ (Matthew 13:38). In the later series of Parables, as in that of the Vineyard and the Husbandmen, it is said, ‘The kingdom of God shall be taken away from you, and shall be given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof’ (Matthew 21:43); in the Marriage Feast the direction is found, ‘Go ye … into the highways, and as many as ye shall find, bid to the marriage’ (Matthew 22:9, Luke 14:23); in the Sheep and the Goats there is a picture of the judgment of ‘all nations’ (Matthew 25:32)
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - For though He had already that day illustrated and applied the kingdom of God by a long and splendid series of Parables, His mind was still as full of matter as ever. " And here are we tonight, and in this church, suddenly transported back into Mary's little kitchen in Nazareth, in order to learn there yet another of her Son's Parables about the kingdom of God
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - Bruce's book on the Parables is, to my taste, his best book. For, as it is in so many of His sermons, and as it is in so many of His Parables that illustrate His sermons, this fine parable has, as I think, its first fulfilment in our Lord Himself
Fig-Tree - The Gospel references to the fig-tree include both Parables and incidents, and make allusion to phenomena both of its leafage and its fruitage. As questions arise to how great an extent the incidents may not be symbolic, Parables becoming concrete in process of repetition, or even pure symbols, it is best to consider first the two instances in which the fig-tree is made the subject of undoubted parable by our Lord
Wisdom of Christ - ); His skill in constructing Parables, allegories, and sententious sayings, like those of the wise men of old (cf
Hades - Usually the details of Parables should not be pressed to teach doctrine
Self-Examination - In the Sermon on the Mount, as in so many of His Parables, He was holding up before men the ideal by which they must test their lives
Forsaking All - ’ Then He added two Parables,—the Unfinished Tower and the Two Kings,—warning against the folly of embarking upon an enterprise which one is incapable of carrying through
Friendship - In Parables and conversations Christ indirectly drops sentences which show how general was His observation of all the relations into which people might enter. (1) In the Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Silver, He touches upon the much debated basis of friendship
Pseudepigrapha - It is the Parables or Similitudes
Readiness - ...
The Parables and parabolic sayings in the Synoptics (Matthew 24:42 to Matthew 25:30, Mark 13:32-37, Luke 12:35-48; Luke 19:11-27), intended to enforce the lesson of constant readiness for the Second Coming, may be described as parting counsels and admonitions to the disciples for the guidance of their conduct during the period, indefinitely prolonged, which must elapse between Christ’s departure from the world, then impending, and His return at the close of the present dispensation
Friend, Friendship - In Jesus' Parables the vineyard owner addresses a laborer (Matthew 20:13 ) and the host speaks to a wedding guest he does not know (Matthew 22:12 ) using the term "comrade
Prudence - In the Parables of the Unjust Steward and the Ten Virgins, He expresses His surprise at the lack of forethought and consideration on the part of the children of light
Socialism - His Parables teach social principles of the most far-reaching importance. The Parables, e. The condemnation of riches could hardly be more strongly expressed than in the Parables of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16), and of the Rich Fool (ch
Church - It is revealed as a historical institution in the Parables of the Tares ( Matthew 13:24 ff. Other Parables present it as an ideal which no historical institution can satisfy, e
Gospel - ...
