What does Onesimus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ὀνησίμῳ a Christian slave of Philemon. 1
ὀνήσιμον a Christian slave of Philemon. 1

Definitions Related to Onesimus

G3682


   1 a Christian slave of Philemon.
   Additional Information: Onesimus = “profitable or useful”.
   

Frequency of Onesimus (original languages)

Frequency of Onesimus (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Onesimus
Onesimus (o-nĕs'i-mŭs), useful. A slave of Philemon, In whose behalf Paul wrote the Epistle to Philemon. Colossians 4:9.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Onesimus
(Greek: onesimos, advantageous, profitable)
A native of Phrygia who robbed and fled from his master, Philemon, to Rome where he was converted to Christianity by Saint Paul, and thence sent back to his master with the "Epistle of Saint Paul to Philemon."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
Useful, a slave who, after robbing his master Philemon (q.v.) at Colosse, fled to Rome, where he was converted by the apostle Paul, who sent him back to his master with the epistle which bears his name. In it he beseeches Philemon to receive his slave as a "faithful and beloved brother." Paul offers to pay to Philemon anything his slave had taken, and to bear the wrong he had done him. He was accompanied on his return by Tychicus, the bearer of the Epistle to the Colossians (Philippians 1:16,18 ). The story of this fugitive Colossian slave is a remarkable evidence of the freedom of access to the prisoner which was granted to all, and "a beautiful illustration both of the character of St. Paul and the transfiguring power and righteous principles of the gospel."
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
In New Testament times, households often included slaves, and many of these slaves became Christians. One slave who became a Christian was Onesimus.
Onesimus had worked in Colossae for a man named Philemon, but he ran away and came to Rome. There he met Paul and was converted. Paul knew Philemon, so when Onesimus decided to return to his master, Paul wrote a letter to Philemon, urging him to forgive Onesimus and receive him back (Philem 10-19; for details see PHILEMON).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Onesimus
ONESIMUS . The name of the slave in whose behalf St. Paul wrote the Epistle to Philemon. As in his Epistle to the Colossians, St. Paul speaks of Onesimus as ‘one of you’ ( Colossians 4:9 ), we may infer that he was a native of Colossæ. His name means ‘profitable’ or ‘helpful’ not an uncommon name for slaves. The Apostle plays upon this word in his letter to Philemon : ‘which in time past was unprofitable, but now profitable to thee and to me’ ( Philippians 1:11 ). He ran away from his master, probably after having robbed him ( Philippians 1:18 ). He fled to Rome, the common hiding-place of criminals. There in some way he came under the influence of St. Paul, and was by him converted to Christianity ( Philippians 1:10 ). There grew up a deep affection between the two ( Philippians 1:12 ). The Apostle would gladly have kept him to minister to him ( Philippians 1:13 ), but would not do so without the consent of Philemon, and therefore sends Onesimus back with the letter to obtain his master’s forgiveness and his permission to return to St. Paul.
Morley Stevenson.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Onesimus
Profitable; useful
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
("profitable".) Philemon's runaway slave, of Colosse (Colossians 4:9, "one of you"), in whose behalf Paul wrote the epistle to Philemon: Philemon 1:10-16. Slaves were numerous in Phrygia, from whence Paul dwells on the relative duties of masters and slaves (Colossians 3:22; Colossians 4:1). Paul's "son in the faith," begotten spiritually while Paul was a prisoner at Rome, where Onesimus hoped to escape detection amidst its vast population. Onesimus doubtless had heard the gospel before going to Rome, in Philemon's household, for at Paul's third missionary tour (Acts 18:23) there were in Phrygia believers. Once unprofitable, by conversion Onesimus became really what his name implies, "profitable" to his master, to Paul, and to the church of God; "the faithful and beloved brother" of the apostle and of his master; godliness is profitable for both worlds, and makes men so (1 Timothy 4:8). Sent with Tychicus his safeguard, and put under the spiritual protection of the whole Colossian church and of Philemon. He probably had defrauded his master, as well as run away (1 Timothy 18); Paul offered to make good the loss.
