What does Onycha mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וּשְׁחֵ֙לֶת֙ onycha. 1

Definitions Related to Onycha

H7827


   1 Onycha.
      1a an ingredient used in the holy incense.
      

Frequency of Onycha (original languages)

Frequency of Onycha (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Onycha
A nail; claw; hoof, (Heb. sheheleth; Exodus 30:34 ), a Latin word applied to the operculum, i.e., the claw or nail of the strombus or wing-shell, a univalve common in the Red Sea. The opercula of these shell-fish when burned emit a strong odour "like castoreum." This was an ingredient in the sacred incense.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Onycha
ONYCHA ( shĕchçleth , Exodus 30:34 ). One of the ingredients of the sacred composition which gave a sweet smell when burned (cf. Sir 24:15 , where apparently the same substance is referred to as onyx ). Onycha was obtained from the claw-like [1] operculum of some mollusc of the genus strombus . A similar product is still used in Upper Egypt for fumigations.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Onycha
An ingredient of the anointing unguent (Exodus 30:34). Shechecleth means literally, "a shell or scale", the horny cap of a shell. The operculum or "cover" of the strombus or "wing shell", which abounds in the Red Sea, is employed in compounding perfume, and was the medicine named blatta Βyzantina or unguis odoratus in the middle ages. Pliny (H. N. 32:46) and Dioscorides (Matthew Med. 2:11) mention a "shell", onyx , "both a perfume and a medicine"; "odorous because the shell fish feed on the nard, and collected when the heat dries up the marshes; the best kind is from the Red Sea, whitish and shining; the Babylonian is darker and smaller; both have a sweet odor when burnt, like castoreum ." The onyx "nail" refers to the clawlike shape of the operculum of the strombus genus; the Arabs call this mollusk "devil's claw." Shell fish were unclean; hence, Gosse conjectures a gum resin.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Onycha
One of the ingredients of the holy 'perfume' which was burnt as incense. Exodus 30:34 . The Hebrew is shecheleth; onycha is from the Greek ὄνυξ, 'nail or claw,' and it is supposed to refer to the operculum or claw of one or more species of the Strombus , a shell fish: the claw gave a sweet odour when burnt.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Onycha
(ahn' ih chaw) A spice probably derived from the closing flaps or the shell of a Red Sea mollusk which was used in the incense reserved for the worship of Yahweh (Exodus 30:34 ).
Webster's Dictionary - Onycha
(1):
(n.) An ingredient of the Mosaic incense, probably the operculum of some kind of strombus.
(2):
(n.) The precious stone called onyx.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Onycha
An ingredient of the sacred incense, whose fragrance perfumed the sanctuary alone, Exodus 30:34 . It is conjectured to mean the Blatta Bryzantina of the shops; an article which consists of the cover or lid of a species of muscle, and when burnt emits a musky odor. The best onycha is found in the Red Sea, and is white and large.
King James Dictionary - Onycha
ON'YCHA, n. from Gr. Supposed to be the odoriferous shell of the onyxfish, or the onyx. Exodus 30 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Onycha,
spoken of in (Exodus 30:34 ) was one of the ingredients of the sacred perfume. It consists of the shells of several kinds of mussels, which when burned emit a strong odor.