Written ten to twenty years after Mark, Matthew takes the general framework of the first written Gospel and adds to it extensive examples of Jesus' Parables and other teachings. The constant reference to miracles as “signs,” the “I am” speeches, and the total exclusion of story-like Parables also set John apart from the other three
Luke, Gospel According to - The insertion deals largely with the Peræan ministry and the journeys towards Jerusalem, and contains many Parables peculiar to Lk (the Good Samaritan, the Importunate Friend, the Rich Fool, the Barren Fig-tree, the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, the Prodigal Son, the Unjust Steward, the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Ten Lepers, the Unjust Judge, the Pharisee and the Publican), and also several incidents and sayings peculiar to Lk. the Mission of the Seventy; this section also has portions of the Sermon on the Mount and some Parables and sayings common to Mt
Jesus Christ - His Parables had a similar purpose. They made people think, and those who understood and accepted their message entered the kingdom of their Saviour-Messiah (Matthew 13:10-16; see Parables)
Election - Many of the Parables of Jesus, such as that of the marriage feast (Matthew 22:1-14 ) and that of the laborers in the vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16 ), illustrate the sovereignty of God in salvation
Growing - 90–143; Marcus Dods, Parables of our Lord, 1st Ser
Mercy - This is Christ’s teaching in Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7; Matthew 23:23, and in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30) and of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31), as well as in that of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28)
Ezekiel, Book of - Instruction under various Parables
Discipleship - ) are, under one aspect, all so many facets of discipleship; metaphors like ‘the salt of the earth,’ the ‘light of the world’ (Matthew 5:13-14), ‘a little flock’ (Luke 12:32), ‘the branches of the vine’ (John 15:5), ‘every plant which my heavenly Father hath not planted’ (Matthew 15:13), and many another, including those developed into Parables,—all sketch some features of discipleship, as do such sayings as that one must be reborn, and much of the teaching concerning the Kingdom
Mercy - This is Christ’s teaching in Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7; Matthew 23:23, and in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30) and of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31), as well as in that of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28)
Premeditation - The Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price are the records of those who thoughtfully weigh all lesser things against the great adventure (Matthew 13:44-45)
Property (2) - Again, some force must be allowed to the fact that in several of the Parables (Luke 19:12, Matthew 21:33) Jesus used the rights which men have over their property to illustrate the duty which all owe to God. In some of the Parables the duty of faithfulness in secular pursuits is plainly taught (e
John, the Gospel of - Jesus tells no Parables, and there is nothing like the Sermon on the Mount
Scribes - Parables were largely used
Fish, Fisher, Fishing - In one of the Parables of the Kingdom (Matthew 13:47-50) Jesus compares the latter to a net; and the separation which the fishermen make, in their catch, between what is good and what is bad, is used to symbolize the separation of the righteous from the wicked at the Final Judgment
Neighbour (2) - on the NT, and works on the Parables; J
Punishment (2) - —This fact is involved in certain explicit statements of our Lord Himself (Matthew 13:41-42; Matthew 27:4-5,8 John 15:2; John 15:6), and clearly suggested in more than one of His Parables (Mark 12:9, Matthew 13:30; Matthew 22:13-14, Luke 13:9; Luke 13:22 ff
Metaphor - Browne, The Parables of the Gospels, p. ’...
Not only are there no Parables outside the Synoptists, but the use of metaphorical language is both more complicated and more extended
Son, Sonship - ’ Some of His most noticeable Parables and illustrative sayings are based on the relation of father and son as best representing the relation between God and man (see, e
Repentance (2) - Consequently His call to repentance is, as a rule, in the form of those exquisite Parables that speak to the heart
Names of God - In the New Testament, the image of God as shepherd is continued in Parables (Luke 15:4-7 ) and in John's portrayal of Christ as the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18 )
Jeremiah, Book of - In some instances Jeremiah's Parables were acted , so as the more forcibly to impress the careless people
Gospel - ...
They relate the first appearance of Christ upon earth, his extraordinary and miraculous birth, the testimony borne to him by his forerunner, John the Baptist, the temptation in the wilderness, the opening of his divine commission, the pure, the perfect, and sublime morality which he taught, especially in his inimitable sermon on the mount, the infinite superiority which he showed to every other moral teacher, both in the matter and manner of his discourses, more particularly by crushing vice in its very cradle, in the first risings of wicked desires and propensities in the heart, by giving a decided preference to the mild, gentle, passive, conciliating virtues, before that violent, vindictive, high-spirited, unforgiving temper, which has been always too much the favourite character of the world; by requiring us to forgive our very enemies, and to do good to them that hate us; by excluding from our devotions, our alms, and all our virtues, all regard to fame, reputation, and applause; by laying down two great general principles of morality, love to God, and love to mankind, and deducing from thence every other human duty; by conveying his instructions under the easy, familiar, and impressive form of Parables; by expressing himself in a tone of dignity and authority unknown before; by exemplifying every virtue that he taught in his own unblemished and perfect life and conversation; and, above all, by adding those awful sanctions, which he alone, of all moral instructers, had the power to hold out, eternal rewards to the virtuous, and eternal punishments to the wicked
Commerce - ...
