What does Olives mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἐλαιῶν an olive tree. / an olive 9
זַ֥יִת olive 2
ἐλαίας an olive tree. / an olive 1
גַּרְגְּרִ֖ים berry 1
הַזֵּיתִ֜ים olive 1
זֵיתֶֽךָ olive 1
זַ֙יִת֙ olive 1
הַזֵּתִ֜ים‪‬ olive 1
הַזֵּיתִ֤ים olive 1

Definitions Related to Olives

G1636


   1 an olive tree.
   2 an olive, the fruit of an olive tree.
   

H2132


   1 olive, olive tree.
      1a olive tree.
      1b Olives.
   2 mountain facing Jerusalem on the east side.
   

H1620


   1 berry, olive berry.
   

Frequency of Olives (original languages)

Frequency of Olives (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Olives
Olives, the Mount of, Olivet, Mount. A mountain ridge to the east of Jerusalem, from which it is separated by the valley of Jehoshaphat. It has three or four summits or peaks. The mount of Olives, called also Olivet, and by the Arabs at present Jebel et-Tur, a name they give to elevated summits generally, was so styled from the olive trees which clothed its sides. Some of these still remain; and on part of the hill are corn-fields; and in a few half-cultivated gardens are fig and pomegranate trees.
Olivet is mentioned several times in the Old Testament, up its slopes David, fleeing from Jerusalem for fear of Absalom, went wearied and weeping. Here he met Hushai and Ziba. 2 Samuel 15:30; 2 Samuel 16:4. It is also referred to by Zechariah. Zechariah 14:4. From Olivet our Lord looked down upon Jerusalem and wept bitter tears over its perverseness. Over Olivet he passed to and fro visiting Bethany. On the side of Olivet was Gethsemane. On Olivet, the last charge was given to the disciples who were thenceforth to build up the Christian church, and from its top Christ ascended to reign till every enemy snail be subdued beneath his feet. Matthew 24:3; Matthew 26:30; Mark 11:1-20; Mark 13:8; Mark 14:26; Luke 19:29-44; Luke 21:37; Luke 22:39; John 8:1; Acts 1:9-12. Christ did not ascend from the spot where now stands the church of the Ascension: it was rather from some point over the summit, near to Bethany. Luke 24:50-51. The views from this mount in different directions are extensive; Jerusalem on one side, on another there are the dreary hills over which the road passes to Jericho, with the northern end of the Dead Sea visible, and the mountains of Moab beyond. The highest point of Olivet is 2682 feet above the sea-level.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount of Olives Witnesseth, the
Hymn for Matins on October 7, feast of the Most Holy Rosary. It was written in the 18th century by A. Ricchini. Four translations exist; the English title given is by Monsignor Henry.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Olives, Mount of
Ηar-hazzey-thim . E. of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 11:23), separated from it by "the valley of Jehoshaphat" (Zechariah 14:4). "The mount of the olive grove" (Εlaionos ), Acts 1:12. Arabic jebel es Ζeitun . In 2 Samuel 15:30 "the ascent of the olives" (Hebrew). "The mountain facing Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:7); called "the hill of corruption" from Solomon's high places built to Chemosh and Moloch (2 Kings 23:13-14). The road by which David fled from Absalom across Kedron, and passed through trees to the summit, where was a consecrated spot (an old sanctuary to Εlohim , like Bethel) at which he worshipped God (2 Samuel 15:30; 2 Samuel 15:32). Turning the summit he passed Bahurim (2 Samuel 16:5), probably near Bethany, then through a "dry and weary (Hebrew hayeephim ) land where no water was," as he says Psalms 63:1; 2 Samuel 16:2; 2 Samuel 16:14 (the same Hebrew), 2 Samuel 17:2. In Psalm 42 he was beyond Jordan; in Psalm 63 he is in the wilderness on the near side of Jordan (2 Samuel 15:28; 2 Samuel 17:21-22).
Shimei, scrambling along the overhanging hill, flung down the stones and dust of the rough and parched descent. The range has four hills. Josiah defiled Solomon's idolatrous high places, breaking the "statues," cutting down the groves, and filling their places with men's bones. After the return from Babylon the olive, pine, palm, and myrtle branches for booths at the feast of tabernacles were thence procured (Nehemiah 8:15). The ridge runs N. and S., separating the city which lies on its western side from the wilderness reaching from the eastern side of Olivet to the Dead Sea. At the northern extremity the range bends to the W., leaving a mile of level space between it and the city wall; whereas on the E. the mountain approaches the wall, separated only by a narrow ravine, Kedron, to which the descent from the Golden gate, or the gate of Stephen, is steep, and the ascent from the valley bed up the hill equally so. The northern part, probably Nob, Mizpeh, and Scopus (so called from the view it commands of the city), is distinct historically, though geologically a continuation, from "the Mount of Olives."
So too the "mount of evil counsel" on the S. The Latin Christians call the northern part "Viri Galilaei ", being the presumed site of the angels' address to the disciples at the ascension, "ye men of Galilee," etc. (Acts 1:11). Olivet (Et Tur), the historical hill so called, separated from Scopus by a depression running across, is a limestone rounded hill, the whole length two miles; the height at the Church of the Ascension on the summit is 2,700 ft. above the Mediterranean, Zion is 2,537 ft. above, Moriah ("temple area" or Ηaram ) at 2,429 ft., the N.W. corner of the city at 2,581 ft. Thus it is considerably higher than the temple mountain, and even than the socalled Zion. S. of the mount of ascension, and almost a part of it, stands that of the tombs of the prophets; again, S. of that, the mount of offense. Of the three paths from the valley to the summit the first follows the natural shape of the ground, the line of depression Between the central and the northern hill. It was evidently David's route in fleeing.
It was also the Lord's route between Bethany and Jerusalem (Luke 19:28-37), and that whereby the apostles returned to Jerusalem after the ascension. The second path at 50 yards beyond Gethsemane strikes off directly up the steep to the village. The third turns S. to the tombs of the prophets, and then to the village. The reputed sites at the W. of the central mount are: the tomb of the Virgin, then successively up the hill, namely, an olive garden, cavern of Christ's prayer and agony, rock where the disciples slept, place of Jesus' capture, spot from whence the Virgin saw Stephen stoned, spot where her girdle dropped at her assumption, spot of Jesus' lament over Jerusalem (Luke 19:41), tombs of the prophets, including Haggai and Zechariah (the Jews say; Matthew 23:29), place of the ascension, and church. (See GETHSEMANE.)
On the eastern side, descending from the ascension church to Bethany, are the field of the fruitless figtree, Bethphage, Bethany, Lazarus' house, Lazarus' tomb, stone on which Christ sat when Martha and Mary came to Him. Gethsemane is doubtless authentic. The empress Helena (A.D. 325) was the first who connected the ascension with Olivet (Eusebius Vit. Const. 3:43, Demonstr. Evang. 6:18); not that she fixed the precise spot but she erected a memorial ascension church with a glittering cross on this conspicuous site near the cave, the reputed place of Christ's teaching the disciples. The tradition was not an established one until more than 300 years later. The real place of ascension was Bethany, on the eastern slope, a mile beyond the traditional site (Luke 24:50-51; Acts 1:6-11). The "sabbath day's journey" (about six furlongs) specified for the information of Gentiles not knowing the locality in Acts 1 is from Olivet's main part and summit (or from Kefr et Tur, Bethphage according to Ganneau: see below), not from the place of actual ascension, Bethany, which is more than twice a sabbath day's journey.
So public a spot as the summit, visible for miles from all points, would ill suit the ascension of Him who after the resurrection showed Himself "not unto all the people but to witnesses chosen before of God" (Acts 10:41-42). The retired and wooded slopes of Bethany on the contrary were the fit scene of that crowning event. "The Mount of Olives" is similarly used in a general sense for Bethany (Luke 21:37, compare Matthew 21:17; Matthew 26:6). "Bethany" does not mean (as Alford says) the district of Bethany extending to the summit, but the village alone. The traditional site of the lamentation over Jerusalem is similarly unreal, for it can only be reached by a walk of hundreds of yards over the breast of the hill, the temple moreover and city being in full view all the time. The real site must have been a point on the road. from Bethany where the city bursts into view.
The Lord's triumphal entry was not by the steep short path of pedestrians over the summit, but the long easy route round the S. shoulder of the southernmost of the three divisions of Olivet; thence two views present themselves in succession; the first of the S.W. part of the city, namely, so called "Zion," the second, after an interval, of the temple buildings, answering to the two points of the history, the hosannas and the weeping of Jesus. Luke 19:37, "when He was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount," etc.; Luke 19:41-44, "when He was come near He beheld the city and wept over it." On the slope the multitude found the palm branches when going to meet the Lord (John 12:13). The catacomb called "the tombs of the prophets," on the hill S. of the central ascension hill and forming part of it with a slight depression between, is probably that cave where according to Eusebius Jesus taught mysteries to His disciples (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, 453).
The mount of offense (Βaten el Ηawa , Arabic, "bag of the wind") is the most southern portion of the range. The road in the hollow between it and the hill of "the tomb of the prophets" is the road from Bethany whereby Christ in triumph entered Jerusalem. The identification of "the hill of offense" with Solomon's "mount of corruption" (1 Kings 11:7; 2 Kings 23:13) is a late tradition of the 13th century. Stanley makes the northern hill (Viri Galilaei ) to be "the mount of corruption" (why so called is uncertain in that case) because the three sanctuaries were on the right side, i.e. S. of it, namely, on the other three summits. But 2 Kings 23:13 rather means the three high places were on the S. side of "the mount of corruption," i.e. the S. side or else peak of the Mount of Olives, which from Brocardus' time (13th century) has been called "the mount of offense" from the Vulgate translated of 2 Kings 23:13. The southern hill is lower and more rugged. The wady en Nar, continuing the Kedron valley eastward to the Dead Sea, is the southern boundary of the southern hill. Its bald surface contrasting with the vegetation of the other hills may have suggested the identification of it as the "mount of corruption."
On its steep western face is the dilapidated village of Silwan. (See SILOAM.) On a projecting part of its eastern side, overlooking Christ's triumphal route, are tanks and foundations, supposed by Barclay (City, etc., 66) to be the site of Bethphage; but the discovery of "an almost square block of masonry or rock, covered with paintings," not separated from the porous limestone rock of which it forms a part, on the strip to the N. of this road, shows that in the 11th century Christians identified Bethphage with that site. The block is 4 ft. 3 inches by 3 ft. 6 inches, and 3 ft. 10 inches high, and has on the S. side a representation of the raising of Lazarus, on the N. the disciples fetching the donkey; the supposition in the 11th century was that this was the stone on which our Saviour rested while the disciples were absent on their divine errand. Bethphage must have been, as this stone is, not on the road which Jesus was taking, namely, the narrow ridge to the Mount of Olives; otherwise He need not have sent disciples if He would have to pass it Himself; He said to them, "Go to the village over against you" (Matthew 21:2).
Ganneau identifies Bethphage with Kefr et Tur, "the village of the Mount of Olives," where exist ancient remains; he thinks it marked on the E. the sabbath day's journey from Jerusalem (Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, April 1878). The notion that the northern hill (Arabic Κarem es Serjad , "the vineyard of the sportsmen") was the scene of the angels' address to the apostles after the ascension first came into existence in the 16th century. Its first name in 1250 was "Galilee" (Perdiccas in Reland Pal., 52), either from its having been the lodging place of Galilaeans coming up to Jerusalem or from corruption of an ancient name, perhaps Geliloth, on Benjamin's southern boundary (Joshua 18:17). The place of the angels' address was from the 12th to the 16th century more appropriately assigned to a place in the Church of the Ascension, marked by two columns. Now it is only in the secluded slopes of the northern hill that venerable olives are seen spreading out into a wood; anciently the hills were covered with them. No date palms (from which Bethany took its name) are to be seen for miles.
Fig trees are found chiefly on the road side. Titus at the siege stripped the country all round of trees, to construct embankments for his engines. Rabbi Janna in the Midrash Tehillim (Lightfoot, 2:39) says that the shechinah ("divine presence"), after retiring from Jerusalem, dwelt three years and a half on Olivet, to see whether the Jews would repent; but when they would not, retired to its own place. Jesus realized this in His three years' and a half ministry. "The glory of Jehovah went up from the city and stood upon the mountain on its E. side." Its return into the house of Jehovah shall be "from the way of the E., by the gate whose prospect is toward the E." (Ezekiel 11:23; Ezekiel 43:2; Ezekiel 43:4). "His feet shall stand upon the Mount of Olives which is before Jerusalem on the E., and the Mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof toward the E. and toward the W., and there shall be a very great valley, and half of the mount shall remove toward the N. and half of it toward the S." The place of His departure shall be the place of His return, the manner too shall be similar (Acts 1:11).
