What does Obadiah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
עֹבַדְיָ֖ה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 2
וְעֹבַדְיָ֖ה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 2
עֹבַדְיָה֙ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֙הוּ֙ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֥ה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹֽבַדְיָֽה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וְעֹבַדְיָ֤הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וּלְעֹבַדְיָ֣ה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֛הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹ֣בַדְיָ֔הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וְעֹֽבַדְיָ֛הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֑הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֜הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וְעֹבַדְיָ֗הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹבַדְיָ֖הוּ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וְעֹבַדְיָה֙ the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
וְ֠עֹבַדְיָה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1
עֹֽבַדְיָ֑ה the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah 1

Definitions Related to Obadiah

H5662


   1 the 4th of the 12 minor prophets; nothing personal is known of him but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel.
      1a the prophetic book by him; prophesies against Edom.
   2 father of Ishmaiah, one of the chiefs of Zebulun in the time of David.
   3 a Merarite Levite overseer of the work of restoring the temple in the time of king Josiah of Judah.
   4 chief of the household of king Ahab of Israel; an devout worshipper of Jehovah who at risk to his own life hid over 100 prophets during the persecution of Jezebel.
   5 a descendant of David.
   6 a chief of the tribe of Issachar.
   7 a Benjamite, one of the 6 sons of Azel and a descendant of king Saul.
   8 a Levite, son of Shemaiah and a descendant of Jeduthun.
   9 a Gadite chief, the 2nd of the lion-faced Gadites who joined David at Ziklag.
      10 a prince of Judah in the time of king Jehoshaphat of Judah.
      11 a priest, son of Jehiel of the sons of Joab who returned from exile with Ezra.
      12 a gatekeeper in the time of Nehemiah.
      13 one of the men who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah.
         13a perhaps the same as 12.
         Additional Information: Obadiah = “servant of Jehovah”.
         

Frequency of Obadiah (original languages)

Frequency of Obadiah (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Obadiah
Obadiah (ôla-dî'ah or ŏb'a-dî'ah), servant of Jehovah. The name of 13 persons in Scripture. The most noted of these were: 1. The officer of Ahab's court who hid 150 prophets from Jezebel. 2. The prophet whose prophecy is placed fourth among the minor prophecies. Absolutely nothing is known of his life. His prophecy was possibly uttered subsequently to b.c. 588, as we draw from verse 11. The captivity of this verse is in all probability that by Nebuchadnezzar in b.c. 588.
Prophecy of, contains a general accusation of Edom, and an account of the prosperity of Zion when Jacob should return from his captivity and Esau be discomfited. There is a striking resemblance between the first nine verses of this prophecy and Jeremiah 49:7-16. One prophet must have read the other's prophecy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Obadiah
(from Hebrew: servant of Jehovah). The Book of Abdias is limited to a single chapter of twenty-one verses. It is the shortest book in the Old Testament. Its literary unity has been contested; yet the arguments in its favor are more solid. Abdias is the prophet of the God of Armies coming for judgment upon Edom. God calls to arms (verse 1). Edom shall be humbled and despoiled (2-7), no wisdom can save her (8-10), because she has rejoiced in the distress of Israel (11-14), God will punish all nations (15-16); while Israel shall be saved, Edom shall perish (17-18). The land of Israel will be widened (19-20), and on Sion shall be established the kingdom of God (21). Its canonicity is based on the following considerations: though never cited in the New Testament, it was ever embodied in the lists of Prophets; it is quoted by Jeremias, in chapter 49; it is comprised in the commendation of Sirach 49:12; it was ever recognized by the Church. It is in the Breviary on Friday the fourth week in November, but not in the Missal. The name of Abdias alone is known to us. The time when he lived is put by some as the first century A.D., while others regard him as the most ancient of minor prophets. Conservative opinion wavers between the ninth and fifth centuries B.C. The decision hinges on the interpretation of verses 10-14, prophesying a destruction of Jerusalem. If this passage refers to its destruction by the Chaldeans in 587 B.C., the book was written in post-Exilic times. However, a closer study seems to favor the view that these and other verses refer to an earlier event, such, for instance, as is narrated in 2Paralipomenon, 21,16, where is described the pillage of Jerusalem under Joram, king of Juda (849-842 B.C.). Furthermore, the woes invoked upon Edom may well suit the historic situation which confronted King Amasias (797-789) on the eve of his war with Edom. Then Abdias may well be identified with the man of God who assured the king of his victory.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Obadiah
OBADIAH is a name of a type common among the Semitic peoples; It occurs frequently in the OT, for the most part as the name of persons of whom little or nothing is known. It has also been found on an ancient Hebrew seal. For the meaning of the name, ‘servant of Jahweh,’ see art. Servant of the Lord, § 2 . The different persons thus named are 1 . The author of the Vision of Obadiah: see following article. 2 . Ahab’s steward, the protector of Jahweh’s prophets against Jezebel ( 1 Kings 18:3-16 ). This person lived in the 9th cent. b.c. 3. A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ), who lived, to judge from his position in the genealogy, about b.c. 700. On the probable genuineness of the genealogy see G. B. Gray, Studies in Heb. Proper Names , p. 241 f. 4 . An Issacharite ( 1 Chronicles 7:3 ). 5 . A descendant of David in the 5th cent. b.c., if the Hebrew text ( 1 Chronicles 3:21 ) correctly makes him a grandson of Zerubbabel, but in the 4th if the LXX [1] is right and he belonged to the sixth generation after Zerubbabel. 6 . The head of a family who returned with Ezra ( Ezra 8:9 = Abadias of 1Es 8:35 ). 7 . A priestly contemporary of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:5 ). 8 . A door-keeper ( Nehemiah 12:25 ). 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Various persons in the genealogies or stories of the Chronicler ( 1 Chronicles 9:16 [2] 1 Chronicles 12:9 , 1Ch 27:19 , 2 Chronicles 17:7 ; 2 Chronicles 34:12 ). On the Chronicler’s use of such names, see G. B. Gray, op. cit ., pp. 170 190.