The Parables of the pounds and the talents suggest the existence of a sophisticated banking and investment community, which lent out sums for commercial enterprises and garnered profits for those who left their money with them
Nationality - The harriers had been broken down between Jew and Gentile, Greek and barbarian, bond and free; they being brought by the blood of the Cross near to God, and so to one another, in order that henceforth the bonds of brotherhood might be of a purely human character, and that the Parables of the Good Samaritan and of the Shepherd-judgment might be the pattern and sanction for next-door philanthropies and world-wide missions
Pride (2) - The Parables of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1 ff
Immortality (2) - The whole tone of His speech, the implications of His Parables, the sanctions with which He surrounds His encouragements and warnings, the comparative value which He teaches men to set upon heavenly and earthly things, the gravity and seriousness of His outlook into the future, all show that here at least to Him and to His hearers there was common ground; that He did not need to begin by proving to them that death was not the end of all, but that the universal postulate of religious thought of His day anticipated a renewal of personal and conscious existence after death. Here it need only be said that Parables such as those of the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Wise and Foolish Virgins, or the Wedding Feast, do not in themselves suggest or demand any inequality of treatment as regards the mere duration of the allotted punishment or reward; and that references to the Judgment, the Day of Judgment, or the Last Day are equally neutral, as far as direct statement is concerned
Mark, Gospel According to - Indirectly the Shepherd of Hermas supplies a great argument for the antiquity of the Gospels, because it shows the uniqueness of our Lord’s Parables as there narrated. productions, and the words of our Lord had been handed on only by oral tradition, the Parables could never have been kept so pure
Jesus Christ - (On His miracles, see MIRACLES and on His Parables, see Parables
Mercy, Merciful - His Parables use the term to describe the mercy of a master on his indebted servant (Matthew 18:27 ), the compassion of a father for his prodigal son (Luke 15:20 ), and a Samaritan's pity for a wounded Jew (Luke 10:33 )
Violence - It may be illustrated by the Parables of the Mustard Seed and the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and it has the great advantage of conveying the same sense as the parallel clause in Lk
Swedenborgians - It is farther endeavoured to be shown that Jesus Christ spake continually according to this same doctrine, veiling divine and spiritual truths under natural images, especially in his Parables, and thus communicating to man the most important mysteries relative to himself and his kingdom, under the most beautiful and edifying figures taken from the natural things of this world
Power - ...
Again, the same principle of looking and stooping downwards and of uplifting what is beneath is the main subject-matter of the Parables of Christ
Regeneration (2) - We see it in the Parables of the New Patch on the Old Garment and the New Wine in the Old Bottles (Mark 2:21 f. We are reminded here of the Parables in which the word of God—that is, the gospel—is spoken of as a seed, and of 1 Corinthians 4:19, though in James it is the will of God and not the ministry of an Apostle to which the new birth is referred
Hermas Shepherd of - -The book is divided up into five Visions, twelve Mandates or Commandments, and ten Similitudes or Parables. Hermas at first fails to recognize him as the being to whom he was delivered, but on recognition proceeds to write down the Commandments and the Parables dictated by the Shepherd
Complacency - Such are: John 10:17, Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10; Luke 15:22; Luke 15:24; Luke 15:32 (in the Parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Coin, and the Prodigal Son, in which Luke 15:22; Luke 15:32 are especially notable, where Jesus mentions the joy of the father over the son’s return, and the reason which the father gives for that joy: ‘It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found’); our Lord’s assurance in another place that the prayer of the Publican was accepted of God (Luke 18:14); and again His testimony that prayer and almsgiving, if prompted by the right spirit, are rewarded by the Father who seeth in secret (Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6). The Parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Coin, and the
Apocalypse - Parables that are puzzles can hardly be edifying. Some of the Parables of Daniel are puzzles to this day
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - There ought to be many Parables and miracles of which we should be uncertain whether they were common to all the evangelists or special to one and what place in that one they should occupy. To this, and possibly other similar stories, Eusebius no doubt refers when he says that Papias had related certain strange Parables and teachings of the Saviour and other things of a fabulous character
Prophecy, Prophets - They worked symbolic acts which served as dramatic, living Parables
Animals - ...
Similarly, Jesus used illustrations from the animal world in his Parables and teaching
Hell - Important portrayals of hell are also present in Jesus' Parables, including the tares (Matthew 13:40-42 ), the net (Matthew 13:50 ); the great supper (Matthew 22:13 ), the good servant and the wicked servant (Matthew 24:51 ; par
Lord's Supper, the - Jesus spoke of meals and joyous banquets in his Parables (e
Impotence - ...