The direction shall be "as the lightning cometh out of the E." (Matthew 24:27). The scene of His agony shall be that of His glory, the earnest of which was His triumphal entry from Olivet (Matthew 21:1-10). It was His favorite resort (John 8:1). Ganneau (Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement) identifies Scopus with Mecharif, where is a great well. The Mussulmen place little heaps of stones there as the point from which Jerusalem and the Sakhrah mosque are first observed in coming from Nablus. "Scopus" may comprise the whole chain from Mecharif to Olivet. Conder fixes on a site E. of the great northern road from Jerusalem to Nablus. Jerusalem is wholly hidden from view until the last ridge is reached, from which the road rapidly descends and passes to the Damascus gate; the grey northern wall and the mosque, etc., here burst on the view at a mile and a half distance, as Josephus describes.
Before the ridge is a plateau large enough to afford camping ground for the two Roman legions of Titus, and at the same time hidden from view of the city; it has also the military advantages of being directly upon the line of communication, of being difficult to approach from the front, and having good communication with the flanks and rear. Beyond the ridge, three furlongs to the N., the second camp, the fifth legion, could camp on a large plain stretching toward Tel el Ful, close to the great northern road. The name Εl Μesharif , or "the look out," Greek Scopos , is still constantly applied to the ridge. Josephus' "seven furlongs" from the center of the plateau reaches exactly to the large masonry discovered by Major Wilson, and supposed to be part of the third wall, proving Jerusalem extended northwards far beyond its present limits. This again discredits the popular site of the Holy Sepulchre.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Olives, Mount of
OLIVES, MOUNT OF . The range of hills east of Jerusalem, separated from the Temple mountain by the Kidron Valley. It is scarcely mentioned in the OT. David crossed it when fleeing from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:30 ). Here branches were cut to make booths for the Feast of Tabernacles ( Nehemiah 8:15 ). Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 11:23 ) and Zechariah ( Zechariah 14:4 ) make it the scene of ideal theophanies: the literal interpretation of the latter prophecy has given rise to many curious and unprofitable speculations.
The chief interest of the mountain, however, is its connexion with the closing years of our Lord’s life. Over this He rode on His triumphal entry to Jerusalem; and wept over the city as it came into view (Luke 19:41 ); and during the days when He lodged in Bethany and visited Jerusalem He must necessarily have passed over it daily ( Luke 21:37 ). The fig-tree which He cursed ( Matthew 21:19 ) was most probably on the mountain slopes; and in one of these daily pilgrimages He delivered to His disciples the great eschatological discourse ( Matthew 24:1-51 ; Matthew 25:1-46 ). On the side of the mountain was Gethsemane, where took place the first scene of the final tragedy.
The ridge is formed of hard cretaceous limestone, surmounted by softer deposits of the same material. It is divided, by gentle undulations and one comparatively deep cleft, into a series of summits. There is no reason to apply the name Olivet ( Acts 1:12 , 2 Samuel 15:30 [1] only]) exclusively to any one of these summits. The southernmost, which is separated from the rest by the cleft just mentioned, on the slope of which stands the village of Siloam ( Silwân ), is traditionally known (by the Franks) as the ‘Mount of Offence,’ and is considered to be the scene of Solomon’s idolatry. The peak north of this is commonly called Olivet proper; it is unfortunately spoilt by a hideous bell-tower and some other modern monastic buildings. The next peak, the Viri Galilœi , is the traditional site of the Ascension; and the next is popularly, but erroneously, called Scopus .
Ecclesiastical tradition has, as might he expected, been busy with the Mount of Olives, and the places pointed out have by no means remained unaltered through the Christian centuries, as becomes evident from a study of the writings of the pilgrims. To-day are shown the tomb of the Virgin; the grotto of the Agony; the Garden of Gethsemane (two sites); the chapel of the Ascension (a mosque, with a mark in the floor said to be the ‘footprint of Christ’); the tomb of Huldah; the site (an impossible one) of Christ’s weeping over the city; the place where He taught the Lord’s Prayer; the place where the Apostles’ Creed was composed, etc. etc. Far more interesting than these ecclesiastical inventions are the numerous ancient Jewish and early Christian tombs (especially the tomb of Nicanor the donor of the ‘Beautiful Gate’ of the Temple; the extraordinary labyrinth commonly known as the ‘Tombs of the Prophets’); and the fragments of mosaic found here from time to time which testify to the pious regard in which the mount was naturally held from early times.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Olives
See Agriculture .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Olives, Mount of
The two and a half mile-long mountain ridge that towers over the eastern side of Jerusalem, or more precisely, the middle of the three peaks forming the ridge. Heavily covered with olive trees, the ridge juts out in a north-south direction (like a spur) from the range of mountains running down the center of the region. Both the central Mount of Olives and Mount Scopus, the peak on its northern side, rise over two hundred feet above the Temple mount across the Kidron Valley. It provided a lookout base and signaling point for armies defending Jerusalem.
David crossed the Mount of Olives when fleeing Absalom (2 Samuel 15:30 ). Ezekiel saw the cherubim chariot land there (Ezekiel 11:23 ). Zechariah described how the Mount of Olives would move to form a huge valley on the Day of the Lord (Zechariah 14:3-5 ). Many crucial events in Jesus' life occurred on the Mount of Olives. (See, for example, Matthew 26:30 ; Mark 11:1-2 ; Luke 4:5 ; Luke 22:39-46 ; Acts 1:9-12 ).
Robert O. Byrd
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Olives, Olivet, Mount of
The mountain range on the east of Jerusalem, separated from the city by the Kidron valley. It doubtless derived its name from the olive-trees that grew on it. This name occurs but seldom in the O.T., and apparently the mountain is not referred to under any other name. David when he hastened from Jerusalem at the rebellion of Absalom ascended Mount Olivet. 2 Samuel 15:30 . In a future day its configuration will be changed, for the prophet says the feet of the Lord will stand upon it and the mount will be cleft asunder. Zechariah 14:4 .
It comes into prominence in the N.T. because of the Lord's association with it: He was 'wont' to go there and "at night he went out and abode in the mount." Luke 21:37 ; Luke 22:39 ; John 8:1 . The Lord sat on this mount, opposite to the temple, when He spoke to His disciples of the future tribulations and coming judgement. Mark 13:3 . Apparently the Lord ascended to heaven from a low part of the mount near to Bethany, Luke 24 :50; Acts 1:12 ; and, as noticed above, He will again stand on that mount on His return.
On the northern slope of the mount is a walled garden kept by the Franciscan monks, with a few old olive trees, said to be the garden of Gethsemane, but another site is now shown by the Greek church. There are two principal roads over the mount. One nearly due east from St. Stephen's gate which passes the old so-called garden of Gethsemane. This was doubtless the road most frequented by the Lord in retiring for the night. The other road, from the same gate but farther south, led to Bethany and thence to Jericho. It was doubtless by this road that the Lord came when riding on an ass.
A great part of the mount is cultivated with wheat and barley, with a vine here and there; also a few fig trees, but of trees there are still more of olives than any other. Its modern name is Jebel et Tor, 'Mount of the Summit,' signifying 'mount of importance,' or Jebel ez Zeitun , 'Mount of Olives.' It is 2,683 feet above the sea, and about 250 feet above Moriah. From its summit the best view of Jerusalem is obtained.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Olives
The Mount of Olives was situated to the east of Jerusalem, and divided from the city only by the brook Kidron, and by the valley of Jehoshaphat, which stretches out from the north to the south. It was upon this mount that Solomon built temples to the gods of the Ammonites, 1 Kings 11:7 , and the Moabites, out of complaisance to his wives of those nations. Hence it is that the Mount of Olives is called the mountain of corruption, 2 Kings 23:13 . The Mount of Olives forms part of a ridge of limestone hills, extending to the north and the south-west. Pococke describes it as having four summits. On the lowest and most northerly of these, which, he tells us, is called Sulman Tashy, the stone of Solomon, there is a large domed sepulchre, and several other Mohammedan tombs. The ascent to this point, which is to the north-east of the city, he describes as very gradual, through pleasant corn fields, planted with olive trees. The second summit is that which overlooks the city: the path to it rises from the ruined gardens of Gethsemane, which occupy part of the valley. About half way up the ascent is a ruined monastery, built, as the monks tell us, on the spot where our Saviour wept over Jerusalem. From this point, the spectator enjoys, perhaps, the best view of the holy city. On reaching the summit, an extensive view is obtained toward the east, embracing the fertile plain of Jericho, watered by the Jordan, and the Dead Sea, enclosed by mountains of considerable grandeur. Here there is a small village, surrounded by some tolerable corn land. This summit is not relatively high, and would more properly be termed a hill than a mountain: it is not above two miles distant from Jerusalem. At a short distance from the summit is shown the supposed print of our Saviour's left foot; Chateaubriand says the mark of the right was once visible, and Bernard de Breidenbach saw it in 1483! This is the spot fixed upon by the mother of Constantine, as that from which our Lord ascended, and over which she accordingly erected a church and monastery, the ruins of which still remain. Pococke describes the building which was standing in his time, as a small Gothic chapel, round within, and octagonal without, and tells us that it was converted into a mosque. The Turks, for a stipulated sum, permit the Christian pilgrims to take an impression of the foot print in wax or plaster, to carry home. "Twice," says Dr. Richardson, "I visited this memorable spot; and each time it was crowded with devout pilgrims, taking casts of the holy vestige. They had to purchase permission of the Turks; but, had it not been in the possession of the Turks, they would have had to purchase it from the more mercenary and not less merciless Romans or Greeks." On ascension eve, the Christians come and encamp in the court, and that night they perform the offices of the ascension. Here, however, as with regard to Calvary and almost all the supposed sacred places, superstition has blindly followed the blind. That this is not the place of the ascension, is certain from the words of St. Luke, who says that our Lord led out his disciples "as far as Bethany, and lifted up his hands, and blessed them. And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up to heaven," Acts 1. Bethany is a small village to the east of the Mount of Olives, on the road to Jericho, not farther from Jerusalem than the pinnacle of the hill. There are two roads to it; one passes over the Mount of Olives; the other, which is the shorter and easier, winds round the eastern end, having the greater part of the hill on the north or left hand, and on the right the elevation called by some writers the Mount of Offence, which is, however, very little above the valley of Jehoshaphat. The village of Bethany is small and poor, and the cultivation of the soil is much neglected; but it is a pleasant and somewhat romantic spot, sheltered by Mount Olivet on the north, and abounding with trees and long grass. The inhabitants are Arabs.
The olive is still found growing in patches at the foot of the mount to which it gives its name; and "as a spontaneous produce, uninterruptedly resulting from the original growth of this part of the mountain, it is impossible," says Dr. E. D. Clarke, "to view even these trees with indifference." Titus cut down all the wood in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem; but there would seem to have been constantly springing up a succession of these hardy trees. "It is truly a curious and interesting fact," adds the learned traveller, "that, during a period of little more than two thousand years, Hebrews, Assyrians, Romans, Moslems, and Christians, have been successively in possession of the rocky mountains of Palestine; yet, the olive still vindicates its paternal soil, and is found, at this day, upon the same spot which was called by the Hebrew writers Mount Olivet and the Mount of Olives, eleven centuries before the Christian era," 2 Samuel 15:30 ; Zechariah 14:4 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Olives, Olive Tree
1: ἐλαία (Strong's #1636 — Noun Feminine — elaia — el-ah'-yah ) denotes (a) "an olive tree," Romans 11:17,24 ; Revelation 11:4 (plural); the Mount of Olives was so called from the numerous olive trees there, and indicates the importance attached to such; the Mount is mentioned in the NT in connection only with the Lord's life on earth, Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; 26:30 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; 14:26 ; Luke 19:37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; (b) "an olive," James 3:12 , RV (AV, "olive berries").
2: ἐλαιών (Strong's #1638 — Noun Masculine — elaion — el-ah-yone' ) "an olive grove" or "olive garden," the ending -- on, as in this class of noun, here indicates "a place set with trees of the kind designated by the primitive" (Thayer); hence it is applied to the Mount of Olives, Luke 19:29 ; 21:37 ; Acts 1:12 ("Olivet"): in the first two of these and in Mark 11:1 , some mss. have the form of the noun as in No. 1.
3: καλλιέλαιος (Strong's #2565 — Noun Feminine — kallielaios — kal-le-el'-ah-yos ) "the garden olive" (from kallos, "beauty," and No. 1), occurs in Romans 11:24 , "a good olive tree."
4: ἀγριέλαιος (Strong's #65 — Adjective — agrielaios — ag-ree-el'-ah-yos ) an adjective (from agrios, "growing in the fields, wild," and No. 1), denoting "of the wild olive," is used as a noun in Romans 11:17,24 , "a wild olive tree" (RV, in the latter verse).
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Olives, Mount of
Ezekiel 11:23 , called also OLIVET, 2 Samuel 15:30 , a ridge running north and south on the east side of Jerusalem, its summit about half a mile from the city wall, and separated from it by the valley of the Kidron. It is composed of chalky limestone, the rocks everywhere showing themselves. The olive-trees that formerly covered it, and gave it its name, are now represented by a few trees and clumps of trees which ages of desolation have not eradicated. There are three prominent summits on the ridge; of these the southernmost, which is lower than the other two, is now known as the "Mount of Corruption," because Solomon defiled it by idolatrous worship, 1 Kings 11:5-7 2 Kings 23:13 . Over this ridge passes the road to Bethany, the most frequented road to Jericho and the Jordan. The sides of the Mount of Olives towards the west contain many tombs, cut in the rocks.
