What does Palm Tree mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
תָּמָ֣ר palm tree 1
כַּתָּמָ֣ר palm tree 1
לְתָמָ֔ר palm tree 1
בְתָמָ֔ר palm tree 1
כְּתֹ֨מֶר palm tree 1
תֹּ֜מֶר palm tree 1
וְתִֽמֹרָה֙ palm tree figure (as ornament). 1
הַתִּֽמֹרָה֙ palm tree figure (as ornament). 1
הַתִּֽמֹרָ֖ה palm tree figure (as ornament). 1

Definitions Related to Palm Tree

H8561


   1 Palm Tree figure (as ornament).
   

H8560


   1 Palm Tree, post, column.
   

H8558


   1 Palm Tree, date palm.
   

Frequency of Palm Tree (original languages)

Frequency of Palm Tree (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Palm Palm Tree
Palm, Palm Tree. Exodus 15:27; Leviticus 23:40; Deuteronomy 34:3. There are several hundred species of palm; but the Phœnix dactylifera, or date-palm, is that which, growing in Palestine, is often referred to in Scripture. Its fruit furnishes a considerable part of subsistence to the inhabitants of Egypt, Persia, and Arabia. A conserve is also made of it with sugar; while the stones are ground in the handmills for the food of camels. Baskets, bags, mate, etc., are manufactured of the leaves; the trunk is split up, and is serviceable in various ways; the weblike integuments at the bases of the leaves are twisted into ropes: the sap is collected, and is at first a sweetish mild beverage, but afterwards ferments, and a kind of arrack is produced from it by distillation. Every part, therefore, of the tree has its use. The names of many places show that palms were abundant: Elim, Elath, Hazezon-tamar—"felling of palm tree"—Genesis 14:6; Bethany, "house of dates." John 11:1; John 12:13.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Palm Tree
(Heb. tamar), the date-palm characteristic of Palestine. It is described as "flourishing" (Psalm 92:12 ), tall (Song of Solomon 7:7 ), "upright" (Jeremiah 10:5 ). Its branches are a symbol of victory (Revelation 7:9 ). "Rising with slender stem 40 or 50, at times even 80, feet aloft, its only branches, the feathery, snow-like, pale-green fronds from 6 to 12 feet long, bending from its top, the palm attracts the eye wherever it is seen." The whole land of Palestine was called by the Greeks and Romans Phoenicia, i.e., "the land of palms." Tadmor in the desert was called by the Greeks and Romans Palmyra, i.e., "the city of palms." The finest specimens of this tree grew at Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ) and Engedi and along the banks of the Jordan. Branches of the palm tree were carried at the feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40 ). At our Lord's triumphal entrance into Jerusalem the crowds took palm branches, and went forth to meet him, crying, "Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord" (Matthew 21:8 ; John 12:13 ). (See DATE .)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Palm, Palm Tree,
tamar. This is a lofty tree without lateral branches, witha large tuft of leafy branches clustering at the top several feet long. At the base of the branches grow the dates in large clusters. Exodus 15:27 ; Numbers 33:9 ; Judges 4:5 ; Song of Solomon 7:7,8 ; Jeremiah 10:5 ; Joel 1:12 . The branches were used to construct the booths at the feast of tabernacles. Leviticus 23:40 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ; and were strewn in the path on the Lord's last entrance into Jerusalem. John 12:13 . There were many representations of palm-trees in the decorations of the temple, as there will also be in the future temple. 1 Kings 6:29-35 ; 1 Kings 7:36 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5 ; Ezekiel 40:16-37 ; Ezekiel 41:18-26 . The palm-tree is used as an emblem of fertility in Psalm 92:12 ; some trees will bear yearly more than a hundred-weight of dates and for a period of about seventy years. The palm-branches are a token of rest and peace after sorrow. Revelation 7:9 . The palm is the Phoenix dactylifera.
CITY OF PALM-TREES. Name given several times to Jericho because of the palms that grew there. Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 , etc.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Palm Tree
תמר , Exodus 15:27 , &c. This tree, sometimes called the date tree, grows plentifully in the east. It rises to a great height. The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk of this tree is not solid, like other trees, but its centre is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark full of strong fibres when young, which, as the tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. To this bark the leaves are closely joined, which in the centre rise erect; but, after they are advanced above the vagina which surrounds them, they expand very wide on every side the stem; and, as the older leaves decay, the stalk advances in height. The leaves, when the tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six or eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, &c. The fruit, which is called date, grows below the leaves in clusters, and is of a sweet and agreeable taste. The learned Kaempfer, as a botanist, an antiquary, and a traveller, has exhausted the whole subject of palm trees. "The diligent natives," says Mr. Gibbon, "celebrated, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches, the leaves, the juice, and the fruit, were skilfully applied." "The extensive importance of the date tree," says Dr. E. D. Clarke, "is one of the most curious subjects to which a traveller can direct his attention. A considerable part of the inhabitants of Egypt, of Arabia, and Persia, subsist almost entirely upon its fruit. They boast also of its medicinal virtues. Their camels feed upon the date stone. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes; from the branches, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fibres of the boughs, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the tree furnishes fuel.
It is even said that from one variety of the palm tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibres of the trunk, and has been used for food."
