What does Parable mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
παραβολὴν a placing of one thing by the side of another 19
παραβολήν a placing of one thing by the side of another 6
παραβολῆς a placing of one thing by the side of another 2
παραβολή a placing of one thing by the side of another 2
παραβολάς a placing of one thing by the side of another 1
παραβολῇ a placing of one thing by the side of another 1
מָשָׁ֑ל proverb 1
מָשָׁ֔ל proverb 1
בְמָשָׁ֣ל proverb 1

Definitions Related to Parable

G3850


   1 a placing of one thing by the side of another, juxtaposition, as of ships in battle.
   2 metaph.
      2a a comparing, comparison of one thing with another, likeness, similitude.
      2b an example by which a doctrine or precept is illustrated.
      2c a narrative, fictitious but agreeable to the laws and usages of human life, by which either the duties of men or the things of God, particularly the nature and history of God’s kingdom are figuratively portrayed.
      2d a Parable: an earthly story with a heavenly meaning.
   3 a pithy and instructive saying, involving some likeness or comparison and having preceptive or admonitory force.
      3a an aphorism, a maxim.
   4 a proverb.
   5 an act by which one exposes himself or his possessions to danger, a venture, a risk.
   

H4912


   1 proverb, Parable.
      1a proverb, proverbial saying, aphorism.
      1b byword.
      1c similitude, Parable.
      1d poem.
      1e sentences of ethical wisdom, ethical maxims.
      

Frequency of Parable (original languages)

Frequency of Parable (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Parable
Parable (from a Greek word signifying comparison) is used in the Bible in both the wide and a narrow sense. In the first case it comprises all forms of teaching by analogy, and all forms of figurative speech, and is applied to metaphors, whether expanded into narratives, Ezekiel 12:22, or not, Matthew 24:32; to proverbs and other short sayings, 1 Samuel 10:12; 1 Samuel 24:13; 2 Chronicles 7:20; Luke 4:23; to dark utterances or signs of prophetic or symbolical meaning. Numbers 23:17-18; Numbers 24:3; Ezekiel 20:49; Hebrews 9:9, etc. In the second case it means a short narrative of some every-day event, by which some great spiritual truth is conveyed to the hearer. For list of parables of Christ see Appendix.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Light of the World, Parable of the
(John 3) Gospel for Monday of Octave of Pentecost. In the nightly visit of Nicodemus Christ explained the mystery of redemption. Means to it is faith in Jesus as the Christ. The unbeliever is already judged (verse 18) because he remains in darkness by his own free will (verse 19). Moral corruption prevents him from coming to the light (Jesus), lest his rottenness become exposed. Rather than face this he would deny revelation. Light is the symbol of joy (luminous thoughts give us thrills), of life (light vivifies living creatures), of happiness (days of light are days of happiness). Jesus is the giver of light; in redemption He brings to the believer truth, blessing, and peace. The evangelist called the Word Light. "In him (the Word) was life and the life was the light of men," and "The light shineth in darkness, and darkness did not comprehend it" (refused to be enlightened). Christ himself repeatedly announced: "I am the Light of the world" (John 8,9). The sense is clear. In the divine economy we must believe in Christ, to be possessed of tte light of life. But this light must likewise be our moral guide, and reveal the otherwise unfathomable mystery of unbelief.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - King's Sons Free From Tribute, Parable of the
Matthew 17. Not used liturgically, but is very important. It implies Christ's claim to Divine Sonship (admitted by all commentators except such extremists as hold that the Christ of the Synoptists holds out no such claim). The time is after the Transfiguration; the place Capharnaum, probably the house of Peter; the occasion: the attempt to collect from Christ the annual temple tax, ordained by "the Law" (Exodus 30). Peter had hastily assured the collector that his master would pay it. Christ coming into the house confronted Peter (ere he could inform him of the incident) with the question: whether the king's sons must pay tribute and custom. The answer supposed is: No. Thus Christ plainly declared that he claimed to be "the son of Jehovah; the God of Israel, to whom the temple tax was due." By theological reasoning the parable may be proved to teach, moreover, that the apostles, too, as Christ's family, are free. Hence the "we" in Christ's answer: "that we may not scandalize." This may teach us further that the law of evangelical freedom must not be abused so as to scandalize the little ones.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Laborers in the Vineyard, Parable of the
One of the parables of Christ (Matthew 20), in which the householder hiring men at different hours of the day even up to the eleventh, or last, gives each of them the same wage, "a penny" meaning a piece of money, as if the one hour laborer was entitled to as much as the full day laborer. The householder is evidently meant for Christ as head of His Kingdom to do as He sees fit with his gifts, to give those who cannot find work to do as much as those who are more fortunate; to bless those who have to struggle for the faith as much as those to whom it comes easily, as if by inheritance, or with mother's milk. Many would see in the parable an economic meaning, and it seems to justify the principle of a living wage the right of all men to have enough to live on, provided they seek and perform their share of labor honestly.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Good Shepherd, Parable of the
Our Lord means to teach in this parable (Matthew 18) the care and love of God for the little ones, that is to say the weak, of whom He thinks so much that He has placed them under the protection of His angels. God wishes that not one of them should become lost; hence the duty of looking after them to secure their salvation. The lesson is conveyed in the parable of the lost sheep; a shepherd with a flock of 100 sheep will leave the 99 that are not in danger and in no special need of his care, in order to look for the one that has been lost, and will not give up the search until he has found the lost one. This parable resembles very closely that in Luke 15, and so quite naturally the two parables are commonly identified. The differences between them are of the kind that may be expected in two parallel versions of the same discourse, teaching essentially the same lesson; the value of the soul in the eyes of God, whence flows the necessity of doing everything to reclaim one on the way to perdition, the point brought out especially by Saint Matthew, and the joy of God over the conversion of the sinner, the point brought out especially by Saint Luke.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - King Going to War, Parable of the
parable of the King Going to War Luke 14 A companion of the parable of the "builder" and emphasizing the same idea. It is taken from international political life: a ruler engaging in war must know the military strength of the enemy as well as his own. If there be any reasonable fear, that he might be defeated in battle, he better enter peace negotiations. Literal application same as in the "builder." General application is possible by abstracting from the literal meaning and using the parable independently. Then it may teach us that the spiritual warfare which we must wage daily against the prince of this world requires detachment from both se)f and the world.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fishing Net, Parable of the
This is one of the parables concerning the Kingdom of Heaven which Saint Matthew has grouped together among the parables spoken by Our Lord by the sea, ride (Matthew 13). It is followed immediately by its explanation. The fishers' net catches all kinds of fish, good and worthless, and it is only when the fishing is over, the net having been pulled to the shore, that the selection can take place. The point which the parable teaches is that in the Kingdom n God, as realized on earth, there shall be good and bad members, and that the separation is reserved for the end, the final judgment. It thus forewarns the disciples against scandal resulting from the presence of evil in the Kingdom, and reminds them that the establishment of the Kingdom of God will not result in the disappearance of evil from the world. The disciples, therefore, must not expect a sudden, miraculous transformation of the world, which would make it resemble heaven, and must not be scandalized when persecution comes, as it is bound to, from the coexistence of the Kingdom and of evil.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Parable
(Gr. parabole), a placing beside; a comparison; equivalent to the Heb. mashal, a similitude. In the Old Testament this is used to denote (1) a proverb (1 Samuel 10:12 ; 24:13 ; 2 Chronicles 7:20 ), (2) a prophetic utterance (Numbers 23:7 ; Ezekiel 20:49 ), (3) an enigmatic saying (Psalm 78:2 ; Proverbs 1:6 ). In the New Testament, (1) a proverb (Mark 7:17 ; Luke 4:23 ), (2) a typical emblem (Hebrews 9:9 ; 11:19 ), (3) a similitude or allegory (Matthew 15:15 ; 24:32 ; Mark 3:23 ; Luke 5:36 ; 14:7 ); (4) ordinarily, in a more restricted sense, a comparison of earthly with heavenly things, "an earthly story with a heavenly meaning," as in the parables of our Lord. Instruction by parables has been in use from the earliest times. A large portion of our Lord's public teaching consisted of parables. He himself explains his reasons for this in his answer to the inquiry of the disciples, "Why speakest thou to them in parables?" (Matthew 13:13-15 ; Mark 4:11,12 ; Luke 8:9,10 ). He followed in so doing the rule of the divine procedures, as recorded in Matthew 13:13 .
The parables uttered by our Lord are all recorded in the synoptical (i.e., the first three) Gospels. The fourth Gospel contains no parable properly so called, although the illustration of the good shepherd (John 10:1-16 ) has all the essential features of a parable. (See List of Parables in Appendix.)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Parable
1: παραβολή (Strong's #3850 — Noun Feminine — parabole — par-ab-ol-ay' ) lit. denotes "a placing beside" (akin to paraballo, "to throw" or "lay beside, to compare"). It signifies "a placing of one thing beside another" with a view to comparison (some consider that the thought of comparison is not necessarily contained in the word). In the NT it is found outside the Gospels, only in Hebrews 9:9 ; 11:19 . It is generally used of a somewhat lengthy utterance or narrative drawn from nature or human circumstances, the object of which is to set forth a spiritual lesson, e.g., those in Matthew 13 and Synoptic parallels; sometimes it is used of a short saying or proverb, e.g., Matthew 15:15 ; Mark 3:23 ; 7:17 ; Luke 4:23 ; 5:36 ; 6:39 . It is the lesson that is of value; the hearer must catch the analogy if he is to be instructed (this is true also of a proverb). Such a narrative or saying, dealing with earthly things with a spiritual meaning, is distinct from a fable, which attributes to things what does not belong to them in nature.
Christ's "parables" most frequently convey truths connected with the subject of the kingdom of God. His withholding the meaning from His hearers as He did from the multitudes, Matthew 13:34 , was a Divine judgment upon the unworthy.
Two dangers are to be avoided in seeking to interpret the "parables" in Scripture, that of ignoring the important features, and that of trying to make all the details mean something.
2: παροιμία (Strong's #3942 — Noun Feminine — paroima — par-oy-mee'-ah ) denotes "a wayside saying" (from paroimos, "by the way"), "a byword," "maxim," or "problem," 2 Peter 2:22 . The word is sometimes spoken of as a "parable," John 10:6 , i.e., a figurative discourse (RV marg., "proverb"); see also John 16:25,29 , where the word is rendered "proverbs" (marg. "parables") and "proverb."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lost Coin, Parable of the
A parable told to the Pharisees and Scribes who were murmuring against Our Lord for stooping to receive and enlighten publicans and sinners (Luke 15); also read for the Gospel, the third Sunday after Pentecost. The coin lost was very small as coins go (15 to 25 cents), but it meant much to the poor woman; hence her care in searching for it and joy at finding it. So, too, sinners, despicable and of no value in the eyes of the Pharisees, mean much to God who out of His great love created and destined them for heaven. This explains the zeal of Jesus, and that of His true disciples, in searching out souls lost in the dark and hidden corners of sin, and His great joy, which the angels and saints share, when He has found and restored them to Him to whom as Creator and Redeemer they rightfully belong.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Parable
A fable or allegorical instruction, founded on something read or apparent in nature or history, from which a moral is drawn, by comparing it with something in which the people are more immediately concerned: such are the parables of Dives and Lazarus, or the prodigal son, of the ten virgins, &c. Dr. Blair observes, that "of parables, which form a part of allegory, the prophetical writings are full; and if to us they sometimes appear obscure, we must remember, that, in those early times, it was universally the mode throughout all the eastern nations, to convey sacred truths under some mysterious figures and representations."
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Parable
The range of meaning of the term "parable" (Gk. parabole [ Matthew 13:33 ; B. Pes. 49a), allegories (Ezekiel 17:2 ; 24:3 ; Matthew 13:18,24 , 36 ), proverbs (Proverbs 1:1,6 ; Mark 3:23 ), riddles (2 Samuel 12:1-404 ; Mark 7:17 ), and symbols or types (Hebrews 9:9 ; B. Sanh. 92b ). "Parable" is a general term for a figurative saying.
The conceptual background for the concept of parable in the New Testament was Semitic, not Aristotelian Greek. This single insight could have saved the history of interpretation of the parables of Jesus from several key misconceptions. From Jülicher on, based on the Aristotelian Greek idea of parable as "pure comparison" conveying only a single point, there has been a significant school of interpretation that has regarded all allegorical traits as foreign to the parables of Jesus and has insisted that each parable has only one point. This narrow definition of parable has led interpreters to regard the allegorical interpretations of parables in the Gospels (e.g., Mark 4:14-20 ) as later misinterpretations, even though the earliest written gospels have the highest percentage of allegorical elements, and the latest, the Gospel of Thomas, has the least. It has also led to a seemingly endless series of variations of exactly just what was the "one point" of each parable. A study of the many interpretations shows a wide range of views of just what that one point must have been. For many parables, such as the prodigal son, limiting the interpretation to "one point" has proved to be a procrustean bed.
Nathan's parable of the ewe lamb in 1618420467_2 foreshadows in several respects many of Jesus' parables. The story of the rich man who slew a poor man's beloved pet lamb caused David to judge the rich man worthy of death. Nathan's "You are the man!" struck David to the quick precisely because he recognized the parallels between his actions and the rich man's, between Uriah and the poor man, and between Uriah's wife and the ewe lamb. This is reinforced with specific imagery ("It shared his food, drank from his cup, and even slept in his arms") that could be applied just as well to Uriah's wife. Similarly, many of Jesus' parables elicit a judgment that invites repentance, such as the good Samaritan. His parables lead us to a new way of seeing life and invite us to adopt a whole new perspective that changes how we live.
The parable of the vineyard in Isaiah 5:1-6 is immediately interpreted in verse 7 with explicit allegorical identifications: "The vineyard of the Lord Almighty is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah are the garden of his delight." Thus, the allegorical interpretations of Jesus' parables in the Gospels follow the pattern in the Old Testament, a pattern that is abundantly exemplified in rabbinic literature as well.
Jesus' narrative parables are probably best understood as extended metaphors. The story (the image) is a window through which a larger reality (the referent) is depicted. Understanding the message of a parable is more than identifying its "point, " though many parables do have a focal point that is reinforced by the parable as a whole. Thus, it is crucial both to understand the story as it would have been understood by Jesus' original hearers, and to understand the referent, the wider reality about which it gives insight. Typically the referent is some aspect of the kingdom of God, the reign of God in people's hearts, or the realm of God's sovereignty. In order to let the parable have its full impact, we need to see the referent in a new way through the parable story.
To understand a parable we first need to listen to the story. We need to appreciate how its various details support the focus of the whole. For instance, the words describing the fate of each of the seeds that did not bear fruit—devoured, scorched, chokedhave terrifying overtones. This is a story about the reception of seed in various soils. The three examples of multiplied fruitfulness balance the former three examples of fruitlessness. By their concluding position the multiplied fruitfulness of the good soil offers hope in contrast to the devastation where the Word does not take root. The interpretation in each of the Synoptics fits the story perfectly: a person's destiny depends on his or her response to the Word. It both offers hope and warns of devastation to those who will not accept the message. Such a combination of cursing and blessing seems to have been typical of Jesus' contrast parables: eschatological blessing for those who respond properly to God's invitation, but cursing for those who do not.
Of Jesus' fifty-two recorded narrative parables, twenty seem to depict him in imagery that in the Old Testament metaphorical use typically referred to God. The frequency with which this occurs indicates that Jesus regularly depicted himself in images that were particularly appropriate for depicting God. Such self-portrayal appears to be unique to Jesus. In the vast corpus of rabbinic parables there seems to be none in which a rabbi depicted himself. This distinctiveness, like the distinctive artistry of Jesus' parables, is further evidence that the parables recorded in the Gospels are authentic to Jesus.
The imagery that Jesus used to depict himself is an integral and often necessary part of the parables in which they occur. For instance, take the "father" out of the prodigal son, the "bridegroom" out of the bridegroom, the "shepherd" out of the lost sheep, or the "rock" out of the two houses and the parable disintegrates. Furthermore, these symbols for God applied by Jesus to himself in the parables are not interpreted in the Gospels as divine claims. In light of these factors, we can be confident that they were not later, theologically motivated insertions.
The argument implicit in many of these parables depends on the hearer's making an association that equates Jesus' act with God's act. Jesus implicitly claimed to be performing the work of God: as the sower, sowing the kingdom and implanting his word in people; as the director of the harvest, assuming God's role as judge in the endtimes; as the rock, providing the only secure foundation; as the shepherd, seeking out his lost sheep and leading his own; as the bridegroom in the wedding feast of the kingdom, where fasting is unthinkable; as the father, welcoming repentant sinners into the kingdom and calling his children into his service; as the giver of forgiveness, even to grievous sinners; as the vineyard owner, graciously giving undeserved favor; as the lord, who has final authority over his servants, who calls them into responsible participation in the kingdom, and who will ultimately determine the destiny of each of them, depending on their response to his lordship; and as the king, who has authority to allow or refuse entry into the kingdom, and to increase the responsibility of people who develop his resources, or to take away those resources from people who fail to develop them.
Not only do these parables depict Jesus as performing the work of God; they implicitly apply various titles of God to Jesus: the Sower, the Rock, the Shepherd, the Bridegroom, the Father, the Lord, and the King. Each of these parables adds to the overall impression that Jesus implicitly claimed to be God. Most parable studies that deal with the sort of implicit claim Jesus was making through the parables assume that it is a messianic claim, but most of this imagery was not used in the Old Testament to depict the Messiah. Even those symbols that were occasionally also used of the Messiah in the Old Testament (shepherd, king, stone) in Jesus' parables refer more naturally to God.
However, could Jesus' use of these symbols for God mean simply that he saw himself, as all of the prophets did, as doing God's work and speaking God's word? A few of these parables, like the two houses and the two sons, with their particular focus on obedience to Jesus' word, could be interpreted in this way. But three points support the view that Jesus was in fact presenting himself as God:
None of the prophets applied symbols for God to himself in the way that Jesus did so consistently in his parables. None of the prophets claimed that they were doing or would do what the Scriptures specifically say that God will do. Yet it is precisely these things that Jesus so often depicted himself as doing in the parables: forgiving sin, sowing the kingdom, sowing his word in men's hearts, graciously welcoming undeserving sinners into the kingdom, seeking out and rescuing his lost sheep, directing the harvest of the great judgment, and dividing between those who will and those who will not enter the kingdom. Many of the images through which Jesus refers to himself focus not so much on his activity as on who he is: the bridegroom of the kingdom, the good shepherd, the one who will return as king, the one with authority as vineyard owner and lord to do what he wishes with what is his, the one with authority to forgive sins, and the lord with authority to give or refuse entry into the kingdom and to reward the faithful. This is of vital relevance to the current debate on the deity of Jesus. Did he really understand himself to be deity? Here in the parables, the most assuredly authentic of all the traditions about Jesus, is a clear, implicit affirmation of Jesus' self-understanding as deity. His sense of identification with God was so deep that to depict himself he consistently gravitated to imagery and symbols that in the Old Testament depicted God.
Jesus' parables depict many aspects of the kingdom of God. God's reign requires total devotion to him and a life exemplifying repentance, trust, love, and obedience. The forgiving quality of God's love and his merciful invitation to the kingdom inspire trust, the rejection of prejudice, and love for our neighbors.
Philip Barton Payne
See also Allegory ; Jesus Christ ; Kingdom of God
Bibliography . K. Bailey, Poet and Peasant ; idem, Through Peasant Eyes ; C. Blomberg, Interpreting the Parables ; C. H. Dodd, The Parables of the Kingdom ; J. Jeremias, The Parables of Jesus ; P. B. Payne, Trinity J 2 ns (1981):3-23; R. H. Stein, An Introduction to the Parables of Jesus ; D. Wenham, The Parables of Jesus .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Good Samaritan, Parable of the
The occasion of the parable (Luke 10) was a question of a doctor of the law concerning eternal life, asked with the intention of embarrassing Our Lord. Christ refers the man to the Law and invites him to answer himself; this the questioner does by reciting the commandment of the love of God, which was part of the great daily prayer, and adding to it the precept of the love of the neighbor, as was done by Our Lord himself in His teaching. When Our Lord approves his answer, the doctor wishes to justify himself for putting a question which he was so well able to answer, by asking: And who is my neighbor? Since a more or less abstract definition could give occasion to distinctions and discussions, Jesus answered by giving a concrete illustration in the parable of the Good Samaritan. A man going down from Jerusalem to Jericho is attacked by a band of robbers who despoil him and beat him. A priest approaches, who might be expected to give good example and obey the Law's precept of charity towards the neighbor, especially as the victim is apparently a fellow countryman, but he passes by. So also a Levite. Next comes a Samaritan, chosen by Our Lord to give greater force to the lesson; for in his case, racial and religious bitterness would make the practise of charity more difficult (John 4). At once moved by compassion, he attends to the needs of the unfortunate, then conveys him to an inn, and pays in advance for the care for the man a sum equivalent to two days wages, promising to make good on his return any further expense incurred by the innkeeper. The story leads up quite naturally to the question with which Our Lord concludes the narrative: "Which of these three, in thy opinion, was neighbor to him that fell among the robbers?" The only possible answer to this query is given by the doctor of the law, who thus learns that a neighbor is anyone who needs any manner of assistance or help.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Parable
In the O.T. the word is mashal, 'a similitude,' and is also translated 'proverb.' In the N.T. it is παραβολή. A parable is a mode of relation under which something is figured which is not expressed in the terms. Hence a parable usually necessitates an expositor. The Lord said on one occasion that He spoke in parables, so that the multitude should not understand His teaching: they had virtually rejected their Messiah, and were not morally in a condition to be taught. The Lord acted as expositor and explained the meaning privately to His disciples, for it was given unto them to know 'the mysteries of the kingdom.' Matthew 13:11 . Some, however, of the Lord's parables were so pointed that they were understood even by His enemies, which doubtless was His intention; they were laid bare as in His presence. Some of those in the O.T. also were plain, but in the parable of the ewe lamb, David did not see the application till he had himself judged the culprit. So also with Ahab and the 'escaped captive.' These allegories were calculated to strike home the intended lesson, by portraying in an objective way the evil.
The word 'parable' is used many times in the O.T. for figurative language where no distinct parable is related, as when Balaam 'took up his parable,' Numbers 23:7,18 , etc.; and Job 'continued his parable.' Job 27:1 ; Job 29:1 . The word παραβολή is twice translated 'FIGURE.' Hebrews 9:9 ; Hebrews 11:19 .
From the fact of the Lord connecting 'the mysteries of the kingdom' with the parables He uttered, we may be sure that there is much instruction to be gathered from them if rightly interpreted: they need the teaching of the Spirit of God as much as any other part of scripture.
It will be seen by the annexed list that some of the parables are recorded only by Matthew; two 'similes' are found in Mark only; several parables are given only by Luke; and none are recorded by the evangelist John. There must be divine reasons for this, and wisdom is needed to discern and profit by it. All is doubtless in harmony with the character of each of the Gospels. The word 'parable' occurs in John 10:6 in the A.V., but it is not the same word, and signifies 'allegory.' The teaching is not in the form of a parable: the Lord is speaking of Himself as the good Shepherd.
Some of the parables are grouped together. Thus in Matthew 13 there are seven parables, four of which were delivered in the hearing of the multitude, and three in private. The first was introductory, namely, the SOWER. The Lord came seeking fruit, but finding none He revealed that He had really been sowing 'the word of the kingdom,' and explained why much of the seed did not produce fruit. The next three parables give the outward aspect of the kingdom during Christ's absence, that which man has made of it. The second is the WHEAT AND THE TARES. The Lord sowed the good seed, but Satan at once sowed his seed, and both grew up together until the harvest at the end of the age. The third is the MUSTARD SEED. This grows up into a tree large enough for the birds (which caught away the good seed in the parable of the sower) to lodge in its branches. The fourth is the LEAVEN. A woman hid leaven (always a type of what is human, arid hence of evil, because sin is in the flesh) which diffused itself unseen amid the three measures of meal until all was leavened.
Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and in private explained first to His disciples the parable of the Wheat and the Tares, and then added parables that show the divine object and intent in the kingdom. The first is the HID TREASURE, for the sake of obtaining which a man buys the field in which it is hid. The second is the PEARL OF GREAT PRICE. The merchant-man seeks goodly pearls, and having found one pearl of great price, sells all that he has to be possessed of it. Christ renounced all that belonged to Him as man after the flesh and as Messiah on earth, in order that He might possess the church. The third is the parable of the NET, which gathers out of the sea of nations good and bad, as the gospel has done in Christendom. When the net is drawn to shore the servants make a selection of the good from the bad, but at the end of the age (it is added in the exposition) the angels will separate the wicked from the just, and cast them into the furnace of fire.
Another group of parables is in Luke 15 , or in one sense a parable in three sections (Luke 15:3 ). It answers the charge brought against the Lord, "This man receiveth sinners."
1. THE LOST SHEEP was followed by the shepherd until it was found.
2. THE LOST PIECE OF MONEY. The piece of money was lost in the house, even as many persons in God's sight were lost in the outward profession of being Abraham's children (as many indeed are lost now in Christendom). The lost piece was sought by the light of the candle till it was found. It was precious, a piece of silver.
3. THE PRODIGAL SON was joyfully received by the father, a feast was prepared, and the recovery of the lost one was celebrated by music and dancing. This is the climax — the celebration of grace. In all three the joy is that of the finder. It is the joy of heaven over the recovery of lost sinners.
It is doubtless best to study each parable or each group, with its context, as the Holy Spirit has given them. Attempts have, however, been made to classify them according to the truth conveyed by them thus:
1. The setting aside of Israel. THE TWO SONS, of which the Lord gives the interpretation. THE WICKED HUSBANDMEN: the rulers of Israel were among the Lord's hearers, and He explained the parable thus: "The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof." The BARREN FIG TREE: the Lord came seeking fruit in Israel as representing man under culture, but found none. He gave time for repentance, but the fig tree yielded no fruit and was to be cut clown: the destruction of Jerusalem was its actual removal.
2. The introduction of the kingdom and Satan's opposition to it. The SOWER. The WHEAT AND TARES. The GROWTH OF SEED: notwithstanding the opposition of Satan, God in His own secret way makes His seed fructify and bring forth fruit. The LEAVEN; the HIDDEN TREASURE; the PEARL OF GREAT PRICE; and the NET.
3. God's way of bringing into blessing. The LOST SHEEP; the LOST PIECE OF MONEY; and the PRODIGAL SON. The MARRIAGE FOR THE KING'S SON: God will do honour to His Son. The Jews were invited to the feast, but would not come. Others, the Gentile outcasts, were invited. One without the wedding robe (Christ) was cast out. He had no sense of natural unfitness. The GREAT SUPPER: the feast of heavenly grace in contrast to the earthly things of the kingdom of God. All who were invited made excuses, not as prevented by evil but by earthly things; they were indifferent to the gracious invitation. Some, the poor and afflicted of the city, were brought in, and others were to be compelled to come in. God will have His house filled. The PHARISEE AND PUBLICAN: the Pharisee thanked God that he was not as other men; the publican cried for mercy, and went down to his house justified rather than the other. The TWODEBTORS: the poor woman was forgiven much, and she loved much; not forgiven because she loved much. The UNJUST JUDGE: the Lord's point was that men "ought always to pray and not to faint." God will answer in His own time, and the earthly elect will be saved. The LABOURERS IN THE VINEYARD: God in His sovereignty asks, "Is it not lawful for me to do what I will with mine own?" Man claims this liberty for himself, yet murmurs against the sovereignty of God. "Many are called, but few chosen." Notice also in this parable the Lord's reply to Peter's question in Matthew 19:27 ; Matthew 20 continues the subject and shows us sovereign grace in contrast with the mercenary spirit of man's heart.
4. The various responsibilities of men. The GOOD SAMARITAN: this was given in answer to "Who is my neighbour?" The Lord was really the good Samaritan, and after describing the course He took He said, "Go thou and do likewise." The FOOLISH RICH MAN: the moral is, "So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God." The UNJUST STEWARD: he sacrificed the present for the future, forwhich his master commended him, not for his injustice but his wisdom. The Lord applies the parable thus: "Make to yourselves friends with the mammon of unrighteousness [1] that when it fails ye may be received into eternal tabernacles." Giving to the poor is lending to the Lord, and laying up treasure in heaven. The Lord exhorted His hearers to be (unlike the unjust steward) faithful in their stewardship of the unrighteous mammon (which does not belong to the Christian), that the true riches might be entrusted to them.
The RICH MAN AND LAZARUS. Nothing is said of the moral character of either of these men. It had been taught in the O.T. that outward prosperity should mark the upright man. Psalm 112:2,3 . In the kingdom in its new phase, consequent upon Christ's rejection, the possession of riches is no sign of divine favour. This was a needful lesson for the Jew. It was very difficult for a rich man to be saved, but the poor had the gospel preached unto them. The poor man was carried into Abraham's bosom, and the rich man fell into perdition. Another world reverses the conditions of the present one. The teaching in the parable of the Unjust Steward is continued here: the rich man was not sacrificing the present for the future. It also gives a vivid picture of the unalterable condition of the lost.
The UNMERCIFUL SERVANT. This illustrates the government of God, which is not set aside by His grace. It is revealed that God will recompense to His people according as they act towards others. Matthew 7:2 . Doubtless this parable has another application, bearing upon the Jews as to their jealousy of grace being shown to the Gentiles. The debt of the Gentiles to them is expressed in the hundred pence [2]; whereas the indebtedness of the Jews to God is seen in the ten thousand talents [3]. Pardon was offered to them by Peter in Acts 3:19-26 ; but it was rejected, and their persecution of Paul and those who carried the gospel to the Gentiles showed that they could not forgive the Gentiles the hundred pence. They must now pay the uttermost farthing. Compare Isaiah 40:2 ; Matthew 5:25,26 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:15,16 .
The TEN VIRGINS. The explanation of this is simple. The normal attitude of Christians is that they have gone forth to meet the Bridegroom. This was the hope and expectation of the apostles. After their days all in this respect fell asleep. There may have been times of awakening, but when the last call goes forth it reveals the solemn fact that some have a profession only, without Christ — lamps without oil — who will be for ever shut out. "Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour." The virgins signify Christians, and not the faithful Jewish remnant, for these will not sleep (persecution will prevent that), nor be a mixed company, nor have to wait a long time for their Deliverer.
The TALENTS. This parable is similar in character to that of the POUNDS. The talents were distributed according to the ability of each servant, so that one had five, another two, and another one. This parable follows that of the Ten Virgins, showing that while the Christian waits for his Lord, he should be faithfully using the gifts entrusted to him. The POUNDS show the Lord Jesus leaving the earth to receive a kingdom, and giving to each of His servants a pound to trade with during His absence. All gifts are for the glory of the Lord, and the servant is responsible to Him for the faithful use of them.
Another arrangement of the principal parables has been suggested, namely, in three groups corresponding to different periods of the Lord's ministry.
1. In His early ministry, embracing the new teaching connected with the kingdom, and the mysterious form which it takes during His absence. This extends to Matthew 13 and Mark 4 . These parables will be easily distinguished in the following table.
2. After an interval of some months. The parables are now of a differenttype, and are drawn from the life of men rather than from the world of nature. They are principally in answer to questions, not in discourses to the multitude. Most of them occur in Luke only, in which gospel the Son of man is for man. They fall chiefly between the mission of the seventy and the Lord's last approach to Jerusalem.
3. This group falls towards the close of the Lord's ministry. They concern the kingdom in its consummation, and are prophetic of the rejection of Israel and the coming of the Lord.
In Matthew 13 the Lord asked His disciples if they understood what He had been saying to them. They said, "Yea, Lord." He added, "Every scribe which is instructed unto the kingdom of heaven, is like unto a man that is a householder which bringeth forth out of his treasure things new and old."
PARABLES AND SIMILES IN THE OLD TESTAMENT.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hidden Treasure, Parable of the
Parable in Saint Matthew's Gospel 13. One of the parables of the lakeside reproduced by Saint Matthew; in which different aspects of the Kingdom of Heaven are brought out by Our Lord. This parable is followed by that of the pearl of great price and that of the fishing net and forms with those a group of parables found only in the Gospel of Saint Matthew. The two parables of the hidden treasure and of the pearl of great price are closely related and teach the same lesson, namely the supreme value of the Kingdom of Heaven, for which all else must, be sacrificed without any hesitation. The lesson comes out so clearly that Our Lord does not give an explanation of these two parables to the disciples. In appreciating the lesson taught in the parable of the hidden treasure, we must keep before our mind, the special point which Our Lord intends to teach and not press every single detail of the story as if meant to convey a lesson. Thus in the case of the parable of the hidden treasure Christ does not mean to hold up to our imitation the manner in which the finder gets possession of the treasure. The sole point which Our Lord intends here is the eagerness of the man who is willing to sell everything he owns in order to get the treasure, the latter being supposed naturally to be of much greater value; the application to the spiritual religious life is that the Kingdom is something of such incomparable value that no sacrifice made to enter it will be too great.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable
An illustrative discourse or story that uses common events and culture and is meant to convey a meaning or lesson. Jesus used parables extensively. Some of the OT parables are Trees Making a King (2 Samuel 12:1-4); The Thistle and the Cedar (2 Kings 14:9); Israel, a Vine Planted by Water (Ezekiel 24:1014), etc. Some NT parables are The Sower (Luke 8:5-8); the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13); The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37); The Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32), etc. See Parables.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Parable
Hebrew maashaal , Greek parabolee , a placing side by side or comparing earthly truths, expressed, with heavenly truths to be understood. (See FABLE.) The basis of parable is that man is made in the image of God, and that there is a law of continuity of the human with the divine. The force of parable lies in the real analogies impressed by the Creator on His creatures, the physical typifying the higher moral world. "Both kingdoms develop themselves according to the same laws; Jesus' parables are not mere illustrations, but internal analogies, nature becoming a witness for the spiritual world; whatever is found in the earthly exists also in the heavenly kingdom." (Lisco.) The parables, earthly in form heavenly in spirit, answer to the parabolic character of His own manifestation. Jesus' purpose in using parables is judicial, as well as didactic, to discriminate between the careless and the sincere.
In His earlier teaching, as the Sermon on the Mount, He taught plainly and generally without parables; but when His teaching was rejected or misunderstood, He in the latter half of His ministry judicially punished the unbelieving by parabolic veiling of the truth (Matthew 13:11-16), "therefore speak I to them in parables, because they seeing see not ... but blessed are your eyes, for they see," etc. Also Matthew 13:34-35. The disciples' question (Matthew 13:10), "why speakest Thou unto them in parables?" shows that this is the first formal beginning of His parabolic teaching. The parables found earlier are scattered and so plain as to be rather illustrations than judicial veilings of the truth (Matthew 7:24-27; Matthew 9:16; Matthew 12:25; Mark 3:23; Luke 6:39). Not that a merciful aspect is excluded even for the heretofore carnal hearers. The change of mode would awaken attention, and judgment thus end in mercy, when the message of reconciliation addressed to them first after Jesus' resurrection (Acts 3:26) would remind them of parables not understood at the time.
The Holy Spirit would "bring all things to their remembrance" (John 14:26). When explained, the parables would be the clearest illustration of truth. The parable, which was to the carnal a veiling, to the receptive was a revealing of the truth, not immediate but progressive (Proverbs 4:18). They were a penalty era blessing according to the hearer's state: a darkening to those who loved darkness; enshrining the truth (concerning Messiah's spiritual kingdom so different from Jewish expectations) from the jeer of the scoffer, and leaving something to stimulate the careless afterward to think over. On the other hand, enlightening the diligent seeker, who asks what means this parable? and is led so to "understand all parables" (Mark 4:13; Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 16:11), and at last to need no longer this mode but to have all truth revealed plainly (John 16:25). The truths, when afterward explained first by Jesus, then by His Spirit (John 14:26), would be more definitely and indelibly engraven on their memories.
About 50 out of a larger number are preserved in the Gospels (Mark 4:33). Each of the three synoptical Gospels preserves some parable peculiar to itself; John never uses the word parable but "proverb" or rather brief "allegory," parabolic saying (paroimia ). Parabolic sayings, like the paroimia) in John (John 10:1; John 10:6-18; John 16:25; John 15:1-8), occur also in Matthew 15:15; Luke 4:23; Luke 6:39; Mark 3:23, "parable" in the sense "figure" or type, Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 11:19 Greek Fable introduces brutes and transgresses the order of things natural, introducing improbabilities resting on fancy. Parable does not, and has a loftier significance; it rests on the imagination, introducing only things probable. The allegory personifies directly ideas or attributes. The thing signifying and the thing signified are united together, the properties and relations of one being transferred to the other; instead of being kept distinct side by side, as in the parable; it is a prolonged metaphor or extended simile; it never names the object itself; it may be about other than religious truths, but the parable only about religious truth.
The parable is longer carried out than the proverb, and not merely by accident and occasionally, but necessarily, figurative and having a similitude. The parable is often an expanded proverb, and the proverb a condensed parable. The parable expresses some particular fact, which the simile does not. In the fable the end is earthly virtues, skill, prudence, etc., which have their representatives in irrational creation; if men be introduced, they are represented from their mere animal aspect. The rabbis of Christ's time and previously often employed parable, as Hillel, Shammai, the Gemara, Midrash (Lightfoot, Hor. Hebrew, Matthew 13:3); the commonness of their use was His first reason for employing them, He consecrated parables to their highest end. A second reason was, the untutored masses relish what is presented in the concrete and under imagery, rather than in the abstract. Even the disciples, through Jewish prejudices, were too weak in faith impartially to hear gospel truths if presented in naked simplicity; the parables secured their assent unawares.
The Pharisees, hating the truth, became judicially hardened by that vehicle which might have taught them it in a guise least unpalatable. As in the prophecies, so in parables, there was light enough to guide the humble, darkness enough to confound the willfully blind (John 9:39; Psalms 18:26). A third reason was, gospel doctrines could not be understood fully before the historical facts on which they rested had been accomplished, namely, Jesus' death and resurrection. Parables were repositories of truths not then understood, even when plainly told (Luke 18:34), but afterward comprehended in their manifold significance, when the Spirit brought all Jesus' words to their remembrance. The veil was so transparent as to allow the spiritual easily to see the truth underneath; the unspiritual saw only the sacred drapery of the parable in which He wrapped the pearl so as not to cast it before swine. "Apples of gold in pictures (frames) of silver." The seven in Matthew 13 represent the various relations of the kingdom of God. The first, the relations of different classes with regard to God's word.
The second, the position of mankind relatively to Satan's kingdom. The third and fourth, the greatness of the gospel kingdom contrasted with its insignificant beginning. The fifth and sixth, the inestimable value of the kingdom. The seventh, the mingled state of the church on earth continuing to the end. The first four parables have a mutual connection (Matthew 13:3; Matthew 13:24; Matthew 13:31; Matthew 13:33), and were spoken to the multitude on the shore; then Matthew 13:34 marks a break. On His way to the house He explains the parable of the sower to the disciples; then, in the house, the tares (Matthew 13:36); the three last parables (Matthew 13:44-52), mutually connected by the thrice repeated "again," probably in private. The seven form a connected totality. The mustard and leaven are repeated in a different connection (Luke 13:18-21).
Seven denotes "completeness"; they form a perfect prophetic series: the sower, the seedtime; the tares, the secret growth of corruption; the mustard and leaven, the propagation of the gospel among princes and in the whole world; the treasure, the hidden state of the church (Psalms 83:3); the pearl, the kingdom prized above all else; the net, the church's mixed state in the last age and the final separation of bad from good. The second group of parables are less theocratic, and more peculiarly represent Christ's sympathy with all men, and their consequent duties toward Him and their fellow men. The two debtors (Luke 7:41), the merciless servant (Matthew 18), the good Samaritan (Luke 10:30), the friend at midnight (Luke 11:5), the rich fool (Luke 12:16), the figtree (Luke 13:6), the great supper (Luke 14:16), the lost sheep, piece of silver, son (Luke 15; Matthew 18:12), the unjust steward (Luke 16:1), Lazarus, etc. (Luke 16:19), unjust judge (Luke 18:2), Pharisee and publican (Luke 18:9), all in Luke, agreeable to his Gospel's aspect of Christ. (See LUKE.)
Thirdly, toward the close of His ministry, the theocratic parables are resumed, dwelling on the final consummation of the kingdom of God. The pound (Luke 19:12), two sons (Matthew 21:28), the vineyard (Matthew 21:33), marriage (Matthew 22:2); the ten virgins, talents, sheep and goats (Matthew 25). Matthew, being evangelist of the kingdom, has the largest number of the first and third group. Mark, the Gospel of Jesus' acts, has (of the three) fewest of the parables, but alone has the parable of the grain's silent growth (Mark 4:26). John, who soars highest, has no parable strictly so-called, having reached that close communion with the Lord wherein parables have no place. For a different reason, namely, incapacity to frame them, the apocryphal Gospels have none.
INTERPRETATION. Jesus' explanation of two parables, the sower and the tares, gives a key for interpreting other parables. There is one leading thought round which as center the subordinate parts must group themselves. As the accessories, the birds, thorns, heat, etc., had each a meaning, so we must in other parables try to find the spiritual significance even of details. The mistakes some have made are no reason why we should not from Scripture seek an explanation of accessories. The fulfillment may be more than single, applying to the church and to the individual at once, both experimental and prophetic. But
(1) The analogies must be real, not imaginary, and subordinate to the main lesson of the parable.
(2) The parable in its mere outward form must be well understood, e.g. the relation of love between the Eastern shepherd and sheep (2 Samuel 12:3, an Old Testament parable, as the vineyard Isaiah 5 also) to catch the point of the parable of the lost sheep.
(3) The context also introducing the parable, as Luke 15:1-2 is the starting point of the three parables, the lost sheep, etc.; so Luke 16:14-18 (compare John 8:9) introduces and gives the key to the parable of the rich man and Lazurus.
(4) Traits which, if literally interpreted, would contradict Scripture, are coloring; e.g. the number of the wise virgins and the foolish being equal; compare Matthew 7:13-14. But there may be a true interpretation of a trait, which, if misinterpreted, contradicts Scripture, e.g. the hired laborers all alike getting the penny, not that there are no degrees of rewards (2 John 1:8) but the gracious gift of salvation is the same to all; the key is Matthew 19:27-30; Matthew 20:16. So the selling the debtor's wife and children (Matthew 18:25) is mere coloring from Eastern usage, for God does not consign wife and children to hell for the husband's and father's sins.
Webster's Dictionary - Parable
(1):
(a.) Procurable.
(2):
(n.) A comparison; a similitude; specifically, a short fictitious narrative of something which might really occur in life or nature, by means of which a moral is drawn; as, the parables of Christ.
(3):
(v. t.) To represent by parable.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Parable
παραβολη , formed from παραβαλλειν , to oppose or compare, an allegorical instruction, founded on something real or apparent in nature or history, from which a moral is drawn, by comparing it with some other thing in which the people are more immediately concerned.
( See ALLEGORY. ) Aristotle defines parable, a similitude drawn from form to form. Cicero calls it a collation; others, a simile. F. de Colonia calls it a rational fable; but it may be founded on real occurrences, as many parables of our Saviour were. The Hebrews call it משל , from a word which signifies either to predominate or to assimilate; the Proverbs of Solomon are by them also called משלים , parables, or proverbs. Parable, according to the eminently learned Bishop Lowth, is that kind of allegory which consists of a continued narration of a fictitious or accommodated event, applied to the illustration of some important truth. The Greeks call these αινοι , allegories, or apologues; the Latins fabulae, or "fables;" and the writings of the Phrygian sage, or those composed in imitation of him, have acquired the greatest celebrity. Nor has our Saviour himself disdained to adopt the same method of instruction; of whose parables it is doubtful whether they excel most in wisdom and utility, or in sweetness, elegance, and perspicuity. As the appellation of parable has been applied to his discourses of this kind, the term is now restricted from its former extensive signification to a more confined sense. But this species of composition occurs very frequently in the prophetic poetry, and particularly in that of Ezekiel. If to us they should sometimes appear obscure, we must remember, that, in those early times when the prophetical writings were indited, it was universally the mode throughout all the eastern nations to convey sacred truths under mysterious figures and representations. In order to our forming a more certain judgment upon this subject, Dr. Lowth has briefly explained some of the primary qualities of the poetic parables; so that, by considering the general nature of them, we may decide more accurately on the merits of particular examples.
It is the first excellence of a parable to turn upon an image well known and applicable to the subject, the meaning of which is clear and definite; for this circumstance will give it perspicuity, which is essential to every species of allegory. If the parables of the sacred prophets are examined by this rule, they will not be found deficient. They are in general founded upon such imagery as is frequently used, and similarly applied by way of metaphor and comparison in the Hebrew poetry. Examples of this kind occur in the parable of the deceitful vineyard, Isaiah 5:1-7 , and of the useless vine, Ezekiel 15; Ezekiel 19:10-14 ; for under this imagery the ungrateful people of God are more than once described; Ezekiel 19:1-9 ; Ezekiel 31; Ezekiel 16; Ezekiel 23. Moreover, the image must not only be apt and familiar, but it must be also elegant and beautiful in itself; since it is the purpose of a poetic parable, not only to explain more perfectly some proposition, but frequently to give it some animation and splendour. As the imagery from natural objects is in this respect superior to all others, the parables of the sacred poets consist chiefly of this kind of imagery. It is also essential to the elegance of a parable, that the imagery should not only be apt and beautiful, but that all its parts and appendages should be perspicuous and pertinent. Of all these excellencies, there cannot be more perfect examples than the parables that have been just specified; to which we may add the well known parable of Nathan, 2 Samuel 12:1-4 , although written in prose, as well as that of Jotham, Judges 9:7-15 , which appears to be the most ancient extant, and approaches somewhat nearer to the poetical form. It is also the criterion of a parable, that it be consistent throughout, and that the literal be never confounded with the figurative sense; and in this respect it materially differs from that species of allegory, called the continued metaphor, Isaiah 5:1-7 . It should be considered, that the continued metaphor and the parable have a very different view. The sole intention of the former is to embellish a subject, to represent it more magnificently, or at the most to illustrate it, that, by describing it in more elevated language, it may strike the mind more forcibly; but the intent of the latter is to withdraw the truth for a moment from our sight, in order to conceal whatever it may contain ungrateful or reproving, and to enable it secretly to insinuate itself, and obtain an ascendency as it were by stealth. There is, however, a species of parable, the intent of which is only to illustrate the subject; such is that remarkable one of the cedar of Lebanon, Ezekiel 31; than which, if we consider the imagery itself, none was ever more apt or more beautiful; or the description and colouring, none was ever more elegant or splendid; in which, however, the poet has occasionally allowed himself to blend the figurative with the literal description, Ezekiel 31:11 ; Ezekiel 31:14-17 ; whether he has done this because the peculiar nature of this kind of parable required it, or whether his own fervid imagination alone, which disdained the stricter rules of composition, was his guide, our learned author can scarcely presume to determine.
