What does Oracles mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
λόγια a brief utterance 3
λογίων a brief utterance 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֣א load 1

Definitions Related to Oracles

G3051


   1 a brief utterance, a divine oracle (doubtless because Oracles were generally brief).
      1a in the NT, the words or utterances of God.
      1b of the contents of the Mosaic law.
      

H4853


   1 load, bearing, tribute, burden, lifting.
      1a load, burden.
      1b lifting, uplifting, that to which the soul lifts itself up.
      1c bearing, carrying.
      1d tribute, that which is carried or brought or borne.
   2 utterance, oracle, burden.
   3 a son of Ishmael.
   Additional Information: Massa = “burden”.
   

Frequency of Oracles (original languages)

Frequency of Oracles (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Oracles
Communications from God. The term refers both to divine responses to a question asked of God and to pronouncements made by God without His being asked. In one sense, oracles were prophecies since they often referred to the future; but oracles sometimes dealt with decisions to be made in the present. Usually, in the Bible the communication was from Yahweh, the God of Israel. In times of idol worship, however, Israelites did seek a word or pronouncement from false gods (Hosea 4:12 ). Many of Israel's neighbors sought oracles from their gods.
Although the word oracle is not very frequent in the Old Testament, oracles were common in that period. This difference occurs because the Hebrew words translated “oracle” may also be translated as “burden,” “saying,” “word,” etc. Translations are not consistent in how they render these Hebrew words. Both the NRSV and the NAS translate the same Hebrew word as “oracle” in Numbers 24:3 , but it is rendered “declare” in 1 Samuel 2:30 . Jeremiah 23:33-34 makes a play on a Hebrew word which may be translated either “burden” or “oracle.” The NAS uses “oracle,” but the NRSV and KJV use “burden.” Moreover, in the KJV the English word oracle is used to refer to the holy of holies in the Temple.
Concordance study shows the following meaning and use of “oracle.” Sometimes “oracle” refers to the whole of a prophetic book (Malachi 1:1 NRSV) or a major portion of one ( Habakkuk 1:1 NRSV). In Isaiah, several smaller prophecies of judgment or punishment are called “oracles” ( Isaiah 13:1 NRSV; Isaiah 14:28 NRSV). The NRSV also entitles Zechariah 9:1 and Zechariah 12:1 “An Oracle.” Specific sayings about God's judgment on Joram ( 2 Kings 9:25 NRSV) and Joash ( 2 Chronicles 24:27 NRSV) are also called oracles. Other examples, although the word oracle is not used, include Elijah's word to Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:17-19 ) and Elisha's word to Jehoram (2 Kings 3:13-20 ). On the basis of these kinds of usages, many Bible students understand oracles to be divine words of punishment or judgment. However, Balaam's oracle (Numbers 24:3-9 ) is a blessing. Also references to Ahithophel's counsel (2 Samuel 16:23 ) and to oracles in Jerusalem which were pleasing but false (Lamentations 2:14 ) show us that prophetic pronouncements were not always negative.
The New Testament does not reflect quite the same use of oracles or the word oracle as does the Old. The early church did have prophets like Agabus (Acts 21:10-11 ), who expressed God's word regarding what was to come. The word oracles in the New Testament most often refers to the teachings of God in the Old Testament (Acts 7:38 ; Romans 3:2 ). It may refer to Christian teachings, too (Hebrews 5:12 ).
Why Were Oracles Given? We must distinguish between oracles that were sought and those that came without any request. The first kind might be called “decision oracles.” The second kind will be referred to as “pronouncement oracles.” Decision oracles came when people asked God a question or sought His counsel. For example, David needed to know the right time to attack the Philistines. So he asked God. The answers he received were oracles (2Samuel 5:19,2 Samuel 5:23-24 ). Saul, the first king of Israel, was chosen through an oracle (1 Samuel 10:20-24 ). In that case, the communication from God was through the casting of lots. The falling of the lots was considered an oracle from God. Decision oracles, then, were God's response to questions and concerns in the present. They did not condemn sin or predict the future in any specific sense.
Pronouncement oracles were God's word to a situation or a person even though no word (from God had been sought. (But, see comments below on Balaam's oracle.) The pronouncement oracles were sometimes brief as when Elijah foretold a drought in Israel (1 Kings 17:1 ). The message could be long; thus the whole Book of Malachi is a pronouncement oracle. This kind of oracle usually told what was going to happen. It also frequently condemned sin. It expressed God's view of present acts or circumstances. In that sense, many of the prophecies in the Old Testament were pronouncement oracles. Because they were God's word, these pronouncements were true, even though they could be changed as in the case of Jonah's pronouncement over Nineveh (Jonah 3:4-9 ).
Pronouncement oracles were given to produce an effect. People were to hear and to change their ways. With that in mind, the pronouncement oracles against foreign nations form a special group. Many of the writing prophets have pronouncements against (or concerning) nations surrounding Israel (Amos 1:1 ; Isaiah 13-19 ; Jeremiah 46-51 ). These foreign nations had little chance to hear and heed the word of an Israelite prophet. Other nations had their own gods and their own prophets. Apparently, the pronouncements over foreign nations were intended to have an effect on the people of Israel as well as bring about the events described. At times, Israel or Judah heard their name included among foreign nations (for example, Amos 2:4-16 ). God cared for the other nations even though they cared little for Him. God's expression of concern by pronouncing judgment (or salvation as in Isaiah 19:19-22 ) was intended to remind Israel of her mission to share God with others. At least, these words reminded the hearers of God's international, even universal, power and expectations.
Balaam's oracle (Numbers 24:1 ) is a special case. Balak sought a pronouncement through the prophet Balaam. Balak's intention was to curse or to pronounce judgment on the Israelites. God did not allow this but gave Balaam an oracle of blessing to pronounce. Balaam's oracle, then, was positive and sought—a positive pronouncement oracle. The seeking of a pronouncement like this may have been more common than we know. Oracles came either in response to human questions or when God wished to make His views known to produce a change.
How Were Oracles Given or Received? Oracles were given through special people. Although anyone could seek a word from God and many, such as Gideon or Abraham, received an oracle directly; these divine communications usually came through either priests, prophets, or prophetesses. These two groups seemed to have their own specific ways of receiving oracles. In the earlier period, priests were more often sought out to receive a word from God. Later, the prophets were more prominent. Of course, for a long period both functioned as intermediaries. One caution about prophets and their pronouncements must be made. Often the prophets were not prophets until they received God's word (consider Amos' experience in Amos 7:14-15 ). The word came to some reluctantly as in the case of Jeremiah. God's giving of an oracle to a man or woman made them a prophet; for, when the divine word came, the prophet had to speak (Amos 3:8 ).
Different methods were used by priests and prophets to receive the two forms of oracles, although we should not try to make too rigid a distinction. Decision oracles often came through the use of objects. Examples of such objects include the High Priest's Urim and Thummim and the ephod. Lots, too, were used. See Urim and Thummim ; Ephod ; Lots .
Decision oracles could also come through a person without the use of any objects. David sought the Lord's will at the point of building a temple. His answer came through Nathan, the prophet (2 Samuel 7:1 ). In 1 Kings 22:1 , a dramatic conflict arose while the kings of Judah and Israel together sought a decision oracle. No objects were used in this case. The drama came from a true prophet receiving one answer regarding the decision and a large number of false prophets giving a different answer. Prophets did sometimes use music as a means of receiving a decision oracle as did Elisha (2 Kings 3:15 ). However, the exact way music was used is unclear to us.
Frequently, the Old Testament gives no indication as to how God communicated His pronouncement oracles to His prophet or priest. Careful reading of the Old Testament shows a variety of methods in use. Audition—the actual hearing of a voice—and visions undoubtedly played a part in the receiving of God's words. We cannot know how much of God's revelation came through the actual ear or eye or how much came through the mind. Balaam spoke when the Spirit came upon him (Numbers 24:2 ). He described himself as one whose eye was opened, one who heard God's word and saw His vision. Nahum and Habakkuk wrote of a vision or of seeing their oracles (Nahum 1:1 ; Habakkuk 1:1 ). Through Jeremiah, God condemned those prophets who relied on dreams to receive an oracle (Jeremiah 23:23-32 ). However, Solomon earlier had received God's pronouncement in a dream (1 Kings 3:5 .). Several times God used scenes which the prophet saw as a means of giving a pronouncement oracle. Some of the scenes were external (Jeremiah 18:1-12 ), and some were visionary (Ezekiel 37:1-14 ). The frequent use of sights in pronouncements has led some to believe that the prophets had encounters with God that later they had to interpret and communicate to others.
Regardless of how the oracle came, it was to be expressed to others. This expression seems most often to have been oral. The priest or prophet told the oracle to either the individual or a group. The place may have been in a field or a king's throne room. The pronouncement oracles were often proclaimed in the city, even in a temple (Amos in Bethel and Jeremiah in Jerusalem). Many of the oracles, though, give us no indication of where or when they were spoken.
Oracles which were not simply yes or no seem most often to have been given in poetic form. This is especially true of the pronouncements of the writing prophets which have been preserved for us. Though given orally in the beginning, at some time the pronouncement oracles were written down. They may have been written by disciples of the prophet or by others who heard. They may have been written when they were first told or at a later time. Whatever the case, the oracles were given by God and preserved for us.
How Did People Respond to the Oracles? Again, a distinction should be made between the decision and the pronouncement oracles. Those who were seeking God's help or counsel in a decision-making process undoubtedly acted on what they learned. Others, who heard oracles they had neither sought nor welcomed, may not have been as quick to accept the pronouncement (consider Elijah's words to Ahab, 1 Kings 21:20-24 ). Most often the response of those who heard or read the oracles of God can be guessed at. Two points should be recognized. First, oracles were remembered long after their pronouncement. When Jehu killed Joram (2 Kings 9:25 ), he had the body taken to Naboth's vineyard in order that an oracle pronounced in Ahab's day might be fulfilled. Second, though we do not know the response of the original hearers, God's pronouncements are still being read and are producing change in people in our day. Thus, the oracles are still functioning. See Inspiration; Priest; Prophet; Spirit .
Albert Bean
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sybilline Oracles
See Pseudepigrapha .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Oracles
(1) divine utterances, as those by Urim and Thummim and the ephod of the high priest: 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 30:7-8.
(2) The place where they were given (2 Samuel 16:23; 1 Kings 6:16), "the most holy place." In the New Testament the Spirit-inspired Scriptures (Romans 3:2; Hebrews 5:12; 1 Peter 4:11) of the Old Testament are so called. Others translated, "let him speak as (becomes one speaking) oracles of God," which designates the New Testament words (afterward written) of inspired men by the same term as was applied to the Old Testament Scriptures; in the Greek there is no article. The pagan "oracles" ceased when Christianity supplanted paganism. Paul's casting out "the spirit of pithon" (divination) implies that the ancient oracles were not always imposture, but were sometimes energized by Satanic powers (Acts 16:16).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Sibylline Oracles
Prophecies delivered, it is said, by certain women of antiquity, showing the fates and revolutions of kingdoms. We have a collection of them in eight books. Dr. Jorton observes, that they were composed at different times by different persons; first by Pagans, and then, perhaps, by Jews, and certainly by Christians. They abound with phrases, words, facts, and passages, taken from the LXX, and the New Testament. They are, says the Doctor, a remarkable specimen of astonishing impudence and miserable poetry, and seem to have been, from first to last, and without any one exception, mere impostures.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sibylline Oracles
At the close of the 5th (6th?) cent. Gospel (cf. vol. i. p. 489) which is entitled The History of Joseph the Carpenter, the Saviour predicts that Antichrist will murder four persons and shed their blood like water, in revenge for their exposure of his evil policy. The apostles ask who these four persons are, and the Lord replies, ‘They are Enoch, Elijah, Schila, and Tabitha.’ ‘Schila’ has puzzled editors of this Arabic document. It is commonly taken as a man’s name, and he has been identified with the NT ‘Silas,’ although there is no obvious reason either in the NT or in later tradition why Silas should be in such exalted company. E. Nestle (ZNTW [1] xi. [2] 240) suggests that he was the son of the widow of Nain; but this is pure conjecture, and Nestle’s companion idea that ‘Tabitha’ represents the daughter of Jairus (Mark 5:41, ταλειθά κούμ) is a precarious support. Tabitha is certainly the woman of Joppa (Acts 9:36-41) whom St. Peter raised from the dead. In the Coptic Apocalypse of Elijah she encounters Antichrist, and in a fragment of some Sahidic apocalypse, quoted by Crum (ZNTW [1] xii. [4] 352), she is ranked with Enoch and Elijah as having entered heaven in the body. Crum further solves the problem of ‘Schila’ by noting that when the Arabic noun is pointed differently it becomes equivalent to ‘Sibylla,’ who is elsewhere associated with Enoch. This yields an excellent sense for the passage, two men being followed by two women.