G. B. Gray.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Obadiah, Book of
Consists of one chapter, "concerning Edom," its impending doom (1:1-16), and the restoration of Israel (1:17-21). This is the shortest book of the Old Testament. There are on record the account of four captures of Jerusalem, (1) by Shishak in the reign of Rehoboam (1 Kings 14:25 ); (2) by the Philistines and Arabians in the reign of Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:16 ); (3) by Joash, the king of Israel, in the reign of Amaziah (2 Kings 14:13 ); and (4) by the Babylonians, when Jerusalem was taken and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (B.C. 586). (Obadiah 1:11-14 ) speaks of this capture as a thing past. He sees the calamity as having already come on Jerusalem, and the Edomites as joining their forces with those of the Chaldeans in bringing about the degradation and ruin of Israel. We do not indeed read that the Edomites actually took part with the Chaldeans, but the probabilities are that they did so, and this explains the words of Obadiah in denouncing against Edom the judgments of God. The date of his prophecies was thus in or about the year of the destruction of Jerusalem.
Edom is the type of Israel's and of God's last foe (Isaiah 63:1-4 ). These will finally all be vanquished, and the kingdom will be the Lord's (Compare Psalm 22:28 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
Servant of the Lord.
An Israelite who was chief in the household of King Ahab (1 Kings 18:3 ). Amid great spiritual degeneracy he maintained his fidelity to God, and interposed to protect The Lord's prophets, an hundred of whom he hid at great personal risk in a cave (4,13). Ahab seems to have held Obadiah in great honour, although he had no sympathy with his piety (5,6,7). The last notice of him is his bringing back tidings to Ahab that Elijah, whom he had so long sought for, was at hand (9-16). "Go," said Elijah to him, when he met him in the way, "go tell thy lord, Behold, Elijah is here."
A chief of the tribe of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:3 ).
A descendant of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:38 ).
A Levite, after the Captivity (1 Chronicles 9:16 ).
A Gadite who joined David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:9 ).
A prince of Zebulun in the time of David (1 Chronicles 27:19 ).
One of the princes sent by Jehoshaphat to instruct the people in the law (2 Chronicles 17:7 ).
A Levite who superintended the repairs of the temple under Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:12 ).
One who accompanied Ezra on the return from Babylon (Ezra 8:9 ).
A prophet, fourth of the minor prophets in the Hebrew canon, and fifth in the LXX. He was probably contemporary with Jeremiah and Ezekiel. Of his personal history nothing is known.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
("worshipper of Jehovah"; Arabic: Αbdallah .)
1. One of Israhiah's "five" sons, of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:3). But as four only are mentioned, Kennicott with four manuscripts omits "and the sons of Israhiah," thus making him brother not father of Obadiah, and both sons of Uzzi. Syriac and Arabic have our text, but "four."
2. 1 Chronicles 8:38; 1 Chronicles 9:44.
3. 1 Chronicles 9:16; Nehemiah 12:24-25.
4. 1 Chronicles 3:21.
5. 1 Chronicles 12:8-9.
6. 2 Chronicles 17:7.