In the temple of Solomon were pilasters made in the form of palm trees, 1 Kings 6:29 . It was under a tree of this kind that Deborah dwelt between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:5 . To the fair, flourishing, and fruitful condition of this tree, the psalmist very aptly compares the votary of virtue, Psalms 92:12-14 :—
The righteous shall flourish like a palm tree. Those that are planted in the house of Jehovah, In the courts of our God, shall flourish;
In old age they shall still put forth buds, They shall be full of sap and vigorous.
The palm tree is crowned at its top with a large tuft of spiring leaves about four feet long, which never fall off, but always continue in the same flourishing verdure. The tree, as Dr. Shaw was informed, is in its greatest vigour about thirty years after it is planted, and continues in full vigour seventy years longer; bearing all this while, every year, about three or four hundred pounds' weight of dates. The trunk of the tree is remarkably straight and lofty. Jeremiah, speaking of the idols that were carried in procession, says they were upright as the palm tree, Jeremiah 10:5 . And for erect stature and slenderness of form, the spouse, in Song of Solomon 7:7 , is compared to this tree:—
How framed, O my love, for delights! Lo, thy stature is like a palm tree, And thy bosom like clusters of dates.
On this passage Mr. Good observes, that "the very word tamar, here used for the palm tree, and whose radical meaning is ‘straight,' or ‘upright,' (whence it was afterward applied to pillars or columns, as well as to the palm,) was also a general name among the ladies of Palestine, and unquestionably adopted in honour of the stature they had already acquired, or gave a fair promise of attaining."
A branch of palm was a signal of victory, and was carried before conquerors in the triumphs. To this, allusion is made, Revelation 7:9 : and for this purpose were they borne before Christ in his way to Jerusalem, John 12:13 . From the inspissated sap of the tree, a kind of honey, or dispse, as it is called, is produced, little inferior to that of bees. The same juice, after fermentation, makes a sort of wine much used in the east. It is once mentioned as wine, Numbers 28:7 ; Exodus 29:40 ; and by it is intended the strong drink, Isaiah 5:11 ; Isaiah 24:9 . Theodoret and Chrysostom, on these places, both Syrians, and unexceptionable witnesses in what belongs to their own country, confirm this declaration. "This liquor," says Dr. Shaw, "which has a more luscious sweetness than honey, is of the consistence of a thin syrup, but quickly grows tart and ropy, acquiring an intoxicating quality, and giving by distillation an agreeable spirit, or araky, according to the general name of these people for all hot liquors, extracted by the alembic." Its Hebrew name is שכר , the σικερα of the Greeks; and from its sweetness, probably, the saccharum of the Romans. Jerom informs us that in Hebrew "any inebriating liquor is called sicera, whether made of grain, the juice of apples, honey, dates, or any other fruit."
This tree was formerly of great value and esteem among the Israelites, and so very much cultivated in Judea, that, in after times, it became the emblem of that country, as may be seen in a medal of the Emperor Vespasian upon the conquest of Judea. It represents a captive woman sitting under a palm tree, with this inscription, "Judea capta;" [1] and upon a Greek coin, likewise, of his son Titus, struck upon the like occasion, we see a shield suspended upon a palm tree, with a Victory writing upon it.
Pliny also calls Judea palmis inclyta, "renowned for palms." Jericho, in particular, was called "the city of palms," Deuteronomy 34:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ; because, as Josephus, Strabo, and Pliny have remarked, it anciently abounded in palm trees. And so Dr. Shaw remarks, that, though these trees are not now either plentiful or fruitful in other parts of the holy land, yet there are several of them at Jericho, where there is the conveniency they require of being often watered; where, likewise, the climate is warm, and the soil sandy, such as they thrive and delight in. Tamar, a city built in the desert by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 ; Ezekiel 47:19 ; Ezekiel 48:28 , was probably so named from the palm trees growing about it; as it was afterward by the Romans called Palmyra, or rather Palmira, on the same account, from palma, "a palm tree."
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Palm-Tree
Exodus 15:27 . This tree is called in Hebrew tamar, from its straight upright, branchless growth, for which it seems more remarkable than any other tree; it sometimes rises to the height of a hundred feet.
The palm is one of the most beautiful trees of the vegetable kingdom. The stalks are generally full of rugged knots, which render it comparatively easy to climb to the top for the fruit, Song of Song of Solomon 7:7,8 . These projections are the vestiges of the decayed leaves; for the trunk is not solid like other trees, but its center is filled with pith, round which is a tough bark, full of strong fibers when young, which, as the tree grows old, hardens and becomes ligneous. To this bark the leaves are closely joined, which in the center rise erect, but after they are advanced above the sheath that surrounds them, they expand very wide on every side the stem, and as the older leaves decay, the stalk advances in height. With its ever verdant and graceful crown continually aspiring towards heaven, it is an apt image of the soul growing in grace, Psalm 92:12 . The leaves, when the tree has grown to a size for bearing fruit, are six to eight feet long, are very broad when spread out, and are used for covering the tops of houses, and similar purposes.
The fruit, from which the palm is often called the date-tree, grows below the leaves in clusters sometimes weighing over fifteen pounds, and is of a sweet and agreeable taste. The diligent natives, says Mr. Gibbon, celebrate, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches or long leaf-stalks, the leaves, fibers, and fruit of the palm are skillfully applied. A considerable part of the inhabitants of Egypt, of Arabia, and Persia, subsist almost entirely on its fruit. They boast also of its medicinal virtues. Their camels feed upon the date stone. From the leaves they make couches, baskets, bags, mats, and brushes: from the branches or stalks, cages for their poultry, and fences for their gardens; from the fiber of the trunk, thread, ropes, and rigging; from the sap is prepared a spirituous liquor; and the body of the tree furnishes fuel: it is even said that from one variety of the palm-tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibers of the trunk, and has been used for food.