But what is the Sibyl, a pagan figure, doing in this Christian connexion? How did she come to till so strange a rôle? The answer to these questions is the subject of the present article.
The etymology of the word ‘Sibyl’ is a disputed point. (a) The oldest derivation is the attractive one given by Varro (quoted in Lact. Div. Inst. i. 6), that the term is a generic title for prophetesses, which comes from the Doric or aeolic σιός = θεός, and βολλά (βούλλα) = βουλή, i.e. ‘the counsel of God.’ (b) J. P. Postgate (AJPh [5] iii. [6] 333-334), unable to accept (a), since σιός is Laconian, not aeolic, and since the loss of an accented syllable is unlikely, prefers the roots σιβ-υλο-γα (the feminine suffix) = ‘the wise (little) woman,’ the suffix -υλο being used in a diminutive sense, and σιβ- being connected with sap, ‘to be wise.’ (c) The idea of wisdom is brought in by those philologists, like Max Müller (Lectures on the Science of Language, new ed., London, 1882, vol. i. p. 109), who connect σιβ with a primitive Italian sabus or sabius, ‘wise’; but there is no trace of this Italian term as the origin of the diminutive, and ‘Sibulla’ does not seem to occur in any Italian dialect. (d) E. Hofmann (see below) accepts the first part of (a), but makes the word a composite from σιός and ἵλλαος = ἱλαος (ἵλεως), meaning ‘God-appeasing,’ or ‘God-reconciling,’ with reference to the aim of the primitive Sibylline oracles. Others find the thought of age dominant and (e), like S. Krauss, derive it from sib-il, ‘the ancient of God,’ sib or šib = ‘old,’ and -ιλ as in Βαβυλών, for which the inscriptions furnish the form ‘Bâb-il’ (Byzantinische Zeitschrift, xi. [7] 122), or (f), like H. Lewy in Philologus, lvii. [8] 350 f., connect σίβυλλα with the Semitic (Aramaic) root of sâbetâ, ‘grandmother,’ although this leaves the reduplication of the β unexplained. None of these, or of the other ancient and modern etymologies which have been proposed, is satisfactory. Σίβιλλα occurs as a woman’s name in an Attic inscription from the 4th cent. b.c., but, while this suggests that Sibyl may have been a proper name to begin with, it is insufficient to prove that Sibyl was a Greek term, not an Oriental. Eventually the name was applied la any woman or prophetic gifts, according to Servius (on aen. iii. 445: ‘Sibylla … dicitur omnis puella cuius pectus numen recipit’) and Suidas (ἐνὶ ὀνόματι αἱ θηλείαι μάντιδες ὠνομάσθησαν Σιβύλλαι). But originally it was restricted to a small class or prophetesses, whom we may call:
1. The classical Sibyl(s).-Towards the end of the 6th, or about the beginning of the 5th, cent. b.c., the foundation of the Capitoline temple in Rome was associated with the influence of Sibylline utterances and the infusion of Greek rites (Graecus ritus) into Roman religion. The origin of these was Eastern. During the 6th cent. ‘Greece was not only full of Orphism and Pythagoreanism, but of floating oracular dicta believed to emanate from a mystic female figure, a weird figure of whom it is hard to say how far she was human or divine; and of whose origin we know nothing, except that her original home was, as we might expect, Asia Minor’ (W. Warde Fowler, The Religious Experience of the Roman People, London, 1911, p. 257). This was the Sibyl. Like the Pythia, she was a woman, considered to be inspired by Apollo. Subsequently, she was supposed to be extremely old, on the principle, probably, that long experience added to her prophetic capacities. As time went on, her personality multiplied; in the 4th cent. b.c. Heraclides Ponticus, the historian, knew of three, and Varro reckoned as many as ten [Note: The variant tradition of nine reached Shakespeare. The Bastard in King Henry VI. (pt. i. act i. scene ii. lines 55-57), describing Joan of Arc, says:
‘The spirit of deep prophecy she hath,
Exceeding the nine sibyls of old Rome:
What’s past and what’s to come she can descry.’] Sibyls. Primitive tradition located the original Sibyl at Erythrae, but the most famous Sibyl resided at Cumae, the old Greek settlement in Campania, though it is probable that the Sibylline oracles which came to Rome from Cumae had reached the latter city from Erythrae. [8] 90-113.] The Roman collection, which legend linked to the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, perished in the Capitol fire of 83 b.c. But they had become too important for the purposes of religion to be lost, and a commission of three State officials replaced them by a fresh collection of a thousand verses, gathered from Erythrae, Samos, Ilium, Africa, Sicily, and elsewhere. Instructions were given that only genuine productions were to be admitted to thus new edition of the libri Sibyllini or libri fatales. [10] 289 ff.] But such precautions as were taken do not seem to have been more than partially successful. Oracles of this kind absorbed forgeries of a more or less political aim, and the authorized collection had to be purged from time to time. In 13 b.c. Augustus included this among his religious reforms, and Tiberius had to prevent an anonymous Sibylline book from being added to the list; the Emperor showed himself more sceptical than the quindecimuiri sacris faciundis, [11] who were officially responsible for the interpretation of the oracles and for the application of their mysterious commands to the national life. In times of disaster and misfortune, or when prodigies occurred, the Romans turned to this sacred collection. Whatever measures it dictated-fasts, feasts, expiations, or the like-were carried out with trembling, anxious care, as during the panic roused by Hannibal’s campaign in Northern Italy. The Sibylline collection met, or was skilfully manipulated to meet, the popular appetite for appeasing the supernatural, which prodigies and defeats created from time to time. These Roman oracles originally were not so much predictions of woes to come, like apocalyptic tracts, as explanations of what was required to avert the anger of the gods and ward off evil to the State on earth. They were not ‘vaticinia’ but ‘remedia Sibyllina,’ as Pliny puts it (Historia Naturalis (Pliny) xi. 35). They were also esoteric literature; the consent of the Senate was required before a line of their contents could be divulged to the general public. This put considerable power into the hands of the officials who had charge of them, especially as the obscurity of their contents made the sense of certain passages conveniently ambiguous, and it is not surprising to find that, as time went on, their reputation suffered in the same way as the Greek oracles; the Roman, like the Greek, Sibyllina might ‘philippize’; genuine lines might be interpreted for private ends, if a political leader could influence the expositors, and forged lines could be surreptitiously introduced. Still, for two centuries at least, these oracles had a singular power over the religious hopes and fears of the people. An odd story like that preserved by Petronius [7] in the 1st cent. a.d. must not be allowed to count unduly against the esteem which was still felt for the oracles. But their influence was upon the wane. Thus, in a.d. 270, when the Alemanni invaded Italy, the Senate hesitated to consult the Sibyllina, and Aurelian had to incite them (Vopiscus, Vita Aureliani, 20); the Emperor taunted them with behaving as if they were in a Christian church-a significant indication of the changed attitude towards these oracles! Their use lingered down to the age of Julian. Then the Christian reaction proved fatal to them, and Stilicho is said to have burned the entire official collection at the beginning of the 5th century. His action was bitterly resented, as we can see from the indignant verses of Rutilius Numantianus, but the protect did not affect the fact; Stilicho’s action had made it impossible for the authorities to appeal in future to this ancient relic of pagan divination. [13]
Besides the official collection, however, Sibylline oracles passed current in large numbers among the people. Lactantius, who has preserved several important data on the subject, declares that only the Cumaean Sibyl’s oracles, amounting to three books, were kept secret, [14] while the writings of the other Sibyls for the most part circulated freely. It is true, as we have seen, that the very diffusion of such verses led to the partial discrediting of the entire literature as a religious authority of impartial value, but long before this shadow fell upon the Sibyllina at Rome the Hellenistic Jews of Alexandria had taken advantage of the current Sibylline verse as a literary genre and started a new, ingenious development of the method.
2. The Jewish Sibylline oracles.-We come upon Jewish Sibylline oracles before we hear of a Jewish Sibyl. The latter is first mentioned by Alexander Polyhistor, the Greek author of Χαλδαϊκά, in the 1st cent. b.c., who quotes what is apparently an oracle still extant in Sib. Orac. iii. 97 ff. It is necessary to say ‘apparently,’ for serious doubts have been thrown recently upon Alexander’s indebtedness to a Jewish source; both Geffcken [Note: In his ‘Komposition und Entstehungszeit der Oracula Sibyllina’ (TU xxiii. 1 [7] 2 f.).] and Bousset [Note: In an essay in E. Preuschen’s ZNTW iii. [7] 23-49.] prefer to find traces of a Babylonian (Greek) Sibylline oracle, and Schürer’s criticism of this theory does not succeed in ruling it out of court. The exact relations between the Jewish Sibyl and the Chaldaean have not yet been cleared up. Pausanias vouches for four Sibyls, the Erythraean Herophile, the Cumaean Demo, a Libyan prophetess, and ‘subsequent to Demo, an oracular woman among the Hebrews, named Sabbe; Berosus is said to have been the father, Erymanthes the mother, of Sabbe, Some call her the Babylonian, others the Egyptian Sibyl’ (x. 12). A later variant for ‘Sabbe’ is ‘Sambethe,’ which is variously explained. But among these uncertainties the fact shines clear, that by the 2nd cent. b.c. the literary method of the Sibylline oracles had been exploited by one or more Jewish authors at Alexandria, in the interests of religious apologetic and propaganda. Like the older Philo, Theodotus, and possibly the author of the pseudo-Phocylidaean verses, the Jews who composed these Sibylline oracles of their own could write Greek hexameters. [17] They chose this pagan form in order not only to convey threats of doom against persecuting powers like Assyria and Rome, but also to win a hearing among outside circles for their own monotheism and moralism. Why should not the Sibyl, this recognized exponent of Divine things, voice the true inspiration of Israel as well as the secondary revelation of the nations? Why should not this authoritative channel convey the living water of Jewish truth, or rather of truth as only the Jews knew it? And so this form of pseudonymous literature came into vogue. [18]
But the vogue did not last very long. The same fate befell the Sibylline oracles of Judaism that befell the apocalypses: their popularity with the early Christian Church appears to have thrown them out of favour with the officials of Rabbinic Judaism.|| [14] The Church appropriated them, appealed to them, edited them in her own interests, composed fresh ones, and, in general, treated the Jewish Sibylline oracles much as the Alexandrian Jews had treated the pagan ones. It is true that the composition of Jewish Sibyllines continued sporadically till the reign of Marcus Aurelius at any rate, and even later. But the extant collection is due to Christians, and one of the intricate problems of this literature is to determine how far Christians have edited sources which were originally Jewish. As in the case of the apocalypses, the criteria are far from being satisfactory. The Sibylline oracles are a conglomerate of documents, ranging from the 2nd cent. b.c. to the middle of the 7th cent. a.d. Some sections (e.g. the earliest, in bk. iii.) are evidently Jewish, others as evidently Christian; hut large passages seem to show no distinct soil in one or the other religion. Some of them are not definitely pre-Christian, and even those that are to be dated in the Christian era may be Jewish compositions worked over by a Christian hand.