(b) Of the state or condition, manner or circumstance, range or sphere in which a person is or acts: (α) state or condition (Matthew 4:16 ‘the people which sat in darkness,’ Luke 1:75 ‘serve him in holiness and righteousness,’ John 4:23 ‘worship in spirit and truth,’ Matthew 21:22 ‘ask in prayer’); (β) manner (Matthew 13:3 ‘in Parables’); (γ) occasion (Matthew 22:15 ‘ensnare him in talk,’ Luke 23:31 ‘if they do this in the green tree,’ Luke 24:35 ‘in the breaking of bread’); (δ) surrounding accompaniment (Matthew 6:29 ‘Solomon in all his glory,’ Matthew 16:28 ‘coming in his kingdom,’ Matthew 16:27 ‘in the glory of his Father’); (ε) range or sphere (John 8:21 ‘die in your sins,’ Mark 1:15 ‘believe in the gospel’ will also belong to this head, unless we admit that this is an exceptional use of πιστεύω with ἐν
Matthew - It needed a practised, and an assiduous, and an understanding pen to take down the Sermon on the Mount, and to report and arrange the Parables, and to seize with such correctness and with such insight the terrible sermons of his Master's last week of preaching
Calling - The doctrine of Christ's Parables is in entire contradiction to this notion of irresistible influence; for they who refused, and they who complied but partially with the calling, are represented, not merely as being left without the benefit of the feast, but as incurring additional guilt and condemnation for refusing the invitation
Gospels - the Sermon on the Mount) and groups of Parables, not necessarily spoken at one time, but closely connected by subject. of set Parables, allegories taking their place; and the character of the miracles, there being no casting out of devils in Jn
Forgiveness (2) - (b) The Parables of Luke 15, especially that of the Prodigal Son, and of the Pharisee and the Publiean in Luke 18:9-14. ...
The same may be said of the two gracious Parables of our Lord which chiefly deal with this subject
Ezekiel - ...
His mysterious symbols presented in plain words, like our Lord's Parables, were designed to stimulate the people's dormant minds
Wages - In some of his Parables Jesus instructed his disciples to be diligent about their calling since a day of judgment would reward the righteous as well as recompense the unrighteous (Matthew 24:45-51 ; 25:14-30,31-46 )
Galilee (2) - Along these and many other roads flowed a ceaseless stream of traffic, and the fulness of their life is reflected in the Parables of Christ (cf
Disciple (2) - In the Sermon on the Mount men are told plainly what it is desirable for them to know; afterwards, the teaching passes through Parables and hard sayings up to the mysteries conveyed by the Last Supper’ (Latham, op
Providence - Prudence), both in worldly matters and in the affairs of the Kingdom of heaven—witness the Parables of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1 ff
John, the Gospel According to - ...
The synoptists having already recorded the Parables which suited the earlier ages of the church, it remained for John to record the parabolic allegories: John 10:1-6 (parabolee nowhere occurs in John, but paroimia ), John 3:8; John 15:1 ff; John 4:35; John 4:38; compare Matthew 9:38
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - The form and substance of the discourses are also very different, the Christ of the Synoptics speaking as a man to men, as a Jew to Jews; conveying His message in pithy aphorisms, easily understood and remembered, and in homely Parables, adapted to the comprehension of country folk. Our Evangelist, on the other hand, represents Jesus as taking part in long polemical disputations with ‘the Jews,’ who are as much His enemies as they were the enemies of the Christian Church 80 years later; the Parables have disappeared, and their place is taken by ‘proverbs’ or symbolic language; and, above all, His whole teaching is centred upon faith in and devotion to Himself
Inspiration - To relate, at the distance of twenty years, long moral discourses, which were not originally written, and which were not attended with any striking circumstances that might imprint them upon the mind; to preserve a variety of Parables, the beauty and significancy of which depended upon particular expressions; to record long and minute prophecies, where the alteration of a single phrase might have produced an inconsistency between the event and the prediction; and to give a particular detail of the intercourse which Jesus had with his friends and with his enemies;—all this is a work so very much above the capacity of unlearned men, that, had they attempted to execute it by their own natural powers, they must have fallen into such absurdities and contradictions as would have betrayed them to every discerning eye. ...