The Apostolic Canons (73) make him to have been emancipated by Philemon. The Apostolic Constitutions (7:46) make him to have been consecrated bishop of Berea by Paul, and martyred at Rome. Ignatius (Ep. ad Ephes. i.) makes an Onesimus the Bishop of the Ephesians. Instead of violently convulsing society by stirring up slaves against their masters, Christianity introduces love, a principle sure to undermine slavery at last; "by christianizing the master, Christianity enfranchises the slave" (Wordsworth). Onesimus so endeared himself to Paul by Christian sympathy and by personal services that he calls him "mine own bowels," i.e. vitals: he bore for him a parent's intense affection for a child. Paul would gladly have kept him to minister to him, but delicate regard to Philemon's rights, and self denying love, made him waive his claims on Philemon and Onesimus (Philemon 1:13-14; Philemon 1:19). Onesimus "was parted" from his master "for a season" to become his "forever" in Christian bonds. In Philemon 1:20 he plays again on the name, "let me have 'profit' (Greek onaimen ) of thee in the Lord," "refresh my bowels," i.e. gratify my feelings by granting this.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
Slave of Philemon, converted when with Paul, and sent back to his master not simply as a servant, but as 'a brother beloved.' Colossians 4:9 ; Philippians 10 . Christianity did not come in to set the world right thus: Onesimus was sent back to his master, and slaves are elsewhere exhorted to be faithful to their masters; but slavery is doubtless one of the fruits of man's sin.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
(oh nehss' ih muhss) Personal name that may mean, “profitable.” The slave for whom Paul wrote his letter to Philemon. In the epistle, Paul pled with Philemon to free the servant because Onesimus had been so helpful to the apostle. Onesimus had robbed his master, escaped, met Paul, and accepted Christ. In sending him back to Philemon, Paul urged the owner to treat the slave as a Christian brother (Genesis 38:16 ).
Later, Onesimus accompanied Thychius in bearing Paul's letter to the church at Colossae (Colossians 4:7-9 ). Two traditions connect Onesimus with a bishop of that name in the second-century church, and with Onesiphorus in 2 Timothy 1:16 . Neither connection has been proven satisfactorily. See Philemon .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Onesimus
was a Phrygian by nation, a slave to Philemon, and a disciple of the Apostle Paul. Onesimus having run away from his master, and also having robbed him, Philippians 1:18 , went to Rome while St. Paul was there in prison the first time. As Onesimus knew him by repute, (his master Philemon being a Christian,) he sought him out. St. Paul brought him to a sense of the greatness of his crime, instructed him, baptized him, and sent him back to his master Philemon with a letter, inserted among St. Paul's epistles, which is universally acknowledged as canonical. This letter had all the good success he could desire. Philemon not only received Onesimus as a faithful servant, but rather as a brother and a friend. A little time after, he sent him back to Rome to St. Paul. that he might continue to be serviceable to him in his prison. And we see that after this Onesimus was employed to carry such epistles as the Apostle wrote at that time. He carried, for example, that which was written to the Colossians, while St. Paul was yet in his bonds.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Onesimus
Had been a slave to Philemon of Colosse, and had run away from him, and fled to Rome; but being converted to Christianity through preaching of Paul, he was the occasion of Paul's writing the epistle to Philemon, Colossians 4:9 Philippians 1:10 .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Onesimus
A name well known in the New Testament, whose history is exceedingly interesting. His name, it should seem, is derived from the Greek, and means useful. And very useful hath the relation which is given of his conversion proved to the church in all ages ever since.
It appears from the short Epistle of Paul to Philemon, (which see) (Philemon 1:1:1-25) that Onesimus was originally the slave or servant to Philemon. And though it is not expressly said in so many words that he robbed his master, yet from some expressions in Paul's letter, there seems great probability of it. Be this however as it may, certain it is that he ran from his master, and thereby manifested much worthlessness of conduct. In his wanderings he came to Rome, when Paul was there imprisoned the first time; and knowing the apostle while in his master's service, he visited the apostle in the prison. The Lord, who by his providence brought Onesimus to Paul, made this interview prosperous by his grace; and those visits ended, by the Lord's blessing, in the epistle Paul sent by him to his master Philemon relates those interesting circumstances. And as we find the Epistle to the church of the Colossians was sent from Rome by Onesimus, there is reason to conclude that Philemon sent him back to Paul to minister to him in the prison.
The epistle of Paul to Philemon is a master-piece for elegance and simplicity of style. Methinks it were devoutly to be wished, that all the followers of the Lord Jesus would form their letter-writing by this model. How truly blessed doth the epistle open, after subscribing himself as the prisoner of the Lord, in praying that grace and peace to Philemon might flow from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ! And how blessedly doth the apostle close his letter, in a similar prayer, that the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ might be with his spirit! Amen. And as the epistle opens and closeth in so sweet and gracious a spirit, so all the parts of it breathe every thing that is truly lovely and becoming the blessed Gospel of Christ.
But while I thus venture to recommend to myself and to others this style of writing. I beg yet more to remark the abundant grace of God the Holy Ghost, in causing such a blessed fragment of his sacred word to have been recorded and handed down in his church. Was it thought an object of everlasting moment thus to preserve in the book of God the history of a poor fugitive, and to let the church know that, in the instance of this slave, the Lord's grace outruns even all our undeservings? Was it indeed meant to shew in this, as well as in a thousand and ten thousand other instances, that "where sin aboundeth grace doth much more abound?"