An instance of the difficulty of deciding whether a passage of the Sibyllina was written by a Jew or by a Christian is afforded by the first of the fragments which Theophilus of Antioch has preserved (ad Autol. ii. 36):
‘O mortal men of flesh, mere things of nought,
How quick your pride, regardless or life’s end!
Have ye no fear of God, who knows each thought,
Who sees all, rules all, [20] who doth all transcend,
Nourishing all he made, and in all men
Sets the sweat [21] Spirit to direct their ways?
One God there is, Lord above mortal ken,
Unborn, alone in power, from mortal gaze
Hidden himself, who yet beholdeth all.
The immortal God no eye of flesh can view,
Who dwells above, the heavenly God, the true;
For mortal nerves will weakly flinch and fall
Even before the sun’s refulgent ball. [1]
Ah, worship him who o’er the world holds sway,
Unborn, eternal, self-created Being,
Sustaining Lord, who in our common day [23]
Assigns to mortals each the power of seeing. [24]
Bitterly for ill error shall ye pay,
For all forsaking of his altars true,
For hecatombs and offerings ye lay
On altars of dead idols as their due.
Besotted, proud, ye left the straight highway
To wander blindly among thorns; ah, cease.
Cease, oh ye foolish men, to roam astray,
From darkness and black night seek ye release,
Lay hold upon the Light, [25] unerring, clear,
For all to mark his presence now and here.
Turn not for ever to the murky night:
When lo the sun’s sweet rays are shining bright!
Be wise at heart, be wise and understand:
There in one God, who sends upon the land
The rain, the wind, the lightning and the might
Of earthquake, famine, pestilence, and wce,
Sad wce that weighs the heart, the had, the snow,-
All, [26] all are his, who reigns over his own,
Sovereign of heaven and earth himself alone.’
A passage like this breathes so much of the monotheistic moralism which was common to Orphism, Judaism, and Christianity that we have no definite criteria for assigning it to either a Jewish or a Christian Sibyllinist; either might have written it, subordinating his dogmatic idiosyncrasies to the need of preserving the dramatic probabilities of the situation. The spirit of the piece is deliberately neutral. On the other hand, there can be no doubt with regard to a passage like this from bk. iii. 263 ff., which describes the fortunes of the twelve tribes:
‘To them alone a hundred told the field
Bears harvest, and God’s measures ample yield.
Yet even they shall fare amiss, even they
Shall suffer pestilence. Thou, [27] far away
From thy fair shrine shalt flee, for ‘tis thy fate
To leave thy sacred soil all desolate;
Borne to Assyria, thou shalt there behold
Thy wives and children into slavery sold,
And greedy hands despoiling all thy gold.
Thou shalt fill every country, every sea,
And at thy customs all shall angry be. Oracles
Oracles are the divine revelations given to God's people. God's method of communicating these oracles varied from dreams and visions (Numbers 12:6-8), to wisdom (Proverbs 30:1), and even the Urim and Thummim (Numbers 27:21; 1 Samuel 14:337).1

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Oracles - Oracles are the divine revelations given to God's people. God's method of communicating these Oracles varied from dreams and visions (Numbers 12:6-8), to wisdom (Proverbs 30:1), and even the Urim and Thummim (Numbers 27:21; 1 Samuel 14:337)
Oracles - In one sense, Oracles were prophecies since they often referred to the future; but Oracles sometimes dealt with decisions to be made in the present. Many of Israel's neighbors sought Oracles from their gods. ...
Although the word oracle is not very frequent in the Old Testament, Oracles were common in that period. In Isaiah, several smaller prophecies of judgment or punishment are called “oracles” ( Isaiah 13:1 NRSV; Isaiah 14:28 NRSV). ” Specific sayings about God's judgment on Joram ( 2 Kings 9:25 NRSV) and Joash ( 2 Chronicles 24:27 NRSV) are also called Oracles. On the basis of these kinds of usages, many Bible students understand Oracles to be divine words of punishment or judgment. Also references to Ahithophel's counsel (2 Samuel 16:23 ) and to Oracles in Jerusalem which were pleasing but false (Jeremiah 18:1-122 ) show us that prophetic pronouncements were not always negative. ...
The New Testament does not reflect quite the same use of Oracles or the word oracle as does the Old. The word Oracles in the New Testament most often refers to the teachings of God in the Old Testament (Acts 7:38 ; Romans 3:2 ). ...
Why Were Oracles Given? We must distinguish between Oracles that were sought and those that came without any request. The first kind might be called “decision Oracles. ” The second kind will be referred to as “pronouncement Oracles. ” Decision Oracles came when people asked God a question or sought His counsel. The answers he received were Oracles (2Samuel 5:19,2 Samuel 5:23-24 ). Decision Oracles, then, were God's response to questions and concerns in the present. ...
Pronouncement Oracles were God's word to a situation or a person even though no word (from God had been sought. ) The pronouncement Oracles were sometimes brief as when Elijah foretold a drought in Israel (1 Kings 17:1 ). In that sense, many of the prophecies in the Old Testament were pronouncement Oracles. ...
Pronouncement Oracles were given to produce an effect. With that in mind, the pronouncement Oracles against foreign nations form a special group. Oracles came either in response to human questions or when God wished to make His views known to produce a change. ...
How Were Oracles Given or Received? Oracles were given through special people. These two groups seemed to have their own specific ways of receiving Oracles. ...
Different methods were used by priests and prophets to receive the two forms of Oracles, although we should not try to make too rigid a distinction. Decision Oracles often came through the use of objects. ...
Decision Oracles could also come through a person without the use of any objects. ...
Frequently, the Old Testament gives no indication as to how God communicated His pronouncement Oracles to His prophet or priest. Nahum and Habakkuk wrote of a vision or of seeing their Oracles (Nahum 1:1 ; Habakkuk 1:1 ). The pronouncement Oracles were often proclaimed in the city, even in a temple (Amos in Bethel and Jeremiah in Jerusalem). Many of the Oracles, though, give us no indication of where or when they were spoken. ...
Oracles which were not simply yes or no seem most often to have been given in poetic form. Though given orally in the beginning, at some time the pronouncement Oracles were written down. Whatever the case, the Oracles were given by God and preserved for us. ...
How Did People Respond to the Oracles? Again, a distinction should be made between the decision and the pronouncement Oracles. Others, who heard Oracles they had neither sought nor welcomed, may not have been as quick to accept the pronouncement (consider Elijah's words to Ahab, 1 Kings 21:20-24 ). Most often the response of those who heard or read the Oracles of God can be guessed at. First, Oracles were remembered long after their pronouncement. Thus, the Oracles are still functioning
Urim vetumim - the stones embedded in the High Priest�s breastplate, which served as Oracles...
Theomancy - ) A kind of divination drawn from the responses of Oracles among heathen nations
Oracle - Among christians, Oracles, in the plural, denotes the communications, revelations or messages delivered by God to prophets. In this sense it is rarely used in the singular but we say, the Oracles of God, divine Oracles, meaning the Scriptures. OR'ACLE, To utter Oracles
Scriptural - ) Contained in the Scriptures; according to the Scriptures, or sacred Oracles; biblical; as, a scriptural doctrine
Adytum - ) The innermost sanctuary or shrine in ancient temples, whence Oracles were given
Pythian - ) Of or pertaining to Delphi, to the temple of Apollo, or to the priestess of Apollo, who delivered Oracles at Delphi
Oracles - Others translated, "let him speak as (becomes one speaking) Oracles of God," which designates the New Testament words (afterward written) of inspired men by the same term as was applied to the Old Testament Scriptures; in the Greek there is no article. The pagan "oracles" ceased when Christianity supplanted paganism. Paul's casting out "the spirit of pithon" (divination) implies that the ancient Oracles were not always imposture, but were sometimes energized by Satanic powers (Acts 16:16)
Oracle - It is also spoken of the covering of he ark of the covenant; as if God there sat enthroned, and delivered his Oracles, 2 Samuel 16:23 . ...
Strikingly unlike the true and living Oracles of God were the famous counterfeit Oracles of numerous heathen temples
Oracle - That is probably also its meaning in 1 Peter: ‘If any man speaketh, speaking as it were Oracles of God,’ i. 16) quotes Papias as saying that ‘Matthew composed the Oracles (sc. Selwyn holds that these were the Messianic prophecies of the OT which Matthew collected (The Oracles in the New Testament, London, 1912, p
Oracle - So Moses is said by Stephen to have received the "lively Oracles" to give unto the Israelites. These Oracles contained the law, both moral and ceremonial, with all the types and promises relating to the Messiah which are to be found in the writings of Moses. The Jews were a highly privileged people in many and various respects, Romans 9:4-5 ; but the Apostle Paul mentions it as their chief advantage that "unto them were committed the Oracles of God," Romans 3:2 . The hundred and nineteenth Psalm abounds with praises of the lively Oracles, the word of the living God; it abounds with the warmest expressions of love to it, of delight in it, and the most fervent petitions for divine illumination in the knowledge of it. Such was the esteem and veneration which the faithful entertained for the lively Oracles under the former dispensation, when they had only Moses and the prophets; how, then, ought they to be prized by Christians, who have also Christ and his Apostles!...
Among the Heathen the term oracle is usually taken to signify an answer, generally couched in very dark and ambiguous terms, supposed to be given by demons of old, either by the mouths of their idols, or by those of their priests, to the people, who consulted them on things to come. Seneca defines Oracles to be enunciations by the mouths of men of the will of the gods; and Cicero simply calls them, deorum oratio, the language of the gods. Mankind have had always a propensity to explore futurity; and conceiving that future events were known to their gods, who possessed the gift of prophecy, they sought information and advice from the Oracles, which, in their opinion, were supernatural and divine communications. The institution of Oracles seemed to gratify the prevalent curiosity of mankind, and proved a source of immense wealth, as well as authority and influence, to those who had the command of them. Accordingly, every nation, in which idolatry has subsisted, had its Oracles, by means of which imposture practised on superstition and credulity. The principal Oracles of antiquity are, that of Abae, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Amphiaraus, at Oropus in Macedonia; that of the Branchidae at Didymeum: that of the camps at Lacedaemon; that of Dodona; that of Jupiter Ammon; that of Nabarca in the country of the Anariaci, near the Caspian Sea; that of Trophonius, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Chrysopolis; that of Claros, in Ionia; that of Amphilochus at Mallos; that of Petarea; that of Pella in Macedonia; that of Phaselides in Cilicia; that of Sinope in Paphlagonia; that of Orpheus's head at Lesbos, mentioned by Philostratus. But of all Oracles, the oracle of Apollo Pythius at Delphi was the most celebrated: this was consulted in the dernier resort by most of the princes of those ages. ...