Several parts of the Holy Land, no less than of Idumea, that lay contiguous to it, are described by the ancients to have abounded with date-trees. Judea particularly is typified in several coins of Vespasian by a desconsolate woman sitting under a palm-tree, with the inscription, JUDEA CAPTA. In Deuteronomy 34:3 , Jericho is called the "city of palm-trees;" and several of these trees are still found in that vicinity; but in general they are now rare in Palestine. Palm wreaths, and branches waved in the air or strown on the road, are associated not only with the honors paid to ancient conquerors in the Grecian games and in war, but with the triumphant entry of the King of Zion into Jerusalem, John 12:12-13 , and with his more glorious triumph with his people in heaven, Revelation 7:9 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Palm Tree
PALM TREE ( tâmâr ). The date palm ( Phœnix dactylifera ) is a tree essential to existence in the deserts of Arabia, and was therefore held sacred among the Semites from the earliest historic times. It flourishes in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the oases of Arabia ( Exodus 15:27 , Numbers 33:9 ), but its cultivation has for long been much neglected in Palestine. It is still found in considerable numbers in the Maritime Plain, e.g . at the Bay of ‘Akka and at Gaza; and small scattered groups occur all over the land in the neighbourhood of springs. In the valleys east of the Dead Sea, many sterile, dwarfed palms occur. Both in the OT ( Deuteronomy 34:3 , Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 , 2 Chronicles 28:15 ) and in Josephus ( BJ IV. viii. 2 3), Jericho is famous for its vast groves of palms; to-day there are but few, and these quite modern trees. Not only are dates a staple diet in Arabia and an important article of export, but the plaited leaves furnish mats and baskets, the bark is made into ropes, and the seeds are ground up for cattle. From the dates is made a kind of syrup, date-honey or dibs , a valuable substitute for sugar. The method of fertilization of the female (pistillate) flowers by the pollen from the male (staminate) flowers was known in very ancient times, and nature was then, as now, assisted by shaking out the pollen over the female flowers. The palm tree is referred to ( Psalms 92:12 ) as a sign of prosperity and ( Song of Solomon 7:7-8 ) of beauty. Figures of palm trees were used to ornament the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1-38 ); at a later period they occur on Jewish coins and in the sculpture of the ancient Jewish synagogues, notably in the recently excavated synagogue at Tell Hûm (Capernaum). The sacredness of this tree thus persisted from the early Semite to late Jewish times. Palm branches were used at the rejoicings of the Feast of Tabernacles ( Leviticus 23:40 , Nehemiah 8:15 ), as they are among the modern Jews, who daily, during this feast, wave branches of palms in their synagogues. In 1Ma 13:51 we read of the bearing of palm branches as the sign of triumphant rejoicing an idea also implied in their use in John 12:13 and Revelation 7:9 . To-day these branches are used by the Moslems especially at funeral processions, and to decorate graves.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Palm Tree
(Heb. tamar ). Under this generic term many species are botanically included; but we have here only to do with the date palm, the Phoenix dactylifera of Linnaeus. While this tree was abundant generally in the Levant, it was regarded by the ancients as peculiarly characteristic of Palestine and the neighboring regions, though now it is rare. ("The palm tree frequently attains a height of eighty feet, but more commonly forty to fifty. It begins to bear fruit after it has been planted six or eight years, and continues to be productive for a century. Its trunk is straight, tall and unbroken, terminating in a crown of emerald-green plumes, like a diadem of gigantic ostrich-feathers; these leaves are frequently twenty feet in length, droop slightly at the ends, and whisper musically in the breeze. The palm is, in truth, a beautiful and most useful tree. Its fruit is the daily food of millions; its sap furnishes an agreeable wine; the fibres of the base of its leaves are woven into ropes and rigging; its tall stem supplies a valuable timber; its leaves are manufactured into brushes, mats, bags, couches and baskets. This one tree supplies almost all the wants of the Arab or Egyptian." --Bible Plants.) Many places are mentioned in the Bible as having connection with palm trees; Elim, where grew three score and ten palm trees, ( Exodus 15:27 ) and Elath. (2:8) Jericho was the city of "palm trees." (31:3) Hazezon-tamar, "the felling of the palm tree," is clear in its derivation. There is also Tamar, "the palm." (Ezekiel 47:19 ) Bethany means the "house of dates." The word Phoenicia, which occurs twice in the New Testament -- (Acts 11:19 ; 15:3 ) --is in all probability derived from the Greek word for a palm. The, striking appearance of the tree, its uprightness and beauty, would naturally suggest the giving of Its name occasionally to women. (Genesis 38:6 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 ; 14:27 ) There is in the Psalms, (Psalm 92:12 ) the familiar comparison, "The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree." which suggests a world of illustration whether respect be had to the orderly and regular aspect of the tree, its fruitfulness, the perpetual greenness of its foliage, or the height at which the foliage grows, as far as possible from earth and as near as possible to heaven. Perhaps no point is more worthy of mention, we wish to pursue the comparison, than the elasticity of the fibre of the palm and its determined growth upward even when loaded with weights. The passage in (Revelation 7:9 ) where the glorified of all nations are described as "clothed with white robes and palms in their hands," might seem to us a purely classical image; but palm branches were used by the Jews in token of victory and peace. (To these points of comparison may be added, its principle of growth: it is an endogen, and grows from within; its usefulness; the Syrians enumerating 360 different uses to which it may be put; and the statement that it bears its best fruit in old age. --ED.) It is curious that this tree, once so abundant in Judea, is now comparatively rare, except in the Philistine plain and in the old Phoenicia about Beyrout .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Palm Tree
