What does Oracle mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מְשָׁל֖וֹ proverb 7
מַשָּׂ֣א load 2
בִּדְבַ֣ר speech 1
מַשָּׂ֖א load 1
؟ מַשָּׂ֔א load 1
וּמַשָּׂ֥א load 1
הַמַּשָּׂ֗א load 1
נְאֻֽם־ (Qal) utterance 1

Definitions Related to Oracle

H4912


   1 proverb, parable.
      1a proverb, proverbial saying, aphorism.
      1b byword.
      1c similitude, parable.
      1d poem.
      1e sentences of ethical wisdom, ethical maxims.
      

H4853


   1 load, bearing, tribute, burden, lifting.
      1a load, burden.
      1b lifting, uplifting, that to which the soul lifts itself up.
      1c bearing, carrying.
      1d tribute, that which is carried or brought or borne.
   2 utterance, Oracle, burden.
   3 a son of Ishmael.
   Additional Information: Massa = “burden”.
   

H1697


   1 speech, word, speaking, thing.
      1a speech.
      1b saying, utterance.
      1c word, words.
      1d business, occupation, acts, matter, case, something, manner (by extension).
      

H5002


   1 (Qal) utterance, declaration (of prophet).
      1a utterance, declaration, revelation (of prophet in ecstatic state).
      1b utterance, declaration (elsewhere always preceding divine name).
      

Frequency of Oracle (original languages)

Frequency of Oracle (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Oracle - Communication
(Latin: orare, to speak)
A Divine communication given at a particular place through particularly appointed persons; also the place itself. This form of divination existed in Babylon and Assyria, among the Hebrews, and in Greece and Rome. The Delphic Oracle was perhaps the most famous and exercised the greatest and most balefui influence. Christianity alone could conquer these homes of revelation; Constantine stripped Delphi and Dodona, and under Theodosius the repression was completed.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Oracle - Garment
Shoulder cape worn by the pope alone, consisting of two pieces of white silk ornamented with narrow woven stripes of red and gold. It is nearly circular in shape with a round hole in the middle for the head to pass through, and with a small gold cross embroidered in front. It is worn over the alb, and only at solemn pontifical Mass. Mentioned in the oldest known Roman Ordinal, it was used in the 8th century, called anabolagium, and worn by all ecclesiastics. It was not reserved exclusively for the pope until the 12th century, when it was called the oracle. Its present collar-like form dates from about the 16th century.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Oracle
In the Old Testament used in every case, except 2 Samuel 16:23 , to denote the most holy place in the temple (1 Kings 6:5,19-23 ; 8:6 ). In 2 Samuel 16:23 it means the Word of God. A man inquired "at the oracle of God" by means of the Urim and Thummim in the breastplate on the high priest's ephod. In the New Testament it is used only in the plural, and always denotes the Word of God ( Romans 3:2 ; Hebrews 5:12 , etc.). The Scriptures are called "living oracles" (Compare Hebrews 4:12 ) because of their quickening power (Acts 7:38 ).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Oracle
Among the Heathens, was the answer which the gods were supposed to give to those who consulted them upon any affair of importance. It is also used for the god who was thought to give the answer, and for the space where it was given. Learned men are much divided as to the source of these oracles. Some suppose that they were only the invention of priests; while others conceive that there was a diabolical agency employed in the business. There are, as one observes, several circumstances leading to the former hypothesis: such as the gloomy solemnity with which many of them were delivered in caves and subterraneous caverns: the numerous and disagreeable ceremonies enjoined, as sometimes sleeping in the skins of beasts, bathing, and expensive sacrifices; the ambiguous and unsatisfactory answers frequently returned: these look very much like the contrivances of artful priests to disguise their villany; the medium of priests, speaking images, vocal groves, &c. seem much to confirm it. On the other hand, if we may credit the relation of ancient writers, either among Heathens or Christians, this hypothesis will hardly account for many of the instances they mention.
And since it cannot be proved either impossible or unscriptural, is it not probable that God sometimes permits an intercourse with infernal spirits, with a design, in the end, to turn this and every other circumstance to his own glory? Respecting the cessation of these oracles, there have been a variety of opinions. It has been generally held, indeed, that oracles ceased at the birth of Jesus Christ: yet some have endeavoured to maintain the contrary, by showing that they were in being in the days of Julian, commonly called the apostate, and that this emperor himself consulted them; nay, farther, say they, history makes mention of several laws published by the Christian emperors, Theodosius, Gratian, and Valentinian, to punish persons who interrogated them, even in their days; and that the Epicureans were the first who made a jest of this superstition, and exposed the roguery of its priests to the people. But on the other side it is observed,
1. That the question, properly stated, is not. Whether oracles became extinct immediately upon the birth of Christ, or from the very moment he was born; but, Whether they fell gradually into disesteem, and ceased as Christ and his Gospel became known to mankind? And that they did so is most certain from the concurrent testimonies of the fathers, which whoever would endeavour to invalidate, may equally give up the most respectable traditions and relations of every kind.
2dly, But did not Julian the apostate consult these oracles? We answer in the negative: he had, indeed, recourse to magical operations, but it was because oracles had already ceased; for he bewailed the loss of them, and assigned pitiful reasons for it; which St. Cyril has vigorously refuted, saying, that he never could have offered such, but from an unwillingness to acknowledge, that, when the world had received the light of Christ, the dominion of the devil was at an end.
3dly. The Christian emperors do, indeed, seem to condemn the superstition and idolatry of those who were still for consulting oracles; but the edicts of those princes do not prove that oracles actually existed in their times, any more than that they ceased in consequence of their laws. It is certain that they were for the most part extinct before the conversion of Constantine.
4thly. Some Epicureans might make a jest of this superstition; however, the Epicurean philosopher Celsus, in the second century of the church, was for crying up the excellency of several oracles, as appears at large from Origen's seventh book against him. Among the Jews there were several sorts of real oracles. They had,
first, oracles that were delivered viva voice; as when God spake to Moses face to face, and as one friend speaks to another, Numb. 12: 8.
Secondly, Prophetical dreams sent by God; as the dreams which God sent to Joseph, and which foretold his future greatness, Genesis 27:5-6 .
Thirdly, Visions; as when a prophet in an ecstacy, being neither properly asleep nor awake, had supernatural revelations, Genesis 15:1 . Genesis 46:2 .
Fourthly, The oracle of the Urim and Thummim, which was accompanied with the ephod, or the pectoral worn by the high priest, and which God had endued with the gift of foretelling things to come, Numb. 12: 6. Joel 2:28 . This manner of inquiring of the Lord was often made use of, from Joshua's time to the erection of the temple at Jerusalem. Fifthly, After the building of the temple, they generally consulted the prophets, who were frequent in the kingdoms of Judah and Israel.
From Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, who are the last of the prophets that have any of their writings remaining, the Jews pretend that God gave them what they call Bathkol, the Daughter of the Voice, which was a supernatural manifestation of the will of God, which was performed either by a strong inspiration or internal voice, or else by a sensible and external voice, which was heard by a number of persons sufficient to bear testimony of it. For example, such was the voice that was heard at the baptism of Jesus Christ, saying, This is my beloved Son, &c. Matthew 3:17 . The scripture affords us examples likewise of profane oracles. Balaam, at the instigation of his own spirit, and urged on by his avarice, fearing to lose thy recompence that he was promised by Balak, king of the Moabites, suggests a diabolical expedient to this prince of making the Israelites fall into idolatry and fornication, (Numb. 24: 14. Numb. 31: 16.) by which he assures him of a certain victory, or at least of considerable advantage against the people of God. Micaiah, the son of Imlah, a prophet of the Lord, says (1 Kings 22:20 , &c.) that he saw the Almighty, sitting upon his throne, and all the host of heaven round about him; and the Lord said, Who shall tempt Ahab, king of Israel, that he may go to war with Ramoth Gilead, and fall in the battle? One answered after one manner, and another in another.
At the same time an evil spirit presented himself before the Lord, and said, I will seduce him. And the Lord asked him, How? To which Satan answered, I will go and be a lying spirit in the mouth of his prophets. And the Lord said, Go, and thou shalt prevail. This dialogue clearly proves these two things; first, that the devil could do nothing by his own power; and, secondly, that, with the permission of God, he could inspire the false prophets, sorcerers, and magicians, and make them deliver false oracles.
See Vandals and Fontenelle's Hist. de Orac; Potter's Greek Antiquities, vol. 1: b. 2. ch. 7; Edwards's Hist. of Red. P. 408; Farmer on Mir. p. 281, 285; Enc. Brit. article ORACLE.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Oracle
1 Peter 4:11 (a) Here we see a description of the character, authenticity and forcefulness of the man of GOD who delivers GOD's message in the power of the Holy Spirit.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Oracle
It was said of Ahithophel that his counsel was "as if a man had enquired at the oracle of God," or at the 'word' of God. 2 Samuel 16:23 . In all other places in the O.T. the word 'oracle' applies to the holy of holies. It is doubtless so called because God said, "There I will meet with thee, and I will commune with thee from above the mercy seat, from between the two cherubims which are upon the ark of the testimony, of all things which I will give thee in commandment unto the children of Israel." Exodus 25:22 . And it was from thence that Moses received many of the laws. 1 Kings 6:5-31 ; 1 Kings 7:49 ; 1 Kings 8:6,8 ; 2 Chronicles 3:16 ; 2 Chronicles 4:20 ; 2 Chronicles 5:7,9 ; Psalm 28:2 .
In the N.T. the word thus translated is λόγιον; it is applied to the law given to Moses, and committed to Israel; and also to truths revealed in N.T. times. Acts 7:38 ; Romans 3:2 ; Hebrews 5:12 ; 1 Peter 4:11 . It signifies 'a message or answer given by God,' and thence the place from which such were given.
In the learned heathen world, Satan had places in imitation of this, at which it was professed that an answer from their gods could be obtained; but the answers were often purposely vague in order that afterwards they could be interpreted differently according as the event turned out. Thus the persons were duped who asked the questions.
Webster's Dictionary - Oracle
(1):
(n.) A wise sentence or decision of great authority.
(2):
(n.) The sanctuary, or Most Holy place in the temple; also, the temple itself.
(3):
(n.) The communications, revelations, or messages delivered by God to the prophets; also, the entire sacred Scriptures - usually in the plural.
(4):
(n.) Any person reputed uncommonly wise; one whose decisions are regarded as of great authority; as, a literary oracle.
(5):
(n.) Hence: The deity who was supposed to give the answer; also, the place where it was given.
(6):
(v. i.) To utter oracles.
(7):
(n.) One who communicates a divine command; an angel; a prophet.
(8):
(n.) The answer of a god, or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry respecting some affair or future event, as the success of an enterprise or battle.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Oracle
denotes something delivered by supernatural wisdom; and the term is also used in the Old Testament to signify the most holy place from whence the Lord revealed his will to ancient Israel, 1 Kings 6:5 ; 1 Kings 6:19-21 ; 1 Kings 6:23 . But when the word occurs in the plural number, as it mostly does, it denotes the revelations contained in the sacred writings of which the nation of Israel were the depositories. So Moses is said by Stephen to have received the "lively oracles" to give unto the Israelites. These oracles contained the law, both moral and ceremonial, with all the types and promises relating to the Messiah which are to be found in the writings of Moses. They also contained all the intimations of the divine mind which he was pleased to communicate by means of the succeeding prophets who prophesied beforehand of the coming and of the sufferings of the Messiah with the glory that should follow. The Jews were a highly privileged people in many and various respects, Romans 9:4-5 ; but the Apostle Paul mentions it as their chief advantage that "unto them were committed the oracles of God," Romans 3:2 . "What nation," says Moses, "is there that hath statutes and judgments so righteous as all this law which I set before you this day?" Deuteronomy 4:8 . The psalmist David enumerates their excellent properties under various epithets; such as the law of the Lord, his testimony, his statutes, his commandments, his judgments, &c. Their properties are extolled as perfect, sure, right, pure, clean, true, and righteous altogether; more to be desired than much fine gold; sweeter than honey and the honey comb. Their salutary effects are all mentioned; such as their converting the soul, making wise the simple, rejoicing the heart, enlightening the eyes; and the keeping of them is connected with a great reward, Psalms 19. The hundred and nineteenth Psalm abounds with praises of the lively oracles, the word of the living God; it abounds with the warmest expressions of love to it, of delight in it, and the most fervent petitions for divine illumination in the knowledge of it. Such was the esteem and veneration which the faithful entertained for the lively oracles under the former dispensation, when they had only Moses and the prophets; how, then, ought they to be prized by Christians, who have also Christ and his Apostles!