Most of the Pagan deities had their appropriate Oracles. Mercury had Oracles at Patras, upon Harmon, and in other places; Mars, in Thrace, Egypt and elsewhere; Hercules, at Cadiz, Athens, in Egypt, at Tivoli, in Mesopotamia, where he issued his Oracles by dreams, whence he was called Somnialis. Isis, Osiris, and Serapis delivered in like manner their Oracles by dreams, as we learn from Pausanias, Tacitus, Arrian, and other writers; that of Amphilochus was also delivered by dreams; the ox Apis had also his oracle in Egypt. Diana, the sister of Apollo, had several Oracles in Egypt, Cilicia, Ephesus, &c. The fountains also delivered Oracles, for to each of them a divinity was ascribed: such was the fountain of Castalia at Delphi, another of the same name in the suburbs of Antioch, and the prophetic fountain near the temple of Ceres in Achaia. Juno had several Oracles: one near Corinth, one at Nysa, and others at different places. Saturn had Oracles in several places, but the most famous were those of Cumae in Italy, and of Alexandria in Egypt. The demi-gods and heroes had likewise their Oracles, such were those of Castor and Pollux at Lacedaemon, of Amphiaraus, of Mopsus in Cilicia, of Ulysses, Amphilochus, Sarpedon in Troas, Hermione in Macedonia, Pasiphae in Laconia, Chalcas in Italy, Aristaeus in Boeotia, Autolycus at Sinope, Phryxus among the Colchi, Zamolxis among the Getae, Hephaestion the minion of Alexander, and Antinous, &c. ...
The responses of Oracles were delivered in a variety of ways: at Delphi, they interpreted and put into verse what the priestess pronounced in the time of her furor. The suppliants, who consulted the Oracles, were not allowed to enter the sanctuaries where they were given; and accordingly, care was taken that neither the Epicureans nor Christians should come near them. In several places, the Oracles were given by letters sealed up, as in that of Mopsus, and at Mallus in Cilicia. Oracles were frequently given by lot, the mode of doing which was as follows: the lots were a kind of dice, on which were engraven certain characters or words, whose explanations they were to seek on tables made for the purpose. The ambiguity of the Oracles in their responses, and their double meaning, contributed to their support. ...
Ablancourt observes, that the study or research of the meaning of Oracles was but a fruitless thing; and that they were never understood till after their accomplishment. That prince, who had no great faith in Oracles, sent thither a blank note; and they returned him another of the same kind. Sometimes the responses of the Oracles were mere banter, as in the case of the man who wished to know by what means he might become rich, and who received for answer from the god, that he had only to make himself master of all that lay between Sicyon and Corinth. ...
There are two points in dispute on the subject of Oracles; namely, whether they were human, or diabolical machines; and whether or not they ceased upon the publication or preaching of the Gospel. Most of the fathers of the church supposed that the devil issued Oracles; and looked on it as a pleasure he took to give dubious and equivocal answers, in order to have a handle to laugh at them. Vossius allows that it was the devil who spoke in Oracles; but thinks that the obscurity of his answers was owing to his ignorance as to the precise circumstances of events. Eusebius has preserved some fragments of a philosopher, called OEnomaus; who, out of resentment for his having been so often fooled by the Oracles, wrote an ample confutation of all their impertinencies: "When we come to consult thee," says he to Apollo, "if thou seest what is in futurity, why dost thou use expressions that will not be understood? Dost thou not know, that they will not be understood? If thou dost, thou takest pleasure in abusing us; if thou dost not, be informed of us, and learn to speak more clearly. "...
It is a very general opinion among the more learned, that Oracles were all mere cheats and impostures; either calculated to serve the avaricious ends of the Heathen priests, or the political views of the princes. Father Balthus, a Jesuit, wrote a treatise in defence of the fathers with regard to the origin of Oracles; but without denying the imposture of the priests, often blended with the Oracles. The Abbe Banier espouses the same side of the question, and objects that Oracles would not have lasted so long, and supported themselves with so much splendour and reputation, if they had been merely owing to the forgeries of the priests. Bishop Sherlock, in his "Discourses concerning the Use and Intent of Prophecy," expresses his opinion, that it is impious to disbelieve the Heathen Oracles, and to deny them to have been given out by the devil; to which assertion, Dr. Middleton, in his "Examination," &c, replies, that he is guilty of this impiety, and that he thinks himself warranted to pronounce from the authority of the best and wisest of the Heathens themselves, and the evidence of plain facts, which are recorded of those Oracles, as well as from the nature of the thing itself, that they were all mere imposture, wholly invented and supported by human craft, without any supernatural aid or interpositon whatsoever. He alleges, that Cicero, speaking of the Delphic oracle, the most revered of any in the Heathen world, declares, that nothing was become more contemptible, not only in his days, but long before him; that Demosthenes, who lived about three hundred years earlier, affirmed of the same oracle, in a public speech to the people of Athens, that it was gained to the interests of King Philip, an enemy to that city; that the Greek historians, tell us, how, on several other occasions, it had been corrupted by money, to serve the views of particular persons and parties, and the prophetess sometimes had been deposed for bribery and lewdness; that there were some great sects of philosophers, who, on principle, disavowed the authority of all Oracles; agreeably to all which Strabo tells us, that divination in general and Oracles had been in high credit among the ancients, but in his days were treated with much contempt; lastly, that Eusebius also, the great historian of the primitive church, declares, that there were six hundred writers among the Heathens themselves who had publicly written against the reality of them. Plutarch has a treatise on the ceasing of some Oracles; and Van Dale, a Dutch physician, has a volume to prove they did not cease at the coming of Christ; but that many of them ceased long before, and that others held till the fall of Paganism, under the empire of Theodosius the Great, when Paganism being dissipated, these restitutions could no longer subsist. Fontenelle espoused Van Dale's system, and improved upon it in his "History of Oracles;" and showed the weakness of the argument used by many writers in behalf of Christianity, drawn from the ceasing of Oracles. Cicero says, the Oracles became dumb in proportion as people, growing less credulous, began to suspect them for cheats. Plutarch alleges two reasons for the ceasing of Oracles: the one was Apollo's chagrin; who, it seems, took it in dudgeon to be interrogated about so many trifles. The other was, that in proportion as the genii, or demons, who had the management of the Oracles, died, and became extinct, the Oracles must necessarily cease. He adds a third and more natural cause for the ceasing of Oracles; namely, the forlorn state of Greece, ruined and desolated by wars; for, hence, the smallness of the gains let the priests sink into a poverty and contempt too bare to cover the fraud. That the Oracles were silenced about or soon after the time of our Saviour's advent, may be proved, says Dr. This likewise appears from Plutarch's treatise, why the Oracles cease to give answers, already cited; whence it is also manifest, that the most learned Heathens were very much at a loss how to give a tolerable account of it. " With respect to the origin of Oracles, they were probably imitations, first, of the answers given to the holy patriarchs from the divine presence or Shechinah, and secondly, of the responses to the Jewish high priest from the mercy seat: for all Paganism is a parody of the true religion
Oracle - Learned men are much divided as to the source of these Oracles. ...
And since it cannot be proved either impossible or unscriptural, is it not probable that God sometimes permits an intercourse with infernal spirits, with a design, in the end, to turn this and every other circumstance to his own glory? Respecting the cessation of these Oracles, there have been a variety of opinions. It has been generally held, indeed, that Oracles ceased at the birth of Jesus Christ: yet some have endeavoured to maintain the contrary, by showing that they were in being in the days of Julian, commonly called the apostate, and that this emperor himself consulted them; nay, farther, say they, history makes mention of several laws published by the Christian emperors, Theodosius, Gratian, and Valentinian, to punish persons who interrogated them, even in their days; and that the Epicureans were the first who made a jest of this superstition, and exposed the roguery of its priests to the people. Whether Oracles became extinct immediately upon the birth of Christ, or from the very moment he was born; but, Whether they fell gradually into disesteem, and ceased as Christ and his Gospel became known to mankind? And that they did so is most certain from the concurrent testimonies of the fathers, which whoever would endeavour to invalidate, may equally give up the most respectable traditions and relations of every kind. ...
2dly, But did not Julian the apostate consult these Oracles? We answer in the negative: he had, indeed, recourse to magical operations, but it was because Oracles had already ceased; for he bewailed the loss of them, and assigned pitiful reasons for it; which St. The Christian emperors do, indeed, seem to condemn the superstition and idolatry of those who were still for consulting Oracles; but the edicts of those princes do not prove that Oracles actually existed in their times, any more than that they ceased in consequence of their laws. Some Epicureans might make a jest of this superstition; however, the Epicurean philosopher Celsus, in the second century of the church, was for crying up the excellency of several Oracles, as appears at large from Origen's seventh book against him. Among the Jews there were several sorts of real Oracles. They had, ...
first, Oracles that were delivered viva voice; as when God spake to Moses face to face, and as one friend speaks to another, Numb. The scripture affords us examples likewise of profane Oracles. This dialogue clearly proves these two things; first, that the devil could do nothing by his own power; and, secondly, that, with the permission of God, he could inspire the false prophets, sorcerers, and magicians, and make them deliver false Oracles
Adytum - The adytum of the Greeks and Romans answered to the sanctum sanctorum of the Jews, and was the place from whence Oracles were delivered
Endor - The ancient world had many such Oracles; the most famous of which were that of Jupiter-Ammon in Lybia, and that of Delphi in Greece: and in all of them, the answers to those who consulted them were given from the mouth of a female; who, from the priestess of Apollo at Delphi, has generally received the name of Pythia. That many such Oracles existed in Canaan, is evident from the number which Saul himself is said to have suppressed; and such a one, with its Pythia, was this at Endor. At these shrines, either as mock Oracles, contrived by a crafty and avaricious priesthood, to impose on the credulity and superstition of its followers; or, otherwise, as is more generally supposed, as the real instruments of infernal power, mankind, having altogether departed from the true God, were permitted to be deluded
Monument - is to the custom of obtaining Oracles by incubation, that is, spending the night in subterranean sacred places
Lively - The other passages are Acts 7:38 ‘lively Oracles’ and 1 Peter 1:3 ‘lively hope
Oracle - The Scriptures are called "living Oracles" (Compare Hebrews 4:12 ) because of their quickening power (Acts 7:38 )
Isles - " God will dry up the fountains of the pagan idolatry and Oracles, i
Oracle - ...
Notes: Divine "oracles" were given by means of the breastplate of the high priest, in connection with the service of the tabernacle, and the Sept
Intrust - 1: πιστεύω (Strong's #4100 — Verb — pisteuo — pist-yoo'-o ) "to believe," also means "to entrust," and in the Active Voice is translated "to commit," in Luke 16:11 ; John 2:24 ; in the Passive Voice, "to be intrusted with," Romans 3:2 , RV, "they were intrusted with" (AV, "unto them were committed"), of Israel and the Oracles of God; 1 Corinthians 9:17 , RV, "I have
Scripture - The word is used either in the singular or plural number, to denote the sacred writings or divine Oracles, called sacred or holy, as proceeding from God and containing sacred doctrines and precepts
Partition - To the Jew was given the Oracles of GOD, but not to the Gentile
Sinai - In the Jewish tradition it was sacred to Jahweh, and was memorable as the place where God gave to Moses the ‘lively Oracles’ (Acts 7:38)
Breastplate - Prideaux thinks the words chiefly denote the clearness of the Oracles dictated to the high priest, though perhaps the lustre of the stones in his breastplate might represent this clearness. That the Oracles of God rejected all equivocal and enigmatical replies, which was the character of the Heathen pretended Oracles. His preaching is thus tacitly compared to the Oracles of God; theirs, to the misleading and perplexed Oracles of the Heathen
Symbols - In reading scripture, it is necessary to follow carefully the general use of such and such a symbol, throughout the inspired Oracles
Oracle - ) To utter Oracles
Teraphim - Some Jewish writers tell us the teraphim were human heads placed in niches, and consulted by way of Oracles
Apocrypha - ...