The central summit rises two hundred feet above Jerusalem, and presents a fine view of the city, and indeed of the whole region, including the mountains of Ephraim on the north, the valley of the Jordan on the east, a part of the Dead Sea on the southeast, and beyond it Kerak in the mountains of Moab. Perhaps no spot on earth unites so fine a view, with so many memorials of the most solemn and important events. Over this hill the Savior often climbed in his journey to and from the holy city. Gethsemane lay at its foot on the west, and Bethany on its eastern slope, Matthew 24:3 Mark 13:3 . It was probably near Bethany, and not as tradition says on the middle summit, that our lord ascended to heaven, Luke 24:50 Acts 1:12 , though superstition has built the "Church of the Ascension" on the pretended spot, and shows the print of his feet on the rock whence he ascended! From the summit, three days before his death, he beheld Jerusalem, and wept over it, recalling the long ages of his more than parental care and grieving over its approaching ruin. Scarcely any thing in the gospels moves the heart more than this natural and touching scene. No one can doubt that it was God who there spoke; his retrospect, his predictions of his future judgments in the earth, Zechariah 14:4 . See view of the central summit in GETHSEMANE . Also SEPULCHRES.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Olives, Mount of
"The Mount of Olives" occurs in the Old Testament in (Zechariah 14:4 ) only. In (2 Samuel 15:30 ) it is called "Olivet;" in other places simply "the mount," (Nehemiah 8:15 ) "the mount facing Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:7 ) or "the mountain which is on the east aide of the city." (Ezekiel 11:23 ) In the New Testament the usual form is "the Mount of Olives." It is called also "Olivet." (Acts 1:12 ) This mountain is the well-known eminence on the east of Jerusalem, intimately connected with some of the gravest events of the history of the Old Testament and the New Testament, the scene of the flight of David and the triumphal progress of the Son of David, of the idolatry-of Solomon, and the agony and betrayal of Christ. It is a ridge of rather more than a mile in length, running in general direction north and south, covering the whole eastern side of the city. At its northern end the ridge bends round to the west so as to form an enclosure to the city on that side also. On the north a space of nearly a mile of tolerably level surface intervenes between the walls of the city and the rising ground; on the east the mount is close to the walls, parted only by the narrow ravine of the Kidron. It is this portion which is the real Mount of Olives of the history. In general height it is not very much above-the city: 300 feet higher than the temple mount, hardly more than 100 above the so-called Zion. It is rounded, swelling and regular in form. Proceeding from north to south there occur four independent summits, called -- 1, "Viri Galilaei:" 2, "Mount of Ascension;" 3, "Prophets" --subordinate to the last and almost a part of it; 4, "Mount of Offence."
Of these the central one -the "Mount of Ascension"--is the most important. Three paths lead from the valley to the summit-one on the north, in the hollow between the two crests of the hill another over the summit, and a third winding around the southern shoulder still the most frequented and the best. The central hill, which we are now considering, purports to contain the sites of some of the most sacred and impressive events of Christian history. The majority of these sacred spots now command little or no attention; but three still remain, sufficiently sacred--if authentic--to consecrate any place. These are-- (1) Gethsemane, at the foot of the mount; (2) The spot from which our Saviour ascended on the summit; (3) The place of the lamentation of Christ over Jerusalem, halfway up. Of these, Gethsemane is the only one which has any claim to be authentic. [1]
Next to the central summit, on the southern side is a hill remarkable only for the fact that it contains the "singular catacomb" known as the "Tombs of the Prophets," probably in allusion to the words of Christ. (Matthew 23:29 )
The most southern portion of the Mount of Olives is that usually known as the "Mount of Offence," Mons Offensionis . It rises next to that last mentioned. The title "Mount of Offence," or "Scandal," was bestowed on the supposition that it is the "Mount of Corruption" on which Solomon erected the high places for the gods of his foreign wives. ( 2 Kings 23:13 ; 1 Kings 11:7 ) The southern summit is considerably lower than the centre one.
There remains the "Viri Galilaei," about 400 yards from the "Mount of Ascension." It stands directly opposite the northeast corner of Jerusalem, and is approached by the path between it and the "Mount of Ascension." The presence of a number of churches and other edifices must have rendered the Mount of Olives, during the early and middle ages of Christianity, entirely unlike what it was in the time of the Jewish kingdom or of our Lord. Except the high places on the summit, the only buildings then to be seen were probably the walls of the vineyards and gardens and the towers and presses which were their invariable accompaniment. But though the churches are nearly all demolished, there must be a considerable difference between the aspect of the mountain now and in those days when it received its name from the abundance of its olive proves. It does not now stand so pre-eminent in this respect among the hills in the neighborhood of Jerusalem. It is only in the deeper and more secluded slope leading up to the northernmost summit that these venerable trees spread into anything like a forest. The cedars commemorated by the Talmud sad the date-palms implied in the name Bethany have fared still worse; there is not one of either to be found within many miles. Two religious ceremonies performed there must have done much to increase the numbers who resorted to the mount. The appearance of the new moon was probably watched for, certainly proclaimed, from the summit. The second ceremony referred to was the burning of the red heifer. This solemn ceremonial was enacted on the central mount, and in a spot so carefully specified that it would seem not difficult to fix it. It was due east of the sanctuary, and at such an elevation on the mount that the officiating priest, as he slew the animal and sprinkled blood, could see the facade of the sanctuary through the east gate of the temple.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mount of Olives
MOUNT OF OLIVES (τὸ ὄρος τῶν ἐλαιῶν, Matthew 21:1; Matthew 24:3; Mark 11:12-1449 Mark 13:3; Mark 14:26, Luke 19:37; Luke 22:39, John 8:1; and τὸ ὄρος τὸ καλούμενον ἐλαιῶν, Luke 19:29; Luke 21:37).—One of the universally accepted holy sites around Jerusalem. It is to-day known as Jebel et-Tûr (the mountain of the elevation or tower) by the Moslems, and as Jebel ez-Zeitûn (the mount of olives) by native Christians and, indeed, also by Moslems. By the Jews, besides the above mentioned, the name ‘mountain of light’ has also been given, from the fact that here used to be kindled the first beacon-fire to signalize through the land the appearance of each new moon.
The mount due east of Jerusalem forms the culminating height of a range which, separating itself from the central plateau near the village of Sha‘phat, runs for two miles, first S. and then S. W., and terminates beyond the village of Silwân at the Wady en-Nâr. The beginning of the range has very generally been accepted as the Scopus (prospect) of Josephus, and the part running S. W.—Batn el-Hawa—considerably lower than the part east of the city and not higher than the Temple area itself, has by many been identified as the Mount of Offence. Although these have been described by some authorities as parts of the Mount of Olives, there seems no real reason for including them in the description, and to do so is confusing.
The natural boundaries of Olivet are to-day well defined by two ancient roads. To the N. a very ancient highway to Jericho, after traversing a deep bay* [1] in the range, which from the city side seems to separate the range into two, crosses a low neck cutting off the northern part, now crowned by the house of Sir John Grey Hill, from the southern loftier mass—the true Mount of Olives. To the S. the road which runs to Bethany forms a convenient if somewhat arbitrary division, cutting off Olivet from the so-called ‘Mount of Offence’ and from other spurs to the south. To the W. the boundary is sufficiently plainly marked off by the deep valley of the Kidron, while to the E. [2] there are indications (see Luke 19:29; Luke 24:50; cf. Acts 1:12) for including within the limits the projecting spur on which Bethany stands. Probably the limits were never defined geographically, but the whole area was distinguished, as it is to some extent to-day, by its thick plantations of olives, figs, and palms,—hence the names Bethphage (house of figs) and Bethany (house of dates). This fertility, though no doubt most constantly observed by the city dwellers, to whom the beautiful slopes, then as they do to-day, would appeal most refreshingly as viewed from the dirty, squalid streets, must also have held out to the tired and thirsty travellers, ascending the dry and dusty wilderness from the Jordan to the city, an enchanting prospect of coolness and refreshment. For this alone it would appear only reasonable to include the sites of the villages on the eastern side, with their abundant gardens, as an essential part of the Mount. There can be little doubt that in the days of Christ the hill was thickly spread with verdure over parts which to-day are given up to churches, hovels, and extensive cemeteries.
Viewing the mountain thus, two principal summits and two subsidiary spurs may be described. The N. summit is that known as Karem es-Sayuâd (the vineyard of the hunter), and also as the Viri Galilœi; it reaches a height of 2723 feet above the Mediterranean, and is separated from the S. mass by a narrow neck of land traversed to-day by the new carriage road. As far back as 530 this hill is spoken of as Galilee, and in the Acts of Pilate (about 350) a mountain near Jerusalem called ‘Galilee’ is mentioned, It is said to have first received its name Γαλιλαία because the Galilaeans attending the feasts used to encamp there, or as Saewulf (1102) says, it ‘was called Galilee because the Apostles, who were called Galilaeans, frequently visited there.’* [3] The S. summit, of practically equal height, is the traditional Mount of the Ascension, and has for some years been distinguished by a lofty tower erected by the Russians. Here, too, Constantine erected his Church of the Ascension in 316 on the site where now stands its successor (erected 1834–5) of the same name. Here also is the Church of the Creed and the Paternoster Church, the latter a modern building on the site of one of that name destroyed long ago. Scattered over the summit is a modern Moslem village—Kefr et-Tûr—which combines with the noisy conduct of its rapacious inhabitants in spoiling the quiet beauty and holy associations of this sacred spot.
A small spur running S. is sometimes known as the Hill of the Prophets, on account of the interesting old ‘Tomb of the Prophets’—a sepulchre generally believed, until recently,† [4] to have been originally Jewish—which is situated there; and the other somewhat isolated spur to the S. E. [2] , on which stands the wretched, half-ruined village of el-‘Azarîyeh, on the site of Bethany, should, for reasons given, be included in the Mount.
Along the W. slopes facing the city lies the reputed Garden of Gethsemane (part, too, of the Mount, cf. Luke 22:39; see Gethsemane) of the Latins and its Greek rival; and a little higher up the hill to the S. the great Russian Church of St. Magdalene. The greater part of the slopes of the S. W. part of the hill is filled with a vast number of graves, those from the valley bottom till a little above the Bethany road being Jewish, while higher up are some Christian cemeteries. The Jews have a strong sentiment about being buried on this spot, the slopes of the ‘Valley of Jehoshaphat’ being traditionally, with them and with the Moslems, the scene of the resurrection and final judgment.
Traversing this side of the Mount are three steep paths, all probably ancient. The most evident and important is the N. one, which continues the line of the path from the St. Stephen’s Gate and the Tomb of the Virgin. It runs along the depression between the two summits, and is the direct route for travellers crossing the Mount from or to Bethany. Too steep for riding, it is essentially the short cut for the pedestrian. The second path, still steeper, branches off from this just above the Garden of Gethsemane, and after passing the traditional scene of the lamentation of Jesus over the city, leads to-day to the Russian tower and buildings. It is the path of the modern pilgrim. The third, more gradual in ascent, starts from the Garden of Gethsemane and ascends the hill through Russian property in a S. direction, passing near the ‘Tomb of the Prophets.’ Whether the first or second of these lies most in the direction of our Lord’s frequent passages from the city to the Mount of Olives and to Bethany, it is difficult to say, but it can hardly be supposed that He came by such a path on the morning of His triumphal entry into the city. The only likely course for the highroad of Roman times must have been in the general direction of the present Bethany and Jericho road; and, as Dean Stanley has suggested, the most natural site for the scene of the lamentation over the city is the point where this highroad crosses the S. W. shoulder of the Mount and the first full view of the city is obtained. A viaduct appears to have connected the Mount with the Temple hill, probably on the site of one of the two bridges which to-day span the dry torrent bed of the Kidron.
The Mount of Olives in the days of Christ must have presented rural fertility, verdure, and quiet very grateful to country visitors to the great metropolis; fresh mountain breeziness in contrast to the closeness and foulness of the city atmosphere, and a view of the beloved and sacred city in which all that was sordid was lost, and only the beauty and grandeur remained. This view is, when the historical associations are taken into consideration, probably the most fascinating in the Holy Land. It is seen at its best about the hour of sunset. In its essential details it is one on which the eyes of Christ must frequently have rested.