In the New Testament, the word parable is used variously: in Luke 4:23 , for a proverb, or adage; in Matthew 15:15 , for a thing darkly and figuratively expressed; in Hebrews 9:9 , &c, for a type; in Luke 14:7 , &c, for a special instruction; in Matthew 24:32 , for a similitude or comparison.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the
A natural fact in the vegetable world to which Christ, in a short four verse parable, likens the Kingdom of Heaven. When a man has sown his seed whether he is asleep or awake, night or day, germination will go on without his knowing how, and the earth will put forth first the blade, then the ear, and last of all the full corn in the ear. When the grain is ripe there is nothing for him to do but come with the sickle: it is the harvest time. This is the only parable peculiar to Saint Mark's Gospel (Mark 4), and is told in his characteristic crisp style. It is one of a trinity of parables which describe the Kingdom of God on earth, the others being the "Sower" and the "Mustard Seed." The audience consisted of a "great multitude," mostly from Capharnaum, who remained on the shore while Jesus taught them many things in patables from a little boat on the Lake of Tiberias. The meaning of the similitude is that Our Lord having founded the Church and endowed it with gifts and power of spiritual growth, leaves it alone, as it were, to grow and ripen by itself. The Church germinates and increases as a Divine seed even to the end of the world. Its development nothing is able to arrest. When its period of growth is complete, at the Last Day, He will return and gather in the harvest. The parable is explained thus: the seed is the teaching of the Gospel; the sower is primarily Christ who first promulgated this teaching and left it to the Church, and secondarily the Apostles and their successors; by earth is meant the hearts and souls of men. The words sleep, rise, and he knoweth not can refer only to the human ministers of the Gospel to whose efforts the growth of the Gospel is not to be ascribed, only God giveth the increase. Putting in the sickle signifies the end of the world. The same parable can be applied to the Kingdom of God in each Christian soul in particular. Patience is the great lesson taught by this parable, hence the stress laid on the spontaneity of the growth. Those who preach the Word of God must patiently wait for the fruit of their labors. There is no liturgical assignment of this parable to any Sunday of the year.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable
Derived from a Greek word, which signifies, to compare things together, to form a parallel or similitude of them with other things.
What we call the Proverbs of Solomon, which are moral maxims and sentences, the Greeks call the Parables of Solomon. In like manner, when Job answers his friends, it is said he took up his "parable," Matthew 21:28-3232 29:1 . In the New Testament the word parable denotes sometimes a true history, or an illustrative sketch from nature; sometimes a proverb or adage, Luke 4:23 ; a truth darkly or figuratively expressed, Matthew 15:15 ; a type, Hebrews 9:9 ; or a similitude, Matthew 24:32 . The parabolical, enigmatical, figurative, and sententious way of speaking, was the language of the Eastern sages and learned men, Psalm 49:4 78:2 ; and nothing was more insupportable than to hear a fool utter parables, Proverbs 26:7 .
The prophets employed parables the more strongly to impress prince and people with their threatening or their promises. Nathan reproved David under the parable of a rich man who had taken away and killed the lamb of a poor man, 2 Samuel 12:1-31 . See also Judges 9:7-15 2 Kings 14:9-10 . Our Savior frequently addressed the people in parables, thereby verifying the prophecy of Isaiah 6:9 , that the people should see without knowing, and hear without understanding, in the midst of instructions. This result, however, only proved how inveterate were their hardness of heart and blindness of mind; for in no other way could he have offered them instruction more invitingly, clearly, or forcibly, than by this beautiful and familiar mode. The Hebrew writers made great use of it; and not only the Jews, but the Arabs, Syrians, and all the nations of the east were and still are admirers of this form of discourse.
In the interpretation of a parable, its primary truth and main scope are chiefly to be considered. The minute particulars are less to be regarded than in a sustained allegory; and serious errors are occasioned by pressing every detail, and inventing for it some spiritual analogy.
The following parables of our Lord are recorded by the evangelists.
Wise and foolish builders, Matthew 7:24-27 .
Children of the bride-chamber, Matthew 9:15 .
New cloth and old garment, Matthew 9:16 .
New wine and old bottles, Matthew 9:17 .
Unclean spirit, Matthew 13:47-501 .
Sower, Matthew 13:3,18 Matthew 22:2-14 .
Tares, Matthew 13:24-30,36-43 .
Mustard-seed, Matthew 13:31-32 Luke 13:19 .
Leaven, Matthew 13:33 .
Treasure hid in a field, Matthew 13:44 .
Pearl of great price, Matthew 13:45-46 .
Net cast into the sea, Luke 14:34-35 .
Meats defiling not, Matthew 15:10-15 .
Unmerciful servant, Matthew 18:23-35 .
Laborers hired, Matthew 20:1-16 .
Two sons, 1618420467_3 .
Wicked husbandmen, Matthew 21:33-45 .
Marriage-feast, Luke 8:5,11 .
Fig tree leafing, Matthew 24:32-34 .
Man of the house watching, Matthew 24:43 .
Faithful and evil servants, Matthew 24:45-51 .
Ten virgins, Matthew 25:1-13 .
Talents, Matthew 25:14-30 .
Kingdom divided against itself, Mark 3:24 .
House divided against itself, Mark 3:25 .
Strongman armed, Mark 3:27 Luke 11:21 .
Seed growing secretly, Mark 4:26-29 .
Lighted candle, Mark 4:21 Luke 11:33-36 .
Man taking a far journey, Mark 13:34-37 .
Blind leading the blind, Luke 6:39 .
Beam and mote, Luke 6:41-42 .
Tree and its fruit, Luke 6:43-45 .
Creditor and debtors, Luke 7:41-47 .
Good Samaritan, Luke 10:30-37 .
Importunate friend, Luke 11:5-9 .
Rich fool, Luke 12:16-21 .
Cloud and wind, Luke 12:54-57 .
Barren fig tree, Luke 13:6-9 .
Men bidden to a feast, Luke 14:7-11 .
Builder of a tower, Luke 14:28-30,33 .
King going to war, Luke 14:31-33 .
Savor of salt, 1618420467_17 .
Lost sheep, Luke 15:3-7 .
Lost piece of silver, Luke 15:8-10 .
Prodigal son, Luke 15:11-32 .
Unjust steward, Luke 16:1-8 .
Rich man and Lazarus, Luke 16:19-31 .
Importunate widow, Luke 18:1-8 .
Pharisee and publican, Luke 18:9-14 .
Pounds, Luke 19:12-27 .
Good shepherd, John 10:1-6 .
Vine and branches, John 15:1-5 .
King James Dictionary - Parable
PAR'ABLE, n. L. parabilis. Easily procured. Not used.
PAR'ABLE, n. L. parabola Gr. to throw forward or against, to compare to or against as in confero, collatum, to set together, or one thing with another. A fable or allegorical relation or representation of something real in life or nature, from which a moral is drawn for instruction such as the parable of the trees choosing a king, Judges 9 . the parable of the poor man and his lamb. 2 Samuel 12 . the parable of the ten virgins, Matthew 25
PAR'ABLE, To represent by fiction or fable.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Parable
PARABLE (IN OT)
1 . The word represents Heb. mâshâl , which is used with a wide range of meaning, and is very variously tr. [1] both in LXX [2] and in EV [3] . The root means ‘to be like,’ and Oxf. Heb. Lex . refers the word to ‘the sentences constructed in parallelism,’ which are characteristic of Heb. poetry and gnomic literature; i.e . it refers to the literary form in which the sentence is cast, and not to any external comparison implied in the thought. Such a comparison, however, is often found in the mâshâl , and, according to many scholars, is the main idea underlying the word. We are concerned here with the cases where the EV [3] tr. [1] ‘parable’; it is important to notice that in OT ‘parable’ has the varying senses of mâshâl , and is never used in the narrow technical sense of the NT. In Numbers 23:7 etc. it is used of the figurative discourse of Balaam (cf. Isaiah 14:4 [6] ], Micah 2:4 , 2 Samuel 12:1-48 ); in Job 27:1 ; Job 29:1 of Job’s sentences of ethical wisdom, differing little from the ‘ proverbs ’ of 1 Kings 4:32 , Proverbs 1:1 ; Proverbs 10:1 (the same word mâshâl ). So in Luke 4:28 (RV [7] ) it is used of a proverb. Proverbs 26:7-9 speaks of ‘a parable in the mouth of fools,’ which halts and is misapplied. In Psalms 49:4 ; Psalms 78:2 ‘parable’ is coupled with ‘ dark saying ’ and implies something of mystery; cf. the quotation in Luke 16:19-31 and John 16:25 AVm [8] , RVm [9] , where it represents a Gr. word usually tr. [1] ‘proverb.’ In Wis 5:3 (AVm [8] , RV [7] ), ‘parable’ means ‘by-word,’ a sense which mâshâl often has. In Ezekiel 17:2 we have ‘the parable’ of the eagle, really an allegory (see below); cf. the use in John 10:3 , Hebrews 9:9 RV [7] , Hebrews 11:19 RV [7] , where it represents a figure or allegory. Closely connected is Ezekiel 24:3 , the parabolic narrative of the caldron; the action described was probably not actually performed. Such mysterious figures are characteristic of Ezekiel, and he is reproached as ‘a speaker of parables’ ( Ezekiel 20:49 ).
2 . The meaning of ‘parable’ in the technical sense . If Christ did not create the parabolic type of teaching, He at least developed it with high originality, and gave it a deeper spiritual import. His parables stand as a type, and it is convenient to attach a technical sense to the word, as describing this special type. As distinguished from fable (wh. see), it moves on a higher ethical and literary plane. Fables violate probability in introducing speech of animals, etc., in an unnatural way, and their moral is confined to lessons of worldly wisdom. The allegory , again, is more artificial. It represents something ‘other’ than itself (the Gr. word means ‘speaking other’), the language of the spiritual life being translated into the language, e.g ., of a battle, or a journey. ‘The qualities and properties of the first are transferred to the last, and the two thus blended together, instead of being kept quite distinct and placed side by side, as is the case in the parable’ (Trench, On Parables , ch. 1). Hence each detail has its meaning, and exists for that meaning, not for the sake of the story. In the parable , particularly in those of the NT, the story is natural and self-sufficient as a story, but is seen to point to a deeper spiritual meaning. The details as a rule are not to be pressed, but are simply the picturesque setting of the story, their value being purely literary. In the allegory, each figure, king or soldier, servant or child, ‘is’ some one else without qualification; each detail, sword or shield, road or tree, ‘means’ something perfectly definite. It is not so in most of the parables; the lesson rests on the true analogy which exists between the natural and the spiritual world. Without requiring any fictitious ‘licence,’ the parable simply assumes that the Divine working in each sphere follows the same law. Like an analogy, it appeals to the reason no less than to the imagination.
3 . OT parables . There are five passages in the OT which are generally quoted as representing the nearest approach to ‘parables’ in the technical sense. It is noticeable that in none of them is the word used; as we have seen, where we have the word, we do not really have the thing; in the same way, where we have the thing, we do not find the word. The first two passages ( 1618420467_80 [11], 2 Samuel 14:6 [16]) are very similar; we have a natural story with an application. The first is exactly parallel to such a parable as ‘the Two Debtors,’ but the second has no deep or spiritual significance. The same is true of 1 Kings 20:39 [9], where the story is helped out by a piece of acting. In all three cases the object is to convey the actual truth of the story, and by the unguarded comments of the listener to convict him out of his own mouth. The method has perhaps in the last two cases a suspicion of trickery, and was not employed by our Lord; the application of the parable of the Wicked Husbandmen ( Matthew 21:33 ) was obvious from the first in the light of Isaiah 5:1-8 . This passage is the fourth of those referred to, and is a true parable, though only slightly developed. It illustrates well the relation between a parable and a metaphor; and a comparison with Psalms 80:8 shows how narrow is the border-line between parable and allegory. The last passage is Isaiah 28:24-28 , where we have a comparison between the natural and the spiritual world, but no story. It should be noted that post-Biblical Jewish literature makes a wide use of parable, showing sometimes, alike in spirit, form, and language, a remarkable resemblance to the parables of the NT.
C. W. Emmet.
PARABLE (IN NT) . 1. Meaning and form . (1) The constant use of a word, meaning resemblance both in Hebrew and in Greek, makes it evident that an essential feature of the parable lay in the bringing together of two different things so that the one helped to explain and to emphasize the other. In the parables of Christ the usual form is that of a complete story running parallel to the stages and divisions of a totally different subject. Thus in the parable of the Sower ( Matthew 13:1-8 ) the kinds of soil in the narrative are related to certain distinctions of character in the interpretation ( Matthew 13:19-28 ), The teaching value thus created came from an appeal to the uniformity of nature. In the Oriental thought of the Bible writers this contained a factor or field of illustration often grudgingly conceded by the materialistic provincialism of modern Western science. It was recognized and believed by them that the Lord of all had the right to do as He pleased with His own. Instead of being an element of disruption, this was to them the guarantee of all other sequences. He who gave to the frail grass its form of beauty could be relied upon with regard to higher forms of life. The attention given to the fall of the sparrow would not be withheld from the death of His saints. The conception gave solidarity to all phenomenal sequences, and forced into special notice whatever seemed to be subject to other influences. Such was the parable value of contrast between the behaviour of Israel towards God and the common seotiment of family relationship, and even the grateful instincts of the beasts of burden ( Isaiah 1:2 , Isaiah 1:3 ). Thus also Christ spoke of His own homelessness as a privation unknown to the birds and the foxes ( Matthew 8:20 ). This effect of contrasting couples formed a literary feature in some of Christ’s parables where opposing types of character were introduced side by side ( Matthew 21:28 ; Matthew 25:2 , Luke 18:10 ).
(2) The use of the word paroimia in LXX [2] and in the Gospel of John indicates that a proverb or parable, being drawn from common objects and incidents, was available and meant for public use. What was once said in any particular case could always be repeated under similar circumstances.
(3) Occasionally the public parable value was reached by making an individual represent all others of the same class. The parable then became an example in the ordinary sense of the term (Luke 14:8 ; Luke 14:12-13 ). In John 10:1-8 ; John 15:1-7 , there is no independent introductory narrative dealing with shepherd life and the care of the vineyard. Certain points are merely selected and dwelt upon as in the interpretation of a parable story previously given. Here there is all the explanatory and persuasive efficiency of the appeal to nature and custom, but, as in this case the reference is to Christ Himself as Head of the Kingdom, the parable has not the general application of those belonging to its citizenship. It is nevertheless a parable, though ‘the Door’ and ‘the Vine’ are usually called emblems or symbols of Christ.
2 . Advantages and Disadvantages . In the parable two different planes of experience were brought together, one familiar, concrete, and definite, the other an area of abstractions, conjectures, and possibilities. At the points of contact it was possible for those who desired to do so to pass from the known to the unknown. Imagination was exercised and the critical faculty appealed to, and sympathy was enlisted according to the merits of the case presented. A moral decision could thus be impartially arrived at without arousing the instinct of self-defence, and when the parallelism was once recognized, the hearer had either to make the desired application or act in contempt of his own judgment ( 2 Samuel 12:1-4 ). In Christ’s parables, as distinct from the ordinary fable which they otherwise completely resembled in form, the illustrations were always drawn from occurrences that were possible, and which might therefore have belonged to the experience of the hearer. When the meaning was perceived, this fact gave to the explanation the persuasive value of something sanctioned, by the actualities of life. But, on the other hand, the meaning might not be understood. Its acceptance was limited by the power to discover it. Only he who could see the prophet’s chariot could use the prophet’s mantle. The transition of responsibility from the speaker to the hearer was sometimes indicated by the words, ‘He that hath ears to hear, let him hear’ ( Matthew 13:9 ). Christ’s most solemn utterances were directed towards the insensibility that took its music without dancing, and sat silent where the wail for the dead was raised ( Matthew 11:17 ). His last act towards such imperviousness was to pray for it and to die for it ( Luke 23:34 ; Luke 23:37 , Romans 5:8 ).
3 . The special need of Parables in Christ’s teaching . If the teaching of Christ had been devoted to matters already understood and accepted as authoritative, such as the conventional commentary on the law of Moses, such a presentation of moral and spiritual truth, while imparting the charm of freshness to things familiar, would not have been actually necessary. The Scribes and Pharisees did not require it. Even if, passing beyond the Jewish ceremonial observance and externalism, He had been content to speak of personal salvation and ethical ideas after the manner so prevalent in the Western Church of to-day, He would not have needed the vehicle of parable instruction. But the subject which, under all circumstances, privately and publicly, directly and indirectly, He sought to explain, commend, and impersonate, was that of a Kingdom that had for its destiny the conquest of the world. Alike in His preaching and in His miraculous works, His constant purpose was to reveal and glorify the Father ( John 15:8 ; John 16:25 ) and to unfold the mysteries of the Kingdom of heaven ( Matthew 4:23 ; Matthew 13:11 , Luke 8:10 ). These mysteries were not in themselves obscure or remote ( Matthew 16:1-4 , Luke 17:21 ; Luke 18:16 ), but its principles and motives and rewards were so opposed to all that had entered the mind of man, that it had to be characterized as a Kingdom that was not of this world ( John 18:36 ). It was this Kingdom of Messianic expectation that united Christ with the historic past of the elected nation to which according to the flesh He belonged. Its appearance had been the chief burden of prophecy, and its expansion and attendant blessing to humanity had been dwelt upon as the recompense for the travail of Zion. The Messiah was to be the Prince of Peace in that Kingdom of exploded and exhausted evil, where in symbol the wolf and the lamb were to feed together ( Isaiah 65:25 ). The princes of the people of the earth were to be gathered together to be the people of the God of Abraham ( Genesis 12:3 , Psalms 47:9 ). But the same mysteries of the Kingdom, which connected Christ with the prophetic utterances and developed history of Israel, also brought Him into a relationship of antagonism towards the religious teaching of His own time. The people recognized in His words the authority that belonged to Moses’ seat, but they saw very clearly that another than Moses was there. The point of distinction between Him and the Pharisees was that in His hands the Law was no longer an end in itself, but became a minister to what was beyond and greater than itself. While the Rabbinical teaching boasted that the world had been created only for the Torah, He taught that the Law had been created for the world. This radical opposition appeared in what He said about the proper use and observance of the Sabbath day, and in His condemnation of those who would neither enter the Kingdom nor allow others to do so. They taught with pride and complacency that the Kingdom of God had reached its final consummation and embodiment in their own exclusive circle, whereas the message of Christ was to be borne over new areas of progress and expansion until it reached and conquered the uttermost parts of the earth. It was a parting at the fountain-head. One teaching meant the extinction of the other. Of this Kingdom and its mysteries Christ spoke in parables. He thereby turned the thoughts of men from the Mosaic succession of Rabbinical precedents and their artificial mediation of the Law of God, and discovered a new source of illumination and authority in the phenomena of the seasons, the relationships of the family, and the industries of village life. Faith, obedience, and love took the place of technical knowledge and official position. The Kingdom of heaven was at hand, and the King’s invitation to enter was always wider than the willingness to accept it. To His disciples He more intimately explained that it was a Kingdom of relationship to God, and of men’s relationship, in consequence, towards one another. This, along with the story of His own life and ministry and resurrection, was to be the gospel they were to preach, by the power of the Spirit, as the message of God’s salvation to the whole world. In the Sermon on the Mount those mysteries of the Kingdom were indicated in outline, and in the parables the theme was still the same, whether the story started from the initiative of the Teacher in the presence of the multitude, or was suggested by some incident of the hour. In the long warfare of the world’s kingdoms men had grown familiar with the cry, ‘Woe to the vanquished!’ but, in that Kingdom of which He spoke, a new social instinct, created and nourished by its citizenship, was to inflict an intolerable pain on those who could relieve misery and uplift the down-trodden and cheer the despairing, and did it not. It was to take upon itself the world’s estrangement from God and hardness of heart, and make its own the Christless shame of moral defeat, and social discord, and all unloveliness of life. In the citizenship of that Kingdom the sorest impoverishment would not be in the humble byways of the lame and the blind, but in the homes of selfish luxury and privileged exemption. The chief crime of the Kingdom, involving a complete negation of discipleship, would be an evaded cross. ‘I was sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not’ ( Matthew 25:43 ). Both from the novelty of the vision thus presented, and from its hostility to the spirit and authority of the religious leaders, it is evident that teaching by parable was the form best adapted to Christ’s purpose and subject, and to the circumstances of the time. It was an efficient and illuminating method of instruction to those who were able to receive it. The petition once presented by two of His disciples indicates what might have become general if the rewards of the Kingdom had been announced to those who had not the true spirit of its service ( Matthew 20:21 ). By leaving altogether the traditions and controversies of the exhausted Church of that day, He gave a fresh positive re-statement of the nature and dimension of the Kingdom of God.
4. The following selection from Christ’s parables Indicates some of the points of relationship to the Kingdom. Whatever is stated generally applies also to the individual, and the latter should not regard anything as essential and vital which he cannot share with the whole membership. The humblest service is regarded as done directly to the King. (1) The parable of boundaries, the conditions and environment of the Kingdom: the Sower and the Seed ( Matthew 13:1-23 ); difficulties and dangers arising from in attention, superficiality, and divided allegiance. Failure abnormal. (2) Accepted circumstance: Wheat and Tares ( Matthew 13:24-30 ); malignity progressively revealed in the advancing stages of the Kingdom; the patience of the Spirit. (3) Continuous development and adaptation: Growing Seed ( Mark 4:26-29 ); union in the service of the Kingdom not an artificial pattern commending itself to a particular age, but a new circle of growth around the parent stem which moves onwards and upwards towards flower and fruit. (4) The appointed task: Talents ( Matthew 25:14-30 ), Pounds ( Luke 19:12-27 ); faith accepting personal responsibility; the servant of the Kingdom, being relieved from the dangers of success and failure, labours so that he may present his account with joy in the presence of the King, being prepared for that which is prepared for him. (5) The parable of office: The Husbandmen in the Vineyard ( Matthew 21:33-46 , Luke 12:42-46 ); names and claims in the Church that dispossess and dishonour Christ. (6) The King’s interest: Lost Sheep ( Luke 15:3-7 ), Lost Coin ( Luke 15:8-10 ), Lost Son ( Luke 15:11-32 ); forfeited ownership sorrowfully known to the owner; social relationship to the Kingdom indicated by the fact that the sheep was one of a hundred, the coin one of ten, and the son a member of a family. (7) Cost and recompense of citizenship: Hid Treasure ( Matthew 13:44 ), Pearl of Great Price ( Matthew 13:45 ); self is eliminated, but ‘all things are yours.’ (8) Fulfilment: The Great Supper ( Luke 14:15-24 ): the King’s purpose must be carried out; if individuals and nations of civilized pre-eminence hold back, others will be made worthy of the honour of the service. (9) Rejected membership and lost opportunity: Rich Fool ( Luke 12:16-21 ), Rich Man and Lazarus ( Matthew 13:35 ). (10) Personality in the Kingdom: ( a ) humility ( Matthew 18:1-4 , Luke 18:9-14 ); ( b ) sincerity ( Matthew 7:15-27 ); ( c ) usefulness ( Luke 13:3-8 ); ( d ) gratitude ( Matthew 18:28-35 , Luke 7:41-43 ); ( e ) readiness to help ( Luke 10:30-37 ); ( f ) assurance of faith ( Luke 11:5-13 ; Luke 18:1-8 ); ( g ) patient hope ( Mark 13:34-37 , Luke 12:35-39 ).
G. M. Mackie.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Two Sons, Parable of the
Parable in Saint Matthew's Gospel, 21. It was spoken on Tuesday of Holy Week, and addressed to a deputation from the Sanhedrin. It is the story of a father who asked his two sons to go to work in his vineyard. The first son defiantly said he would not; but afterwards, being moved with repentance, he went. The second respectfully signified his immediate willingness to go, but he went not. Christ then assuming the offensive inquired of the audience which of the two did his father's will. They responded in favor of the first son: whereupon Jesus said that publicans and harlots shall go into the Kingdom of God before the chief-priests, Scribes, and Pharisees, thus giving the meaning of the parable and convicting the members of the august Sanhedrin out of their own mouths. The interpretation of the parable is this: The certain man is God; the first son, the notorious sinners, at first rebellious but who repented at the preaching of John the Baptist; the second son, the Pharisees and their type, who professed to obey God but rejected the teaching of the Precursor. The parable is easy of application. It fits any age. The two classes of men of which the sons are the types are always found. Lip-service avails nothing. Sincerty and true repentance manifested in obedience to the will of God, regardless of former sin and rebellion, are the only means of entering the Kingdom of God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Rich Fool, Parable of the
Parable of Our Lord in Luke12. The rich man's harvest was so abundant that he planned to tear down his old barns and build them larger. He calculated on having goods laid up for many years. "And I will say to my soul: ...take thy rest; eat, drink, make good cheer. But God said to him: Thou fool, this night do they require thy soul of thee." The moral is: "A man's life doth not consist in the abundance of things which he possesseth."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Harvest And Few Laborers, Parable of the
Parable of Our Lord occurring in the Gospels of Saint Matthew 9, and Saint Luke 10, in slightly different settings. In the former it is a reflection of Our Lord saddened at the sight of the multitude but poorly cared for by their spiritual guides; in the latter it is a part of the instruction given to the 72 disciples as a preparation for their mission as forerunners of Jesus. It is very probable that Our Lord uttered this entreaty more than once and in different circumstances. In any case the meaning is the same: God, the Father, or even Christ Himself, is the Lord of the Harvest, the field is the world, the crops to be harvested are first the Jewish people, then the Gentiles, the laborers the Apostles, their workers, and successors. These verses form part of the Gospels read in the Masses of various saints noted for Apostolic zeal: e.g., Saint Mark and Saint Ignatius Loyola (Luke 10) and Saint John Francis Regis and Saint Vincent de Paul (Matthew 9).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sower, Parable of the
Title applied to one of the few parables recorded concurrently by all three Synoptists (Matthew 13; Mark 4; Luke 8). It belongs to that group of parables dealing with the Kingdom of Heaven. The discourse was addressed to a "great multitude" by the shore of Lake Tiberias. Christ was teaching them from the boat. The similitude Jesus employs is a familiar picture of the Palestinian peasant sowing his field. Every detail of typical Galilean fields is depicted: the small foot-paths ("wayside"), hard and beaten, running straight across the field; the parts strewn with stones and boulders; the luxuriant growth of thorns and thistles; finally, the more or less good soil. The sower scatters the seed. Christ tells where each one falls and its fate. Some seed falls on the foot-paths, it is trodden down or devoured by the fowl of the air; some on the rocky ground, this germinates and sprouts quickly, but having neither moisture nor roots it is scorched by the sun and withers away; other seed falls on better ground but the thorns and thistles depriving it of light and air choke it; a considerable portion falls on good soil and yields fruit in varying degrees, thirty, sixty, and a hundred fold. Christ Himself fully and minutely afterwards explained to His disciples the truths He would impart by this parable. The sower is Christ; the seed is the tidings of the Kingdom of God; the wayside, indifferent and careless Christians with hard and unimpressionable hearts; birds of the air, Satan; the rocky ground, superficial Christians, creatures of impulse and without stability; scorching sun, temptations and persecutions for the faith; the thorny ground, inordinate desires and passions of the heart, and anxieties and allurements of the world. After showing the three-fold fate of the unfruitful seed, Jesus balances the picture and gives the triple species of the fruitful seed seen in the thirty, sixty, and hundred-fold yield. Points for application are inexhaustible. The precise date when this parable was uttered is uncertain; probably during the second year of His ministry. This parable is read, according to Saint Luke's account, on Sexagesima Sunday.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Parable
(The word parable is in Greek parable (parabole ) which signifies placing beside or together, a comparison, a parable is therefore literally a placing beside, a comparison, a similitude, an illustration of one subject by another. --McClintock and Strong. As used in the New Testament it had a very wide application, being applied sometimes to the shortest proverbs, ( 1 Samuel 10:12 ; 24:13 ; 2 Chronicles 7:20 ) sometimes to dark prophetic utterances, (Numbers 23:7,18 ; 24:3 ; Ezekiel 20:49 ) sometimes to enigmatic maxims, (Psalm 78:2 ; Proverbs 1:6 ) or metaphors expanded into a narrative. (Ezekiel 12:22 ) In the New Testament itself the word is used with a like latitude in (Matthew 24:32 ; Luke 4:23 ; Hebrews 9:9 ) It was often used in a more restricted sense to denote a short narrative under which some important truth is veiled. Of this sort were the parables of Christ. The parable differs from the fable (1) in excluding brute and inanimate creatures passing out of the laws of their nature and speaking or acting like men; (2) in its higher ethical significance. It differs from the allegory in that the latter, with its direct personification of ideas or attributes, and the names which designate them, involves really no comparison. The virtues and vices of mankind appear as in a drama, in their own character and costume. The allegory is self-interpreting; the parable demands attention, insight, sometimes an actual explanation. It differs from a proverb in that it must include a similitude of some kind, while the proverb may assert, without a similitude, some wide generalization of experience.--ED.) For some months Jesus taught in the synagogues and on the seashore of Galilee as he had before taught in Jerusalem, and as yet without a parable. But then there came a change. The direct teaching was met with scorn unbelief hardness, and he seemed for a time to abandon it for that which took the form of parables. The worth of parables as instruments of teaching lies in their being at once a test of character and in their presenting each form of character with that which, as a penalty or blessing, is adapted to it. They withdraw the light from those who love darkness. They protect the truth which they enshrine from the mockery of the scoffer. They leave something even with the careless which may be interpreted and understood afterward. They reveal on the other hand, the seekers after truth. These ask the meaning of the parable, and will not rest until the teacher has explained it. In this way the parable did work, found out the fit hearers and led them on. In most of the parables it is possible to trace something like an order.
There is a group which have for their subject the laws of the divine kingdom. Under this head we have the sower, (Matthew 13:1 ; Mark 4:1 ; Luke 8:1 )... the wheat and the tares (Matthew 13:1 ) ... etc.
When the next parables meet us they are of a different type and occupy a different position. They are drawn from the life of men rather than from the world of nature. They are such as these --the two debtors, (Luke 7:1 ) ... the merciless servant, (Matthew 18:1 ) ... the good Samaritan, (Luke 10:1 ) ... etc.
Toward the close of our Lord's ministry the parables are again theocratic but the phase of the divine kingdom on which they chiefly dwell is that of its final consummation. In interpreting parables note-- (1) The analogies must be real, not arbitrary; (2) The parables are to be considered as parts of a whole, and the interpretation of one is not to override or encroach upon the lessons taught by others; (3) The direct teaching of Christ presents the standard to which all our interpretations are to be referred, and by which they are to be measured.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Parable
A mode of speaking, in order to illustrate and make familiar to our apprehension divine and spiritual things, by human and natural figures of expression. It was a method of teaching common in the eastern part of the world, and hence all the sacred writers and servants of the Lord adopted it. Yea; the Lord Jesus himself condescended to the same; and indeed so much so that at one time we are told, "without a parable spake he not unto them." (Matthew 13:34)
There is another sense of the word parable, in which it is sometimes used in Scripture when spoken in a way of reproach; hence Moses, when charging Israel to faithfulness, declares that if the people of God apostatize from him, and set up idols in the land, the Lord would scatter them among all nations, "and thou shalt become (saith Moses) an astonishment, a proverb, (or parable) and a by-word, among all nations whither the Lord shall lead thee." (Deuteronomy 28:37) See Types
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Parable
PARABLE
1. Definition and Classification.—The word ‘parable’ is an oft-recurring one in the Synoptic Gospels, appearing altogether 48 times. Otherwise it is found in the NT only in Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 11:19 (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), where it has the meaning of ‘type’ or ‘symbol’ (Authorized Version ‘figure’). The Evangelists use of it suggests that for them it was a technical term designating a certain form of discourse or method of teaching, and they report Jesus as employing it in like manner. It is always introduced as something well known, and nowhere denned. The readers are assumed to be as familiar with it as are the writers. This occasions no surprise, for we know that the term had long been current in the circle to which the Evangelists belonged, appearing, as it does, often in the LXX Septuagint . The connexion between the NT usage and that of the LXX Septuagint is expressly pointed out by St. Matthew (Matthew 13:35), who sees in Jesus’ use of parables the fulfilment of Psalms 78:2.
In the LXX Septuagint παραβολή serves frequently, though not uniformly, to translation the Heb. mâshâl (מָשָׁל). The practice is sufficiently constant to warrant the assumption that it had much the same range of meaning. But, accepting this as true, we have made little progress in determining the exact significance of παραβολή, for as yet agreement has not been attained with reference to the definition of the Semitie original (משל, Aram. Aramaic מתלא). By some scholars the root is thought to mean primarily to represent or stand for something (so Fleischer; cf. Franz Delitzsch, Com. zu Prov., Leipzig, 1873, p. 43 f.; Gesenius-Buhl, HWB [1] ; Bugge, Die Haupt-Parabeln, i. 20 f.); while others, following a different line of derivation, make the conception of likeness or resemblance to be fundamental (König in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. p. 661; cf. Jülicher, Die Gleichnisreden Jesu, i. p. 36 f.). An examination of the OT makes it evident that Hebrew writers employed the term in the broadest and most inclusive way. Allegory, similitude, parable, proverb, paradox, type, and even riddle could be so designated. Jülicher concludes (op. cit. i. p. 37) that the most that can be done in the way of definition is to say that in the OT mâshâl is a discourse expressing or implying comparison. The limitations thus suggested are, that it be a complete statement and not merely a word or phrase, and that it employ or rest on comparison.
The modern understanding of the word ‘parable’ has not as yet become well defined. One naturally expects this to follow the Greek conception, but in many definitions one finds a considerable infusion of the Semitic point of view. παραβολή (from παρά ‘beside,’ and βάλλειν ‘to throw or east’) signifies literally a placing beside, and in ancient rhetoric designates an illustration or comparison. The fundamental idea is thus in agreement with that which is found by some in the Heb. mâshâl. Aristotle classes parable and fable together as means of indirect proof, more convenient and easier to use than historical example for one who is able to detect resemblances, but less effective.
That the Synoptists should entertain this narrower and more definite view of Greek and Roman writers is not to be anticipated. One expects to find in them rather the wider and more indefinite application of Semitic authors, and in this one is not disappointed. Proverb (John 10:1-16), paradox (Mark 7:17), similitude (John 10:7-10), allegory (Mark 4:13), and example or illustrative instance (Luke 12:16) are so named. The word appears with sufficient frequency to make evident its wide application. This does not prove, of course, that in the NT it has a meaning identical with that which it bears in the OT. It is Jülicher’s view that a new element entered in during the period of the Jewish-Hellenistic literature. Besides being a complete thought and expressing or implying comparison, the parable is now understood to veil a hidden meaning. The real teaching is not in what the words seem to say, but in their deeper import. We shall have occasion to return to this topic after reviewing the range of the parabolic material.
It is not to be assumed that the Synoptists have prefixed a title to all the sections that they regarded as παραβολαί. On the contrary, they have done so only incidentally as occasion required, since they had no particular interest in rhetorical categories. In Mk. the word παραβολή is found 13 times, with reference to 6 different sections; 17 times in Mt., with reference to 12 sections; and 18 times in Lk., with reference to 13 sections. It is not used in Jn., but παροιμία occurs with much the same meaning. Deducting parallels, there are 20 passages in the Synoptic Gospels that are spoken of as parables. How far short this comes of full enumeration is made evident by noting the number of parables recognized by modern expositors: e.g. van Koetsveld, 79 (including Jn.); Bugge, 71; Weinel, 59; Jülicher, 53; Heinrici, 39; Lisco, 37; Bruce, 33, and 8 parable germs.
This divergence of opinion makes it evident that it is not easy to determine the precise extent of the parabolic material. Nor is it easy to discover a satisfactory principle for classifying it. This has been attempted from various points of view. Some have sought to make the truth taught a standard for grouping. So Bruce distinguishes (1) Theoretic parables, or those embodying a general teaching regarding the Kingdom of God; (2) the parables of Grace; (3) the parables of Judgment. Others have made the realm from which the illustration was taken the criterion of division. More satisfactory results are obtained by paying heed to the form of the parable, that is, to the character of the illustration and the manner of its introduction. From this point of view a large portion of the material falls within one general division. To this belong all the sections in which a spiritual or moral truth is established or enforced by the use of an express or implicit comparison. An appeal is made to common experience, to what is recognized and accepted by all, in support of less evident truths pertaining to a higher realm. The tacit assumption is that the same laws are valid for moral and religious as for daily practical life. If assent is yielded without hesitation in the one case, it cannot be withheld in the other.
At times the comparison is expressly made by some formula, or by some word or particle (e.g. ὅμοιον, ὥσπερ, or ὡς). Attention is in this way directed to the resemblance between two distinct relationships. The writer makes his readers aware that a concrete experience is being used to teach some moral or spiritual lesson. Parables of this kind have been happily called Similitudes. The passage regarding the Fig-tree, found in all the Gospels (Mark 13:28 f., Matthew 24:32 f., Luke 21:29 f.), and designated in them all as a parable, is a good example. ‘Now from the fig-tree learn her parable: when her branch is now become tender and putteth forth its leaves, ye know that the summer is nigh; even so ye also, when ye see these things coming to pass, know that it is nigh, even at the doors.’ All the dwellers in Palestine knew that the bursting buds and tender shoots of the fig-tree gave unmistakable indication that summer was at hand. The application is that the nearness of the Parousia can with equal certainty be inferred from the signs that immediately precede its coming. There is here no thought of the resemblance of details, as, for example, between summer and the Parousia; but in both instances it is pointed out that with equal certainty, from the signs of the coming, the nearness of the coming itself can be inferred. The likeness is one of relationships and not of details. In the pair of parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price we have two illustrations of like character to enforce the one truth, that to gain a possession of greatest value no sacrifice is too great. The Synoptic records afford evidence that not infrequently Jesus thus employed a double illustration. The attempt to discover resemblances between the Kingdom of heaven and the treasure or the pearl may be homiletically admissible, but it is exegetically beside the mark. Equally irrelevant are the ethical discussions regarding the conduct of the man who found the treasure. Jesus no more approves the quality of his act than He does that of the younger brother, or that of the unjust steward.
The following inferences regarding the character of a Similitude are possible in view of what has been said: (1) Fundamentally it is a comparison. Often this is expressly indicated, as above. (2) It is a comparison of relationships and not of details. There may chance to be some suggestive resemblance in details, but this is immaterial to the real purpose of the illustration. (3) In each Similitude there is one main comparison and one application, one truth that is unfolded. (4) Since there are two parts, the statement needing proof and the illustration supplying this, it is wrong, as is often done, to speak of the illustration alone as the Similitude. (5) The purpose of the Similitude is manifestly to elucidate or to prove, to win assent for what is unfamiliar by an appeal to what is well known.
A group of passages of lesser extent than the one just considered makes a like use of sayings which were apparently proverbial. Luke 4:23 is an instance of this: ‘And he said unto them, Doubtless ye will say unto me this parable, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done at Capernaum, do also here in thine own country.’ Jesus, conduct is likened to that of the physician in question. The proverb by itself does not constitute the parable, but the proverb used as an illustration. Since such proverbs are the concise and pointed formulations of the truths of common experience, we need not differentiate these parables from those last discussed—no further, at least, than to make them a subdivision of the Similitudes. Besides the passage quoted, others, such as Matthew 5:14 b, Matthew 6:24 (Luke 16:13) Luke 15:14 (Luke 6:39) Luke 24:28 (Luke 17:37), Mark 2:17 (Matthew 9:12 f., Luke 5:13 f.), would be included.
Often the illustration from experience is not stated as a general inference, recognized always and by all, but is embodied in the form of a specific incident, in what was done by some person or persons, or in what happened to them. Thus Luke 15:11-32 begins, ‘A certain man had two sons,’ and Mark 4:3-9 ‘Behold, the sower went forth to sow.’ In purpose and in the way the illustration is employed there is close resemblance between this group and the Similitudes. The difference is mainly in the definiteness of the experience. Here it is presented as a single occurrence. It may still be, and no doubt usually is, wholly imaginary. All that is required is a degree of naturalness and probability sufficient to command unhesitating assent. Such a story, formed by the imagination from the material of actual experience, might be classed as a Fable, had not this name gained in the course of time a restricted meaning. By many writers it is looked upon as applicable only to the small group of animal fables in which the main actors are animals or inanimate objects. Since such stories often serve merely to entertain or to teach worldly prudence and discretion, the difference between parable and fable is made by some to consist in the kind of truth enforced. The latter is restricted to the lower realm of worldly knowledge, while the former is assigned to the service of the higher truths of morality and religion. We need not further discuss the distinction, because fable has become exclusively associated in most minds with the type of teaching attributed to aesop. To connect it with any of the discourses of Jesus would occasion misunderstanding. Jülicher’s proposal is to retain for this group the name Parable in its narrower meaning. Until a better designation is found, it will be well to accept this.
The Gospel of Lk. contains at least four sections differing in character from any previously considered. They have the narrative form, but the illustration is taken, not from a different realm, but from that to which the truth under discussion belongs. A specific instance wherein this is exemplified is recited to win the approval or call forth the disapprobation of the hearer. The application is made, not through analogy, not by some word expressing likeness or resemblance, but by simple affirmation: ‘So is it’ or ‘so should it not be.’ The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37), the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-20), the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), and the Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:9-14) belong to this group. Possibly, as Heinrici suggests (PRE [2] 3 [3] , vi. 692), we ought also to add the accounts of the Importunate Friend (Luke 11:5 ff.), and the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1 ff.), since the lesson is gained in these instances by reasoning a minori ad majus. It is often difficult, as here, to determine to which division a given section may be most properly assigned. Comparison enters into this class only through the demand made upon the listener to test his life and conduct by that depicted in the story. The abstract truth is commended to him in concrete form. We might call such illustrations, which stand apart from the groups previously enumerated, Narrative Examples, or perhaps it will be better to term them, with Jülicher, Illustrative Instances.
On the basis of the reference in Mark 7:17 (Matthew 15:15) it has been proposed (cf. Bugge, op. cit. i. pp. 59, 15, and 16) to regard the Paradox as a class of parable. That the name might be so applied may, in the light of Semitic usage, be assumed as probable, though there is wide difference of view regarding this particular passage in Mk. and Mt. Expositors have not, however, generally made paradoxes a distinct group in their treatment of the parables.
It now remains to ask whether there is another class of passages that should be brought together under the head of Allegory. This question has recently been much discussed, and opinion is still widely divided. It is variously affirmed that, even according to the Synoptists, Jesus never spoke in allegories (Weinel, Die Gleichnisse Jesu, p. 30); or that He is mistakenly reported by them as so doing (Jülicher, op. cit. i. 61 ff. etc.); or that He did make use of allegories, and is correctly reported in this respect (Bugge, op. cit. i. 40 ff. etc.). Allegory (ἀλληγορία, ἀλληγορεῖν) comes from ἄλλο, ‘other,’ ‘something else,’ and ἀγορεύειν, ‘to speak.’ The word occurs as a substantive nowhere in the NT or in Biblical Greek, nor does the verb appear except in Galatians 4:24, where St. Paul makes use of the participle ἀλληγορούμενος. It is a mode of speech whereby one thing is ostensibly described or narrated, while the primary reference is to something very different. It is thus closely akin to the metaphor (wh. see), differing from it in consisting not of a single word or concept, but of a series of concepts belonging to the same realm, and so related as to form together a continuous and intelligible narrative. Since the several details are introduced, not because they are the component parts of a vivid and artistic picture, but because of their suitability to portray the desired meaning, the best of allegories are marked by some degree of artificiality and incongruity. The attentive listener is made aware that the story is being told to convey some deeper meaning and not for its own sake. Often it will be impossible for him to determine what this is until the allegory has been wholly or in part interpreted. In other instances the setting in which it occurs may afford the needed clue. To understand it fully, he must be able to translate the terms one by one and read their hidden meaning. Naturally no one but the framer of the allegory can be his infallible guide in this. In the similitude and parable we do not feel the need of seeking for any meaning beyond that which the words usually bear, whereas in the allegory the deeper, hidden significance is of first importance. Are there sections in the Gospels of which this is true? It seems to be, to some degree, in at least five. Three are in the Synoptic Gospels, namely, the accounts of the Sower (Mark 4:3-9; Mark 4:14-20, Matthew 13:3-9; Matthew 13:18-23, Luke 8:5-8; Luke 8:11-15), of the Wicked Husbandmen (Mark 12:1-12, Matthew 21:33-46, Luke 20:9-19), and of the Tares (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43): and two are from the Fourth Gospel, the Door of the Sheepfold (Luke 4:23), and the Vine and the Branches (John 15:1-8). In each of these, except the Wicked Husbandmen, an allegorical interpretation is expressly added, while in this latter the setting, the comments, as well as the character of the narration, suggest an allegory. According to the definition given above, none of the five passages can he regarded as a perfect and fully developed allegory, because each has unimportant details that are not, and clearly were not intended to be, interpreted. They are introduced as natural parts of the picture, without reference to a hidden meaning. For instance, in the Sower no deeper meaning attaches to the way, the thirty, sixty, and hundredfold, as would be the case in a carefully developed allegory. The Wicked Husbandmen and the Tares are better examples of allegory; but even in these there are several features without allegorical significance. The passages in the Fourth Gospel differ quite markedly from those in the Synoptics. The literal and the figurative are blended in such an unusual way that it has not been possible for commentators to agree in their classification. In ch. 10, following the first interpretation (Mark 4:30) comes a second (John 10:11-16), which seems to presuppose a closely related but really different allegory. Or we can regard these last verses as a new allegory with continuous interpretation. The discourse of ch. 15 is of exactly the same type; parallel to ‘I am the good shepherd’ we there have ‘I am the true vine.’ Besides lacking the unity that usually marks the allegory, these Johannine sections contain many terms that have no significance beyond that belonging to them in ordinary speech. It seems, nevertheless, more correct to class them as allegories than to call them parables with an allegorical interpretation, or collections of related metaphors.