...
These books were written not in Hebrew but in Greek, and during the "period of silence," from the time of Malachi, after which Oracles and direct revelations from God ceased till the Christian era
Numbers - ...
The Hebrews prepare to depart from Mount Sinai (1-10):
the census (1-4)
some supplementary laws
last events before the departure (7-10)
From Mount Sinai to Cades (10,11-12)
Cades (13-20):
the spying of the Promised Land, revolt, and chastisement (13- 14)
revolt of Core, Dathan, and Abiron (15-17)
the waters of contradiction (20)
From Cades to the Plains of Moab (22-34):
Balaam's Oracles (22-24)
idolatry and impurity (25)
new census and new laws concerning the sacrifices (26-30)
punishment of the Madianites and first division of the conquered territory (31-35)
The last chapter deals with the Levitical cities and the cities of refuge
Understand - ) To have just and adequate ideas of; to apprehended the meaning or intention of; to have knowledge of; to comprehend; to know; as, to understand a problem in Euclid; to understand a proposition or a declaration; the court understands the advocate or his argument; to understand the sacred Oracles; to understand a nod or a wink
Sibylline Oracles - Hofmann (see below) accepts the first part of (a), but makes the word a composite from σιός and ἵλλαος = ἱλαος (ἵλεως), meaning ‘God-appeasing,’ or ‘God-reconciling,’ with reference to the aim of the primitive Sibylline Oracles. Primitive tradition located the original Sibyl at Erythrae, but the most famous Sibyl resided at Cumae, the old Greek settlement in Campania, though it is probable that the Sibylline Oracles which came to Rome from Cumae had reached the latter city from Erythrae. Oracles of this kind absorbed forgeries of a more or less political aim, and the authorized collection had to be purged from time to time. ]'>[11] who were officially responsible for the interpretation of the Oracles and for the application of their mysterious commands to the national life. These Roman Oracles originally were not so much predictions of woes to come, like apocalyptic tracts, as explanations of what was required to avert the anger of the gods and ward off evil to the State on earth. This put considerable power into the hands of the officials who had charge of them, especially as the obscurity of their contents made the sense of certain passages conveniently ambiguous, and it is not surprising to find that, as time went on, their reputation suffered in the same way as the Greek Oracles; the Roman, like the Greek, Sibyllina might ‘philippize’; genuine lines might be interpreted for private ends, if a political leader could influence the expositors, and forged lines could be surreptitiously introduced. Still, for two centuries at least, these Oracles had a singular power over the religious hopes and fears of the people. must not be allowed to count unduly against the esteem which was still felt for the Oracles. 270, when the Alemanni invaded Italy, the Senate hesitated to consult the Sibyllina, and Aurelian had to incite them (Vopiscus, Vita Aureliani, 20); the Emperor taunted them with behaving as if they were in a Christian church-a significant indication of the changed attitude towards these Oracles! Their use lingered down to the age of Julian. ]'>[13] ...
Besides the official collection, however, Sibylline Oracles passed current in large numbers among the people. Lactantius, who has preserved several important data on the subject, declares that only the Cumaean Sibyl’s Oracles, amounting to three books, were kept secret, [19] The Church appropriated them, appealed to them, edited them in her own interests, composed fresh ones, and, in general, treated the Jewish Sibylline Oracles much as the Alexandrian Jews had treated the pagan ones. The Sibylline Oracles are a conglomerate of documents, ranging from the 2nd cent
Jeremiah - In Egypt he continued to preach Oracles against the Egyptians (Jeremiah 27:20 ) and against his compatriots (Jeremiah 44:1-30 ). He was accused of treason and convicted (Jeremiah 37:11 ; Jeremiah 38:1-6 ), and yet the most aggressive Oracles against Babylon are attributed to him (50–51). ...
He constantly proclaimed God's judgment upon Judah and Jerusalem, and yet he was also a prophet of hope, proclaiming Oracles of salvation, conditioned (Jeremiah 3:22-4:2 ) or unconditioned (30–31; Jeremiah 32:36 ; Jeremiah 33:6 ; Jeremiah 34:4 ). Oracles Against Foreign nations (Jeremiah 25:15-38 ; Jeremiah 46:1-51:64 )...
V. Oracles on the restoration of Israel (Jeremiah 30:1-31:40 )...
This structure is not based on chronology as seen above. Oracles of hope (Jeremiah 30-31 ) interrupt the stories about Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26-45 ). There the Oracles against foreign nations are in a different order and appear immediately after Jeremiah 25:13 rather than at Jeremiah 46:1 . Traditional scholarly theories have tried to attribute poetic Oracles to Jeremiah, stories about the prophet to Baruch, and prose sermons to a later editor who used the Book of Jeremiah to exemplify and teach the theology of the Book of Deuteronomy
Zephaniah - His prophecy contains two Oracles, in three chapters, directed against idolaters in Judah, against surrounding idolatrous nations, and against wicked rulers, priests, and prophets
Saturninus, Saint - To reach his church, Saint Saturninus had to pass the capitol where there was a temple, and the pagan priests ascribed to his frequent passings the silence of their Oracles
Try - To prove by a test as, to try weights and measures by a standard to try one's opinions by the divine Oracles
Papias - —Papias wrote a work in five books, entitled ‘Exposition of the Lord’s Oracles (Logia). ...
(a) The Lord’s ‘Oracles’ and their record. But, to Papias, the only sure way of reaching the mind of Christ, the Truth itself, is to start from the Apostolic written collection of ‘the Oracles,’ as he conceived the Gospel according to Matthew to be, the one directly Apostolic document of this character (the Johannine Gospel is in any case of another type). Then in the extract which Eusebius immediately subjoins, Papias sums up (οὖν) the net result of his discussion touching the accuracy of ‘the Oracles’ as originally compiled by that Apostle. ...
‘Matthew, then, for his part, in Hebrew compiled the Oracles; but their interpretation was determined by each man’s ability. ]'>[2] emphasis no doubt falls on the fact that Matthew’s authoritative collection of the Lord’s Oracles was in Hebrew, or rather Aramaic, and not in Greek. Hence we may infer that the point of the citation lies in the words actually given, and that Papias is explaining why various versions of the Oracles (in whole or part) were then current side by side with the recognized Greek Matthew. They went back, that is, to the time when Matthew’s collection of the Oracles existed only in a non-Greek form, various imperfect renderings of which passed into currency before the final Greek version was made. ...
While it is likely that Papias based on the Elder’s testimony his own assertion that Matthew himself wrote his collection of the Lord’s Oracles, it seems precarious to lean much weight on the statement. ...
(b) Papias’ relation to ‘the Elders,’ the prime witnesses to the meaning of the Oracles. —So much for the true text of such Oracles of the Lord as he chooses for comment. He is far from piquing himself on his own insight or ingenuity in evolving, at no slight length, plausible views as to the meaning of such Oracles as may seem obscure even to a careful reader. His zeal in collecting such authentic oral comments, even at second-hand, was due, he explains, to the feeling that the vivâ voce method of continuous transmission was more helpful, for reaching the true sense of the Lord’s Oracles, than any books bearing on their elucidation. ]'>[7]; and whosoever shall not confess the testimony of the Cross, is of the devil; and whosoever shall perversely interpret the Oracles of the Lord (μεθοδεὐῃ τὰ λόγια τοῦ κυρίου) to his own lusts, and say that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, that man is the firstborn of Satan. Here we get the idea of safety in close adherence to the injunctions (ἑντολαί) of Christ and His Apostles, or ‘the message which was delivered’ by them ‘from the beginning,’ in contrast to ‘false teachings’ by which ‘the many’ were apt, in love of empty talk, to be led into error, especially through perverse interpretations of ‘the Oracles of the Lord. Probably, however, he used the Johannine Gospel only as a secondary source of exegesis for the standard Matthaean collection of ‘the Oracles’—as, in fact, a ‘book,’ and so less ‘helpful’ than direct oral tradition. —Although we are unable to conceive in detail the exact character of Papias’ Exposition of Oracles of the Lord, even our meagre knowledge of it, especially when taken in connexion with other Christian writings of the period, helps us not a little to realize the way in which our Gospels, and Gospels generally, were viewed and handled early in the 2nd century. They were heard or read in environments of thought far other than those for which they were first spoken; and just because they were taken so seriously and practically as Divine ‘oracles,’ as religious laws of life, their historical or original meaning was apt to be lost as soon as they passed beyond Palestine, and the fresh meanings or glosses put upon them tended insensibly to replace the Master’s ipsissima verba. , also The Oracles ascribed to Matthew by Papias of Hierapolis (1894), and A
Micah, Theology of - Each cycle begins with judgment-oracles against the nation for having failed to keep the Mosaic covenant, followed by salvation-oracles based on God's promises to Abraham and the patriarchs to be their god foreverso reflecting both aspects of the Lord's covenant with Israel. In these four Oracles Micah predicts Israel's exile, but looking beyond the judgment, he concludes the first cycle with a prophecy that the Lord will preserve a remnant with him as their triumphant King (2:12-13). ...
In the second cycle (3:1-5:16), Micah delivers three Oracles of judgment against Jerusalem's corrupt leaders: the avaricious magistrates, who cannibalize their subjects (3:1-4); the greedy prophets, who should be the nation's watchdogs but only wag their tails if fed a bone (3:5-7); and all the leaders, rulers, prophets, and priests (3:8-11), who are in cahoots to plunder their subjects. Micah concludes these Oracles with the climactic prediction that Jerusalem will fall (3:12; cf. ...
As God's justice informs Micah's judgment-oracles and his righteousness the salvation-oracles, so God's other sublime attributes inform both. Clowney, Dreams, Visions and Oracles ; K
Elements - , "the rudiments of the beginning of the Oracles of God," such as are taught to spiritual babes
Urim And Thummim - See Oracles ; Lots ; High Priest
Earthquake - The Oracles of Amos are dated two years before this earthquake. Amos 1:1 draws attention to the fact that Amos spoke his Oracles two years before the earthquake of Uzziah's time
Ark of the Covenant - Here the Shechinah rested both in the tabernacle and temple in a visible cloud; hence were issued the Divine Oracles by an audible voice; and the high priest appeared before the mercy-seat once every year on the great day of expiation; and the Jews, wherever they worshipped, turned their faces towards the place where the ark stood
Oracle - Hence the apostle, speaking of those who ministered in holy things, enjoined this precept, "If any man speak, let him speak as the Oracles of God;" that is, the truths of God
Thunder - ...
Oracles severe ...
Were daily thunder'd in our gen'ral's ear
Understand - It is important that we should understand the sacred Oracles
Divination - Numerous forms of divination are mentioned, such as divination by rods, ( Hosea 4:12 ) divination by arrows, (Ezekiel 21:21 ) divination by cups, (Genesis 44:5 ) consultation of teraphim, (1 Samuel 15:23 ; Ezekiel 21:21 ; Zechariah 10:2 ) [1]; divination by the liver, (Ezekiel 21:21 ) divination by dreams, (13:2,3; Judges 7:13 ; Jeremiah 23:32 ) consultation of Oracles
Elam - ...
Elam is mentioned in Scripture in narratives and Oracles. Prophets mentioned Elam in Oracles
Moreh, - Sitting in the shelter of a sacred tree, the priest or seer delivered his direction or’ Oracles
Element - The word is found also with yet another meaning in Hebrews 5:12 , where the persons addressed are said to need instruction in ‘the rudiments of the first principles of the Oracles of God. By these ‘elements of the beginning of the Oracles of God’ the writer means the primary and simplest truths of God’s revelation of Himself in the prophets and in Christ
Nahum, Theology of - ...