7. Ezra 8:9.
8. Nehemiah 10:5.
9. Over Ahab's house. A kind of lord high chamberlain or mayor of the palace (1 Kings 18:3). As there were saints in Nero's palace (Philippians 1:13; Philippians 4:22), so they were in wicked Ahab's palace. Had not his value as a servant made him necessary to Ahab, his piety would have destroyed him. The pressure of the drought in the third year was such that Ahab could trust none so well as Obadiah to search throughout the land for water to preserve his "beasts," his stud of "horses and mules." Ahab cared more for these than for his perishing subjects! In a corrupt court, in spite of the persecuting idolatrous queen Jezebel, "Obadiah feared Jehovah," not merely a little but "greatly." So much so that he dared to hide from her fury 100 prophets, feeding them by fifty in a cave (compare on love to the Lord's brethren, Matthew 25:40). Ahab went in one direction in search of water, Obadiah another by himself. The latter was startled by the sudden appearance of Elijah, who had disappeared since his first announcement of the drought coming at his word (1 Kings 17:1). Obadiah knew him and reverently fell on his face saying, "art thou that my lord Elijah?"
The suddenness of his appearing and Obadiah's past avoidance of direct contact with him for prudence sake made him ask in order to be sure he was not making a mistake. Elijah told him to tell Ahab of his presence. Obadiah in distrustful fear (for Scripture records the failings as well as the graces of its heroes, for our learning) regarded the message as tantamount to his destruction, supposing the Spirit would carry Elijah elsewhere and so Ahab, disappointed of his victim, would wreak his vengeance on Obadiah. No boastful spirit, but a desire to deprecate Elijah's exposing him to death, prompted his mention of his services to the cause of God. He could truly say what ought to be a motto for the young, "I fear Jehovah from my youth" (compare 2 Timothy 3:15). Elijah's assurance that he would show himself to Ahab sufficed to dispel his fears and to re-establish his faith. After his return to Ahab we hear of him no more. Godliness is a hardy plant that can live amidst the frosts of persecution and the relaxing warmth of a corrupt court, and not merely in the conservatory of a pious family (1 Corinthians 10:13; Isaiah 27:3; 1 Peter 1:5).
10. The prophet. Many conjecture Obadiah to be the same as (Obadiah 1:6), but that is too early a date. His prophetic theme is Edom; and Edom's revolt under Joram, Jehoshaphat's son, is recorded 2 Chronicles 21:10. He stands fourth of the minor prophets in the Hebrew canon, fifth in the Septuagint Jerome makes him contemporary with Hosea, Joel, and Amos. This is more likely than that he was a contemporary of Jeremiah, and that he refers to Edom's cruelty to the Jews at Jerusalem's capture by the Chaldees in 2 Chronicles 21:11-16; 2 Chronicles 21:20 (compare Lamentations 4:21-22; Ezekiel 25:12-14; Ezekiel 25:35; Psalms 137:7). The prophecy of Obadiah is too terse and fresh and compact a whole to have been copied from Jeremiah. It must be Jeremiah who copies from Obadiah and stamps him as inpired; compare Obadiah 1:5 with Jeremiah 49:9; Obadiah 1:6 with Jeremiah 49:10; Obadiah 1:8 with Jeremiah 49:7.
What is disjointed in Jeremiah is progressive and consecutive in Obadiah. Jeremiah would be more likely to copy from an old prophet than from a contemporary. The capture of Jerusalem alluded to by Obadiah is probably that by the Philistines and Arabs under Joram (2 Chronicles 21:8-10; 2 Chronicles 21:16-17), when Edom, who had just before revolted from under Judah and had been punished by Joram, in revenge gave an earnest of that unbrotherly cruelty which he in a still worse degree showed at Jerusalem's capture by Nebuchadnezzar. Amos 1:6; Amos 1:11, and Joel 4:19, refer to the same capture by Philistines and Arabs. It cannot be that by Israelites under Pekah in Amaziah's reign, for Obadiah calls the captors "strangers" and "foreigners" (Obadiah 1:11). He evidently belongs to the same prophetic cycle as Joel and Amos, and so is connected with them in the canon.
Joel drew the outline which succeeding prophets fill in (compare Obadiah 1:10 with Joel 3:19; Amos 1:11; Obadiah 1:11 with Joel 3:3; Joel 3:5; Joel 3:17, where the language is the same, "strangers," "cast lots," "the day of the Lord," Obadiah 1:15; Joel 3:14. The same retribution in kind, Obadiah 1:15; Joel 3:4; Joel 3:7; Obadiah 1:17 also with Joel 3:17; Obadiah 1:18 with Joel 2:3; Joel 2:5; Obadiah 1:21 with Amos 9:12). Joel probably was in Joash's reign, Obadiah in Amaziah's, Amos in Uzziah's. Amaziah slew of Edom in the valley of Salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war (2 Kings 16:7), an earnest of Edom's foretold doom (Obadiah 1:1, etc.).
CONTENTS.
(I.) The doom of Edom (Obadiah 1:1-9).
(II.) Cause of that doom (Obadiah 1:10-16).
(III.) Re-establishment of Israel in their rightful possessions.