The purpose of many of his Parables, the full meaning even of some of his plain discourses, had not been attained by them
Perfection (of Jesus) - He uttered the deep things of the Kingdom in Parables. He who told the parable of the Prodigal Son told also the Parables of the Ten Virgins, the Man without the Wedding Garment, and the Talents
Sympathy - The teaching is further illustrated in several of the Parables
Satan (2) - In the Parables of the Sower and the Tares, the Evil One, variously termed ‘the devil,’ ‘Satan,’ ‘the enemy,’ ‘the wicked one,’ is described as seeking to frustrate the work of Christ by catching away the good seed sown in the heart (Matthew 13:19, Mark 4:15, Luke 8:12); or by sowing tares among the wheat (Matthew 13:38-39), the tares denoting the children of ‘the wicked one’ as the enemy that sowed them is ‘the devil
Money - Jesus' Parables portray the phenomenon of interest in order to underscore the point that God expects his people to use his gifts productively (Matthew 25:27 )
Mark, Theology of - Salvation is defined by the responses of Jesus' audiences to his miracles, sayings, and Parables within a variety of settings between these two events, and Jesus' interpretation of his actions
Heir Heritage Inheritance - The kingdom has already begun (Matthew 3:2, and the Parables of ch
Eternal Punishment - In the Parables of the Tares (Matthew 13:24 ff
Lazarus - ‘Lazarus and Dives’; Trench, Bruce, Orelli, and Dods on the Parables; Plummer, ‘St
Metaphors - Parables and allegories are similes or metaphors elaborately extended, and do not come into the scope of this discussion (see Parable)
Devotion - In the Parables the joy is occasionally festal and general, but sometimes becomes that of personal and assured possession (Matthew 13:44; Matthew 13:46), or is even lifted up into likeness to the Saviour’s own joy, incapable of dimness or of eclipse (John 15:11, Matthew 25:21)
Devil - ), and in the Parables sowed the tares ( Matthew 13:39 ) or snatched up the good seed ( Luke 8:12 ; cf
Solomon - 1 Kings 4:20 ; 1 Kings 4:33 suggest general and poetical culture, Parables drawn from nature, rather than the beginnings of science
Job, the Book of - Though this approach is possible, it seems unlikely for most Parables have some type of interpretation close by which helps to explain them
Vine, Allegory of the - When we compare it with the Parables and similitudes of the Synoptic Gospels, we realize at once what a vast difference there is between them
Entry Into Jerusalem - —This was one of the acted Parables of Jesus, in which some immortal lesson is concealed
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - All other fields are but Parables to him of his own field
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - And if God expresses it never so plainly and properly, he will still think that God is speaking in riddles and Parables
Peter, Second Epistle of - Likewise the Christian life is regarded as the fulfilment of the new law, and the Parables in Mk
Nature And Natural Phenomena - A glance at our Lord’s Parables and illustrations at once reveals this dominant human interest
Ethics - In Parables (Matthew 21:33-43 ; 25:14-46 ; Luke 12:16-21 ; 13:6-9 ; 16:19-31 ) and numerous phrases the truth is made clear that people cannot trifle with God indefinitely
Kingdom of God - Matthew 4:17 ; Luke 4:42-43 ); the prayer Jesus taught his disciples, "your kingdom come" (Matthew 6:10 ); in the Beatitudes, "for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 5:3,10 ); at the Last Supper, "I will not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it anew in the kingdom of God" (Mark 14:25 ); and in many of Jesus' Parables (Matthew 13:24,44 , 45,47 ; Mark 4:26,30 ; Luke 19:11 )
Gentiles - This sentence occurs in one of the last Parables of judgment (Matthew 21:43), but other sayings reported before lead up to it, as: ‘Many shall come from the east and west’; ‘The field is the world’; ‘The last shall be first, and the first last’ (Matthew 8:11; Matthew 13:38; Matthew 20:16)
Individual - The Parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, and above all of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15), speak of God’s unwillingness to let anything so precious as an individual be lost
Justice (2) - That man can be just or unjust in relation to God appears also from passages in which sin is spoken of as a state of indebtedness—God being the creditor and man the debtor (Matthew 5:26; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:23-35, Luke 7:41-43); and from those Parables in which God and man are related as Master and servant, or King and subject (Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 21:33-41; Matthew 25:14-30; Mark 12:1-12)
Sarah - ...