Among the Heathen the term oracle is usually taken to signify an answer, generally couched in very dark and ambiguous terms, supposed to be given by demons of old, either by the mouths of their idols, or by those of their priests, to the people, who consulted them on things to come. Oracle is also used for the demon who gave the answer, and the place where it was given. Seneca defines oracles to be enunciations by the mouths of men of the will of the gods; and Cicero simply calls them, deorum oratio, the language of the gods. Among the Pagans they were held in high estimation; and they were consulted on a variety of occasions pertaining to national enterprises and private life. When they made peace or war, enacted laws, reformed states, or changed the constitution, they had in all these cases recourse to the oracle by public authority. Also, in private life, if a man wished to marry, if he proposed to take a journey, or to engage in any business of importance, he repaired to the oracle for counsel. Mankind have had always a propensity to explore futurity; and conceiving that future events were known to their gods, who possessed the gift of prophecy, they sought information and advice from the oracles, which, in their opinion, were supernatural and divine communications. The institution of oracles seemed to gratify the prevalent curiosity of mankind, and proved a source of immense wealth, as well as authority and influence, to those who had the command of them. Accordingly, every nation, in which idolatry has subsisted, had its oracles, by means of which imposture practised on superstition and credulity. The principal oracles of antiquity are, that of Abae, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Amphiaraus, at Oropus in Macedonia; that of the Branchidae at Didymeum: that of the camps at Lacedaemon; that of Dodona; that of Jupiter Ammon; that of Nabarca in the country of the Anariaci, near the Caspian Sea; that of Trophonius, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Chrysopolis; that of Claros, in Ionia; that of Amphilochus at Mallos; that of Petarea; that of Pella in Macedonia; that of Phaselides in Cilicia; that of Sinope in Paphlagonia; that of Orpheus's head at Lesbos, mentioned by Philostratus. But of all oracles, the oracle of Apollo Pythius at Delphi was the most celebrated: this was consulted in the dernier resort by most of the princes of those ages.
Most of the Pagan deities had their appropriate oracles. Apollo had the greatest number: such as those of Claros, of the Branchidae, of the suburbs of Daphne at Antioch, of Delos, of Argos, of Troas, AEolis, &c, of Baiae in Italy, and others in Cilicia, in Egypt, in the Alps, in Thrace, at Corinth, in Arcadia, in Laconia, and in many other places enumerated by Van Dale. Jupiter, beside that of Dodona and some others, the honour of which he shared with Apollo, had one in Boeotia under the name of Jupiter the Thunderer, and another in Elis, one at Thebes and at Meroe, one near Antioch, and several others. AEsculapius was consulted in Cilicia, at Apollonia, in the isle of Cos, at Epidaurus, Pergamos, Rome, and elsewhere. Mercury had oracles at Patras, upon Harmon, and in other places; Mars, in Thrace, Egypt and elsewhere; Hercules, at Cadiz, Athens, in Egypt, at Tivoli, in Mesopotamia, where he issued his oracles by dreams, whence he was called Somnialis. Isis, Osiris, and Serapis delivered in like manner their oracles by dreams, as we learn from Pausanias, Tacitus, Arrian, and other writers; that of Amphilochus was also delivered by dreams; the ox Apis had also his oracle in Egypt. The gods, called Cabiri, had their oracle in Boeotia. Diana, the sister of Apollo, had several oracles in Egypt, Cilicia, Ephesus, &c. Those of fortune at Praeneste, and of the lots at Antium are well known. The fountains also delivered oracles, for to each of them a divinity was ascribed: such was the fountain of Castalia at Delphi, another of the same name in the suburbs of Antioch, and the prophetic fountain near the temple of Ceres in Achaia. Juno had several oracles: one near Corinth, one at Nysa, and others at different places. Latona had one at Butis in Egypt; Leucothea had one in Colchis; Memnon in Egypt; Machaon at Gerania in Laconia; Minerva had one in Egypt, in Spain, upon mount AEtna, at Mycenae and Colchis, and in other places. Those of Neptune were at Delphos, at Calauria, near Neocesarea, and elsewhere. The nymphs had theirs in the cave of Corycia. Pan had several, the most famous of which was that in Arcadia. That of the Palici was in Sicily. Pluto had one at Nysa. Saturn had oracles in several places, but the most famous were those of Cumae in Italy, and of Alexandria in Egypt. Those of Venus were dispersed in several places, at Gaza, upon Mount Libanus, at Paphos, in Cyprus, &c. Serapis had one at Alexandria, consulted by Vespasian. Venus Aphacite had one at Aphaca between Heliopolis and Byblus. Geryon, the three-headed monster slain by Hercules, had an oracle in Italy near Padua, consulted by Tiberius; that of Hercules was at Tivoli, and was given by lots, like those of Praeneste and Antium. The demi-gods and heroes had likewise their oracles, such were those of Castor and Pollux at Lacedaemon, of Amphiaraus, of Mopsus in Cilicia, of Ulysses, Amphilochus, Sarpedon in Troas, Hermione in Macedonia, Pasiphae in Laconia, Chalcas in Italy, Aristaeus in Boeotia, Autolycus at Sinope, Phryxus among the Colchi, Zamolxis among the Getae, Hephaestion the minion of Alexander, and Antinous, &c.
The responses of oracles were delivered in a variety of ways: at Delphi, they interpreted and put into verse what the priestess pronounced in the time of her furor. Mr. Bayle observes that at first this oracle gave its answers in verse; and that it fell at length to prose, upon the people's beginning to laugh at the poorness of its versification. The Epicureans made this the subject of their jests, and said, in raillery, it was surprising enough, that Apollo, the god of poetry, should be a much worse poet than Homer, whom he himself had inspired. By the railleries of these philosophers, and particularly by those of the Cynics and Peripatetics, the priests were at length obliged to desist from the practice of versifying the responses of the Pythia, which, according to Plutarch, was one of the principal causes of the declension of the oracle of Delphos. At the oracle of Ammon, the priests pronounced the response of their god; at Dodona, the response was issued from the hollow of an oak; at the cave of Trophonius, the oracle was inferred from what the supplicant said before he recovered his senses; at Memphis, they drew a good or bad omen, according as the ox Apis received or rejected what was presented to him, which was also the case with the fishes of the fountain of Limyra. The suppliants, who consulted the oracles, were not allowed to enter the sanctuaries where they were given; and accordingly, care was taken that neither the Epicureans nor Christians should come near them. In several places, the oracles were given by letters sealed up, as in that of Mopsus, and at Mallus in Cilicia. Oracles were frequently given by lot, the mode of doing which was as follows: the lots were a kind of dice, on which were engraven certain characters or words, whose explanations they were to seek on tables made for the purpose. The way of using these dice for knowing futurity, was different, according to the places where they were used. In some temples, the person threw himself; in others, they were dropped from a box; whence came the proverbial expression, "The lot is fallen." This playing with dice was always preceded by sacrifices and other customary ceremonies. The ambiguity of the oracles in their responses, and their double meaning, contributed to their support.
Ablancourt observes, that the study or research of the meaning of oracles was but a fruitless thing; and that they were never understood till after their accomplishment. Historians relate, that Croesus was tricked by the ambiguity and equivocation of the oracle:
Κροισος Αλυν διαβας μεγαλην αρχην καταλυσει . Thus rendered in Latin:
"Croesus Halym superans magnam pervertet opum vim."
[1] Thus, if the Lydian monarch had conquered Cyrus, he overthrew the Assyrian empire: if he himself was routed, he overturned his own. That delivered to Pyrrhus, which is comprised in this Latin verse,
"Credo equidem AEacidas Romanos vincere posse,"
[2] had the same advantage; for, according to the rules of syntax, either of the two accusatives may be governed by the verb, and the verse be explained, either by saying the Romans shall conquer the AEacidae, of whom Pyrrhus was descended, or those shall conquer the Romans. When Alexander fell sick at Babylon, some of his courtiers who happened to be in Egypt, or who went thither on purpose, passed the night in the temple of Serapis, to inquire if it would not be proper to bring Alexander to be cured by him. The god answered, it was better that Alexander should remain where he was. This in all events was a very prudent and safe answer. If the king recovered his health, what glory must Serapis have gained by saving him the fatigue of the journey! If he died, it was but saying he died in a favourable juncture after so many conquests; which, had he lived, he could neither have enlarged nor preserved. This is actually the construction they put upon the response; whereas had Alexander undertaken the journey, and died in the temple, or by the way, nothing could have been said in favour of Serapis. When Trajan had formed the design of his expedition against the Parthians, he was advised to consult the oracle of Heliopolis, to which he had no more to do but send a note under a seal. That prince, who had no great faith in oracles, sent thither a blank note; and they returned him another of the same kind. By this Trajan was convinced of the divinity of the oracle. He sent back a second note to the god, in which he inquired whether he should return to Rome after finishing the war he had in view. The god, as Macrobius tells the story, ordered a vine, which was among the offerings of his temple, to be divided into pieces, and brought to Trajan. The event justified the oracle; for the emperor dying in that war, his bones were carried to Rome, which had been represented by that broken vine. As the priests of that oracle knew Trajan's design, which was no secret, they happily devised that response, which, in all events, was capable of a favourable interpretation, whether he routed and cut the Parthians in pieces, or if his army met with the same fate. Sometimes the responses of the oracles were mere banter, as in the case of the man who wished to know by what means he might become rich, and who received for answer from the god, that he had only to make himself master of all that lay between Sicyon and Corinth. Another, wanting a cure for the gout, was answered by the oracle, that he was to drink nothing but cold water.
There are two points in dispute on the subject of oracles; namely, whether they were human, or diabolical machines; and whether or not they ceased upon the publication or preaching of the Gospel. Most of the fathers of the church supposed that the devil issued oracles; and looked on it as a pleasure he took to give dubious and equivocal answers, in order to have a handle to laugh at them. Vossius allows that it was the devil who spoke in oracles; but thinks that the obscurity of his answers was owing to his ignorance as to the precise circumstances of events. That artful and studied obscurity in which the answers were couched, says he, showed the embarrassment the devil was under; as those double meanings they usually bore provided for their accomplishment. Where the thing foretold did not happen accordingly, the oracle, for-sooth, was misunderstood. Eusebius has preserved some fragments of a philosopher, called OEnomaus; who, out of resentment for his having been so often fooled by the oracles, wrote an ample confutation of all their impertinencies: "When we come to consult thee," says he to Apollo, "if thou seest what is in futurity, why dost thou use expressions that will not be understood? Dost thou not know, that they will not be understood? If thou dost, thou takest pleasure in abusing us; if thou dost not, be informed of us, and learn to speak more clearly. I tell thee, that if thou intendest to equivoque, the Greek word whereby thou affirmedst that Croesus should overthrow a great empire was ill chosen; and that it could signify nothing but Croesus's conquering Cyrus. If things must necessarily come to pass, why dost thou amuse us with thy ambiguities? What doest thou, wretch as thou art, at Delphi? employed in muttering idle prophecies!" But OEnomaus is still more out of humour with the oracle, for the answer which Apollo gave the Athenians, when Xerxes was about to attack Greece with all the strength of Asia. The Pythian declared, that Minerva, the protectress of Athens, had endeavoured in vain to appease the wrath of Jupiter; yet that Jupiter, in complaisance to his daughter, was willing the Athenians should save themselves within wooden walls; and that Salamis should behold the loss of a great many children, dear to their mothers, either when Ceres was spread abroad, or gathered together. Here OEnomaus loses all patience with the god of Delphi. "This contest," says he, "between father and daughter is very becoming the deities! It is excellent, that there should be contrary inclinations and interests in heaven. Poor wizard, thou art ignorant whose the children are that Salamis shall see perish; whether Greeks or Persians. It is certain they must be either one or the other; but thou needest not to have told so openly, that thou knewest not which. Thou concealest the time of the battle under those fine poetical expressions, ‘either when Ceres is spread abroad, or gathered together;' and wouldest thou cajole us with such pompous language? Who knows not, that if there be a sea fight, it must either be in seed time or harvest? It is certain it cannot be in winter. Let things go how they will, thou wilt secure thyself by this Jupiter, whom Minerva is endeavouring to appease. If the Greeks lose the battle, Jupiter proved inexorable to the last; if they gain it, why then Minerva at length prevailed."