In addition to these passages there are numerous others where little doubt can exist that the Evangelists understood some details allegorically, for they suggest, even if they do not give, such an interpretation. By way of illustration the reference to the whole and the sick (Mark 2:17) may be cited, so also the taking away of the bridegroom (Mark 2:20), and the blind who lead the blind (Matthew 15:14, Luke 6:39). Jülicher maintains that they looked on all parables as allegories. They have given, it is true, few allegorical interpretations, and have not often indicated that they felt such treatment necessary, but this is only because their practice is not in accord with their theory. Whenever they reflect (as they do in Mark 4:10-12; Mark 4:33-34 || Matthew 13:10 to Matthew 15:34 ff., Luke 8:9-10), they think of parables as always veiling a hidden meaning, one hard to be understood and intelligible to the disciples themselves only after interpretation. This conception, as was stated above, is not held to be their own creation, but is thought to be one that came to them from the age of the Jewish-Hellenistic literature. It was the product of scribal activity. Such an explanation is open to serious question. It may be doubted whether existing evidence proves that the notion of mystery belonged so exclusively to this later period. It is true that with the decadence of prophecy men looked for the message of God in what had been said rather than in what was being said, and that the allegorical method of exegesis was assiduously cultivated. It may also be true that the Gospels indicate that, at the time when the Evangelists wro

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Faithful Steward - Parable in Luke 12, included in a discourse concerning watchfulness. Matthew 24, has a similar Parable as part of the eschatological instruction. In both it is preceded by the Parable of the thief in the night. Perhaps Christ used the Parable twice. " In Luke it is an answer to Peter's query, "Dost thou speak this Parable (of the thief) to us?" and emphasizes the responsibility of the ministers of the church. According to the Parable, a wealthy master going abroad for a long time must appoint one of his servants to the task of meting out to the slaves their daily rations of corn; if he prove faithful, though not suspecting the earlier return of the master, he will be highly rewarded. The Parable applies to the Apostles and their successors
Steward, Faithful - Parable in Luke 12, included in a discourse concerning watchfulness. Matthew 24, has a similar Parable as part of the eschatological instruction. In both it is preceded by the Parable of the thief in the night. Perhaps Christ used the Parable twice. " In Luke it is an answer to Peter's query, "Dost thou speak this Parable (of the thief) to us?" and emphasizes the responsibility of the ministers of the church. According to the Parable, a wealthy master going abroad for a long time must appoint one of his servants to the task of meting out to the slaves their daily rations of corn; if he prove faithful, though not suspecting the earlier return of the master, he will be highly rewarded. The Parable applies to the Apostles and their successors
Figure - See Parable
Allegory - See Parable
Fable (2) - —See Parable
Allegory (2) - —See Parable
Fable - The fable differs from the Parable in that --
The Parable always relates what actually takes place, and is true to fact, which the fable is not; and ...
The Parable teaches the higher heavenly and spiritual truths, but the fable only earthly moralities. Of the fable, as distinguished from the Parable [1], we have but two examples in the Bible: ...
That of the trees choosing their king, addressed by Jotham to the men of Shechem, (Judges 9:8-15 ) ...
That of the cedar of Lebanon and the thistle, as the answer of Jehoash to the challenge of Amaziah
Proverb - * For PROVERB see Parable , No
Dark Saying - See Parable (in OT), § 1
Prodigal Son - Popular term used to identify Jesus' Parable in Luke 15:11-32 . “The Prodigal Son” is an unfortunate designation for this Parable told in defense of Jesus' practice of fellowshipping with sinners (Luke 15:1 ). The Parable focuses not on the reckless-then-repentant younger son but on the waiting father who rushes to welcome his child home and calls all, elder brother included, to share the joy of homecoming
Parable - A fable or allegorical relation or representation of something real in life or nature, from which a moral is drawn for instruction such as the Parable of the trees choosing a king, Judges 9 . the Parable of the poor man and his lamb. the Parable of the ten virgins, Matthew 25 ...
PAR'ABLE, To represent by fiction or fable
Mashal - The name means a Parable
King Going to War, Parable of the - Parable of the King Going to War Luke 14 A companion of the Parable of the "builder" and emphasizing the same idea. " General application is possible by abstracting from the literal meaning and using the Parable independently
Parabolical - ) Of the nature of a Parable; expressed by a Parable or figure; allegorical; as, parabolical instruction
Mustard Seed - Subject of a Parable of Our Lord (Matthew 13). " This is a prophecy as well as a Parable of the growth of the Church, as described in Vassall-Phillips' book "The Mustard Seed," London, 1912
Seed, Mustard - Subject of a Parable of Our Lord (Matthew 13). " This is a prophecy as well as a Parable of the growth of the Church, as described in Vassall-Phillips' book "The Mustard Seed," London, 1912
Great Supper - A Parable occurring in Luke 14. The occasion of this Parable was a pious exclamation, made by one of the guests at a supper to which Our Lord had been invited. " Jesus takes occasion to teach that the Kingdom of God is something which will require more than a pious wish, and He does so in the Parable of the Great Supper. The Parable teaches that they alone shall enter the Kingdom of God who have listened to His call in a spirit of docility, without allowing themselves to be detained by other cares in the false hope that their place is secure. Several Catholic authors as well as most critics outside the Catholic Church hold that this Parable, and that reported in Matthew 21, are two parallel forms of the same Parable; still the identification cannot be regarded as certain
Parabolically - ) By way of Parable; in a parabolic manner
Proverb - A trite maxim; a similitude; a Parable. It comes from a root meaning "to be like," "parable
Proverb - The Parable of the great eagle in Ezekiel 17:2,3 , is also called a 'riddle. this is only once translated 'proverb,' Luke 4:23 ; but is often translated 'parable. '...
2, παροιμία: this is more an obscure saying, John 16:25,29 ; 2 Peter 2:22 ; it is translated 'parable' in John 10:6 , but 'allegory' would be a better rendering
Dives - ) The name popularly given to the rich man in our Lord's Parable of the "Rich Man and Lazarus" (Luke xvi
Two Sons, Parable of the - Parable in Saint Matthew's Gospel, 21. They responded in favor of the first son: whereupon Jesus said that publicans and harlots shall go into the Kingdom of God before the chief-priests, Scribes, and Pharisees, thus giving the meaning of the Parable and convicting the members of the august Sanhedrin out of their own mouths. The interpretation of the Parable is this: The certain man is God; the first son, the notorious sinners, at first rebellious but who repented at the preaching of John the Baptist; the second son, the Pharisees and their type, who professed to obey God but rejected the teaching of the Precursor. The Parable is easy of application
Parable - Yea; the Lord Jesus himself condescended to the same; and indeed so much so that at one time we are told, "without a Parable spake he not unto them. " (Matthew 13:34)...
There is another sense of the word Parable, in which it is sometimes used in Scripture when spoken in a way of reproach; hence Moses, when charging Israel to faithfulness, declares that if the people of God apostatize from him, and set up idols in the land, the Lord would scatter them among all nations, "and thou shalt become (saith Moses) an astonishment, a proverb, (or Parable) and a by-word, among all nations whither the Lord shall lead thee
Groat - Piece of money mentioned by Our Lord in the Parable of the woman who has ten groats and loses one (Luke 15); it is identical with the drachma, and has the same value
Seed Growing Secretly, Parable of the - A natural fact in the vegetable world to which Christ, in a short four verse Parable, likens the Kingdom of Heaven. This is the only Parable peculiar to Saint Mark's Gospel (Mark 4), and is told in his characteristic crisp style. It is one of a trinity of Parables which describe the Kingdom of God on earth, the others being the "Sower" and the "Mustard Seed. The Parable is explained thus: the seed is the teaching of the Gospel; the sower is primarily Christ who first promulgated this teaching and left it to the Church, and secondarily the Apostles and their successors; by earth is meant the hearts and souls of men. The same Parable can be applied to the Kingdom of God in each Christian soul in particular. Patience is the great lesson taught by this Parable, hence the stress laid on the spontaneity of the growth. There is no liturgical assignment of this Parable to any Sunday of the year
Kilkenny Cats - It is probably a Parable of a local contest between Kilkenny and Irishtown, which impoverished both towns
Friend at Midnight - This Parable (Luke 11), the lesson of which recalls somewhat that of the Parable of the widow and the unjust judge (Luke 18), teaches the efficacy of perseverance in prayer
Birds - These are employed as symbols of evil agents: as, in the dream of Pharaoh's baker, the birds ate the bakemeats he was carrying on his head, Genesis 40:17 ; and in the Parable of the Sower the fowls or birds which devoured the seed by the wayside are interpreted by Christ to signify 'the wicked one. In the Parable of the Mustard Seed the kingdom of heaven becomes a great system with roots in the earth, under the protection of which the birds of the air find shelter. The Greek is πετεινόν,the same in the two Parables
Parables - Parable means a putting alongside for purposes of comparison and new understanding. Parables utilize pictures such as metaphors or similes and frequently extend them into a brief story to make a point or disclosure. Nevertheless, a Parable is not synonymous with an allegory. ...
The difference between a Parable and an allegory turns on the number of comparisons. A Parable may convey other images and implications, but it has only one main point established by a basic comparison or internal juxtaposition. For example, the Parable of the mustard seed (Mark 4:30-32 ; Matthew 13:31-32 ; Luke 13:18-19 ) compares or juxtaposes a microscopically small seed initially with a large bush eventually. Parable is the basic figure Jesus used. Though no Parable in the Synoptic Gospels is a pure allegory, some Parables contain subordinated allegorical aspects, such as the Parable of the wicked tenants ( Mark 12:1-12 ; Matthew 21:36-46 ;...
Luke 20:9-19 ). Even in the Parable of the Mustard Seed the passing reference to the birds of heaven nesting in the branches (Mark 4:32 ) may be an allegorical detail, but the distinction of the Parable establishing a basic, single comparison remains and aids interpretation. ...
Parables Prior to Jesus Though Jesus perfected the oral art of telling Parables, their background can be found in the Old Testament and in secular sources. A mashal can be a proverb ( Luke 15:3-102 ), a taunt (Micah 2:4 ), a dark riddle (Psalm 78:2 ), an allegory (Ezekiel 24:3-4 ), or a Parable. The stories of Jesus are linked with the heritage of the prophetic Parables in the Old Testament (Isaiah 28:23-29 ; Isaiah 5:1-7 ; 1 Kings 20:39-43 ; Ecclesiastes 9:13-16 ; 2 Samuel 12:1-4 ). ...
Perhaps the most interesting antecedent of the Parables of Jesus comes from Nathan's word to David. Nathan then applied the Parable to the king's affair with Bathsheba (2 Samuel 12:5-14 ). This eventful Parable and others in the Old Testament belong to the same tradition in which our Lord stood. ...
The Parable was also recognized as a literary type before the time of Jesus in the writings of the Greeks concerning rhetoric. The famous writer Homer included 189 Parables in The Illiad and 39 more in The Odyssey . Aristotle recognized the place of Parable in his writings. ...
Stormy debate rages among Bible students regarding the further question of Parables from the rabbis before and during the ministry of Jesus. Bugge and Paul Fiebig pointed to numerous rabbinic Parables deriving from the beginning of the first century A. We do know of Parables from the rabbis soon after the time of Jesus, and we do recognize that the Parables of Jesus are not only far more compelling but center in the coming kingdom of God rather than in exposition of the Law or Torah as the rabbinic Parables. ...
Jesus' Special Use of Parables Many of the Parables grew out of the conflict situations when Jesus answered His religious critics. These answering Parables, usually for Pharisees and sinners simultaneously, expose and extol. When John the Baptizer was accosted for being too serious and Jesus for being too frivolous, Jesus came back with the Parable of the playing children (Matthew 11:16-19 ; Luke 7:31-35 ) to expose the inconsistency of the criticism. In His most famous Parable, He extolled the forgiving love of the father and exposed the hostile criticism of the unforgiving elder brother (Luke 15:11-32 ). ...
In fact, Jesus interpreted His ministry and its place in salvation history by means of Parable. As Jesus interpreted His ministry through Parables, these sometimes have a “Christological penetration. The Parables are not merely clever stories but proclamation of the gospel. The Parable of the wicked tenants (Mark 12:1-12 ) represented a blatant confrontation. One of the reasons they crucified Jesus was because of His challenging Parables and the claims of his Kingdom. ...
Jesus' Different Kinds of Parables Jesus could turn people's ears into eyes, sometimes with a still picture and then again with a moving picture. These Parable germs or incipient Parables were generally one liners with a picturesque appeal to the imagination. Remarkably, the Gospel of John has no Parables as such; it does include thirteen parabolic sayings. ...
Jesus also spoke (2) simple Parables which represent a picture elaborated into a story. ” Examples are the paired Parables of the treasure and the pearl (Matthew 13:44-46 ), the tower builder and the warring king (Luke 14:28-32 ), and the lost sheep and lost coin (1618420467_6 ). ...
Additionally, Jesus told his famous (3) narrative Parables that represent a specific situation and often include in the first sentence reference to a certain person. While Matthew reported a great many parabolic sayings, Luke contains numerous narrative Parables, such as the Parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ), the compassionate Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37 ), and the rich fool (Luke 12:16-21 ). A narrative Parable is a dramatic story composed of one or more scenes, drawn from daily life yet focused on an unusual, decisive circumstance. ...
Special Literary Considerations Narrative Parables and the simple Parables total more than forty examples. Certain metaphors recur in the different Parables. For example, seed Parables such as those of the sower, the seed growing of itself, and the mustard seed in Mark 4:1 focus on the nature of the coming kingdom. Master/servant Parables reflect a time of critical reckoning. Kingly Parables, especially in Matthew, portray the sovereignty of the divine judgment and grace. Householder Parables feature an authority figure whose purpose is resisted or rejected yet whose will is finally achieved. ...
Attention to Parable form also brings up the prominence of the question format, the refusal Parables, and the place of direct discourse. Jesus intended to involve His hearers, and so He constructed many Parables that amount to one big question. The Parable of the servant and his wages moves by means of two questions (Luke 17:7-10 ). The Parable of the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-8 ) includes four questions. These interrogatives within Parables often define a dilemma (Luke 12:20 ; Mark 12:9 ) or call for an agreeing nod in one area of life that carries over to another. ...
The refusal Parables are those that express the intention of a character not to do what is requested: “I do not will. ...
Direct discourse is also immensely important in many of the Parables because it brings the stories to life. Through the human conversation the Parable often makes its point, especially in the last speech. Surely Jesus delivered these lines from each of the parabolic characters in a most animated fashion and even interpreted His Parables by the tone of His voice. ...
Common Theme of Jesus' Parables Jesus' great thesis centers on the kingdom of God (Mark 1:15 ). Each Parable explores and expands the theme. ...
Jesus lifted the theme to new heights and through His Parables portrayed the nature of the kingdom (Mark 4:26-29 ), the grace of the kingdom (Luke 18:9-17 ), the crisis of the kingdom (Luke 12:54-56 ), and the conditions of the kingdom such as commitment (Luke 14:28-30 ), forgiveness (Matthew 18:23-35 ), and compassion (Luke 10:25-37 ). ...
The Parables further proclaim the kingdom as ethical, experiential or existential, eschatological, and evangelistic. Several Parables accentuate ethical concerns such as attitude toward one's fellows (Luke 18:9-14 ; Luke 15:25-32 ; Matthew 18:23-35 ). The rousing call to repentance embodied in many Parables requires a moral and spiritual reorientation of life around the kingdom. ...
Many Parables reach the watertable of common experience and illumine existence or life. His Parables exposed the inauthentic life aggressively self-centered and greedy (Luke 12:13-21 ; Luke 16:19-31 ). ...
As Jesus proclaimed through Parables, God was bursting into history, the hinge of history had arrived. He brought an otherwordly perspective to bear in the Parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21 ). ...
The Parables are evangelistic because they sought to stimulate a decision and change a life. The Parables intended to awaken faith. ...
Unspoken Parables Like the prophets, Jesus enacted some of His intended message. At the last supper as He broke the bread and poured the wine, He enacted with miniparables the loving sacrifice of Calvary. ...
Parables Perspective on Life Some of the stories carry a pastoral and others a prophetic relevance. The Parable of the mustard seed speaks pastorally about ending despair, and the Parable of the persistent widow (Luke 18:1-8 ) encourages to hang in there. The Parable of the barren fig tree (Luke 13:6-9 ) speaks prophetically concerning national priorities; the Parable of the wicked tenants accosts arrogant religious leaders; and the Parable of the rich fool confronts false confidence in materialism. Through the Parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector, grace peers down on two people praying in the Temple, and appearances take a pounding
Spiritualizing of the Parables - SPIRITUALIZING OF THE ParableS. —‘The legs of the lame,’ says a Hebrew proverb, ‘hang loose; so is a Parable in the mouth of fools’ (Proverbs 26:7); but it is possible to err in the opposite direction by pressing a Parable too far, and, if the expression may be allowed, riding it to death. The error lies in forgetting that a Parable is designed to teach one broad lesson, and insisting on discovering some significance in every detail. ]'>[1] of the Parable of the Steward (Luke 16:1-12), which inculcates simply the duty of being as shrewd in spiritual matters as men are wont to be in worldly affairs. ...
Origen’s exposition of the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37) is a masterpiece of ill-applied ingenuity. ]'>[2] ...
The Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13) has furnished another fruitful field to spiritualizing interpreters. The lesson of the Parable is that virginity without philanthropy is darkness. Parable and Circumstantiality in the Parables
Paradigm - ) An illustration, as by a Parable or fable
Parable - ) Aristotle defines Parable, a similitude drawn from form to form. de Colonia calls it a rational fable; but it may be founded on real occurrences, as many Parables of our Saviour were. The Hebrews call it משל , from a word which signifies either to predominate or to assimilate; the Proverbs of Solomon are by them also called משלים , Parables, or proverbs. Parable, according to the eminently learned Bishop Lowth, is that kind of allegory which consists of a continued narration of a fictitious or accommodated event, applied to the illustration of some important truth. Nor has our Saviour himself disdained to adopt the same method of instruction; of whose Parables it is doubtful whether they excel most in wisdom and utility, or in sweetness, elegance, and perspicuity. As the appellation of Parable has been applied to his discourses of this kind, the term is now restricted from its former extensive signification to a more confined sense. Lowth has briefly explained some of the primary qualities of the poetic Parables; so that, by considering the general nature of them, we may decide more accurately on the merits of particular examples. ...
It is the first excellence of a Parable to turn upon an image well known and applicable to the subject, the meaning of which is clear and definite; for this circumstance will give it perspicuity, which is essential to every species of allegory. If the Parables of the sacred prophets are examined by this rule, they will not be found deficient. Examples of this kind occur in the Parable of the deceitful vineyard, Isaiah 5:1-7 , and of the useless vine, Ezekiel 15; Ezekiel 19:10-14 ; for under this imagery the ungrateful people of God are more than once described; Ezekiel 19:1-9 ; Ezekiel 31; Ezekiel 16; Ezekiel 23. Moreover, the image must not only be apt and familiar, but it must be also elegant and beautiful in itself; since it is the purpose of a poetic Parable, not only to explain more perfectly some proposition, but frequently to give it some animation and splendour. As the imagery from natural objects is in this respect superior to all others, the Parables of the sacred poets consist chiefly of this kind of imagery. It is also essential to the elegance of a Parable, that the imagery should not only be apt and beautiful, but that all its parts and appendages should be perspicuous and pertinent. Of all these excellencies, there cannot be more perfect examples than the Parables that have been just specified; to which we may add the well known Parable of Nathan, 2 Samuel 12:1-4 , although written in prose, as well as that of Jotham, Judges 9:7-15 , which appears to be the most ancient extant, and approaches somewhat nearer to the poetical form. It is also the criterion of a Parable, that it be consistent throughout, and that the literal be never confounded with the figurative sense; and in this respect it materially differs from that species of allegory, called the continued metaphor, Isaiah 5:1-7 . It should be considered, that the continued metaphor and the Parable have a very different view. There is, however, a species of Parable, the intent of which is only to illustrate the subject; such is that remarkable one of the cedar of Lebanon, Ezekiel 31; than which, if we consider the imagery itself, none was ever more apt or more beautiful; or the description and colouring, none was ever more elegant or splendid; in which, however, the poet has occasionally allowed himself to blend the figurative with the literal description, Ezekiel 31:11 ; Ezekiel 31:14-17 ; whether he has done this because the peculiar nature of this kind of Parable required it, or whether his own fervid imagination alone, which disdained the stricter rules of composition, was his guide, our learned author can scarcely presume to determine. ...
In the New Testament, the word Parable is used variously: in Luke 4:23 , for a proverb, or adage; in Matthew 15:15 , for a thing darkly and figuratively expressed; in Hebrews 9:9 , &c, for a type; in Luke 14:7 , &c, for a special instruction; in Matthew 24:32 , for a similitude or comparison
Dives - (Latin: rich) ...
The word has come to be employed as tbe name of the rich man in tho Parable of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16) although it is not used in the Bible as a proper noun
Parable - ) The basis of Parable is that man is made in the image of God, and that there is a law of continuity of the human with the divine. The force of Parable lies in the real analogies impressed by the Creator on His creatures, the physical typifying the higher moral world. "Both kingdoms develop themselves according to the same laws; Jesus' Parables are not mere illustrations, but internal analogies, nature becoming a witness for the spiritual world; whatever is found in the earthly exists also in the heavenly kingdom. ) The Parables, earthly in form heavenly in spirit, answer to the parabolic character of His own manifestation. Jesus' purpose in using Parables is judicial, as well as didactic, to discriminate between the careless and the sincere. ...
In His earlier teaching, as the Sermon on the Mount, He taught plainly and generally without Parables; but when His teaching was rejected or misunderstood, He in the latter half of His ministry judicially punished the unbelieving by parabolic veiling of the truth (Matthew 13:11-16), "therefore speak I to them in Parables, because they seeing see not . The disciples' question (Matthew 13:10), "why speakest Thou unto them in Parables?" shows that this is the first formal beginning of His parabolic teaching. The Parables found earlier are scattered and so plain as to be rather illustrations than judicial veilings of the truth (Matthew 7:24-27; Matthew 9:16; Matthew 12:25; Mark 3:23; Luke 6:39). The change of mode would awaken attention, and judgment thus end in mercy, when the message of reconciliation addressed to them first after Jesus' resurrection (Acts 3:26) would remind them of Parables not understood at the time. When explained, the Parables would be the clearest illustration of truth. The Parable, which was to the carnal a veiling, to the receptive was a revealing of the truth, not immediate but progressive (Proverbs 4:18). On the other hand, enlightening the diligent seeker, who asks what means this Parable? and is led so to "understand all Parables" (Mark 4:13; Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 16:11), and at last to need no longer this mode but to have all truth revealed plainly (John 16:25). Each of the three synoptical Gospels preserves some Parable peculiar to itself; John never uses the word Parable but "proverb" or rather brief "allegory," parabolic saying (paroimia ). Parabolic sayings, like the paroimia) in John (John 10:1; John 10:6-18; John 16:25; John 15:1-8), occur also in Matthew 15:15; Luke 4:23; Luke 6:39; Mark 3:23, "parable" in the sense "figure" or type, Hebrews 9:9; Hebrews 11:19 Greek Fable introduces brutes and transgresses the order of things natural, introducing improbabilities resting on fancy. Parable does not, and has a loftier significance; it rests on the imagination, introducing only things probable. The thing signifying and the thing signified are united together, the properties and relations of one being transferred to the other; instead of being kept distinct side by side, as in the Parable; it is a prolonged metaphor or extended simile; it never names the object itself; it may be about other than religious truths, but the Parable only about religious truth. ...
The Parable is longer carried out than the proverb, and not merely by accident and occasionally, but necessarily, figurative and having a similitude. The Parable is often an expanded proverb, and the proverb a condensed Parable. The Parable expresses some particular fact, which the simile does not. The rabbis of Christ's time and previously often employed Parable, as Hillel, Shammai, the Gemara, Midrash (Lightfoot, Hor. Hebrew, Matthew 13:3); the commonness of their use was His first reason for employing them, He consecrated Parables to their highest end. Even the disciples, through Jewish prejudices, were too weak in faith impartially to hear gospel truths if presented in naked simplicity; the Parables secured their assent unawares. As in the prophecies, so in Parables, there was light enough to guide the humble, darkness enough to confound the willfully blind (John 9:39; Psalms 18:26). Parables were repositories of truths not then understood, even when plainly told (Luke 18:34), but afterward comprehended in their manifold significance, when the Spirit brought all Jesus' words to their remembrance. The veil was so transparent as to allow the spiritual easily to see the truth underneath; the unspiritual saw only the sacred drapery of the Parable in which He wrapped the pearl so as not to cast it before swine. The first four Parables have a mutual connection (Matthew 13:3; Matthew 13:24; Matthew 13:31; Matthew 13:33), and were spoken to the multitude on the shore; then Matthew 13:34 marks a break. On His way to the house He explains the Parable of the sower to the disciples; then, in the house, the tares (Matthew 13:36); the three last Parables (Matthew 13:44-52), mutually connected by the thrice repeated "again," probably in private. The second group of Parables are less theocratic, and more peculiarly represent Christ's sympathy with all men, and their consequent duties toward Him and their fellow men. )...
Thirdly, toward the close of His ministry, the theocratic Parables are resumed, dwelling on the final consummation of the kingdom of God. Mark, the Gospel of Jesus' acts, has (of the three) fewest of the Parables, but alone has the Parable of the grain's silent growth (Mark 4:26). John, who soars highest, has no Parable strictly so-called, having reached that close communion with the Lord wherein Parables have no place. Jesus' explanation of two Parables, the sower and the tares, gives a key for interpreting other Parables. , had each a meaning, so we must in other Parables try to find the spiritual significance even of details. But...
(1) The analogies must be real, not imaginary, and subordinate to the main lesson of the Parable. ...
(2) The Parable in its mere outward form must be well understood, e. the relation of love between the Eastern shepherd and sheep (2 Samuel 12:3, an Old Testament Parable, as the vineyard Isaiah 5 also) to catch the point of the Parable of the lost sheep. ...
(3) The context also introducing the Parable, as Luke 15:1-2 is the starting point of the three Parables, the lost sheep, etc. ; so Luke 16:14-18 (compare John 8:9) introduces and gives the key to the Parable of the rich man and Lazurus
Hidden Treasure, Parable of the - Parable in Saint Matthew's Gospel 13. One of the Parables of the lakeside reproduced by Saint Matthew; in which different aspects of the Kingdom of Heaven are brought out by Our Lord. This Parable is followed by that of the pearl of great price and that of the fishing net and forms with those a group of Parables found only in the Gospel of Saint Matthew. The two Parables of the hidden treasure and of the pearl of great price are closely related and teach the same lesson, namely the supreme value of the Kingdom of Heaven, for which all else must, be sacrificed without any hesitation. The lesson comes out so clearly that Our Lord does not give an explanation of these two Parables to the disciples. In appreciating the lesson taught in the Parable of the hidden treasure, we must keep before our mind, the special point which Our Lord intends to teach and not press every single detail of the story as if meant to convey a lesson. Thus in the case of the Parable of the hidden treasure Christ does not mean to hold up to our imitation the manner in which the finder gets possession of the treasure. The sole point which Our Lord intends here is the eagerness of the man who is willing to sell everything he owns in order to get the treasure, the latter being supposed naturally to be of much greater value; the application to the spiritual religious life is that the Kingdom is something of such incomparable value that no sacrifice made to enter it will be too great
Abraham Men - Name given in contempt in Reformation days to the poor who were forced to wander and beg alms after the dissolution of the monasteries in England, originating probably from the Gospel Parable of Lazarus, the poor man received into Abraham's bosom
Abram-Men - Name given in contempt in Reformation days to the poor who were forced to wander and beg alms after the dissolution of the monasteries in England, originating probably from the Gospel Parable of Lazarus, the poor man received into Abraham's bosom
Protevangelium - ...
PROVERB is the rendering of παραβολή in Luke 4:23 (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘parable’) and of παροιμία in John 16:25; John 16:29 ((Revised Version margin) ‘parable’). In John 10:6 παροιμία is rendered ‘parable’ ((Revised Version margin) ‘proverb’). Ordinarily παραβολή means ‘parable’ παροιμία ‘proverb’; but the words are sometimes interchanged in Hellenistic Greek. ’ Such comparison lies at the base of many proverbs as well as Parables; in fact many proverbs are only condensed Parables; and a proverb usually sets up a single case as the type of a whole class. , like the LXX Septuagint , uses παραβολή for ‘proverb’ as well as ‘parable’; while Jn. πκραβολή; Trench, Parables, ch
Likeness - ) A comparison; Parable; proverb
Parable - ) A comparison; a similitude; specifically, a short fictitious narrative of something which might really occur in life or nature, by means of which a moral is drawn; as, the Parables of Christ. ) To represent by Parable
Parable - (The word Parable is in Greek Parable (parabole ) which signifies placing beside or together, a comparison, a Parable is therefore literally a placing beside, a comparison, a similitude, an illustration of one subject by another. Of this sort were the Parables of Christ. The Parable differs from the fable (1) in excluding brute and inanimate creatures passing out of the laws of their nature and speaking or acting like men; (2) in its higher ethical significance. The allegory is self-interpreting; the Parable demands attention, insight, sometimes an actual explanation. ) For some months Jesus taught in the synagogues and on the seashore of Galilee as he had before taught in Jerusalem, and as yet without a Parable. The direct teaching was met with scorn unbelief hardness, and he seemed for a time to abandon it for that which took the form of Parables. The worth of Parables as instruments of teaching lies in their being at once a test of character and in their presenting each form of character with that which, as a penalty or blessing, is adapted to it. These ask the meaning of the Parable, and will not rest until the teacher has explained it. In this way the Parable did work, found out the fit hearers and led them on. In most of the Parables it is possible to trace something like an order. ...
When the next Parables meet us they are of a different type and occupy a different position. ...
Toward the close of our Lord's ministry the Parables are again theocratic but the phase of the divine kingdom on which they chiefly dwell is that of its final consummation. In interpreting Parables note-- (1) The analogies must be real, not arbitrary; (2) The Parables are to be considered as parts of a whole, and the interpretation of one is not to override or encroach upon the lessons taught by others; (3) The direct teaching of Christ presents the standard to which all our interpretations are to be referred, and by which they are to be measured
Mashal - Technical Hebrew term for proverb, Parable, simile
Jotham (1) - Gerizim, and addressed to them the ‘Parable of the Trees’ ( Judges 9:8-20 ). The Parable, which is somewhat incongruous in parts, is intended as an appeal to the conscience of the Shechemites; in case the appeal should turn out to be fruitless (which indeed proved to be the case), Jotham utters a curse ( Judges 9:20 ) against both Abimelech and the Shechemites; this curse is shortly afterwards fulfilled
Wedding Guests, Bridegroom And the - Descriptive term for a short Parable recorded by the three synoptic Gospels (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5). The Parable was provoked by the question of the disciples of John the Baptist and some of the scribes and Pharisees asking "Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but thy disciples do not fast?" Jesus replies in a similitude, asking if the companions of the bridal-chamber, whose special task it was to provide for the merrymaking at the feast, could be expected at the same time to mourn and fast. The meaning of the Parable was quite intelligible to His hearers. The Parable does not condemn the strictness of John nor does it condemn fasting. This Parable does stand against the spirit of the Pharisees who esteemed too highly external works and it shows to all that a new time had come and another spirit reigned in the Kingdom
Figure - " The earthly tabernacle anticipatively represented what is now made good in Christ; it was a "figure" or "parable" (Hebrews 9:9 ), "for the time now present," RV, i. ...
3: παραβολή (Strong's #3850 — Noun Feminine — parabole — par-ab-ol-ay' ) "a casting or placing side by side" (para, "beside," ballo, "to throw") with a view to comparison or resemblance, a Parable, is translated "figure" in the AV of Hebrews 9:9 (RV, "a Parable for the time now present") and Hebrews 11:19 , where the return of Isaac was (parabolically, in the lit. sense of the term) figurative of resurrection (RV, "parable"). See Parable
Good Shepherd, Parable of the - Our Lord means to teach in this Parable (Matthew 18) the care and love of God for the little ones, that is to say the weak, of whom He thinks so much that He has placed them under the protection of His angels. The lesson is conveyed in the Parable of the lost sheep; a shepherd with a flock of 100 sheep will leave the 99 that are not in danger and in no special need of his care, in order to look for the one that has been lost, and will not give up the search until he has found the lost one. This Parable resembles very closely that in Luke 15, and so quite naturally the two Parables are commonly identified
Lost Sheep - Our Lord means to teach in this Parable (Matthew 18) the care and love of God for the little ones, that is to say the weak, of whom He thinks so much that He has placed them under the protection of His angels. The lesson is conveyed in the Parable of the lost sheep; a shepherd with a flock of 100 sheep will leave the 99 that are not in danger and in no special need of his care, in order to look for the one that has been lost, and will not give up the search until he has found the lost one. This Parable resembles very closely that in Luke 15, and so quite naturally the two Parables are commonly identified
Householder - It is rendered ‘householder’ in the Parables of the Tares and the Wheat (Matthew 13:27), of the Owner bringing forth his treasures new and old (Matthew 13:52), of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1), of the Vineyard let out to husbandmen (Matthew 21:33), with special application to Christ as Head of the Church. It occurs also in the Parable of the Great Supper, Luke 14:21 (corresponding to the king of Matthew 22:2; Matthew 22:7), also as denoting the head of the house whose persecution involves that of his subordinates, Matthew 10:25 (see Household); and once more in the Parable of the Unfaithful, against whom the door was shut, Luke 13:25 (cf. Parable of the Ten Virgins, Matthew 25)
Tares - ...
The Parable of the Tares and its explanation are found only in Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43. This ties the Parable to the historical situation in which it was spoken, forbidding an exclusive reference to the future; while the fact that it is the Son of Man (= Messiah) who has sown the good seed (cf. The time of the Parable is the time of the question of the servants (Matthew 13:27), when the tares had been already recognized as such (ἐφάνη, Matthew 13:26). Matthew 13:27 and the following verse show that the idea of wheat degenerating into darnel is foreign to the Parable; the servants think of mixed seed, the master of an independent sowing of darnel. Still less is there any idea in the Parable that darnel may become wheat (B. ...
The correct interpretation of this Parable flows directly from its historical setting. The Sower had been a Parable of disillusionment, disclosing that the success of the Messianic Kingdom would not be so universal or immediate as they had fondly imagined, that its method was to be preaching and not cataclysm, that it depended for its spread on its reception in human hearts. The Tares is equally a Parable of disillusionment. ‘On that day’ (Matthew 13:1) of the Parables, or at least a short time before it, the Pharisees had shown their true colours by charging that Jesus cast out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of the demons (Matthew 12:22-32). ), ‘Lord, wilt thou that we bid fire to come down from heaven and consume them?’ In this Parable Jesus teaches them that the judgment which they momentarily expected, the separation of the sons of the Kingdom and the sons of the Evil One, shall surely come, not now, but at the end of the age, and that meantime the wicked shall continually spring up among the righteous. The Parable therefore discloses the fact that, instead of being victorious at one stroke, the progress of the Kingdom is to be continually hindered and hampered (cf. ...
This interpretation leaves unanswered those questions about Church discipline which have made the Parable an ecclesiastical battle-ground for centuries, because the Parable has nothing to do with such controversies. (4) If the Parable refers to Church discipline, it forbids it in toto, while the Parable of the Net on a similar interpretation makes it impossible. (6) The Apostles did not so understand the Parable, for they insisted on Church discipline (1 Corinthians 5:2; 1 Corinthians 5:13, Matthew 25:37-433 2 Thessalonians 3:6; 2 Thessalonians 3:13, Revelation 2:14-16; Revelation 2:20-23; cf. The history of the interpretation of the Parable shows that such a use of it was first made by Cyprian during his bishopric (248–258), in support of his theories of the Church. ...
Two objections to the interpretation of the Parable proposed in this article deserve attention. It is admitted that the word ‘Kingdom’ is used in this Parable in a very loose sense. In the process of taking shape, the Parable tells us, opposition has risen in the world of men which these truths and principles claim as their rightful sphere, and which men expect them to occupy. (2) The related Parable of the Net (Matthew 13:47-50) is supposed to refer to the discipline of the Church. (d) The Parable, if it relates to Church discipline, makes that absolutely impossible. have worked over the same original Parable, Mt. Jülicher acknowledges an unrecognizable Parable-kernel here, which lies at the bottom of both Mt. The Parable, as it stands in Mt. ’s Parable and the original Parable, the companion of the Net, while the explanation is from the same editor’s hand. ’s Parable as a weakened form of the Tares, or a substitute for it. Weiss thinks that the idea of gradual development is not in this or its sister Parables. ; Arnot (Parables) may be compared as a pioneer of the correct interpretation
Draw-Net - This kind of net is mentioned in the Gospels only in the Parable of Matthew 13:47-50, where it is very much in point. To one who has watched it—the very gradual progress of the operation, the extended area slowly encircled, the final drawing up of the net on the beach, and the sorting of its varied contents, with the reservation of some and the rejection of others—the aptness of the Parable becomes very apparent. ...
The Parable closes the series of seven in Matthew 13, in which various aspects of the Kingdom of Heaven are presented. It points, like that Parable, to the intermixture of good and evil in the Church in its present stage, and it is implicit in the figure used that no absolute separation is possible or to be thought of now. But the emphasis of the Parable and of the explanation added by our Lord, lies not upon the fact of the intermixture, but upon the certainty that there will be a decisive end to it. The Parable is concerned with the future rather than with the present, hence its suitability at the end of the series. ...
This Parable, like that of the Tares, was much appealed to in the Donatist controversy. ...
What conception of the Kingdom of Heaven is indicated by the Parable? The Parable may be said to be an expansion of the idea contained in ‘fishers of men. The Parable, naturally interpreted, certainly suggests a visible community
Adummim - This road ascends through a desolate and rocky region, "the ascent of Adummim," Joshua 15:7 ; 18:17 ; it furnished many lurking places for robbers, and was the scene of our Savior's Parable, The Good Samaritan, Luke 10:1-42
Bride - Compare Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13 )
Mustard - Jesus used the mustard plant in a Parable to symbolize the rapid growth of the kingdom of God (Matthew 13:31-32 ), and its seed as a simile for faith (Matthew 17:20 )
Job - Others maintain that the story is only a Parable
Riddle - A dark or hidden saying, as that which Samson put forth respecting the carcase of the lion, Judges 14:12-19 ; and that of Ezekiel concerning the great eagle, but this is also called a 'parable
Talents - TALENTS (Parable of). The story resembles so closely the Parable of the Pounds in Luke 19:11-27 that many scholars have considered them to be different versions of the same Parable. It is therefore necessary to begin with an investigation of the relations between the two Parables. (a) In the Parable of the Talents we have three slaves mentioned, who seem from the expression chosen—‘his own slaves’—to stand in a relation of peculiar intimacy to their master. ...
(b) The Parable of the Pounds (see art. It is, in fact, held by many that in the Parable of the Pounds we have two Parables blended together, one of which described how a nobleman was opposed in his efforts to obtain a kingdom by his fellow-citizens, and how, having received the kingdom, he executed vengeance upon them. The other Parable went on similar lines to the Parable of the Talents, the differences being due either to a difference in the lesson Jesus intended to teach, or to variations of the story that grew up as it was told and retold in the Christian Church. It is, however, important in this connexion to observe that the whole Parable is dominated by the idea that it is of a prince that the story speaks. It is probable that the Parable rests on a historical incident, and the view of most interpreters is that it is the journey of Archelaus to Rome to secure his kingdom and the embassy of the Jews to thwart him to which Jesus here alludes. In the Parable of the Talents we have apparently to do with a merchant whose object is to make money. There is no need to suppose that this is an incongruity in the Parable. It would have been tedious, however, to mention each slave individually in the Parable of the Pounds, hence three only are introduced as specimens of the rest. Besides, the Parable is subordinated to the aim of teaching its lesson, and attention would have been distracted by the multiplicity of detail, even if ten different lessons could have been drawn from the different conduct of the ten slaves. When we compare the treatment of the two servants in the Parable of the Talents, the difference becomes significant. In that Parable the two slaves have unequal capacity, but they have exhibited the same zeal for their master, and achieved a similar result; that is, each has doubled his capital: accordingly they receive the same reward with the same warmth of praise. In the Parable of the Pounds the slaves start from an equal position, but achieve an unequal result. The Parable concludes with the genuinely Oriental trait of the execution of the malcontents who sought to keep the prince out of his kingdom. ...
It will be clear, then, from this comparison, that the two Parables presuppose different situations, each of which is harmoniously worked out in detail, and that each has different lessons to teach. There is, therefore, no substantial reason for assuming that the same original Parable has developed into these two very different stories. Acordingly, it is not impossible that here the Parable of the Pounds has influenced the report. There the contrast between the one pound and the ten cities might well be described in the terms employed in the Parable of the Talents. In the Parable of the Pounds the description of the sum entrusted as very little is entirely appropriate. In the Parable of the Talents the lesson is, that difference in endowment or opportunity involves no difference in the reward. The significance in the Parable of the Pounds is different: each starts from the same level, but they reach a very different result. Another lesson, common to both Parables, Is that reward for work is more work, but work on a larger scale with ampler opportunities. And, in any case, the slave had his orders, tacitly, it is true, in the Parable of the Talents, but explicitly in the Parable of the Pounds. The question remains as to the relation between these two Parables and the Second Coming. introduces the Parable of the Pounds with the statement that it was occasioned by the approach of Jesus to Jerusalem, and the expectation entertained by His followers that the Messianic Kingdom was immediately to be established. The Parable of the Pounds fits that situation in so far as it indicates that the master is going on a distant journey and will be away for a long time, and that the kingdom is to be established only upon his return. The eschatological colour is not so deep in the Parable of the Talents, still it is present. It is, however, noteworthy that the main point of both Parables is not the explanation of the delay in the Second Coming. There the unfaithful servant abuses his trust precisely because his lord delays his coming, and there are other closely related sayings and Parables which bear on the need for watchfulness and on the suddenness of the Second Coming. There is no need to suppose that the Parables of the Pounds and the Talents are a development of Mark 13:34-37, or to think that the experience of delay in the early Church created the Parables. may have accurately stated the occasion of the Parable of the Pounds, though there are other Parables that would suit better the particular situation. Discussions in works on New Testament Theology, Teaching of Jesus, and Lives of Christ, and especially the works on the Parables by Trench, Bruce, Dods, Jülicher, and Bugge
Lazarus - ...
...
A beggar named in the Parable recorded Luke 16:19-31
Tares - Travellers describe the process of pulling up this grass and separating it from the genuine grain, and their descriptions perfectly accord with the language of our Saviour in the Parable
Wedding Garment - The custom of the East at their marriage feasts, can only explain that expression of our Lord in his Parable, (Matthew 22:11) of the man that had not on a wedding garment. And for the king's son in his marriage, which the Parable represents, the presents must have been splendid indeed. And as the Parable of Jesus on this subject was wholly figurative, and with an eye to the gracious marriage of the Son of God with our nature, nothing could have been more happily chosen to have shewn the awful consequence of the unbeliever, in his appearing now at ordinances, and finally at the last day, at judgment; unclothed with the righteousness of Christ, and standing naked and defenceless in his own sinful nature, when the King shall come in to the marriage supper of the Lamb in heaven! It would be well if every man who is looking for acceptance, either wholly or in part from any garment of his own, would pause over the awful subject of such contumacy and self-righteousness!...
Wayside - Again, in the Parable of the Sower, some of the seed fell ‘by the wayside’ (Matthew 13:4), i. Jesus gave His own interpretation of the Parable
Allegory - The distinction in scripture between a Parable and an allegory, is said to be that a Parable is a supposed history, and an allegory, a figurative description of real facts
Parables - Broadly speaking, these pictures and stories are called Parables. The Old Testament contains a number of stories that may be considered Parables (Judges 9:8-15; 2 Samuel 12:1-4; 2 Kings 14:9), but by far the majority of Parables in the Bible were spoken by Jesus. ...
Purpose of Jesus’ Parables...
Jesus’ Parables were more than mere illustrations. Jesus’ Parables helped separate those who were genuinely interested from those who were merely curious (Mark 4:1-2; Mark 4:11-12). ...
This separation occurred as people exercised their minds to work out the meaning of the Parables. Those who desired to know more of Jesus and his teaching found the Parables full of meaning. Those who had no real interest in Jesus’ teaching saw no meaning in the Parables at all and so turned away from him. ...
Although the teaching of Parables may have caused the idly curious to lose interest in Jesus, the basic purpose of a Parable was to enlighten, not to darken. A Parable was like a lamp, and a lamp was put on a stand to give people light, not hidden under a bowl or a bed to keep people in darkness. ...
Parables of the kingdom...
Because Jesus’ Parables separated between the true and the false, many of them were concerned with the subject of the kingdom of God. ...
This was seen clearly in the Parable of the sower, where the different kinds of soil illustrated the different responses that people made to the teaching of Jesus. This Parable was the key to understanding the others (Mark 4:13). ...
Further characteristics of the Parables...
Whether or not Jesus’ Parables are directly related to the subject of the kingdom in the manner just outlined, Jesus usually intended them to teach only one or two points. Likewise instead of giving a direct answer to a question or criticism, Jesus sometimes told a Parable by which the hearer himself could work out the answer (Luke 10:29-30; Luke 15:2-3). ...