To the immediate W. is the Holy City, separated from the onlooker by the deep Valley of Jehoshaphat; just within the wall lies the ‘Dome of the Rock’ and the al-Aksa mosque, and in the open space of the great Temple area figures of people may be discerned moving about. Beyond this enclosure lie, pile above pile, the domed houses of the modern city, interspersed with the minarets, the synagogue domes, and the church towers of the followers of the three great Semitic religions: most prominent of all are the two domes and the massive tower which go to make up the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Far to the W. lie the battlements of the so-called Tower of David, and behind that, on the horizon, the W. mountains of Judaea shut off the distant sea. The roar of the city is deadened, but the fresh breeze carries the chiming of many bells, the blast of a military bugle or the roar of a salute from the barracks, reminding the onlooker that it is no dead city of the far past he is looking at. Somewhat to the N. the eye passes from the close-packed streets of the Moslem and Christian quarters, past the long line of the N. wall, to the many buildings of the newer Jerusalem, chiefly mean Jewish houses, but among them many handsome buildings like the great French Hospice, the Russian Cathedral, or the Abyssinian Church. Here lies all that is progressive and of promise for the days to be. Beyond again, against the sky line to the N., rises the outline of Nebi Samwîl crowning the height of Miẓpeh.
Turning S. the spectator sees the bare slopes south of the city walls, once thickly covered with the houses of the poor, terminating in the two deep valleys of Kidron and Hinnom, while on the opposite slope some of the houses of Silwân may be distinguished. Far to the S. in a gap in the hills lies the convent of Mar Elias on the road to Bethlehem; and to its left a crater-shaped hill—the Herodium—the burial-place of Herod the Great.
As the eye passes gradually E. [2] over the wilderness of Judaea, it is caught by the still beauty of the Dead Sea lying nearly 4000 feet below, but in the clear atmosphere looking very near, while behind lies the long level line of the beautiful hills of Moab. More in the foreground a few houses of Bethany appear, and behind them the village of Abu Dîs—inhabited by the hereditary robbers of the Jericho road. Northward of the great lake, beyond a vista of tumbled hills and parched valleys, lies the Jordan Valley, through the centre of which may be traced, by a serpentine line of green, the course of the famous river itself. Eastward of this the line of Moab is continued N. as the mountains of Gilead, with their one distinct summit—Jebel Ôsha‘—almost directly E. [2] of the onlooker.
Gospel incidents connected with the Mount of Olives.—Although, with the single exception of John 8:1, all the incidents expressly connected with the Mount of Olives belong to the Passion week, there can be no doubt (Luke 21:37) that this quiet spot was one beloved and frequented by the Master. Here He withdrew from the city for rest and meditation (John 8:1) and for prayer (Matthew 26:30 etc). Once we read of His approach to the Mount from the Eastern side ‘unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives’ (Mark 11:1 || Matthew 21:1 || Luke 19:29). Over a part of the Mount He must have made. His triumphal progress to the city (Matthew 21, Mark 11, Luke 19), and on this road He wept over Jerusalem (Luke 19:40-44). During the whole of that week ‘in the daytime he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out and abode in the Mount that is called of Olives’ (Luke 21:37)—the special locality on the Mount being Bethany (Matthew 21:17, Mark 11:11). Crossing over from Bethany, Jesus illustrated His teaching by the sign of the withering of the barren fig-tree (Matthew 21:18-19 || 1618544032_1; Mark 11:20-22), and on the slopes of this hill, with the doomed city spread out before them, Christ delivered to His disciples His wonderful eschatological discourse (Matthew 24:3 f. || Mark 13:3 f.). Then here, in the Garden of Gethsemane, occurred the Agony, the Betrayal, and the Arrest (Matthew 26:36-56, Mark 14:26-52, Luke 22:39-53, John 18:1-12). Lastly, on the Mount, not on the summit where tradition places it, but near Bethany, occurred the Ascension (Luke 24:50-52, Acts 1:12).
To these incidents where the Mount of Olives is expressly mentioned may be added the scene in the house of Martha and Mary (Luke 10:38-42), the raising of Lazarus (John 11), and the feast at the house of Simon (Matthew 26:6-13, Mark 14:3-9, John 12:1-19); for, as has been shown, Bethany was certainly a part of the Mount of Olives.
Literature.—PEF [8] Mem., ‘Jerusalem’ volume; papers by Schick and others in the Quarterly Statements (PEFSt [9] ); Groves, art. ‘Mount of Olives’ in Smith’s DB [1]3 ; R. Hofman, Galilœa auf dem Oelberg, Leipzig, 1896; Porter in Murray’s Handbook to Palestine; Robinson, BRP [11] vol. i. (1838); Stanley, SP [12] ; Socin and Benzinger in Baedeker’s Palestine and Syria; J. Tobler, Siloahquelle und Oelberg, 1852; Vincent (Père), ‘The Tombs of the Prophets’ in Revue Biblique, 1901; C. Warren, art. ‘Mount of Olives’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible .
E. W. G. Masterman.

Sentence search

ol'Ivet - (place of Olives ). ( 2 Samuel 15:30 ; Acts 1:12 ) [1]
Gethsemane - See Olives , Mount of
Olivet - —See Mount of Olives
Olivet - —See Mount of Olives
Olives, Mount of - Both the central Mount of Olives and Mount Scopus, the peak on its northern side, rise over two hundred feet above the Temple mount across the Kidron Valley. ...
David crossed the Mount of Olives when fleeing Absalom (2 Samuel 15:30 ). Zechariah described how the Mount of Olives would move to form a huge valley on the Day of the Lord (Zechariah 14:3-5 ). Many crucial events in Jesus' life occurred on the Mount of Olives
Corruption, Mount of - Hill east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives where Solomon built altars to the gods of his foreign wives (1 Kings 11:7 ). The name is probably a word play by the biblical writer on Mount of Oil, an early name of the Mount of Olives and a word spelled much like Mount of Corruption or Destruction
Birzavith - In the marginal or keri reading; "well of Olives
Pimiento - ) The Spanish sweet pepper, the fruit of which is used as a vegetable, to stuff Olives, etc
Beaten Oil - The highest grade of olive oil produced by crushing ripe Olives in a mortar. The second grade of oil was produced by pressing the Olives
Beaten Oil - (Exodus 27:20 ; 29:40 ), obtained by pounding Olives in a mortar, not by crushing them in a mill
Gethsemane - Gethsemane was the name of a garden on the slopes of the Mount of Olives, just outside Jerusalem. (Concerning the Mount of Olives see JERUSALEM, sub-heading ‘Mountains and hills’
Bethphage - Place of figs, a little village at the eastern foot of the Mount of Olives, near to Bethany, Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29
Olive - The best oil was from Olives that were plucked before being fully ripe, and then beaten or squeezed (Deuteronomy 24:20 ; Isaiah 17:6 ; 24:13 ). " The phrase "vineyards and Olives" (Judges 15:5 , A
a'Zal, - a name only occurring in (Zechariah 14:5 ) It is mentioned as the limit to which the ravine of the Mount of Olives will extend when "Jehovah shall go forth to fight
Kidron Valley - ” The deep ravine beside Jerusalem separating the Temple mount and the city of David on the west from the Mount of Olives on the east. After the Last Supper, Jesus went through the Kidron Valley on his way to the Mount of Olives (John 18:1 ). See City of David ; Jerusalem ; Mount of Olives; Spring of Gihon; Valley of Hinnom
Mount of Corruption - Hill on the southern ridge of the Mount of Olives upon which Solomon built pagan shrines for use by his wives
Mount of Corruption - Hill on the southern ridge of the Mount of Olives upon which Solomon built pagan shrines for use by his wives
Oil, Olive - Oil obtained from the pulp of Olives. In the Old Testament God commanded that a lamp filled with purest oil of Olives should always burn in the Tabernacle of the Testimony (Exodus 27); it was also used in many religious ceremonies, e
Olive Oil - Oil obtained from the pulp of Olives. In the Old Testament God commanded that a lamp filled with purest oil of Olives should always burn in the Tabernacle of the Testimony (Exodus 27); it was also used in many religious ceremonies, e
Rhachiglossa - It includes many of the large ornamental shells, as the miters, murices, Olives, purpuras, volutes, and whelks
Bethphage - Village on the Mount of Olives near to Bethany
Bethphage - ” A small village located on the Mount of Olives near Bethany on or near the road between Jerusalem and Jericho. of Olives; Triumphal Entry
Olive Tree - Tournefort mentions eighteen kinds of Olives; but in the Scripture we only read of the cultivated and wild olive. The wild Olives were of a less kind. Canaan much abounded with Olives
Kidron, Brook of - Ravine 20 miles long, east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives (2 Kings 15; 3Kings 2; Jeremiah 31)
Mount of Corruption - , "mount of offence"), the name given to a part of the Mount of Olives, so called because idol temples were there erected in the time of Solomon, temples to the Zidonian Ashtoreth and to the "abominations" of Moab and Ammon
Cedron, Brook of - Ravine 20 miles long, east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives (2 Kings 15; 3Kings 2; Jeremiah 31)
Baalhanan - David's officer over his Olives and sycamores in the shephelah (low plain)
Jehoshaphat - Some have thought, near the mount of Olives
Bethtappua - The terraces still are there, and Olives, vines, and grain, but no apples or citrons
Gethsemane - ) Beyond the brook Kedron at the foot of the mount of Olives; where probably oil was made from the Olives of the adjoining hill (Luke 22:39; John 18:1). In Luke 24:50 the sense is, He led them to the side of the hill where the road strikes downward to Bethany; for Acts 1:12 shows He ascended from the mount of Olives. The tenth legion, moreover, was posted about the mount of Olives (5:2, section 3, 6:2, section 8); and in the siege a wall was carried along the valley of Kedron to the Siloam fountain (5:10, section 2). The Olives of Christ's time may have reproduced themselves
Gethsemane - ” Place where Jesus went after the Last Supper, a garden outside the city, across the Kidron on the Mount of Olives (Matthew 26:36-56 ; Mark 14:32-52 ; Luke 22:39-53 ; John 18:1-14 ). 326) at the foot of the Mount of Olives, a short distance down from the Golden Gate. ” See Mount of Olives; Kidron; Judas
Beth-Phage - House of the unripe fig, a village on the Mount of Olives, on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho (Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ), and very close to Bethany
Azal - ) The limit to which "the valley" or cleft of the mount of Olives will extend, when Jehovah shall go forth to fight against those nations which shall have assailed Jerusalem
Josaphat, Valley of - Identified by some with the Valley of the Cedron, a ravine situated between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, regarded as the valley of judgment, probably because since the time of the kings of Juda, it was the principal cemetery of Jerusalem
Galilee, Mountain in - of Olives, whose north point is said to have borne the name ‘Galilee
an'Athoth, - (Isaiah 10:30 ) The cultivation of the priests survives in tilled fields of grain, with figs and Olives
Gethsemani - (Hebrew: gat, press; semen, oil) ...
Plot of ground on the Mount of Olives, beyond the ravine of the brook Cedron, where Jesus spent much time with His disciples (John 18), suffered His agony (Mark 14; Luke 22), and was taken prisoner by the Jews (Mark 14)
Valley of Josaphat - Identified by some with the Valley of the Cedron, a ravine situated between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, regarded as the valley of judgment, probably because since the time of the kings of Juda, it was the principal cemetery of Jerusalem
an'Athoth, - (Isaiah 10:30 ) The cultivation of the priests survives in tilled fields of grain, with figs and Olives
Bethany - It lay about fifteen furlongs (nearly two of our miles) from Jerusalem, at the foot of the mount of Olives
Bethany - A village about 15 stadia (2910 yards or about 1⅝ mile) from Jerusalem ( John 11:18 ) on the road from Jericho, close to Bethphage and on the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 ). of the Mount of Olives beside the Jericho road
Geder - In 1 Chronicles 27:28 Baal-hanan, who had charge of David’s Olives and sycomores, is called the Gederite , which may be a gentilic name derived from Geder, although some prefer to derive it from Gederah (wh
Beth-Phage - Probably, the opening of the valley at the foot of the mount of Olives
Kedron - The valley, now quite narrow, between the Mount of Olives and Mount Moriah
Enshemesh - of Jerusalem and of the mount of Olives
en-Shemesh - It was between the "ascent of Adummim" and the spring of En-rogel, and hence was on the east of Jerusalem and of the Mount of Olives
Beth'Any - It was situated "at" the Mount of Olives, ( Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ) about fifteen stadia (furlongs, i. It lies on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, fully a mile beyond the summit, and not very far from the point at which the road to Jericho begins its more sudden descent towards the Jordan valley
Beth'Any - It was situated "at" the Mount of Olives, ( Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ) about fifteen stadia (furlongs, i. It lies on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, fully a mile beyond the summit, and not very far from the point at which the road to Jericho begins its more sudden descent towards the Jordan valley
Bethania - 75 miles east of Jerusalem, at the base of the Mount of Olives
Bethany - 75 miles east of Jerusalem, at the base of the Mount of Olives
Eshcol - This valley is believed to be one which closely adjoins Hebron on the north, and still furnishes the finest grapes in the country, as well as pomegranates, figs, Olives etc
Melania the Younger, Saint - Melania founded a cloister and a convent on the Mount of Olives
Gethsemane - slope of the Mount of Olives above the Kidron; but there is no justification for the exact localization of the site
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Since the third century, however, the name has been appropriated to the deep and narrow glen east of Jerusalem, running north and south between the city and the Mount of Olives, called in the Bible the brook Kidron
Younger, Melania the, Saint - Melania founded a cloister and a convent on the Mount of Olives
Olives, Olive Tree - 1: ἐλαία (Strong's #1636 — Noun Feminine — elaia — el-ah'-yah ) denotes (a) "an olive tree," Romans 11:17,24 ; Revelation 11:4 (plural); the Mount of Olives was so called from the numerous olive trees there, and indicates the importance attached to such; the Mount is mentioned in the NT in connection only with the Lord's life on earth, Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; 26:30 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; 14:26 ; Luke 19:37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; (b) "an olive," James 3:12 , RV (AV, "olive berries"). ...