But to come back to solid ground, and to speak no more about Parables
Christ, Christology - His Parables enunciated both the arrival of the kingdom and its character, setting a pattern for living for those who would enter God's realm as His children (Matthew 13:1 ; Mark 4:1 )
Necessity - Matthew, Christ is born of a virgin at Bethlehem, is named Jesus, sojourns in Egypt, resides at Nazareth, migrates to Capernaum, heals the sick, speaks in Parables, enters Jerusalem riding an ass, is deserted by the disciples, is betrayed and put to death, ‘that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Lord through the prophet’ (ἵνα πληρωθῆ το ῥηθεν ὑτὸ τον Κυρίου διὰ τοῦ προφήτου λέγοντος, κ
Faith - Specifically, the Parables of Jesus and the Sermon on the Mount call for a response
Ezekiel, Theology of - ...
More than any other prophet, Ezekiel acted out his message in Parables
Prayer - Some argue that these Parables teach perseverance in a request until either our wills or the circumstances of our lives are altered
Guilt (2) - It is the personal relation, and therefore the guilt of sin, which appears in the Parables of the Lost Sheep, etc
Logia - ’ In this formula the expression λόγοι is varied only by the expressions ‘parables’ and ‘directions to the Twelve,’ where the context requires (Matthew 11:1; Matthew 13:53), while the final group concludes: ‘And it came to pass when Jesus had finished all these words’ (πάντας τοὺς λόγους τούτους, Matthew 26:1), in spite of the fact that the narrative continues: ‘he said to his disciples
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - ; the latter being often from our Lord's Parables, miracles, etc
Woman - The Parables of the mustard seed and leaven (like the lost sheep and coin), each make the same point but alternate between male and female protagonists (13:18-21; 15:1-10)
Eschatology - Jesus proclaimed negative judgments in Parables (Matthew 13:1 ) and many other sayings (Matthew 5:29-30 ; Matthew 11:21-24 ; Matthew 23:33 )
Redemption (2) - His denunciations of the Pharisees are merciless in their severity (Matthew 23:14-15; Matthew 23:32-33); the language of judgment in many of the Parables is hardly less strong (Matthew 13:42; Matthew 13:50, Matthew 18:34, Matthew 21:44, Matthew 22:7; Matthew 22:13 etc
Righteous, Righteousness - Again and again Christ, by means of a series of Parables, teaches the future suffering of the wicked
Sanctify, Sanctification - Another set of Parables represents men as servants of a long-absent Lord, who have to show diligence in trading with the pounds, fidelity in the use of talents, and patience in watching (Matthew 25:14, Luke 19:12, Matthew 24:42)
Righteousness - Paul never speaks of Jesus Christ as righteous,’ nor of His righteousness, although this was a familiar predicate of Messiah not only in the OT but in the later Judaism, especially in the Enochic Parables, where righteousness is one of the leading characteristics of Messiah as well as of the saints
Money (2) - In his Notes on the Parables, Trench assumes that this drachm was Athenian, stamped with ‘an owl, a tortoise, or a head of Minerva,’ and reluctantly surrenders ‘the resemblance to the human soul, originally stamped with the image and superscription of the great King,’ which earlier expositors had delighted to trace
Character - Jesus struck at the limitations of race prejudice and enmity in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:20 ff
Asceticism (2) - The Parables of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-12), of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), or the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), prove that Jesus was far from regarding wealth as evil in itself, or requiring that people in general should renounce its use
Fall (2) - ), and the corresponding Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Money in the same chapter
Father, Fatherhood - For, in the first place, the parable was spoken to justify Jesus’ reception of publicans (1618613279_67), and publicans were rated as no better than Gentiles (Matthew 18:17); and, in the second place, the conclusion of Jesus in the Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin, which are manifestly parallel to that of the Lost Son, is perfectly general
Jesus Christ - upon the thoughts; he collected human duty into two well-devised rules; he repeated these rules, and laid great stress upon them, and thereby fixed the sentiments of his followers; he excluded all regard to reputation in our devotion and alms, and, by parity of reason, in our other virtues; his instructions were delivered in a form calculated for impression; they were illustrated by Parables, the choice and structure of which would have been admired in any composition whatever: he was free from the usual symptoms of enthusiasm, heat, and vehemence in devotion, austerity in institutions, and a wild particularity in the description of a future state; he was free also from the depravities of his age and country; without superstition among the most superstitious of men, yet not decrying positive distinctions or external observances, but soberly recalling them to the principle of their establishment, and to their place in the scale of human duties; there was nothing of sophistry or trifling, though amidst teachers, remarkable for nothing so much as frivolous subtilties and quibbling expositions: he was candid and liberal in his judgment of the rest of mankind, although belonging to a people who affected a separate claim to divine favour, and, in consequence of that opinion, prone to uncharitableness, partiality, and restriction; in his religion there was no scheme of building up a hierarchy, or of ministering to the views of human governments; in a word, there was every thing so grand in doctrine, and so delightful in manner, that the people might well exclaim...