The themes of salvation and judgment continue into the next major section of the prophecy (1:9-2:2), where the writer magnificently interweaves Oracles of judgment and salvation. Salvation-oracles occur in 1:12-13,15, and 2:2; judgment-oracles are found in 1:9-11,14, and 2:1. ...
The interweaving judgment- and salvation-oracles are followed by a prophetic vision in which Nahum describes the future downfall of the city as if he were there
Logia - ) it is applied to the Divine Oracles (because brief utterances), as those of the Sibyl of Dodona, of Delphi, etc. By NT writers the term is applied to the Scriptures generally, as ‘oracles’ of God, or to individual inspired utterances of prophets, pre-Christian or Christian (Acts 7:38, Romans 3:2, Hebrews 5:12, 1 Peter 4:11). 39), who interpreted ‘the Oracles of the Lord’ (λόγια κυριακά) in accordance with the tradition of elders who had been followers of the Apostles. For Papias these precepts are ‘commandments delivered by the Lord to the faith’ (ἐντολαὶ τῄ πίστει δεδομέναι), and hence comparable with ‘the Oracles of God committed to Israel’ (ἐπιστεύθησαν τὰ λόγια τοῦ θεοῦ, Romans 3:2); but he refers to just the same precepts as λόγοι, when in a connected clause he declares that Peter had no design of making a syntagma of the ‘sayings’ (οὐχ ὥσπερ σύνταξιν τῶν κυριακῶν ποιούμενος λόγων). , as ‘oracles,’ of which Matthew did make a syntagma, the difference is only that in the latter embodiment they seemed to him comparable with the ‘oracles of God’ given to Israel (Acts 7:38, Romans 3:2, Hebrews 5:12, 1 Peter 4:11). —The fragments from the preface (προοίμιον) of Papias’ work in five books, entitled Exposition (s?) of the Oracles of the Lord, as given by Eusebius (Historia Ecclesiastica iii. As regards the ‘commandments’ which Papias sought to hear and to expound as ‘oracles,’ the fragment states as a tradition (probably from the same authority, ‘John the Elder, who gave that regarding Mark) that ‘Matthew made a compend (συνετάξατο v. is not a translation, whether from Hebrew or Aramaic; not (strictly) a syntagma of the Oracles; and, as concerns derivation from immediate ‘followers of the Lord,’ less authentic in its ‘order’ than Mk
Hebrew Bible - ...
God has watched over His own book, and doubtless He helped the Jewish copyists: to the Jews "were committed the Oracles of God
Akkadian - Fourth, the Akkadian mythico-religious texts have included accounts of creation and flood, as well as prophetic Oracles, curses and blessings, and prayers, which provide a basis for understanding both the common Semitic heritage and the uniqueness of Israel's faith
Principles - The two words are used together in Hebrews 5:12, ‘the rudiments of the first principles of the Oracles of God’ (τὰ στοιχεῖα τῆς ἀρχῆς τῶν λογίων τοῦ θεοῦ)
Divination - Divination of all kinds being the offspring of credulity, nursed by imposture, and strengthened by superstition, was necessarily an occult science, retained in the hands of the priests and priestesses, the magi, the soothsayers, the augurs, the visionaries, the priests of the Oracles, the false prophets, and other like professors, till the coming of Jesus Christ, when the light of the Gospel dissipated much of this darkness
Exhortation - They well not say that the omission was an oversight in the inspired writers; or admit the thought for a moment, that they can improve on their plan: why then cannot they be satisfied to "speak according to the Oracles of God, without affecting a more entire consistency? Great mischief has thus been done by very different descriptions of men, who undesignedly concur in giving Satan an occasion of suggesting to the trembling enquirer that perhaps he may persevere in asking, seeking, and knocking, with the greatest earnestness and importunity, and yet finally be cast away
Lots - See Oracles ; Urim and Thummim
Judges - A ‘judge’ was therefore originally a priest who pronounced Oracles; then the elders of the people became judges
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Mark of the Beast - The apocalyptic Sibylline Oracles used "888, " the numerical equivalent of Iesous [3] (Greek letters for Jesus), as an indirect reference to Jesus as the incarnate God. book 5 of the Sibylline Oracles ) to the time of Augustine, who cites this idea in The City of God
Prophet - 1: προφήτης (Strong's #4396 — Noun Masculine — prophetes — prof-ay'-tace ) "one who speaks forth or openly" (see PROPHECY , A), "a proclaimer of a divine message," denoted among the Greeks an interpreter of the Oracles of the gods
Analogy of Faith - It may, however, be of use to the serious and candid enquirer; for, as some texts may seem to contradict each other, and difficulties present themselves, by keeping the analogy of faith in view, he will the more easily resolve those difficulties, and collect the true sense of the sacred Oracles
Judaism - Notwithstanding God's prophets, and Oracles, and ordinances, and the symbol of his presence, were among them, the Jews were ever very prone to idolatry, till the Babylonish furnace served to purify them from that corruption
Nahum - That Nahum was the author of the two Oracles is hardly open to question, but of late years some doubt has been thrown upon the authenticity of the prologue. The language and atmosphere of the prologue are those of the succeeding Oracles. The question of the authenticity of the first chapter does not seriously affect the further question of the date at which Nahum composed the two Oracles by general consent ascribed to him. About 623 or 624 Nahum would need no great discernment to see the approaching fall of Assyria, and in the equipment and quick movements of the Medes and Scythians he would find the imagery which he uses to such good effect in his Oracles
Trinity - The sacred Oracles most assuredly teach us, that the One living and true God is, in some inexplicable manner, Triune, for he is spoken of, as One in some respects, and as Three in others, Genesis 1:26 , Genesis 2:6-7
Carchemish - Assyria's ultimate capture of the city was noteworthy enough that Isaiah used it as a rhetorical example in one of his Oracles (Isaiah 10:9 )
Ethiopia - to his priests, elected by him, acting only upon his Oracles, and ready to abdicate or even to commit suicide at his command
Prophecy - ...
The distinction between the prophecies of Scripture and the Oracles of Heathenism is marked and essential. In the Heathen Oracles we cannot discern any clear and unequivocal tokens of genuine prophecy. ( See Oracles. If we look, says Bishop Hurd, into the prophetic writings, we find that prophecy is of a prodigious extent; that it commenced from the fall of man, and reaches to the consummation of all things; that for many ages it was delivered darkly to a few persons, and with large intervals from the date of one prophecy to that of another; but, at length, became more clear, more frequent, and was uniformly carried on in the line of one people, separated from the rest of the world,—among other reasons assigned, for this principally, to be the repository of the divine Oracles; that, with some intermission, the spirit of prophecy subsisted among that people to the coming of Christ; that he himself and his Apostles exercised this power in the most conspicuous manner, and left behind them many predictions, recorded in the books of the New Testament, which profess to respect very distant events, and even run out to the end of time, or, in St. The double sense of many prophecies in the Old Testament, says an able writer, has been made a pretext by ill disposed men for representing them as of uncertain meaning, and resembling the ambiguity of the Pagan Oracles. The equivocations of the Heathen Oracles manifestly arose from their ignorance of future events, and from their endeavours to conceal that ignorance by such indefinite expressions, as might be equally applicable to two or more events of a contrary description. For, who but the Being that is infinite in knowledge and in counsel could so construct predictions as to give them a two-fold application, to events distant from, and, to human foresight, unconnected with, each other? What power less than divine could so frame them as to make the accomplishment of them in one instance a solemn pledge and assurance of their completion in another instance, of still higher and more universal importance? Where will the scoffer find any thing like this in the artifices of Heathen Oracles, to conceal their ignorance, and to impose on the credulity of mankind? See Oracles
Jeremiah, Theology of - , judgment Oracles, laments), the traditions on which it draws (e. Oracles against Nations (46-51) A1. The first major section, leaving aside chapter 1, contains speeches and is matched by the Oracles against nations. The theological rubric in which the sermons and the Oracles are cast is the history of both salvation and judgment. This title, associated closely with verdicts of judgment (thirty times), is liberally sprinkled in the Oracles against the nations. The Oracles against the nations do not so much present the case for punishment as they do the certainty and nature of God's judgment
Canon of Scripture - Now the scripture informs us that to the Jews were committed the Oracles of God, Romans 3:2 , and as is well known they most carefully guarded the O
Ark of the Covenant - Over this it was that the Shechinah, or visible display of the divine presence in a luminous cloud rested, both in the tabernacle, and in the temple, ...
Leviticus 16:2 ; and from hence the divine Oracles were given forth by an audible voice, as often as God was consulted in behalf of his people. However, the defect was supplied as to the outward form, for in the second temple there was also an ark of the same dimensions with the first, and put in the same place; but it wanted the tables of the law, Aaron's rod, and the pot of manna; nor was there any appearance of the divine glory over it; nor any Oracles delivered from it
Ark of the Covenant - Here he received the homage of his people, and dispensed his living Oracles, Numbers 7:89
Jeremiah - He was raised In love and respect for Jewish traditions, and studied with care the utterances of previous prophets, in particular the Oracles of Isaias and Micheas
Jeremias - He was raised In love and respect for Jewish traditions, and studied with care the utterances of previous prophets, in particular the Oracles of Isaias and Micheas
Divination - Intuitive types of divination in the ancient Near East involved Oracles, prophecies, and dreams
Antichrist - This expectation accords with that of Jewish apocalyptic literature (Sybilline Oracles, Book 3; 4Esdras 5:6) and early Catholic Christianity (Didache 16:1-4)
Scriptures - And it is the most blessed of all employments to be everlastingly studying those precious Oracles of divine truth, which the Lord Jesus so strongly enjoined in relation to the Old Testament, and which all his believing people find more refreshing than their necessary food, both in the Old and New
Titus, Epistle to - His sayings were quoted as Oracles, which may account for his being called a 'prophet
Belial, Beliar - In the Sibylline Oracles (iii
Hosea - A similar pattern is discernible in the Oracles of Hosea (Hosea 4-14 ), though the pattern is not balanced as neatly nor revealed as clearly. Certainly the book ends on a hopeful note (Hosea 14:1 ), but most of the Oracles in Hosea 4-13 are judgmental in nature. Not only are Hosea's Oracles (Hosea 4-14 ) the word of the Lord to Israel, but so also are the materials dealing with his domestic problems (Hosea 1-3 )
Matthew, Gospel According to - ...
( a ) What does Papias mean by the ‘logia’? The word may be translated ‘oracles’ or ‘discourses,’ and it is much disputed which sense we should take here. , who choose the translation ‘oracles’) is that it is an early word for the Gospels. Romans 3:2 where ‘oracles’ may mean only God’s sayings, but more naturally may be taken to mean the whole of the OT). Others deny that at so early a date a NT writing as such could be called ‘the Lord’s Oracles,’ and take logia to mean ‘discourses. The argument against the translation ‘oracles’ is deprived of force if we understand the reference to be, not necessarily to a written record, but to the Gospel story pure and simple, whether written or oral
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - ...