Expanding southward, westward, eastward, and northward, they shall acquire additionally Edom, Philistia, and northern Canaan to Zarephath (Sarepta near Sidon). Benjamin's acquiring Gilead implies that the transjordanic tribes will acquire new possessions. (See EDOM for the fulfillment.) "Saviours shall come up on Mount Zion to judge the Mount of Esau, and the kingdom shall be the Lord's"; no longer under the usurping prince of this world. In the millennial kingdom to come there will be a "prince" not a "king" (Ezekiel 44:3; Ezekiel 44:7); "saviours" or "deliverers" like the "judges," bringing in sabbattic rest.
The Maccabees (Judah's deliverers from Antiochus Epiphanes) who conquered Edom were types. "To judge Esau" means to punish, as 1 Samuel 3:13. Edom typifies Israel's and God's last foes (Isaiah 63:1-4). The Mount of Esau shall be abased before Mount Zion. Messiah will assume the kingdom with His transfigured saints, the Antitype to all former "saviours." They shall "judge the world," and as king priests shall be mediators of blessing to the nations in the flesh. (Daniel 2:44; Daniel 7:14; Daniel 7:27; Zechariah 14:9; Luke 1:33; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 19:6, "Alleluia! for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.") Obadiah quotes here Psalms 22:28, "the kingdom is the Lord's."
11. 1 Chronicles 27:19.
12. 2 Chronicles 34:12.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
The Bible mentions at least twelve people named Obadiah. The most important is the prophet who wrote about the Edomites (see OBADIAH, BOOK OF). Of the remainder, the best known is the manager of Ahab’s royal household. When all around him were worshipping Baal, this man remained faithful to God. He protected God’s prophets from Jezebel’s violence, and on one occasion carried a message from Elijah to Ahab (1 Kings 18:1-16).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Obadiah, Book of
The book of Obadiah is largely an announcement of judgment upon Edom for its part in helping Babylon in the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BC (Obadiah 1:10-14; cf. Psalms 137:7; Ezekiel 35:5; Ezekiel 35:12; Ezekiel 35:15). Edom, being descended from Esau, was a brother nation to Israel-Judah, and therefore should have helped Jerusalem in its final hour (cf. Genesis 25:23-26; Genesis 32:28; Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:8-9). Instead the Edomites took the opportunity to plunder the helpless city (Obadiah 1:11; Obadiah 1:13). They even captured the fleeing Jerusalemites and sold them to the Babylonian conquerors (Obadiah 1:14; for map and other details see EDOM).
Contents of the book
Edom prided itself in the strength of its mountain defences and the cleverness of its political dealings. Neither, however, would save it from the divine judgment that would fall upon it because of its active cooperation in the destruction of Jerusalem (Obadiah 1:1-16).
But whereas God would destroy Edom totally, he would bring Judah out of captivity and back to its land, where it would rebuild its national life. It would even spread its power into former Edomite territory (Obadiah 1:17-21).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Obadiah, Book of
OBADIAH, BOOK OF. The questions as to the origin and Interpretation of this, the shortest book of the OT, are numerous and difficult. The title describes the book as ‘a vision’ (cf. Isaiah 1:1 , Nahum 1:1 ) and ascribes it to Obadiah. Obadiah is one of the commonest of Hebrew names, and occurs both before and after the Exile: see preceding article. Some fruitless attempts have been made to identify the author of the book with one or other of the persons of the same name mentioned in the OT.
The book of Obadiah stands fourth in order (in the Greek version, fifth) of the prophets whose works were collected and edited in (probably) the 3rd cent. b.c.; the collection since the beginning of the 2nd cent. b.c. has been known as ‘The Twelve’ (see Canon of OT; cf. Micah [1], ad init .). By the place which he gave this small book in his collection the editor perhaps intended to indicate his belief that it was of early, i.e . pre-exilic, origin. But the belief of an editor of the 3rd cent. b.c. is not good evidence that a book was written earlier than the 6th century. The relative probabilities of the different theories of its origin must be judged by internal evidence; this, unfortunately, is itself uncertain on account of ambiguities of expression.
It will be convenient to state first what appears on the whole the most probable theory, and then to mention more briefly one or two others.
The book contains two themes: (1) a prophetic Interpretation of an overwhelming disaster which has already befallen Edom ( Obadiah 1:1-7 ; Obadiah 1:10-14 ; Obadiah 1:16 b); (2) a prediction of a universal judgment and specifically of judgment on Edom which is now imminent ( Obadiah 1:8-9 ; Obadiah 1:16 a, Obadiah 1:16-21 ).