This beautiful tree is spoken of in Scripture with so much commendation, that it merits our attention; and the more so because the Lord Jesus, when describing the loveliness of his church, compares her stature to it, and speaks with a degree of fervour and delight while professing his determination to take hold of her. "I said I will go up to the palm tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as the clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples." (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the palm tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of palm trees." (Deuteronomy 34:3) Engedi was also called Hazazon Tamar, or the village of palm trees, from the number of palm trees which grew there. The Jews called the palm tree Tamar. And not only in Judea, but in all places of the east where palms are found, the branches of it have always been celebrated as the tokens of triumph and victory; hence when the Lord Jesus entered Jerusalem, the multitude, as if overruled by a divine power, "took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna, blessed is the King of Israel, that cometh in the name of the Lord." (John 12:12-13) And hence also, as if to shew the same glorious testimony to the Lord Jesus, the redeemed in heaven are represented as "standing before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms their hands." (Revelation 7:9) I defy any man upon earth to shew the shadow of a reason wherefore the correspondence between Christ's appearance upon earth, in the day of his unequalled humility, and the day of his supreme power and glory, should have been thus set forth, but from the one certain and unquestionable truth of his almighty power and GODHEAD, and the divinity of his mission. What could have induced the whole multitude to have honoured Christ with those palm trees in the days of his flesh, when in the garb of a poor Jew, but the power of God overruling the whole mind of the people as the mind of one man? And wherefore the same display made in heaven, but to testify the approbation of God?
I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our attention to the palm tree before that I have first remarked some of the properties of it, by way of illustrating the beauty of our Lord's comparing his church to it. The Psalmist hath said, (Psalms 92:12) that "the righteous shall flourish like the palm tree; he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon." And there will appear a striking allusion between the believer in Jesus and the palm tree of Engedi, if we consider a few of the leading particulars. The growth of the palm is very upright and tall; and, as we are told by naturalists, is to old age always in this state of progression. And surely the church of Jesus, and every individual of the church, is in constant tendency upward. Trees of the Lord's "right hand planting are trees of righteousness," always supposed to be looking upward to Jesus, and their branches extending in every direction according to the exercise of his grace in them, by living wholly upon him in his person, blood, and righteousness.
Moreover, the palm tree is very fruitful, and the fruit is both lovely to the eye and delicious to the taste. And such are the followers of the Lord Jesus. What more lovely than to behold a truly regenerated believer in Christ Jesus? and who more blessed in his day and generation? Like the lofty and luxuriant palm tree of Engedi, which forms both a shade to the traveller to protect him from the heat, and fruit to refresh him as he passeth by, so the church of Jesus becomes a blessedness in her Lord to every spiritual traveller, and affords shelter, and nourishment, and every delight.
There is one property yet, if possible, more striking in the palm tree, which serves to open to a spiritual. Improvement, in allusion to Christ and his church, of a very singular nature, and peculiar, as far as I have learned, to the palm; namely, that the chief source of life in this tree is in its top; or, as it is physically called, the brain of the tree. We are told by those who are acquainted with the nature of palm trees, that if by any means this top be cut off, the tree is for ever after barren. Now here the reader will instantly perceive the striking resemblance between the palm tree and the child of God. To be wholly in Jesus is found the source of life and fruitfulness; and were it possible for a believer to be separated from Christ, yea, but for a moment, everlasting barrenness would follow. How blessedly hath Jesus spoken to this point when he said, "From me is thy fruit found." (Hosea 14:8) And so again, (John 15:4) "Abide in me, and I in you; as the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine, no more can ye, except ye abide in me?"
We are told that the palm tree is all evergreen. On the top of the tree is a kind of tuft or coronet, which never falls off, but is continually the same in verdure. A beautiful representation this of the church in Jesus. Many parts of Scripture correspond in speaking of the real disciple of Christ as one whose "leaf shall never fade nor fall;" and certainly, in the unceasing spring and summer of his glorious head, into whom he is ingrafted, there are no wintery dispensations or change.