What a precious example is held forth in this epistle to ministers of the word of God, to parents, masters of families, and all that are interested in the care and government of incautious youth, to feel what Paul felt, and to take an earnest concern in the recovery of transgression of every description and character! Did Paul count this runaway servant a brother, yea, his son, and speak of him as his own bowels, with what affection ought the ties of the minister and his people, the parent and his children, the master and his servant, to be felt and acknowledged in all the circumstances of life! How tenderly the same great apostle elsewhere recommends those gracious principles as the common actions of the christian! "Put on therefore (saith the apostle) as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering, forbearing one another, and forgiving one another; if any man have a quarrel against any, even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye." (Colossians 3:12-13)
It is hardly possible, while thus naming the name of Jesus, and in this endearing character of his forgiveness, it is hardly possible to overlook how eminently the Lord himself stands forth in his high office of Intercessor for every Onisemus of his people, who, like this poor fugitive, have all run away from our Lord and master, and wandered from his service. If Paul found Onesimus, how much more hath Jesus found us in our lost estate, "for his mercy endureth for ever!" And if Paul's intercession was so prevalent with Philemon, what must the Lord Jesus's be with the Father!
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Onesimus
(Ὀνήσιμος)
Onesimus was a Colossian (Colossians 4:9), the slave of Philemon (Philemon 1:16). The name, signifying ‘useful,’ ‘profitable,’ ‘helpful,’ was frequently and appropriately borne by slaves (see J. B. Lightfoot, Colossians and Philemon3, 1879, p. 310, who quotes numerous examples, chiefly from Muratori’s Collection of Inscriptions). C. v. Weizsäcker (Apostolic Age, Eng. translation , 1894-1895, ii. 245) regards the Epistle to Philemon as allegorical owing to the play on the name Onesimus in Phil 3, 1879:11; but on similar grounds much well-authenticated history might be rejected. Onesimus, for a time, belied his name; he absconded from his master’s house, after either robbing him or otherwise doing him ‘injury.’ In order, probably, to avoid detection and at the same time to seek his fortune, Onesimus came to Rome. (For the argument against Caesarea as his place of refuge, see Philemon, Epistle to.) There he came into relation with the apostle Paul, the spiritual father of Philemon. At this time St. Paul had not yet visited Colossae (Colossians 2:1); but Onesimus may have seen and heard the Apostle at Ephesus during the latter’s three years’ abode in that city, which was only 100 miles distant from Colossae. In any case, he must have heard much of St. Paul in Philemon’s house; and he may thus have been drawn to the Apostle’s Roman lodging by the desire to obtain help in need or to listen to teaching from one who had taken a special interest in slaves (1 Corinthians 7:21-22, Ephesians 6:7-9, Acts 16:18). Epaphras of Colossae, the Apostle’s fellow-worker in Rome (Colossians 4:12), may have been the medium of introduction. Under St. Paul’s instruction and influence Onesimus became a Christian (Philemon 1:10, ‘whom I have begotten in my bonds’). There must have been something very lovable about the fugitive slave, notwithstanding his blemished record; for the Apostle not only testifies to his faithfulness and helpfulness, but calls him a ‘beloved brother’ (Colossians 4:9), his other self (Philemon 1:17), ‘my very heart’ (lit. [1] ‘my own bowels,’ τὰ ἐμὰ σπλάγχνα, Philemon 1:12). As a Christian, Onesimus would realize more keenly his misdemeanour in absconding and perhaps stealing from Philemon; hence he appears to have readily acquiesced in St. Paul’s determination not to retain him, however ‘profitable,’ but to restore him to his lawful master. Onesimus, accordingly, returns to Colossae along with St. Paul’s colleague in the ministry, Tychicus (Colossians 4:8-9), who, as a native of the province of Asia, would probably be known to Philemon, and would be an appropriate personal intercessor for Onesimus with Philemon on the Apostle’s behalf. To render certain, however, the friendly reception of Onesimus, St. Paul sends with the slave a letter to Philemon commending him as one to be received and permanently possessed (αἰώνιον ἀπέχῃς) ‘no longer as a slave, but above a slave, a brother beloved.’
We have no reliable account of Onesimus’ subsequent history; but we may accept as in itself highly credible the tradition (Apost. Canons, 82) that Philemon not only forgave but emancipated his slave. More doubtful and also discordant are the records which represent Onesimus as attaining to the position of ‘bishop’ or presiding presbyter, in BerCEa, according to the Apost. Const. (vii. 46); in Ephesus, according to another tradition which identifies him with Onesimus, ‘bishop’ of Ephesus in the time of Ignatius (Ign. Ephesians 1; AS [2] , under 16th Feb.). A tradition (also embodied in the AS [2] ) represents him as journeying to Spain; and the apocryphal Acts of the Spanish Xanthippe and Polyxena are written in his name (see Texts and Studies ii. 3 [4]). Nicephorus (9th cent.) transmits (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.) iii. 11) a tradition that he was martyred at Rome; while another authority (Galesinius) describes that martyrdom as taking place at Puteoli (AS [2] , loc. cit.). The commonness of the name deprives these accounts of any historical reliability. F. W. Farrar, in Darkness and Dawn, ed. 1892, p. 79 ff., and the author of Philochristos (E. A. Abbott) in his Onesimus, 1882, give interesting fictitious accounts of what might have been the life-story of this slave.