1. The prophetic interpretation of Edom’s fall . The prophet describes the complete conquest of the Edomites and their expulsion from their land ( Obadiah 1:7 ) by a number of nations ( Obadiah 1:1 ) once their friends and allies ( Obadiah 1:7 ). In this calamity the writer sees Jahweh’s judgment on Edom for gloating over the fall of the Jews described as Edom’s brother ( Obadiah 1:12 ) and participating with foreign and alien enemies ( Obadiah 1:11 ) in the infliction of injuries on them. This interpretation is stated in simple and direct terms in Obadiah 1:10-11 , and dramatically in Obadiah 1:12-14 , where the writer, throwing himself back to the time of the Edomites’ ill-treatment of the Jews, adjures them not to do the things they actually did. The section closes with the effective assertion of the retributive character of the disasters that had befallen Edom and still affect it ‘As thou hast done, is it done unto thee; thy dealing returns upon thine own head’ ( Obadiah 1:15 b).
The verses thus summarized have these points in common: ( a ) the tenses are historical except in Obadiah 1:10 (‘shame doth cover thee, and thou art cut off for ever’) and Obadiah 1:15 b, which may be rendered as presents, and interpreted as at the end of the preceding paragraph; and ( b ) after Obadiah 1:1 , where Edom, in the present text, is spoken of in the 3rd person, Edom is throughout addressed in the 2nd pers. sing. Among these verses are now interspersed others, Obadiah 1:6 , which speaks of Esau (=Edom) in the 3rd person (pl. in clause a , sing, in b ) and which may be an aside in the midst of the address, but is more probably an Interpolation; and Obadiah 1:8-9 (together with the last clause of Obadiah 1:7 ), which speak of Edom in the 3rd person and unmistakably regard the disaster as still future: these verses are best regarded as an addition by an editor who wished the prophetic interpretation of past fact to be read as a prophetic description of the future.
If now Obadiah 1:1-7 (or Obadiah 1:1-5 ; Obadiah 1:7 ) Obadiah 1:10-15 b, which are held together by the common features just noticed, be a unity; the prophecy is later than b.c. 586; for Obadiah 1:11 cannot well be interpreted by any other disaster than the destruction of Jerusalem in that year. The prophecy also appears in Obadiah 1:5 ; Obadiah 1:7 to allude to the extrusion of the Edomites from ancient Edom owing to the northward movement of Arabs people who had often satisfied themselves with plundering expeditions (cf. Obadiah 1:5 ), but now permanently evicted settled populations from their lands (cf. Obadiah 1:7 ). This northward movement was already threatening at the beginning of the 6th cent. b.c. ( Ezekiel 25:4-5 ; Ezekiel 25:10 ); before b.c. 312, as we learn from Diodorus Siculus, Arabs had occupied Petra, the ancient capital of Edom. Between those two dates, perhaps in the first half of the 5th cent. b.c. (cf. Malachi 1:2-5 ), the prophecy appears to have been written.
2 . The prediction of universal judgment . In contrast with Obadiah 1:10-14 Obadiah 1:10-14 , the tenses in Obadiah 1:15-21 , are consistently imperfects (naturally suggesting the future), the persons addressed (2nd pl.) are Israelites, not Edomites, and Edom is referred to in the 3rd person. The prophecy predicts as imminent: ( a ) a universal judgment ( Obadiah 1:15 a, Obadiah 1:15 , in which the annihilation of Edom by the Jews (not [2] nations as in Obadiah 1:1 ; Obadiah 1:5 ; Obadiah 1:7 ) and Israelites forms an episode which is specially described ( Obadiah 1:18 ), and ( b ) the restoration of the exiles alike of the Northern and of the Southern Kingdom ( Obadiah 1:18 , cf. Obadiah 1:17 ), who are to re-occupy the whole of their ancient territory the Negeb in the S., the Shephçlah in the W., Ephraim to the N., Gilead in the E. ( Obadiah 1:19 , which after elimination of glosses reads, ‘And they shall possess the Negeb and the Shephçlah, and the field of Ephraim and Gilead’); in particular, the Israelites will re-occupy as far N. as Zarephath (near Tyre), and the Jews as far south as the Negeb ( Obadiah 1:20 ). The prophecy closes with the announcement of Jahweh’s reign from Zion ( Obadiah 1:21 ).
The prediction (Obadiah 1:15-21 ) scarcely appears to be the original and immediate continuation of the former part of the chapter, but is, like Obadiah 1:8-9 , a subsequent addition. The theory of the origin and interpretation of the book just described is substantially that of Wellhausen; it has been adopted in the main by Nowack and Marti; and, so far as the separation of Obadiah 1:15-21 (with Obadiah 1:15 b) from the rest of the chapter is concerned, and the assignment of the whole to a date after the Exile, by Cheyne ( EBi [3] ).