One property more merits regard in the resemblance of the palm tree to the Christian, namely, the great duration and continuance of the palm. Dr. Shaw, in his travels, relates that the commonly-received opinion of the inhabitants of those countries where palm trees mostly abound is, that for seventy or eighty years the palm will live, bearing fruit to a great extent, even of 300 lb. weight of dates every year. It need not be noticed, by way of shewing the striking similarity to our nature, that the Psalmist represents the age of man as three-score years and ten, and (saith the Psalmist) "by reason of strength sometimes to four-score years." (Psalms 90:10) What a lovely palm tree then is the real follower of the Lord Jesus, if thus living to extreme old age he still brings forth fruit to the praise of the Lord's grace, "some thirty fold, some sixty fold, some au hundred fold!" So speaks the Holy Ghost concerning the faithful: "Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God; they shall still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be fat and flourishing; to shew that the Lord is upright: he is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him." (Psalms 92:13-15)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Palm Tree
PALM.—Palm trees, though frequently referred to in the OT, are mentioned in connexion with the life of Christ only once: viz. in the account of the triumphal entry into Jerusalem (John 12:13). The English name (Lat. palma) is due to the similarity of the leaves of some kinds to the open hand. The term in Greek (applied only to a genus) is φοίνιξ, which gave its name to a town in Crete (Acts 27:12). The word also means ‘a Phoenician,’ ‘a purple colour,’ and the fabulous phœnix. In Revelation 7:9 it is used of the leaf (or so-called branch), which is usually called βαΐον
The palm tree is amongst the foremost both in beauty and in utility. It grows with uniform trunk, straight like the mast of a ship. The trunk is in some kinds smooth, in others clearly annulated, in others rough with the roots of former fronds. At the top the leaves (or fronds) spring out in a spreading circle or crown, while beneath them the flowers and clusters of fruit are formed. The tree is endogenous, without bark and without branch. The leaves vary in length from three to ‘thirty feet. And along the stalk on either side long leaflets grow close, presenting in many kinds (pinnated) the shape of an enlarged feather, in others, including most of the fan-shaped palms, a rounder, broader form of palmate or webbed configuration, while in the bi-pinnate caryota and the mauritia they have a triangular (or fish-tailed or wedge-shaped) appearance. The fruit is often valuable, and by incision the juice is obtained that makes palm wine. Palm trees are tropical and semi-tropical. Some grow near wells, as the palms of Elim (Exodus 15:27), but this may be attributed to culture; others flourish in sandy deserts; some are found in mountainous regions, and many rear themselves erect on wind-swept ridges. Besides yielding food, drink, and oil, they afford house-building material, and many are highly serviceable for the various uses to which fibres are applicable.
Palms have been divided into five tribes, over a hundred genera, over a thousand species: but there is a limited number of main kinds. The palm of Palestine is the date-palm. This tree (phœnix dactylifera, date being a contraction of dactylus, ‘finger’) rises gracefully to a height of from fifty to ninety feet. It grows in various climates and latitudes, but its fruit fails both in Europe and in India. The female tree (for the phœnix, unlike most others, is not hermaphrodite) bears a cluster which may contain 200 dates, and it may continue to bear for two hundred years. These fruits, which are half sugar, are a chief article of food in Arabia and North Africa. From an incision near the top the fermenting sap flows so as to yield in one month twenty gallons of wine or toddy. The pinnated leaves, which are of a deep) green colour and from 9 to 12 feet in length, are used to make mats and baskets, and the fibres of their stalks make cordage. The leaves also make thatch, and the trunk is useful timber. This tree abounded in the valley of the Jordan, but Jericho was specially the city of palm trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). A group of palms, with their magnificent crowns, might afford ample shade. Accordingly, we find that early in the history of Israel Deborah dwelt under her palm tree (Judges 4:5), while in the time of our Lord many of the Essenes were said to live in palm groves. Fructification is artificial or accidental; and forests may be cultivated that in years of famine will support the population of a country.
The palm, being upright, green, fruitful, and imposing, was an emblem of the righteous in their prosperity (Psalms 92:12). In appreciation of the beauty of its form it was carved on the walls and doors of the Temple (1 Kings 6:29; 1 Kings 6:32, cf. Ezekiel 40:16; Ezekiel 41:18). Its leaves were borne as symbols of rejoicing at the Feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40) and also at the Maccabaean Feast of Dedication, of which the special feature was the illumination. This tall, firm, unbending tree, with its magnificent crown of fronds, with fruit and leaves that served for sustenance and ornament, was readily reckoned emblematic of moral qualities—rectitude, constancy, gracefulness, usefulness—such as are the constituents of success. The palm came to be regarded specially as the symbol of victory and triumph. It is in that sense that the name has acquired its metaphorical meaning. The winner (we say) carries off the palm. A period of exceptional prosperity is remembered as ‘palmy days’. ‘Another race hath been, and other palms are won’ (Wordsworth).
The carrying of palm leaves (τὰ βαΐα τῶν φοινίκων) by the people in honour Of the Messiah (John 12:13) was in accordance with the custom observed at feasts and on great public occasions. Jesus was saluted as a king proceeding to His coronation. The palms symbolized His triumph and the people’s joy. He allowed the homage of the multitude as the spontaneous expression of pure-minded loyalty. On the other hand, the Pharisees and officials regarded it as a challenge of their authority. The incident has been commemorated since the 5th cent. by the Greek and Latin Churches in the Palm Sunday (dominica palmarum, or feast of palm-leaves), immediately preceding Easter, at which palms are consecrated and a procession takes place.
The supreme expression of the palm as the symbol of triumphant homage is in the Apocalyptic vision, where the innumerable multitude who nave come through the great tribulation, and who serve God day and night, stand before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes and with palms in their hands (Revelation 7:9; Revelation 7:14).
Literature.—Artt. in Encyc. Brit.9 [1] , Chambers’s Encyc., the EBi [2] , and Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ; Historiœ Palmarum by Martius; Griffiths’ Palms of British East India is a volume of illustrations.