2: ἐλαιών (Strong's #1638 — Noun Masculine — elaion — el-ah-yone' ) "an olive grove" or "olive garden," the ending -- on, as in this class of noun, here indicates "a place set with trees of the kind designated by the primitive" (Thayer); hence it is applied to the Mount of Olives, Luke 19:29 ; 21:37 ; Acts 1:12 ("Olivet"): in the first two of these and in Mark 11:1 , some mss
Chaplet - ) A small molding, carved into beads, pearls, Olives, etc
Gleaning - Isaiah compared the few grapes or Olives left for gleaners to the small remnant of Israel God would leave when He judged them (Isaiah 17:5-9 )
Milcom - Solomon established a sanctuary for him on the Mount of Olives, which seems to have continued till it was destroyed by Josiah ( 1Ki 11:5 ; 1 Kings 11:33 , 2 Kings 23:13 )
Hymn - ...
And when the had sung a hymn, they went out to the mount of Olives
Samos - It now contains about fifty thousand inhabitants; and though ill-cultivated, is fruitful in oranges, grapes, and Olives, and exports corn and wine
Bethany - The better known of the two was the village near Jerusalem, on the eastern slopes of the Mount of Olives
Myrtle - "Although no myrtles are now found on the mount (of Olives), excepting in the gardens, yet they still exist in many of the glens about Jerusalem, where we have often seen its dark shining leaves and white flowers
Bahurim - from the Mount of Olives, and about a mile beyond ‘Anata (Anathoth) from Jerusalem
Mount of Olives - MOUNT OF Olives (τὸ ὄρος τῶν ἐλαιῶν, Matthew 21:1; Matthew 24:3; Matthew 26:30, Mark 13:3; Mark 14:26, Luke 19:37; Luke 19:40-444 John 8:1; and τὸ ὄρος τὸ καλούμενον ἐλαιῶν, Luke 19:29; Luke 21:37). It is to-day known as Jebel et-Tûr (the mountain of the elevation or tower) by the Moslems, and as Jebel ez-Zeitûn (the mount of Olives) by native Christians and, indeed, also by Moslems. Although these have been described by some authorities as parts of the Mount of Olives, there seems no real reason for including them in the description, and to do so is confusing. a very ancient highway to Jericho, after traversing a deep bay* [1] in the range, which from the city side seems to separate the range into two, crosses a low neck cutting off the northern part, now crowned by the house of Sir John Grey Hill, from the southern loftier mass—the true Mount of Olives. Probably the limits were never defined geographically, but the whole area was distinguished, as it is to some extent to-day, by its thick plantations of Olives, figs, and palms,—hence the names Bethphage (house of figs) and Bethany (house of dates). ’ Whether the first or second of these lies most in the direction of our Lord’s frequent passages from the city to the Mount of Olives and to Bethany, it is difficult to say, but it can hardly be supposed that He came by such a path on the morning of His triumphal entry into the city. ...
The Mount of Olives in the days of Christ must have presented rural fertility, verdure, and quiet very grateful to country visitors to the great metropolis; fresh mountain breeziness in contrast to the closeness and foulness of the city atmosphere, and a view of the beloved and sacred city in which all that was sordid was lost, and only the beauty and grandeur remained. ...
Gospel incidents connected with the Mount of Olives. —Although, with the single exception of John 8:1, all the incidents expressly connected with the Mount of Olives belong to the Passion week, there can be no doubt (Luke 21:37) that this quiet spot was one beloved and frequented by the Master. Once we read of His approach to the Mount from the Eastern side ‘unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives’ (Mark 11:1 || Matthew 21:1 || Luke 19:29). During the whole of that week ‘in the daytime he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out and abode in the Mount that is called of Olives’ (Luke 21:37)—the special locality on the Mount being Bethany (Matthew 21:17, Mark 11:11). ...
To these incidents where the Mount of Olives is expressly mentioned may be added the scene in the house of Martha and Mary (Luke 10:38-42), the raising of Lazarus (John 11), and the feast at the house of Simon (Matthew 26:6-13, Mark 14:3-9, John 12:1-19); for, as has been shown, Bethany was certainly a part of the Mount of Olives. ‘Mount of Olives’ in Smith’s DB
Olives - The Mount of Olives was situated to the east of Jerusalem, and divided from the city only by the brook Kidron, and by the valley of Jehoshaphat, which stretches out from the north to the south. Hence it is that the Mount of Olives is called the mountain of corruption, 2 Kings 23:13 . The Mount of Olives forms part of a ridge of limestone hills, extending to the north and the south-west. Bethany is a small village to the east of the Mount of Olives, on the road to Jericho, not farther from Jerusalem than the pinnacle of the hill. There are two roads to it; one passes over the Mount of Olives; the other, which is the shorter and easier, winds round the eastern end, having the greater part of the hill on the north or left hand, and on the right the elevation called by some writers the Mount of Offence, which is, however, very little above the valley of Jehoshaphat. "It is truly a curious and interesting fact," adds the learned traveller, "that, during a period of little more than two thousand years, Hebrews, Assyrians, Romans, Moslems, and Christians, have been successively in possession of the rocky mountains of Palestine; yet, the olive still vindicates its paternal soil, and is found, at this day, upon the same spot which was called by the Hebrew writers Mount Olivet and the Mount of Olives, eleven centuries before the Christian era," 2 Samuel 15:30 ; Zechariah 14:4
Graft - Olives were frequently caused to multiply by removing shoots from the base of a cultivated tree (compare Psalm 128:3 ) and grafting them onto the trunks of wild olive trees
Bethphage - ("house of unripe figs"): testifying the former fertility which no longer remains; a village on the mount of Olives, on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem
Mortar - They were used to grind grain for flour, herbs for medicine, Olives for oil (Exodus 27:20 )
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - ...
Others however associate the above with the valley lying between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, now called the Valley of Jehoshaphat; but no trace of this name as attached to that particular valley can be found earlier than the fourth century
Bethany - a considerable place, situated on the ascent of the mount of Olives, about two miles from Jerusalem, John 11:18 ; Matthew 21:17 ; Matthew 26:6 , &c. Richardson, on the shady side of the mount of Olives, and abounds in trees and long grass
Moloch - Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ) erected a high place for this idol on the Mount of Olives, and from that time till the days of Josiah his worship continued (2 Kings 23:10,13 )
Roe - "Among the gray hills of Galilee it is still 'the roe upon the mountains of Bether,' and I have seen a little troop of gazelles feeding on the Mount of Olives close to Jerusalem itself" (Tristram)
Anathoth - Now Anata, on a broad ridge, amidst fields of grain, figs, and Olives
Canaan - Many Christians stop at Jabesh-Gilead and never cross over Jordan to the land of grapes, figs, Olives and victory
Garden - The gardens of the Hebrews were planted with flowers and aromatic shrubs, Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 4:16, besides Olives, fig trees, nuts or walnuts, Song of Solomon 6:11, pomegranates, and others for domestic use
Ophel - It is separated from Mount Zion on the west by the valley called Tyropoeon, and is now devoted to the culture of Olives, figs, and other fruit
Bethany - ) Bethabara, though dates have long disappeared from the locality, and only Olives and figs remain (whence Olivet and Bethphage are named). ...
"In the morning" they proceeded by the same route as before (as appears from their seeing the dried up fig tree), and therefore from Bethany to Jerusalem (Mark 11:27; Mark 12:41) and the temple, where He spoke parables and answered cavils, and then "went out of the temple" (Mark 13:1), to return again to Bethany, as appears from His speaking with Peter, James, Jehu, and Andrew privately "upon the mount of Olives" (Mark 13:3), on the S. Bethany was "at" the mount of Olives (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:1-29), near the usual road from Jericho to Jerusalem (Mark 10:46; Mark 11:1), close to Bethphage ("the house of figs"), frequently named with it. of the mount of Olives, a mile beyond the summit, near the point at which the road to Jericho makes a sudden descent toward the Jordan valley; a hollow, wooded with Olives, almonds, pomegranates, oaks, and carobs; lying below a secondary ridge which shuts out the view of the summit of Olivet
Bethany - The 'house of dates,' a village on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, about 2 miles from Jerusalem, near the road to Jericho
Afford - ) To give forth; to supply, yield, or produce as the natural result, fruit, or issue; as, grapes afford wine; Olives afford oil; the earth affords fruit; the sea affords an abundant supply of fish
Olives - Olives, the Mount of, Olivet, Mount. The mount of Olives, called also Olivet, and by the Arabs at present Jebel et-Tur, a name they give to elevated summits generally, was so styled from the olive trees which clothed its sides
Harvest - ...
Among the more important crops grown were wheat, grapes, and Olives. Olives were harvested between mid-September to mid-November by beating the trees with long sticks (Deuteronomy 24:20 ; Isaiah 17:6 )
Olives, Mount of - "The Mount of Olives" occurs in the Old Testament in (Zechariah 14:4 ) only. " (Ezekiel 11:23 ) In the New Testament the usual form is "the Mount of Olives. It is this portion which is the real Mount of Olives of the history. (Matthew 23:29 ) ...
The most southern portion of the Mount of Olives is that usually known as the "Mount of Offence," Mons Offensionis . " The presence of a number of churches and other edifices must have rendered the Mount of Olives, during the early and middle ages of Christianity, entirely unlike what it was in the time of the Jewish kingdom or of our Lord
Hill - The "hill" in Joshua 15:9, compare 8, is the Mount of Olives
Earthquake - (Zechariah 14:5 ) From (Zechariah 14:4 ) we are led to infer that a great convulsion took place at this time in the Mount of Olives, the mountain being split so as to leave a valley between its summit
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - This is the name given in modern times to the valley between Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives, and the Kidron flows through it
Hyaena - It is both hated and dreaded; it consumes dead bodies, and will even dig up corpses in the cemeteries; the writer has known such rifling of graves to occur on the Mount of Olives
Milcom - Solomon built sanctuaries to Milcom on the Mount of Olives at the request of his foreign wives, reviving the ancient cult (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 )
Dinner - In general, however, a light meal is eaten about the middle of the day, consisting of bread, Olives, fruit, leben (sour curded milk), cheese, etc
Kid'Ron, - It was close to Jerusalem, between the city and the Mount of Olives
Oil - ...
Preparation In biblical times, domestic oil was prepared from Olives. The extraction of oil from Olives is abundantly confirmed by archaeological findings of stone presses found at several sites in Palestine. Since Olives were found in abundance in Palestine, olive oil was also used as a commodity of trade (1 Kings 5:11 ; Ezekiel 27:17 ; Hosea 12:1 )
Bethany - ...
...
A village on the south-eastern slope of the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 ), about 2 miles east of Jerusalem, on the road to Jericho
Siloam, Tower of - It stands on the west slope of the Mount of Olives
Egyptian, the - Later the Egyptian gathered 30,000 in the wilderness, leading the multitude to the Mount of Olives from which, so he promised, they would see the walls of Jerusalem fall at his command
Appetite - Hunger and thirst are natural appetites the appetites for Olives, tobacco, snuff, &c
Cleave - ...
The mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof
Olive - ) A small slice of meat seasoned, rolled up, and cooked; as, Olives of beef or veal
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - ...