One fact has appeared to many scholars an insuperable difficulty in the way of assigning the whole book to a date after 586. It is admitted by all that the resemblances between Obadiah 1:1-5 ; Obadiah 1:5 ; Obadiah 1:8 and Jeremiah 49:14-15 ; Jeremiah 49:9-10 a, Jeremiah 49:7 are so close as to imply the literary dependence of one of the two passages on the other; it is further admitted by most, and should be admitted, that the common matter is in its more original form in Obadiah, and that therefore so much at least of Obadiah is prior to Jeremiah 49:14-16 ; Jeremiah 49:9-10 a, Jeremiah 49:7 , and therefore prior to the year b.c. 604, if the theory that was commonly held with regard to the date of Jeremiah 46:1-28 ; Jeremiah 47:1-7 ; Jeremiah 48:1-47 ; Jeremiah 49:1-39 be admitted. But of recent years many have questioned whether Jeremiah 46:1-28 ; Jeremiah 47:1-7 ; Jeremiah 48:1-47 ; Jeremiah 49:1-39 , at least in its present form , is the work of Jeremiah at all, and consequently whether it was necessarily written before 586.
If the argument that Obadiah 1:1 ; Obadiah 1:8-10 ; Obadiah 1:8 is pre-exilic be accepted, it is necessary to account for what are now generally admitted to be the allusions to the events of 586 in Obadiah 1:10-14 . This has been done by assuming that Ob. and Jer. alike quote from a pre-exilic prophecy, but that Obadiah himself prophesied after b.c. 586. As to the amount of matter cited by Obadiah, scholars differ: e.g . Driver considers that Obadiah 1:1-9 is derived from the old prophecy; G. A. Smith, that Obadiah 1:1-5 ; Obadiah 1:6 are quotations, but that Obadiah 1:7 , which he admits presupposes later conditions, is by Obadiah himself. The weakness of these theories lies in the fact that the distribution of the parts to the two authors does not follow the concrete differences of style indicated above, and that Obadiah 1:7 either receives no adequate interpretation, or is torn away from Obadiah 1:5 , with which it certainly seems closely connected. As to the more precise date of Obadiah 1:1-9 ( Obadiah 1:10 ) or so much of the verses as may be pre-exilic, no agreement has been reached among those who hold them to be pre-exilic; no known circumstances explain the allusions. It is also very uncertain whether any inference can safely be drawn from the allusion to Sepharad (wh. see) in Obadiah 1:20 .
For further discussion of many details, some of which have of necessity been left unmentioned here, and for an account of other theories as well as those described above, the English reader will best consult Driver, LOT [4] ; G. A. Smith, Book of the Twelve , ii. 163 184 (with a critical translation); Selbie’s art. in Hastings’ DB [5] , and Cheyne’s in EBi [3] .
G. B. Gray.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
(oh buh di' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh's servant.” 1. Person in charge of Ahab's palace. He was devoted to Yahweh and saved Yahweh's prophets from Jezebel's wrath. He was the go-between for Elijah and Ahab (1 Kings 18:3-16 ). 2 . A descendant of David through Hananiah (1 Chronicles 3:21 ). 3 . Son of Izrahiah of the tribe of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:3 ). 4 . Son of Azel of the tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 ). 5 . A Levite who returned to Jerusalem with the first of the Babylonian exiles (1 Chronicles 9:16 ). 6 . A Gadite who joined David, along with Ezer and Eliab. Obadiah was second in command behind Ezer (1 Chronicles 12:8-9 ). 7 . Father of Ishmaiah, an officer from the tribe of Zebulun who served in David's army (1 Chronicles 27:19 ). 8 . One of five officials Jehoshaphat sent throughout the cities of Judah to teach “the book of the law of the Lord” (2 Chronicles 17:7-9 ). See 2 Chronicles 34:12 ). See Ezra 8:9 ). He joined other priests along with princes and Levites in putting his seal upon the covenant (Nehemiah 9:38 ) made between the people and God (Nehemiah 10:5 ). 11 . A gatekeeper and guardian of “the ward” (“the storerooms at the gates,” NIV) during the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:25 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Obadiah, Book of
(oh buh di' uh) The shortest book of the Minor Prophets, preserving the message of Obadiah, the prophet.
The Prophet No source outside his book mentions Obadiah. “Obadiah” is a common name in the Old Testament. Meaning “servant of Yahweh,” it reflects his parents' faith and spiritual ambitions for their child. The title “The vision of Obadiah” turns attention to the divine author, “vision” being a technical term for a prophetic revelation received from God.
The Situation Historically, the book belongs to the early postexilic period, at the end of the sixth century B.C. Its central section, Obadiah 1:10-14 , deals with the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 586 B.C., concentrating on the part the Edomites played in that tragic event. Edom was a state to the southeast of Judah. Despite treaty ties (“brother,” Obadiah 1:10 ) the Edomitea, along with others, had failed to come to Judah's aid and had even helped Babylon by looting Jerusalem and handing over refugees. Moreover, the Edomites filled the vacuum caused by Judah's Exile by moving west and annexing the Negeb to the south of Judah and even its southern territory (compare Obadiah 1:19 ).
Judah reacted with a strong sense of grievance. Obadiah's oracle responded to an underlying impassioned prayer of lament, like Psalm 74:1 , Psalm 79:1 , or 137, in which Judah appealed to God to act as providential trial Judge and Savior to set right the situation.