R. Scott.

Sentence search

Ithamar - (Exodus 6:23) His name signifies, island of the Palm Tree, from Tamar, a Palm Tree, on Ai, an island
Baal Tamar - ("lord of a Palm Tree". Deborah's Palm Tree (Judges 4:4) was between Ramah and Bethel, in this neighborhood
Baal-Tamar - (bay' uhl-tay' mahr) Place name meaning, “Baal of the Palm Tree” or “lord of the Palm Tree
Jupati Palm - A great Brazilian Palm Tree (Raphia taedigera), used by the natives for many purposes
Arenga - ) A Palm Tree (Saguerus saccharifer) which furnishes sago, wine, and fibers for ropes; the gomuti palm
Raffia - ) A fibrous material used for tying plants, said to come from the leaves of a Palm Tree of the genus Raphia
Doom Palm - A species of Palm Tree (Hyphaene Thebaica), highly valued for the fibrous pulp of its fruit, which has the flavor of gingerbread, and is largely eaten in Egypt and Abyssinia
Chestnut Tree - ) ( Genesis 30:37 ; Ezekiel 31:8 ) Probably the "palm tree" (Platanus orientalis ) is intended
Frond - ) The organ formed by the combination or union into one body of stem and leaf, and often bearing the fructification; as, the frond of a fern or of a lichen or seaweed; also, the peculiar leaf of a Palm Tree
Baal-Tamar - Lord of Palm Trees, a place in the tribe of Benjamin near Gibeah of Saul (Judges 20:33 ). Probably the Palm Tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5 ) is alluded to in the name
Allon-Bachuth - This particular tree was probably the same as the "palm tree of Deborah" (Judges 4:5 )
Talipot - ) A beautiful tropical Palm Tree (Corypha umbraculifera), a native of Ceylon and the Malabar coast
Pheni'ce - The name was no doubt derived from the Greek word for the Palm Tree, which Theophrastus says was indigenous in the island
Phenice - A town and harbor, more properly Phœnix (from the Greek word for the Palm Tree which was indigenous to Crete)
Cocoa Palm - A Palm Tree producing the cocoanut (Cocos nucifera)
Shekel - Also the citron fruit, and a Palm Tree between two baskets of fruit
Palm Tree - "I said I will go up to the Palm Tree, I will take hold of the boughs thereof: now also thy breasts shall be as the clusters of the vine, and the smell of thy nose like apples. " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)...
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the Palm Tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of Palm Trees. " (Deuteronomy 34:3) Engedi was also called Hazazon Tamar, or the village of Palm Trees, from the number of Palm Trees which grew there. The Jews called the Palm Tree Tamar. And not only in Judea, but in all places of the east where palms are found, the branches of it have always been celebrated as the tokens of triumph and victory; hence when the Lord Jesus entered Jerusalem, the multitude, as if overruled by a divine power, "took branches of Palm Trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna, blessed is the King of Israel, that cometh in the name of the Lord. What could have induced the whole multitude to have honoured Christ with those Palm Trees in the days of his flesh, when in the garb of a poor Jew, but the power of God overruling the whole mind of the people as the mind of one man? And wherefore the same display made in heaven, but to testify the approbation of God?...
I cannot prevail upon myself to dismiss our attention to the Palm Tree before that I have first remarked some of the properties of it, by way of illustrating the beauty of our Lord's comparing his church to it. The Psalmist hath said, (Psalms 92:12) that "the righteous shall flourish like the Palm Tree; he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon. " And there will appear a striking allusion between the believer in Jesus and the Palm Tree of Engedi, if we consider a few of the leading particulars. ...
Moreover, the Palm Tree is very fruitful, and the fruit is both lovely to the eye and delicious to the taste. What more lovely than to behold a truly regenerated believer in Christ Jesus? and who more blessed in his day and generation? Like the lofty and luxuriant Palm Tree of Engedi, which forms both a shade to the traveller to protect him from the heat, and fruit to refresh him as he passeth by, so the church of Jesus becomes a blessedness in her Lord to every spiritual traveller, and affords shelter, and nourishment, and every delight. ...
There is one property yet, if possible, more striking in the Palm Tree, which serves to open to a spiritual. We are told by those who are acquainted with the nature of Palm Trees, that if by any means this top be cut off, the tree is for ever after barren. Now here the reader will instantly perceive the striking resemblance between the Palm Tree and the child of God. " (Hosea 14:8) And so again, (John 15:4) "Abide in me, and I in you; as the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine, no more can ye, except ye abide in me?"...
We are told that the Palm Tree is all evergreen. ...
One property more merits regard in the resemblance of the Palm Tree to the Christian, namely, the great duration and continuance of the palm. Shaw, in his travels, relates that the commonly-received opinion of the inhabitants of those countries where Palm Trees mostly abound is, that for seventy or eighty years the palm will live, bearing fruit to a great extent, even of 300 lb. " (Psalms 90:10) What a lovely Palm Tree then is the real follower of the Lord Jesus, if thus living to extreme old age he still brings forth fruit to the praise of the Lord's grace, "some thirty fold, some sixty fold, some au hundred fold!" So speaks the Holy Ghost concerning the faithful: "Those that be planted in the house of the Lord shall flourish in the courts of our God; they shall still bring forth fruit in old age, they shall be fat and flourishing; to shew that the Lord is upright: he is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in him
Diklah - coast of Arabia; Diklah equates to Dakalah, an important city in the Yemen; it means a fruit-abounding Palm Tree
Palm Palm Tree - Palm, Palm Tree. The names of many places show that palms were abundant: Elim, Elath, Hazezon-tamar—"felling of Palm Tree"—Genesis 14:6; Bethany, "house of dates
Palm - The Palm Tree gives shade and fruit, and hence is emblematic of God's protection and grace
Obscene Object - Some recent interpreters have suggested a stylized Palm Tree as a symbol of fertility
Palm Tree - The learned Kaempfer, as a botanist, an antiquary, and a traveller, has exhausted the whole subject of Palm Trees. ...