Literature.-See under Philemon, Epistle to.
Henry Cowan.

Sentence search

Philemon - The master of Onesimus. See Onesimus...
Philemon - This slave, Onesimus, had robbed Philemon and escaped to Rome. There Onesimus found the apostle Paul who was imprisoned. Paul wrote to Philemon concerning Onesimus. Paul sent both the epistle and Onesimus back to Colosse. The epistle states that Onesimus was now a Christian. Paul requested that Philemon forgive and receive Onesimus not as a slave but as a brother (Philippians 1:16 ). ...
Paul also stated that he was willing to pay any damages caused by Onesimus. Some scholars indicate that Paul may have been asking subtly that Philemon release Onesimus so that he could return and aid Paul in his evangelistic endeavors. Philemon had a judicial right to punish severely or even kill Onesimus. Paul's short epistle of some three hundred and fifty-five Greek words challenged Philemon to apply Christian love in dealing with Onesimus. See Onesimus ; Paul ; Slavery. Plea for Onesimus on Basis of Friendship (8-22)...
IV
Onesimus - One slave who became a Christian was Onesimus. ...
Onesimus had worked in Colossae for a man named Philemon, but he ran away and came to Rome. Paul knew Philemon, so when Onesimus decided to return to his master, Paul wrote a letter to Philemon, urging him to forgive Onesimus and receive him back (Philem 10-19; for details see PHILEMON)
Philemon - A rich citizen of Colosse, in Phrygia, to whom Paul wrote an epistle, on occasion of sending back to him his servant Onesimus. Philemon, converted by the instrumentality of Paul, is exhorted to receive Onesimus as "a brother beloved. See Onesimus, and EPISTLE
Onesimus - In the epistle, Paul pled with Philemon to free the servant because Onesimus had been so helpful to the apostle. Onesimus had robbed his master, escaped, met Paul, and accepted Christ. ...
Later, Onesimus accompanied Thychius in bearing Paul's letter to the church at Colossae (Colossians 4:7-9 ). Two traditions connect Onesimus with a bishop of that name in the second-century church, and with Onesiphorus in 2 Timothy 1:16
Onesimus - (Ὀνήσιμος)...
Onesimus was a Colossian (Colossians 4:9), the slave of Philemon (Philemon 1:16). 245) regards the Epistle to Philemon as allegorical owing to the play on the name Onesimus in Phil 3, 1879:11; but on similar grounds much well-authenticated history might be rejected. Onesimus, for a time, belied his name; he absconded from his master’s house, after either robbing him or otherwise doing him ‘injury. ’ In order, probably, to avoid detection and at the same time to seek his fortune, Onesimus came to Rome. Paul had not yet visited Colossae (Colossians 2:1); but Onesimus may have seen and heard the Apostle at Ephesus during the latter’s three years’ abode in that city, which was only 100 miles distant from Colossae. Paul’s instruction and influence Onesimus became a Christian (Philemon 1:10, ‘whom I have begotten in my bonds’). As a Christian, Onesimus would realize more keenly his misdemeanour in absconding and perhaps stealing from Philemon; hence he appears to have readily acquiesced in St. Onesimus, accordingly, returns to Colossae along with St. Paul’s colleague in the ministry, Tychicus (Colossians 4:8-9), who, as a native of the province of Asia, would probably be known to Philemon, and would be an appropriate personal intercessor for Onesimus with Philemon on the Apostle’s behalf. To render certain, however, the friendly reception of Onesimus, St. ’...