It is therefore important, in reading a Parable, to find the chief purpose for which Jesus told it, and interpret the Parable according to this purpose (Luke 18:1; Luke 18:9). There is no need to find meanings for all the details within the Parable, as these are often nothing more than parts of the framework of the story. ...
For example, in the Parable of Matthew 20:1-15 Jesus was not teaching that an employer should give his workers equal pay for unequal work. Similarly in the Parable of Luke 16:1-17 he was not advising people to use cunning or dishonesty in their business dealings. ...
Whatever the main point of each of Jesus’ Parables may have been, Jesus was inevitably forcing his hearers to a decision. And the challenge that Jesus brought through his Parables is still relevant today (Matthew 13:9; Matthew 13:43)
Dives - —The Latin adjective for ‘rich,’ commonly employed as a quasi-proper name for the rich man in our Lord’s Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31). ’...
Although we are not concerned in this article with the interpretation of the Parable as a whole, we may yet appropriately refer to the various opinions which have been held as to who was intended by our Lord under the figure of the rich man. ...
The noticeable circumstances that in this alone of all His Parables our Lord names one of the characters, i. Lazarus, while the other chief character, the rich man, is significantly nameless, and that the Parable has no prefatory introduction, such as ‘He spake another Parable,’ or the like, have given rise to the conjecture that this is not a Parable pure and simple, but that it is either a narrative of facts, or that persons more or less known are alluded to in the story. Closely connected with this opinion is another which has the support of Ambrose, Augustine, Teclman (quoted by Trench, Parables), and others, according to which, while Lazarus is Christ, Dives is the Jewish people who despised and rejected Him who for their sakes was poor and afflicted. This, however, is an allegorizing of the Parable which, though attractive at first sight, will not bear close examination. Yet, though not the primary, this may be a true application of the Parable, and is not lightly to be set aside. Didon (Life of Christ), Mosheim, and Wetstein hold that he is a Sadducee, since the Pharisees were not characterized by luxurious living or by unbelief; but if, with the majority of expositors, who say that the connexion of the Parable with what precedes requires it, we hold him to be a Pharisee, he is at least a Pharisee who, as Stier says, ‘lives as a Sadducee. It may be, indeed, that our Lord in the Parable glances back at what is said in vv. ’ It has, however, been suggested (Rendel Harris, Expositor, March 1900) that this name may have been evolved from the words ‘hic dives,’ or ‘en dives,’ accompanying some ancient pictorial representation of the Parable
Parable - Parable (IN OT)...
1 . ]'>[1] ‘parable’; it is important to notice that in OT ‘parable’ has the varying senses of mâshâl , and is never used in the narrow technical sense of the NT. Proverbs 26:7-9 speaks of ‘a Parable in the mouth of fools,’ which halts and is misapplied. In Psalms 49:4 ; Psalms 78:2 ‘parable’ is coupled with ‘ dark saying ’ and implies something of mystery; cf. ]'>[2]4 ), ‘parable’ means ‘by-word,’ a sense which mâshâl often has. In Matthew 18:28-358 we have ‘the Parable’ of the eagle, really an allegory (see below); cf. Such mysterious figures are characteristic of Ezekiel, and he is reproached as ‘a speaker of Parables’ ( Ezekiel 20:49 ). The meaning of ‘parable’ in the technical sense . His Parables stand as a type, and it is convenient to attach a technical sense to the word, as describing this special type. ‘The qualities and properties of the first are transferred to the last, and the two thus blended together, instead of being kept quite distinct and placed side by side, as is the case in the Parable’ (Trench, On Parables , ch. In the Parable , particularly in those of the NT, the story is natural and self-sufficient as a story, but is seen to point to a deeper spiritual meaning. It is not so in most of the Parables; the lesson rests on the true analogy which exists between the natural and the spiritual world. Without requiring any fictitious ‘licence,’ the Parable simply assumes that the Divine working in each sphere follows the same law. OT Parables . There are five passages in the OT which are generally quoted as representing the nearest approach to ‘parables’ in the technical sense. The first two passages ( 2 Samuel 12:1-4 [15], 2 Samuel 14:6 [16]) are very similar; we have a natural story with an application. The first is exactly parallel to such a Parable as ‘the Two Debtors,’ but the second has no deep or spiritual significance. The method has perhaps in the last two cases a suspicion of trickery, and was not employed by our Lord; the application of the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen ( Matthew 21:33 ) was obvious from the first in the light of Isaiah 5:1-8 . This passage is the fourth of those referred to, and is a true Parable, though only slightly developed. It illustrates well the relation between a Parable and a metaphor; and a comparison with Psalms 80:8 shows how narrow is the border-line between Parable and allegory. It should be noted that post-Biblical Jewish literature makes a wide use of Parable, showing sometimes, alike in spirit, form, and language, a remarkable resemblance to the Parables of the NT. ...
Parable (IN NT) . (1) The constant use of a word, meaning resemblance both in Hebrew and in Greek, makes it evident that an essential feature of the Parable lay in the bringing together of two different things so that the one helped to explain and to emphasize the other. In the Parables of Christ the usual form is that of a complete story running parallel to the stages and divisions of a totally different subject. Thus in the Parable of the Sower ( Matthew 13:1-8 ) the kinds of soil in the narrative are related to certain distinctions of character in the interpretation ( Matthew 13:19-28 ), The teaching value thus created came from an appeal to the uniformity of nature. Such was the Parable value of contrast between the behaviour of Israel towards God and the common seotiment of family relationship, and even the grateful instincts of the beasts of burden ( Isaiah 1:2 , Isaiah 1:3 ). This effect of contrasting couples formed a literary feature in some of Christ’s Parables where opposing types of character were introduced side by side ( Matthew 21:28 ; Matthew 25:2 , Luke 18:10 ). ]'>[2] and in the Gospel of John indicates that a proverb or Parable, being drawn from common objects and incidents, was available and meant for public use. ...
(3) Occasionally the public Parable value was reached by making an individual represent all others of the same class. The Parable then became an example in the ordinary sense of the term (Luke 14:8 ; Luke 14:12-13 ). Certain points are merely selected and dwelt upon as in the interpretation of a Parable story previously given. Here there is all the explanatory and persuasive efficiency of the appeal to nature and custom, but, as in this case the reference is to Christ Himself as Head of the Kingdom, the Parable has not the general application of those belonging to its citizenship. It is nevertheless a Parable, though ‘the Door’ and ‘the Vine’ are usually called emblems or symbols of Christ. In the Parable two different planes of experience were brought together, one familiar, concrete, and definite, the other an area of abstractions, conjectures, and possibilities. In Christ’s Parables, as distinct from the ordinary fable which they otherwise completely resembled in form, the illustrations were always drawn from occurrences that were possible, and which might therefore have belonged to the experience of the hearer. The special need of Parables in Christ’s teaching . Even if, passing beyond the Jewish ceremonial observance and externalism, He had been content to speak of personal salvation and ethical ideas after the manner so prevalent in the Western Church of to-day, He would not have needed the vehicle of Parable instruction. Of this Kingdom and its mysteries Christ spoke in Parables. In the Sermon on the Mount those mysteries of the Kingdom were indicated in outline, and in the Parables the theme was still the same, whether the story started from the initiative of the Teacher in the presence of the multitude, or was suggested by some incident of the hour. Both from the novelty of the vision thus presented, and from its hostility to the spirit and authority of the religious leaders, it is evident that teaching by Parable was the form best adapted to Christ’s purpose and subject, and to the circumstances of the time. The following selection from Christ’s Parables Indicates some of the points of relationship to the Kingdom. (1) The Parable of boundaries, the conditions and environment of the Kingdom: the Sower and the Seed ( Matthew 13:1-23 ); difficulties and dangers arising from in attention, superficiality, and divided allegiance. (5) The Parable of office: The Husbandmen in the Vineyard ( Matthew 21:33-46 , Luke 12:42-46 ); names and claims in the Church that dispossess and dishonour Christ
Lazarus - Lazar-houses and Lazarettos, seem to have taken their name from the Lazarus of the Parable
Adummim - It is supposed that the scene of the Parable of the Good Samaritan was laid here
Lazarus - The poor man in the Parable of Luke 16 . The teaching of the Parable appears to be that worldly prosperity, which had been a token in O. Though a Parable, it is a vivid picture of the reality of existence after death, and of the different conditions in that existence
Tares - But if what they have said concerning tares be true, it serves to throw a more beautiful light on our Lord's Parable concerning them than is generally understood. ...
But what makes the Parable of Christ so truly striking on the subject is, that while the tares are said to have carried with them so strong a resemblance to the pure seed, the tares differed so very highly from it in quality as to be little short of being poisonous. ...
The Parable of our Lord of the wheat and tares contains in its first, plain and obvious sense many delightful instructions; but under this view which eastern writers give, that tares are not simply weeds, that by springing up with good seed check the growth, but are destructive and poisonous, the Parable becomes infinitely more pointed. Our Lord indeed, when speaking of the tares, and explaining to his disciples in private the Parable, expressly calls them "the children of the wicked one, and the enemy that sowed them the devil. " (See Matthew 13:38-39) But this view of them, as in their nature poisonous, however in appearance like to the good seed, is certainly a striking beauty in the Parable
Lazarus - (Hebrew: God hath helped) ...
The beggar in the Parable Lazarus and the Rich Man set forth by Christ (Luke 16)
Talent - Parable of the talents (Matthew 18:24 ; 25:15 )
Let Out - 1: ἐκδίδωμι (Strong's #1554 — Verb — ekdidomi — ek-did'-o-mee ) primarily, "to give out, give up, surrender" (ek, "out, from," didomi, "to give"), denotes "to let out for hire;" in the NT it is used, in the Middle Voice, with the meaning "to let out to one's advantage," in the Parable of the husbandman and his vineyard, Matthew 21:33,41 ; Mark 12:1 ; Luke 20:9 , AV, "let
Pound - In the Parable of the ten pounds, ( Luke 19:12-27 ) the reference appears to be to a Greek pound, a weight used as a money of account, of which sixty went to the talent
Parable - The range of meaning of the term "parable" (Gk. "Parable" is a general term for a figurative saying. ...
The conceptual background for the concept of Parable in the New Testament was Semitic, not Aristotelian Greek. This single insight could have saved the history of interpretation of the Parables of Jesus from several key misconceptions. From Jülicher on, based on the Aristotelian Greek idea of Parable as "pure comparison" conveying only a single point, there has been a significant school of interpretation that has regarded all allegorical traits as foreign to the Parables of Jesus and has insisted that each Parable has only one point. This narrow definition of Parable has led interpreters to regard the allegorical interpretations of Parables in the Gospels (e. It has also led to a seemingly endless series of variations of exactly just what was the "one point" of each Parable. For many Parables, such as the prodigal son, limiting the interpretation to "one point" has proved to be a procrustean bed. ...
Nathan's Parable of the ewe lamb in 2 Samuel 12:1-4 foreshadows in several respects many of Jesus' Parables. Similarly, many of Jesus' Parables elicit a judgment that invites repentance, such as the good Samaritan. His Parables lead us to a new way of seeing life and invite us to adopt a whole new perspective that changes how we live. ...
The Parable of the vineyard in Isaiah 5:1-6 is immediately interpreted in verse 7 with explicit allegorical identifications: "The vineyard of the Lord Almighty is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah are the garden of his delight. " Thus, the allegorical interpretations of Jesus' Parables in the Gospels follow the pattern in the Old Testament, a pattern that is abundantly exemplified in rabbinic literature as well. ...
Jesus' narrative Parables are probably best understood as extended metaphors. Understanding the message of a Parable is more than identifying its "point, " though many Parables do have a focal point that is reinforced by the Parable as a whole. In order to let the Parable have its full impact, we need to see the referent in a new way through the Parable story. ...
To understand a Parable we first need to listen to the story. Such a combination of cursing and blessing seems to have been typical of Jesus' contrast Parables: eschatological blessing for those who respond properly to God's invitation, but cursing for those who do not. ...
Of Jesus' fifty-two recorded narrative Parables, twenty seem to depict him in imagery that in the Old Testament metaphorical use typically referred to God. In the vast corpus of rabbinic Parables there seems to be none in which a rabbi depicted himself. This distinctiveness, like the distinctive artistry of Jesus' Parables, is further evidence that the Parables recorded in the Gospels are authentic to Jesus. ...
The imagery that Jesus used to depict himself is an integral and often necessary part of the Parables in which they occur. For instance, take the "father" out of the prodigal son, the "bridegroom" out of the bridegroom, the "shepherd" out of the lost sheep, or the "rock" out of the two houses and the Parable disintegrates. Furthermore, these symbols for God applied by Jesus to himself in the Parables are not interpreted in the Gospels as divine claims. ...
The argument implicit in many of these Parables depends on the hearer's making an association that equates Jesus' act with God's act. ...
Not only do these Parables depict Jesus as performing the work of God; they implicitly apply various titles of God to Jesus: the Sower, the Rock, the Shepherd, the Bridegroom, the Father, the Lord, and the King. Each of these Parables adds to the overall impression that Jesus implicitly claimed to be God. Most Parable studies that deal with the sort of implicit claim Jesus was making through the Parables assume that it is a messianic claim, but most of this imagery was not used in the Old Testament to depict the Messiah. Even those symbols that were occasionally also used of the Messiah in the Old Testament (shepherd, king, stone) in Jesus' Parables refer more naturally to God. ...
However, could Jesus' use of these symbols for God mean simply that he saw himself, as all of the prophets did, as doing God's work and speaking God's word? A few of these Parables, like the two houses and the two sons, with their particular focus on obedience to Jesus' word, could be interpreted in this way. But three points support the view that Jesus was in fact presenting himself as God: ...
None of the prophets applied symbols for God to himself in the way that Jesus did so consistently in his Parables. Yet it is precisely these things that Jesus so often depicted himself as doing in the Parables: forgiving sin, sowing the kingdom, sowing his word in men's hearts, graciously welcoming undeserving sinners into the kingdom, seeking out and rescuing his lost sheep, directing the harvest of the great judgment, and dividing between those who will and those who will not enter the kingdom. Did he really understand himself to be deity? Here in the Parables, the most assuredly authentic of all the traditions about Jesus, is a clear, implicit affirmation of Jesus' self-understanding as deity. ...
Jesus' Parables depict many aspects of the kingdom of God. Blomberg, Interpreting the Parables ; C. Dodd, The Parables of the Kingdom ; J. Jeremias, The Parables of Jesus ; P. Stein, An Introduction to the Parables of Jesus ; D. Wenham, The Parables of Jesus
Circumstantiality in the Parables - CIRCUMSTANTIALITY IN THE ParableS. —A Parable consists of two members, viz. Both members are necessary to make the Parable complete, though the didactic part need not be expressly stated, the circumstances in which the illustration is given making its purpose plain. Unfortunately the Parables of Christ are mostly preserved only in fragmentary form. But if the Evangelists give little, sometimes even a misleading, light as to the context in which the Parables were spoken, they record the illustrative portions of them with much fulness of detail. Particularly is this the case with those Parables in which the illustration is in the form of a narrative. Luke is the most pronounced in the circumstantiality with which he reproduces the stories which Christ introduced in His Parables. Luke is pre-eminent in this respect, all the Synoptists present the illustrative portion of the Parables with move or less circumstantiality. And this feature of the Parables suggests some questions which we may consider under the following heads:—(1) In how far is the circumstantiality of the narratives authentic? (2) If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we fix a limit beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details? (3) If we reject this principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ can we meet the objection that the circumstantiality of the illustrations is empty ornament?...
1. The question of the authenticity of the circumstantiality of the illustrations is in many cases forced upon us by the fact that details which are recorded by one Evangelist are omitted by another For instance, in the Parable of the Sower, St. Again, in the Parable of the Patch on the Old Garment, St. In many cases we find the explanation of such variations in the details of the Parables in the desire of the Evangelists to emphasize the point and heighten the effect of the illustration. To give a few more,—in the Parable of the Supper (Matthew 22:1-14, Luke 14:15-24), St. In the Parable of the Lost Sheep (Matthew 18:12-14, Luke 15:4-7), St. In the Parable of the Houses built upon the Rock and upon the Sand (Matthew 7:24-27, Luke 6:47-49), St. But in other cases we must assign a different motive for the variation in the details of the Parables. Matthew’s version of the Parable of the Supper with St. Again, in the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, St. Again, in the Parable of the Watchful Servants (Mark 13:33-37, Luke 12:35-38), St. If we accept the traditional principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ in how far are we justified in seeking to interpret the circumstantial details so largely present in the Parables? There are some who insist that every little detail is significant, and who regard that as the true method of interpretation which seeks to find some spiritual truth to correspond to every item of the illustration. 270) insists that in every Parable every word must be significant. 271) maintains that Christ never introduces the slightest detail into any Parable which is not designed to correspond to something in the interpretation. Indeed, if the principle of ‘interpretation’ be admitted at all, if the Parables, as such treatment of them involves, in spite of all protest to the contrary, are really allegories, it is difficult to see on what ground a line can be drawn beyond which it is illegitimate to interpret the details. If we reject the principle of parabolical ‘interpretation,’ does not the circumstantiality of the illustrations become mere useless ornament? This is an objection raised against those who contend that the Parables are not to be regarded as allegories of which we have to seek the interpretation, but as comparisons between the principle involved in some case taken from everyday life and a similar principle which it is desired to establish in the spiritual sphere. There is only the one point of comparison between the two cases, only the one lesson enforced by the Parable. In answer to the objection that this seems to reduce the fulness of detail with which the illustrations are elaborated to mere useless ornament, it is replied that though the details are not regarded as significant in the symbolical sense, they are yet full of significance as serving to bring out with force and clearness the thought which it is the purpose of the Parable to enforce. And so with all the details with which the Parables are supplied. Every little touch serves to bring out more clearly the central thought enforced by the illustration, and so contributes to the effect of the Parable. —See the list at the end of article Parable
Debtors, the Two - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the Parable of the two debtors, who owed to a money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude
Sower, Sowing - Besides the common reference to agriculture (for which see SEASONS),sowing is used symbolically for spreading the gospel, as in the Parable of the Sower, of which the Lord graciously gave His own explanation. Whenever the gospel is preached, the seed is being sown, and doubtless falls upon different sorts of ground as in the Parable
Compare, Comparison - , "parable"), occur in Mark 4:30 , RV, "In what Parable shall we set it forth?," AV, "with what comparison shall we compare it?" See ARRIVE
Two Debtors, the - (Luke 7) Parable, spoken by Our Lord in the house of Simon the Pharisee, when the latter was wondering that Jesus should allow the woman to bathe His feet with her tears and wipe them with her hair. Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the Parable of the two debtors, who owed to a money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude
Allegory - Such are Nathan's address to David, 2 Samuel 12:1 - 14 ; Psalm 80:1-19 , and our Lord's Parable of the sower, Luke 8:5 - 15
Allegory - Every Parable is an allegory
Tares - It is mentioned in the Parable of the man who sowed good seed in his field, but whose enemy came and oversowed cockle in the wheat (Matthew 13)
Parable - A Parable is a mode of relation under which something is figured which is not expressed in the terms. Hence a Parable usually necessitates an expositor. The Lord said on one occasion that He spoke in Parables, so that the multitude should not understand His teaching: they had virtually rejected their Messiah, and were not morally in a condition to be taught. Some, however, of the Lord's Parables were so pointed that they were understood even by His enemies, which doubtless was His intention; they were laid bare as in His presence. also were plain, but in the Parable of the ewe lamb, David did not see the application till he had himself judged the culprit. ...
The word 'parable' is used many times in the O. for figurative language where no distinct Parable is related, as when Balaam 'took up his Parable,' Numbers 23:7,18 , etc. ; and Job 'continued his Parable. ...
From the fact of the Lord connecting 'the mysteries of the kingdom' with the Parables He uttered, we may be sure that there is much instruction to be gathered from them if rightly interpreted: they need the teaching of the Spirit of God as much as any other part of scripture. ...
It will be seen by the annexed list that some of the Parables are recorded only by Matthew; two 'similes' are found in Mark only; several Parables are given only by Luke; and none are recorded by the evangelist John. The word 'parable' occurs in John 10:6 in the A. ' The teaching is not in the form of a Parable: the Lord is speaking of Himself as the good Shepherd. ...
Some of the Parables are grouped together. Thus in Matthew 13 there are seven Parables, four of which were delivered in the hearing of the multitude, and three in private. The next three Parables give the outward aspect of the kingdom during Christ's absence, that which man has made of it. This grows up into a tree large enough for the birds (which caught away the good seed in the Parable of the sower) to lodge in its branches. ...
Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and in private explained first to His disciples the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares, and then added Parables that show the divine object and intent in the kingdom. The third is the Parable of the NET, which gathers out of the sea of nations good and bad, as the gospel has done in Christendom. ...
Another group of Parables is in Luke 15 , or in one sense a Parable in three sections (Luke 15:3 ). ...
It is doubtless best to study each Parable or each group, with its context, as the Holy Spirit has given them. THE WICKED HUSBANDMEN: the rulers of Israel were among the Lord's hearers, and He explained the Parable thus: "The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof. " Notice also in this Parable the Lord's reply to Peter's question in Matthew 19:27 ; Matthew 20 continues the subject and shows us sovereign grace in contrast with the mercenary spirit of man's heart. The Lord applies the Parable thus: "Make to yourselves friends with the mammon of unrighteousness [1] that when it fails ye may be received into eternal tabernacles. The teaching in the Parable of the Unjust Steward is continued here: the rich man was not sacrificing the present for the future. Doubtless this Parable has another application, bearing upon the Jews as to their jealousy of grace being shown to the Gentiles. This Parable is similar in character to that of the POUNDS. This Parable follows that of the Ten Virgins, showing that while the Christian waits for his Lord, he should be faithfully using the gifts entrusted to him. ...
Another arrangement of the principal Parables has been suggested, namely, in three groups corresponding to different periods of the Lord's ministry. These Parables will be easily distinguished in the following table. The Parables are now of a differenttype, and are drawn from the life of men rather than from the world of nature. "...
ParableS AND SIMILES IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
Inheritance - Property was sometimes distributed among children during the lifetime of the father: thus, in the Parable of the prodigal son, the father divided his property between the two sons, Luke 15:12
Denarius - From the Parable of the laborers in the vineyard it would seem that a denarius was then the ordinary pay for a day's labor
Adummim - It lies in the road between Jerusalem and Jericho, and agrees with the Parable of the good Samaritan in being a descent from Jerusalem, and was until lately a dangerous road, infested with robbers
Debtor - 1), is found in Luke 7:41 , of the two "debtors" mentioned in the Lord's Parable addressed to Simon the Pharisee, and in Luke 16:5 , of the "debtors" in the Parable of the unrighteous steward. This Parable indicates a system of credit in the matter of agriculture
Laz'Arus - ...
The name of a poor man in the well-known Parable of (Luke 16:19-31 ) The name of Lazarus has been perpetuated in an institution of the Christian Church. The use of lazaretto and lazarhouse for the leper hospitals then founded in all parts of western Christendom, no less than that of lazaroni for the mendicants of Italian towns, is an indication of the effect of the Parable upon the mind of Europe in the Middle Ages, and thence upon its later speech
Tares, - In the Parable of the Wheat and Tares the Lord compares to tares those introduced into the kingdom by Satan, who will be consumed in judgement. See ParableS
Inn - , "a place where all are received" (pas, "all," dechomai, "to receive"), denotes "a house for the reception of strangers," a caravanserai, translated "inn," in Luke 10:34 , in the Parable of the good samaritan
Rich Fool, Parable of the - Parable of Our Lord in Luke12
Honesty - In the Parable of the Good Samaritan the subject of neighbourly kindness had fallen among robbers (Luke 10:30), whose excessive cruelty is described; but the point of the Parable is not in their conduct, which is referred to only in order to show the depth of misery in which their victim was found. ...
In the Parable of the Unjust Steward it might appear that Jesus was commending an act of dishonesty. The master in the Parable commends his steward. But against that rendering is the fact that the rich man is called the steward’s ‘lord’ throughout the Parable. Plummer remarks, the argument, like that implied by the Parable of the Unjust Judge, is a fortiori. This Parable is an extreme instance for the rule that in any Parable the main lessons only should be sought, and not its details allegorized. Latham put forward the view that the steward had been too scrupulous in studying the interests of his employer, to the neglect of the rights of the tenants, whom he ground down cruelly; and he took the Parable as a warning against unwise zeal for God at the cost of unkindness to men, on whom in the name of Cod too heavy requirements are laid (Pastor Pastorum, pp
Adummim - It is supposed to have been the place referred to in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37 )
Abraham's Bosom - Unique phrase found in a Parable of Jesus describing the place where Lazarus went after death (Luke 16:19-31 )
Bill - In the Parable of the Unjust Steward ( Luke 16:6 f
Proverb - ) A striking or paradoxical assertion; an obscure saying; an enigma; a Parable
Neighbor - See the beautiful Parable of the Good Samaritan, the real neighbor to the distressed, Luke 10:29
Tares - There can be little doubt that the zizania of the Parable, ( Matthew 13:25 ) denotes the weed called "darnel" (Lolium temulentum ). "These stalks," he continues, "if sown designedly throughout the fields, would be inseparable from the wheat, from which, even when growing naturally and by chance, they are at first sight hardly distinguishable. 420): "The grain is in just the proper stage to illustrate the Parable
Grain of Wheat - A Parable occurring in John 12, given as an explanation, when after the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, Philip and Andrew presented to Jesus the request of some Gentiles to see Him, of why He must suffer and die before His glorification. Saint Ignatius of Antioch applied this Parable to himself, just before being thrown to the lions, in the beautiful words "I am the wheat of Christ, I shall be ground between the teeth of beasts, that I may become clean bread
Intermediate State - Blunt, "has answered this questionto a certain extent by the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man (St. By that Parable He has taught us that the livingsouls of the departed live in a condition of happiness or miserysuitable to the judgment which the all-seeing eye of God has passedupon their lives; the good Lazarus at rest in 'Abraham's Bosom,' thewicked Dives 'in torments
Sower, Parable of the - Title applied to one of the few Parables recorded concurrently by all three Synoptists (Matthew 13; Mark 4; Luke 8). It belongs to that group of Parables dealing with the Kingdom of Heaven. Christ Himself fully and minutely afterwards explained to His disciples the truths He would impart by this Parable. The precise date when this Parable was uttered is uncertain; probably during the second year of His ministry. This Parable is read, according to Saint Luke's account, on Sexagesima Sunday
Fable - But the word is used as almost equivalent to Parable
Ring (2) - —When the Prodigal Son in the Parable returned to his father (Luke 15:22), the latter ordered a ring (δακτύλιος) to be placed on his son’s finger. For the allegorical fancies that have clustered round this ring, see the works on the Parables; cf
Parable - In the New Testament, (1) a proverb (Mark 7:17 ; Luke 4:23 ), (2) a typical emblem (Hebrews 9:9 ; 11:19 ), (3) a similitude or allegory (Matthew 15:15 ; 24:32 ; Mark 3:23 ; Luke 5:36 ; 14:7 ); (4) ordinarily, in a more restricted sense, a comparison of earthly with heavenly things, "an earthly story with a heavenly meaning," as in the Parables of our Lord. Instruction by Parables has been in use from the earliest times. A large portion of our Lord's public teaching consisted of Parables. He himself explains his reasons for this in his answer to the inquiry of the disciples, "Why speakest thou to them in Parables?" (Matthew 13:13-15 ; Mark 4:11,12 ; Luke 8:9,10 ). ...
The Parables uttered by our Lord are all recorded in the synoptical (i. The fourth Gospel contains no Parable properly so called, although the illustration of the good shepherd (John 10:1-16 ) has all the essential features of a Parable. (See List of Parables in Appendix
Hire - In the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:8) it is spoken of the day’s wage, the denarius, owing by agreement to the workers. A similar derivative (μίσθιος) describes the father’s servants in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:19)
Jotham - His Parable of the reign of the bramble is the earliest example of the kind, Judges 9:7 to Judges 21:2
Lazarus - In the Parable by which our Saviour illustrates the retributions of the future world one of the parties is named Lazarus
jo'Tham - ) His Parable of the reign of the bramble is the earliest example of the kind
Torment (2) - The one example of the figurative use of the word in the Gospels is in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:23-28 βάσανος, ‘torment’; ὀδυνᾶσθαι, ‘to be tormented’). Christ addressed the startling language of this Parable to men who were hurting their souls by covetousness
Seed (2) - Mark 12:19-24, Luke 1:55, John 7:42), we find it exclusively employed in the Parables of Jesus as an apt symbol for Divine influence, or for the expansion of the moral and religious life in communities or individuals. In Mark 4:26-29, a Parable peculiar to Mark, Jesus uses the process of sowing and the subsequent conduct of the farmer to illustrate the certain success of His Kingdom upon earth. Such is the general point of the Parable. ...
The Kingdom is also compared to seed in the Parable of the Mustard Seed (Mark 4:30-32 = Matthew 13:31-32 = Luke 13:18-19). Consequently we find that in two other Parables the seed represents not the Kingdom, but the word (cf. ...
The first of these, the Parable of the Sower and the Soils (Mark 4:2 f. In the Parable itself, which is undoubtedly genuine, the original reference is to the experiences of Jesus Himself as a preacher. But in the subsequent interpretation of the Parable, which, like other interpretations, must be held to contain in whole or part reflexions of the Apostolic age and traces of the editor’s hand, the scope widens to include the general preaching of Christian evangelists, who are counselled not to let themselves be daunted by finding the unsympathetic and the preoccupied among their hearers. ...
The other Parable is that of the Tares, or darnel (Matthew 13:24 f. ...
Both of the latter Parables, in so far as they emphasize the nature of God’s word or message as seed, thus touch wisely and earnestly on its mysterious power of growth. —In addition to the critical editors on the passages above cited, and writers on the Parables (especially Trench, Bruce, Jülicher, and Godet), cf
Doors, Closed - " In the Parable of "The Ten Virgins" (Matthew 25) occurs the expression "the door was shut," indicating the security of those within and the exclusion of those without, or as Saint Augustine says "where enemies do not enter nor friends go forth
Sin: Its Wide Consequences - ' ...
This ancient Parable is worthy of the utmost consideration
Sower - Jesus used the sower for a Parable about life and illustrated the everyday hardships farmers faced (Matthew 13:3-9 ; Mark 4:3-9 ; Luke 8:4-8 )
Calf - ...
A calf was kept by the affluent, ready for any special meal, such as was presented tender and good to the angels by Abraham, Genesis 18:7 ; which is also described as 'the fatted calf' in the Parable of the Prodigal Son
Gennesaret - The plain was formerly very rich and fruitful, according to Josephus, and is supposed to be the scene of the Parable of the sower, Matthew 13:1-8, but it is now fruitful in thorns
Eagle, the Body And the - (Matthew 24; Luke 17) Parable following a description given by Jesus of His second coming
Bath-Sheba - These sins displeased Jehovah, who sent the prophet Nathan to David, with the Parable of the ewe lamb, 2 Samuel 12:1
Bank - In the Parable of the Pounds, Christ upbraids the slothful servant because he had not I given his pound to the bank (ἐπὶ τράπεζαν), i. ...
In this Parable some suppose that Christ meant by ‘the bank’ to indicate the Synagogue, or the Christian Church as an organized body, which might use the gifts or powers of a disciple, when he could not, through timidity or lack of energy, exercise them himself. ...
There is an apocryphal saying of Christ which may be connected with this Parable
Mote And the Beam, the - A Parable forming part of the Sermon on the Mount, and read in the Gospel the first Sunday after Pentecost (Matthew 7; Luke 6)
Adummim - It was believed to be the place where the traveler fell among robbers in the Parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10)
Professor - 9; Mead's Almost Christian; Bellamy's True Religion delineated; Shepherd's Sincere Convert, and on the Parable of the Ten Virgins; Secker's Nonsuch Professor
Seed - ...
Matthew 13:38 (a) The people of GOD are the seed in this Parable
Sowing - Our Lord, in his Parable of the sower, says, "Some seeds fell by the wayside, and the fowls came and devoured them
Gennes'Aret - Additional interest is given to the land of Gennesaret, or el-Ghuweir, by the probability that its scenery suggested the Parable of the sower
Parable - Parable (from a Greek word signifying comparison) is used in the Bible in both the wide and a narrow sense. For list of Parables of Christ see Appendix
Judgment, Particular - The existence of the Particular Judgment may be inferred from the Parable of Lazarus and Dives (Luke 16), from the promise of Christ to the penitent thief (Luke 23), and from other passages in Holy Scripture where it is clearly indicated that the soul's eternal lot will be determined immediately after death
Beer - The place to which Jotham ran away after uttering his Parable ( Judges 9:21 )
Tares - The plants can be separated out, but the custom, as in the Parable, is to leave the cleaning out till near the time of harvest, Matthew 13:25-27,29,30,36,38,40
Jotham - The youngest son of Gideon, who escaped the massacre of his brethren by Abimelech, and afterwards boldly and prophetically denounced the Shechemites in the beautiful Parable of the bramble and the other trees
Elihu - In several sentences he beautifully expresses his faith in the pardoning and restoring grace of God towards sinners, Job 33:23,24,27-30 , passages in probably the oldest book of the Bible in the very spirit of the Parable of the prodigal son
Allege - 1: παρατίθημι (Strong's #3908 — Verb — paratithemi — par-at-ith'-ay-mee ) "to place beside or to set before" (para, "beside," tithemi, "to put"), while often used in its literal sense of material things, as well as in its more common significance, "to commit, entrust," twice means "to set before one in teaching," as in putting forth a Parable, Matthew 13:24,31 , RV
Fig Tree - ...
The Parable of the Barren Fig-tree is given in Luke 13, in connection with the call to repentance, inspired by recent misfortunes which should cause the nation of Israel to think, else destruction awaits them. The Parable speaks of a fig-tree, planted in a vineyard. The application of the Parable to the case of Israel is sufficiently clear to need no further explanation
Fable - It represents man's relations to his fellow man; but the Parable rises higher, it represents the relations between man and God. The Parable's framework is drawn from the dealings of men with one another; or if from the natural world, not a grotesque parody of it, but real analogies. The fable rests on what man has in common with the lower creatures; the Parable on the fact that man is made in the image of God, and that the natural world reflects outwardly the unseen realities of the spiritual world. In the Parable the lower sphere is kept distinct from the higher which it illustrates; the lower beings follow the law of their nature, but herein represent the acts of the higher beings; the relations of brutes to each other are not used, as these would be inappropriate to represent man's relation to God
Pound - In the Parable of the talents one may have two gifts for ministry and another may have eight or ten gifts in ministry
Beggars - we read of several beggars who were also blind, who received blessing, Mark 10:46 ; Luke 18:35 ; John 9:8 ; and in the Parable the Lord spoke of the beggar named Lazarus who was carried into Abraham's bosom
Pearl - In the Parable of the one Pearl of Great Price the Lord is represented as selling all that He had (as man and Messiah) in order to become its possessor
Symbols - This principle is altogether violated by taking leaven to signify 'evil' in the offerings in Leviticus, and what is 'good' in the Parable of 'the leaven hid in the meal' in Matthew and Luke, as is often done
Gerizim - Gerizim was the scene of the first recorded Parable—that of the trees and brambles
Wedding Garment - —The Parable in which the incident of the wedding garment occurs is recorded in Matthew 22:1 ff. is not a different version of the same Parable, but another teaching given on a different occasion, there will be no attempt made to find what light Lk. ’s Parable of the Great Supper throws on it. ’ The wedding of the Parable stands for the union of God with humanity—the Incarnation, as we call it
Foolishness - The Parable (Luke 12:16-21) was inspired by a request which showed to Christ a heart so absorbed in thought of material good that it could not listen to His message. That fact gives us the point of view from which to consider the Parable. This foolishness of believers is the formative thought of the Parables of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:3-9) and of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13). The meaning of the former Parable is said by Jesus to be, that the children of this world are wiser in their generation than the children of light. The Parable of the Ten Virgins completes this teaching of the foolishness of a half-hearted faith
Lost Coin, Parable of the - A Parable told to the Pharisees and Scribes who were murmuring against Our Lord for stooping to receive and enlighten publicans and sinners (Luke 15); also read for the Gospel, the third Sunday after Pentecost
Allegory - Semitic Parables, including the Gospel Parables, have varying amounts of allegorical elements. ...
Nathan's Parable of the rich man who slew a poor man's beloved pet lamb in 2 Samuel 12:1-4 has allegorical reference to David's actions in causing Uriah's death in order to take his wife. )...
The Parables of Jesus have a wide range of degrees of allegorical reference. The Parable of the sower is followed by an allegorical interpretation (Mark 4:14-20 ) that has been widely criticized, but on examination, the common objections turn out to support authenticity. If the Gospel tradition progressively allegorized the Parables, as many allege, it is surely odd that the earliest Gospels (Mark, Matthew) contain the most allegorical elements, whereas the later Gospels contain progressively less (Luke, John). ...
Philip Barton Payne...
See also Parable ...
Bibliography
Discourse - His Teaching, Parables, Sermon on the Mount, etc. To this class belong: the discourse on Forgiveness, with the Parable of the Two Debtors, given at the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50); the beginning of the discourse on Tradition (eating with unwashen hands), though later ‘he called the multitudes,’ ‘and the disciples came unto him’ (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-20); the Denunciation of the Pharisees and Lawyers at the house of a chief Pharisee (Luke 11:37-54); the discourse at another Pharisee’s house, where He discussed Modesty, Giving Feasts, and spoke the Parable of the Great Feast and Excuses (Luke 14:1-24); finally, the discourse at the house of Zaccbaeus, with the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:1-27). To this class belong: the discourse on Fasting (Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:18-22, Luke 5:33-39); the response to objectors on Sabbath Observance (Matthew 12:1-8, Mark 2:23-28, Luke 6:1-5); responses about Following Him (Matthew 8:19-22, Luke 9:57-62); response to the lawyer about Eternal Life, and Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37, cf. Luke 10:23); on Divorce (Matthew 19:3-12, Mark 10:2-12); response to the Rich Young Ruler, with discourse on the Perils of Wealth and on Forsaking All and Following Him (Matthew 19:6-30, Mark 10:17-31, Luke 18:18-30); the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-18); response to the request of certain Greeks, with remarks on His Death and Glory (John 12:30-36). (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short Parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Luke 11:14-362 to Luke 19:47-488 Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (Luke 10:1-24); teaching as to Prayer, with Parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (Luke 17:1-10); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19). Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, 1618420467_16); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (1618420467_49); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with Parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (John 10:1-18); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, Parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:14-31); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with Parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Mark 8:31 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50). Only a few of the great discourses of our Lord are reported in extenso: the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7, Luke 6:17-49)—in a sense public, though addressed primarily to the disciples; discourse at the feast in Jerusalem on His Relations with the Father (John 5:19-47); on John the Baptist and suggested topics (Matthew 11:7-30, Luke 7:24-35); the first great group of Parables, the Sower, etc. (Matthew 13:1-53, Mark 4:1-34, Luke 8:4-16); discourse in the synagogue at Capernaum on the Bread of Life (John 6:22-65); colloquy in the Temple on His Mission (John 7, 8); second great group of Parables, the Lost Sheep, etc
Door - In John 10, Our Lord, explaining the Parable of the sheepfold, calls Himself "the door" through which the true shepherds must pass
Laborers in the Vineyard, Parable of the - One of the Parables of Christ (Matthew 20), in which the householder hiring men at different hours of the day even up to the eleventh, or last, gives each of them the same wage, "a penny" meaning a piece of money, as if the one hour laborer was entitled to as much as the full day laborer. Many would see in the Parable an economic meaning, and it seems to justify the principle of a living wage the right of all men to have enough to live on, provided they seek and perform their share of labor honestly
Bramble - Not our English trailing blackberries; but the Ρaliurus rhamnus aculeatus , a lowly stunted tree with drooping jagged branches, from which project sharp stiff thorns, affording no shade, but only scratching those who touched it; fit emblem of the self important, petty, but mischievous speaker (answering to Abimelech) in Jotham's Parable (Judges 9:8-20), the oldest fable extant
Candle - In beautiful contrast, as the woman in the Parable "lit the candle, swept the house, and sought diligently until she found" the lost piece of silver, so God (Luke 15:8) searches out His elect so that not one is lost, and takes each out of the darkness of this world, and restores the divine image, with a view to their salvation
Dung - In this Parable, dung probably represents things in this life which are used to promote and help the growth of the things of GOD
Thorns, Thistles - The thistle is used to signify a worthless person in the Parable of Jehoash, king of Israel
Wheat - In the Parable it is used by the Lord as representing the children of the kingdom, the fruit of the good seed that He was sowing on the earth, in contrast to the tares, or darnel, which Satan secretly sowed among the good seed
Abraham's Bosom - In the Parable of Luke 16:19 ff
Talent - ) Intellectual ability, natural or acquired; mental endowment or capacity; skill in accomplishing; a special gift, particularly in business, art, or the like; faculty; a use of the word probably originating in the Scripture Parable of the talents (Matt
Nathan - By a fine Parable, pointedly applied, he convicted David of his guilt in respect to Uriah and Bathsheba, 2 Samuel 12:1-31 Psalm 51:1-19 ; and his bold fidelity here seems to have been appreciated by David, see 2 Samuel 12:25 ; and was effectually aided by him in his peaceful succession to the throne, 1 Kings 1
Jotham - He boldly declared the Parable 'The Reign of the Bramble' in the hearing of the men of Shechem
Ear (2) - The definitive passages for this use are Matthew 13:3-23, Mark 4:2-20, Luke 9:44 where it forms the underlying subject of Christ’s first Parable, ‘the Sower,’ a Parable concluded in each account by the phrase, ‘He that hath ears (to hear) let him hear. ’ Indeed, the general principle of speaking in Parables is in these passages connected with ‘ears dull of hearing’ (Matthew 13:13-15)
Importunity - ’ In the companion Parable, Coverdale (1535) uses the cognate adjective, Luke 18:5 ‘yet seynge this weddowe is so importune vpon me, I will delyner her. ’...
To bring out the striking contrast which our Lord’s Parable suggests, it is necessary to show that persistence in asking becomes those who know that prayer is never troublesome to God, and never out of season
Good Samaritan, Parable of the - The occasion of the Parable (Luke 10) was a question of a doctor of the law concerning eternal life, asked with the intention of embarrassing Our Lord. When Our Lord approves his answer, the doctor wishes to justify himself for putting a question which he was so well able to answer, by asking: And who is my neighbor? Since a more or less abstract definition could give occasion to distinctions and discussions, Jesus answered by giving a concrete illustration in the Parable of the Good Samaritan
Gulf - The only instance of the use of this word in the Bible occurs in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus ( Luke 16:26 ; cf. The expressions ‘from afar’ ( Luke 16:23 ) and ‘a great gulf’ ( Luke 16:26 ) do not harmonize with the idea of holding a conversation; and it seems plain that they form but subsidiary portions of a Parable by which He means to teach a lesson of purely ethical import
Allegory - We meet with this word but once in the Bible, namely, (Galatians 4:24) where the apostle, speaking of the history of Sarah and Hagar, calls it an allegory; that is, a figure, or Parable. Our almighty Saviour was pleased to adopt a similar manner; and so much so at one time, that we are told, "without a Parable spake he not unto the people
Parable - ...
What we call the Proverbs of Solomon, which are moral maxims and sentences, the Greeks call the Parables of Solomon. In like manner, when Job answers his friends, it is said he took up his "parable," Job 27:1 29:1 . In the New Testament the word Parable denotes sometimes a true history, or an illustrative sketch from nature; sometimes a proverb or adage, Luke 4:23 ; a truth darkly or figuratively expressed, Matthew 15:15 ; a type, Hebrews 9:9 ; or a similitude, Matthew 24:32 . The parabolical, enigmatical, figurative, and sententious way of speaking, was the language of the Eastern sages and learned men, 2 Kings 14:9-102 78:2 ; and nothing was more insupportable than to hear a fool utter Parables, Proverbs 26:7 . ...
The prophets employed Parables the more strongly to impress prince and people with their threatening or their promises. Nathan reproved David under the Parable of a rich man who had taken away and killed the lamb of a poor man, 2 Samuel 12:1-31 . Our Savior frequently addressed the people in Parables, thereby verifying the prophecy of Isaiah 6:9 , that the people should see without knowing, and hear without understanding, in the midst of instructions. ...
In the interpretation of a Parable, its primary truth and main scope are chiefly to be considered. ...
The following Parables of our Lord are recorded by the evangelists
Illustrations - He spoke in similes and metaphors and Parables; general rules He illustrated by examples or stated in concrete instances. ‘In theology,’ it is said to be an axiom that ‘parables do not act as arguments’ (Trench15 [1] , p. The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:21 ff. That Parable also does not answer the question directly. And the form of His teaching—His Parables, similes, metaphors, concrete instances—was a means to serve that end. ...
Many of Jesus’ Parables and pictures are more than mere illustrations; they have in them the imagination’s power of interpretation, the revealing vision of the poet. The Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:9 ff. The Parable has the force of a revelation, suddenly illumining a whole spiritual world. Many of the Parables have this quality, such as the Seed Growing in Secret, the Good Samaritan, the Unmerciful Servant, the Prodigal Son, the Two Debtors. ...