It is even said that from one variety of the Palm Tree, the phoenix farinifera, meal has been extracted, which is found among the fibres of the trunk, and has been used for food. "...
In the temple of Solomon were pilasters made in the form of Palm Trees, 1 Kings 6:29 . To the fair, flourishing, and fruitful condition of this tree, the psalmist very aptly compares the votary of virtue, Psalms 92:12-14 :—...
The righteous shall flourish like a Palm Tree. ...
The Palm Tree is crowned at its top with a large tuft of spiring leaves about four feet long, which never fall off, but always continue in the same flourishing verdure. Jeremiah, speaking of the idols that were carried in procession, says they were upright as the Palm Tree, Jeremiah 10:5 . And for erect stature and slenderness of form, the spouse, in Song of Solomon 7:7 , is compared to this tree:—...
How framed, O my love, for delights! Lo, thy stature is like a Palm Tree, And thy bosom like clusters of dates. Good observes, that "the very word tamar, here used for the Palm Tree, and whose radical meaning is ‘straight,' or ‘upright,' (whence it was afterward applied to pillars or columns, as well as to the palm,) was also a general name among the ladies of Palestine, and unquestionably adopted in honour of the stature they had already acquired, or gave a fair promise of attaining. It represents a captive woman sitting under a Palm Tree, with this inscription, "Judea capta;" [1] and upon a Greek coin, likewise, of his son Titus, struck upon the like occasion, we see a shield suspended upon a Palm Tree, with a Victory writing upon it. " Jericho, in particular, was called "the city of palms," Deuteronomy 34:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ; because, as Josephus, Strabo, and Pliny have remarked, it anciently abounded in Palm Trees. Tamar, a city built in the desert by Solomon, 1 Kings 9:18 ; Ezekiel 47:19 ; Ezekiel 48:28 , was probably so named from the Palm Trees growing about it; as it was afterward by the Romans called Palmyra, or rather Palmira, on the same account, from palma, "a Palm Tree
Deborah - a prophetess, wife of Lapidoth, judged the Israelites, and dwelt under a Palm Tree between Ramah and Bethel, Judges 4:4-5
Zin - Zin (zĭn), a low Palm Tree
Turtle, Turtle-Dove - In the valley of the Jordan, an allied species, the palm-dove (so named because it builds its nest in the Palm Tree), or Egyptian turtle-- Turtur aegyptiacus , Temm. It is not improbable that the palm-dove may in some measure have supplied the sacrifice in the wilderness, for it is found in amazing numbers wherever the Palm Tree occurs, whether wild or cultivated
Brier - ...
...
Ezekiel 28:24 , Sallon' , properly a "prickle," such as is found on the shoots of the Palm Tree
Deborah - , had a tent pitched beneath, a noted tree; a Palm Tree it is called, and may have been at Baal-tamar, Judges 20:33, or not far distant from the tree under which the first Deborah was buried
Cedar - The Palm Tree in this verse represents the individual testimony
Gourd - ...
See Palm Tree
Enos - The eastern people make the following additions to his history:—that Seth, his father, declared him sovereign prince and high priest of mankind, next after himself; that Enos was the first who ordained public alms for the poor, established public tribunals for the administration of justice, and planted, or rather cultivated, the Palm Tree
ta'Mar - (palm tree ). ) ...
A spot on the southeastern frontier of Judah, named in (Ezekiel 47:19 ; 48:28 ) only, evidently called from a Palm Tree
Palm Tree - ("The Palm Tree frequently attains a height of eighty feet, but more commonly forty to fifty. ) Many places are mentioned in the Bible as having connection with Palm Trees; Elim, where grew three score and ten Palm Trees, ( Exodus 15:27 ) and Elath. (2:8) Jericho was the city of "palm trees. " (31:3) Hazezon-tamar, "the felling of the Palm Tree," is clear in its derivation. (Genesis 38:6 ; 2 Samuel 13:1 ; 14:27 ) There is in the Psalms, (Psalm 92:12 ) the familiar comparison, "The righteous shall flourish like the Palm Tree
Elon - See 1 Samuel 10:3 ) or the “palm tree of Deborah” (Judges 4:5 )
Palm Tree - Branches of the Palm Tree were carried at the feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40 )
Branch - ...