It is a very general opinion among the more learned, that oracles were all mere cheats and impostures; either calculated to serve the avaricious ends of the Heathen priests, or the political views of the princes. Bayle says positively, they were mere human artifices, in which the devil had no hand. He was strongly supported by Van Dale and Fontenelle, who have written expressly on the subject. Father Balthus, a Jesuit, wrote a treatise in defence of the fathers with regard to the origin of oracles; but without denying the imposture of the priests, often blended with the oracles. He maintains the intervention of the devil in some predictions, which, could not be ascribed to the cheats of the priests alone. The Abbe Banier espouses the same side of the question, and objects that oracles would not have lasted so long, and supported themselves with so much splendour and reputation, if they had been merely owing to the forgeries of the priests. Bishop Sherlock, in his "Discourses concerning the Use and Intent of Prophecy," expresses his opinion, that it is impious to disbelieve the Heathen oracles, and to deny them to have been given out by the devil; to which assertion, Dr. Middleton, in his "Examination," &c, replies, that he is guilty of this impiety, and that he thinks himself warranted to pronounce from the authority of the best and wisest of the Heathens themselves, and the evidence of plain facts, which are recorded of those oracles, as well as from the nature of the thing itself, that they were all mere imposture, wholly invented and supported by human craft, without any supernatural aid or interpositon whatsoever. He alleges, that Cicero, speaking of the Delphic oracle, the most revered of any in the Heathen world, declares, that nothing was become more contemptible, not only in his days, but long before him; that Demosthenes, who lived about three hundred years earlier, affirmed of the same oracle, in a public speech to the people of Athens, that it was gained to the interests of King Philip, an enemy to that city; that the Greek historians, tell us, how, on several other occasions, it had been corrupted by money, to serve the views of particular persons and parties, and the prophetess sometimes had been deposed for bribery and lewdness; that there were some great sects of philosophers, who, on principle, disavowed the authority of all oracles; agreeably to all which Strabo tells us, that divination in general and oracles had been in high credit among the ancients, but in his days were treated with much contempt; lastly, that Eusebius also, the great historian of the primitive church, declares, that there were six hundred writers among the Heathens themselves who had publicly written against the reality of them. Plutarch has a treatise on the ceasing of some oracles; and Van Dale, a Dutch physician, has a volume to prove they did not cease at the coming of Christ; but that many of them ceased long before, and that others held till the fall of Paganism, under the empire of Theodosius the Great, when Paganism being dissipated, these restitutions could no longer subsist. Van Dale was answered by a German, one Moebius, professor of theology at Leipsic, in 1685. Fontenelle espoused Van Dale's system, and improved upon it in his "History of Oracles;" and showed the weakness of the argument used by many writers in behalf of Christianity, drawn from the ceasing of oracles. Cicero says, the oracles became dumb in proportion as people, growing less credulous, began to suspect them for cheats. Plutarch alleges two reasons for the ceasing of oracles: the one was Apollo's chagrin; who, it seems, took it in dudgeon to be interrogated about so many trifles. The other was, that in proportion as the genii, or demons, who had the management of the oracles, died, and became extinct, the oracles must necessarily cease. He adds a third and more natural cause for the ceasing of oracles; namely, the forlorn state of Greece, ruined and desolated by wars; for, hence, the smallness of the gains let the priests sink into a poverty and contempt too bare to cover the fraud. That the oracles were silenced about or soon after the time of our Saviour's advent, may be proved, says Dr. Leland, in the first volume of his learned work on "The Necessity and Advantage of Revelation," &c, from express testimonies, not only of Christian but of Heathen authors. Lucan, who wrote his "Pharsalia" in the reign of Nero, scarcely thirty years after our Lord's crucifixion, laments it as one of the greatest misfortunes of that age, that the Delphian oracle, which he represents as one of the choicest gifts of the gods, was become silent.
Non ullo saecula dono
Nostra carent majore Deum, quam Delphica sedes
Quod sileat. — Pharsal. lib. v. 111.
"Of all the wants with which the age is curst, The Delphic silence surely is the worst." ROWE.
In like manner, Juvenal says,
Delphis oracula cessant,
Et genus humanum damnat caligo futuri.
Sat. v. 554.
"Since Delphi now, if we may credit fame, Gives no responses, and a long dark night Conceals the future hour from mortal sight." GIFFORD.
Lucian says, that when he was at Delphi, the oracle gave no answer, nor was the priestess inspired. This likewise appears from Plutarch's treatise, why the oracles cease to give answers, already cited; whence it is also manifest, that the most learned Heathens were very much at a loss how to give a tolerable account of it. Porphyry, in a passage cited from him by Eusebius, says, "The city of Rome was overrun with sickness, AEsculapius, and the rest of the gods having withdrawn their converse with men because since Jesus began to be worshipped, no man had received any public help or benefit from the gods." With respect to the origin of oracles, they were probably imitations, first, of the answers given to the holy patriarchs from the divine presence or Shechinah, and secondly, of the responses to the Jewish high priest from the mercy seat: for all Paganism is a parody of the true religion.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Oracle
We find mention made (2 Samuel 16:23) of the oracle of God; but we are at a loss to understand so as to speak with certainty concerning the meaning. In the building of Solomon's temple we are told, that there was "a part for the oracle, even for the most holy place." (1 Kings 6:16) By which it should seem, that the mercy-seat or propitiatory, was intended by the word oracle. And the Psalmist seems to throw a farther light upon the term, considered in this point of view, when he saith, (Psalms 28:2) "Hear the voice of my supplications when I cry unto thee, when I lift up my hands towards thy holy oracle." For where should a soul lift up his hands and his heart, but to the mercy seat, God in Christ speaking from between the cherubim? The word Dabir, which is the word used for oracle, 1 Kings 6:16, properly signifies oracle. But the word Caphoreth (from Capher or Copher, to expiate or pardon) is used for the mercy seat, Exodus 25:18. But in either sense, or in both, by oracle must imply the answers of the Lord to his people. And what is said, of the answers by Urim and Thummim, by visions of the night, by prophecy, and the like, all is one and the same, when the Lord makes known the sacred purposes of his will. Hence the apostle, speaking of those who ministered in holy things, enjoined this precept, "If any man speak, let him speak as the oracles of God;" that is, the truths of God. (1 Peter 4:11. See Genesis 27:5-6; Numbers 13:6-8)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Oracle
1: λόγιον (Strong's #3051 — Noun Neuter — logion — log'-ee-on ) a diminutive of logos, "a word, narrative, statement," denotes "a Divine response or utterance, an oracle;" it is used of (a) the contents of the Mosaic Law, Acts 7:38 ; (b) all the written utterances of God through OT writers, Romans 3:2 ; (c) the substance of Christian doctrine, Hebrews 5:12 ; (d) the utterance of God through Christian teachers, 1 Peter 4:11 .
Notes: Divine "oracles" were given by means of the breastplate of the high priest, in connection with the service of the tabernacle, and the Sept. uses the associated word logeion in Exodus 28:15 , to described the breastplate.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Oracle
A supernatural communication; applied to single divine revelations and to the entire word of god, Acts 7:38 Romans 3:2 Hebrews 5:12 , etc. It is also spoken of the covering of he ark of the covenant; as if God there sat enthroned, and delivered his oracles, 2 Samuel 16:23 . See MERCY SEAT. In other places, it means the "Holy of Holies" in the temple, where the ark was placed, 1 Kings 6:5,16,19 8:6 .
Strikingly unlike the true and living oracles of God were the famous counterfeit oracles of numerous heathen temples. The priests who pretended to convey to applicants the responses of their gods, often gave a reply capable of two opposite interpretations, when neither private information nor their own experience or sagacity gave them the clue to a safe answer. Thus Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, was encouraged to a war, with Rome, by an oracle which was found after his defeat to foretell defeat as much as victory: Aio te, Aeacida, Romanos vincere posse.
King James Dictionary - Oracle
OR'ACLE, n. L. oraculum, from oro, to utter.
1. Among pagans, the answer of a god or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry made respecting some affair of importance, usually respecting some future event, as the success of an enterprise or battle. 2. The deity who gave or was supposed to give answers to inquiries as the Delphic oracle. 3. The place where the answers were given. 4. Among christians, oracles, in the plural, denotes the communications, revelations or messages delivered by God to prophets. In this sense it is rarely used in the singular but we say, the oracles of God, divine oracles, meaning the Scriptures. 5. The sanctuary or most holy place in the temple, in which was deposited the ark of the covenant. 1 Kings 6 . 6. Any person or place where certain decisions are obtained. 7. Any person reputed uncommonly wise, whose determinations are not disputed, or whose opinions are of great authority. 8. A wise sentence or decision of great authority. OR'ACLE, To utter oracles.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Oracle
In the literature of the Apostolic Church the word ‘oracle’ has lost its technical pagan meaning. λόγιον occurs four times in the NT (Acts 7:38, Romans 3:2, Hebrews 5:12, 1 Peter 4:11). In the first three of these passages it means the Canonical Scriptures of the OT. That is probably also its meaning in 1 Peter: ‘If any man speaketh, speaking as it were oracles of God,’ i.e. treating his words as seriously as if they were inspired Scripture. Clement of Rome uses the word three times (ad Cor. xix., liii., lxii.), always in the sense of authoritative Scripture, i.e. the OT. Eusebius (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.) III. xxxix. 16) quotes Papias as saying that ‘Matthew composed the oracles (sc. of the Lord) in Hebrew, and each one interpreted them as he could.’ E. C. Selwyn holds that these were the Messianic prophecies of the OT which Matthew collected (The Oracles in the New Testament, London, 1912, p. 396 ff.). The adjective λόγιος (Revised Version ‘learned’) is applied to Apollos (Acts 18:24).
R. H. Malden.

Sentence search

Oraculous - ) Oracular; of the nature of an Oracle
Oracle - We find mention made (2 Samuel 16:23) of the Oracle of God; but we are at a loss to understand so as to speak with certainty concerning the meaning. In the building of Solomon's temple we are told, that there was "a part for the Oracle, even for the most holy place. " (1 Kings 6:16) By which it should seem, that the mercy-seat or propitiatory, was intended by the word Oracle. And the Psalmist seems to throw a farther light upon the term, considered in this point of view, when he saith, (Psalms 28:2) "Hear the voice of my supplications when I cry unto thee, when I lift up my hands towards thy holy Oracle. " For where should a soul lift up his hands and his heart, but to the mercy seat, God in Christ speaking from between the cherubim? The word Dabir, which is the word used for Oracle, 1 Kings 6:16, properly signifies Oracle. But in either sense, or in both, by Oracle must imply the answers of the Lord to his people. Hence the apostle, speaking of those who ministered in holy things, enjoined this precept, "If any man speak, let him speak as the Oracles of God;" that is, the truths of God
Trophonian - ) Of or pertaining to Trophonius, his architecture, or his cave and Oracle
Delphic - ) Of or relating to Delphi, or to the famous Oracle of that place
en-Mishpat - EN-MISHPAT (‘spring of judgment,’ or ‘decision’ (by Oracle), Genesis 14:7 )
Oracles - In one sense, Oracles were prophecies since they often referred to the future; but Oracles sometimes dealt with decisions to be made in the present. Many of Israel's neighbors sought Oracles from their gods. ...
Although the word Oracle is not very frequent in the Old Testament, Oracles were common in that period. This difference occurs because the Hebrew words translated “oracle” may also be translated as “burden,” “saying,” “word,” etc. Both the NRSV and the NAS translate the same Hebrew word as “oracle” in Numbers 24:3 , but it is rendered “declare” in 1 Samuel 2:30 . Jeremiah 23:33-34 makes a play on a Hebrew word which may be translated either “burden” or “oracle. ” The NAS uses “oracle,” but the NRSV and KJV use “burden. ” Moreover, in the KJV the English word Oracle is used to refer to the holy of holies in the Temple. ...
Concordance study shows the following meaning and use of “oracle. ” Sometimes “oracle” refers to the whole of a prophetic book (Malachi 1:1 NRSV) or a major portion of one ( Habakkuk 1:1 NRSV). In Isaiah, several smaller prophecies of judgment or punishment are called “oracles” ( Isaiah 13:1 NRSV; Isaiah 14:28 NRSV). The NRSV also entitles Zechariah 9:1 and Zechariah 12:1 “An Oracle. ” Specific sayings about God's judgment on Joram ( 2 Kings 9:25 NRSV) and Joash ( 2 Chronicles 24:27 NRSV) are also called Oracles. Other examples, although the word Oracle is not used, include Elijah's word to Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:17-19 ) and Elisha's word to Jehoram (2 Kings 3:13-20 ). On the basis of these kinds of usages, many Bible students understand Oracles to be divine words of punishment or judgment. However, Balaam's Oracle (Numbers 24:3-9 ) is a blessing. Also references to Ahithophel's counsel (2 Samuel 16:23 ) and to Oracles in Jerusalem which were pleasing but false (Lamentations 2:14 ) show us that prophetic pronouncements were not always negative. ...
The New Testament does not reflect quite the same use of Oracles or the word Oracle as does the Old. The word Oracles in the New Testament most often refers to the teachings of God in the Old Testament (Acts 7:38 ; Romans 3:2 ). ...
Why Were Oracles Given? We must distinguish between Oracles that were sought and those that came without any request. The first kind might be called “decision Oracles. ” The second kind will be referred to as “pronouncement Oracles. ” Decision Oracles came when people asked God a question or sought His counsel. The answers he received were Oracles (2Samuel 5:19,2 Samuel 5:23-24 ). Saul, the first king of Israel, was chosen through an Oracle (1 Samuel 10:20-24 ). The falling of the lots was considered an Oracle from God. Decision Oracles, then, were God's response to questions and concerns in the present. ...
Pronouncement Oracles were God's word to a situation or a person even though no word (from God had been sought. (But, see comments below on Balaam's Oracle. ) The pronouncement Oracles were sometimes brief as when Elijah foretold a drought in Israel (1 Kings 17:1 ). The message could be long; thus the whole Book of Malachi is a pronouncement Oracle. This kind of Oracle usually told what was going to happen. In that sense, many of the prophecies in the Old Testament were pronouncement Oracles. ...
Pronouncement Oracles were given to produce an effect. With that in mind, the pronouncement Oracles against foreign nations form a special group. ...
Balaam's Oracle (Numbers 24:1 ) is a special case. God did not allow this but gave Balaam an Oracle of blessing to pronounce. Balaam's Oracle, then, was positive and sought—a positive pronouncement Oracle. Oracles came either in response to human questions or when God wished to make His views known to produce a change. ...
How Were Oracles Given or Received? Oracles were given through special people. Although anyone could seek a word from God and many, such as Gideon or Abraham, received an Oracle directly; these divine communications usually came through either priests, prophets, or prophetesses. These two groups seemed to have their own specific ways of receiving Oracles. God's giving of an Oracle to a man or woman made them a prophet; for, when the divine word came, the prophet had to speak (Amos 3:8 ). ...