We have no reliable account of Onesimus’ subsequent history; but we may accept as in itself highly credible the tradition (Apost. More doubtful and also discordant are the records which represent Onesimus as attaining to the position of ‘bishop’ or presiding presbyter, in BerCEa, according to the Apost. 46); in Ephesus, according to another tradition which identifies him with Onesimus, ‘bishop’ of Ephesus in the time of Ignatius (Ign. Abbott) in his Onesimus, 1882, give interesting fictitious accounts of what might have been the life-story of this slave
Onesimus - Onesimus having run away from his master, and also having robbed him, Philippians 1:18 , went to Rome while St. As Onesimus knew him by repute, (his master Philemon being a Christian,) he sought him out. Philemon not only received Onesimus as a faithful servant, but rather as a brother and a friend. And we see that after this Onesimus was employed to carry such epistles as the Apostle wrote at that time
Onesimus - Onesimus (o-nĕs'i-mŭs), useful
Onesimus - Paul's "son in the faith," begotten spiritually while Paul was a prisoner at Rome, where Onesimus hoped to escape detection amidst its vast population. Onesimus doubtless had heard the gospel before going to Rome, in Philemon's household, for at Paul's third missionary tour (Acts 18:23) there were in Phrygia believers. Once unprofitable, by conversion Onesimus became really what his name implies, "profitable" to his master, to Paul, and to the church of God; "the faithful and beloved brother" of the apostle and of his master; godliness is profitable for both worlds, and makes men so (1 Timothy 4:8). ) makes an Onesimus the Bishop of the Ephesians. Onesimus so endeared himself to Paul by Christian sympathy and by personal services that he calls him "mine own bowels," i. Paul would gladly have kept him to minister to him, but delicate regard to Philemon's rights, and self denying love, made him waive his claims on Philemon and Onesimus (Philemon 1:13-14; Philemon 1:19). Onesimus "was parted" from his master "for a season" to become his "forever" in Christian bonds
Onesimus - Onesimus . Paul speaks of Onesimus as ‘one of you’ ( Colossians 4:9 ), we may infer that he was a native of Colossæ. The Apostle would gladly have kept him to minister to him ( Philippians 1:13 ), but would not do so without the consent of Philemon, and therefore sends Onesimus back with the letter to obtain his master’s forgiveness and his permission to return to St
Philemon, Epistle to - It was written for the purpose of interceding for Onesimus (q. Paul had found Onesimus at Rome, and had there been instrumental in his conversion, and now he sends him back to his master with this letter
Onesimus - Christianity did not come in to set the world right thus: Onesimus was sent back to his master, and slaves are elsewhere exhorted to be faithful to their masters; but slavery is doubtless one of the fruits of man's sin
Philemon - In particular, Paul talks about Onesimus, a slave who had worked in the house of Philemon (Colossians 4:9; Philem 10). ...
Onesimus had fled from his master and, in search of a new life of freedom, had found his way to Rome. He then asks Philemon to forgive Onesimus (8-14) and to welcome him back as a brother in Christ, as if he were welcoming Paul himself (15-20)
Philemon, Epistle to - The similarity of the salutations to those found in the Epistle to the Colossians, and the reference to Onesimus in that epistle, leads to the conclusion that Philemon dwelt somewhere in the direction of Colosse (probably at Laodicea, Archippus being mentioned in Colossians 4:17 , and Philippians 2 ), and that both epistles were sent from Rome about A. ...
Onesimus their slave had run away, and, having been converted under the ministry of Paul, he was sent back by the latter to his master. Paul does not ask for the freedom of Onesimus, but that he may now be received in grace as a brother, indeed, be received as the apostle's 'own bowels
Philemon - Onesimus, a servant of Philemon, had fled to Rome, was there converted, serving Paul for a season, but was sent back to his former master by Paul, who wrote this epistle, chiefly to conciliate the feelings of Philemon toward his penitent servant, and now fellow-disciple
Philemon, the Epistle to - The same bearer Onesimus bore it and epistle to Colossians; in the latter (Colossians 4:7-9) Tychicus is joined with Onesimus. Onesimus of Colosse, (Colossians 4:9), Philemon's slave, had fled to Rome after defrauding his master (Philemon 1:18). Paul skillfully makes the favorable description precede the name which had fallen into so bad repute with Philemon; "I beseech thee for my son whom I begat in my bonds, Onesimus. Paul layeth himself out for poor Onesimus, and with all his means pleadeth his cause with his master, and so setteth himself as if he were Onesimus and had himself done wrong to Philemon. (See PAUL; Onesimus
Phile'Mon, - the name of the Christian to whom Paul addressed his epistle in behalf of Onesimus. He was a native probably of Colosse, or at all events lived in that city when the apostle wrote to him: first, because Onesimus was a Colossian, (Colossians 4:9 ) and secondly because Archippus was a Colossian, (Colossians 4:17 ) whom Paul associates with Philemon at the beginning of his letter
Tychicus - Tychicus and Onesimus carried the Colossian letter from Paul (Colossians 4:7-9 ), and were to relate to the church Paul's condition
Philemon - Paul’s past experience of Philemon’s ‘love and faith,’ generosity to fellow-believers, and loyalty to himself, gave the Apostle ‘confidence’ in interceding with his friend on behalf of that friend’s runaway but now converted slave, Onesimus, and in beseeching Philemon not only to forgive the slave’s misdemeanours, but to receive him as now a brother in Christ. According to a probably well-founded tradition, the Apostle’s confidence was not misplaced (see Onesimus). ...