A great part of the mount is cultivated with wheat and barley, with a vine here and there; also a few fig trees, but of trees there are still more of Olives than any other. Its modern name is Jebel et Tor, 'Mount of the Summit,' signifying 'mount of importance,' or Jebel ez Zeitun , 'Mount of Olives
Olive - In recent years this cultivation has been largely revived, and extensive groves of Olives may be found in many parts, notably near Beit Jala on the Bethlehem road, and near Nâblus . Destruction of a harvest of cereals is a temporary loss, but when the vines and, still more, the Olives are destroyed, the loss takes many years to make good ( Revelation 6:5-6 ). ’ Where groves of wild Olives are found in Palestine, they are probably always the descendants of cultivated trees long ago destroyed. Olives are eaten pickled in hrine, either when green and unripe or when soft and black
Tekoa - of Olives, and Nebi Samwîl (Mizpah) are all visible from it
Andalusia, Spain - The valleys and plains grow oranges, Olives, sugarcane, wheat, corn, and other grains; the mountains produce lead, silver, copper, mercury and coal
Annas - He was father-in-law to Caiaphas; and Jesus Christ was carried before him, directly after his seizure in the garden of Olives, John 18:13
First-Fruits - These first-fruits consisted of wheat, barley, grapes, figs, apricots, Olives, and dates. The company was preceded by an ox appointed for the sacrifice, with a crown of Olives on his head, and his horns gilded
Ascension - When our Savior had repeatedly conversed with his apostles during forty days, after his resurrection, and afforded them infallible proofs of its reality, he led them out to the Mount of Olives, and was raised up to heaven in their sight, there to continue till he shall come again at the last day to judge the quick and the dead, Acts 1:9,11
Kedron - a small brook which, rising near Jerusalem, runs through the valley on the east of the city, between it and the Mount of Olives
Resurrection of Christ - Yet he rose from the dead on the third day, and appeared on eleven different occasions to numerous witnesses, convincing even those who were the most doubtful, and after forty days ascended to heaven from the mount of Olives
Garden - The gardens of the Hebrews were planted with flowers and aromatic shrubs, (Song of Solomon 6:2 ; 4:16 ) besides Olives, fig trees, nuts or walnuts, (Song of Solomon 6:12 ) pomegranates, and others for domestic use
Mount, Mountain - 3); John 4:20 ; (b) of "the Mount of Transfiguration," Matthew 17:1,9 ; Mark 9:2,9 ; Luke 9:28,37 (AV, "hill"); 2 Peter 1:18 ; (c) of "Zion," Hebrews 12:22 ; Revelation 14:1 ; (d) of "Sinai," Acts 7:30,38 ; Galatians 4:24,25 ; Hebrews 8:5 ; 12:20 ; (e) of "the Mount of Olives," Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; Luke 19:29,37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; Acts 1:12 ; (f) of "the hill districts as distinct from the lowlands," especially of the hills above the Sea of Galilee, e
Sycamore - (Amos 7:14 ) So great was the value of these trees that David appointed for them in his kingdom a special overseer, as he did for the Olives (1 Chronicles 27:28 ) and it is mentioned as one of the heaviest of Egypt's calamities that her sycamore were destroyed by hailstones
Sabbath Day's Journey - This phrase appears only once in the Bible (Acts 1:12 ), describing the distance from the Mount of Olives to Jerusalem
Kidron, Kedron, Brook - ...
On the revolt of Absalom David crossed the brook ere he climbed the mount of Olives
Olives, Mount of - In 2 Samuel 15:30 "the ascent of the Olives" (Hebrew). The northern part, probably Nob, Mizpeh, and Scopus (so called from the view it commands of the city), is distinct historically, though geologically a continuation, from "the Mount of Olives. "The Mount of Olives" is similarly used in a general sense for Bethany (Luke 21:37, compare Matthew 21:17; Matthew 26:6). side or else peak of the Mount of Olives, which from Brocardus' time (13th century) has been called "the mount of offense" from the Vulgate translated of 2 Kings 23:13. Bethphage must have been, as this stone is, not on the road which Jesus was taking, namely, the narrow ridge to the Mount of Olives; otherwise He need not have sent disciples if He would have to pass it Himself; He said to them, "Go to the village over against you" (Matthew 21:2). ...
Ganneau identifies Bethphage with Kefr et Tur, "the village of the Mount of Olives," where exist ancient remains; he thinks it marked on the E. Now it is only in the secluded slopes of the northern hill that venerable Olives are seen spreading out into a wood; anciently the hills were covered with them. "His feet shall stand upon the Mount of Olives which is before Jerusalem on the E. , and the Mount of Olives shall cleave in the midst thereof toward the E
Holy Hour, the - A pious exercise of mental or vocal prayer, in union with the prayer of Our Lord in the Garden of Olives on Maundy Thursday night, when He wae abandoned by the Apostles
Chemosh - To Chemosh Solomon erected an altar upon the Mount of Olives, 1 Kings 11:7
Jehosh'Aphat, Valley of - (Joel 3:12 ) The scene of "Jehovah's judgment" as been localized, and the name has come down to us attached to that deep ravine which separates Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives, through which at one time the Kedron forced its stream
Jabbok - Buckingham thus describes it: "The banks of this stream are so thickly wooded with oleander and plane trees, wild Olives, and wild almonds in blossom, with many flowers, the names of which were unknown to us; with tall and waving reeds, at least fifteen feet in height; that we could not perceive the water through them from above, though the presence of these luxuriant borders marked the winding of its course, and the murmur of its flow, echoing through its long deep channel, was to be heard distinctly from afar
Oil - The earliest kind was that which is extracted from Olives
Fig - Like Olives and grapes, figs were plentiful in Israel and neighbouring countries (Deuteronomy 8:8; Judges 9:8-13; Jeremiah 5:17)
Olives, Mount of - Olives, MOUNT OF . ...
Ecclesiastical tradition has, as might he expected, been busy with the Mount of Olives, and the places pointed out have by no means remained unaltered through the Christian centuries, as becomes evident from a study of the writings of the pilgrims
Oil - The "beaten oil" for the sanctuary light was made from Olives bruised in a mortar. The Olives were sometimes "trodden" (Micah 6:15), or "pressed" in a "press," making the fats overflow (Joel 2:24; Joel 3:13; Haggai 2:16)
Olive-Tree - By such a process the sap of the good olive, by pervading the branch which is "graffed in," makes it a good branch, bearing good Olives
Olive - Farmers harvested the Olives by shaking or beating the tree so that the fruit fell to the ground
Mount Mountain - ...
In apostolic history four conspicuous mountains are especially referred to: the Mount of Olives, Sinai, Zion, and ‘the Mount’ (of Transfiguration). The Mount of Olives (τὸ ὄρος τῶν ἐλαιῶν, Acts 1:12). The Mount of Olives, called by the Muslims Jebel et-Tur (‘Mountain of Light’), and Jebel ez-Zeitun (‘Mount of Olives’), is the name of the somewhat elevated range (circa, about 2,650 ft
Mount Mountain - ...
In apostolic history four conspicuous mountains are especially referred to: the Mount of Olives, Sinai, Zion, and ‘the Mount’ (of Transfiguration). The Mount of Olives (τὸ ὄρος τῶν ἐλαιῶν, Acts 1:12). The Mount of Olives, called by the Muslims Jebel et-Tur (‘Mountain of Light’), and Jebel ez-Zeitun (‘Mount of Olives’), is the name of the somewhat elevated range (circa, about 2,650 ft
Fruit - Among the most common are grapes, figs, Olives, pomegranates, and apples (perhaps to be identified with apricots or quince)
Gethsemane - Gethsemane was itself a village, at the foot of the mount of Olives; and the garden Jesus of times resorted to, saw part of this village
Kidron - Kedron = Cedron, turbid, the winter torrent which flows through the Valley of Jehoshaphat, on the eastern side of Jerusalem, between the city and the Mount of Olives
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - of Olives, has since the 4th cent
Gethsemane - Oil-press, a garden or grove in the valley at the foot of the Mount of Olives, over against Jerusalem, to which our Savior sometimes retired, and in which he endured his agony, and was betrayed by Judas, Matthew 26:36-57
Pelagia, Surnamed Margarita - She finally left Antioch for a cell on the Mount of Olives, where she lived as a monk in male attire, and died some three years afterwards from excessive austerities
Kidron (1) - of Olives, it turns South. The whole of this first open section of the valley is to-day known as Wady el-Joz ; (‘Valley of the Nuts’): it is full of fertile soil, and in a great part of its extent is sown with corn or planted with Olives or almonds
Melania, a Roman Lady - There she established herself at the Mount of Olives, where, says Jerome ( Chron. She passed on to Africa with the others; and, after vainly attempting to induce Melania and Pinianus to embrace the monastic state, went on to her former habitation on the Mount of Olives, and 40 days after died, aged 60
Oil - OIL (שָׁמֶן, ἔλαιον), by which we are to understand olive oil, was from the very earliest times one of the main products of Palestine, for already in days prior to the Hebrew settlement, Canaan was ‘a land of oil Olives’ (Deuteronomy 8:8). The earliest method of expression seems to have been that of treading the Olives with the feet, to which allusion is made in Micah 6:15, and perhaps also in Deuteronomy 33:24 This process is unknown in modern times (Thomson, LB
The quality of the oil depended partly on the time at which the Olives were gathered, and partly on the mode of crushing
Agriculture - The primary crops of the Bible include grain, grapes, and Olives (Genesis 27:28 ; Deuteronomy 7:13 ; Joel 1:10 ). ...
How long do olive trees live? The huge trees in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36 ) on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem are hundreds of years old and could potentially stretch back to New Testament times. 70 the Roman forces under Titus felled all the trees, presumably including the Olives which could have sprouted again (Psalm 123:3 ) to yield the aged hollow trees still growing around Jerusalem. Olives require a Mediterranean type of climate of moist cool winters and hot dry summers to be economically productive
Crown - And peaceful Olives crowned his hoary head
Lebanon - Olives, figs, and mulberries also abound, and a number of aromatic shrubs, which perfume the air, as alluded to in Song of Solomon 4:11
Cedron - (John 18:1-2) The brook itself lay in a valley to the east of the city, between Jerusalem and the mount of Olives; and it emptied itself in the dead Sea. And this brook was rendered memorable in allusion to Christ, when David, as a type of Jesus, passed it in his ascent to the mount of Olives, when fleeing from his kingdom with his followers barefoot, his head covered, and weeping, and sorrowing, at the instance of Absalom, his unnatural son
Ashkelon - Its name still appears in our "eschalot" or" shallot," an onion for which it was famous, as for its figs, Olives, etc
Banquet - ...
Typical foods served at banquets were fish, bread, Olives, various kinds of vegetables, cheeses, honey, dates, and figs
Bethlehem - The ridge is cut into terraces, which are covered with Olives and vines
Jehoshaphat - This valley is a deep and narrow glen, which runs from north to south, between the Mount of Olives and Mount Moriah; the brook Cedron flowing through the middle of it, which is dry the greatest part of the year, but has a current of a red colour, after storms, or in rainy seasons. Others think it lies between the walls of Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives
Sharon - Around Ramleh and Ludd are forests of Olives, and the orange gardens of Jaffa are too well known to need more than a passing reference; wherever the hand of man has been diligent, there the soil has bounteously responded
Wallet - The coarse loaves of the country, Olives, and dried fruit form the staple diet, with an occasional lump of cheese
Matthew - Matthew knew the value of goods of all description: wool, flax, linen, pottery, brass, silver, gold, barley, wheat, Olives, figs, wheat
Mephibosheth - ...
At the flight of David from Jerusalem after Absalom’s rebellion, Ziba met him on the Mount of Olives with provisions
Ascension - Leading His eleven apostles out as far as Bethany, on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, in the act of blessing them He ascended up to heaven, and a cloud hid Him from their sight
Leb'Anon, - Fig trees cling to the naked rock; vines are trained along narrow ledges; long ranges of mulberries, on terraces like steps of stairs, cover the more gentle declivities; and dense groves of Olives fill up the bottoms of the glens. Lebanon also abounds in Olives, figs and mulberries; while some remnants exist of the forests of pine, oak and cedar which formerly covered it
Bethany - of Olives' eastern slope, Bethany sat “about two miles” (John 11:18 , NIV) southeast of Jerusalem
Timnah - The grain which he fired grew in the valley, whereas the vineyards and Olives lined the hills
Gibeon - Now el Jib, on a rounded chalk hill the limestone strata of which lie horizontally, forming terraces along which Olives and vines abound, with a basin of broad valleys and plains below
Gethsemane - It lay east of Jerusalem, across the Kidron (John 18:1), at the foot of or upon the Mount of Olives (Matthew 26:20, Mark 14:26, Luke 22:39 : cf
Grave - Those now bearing this name may be seen marked on maps to the north of Jerusalem; and others called the TOMBS OF THE PROPHETS are placed on the mount of Olives
Olives, Mount of - The sides of the Mount of Olives towards the west contain many tombs, cut in the rocks
Food - Some of the better known fruits were figs, grapes, Olives, pomegranates, apples, dates, sycamore, pistachio nuts and almonds (Genesis 43:11; Deuteronomy 8:8; Deuteronomy 34:3; Song of Song of Solomon 7:8; Song of Solomon 8:5; Amos 7:14; Matthew 7:16; see FIGS; GRAPES; Olives). ...