Different methods were used by priests and prophets to receive the two forms of Oracles, although we should not try to make too rigid a distinction. Decision Oracles often came through the use of objects. ...
Decision Oracles could also come through a person without the use of any objects. In 1 Kings 22:1 , a dramatic conflict arose while the kings of Judah and Israel together sought a decision Oracle. Prophets did sometimes use music as a means of receiving a decision Oracle as did Elisha (2 Kings 3:15 ). ...
Frequently, the Old Testament gives no indication as to how God communicated His pronouncement Oracles to His prophet or priest. Nahum and Habakkuk wrote of a vision or of seeing their Oracles (Nahum 1:1 ; Habakkuk 1:1 ). Through Jeremiah, God condemned those prophets who relied on dreams to receive an Oracle (Jeremiah 23:23-32 ). Several times God used scenes which the prophet saw as a means of giving a pronouncement Oracle. ...
Regardless of how the Oracle came, it was to be expressed to others. The priest or prophet told the Oracle to either the individual or a group. The pronouncement Oracles were often proclaimed in the city, even in a temple (Amos in Bethel and Jeremiah in Jerusalem). Many of the Oracles, though, give us no indication of where or when they were spoken. ...
Oracles which were not simply yes or no seem most often to have been given in poetic form. Though given orally in the beginning, at some time the pronouncement Oracles were written down. Whatever the case, the Oracles were given by God and preserved for us. ...
How Did People Respond to the Oracles? Again, a distinction should be made between the decision and the pronouncement Oracles. Others, who heard Oracles they had neither sought nor welcomed, may not have been as quick to accept the pronouncement (consider Elijah's words to Ahab, 1 Kings 21:20-24 ). Most often the response of those who heard or read the Oracles of God can be guessed at. First, Oracles were remembered long after their pronouncement. When Jehu killed Joram (2 Kings 9:25 ), he had the body taken to Naboth's vineyard in order that an Oracle pronounced in Ahab's day might be fulfilled. Thus, the Oracles are still functioning
Nebo - The word Nebo comes from a root that signifies "to prophesy," and therefore may stand for an Oracle. The god Bel was the Oracle of the Babylonians
Load - ...
Maśśâ' (מַשָּׂא, Strong's #4853), “utterance; Oracle. Maśśâ' means “utterance” or “oracle”: “For remember, when you and I rode side by side behind Ahab his father, how the Lord uttered this Oracle against him” (2 Kings 9:25, RSV). 23:33-38 the word appears to connote both a burden and an Oracle
Say, Utter, Affirm - In Numbers the utterances of Balaam are introduced with the formula “and he uttered his Oracle”: “The Oracle of Balaam the son of Beor, the Oracle of the man whose eye is opened” ( Oracle of David, the son of Jesse, the Oracle of the man who was raised on high, the anointed of the God of Jacob, the sweet psalmist of Israel” ( Answer - An answer is (1) an apology or defence, as 2 Timothy 4:16 ‘at my first answer no man stood by me’; so perhaps 1 Peter 3:21 ‘the answer of a good conscience’; (2) Oracle, Divine response, as Romans 11:4 ‘what saith the answer of God?’...
Mercy Seat - At both ends were two cherubim of beaten gold facing each other, and their faces bent downward towards the propitiatory; their wings overshadowed the Oracle. Before the exile, when the high priest entered the holy of holies on the Day of Atonement, he sprinkled with his finger towards the Oracle the blood of the bullock and of the he-goat offered in sacrifice on that day (Leviticus 16)
Bath-Kol - the daughter of a voice, ) an Oracle among the Jews, frequently mentioned in their books, especially the Talmud
High Priest - The chief priest of the Jews, whose special duties were to officiate on the Day of Atonement, preside over the court of judgment, and consult the Divine Oracle; his office was usually for life
Patara - A maritime city of Lycia in Asia Minor, at the mouth of the river Xanthus, celebrated for an Oracle of Apollo, who was supposed to reside here during the six winter months, and the rest of the year at Delos
Detained Before the Lord - Perhaps he was there to fulfill a vow, receive an Oracle, perform an act of penance, or to celebrate a holiday
Daphne - Daphne was famous for its fountains, its temple in honour of Apollo and Diana, its Oracle, and its right of asylum
Burden - In this last sense the Hebrew word may be rendered "oracle," "divine declaration," or "prophecy," as in Proverbs 31:31,1
Oracle - Communication - The Delphic Oracle was perhaps the most famous and exercised the greatest and most balefui influence
Agur - ]'>[3] ‘the Oracle’), which otherwise is out of place, is the name of his country ( Genesis 25:14 )
Burden - In this last sense the Hebrew word may be rendered "oracle
Bath-Kol - For, as with them, the words first opened upon in the works of that poet, was the Oracle whereby they prognosticated those future events which they desired to be informed of; so with the Jews when they appealed to Bath- Kol, the next words which they should hear drop from any one's mouth were taken as the desired Oracle
Kain - A clan mentioned in the fourth Oracle of Balaam (Numbers 24:22 ; KJV has Kenite)
Misgab - Mentioned along with Nebo and Kiriathaim in the Oracle against Moab ( Jeremiah 48:1 )
Asshur - This tribe may also be meant in Balaam's Oracle (Numbers 24:22-24 ), but a reference to Assyria is more likely
Divination - , "python"), in Greek mythology was the name of the Pythian serpent or dragon, dwelling in Pytho, at the foot of mount Parnassus, guarding the Oracle of Delphi, and slain by Apollo
Dodanim - Dodona, seat of the Oracle in Epirus, is a kindred name
Massa - The Hebrew term is used in the special sense of Oracle, especially at the beginning of prophecies of judgment (for example, Isaiah 13:1 ; Nahum 1:1 ; Habakkuk 1:1 )
Endor - Bryant derives Endor from En-Ador, signifying fons pythonis, "the fountain of light," or Oracle of the god Ador: which Oracle was probably founded by the Canaanites, and had never been totally suppressed. The ancient world had many such Oracles; the most famous of which were that of Jupiter-Ammon in Lybia, and that of Delphi in Greece: and in all of them, the answers to those who consulted them were given from the mouth of a female; who, from the priestess of Apollo at Delphi, has generally received the name of Pythia. That many such Oracles existed in Canaan, is evident from the number which Saul himself is said to have suppressed; and such a one, with its Pythia, was this at Endor. At these shrines, either as mock Oracles, contrived by a crafty and avaricious priesthood, to impose on the credulity and superstition of its followers; or, otherwise, as is more generally supposed, as the real instruments of infernal power, mankind, having altogether departed from the true God, were permitted to be deluded
Urim And Thummim - Accordingly, they derive them from the Egyptians, who consulted their lares, and had an Oracle, or teraphim, which they called Truth. The more common opinion among Christians concerning the Oracle by Urim and Thummim, and which Dr. Prideaux espouses, is, that when the high priest appeared before the veil, clothed with his ephod and breastplate, to ask counsel of God, the answer was given with an audible voice from the mercy seat, within the veil; but, it has been observed, that this account will by no means agree with the history of David's consulting the Oracle by Abiathar, 1 Samuel 23:9 ; 1 Samuel 23:11 ; 1 Samuel 30:7-8 ; because the ark, on which was the mercy seat, was then at Kirjathjearim; whereas David was in the one case at Ziklag, and in the other in the forest of Hareth. Braunius and Hottinger have adopted another opinion: they suppose, that, when Moses is commanded to put in the breastplate the Urim and Thummim, signifying lights and perfections in the plural number, it was meant that he should make choice of the most perfect set of stones, and have them so polished as to give the brightest lustre; and, on this hypothesis, the use of the Urim and Thummim, or of these exquisitely polished jewels, was only to be a symbol of the divine presence, and of the light and perfection of the prophetic inspiration; and, as such, constantly to be worn by the high priest in the exercise of his sacred function, especially in consulting the Oracle. Hales, or most holy place, was called the Oracle, 1 Kings 6:16 , because there the Lord communed with Moses, face to face, and gave him instructions in cases of legal difficulty or sudden emergency, Exodus 25:22 ; Numbers 7:89 ; Numbers 9:8 ; Exodus 33:11 ; a high privilege granted to none of his successors. After the death of Moses a different mode was appointed for consulting the Oracle by the high priest, who put on "the breastplate of judgment," a principal part of the pontifical dress, on which were inscribed the words Urim and Thummim, emblematieal of divine illumination; as the inscription on his mitre, "Holiness to the Lord," was of sanctification, Exodus 28:30-37 ; Leviticus 8:8 . The Oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c. After the Babylonish captivity, and the last of the prophets, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, the Oracle ceased; but its revival was foretold by Ezra 2:63 , and accomplished by Christ, who was himself the Oracle, under the old and new covenants, Genesis 15:1 ; John 1:1
Burden - The second sense is that of a solemn utterance, and the marginal alternative ‘oracle’ ( Isaiah 14:28 et al . ]'>[1] puts ‘oracle’ in the text and ‘burden’ in the margin), and the word-play in Jeremiah 23:33 ff. involves a reproof of the men who were disposed to regard the Oracle of God as literally a burden
Oracle - A man inquired "at the Oracle of God" by means of the Urim and Thummim in the breastplate on the high priest's ephod. The Scriptures are called "living Oracles" (Compare Hebrews 4:12 ) because of their quickening power (Acts 7:38 )
Eshtaol - (ehssh' tay ahl) Place name meaning, “asking (for an Oracle)
Kin - And the ear-deafening voice of th' Oracle, ...
Kin to Jove's thunder
Oracle - It was said of Ahithophel that his counsel was "as if a man had enquired at the Oracle of God," or at the 'word' of God. the word 'oracle' applies to the holy of holies
Oracle - Garment - It was not reserved exclusively for the pope until the 12th century, when it was called the Oracle
Anabolagium - It was not reserved exclusively for the pope until the 12th century, when it was called the Oracle
Oracle - 1: λόγιον (Strong's #3051 — Noun Neuter — logion — log'-ee-on ) a diminutive of logos, "a word, narrative, statement," denotes "a Divine response or utterance, an Oracle;" it is used of (a) the contents of the Mosaic Law, Acts 7:38 ; (b) all the written utterances of God through OT writers, Romans 3:2 ; (c) the substance of Christian doctrine, Hebrews 5:12 ; (d) the utterance of God through Christian teachers, 1 Peter 4:11 . ...
Notes: Divine "oracles" were given by means of the breastplate of the high priest, in connection with the service of the tabernacle, and the Sept
Debir - A word, an Oracle, Judges 1:11 , a place called also KIRJATH-SEPHER, a city of books; and KIRJATH-SANNAH, a city of literature, Joshua 5:15,15
Eglath-Shelishiyah - EGLATH-SHELISHIYAH occurs in an ancient Oracle against Moab, which is quoted in Isaiah 15:5 and Jeremiah 48:34
Oracle - So Moses is said by Stephen to have received the "lively Oracles" to give unto the Israelites. These Oracles contained the law, both moral and ceremonial, with all the types and promises relating to the Messiah which are to be found in the writings of Moses. The Jews were a highly privileged people in many and various respects, Romans 9:4-5 ; but the Apostle Paul mentions it as their chief advantage that "unto them were committed the Oracles of God," Romans 3:2 . The hundred and nineteenth Psalm abounds with praises of the lively Oracles, the word of the living God; it abounds with the warmest expressions of love to it, of delight in it, and the most fervent petitions for divine illumination in the knowledge of it. Such was the esteem and veneration which the faithful entertained for the lively Oracles under the former dispensation, when they had only Moses and the prophets; how, then, ought they to be prized by Christians, who have also Christ and his Apostles!...
Among the Heathen the term Oracle is usually taken to signify an answer, generally couched in very dark and ambiguous terms, supposed to be given by demons of old, either by the mouths of their idols, or by those of their priests, to the people, who consulted them on things to come. Oracle is also used for the demon who gave the answer, and the place where it was given. Seneca defines Oracles to be enunciations by the mouths of men of the will of the gods; and Cicero simply calls them, deorum oratio, the language of the gods. When they made peace or war, enacted laws, reformed states, or changed the constitution, they had in all these cases recourse to the Oracle by public authority. Also, in private life, if a man wished to marry, if he proposed to take a journey, or to engage in any business of importance, he repaired to the Oracle for counsel. Mankind have had always a propensity to explore futurity; and conceiving that future events were known to their gods, who possessed the gift of prophecy, they sought information and advice from the Oracles, which, in their opinion, were supernatural and divine communications. The institution of Oracles seemed to gratify the prevalent curiosity of mankind, and proved a source of immense wealth, as well as authority and influence, to those who had the command of them. Accordingly, every nation, in which idolatry has subsisted, had its Oracles, by means of which imposture practised on superstition and credulity. The principal Oracles of antiquity are, that of Abae, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Amphiaraus, at Oropus in Macedonia; that of the Branchidae at Didymeum: that of the camps at Lacedaemon; that of Dodona; that of Jupiter Ammon; that of Nabarca in the country of the Anariaci, near the Caspian Sea; that of Trophonius, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Chrysopolis; that of Claros, in Ionia; that of Amphilochus at Mallos; that of Petarea; that of Pella in Macedonia; that of Phaselides in Cilicia; that of Sinope in Paphlagonia; that of Orpheus's head at Lesbos, mentioned by Philostratus. But of all Oracles, the Oracle of Apollo Pythius at Delphi was the most celebrated: this was consulted in the dernier resort by most of the princes of those ages. ...