Philemon, like Onesimus, is quite a common Greek name and is specially notable in the Phrygian legend of Philemon and Baucis (Ovid, Metam
Colosse, or Colassae - He hoped to visit them soon, Philippians 22 , for to this place Philemon and Onesimus belonged
Philemon, the Epistle of Paul to, - The occasion of the letter was that Onesimus, a slave of Philemon, had run away from him to Rome, either desiring liberty or, as some suppose, having committed theft. He used his influence with Onesimus, ver
Malchus - The name is unusual for slaves who commonly had names such as Onesimus (“Useful”; Philippians 1:10-11 )
Philemon - He had converted a fugitive slave to the Christian faith; and he here intercedes with his master in the most earnest and affectionate manner for his pardon; he speaks of Onesimus in terms calculated to soften Philemon's resentment, engages to make full compensation for any injury which he might have sustained from him, and conjures him to reconciliation and forgiveness by the now endearing connection of Christian brotherhood. See Onesimus
Philemon, Epistle to - there is also close connexion in the fact that Onesimus was a Colossian ( Colossians 4:9 ), and in the salutations in both Epistles from Epaphras, Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke. It is almost certain that the letter was sent from Rome (not Cæsarea) to Colossæ, along with the Colossian Epistle, by Tychicus and Onesimus, to be handed to Philemon by the runaway slave, who at St. Onesimus had in some way become known to the Apostle, who had won him to the Christian faith ( Philippians 1:10 ). A wistful humour appears in the play on the meaning of the name Onesimus ; ‘I beseech thee for Profitable, who was aforetime unprofitable, but now is profitable … Yea, let me have profit of thee’ ( Philippians 1:11 ; Philippians 1:20 ); also when at Philippians 1:19 St. Paul does not ask that Onesimus be set free. 321): if it is, it is rather that Onesimus may be permitted to return to continue his ministry to the imprisoned Apostle than that Christianity, as he conceives it, forbids slavery
Onesimus - ...
It appears from the short Epistle of Paul to Philemon, (which see) (Philemon 1:1:1-25) that Onesimus was originally the slave or servant to Philemon. The Lord, who by his providence brought Onesimus to Paul, made this interview prosperous by his grace; and those visits ended, by the Lord's blessing, in the epistle Paul sent by him to his master Philemon relates those interesting circumstances. And as we find the Epistle to the church of the Colossians was sent from Rome by Onesimus, there is reason to conclude that Philemon sent him back to Paul to minister to him in the prison. If Paul found Onesimus, how much more hath Jesus found us in our lost estate, "for his mercy endureth for ever!" And if Paul's intercession was so prevalent with Philemon, what must the Lord Jesus's be with the Father!...
Philemon - From Colossians 4:9 it seems that Onesimus, and therefore Philemon, resided in Colossæ; Archippus , too, who is joined with Philemon in the salutation, is a Colossian ( Colossians 4:17 ), and there is no reason to doubt the natural supposition that St
Owe - , "thou owest me already as much as Onesimus' debt, and in addition even thyself" (not "thou owest me much more")
Colossae - Both letters were carried from Rome by Tychicus, who was accompanied by Onesimus, whose master Philemon was an inhabitant of Colossæ
Philemon Epistle to - For the view that the letter is allegorical (grounded on the name Onesimus and on the play thereon in v. 11) there is no semblance of ancient authority; and historical reality is stamped on every sentence of the Epistle (see Onesimus). But (1) Rome would be preferable for Onesimus, with a view to avoiding detection: and v. -See Onesimus and Philemon. He solicits a friendly reception for Philemon’s slave Onesimus, in spite of past delinquency through which he had belied his name, and become ‘unprofitable. ’ Onesimus was St. Onesimus had in some way wronged Philemon, apart from desertion. Paul, an Intercessor at the throne of grace, more sympathetic and more persevering even than him who mediated with Philemon for the runaway Onesimus
Repay - ...
3: ἀποτίνω (Strong's #661 — Verb — apotino | apotio — ap-ot-ee'-no ) signifying "to pay off" (apo, "off," tino, "to pay a fine"), is used in Philemon 1:19 , of Paul's promise to "repay" whatever Onesimus owed Philemon, or to whatever extent the runaway slave had wronged his master
Unprofitable, Unprofitableness - ...