His name is famous as the writer of a treatise in five books called Expositions of Oracles of the Lord ( Λογίων Κυριακῶν ἐξηγήσεις ), which title we shall discuss presently. For he neither heard the Lord nor had been a follower of His; but afterwards, as I said, was a follower of Peter, who framed his teaching according to the needs [2], but not with the design of giving a connected account of the Lord's discourses [3]. " Concerning Matthew, all that remains of what Papias says is, "So then Matthew composed the Oracles in Hebrew, and every one interpreted them as he could. Matthew's Gospel, according to Papias, was a Hebrew book, containing an account only of our Lord's discourses; for so Schleiermacher translates τὰ λόγια , which we have rendered "oracles. (Act_7:38; Rom_3:2; Heb_5:12; 1Pe_4:11) the word has its classical meaning "oracles," and is applied to the inspired utterances of God in O. says that to the Jews were committed the Oracles of God he confined this epithet to those parts of O. books had in Christian use been extended to the Gospels which were called τὰ κυριακὰ λόγια the "oracles of our Lord
Necromancy - Included under these statements were those who consulted ghosts or spirits or who sought Oracles from the dead (Deuteronomy 18:11 )
Living - -(4) Figuratively, the expression is applied to the Oracles given by God to Moses (Acts 7:38, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the word of God generally (Hebrews 4:12, Authorized Version ‘quick’); to the way into the holy place which Jesus dedicated for us (Hebrews 10:20); to the hope unto which God has begotten us by the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead (1 Peter 1:3, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the Stone rejected of men but with God elect, precious (1 Peter 2:4), and the stones built up on that foundation into a spiritual house (1 Peter 2:5, Authorized Version ‘lively’); to the fountains of waters to which the Lamb shall lead His people (Revelation 7:17 TR Apocrypha - The Jews did not receive the Apocrypha as any part of scripture, and to 'them were committed the Oracles of God
Dispensation, - The Oracles of God were given to a nation, the only nation in all the earth that God had known in this way
Miltiades, 2nd Cent. Christian Writer - 17) that, besides leaving other records of his diligent study of the divine Oracles, he composed a treatise "against the Greeks," another "against the Jews," and an "Apology" addressed to the rulers of this world on behalf of the school of philosophy to which he belonged
Apocalyptic - With these Jubilees, Psalms of Solomon, Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and the Sibylline Oracles are generally classed, although their form differs from that of “classic apocalyptic. For example, the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs take the form of testaments, but poetic composition appears in the Sybilline Oracles
Dispersion - For use in this propaganda the Sibylline Oracles and other forms of literature likely to interest Græco-Roman readers were produced
Ignorance (2) - But far more culpable than the half-heathen Samaritans were the Jews, who had behind them a long religious ancestry of patriarchs and prophets (Romans 9:5), who inherited the promises, and to whom were committed the Oracles of God (Romans 3:2, Romans 9:4)
Remnant - ...
Remnant and Oracles of Salvation . Oracles of salvation may follow immediately on the heels of announcements of judgment, and paradoxically, both entail a remnant
Religion - We, indeed, admit may propositions as certainly true, upon the sole authority of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures, and we receive these Scriptures with gratitude as the lively Oracles of God; but it is self-evident that we could not do either the one or the other, were we not convinced by natural means that God exists; that he is a being of goodness, justice, and power; and that he inspired with divine wisdom the penmen of these sacred volumes
Dreams - See Inspiration; Oracles ; Prophets; Revelation
Fathers - Oracles ii
Assurance - The means to attain assurance are not those of an extraordinary kind, as some people imagine; such as are ordinary; self-examination, humble and constant prayer, consulting the sacred Oracles, Christian communication, attendance on the divine ordinances, and perseverance in the path of duty; without which all our assurance is but presumption, and our profession but hypocrisy
Live - 2 Corinthians 12:10 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ; (j) bread, figurative of the Lord Jesus, John 6:51 ; (k) a stone, figurative of the Lord Jesus, 1 Peter 2:4 ; (l) water, figurative of the Holy Spirit, John 4:10 ; 7:38 ; (m) a sacrifice, figurative of the believer, Romans 12:1 ; (n) stones, figurative of the believer, 1 Peter 2:5 ; (o) the Oracles, logion, Acts 7:38 , and word, logos, Hebrews 4:12 ; 1 Peter 1:23 , of God; (p) the physical life of men, 1 Thessalonians 4:15 ; Matthew 27:63 ; Acts 25:24 ; Romans 14:9 ; Philippians 1:21 (in the infinitive mood used as a noun, with the article, 'living'),22; 1 Peter 4:5 ; (q) the maintenance of physical life, Matthew 4:4 ; 1 Corinthians 9:14 ; (r) the duration of physical life, Hebrews 2:15 ; (s) the enjoyment of physical life, 1 Thessalonians 3:8 ; (t) the recovery of physical life from the power of disease, Mark 5:23 ; John 4:50 ; (u) the recovery of physical life from the power of death, Matthew 9:18 ; Acts 9:41 ; Revelation 20:5 ; (v) the course, conduct, and character of men, (1) good, Acts 26:5 ; 2 Timothy 3:12 ; Titus 2:12 ; (2) evil, Luke 15:13 ; Romans 6:2 ; 8:13 ; 2 Corinthians 5:15 ; Colossians 3:7 ; (3) undefined, Romans 7:9 ; 14:7 ; Galatians 2:14 ; (w) restoration after alienation, Luke 15:32
Divination - Consultation of idols' Oracles is referred to in 2 Kings 1:2-6. Our "oracles" are the Holy Scriptures (Acts 7:38; Romans 3:2)
Exclusiveness - By virtue of possessing the Oracles of God, Israel alone was fitted to appreciate the message of the Kingdom, which could not be presented to the world at large without a preparatory training, involving more or less delay
Isaiah - The remainder of the book of Isaiah, Isaiah 40:1-66:24 , contains a series of Oracles referring to the future times of temporal exile and deliverance, and expanding into glorious views of the spiritual deliverance to be wrought by the Messiah
Isaiah - ...
A Collection of Prophetic Oracles (Isaiah 28–35 ) Since five in this series of prophecies commence with an introductory “woe,” it suggests that much of this block of materials will be negative in its criticism. ...
Isaiah 29-35 are largely directed to Judah; elements of severe censure are often followed by Oracles of comfort. ...
The Concluding Prophetic Oracles (Isaiah 56–66 )...
Its Historical Setting
Amos, Theology of - Like all biblical prophets, Amos spoke the Oracles of Yahweh, Israel's God, to people in a particular context. In this he is comparable to other prophets whose utterances include Oracles about foreign nations (cf. Most of these Oracles are judgment pronouncements. ...
Amos's purpose in uttering Oracles about nations beyond the borders of eighth-century Israel is not only to declare the impending punishment of others who have been disloyal to Yahweh
Minister - They must be men whose hearts are renovated by divine grace, and whose sentiments are derived from the sacred Oracles of divine truth
Belshazzar - It was only for the power which sent the omen to unfold, not in equivocal terms, like the responses of Heathen Oracles, but in explicit language, the decision of the righteous Judge, the termination of his long suffering, and the instant visitation of judgment
Matthew, the Gospel According to - 3:3), says, "Matthew wrote his Oracles (logia ) in Hebrew, and each interpreted them in Greek as he could. " Perhaps the Greek for "oracles," logia , expresses that the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew was a collection of discourses (as logoi means) rather than a full narrative. For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Psalms 118:25-26); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in parables (Matthew 13:14 ff)
Messiah - On the other hand, the reign of Josiah reawakened the hopes of the faithful adherents of Jahweh, and it is significant that Messianic expectation revives in the Oracles of Jeremiah. Thus Jeremiah 33:14-24 is regarded by most critics as a later addition to the Oracles of Jeremiah (see, e. This prophet was an earnest student of Israel’s past, and read its records and its Oracles
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Also, prophetic Oracles such as Amos 2:1-3 ; Isaiah 15:1 ; and Jeremiah 48:1 pertain to these last, waning years of the Moabite kingdom
New Jerusalem - Sibylline Oracles 5:414-29 record God's provision of a new city (a temple is included in contrast to Revelation 21-22 , which may reflect a more earth-oriented perspective)
Antonius - From their dialectical subtleties he appealed to facts, to a Christian's contempt of death and triumph over temptation; and contrasted the decay of pagan Oracles and magic with the growth of Christianity in spite of persecutions
Urim And Thummim - The Oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Ezekiel, Theology of - ...
Oracles against the Nations . Like many other prophets, Ezekiel includes a series of Oracles against the nations in his book (25:1-32:32). ...
For Ezekiel, the Oracles against the nations meant that the same God who had condemned Jerusalem also stood in judgment over the nations
Apostolic Fathers - He wrote a five-volume work called Interpretation of the Lord's Oracles of which only fragments remain in the writings of others
Prophets - They seem to have spoken from immediate inspiration, whether in reference to future events of to the mind of the Spirit generally, as in expounding the Oracles of God
bi'Ble - (3) The Oracles , i
Minucius Felix, Marcus - The power of their deities bad been exhibited in many Oracles and prodigies; only one or two philosophers had ventured to deny their agency, and one of these, Protagoras, had in consequence been banished by the Athenians. He traces the source of all idolatry to the operation of the demons who, having lost their first estate, desired to draw others into the same ruin as themselves, who inspired Oracles, wrought fictitious cures and other pretended miracles to deceive men, and were also the inventors and instigators of the calumnies against Christianity
Canon of the Old Testament - To the Jews, saith Scripture," were committed the Oracles of God" (Romans 3:2)
Death - This was the hour of Christ's triumph over all the powers of darkness; the hour in which he overthrew dominions and thrones, led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men; then it was that the foundation of every pagan temple shook; the statue of every false god totterd on its base; the priest fled from his falling shrine, and the heathen Oracles became dumb for ever!...
This was the hour when our Lord erected that spiritual kingdom which is never to end
Prophet, Christ as - A prophet was charged with more than merely delivering the Oracles of God to the people; he was to teach them how to live and how to bring their lives into conformity with that revelation
Israel - Ancient Israel had ‘the Oracles of God’ (Romans 3:2)
Greece, Religion And Society of - In this group were “seers” who gave Oracles from the gods. Delphi and this temple became popular because the “priestesses” became famous for their ability to give advice in the form of “oracles” to civil and military leaders who asked
Pseudepigrapha - ...
The Sibylline Oracles were very popular apocalyptic writings in the ancient world
Lamentations, Theology of - The reference in 2:14 to prophets whose Oracles were false may well be to those who announced peace to a sinning people, and with whom Jeremiah so vigorously debated (23:16-18)
Magic - The biblical writers banned all of the foreign techniques employed for divinatory Oracles (Leviticus 20:6,27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 ; 2 Kings 23:24 ; Isaiah 2:6 ; 8:19 ; 57:3 ; Ezekiel 13:17 ), including hydromancy (Genesis 44:5,15 ) and astrology (Isaiah 47:13 ; Jeremiah 10:2 )
Amos - The second section of the book consists of judgment Oracles directed against Israel (Amos 3:1-6:14 )
Inspiration - To them the Scriptures were the ‘oracles of God’, the living, authoritative voice of God (Romans 3:2; Hebrews 5:12)
Elements - The word unquestionably has this meaning in Hebrews 5:12, ‘the rudiments of the first principles (τὰ στοιχεῖα τῆς ἀρχῆς) of the Oracles of God’-the ABC of Christian education, what is milk for babes but not solid food for men (Hebrews 5:13)
Bible, - ...
The 'oracles of God' were committed to Israel, Romans 3:2 , and they have been zealous defenders of the letter of the O
Hadrianus, Publius Aelius, Emperor - He was restrained, it was reported, by Oracles which declared that, if this were done, all other temples would be deserted and the religion of the empire subverted
Theophilus, Bishop of Antioch - He contrasts the perfect consistency of the divine Oracles which he regards as a convincing proof of their inspiration with the inconsistencies of heathen philosophers
Scripture - ), As the ‘living Oracles’ of God, then, the Scriptures are the final norm alike of faith and of conduct
Commentary - ...