Surely, never man spake like this man!" As to his example, bishop Newcome observes, "it was of the most perfect piety to God, and of the most extensive benevolence and the most tender compassion to men
Anger - The moral of the Parables of the Prodigal and the Labourers (cf
Miracles - Pritchard observes, Christ's miracles, as His Parables, go on the principle of the law of continuity of the human with the divine
Marriage - 455) and Trench (Parables, 248), with torches, as the Roman custom was
Offence (2) - —It is remarkable that almost the only thing approaching to a discourse of Jesus in our earliest Gospel (if we omit the chapter of Parables (ch
Ideas (Leading) - Some of the Parables which were intended to throw light on the nature of the Kingdom, e
Religion (2) - To this end He spoke in Parables that they might not understand on any other conditions’ (Oman, Vision and Authority, p
Wandering Stars - ’ Furthermore, among the special Parables, or rather illustration’s, of St
Gospel (2) - In several of His Parables He referred to Himself as the Son of God (Luke 20:13), as the Judge and King of men (Matthew 25:31), as the bridegroom (Matthew 9:15; Matthew 25:6); these and other titles indicate the peculiar value of His person
Sirach - Enigmas and Parables is the title taken by Psalms 78, to which there is a reference in 39:3b
Beatitude - This theory accounts for all the variations, but it leaves unexplained the remarkable resemblances in the general purport of the teaching, the frequent identity of phraseology, and the close agreement of the introductory narratives and of the closing Parables
Psalms (2) - , the parabolic method of teaching adopted by Jesus is said to be in fulfilment of the prophecy (attributed in one MS to Isaiah), ‘I will open my mouth in Parables, I will utter things hidden from the foundation of the world
Science (2) - ’ His insight into the human soul, His Parables so true to life, His startling paradoxes, His telling object-lessons, all show the best traits of Jewish thought carried to their highest power
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Scripture is replete with examples of such activity, which can best be described as outdoor theater, pantomimes, or Parables in action
Ethics (2) - Further, we must make a searching examination of the characteristically Lukan tradition as it appears in the Parables of the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Good Samaritan, etc
Mental Characteristics - ...
This was one leading reason why the use of Parables was such a very characteristic feature in Jesus’ teaching; they have been said, in fact, and not without reason, to be the most characteristic of the Lord’s recorded sayings
New Jerusalem - The author of the Parables (i
Montanus - Through His enlightenment the dark places of Scripture are made clear, Parables made plain, those passages of which heretics had taken advantage cleared of all ambiguity" (Tert
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - Hosea is a prophet who is fond of Parables, and some of his illustrations from nature are
Poet - ...
Scenes from the life—plant and animal—of nature occur in all His Parables, and in very many sayings, which show the exactness and sympathy of His observations
Prophet - His every act was a message, and His miracles, not less than His Parables, were revelations to teach men of His Father
Hermas, Known as the Shepherd - Parables, though the frigid compositions of Hermas fall infinitely below these
Jesus Christ - He knows the inmost character, every prejudice and every feeling of his hearers; and, accordingly, uses Parables to conceal or to enforce his lessons; and he powerfully impresses them by the significant language of actions
Palestine - Most of Jesus’ Parables of kings and their wars (Matthew 18:23 etc