A — 2: ἄχρηστος (Strong's #890 — Adjective — achrestos — akh'-race-tos ) "unprofitable, unserviceable" (chrestos, "serviceable"), is said of Onesimus, Philemon 1:11 , antithetically to euchrestos, "profitable," with a play on the name of the converted slave (from onesis, "profit")
Person - (3) In Philemon 1:12 , the pronoun autos, "he," placed in a position of strong emphasis, is translated "in his own person," RV, stressing the fact that in spite of the Apostle's inclination to retain Onesimus, he has sent him, as being, so to speak, "his very heart," instead of adopting some other method
Servant - Paul sent back Onesimus, a runaway slave, to his master, who was a Christian, and did not demand his liberation: but he beautifully puts before Philemon that he should possess Onesimus no longer as a slave, but as a brother beloved
Colossians - The epistle seems to have been called forth by the information Paul had received from Epaphras, Colossians 4:12; Philemon 1:23, and from Onesimus, both of whom appear to have been natives of Colossæ
Epaphroditus - After Tychicus and Onesimus had departed from Rome carrying the epistles to Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon, Paul was cheered by the arrival of Epaphroditus with the Philippian contribution
Begotten - 15 ; and of Onesimus he says, "whom I have begotten in my bonds," Philippians 10 signifying that he had been the means of their conversion; for the Christian is begotten of God
Profit, Profitable, Profiting - 1), is used in Philemon 1:11 , "profitable," in contrast to achrestos, "unprofitable" (a negative), with a delightful play upon the name "Onesimus," signifying "profitable" (from onesis, "profit"), a common name among slaves. Onesimus, who had belied his name, was now true to it on behalf of his erstwhile master, who also owed his conversion to the Apostle
Slave - Paul's sending back Onesimus to Philemon does not sanction slavery as a compulsory system, for Onesimus went back of his own free will to a master whom Christianity had made into a brother. In 1 Corinthians 7:21-24 Paul exhorts slaves not to be unduly impatient to cast off even slavery by unlawful means (1 Peter 2:13-18), as Onesimus did by fleeing
Slave, Slavery - He recognizes the legal ownership of Philemon by returning the runaway slave Onesimus (vv. Onesimus now has the status of a brother (v. The tone of Paul's appeal for Onesimus may well imply his desire that Philemon give Onesimus his freedom, but Paul comes short of demanding this response
Philemon - A Christian householder who hospitably entertained the saints (Philemon 1:7) and befriended them with loving sympathy at Colossae, for Onesimus and Archippus were Colossians (Colossians 4:9; Colossians 4:17; Philemon 1:1-2; Philemon 1:10); to whom Paul wrote the epistle
Philemon, Theology of - Although the letter contains no theological arguments, it is written from a definite theological presupposition centering on Onesimus's new postconversion relationship (v. ...
This reality applied with equal validity to both Philemon and Onesimus, to master as well as slave
Tychicus - Tychicus, being an Asiatic himself, fitly carried both the epistles to the Asiatic Ephesians and Colossians, and Philemon; but was not a Colossian as Onesimus, for of the latter alone Paul says "who is one of you" (Colossians 4:9)
Colossians, Epistle to the - (2) Onesimus, a runaway slave from Colossæ, had found his way to Rome and had there come under the influence of St. The Apostle took advantage of Tychicus’ journey to send Onesimus back to his master at Colossæ, with a letter of commendation (see Philemon). Paul tactfully associates Onesimus; with St
Impute - Philemon 1:1:18; "if Onesimus hath wronged thee, or oweth thee aught, put that on mine account" In Romans 4:6 righteousness imputed without works must mean a righteousness not our own, yet reckoned as ours, namely, "the righteousness of (Him who is both) God
Quartus - Elsewhere in the Pauline Epistles, Apollos (1 Corinthians 16:12), Epaphroditus (Philippians 2:25), Onesimus (Colossians 4:9), Sosthenes (1 Corinthians 1:1), Timothy (2 Corinthians 1:1, etc
Justice - Though he stands for Christian freedom, the Apostle feels morally obliged to send back Philemon’s slave, however helpful he found him to be; and he further takes on his own shoulders full liability for Onesimus’ misdeeds (Philemon 1:10 ff
Stealing - Paul’s words to Philemon (Acts 5:18-19)-‘if he hath wronged thee at all, or oweth thee aught, put that to mine account … I will repay it’-seems to be that Onesimus had been guilty of some theft, and had fled to escape punishment
Archippus - Paul (through Tychicus, the bearer of his letter to Philemon) might have suggested that Onesimus should be employed not in the city where he had lived as a slave, but in the Laodicean Church under Archippus
Synzygus - the use of Onesimus in Philemon 1:11)
Bond - Paul’s offer to pay Philemon for the debt of Onesimus (Philemon 1:18 f
Debt, Debtor - Paul delicately refers to money or valuables stolen from Philemon by Onesimus. Paul thus gives Philemon his note of hand to pay the debt of Onesimus
Berôa - 46) that Onesimus was the first bishop of the Church of Berœa
Colossians, Epistle to the - Tychicus and Onesimus would declare to them the affairs of Paul
Letter Form And Function - (Paul interceded with Philemon on behalf of his runaway slave Onesimus)
Minister - Paul by Timothy, Erastus, and Onesimus ( Acts 19:22 , Philippians 1:13 ), are described as forms of ministry
Family - (where the great detail was doubtless suggested by the Onesimus incident), 1 Timothy 6:1 f. Paul does not claim Onesimus’ freedom, though he indirectly suggests it (Philemon 1:13 f. In Philom 18 Onesimus is said to be ‘no longer a slave, but more than a slave, a brother beloved
Colosse - ...