In the Synoptic Gospels there is an explanation of Jesus’ use of Parables which is a startling paradox. It is that He spake to those without in Parables, and that He did so to hide His meaning (Matthew 13:10-15, Mark 4:11-12, Luke 8:10). ‘Parables’) rejects this conception, placed on the lips of Jesus, as quite unhistorical. But we find that in all these Gospels this explanation occurs at one place, namely, between the Parable of the Sower as spoken to those without and its interpretation to the disciples. The Parable did not convey its meaning on the face of it. He spoke this Parable which tells the disappointments of a prophet and the hope that sustains him, the faith that some, his sheep, will know his voice. It is a simple enough Parable; and yet a veil does rest upon it for the careless unspiritual many who are listening, though not any veil of subtle allegory. That is exemplified in Jesus’ latest Parables. These are Parables of judgment; the shadow of the Cross rests on them. Jesus says to His enemies, ‘Hear another Parable’; and after the Parable of the Two Sons, He tells the Parable of the Householder and his Vineyard. Parables. —Books on the Parables, by Trench, Arnot, Dods, Bruce; Steinmeyer, Die Parabeln des Herrn; Julicher, Die Gleichnisreden Jesu; Fiebig, Altjüdische Gleichnisse und die Gleichnisse Jesu; Wendt, The Teaching of Jesus, English translation vol. ‘Parables’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Sanday, Outlines of the Life of Christ, or art ‘Jesus Christ’ in DB Lazarus - The beggar in our Lord’s Parable ( Luke 16:19-31 ). This is the only instance where Jesus gives a name to a parabolic character, and there was an idea in early times that it was not a Parable but a story from real life. ...
The Parable is a drama with two scenes: (1) The conditions of the Rich Man and the Beggar here the former with his mansion, his fine clothing, his sumptuous table; and the latter lying at his gateway, full of sores, with none to tend him, hungrily eyeing the feast, and glad of any scraps that were flung to him. ...
The Parable is clothed with Jewish imagery. Jesus, ever anxious to appeal to His hearers, has clothed His Parable with this familiar imagery. ...
The purpose of the Parable is not to condemn riches and exalt poverty in the spirit of Ebionitic asceticism
Prodigal Son - —The details of this Parable (Luke 15) seem to have been carefully thought out, as the structure of the story is fairly complete and its movement quite natural. ’...
The prodigal is a minor character in the Parable. The substance of the Parable is this: a father who welcomes back an erring and repentant son has his action emphatically approved, and an elder brother who maintains an attitude of surly aloofness is shown to merit severe disapprobation. ...
The Parable is thus practical in its aim—teaching men not only how they ought to treat their repentant brethren, but chiefly what is necessary to enable them to do so. ...
In the first instance, no doubt, the Parable was meant to point out the defect in the Jewish way of dealing with those who had sinned. ...
The Parable thus emphasizes one aspect of the great commandment of our Lord, that men should love one another; and in this respect shows a close resemblance to several of His other Parables. —Goebel, Parables of Jesus; A. Dods, Parables of Our Lord; Trench, Notes on the Parables; Arnot, Parables of Our Lord; W. Taylor, Parables of Our Saviour; also F
Zacchaeus - This led to the remarkable interview recorded by the evangelist, and to the striking Parable of the ten pounds (Luke 19:12-27 )
Mammon - In the Parable of the unjust steward (Luke 15:1-13 ), Jesus commended the steward's foresight, not his method
Gennesaret, Sea of - )...
In the land of Gennesaret was spoken the Parable of the sower
Proverbs - The Eastern method of teaching by similitudes, and figures, and Parables, was the most general: hence Solomon's whole book is to this amount. So much so was this plan adopted by Christ, that we are told that at one time without a Parable spake he not unto them. When we read, therefore, the Parables, or indeed any other of the blessed sayings which dropped from Christ's mouth, when we are alone with Jesus we should ask the indulgent Lord to do the same by us, and make the word doubly sweet and blessed by unfolding and explaining all things to us himself
Harvest And Few Laborers, Parable of the - Parable of Our Lord occurring in the Gospels of Saint Matthew 9, and Saint Luke 10, in slightly different settings
Salt of the Earth - In Saint Mark this Parable is a rebuke for their quarrels over precedence; in Saint Matthew and Saint Luke it is a warning to remain true to their vocation by correspondence to Christ's teaching and grace, which alone will give them the authority and spiritual force necessary to imbue others with the true spirit of Jesus
Talent - word as "a gift or ability," especially under the influence of the Parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30 )
Burden - ]'>[1] of the day and the heat,’ in the Parable of the Labourers (Matthew 20:12) is a description of toil which strains and wearies. In the interpretation of the Parable, if any stress were laid on this detail, it might be the long and conscientious fulfilment of duty in the Christian life, which, though it must receive recognition in the end, gives no claim on God as one who rewards of debt, nor allows the worker to glory over another who has been less richly furnished with opportunity
Marriage - This explains the sense of the Parable. But the spiritual meaning of the Parable is still infinitely more important. " So that wheresoever the sound of the gospel comes, it may be truly said, in the language of the Parable, the invitation goeth forth, and there will be gathered together, all, as many as the servants find, both bad and good; and the wedding will be furnished with guests. Such seems to be the evident scope and tendency of this beautiful Parable of our Lord
Allegory - ...
While Jesus never made allegorical interpretations of the Old Testament, some of His Parables were interpreted as allegories. The Parable of the soils (Mark 4:1-20 ) and the Parable of the tares (Matthew 13:24-30 ,Matthew 13:24-30,13:36-43 ) are prime examples. Other Parables draw on obvious Old Testament images (such as the vineyard representing Israel). In general, however, Parables are to be distinguished from allegories because of their simplicity, sharp focus, and direct imagery. Contemporary scholarship generally prefers the plain and obvious point of the Parable over the veiled and obscure meanings that often characterize allegories
Ambassage - And He gives in illustration the Parable which teaches the folly of entering on an enterprise without counting the cost. ...
The second occurrence (Luke 19:14) is in the Parable of the Pounds; not in the main part, which bears resemblance to the Parable of the Talents, but in one of two verses (Luke 19:14; Luke 19:27) directed to a subsidiary aspect of the situation. ...
It is further notable that commentators are able to refer the suggestion of both these Parables to contemporary history
Parable - PARABLE...
1. —The word ‘parable’ is an oft-recurring one in the Synoptic Gospels, appearing altogether 48 times. Matthew (Matthew 13:35), who sees in Jesus’ use of Parables the fulfilment of Psalms 78:2. Allegory, similitude, Parable, proverb, paradox, type, and even riddle could be so designated. ...
The modern understanding of the word ‘parable’ has not as yet become well defined. Aristotle classes Parable and fable together as means of indirect proof, more convenient and easier to use than historical example for one who is able to detect resemblances, but less effective. Besides being a complete thought and expressing or implying comparison, the Parable is now understood to veil a hidden meaning. Deducting parallels, there are 20 passages in the Synoptic Gospels that are spoken of as Parables. How far short this comes of full enumeration is made evident by noting the number of Parables recognized by modern expositors: e. ); Bugge, 71; Weinel, 59; Jülicher, 53; Heinrici, 39; Lisco, 37; Bruce, 33, and 8 Parable germs. So Bruce distinguishes (1) Theoretic Parables, or those embodying a general teaching regarding the Kingdom of God; (2) the Parables of Grace; (3) the Parables of Judgment. More satisfactory results are obtained by paying heed to the form of the Parable, that is, to the character of the illustration and the manner of its introduction. Parables of this kind have been happily called Similitudes. ), and designated in them all as a Parable, is a good example. ‘Now from the fig-tree learn her Parable: when her branch is now become tender and putteth forth its leaves, ye know that the summer is nigh; even so ye also, when ye see these things coming to pass, know that it is nigh, even at the doors. In the pair of Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price we have two illustrations of like character to enforce the one truth, that to gain a possession of greatest value no sacrifice is too great. Luke 4:23 is an instance of this: ‘And he said unto them, Doubtless ye will say unto me this Parable, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done at Capernaum, do also here in thine own country. The proverb by itself does not constitute the Parable, but the proverb used as an illustration. Since such proverbs are the concise and pointed formulations of the truths of common experience, we need not differentiate these Parables from those last discussed—no further, at least, than to make them a subdivision of the Similitudes. Since such stories often serve merely to entertain or to teach worldly prudence and discretion, the difference between Parable and fable is made by some to consist in the kind of truth enforced. Jülicher’s proposal is to retain for this group the name Parable in its narrower meaning. 59, 15, and 16) to regard the Paradox as a class of Parable. Expositors have not, however, generally made paradoxes a distinct group in their treatment of the Parables. In the similitude and Parable we do not feel the need of seeking for any meaning beyond that which the words usually bear, whereas in the allegory the deeper, hidden significance is of first importance. It seems, nevertheless, more correct to class them as allegories than to call them Parables with an allegorical interpretation, or collections of related metaphors. Jülicher maintains that they looked on all Parables as allegories. , Luke 8:9-10), they think of Parables as always veiling a hidden meaning, one hard to be understood and intelligible to the disciples themselves only after interpretation
Lazarus - Lazarus the beggar, who, in our Lord’s Parable (Luke 16:19-31), lay, a mass of loathsome sores, at the gateway of the rich man, named traditionally Nineuis (Euth. ...
This has been pronounced no authentic Parable of Jesus, but an ‘evangelic discourse upon His words—“that which is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God” ’ (Luke 16:15),†
As for the Jewish imagery, it constitutes no argument against the authenticity of the Parable. ]'>[9] Keim finds the germ of the story in the Ebionite Parable of the Rich Man and the Beggar (Luke 16:19-31). ‘If,’ says Abraham in the Parable, ‘to Moses and the prophets they do not hearken, not even if one rise from the dead will they be persuaded’; and the Johannine narrative is this saying converted into a history: a man rose from the dead, and the Jews did not believe. The story is thus doubly divorced from reality, being an unhistorical development of an unauthentic Parable. ‘Lazarus and Dives’; Trench, Bruce, Orelli, and Dods on the Parables; Plummer, ‘St
King's Sons Free From Tribute, Parable of the - " By theological reasoning the Parable may be proved to teach, moreover, that the apostles, too, as Christ's family, are free
Bottle - ]'>[2] the NT revisers have wisely introduced skins and wine-skins in the familiar Parable ( Matthew 9:17 ||), but their OT collaborators have done so only where, as in Joshua 9:4 ; Joshua 9:13 , the context absolutely required it
Fishing Net, Parable of the - This is one of the Parables concerning the Kingdom of Heaven which Saint Matthew has grouped together among the Parables spoken by Our Lord by the sea, ride (Matthew 13). The point which the Parable teaches is that in the Kingdom n God, as realized on earth, there shall be good and bad members, and that the separation is reserved for the end, the final judgment
Husk - In Luke 15:16 , in the Parable of the Prodigal Son, it designates the beans of the carob tree, or Ceratonia siliqua
Husbandman, Husbandry - So, too, in the Parable of the Vineyard ( Matthew 21:33 ff
Wages - (Exodus 2:9 ) The only mention of the rate of wages in Scripture is found in the Parable of the householder and the vineyard, (Matthew 20:2 ) where the laborer's wages was set at one denarius per day, probably 15 to 17 cents, a sum which may be fairly taken as equivalent to the denarius, and to the usual pay of a soldier (ten asses per diem) in the later days of the Roman republic
Enemies - Of the devil and the powers of evil, in the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares, Matthew 13:25; Matthew 13:39
Jehoahaz - In the Parable of the Lion's whelps in Ezekiel 19:1-9 this king is referred to as being carried in chains to Egypt
Thief - In the Parable of the Good Samaritan the traveller fell among robbers
Virgin - 1: παρθένος (Strong's #3933 — Noun Feminine — parthenos — par-then'-os ) is used (a) of "the Virgin Mary," Matthew 1:23 ; Luke 1:27 ; (b) of the ten "virgins" in the Parable, Matthew 25:1,7,11 ; (c) of the "daughters" of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9 ; (d) those concerning whom the Apostle Paul gives instructions regarding marriage, 1 Corinthians 7:25,28,34 ; in 1 Corinthians 7:36-38 , the subject passes to that of "virgin daughters" (RV), which almost certainly formed one of the subjects upon which the church at Corinth sent for instructions from the Apostle; one difficulty was relative to the discredit which might be brought upon a father (or guardian), if he allowed his daughter or ward to grow old unmarried
Learn - Now learn a Parable of the fig tree
Swine - The beautiful and affecting Parable of the prodigal son shows that the tending of swine was considered to be an employment of the most despicable character; it was the last resource of that depraved and unhappy being who had squandered his patrimony in riotous living, Luke 15:14-16
Tare - Declare to us the Parable of the tares of the field
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - ...
Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and went into the house; and His disciples came unto Him, saying, Declare unto us the Parable of the tares of the field. And He gave them an interpretation of His Parable, which was to be the authoritative and the all-comprehending interpretation from that time to the end of the world. At the same time, and in and under that interpretation of His, there are occasional, and provisional, and contemporaneous, interpretations and applications of this Parable, that are to be made by each reader of this Parable, according to his own circumstances and experiences. ...
Occasions have often arisen in the past, and they will often arise in the future, when a great alarm will be taken at the new discoveries, the new opinions, and the new utterances, of men who are under our jurisdiction, as the tares were under the jurisdiction of the servants in the Parable. Now, for what other purpose, do you think, was this Parable spoken to us by our Master, but to impose upon us patience, and caution, and confidence in the truth, and to deliver us from all panic, and all precipitancy, and all sudden execution of our fears? This is a very wonderful Parable. No Parable of them all is more so. But if our Divine Lord actually uttered these great and wonderful words, full of such calmness, and such patience, and such toleration, and such endurance; such endurance even of evil,-shall we not take His wonderful words to heart, and humbly and believingly apply them, where it is at all possible; even erring, if err we must, on the safe side; and leave it to Him, when we at all can, to give His own orders about His own field at the end of the world? And, if we leave it to Him, it will be a sight on that day to see how He will vindicate our patience and His own Parable. Now, with all this, I have not gone out of my way one inch tonight to seek out this wonderful Parable, and its so timeous interpretation. But the day will declare both the eternal truth, and the present truth, about this Parable of the wheat and the tares. On that day, He who preached this Parable will winnow out, and will burn up all false interpretations of it, and mine among the rest. Such is the versatility, and the spirituality, and the inwardness, of our Lord's words in this wonderful Parable, that they apply with the very greatest support and comfort to the heart of every sinful man also under his own all-searching sanctification. All other fields are but Parables to him of his own field
Brothers - Other examples of physical brothers are found in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:28 ), the story of the disputed inheritance (Luke 12:13 ), and the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:1 )
Olive (Tree) - Judges 9:8 (b) In this Parable probably this tree represents some delightful, refreshing person who might be called to be the leader of the people. You will note that other trees represent other kinds of people in this same Parable
Pound - The only Gospel reference in this sense is in the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27). (including Calvin) treat the story of the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27) as a variant of the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30). the Parable appears as part of the prophetic discourse delivered at Jerusalem, when days of disaster were impending, and our Lord’s absence from this mortal scene became naturally an impressive theme (see art. That Jesus uttered the Parable is not to be doubted, but there seems some uncertainty in the details. —Trench and Bruce in their works on the Parables, in loc
Mammon - ’...
The Lukan setting is as apt in its own way, placing the same logion amid a cluster of characteristic (see Theophilus) sayings and Parables on the dangers and abuse of money (cf. Luke 16:13 forms one of several rather heterogeneous fringes to the Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-8 or Luke 16:1-7), arranged with almost as little connexion as the logia in Luke 16:16 f. The point of Luke 16:1-8, which is certainly a genuine Parable of Jesus, is to inculcate the wisdom of making provision in the present life for the life which is to come. Weiss, Wernle, and Jülicher, all five verses are regarded as editorial glosses, the solution becomes fairly simple, the original Parable having nothing to do with the use of money at all, as Christ meant it. Luke 16:11, especially, indicates the right use of money (as in the Parable of the Talents): Use it faithfully, i. ...
On this interpretation ‘the mammon of unrighteousness’ does not mean money or worldly advantages wrongfully gained, as though the point of the Parable were that wealth, dishonestly come by, should be disbursed in charity (so Strauss, and O. The object of the Parable is to point out how one may best use this tainted possession in view of the future, and the teaching is on the lines of the later Jewish Rabbis, who attached high religious significance to alms (cf. —See the commentators on Matthew and Luke, the various Lives of Jesus, and the current works upon the Parables, in all of which the mammon passages are handled; also Zahn’s Einleitung, i. On the Parable of the Unjust Steward, cf. Further discussions on the significance of the Parable may be found in Expos
Adversary (2) - ...
In Matthew 5:25 (|| Luke 12:58), and again in the Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:3), the question suggests itself, ‘Who is the adversary referred to?’ The passage from the Sermon on the Mount occurs as one of a series of maxims of Christian prudence, and the key to its interpretation is suggested by that which immediately precedes it (Matthew 5:23 f. ...
In the Parable of the Unjust Judge the widow’s petition against her opponent at law, and her importunity in pressing it upon the attention of the judge, are used to illustrate the prayers of God’s elect. ; Trench, Parables, 488, etc. We must not forget that the word occurs in a Parable which was spoken with a special didactic purpose, that being, as St. ἀντίδικος, ἀντικείμενος; Trench, Notes on the Parables; Bruce, The Parabolic Teaching of Christ: comm
Unity: Among Christians to be Desired - Melancthon mourned in his day the divisions among Protestants, and sought to bring the Protestants together by the Parable of the war between the wolves and the dogs
Schools (2) - Here, thought I, is a Parable
Seal - —The only reference in the Gospels to the literal use of a seal is Matthew 27:66,* Mustard Seed - The teaching of the Parable is that the kingdom of God would become elevated in the earth and suitable for emissaries of Satan to find protection under its shadow
Wither - In his Parable of the vine, Ezekiel likens God’s judgment on Judah to the “withering” of a vine that is pulled up ( Allegory, - " "A fable or Parable; is a short allegory with one definite moral
Mustard - ...
As the Parable indicates, Christendom presents a sort of Christianity that has become conformed to the principles and ways of the world, and the world has favored this debased Christianity
Seal - —The only reference in the Gospels to the literal use of a seal is Matthew 27:66,* Jotham - Jotham, who was the only one of Gideon’s sons to escape the massacre, told a Parable to warn the Shechemites of the trouble they had brought upon themselves (Judges 9:1-21)
God: Vague Conceptions of - One day, in conversation with the Jungo-kritu, head pundit of the College of Fort William, on the subject of God this man, who is truly learned in his own shastrus, gave me from one of their books, this Parable;: 'In a certain country there existed a village of blind men. ' ...
The pundit's Parable may be appropriately applied to the essence of theology
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - And as He meditated on the process going on under His eyes, He would again see in the leaven and in the meal another Parable of the kingdom of God. And thus it was that on that great day of teaching and preaching when He sat by the sea-side, He had already given out Parable after Parable, till any other preacher but Himself would have been exhausted; but He still went on as fresh and as interesting and as instructive as when He began in the morning. For though He had already that day illustrated and applied the kingdom of God by a long and splendid series of Parables, His mind was still as full of matter as ever. And the more He tried to put the kingdom of God into this and that Parable, the more He saw other things in that inexhaustible kingdom for which no Parable had as yet been provided. " And here are we tonight, and in this church, suddenly transported back into Mary's little kitchen in Nazareth, in order to learn there yet another of her Son's Parables about the kingdom of God. Till it has to be my prayer, with the candle of the Lord in may hand continually-Search me, O God, and know my heart: try me, and know my thoughts: and see if there be any of this wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!...
The Apostle Paul also has this on this same Parable: "Purge out therefore the old leaven. ...
...
And though Pharisaic self-esteem and diabolical malice are all the instances to which our Lord's Parable is applied first by Himself and then by His best Apostle, yet the Parable is equally true of all the other leavenings of the devil that are insinuated into our souls. They would seem in this to leave it to ourselves to apply and to verify the Parable in its application to the things of the kingdom of God. And His example, and Paul's example, would seem to say to all preachers-give your people one or two illustrations taken from things they are only too well acquainted with already, and then leave them to prosecute the Parable further for themselves. Would, said Moses, that all the Lord's people were prophets! And I will leave this Parable where our Lord and His Apostle left it, only saying over it and over you, Would that all the Lord's people wore expositors and preachers, and that out of their own observation and experience!...
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - BRUCE is by far the best expositor of this exquisite little Parable. And therefore the Parable to be studied has been to him for many years a favourite subject of thought, and a fruitful source of comfort. Bruce's book on the Parables is, to my taste, his best book. And then the exquisite little Parable now open before us, shows Dr. Bruce's exposition, is all to be traced back to the originality, and the freshness, and the force, of the Parable which he so excellently expounds. Well, learn this little Parable by heart, and say it to yourselves, till you feel the full taste of it in your mouth, and till you instinctively spue out of your mouth everything of a written kind that is not natural, and fresh, and forceful: everything that is not noble, and beautiful, and full of grace and truth, like this Parable. For, as it is in so many of His sermons, and as it is in so many of His Parables that illustrate His sermons, this fine Parable has, as I think, its first fulfilment in our Lord Himself. For did He not grow up before them as a tender plant? And was He not subject to them as a little Child in the Lord? And was it not so that the Spirit of the Lord rested upon Him, they knew not how, till He began to be about thirty years of age? Matthew Henry sees our Lord Himself in this Parable, and I am glad to have that great commentator's countenance in dwelling, as I so much love to dwell, on this delightful side of this delightful scripture. ...
And, then, what a heart-upholding Parable this is for all over-anxious ministers. It should be called the Parable for all impatient parents and pastors; pastors especially. Till, you may depend upon it, our Lord had His eye and His heart on His saints who are undergoing a great spiritual sanctification when He spake this many-sided and most comforting Parable
the Ten Virgins - ' And thus it was that when our Lord and His disciples were called to that marriage where the original of this Parable took place, as soon as He saw the five wise virgins admitted to the marriage, and the five foolish virgins shut out, He turned to the twelve and said,-The kingdom of heaven is just like that. It would have been well, and we would have been deep in their debt, had some of the twelve said to their Master at that moment: Declare to us the Parable of the ten virgins also. It would have been a great assistance to us if, over and above the Parable itself, we had possessed our Lord's own exposition of it. As it is, we are left to our own insight into the things of the kingdom of heaven, and to our own experience of its mysteries, to find out for ourselves and for others the true key to this Parable. ...
The wisdom, whatever it was, of the five wise virgins is, plainly, the main lesson set to be learned out of this whole Parable. Other lessons, more or less essential, more or less interesting, and more or less instructive, may be extracted out of this remarkable Parable, but its supreme and commanding lesson is the richly rewarded wisdom of the five wise virgins. ...
Now if you would fain know what, exactly, this oil is of which so much is made in this Parable, this oil the possession of which made the five virgins so wise, just look into your own heart for the answer to that. Fix this firmly in your mind, that the Holy Ghost is this light-giving and life-giving oil, and you will have in that, not only the true key to this whole Parable, but at the same time the true key to all your own light and darkness also. ...
Our Lord does not explicate, point by point, all this Parable to us, but He is most emphatic, and even alarming, in His application of it. All the time of supper and prayers at home they will be hiding this terrible Parable in their hearts. " The difference will be that the foolish among us will sit tonight and talk and talk till they extinguish this Parable and all its impressions clean off their minds and their hearts, while the wise among us will take their candles
Giving - The second commandment of love to our neighbour (Matthew 19:19; Matthew 22:39) and the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30 ff. The stewardship of all possessions is taught in the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:16 ff. Judgment is pronounced upon the selfish use of wealth in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19 ff. The general lesson on wealth and its uses is in the Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1 f. Confessedly difficult of interpretation as this Parable is in detail, its main lesson can hardly be overlooked—Heaven, which cannot be bought by gold, may yet be prepared for by the best uses of wealth
Children And Dogs - (Matthew 15; Mark 7) Parable addressed to a Canaanite woman who, taking advantage of Jesus' presence near Tyre and Sidon, besought Him to cast a devil out of her daughter
Camel - The Parable reveals the impossibility of a sinner to enter into Heaven by any works or wealth of his own
Hearing the Word of God - Stennet's Parable of the Sower; Massilon's Ser
Lamp - ’ It is also used in the Parable of the Ten Virgins, Matthew 25, where it would be better translated ‘torch
Candlestick - Practical illustrations of this Parable are found in Mark 5:19-20, Matthew 10:27; Matthew 10:32, Luke 10:21; Luke 17:18 (cf
Inn - Another kind of "inn" is that mentioned in the Parable of the Good Samaritan
Austere - " It is used by Matthew to describe the unprofitable servant's remark concerning his master, in the Parable corresponding to that in Luke 19 (see austeros, above)
Pity - ...
In the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant, Jesus inculcates the exercise of pity in men’s dealings with each other, and teaches the sacredness of its character by emphasizing its identity with God’s compassion for sinners (Matthew 18:33 ; cf. the Parable of the Good Samaritan, Luke 10:25-37 )
Riot, Rioting, Riotous, Riotously - 1), is translated "with riotous living" in Luke 15:13 ; though the word does not necessarily signify "dissolutely," the Parable narrative makes clear that this is the meaning here
Interest - Luke's Parable in particular contains reminiscences of the hated Archelaus (Luke 19:12 ,Luke 19:12,19:14 ; compare Matthew 2:22 )
Gomer - fjcr pbHer unfaithfulness to her husband became a sort of living Parable of Israel's unfaithfulness to Yahweh
Household - the dependants on an estate to whom the steward was bound in our Lord’s Parable to serve out rations at intervals of a day, a week, or a month
Spoil - ...
Matthew 12:29 (a) Our Lord gives in this Parable the story of salvation or conversion
Beggar - Mark 10:46-52, Luke 18:35-43, John 9:1-41, and Luke 16:19-31 Parable of Rich Man and Lazarus), they undoubtedly formed a considerable class in the Gospel age. ...
The remark of the unjust steward in the Parable (Luke 16:3)—‘To beg I am ashamed’—favours the conclusion that begging, under any circumstances, was regarded as an unfortunate mode of existence, and, in the case of the indolent, was condemned as strongly by public opinion as it was in the days of Jesus the son of Sirach (Sirach 40:28-30)
Nobleman - In the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:11 ff. ’ The ‘nobleman’ of this Parable is probably Archelaus, who, on the death of his father, Herod the Great, went to Rome in order to urge his claims to the kingdom
Neighbor - This lawyer-scribe unknowingly expresses a fundamental issue in all of ethics: For whom are we responsible in issues of justice and mercy? Jesus' answer was the Parable of the Good Samaritan and the fundamental ideas of the Parable find their roots in both Old Testament and Jewish soil. Thus, we are to understand the Parable of the good Samaritan as addressing the issue of the "limits" of one's responsibility and we are to see Jesus saying that there are no limits; one cannot exclusively exercise compassion or justice for one's own kind. ...
This profound Parable of Jesus, with its teaching on the importance of showing love for anyone within one's reach, along with Jesus' command to love one's enemies (Matthew 5:43-48 ) and his overt friendliness to Gentiles become foundational for the early church's missionary efforts and for interpersonal relationships within the largely Gentile churches of Paul
Fig Tree - It is well known, that in the eastern world almost all instruction was conveyed by Parable and figure. And so much did the Lord Jesus, in his divine teaching, fall in with this popular way of conveying knowledge, that at one time we are told "without a Parable spake he not unto them. " (John 15:5) If this be the right sense of the passage, and the Lord Jesus meant to teach his disciples thereby, that every hedge fig tree hath no part in the church, no owner in Christ by his Father's gift or purchase, no union with him, and, consequently, no communion in his graces, but must in the hour of decision instantly wither away; then will this Parable of the barren fig tree form one testimony more to the numberless other testimonies with which the word of God abounds, that the children of the wicked one, and the children of the kingdom, are totally separate and dissimilar from everlasting, and so must continue to everlasting
Nathan - It was Nathan who had to condemn David's conduct with respect to Bathsheba and her husband; he delicately brought the sin home to his conscience by means of a suited Parable
Highway - —In the Parable (Matthew 22:9) where the invited guests all made excuse, the king sent his servants out ἐπὶ τὰς διεξόδους τῶν ὁδῶν, ‘into the highways’ (Authorized Version), to gather as many as they could find, and bid them to the feast
Lamp - Judges 15:4 The use in marriage processions of lamps fed with oil is alluded to in the Parable of the ten virgins
Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius - The second week, on the life of Christ, is introduced by a Parable of a king, a type of Christ, who invites high-souled knights to assist him in winning the world for God
Napkin (2) - The misuse of the napkin, revealing as it does the lazy habit of the man, is of importance for the right understanding of the Parable. Mackie, Bible Manners and Customs; Trench, Notes on the Parables (Parable of the Pounds)
Messianic Secret - The Parables of Jesus were offered in order to keep “outsiders” from learning the secret (Mark 4:11-12 ). The only Parable of Jesus which Mark recorded exclusively may provide a clue to the purpose of the messianic secret. Jesus introduced the Parable of the secret growing seed (Mark 4:26-29 ) with the proverb: “For nothing is hidden, except to be revealed; nor has anything been secret, but that it should come to light” (Mark 4:22 NAS)
Publican - Matthew leaves the Parable of the publican to Luke (Luke 18:9), because he is the publican from whom it is drawn. Hence we see what a breach of Jewish notions was the Lord's eating with them (Matthew 9:11), and His choice of Matthew as an apostle, and His Parable in which He justified the penitent self condemned publican and condemned the self satisfied Pharisee
Fig-Tree - The Gospel references to the fig-tree include both Parables and incidents, and make allusion to phenomena both of its leafage and its fruitage. As questions arise to how great an extent the incidents may not be symbolic, Parables becoming concrete in process of repetition, or even pure symbols, it is best to consider first the two instances in which the fig-tree is made the subject of undoubted Parable by our Lord. ...
(a) The Parable of the Fig-Tree (Mark 13:28-29 = Matthew 24:32-33, paraphrased and interpreted Luke 21:29-31) is based on the early verdure of the tree. ...
(b) The Parable of the Barren Fig-Tree (Luke 13:6-9) stands in the same eschatological context as the warning to read the signs of the times (Luke 12:35 to Luke 13:9 paralleled by Mark 13:33-36; Mark 13:12-13), and forms its climax. One is tempted to conjecture that the problematic ‘parable’ referred to in Mark 13:28, Matthew 24:32 (ἀπὸ δὲ τῆς συκῆς μάθετε τὴν παραβολήν, cf. Luke 23:31), but the Parable concludes a context wherein the men of Jerusalem, overwhelmed by the fall of the tower in Siloam, and the Galilaeans, cut down by the sword of Pilate, are brought forward as ‘signs of the times. —Parabolic symbolism is so slightly concealed under the narrative features of this story that the majority of critics are disposed to regard it as a mere endowment of the Lukan Parable of the Barren Fig-tree with concrete form, just as the Parable of the Good Samaritan, and others, were long treated as instances of historical fact. Luke regarded the story as a double of his Parable, Luke 13:6-9. Conversely the Parable does not appear in Mt
Proverb - In the Bible there is no essential difference between the proverb and the Parable (wh. The surprise was intensified when the Parable product contradicted ordinary experience, as in the statement, ‘One soweth and another reapeth’ ( John 4:37 ). It is then ‘a Parable of the ancients’ ( 1 Samuel 24:13 )
Lazarus - One of the principal characters in a Parable Jesus told to warn the selfish rich that justice eventually will be done
Lazarus And the Rich Man - One of the most graphic Parables of Christ (Luke 16), describing the beggar at the rich man's table. " The Parable is a lesson on the enormity of injustice, the evils of inequality in the distribution of this world's goods, the heartlessness that too often develops from the acquisition of wealth, and the assumption of the rich man that money can command anything, even a special revelation if necessary
Olive-Tree - It is mentioned in the first Old Testament Parable, that of Jotham (Judges 9:9 ), and is named among the blessings of the "good land," and is at the present day the one characteristic tree of Palestine
Jotham - , the stone set up by Joshua, 24:26; Compare Genesis 35:4 ) "that was in Shechem, to make Abimelech king," from one of the heights of Mount Gerizim he protested against their doing so in the earliest Parable, that of the bramble-king
Pharisees - The Pharisee in the Parable thanked God that he was 'not as other men
Gerizim - Here Jotham spoke his Parable to the elders of Shechem ( Judges 9:7 )
Leaven - In the Parable of 'the leaven hid in the meal,' it also represents the same evil, which in an insidiousway permeates the mass with which it is mixed
Tree - the Lord's Parable in Luke 13:6-9 ; see Ezekiel 20:47 , and cp
Pearl - —This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46)
Pearl - —This jewel, specially esteemed and familiar in the East, is twice used by our Lord as an image of the preciousness of the Christian religion: once in the saying, ‘Cast not your pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6), and again in the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price (Matthew 13:46)
Olive Olive-Tree - The high estimation in which the olive tree was held is seen by its being placed first in Jotham's Parable
Jonas, Book of - A few Catholic writers have taken the view that the story of Jonas is a Parable and was intended to teach certain religious truths, e
Cornerstone - The Synoptic gospels quote Psalm 118:22 after the Parable of the wicked tenants to show the rejection and ultimate triumph of Christ ( Matthew 21:42 ; Mark 12:10 ; Luke 20:17 ; compare Acts 4:11 ; Ephesians 2:20-22 )
Capstone - Jesus makes use of this psalm in a Parable referring to Israel and its rejection of him as Messiah ( Matthew 21:33-44 , ; and parallels)
Nathan - The next appearance of Nathan is in connexion with the Parable of the ewe lamb, by which David was self-convicted of his sin with Bath-sheba ( 2 Samuel 12:1-15 )
Wheat, - In the Parable of the sower our Lord alludes to grains of wheat which in good ground produce a hundred-fold
Reflectiveness - The Parable of the Sower should help to restore the reflective habit to its high place among the duties and privileges of life (Matthew 13:19; Matthew 13:22)
Hireling - The following passage from Morier's Travels in Persia, illustrates one of our Lord's Parables: "The most conspicuous building in Hamadan is the Mesjid Jumah, a large mosque now falling into decay, and before it a maidan or square, which serves as a market place. This custom, which I have never seen in any other part of Asia, forcibly struck me as a most happy illustration of our Saviour's Parable of the labourers in the vineyard in Matthew 20; particularly when, passing by the same place late in the day, we still found others standing idle, and remembered his words, ‘Why stand ye here all the day idle?" as most applicable to their situation; for in putting the very same question to them, they answered us, ‘Because no man hath hired us
Lazarus - The helpless beggar who lay at the rich man's gate in one of Christ's most solemn and instructive Parables. Our Savior plainly teaches us, in this Parable, that both the friends and the foes of God know and begin to experience their doom immediately after death, and that it is in both cases unchangeable and eternal
Patience - Jesus' Parable of the tenants depicted God's patience with His people (Mark 12:1-11 )
Talent - Faculty natural gift or endowment a metaphorical application of the word, said to be borrowed from the Scriptural Parable of the talents
Persecution (2) - It was mentioned in the Parable of the Sower as the cause of defection among superficial believers (Mark 4:17, Matthew 13:21)
Care - ...
In Matthew 13:22 in Christ's Parable of the four seeds, the third person is represented by the seed that was choked out by the "cares of the world. " The enigmatic meaning of the Parable is that preoccupation with the world depletes one's devotion to God
Saying And Doing - The same contrast is boldly presented in the Parable of the Two Sons (Matthew 21:28-32), with special reference on the one hand to the Pharisees and scribes, and on the other to the outwardly unpromising ‘publicans and sinners’ who welcomed the message of the Kingdom of heaven. The ‘acted Parable’ of the withering of the barren fig-tree with its deceptive show of premature leaves, was a solemn warning against the danger and sin of ‘saying’ without ‘doing’ (Matthew 21:18-19, Mark 11:12-14)
Fable - For the definition of a fable, as distinct from Parable, allegory, etc. , see Trench, Parables , p. See Parable
Games (2) - The Parable is a vivid picture of the fickleness, sulkiness, and self-will of the contemporaries of Jesus. It is not necessary to read into the Parable a condemnation of those who should have outgrown childish things but are still playing at life
Heir - our Lord’s application of the term to Himself in the Parable of the Wicked Husbandman, Matthew 21:38). (3) The sheep in the Parable of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:34), i
Corn - The Parable of the Blade, the Ear, and the Full Corn was used to unfold the law of growth in the Kingdom of God. And these lessons from the corn in the records of the Lord’s ministry may be greatly extended as we recall what He said about the sowing of the corn (parable of the Sower) and its reaping (the Tares and the Wheat); how He saw in the white fields a vision of a great spiritual harvest only waiting to be gathered (John 4:35); how at Capernaum He turned the people’s minds from the barley bread of the previous day’s miracle to think of Himself as the Bread of Life (John 6); and said of the broken loaf at the Last Supper, ‘Take, eat, this is my body
Leaven - ...
The first occurrence is in the Parable of the leaven (Matthew 13:33 ; Luke 13:20-21 ). This Parable teaches that the reign of God is like what happens when leaven permeates a batch of dough. Although the Parable does not describe how this will happen, it alludes to Jesus' future reign as the Son of Man
Money (2) - In the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23-35) the one servant owes the king 10,000 talents, or nearly two-and-a-half millions of our money—an enormous sum, of which the 100 denarii (= £4) owed him by his fellow-servant represents but an insignificant fraction (1/6000). It may be remarked that the juxtaposition in this Parable of the talent and the denarius is a confirmation of the view that it is the Attic talent that is meant). In the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 28:12) the master intrusts his capital of eight talents or £1920 to his three servants in sums of £1200, £480, and £240 respectively. ...
The only mention of this sum in the Gospels is in the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), where a nobleman, going to a far country to get a kingdom, gives one mina to each of his ten servants, bidding them trade with it till his return. The smallness of the sum in such a connexion is remarkable, especially when compared with the companion Parable of the Talents. Thus in the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28, see above under ‘Talent’) a sum of 100 denarii is mentioned, while in the Parable of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41) the two debts are stated at 500 and 50 denarii respectively (£20 and £2). This appears from the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (1618420467_2), where a denarius is evidently looked upon as liberal pay for a day’s work; for we may be quite sure that the employer who dealt so generously with the labourers engaged late in the day had struck no niggardly bargain with those hired in the morning. In the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37) two denarii are given to the innkeeper as a reasonable payment in advance for the keep of the wounded traveller for a day or two, to he supplemented if necessary on the return of the Samaritan. In the Gospels it occurs only in the Parable of the Lost Coin, where, of course, it must be understood of some coin current in Palestine. In his Notes on the Parables, Trench assumes that this drachm was Athenian, stamped with ‘an owl, a tortoise, or a head of Minerva,’ and reluctantly surrenders ‘the resemblance to the human soul, originally stamped with the image and superscription of the great King,’ which earlier expositors had delighted to trace. A sound method of Parable exposition will indeed dispense with this fanciful suggestion, but not for Trench’s reasons (see Bruce, Parabolic Teaching, 279)
Parable - ...
Christ's "parables" most frequently convey truths connected with the subject of the kingdom of God. ...
Two dangers are to be avoided in seeking to interpret the "parables" in Scripture, that of ignoring the important features, and that of trying to make all the details mean something. The word is sometimes spoken of as a "parable," John 10:6 , i. "parables") and "proverb
Harvest - In the Parable of the tares, Jesus related harvest to the end of the world (Matthew 13:30-39 )
Arrive - have this verb (AV, "compare"); the most authentic have tithemi, to set forth (with the word "parable")
Fig - The Parable of the fig tree spared at the intercession of the dresser of the garden, Luke 13:6-9, is full of instruction
Fig Tree - The Parable of the fig tree spared at the intercession of the dresser of the garden, Luke 13:6-9, is full of instruction
Mustard - The objection commonly made against any sinapis being the plant of the Parable is that the reed grew into "a tree," in which the fowls of the air are said to come and lodge. The Lord in his popular teaching," says Trench ("Notes on Parables", 108), "adhered to the popular language;" and the mustard-seed was used proverbially to denote anything very minute; or may mean that it was the smallest of all garden seeds, which it is in truth
Second Coming, the - In His Parable of the foolish virgins (Matthew 25:1-13 ) Jesus told of them sleeping and not being ready when the Bridegroom came (compare James 5:7-8 ). In His Parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30 ), Jesus reserved His condemnation for the man who did nothing, simply taking his talent and hiding it
Levites - In the first of these, the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-35), a priest and a Levite, representatives of the religion of Israel and at the same time examples of Jewish traditionalism, are unfavourably contrasted with a Samaritan, one of a people with whom the Jews had no dealings. The Parable is the answer of Jesus to the lawyer who asked, ‘Who is my neighbour?’ and it seems evident that the Levite, described by Jesus, when he looked on the wounded man and passed by on the other side, recognized that he was not a Jew, and therefore not a neighbour to be humanely treated according to the commandment, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself’ (Leviticus 19:18)
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - OUR LORD'S Parables are all so many applications of what we sometimes call the Sacramental Principle. That is to say, in all His Parables our Lord takes up something in nature and makes it a lesson in grace, and a means of grace. Our Lord so lived in heaven: He had His whole conversation so completely in heaven: His whole mind and heart and life were so absolutely absorbed in heaven, that everything He saw on earth, in some way or other, spoke to Him about heaven, and thus supplied Him with His daily texts, and sermons, and Parables, about heaven. And as He grew in wisdom and in stature, He would come to read in that same mustard tree yet another Parable about His Father's house and His Father's business. For there immediately sprang up out of that small seed this exquisite little Parable. This little Parable, so exquisitely beautiful in its literature, and so inexhaustibly rich in its applications and fulfilments in no end of directions. ...
Our Lord, you may depend upon it, had all those Old Testament instances in the eyes of His mind when He spake to His disciples this so charming and so instructive little Parable. And among ourselves that small mustard seed is eminently a Parable for all parents. Let all parents, then, and all nurses, and all tutors, and all schoolmasters, and all who have little children in the same house with them, lay this little Parable well home to their imagination and to their heart. But, oh! the tremendous and irreparable oversight for you and for him! Read Butler for yourself till you have that wisest of Englishmen by heart
Animals - ...
A general term for ‘beast of burden’ occurs in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:34 κτῆνος). ...
The ox (βοῦς) is mentioned three times in Luke, twice in connexion with the ass in the passages previously cited (Luke 13:15; Luke 14:5), and again in the Parable of the Great Supper, when one of the invited guests excuses himself on the ground that he has bought five yoke of oxen which need to be tested (Luke 14:19). Similarly the fatted calf (ὁ μόσχος ὁ σιτευτός), which appears only in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:23; Luke 15:27; Luke 15:30), indicates an unusual feast, made to celebrate an unusual joy. The bulls and fatlings in the Parable of the Marriage Feast, and the fatted calf in the Parable of the Returning Prodigal, alike stand for the lavish generosity of God’s love, which the Scribes and Pharisees could not appreciate, even when offered to themselves, the king’s invited guests, much less when those prodigals, the publicans and sinners, were likewise embraced therein. ]'>[3] ἐρίφιον) is mentioned in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:29). A Christian is not required to wear his heart on his sleeve! In the Parable of Dives and Lazarus it is said that these street-dogs came and licked the beggar’s sores (Luke 16:21). The birds appear in the Parable of the Sower, where they pick up the seed that falls by the wayside (Matthew 13:4, Mark 4:4, Luke 8:5). Probably the Parable was spoken early in the year. The Parable of the Mustard Seed also introduces the birds, which come and lodge in the branches of the full-grown tree (Matthew 13:32, Mark 4:32, Luke 13:19). The description in the Parable carries with it the same implication with regard to the kingdom of heaven
Jericho - Robbers still infest the road from Jerusalem down (a steep descent) to Jericho, as when Jesus spoke the Parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:30); Pompey undertook to destroy their strongholds not long before. The Lord's visit to Bethany appropriately follows His Parable of the good Samaritan who relieved the man robbed between Jerusalem and Jericho, for Jesus was then traveling from Jericho to Jerusalem, and Bethany was only a little way short of Jerusalem (Luke 10:25; Luke 10:38; John 11:1). James and John's proposal to call fire down upon the Samaritans who would not receive Him in an earlier stage of the journey suggested probably His choosing a Samaritan to represent the benefactor in the Parable, a tacit rebuke to their un-Christlike spirit (Luke 9:51-56)
Almsgiving - In certain cases, like that of the Rich Young Ruler, it may be needful for a man to sell all and distribute to the poor (Matthew 19:21, Mark 10:21, Luke 18:22); while the poor whom we may make our friends by using ‘the mammon of unrighteousness,’ for their benefit, are able, by their grateful prayers for us, to ‘receive us, when it (our wealth) has failed us, into the eternal tabernacles’ (Luke 16:1-13 Parable of the Unjust Steward). On the other hand, for the rich to indulge themselves, and neglect their poor neighbour, is the way for them to Gehenna (Luke 16:19-31 Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus); and the omission of the duty will be a ground of condemnation at the Last Day (Matthew 25:45). Not far, at any rate, from this is His Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16), where Jesus describes God under the figure of a rich and generous householder who gives work and wages (not mere alms) to those who are able to work, asks with surprise of such, ‘Why stand ye here all the day idle?’ and, on learning it was their misfortune and not their fault, makes them work for the last hour, yet pays them a whole day’s wages. He exposes also the ugliness of boasting of our giving before God (Luke 18:11 Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican); insists that justice, mercy, and truth are of infinitely greater importance than minute scrupulousness in tithing, and lays down the comprehensive principle that, however there may be opportunities for us to do more than we have been explicitly commanded, yet we never can do more than we owe to God: ‘When ye have done all, say, We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which it was our duty to do’ (Luke 17:10)
Matthew, Gospel by - He gives a series of Parables showing the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven. The first four Parables were spoken to the people — that of the Tares being peculiar to this gospel. The Lord in explaining (in the house) the Parable of the Tares, speaks of the completion of the age, and of the judgement by which the Son of man by angelic agency shall purge "out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity. " The last three Parables were spoken to the disciples in private, and are peculiar to this gospel. The gospel net gathers good and bad, but at the completion of the age a discriminating judgement will sever the "wicked from among the just," See ParableS. The Parables had dealt with the kingdom in mystery , but some who stood there should at once have a glimpse of the kingdom in glory, which was vouchsafed to them in seeing Jesus transfigured before them on the mount. " The Lord proceeded in the Parable of the King that would take account of His servants, to enforce the necessity of His disciples forgiving one another, as otherwise they would come under His Father's hand. Farther on, the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard maintains the sovereignty of the Lord in dispensing His own things: both of these Parables being peculiar to Matthew. Notwithstanding their opposition, He spoke of the certainty of the establishment of God's purpose in the Parable of the marriage of the King's Son. ...