The Message The response begins with a prophetic messenger formula which reinforces the thrust of the title, that God is behind the message. Obadiah 1:2-9 give the divine verdict. Addressing Edom, God promised to defeat those supermen and topple the mountain capital which reflected their lofty self-conceit. Their allies would let them down, and neither their framed wisdom nor their warriors would be able to save them. This seems to look fearfully ahead to the Nabateans' infiltration from the eastern desert and their eventual takeover of Edom's traditional territory. The end of Obadiah 1:1 appears to be a report from the prophet that already a coalition of neighboring groups was planning to attack Edom.
The catalog of Edom's crimes (Obadiah 1:10-14 ) functions as the accusation which warranted God's verdict of punishment. Repetition raises “day” to center stage . The underlying thought is that Judah had been the victim of “the day of the Lord” when God intervened in judgment, and had drunk the cup of God's wrath (Obadiah 1:15-16 ; compare Lamentations 1:12 ; Lamentations 2:21 ). In Old Testament theology the concept of the day of the Lord embraces not only God's people but their no-less-wicked neighbors. This wider dimension is reflected in Obadiah 1:15-16 (compare Lamentations 1:21 ). The fall of Edom was to trigger this eschatological event in which order would be restored to an unruly world. Then would come the vindication of God's people, not for their own sakes but as earthly witnesses to His glory; and so “the kingdom shall be the Lord's” (Obadiah 1:21 ).
The Meaning Like the Book of Revelation, which proclaims the downfall of the persecuting Roman Empire, the aim of Obadiah is to sustain faith in God's moral government and hope in the eventual triumph of His just will. It brings a pastoral message to aching hearts, that God is on the throne and cares for His own.
Outline
I. God Knows and Will Judge the Sins of His People's Enemies (1–14).
A. Pride deceives people into thinking they can escape God's judgment. (1–4).
B. Deceitful people will be deceived by their “friends” (5–7).
C. Human wisdom cannot avoid divine judgment (8–9).
D. Conspiracy against “brothers” will not go unpunished (10–14).
II. The Day of the Lord Offers Judgment for the Nations but Deliverance for God's People (15–21).
A. Sinful peoples will receive just recompense (15–16).
B. God will deliver His people in holiness (17–18).
C. God's remnant will be restored (19–20)
D. The Kingdom belongs to God alone (21)
Leslie C. Allen
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Obadiah
Servant of the Lord
Chabad Knowledge Base - Obadiah
(8th century BCE) An Edomite by birth, later converted to Judaism and became a disciple of Elijah. Steward of King Ahab's household. Merited the gift of prophecy after hiding and feeding the prophets whom Jezebel persecuted. His prophecies pertain to the destruction of his native nation, Edom.
Obadiah, the book of: The shortest book in Tanach, containing Obadiah's prophecy that foretells Edom's destruction.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Obadiah, Theology of
Obadiah, the shortest Old Testament book with only twenty-one verses, was probably written shortly after the fall of Judah and Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 587 b.c. (see 2 Kings 25 ). The author, unknown apart from his name heading this message from God, brings hope to God's people who have been devastated by the recent events.
Hope envelops the book even in identifying the source of the message as "the Lord" in the first and last verses (see also vv. 4,8, 15,18). This is the usual English rendering of the personal, covenant name of Yahweh/Jehovah, Israel's God. Yahweh had promised Abram a special relationship with himself (Genesis 12:1-3 ). This intimacy was expanded through the covenant that Yahweh made through Moses with Abram's descendants at Mount Sinai (Exodus 19-24 ). God renewed and expanded his unique covenant relationship with David (2 Samuel 7 ), with special places reserved for Zion as his capital and his sons as kings.
Judah, facing a destroyed capital and deposed king, feared that God was either dead or had forgotten or abandoned them because of their sins. Imagine their relief when he addressed them in this oracle not only with words of encouragement, but even using his special, intimate, covenant name. He is still their God, and they are still his people in spite of their sin.
Obadiah also provided the people concrete hope in that he declared the defeat of a perennial enemy, Edom. These people are portrayed in the Bible as related to the Israelites, being descendants of Esau (Genesis 36 , especially vv. 1,9), though they did not get along well with each other during most of their history. Edom troubled Israel during the exodus wanderings (Numbers 20:14-21 ; 24:18 ), and often during the monarchy (1 Samuel 14:47 ; 2 Samuel 8:13-14 ; 1 Kings 9:26-28 ; 11:15-16 ; 2 Chronicles 20:1-2 ; 25:11-12 ). While not confirmed by any other historical sources, Edom, which became a vassal first of Assyria and later of Babylonia, is credited with burning the temple in Jerusalem when Jerusalem fell to Babylon in 587 b.c. (1 Esdras 4:45 ).