Most of the Pagan deities had their appropriate Oracles. Mercury had Oracles at Patras, upon Harmon, and in other places; Mars, in Thrace, Egypt and elsewhere; Hercules, at Cadiz, Athens, in Egypt, at Tivoli, in Mesopotamia, where he issued his Oracles by dreams, whence he was called Somnialis. Isis, Osiris, and Serapis delivered in like manner their Oracles by dreams, as we learn from Pausanias, Tacitus, Arrian, and other writers; that of Amphilochus was also delivered by dreams; the ox Apis had also his Oracle in Egypt. The gods, called Cabiri, had their Oracle in Boeotia. Diana, the sister of Apollo, had several Oracles in Egypt, Cilicia, Ephesus, &c. The fountains also delivered Oracles, for to each of them a divinity was ascribed: such was the fountain of Castalia at Delphi, another of the same name in the suburbs of Antioch, and the prophetic fountain near the temple of Ceres in Achaia. Juno had several Oracles: one near Corinth, one at Nysa, and others at different places. Saturn had Oracles in several places, but the most famous were those of Cumae in Italy, and of Alexandria in Egypt. Geryon, the three-headed monster slain by Hercules, had an Oracle in Italy near Padua, consulted by Tiberius; that of Hercules was at Tivoli, and was given by lots, like those of Praeneste and Antium. The demi-gods and heroes had likewise their Oracles, such were those of Castor and Pollux at Lacedaemon, of Amphiaraus, of Mopsus in Cilicia, of Ulysses, Amphilochus, Sarpedon in Troas, Hermione in Macedonia, Pasiphae in Laconia, Chalcas in Italy, Aristaeus in Boeotia, Autolycus at Sinope, Phryxus among the Colchi, Zamolxis among the Getae, Hephaestion the minion of Alexander, and Antinous, &c. ...
The responses of Oracles were delivered in a variety of ways: at Delphi, they interpreted and put into verse what the priestess pronounced in the time of her furor. Bayle observes that at first this Oracle gave its answers in verse; and that it fell at length to prose, upon the people's beginning to laugh at the poorness of its versification. By the railleries of these philosophers, and particularly by those of the Cynics and Peripatetics, the priests were at length obliged to desist from the practice of versifying the responses of the Pythia, which, according to Plutarch, was one of the principal causes of the declension of the Oracle of Delphos. At the Oracle of Ammon, the priests pronounced the response of their god; at Dodona, the response was issued from the hollow of an oak; at the cave of Trophonius, the Oracle was inferred from what the supplicant said before he recovered his senses; at Memphis, they drew a good or bad omen, according as the ox Apis received or rejected what was presented to him, which was also the case with the fishes of the fountain of Limyra. The suppliants, who consulted the Oracles, were not allowed to enter the sanctuaries where they were given; and accordingly, care was taken that neither the Epicureans nor Christians should come near them. In several places, the Oracles were given by letters sealed up, as in that of Mopsus, and at Mallus in Cilicia. Oracles were frequently given by lot, the mode of doing which was as follows: the lots were a kind of dice, on which were engraven certain characters or words, whose explanations they were to seek on tables made for the purpose. The ambiguity of the Oracles in their responses, and their double meaning, contributed to their support. ...
Ablancourt observes, that the study or research of the meaning of Oracles was but a fruitless thing; and that they were never understood till after their accomplishment. Historians relate, that Croesus was tricked by the ambiguity and equivocation of the Oracle:...
Κροισος Αλυν διαβας μεγαλην αρχην καταλυσει . When Trajan had formed the design of his expedition against the Parthians, he was advised to consult the Oracle of Heliopolis, to which he had no more to do but send a note under a seal. That prince, who had no great faith in Oracles, sent thither a blank note; and they returned him another of the same kind. By this Trajan was convinced of the divinity of the Oracle. The event justified the Oracle; for the emperor dying in that war, his bones were carried to Rome, which had been represented by that broken vine. As the priests of that Oracle knew Trajan's design, which was no secret, they happily devised that response, which, in all events, was capable of a favourable interpretation, whether he routed and cut the Parthians in pieces, or if his army met with the same fate. Sometimes the responses of the Oracles were mere banter, as in the case of the man who wished to know by what means he might become rich, and who received for answer from the god, that he had only to make himself master of all that lay between Sicyon and Corinth. Another, wanting a cure for the gout, was answered by the Oracle, that he was to drink nothing but cold water. ...
There are two points in dispute on the subject of Oracles; namely, whether they were human, or diabolical machines; and whether or not they ceased upon the publication or preaching of the Gospel. Most of the fathers of the church supposed that the devil issued Oracles; and looked on it as a pleasure he took to give dubious and equivocal answers, in order to have a handle to laugh at them. Vossius allows that it was the devil who spoke in Oracles; but thinks that the obscurity of his answers was owing to his ignorance as to the precise circumstances of events. Where the thing foretold did not happen accordingly, the Oracle, for-sooth, was misunderstood. Eusebius has preserved some fragments of a philosopher, called OEnomaus; who, out of resentment for his having been so often fooled by the Oracles, wrote an ample confutation of all their impertinencies: "When we come to consult thee," says he to Apollo, "if thou seest what is in futurity, why dost thou use expressions that will not be understood? Dost thou not know, that they will not be understood? If thou dost, thou takest pleasure in abusing us; if thou dost not, be informed of us, and learn to speak more clearly. If things must necessarily come to pass, why dost thou amuse us with thy ambiguities? What doest thou, wretch as thou art, at Delphi? employed in muttering idle prophecies!" But OEnomaus is still more out of humour with the Oracle, for the answer which Apollo gave the Athenians, when Xerxes was about to attack Greece with all the strength of Asia. "...
It is a very general opinion among the more learned, that Oracles were all mere cheats and impostures; either calculated to serve the avaricious ends of the Heathen priests, or the political views of the princes. Father Balthus, a Jesuit, wrote a treatise in defence of the fathers with regard to the origin of Oracles; but without denying the imposture of the priests, often blended with the Oracles. The Abbe Banier espouses the same side of the question, and objects that Oracles would not have lasted so long, and supported themselves with so much splendour and reputation, if they had been merely owing to the forgeries of the priests. Bishop Sherlock, in his "Discourses concerning the Use and Intent of Prophecy," expresses his opinion, that it is impious to disbelieve the Heathen Oracles, and to deny them to have been given out by the devil; to which assertion, Dr. Middleton, in his "Examination," &c, replies, that he is guilty of this impiety, and that he thinks himself warranted to pronounce from the authority of the best and wisest of the Heathens themselves, and the evidence of plain facts, which are recorded of those Oracles, as well as from the nature of the thing itself, that they were all mere imposture, wholly invented and supported by human craft, without any supernatural aid or interpositon whatsoever. He alleges, that Cicero, speaking of the Delphic Oracle, the most revered of any in the Heathen world, declares, that nothing was become more contemptible, not only in his days, but long before him; that Demosthenes, who lived about three hundred years earlier, affirmed of the same Oracle, in a public speech to the people of Athens, that it was gained to the interests of King Philip, an enemy to that city; that the Greek historians, tell us, how, on several other occasions, it had been corrupted by money, to serve the views of particular persons and parties, and the prophetess sometimes had been deposed for bribery and lewdness; that there were some great sects of philosophers, who, on principle, disavowed the authority of all Oracles; agreeably to all which Strabo tells us, that divination in general and Oracles had been in high credit among the ancients, but in his days were treated with much contempt; lastly, that Eusebius also, the great historian of the primitive church, declares, that there were six hundred writers among the Heathens themselves who had publicly written against the reality of them. Plutarch has a treatise on the ceasing of some Oracles; and Van Dale, a Dutch physician, has a volume to prove they did not cease at the coming of Christ; but that many of them ceased long before, and that others held till the fall of Paganism, under the empire of Theodosius the Great, when Paganism being dissipated, these restitutions could no longer subsist. Fontenelle espoused Van Dale's system, and improved upon it in his "History of Oracles;" and showed the weakness of the argument used by many writers in behalf of Christianity, drawn from the ceasing of Oracles. Cicero says, the Oracles became dumb in proportion as people, growing less credulous, began to suspect them for cheats. Plutarch alleges two reasons for the ceasing of Oracles: the one was Apollo's chagrin; who, it seems, took it in dudgeon to be interrogated about so many trifles. The other was, that in proportion as the genii, or demons, who had the management of the Oracles, died, and became extinct, the Oracles must necessarily cease. He adds a third and more natural cause for the ceasing of Oracles; namely, the forlorn state of Greece, ruined and desolated by wars; for, hence, the smallness of the gains let the priests sink into a poverty and contempt too bare to cover the fraud. That the Oracles were silenced about or soon after the time of our Saviour's advent, may be proved, says Dr. Lucan, who wrote his "Pharsalia" in the reign of Nero, scarcely thirty years after our Lord's crucifixion, laments it as one of the greatest misfortunes of that age, that the Delphian Oracle, which he represents as one of the choicest gifts of the gods, was become silent. ...
Lucian says, that when he was at Delphi, the Oracle gave no answer, nor was the priestess inspired. This likewise appears from Plutarch's treatise, why the Oracles cease to give answers, already cited; whence it is also manifest, that the most learned Heathens were very much at a loss how to give a tolerable account of it. " With respect to the origin of Oracles, they were probably imitations, first, of the answers given to the holy patriarchs from the divine presence or Shechinah, and secondly, of the responses to the Jewish high priest from the mercy seat: for all Paganism is a parody of the true religion
Dumah - Isaiah proclaimed an Oracle against Dumah (Isaiah 21:11 )
Burden - The learned are not agreed as to the force of massa in such places: its natural meaning would be 'a judgement that lies heavy on the people;' but some take its meaning to be 'an Oracle or sentence pronounced against them
Ahithophel - A Gilonite, grandfather of Bathsheba, and a very wise counsellor of David, of whom it is said that all his counsel was "as if a man had inquired at the Oracle of God
Eshtemoa - ” The name may indicate an ancient tradition of going to Eshtemoa to obtain an Oracle or word of God from a prophet or priest
Diviner's Oak - The terebinth was designated the diviner's or soothsayer's tree since persons would go to the sanctuary seeking an Oracle
Oracle - ) Any person reputed uncommonly wise; one whose decisions are regarded as of great authority; as, a literary Oracle. ) To utter Oracles
Habakkuk - ...
The BOOK OF HABAKKUK consists of three chapters, which all constitute on Oracle
Teraphim - What then were these teraphim? The Septuagint translate this word by "oracle," and sometimes by "vain figures. Some Jewish writers tell us the teraphim were human heads placed in niches, and consulted by way of Oracles
Dumah - The same place may be referred to in the obscure Oracle Isaiah 21:11 , but the LXX Rebecca - (Ῥεβέκκα)...
Rebecca, the wife of Isaac, received a Divine Oracle before the birth of her twin sons, Esau and Jacob, foretelling her that she would be the mother of two nations or peoples, of whom the elder would serve the younger (Romans 9:10-12, from Genesis 25:24-26)
Pillar - 40-41: “And for the entering of the Oracle he made doors of olive tree: the lintel [1] and side posts were a fifth part of the wall” (1 Kings 6:31)
Miletus - It was the parent of many colonies, and was celebrated for a temple and Oracle of Apollo Didymaeus, an as the birthplace of Thales, Anaximander, Democritus, and other famous men
Immanuel - Isaias in a first Oracle inculcates the doctrine that in Jehovah, but in Him alone, salvation is to be found, and declares that lack of trust in Him will involve disaster: "If you will not believe, you shall not continue. " In another Oracle, the Prophet offers to give any sign of God's protection that Achaz may ask
Emmanuel Title - Isaias in a first Oracle inculcates the doctrine that in Jehovah, but in Him alone, salvation is to be found, and declares that lack of trust in Him will involve disaster: "If you will not believe, you shall not continue. " In another Oracle, the Prophet offers to give any sign of God's protection that Achaz may ask
Olive, Olive Tree - In the temple, within the holy of holies, Solomon made two cherubim of olive wood; the doors into the Oracle were also made of the same wood
Oracle - The deity who gave or was supposed to give answers to inquiries as the Delphic Oracle. Among christians, Oracles, in the plural, denotes the communications, revelations or messages delivered by God to prophets. In this sense it is rarely used in the singular but we say, the Oracles of God, divine Oracles, meaning the Scriptures. OR'ACLE, To utter Oracles
Oracle - It is also spoken of the covering of he ark of the covenant; as if God there sat enthroned, and delivered his Oracles, 2 Samuel 16:23 . ...