Sentence search

Onyx - See Jewels and Precious Stones, Onycha
Onycha - Onycha ( shĕchçleth , Exodus 30:34 ). Onycha was obtained from the claw-like Stacte - The gum of the storax tree which was combined with Onycha, galbanum, and frankincense to make the incense to be burned in the tabernacle (Exodus 30:34 )
Onycha - The Hebrew is shecheleth; Onycha is from the Greek ὄνυξ, 'nail or claw,' and it is supposed to refer to the operculum or claw of one or more species of the Strombus , a shell fish: the claw gave a sweet odour when burnt
Onycha - The best Onycha is found in the Red Sea, and is white and large
Incense - In connection with the tabenacle, the "incense" was to be prepared from stacte, Onycha, and galbanum, with pure frankincense, an equal weight of each; imitation for private use was forbidden, Exodus 30:34-38
Perfume - It was compounded of stacte, Onycha, galbanum, and frankincense, an equal weight of each: it was most holy
Incense - The incense used in the Jewish offerings was a mixture of sweet spices, stacte, Onycha, galbanum, and the gum of the frankincense tree
Incense - The holy incense ( Exodus 30:34 ) was made of stacte, Onycha, galbanum, and frankincense, but the incense of later times, which was offered daily ( Jdt 9:1 , Luke 1:8-10 ), was more complicated
Spice, Spices - In the first passage the ‘sweet spices’ are enumerated as stacte, Onycha, and galbanum (all of which see)
Incense - It was a compound of sweet spices: stacte, Onycha, galbanum, and pure frankincense, an equal weight of each
Incense - The incense employed in the service of the tabernacle walls compounded of the perfumes stacte, Onycha, galbanum and pure frankincense
Spices - Among these spices were frankincense, myrrh, galbanum, stacte, Onycha, cassia, aloes, cummin, dill, cinnamon, mint, rue, mustard, balm, sweet cane, henna, nard, saffron and calumus (Genesis 37:25; Exodus 30:23-24; Exodus 30:34; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 4:13-14; Jeremiah 6:20; Matthew 23:23; Luke 11:42; Luke 13:19)
Ointment - Matthew 4:13-14 ; Mark 14:3 ; KJV: “spikenard”), frankincense (KJV: “incense”; Isaiah 60:6 ; Matthew 2:11 ); balsam or balm (Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ); cassia (Exodus 30:24 ; Ezekiel 27:19 ), calamus (Exodus 30:23 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:14 ; NRSV: “aromatic cane”), cinnamon (Exodus 30:23 ; Revelation 18:13 ), stacte (Exodus 30:34 ), and Onycha (Exodus 30:34 ). Onycha, an ingredient derived from mollusks found in the Red Sea, was used in the mixture to be burned on the altar of incense
Anoint - Though priests in general were at first anointed, afterward anointing was restricted to the high priest, called "the priest that is anointed:" the perfume used was of stacte, Onycha, and galbanum, with pure frankincense, and it was death to imitate it
Fruit - Examples include myrrh (aromatic gum of the tree/bush of Arabia, Ethiopia, and Somalia), cinnamon (of the cinnamon tree), and olive oil for the sacred oil for the tabernacle (Exodus 30:22-33 ); the fragrant spices of gum resin (the aromatic myrrh gum), Onycha (made from mollusk shells), galbanum (resin from plant roots), and frankincense (resin from a small tree/bush from Ubar, Oman) for the sacred fragrant tabernacle incense (Exodus 30:34-38 ); frankincense and myrrh given by the magi in their worship of Jesus (Matthew 2:11 ); the nard (perfume made from a Middle East plant) Mary poured out in worship on the feet of Jesus (John 12:3 ); the seventy-five-pound mixture of myrrh and aloes (aromatic resin of a Near Eastern tree) Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus used in wrapping up the body of Jesus (John 19:39-40 ) and the spices and perfumes the women took to the tomb to anoint the body of Jesus (Mark 16:1 ; Luke 23:56-24:1 )
Spices - Onycha Traditionally taken as the aromatic crushed shell of a mollusc but in light of Ugaritic plant lists probably a type of cress (Lepidium sativum)
Incense - The incense consisted of four aromatic ingredients (representing God's perfections diffused throughout the four quarters of the world): stacte (Hebrew nataph , "a drop," the gum that drops from the storax tree, Styrax officinalis , found in Syria; the benzoin, or gum benjamin, is from Java and Sumatra; the liquid storax of commerce is from a different tree, the Liquidambar Syraciflua ), Onycha (Hebrew: shecheleth , probably the cap of the wing shell, strombus , abounding in the Red Sea, used for making perfumes), galbanum (a yellowish brown gum, imported from Persia, India, and Africa), and pure frankincense (the chief of the aromatic gums: Song of Solomon 3:6; Matthew 2:11; obtained from India through the Sabeans of S