4: βαΐον (Strong's #902 — Noun Neuter — baion — bah-ee'-on ) of Egyptian origin, frequent in the papyri writings, denotes "a branch of the Palm Tree," John 12:13
Palm Tree - Palm Tree ( tâmâr ). The Palm Tree is referred to ( Psalms 92:12 ) as a sign of prosperity and ( Song of Solomon 7:7-8 ) of beauty. Figures of Palm Trees were used to ornament the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1-38 ); at a later period they occur on Jewish coins and in the sculpture of the ancient Jewish synagogues, notably in the recently excavated synagogue at Tell Hûm (Capernaum)
Palm - ) Any endogenous tree of the order Palmae or Palmaceae; a Palm Tree
Deb'Orah - ) She lived under the Palm Tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in Mount Ephraim, (Judges 4:5 ) which, as Palm Trees were rare in Palestine, "is mentioned as a well-known and solitary landmark
Grove - Some trees are specially-noted: the tamarisk (eeshel ) under which Saul abode in Gibeah (1 Samuel 22:6); the terebinth in Shechem under which Joshua, after writing the law of God, set up (Joshua 24:26) a great stone as a witness; the Palm Tree of Deborah (Judges 4:5); the terebinth of enchantments (Judges 9:37 margin, (See MEONENIM); of wanderers (Judges 6:11, (See ZAANAIM)); 1 Samuel 14:2, "a pomegranate tree in Migron" (1 Samuel 10:3)
Deborah - She became a "mother in Israel" (Judges 4:6,14 ; 5:7 ), and "the children of Israel came up to her for judgment" as she sat in her tent under the Palm Tree "between Ramah and Bethel
Jericho - Riha lies almost desert; and even that "one solitary Palm Tree" which Dr
Deborah - She held court at “the Palm Tree of Deborah,” in the southern part of the territory of Ephraim, between Ramah and Bethel (Judges 4:4-5 )
Trees - Each type of a tree represents a different truth as follows:...
Palm tree - it represents the individual Christian life living for GOD in the midst of adverse conditions such as the Palm Tree has in the desert. ...
Cedar tree - it represents the collective Christian life, for cedars grow in forests and not as the Palm Tree which dwells almost alone
Baal - Baal-tamar (bâ'al-tâ'mar), lord of the Palm Tree. The Palm Tree (tâmâr) of Deborah, Judges 4:1-24; Judges 5:1-31, was situated somewhere in the locality
Names - Deborah, "bee;" Tamar, "a Palm Tree;" Jonah, "dove
Palm Tree - —Palm trees, though frequently referred to in the OT, are mentioned in connexion with the life of Christ only once: viz. In Revelation 7:9 it is used of the leaf (or so-called branch), which is usually called βαΐον...
The Palm Tree is amongst the foremost both in beauty and in utility. Palm Trees are tropical and semi-tropical. This tree abounded in the valley of the Jordan, but Jericho was specially the city of Palm Trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). Accordingly, we find that early in the history of Israel Deborah dwelt under her Palm Tree (Judges 4:5), while in the time of our Lord many of the Essenes were said to live in palm groves
Palm - Solomon had these Palm Trees carved in the wood of the temple to ever remind Israel that each one individually was to be responsible for his own individual Christian life. ...
Psalm 92:12 (b) The Palm Tree in this passage is a type of the life that GOD expects from the Christian
Amorite (the) - As early as Genesis 14:7; Genesis 14:18, they occupied the rugged heights afterward called Engedi (fount of the kid); then Hazezon Tamar (the cutting of the Palm Tree)
Naming - Less frequently occurring are names taken from plants: Tamar meaning “palm tree”; Susanna meaning “lily
Gal'Ilee - The walnut, which delights above other trees in a wintry climate, grows here luxuriantly together with the Palm Tree, which is flourished by heat
River; Wadi - In Arabic these same radicals mean “palm tree
Deborah - "Lived under the Palm Tree"; a landmark, as palms were rare in Palestine (Judges 4:5); possibly meaning Baal Tamar, "the sanctuary of the palm" (Judges 20:33)
Phoeni'ce, Phoenic'ia - (land of Palm Trees ) a tract of country, of which Tyre and Sidon were the principal cities, to the north of Palestine, along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea bounded by that sea on the west, and by the mountain range of Lebanon on the east. The name was not the one by which its native inhabitants called it, but was given to it by the Greeks, from the Greek word for the Palm Tree
Money - 405), struck after Titus took Jerusalem, has the legend Judaea Capta, with a female" sitting on the ground desolate" (fulfilling Isaiah 3:26) under a Palm Tree
Ark - Foster deduces it from two Egyptian words, thoi, "a ship," and bai, "a Palm Tree branch;" and such ships are still to be seen not only in Egypt, but in India and other countries; particularly in some isles of the Pacific Ocean
Food - ]'>[9] , and that without any justification, as the marginal alternative of ‘honey,’ 2 Chronicles 31:5 ; yet Joel includes ‘the Palm Tree’ in his list of fruit-trees ( 2 Chronicles 1:12 ), and from the Mishna we learn that dates, like the fruits already discussed, were not only eaten as they came from the palm, but were dried in clusters and also pressed into cakes for convenience of transport
Canaan - Dates are another important article of consumption; and the neighbourhood of Judea was famous for its numerous Palm Trees, which are found springing up from chance-sown kernels in the midst of the most arid districts. Tacitus compares both the climate and the soil, indeed, to those of Italy; and he particularly specifies the Palm Tree and balsam tree as productions which gave the country an advantage over his own. The country about Jericho was celebrated for its balsam, as well as for its Palm Trees; and two plantations of it existed during the last war between the Jews and the Romans for which both parties fought desperately
Sea of Galilee - The hills and the valleys on both shores become clothed in a luxuriant greenness, while, as the season advances, the fresh bursting buds of the olive, the fig, the vine, and the pomegranate, with here and there a Palm Tree, add variety and pleasantness to the landscape
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - The idea of the Palm Tree is taken from a story in the History of the Nativity of Mary, when she rests under it on the way to Egypt