Strikingly unlike the true and living Oracles of God were the famous counterfeit Oracles of numerous heathen temples. Thus Pyrrhus, king of Epirus, was encouraged to a war, with Rome, by an Oracle which was found after his defeat to foretell defeat as much as victory: Aio te, Aeacida, Romanos vincere posse
Oracle - In the literature of the Apostolic Church the word ‘oracle’ has lost its technical pagan meaning. That is probably also its meaning in 1 Peter: ‘If any man speaketh, speaking as it were Oracles of God,’ i. 16) quotes Papias as saying that ‘Matthew composed the Oracles (sc. Selwyn holds that these were the Messianic prophecies of the OT which Matthew collected (The Oracles in the New Testament, London, 1912, p
Jahaz - Isaiah's Oracle against Moab described the isolated city of Jahaz as hearing the mourning of Heshbon and Elealeh (Isaiah 15:4 )
Rephaim, Valley of - Again warned by a divine Oracle, David led his army to Gibeon, and attacked the Philistines from the south, inflicting on them another severe defeat, and chasing them with great slaughter to Gezer (q
Fame - A — 1: φήμη (Strong's #5345 — Noun Feminine — pheme — fay'-may ) originally denoted "a Divine voice, an Oracle;" hence, "a saying or report" (akin to phemi, "to say," from a root meaning "to shine, to be clear;" hence, Lat
Behemoth - This may be correct, but the Oracle which follows says nothing about the ‘beasts of the south’; either the text is corrupt or the title may have been prefixed because Rahab, another name for the chaos-monster, occurs in v
Patara - 440, and the chief Lycian god was identified with Apollo, whose celebrated Oracle at Patara gave him the title Patareus (Hor
Ekron - ...
A shrine and Oracle of Baalzebub was there, to which king Ahaziah applied for consultation in his sickness (2 Kings 1:2; 2 Kings 1:16)
Teraphim - The Syriac teraph means "to inquire" of an Oracle, Hebrew toreph "an inquirer" (Hosea 3:4-5)
Ahaziah - Ahaziah is accused of sending messengers to inquire of the celebrated Oracle at Ekron, and is said unexpectedly to have received his answer from Elijah ( 2 Kings 1:1-18 )
Ekron - Its local numen was Baal-zebub, whose Oracle Ahaziah consulted after his accident ( 2 Kings 1:2 )
Admonition - χρηματίζω in the active signifies ‘transact business’ (χρῆμα), ‘give a Divine response to one consulting an Oracle,’ ‘give Divine admonition’ (cf. This meaning of ‘Divine Oracle’ is found chiefly in the NT, with the underlying idea that the mind and heart must be suitably prepared for its reception
Balaam - At the request of Balak he changed his position again and again on the heights above the Dead Sea, in the hope of obtaining a different Oracle, but the message he had to deliver remained the same, and he foretold the future splendour of Israel ( Numbers 24:2 ff. Sent away by Balak without the reward promised to him if he would deliver an Oracle adverse to Israel, he returned to his own land. He then utters another Oracle predicting the glory of Israel and the destruction of Moah and Ammon ( Numbers 24:17-19 ). 23, with its elaborate building of altars and offering of sacrifices, seems to belong to a later date; while the constant shifting of position in the effort to secure a more favourable Oracle presents Balaam in a much more unfavourable light than before
Breastplate - It was also called the breastplate of judgment, because it had the divine Oracle of URIM and THUMMIM annexed to it. Some think they were two precious stones added to the other twelve, by the extraordinary lustre of which, God marked his approbation of a design, and, by their becoming dim, his disallowance of it; others, that these two words were written on a precious stone, or plate of gold, fixed in the breastplate; others, that the letters of the names of the tribes, were the Urim and Thummim; and that the letters by standing out, or by an extraordinary illumination, marked such words as contained the answer of God to him who consulted this Oracle. Prideaux thinks the words chiefly denote the clearness of the Oracles dictated to the high priest, though perhaps the lustre of the stones in his breastplate might represent this clearness. That the Oracles of God rejected all equivocal and enigmatical replies, which was the character of the Heathen pretended Oracles. " His own Oracle bears, therefore, an inscription which signifies lights and perfections, or the shining and the perfect; or, according to the LXX, manifestation and truth. His preaching is thus tacitly compared to the Oracles of God; theirs, to the misleading and perplexed Oracles of the Heathen
Esau - Paul (Romans 9:10-13) uses the pre-natal Oracle regarding Esau and his brother (Genesis 25:22-23) as an illustration of the principle of Divine election. The first part of the Oracle runs, ‘Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be separated from thy bowels’ (Genesis 25:23); and the Prophet’s words are, ‘Was (or ‘is,’ Revised Version margin) not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the Lord: yet I (have) loved Jacob; but Esau (have) I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave (given) his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness
Admonition, Admonish - ...
B — 3: χρηματίζω (Strong's #5537 — Verb — chrematizo — khray-mat-id'-zo ) primarily, "to transact business," then, "to give advice to enquirers" (especially of official pronouncements of magistrates), or "a response to those consulting an Oracle," came to signify the giving of a Divine "admonition" or instruction or warning, in a general way; "admonished" in Hebrews 8:5 , AV (RV, "warned"). In the case of oracular responses, the word is derived from chresmos, "an Oracle
Nahum, Theology of - ...
The themes of salvation and judgment continue into the next major section of the prophecy (1:9-2:2), where the writer magnificently interweaves Oracles of judgment and salvation. Salvation-oracles occur in 1:12-13,15, and 2:2; judgment-oracles are found in 1:9-11,14, and 2:1. ...
The interweaving judgment- and salvation-oracles are followed by a prophetic vision in which Nahum describes the future downfall of the city as if he were there. Between these two metaphorical taunts stands a woe-oracle (3:1-3). This Oracle finds its origin in a funeral ritual, but here no sympathy or sense of loss is expressed. As with the woe-oracle, the dirge has its origin in funerary mourning. Nahum speaks an Oracle of doom against Assyria, a nation that existed in the distant past. Janzen, Mourning Cry and Woe Oracle ; B
lo-Debar - Prior to the delivery of this Oracle, Lo-Debar and Karnaim had been recaptured by Jereboam II from the Arameans in a campaign blessed by God (2 Kings 14:25-28 )
lo-Debar - Prior to the delivery of this Oracle, Lo-Debar and Karnaim had been recaptured by Jereboam II from the Arameans in a campaign blessed by God (2 Kings 14:25-28 )
Urim And Thummin - When this Oracle was to be used in inquiring of the Lord, if at Jerusalem, the high-priest put on his robes, and going into the Holy Place, stood before the curtain that separated the Holy Place from the Most Holy Place; then, turning his face directly towards the ark and the mercy-seat, upon which the divine presence rested, he proposed the subject respecting which he desired "light and truth
Debir - Oracle town; sanctuary
Flowers - This is attested by the floral ornamentation on the woodwork of the Oracle (1 Kings 6:18), the folding-doors (1 Kings 6:35), and the pillars of the temple (1 Kings 7:22), the brim of the molten sea (1 Kings 7:26), and the golden candlestick (Exodus 25:31; Exodus 25:33)
Phin'Ehas - In this capacity he is introduced as giving the Oracle to the nation during the whole struggle with the Benjamites on the matter of Gibeah
Egypt - ...
God speaks of his love for his people in an Oracle of the prophet Hosea: "When Israel was a child, I loved him, and out of Egypt I called my son" (11:1). In this Oracle, Egypt functions again as a place of oppression, this time under Assyria. Matthew applies the Oracle of Hosea 11 to this situation, further linking Jesus with the historic suffering of the people of God ( Matthew 2:15 )
Deborah - ...
As a prophet, Deborah summoned Barak and delivered an Oracle giving him God's instructions for a battle in the Jezreel Valley against the Canaanite army commanded by Sisera (Judges 4:6-9 ; compare Samuel in 1 Samuel 15:2-3 and the unnamed prophet in 1 Kings 20:13-15 )
Ahazi'ah - Being an idolater, he sent to inquire of the Oracle of Baalzebub in the Philistine city of Ekron whether he should recover his health
Saul - When Saul heard of the flight of the enemy he inquired of the Oracle what to do, but the rout was so apparent that he joined pursuit without the answer. As he failed to receive an answer from the Oracle, when he Inquired whether he should pursue the Philistines farther, Saul concluded that some one had sinned. An inquiry was taken to the Oracle, and the fault was found to lie with Jonathan, who confessed to having tasted honey
Abomination of Desolation - 3) that the Jewish Christians, because of a Divine Oracle, fled from Jerusalem during the early course of the siege
Siloam - John 9:7,11 , or SHILOAH, Nehemiah 3:15 Isaiah 8:6 ; a fountain and pool at the vase of the hill Ophel, near the opening of the Tyropoeon into the valley of the Kidron on the south of Jerusalem; ...
"Siloah's brook, that flowed ...
Fast by the Oracle of God
Joash or Jehoash - He had a great regard for the prophet Elisha, and visited him on his deathbed, where by a divine Oracle he was assured of three victories over the Syrians
Patara - 182), whose temple and Oracle there were only less famous than those at Delphi: ‘Pataraean Apollo who haunts the thickets of Lycia’ (Hor
Micah - Micheas is the prophet of the common folk and the villages, as Isaias was the Oracle of the court and the capital
Micheas - Micheas is the prophet of the common folk and the villages, as Isaias was the Oracle of the court and the capital
Burden - Recent translations have tended to render the word "oracle" instead of "burden
No - In Ethiopia he was adopted as the national god, and his worship was established in the Oases, especially in the Oasis of Ammon (Siwa), where his Oracle was visited by Alexander
Daniel, the Stylite - He was visited with reverence by kings and emperors as an Oracle; but discouraged all who brought complaints against their bishops
Baal Zebub - Pliny is of opinion, that the name of Achor, the god invoked at Cyrene against flies, is derived from Accaron, or Ekron, where Baal-zebub was worshipped, and where he had a famous temple and Oracle
Carmel - 78) refers to the mountain as the site of an Oracle; the Druses hold the traditional site of the sacrifice of Elijah sacred; and the mountain has given its name to the Carmelite order of friars
Judges - An examination of Exodus 18:1-27 shows that the Hebrew word for to ‘judge’ means originally to pronounce the Oracle; thus, when we read of Moses sitting to ‘judge the people’ ( Exodus 18:13 ), a reference to Exodus 18:15-16 shows that what is meant is the giving of Divine decisions: ‘… the people come unto me to inquire of God: when they have a matter they come unto me; and I judge between a man and his neighbour, and I make them know the statutes of God, and his laws’ (cf. A ‘judge’ was therefore originally a priest who pronounced Oracles; then the elders of the people became judges
Ahithophel - 'For the counsel of Ahithophel,' says the sacred writer, 'which he counselled in those days, was as if a man had inquired at the Oracle of God: so was all the counsel of Ahithophel both with David and with Absalom. But the sacred writer has already given you all that, and far more than all that, in one of his incomparably strong and satisfying sentences; it was, he says, as if a man had inquired at the Oracle of God. And it does not need an Oracle of God to tell us how Ahithophel took the ruin of his grandchild and the murder of her husband. For the counsel of Ahithophel, which he counselled in those days, was as if a man inquired at the Oracle of God; so was all the counsel of Ahithophel with Absalom as it had been wont to be with David. And with Ahithophel's head like the Oracle of God, and with his heart rankling against David like hell, the conspiracy was strong, and the people increased continually with Absalom. Yes, Ahithophel, like the Oracle of God he was, should have called to mind this psalm of David, and said: It shall be an excellent oil, which shall not break my head; for yet my prayer shall be for David in all his calamities. Where is that family? Where is that former friend? Where is he who was once to us as the Oracle of God? Where is that man, mine equal, my guide, and mine acquaintance? We took sweet counsel together, and walked unto the house of God in company
Nahum - The latter section is the actual prophecy or Oracle. ...
The Oracle proper consists also of two sections, corresponding with the division into chapters. ...
A second Oracle is contained in the third chapter, which there is no need to regard as compacted of several prophecies, but of which the unity in theme and sequence of thought is conspicuous. That Nahum was the author of the two Oracles is hardly open to question, but of late years some doubt has been thrown upon the authenticity of the prologue. This plea is followed by the statement that such a literary form points to a late origin; and consequently the prologue is held to have been composed or constructed in the post-exilic period, and prefixed as an appropriate Introduction to the Oracle of Nahum on account of its expression of the general principle of God’s avenging justice, of which the drama of Nineveh was supposed to afford a striking illustration. The language and atmosphere of the prologue are those of the succeeding Oracles. The question of the authenticity of the first chapter does not seriously affect the further question of the date at which Nahum composed the two Oracles by general consent ascribed to him. About 623 or 624 Nahum would need no great discernment to see the approaching fall of Assyria, and in the equipment and quick movements of the Medes and Scythians he would find the imagery which he uses to such good effect in his Oracles
Babylas, Bishop of Antioch - The Oracle of Apollo at Daphne, it seems, was rendered dumb by the near vicinity of St
Prophecy - It is very different from a sagacious and happy conjecture as to futurity, and from a vague and equivocal Oracle, without any certain meaning
Tomb, Grave, Sepulchre - Religious meetings were held there, and pilgrimages were made to it as to a heathen Oracle, and votive offerings gradually adorned the walls of the building erected over it
Kenites - Observe here that the Oracle on the Kenites follows closely upon that on the Amalekites)
Vision(s) - Sometimes a prophetic sermon is introduced as a burden (or "oracle, " massa, ). But even this is something that the prophet "sees, " usually using the term haza [ Habakkuk 1:1 ; NIV's "the Oracle that Habakkuk the prophet received" )
Oracle - Learned men are much divided as to the source of these Oracles. ...