Olives were crushed to produce olive oil, which, because of its extensive use in cooking, was a basic necessity for the Hebrews
Hill - Psalm 2:6 (a) This is a clear reference to the Mount of Olives on which the Lord JESUS will stand when He returns to this earth to set up His kingdom
Candle - נֵד, נִיר, the latter used only in a figurative sense) was, as a rule, an earthenware vessel, like a tiny flat teapot, with a flaxen wick (Matthew 12:20) in the spout, and supplied with oil (mostly from Olives, but also from sesame, nuts, radishes, or fish), through a hole in the centre, from an ἀγγείον (Matthew 25:4) or other vessel
Anointing - One of the punishments on Israel was that the Olives should not yield oil for the anointing
First-Fruits - Such were the first-fruits of the dough, Numbers 16:20-21; and of the threshing-floor, which Jewish writers distinguish into two kinds, the first including wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, Olives, and figs; the second oil, wine, and other produce which supported human life, also the first of the fleece and the hair of goats
Judea - The valleys yielded large crops of grain; and the hills were terraced, watered, covered with vines, Genesis 49:11,12 , and rich in Olives, figs, and many other fruits
Lebanon - Its western slopes particularly, rising by a succession of terraces from the plain of the coast, are covered with vines, Olives, mulberries, and figs; and occupied, as well as the valleys among the mountains, by numberless villages
Olves, Mount of - , "Mount of Olives
Tabor (1) - ‘the mountain of the mount,’ the same name as is applied to the Mount of Olives
Olivet Discourse, the - (ahl' ih veht) Jesus' major sermon preached on the Mount of Olives; Jesus gave instructions concerning the end of the age and the destruction of Jerusalem
Seir - In the summer it produces most of the European fruits, namely, apricots, figs, pomegranates, Olives, apples, and peaches; while in winter deep snows occasionally fall, with frosts, to the middle of March
Miz'Pah - These conditions are satisfied by the position of Scopus, the broad ridge which forms the continuation of the Mount of Olives to the north and cast, from which the traveller gains, like Titus, his first view, and takes his last farewell, of the domes, walls and towers of the holy city
Brook - of Olives even in the latest days of the Temple (Jerus
Samson - Then, his wife being given to another man, Samson burned up their corn, their vineyards, and their Olives, and smote the Philistines with 'a great slaughter
Annas - 5) or on the Mount of Olives (J
Annas (2) - 116) or on the Mount of Olives (Derenbourg), the profits of which enriched the high priestly family
Claudius - Felix sent to Rome Eleazar, son of Dinaeus, captain of a band of robbers, who had committed great ravages in Palestine; he procured the death of Jonathan, the high priest, who sometimes freely represented to him his duty; he defeated a body of three thousand men, whom an Egyptian, a false prophet, had assembled upon the Mount of Olives
Moloch - Solomon built a temple to Moloch upon the Mount of Olives, 1 Kings 11:7 ; and Manasseh a long time after imitated his impiety, making his son pass through the fire in honour of Moloch, 2 Kings 21:3-6
Olive - Those who see Olives for the first time are occasionally disappointed by the dusty color of their foilage; but those who are familiar with them find an inexpressible charm in the rippling changes of their slender gray-green leaves
Canaan - The principal mountains are Lebanon, Carmel, Tabor, Gilead, Herman, the mount of Olives, etc. Olives, figs, vines, and pomegranates grew in abundance; the hills were clothed with flocks and herds, and the valleys were covered with corn. Its hills, once terraced to the summit, and covered with luxuriant grain, vines, Olives, and figs, are now bare rocks
Molech, Moloch - On the other hand, we are told that, while Melech was worshipped at Topheth, the sanctuary of Milcom was on the Mount of Olives ( 2 Kings 23:13 )
Lebanon - Every available space is utilized for figtrees, vines, mulberry trees, and Olives
Caesarea - Anciently Paneas or Panium (from the sylvan god Pan, whose worship seemed appropriate to the verdant situation, with groves of Olives and Hermon's lovely slopes near); the modern Bahias
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Joel 3:2; Joel 3:12, parallel to Zechariah 14:2-4, where the mount of Olives answers to the "valley of Jehoshaphat" in Joel
Oil - The Olives were either shaken from the tree or beaten down by striking the branches with a light pole, as illustrated on Greek vases (illust. In these the Olives were crushed by means of a large round stone
Moloch - But Milcom's high place was on the Mount of Olives, and human sacrifices were not offered as they were to Moloch (2 Kings 23:10; 2 Kings 23:13
Fig, Fig-Tree - ...
The meaning of James 3:12 is clear: a tree is known by its fruits; a fig-tree cannot bring forth Olives, neither can an olive-tree bring forth figs; a man’s ‘works’ are, in short, an infallible index to his ‘faith’ (James 2:18)
Siloam, the Pool of - Siloam was called so from sending its waters to refresh the gardens below, still the greenest spot about Jerusalem, and abounding in Olives, figs, and pomegranates
Oil (Olive) - In Revelation 6:6 ‘the oil and the wine’ refer to the growing crops of Olives and grapes
Palestine - The original woods had for ages disappeared, though the slopes were dotted, as now, with figs, Olives, and other fruit-trees where there was any soil. Hills now bare, or at best rough with stunted growth, were then terraced, so as to grow vines, Olives, and grain
Decapolis - 18), but also praises the small Olives of the region (Mark 15:4)
Advent, Second - " "His feet shall stand in that day upon the mount of Olives, which is before Jerusalem on the east
Agriculture - ...
The soil of Gaza is dark and rich, though light, and retains rain; Olives abound in it. The gleanings, the grainers of the field, and the forgotten sheaf and remaining grapes and Olives, were also the poor man's right; and perhaps a second tithe every third year (Leviticus 19:9-10; Deuteronomy 14:28; Deuteronomy 26:12; Amos 4:4)
Bethlehem - The slopes outside abound in figs, vines, almonds and Olives
Nazareth - The valley and hill sides abound in gay flowers as the hollyhock growing wild, fig trees, Olives, and oranges, gardens with cactus hedges, and grainfields
Tabor, Mount - The modern Arabic name—identical with the name of the Mount of Olives—is Jebel et-Tur
Palestine - Rounded low hills, with coarse gray stone, clumps of oak bushes, and the remains of ancient terraces running round them, meet one on each side, or else the terraces are reconstructed and bear Olives and figs, and vineyards are surrounded by rough walls with watchtowers. Olives, terebinths, pines, and laurels here and ten miles to the N. Extensive woods there are none, and the Olives which are found everywhere but little improve the landscape. Low calcareous hills, covered with villages and ruins, and largely planted with Olives, rise above broad arable valleys. The lower limestone group has two series of beds: the upper darkish, cavernous, and ferruginous; the lower dark gray, solid, abounding in the fossil cidaris, an extinct echinus, the spines of which are the "olives" of the convents
Naphtali - 180) quotes a saying from the Talmud: ‘It is easier to raise a legion of Olives in Galilee than to bring up a child in Palestine
Gourd - When gathered, they obtain from it, either by friction or pressure, an unctuous liquid, which diffuses an offensive smell, but for burning it is equal in quality to the oil of Olives
Mountains - ...
The hills of Judea were anciently cultivate to the top, with scores of terraces, and covered with vines, Olives, figs, etc
Jerusalem - It stands on four peaks of the mountain ridge of Western Palestine, at a general elevation of about 2600 feet above the sea, the English survey placing the height of Moriah at 2440 feet, Mount Zion 2550 feet, Mount of Olives 2665 feet. From the Jordan valley by Jericho and the Mount of Olives. The latter part of the approach, over the Mount of Olives, as generally followed at the present day, is identical with what it was, at least in one memorable instance, in the time of Christ. ...
The king's garden, Nehemiah 3:15, was probably outside the city at the south, as Gethsemane, Matthew 26:36, was eastward at the foot of the Mount of Olives
Joannes ii, Bishop of Jerusalem - It had also a special interest from the settlements of distinguished persons from the West, which made it during his episcopate a focus of Christian and literary activity, and with two of which, that of Rufinus and Melania on the Mount of Olives, and of Jerome and Paula at Bethlehem, he was destined to have close but similar relations. ...
When John became bishop, Rufinus had already been settled on the Mount of Olives some nine years, and Jerome and his friends were just entering on their work at Bethlehem
Rock - Deuteronomy 32:13 emphasizes the fact that in Palestine even the rocks are the home of bees ( Psalms 81:16 , Isaiah 7:19 ), and the rocky soil produces Olives ( Job 29:6 )
Salt - In other treatises of the Mishna we find frequent references to the use of salt for salting fish, for pickling Olives, vegetables, etc
Rufinus of Aquileia - Certainly he now settled with her on the Mount of Olives. —For 18 or 20 years, reckoning either from 377 or 379 to 397, Rufinus lived on the Mount of Olives. Rufinus records that Jerome was once his guest at the Mount of Olives ( ib. The preface says it is written in response to repeated requests of the monks on the Mount of Olives
Greece - Small grains, grapes, and Olives were the main agricultural products while the mountains provided pastures for sheep and goats
Cosmetics - Oils for the skin creams were extracted from Olives, almonds, gourds, other trees and plants, and animal and fish fats
Carmel - "...
Fossil spines of echinus are called "olives
Oil - As a sign of judgment Micah predicted that the nation of Israel "will press Olives" but not have the opportunity to "use the oil" (6:15)
Loneliness - lxxx); in the last visit to Jerusalem He sought retirement at night by leaving the city either for Bethany or the Mount of Olives (Matthew 21:17, Luke 9:54-55, Luke 21:37)
Fox - It is recorded, in Judges 15:4-5 , that "Samson went and caught three hundred foxes, and took firebrands, and turned tail to tail, and put a firebrand in the midst between two tails; and when he had set the brands on fire, he let them go into the standing corn of the Philistines, and burnt up both the shocks, and also the standing corn, with the vineyards and Olives
Transjordan - Gilead, situated east of that portion of the Jordan which connects the Sea of Galilee with the Dead Sea, produces grapes, Olives, vegetables, cereals, and also is mentioned in the Bible as a source of balm (Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 )
Ointment - Olives were very common in Palestine; however, perfumed salves were very expensive
Haggai, Theology of - And even though there were very few grapes, figs, or Olives growing in the land, God promised that "from this day on I will bless you" (2:19)
Ascension - Here we learn that the scene was more precisely the Mount, of Olives ( Acts 1:12 ); that the final conversation, to which allusion is possibly made in Mark 16:19 , concerned the promise of the Holy Spirit ( Mark 16:6-8 ); and that the Ascension, so far as it was an event and therefore a subject of testimony, took the form of the uplifting of the bodily form of Jesus from the earth till it disappeared in a cloud ( Mark 16:9-10 )
Feasts - The hottest part of the year had now arrived, and over the next few months the figs, grapes, Olives and dates ripened and were harvested
Jerusalem - 173):...
‘He [5] found the whole city razed to the ground, and the Temple of the Lord trodden under foot, there being only a few houses standing, and the Church of God, a small building, on the place where the disciples on their return from the Mount of Olives, after the Saviour’s Ascension, assembled in the upper chamber. -Discarding Luke 24:50, Christian tradition early laid hold upon the summit of the Mount of Olives (cf. 172):...
‘All believers in Christ flock together from all quarters of the earth, not as of old to behold the beauty of Jerusalem, or that they may worship in the former Temple which stood in Jerusalem, but that they may abide there, and both hear the story of Jerusalem, and also worship in the Mount of Olives over against Jerusalem, whither the glory or the Lord removed itself, leaving the earlier city. There, also, according to the published record, the feet of our Lord and Saviour, who was Himself the Word, and, through it, took upon Himself human form, stood upon thy Mourn of Olives near the cave which is now pointed out there
Travel (2) - 6) gives the distance from Jerusalem to the Mount of Olives as 5 furlongs, and in another as 6 (BJ v
Jerusalem - ...
Immediately to the east of the city another valley ran south, separating the city from the Mount of Olives
Linus (1) - John on the Mount of Olives
Farming - ...
After the grapes were the Olives, which workers harvested by shaking or beating the tree so that the fruit fell to the ground
Jerusalem - In the celebrated prospect from the Mount of Olives, the city lies too low, is too near the eye, and has too much the character of a bird's eye view, with the formality of a topographical plan. After citing the language of the Prophet Jeremiah, in his lamentations on the desolation of the ancient city, as accurately portraying its present state, Lamentations 1:1-6 ; Lamentations 2:1-9 ; Lamentations 2:15 , he thus proceeds: "When seen from the Mount of Olives, on the other side of the Valley of Jehoshaphat, Jerusalem presents an inclined plane, descending from west to east. The best view of it is from the Mount of Olives: it commands the exact shape and nearly every particular; namely, the church of the holy sepulchre, the Armenian convent, the mosque of Omar, St. A few gardens still remain on the sloping base of Mount Zion, watered from the pool of Siloam; the gardens of Gethsemane are still in a sort of ruined cultivation; the fences are broken down, and the olive trees decaying, as if the hand that pressed and fed them were withdrawn; the Mount of Olives still retains a languishing verdure, and nourishes a few of those trees from which it derives its name; but all round about Jerusalem the general aspect is blighted and barren; the grass is withered; the bare rock looks through the scanty sward; and the grain itself, like the staring progeny of famine, seems in doubt whether to come to maturity, or die in the ear
Plants in the Bible - The stone fruits ripen toward the end of summer and are pickled in brine either unripe as green Olives or ripe as black Olives
Meals - ]'>[1] ) by eating a morsel of bread the ‘morning morsel’ as it is called in the Talmud with some simple relish, such as a few Olives; but this was in no sense a meal. This would consist of several courses, beginning with light appetizing dishes, such as salted fish, pickled Olives, etc
Gennesaret, Land of - —...