There are some people so wise in their own conceit, and think human helps of so little worth, that they despise commentaries on the Scriptures altogether: but every student or preacher whose business is to explain the sacred Oracles, to make known the mind of God to others, to settle cases of conscience, to oppose the sophistry of sceptics, and to confound the arguments of infidels, would do well to avail himself of the most judicious, clear, copious, critical, and sound commentaries on the Bible
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - Its canonicity rests on the testimony of the Jewish church, "to whom were committed the Oracles of God," and who are never charged in the New Testament with unfaithfulness in that respect, though so unfaithful in other respects (Romans 3:2)
Jeremiah - This is most evident in the Lamentations, where those passions altogether predominate; but it is often visible also in his prophecies, in the former part of the book more especially, which is principally poetical: the middle parts are chiefly historical; but the last part, consisting of six chapters, is entirely poetical, and contains several Oracles distinctly marked, in which this prophet falls very little short of the lofty style of Isaiah
Jonathan - The teraphim or household gods were also worshipped as givers of prosperity and as Oracles
John, Gospel of (Critical) - We know that in the time of Eusebius the only writing of Papias to which he had access was a work in five books, entitled ‘Exposition(s) of the Oracles of the Lord’ (Λογίων κυριακῶν ἐξήγησις [3]). ...
The ‘Oracles’ were probably a collection of sayings of our Lord, together with some kind of historical setting. ) Papias is best known by the famous extract from the Preface to his work which is preserved by Eusebius:...
‘I will not hesitate to place before you, along with my interpretations (of the Oracles of the Lord), everything that carefully learned, and carefully remembered in time past from the elders, and I can guarantee its truth
Canon - These Oracles were committed to the Jews as a sacred deposit, and they are never charged with unfaithfulness in this trust. But whatever other corruptions have crept into the Jewish or Christian churches, it does not appear that either of them, as a body, ever incurred the censure of having been careless in preserving the Oracles of God
Alexandria - The translation was regarded by the Jews with mingled feelings, execrated by one section as the grossest desecration of the holy Oracles, extolled by another section as the means by which the beauties of the Law and the Prophets could be appreciated for the first time by the Greek-speaking Gentile world
Old Testament - The books of the OT were the ‘oracles of God,’ which enshrined the Divine rule of life, not for the Fathers only, but for those also who had been called and redeemed in Christ. ...
The Apostle to the Gentiles was a Pharisee ‘of the straitest sect,’ brought up at the feet of Gamaliel, and thus imbued not merely with a deep reverence and love for the Scriptures, but also with the Rabbinic method of expounding them, in entire independence of their historical setting and significance, as a store-house of separate ‘oracles,’ the manifold sense of which (literal, allegorical, rational, and mystical) was to be deduced by the interpreter’s own insight, logical acumen, or fancy, according to the rules laid down by representative Rabbis
Hosea, Theology of - ...
Yet, while glimmers of hope permeate the prophet's Oracles God's judgment is given a more prominent place in his theology
Prophets - They were the established Oracles of their country, and consulted upon all occasions when it was necessary to collect the divine will on any civil or religious question
Daniel, Theology of - Most of the other prophets have Oracles against Israel's enemy nations, a prophetic form that is ancient in Israelite literature (see, e
Jerusalem - The new Jerusalem/Zion will be a place of great beauty (Tobit 13:16-17 ), ruled over by God Himself (Sibylline Oracles 3:787)
Poetry - Thus, for emotions as diverse as laments, Oracles of judgment, and paeans of praise, poetry is perfectly suited
Diocletian, Emperor - The answer came, not from the priestess only, but, as it were, from the god himself speaking from the recesses of his cave, telling him that the presence of the self-styled "just ones" on the earth made it impossible for the Oracles to speak the truth
Psalms, Theology of - They differ from prophetic Oracles, moral imperatives, or propositional statements of doctrine that presuppose a revelatory flow from God to humans. As in the Oracles of the prophets, the emphasis in these psalms is on integrity and moral purity as defined by the Sinai covenant rather than merely on ritual purity and sacrifices
Education - that most of the NT books were recognized in the Church as the Oracles of God, and on the same level of authority as the books of the OT. 1), ‘Yea, your knowledge is laudable, and ye have deep insight into the Oracles of God
John (the Apostle) - In his preface to his Expositions of the Oracles of the Lord he says:...
‘But I shall not hesitate also to put down for you along with my interpretations whatsoever things I have at any time learned carefully from the elders and carefully remembered, guaranteeing their truth. ), which reads, ‘Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis, declares in the second book of the Oracles of the Lord that John was put to death by the Jews
Possession - This, rightly called ‘inspiration’, is not found in the lower culture, except occasionally, when it is due to the spirits of the dead, though it has been maintained that the deliverances of the classic Oracles were given by a divine being. ðÇçÇùÑ, ‘enchantment,’_ ùÑÇçÀøÈäÌ ‘sorcery,’_ ëÌÆùÑÈó, ‘incantations’;_ (b) the terms indicating the practice of such arts, as òåÉðÅï, ‘to use hidden or magical arts,’_ such as those common among the Philistines; çÈáÇø, ‘to tie magical knots,’_ öÄôÀöÅó ‘to twitter,’ with its corresponding name for the practitioner, äÇîÀöÇôÀöÀôÄéí;_ (c) the various kinds of practitioners whose business it was to deal with spirits, as ãÌÉøÅùÑ àÆiÎäÇîÅúéí, ‘necromancers’; éÄãÌÀò̇ðÄéí ‘knowing ones,’ or wizards;_ îÇäÀðÄéí, ‘those who mutter’;_ àÄèÌÄéí, ‘whisperers’;_ àåÉá, those who maintain communion with the dead, cause them to return, and through intercourse with them deliver Oracles, speaking low as if out of the ground
Revelation, Idea of - Small wonder that Christians have relished the apostle's use of the term "the Oracles of God" for his Bible
Thomas - ...
At the same time, Thomas in his melancholy candour and saddened plainness of speech was but ministering an opportunity to his Master to utter one of His most golden Oracles
Divination - Myers, on ‘Greek Oracles,’ in Essays, 1883, and to the series of articles in Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics vi
Egypt - Oracles were given in the temples, not by an inspired priest, but by nods or other signs made by the god; sometimes, for instance, the decision of a god was sought in a legal matter by laying before him a papyrus in which the case was stated. The Oracles of the Theban Ammon and (later) of Buto were political forces: that of Ammon in the Oasis of Siwa played a part in Greek history
Apocrypha - One of the curious cases of mixed material is that of the Sibylline Oracles , See Apocalyptic Literature
War - ...
Previously to commencing war, the Heathen nations consulted Oracles, soothsayers, necromancers, and also the lot, which was ascertained by shooting arrows of different colours, 1 Samuel 28:1-10 ; Isaiah 41:21-24 ; Ezekiel 25:11
Inspiration - They are called "the Oracles of God" (Romans 3:2), i
God, Names of - " The name yhwh is prominent in salvation Oracles ( Zephaniah 3:14-17 ) and in petitions (Psalm 79:5,9 ; 86:1 )
Apocalyptic Literature - The Sibylline Oracles are the most important illustration of the extra-Palestinian-Hellenistic apocalyptic hope
Zechariah, Theology of - ), references to Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the Davidic governor, encouragement to rebuild the temple, and a mixture of Oracles and visions
Scripture - Scripture is called in the New Testament "the word of God," "oracles of God," and "God's words
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - ...
Early descriptions of the day are found in the Oracles against the nations
Bible - Paul says that one grand preeminence of the Jews was that unto them were committed the Oracles of God (Romans 3:2), and they are never accused of unfaithfulness in their trust
War, Holy War - Kings were often very careful to determine if prophetic Oracles endorsing the attack were genuine (cf
Prophet - spokesman: Exodus 7:1) of God's will (the mantis was the inspired unconscious utterer of Oracles which the prophet interpreted); so in Scripture the divinely inspired revealer of truths be fore unknown
Descent Into Hades - section of the Sibylline Oracles (i
Revelation, the Book of - The remaining “voices” (or Oracles) follow in rapid succession
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - The concept was dear to Jewish apocalyptic writers, believing as they did that this age could be remedied only by the kingdom of God or the age to come (see Isaiah 40-66 ; Daniel 2:44 ; 1 Enoch 6-36,83-90 ; Sib Oracles 3:652-56; 2Baruch 39-40; 4Ezra 7; etc
Miracles - ...
(9) Not tentative, where out of many trials some succeed, as the ancient Oracles, cures wrought by relics, etc
Mark, Gospel According to - For neither did he hear the Lord, nor did he follow Him, but afterwards, as I said, (attended) Peter, who adapted his instructions to the needs (of his hearers), but had no design of giving a connected account of the Lord’s Oracles [3]
Romans, Theology of - ) Yet in spite of the special advantage of the Jews in being entrusted with the Oracles of God (3:2), they are now no better off under the leveling justice of God (3:9)
Prophecy - ...
Pagans had their Oracles, augurs, and soothsayers; modern idolaters their necronancers and diviners; and the Jews, Christians, and Mahometans, their prophets
Inspiration - Even where tribes are too uncivilized to possess sacred writings, there exists a belief that God makes known His mind through dreams, Oracles, or inspired individuals; and the presence and influence of God is frequently spoken of as an afflatus, the blowing of a breath or wind upon the inspired person
Mark, Gospel According to - For neither did he hear the Lord, nor did he follow Him; but afterwards, as I said, (attended) Peter, who adapted his instructions to the needs (of his hearers), but had no design of giving a connected account of the Lord’s Oracles Aristion (Aristo) - Interpretation) of the Lord’s Oracles ‘referred frequently by name’ to ‘Aristion and the Elder John’ as his authorities
Bible - When Papias says that Matthew wrote ‘the Oracles of the Lord in the Hebrew dialect,’ he would seem to mean Aramaic
God - ...
Rather than emphasizing the precepts of the Torah or the Oracles of the prophets, wisdom stresses the design of nature as a means of divine revelation
Hellenism - It was for the benefit of such faithful proselytes that the Jews composed a moral catechism in poetical form under the name of Phokylides, or wrote the Sibylline Oracles, embodying the hope of the Jewish people, or interpolated hints to Jewish believers into the works of the famous Greek authors
Colossians, Epistle to the - ) and in the fourth book of the Sibylline Oracles, probably written in Asia c
Apocalyptic Literature - The Sibylline Oracles
Apocalypse - -The Sibylline Oracles (q
Ascension of Isaiah - In the Sibylline Oracles, ii
Mahometanism - Yet, defective in its structure, and not less exceptionable in its doctrines and precepts, was the work which he thus delivered to his followers as the Oracles of God
Messiah - In the Sibylline Oracles the figure of the Messiah again is not distinct, but there is a picture (III
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - We have spoken gladly, knowing that we spoke to men who have studied the Oracles of God (lxii
Koran - Yet, thus defective in its structure, and no less objectionable in its doctrines, was the work which Mahomet delivered to his followers as the Oracles of God
Polycarp - 1]'>[2]: ‘Whosoever shall not confess the testimony of the Cross is of the devil; and whosoever shall pervert the Oracles of the Lord to his own lusts and say that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, that man is the first-born of Satan’)
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - He says, "Every one who doth not confess that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is antichrist; and whosoever doth not confess the testimony of the Cross is of the devil; and whosoever perverteth the Oracles of the Lord to his own lusts and saith that there is neither resurrection nor judgment, this man is a first-born of Satan
Tatianus - He soon discovered that these writings were older than the oldest remains of Greek literature, and in their prophecies and precepts diviner and truer than the Oracles and practices of the most powerful gods or the purest philosophers
Methodists, Protestant - ...
He showed a mind well instructed in the Oracles of God, and well acquainted with human nature