Matthew 25 is peculiar to Matthew; Matthew 25:1-30 , the Parables of the Ten Virgins and of the Talents, apply to professing Christians
Stone - (So πετρώδης in the Parable of the Sower [2] does not mean ‘stony’ [3] but ‘rocky’ [4]—not ground full of loose stones, but a thin soil with shelves of rock lying underneath). ‘Take ye away the stone,’ Jesus said (John 11:39); and when they had done so, another word of command turned that gravestone at Bethany into a Parable to all the ages of the rolling away from human hearts of the crushing bondage of death (Hebrews 2:14 f. He had just spoken the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, and after announcing their doom, He quoted epexegetically Psalms 118:22 ‘The stone which the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner. ’ Thus He identified the rejected ‘Son’ of the Parable with the rejected stone of the Psalm, and the wicked husbandmen with the scribes and Pharisees as the ‘builders’ of Israel’s theocratic edifice; but at the same time intimated to the latter that they must not think that by rejecting Him and putting Him to death they would be done with Him for ever. And in his Epistle he returns to this Parable of the stone as a symbol of Christ’s Person, and dwells upon it with much greater fulness (1 Peter 2:4-8)
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - ...
Well, the first and foundation likeness between this Parable and the kingdom of heaven is surely this. Just as our Lord is the Sower in another Parable, and just as He is the Planter of the mustard seed in another, and the Good Shepherd in another, and the Good Samaritan in another, so He is the happy ploughing Man in this Parable. And as the field was the world in a former Parable, so is it here. "...
Incomparable Thomas Goodwin,-incomparable to me, at any rate,-says that Paul will be the second man in heaven, the Man Christ Jesus being the first man. And every one here will already have thought of Paul as soon as this fine little Parable was read out to him. For, if ever any man could be said to have had every letter of this fine little Parable fulfilled both in him and by him, that man was Paul. If Jesus Christ was the first ploughing man of this Parable, then, surely, Paul was the second
Swine - The same ideas colour the Parable of the Prodigal Son ( Luke 15:15 ), where he is depicted as reaching the lowest depth of infamy in being sent to feed swine, and actually being reduced to covet their food; and also the narrative of the demoniacs, where the Gentile inhabitants of Gerasa lose their great herd of swine ( Matthew 8:30 , Mark 5:13 , Luke 8:32 )
Neighbor - The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10), illustrates this teaching by showing that neighbor includes in a special manner our fellowman in need
Christ: the Soul's Only Defence - There is an ancient Parable which says that the dove once made a piteous complaint to her fellow birds, that the hawk was a most cruel tyrant, and was thirsting for her blood
Pride - The Parable of the Pharisee and the publican was directed at those guilty of spiritual pride, the ones who “trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others” (Luke 18:9 )
Rest (2) - In the Parable of the Sower, the recompense is in the abundant harvest
Slowness of Heart - Slowness of heart is the opposite extreme to that over-quickness of faith which our Lord stigmatized in the Parable of the Sower under the figure of the rocky ground
Famine (2) - ...
In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, it was ‘a mighty famine’ (λιμὸς ἰσχυρά) in the land of his distant exile that helped to bring the wanderer to his senses (Luke 15:14)
Jotham - side of the city, uttered against him and the Shechemites the Parable or fable (the oldest extant) of the bramble and the trees
Jonah - Rather, the book is to be regarded as a satirical Parable intended to criticize and correct its readers' attitudes (compare 2 Samuel 12:1-6 ; 2 Samuel 14:1-11 ; Isaiah 5:1-7 ). It builds on an earlier phenomenon, as the Parable in Luke 19:11-27 builds on Archelaus' visit to Rome
Vengeance - In Jesus' Parable of the unjust judge, a widow's persistent request for vindication from her enemy is grudgingly granted. Luke displayed the Parable as a worst-case model of God's vindication (“deliverance”) of His people ( Luke 18:1-8 )
Fig - " Similarly the Jews (for it was an acted Parable) had the show of religion before the. On Olivet too was spoken the Parable of the budding fig tree, the sign of coming summer (Matthew 21:21)
Sow (Verb) - ...
Matthew 13:27 (b) In this Parable the seed is the child of GOD, while in the previous Parable the seed is the Word of GOD
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - Æsop's famous fable taught the very same lesson in ancient Greece that our Lord's present Parable taught to Israel in His own day, and still teaches to Christendom in our day. ...
But before we come to that, there are one or two preliminary lessons that we are intended to learn from the very framework, so to call it, of this Parable. My Father is the husbandman, says our Lord in another Parable. ...
"Behold we have forsaken all, and followed Thee; what shall we have therefore?" That miserable speech of Peter's, which gave occasion to this Parable, utterly vitiated all Peter's previous work for his Master, however hard he had worked, and however much he had forsaken for his Master's cause. And as it was at Peter and his miserable motives that his Master levelled this Parable, so it is at us and at our miserable motives, and at the miserable envies and jealousies that spring out of our miserable motives, that He levels this same Parable in this house tonight
Gospels, the - In this gospel only we have the Parable of the good Samaritan, teaching that grace does not ask the question, "who is my neighbour?" for all men are neighbours; and here only we get the Parable of the lost sheep, the lost piece of money, and the prodigal son: it is God seeking the lost. ...
Believe, to πιστεύω 11 15 9 100 ...
End of the world (age) 5 - - - ...
Father, The πατήρ 44 5 17 122 ...
Glory, glorify δόξα, δοξάζω 12 4 22 42 ...
Immediately εὐθέως, εὐθύς 18 42 8 7 ...
Kingdom of God 5 15 33 2 ...
Kingdom of the Heavens 32 - - - ...
Know, to γινώσκωι 20 13 28 54 ...
Life ζωή 7 4 6 36 ...
Light φῶς 7 1 6 23 ...
Love ἀγαπάω, ἀγάπη 9 5 14 44 ...
Love φιλέω 4 - 1 13 ...
Parable παραβολή 17 13 18 - ...
People λαός 15 3 36 3 ...
Power δύναμις 13 10 15 - ...
Preach, to κηρύσσω 9 14 9 - ...
Preach (the gospel), to εὐαγγελίζω 1 - 10 - ...
Scribe γραμματεύς 24 22 15 1 ...
True ἀληθής 1 1 - 12 ...
True ἀληθινός - - 1 8 ...
Truly ἀληθῶς 3 2 3 10 ...
Truth ἀληθεια 1 3 3 25 ...
Witness μαρτυρέω, μαρτυρία 1 3 3 47 ...
Woe οὐαί 13 2 14 - ...
Works ἔργον 5 2 2 27 ...
World κόσμος 9 3 3 79 ...
For the Chronology of the Gospel History see NEW TESTAMENT
Hope - ' You know the Parable, you recognise the voice: may you hear it in your souls to-day! ...
...
Leaven - In ordinary cases, in the preparation of the household bread, the lump of dough, above referred to, was either broken down into the water in the kneading trough (see Bread) before the fresh flour was added, or it might be ‘hid’ in the latter and kneaded along with it, as in the Parable, Matthew 13:33
Net - ...
Matthew 13:47 (b) In this Parable the net represents the great religious plans and programs of Christendom which are used to gather in people of every kind, saved and unsaved
Fell - ...
Matthew 13:4 (a) This Parable represents the ministry of GOD's Word by the servant of GOD
Archelaus - ARCHELAUS (Ἀρχέλαος) is named once in the NT (Matthew 2:22), and probably is referred to in the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:12 ff
Fowl - In the Parable of the Sower they devour the seed that falls by the wayside (Matthew 13:4); in that of the Mustard Seed they lodge under the shadow of the huge plant which grew out of such a tiny germ (Mark 4:32)
Leaven - " The same statement, as made in other Parables, shows that it is the whole Parable which constitutes the similitude of the kingdom; the history of Christendom confirms the fact that the pure meal of the doctrine of Christ has been adulterated with error; (2) of corrupt practices, Mark 8:15 (2nd part), the reference to the Herodians being especially applied to their irreligion; 1 Corinthians 5:7,8 ; (b) literally, in Matthew 16:12 , and in the general statements in 1 Corinthians 5:6 ; Galatians 5:9 , where the implied applications are to corrupt practice and corrupt doctrine respectively
Compassion, Compassionate - ...
A — 2: σπλαγχνίζομαι (Strong's #4697 — Verb — splanchnizomai — splangkh-nid'-zom-ahee ) "to be moved as to one's inwards (splanchna), to be moved with compassion, to yearn with compassion," is frequently recorded of Christ towards the multitude and towards individual sufferers, Matthew 9:36 ; 14:14 ; 15:32 ; 18:27 ; 20:34 ; Mark 1:41 ; 6:34 ; 8:2 ; 9:22 (of the appeal of a father for a demon-possessed son); Luke 7:13 ; 10:33 ; of the father in the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:20
Leper - There are two forms of the disease—the tuberculated, incrusting the whole person with ulcerous tubercles, and the anæsthetic, making the skin mummylike—but under both forms "Death lives," and the diseased is a walking tomb, a Parable of death
Avenge, Avenger - " With the meaning (a), it is used in the Parable of the unjust judge, Luke 18:3,5 , of the "vindication" of the rights of the widow; with the meaning (b) it is used in Revelation 6:10 ; 19:2 , of the act of God in "avenging" the blood of the saints; in 2 Corinthians 10:6 , of the Apostle's readiness to use his apostolic authority in punishing disobedience on the part of his readers; here the RV substitutes "avenge" for the AV, "revenge;" in Romans 12:19 of "avenging" oneself, against which the believer is warned
Jericho - It is an extremely arduous path, and wayfarers were much exposed to the attacks of robbers, who easily found secure concealment among the bare and rugged hills which it traversed: a fact which gives vividness to the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30). * Jericho - It is an extremely arduous path, and wayfarers were much exposed to the attacks of robbers, who easily found secure concealment among the bare and rugged hills which it traversed: a fact which gives vividness to the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30). * Hermas Shepherd of - From the first Vision, with its revelation of the sinfulness of sins of thought, and of neglect of responsibility for others, to the last Parable, where the greatness of the Shepherd, the supernatural Being ‘to whom alone in the whole world hath authority over repentance been assigned’ (Sim. -The book is divided up into five Visions, twelve Mandates or Commandments, and ten Similitudes or Parables. Hermas at first fails to recognize him as the being to whom he was delivered, but on recognition proceeds to write down the Commandments and the Parables dictated by the Shepherd. -The first Parable is a simple expansion of the theme that the Christian is a sojourner in a foreign city, and should act as a citizen of the city which is his true home. The fifth Parable presents the story of a vineyard, a master, and a faithful servant, the exposition of which reveals an early belief in the doctrine of works of supererogation, and an Adoptianist conception of the personality of the Son of Cod (see below). A few days later Hermas is afflicted by this angel of punishment, and in the seventh Parable he is taught that this is because of the sins of his household. The ninth Parable is an amplification of the third Vision. The Shepherd, as in the former Parable, deals with the latter, to fit those that are capable for a place in the building. The purport of the concluding Parable is an exhortation to Hermas to keep the Shepherd’s commandments and to publish them to others. In view of the Roman character of the Shepherd, it is interesting to note that the tower which represents the Church is represented as founded, not on Peter, but, in the third Vision, upon the waters of baptism, and, in the ninth Parable, upon the rock of the Son of God. In the Parable of the vineyard (the fifth) the Son of God is represented as a slave placed in charge, with a promise of freedom if he fulfils his allotted duty. In this same fifth Parable we have an early trace of the doctrine of works of supererogation, which, in mediaeval times, was so prominent in the Church’s system
Wealth (2) - Luke 18:22; in the Parable of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) it is the ‘good and bad’ who are gathered in from the highways, in the Parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24) it is the ‘poor and maimed and blind and lame. In the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus recorded by him alone (Luke 16:19-31), rich Abraham is in bliss as well as poor Lazarus. This is implied in such Parables as those of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-8), all of which deal with the uses of money, without any disapprobation of its possession being indicated. And it is accepted by Jesus and illustrated in the Parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21). And this is made specially clear with regard to wealth in the Parable of the Foolish Rich Man. This view of wealth is presented in the Parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21), the Unjust Steward and Christ’s comments on it (1618420467_63), Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), and in the picture of the Judgment of Men (Matthew 25:31-46). On the other hand, we are taught in the Parable of the Unrighteous Steward that as the Steward employed his lord’s wealth in securing for himself friends who would support him after he was deprived of his office, so we should administer the wealth committed to us in such a way that it will contribute to our well-being in the world to come
Poverty (2) - The danger of wealth is constantly pointed out (Matthew 19:23, Mark 10:23, Luke 18:24 ‘How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of heaven’; Matthew 18:8 ‘If thy hand or thy foot cause thee to stumble, cut it off’; Luke 16:19 the Parable of Lazarus and Dives; Luke 12:16 the Parable of the Rich Fool, following on Christ’s peremptory refusal to divide the inheritance between the two brothers). That Christ had the true Israelite contempt for money and commercial prosperity is at least hinted in the story of the Temptation (Matthew 4:10, Luke 4:8), and shown quite plainly in the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard: ‘It is my will to give unto this last even as unto thee,’ Matthew 20:15,—a principle which, as Ruskin saw (Unto this Last), is a defiance of political economy as ordinarily understood. Peabody (Jesus Christ and the Social Question) points out the further opposition to current Socialism implied in the Parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:29, Luke 12:48; cf
Neighbor - ...
Two truths are found from the Parable
Loins - ...
Ezekiel 47:4 (b) Look under "ANKLES" for a rather full description of this Parable
Camp - That it failed not to produce effect upon the richly endowed and poetic mind of Balaam, appears from Numbers 24:2 ; "And Balaam lifted up his eyes and he saw Israel abiding in his tents according to their tribes; and the Spirit of God came upon him, and he took up his Parable and said, How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob, and thy tabernacles, O Israel! As the valleys are they spread forth, as gardens by the river side, as the trees of lign aloes which the Lord hath planted, and as cedar trees beside waters
Lamp - 2), as in the Parable of the ten virgins, Matthew 25:1,3,4,7,8 ; John 18:3 , "torches;" Acts 20:8 , "lights;" Revelation 4:5 ; 8:10 (RV, "torch," AV, "lamp")
Reverence - It is used in the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen (Matthew 21:37, Mark 12:6, Luke 20:13), where the idea is that even those who had ill-treated the servants might show proper respect and honour to the Son. (See also the usage of the same word in the Parable of the Unjust Judge, who ‘feared not God, neither regarded man,’ Luke 18:2-4)
Responsibility - ...
Jesus told several Parables in which responsibility and accountability are at the center. Illustrative is the Parable of the talents. Jesus concluded the teaching of a Parable with the statement, "From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked" (Joshua 7:24-25 )
Heritage - And this throws a light upon the subject of the younger son in the Parable. And though too often, like the prodigal in the Parable, we waste and abuse the bounties of our heritage, yet, like him, the eye of our God and Father is always on the look-out for our return, and when by grace brought back, as he was, we are graciously received, and made happy in the pardoning mercy and love of our Father
Perseverance - ...
In the Parable of the sower, those who hear and produce a crop stand in contrast to the second and third types in the Parable who fall away in time of trial, for they do not remain constant in adversity and they apostasize, or do not grow into maturity (Luke 8:13-14 ). Thus, Jesus' Parable is meant to encourage believers to produce "for the long haul
Uri'ah - It may be inferred from Nathan's Parable, (2 Samuel 12:3 ) that he was passionately devoted to his wife, and that their union was celebrated in Jerusalem as one of peculiar tenderness
Wheat - The sixty-fold or hundred-fold of the Parable (Matthew 13:8 ||) might well have been obtained in the days of its former prosperity
Statute - The Parable of Lazarus and the rich man speaks to it as well
Justifying One's Self - Our Lord’s Parable of the Good Samaritan and its application, ‘Which of these was neighbour unto him?’ revealed the true aspect and attitude
Candle - The Parable of the Ten Virgins with their λαμπάδες teaches a similar lesson
Beloved - He Himself uses it but once, and then in the Parable of the Lord of the Vineyard, wherein the ‘beloved son’ is the evident picture of the Son of Man (Mark 12:6 [1], Luke 20:13)
Wolf - The dispositions of the wolf to attack the weaker animals, especially those which are under the protection of man, is alluded to by our Saviour in the Parable of the hireling shepherd: "The wolf catcheth them, and scattereth the flock," Matthew 7:15
Beloved - He Himself uses it but once, and then in the Parable of the Lord of the Vineyard, wherein the ‘beloved son’ is the evident picture of the Son of Man (Mark 12:6 [1], Luke 20:13)
Wheat - The sixty-fold or hundred-fold of the Parable (Matthew 13:8 ||) might well have been obtained in the days of its former prosperity
Hosea - On the subject of his marriage with Gomer,...
(See Gomer)...
some have thought, that this was a Parable, and only intended by the Lord in a figurative way, to shew the Lord's grace to his adulterous Israel and Judah
Olive - It is the emblem of "fatness" in the oldest Parable (Judges 9:8-9)
Personal Effort: Needed For Success - Shall I venture a Parable? A certain band of warlike knights had been exceedingly victorious in all their conflicts
Soldiers - In the Parable of the Marriage of the King’s Son (Matthew 22:1 ff
Stranger - But its degeneracy into proud, morose isolation and misanthropy our Lord rebukes in His large definition of "neighbour" in the Parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:36)
Benevolence - Natural benevolence expresses itself in the exclamation of those who heard of the fate of the wicked husbandmen in the Parable, ‘God forbid’ (Luke 20:16)
Feet - FOOT, FEET...
The Hebrews were so much accustomed to use Parable and figure in their discourses, and gesture in their conversation, to convey to each other their meaning, rather than by words, that it is no wonder so many and various meanings should be conveyed by one and the same way
Coins - ...
One hundred drachmas (or a hundred denarii) was equal to one mina, the gold coin that the nobleman in Jesus’ Parable entrusted to each of his ten servants (Luke 19:13). It is referred to in two other Parables of Jesus (Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15; see TALENT)
Covetousness - ...
A Parable follows (Luke 12:16-21), not necessarily associated originally with the foregoing incident, although in full affinity of theme. There is affinity of teaching in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus (which see). —The standard works on the Sermon on the Mount and on the Parables
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - I think I see enough to justify me in believing that this Parable was no Parable but was an actual experience of our Lord Himself. At any rate, whether our Lord only invented and composed this Parable, or actually Himself experienced it, at any rate, it has all been performed by Him and fulfilled to Him by this time, in every jot and tittle of it, first in His earthly life, and then in His heavenly life. And now, as this Parable says, He has worship in the presence of them that sit at meat with Him
Kindness (2) - ...
If explicit statements of the character of that now considered are not multiplied in our Lord’s teaching, it is to be pointed out that the same conception of God is necessarily implied in a considerable group of the Parables—those, in particular, that illustrate the Divine grace. The great trilogy of Luke 15, exhibiting the Divine concern for man as τὸ ἀπολωλός; the Parables which show how royally and wonderfully God pities and forgives, whether that forgiveness is gratefully realized (the Two Debtors, Luke 7:36-50) or is strangely disregarded (the Unmerciful Servant, Matthew 18:23-35); the Parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24), with its comprehensive ‘welcome for the sinner’—these and other such are full of the wide-reaching kindness of God. Is it not significant that Jesus declares God’s kindness without any qualification whatever, and shows Himself all unconscious that any difficulties are thereby occasioned, that there is anything requiring to be explained and adjusted? The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant displays God’s benignity; but the truculence which shows itself unaffected by an amazing experience of forgiving mercy must needs lose the boon which that benignity bestowed. The conclusion of the Parable (Matthew 18:35) expresses what must needs be; and Jesus presents the doom of the ‘wicked servant’ as a picture of God’s dealings with men just as directly and simply as He sets forth the kindness of our Father in heaven. What can equal the Parable of the Good Samaritan as helping to a definition of the ‘neighbour’ to whom the service of kindness is due?...
Yet the OT and other forms of teaching are not without traces of a wider view than the scribes of Christ’s day would allow
Questions And Answers - The use of a rhetorical question to introduce Parables or parabolic utterances is characteristic of Luke, but is found also in Matthew and Mark. In the latter Gospel the Parable of the Mustard-seed (Mark 4:30) is introduced by the striking double question, ‘How shall we liken the kingdom of God? or in what Parable shall we set it forth?’ which Swete (ad loc. are Luke 6:39; Luke 11:5 (where the interrogative form in which the Parable of the Friend at Midnight begins is not carried to a grammatical conclusion), Luke 13:20 (= Matthew 13:33 where the question is dropped) Matthew 14:28; Matthew 14:31, Matthew 15:8, Matthew 17:7 f. ...
This investigation throws an interesting side-light on the Synoptic problem: one of the four Parables recorded by Mk. is introduced by a very striking interrogative formula, and many Parables in the non-Markan document used by Mt. Christ often asked a question also in order to make men draw their own conclusions from His Parables: cf
Watchfulness - He employs a variety of Parables and illustrations to paint word portraits of watchfulness (see Matthew 24:32-51 ). The Parable of the ten virgins emphasizes the imminence of the parousia (Matthew 25:1-13 )
Intermediate State - Although the Parable of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31 ) has many symbolic features, it clearly suggests a state of conscious existence for the wicked
Wealth - In the exposition of the Parable of the Sower our Lord speaks of the ‘deceitfulness of riches’ as one of those things which ‘choke the word’ and render it unfruitful (Mark 4:19, Matthew 13:22; cf
Wages - ’ The labourers in the Parable hire themselves for a denarius a day (Matthew 20:8). on the Parables, esp
Banking - In the Parable of the pounds (Luke 19:23 ) Jesus refers to a bank, where deposits could be made and interest earned
Guilt - In the Parable of the unmerciful servant Jesus shows that we owe God an enormous debt, far greater than we could possibly repay (Matthew 18:21-35 )
Harvest - ...
Jesus described the last judgment in a Parable about harvest (Matthew 13:30,39 )
Tare - In the Parable of the tares, our Lord states the very same circumstances
Banking - In the Parable of the pounds (Luke 19:23 ) Jesus refers to a bank, where deposits could be made and interest earned
Treasure - In setting forth the manner in which the Kingdom is received into different kinds of hearts, our Lord once again uses the figure of treasure, in the Parable of the Treasure hid in a field (Matthew 13:44). This and the Parable of the Pearl of Great Guest - (in the Parable of the Wedding Feast), where ‘guests’ = ἁνακείμενοι; and in Luke 19:7, where ‘to be guest’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘to lodge’) = καταλῦσαι. ...
Some of the Parables of Jesus reflect this aspect of Oriental life. In the Parable of the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1 ff
Long-Suffering - In the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant the prayer of that unworthy man was for long-suffering (Matthew 18:26), but a full pardon was given instead, until his subsequent conduct caused the withdrawal of the boon (Matthew 18:29). In the Parable of the Unjust Judge the word μακροθυμεῖ (Luke 18:7) occurs in connexion with a difficult piece of interpretation, for the full discussion of which we have scarcely space here
Oneness - This is the subject of the three Parables in ch. 15 and of the Parable of the Banquet in ch. To these may be added the Parable of the Good Samaritan (ch
Marriage - In the Parable the father is said to make a marriage, or a marriage feast (ποιεῖν γάμον), for his son (Matthew 22:2); so in the OT, Genesis 24:3 (Abraham and his steward for Isaac) Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8 (Hamor for Shechem) Genesis 38:6 (Judah for Er), Judges 14:2-10 (Manoah for Samson). The bridegroom goes to fetch the bride at night, as in the Parable of the Ten Virgins, and brings her to his house at midnight (Matthew 25:6), with lamps-not, according to Edersheim (ii. 455) and Trench (Parables, 248), with torches, as the Roman custom was. But in the Parable was the bridegroom returning with his bride to his own house, or going to fetch her? The latter view is taken by Edersheim (ii. Normally the wedding is in the bridegroom’s house, and in the absence of any requirement of the Parable to the contrary the usual custom must be assumed. It is true that in the best text she is not mentioned; but that is because she is not needed for the purpose of the Parable. The Parable of the marriage of the king’s son (Matthew 22:2-14, apparently quite a different incident from that of Luke 14:16-24) gives an account of it. the story of Esau and Jacob’s presents, Genesis 33); in the Parable no excuse is offered
Prayer (2) - Luke tells of others worshipping in the Temple: Zacharias (Luke 1:9), Simeon (Luke 2:27), Anna (Luke 2:37), the disciples (Luke 24:53), and (in a Parable) the Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:10). (2) He devoted certain Parables to the subject. (3) He uttered a variety of sayings, enforcing and completing the teaching of the Parables. ...
(2) There are five Parables, three of which bear directly and two indirectly on the subject of prayer. So far as the two Parables differ, the former teaches that prayer is never out of season, the latter that it is sure to bring a blessing and not a curse. But we must beware of supposing that either Parable teaches that by constant prayer we at last overcome God’s unwillingness. The argument in both Parables is a fortiori, and is strongest in the second. ...
The Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican, which also is preserved by St. a deep sense, not only of need (as in the other two Parables), but of unworthiness. The Parable indicates that downcast eyes and beating of the breast are natural accompaniments of a penitent’s prayer. Less directly, and apart from its main purpose, the Parable of the Prodigal Son teaches a similar lesson. And there is yet another Parable which teaches what is requisite, if this most necessary of all prayers is to be rightly offered: the sinner himself must have a forgiving spirit. ...
(3) Besides the Parables, there are frequent sayings of Christ on the subject of prayer, and these are found in all four Gospels
Sheol - The most important is that of Luke 16:23 , the Parable of Dives and Lazarus
Prov'Erbs, Book of - " It is sometimes translated Parable, sometimes proverb as here
Exaltation (2) - In Christ’s Parable of the Wedding Feast He insists on this principle, as against the self-seeking and pride of the scribes and Pharisees, who love the chief seats in the synagogue, and the foremost places at feasts
Bed - In such a room the master of the house and his family lay, according to the Parable (Luke 11:7), "My children are with me in bed
Tower - —‘Tower’ (πύργος) is mentioned three times in the Lord’s teaching: in the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen (Matthew 21:33, Mark 12:1), in the allusion to an accident in Siloam which led to the loss of eighteen lives (Luke 13:4), and in the illustration of the builder who was unable to complete his undertaking (Luke 14:28)
Tribulation (2) - ‘Tribulation’ and persecution (διωγμός) ‘because of the word’ are mentioned in the Parable of the Sower as the conditions which cause those ‘to stumble straightway’ that ‘hear the word, and straightway with joy receive it, and have no root in themselves’ (Matthew 13:21, Mark 4:17)
Hades - The moral lesson that the recompense of character is sure and that it begins immediately after death is very clear; but it is going beyond our Lord’s didactic intention in a Parable to find here a detailed doctrine as to the circumstances and conditions of the intermediate state
Condemnation (2) - The fig-tree in the Parable has a time of probation and then may be suddenly cut down (Luke 13:6-9)
Bill - The word itself is indefinite (literally = ‘the letters’), and throws no light upon a question much discussed by commentators on the Parable of the Unjust Steward, viz. ; see also the various commentators on the Parables
Wing - This is best expressed in Ezekiel’s Parable of the two eagles and the vine: “And say, Thus saith the Lord God; A great eagle with great wings, longwinged, full of feathers, which had divers colors, came unto Lebanon, and took the highest branch of the cedar: he cropped off the top of his young twigs, and carried it into a land of traffic; he set it in a city of merchants” ( Allegory - In allegory proper, when distinguished from metaphor, Parable, type, etc
Beat - , "dermatology"), primarily "to flay," then "to beat, thrash or smite," is used of the treatment of the servants of the owner of the vineyard by the husbandmen, in the Parable in Matthew 21:35 ; Mark 12:3,5 ; Luke 20:10,11 ; of the treatment of Christ, Luke 22:63 , RV, "beat," for AV, "smote;" John 18:23 ; of the followers of Christ, in the synagogues, Mark 13:9 ; Acts 22:19 ; of the punishment of unfaithful servants, Luke 12:47,48 ; of the "beating" of Apostles by the High Priest and the Council of the Sanhedrin, Acts 5:40 ; by magistrates, 16:37
Nets - σαγήνη is found in the Gospels only in Matthew 13:47 (translation ‘net,’ the word ‘draw-net, is not in the English text, but only in the Authorized Version chapter-heading), where the choice of this term instead of δίκτυον or ἀμφίβληστρον greatly strengthens the meaning of the Parable
Publican - Luke 15:1), is not to be held as implying that He laid Himself out more for them than for other sinners who realized their need of Him; nor are we to infer that, in contrasting them with the Pharisees and scribes, as in the well-known Parable (Luke 18:10 ff
Vengeance (2) - ἐκδίκησις occurs also in the phrase ποιεῖν ἐκδίκησιν (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘avenge’) in the Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:7-8), and the corresponding verb ἐκδικέω (also rendered ‘avenge’; cf. (Revised Version margin) ‘do me justice of’) is found in the same Parable (Luke 18:3; Luke 18:5). , in the Parable of the Unjust Judge: ‘Shall not God avenge his own elect?… I say unto you, that he will avenge them speedily’ (Luke 18:7 f. It is in this light that we must read all Christ’s words of denunciation, His Parables of Judgment, His judicial acts (such as the cleansing of the Temple), His lament over impenitent Jerusalem. on Sermon on the Mount; Goebel, Parables; Sanday-Headlam, Romans; Moule, Romans; Stevens, Teaching of Jesus; Wendt, Teaching of Jesus; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , artt
Dead, the - The omission of any mention of burial in the case of Lazarus in the Parable (Luke 16:22), as contrasted with the case of the rich man, who ‘had a funeral,’ bespeaks a poor abject. So also in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19 ff. This Parable also favours the belief in the soul’s direct and immediate entrance upon this new conscious state, as do our Lord’s words in Luke 23:43 ‘To-day shalt thou be with me in paradise
Neighbour (2) - ’ ‘Who is my neighbour?’ asked a scribe; and Christ made answer with the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37), seeking by a picture of pure compassion to shame him of his question. ’ It is to be noted that in the application of the Parable He does not ask which of the three was, but which of the three became (γεγονέναι, Luke 10:36) neighbour unto him that fell among thieves. the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:11 ff. on the NT, and works on the Parables; J
Joy (2) - ...
In the Parables in which the secret of the Kingdom is itself set forth by our Lord, we meet the word ‘joy’ several times. In the interpretation of the Parable of the Sower we are told: ‘He that was sown upon the rocky places, this is he that heareth the word, and straightway with joy receiveth it’ (Matthew 13:20), a striking characterization of the temper of those who eagerly adopt a new idea, but are just as ready to exchange it for some more recent fashion. In the three famous Parables that fill that chapter, the joy of God’s own heart is set forth under the images of the shepherd with his sheep, the woman with her precious coin, and the father with his restored son. The reward promised to the faithful servant in the Parable of the Talents is to enter into ‘the joy of his Lord’ (Matthew 25:21). ’ It may be that our Lord regarded this as too much akin to the shallow joy which He had exposed in the Parable of the Sower, or, at any rate, as detrimental to the more serious thought with which He wished their minds to be filled; for He replied (Luke 10:20): ‘Howbeit in this rejoice not that the spirits are subject unto you, but rejoice that your names are written in heaven. Many of the Parables, other than those already named, set forth the inherent joy of the Kingdom, as, for example, those of the Wedding Supper and the Ten Virgins. All these more or less exuberant outbursts of spontaneous joy greatly offended the Pharisees and other formal religionists; and while it would not be correct to say that our Lord designedly arranged circumstances in which the contrasts would be clearly manifested, still the conditions in which they were so displayed were admirable Parables in action of some of the deepest truths of His kingdom. His attitude stood in such clear contrast to the general character of the religious people round about Him, that the consciousness of it must have been felt by all the onlookers; but in addition to this fact was the whole teaching about His kingdom, which, as set forth in Parable and precept, was to be a kingdom of gladness
Field - ...
A knowledge of certain peculiarities of the fields of Palestine is helpful to the full understanding of several of the Parables of our Lord and some other passages in the Gospels. Then, if the owner were killed in battle, or died in a far country, no one might know where his treasures were hid; and, according to usage, such valuables when found, if no owner appeared to claim them, belonged to the owner of the land—a fact which gives point to the Parable of the Hid Treasure (Matthew 13:44, cf. ...
In the Parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:4, Mark 4:4, Luke 8:5), where the Authorized Version has ‘some (seeds) fell by the wayside,’ the picture is really of grains of wheat or barley which fell on the trodden pathway leading across the field, and so were left exposed where the birds could see and devour them (cf
Son, Sonship - In the former instance—the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen—the position of an only son as carrying with it sole heirship is emphasized. This serves the purpose of the Parable; but it may be doubted whether such an occurrence was common in actual life. The Parable of the Two Sons (Matthew 21:28 ff. ’ Some of His most noticeable Parables and illustrative sayings are based on the relation of father and son as best representing the relation between God and man (see, e
King (2) - Jerusalem ‘the city of the great king’ (Matthew 5:35), the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (18:23); and in particular, the Parable of the Marriage Feast (22:1ff. 34, 40; probably, however, we have in this passage reminiscences of some older Parable, which had to do with a king and not with the Messiah at all
Abraham - The Parable says nothing of any superior piety or faith exhibited by Lazarus, which might win for him a more exalted position than others. ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ like the Hades in which the rich man lifts up his eyes, is part of the figurative or pictorial setting of the Parable, and indicates no more than a haven of repose and felicity, the home and resting-place of the righteous with Abraham, who is the typical example of righteousness. The Parable is on the plane of popular belief, and of set purpose employs the imagery which would be most familiar and intelligible to the hearers. † Abraham - The Parable says nothing of any superior piety or faith exhibited by Lazarus, which might win for him a more exalted position than others. ‘Abraham’s bosom,’ like the Hades in which the rich man lifts up his eyes, is part of the figurative or pictorial setting of the Parable, and indicates no more than a haven of repose and felicity, the home and resting-place of the righteous with Abraham, who is the typical example of righteousness. The Parable is on the plane of popular belief, and of set purpose employs the imagery which would be most familiar and intelligible to the hearers. † Nathan - Nathan convicted David of his sin in the case of Uriah by the beautiful Parable of the poor man's lamb (2 Samuel 12:1-15; 2 Samuel 12:25; Psalm 51)
Murmur, Murmuring - ’ Hostile murmuring is found in the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:11), and in the story of the Anointing in the house of Simon the leper (Mark 14:5)
Vengeance - The verb (ἐκδικέω) occurs in the Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:3; Luke 18:7-8) in the sense of affording protection from a wrong-doer and so vindicating the right of the injured person
Torch - With our presen slender knowledge of the marriage customs of the Jews in the time of our Lord, it is impossible to determine exactly the nature of the torches or lamps of the Parable, but the balance of probability seems to incline to some kind of lamp-torch lifted high into the air
Brotherly Love - He declared that the second great commandment is, “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself” (Mark 12:31 ), and in the Parable of the Good Samaritan He explained who that neighbor is (Luke 10:25-37 )
Find - To unriddle to solve as, to find out the meaning of a Parable of an enigma
Joash - ' Joash in a Parable called Judah a thistle, and himself a cedar, and advised Amaziah to stay at home; but he would not, and Judah was smitten
Neighbour - ’ If this racial limitation is kept in view, its abrogation in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:27 ff
Observation - Against (3) is the indication of signs, such as, ‘Now learn a Parable of the fig-tree,’ etc
Common Life - We have the boldest assertion of this truth in the Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:9-14), wherein He points out that the strictest—nay, the supererogatory—performance of ritual cannot win justification in the sight of God, while simple repentance, utterly without these things, is assured of pardon and peace. the Parable of the Rich Fool, Luke 12:16-21). the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus, Luke 16:19-31). ...
Christ’s teaching as to worldly good is particularly revealed in the Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-12)
Kingdom of God - ...
Parables of the kingdom...
Jesus emphasized this mystery of the kingdom in the Parables recorded in Matthew 13 (Galatians 3:28-29; see Parable). The Parable of the seed and the soils shows that because people are free to accept or reject the message of the kingdom, most reject it. The Parable of the wheat and the weeds teaches that in the present world those who are in God’s kingdom live alongside those who are not; but in the day of judgment, when God’s kingdom will be established openly, believers will be saved and the rest punished (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:34-43). ...
The Parables of the mustard seed and the yeast illustrate that although the kingdom may appear to have insignificant beginnings, it will one day have worldwide power and authority (Matthew 13:31-33). The Parables of the hidden treasure and the valuable pearl illustrate that when people are convinced of the priceless and lasting value of the kingdom of God, they will make any sacrifice to enter it (Matthew 13:44-46). The Parable of the fishing net shows that these will be separated in God’s decisive judgment at the close of the age (Matthew 13:47-50)
Night (2) - Such annoyances would be encountered by the host in the Parable, who, coming to beg bread, arrived at midnight after stumbling through the narrow streets of the village (Luke 11:5 etc. In the Parable of the Ten Virgins the guests assembled at nightfall, but they had to tarry till midnight before the bridegroom came, the hour being chosen for the purpose of the Parable, because then they would most likely be off their guard (Matthew 25:6). Psalms 119:62); and it is not without significance that the time is midnight in the Parable in which Jesus teaches the lesson of ‘shameless’ prayer (ἀναιδία, Luke 11:8)
Lazarus - ...
The very sign which the Pharisees desired in the Parable of Lazarus (1618420467_31) is now granted in the person of one of the same name, but only stimulates them to their crowning sin, to kill Jesus, nay even to kill Lazarus too (John 12:10). Lazarus in the Parable, Luke 16:19-31. The historic Lazarus raised from the dead, yet not convincing the Jews, proves the truth stated in the Parable of Lazarus that cf6 "if they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither would they be persuaded though one rose from the dead
Love - The love demonstrated in the Parable of the good Samaritan shows that agape [1] love is not emotional love, but a response to someone who is in need. When asked to define "neighbor, " however, Jesus cited the Parable of the good Samaritana person who knowingly crossed traditional boundaries to help a wounded Jew (Luke 10:29-37 )
Hades - ...
Jesus' Parable of the rich man and Lazarus portrays additional features of this state (Luke 16:19-31 ). Usually the details of Parables should not be pressed to teach doctrine. In this case Jesus' vivid description of the basic conditions of the godly and ungodly dead is indispensable to the Parable's point. In the Parable of the rich man and Lazarus, the rich man experiences torment in Hades
Marriage - Hence the Parable of the ten virgins that went at midnight to meet the bride and bridegroom, Matthew 25:1-46 . Never was I so struck with our Lord's beautiful Parable as at this moment; and the door was shut
Biblical Commission - It was further decided that the historical narratives must be accepted as genuinely historical and not as merely having the appearance of history for the purpose of setting forth some religious idea; an exception was granted under proper restrictions where it could be solidly proved that the writer meant to give only a Parable or allegory, and not an historical narrative
Repent, Repentance - The Parable of the Prodigal Son is an outstanding illustration of this
Robber - ...
The road from Jerusalem to Jericho, the scene of the Parable of the Good Samaritan, has always had a bad name for robbers
Micah, Micaiah - The Parable which the prophet then utters is a terrible indictment against the ‘lying prophets’ of Israel; the blow which one of them thereupon gives him is answered by a further prophecy, this time directed against the false prophet who gave the blow
Elder (2) - The few cases of unofficial meaning of the term are: Luke 15:25, where it describes the ‘elder brother’ in the Parable of the Prodigal; and Matthew 15:2, Mark 7:3; Mark 7:5, where it means ‘the elders’ of a former age, the men of old from whom customs and maxims are handed down
Gain - These passages fall into three groups: (1) The parallel records of a saying repeated by all the Synoptists (Matthew 16:26, Luke 9:25, Mark 8:36); (2) the Parables of the Talents and the Pounds (Matthew 25:17; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22, Luke 19:15-16; Luke 19:18); (3) the single record of the saying in Matthew 18:13. Luke’s use of διαπραγματεύομαι, προσεργάζομαι, and ποιέ in the Parable of the Pounds) always a translation of ΚΕΡΔΑίΝΩ. ’ The thought finds its simplest and at the same time its fullest expression in the Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price, whose finder sells ‘with joy’ all that he has, to buy what he has discovered. The Parables of the Talents and the Pounds express the gain to character which comes of faithful use of powers and abilities
Harlot - In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, the far country in which he devoured his living with harlots (Luke 15:30) might be supposed to be possibly within Palestine
Drunkenness (2) - Elsewhere He warns against it indirectly, as in the Parables where He holds up drunken servants to reprobation (Matthew 24:49 = Luke 12:45). Nevertheless, that He did not overlook the fact that excess was common, and that He had an open eye for the obtrusive evils of over-indulgence, is abundantly evident from other references, as in the Parables. In the Parable of the Householder (Matthew 24:45-51 = Luke 12:42-46), the drunken characters whom He holds up to contempt are servants of one in high position, forming the ménage of a luxurious household in which creature comforts would be plentiful
Fierceness - His ‘judge not’ (Matthew 7:1), or His Parable of patience that has its part in the ‘wheat and tares’ being allowed to grow together (Matthew 13:30), or His doctrine of unlimited forgiveness (Luke 17:1-4),—these are thought to be entirely representative
Apostasy - ...
Associated New Testament concepts include the Parable of the soils, in which Jesus spoke of those who believe for a while but “fall away” in time of temptation (Luke 8:13 )
Journey, Journeyings - ...
B — 4: ὁδεύω (Strong's #3593 — Verb — hodeuo — hod-yoo'-o ) "to be on the way, journey" (from hodos, "a way"), the simplest form of the verbs denoting "to journey," is used in the Parable of the good samaritan, Luke 10:33
Like, Liken - , "and the (things) similar to these;" 1 John 3:2 ; Revelation 13:4 ; 18:18 ; 21:11,18 ; (c) of comparision in Parables, Matthew 13:31,33,44,45,47 ; 20:1 ; Luke 13:18,19,21 ; (d) of action, thought, etc. 1), is used (a) especially in the Parables, with the significance of comparing, "likening," or, in the Passive Voice, "being likened," Matthew 7:24,26 ; 11:16 ; 13:24 ; 18:23 ; 22:2 (RV, "likened"); 25:1; Mark 4:30 ; Luke 7:31 ; 13:18 , RV, "liken" (AV, "resemble"); Luke 13:20 ; in several of these instances the point of resemblance is not a specific detail, but the whole circumstances of the Parable; (b) of making "like," or, in the Passive Voice, of being made or becoming "like," Matthew 6:8 ; Acts 14:11 , "in the likeness of (men)," lit
Harlot - In the Parable of the Prodigal Son, the far country in which he devoured his living with harlots (Luke 15:30) might be supposed to be possibly within Palestine
Invitation - This is one of the reasons why He clothed so many of His doctrines in Parables and figures centred in the idea of hospitality. It was a sign of His insight and wisdom as well as of His broad sympathies, that in a community so eminently sociable as that in which He moved, He should make such free use of the machinery of hospitality for His Messianic purpose, and devise many Parables and illustrations drawn from the customs of the day, and from the etiquette that ruled the relations of hosts and guests, from the highest circles of life to the lowest. But the Parables of invitation have a wider appeal, for the relationships from which they were drawn are universal, and belong to all nations and communities where the customs of social life are honoured. These Parables are a kind of Esperanto of the spiritual life, and appeal to the universal intelligence and sympathies of mankind. His Parables are full of the sound of wedding-bells, of the voice of laughter, of the joy of a great deliverance, of the discovery of a precious and unsuspected happiness. ’ Jesus in the ‘parables of grace’ teaches us that the gospel contains something infinitely precious which is given to us, but which we could never deserve or buy. The idea of an invitation thus merges into that of response; and it is important to notice that great stress is laid on this side of the question in the Parables. In the Parable of the Marriage of the King’s Son, the first guests invited treat the offer with scorn (Matthew 22:3), and ‘make light’ of it, preferring to find their satisfaction in their own way, and even maltreating the king’s messengers. In the Parable of the Great Supper, the guests first accepted the invitation, and then, finding other more absorbing interests, sent various excuses for not attending. Returning to the Parable of the Marriage, we find a final episode in which the man without a ‘wedding-garment’ is dealt with. The care with which Jesus developed these situations in His Parables, and proclaimed the doom that followed, shows how deeply He felt the importance of a right attitude towards spiritual realities
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - And He had started to collect His materials with something like this as one of His guiding principles:-...
What surmounts the reachOf human sense, I shall delineate so,By likening spiritual to corporal forms,As may express them best; though what if EarthBe but the shadow of Heaven, and things thereinEach to other like, more than on Earth is thought?Our Lord knowing that to be the case, and taking that for one of His guiding principles in His preaching, it came about that what we call His Parables, were, in reality, not so much Parables of His at all, as they were His observations of human life, and His experiences of human life, with His divine intuitions of grace and truth irradiating and illuminating them all. In our artificial and superficial way we think of our Lord as making up His Parables as He went on with His sermons, and throwing them in just as they occurred to Him at the moment. For, not seldom His Parables were His own personal experiences, and His own immediate observations, collected and laid up in His mind and in His memory and in His heart, and to be afterwards worked up into His sermons. As we find them worked up with all the freshness and impressiveness and authority that personal experience always gives to preaching, whether that preaching is our Lord's own incomparable preaching, or such poor preaching as our own. And not the Lord's Prayer only; but that richly-favoured disciple got for himself and for his fellow-disciples and for us also, what we call the Parable of the friend at midnight. Depend upon it, He did not make up the Parable of the importunate poor man at midnight. " As much as to say-'When my soul thirsteth for Thee; when my flesh longeth for Thee; when my soul is like the man in the Parable who had a hungry traveller in his house, and had nothing to set before him; then I remember the Lord
Calling - "To call" signifies to invite to the blessings of the Gospel, to offer salvation through Christ, either by God himself, or, under his appointment, by his servants; and in the Parable of the marriage of the king's son, Matthew 22:1-14 , which appears to have given rise, in many instances, to the use of this term in the Epistles, we have three descriptions of "called" or invited persons. The doctrine of Christ's Parables is in entire contradiction to this notion of irresistible influence; for they who refused, and they who complied but partially with the calling, are represented, not merely as being left without the benefit of the feast, but as incurring additional guilt and condemnation for refusing the invitation. In our Lord's Parable it will also be observed, that the persons called are not invited as separate individuals to partake of solitary blessings; but they are called to "a feast," into a company or society, before whom the banquet is spread. When this branch of the evangelic system was fully revealed to the Apostles, and taught by them to others, that part of the meaning of our Lord's Parable which was not at first developed was more particularly discovered to his inspired followers
Banquet - The Parable of the "great supper" is in those countries literally realized. The terms of the Parable exactly accord with established custom. These circumstances furnish a beautiful and striking illustration of the Parable which our Lord uttered, when he saw how those that were invited chose the highest places
Progress - (1) The gradual realization of God’s will and purpose in the lives of men as individuals is everywhere and always the basis of moral progress in the social life and history of humanity; and therefore our Lord—no doubt designedly—illustrated the evolution of the Kingdom of God in its relation to the individual’s heart and life in His first Parable, that of the Sower (Matthew 13:1-8; Matthew 13:18-23). It was from this point of view that our Lord illustrated His ideas of human progress in His Parable of the Seed Growing Secretly (Mark 4:26-29). From these points of view also our Lord contemplated the evolution of human progress; and He so couched His ideas on the subject in His Parable of the Wheat and the Tares (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:37-43). This fact as to man’s progress our Lord likewise fully realized, and He expressed His sense of its truth and value in His Parable of the Mustard-seed (Matthew 13:31-32)—(5) Finally, the end of moral progress in the life and history of humanity will be a destiny in which every department of its individual and social life, external as well as internal, will be interpenetrated and regulated by the will and purpose of God as perfectly realized and manifested in a universal and established order of righteousness and love. Could it be anything else than this that our Lord meant by His Parable of the Leaven and the three measures of meal? (Matthew 13:33)
Allegory - Another kind of allegory is that which, in the proper and more restricted sense, may be called a Parable; and consists of a continued narration of some fictitious event, accommodated, by way of similitude, to the illustration of some important truth. ( See Parable
Enoch Book of - ’...