And since it cannot be proved either impossible or unscriptural, is it not probable that God sometimes permits an intercourse with infernal spirits, with a design, in the end, to turn this and every other circumstance to his own glory? Respecting the cessation of these Oracles, there have been a variety of opinions. It has been generally held, indeed, that Oracles ceased at the birth of Jesus Christ: yet some have endeavoured to maintain the contrary, by showing that they were in being in the days of Julian, commonly called the apostate, and that this emperor himself consulted them; nay, farther, say they, history makes mention of several laws published by the Christian emperors, Theodosius, Gratian, and Valentinian, to punish persons who interrogated them, even in their days; and that the Epicureans were the first who made a jest of this superstition, and exposed the roguery of its priests to the people. Whether Oracles became extinct immediately upon the birth of Christ, or from the very moment he was born; but, Whether they fell gradually into disesteem, and ceased as Christ and his Gospel became known to mankind? And that they did so is most certain from the concurrent testimonies of the fathers, which whoever would endeavour to invalidate, may equally give up the most respectable traditions and relations of every kind. ...
2dly, But did not Julian the apostate consult these Oracles? We answer in the negative: he had, indeed, recourse to magical operations, but it was because Oracles had already ceased; for he bewailed the loss of them, and assigned pitiful reasons for it; which St. The Christian emperors do, indeed, seem to condemn the superstition and idolatry of those who were still for consulting Oracles; but the edicts of those princes do not prove that Oracles actually existed in their times, any more than that they ceased in consequence of their laws. Some Epicureans might make a jest of this superstition; however, the Epicurean philosopher Celsus, in the second century of the church, was for crying up the excellency of several Oracles, as appears at large from Origen's seventh book against him. Among the Jews there were several sorts of real Oracles. They had, ...
first, Oracles that were delivered viva voice; as when God spake to Moses face to face, and as one friend speaks to another, Numb. ...
Fourthly, The Oracle of the Urim and Thummim, which was accompanied with the ephod, or the pectoral worn by the high priest, and which God had endued with the gift of foretelling things to come, Numb. The scripture affords us examples likewise of profane Oracles. This dialogue clearly proves these two things; first, that the devil could do nothing by his own power; and, secondly, that, with the permission of God, he could inspire the false prophets, sorcerers, and magicians, and make them deliver false Oracles. article Oracle
Sheol - ]'>[1] root sha’al (‘to consult an Oracle’), and shilu (‘chamber’)
Divination - Intuitive types of divination in the ancient Near East involved Oracles, prophecies, and dreams. The Bible supposes that a priority rests on revelatory forms (dream, vision, Oracle) rather than on inductive ones (Urim/ Thummim, ephod)
Elijah - But the answer-ὁ χρηματισμός, the Divine Oracle-proved him to be the victim of a morbid fancy, and brought him back to facts
Antioch - The grove at Daphne, planted by Seleucus, which, with its temple and Oracle, presented, during the reigns of the Macedonian kings of Syria, the most splendid and fashionable place of resort for Pagan worship in the east, had sunk into neglect since the establishment of Christianity. The altar of the god was deserted, the Oracle was silenced, and the sacred grove itself defiled by the interment of Christians
Rebekah - Before their birth Rebekah received the Oracle from Jehovah, that two nations were in her womb and that the elder should serve the younger
Church: Her Glory in Tribulation - re greater than all the waters of Israel, and the proud ones of the earth despise that brook which flows 'hard by the Oracle of God,' because her waters go softly and in solitary places; but when the church advances over the steeps of opposition, and is dashed adown the crags of persecution, then, in her hour of sorrow, her glory is revealed
Obadiah, Book of - Obadiah's Oracle responded to an underlying impassioned prayer of lament, like Psalm 74:1 , Psalm 79:1 , or 137, in which Judah appealed to God to act as providential trial Judge and Savior to set right the situation
Gibeah - " Saul first called the muster roll to discover the absentees; next he consulted the Oracle of God; but when the noise in the Philistine host increased, with irreverent impatience (Isaiah 28:16) he desired the priest to stop the consultation, and put himself at the head of the people who, now that the Philistines fled, flocked to him from all their hiding places in Mount Ephraim
Bless - Upon these occasions, the patriarchs enjoyed a divine illumination; and under its influence, their benediction was deemed a prophetic Oracle, foretelling events with the utmost certainty, and extending to the remotest period of time
Answer - ...
A — 3: χρηματισμός (Strong's #5538 — Noun Masculine — chrematismos — khray-mat-is-mos' ) "a Divine response, an Oracle," is used in Romans 11:4 , of the answer given by God to Elijah's complaint against Israel
Rest - The inspired Oracle in Psalms 95 speaks of a ‘rest’ of God
Caesarea - Not all the oratory of Tertullus; not the clamour of his numerous adversaries; not even the countenance of the most profligate of tyrants, availed against the firmness and intrepidity of the Oracle of God
Philippi - The Satriae tribe had the Oracle of Dionysus, the Thracian prophet god
Remove, Depart - 23:7), to declare (an Oracle; 2 Kings 9:25), to slander ( Answer - Paul, discussing the despair of Elijah, asks ‘What saith the answer (χρηματισμός, ‘Divine Oracle’) of God unto him?’...
The passages with which we are most concerned, however, ate those which speak of the Christian answer or ‘defence’ (so usually in Revised Version ) against critics from within or without the Church (ἀπολογέομαι, ἀπολογία)
Obadiah, Theology of - Imagine their relief when he addressed them in this Oracle not only with words of encouragement, but even using his special, intimate, covenant name
House - Elsewhere this noun signifies God’s temple in Jerusalem: “And against the wall of the house he built chambers round about, against the walls of the house round about, both of the temple and of the Oracle …” (1 Kings 6:5)
Psalms, Book of - The basic pattern includes an invocation of God, a description of the petitioner's complaint(s), a recalling of past salvation experiences (usually community laments), petitions, a divine response (or Oracle), and a concluding vow of praise. They may have included an Oracle for the king
Urim And Thummim - These denote the two essential parts of the sacred Oracle by which in early times the Hebrews sought to ascertain the will of God
Altar - In an Oracle against Israel (Amos 3:14 ), God declared that "the horns of the altar will be cut off and fall to the ground
Impostors - ...
Of the great number of impostors of the 2nd and 3centuries and onward, may be mentioned: ...
Alexander of Abonoteichos, called the Oracle-monger, the most notorious impostor of the 2century
the Greek mountebank, Marcus
possibly the women, Priscilla and Maximilla
a fanatic of the 6th century mentioned by Saint Gregory of Tours
Adelbert and Clement, who opposed Saint Boniface in Germany c
Carmel - Tacitus mentions that ages afterward Vespasian went there to consult the Oracle which was without image or temple, and with "only an altar and reverential sanctity" attached to the place
Zechariah, Book of - In Matthew 9:1 to Matthew 11:2 the Oracle is one of doom upon Israel’s neighbours, with promises of dominion and prosperity for Israel, restored to her land. It is evident that the closing Oracle of this collection appended to Zechariah carries us far into ‘the night of legalism
Micah, Theology of - Each cycle begins with judgment-oracles against the nation for having failed to keep the Mosaic covenant, followed by salvation-oracles based on God's promises to Abraham and the patriarchs to be their god foreverso reflecting both aspects of the Lord's covenant with Israel. In these four Oracles Micah predicts Israel's exile, but looking beyond the judgment, he concludes the first cycle with a prophecy that the Lord will preserve a remnant with him as their triumphant King (2:12-13). ...
In the second cycle (3:1-5:16), Micah delivers three Oracles of judgment against Jerusalem's corrupt leaders: the avaricious magistrates, who cannibalize their subjects (3:1-4); the greedy prophets, who should be the nation's watchdogs but only wag their tails if fed a bone (3:5-7); and all the leaders, rulers, prophets, and priests (3:8-11), who are in cahoots to plunder their subjects. Micah concludes these Oracles with the climactic prediction that Jerusalem will fall (3:12; cf. ...
The prophet follows this law suit with yet another Oracle of judgment (6:9-16). In the final judgment Oracle (7:1-7) the ship of state breaks apart. ...
As God's justice informs Micah's judgment-oracles and his righteousness the salvation-oracles, so God's other sublime attributes inform both. Clowney, Dreams, Visions and Oracles ; K
Diocletian, Emperor - He consulted haruspices and augurs as to the success of his enterprises, and in more difficult emergencies the Oracle of the Milesian Apollo at Branchidae (Lactant. One of the haruspices was accordingly sent to the Oracle of the Milesian Apollo at Branchidae. The answer came, not from the priestess only, but, as it were, from the god himself speaking from the recesses of his cave, telling him that the presence of the self-styled "just ones" on the earth made it impossible for the Oracles to speak the truth
Divination - This was the prophetic Oracle at Delphi, held to be the centre and focus of Gentile divination. An evil spirit connected with that Oracle possessed this young woman
Jacob - Hales on this transaction implicate Isaac also:—Thirty-seven years after, when Jacob was seventy-seven years old, according to Abulfaragi, and Isaac a hundred and thirty-seven, when he was old, and his sight had failed, and he expected soon to die, his partiality for Esau led him to attempt to set aside the Oracle, and the cession of Esau's birthright to Jacob, by conferring on him the blessing of Abraham, in reward for bringing him savoury venison to eat, before his death. ...
According to this view, all the parties were more or less culpable; Isaac, for endeavouring to set aside the Oracle which had been pronounced in favour of his younger son; but of which he might have an obscure conception; Esau, for wishing to deprive his brother of the blessing which he had himself relinquished; and Rebekah and Jacob, for securing it by fraudulent means, not trusting wholly in the Lord
Temple, Solomon's - " ...
The temple consisted of, ...
The Oracle or most holy place (1 Kings 6:19 ; 8:6 ), called also the "inner house" (6:27), and the "holiest of all" (Hebrews 9:3 )
Sibylline Oracles - Hofmann (see below) accepts the first part of (a), but makes the word a composite from σιός and ἵλλαος = ἱλαος (ἵλεως), meaning ‘God-appeasing,’ or ‘God-reconciling,’ with reference to the aim of the primitive Sibylline Oracles. Primitive tradition located the original Sibyl at Erythrae, but the most famous Sibyl resided at Cumae, the old Greek settlement in Campania, though it is probable that the Sibylline Oracles which came to Rome from Cumae had reached the latter city from Erythrae. Oracles of this kind absorbed forgeries of a more or less political aim, and the authorized collection had to be purged from time to time. ]'>[11] who were officially responsible for the interpretation of the Oracles and for the application of their mysterious commands to the national life. These Roman Oracles originally were not so much predictions of woes to come, like apocalyptic tracts, as explanations of what was required to avert the anger of the gods and ward off evil to the State on earth. This put considerable power into the hands of the officials who had charge of them, especially as the obscurity of their contents made the sense of certain passages conveniently ambiguous, and it is not surprising to find that, as time went on, their reputation suffered in the same way as the Greek Oracles; the Roman, like the Greek, Sibyllina might ‘philippize’; genuine lines might be interpreted for private ends, if a political leader could influence the expositors, and forged lines could be surreptitiously introduced. Still, for two centuries at least, these Oracles had a singular power over the religious hopes and fears of the people. must not be allowed to count unduly against the esteem which was still felt for the Oracles. 270, when the Alemanni invaded Italy, the Senate hesitated to consult the Sibyllina, and Aurelian had to incite them (Vopiscus, Vita Aureliani, 20); the Emperor taunted them with behaving as if they were in a Christian church-a significant indication of the changed attitude towards these Oracles! Their use lingered down to the age of Julian. ]'>[13] ...
Besides the official collection, however, Sibylline Oracles passed current in large numbers among the people. Lactantius, who has preserved several important data on the subject, declares that only the Cumaean Sibyl’s Oracles, amounting to three books, were kept secret, [19] The Church appropriated them, appealed to them, edited them in her own interests, composed fresh ones, and, in general, treated the Jewish Sibylline Oracles much as the Alexandrian Jews had treated the pagan ones. The Sibylline Oracles are a conglomerate of documents, ranging from the 2nd cent
Gift, Giving - Gifts were expected in consulting a prophet or Oracle ( Num 22:1-41 , 1 Samuel 9:7 , 2Ki 5:5 , 2 Kings 8:9 , Daniel 5:17 )
Habakkuk - The prophet, retiring to his watch-tower, whence he looks out over the world, to see it in ruins, receives an Oracle which he is bidden to write down on tablets for all to read
Ammonites - See for example Amos' Oracle against the Ammonites in 1 Kings 11:1
Death - You behold Moses and Aaron bearing the ark of the covenant; David and Elijah presenting the Oracle of testimony. This was the hour of Christ's triumph over all the powers of darkness; the hour in which he overthrew dominions and thrones, led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men; then it was that the foundation of every pagan temple shook; the statue of every false god totterd on its base; the priest fled from his falling shrine, and the heathen Oracles became dumb for ever!...
This was the hour when our Lord erected that spiritual kingdom which is never to end
Scribes - When, however, there were no inspired teachers in Israel, no divine Oracle in the temple, the scribes presumed to interpret, expound, and comment, upon the law and the prophets in the schools and in the synagogues
Isaiah - ...