‘Its nature is wonderful as well as its beauty: its soil is so fruitful that all sorts of trees can grow upon it, and the inhabitants accordingly plant all sorts of trees there; for the temper of the air is so well mixed that it agrees very well with these several sorts; particularly walnuts, which require the coldest air, flourish there in vast plenty; there are palm trees also, which grow best in hot air; fig trees also and Olives grow near them, which yet require an air that is more temperate. But to-day, though its grapes, figs, Olives, and walnuts have vanished, there are to be seen wild figs, oleanders, nubk trees, dwarf palms, papyrus plants, tall prickly centaureas: in summer, magnificent lilac-coloured convolvuli hanging in long festoons of blossom from the prickly shrubs; wild flowers of countless variety—tulips, anemones, irises; rice, wheat, the best and earliest melons and cucumbers in Palestine, sedges and rushes by the Lake; also thorns and thistles, especially in the central portion; in short, a tangle of luxuriant vegetation—a lovely floral carpet in February, a wilderness of thorns in summer
Tomb - The only important hypogeum which is wholly Jewish in its arrangement, and may consequently belong to an earlier or to any epoch, is that known as the tombs of the prophets, in the western flank of the Mount of Olives
Fruit (2) - Other references to fruits under their specific names, without the use of the word ‘fruit’: (a) grapes (Matthew 7:16, Luke 6:44); (b) figs (Matthew 7:16, Mark 11:13, Luke 6:44); (c) husks (Luke 15:16, probably the fruit of the carob or locust-tree); (d) mulberry (Luke 17:16; (e) Olives (Matthew 21:1)
Gardens - Doubdan found a very fruitful vineyard, full of Olives, fig trees, and vines, about eight miles south-west from Bethlehem, enclosed with a hedge; and that part of it adjoining to the road, strongly formed of thorns and rose bushes, intermingled with pomegranate trees of surpassing beauty and fragrance
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - 246); he records having ascended from "holy Gethsemane" to the "holy mount of Olives" (187)
Palladius, Bishop of Helenopolis - 137, 138), as well as of the three years which the writer spent on the Mount of Olives with Innocent, the presbyter of the church there
Jerusalem - On the east of Jerusalem, and stretching from north to south, lies the Mount of Olives, divided from the city by the valley of the Kidron, and commanding a noble prospect of the city and surrounding county. Over against Moriah, or a little further north, lies the garden of Gethsemane, with its olive trees, at the foot of the Mount of Olives
Samaria - high, surrounded with terraced hills, clad with figs and Olives
Zechariah, Book of - Zechariah 14:1 envisions the Mount of Olives splitting in two, with fresh water (representing the blessings of God) flowing east and west watering the world
Temple - Solomon's portico was situated in the eastern front of the temple, opposite to the mount of Olives, where our Saviour is said to have sat when his disciples came to show him the grandeur of its various buildings, of which, grand as they were, he said, the time was approaching when one stone should not be left upon another, Matthew 24:1-3 . These votive offerings, it should seem, were visible at a distance; for when Jesus Christ was sitting on the mount of Olives, and his disciples called his attention to the temple, they pointed out to him the gifts with which it was adorned, Luke 21:5
Fruit - James 3:12 asks whether a fig-tree can yield Olives or a vine figs
Philistia - Their plain was famed for its fertility in grain, vines, and Olives (Judges 15:5), so that it was the refuge from times of famine (2 Kings 8:2; compare Genesis 26:12)
Solomon - To these he built temples on the Mount of Olives, over against and east of Jerusalem, and thus insulted openly the Majesty he had adored
Ascension - ...
The place of the Ascension was Olivet (Acts 1:12, Ἐλαιών-so, according to some editors, we ought to read the word in Luke 19:29; Luke 21:37), usually called the Mount of Olives. But ‘up’ and ‘down’ are symbolical words; heaven is not a palace vertically above the Mount of Olives, nor is it a place at all, but a state; the Ascension is a transition rather from one condition to another than from one place to another (Milligan, The Ascension, p
Jeru'Salem - --There appear to have been but two main approaches to the city:-- ...
From the Jordan valley by Jericho and the Mount of Olives. ( Nehemiah 3:15 ) The Mount of Olives, as its name, and the names of various places upon it seem to imply, was a fruitful spot
Bread - They can then be opened a little at one side, and the loaf thus forms a natural pouch enclosing the meat, cheese, raisins or Olives to be eaten with it by the labourer
Assyria - Among its products, besides the common cereals, were dates, Olives, cotton, mulberries, gum-arabic, madder, and castor-oil
Food - see), itself an invaluable aid in the preparation of food, Olives were not only eaten in the fresh state, but were at all times preserved for later use by being soaked in brine. Such pickled Olives were, and still are, used as a relish with bread by rich and poor alike
Discourse - But of the longer discourses with the chosen few we have the following: the Mission and Instruction of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-13, Luke 9:1-6); on Humility, Offences, Forgiveness (Matthew 18:1-35, Mark 9:33-50, Luke 9:46-50); discourse on the Mount of Olives on His Second Coming and the Final Judgment (Matthew 24, 25, Mark 13, Luke 21:7-36); the Farewell Discourse and Prayer (John 14-17)
Tabernacle - , for this occasion, from the Mount of Olives
Sabbath - The Mount of Olives was exactly, as the writer of Acts says, "a sabbath day's journey from Jerusalem
Docetism - John on the mount of Olives, at the time of the crucifixion, teaches that the form crucified was not really our Lord, but does not suggest that it was any other person
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - He visited Bethlehem, Golgotha, the Mount of Olives, and the Anastasis. He asserts the religious superiority of Cappadocia, which had more churches than any part of the world, and inquires in plain terms whether a man will believe the virgin birth of Christ the more by seeing Bethlehem, or His resurrection by visiting His tomb, or His ascension by standing on the Mount of Olives" (Milman, Hist
Ascension (2) - of Olives; the time, forty days after the Resurrection; the occasion, a conversation concerning the Kingdom; the act of parting in being taken up; the vanishing in a cloud; the vision of two men in white apparel and their announcement of His coming again: all indicating a bodily disappearance by an upward movement into the sky. of Olives, about a mile down from the summit
Cooking And Heating - After the Olives had been beaten from the trees and crushed in the olive press, the olive oil was used both for binding the flour instead of water, and for frying
Wine And Strong Drink - These, according to Pliny, were steeped in water before being sent to the press, where they were probably treated as the Olives were treated in the oil-press (see Oil)
Upper Room (2) - It was there that the disciples, on their return when the Saviour had ascended from the Mount of Olives, went up into the upper chamber (τὸ ὑπερᾷον); for on that site had it been built
James - James is specially mentioned as present at the healing of Peter’s wife’s mother (Mark 1:29), at the raising of Jairus’ daughter (Mark 5:37), at the Transfiguration (Mark 9:2), at the Mount of Olives during the great ‘eschatological’ discourse (Mark 13:3), and at the agony in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 20:20-23)
Jerusalem - The Mount of Olives is on the east, from whence the best view of Jerusalem is to be had
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - Cyril of Jerusalem, describing a cross of light which appeared "on May 7, about the third hour," "above the holy Golgotha and stretching as far as the holy mount of Olives," and seen by the whole city
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - There are problems, such as the difficulty of being sure what parts of Jesus' discourse on the Mount of Olives toward the end of his earthly life refer to the destruction of Jerusalem and what to the end of the world
Galilee (2) - It too was a fertile land, with thick woods, sycamores, Olives, vines, and green pastures by its waters
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - HAD we been with our Lord on the Mount of Olives that day, this parable would have ended far differently from the way we would have expected it to end
Judas - " After the supper, when they had sung a hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives
Passion Week - of Olives was spoken two days before the Passover, i
Jerusalem (2) - one terminates opposite the city as the Mount of Olives, while a southern branch, given off near the highest point before the modern Jaffa road commences to descend to the city, runs almost due south, and terminates near the commencement of the Wady el-Wurd, at a point on which is situated to-day the summer residence of the Greek Patriarch, known as Katamûn. The least durable, which still lies on the surface of the Mount of Olives, having been denuded here, the top layer over the city’s site, is a hard limestone with flinty bands, known locally as the Mezzeh
Galilee - It was ‘a land of wheat and barley, and vines and fig trees and pomegranates; a land of oil Olives and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it’ (Deuteronomy 8:8-9)
Night (2) - It was dark when they sang a hymn, and went to the Mount of Olives (Matthew 26:30)
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - After this he uncovered the table and found, according to one account, many kinds of food; according to another, a fish ready cooked, without scales or prickly fins, dropping with fat, well seasoned, surrounded with all kinds of herbs, and leaves on which were Olives, honey, cheese, and so on. Round it were placed five loaves, and on each loaf were a few Olives, five pomegranates, and five dates
Entry Into Jerusalem - of Olives’ (ἤδη πρὸς τῇ καταβάσει), from which, Dean Stanley states, the first view is caught of the south-eastern corner of the city as the road from Bethany begins to descend
Zechariah, Theology of - In that day, Jesus will descend to the Mount of Olives (Zechariah 14:4 ; Acts 1:11 ) in the same way that he ascended, bringing his heavenly host with him (Zechariah 14:5 ; Matthew 25:31 )
Palestine - Grain, grass, Olives, and grapes were abundant
Temple - The front or entrance to the temple was on the eastern side, and consequently facing the Mount of Olives, which commanded a noble prospect of the building
Passover (i.) - There remained another cup to be drunk, for the number four was insisted upon, and became the subject of various interpretations; the second part of the Hallel (Psalms 115-118) was sung—probably the ‘hymn’ after which ‘they went out unto the mount of Olives’ (Mark 14:26)—and the feast ended with a benediction, ‘the blessing of the song
Lord's Prayer (i) - Not far from the traditional site of Gethsemane, on the slope of the Mount of Olives, stands to-day the Church of the Paternoster, showing in the quadrangle the Lord’s Prayer engraved in thirty-two languages
Dress (2) - This is known as the u‘bb or ‘bosom,’ and in this are carried many things; for example, the bread and Olives for the midday meal, the seed or corn for sowing (Luke 6:38), or, in the case of a shepherd, a newborn lamb or kid (cf
Poetry of the Hebrews - The two most remarkable mountains of the country were Lebanon and Carmel; the former noted for its height, and the woods of lofty cedars that covered it; the latter, for its beauty and fertility, the richness of its vines and Olives
John the Apostle - On one or perhaps two occasions Andrew was associated with these three possibly at the healing of Peter’s wife’s mother ( Mark 1:29 ), and certainly at the interview described in Mark 13:3 , when Jesus sat on the Mount of Olives and was ‘asked privately’ concerning His prophecy of the overthrow of the Temple
Prayer (2) - John 14:31), and in which Jesus and the Eleven ‘sang a hymn’ (Matthew 26:30, Mark 14:26) before going to the Mount of Olives
Weights And Measures - of Olives was distant a Sabbath day’s journey from Jerusalem, and the same distance is given by Josephus as 5 stadia , thus confirming the 2000 cubits computation
Transfiguration (2) - of Olives
Golgotha - 315 speaks of pilgrims coming from all parts of the world to behold the fulfilment of prophecy and to pay their adorations on the summit of the Mount of Olives, where Jesus gave His last charge to His disciples and then ascended into heaven
Bethlehem - The valleys below and the fields lying to the east produce crops of wheat and barley, as in the days when Ruth gleaned in the fields of Boaz; and the terraced slopes, under diligent cultivation, bear Olives, almonds, pomegranates, figs, and vines
Palestine - Wheat, barley, millet, maize, peas, beans, lentils, Olives, figs, mulberries, vines, and other fruit; cotton, nuts of various species; the ordinary vegetables, and some (such as solanum or ‘egg-plant’) that do not, as a rule, find their way to western markets; sesame, and tobacco which is grown in some districts are the most characteristic crops produced by the country
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - John as on the Mount of Olives during the crucifixion, and so contradicted the gospel, which relates that he was close to the Cross
Jesus Christ - When "every man went unto his own house" He who had not where to lay His head "went to the mount of Olives," His wonted resort for prayer; "early in the morning He came again into the temple
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - Every type of crop, including grapes, Olives, wheat, barley, figs, pomegranates, and apples had been ravaged (Joel 1:7-12 )
Noah - 50) mention Olives in the Red Sea
Canaan - '" An oriental's ideas of fertility differ, however, from ours; for to him, plantations of figs, vines, and Olives, with which the limestone rocks of Judea were once covered, would suggest the same associations of plenty and opulence that are called up in the mind of an Englishman by rich tracts of corn land
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - He gives an account or his vision on the Mount of Olives: Levi obtains the sun, Judah the moon, and Joseph ascends on a winged bull
Sea of Galilee - ‘It is easier,’ saith Rabbi Eliezer ben Simon, ‘to nourish a legion of Olives in Galilee than to bring up one child in the land of Israel’ (Ber
Jerusalem - direction; it then turns southward and deepens rapidly, separating the Jerusalem plateau from the ridge of the Mount of Olives on the east; finally, it meanders through the wild mountains of the Judæan desert, and finds its exit on the W