We have only to take the single example of the unique portrait of the ‘Son of Man’ in the Parables-eternally pre-existent with God, recognized now by the righteous, and hereafter to be owned and adored by all, even His foes-to be assured of the truth of this verdict. -Enoch takes up his Parable: God’s coming to judgment to help and bless the righteous and destroy the ungodly (i. ...
-The Parables. 1 commences ‘the second vision … of wisdom’; till the present day such wisdom has never been given as is embodied in these three Parables recounted to those that dwell on the earth (xxxvii. ...
The First Parable. ...
-The Second Parable. ...
-The Third Parable. ]'>[5]...
Third Parable resumed. ]'>[3]...
Close of Third Parable. : The Parables (formerly known as ‘the Similitudes’)...
There are three Parables (xxxviii. belongs to the Third Parable. Behind the Parables proper lie two sources, as Beer (Kautzsch’s Apok. Parables)
Alms - Our Lord says to the rich young ruler, ‘Sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven’ (Mark 10:21); in the Parable of the Judgment, the place of men is decided on the ground that they have or have not helped and relieved the Lord’s brethren (Matthew 25:34-46), and in St
Fig - It was the want of promise of future fruitfulness in the Jewish nation for which they were condemned in the acted Parable of the barren fig tree
Hindrance - Instances of these outward and inward difficulties are given in the Parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:18-23), and in that of the Tares their final elimination is predicted (Matthew 13:41)
Kingdom, Kingdom of God, Kingdom of Heaven - ...
The Parables in the gospels describe the form and objects of the kingdom while the Lord is away. In Matthew 13 the Lord spoke four Parables to the multitude; then He dismissed the people and explained the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares to His disciples and added three Parables bearing on the secret character of the kingdom
Prison (2) - In our Lord’s Parable of the Unforgiving Servant, that ungrateful wretch fell into the hands of torturers (τοῖς βασανισταῖς, Matthew 18:34)—a staff of officials whose very name is sinister
Forgiveness (2) - (b) The Parables of Luke 15, especially that of the Prodigal Son, and of the Pharisee and the Publiean in Luke 18:9-14. ...
The same may be said of the two gracious Parables of our Lord which chiefly deal with this subject. It is impossible to found accurate doctrine on a Parable only, and it is always a mistake to suppose that one Parable can cover the whole range of doctrine. But in the Parable of the Prodigal Son the lesson is impressed that the utmost failure in filial duty will be readily forgiven, if the wanderer will but repent and return. In the Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican the essential teaching is the same—the danger lest those who comply with rules of ordinary morality should so plume themselves on their obedience as to lose the sense of their own deep need and ill-desert, and the fact that grave offenders against the fundamental laws of righteousness, like the publican and the harlot, may find their way into the kingdom of grace before the self-righteous Pharisee. For (1) the whole scope of the Parable of the two debtors shows that forgiveness precedes love; (2) the latter part of Luke 7:47 enforces the same lesson; and so (3) does the absolution pronounced in Luke 7:48. The principle is not to be understood as a kind of Divine lex talionis, as in the Parable of the Unmerciful Debtor (Matthew 18:35)—that a man does not deserve mercy himself, if he will not show it to others, though this is true and appeals to a natural sense of justice. This power, while great and important, is clearly not comparable to the Divine forgiveness of the individual sinner
Immortality (2) - It will, however, be necessary to examine how far the words of Christ suggest or imply that He regarded happiness as an essential and inseparable part of the life to come, or a future existence of misery more or less prolonged as inconceivable unless it were terminated by restoration to bliss or annihilation of consciousness. The whole tone of His speech, the implications of His Parables, the sanctions with which He surrounds His encouragements and warnings, the comparative value which He teaches men to set upon heavenly and earthly things, the gravity and seriousness of His outlook into the future, all show that here at least to Him and to His hearers there was common ground; that He did not need to begin by proving to them that death was not the end of all, but that the universal postulate of religious thought of His day anticipated a renewal of personal and conscious existence after death. More than one Parable bears emphatic witness to the same belief, for example that of the King and the Wedding Feast (Matthew 22:1 ff. , and the interpretation that is given by Christ Himself of the Parable of the Sower). Here it need only be said that Parables such as those of the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Wise and Foolish Virgins, or the Wedding Feast, do not in themselves suggest or demand any inequality of treatment as regards the mere duration of the allotted punishment or reward; and that references to the Judgment, the Day of Judgment, or the Last Day are equally neutral, as far as direct statement is concerned. While the burning of the tares in the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares (Matthew 13:30), if the detail is to be pressed as anything more than the natural and appropriate setting of the story,—the legitimate and necessary end of weeds,—rather points in the direction of permanence and indestructibility. And this particular feature of the Parable might admit of interpretation as implying renovation through suffering, but is hardly satisfied by any theory of absolute cessation of being. In one context, the Parable of the Tares in St
Jonah - In this way, it is nearly universally agreed, we are to explain His words about Hades and Abraham’s bosom in the graphic Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus; i. (3) Or did both our Lord and His hearers, the scribes and Pharisees, regard the story of Jonah as a Parable or fictitious narrative, like others in the OT and in the Apocrypha, and did He thus refer to it? Although in view of Tobit 14:4; Tobit 14:8, 3 Maccabees 6:8, Josephus Ant. Even so firm a maintainer of the historicity of Jonah as Huxtable writes in the Speaker’s Commentary: ‘The reference to Jonah’s experiences, as yielding an illustrative parallel to what would be seen in His own case, or even as predictive of it, seems as cogent on the supposition of the book being an inspired Parable, as on that of its being authentic narrative
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - HAD we been with our Lord on the Mount of Olives that day, this Parable would have ended far differently from the way we would have expected it to end. And at the beginning of this Parable we would have felt sure that before it closed the Divine Preacher would take the side of the despised and untalented servant, and would say some of His severest things about the rich, and about the great, and about those who were full of all manner of prosperity. Till it is to be feared that his Master's prophecy at the end of this Parable was, some of it, fulfilled in that manse that Sabbath night
the Importunate Widow - But there are some other souls who say unto their Lord as soon as He has spoken this about the widow and her adversary to them: Lo, now speakest Thou plainly, and speakest no Parable. O sin! O sin! How thou hast persecuted my soul down to the ground! How thou hast robbed and desolated my soul! How thou hast made my life a burden to me! How thou hast driven me sometimes beside myself with thy cruel and bitter bondage! How my soul sometimes seeks death to escape from thee! O thou foul and cruel tyrant, I will surely be revenged upon thee yet!...
And He spake this Parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray. My matter is, shall He find such prayer in me? Shall He find me in my bed, or on my knees? Shall I be reading this Parable of His for the ten thousandth time to keep my heart from fainting? Shall, Avenge me of mine adversary, be on my lips at the moment when the judgment-angel puts the last trump to his lips? And shall I be found of him on my knees, and with my finger on this scripture, when the trumpet shall sound, and I shall be changed?...
Set - In Mark 4:30 it is used of "setting" forth by Parable the teaching concerning the kingdom of God, RV, "shall we set (it) forth" (AV, "compare"). 3), "to set forth," of a Parable, Matthew 13:24 , RV (AV, "put forth"); "to set before," of food, Mark 6:41 ; 8:6 (twice),7; Luke 9:16 ; 10:8 ; 11:6 ; Acts 16:34 ; 1 Corinthians 10:27
Growing - § Jesus Christ - He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of Parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected. Here he taught in public, and answered a lawyer's question with the Parable of the Good Samaritan. In Peræa, on his way to Jerusalem, he uttered the Parables of the lost sheep, the unjust steward, the rich man and Lazarus, and the pharisee and the publican; five precepts concerning divorce: blessed little children; taught the rich young ruler. A third time he foretold his death and resurrection, and approaching Jericho healed blind men, called Zacchæus, and gave the Parable of the pounds. At the beginning of the last week before the crucifixion Jesus made a public entry into the city, spoke Parables and warnings, lamented over Jerusalem, praised the widow's mite, met certain Greeks and predicted his second coming with solemn warnings confirmed by the Parables of the ten virgins, the five talents, and the sheep and the goats
Proverbs, the Book of - So Balaam's "parable" is prophecy in figurative language (Numbers 23:7-10; 1 Samuel 10:12; Ezekiel 12:22-23; Ezekiel 17:2-3; Ezekiel 18:2; Ezekiel 20:49; Ezekiel 24:3; Luke 4:23). In Job 27:1 "parable" (Job 29:1) means a figurative, sententious, weighty embodiment of wisdom, not in this case short, but containing Job's whole argument (Psalms 49:4, maashaal)
Premeditation - The Parables of the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of Great Price are the records of those who thoughtfully weigh all lesser things against the great adventure (Matthew 13:44-45). The Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins is obviously the story of premeditation and its worth. the Parable of the Rich Fool, Luke 12:15-21)
Micaiah - 6) says that it was Micaiah who predicted ("in the word of Jehovah," Haggai 1:13) death by a lion to the neighbor who would not smite him, and who, disguised with ashes, under the Parable of one letting go a prisoner entrusted to him made Ahab in his hour of triumph, when the mortification would be the greater, condemn himself out of his own mouth, to lose his life for letting Benhadad escape (1 Kings 20:35-43)
Rock (2) - The word ‘rock’ occurs in Luke 8:6; Luke 8:13, in the Parable of the Sower
Joy - Luke places three Parables together in which God, in two instances with the angels, rejoices at the redemption. The Parable of the man who liquifies his assets to purchase the treasure hidden in the field teaches us that God has joy in bringing about the atonement (Matthew 13:44 )
Loaf - ...
Luke 11:5 (b) This Parable is concerning the soul winner
Boldness - In reference to speech, it is plainness and candour without reserve or ambiguity, without Parable or metaphor, without hesitation or misgiving, in the utterance of it (John 7:13; John 11:14; John 16:25; John 16:29, Acts 4:29; Acts 13:46 where παρρησιάζεσθαι is used)
Fathers - 330–333), is implied in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus
Vine - Vine twigs are particularly mentioned as used for fuel in dressing their food, by D'Arvieux, La Roque, and others: Ezekiel says, in his Parable of the vine, used figuratively for the people of God, "Shall wood be taken thereof to do any work? Or will men take a pin of it to hang any vessel thereon? Behold, it is cast into the fire for fuel," Ezekiel 15:3-4
Descent Into Hades - In the Parable of Dives and Lazarus ( Luke 16:19-31 ), while the soul of Dives was said to be in torment the soul of Lazarus was taken to the society of Abraham
Paradox - Parable, p
Teaching of Jesus - ): ‘From the Kingdom as present, Jesus as already constituted (dagewesener) and present Messiah is inseparable; accordingly He cannot Himself have spoken of it. ]'>[5] of which His use of Parables deserves special notice. ...
As regards Jesus’ use of the Parable proper, as distinct from mere figurative maxims or illustrations, it is often strangely overlooked that the Gospels do not represent it as a form of communicating religious knowledge employed by Jesus from the first. , Jesus is said to have ‘taught in Parables’ (Mark 4:2, Matthew 13:3; Mark 3:23, Luke 5:36; Luke 6:39 do not prove the contrary), but also from the fact that His disciples ask Him as to the meaning of the first recorded Parable, plain as its meaning is to us (Mark 4:10; Mark 4:13). That in itself is significant; and its significance is enhanced by the scene which precedes the first Parables, when He dwells on the spiritual ties binding Him to the disciples, in contrast even to His own blood relations. : ‘He proceeded to teach them in Parables many things, and to say to them in his teaching, Listen (Mark 4:2) … He who has ears to listen, let him listen (Mark 4:9). Then, after two more Parables,† [7] we read: ‘And with such Parables, and many of them, he used to speak to them the word just as they were able to listen; but without Parable used he not to speak to them, whilst privately to his own disciples he used to resolve (the meaning of) all things’ (Mark 4:33 f. is a single coherent conception of the function of Parable as a vehicle of religious knowledge, viz. But the teacher’s ulterior object in Parable, as in plainer modes of speech (as the context of the simile of casting pearls before swine helps to make clear, Matthew 7:6 ff
Ezekiel, Theology of - ...
More than any other prophet, Ezekiel acted out his message in Parables. Chapter 16 describes the nation's history in a Parable. ...
In chapter 23 using the most graphic sexual imagery found anywhere in the Bible, Ezekiel set out the Parable of the sisters Oholah and Oholibah. ...
The almost pornographic character of this Parable serves several purposes. Third, the Parable illustrates the folly of Jerusalem, in that its people did not learn the lessons vividly acted out before them in the destruction of Samaria
Confession (of Sin) - And as confession is inseparable from true penitence, being the form which the latter instinctively and inevitably takes in its approaches to God, we may say that all through His public ministry, by insisting upon the need of repentance, Jesus taught the necessity of the confession of sin. In the Parable of the Prodigal Son the prodigal’s first resolution ‘when he came to himself’ was to go to his father and acknowledge his sin (Luke 15:17-18); and his first words on meeting him were the frank and humble confession, ‘Father, I have sinned’ (Luke 15:21). The Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican, again, hinges upon this very matter of the acknowledgment of sin and unworthiness
the Rich Man And Lazarus - Luther was asked whether he took the story of the rich man and Lazarus for a Parable, or for an actual fact. ...
Now, whether it is pure history, or pure Parable, or founded on fact, this tremendous Scripture is equally true and is equally solemnising to us, since it comes straight to us from our Lord's own lips. I used to read this Parable so superficially as to think that the rich man is where he is altogether because of his starvation of Lazarus
Symbol - Like the proverb and Parable, the symbol implies a connexion between two things of which one is concrete and physical, the other abstract and referring to intellectual, moral, and spiritual matters
Habakkuk - The oppressed nations "shall take up a Parable," i
Samaritan, the Good - ‘And who,’ he asked, ‘is my “neighbour”?’ Jesus answered with a Parable. ; the works of Trench, Bruce, Dods, and Taylor on the Parables; Edersheim, Life and Times, ii
Joy - Then Jesus told three Parables—the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the loving father. The explicit theme of each Parable is joy over one sinner who repents
Thieves - Even on the high road between Jericho and Jerusalem they assailed travelers, as the Parable of the good Samaritan shows (Luke 10:30)
Wealth And Materialism - Jesus' references to money in the New Testament consist mainly of stories or Parables which show the dangers of wealth. In the Parable of the seed and the sower Jesus warned that riches and the pursuit of pleasure may keep some from maturing in the faith (Luke 8:14 )
Regeneration - They are unable to explain it upon any principles of their own, and therefore wish of all things to class it under the character of metaphor or Parable
Mercy - Our Lord strongly recommended this act of mercy in the Parable of the man who fell among thieves, and was relieved by the poor Samaritan: and in the conclusion he adds, 'Go and do thou likewise, ' Luke 10:30-37
Marriage - " They had marriage feasts, as in the Parable of Matthew 22 (when a special garment was provided for each of the guests), and as the one to which the Lord, His mother, and His disciples were invited at Cana, where the Lord made the water into wine
Pre-Existence - A similar conclusion might be drawn from the language of the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen (see esp
Righteous, Righteousness - Such is the teaching of the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32). Again and again Christ, by means of a series of Parables, teaches the future suffering of the wicked. It will suffice to quote one which shows the unity of the Divine love in its two aspects of mercifulness and sternness—the Parable of the king that took account of his servants and punished him who showed no mercy to his fellow (Matthew 18:23-35). Thus δικαιοσύνη, which is very close in meaning to our modern word ‘morality,’ is throughout based on religion, and treated as inseparable from it. To the scribe’s question, ‘Who is my neighbour?,’ Christ replies by a Parable, in which a Samaritan is represented as doing for one of his traditional enemies, the Jews, what the priest and Levite of the man’s own race had left undone (Luke 10:29 ff. The teaching of the Parable of the Prodigal Son is still more emphatic on this point
Sanctify, Sanctification - But Jesus bracketed the commandment to ‘love thy neighbour as thyself’ with this ‘first and greatest’ (Matthew 22:39 ||); and the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) has been interpreted as teaching that ‘charity is the true sanctity’ (Bruce). This is suggested in the Parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:3, Mark 4:3); the Parable of the Seed as growing up—‘first the blade, then the ear, then the full corn in the ear’ (Mark 4:28); and in all the figures of fruit-bearing, because fruit-bearing is the late result of a long process (cf. Another set of Parables represents men as servants of a long-absent Lord, who have to show diligence in trading with the pounds, fidelity in the use of talents, and patience in watching (Matthew 25:14, Luke 19:12, Matthew 24:42). Matthew 25:10; Matthew 25:14-30, Luke 19:12-27, Mark 10:29-30 ||); and if heavenly rewards are granted to those morally fit, as is taught clearly by the Parable of the Pounds (Luke 19), these passages imply that sanctification is advanced by a life of obedience to God’s will
Sermon on the Mount - 10); the kingdom explained in Parables (chap. ...
The Beatitudes with their initiatory "blessed" (5:3-11) prepare for this title given first to the apostles as those who have heard and understood the Parables (13:16) and then to Peter who confesses Jesus as Christ (16:17). The sermon's Parable of the two houses (7:24-27), a brief apocalypse in its own right, sets the literary tone for the second discourse with its Parables (chap. The Parable of the houses describes the final judgment (7:24-27)
Death (2) - The thought of it ought therefore to guard us against over-anxiety about the things of this world, and to keep us always watchful, and mindful of the true issues of life (‘This night thy soul shall be required of thee’ [3]; Parable of Rich Man and Lazarus Foundation - The figurative use of θεμέλιος goes back to our Lord’s Parable of the Wise Builder-ὅς ἕσκαψε καὶ ἐβάθυνε, καὶ ἕθηκε θεμέλιον ἐπὶ τὴν πέτραν-‘who digged and went deep and laid a foundation upon the rock’ (Luke 6:48). The somewhat involved metaphor is perhaps due to a reminiscence of our Lord’s Parable (Luke 16:9), but specially of Matthew 6:20 where the verb is the same and also the duty enjoined: θησαυπρίζετε δὲ ὑμῖν θησαυροὺς ἐν οὐρανῷ, ‘lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven
Rock - ]'>[2] ) of the Parable of the Sower; i
Repentance - Moreover, He illustrated His understanding of repentance in the Parable of the prodigal who returned to the father ( Luke 15:11-32 )
Seeing - On Matthew 13:14-16 || see Parable, p. Thus the miracles of giving sight to the blind become peculiarly significant; but we need not, therefore, assume that, though they are in this way acted Parables, the narratives of such miracles are not to be regarded as of any historical value, but as mere pictorial representations of the spiritual truths they are meant to convey
Leaven - ...
The effect of leaven in raising a mass of dough (see above) is the basis of our Lord’s Parable of the Leaven (Matthew 13:33, Luke 13:20-21), which sets forth the gradual and pervasive influence of the Kingdom of God upon the whole of human society. —Trench, Dods, Bruce, Orelli on the Parables; Winterbotham, Kingdom of Heaven, 70; Drummond, Stones Rolled Away, 144; Scott-Holland, God’s City, 143; Macmillan, Two Worlds are Ours, 153; R
Fig (Tree) - All the efforts He put forth, plus those of His disciples, are represented in this Parable by the efforts made to fertilize the tree
Beam And Mote - Bruce suggests that the Parable comes in at this point, because censoriousness is a natural fault of young disciples
Garments - In the Parable of the wedding garment, the king expected to have found all his guests clad in roes of honor of his own providing, Matthew 22:11
Leaven - ...
The effect of leaven in raising a mass of dough (see above) is the basis of our Lord’s Parable of the Leaven (Matthew 13:33, Luke 13:20-21), which sets forth the gradual and pervasive influence of the Kingdom of God upon the whole of human society. —Trench, Dods, Bruce, Orelli on the Parables; Winterbotham, Kingdom of Heaven, 70; Drummond, Stones Rolled Away, 144; Scott-Holland, God’s City, 143; Macmillan, Two Worlds are Ours, 153; R
Oil - A similar usage is found in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:34)
Vine, Allegory of the - When we compare it with the Parables and similitudes of the Synoptic Gospels, we realize at once what a vast difference there is between them. It has been suggested that the allegory of the vine may have been originally a Parable which John has worked up into its present form. The main point in the Parable could not have been that the increasing fruitfulness of the branches depended upon their abiding in the vine, but that this abiding might be forfeited by continued unfruitfulness. But the Evangelist, who ever puts the personal relation to Christ in the foreground, made this abiding in Christ as the condition of fruitfulness in the religious life the central thought, though in John 15:2; John 15:6 the original tendency of the Parable is still apparent (in Meyer’s Kommentar, 1893, ad loc
Friendship - In Parables and conversations Christ indirectly drops sentences which show how general was His observation of all the relations into which people might enter. (1) In the Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Silver, He touches upon the much debated basis of friendship. (a) The Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-9), ‘who made friends out of the mammon of unrighteousness,’ illustrates the commercial type. —(b) The exclusive type of friendship is displayed in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15). Thus Jesus broadened the stream of friendship by bringing neighbours within the same flow of feeling, as is set forth in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30 ff
Headship - The word ‘head’ (κεφαλή), as applied to the relation of Christ to His Church, occurs only three times in the Gospels, and there in the passages in the Synoptics (Matthew 21:42 || Mark 12:10 || Luke 20:17) in which, applying the lesson of the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, Jesus quotes Psalms 118:22 in the Septuagint version, ‘The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner’ (οὗτος ἐγενήθη εἰς κεφαλἡν γωνίας), where the expression κεφαλὴν γωνίας is an exact rendering of the Hebrew רא̇שׁ פּנְּה. Paul gives (Colossians 2:19)—‘the head, from which all the body by joints and bands having nourishment ministered and knit together, increaseth with the increase of God’—corresponds to what Christ says in His Parable of the Vine of the source of life and fruitfulness, with the thought of the healthy flow of life-giving sap which His words suggest: ‘As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself except it abide in the vine, no more can ye except ye abide in me
Widow - He reversed the standards by which people were judged with the Parable of the widow's tithe: the widow gave from her poverty while the wealthy merely offered from their abundance (Mark 12:41-42 ). In another Parable, the church was compared with an importunate widow who kept demanding that her case be heard
Golden Rule - And with regard to the burning question, "Who is my neighbor?" Jesus responds with the Parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-36 )
Forgiveness - In the Lord's Prayer (Matthew 6:12 ; Luke 11:4 ) and the Parable of the Unforgiving Servant (Matthew 18:12-35 ) Jesus clearly indicated such is the case: “But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (Matthew 6:15 )
Judgment Day - Very similar in emphasis is the Parable of the sheep and goats (Matthew 25:31-56 )
Understanding - The former ‘does not recognize himself as standing in any relation to the word which he hears or to the kingdom of grace which that word proclaims’ (Trench, Parables, in loc. In Matthew 13:51, concluding the series of Parables, Jesus asks His disciples if they have apprehended the meaning of all that He has said. He does not use the special thought in his account of the exposition of the Parable of the Sower
Liberality - His injunctions to love enemies (Matthew 5:44-46, Luke 6:27-28), to refrain from passing judgment on others (Matthew 7:1-5, Luke 6:37), and indirectly, the Parable of the Good Samaritan, afford instances in which He condemns the spirit of prejudice and inculcates an open mind and generous bearing towards others
Image - 100: 10, of certain cups or chalices, as Beliarmine pretends, on which was represented the Parable of the good shepherd carrying the lost sheep on his shoulders: but this instance only proves that the church, at that time, did not think emblematical figures unlawful ornaments of chalices
Grape - Jeremiah uses the same image, and applies it to the same purpose, in an elegant paraphrase of this part of Isaiah's Parable, in his flowing and plaintive manner: "I planted thee a Sorek, a scion perfectly genuine
Poverty - Nathan’s Parable, 2 Samuel 12:1-6 ); but there was little permanent poverty
Reconciliation - The Parable of the Prodigal Son is a typical Parable or reconciliation (Luke 15:11 ff
Heart - The Parable of the Rich Fool is a vivid picture of the real poverty of the man who trusts in his worldly success and is not rich in the things that belong to the inner life (Luke 12:16-21); while in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus there is another picture, fitted to break down the self-confidence of the prosperous, showing that the day will come when conditions may be reversed, and when heart-qualities alone will determine the status and happiness of men (Luke 16:19-31)
the Unmerciful Servant - And how well that case fitted into the kingdom of heaven for one Parable of that kingdom, all the world has seen ever since that day on which our Lord gave that procurator's case as His answer to Peter's complaint. He is to have a great, a universal, and an irrevocable, reckoning time with all men at the end of this life; but the first point in this Parable is this, that He has preliminary and preparatory reckoning times in which He begins to take account of His servants even in this world
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - The Parable of the friend at midnight was not so much a Parable after all
Heart - The Parable of the Rich Fool is a vivid picture of the real poverty of the man who trusts in his worldly success and is not rich in the things that belong to the inner life (Luke 12:16-21); while in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus there is another picture, fitted to break down the self-confidence of the prosperous, showing that the day will come when conditions may be reversed, and when heart-qualities alone will determine the status and happiness of men (Luke 16:19-31)
Reconciliation - The Parable of the Prodigal Son is a typical Parable or reconciliation (Luke 15:11 ff
Gentiles - The judgment scene in Jesus' Parable envisioned “all nations” gathered before the glorious throne (Matthew 25:31-32 )
Hosea - ...
Hosea was to act a Parable, by taking a 'wife of whoredoms,' which may mean that the woman that he was to take would be unfaithful to him; but grace abounds over sin
Enthusiasm - That this mood was temporary Jesus recognized in the Parable of the Sower (Mark 4:5-6)
Gerizim - Gerizim that Abimelech, Gideon’s son, spoke his Parable of the trees (Judges 8:31; Judges 9:1; Judges 9:7; Judges 9:20)
Goodness - ), or in the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25 ff
Chance - in Luke 10:30, where in the Parable of the Good Samaritan the priest is said to have been going down that way ‘by chance
Comfort (2) - The same idea of a compensating ‘weight of glory’ for ‘light affliction which is but for a moment’ (2 Corinthians 4:17) is involved in the Parable where Abraham says of Lazarus, ‘Now he is comforted’ (Luke 16:25)
Friends Friendship - When, for example, Martha was feverishly busy with domestic cares, Mary was with Jesus, not saying much perhaps, nor even listening in that hour to Parable or precept, but ministering to Him the ‘one thing needful’-the quiet, loving, sympathetic response to One who cased a heavy spirit to her as He could not do to His uncomprehending apostles
Publishing - His use of Parables was to avoid the casting of pearls before swine. In the explanation of the Parable of the Sower a special condition of fertility was the right understanding. He explained the meaning of His Parables to His disciples in private (Mark 4:34). Towards the end of His ministry He dispensed with Parables in speaking to them (John 16:25; John 16:29)
Christ, Christology - ...
The Parables of the kingdom shed further light on Jesus' Christology of inaugurated eschatology, since a true metaphor is more than a sign because it bears the reality to which it refers. In the Parable of the children in the marketplace (1618420468_2 ) Jesus declares with authority his right to invite outcasts to open table fellowship, thereby going beyond nationalist and ethnic interests to include all who will eat with this friend of tax collectors and sinners (implicitly fulfilling the vision of Isaiah 49:5-13 ). In the twin Parables of the treasure hidden in a field and the pearl of great price (Matthew 13:44-46 ) Jesus describes the surprise and joy of discovering and acquiring great treasure, implying that the saving reign of God is present to be discovered and acquired. In the Parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-32 ) the reprobate who has become like a Gentile is forgiven and restored to the father's table, in reversal of traditional theology that the son was "dead. The Parables of the lost sheep and the lost coin (Luke 15:3-10 ) bear out the same theme of searching, finding, and rejoicing that characterizes Jesus' inauguration of the messianic time of salvation, as do the Parables of the great supper (Matthew 22:1-14 ; Luke 14:16-24 ) and the unjust steward (Luke 16:1-9 ), which emphasize the importance of immediate decision. The Parable of the sower (Mark 4:3-9 ) contrasts the small amount of seed and the bountiful harvest
Leprosy - Tradition has made the Lazarus of the Parable a leper, and the terms lazzaro for leper and lazar-house for leper hospital were a result of this. But though Lazarus was ‘full of sores,’ the very account in the Parable that he lay in such intimate contact with passers-by would, apart from the express omission of the statement in the Parable, make his being a leper highly improbable
Children of God, Sons of God - especially the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and the use of the term ‘the Father’ in the conversation with the woman of Samaria). again the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Acts 17:28, and perhaps Hebrews 2:10)
Retribution (2) - There are in the Gospels no ‘poetic justice’ Parables, no limelight scenes of sensational punishments of evil-doers or dramatic vindication of virtue. The doctrine of personal responsibility is indeed fundamental to Christianity, and it is necessary to refer to only a few typical passages: Parables (Matthew 13:24; Matthew 18:23; Matthew 22:2; Matthew 22:25, Luke 12:16; Luke 12:16), Rewards (Matthew 19:28, Luke 14:14), Punishments (Matthew 5:26; Matthew 10:28; Matthew 12:36, Mark 9:42; Mark 14:21, John 5:29). So in the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus, ‘the gulf’ is the character* Wages - In some of his Parables Jesus instructed his disciples to be diligent about their calling since a day of judgment would reward the righteous as well as recompense the unrighteous (Matthew 24:45-51 ; 25:14-30,31-46 ). The Parable of the unforgiving servant demonstrates that all are deeply in debt to God; all debts that human beings owe to each other are trivial in comparison. The Parable of the workers in the vineyard shows that God is in the business of hiring employees until the very end of the working day
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - ...
You may not be much of a merchant man in the world of books, and yet this Parable may be found entirely true of you in some other world of your own. ...
...
But then all that only ends, as every Parable of His has ended, in making our Blessed Lord Himself the Pearl of all pearls to us
Wealth - Further, in the Parables of the Pounds and the Talents ( Luke 19:12 , Matthew 25:14 ) He teaches, under the symbolism of money, that men are not owners but stewards of all they possess; while in the Parable of the Unjust Steward He points out one of the true uses of wealth namely, to relieve the poor, and so to insure a welcome from them when the eternal tabernacles are entered ( Luke 16:9 )
Temperance - ...
In the Parable of the Prodigal Son we see the depth of degradation into which a man is brought when he breaks away from his God
Kingdom of God - More than a hundred references to the kingdom appear in the Gospels, many in Jesus' Parables. See Parable. ...
In His Parables Jesus spoke of the kingdom in many different ways. ...
Jesus spoke Aramaic; the Gospel writers translated Jesus' sermons and Parables into Greek
Immortality - He speaks of it directly in the Parable of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31 ) and in the judgment scene of Matthew 25:31-46
Levite - In the Parable of the good Samaritan both a priest and Levite are mentioned, though not in a commendable manner (Luke 10:31-32 )
Husbandman - ...
But chiefly in the exquisite Parables do we see that power of observation in the material world which makes Jesus so engaging as a child of nature, who lived much, and lived free, in the open air of Palestine. ...
One Parable must be specially noted—the story of the Wicked Husbandmen (Matthew 21:33-43, Mark 12:1-9, Luke 20:9 ff
Selfishness - the Parable of the Rich Fool, Luke 12:16-21, and the profound statement of the same truth in Christ’s Temptation in the Wilderness, Matthew 4:1-11, Luke 4:2-13). ...
That the denial of selfish desires is not to be regarded as an end in itself, is made clear by a whole series of Parables uttered by our Lord upon the subject of labour. Parables of the Talents, Matthew 25:14-30; the Pounds, Luke 19:11-27; the Servants Watching, Luke 12:36-48; the Ten Virgins, Matthew 25:1-13; the Labourers in the Vineyard, Matthew 20:1-15). on the NT; standard works on the Parables; Beyschlag’s and Weiss’ NT Theology; Müller, Christian Doct
Sight - see Parable, p
Cosmopolitanism - On the other hand, our Lord speaks the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30 ff
Abba - Hence the father in the Parable
Adoption - They could scarcely be forgetful of the affecting Parable of the prodigal son; and it is under the same view that St
Jericho - Nothing can be more savage than the present aspect of these wild and gloomy solitudes, through which runs the very road where is laid the scene of that exquisite Parable, the good Samaritan, and from that time to the present, it has been the haunt of the most desperate bandits, being one of the most dangerous in Palestine
Preaching - But in process of time the sermon assumed to a large extent a purely edifying character; it utilized the tale, Parable, allegory, in enforcing the lessons of morality and religion, and developed truly homiletical features, without, however, losing its Scriptural colouring
Compassion - In the Parable of the unforgiving servant, the master had compassion and forgave the servant's debt (Matthew 18:27 )
New Commandment - There is no indication of a wider demand, in the spirit of the Sermon on the Mount and the Parable of the Good Samaritan
Temperance - ...
In the Parable of the Prodigal Son we see the depth of degradation into which a man is brought when he breaks away from his God
Food - Passing now to the ‘food-trees’ ( Leviticus 19:23 ), we may follow the example of Jotham in his Parable ( Judges 9:8 ff. ...
Next to the olive in rank, Jotham’s Parable places the fig-tree, whose ‘sweetness’ and ‘good fruit’ it extols (Judges 9:11 ). A kid, as less valuable than a well-fleeced lamb, was the most frequent and readiest victim, especially among the poor, a fact which gives point to the complaint of the Elder Son in the Parable ( Luke 15:29 )
Metaphor - Browne, The Parables of the Gospels, p. ’ A Parable is an extended simile, and an allegory an extended metaphor. Thus the Greek παραβολή in the NT means not only ‘parable’ but ‘comparison’ (Hebrews 9:9), and in Luke 4:23 the proverb or adage ‘Physician, heal thyself,’ is called παραβολή. מָשָׁל means not only ‘parable’ but ‘by-word,’ ‘similitude’; and it is used more generally still of ethical maxims, didactic poems, or odes. ...
According to König, ‘Metaphor springs from the putting together of comparable instances of the material and visible and the ideal spheres’ (Stilistik, Rhetorik, Poetik in Bezug auf die biblische Litteratur komparativisch dargestellt). ’...
Not only are there no Parables outside the Synoptists, but the use of metaphorical language is both more complicated and more extended
Sympathy - The teaching is further illustrated in several of the Parables. The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30) taught the universal brotherhood of man, apart from the artificial distinctions of creed and country; that of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:20) shows the Great Woman - ...
As a master teacher, Jesus used Parables to teach about the kingdom of God. By capturing their attention and commitment through Parables, He offered them a place in the kingdom. ...
God's seeking activity is the theme of two Parables, the lost sheep begins, “What man of you” and the Parable of the lost coin, “What woman. ...
The twin Parables in Luke 13:18-20 point to the way the kingdom of God grows. His Parables taught that both women and men would be involved in the kingdom work. )...
Jesus' Parable of the ten maidens, five foolish and five wise, hints at the way Jesus saw and dealt with woman (Matthew 25:1-13 )
Heir Heritage Inheritance - , are used literally, as in the Parable of the Vineyard (Mark 12:7, Matthew 21:38, Luke 20:14), where, however, there is a metaphorical interpretation (see (c)); so in Luke 12:13, where Jesus is asked to divide the inheritance between two brothers, apparently to settle a dispute, and in Galatians 4:1, where the son, the heir, is as a servant during his nonage, though lord of all the property, the reference being to the Law and the Gospel. He describes Himself as the Heir in the Parable of the Vineyard. The kingdom has already begun (Matthew 3:2, and the Parables of ch
Metaphors - Parables and allegories are similes or metaphors elaborately extended, and do not come into the scope of this discussion (see Parable). This metaphorical method of speech was habitual with Jesus (Matthew 13:34, Mark 4:11, where παραβολή does not mean ‘parable’ in the modern sense, but metaphorical comparison), and was used, so His disciples thought, to hide the meaning of His words from all except the inner circle of believers
Wealth - The Parable of sheep and goats most likely refers only to needy disciples ("brothers"), but the Parable of the good Samaritan generalizes the principle to embrace even one's enemies, including those of entirely different religions and races (Luke 10:25-37 )
Reserve - When Peter asked if the Parable of the Servants waiting for their Lord was addressed to the disciples specially, or to all, Jesus did not answer (Luke 12:41)
Union - That which was so effected was afterwards in many ways confirmed (John 6:68; John 20:22), and is described in the Parable of the Vine and its Branches (ch
Service - ...
Throughout the parabolic teaching of Jesus the use of this word is sufficiently frequent to be significant; but if He had given no other teaching in this connexion, His mind would have been sufficiently expressed in His acted Parable on the occasion when He Himself stooped to the most menial of all menial service, and washed the feet of His disciples
Care - it follows as a deduction from the Parable spoken against covetousness and the closing saying, ‘So is every one that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God
Debt, Debtor - Jesus draws a picture of imprisonment, and even slavery, for debt in the Parable of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:23-35; cf
Numbers as Symbols - In the Parable of the virgins there were five wise and five foolish
Agriculture - The Parable of the sower (Matthew 13:3-23 ; Luke 8:5-15 ) provides an interesting account of grain sowing and the subsequent fate of the seed
Beauty - , Luke 13:8); while in sharp contrast with the above, there was His denunciation by descriptive Parable and stern rebuke of the hopeless offensiveness of the Pharisaic type (Matthew 21:19; Matthew 21:23, Luke 20:19 etc
Dropsy - Luke as part of a narrative which is peculiar to his Gospel, if, indeed, the Parable in Luke 14:16-24 be not identical with that in Matthew 22:2-14—a conjecture which does not seem likely (see, however, Wright’s Synopsis of the Gospels in Greek, p
Fruit (2) - The original application of the Parable is, doubtless, to the scribes and the chief priests who rejected Jesus, but it is equally applicable to any who think they can do as they please with their life and ignore all obligations to the Giver and Lord
Matthew, Gospel According to - ...
In the above sketch of the picture drawn for us in the First Gospel of the Person and teaching of the Messiah, we have purposely omitted the Parables. Most of the Parables in this Gospel are Parables of the Kingdom. Luke’s Parables, inculcate some Christian virtue or practice, such as love of one’s neighbour, or earnestness in prayer, but convey some lesson about the nature of the Kingdom and the period of preparation for it. Thus the Parable of the Sower illustrates the varying reception met with by the good news of the Kingdom as it is preached amongst men. ...
The Parables of the Mustard Seed and of the Leaven describe the way in which the good news of the Kingdom spreads rapidly and penetrates deeply into human society. That of the Drag-Net has much the same application as the Parable of the Tares. ...
In Matthew 20:1-16 occurs the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard. ...
Of the other Parables in the Gospel, Matthew 2:2 does not bear directly upon the doctrine of the Kingdom, but emphasizes forgiveness as a qualification in all who wish to enter it. ...
Of several of these Parables it will rightly be felt that, as originally spoken, they had a wider meaning and scope than that here given, and one which is inconsistent with the narrow limits of the Kingdom to be inaugurated immediately after the fall of Jerusalem. But the question is not, What did these Parables mean when they were originally spoken? but, What interpretation did the editor put upon them when he incorporated them into his Gospel? He everywhere seems to use the phrase ‘kingdom of the heavens’ in its eschatological sense
Sacrifices - ...
In the last chapter of Hebrews the fate of the sin-offering is made into a Parable of the state of believers (Hebrews 13:10-16). In Isaiah 53 the prophet is compelled to go beyond his sacrificial Parable, and to say, ‘By his stripes we are healed,’ ‘He shall see of the travail of his soul
Soul - Jesus drives home this truth in the Parable of the Rich Fool, who said to his soul, ‘Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry’; and whom God rebuked with the awful words, ‘Thou fool, this night they (i. According to the conceptions represented in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus, retribution does not wait till the Last Day, but begins as soon as the soul leaves the body
Bride - In the Parable of the ten virgins, the same circumstances are introduced: "They that were foolish took their lamps, and took no oil with them: but the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps. ...
The following extract from Ward's "View of the Hindoos" very strikingly illustrates this Parable: "At a marriage, the procession of which I saw some years ago, the bridegroom came from a distance, and the bride lived at Serampore, to which place the bridegroom was to come by water
Soul - Jesus drives home this truth in the Parable of the Rich Fool, who said to his soul, ‘Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry’; and whom God rebuked with the awful words, ‘Thou fool, this night they (i. According to the conceptions represented in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus, retribution does not wait till the Last Day, but begins as soon as the soul leaves the body
Leper - The leper was a "walking tomb," "a Parable of death," and of sin "the wages of which is death
Justification - Hosea's personal experience in marriage served also as a Parable of God's relationship with Israel
Readiness - The two terms are used almost interchangeably in Matthew 24:42; Matthew 24:44, as is evident from the fact that the illustration of the necessity for watchfulness by the case of the negligent householder who suffers his house to be broken through (Matthew 24:43), is followed by the exhortation to readiness in the next verse; further evidence being found in the Parable of the Ten Virgins, where the proper performance of the duty enjoined in Matthew 25:13 (‘Watch, therefore’) is exhibited in the careful preparation made by the wise virgins, who are described as αἱ ἕτοιμοι, for the coming of the bridegroom. ...
The Parables and parabolic sayings in the Synoptics (Matthew 24:42 to Matthew 25:30, Mark 13:32-37, Luke 12:35-48; Luke 19:11-27), intended to enforce the lesson of constant readiness for the Second Coming, may be described as parting counsels and admonitions to the disciples for the guidance of their conduct during the period, indefinitely prolonged, which must elapse between Christ’s departure from the world, then impending, and His return at the close of the present dispensation
Friend, Friendship - In Jesus' Parables the vineyard owner addresses a laborer (Matthew 20:13 ) and the host speaks to a wedding guest he does not know (Matthew 22:12 ) using the term "comrade. Jesus encourages his followers to invite needy strangers, not friends, to their tables (Luke 14:12-14 ), and in the Parable of the Good Samaritan he extends the concept of neighbor to include anyone in need (Luke 10:25-37 )
Remember, Remembrance - Further, in the Parable of the rich man and Lazarus, Abraham says to the rich man "Remember that in your lifetime you received your good things" (Luke 16:25 )
Separation - ); and that the Parables of the Tares and the Drag Net were intended to guard against any attempt in that direction. But the evil element referred to in the Parables is not that which has always existed in the world, and must be expected to continue, but that which has entered the Kingdom in the course of, and as the result of, its own operations, which tend to gather within its pale spurious adherents as well as genuine (Matthew 13:47). It could by no possibility give rise to the painful reflexion and inquiry described in the Parable (Matthew 13:27, which are in reality due to the circumstance that the sin which exists in the world ‘is always forcing its way anew into the circle in which the Kingdom of God is being realized. The sifting out of unworthy members results in irreparable loss, at the same time leading, as it does, to their permanent exclusion from heavenly privileges (Matthew 24:50, Matthew 25:11 f
Burial - The empty grave-clothes, out of which the Risen Lord had passed, became thus a sign not only that no violence had been offered to His body by human hands, but also a Parable of the true meaning of His Resurrection: ‘all that was of Jesus of Nazareth has suffered its change and is gone
Celibacy (2) - In Matthew 19:30 and Mark 10:31 the warning that ‘many that are first shall be last; and the last first’ is associated with this promise; and in Matthew 20:1-16 the Parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard is added to illustrate that maxim
Shechem (1) - ...
Jotham's Parable as to the trees, the vine, the fig, and the bramble, were most appropriate to the scenery; contrast the shadow of the bramble which would rather scratch than shelter, with Isaiah 32:2
Firstborn - * Matthew - Matthew's Gospel, and not found in any other, are the following: the visit of the eastern magi; our Saviour's flight into Egypt; the slaughter of the infants at Bethlehem; the Parable of the ten virgins; the dream of Pilate's wife; the resurrection of many saints at our Saviour's crucifixion; and the bribing of the Roman guard appointed to watch at the holy sepulchre by the chief priests and elders
Poverty of Spirit - The rich man could boast, like the Pharisee in the Parable, that he was not as other men, since he had fulfilled to the letter every demand of the Law
Merit - ...
The point is made still clearer by the one Parable where Jesus introduces a relation in which merit and reward are possible, speaking not of household servants, but of hired labourers (Matthew 20:1-16). 196):—...