A Collection of Prophetic Oracles (Isaiah 28–35 ) Since five in this series of prophecies commence with an introductory “woe,” it suggests that much of this block of materials will be negative in its criticism. ...
Isaiah 29-35 are largely directed to Judah; elements of severe censure are often followed by Oracles of comfort. The conclusion of this segment includes the juxtaposition of a negative Oracle against Edom, here symbolic of evil, with a paradisiacal contrast involving Israel ( Isaiah 34-35 ). ...
The Concluding Prophetic Oracles (Isaiah 56–66 )...
Its Historical Setting. The subjects handled in this section include an Oracle on sabbath keeping (Isaiah 56:1-8 ), censure of civil and religious leaders (Isaiah 56:9-57:12 ), an analysis of the meaning of fasting (Isaiah 58:1 ), the dilemma of the unfulfilled divine promises (Isaiah 59:1 ), hopeful encouragement to be anticipated (Isaiah 60-64 ), the grievous sin of Judah and the blessedness of the righteous remnant (Isaiah 65:1 ), and brief fragments on a number of subjects (Isaiah 66:1 )
King - Saul was elected by the divine Oracle from an obscure family, so that all saw his authority was held solely at God's pleasure
Magic - The biblical writers banned all of the foreign techniques employed for divinatory Oracles (Leviticus 20:6,27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 ; 2 Kings 23:24 ; Isaiah 2:6 ; 8:19 ; 57:3 ; Ezekiel 13:17 ), including hydromancy (Genesis 44:5,15 ) and astrology (Isaiah 47:13 ; Jeremiah 10:2 ). pneuma python normally a spirit connected with the Delphic Oracle Acts 16:16 ) was forced to acknowledge Jesus, but the apostles did not accept this testimony because of the ungodly source
Priest - ...
God also appropriated to the high priest the Oracle of his truth; so that when he was habited in the proper ornaments of his dignity, and with the Urim and Thummim, he answered questions proposed to him, and God disclosed to him secret and future things
Temple - ]'>[7] ‘ Oracle ’) or most holy place , which was only 20 cubits by 20 ( 1 Kings 6:20 ). The same position ‘before the Oracle ’ ( dĕbîr 1 Kings 7:23-26 ) is assigned to the ten ‘candlesticks,’ properly lampstands (Tabernacle, § 6 ( b )), five probably being meant to stand on either side of the entrance
Messiah - The Oracle spoken by Nathan (2 Samuel 7:12-16 ) is important since it centers the hope of Israel on the dynasty of David for succeeding generations
Remnant - ...
Remnant and the Oracle of Judgment . ...
Remnant and Oracles of Salvation . Oracles of salvation may follow immediately on the heels of announcements of judgment, and paradoxically, both entail a remnant
Mennonites - Menno was a man of genius, though not of a very sound judgment: he possessed a natural and persuasive eloquence, and such a degree of learning as made him pass for an Oracle in the estimation of the multitude
Descent Into Hades - section of the Sibylline Oracles (i. ’ More explicit is an Oracle quoted both by Justin* Serpent - Bryant, seems to have been named from the worship then instituted; for Endor is compounded of En-ador, and signifies fons pithonis, the "fountain of lights," the Oracle of the god Ador; which Oracle was probably founded by the Canaanites, and had never been totally suppressed
Divination - Consultation of idols' Oracles is referred to in 2 Kings 1:2-6. The only true "oracle" (debir ) was the holy of holies (1 Kings 6:16; Psalms 28:2); previously, consultation of the Lord through the priest with the ephod (2 Samuel 2:1; 2 Samuel 5:23). Our "oracles" are the Holy Scriptures (Acts 7:38; Romans 3:2)
Elijah - ...
Elijah appeared on the scene without warning, introduction, or genealogy (1 Kings 17:1 ) to deliver an Oracle to Ahab announcing a drought, presumably a punishment for defection to the Baal cult
Benedictus - ’ It is evident that Zacharias has in his mind the history of Melchizedek (Genesis 14) and the Oracle, even then ascribed to the pen of David, which forms so important a commentary on that history (Psalms 110)
Philistim - How is the wrath of man made to praise his Creator! Hath he not said, and shall he not do it? The Oracle was delivered by the mouth of the prophet more than five hundred years before the Christian era, and we beheld its accomplishment eighteen hundred years after that event
Nineveh - ...
The threatened overthrow of Nineveh within three days, was, by the general repentance and humiliation of the inhabitants, from the highest to the lowest, suspended for near two hundred years, until "their iniquity came to the full;" and then the prophecy was literally accomplished, in the third year of the siege of the city, by the combined Medes and Babylonians; the king, Sardanapalus, being encouraged to hold out in consequence of an ancient prophecy, that Nineveh should never be taken by assault, till the river became its enemy; when a mighty inundation of the river, swollen by continual rains, came up against a part of the city, and threw down twenty stadia of the wall in length; upon which, the king, conceiving that the Oracle was accomplished, burned himself, his concubines, eunuchs, and treasures; and the enemy, entering by the breach, sacked and rased the city, about B
Jacob - The Oracle Rebekah received (Genesis 25:23 ) probably encouraged her to counter Isaac's will and to gain the blessing for her favorite son by fraud
Altar - The altar of incense also was close by the second veil, directly before the ark (1 Kings 6:22), "by (Hebrew belonging to) the Oracle," i
Temple - The height 30 cubits, twice the whole height of the tabernacle (15 cubits) measuring from its roof, but the Oracle 20 cubits (double the height of the tabernacle walls, 10 cubits), making perfect cube like that of the tabernacle, which was half, i. ten each way; the difference between the height of the Oracle and that of the temple, namely, ten cubits, was occupied by the upper rooms mentioned in 2 Chronicles 3:9, overlaid with pure gold
Wandering Stars - Whether this was in consequence of the apocalyptic Oracle preserved in the Synoptic tradition, or whether this Oracle reflects to some extent the course of affairs, it is not easy to say
Poetry - Thus, for emotions as diverse as laments, Oracles of judgment, and paeans of praise, poetry is perfectly suited. In the prophetic Oracle of judgment, the reader senses the fury of God's wrath, effectively communicating nuances of God's emotions ranging from cajolery to sarcasm
Psalms, Theology of - They differ from prophetic Oracles, moral imperatives, or propositional statements of doctrine that presuppose a revelatory flow from God to humans. Another conjecture is that petitioners may have received a favorable Oracle, presumably mediated by a priest or other cult official, in response to their supplication. Unfortunately, no example of such an Oracle exists in the canonical psalms. As in the Oracles of the prophets, the emphasis in these psalms is on integrity and moral purity as defined by the Sinai covenant rather than merely on ritual purity and sacrifices
High Place, Sanctuary - Thither were brought the tithes and other thankofferings for the good gifts of God; thither men resorted to consult the priestly Oracle , to inquire of the ‘Lord’ in cases of difficulty; and there justice was administered in the name of J″ Lots - ...
‘Among the Hebrews in the oldest times the typical form of divine decision was by the lot, or other such Oracle at the sanctuary
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - His meaning is evident: he is not professing to act as the sole supreme judge and Oracle of Christendom, or as the mouthpiece of the Catholic church; he announces his resolution, in concert with the Alexandrian church, to break off all communion with the bp
Inspiration - They are called "the Oracles of God" (Romans 3:2), i. " As our Lord promised the disciples His Holy Spirit, to teach them how and what they should say before magistrates (Matthew 10:19-20), much more did the Spirit "abiding" with the church "for ever" (John 14:16) secure for the written word, the only surviving infallible Oracle, the inspiration of the manner as well as the matter
Gifts - Paul himself, the fitness being authenticated to the Apostle by a prophetic Oracle or message, and consecrated by a solemn act of benediction-the laying on of the hands of the body of elders
Saul - )...
By slaying the priests, so that Abiathar alone escaped to David, Saul's sin recoiled on himself, for Saul thereby supplied him whom he hated with one through whom to consult Jehovah, and deprived himself of the divine Oracle, so that at last he had to have recourse to witchcraft, though he had himself tried to extirpate it (1 Samuel 23:2; 1 Samuel 23:9; 1 Samuel 28:3-7, etc
Zechariah, Theology of - ), references to Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the Davidic governor, encouragement to rebuild the temple, and a mixture of Oracles and visions. Many scholars also connect the second section of Zechariah with Malachi because Zechariah 9-11 , Zechariah 12-14 , and Malachi all begin with the word "oracle
Lots - ...
‘Among the Hebrews in the oldest times the typical form of divine decision was by the lot, or other such Oracle at the sanctuary
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - ...
Early descriptions of the day are found in the Oracles against the nations. Joel addresses an Oracle to the earth, calling on it not to fear, and promises that it will be fertile and productive (2:22) so that threshing floors will be filled with grain and vats will overflow with new wine (2:24)
Messiah - On the other hand, the reign of Josiah reawakened the hopes of the faithful adherents of Jahweh, and it is significant that Messianic expectation revives in the Oracles of Jeremiah. Zechariah 3:8; Zechariah 6:12 are badly corrupted, and later editors have sought to eliminate the name of Zerubbabel from the original Oracle, because Zechariah’s prophecies with respect to him were not fulfilled. Thus Jeremiah 33:14-24 is regarded by most critics as a later addition to the Oracles of Jeremiah (see, e. This prophet was an earnest student of Israel’s past, and read its records and its Oracles
Zechariah, the Book of - Doubtless because Zechariah had before his mind Jeremiah 18:1-2; Jeremiah 32:6-12; Zechariah's prophecy is but a reiteration of the fearful Oracle of Jeremiah 18-19, about to be fulfilled in the destruction of the Jewish nation
Prophet - spokesman: Jeremiah 13:1-10) of God's will (the mantis was the inspired unconscious utterer of Oracles which the prophet interpreted); so in Scripture the divinely inspired revealer of truths be fore unknown. Their utterances being continued at intervals throughout their lives (as Isaiah in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah) show that they did not earn their reputation as prophets by some one happy guess or Oracle, but maintained their prophetical character continuously; which excludes the probability of imposture, time often detecting fraud
Plagues of Egypt - ...
"For when all things were wrapt in still silence, ...
And night, in her proper speed, holding her mid course, Thy all powerful Oracle leapt down from heaven, ...
Out of the royal throne, a fierce warrior, ...
Into the midst of the land of destruction, Wielding a sharp sword, thine unfeigned command, ...
And standing up, he filled the whole with death, ...
He touched the heavens, indeed, but trod upon the earth!" ...
"And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and he called for," or sent to, "Moses and Aaron by night, and said, Get you forth from among my people, both ye and the children of Israel; and go, serve the Lord, as ye said; take also your flocks and your herds, and be gone; and bless me also
Conscience - -Some intuitionalists have held that conscience, being an infallible Oracle, is incapable of education; and Kant’s famous utterance, ‘An erring conscience is a chimera’ (op
Amos, Theology of - Like all biblical prophets, Amos spoke the Oracles of Yahweh, Israel's God, to people in a particular context. In this he is comparable to other prophets whose utterances include Oracles about foreign nations (cf. Most of these Oracles are judgment pronouncements. ...
Amos's purpose in uttering Oracles about nations beyond the borders of eighth-century Israel is not only to declare the impending punishment of others who have been disloyal to Yahweh. ...
The phrase that introduces this section, "In that day" (9:11), associates the events described in this salvation Oracle with the eschatological day of Yahweh
Son of God - , an ancient Oracle is quoted in which Jehovah says of King David, ‘He shall cry unto me, Thou art my Father, my God, and the rock of my salvation; also I will make him my firstborn, higher than the kings of the earth
Jeremiah - To deprive Jeremiah of the New-Covenant Oracle (as B
Elijah - Sending to consult concerning his recovery the Philistine Oracle of Baalzebub at Ekron, he learned from his messengers that a man met them saying, "Is it not because there is not a God in Israel that thou sendest to inquire of Baalzebub the god of Ekron? therefore thou shalt not come down,
Trial-at-Law - Disputed cases were brought before the headman or leader of the people, who, in his combined capacity of priest and judge, submitted them to God (for decision by Oracle, oath, or ordeal), and in His name gave authoritative sentence (cf
Messiah - In the Sibylline Oracles the figure of the Messiah again is not distinct, but there is a picture (III. 4, where it is said: ‘What most stirred them up to war was the ambiguous Oracle that was found also in their sacred writings Expiation - " Thus, by their very law, and by constant usage, were the Jews familiarized to the notion of expiatory sacrifice, as well as by the history contained in their sacred books, especially in Genesis, which speaks of the vicarious sacrifices offered by the patriarchs; and in the book of Job, in which that patriarch is said to have offered sacrifices for the supposed sins of his sons; and where Eliphaz is commanded, by a divine Oracle, to offer a burnt offering for himself and his friends, "lest God should deal with them after their folly
Originality - Augustus was the prince of peace who healed the wounds of the Civil War; Tiberius, the servant of the community; Caligula, the god-man and world-judge; Nero, the philanthropist who dedicated himself to the service of humanity; Vespasian caused the Jewish Oracle, which had called him to be ruler of the world, to be carried before his legions; Nerva and his successors gave to the Roman world an example of mildness and tranquillity