Onesimus traveled with Tychicus, bearing the letter to Philemon
Colossae - Paul, a prisoner in Rome, wrote to the Colossian Christians, of whose faith and love he had heard (Colossians 1:4; Colossians 1:9) from Epaphras and perhaps from Onesimus, but who had never seen his face (2:1)
Have - '" ...
Is there not a hint of this in Paul's word to Philemon concerning receiving Onesimus (Philemon 1:17 )? Philemon would give the Apostle a receipt for his payment in sending him
Colossians, Epistle to the - There was Onesimus, the converted slave of Philemon, ready at St. Tychicus was at hand, ready to convey both the circular letter, now known as the Epistle to the Ephesians, and the short note to Philemon about Onesimus. Paul came across Onesimus, and from Rome that he sent him back to his master with Tychicus
Eternal Everlasting - Whether αἰώνιον is treated as an adverb of an adjective in Philemon 1:15, it is evident that the meaning must be restricted to the lifetime of Onesimus and Philemon
Friend, Friendship - Onesimus is not only Paul's "son" but his "very heart" (Philippians 10,12 )
Faithfulness - Paul speaks in the Epistle to the Colossians of Tychicus his messenger as ‘the beloved brother and faithful minister and fellow-servant in the Lord’ (Colossians 4:7), and of Onesimus as ‘the faithful and beloved brother’ (Colossians 4:9), he has before his mind chiefly the fidelity of these two brethren to himself the apostle and prisoner of the Lord, In 2 Tim
Begotten - And in like manner, concerning Onesimus, the apostle saith, Whom I have begotten in my bonds
Colossians - Notable in this final section are (1) the mention of Onesimus (Colossians 4:9 ), which links this letter with Philemon, (2) the mention of a letter at Laodicea (Colossians 4:16 ), which may have been Ephesians, and (3) Paul's concluding signature which indicates that the letter was prepared by an amanuensis (secretary) (Colossians 4:18 )
Name - ’ What names could be more appropriate for a trusted slave than Ὀνήσιμος (Onesimus), Asia Minor, Cities of - Paul wrote to the church during his Roman imprisonment, complementing the work of Philemon's servant Onesimus (Colossians 4:9 )
Slave, Slavery - Paul does not dream of suggesting that Onesimus should be set at liberty because he has become a Christian. There was many another Philemon as well as many another Onesimus
Timothy, Epistles to - Indeed, even if we had not the distinct statements of the Pastorals, we should consider it extremely likely that he was thus released; for it is clear that he anticipated being set at liberty when, from his imprisonment, he wrote to the Philippians that he hoped shortly to come to them (Philippians 2:24 ), and when he bid Onesimus prepare him a lodging at Colossæ ( Philippians 1:22 )
Minister Ministry - Paul rather than of ministerial service in the Church: διάκονος (of Tychicus, Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7), διακονία (of Mark, 2 Timothy 4:11), διακονεῖν (of Timothy and Erastus, Acts 19:22; of Onesimus, Philemon 1:13; and of Onesiphorus, 2 Timothy 1:18)
Ephesians, Book of - The case for Caesarea has been posited on speculative questions such as: (1) Would it be easier for Paul to get letters to the three places involved (Ephesus, Colosse, and Philippi) from Caesarea or from Rome? (2) Would it be easier for the runaway slave, Onesimus, to meet Paul in a prison in faraway Rome or the much closer Caesarea?...
A third opinion has grown out of Colossians 4:16 in which Paul urged the church at Colosse to exchange letters with the church at neighboring Laodicea so both might get the benefit of both letters
Minister, Ministration - Paul was thus helped by Timothy and Erastus (Acts 19:22), by Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7), by Onesiphorus (2 Timothy 1:18), by Mark (2 Timothy 4:11), by Onesimus (Philemon 1:13)
Fellowship (2) - Philemon also was a real Christian, whose faith in, and love to, the Lord Jesus was manifested in his kindly offices towards all the saints; and the Apostle delicately suggests that he should not stop till his benevolence becomes complete and embraces even the slave Onesimus (Philemon 1:6; Philemon 1:15-16)
Peter, the Epistles of - The churches of Laodicea were Hierapolis and Colesse (having as members Philemon and Onesimus, and leaders Archippus and Epaphras)
Paul the Apostle - And indeed it is impossible that a forger could have conceived such a gem as the latter Epistle; the writer’s pleading with Philemon for the runaway slave Onesimus bears genuineness on its face
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - 60); a martyr with Onesimus at Rome, Feb
Ignatius - The Ephesians sent their bishop, Onesimus (i