‘This remarkable Parable annuls the idea of reward in applying it, completely destroys the relation of merit and right, of performance and reward in general
Ahab - By this symbolic act, and by a Parable of his having suffered an enemy committed to him to escape, the prophet intimated that Ahab's life should pay the forfeit of his having suffered to escape with life one appointed by God to destruction
Mercy - The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23) sets forth the purpose of God negatively, and in 1 John 2:5; 1 John 4:12; 1 John 4:17 the positive side is given. This is Christ’s teaching in Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7; Matthew 23:23, and in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30) and of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31), as well as in that of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28)
Agriculture - Seed was scattered broadcast, as in the Parable of the sower (Matthew 13:3-8), and plowed in afterward, the stubble of the previous crop becoming manure by decay
Agriculture - ...
The prevailing mode of sowing was by hand, as in the Parable of the Sower, the seed being immediately ploughed in
Fruit - ’ This recalls the Parable of the Vineyard spoken by Jesus (Matthew 21, Luke 20); Christian churches and lives are fields and gardens from which the owner who has spent love and time and care over them may reasonably expect good results, ‘fruit unto God’ (Romans 7:4)
Eagle - What Job says concerning the eagle, which is to be understood in a literal sense, "Where the slain are, there is he," our Saviour turns into a fine Parable: "Wheresoever the carcass is, there will the eagles be gathered together," Matthew 24:28 ; that is, Wherever the Jews are, who have corruptly fallen from God, there will be the Romans, who bore the eagle as their standard, to execute vengeance upon them, Luke 17:37
Mercy - The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23) sets forth the purpose of God negatively, and in 1 John 2:5; 1 John 4:12; 1 John 4:17 the positive side is given. This is Christ’s teaching in Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:7; Matthew 23:23, and in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30) and of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31), as well as in that of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28)
Restoration - And He nowhere precludes the possibility of moral growth and betterment in that vast Unseen; the Parable of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31) speaks of ‘a great gulf fixed’ prohibiting a passage from either of the two contrasted states of being to the other, but it was not a gulf across which there could come no communication or redeeming influence, for Dives and Abraham can hold converse; and the Parable hints not obscurely at some betterment of the selfish rich man who begins to have a genuine concern for his brethren (unless it must be interpreted as a subtle form of self-excuse)
Doctrines - ...
Διδαχή, the common word for the act of teaching or that which is taught, occurs more frequently, It is used with reference to the teaching of Jesus in a general sense, as where the people contrast His methods with those of the scribes (Matthew 7:28, Mark 1:22), and again of His preaching, as in connexion with the Parable of the Sower, where St Mark says (Mark 4:2), ‘And he taught them many things in Parables, and said unto them in his doctrine. In this capacity He not only, as in His Parables, explains and illustrates the principles of His government, but, as in the Sermon on the Mount, appears as the authoritative expositor of the Law of God. Again He spoke of the Kingdom as future, and that in connexion with the final coming, the Parousia, of the Son of Man; so in the Parables of the Great Supper (Luke 14:15; Luke 14:24), of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14), of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13). We recognize this in several conspicuous Parables, and no less in the practical means which Jesus adopted of founding and developing His Church, notably in His choice and training of the Twelve as the nucleus of that society of which the Kingdom should consist. Of the former, the most important in this connexion are the Parables of the Sower (Matthew 13:3-23 || Mark 4:1-20 || Luke 8:5-15), of the Seed growing secretly (Mark 4:26-29), of the Mustard Seed and the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33 || Mark 4:30-32). Such a complete change as these words imply—‘change of mind’ (μετάνοια), ‘convert,’ ‘turn round’ (ἐπιστρέφειν, Matthew 13:15), ‘new birth’ or ‘birth from above’ (γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν, John 3:3), is necessary for all, as Jesus shows by addressing His teaching on this theme not only to Pharisees like Nicodemus, but to His own disciples—notably in the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:21-35), in which, in answer to a question of Peter, He likens the condition of all recipients of the Divine forgiveness to that of a man who owes a debt of ten thousand talents, clearly meaning by that the infinitude of
Fulfilment - And so in NT (πληροῦν chiefly): in the Parable of the Drag-net (Matthew 13:48), the net is ‘filled’ with all kinds of fish; Matthew 23:32, ‘Fill ye up then the measure of your fathers. There is no more striking or more frequently noted Parable of...
The slow sweet hours that bring us all things good,...
The slow sad hours that bring us all things ill;...
or sometimes, as George Eliot has expressed it in Adam Bede, of ‘swift hurrying shame,’ ‘the bitterest of life’s bitterness
Balaam - And he took up his Parable and said, Balak hath brought me out of Aram, saying, Come, curse me Jacob, and come defy Israel. But how shall I curse, whom God hath not cursed? Or how shall I defy, whom God hath not defied? Who can count the dust of Jacob, and the number of the fourth part of Israel? Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his!' And, again, on the top of Pisgah, he takes up his Parable in a way not unworthy of the place of Moses' grave: 'God is not a man, that He should lie; neither the son of man, that He should repent
Property (2) - Again, some force must be allowed to the fact that in several of the Parables (1618420468_40 Matthew 21:33) Jesus used the rights which men have over their property to illustrate the duty which all owe to God. In some of the Parables the duty of faithfulness in secular pursuits is plainly taught (e. The Parable of the Good Samaritan, again, is the charter of the Church for all the benevolent work of hospitals, infirmaries, etc. It is the service done rather than the gift made, which is emphasized in the Parable of the Good Samaritan
Lord's Prayer - Christ had been engaged in prayer; then, in response to a request, He delivered a form for the use of His disciples, and enforced the instruction by a Parable and exhortations teaching the power of earnestness in prayer
Church - The claim for the visible church of what belongs to the invisible, in spite of Christ's warning Parable of the tares and wheat (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43), has led to some of Rome's deadliest errors
Love - Just before the Parable of the Good Samaritan, a lawyer quoted the two commands to love and then asked Jesus: “And who is my neighbor?” (Luke 10:29 ) Jesus gave the story of the Samaritan who took care of the man who fell among robbers to illustrate the selfless love which is to be characteristic of citizens of the Kingdom
Hearing - (e) In a large number of passages, especially in the Parable of the Sower, ‘hearing’ either implies one or other of certain richer experiences, or it is explicitly connected therewith as a prefatory experience. For example, referring to the multitude generally, Jesus said to the disciples, ‘Therefore speak I to them in Parables: because seeing they see not, and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand’ (Matthew 13:13, Mark 4:12, Luke 8:10). ‘With many such Parables spake he the word unto them, as they were able to hear it’ (Mark 4:33), etc
Claim - ...
Otherwise Christ moves amid the relationships of common life and the claims of organized society, using them as the field of Parable and the vehicle of His teaching concerning the kingdom that was at hand
Corner-Stone - —The quotation from Psalms 118:22 occurs at the close of the Parable of the Wicked Vinedressers (Matthew 21:42, Mark 12:10, Luke 20:17)
Appreciation (of Christ) - He cannot even look upon the earth or sky but He must read into it the indwelling of the Eternal, find in all its pages picture and Parable of spiritual realities
Joab - ...
Joab next, by the wise woman of Tekoa and her Parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though justice constrained him to severity
Pity - The ‘tender mercy of our God’ in the Benedictus (Luke 1:78) is the thought illustrated in the Parable of the Good Samaritan, who was ‘moved with compassion’ (ἐσπλαγχνίσθη) at the sight of the wounded man (Luke 10:33); as in that of the king who forgave the debtor, being ‘moved with compassion’ (σπλαγχνισθείς, Matthew 18:27); and even more strikingly so in the description of the father of the Prodigal, who, when he saw his son returning, ἐσπλαγχνίσθη καὶ δραμὼν ἐπέπεσεν ἐπὶ τὸν τράχηλον αὐτοῦ (Luke 15:20)
Perfection (of Jesus) - With what irony He sketches the indecision of the Pharisees, in the story of the children who will play neither at funerals nor at weddings! What deeper criticism of a prudential morality is there than in the words ‘he that saveth his life shall lose it’? what clearer perception of the hopelessness of a man’s attempt at self-deliverance than the Parable of the house swept and garnished but empty? There is His indictment of the Pharisees (Matthew 23). He uttered the deep things of the Kingdom in Parables. He who told the Parable of the Prodigal Son told also the Parables of the Ten Virgins, the Man without the Wedding Garment, and the Talents. This union of lowly-mindedness and loftiest self-consciousness is reflected, as in a mirror, in His Parable of the Last Judgment
Type - The tabernacle that Moses pitched pointed to the true tabernacle which the Lord pitched and not man (Hebrews 8:2; Hebrews 8:5), and so became ‘a Parable for the time now present’ (Hebrews 9:9), i. Sodom and Egypt have their spiritual counterparts (Revelation 11:8), the fall of Babylon becomes a Parable of the fall of that great city which made all nations drink of the wine of her fornication (Revelation 14:8)
Character - Jesus struck at the limitations of race prejudice and enmity in the Parables of the Good Samaritan (Luke 6:22-264 ff. The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) illustrates in particular what the Parable of the Great Assize (Matthew 25:31-46) sets forth with ideal completeness, that there is no real love to God which is not expressed in spontaneous and appropriate help to every human being that requires it
Peter, First Epistle of - The Parable of the Sower may have supplied the figure of 1 Peter 1:23 ff. ; the lesson of the tribute money may underlie 1 Peter 2:13-14 ; and Christ’s utterance of doom on apostate Israel, especially the Parable of Mark 12:1-12 , probably suggested the thought of Mark 2:5-10
Isaac - So Hebrews 11:19, "from whence (from the jaws of death, compare 2 Corinthians 1:9-10) he received him back in a Parable," i
Judgment - The Parable of Dives and Lazarus (Matthew 25:46) exhibits this final accounting and the equitable readjustment of their respective conditions
Repentance (2) - Consequently His call to repentance is, as a rule, in the form of those exquisite Parables that speak to the heart. Such is the Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican (Luke 18:9-14), and that of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-24)
Wilderness (2) - We have to mention here (a) the multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14:13-21, Mark 6:30-44, Luke 9:10-17, Matthew 15:32-38, Mark 8:1-10); (b) Jesus withdrawing for prayer (Mark 1:35, Luke 5:16), or to avoid the crowd (Mark 1:45, Luke 4:42, John 11:54); (c) the demoniac of Gadara (Luke 8:29); (d) the Parable of the Lost Sheep (Luke 15:3-7), where the 99 sheep remain ‘in the wilderness,’ whereas the shepherd goes after that which is lost until he finds it
Forgiveness - By almost every method of instruction, from incidental postulate ( Matthew 6:12 = Luke 11:4 , Mark 11:25 ) to deliberate statement ( Matthew 18:21 ff; Matthew 6:15 , Mark 11:25 , Luke 17:4 ) and elaborate Parable ( Matthew 18:23-35 ), He sought to attune the minds of His hearers to this high and difficult note of the Christian spirit (cf
Reward - It is clear from the Parable of the talents in Matthew 25 that the lord of the servants expected more from the five-talented man than he did from the two-talented or the one-talented individuals
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - Hannah's prayer reveals the plight of the poor along with their dependence upon the Lord (1 Samuel 2:5-8 ), while Nathan's Parable to David shows the nature of oppression, the relativity of poverty (this poor man was not destitute), and the concern of the king to provide justice for the poor (2 Samuel 12:1-4 )
Intercession - He paints also in the Parable of the elm and the vine (Sim
Jeremiah, Book of - In some instances Jeremiah's Parables were acted , so as the more forcibly to impress the careless people. ]'>[2] The Parable of the bottles of wine follows, with exhortations to repent of the abominations
Debt, Debtor (2) - There are pictures of indebtedness in the Parables of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41-42), the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and the Pounds (Luke 19:11-27). See Lord’s Prayer), and the Supreme Creditor’s way with men in this regard, especially as depicted in certain well-known Parables. ...
The Parable of the Two Creditors (Matthew 18:23-35) shows the other side of the shield from the Woman’s case, in a person of downright inhumanity concerning whom it is equally clear that he had no saving experience of God’s mercy himself. on the passages referred to, and the standard works on the Parables, the following may be consulted:—Edersheim, Life and Times, ii
Peace (2) - uses it to describe how Jesus put the Sadducees to silence (Matthew 22:34); and in the Parable of the Wedding Garment it is used (Matthew 22:12) to express the speechless condition to which the intruder was reduced when challenged by the king (cf
Intercession - He paints also in the Parable of the elm and the vine (Sim
Offence (2) - ’ The Parable of the Sower, standing where it does, is not so much a prophecy, though it is prophetic, as a summary of the disenchanting experiences of Jesus. 13 the Parable of the Sower gives the keynote: it is the experience of one who knows what it is to be an offence: cf. —It is remarkable that almost the only thing approaching to a discourse of Jesus in our earliest Gospel (if we omit the chapter of Parables (ch. If we cause another to stumble by what we do, our own ruin is inseparable from his
Wisdom - riddle ( Judges 14:14-18 ), fable ( Judges 9:3-15 ), Parable ( 2 Samuel 12:1-3 , Isaiah 5:1-5 ), proverb ( 1 Samuel 10:12 , Jeremiah 31:29 ), essay ( Isaiah 28:23-29 ), lyric, address, etc
Hosea, Theology of - ...
Predating the Parable of the prodigal son Hosea portrays Israel as realizing that the best days were those spent close to God (2:7,15)
Benjamin - ...
The regular road between Jericho and Jerusalem was another of these passes, the scene of the Parable of the good Samaritan
Mark, the Gospel According to - ...
Of passages peculiar to Mark are Mark 3:20-21, Christ's friends' attempt on Him; Mark 4:26-29, Parable of the seed growing secretly; Mark 7:31-37, healing the deaf mute; Mark 8:22-26, gradual cure of the blind; Mark 11:11; Mark 14:51-52; Mark 16:7, the special message to Peter after the resurrection, to cheer him in his despondency after the thrice denial
Apocalyptic - The usual pattern, both in Daniel and in the extrabiblical apocalypses, is that a vision is followed by an explanation of the symbolism (Daniel 7:15-27 ; Zechariah 1:7-21 ), rather like the instances in which a Parable of Jesus is followed by an interpretation (Matthew 13:24-30,36-43 ; Mark 4:1-20 ). In most cases the visions are just related, so that the reader is challenged to provide the interpretation, as in the case of the majority of Jesus' Parables. It is not by accident that each of the letters to the churches ends with the appeal associated with the Parables: "He who has an ear, let him hear
Violence - It may be illustrated by the Parables of the Mustard Seed and the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and it has the great advantage of conveying the same sense as the parallel clause in Lk. obtains the transition to a new Parable, it may be surmised that he has given to Luke 16:16 its present form to accommodate it to the context
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - And all that is our own very exact case to a scriptural Parable
the Publican - And the definiteness of the word that he instinctively used about himself-the sinner, is to this day the best possible test of the state of mind of all who either read this Parable or speak about it
Simeon - By the Parable of the debtor forgiven 500 pence loving the creditor more than the one forgiven only 50, Christ showed that her warm and demonstrative love flowed from consciousness of forgiveness, his want of love from his fancy that he needed but little God's forgiveness
Pharisees - ...
The defect in the Pharisees which Christ stigmatized by the Parable of the two debtors was not immorality but want of love, from unconsciousness of forgiveness or of the need of it
Parousia (2) - Such are the Parables of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-12) and the Tyrannical Upper Servant (Luke 12:42-46 and Mark 13:35). , the two Parables already mentioned (Matthew 25:1-12 and Luke 12:42-46), and also the Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-7). We find, besides, that in a particular group of Parables—the Mustard Seed, the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and the Growing Grain of Corn (Mark 4:26-29)—the Kingdom He came to establish is represented as subject to the law of growth
Money - It is not always realized, perhaps, how vast was the difference in the amounts owing in this Parable ( Matthew 18:23 ff. If these were placed in single file, a yard apart, the train would be almost five miles in length! ( j ) The pound , finally, of another Parable ( Luke 19:13 ff
Ideas (Leading) - Some of the Parables which were intended to throw light on the nature of the Kingdom, e. In the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30 ff. To enforce the lesson, our Lord selected as the hero of His Parable a man belonging to a race which was hated and despised by the Jews
Turning - The Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11 ff. ), who ‘came to himself’ and then returned to his father, is a Parable of conversion
Second Coming of Christ - We should also bear in mind the teaching of the Parable of the talents. We discern the thought of final judgment also in such teachings of Jesus as the Parable of the talents
Son of God - ’ And, if the general scope of Scripture may leave it questionable whether the same high title can be applied to all the first man’s descendants, the authority of our Lord may be claimed, on the ground of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, as deciding the question in the affirmative. ...
Thus, in the Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, the owner of the vineyard, after sending servant after servant to negotiate with the labourers, sends his own son, Mk
Harmony of the Gospels - Some material, part of which appears vital to the record of Jesus' teaching, is included in only one gospel (the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:11-32 ). This source contained at least an infancy story and many Parables. Streeter's “M” and “L” sources involved the implausibility of sources containing, for example, infancy narrative, assorted Parables, and nothing else
Touch - Thus we see already an acted Parable of how in the Incarnation our Lord ‘taketh hold of the seed of Abraham’ (Hebrews 2:16 ἐπιλαμβάνεται, the word already quoted of Jesus ‘catching’ Peter on the waves to hold him up)
Gospel - In the Parable of Matthew 20:1-16 , it is owing to the goodness of the employer that the last workers hired receive a full day's wages
Mercy - To illustrate fulfillment of the half of God's law given to direct human relationships, Jesus told the Parable of the good Samaritan
Hell - Important portrayals of hell are also present in Jesus' Parables, including the tares (Matthew 13:40-42 ), the net (Matthew 13:50 ); the great supper (Matthew 22:13 ), the good servant and the wicked servant (Matthew 24:51 ; par. ...
While the Parable of Lazarus and the rich man occurs in Hades, the intermediate state, and not Gehenna, it does foreshadow the latter
Heal, Health - On the disciples' first mission they were charged to "heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse those who have leprosy, drive out demons" (Matthew 10:8 ); visitation of the sick (always an obligation in Jewish piety, Sirach 7:35 ) was made an issue in the last judgment in Christ's last Parable (Matthew 25:36,44 )
Education (2) - ]'>[6] This admirable institution, comparable to John Knox’s parish school, was attached to the synagogue; and since there was a synagogue in every village in the land, there was also an elementary school in every village. To the simple people of the north He spoke the language of the heart, and couched His teaching in Parable and poetry; but in Jerusalem He had to do with men whose minds were steeped in theology, and He met them on their own ground, talked to them in their own language, and encountered them with their own weapons
Imagination - In the narrative portions and the Parables there is also a striking dramatic element, which gives them wonderful life and movement. (The incident of the Blasted Fig-tree, if understood as a simple but vivid action-parable, loses all the ethical difficulties which have hidden its meaning from so many commentators). All spoken discourse should aim at the qualities of simplicity, concreteness, vividness, and brevity of expression, which are so remarkable a feature in the discourses and Parables of Christ
Laughter - But the crucial instance is the Parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-9). 149):...
‘With pathos often goes humour, and so it is in the Parables. It were a false propriety which took for granted that an expositor was necessarily off the track, because in his interpretation of these Parables an element of holy playfulness appears blended with the deep seriousness which pervades them throughout
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - ...
...
This Parable, it is much to be feared, will have a very visible fulfilment in this house during the next fortnight
Family (Jesus) - The exclusion from the Kingdom, which results when they are lost, is exhibited in the Parable of the Prodigal Son
Marriage - The large number of young females who were present, naturally reminded me of the wise and foolish virgins in our Saviour's Parable
Houses - " Our Lord's Parable of the foolish man who built his house on the sand derives illustration from the following passages in Ward's "View," and Belzoni's "Travels:" "The fishermen in Bengal build their huts in the dry season on the beds of sand, from which the river has retired
House - This may illustrate our Savior's Parable, in Matthew 7:24-27
Prayer - The ordinary posture of prayer was standing with arms outstretched, like the Pharisee of our Lord’s Parable (Luke 18:11), and the earliest paintings of Orantes in the Roman Catacombs
Socialism - His Parables teach social principles of the most far-reaching importance. The Parables, e. The condemnation of riches could hardly be more strongly expressed than in the Parables of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16), and of the Rich Fool (ch. The Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10) gives a new meaning to the word ‘neighbour,’ and teaches the obligation of what nowadays is called social service; and this lesson is even more strongly expressed in the most important Parable of all—that of the Judgment (Matthew 25:31-46)—where we are told that salvation will depend on whether we have succoured the poor and outcast, with whom Christ identifies Himself
Ezekiel - His comparison of Himself to the vine in John 15:1 may have had in mind the Parable of the vine of Ezekiel 15:1
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Another time, when the religious authorities murmured that “This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them” (Luke 15:2 ), Jesus told three Parables of God's inexhaustible love for those who are “lost” and of God's unbridled joy when the lost are found (the Parables of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the lost son; John 6:15 ). Twice He traveled through Samaria (Luke 9:51-56 ; John 4:4 ); once He stayed in a Samaritan village for two days, calling a Samaritan woman and a number of other townspeople to faith (John 4:5-42 ), and once He made a Samaritan the hero of one of His Parables (Luke 10:29-37 ). From that time Jesus began to speak in Parables to make the truth about God's kingdom clear to His followers while hiding it from those blind to its beauty and deaf to its call (Mark 4:10-12 ; notice that Jesus is first said to have spoken in Parables in Mark 3:23 , in immediate response to the charge of demon possession). He also began to intimate, sometimes in analogy or Parable (Mark 10:38 ; Luke 12:49-50 ; John 3:14 ; John 12:24 ,John 12:24,12:32 ) and sometimes in explicit language (Mark 8:31 ; Mark 9:31 ; Mark 10:33-34 ), that He would be arrested and tried by the religious leadership in Jerusalem, die on the cross, and rise from the dead after three days
Luke, the Gospel According to - the Parable of the prodigal son, the tracing of Christ's genealogy up to Adam the common parent of Jew and Gentile, not only to Abraham, as Matthew
Heaven - Again, our Saviour, in the Parable, represents the rich man, as seeing Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom, Luke 16:23 , and speaks of him as addressing his discourse to him
Children (Sons) of God - The essential and universal Fatherhood of God appears in such sayings as that of Matthew 5:43-48 , and, supremely, in the Parable of the Prodigal Son
Thousand Years - The extent of rule (the "ten" or "five cities") is proportioned to the degree of faithfulness, as the Parable teaches (Luke 19:13; Luke 19:15; Luke 19:17; Luke 19:19); all vessels of glory are filled, but those of larger dimensions are of larger capacity for glory (2 Timothy 2:20-21; Isaiah 22:24)
Luke, Gospel of - He also related Jesus' Parable of the widow who persevered (Luke 18:1-8 )
Mission - Through Parable Jesus let them know that he, the Son, was among that number (Matthew 21:34-37 ; Mark 12:2-6 ; Luke 20:10-13 ). The comparison and contrast with Moses, God's first "apostle-redeemer, " reveals not only Jesus' comparable faithfulness but his superiority (Hebrews 3:1-6 )
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - This will be the point also of his explanation of a Parable, "The harvest is the end of the age" (Matthew 13:39 )
Brotherhood (2) - It was the scribe’s suggestion of this narrow view that drew from Jesus the Parable of the Good Samaritan, in which the term ‘neighbour’ is made the equivalent of brother-man (Luke 10:22 ff
Prayer - Doing His will, and asking according to His will, are the conditions of acceptable prayer (1 John 3:22; 1 John 5:14-15; James 5:16); also persevering importunity in prayer for ourselves, taught in the Parable of the importunate widow; as importunity in intercession for others, that the Lord would give us the right spiritual food to set before them, is taught in that of the borrowed loaves (Luke 18:1, etc
Apocrypha, New Testament - ...
New Testament Jesus used the term apokryphos in his Parable of the lamp (Mark 4:22 : “For there is nothing hid, which shall not be manifested;” paralleled in Luke 8:17 : “For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest;”) to speak of the manifestation of that which has been hidden
Fall of Man - And if we are, therefore, compelled to allow that it was understood as a real history by our Lord and his inspired Apostles, those speculations of modern critics, which convert it into a Parable, stand branded with their true character of infidel and semi- infidel temerity
Jonah - An anticipatory dawn of the "light to lighten the Gentiles," Jonah was a Parable in himself: a prophet of God, yet a runaway from God; drowned, yet alive; a preacher of repentance, yet one that repines at repentance resulting from his preaching
Law (2) - His doctrine of the Fatherhood of God and of the incomparable value of the human soul were fundamental convictions. Luke relates the Parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Drachma, and the Lost Son (Luke 15). The Parables are difficult; the lesson taught is clearly the incompatibility of the new with the old, and the disaster that will inevitably follow any attempt to combine them. But it is by no means clear with what ‘old’ and ‘new’ should be identified, nor again can we assume that both Parables express the same truth. Weiss, however, considers that both Parables constitute a defence of the attitude of John’s disciples, they cannot be expected to combine the spirit of the Gospel with their legalist and ascetic habit of life (Bibl. It is possible, however, that Beysehlag is correct in thinking that the Parable of the undressed cloth on the old garment is a justification of John’s disciples in fasting, while the Parable of the new wine in the old bottles is a justification of the disciples of Jesus for refusing to follow their example (NT Theol
Demon - Jesus warned in a Parable of the possibility of multiple demons living in or indwelling a person (Matthew 12:43-45 ; Luke 11:24-26 )
Plants in the Bible - The latter could have been the “thorns' that suffocated the grain in Jesus' Parable (Matthew 13:7 )
Eternal Punishment - —The incomparable worth of the Kingdom, as the richest ‘treasure,’ and ‘pearl of great price’ (Matthew 13:44-45), and the supreme quest of it as the first duty and sovereign wisdom of life (Matthew 6:33), have, as their converse, the incomparable loss which the rejection of the gospel must inevitably entail. In the Parables of the Tares (1 Corinthians 15:20-285 ff. From the explanation of the Parable it is clear that the wheat and the tares represent persons—‘the sons of the kingdom’ and ‘the sons of the evil one
Sanballat - And between them, Sanballat and Nehemiah kindled that intense and unnatural hatred that is still burning in every heart in Jerusalem and Samaria, when the woman at the well refuses a cup of cold water to our Lord, and when the Samaritans will not make ready for Him nor receive Him, because His face is as though He would go to Jerusalem; and till He pays the woman back with a well of water springing up to everlasting life, and the men of Samaria with the Parable of the Good Samaritan
Joab - Joab with his insolence, and his cruelty, and his family familiarity, and his equality in years, and all that eating in and growing, on to David's deathbed-I declare it is another Parable of that cunning Nathan, and not a true and honest history at all! It is a subtle allegory all the time; and that, too, of our own life
Passover (ii. in Relation to Lord's Supper). - (1 Corinthians 11:24-25, Luke 22:19), a number of critical scholars have concluded that Jesus never spoke the words, ‘This do in remembrance of me’; that He had no thought of instituting a rite for perpetual celebration by the Church; and that His purpose in breaking the bread and passing the wine was merely to bid His disciples a solemn farewell, to set before them a striking Parable in action, or at most to point them forward to the hope of a glad reunion in the heavenly Kingdom (Jülicher, Theol
Job, the Book of - Another, and much less frequently suggested purpose, is that of a Parable concerning the nation Israel. Though this approach is possible, it seems unlikely for most Parables have some type of interpretation close by which helps to explain them
Winter - Inseparable from narrative. A concluding Parable (Matthew 12:43-45 = Luke 11:24-26) likens ‘this evil generation,’ with its Pharisaic mania purifica, to ‘a house swept and garnished’ which becomes the abode of demons, because inhospitable to the Spirit of God
Hating, Hatred - in the Parable of the Pounds, ‘his citizens hated him’ (Luke 19:14)
Man (2) - It was while sitting and talking with a Samaritan—a Samaritan woman—that He said: ‘God is Spirit’ (John 4:24); it was in the house of Zacchaeus that men first heard that ‘the Son of man came to seek and to save that which was lost’ (Luke 19:10); while it was in answer to ‘a certain lawyer’ that Jesus related the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37)
Sermon on the Mount - In Luke 12:22-34 it follows the warning against covetonsness and the Parable of the Rich Fool, which were occasioned by one of the multitude appealing to Jesus to decide a question of inheritance between himself and his brother. Thus he gives 7 clauses in the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13), 7 Parables (ch. , His disciples may have discerned in them a deeper meaning, knowing that He was accustomed to speak in Parables; or He Himself may have explained them, for we must remember that in the Gospels we have excerpts from the teachings of Jesus, pregnant sayings, Parables, and aphorisms that stuck in the memory, while the fuller exposition which must often have followed is rarely given, perhaps n
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - " As also in our Lord's so mystical and so beautiful Parable of the true vine and its true branches. And if God expresses it never so plainly and properly, he will still think that God is speaking in riddles and Parables
Agriculture - Such a classification is quite distinct from that of the Parable of the Sower, where the wayside, the rocky places, etc
Peter, Second Epistle of - Matthew 11:27 ; Matthew 11:29 || and the Parable of the Sower ( Luke 8:10 ; Luke 8:16 ) throw much light on 2 Peter 1:2-8 ; and 1618420468_8 ; Matthew 12:43-45 on 2 Peter 2:19-21 . Likewise the Christian life is regarded as the fulfilment of the new law, and the Parables in Mk
Matthew, the Gospel According to - For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Matthew 3:3); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in Parables (Matthew 13:14 ff). Matthew 13: Parables of the hidden treasure, the pearl, and the drag-net. Matthew 22: Parable of the wedding garment. Matthew 25: Parables of the ten virgins, talents, and sheep and goats at the judgment. of his own household" Micah 7:5-6 Matthew 11:5 "Blind receive sight" Isaiah 35:5 Matthew 11:10 "Behold, I send My messenger" Malachi 3:1 Matthew 11:14 "Elias, which was for to come " Malachi 4:5 Matthew 12:3 "Have ye not read what David did?" 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Matthew 12:5 "Priests profane sabbath" Numbers 28:9 Matthew 12:7 "Mercy, not sacrifice" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 12:18-21 "Behold My Servant" Isaiah 42:1-4 Matthew 12:40 "Jonas three days in whale's belly"...
Jonah 1:17 Matthew 12:42 "Queen of the south came" 1 Kings 10:1 Matthew 13:14-15 "Hearing ye shall hear" Isaiah 6:9-10 Matthew 13:35 "I will open my mouth in Parables" Psalms 78:2-3 Matthew 15:8 "This people draweth nigh . Appointment of apostles; doubts of John's disciples; cavils of the Pharisees; on the other hand His loving invitations, miracles, series of Parables on the kingdom; effects of His ministry on Herod and various classes; prophecy to His disciples of His coming death (Matthew 10 - 18:35)
Luke, Gospel According to - The insertion deals largely with the Peræan ministry and the journeys towards Jerusalem, and contains many Parables peculiar to Lk (the Good Samaritan, the Importunate Friend, the Rich Fool, the Barren Fig-tree, the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, the Prodigal Son, the Unjust Steward, the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Ten Lepers, the Unjust Judge, the Pharisee and the Publican), and also several incidents and sayings peculiar to Lk. the Mission of the Seventy; this section also has portions of the Sermon on the Mount and some Parables and sayings common to Mt. the Parable of the Pounds, the narrative of Zacchæus, of the Penitent Robber, of the two disciples on the Emmaus road, and other incidents peculiar to Lk
Justification - ‡ Light - ...
This latter idea, without the moral counsel, is reproduced by Mark 4:21 (= Luke 8:16) as a sequel to the interpretation of the Parable of the Seeds, as if to suggest that such knowledge as had just been imparted to the disciples was not to be kept to themselves but to be diffused like light (cf
Ministry - It appears in the announcement of the Forerunner (John 1:29; John 1:36), in the great saying to Nicodemus (John 3:14-16), in the discourse at Capernaum (John 6:32-33; John 6:48-51), in the Parable of the Good Shepherd (John 10:11; John 10:15; John 10:17-18), in the remarks on the visit of the Greeks (John 12:20-33), and in the words of comfort to the disciples (John 15:13)
Paul as a Man of Prayer - Like his divine Master, everything was to Paul another speaking Parable of the Kingdom of Heaven
Solomon - But I shall always return to that splendid prayer with the author of the Parable of the one little ewe lamb before my mind, rather than the reprobate lover of no end of strange women, and the fatal father of Rehoboam
Family - Matthew 24:45); such were the unjust steward of the Parable (Luke 16:1 ff
Dress (2) - The rich man of the Parable was clothed in ‘purple and fine linen’ (βύσσος), Luke 16:19
Jonath - Jonah was the unmerciful servant of that other New Testament Parable also
Manicheans - To illustrate this Manes used a Parable
Faith - Specifically, the Parables of Jesus and the Sermon on the Mount call for a response. The Parable of the sower calls the proper response to Jesus' word "believing" (Luke 8:12-13 )
Unity (2) - The ‘schism’ deprecated in his Parable of body and members (1 Corinthians 12:25) amounts only to carelessness of mutual interest; solution of continuity in the body of Christ is not contemplated. This transfusion of life is effected by the mission of the Paraclete, the Holy Ghost mediated by Christ in His heavenly intercession (John 14:16-19), and results in a vital unity of Christ with the recipients of the Paraclete; which is comparable to that of a single organism (the True Vine, John 15:1-8) in which the individual inheres by the fact of his inherence in Christ (John 15:6-7). He prays the Father that we may be one in such fashion that the world, seeing it, may believe in His mission: and defines this unity as comparable to His own unity with the Father
Prayer - Some argue that these Parables teach perseverance in a request until either our wills or the circumstances of our lives are altered. In Luke 18 the Parable is placed in
Forgiveness - Jesus' Parable of the unmerciful servant makes the point that human beings are obliged to forgive because God has forgiven them (Matthew 18:23-35 )
Kingdom Kingdom of God - The Parable of the Seed Growing Secretly explained that it would come like harvest after a period of growth, i
Ebionism (2) - ’ Similarly in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), it is supposed that Dives goes to the place of torment because he is rich, while the beggar is carried into Abraham’s bosom simply because he is a beggar
Humility - In the Parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14)
Lord's Supper. (i.) - The day for symbolism was not past, provided the symbolism was adequate; and this Supreme Teacher surpasses all others in the use of Parable and symbol
Descent Into Hades - A Parable is told of the building of a tower which represents the Church at rest
Children - Of the distinctively feminine terms that occur in the Gospels, παρθὲνος is a term of condition rather than of age, and occurs only in connexion with Mary (Matthew 1:23, Luke 1:27) and in the Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1; Matthew 25:7; Matthew 25:11), and παιδἰσκη is employed only in the secondary sense of ‘maid-servant’ (Matthew 26:69 and parallels, Luke 12:45)
Ascension - , ἀνεφέρετο [4], a verb used of the taking up of the disciples to the Mount of Transfiguration, Matthew 17:1, Mark 9:2), a ‘lifting up’ (Acts 1:9, ἐπήρθη, a verb used of lifting up the eyes to heaven, Luke 18:13, John 17:1), and a ‘journey’ (1 Peter 3:22, πορευθείς, used of the nobleman who went into a far country, a Parable looking forward to the Ascension, Luke 19:12)
Organization (2) - They are to lead men to repentance (Mark 6:12), over which the joy of the angels is increased (Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10, ending in the Parable of the Prodigal Son)
Death of Christ - Intimations of his death are also given in his words about his anointing in Bethany being a preparation for his burial (Matthew 26:12 ; Mark 14:8 ; John 12:7 ), in the Parable of the wicked tenants (Matthew 21:33-39 ; Mark 12:1-12 ; Luke 20:9-17 ), at the transfiguration when Moses and Elijah spoke with him "about his departure, which he was about to bring to fulfillment at Jerusalem" (Luke 9:31 ), in the words about the bridegroom being taken away (Matthew 9:15 ; Mark 2:20 ; Colossians 3:5-838 ), and right back in the words of Simeon to Mary about the anguish that would come to her (Luke 2:35 )
Temple (2) - ]'>[20]0 ...
One other reference, prior to the time of Christ’s public ministry, but on the threshold of it, is contained in the Parable of His Temptation, whose second scene (in Lk
Redemption (2) - His denunciations of the Pharisees are merciless in their severity (Matthew 23:14-15; Matthew 5:22); the language of judgment in many of the Parables is hardly less strong (Matthew 13:42; Matthew 13:50, Matthew 18:34, Matthew 21:44, Matthew 22:7; Matthew 22:13 etc. Those who speak of supposed judgments on others are warned: ‘Nay but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish’ (Luke 13:3; Luke 13:5); of a Judas it is declared, ‘Good were it for that man if he had not been born’ (Matthew 26:24, Mark 14:21); the Parable of the Final Judgment has such a sentence as, ‘Depart from me, ye cursed,’ etc
Life - The same thought appears in the Parable of the Prodigal Son: ‘he was dead and is alive again’ (Luke 15:32)
Peter - His true boast, "behold we have forsaken all and followed Thee," called forth Jesus' promise, "in the regeneration, when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of His glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel," and Jesus' warning, illustrated by the Parable of the labourers in reproof of the hireling spirit, "the last shall be first and the first last
Fall (2) - (6) The Fall may be said to be pictured for us more specifically in the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11 ff. ), and the corresponding Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Money in the same chapter
Father, Fatherhood - For, in the first place, the Parable was spoken to justify Jesus’ reception of publicans (Matthew 5:45), and publicans were rated as no better than Gentiles (Matthew 18:17); and, in the second place, the conclusion of Jesus in the Parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Coin, which are manifestly parallel to that of the Lost Son, is perfectly general
Missions - Many of the Parables have references to or suggestions of a future extension of work among the Gentiles. In the interpretation of the Parable of the Tares (one of the earlier Parables) it is said that ‘the field is the world’ (Matthew 13:38). In the later series of Parables, as in that of the Vineyard and the Husbandmen, it is said, ‘The kingdom of God shall be taken away from you, and shall be given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof’ (Matthew 21:43); in the Marriage Feast the direction is found, ‘Go ye … into the highways, and as many as ye shall find, bid to the marriage’ (Matthew 22:9, Luke 14:23); in the Sheep and the Goats there is a picture of the judgment of ‘all nations’ (Matthew 25:32)
Mark, Gospel According to - is small: the Parable of the seed growing silently ( Mark 4:26 ff
Education in Bible Times - " Whether by object lesson or alternative speech forms (parable, rhetorical question, personal conversation, or public discourse), Jesus arrested and held the attention of the learner
Hell - -The conception that meets us in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus, viz
Lord's Prayer (ii) - the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant, Matthew 18:23-35
Consciousness - The Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen, which is given in all the Synoptic Gospels, is very striking, as showing how our Lord made an essential distinction between Himself and all other messengers of God
Anger (2) - This makes the Jews deride Jesus, instead of seriously answering Him; and Wellhausen, taking it so, finds in the words which follow—‘The publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom of God before you’—not an explanation of the Parable, but a Zornesausbruch, an outburst of wrath, which could hardly be cleared of petulance (Das Evangelium Matthaei, 106 f
Esther - And, then, as another stepping-stone up to Esther's incomparable opportunity, Ahasuerus, Haman's master, was a fit master, as we have seen, for such a servant of Satan as Haman was. ...
The Book of Esther is surely a very clear prophecy and a very impressive Parable of the plots, and the persecutions, and the politics of our own day. All the more incomparable will be thy salvation, and all the more lustrous and weighty thy crown. Even we who will never now fill it-unless it is with tears and prayers night and day-we see, when it is too late, the incomparable life it at one time held out to us, and now holds out to you
Hell - -The conception that meets us in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus, viz
Old Testament - ), ‘a Parable for the time now present’ (Hebrews 9:9)
Humility - In the Parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14)
Wandering Stars - ’ Furthermore, among the special Parables, or rather illustration’s, of St. [5] 389-399), is an OT illustration, if not a source, of the Parable
Judges (1) - 9), though certainly belonging to the Gideon chapters (6 8) stands on a somewhat different basis, inasmuch as Abimelech is not reckoned among the judges (see following section): Abimelech is made king of Shechem (Judges 9:1-6 ); Jotham his brother, delivers his Parable from Mt Genzim, and then flees (( Judges 6:7-9 ); the quarrel between Abimelech and the Shechemites ( Judges 9:22-25 ); Gaal raises a revolt among the Shechemites ( Judges 9:26-33 ); Abimelech quells the revolt ( Judges 9:34-41 ); Shechem is captured and destroyed ( Judges 9:42-45 ); its tower burned ( Judges 9:46-49 ); Abimelech’s attack Thehez, and his death ( Judges 9:50-57 )
John, Theology of - " Even the short Parable of 12:24 makes this clear: "unless a kernel of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed
Grace - Grace in the New Testament is largely encompassed by the use of the word charis [ Matthew 20:1-16 ) and the Parable of the great supper (Luke 14:16-24 )
Hebrews Epistle to the - He is the Son of God, inseparable from the Father as the ray is inseparable from the light, revealing the essence of the Father as completely as the device engraved upon a seal is revealed by its impress on wax (ἀπαύγασμα τῆς δόξης καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ, Hebrews 1:3). The essential features of this perfect priesthood are set forth, as in a Parable, in the biblical portrait of the priest-king Melchizedek
Eschatology (2) - Obviously our Lord could not have uttered the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19 ff. While, doubtless, the adumbrations of the conception of immortality which we find scattered throughout the OT had their origin in the sentiment that it must be well with the righteous for ever, this positive aspect of the matter was inseparable from a negative
Lord's Supper (ii) - That it was an acted Parable of Divine truth He asserted to the multitude which sought Him at Capernaum, in the words: ‘Ye seek me, not because ye saw signs, but because ye ate of the loaves, and were filled
Boyhood of Jesus - Perhaps the Parable of the Mote (chip or splinter) and Beam (Matthew 7:3-5) derives its outward form from the work of His youth (cf
Day of Judgment - The question as to whether those who never heard of Jesus are to be subject to this Judgment is not distinctly raised or settled in the Gospels, but the universality of the Judgment seems inevitable from Christ’s warnings, notably in the Parable of the Tares (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43; Matthew 13:47-50)
Work - Jesus' Parable of the talents implies that refusal to use one's gifts and talents for God is an unacceptable response to his grace (Matthew 25:14-30 )
Apocalyptic Literature - —As it stands to-day, the Book of Enoch can be subdivided into five main parts with an introduction and a conclusion, as follows: Introductory Discourse, in which the author announces his Parable, and formally asks attention to the important matters which he is about to divulge (1–5)
Annunciation, the - And he alone gives us the Parable of the Woman and the Lost Coin
Sacrifice (2) - The Parable of the Prodigal Son in the light of this later presentation becomes an impossibility
Sea of Galilee - An illustration of the productiveness of the district, and a parallel to the hundredfold of the Parable, may be seen in the enumeration of the products of a single סאה ארבלית ‘half bushel of Arbela’ (Jerus
Vicarious Sacrifice - The Parable gives way to the doctrinal discussions
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
‘The Gospel which has come down to us in Hebrew characters gave the threat as made not against him who hid (his talent), but against him who lived riotously; for (the Parable) told of three servants, one who devoured his lord’s substance with harlots and flute-girls, one who gained profit many fold, and one who hid his talent; and how in the issue one was accepted, one merely blamed, and one shut up in prison’ (Euseb
Law - Thus Jesus asserted, in accordance with views already advanced among the scribes, that ‘the whole law and the prophets hang on the two commandments’ of love to God and to our neighbour ( Matthew 22:34-40 , Luke 10:25-37 ) the Parable of the Good Samaritan gives to the second command an unprecedented scope
John, Theology of - Our Lord’s allegory not Parable of the Vine and the Branches is full of instruction, but no analogy drawn from vegetable life suffices adequately to describe the fellowship between Christ and His disciples; this is rather to be moulded after the pattern of the spiritual fellowship between the Father and the Son (John 15:9 ; John 17:21-23 ); and the terms ‘communion’ and ‘abiding’ are strongly characteristic of the First Epistle (1:3, 2:6, 27, 28, 3:24, 4:12 etc
Authority in Religion - In the Parable of Dives and Lazarus, our Lord puts these very significant words into the mouth of Abraham, ‘They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them’ (Luke 16:29)
Persecution - In the Parable of the Vineyard He gave a similar account of the nation’s attitude to her God-sent teachers (Mark 12:3 ff
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - ’ The phrase used above for ‘through a desert without water’ is that employed in the description of the conduct of the unclean spirit in our Lord’s Parable in Matthew 12:43. Hosea is a prophet who is fond of Parables, and some of his illustrations from nature are
Prophet - , Luke 13:33); and when He used, in the Parable of the Vineyard, the familiar OT figure of the Kingdom of God, He deliberately made Himself the last of the long line of God’s martyr messengers to His people; and told the Jews that, notwithstanding the fact that they had ‘shamefully handled’ His predecessors the prophets; yet He had been sent to them by God with a final call to repentance. His every act was a message, and His miracles, not less than His Parables, were revelations to teach men of His Father
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - The form and substance of the discourses are also very different, the Christ of the Synoptics speaking as a man to men, as a Jew to Jews; conveying His message in pithy aphorisms, easily understood and remembered, and in homely Parables, adapted to the comprehension of country folk. Our Evangelist, on the other hand, represents Jesus as taking part in long polemical disputations with ‘the Jews,’ who are as much His enemies as they were the enemies of the Christian Church 80 years later; the Parables have disappeared, and their place is taken by ‘proverbs’ or symbolic language; and, above all, His whole teaching is centred upon faith in and devotion to Himself. Yet, in spite of himself, he half substitutes the Alexandrian and Philonic allegory for the Synoptic Parable
Church (2) - Perhaps little more can be said than that in the Parable of Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31) Christ gave a general sanction to current Jewish beliefs as to the state of the departed, and that His words to the penitent thief (Luke 23:43) assure us that union with Himself is not impaired by death
Worship - Therefore, they gladly put the likeness of a shepherd carrying a lamb upon his shoulders, on their cups, as a symbol of the Redeemer, who saves the sinners that return to him, according to the Parable in the Gospel
Person of Christ - ’ Not only does this form occur in three important passages (Matthew 11:27 , Mark 13:32 , and possibly Matthew 28:19 ), certain pieces of indirect evidence also bear on the point, such as His veiled reference to His Sonship in the Parable of the Vineyard, His question to St
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - Some say it was a Parable, and that a table did not actually come down; but most consider that a real table descended