Edom is the subject of the first part of Obadiah. Though considering itself impregnable due to its geographical setting in the inaccessible mountain crags of Transjordan (v. 3), it is not able to escape the wrath of its most powerful enemy. God, who has a special place in his heart and his promises for his people Israel, looms even higher than Edomite strongholds. He will repay their pride in thinking that they are so secure that they can blatantly oppose his people without reprisal (v. 4). It seems from the prophecy itself that Edom had not only stood by while Judah was under attack, but had gloated over its plight, even entering the capital, possibly to plunder, and also had turned over refugees to the conquerors in cold-blooded disregard for kinship loyalty (vv. 11-14).
God promised not to leave Judah unavenged, but swiftly acted in judgment. Within the century, Edom's fortunes started to slide, finally losing its land to the Arabs, though its ethnic presence is still evident in southern Transjordan and Palestine (see Nehemiah 2:19 ; 4:7 ; 6:1 ), even in the later name of the Negev region in southern Palestine as Idumaea (1 Maccabees 4:29 ).
This response of judgment shows that opposition to God, whether direct or indirect, as here with the Edomites acting against his chosen people, will not go unnoticed. God, who is just and holy, takes appropriate action in his time. This punishment of its enemies brought some measure of comfort and vindication to Israel.
The second part of the book (from v. 15) shifts from a focus on Edom to the whole world. Edom is an example of God ultimately calling all nations to account for their deeds. As a day of judgment comes for Edom (v. 8), a wider-scale day of the lord (v. 15) will bring judgment for all.
Punishment is closely related to the wrongdoing that caused it. The proud (v. 2) face humiliation (v. 3) and those who watched the looting of their neighbor (vv. 11-14) will suffer the same fate themselves (vv. 5-9). Those who endanger survivors of destruction (v. 14) will have no survivors themselves (v. 18); those who drive their kin from home and land (v. 14) will themselves be driven out (vv. 7,19). This theological principle of lex talionis, or a crime resulting in a related and appropriate punishment, is specifically stated in verse 15. Common in the Old Testament, it shows that judgment is not capricious, brought simply by the whom of a fickle God. It follows the breach of a known law. This punishment, oddly enough, provides security for the followers of a God who reveals himself. Either in Israel or today, one does not have to second guess a deity who can change his mind and expectations at any time. Yahweh's person and desires are known, as are his rewards for those who respect them.
David W. Baker
See also Israel ; Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy
Bibliography . L. C. Allen, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; D. W. Baker, Obadiah .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Obadiah, the Book of
(See OBADIAH.)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
1. The governor of Ahab's house. He feared the Lord greatly, and had the boldness, in spite of Ahab and Jezebel, to hide a hundred of the prophets of Jehovah, and feed them with bread and water, when Jezebel was cutting off the prophets. When Elijah sent Obadiah to tell Ahab that he was there, he feared that the Spirit of the Lord would catch away Elijah, and he would be slain; but he obeyed, and Elijah met the king . Obadiah is a remarkable instance of how a servant who feared the Lord could maintain his integrity amid flagrant wickedness, though otherwise he seems out of his right place, for he was not separate like Elijah. His false position may account for his dwelling upon his own work for the Lord, and his fear for his life before Ahab. 1 Kings 18:3-16 .
2. Descendant of David. 1 Chronicles 3:21 .
3. Son of Izrahiah, a descendant of Issachar. 1 Chronicles 7:3 .
4. Son of Azel, a Benjamite. 1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 .
5. Son of Shemaiah, a Levite. 1 Chronicles 9:16 . Apparently called ABDA in Nehemiah 11:17 .
6. Gadite who resorted to David at Ziklag, 1 Chronicles 12:9 .
7. A Zebulunite, father of Ishmaiah. 1 Chronicles 27:19 .
8. Prince sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the people. 2 Chronicles 17:7 .
9. Levite who was overseer in the repairs of the temple. 2 Chronicles 34:12 .
10. Son of Jehiel: he returned from exile. Ezra 8:9 .
11. Priest who sealed the covenant. Nehemiah 10:5 .
12. Levite who acted as doorkeeper. Nehemiah 12:25 .
13. The prophet, of whom personally nothing is known. Obadiah 1:1 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Obadiah, Book of
There is nothing in this prophecy to fix its date. The whole of it relates to Edom or the Edomites. Edom (Esau) is characterised in scripture by his deadly hatred to his 'brother Jacob,' Obadiah 10 . His pride is spoken of, exalting himself as the eagle, setting his nest in the firmament of heaven, and seeking his safety in the high caves of the rocks, which well answers to their habitations in Idumea.
Part of the prophecy may refer to the time when Jerusalem was destroyed by Babylon. In Psalm 137:7,8 , Edom is associated with Babylon as against Jerusalem. Obadiah 12 to 14 of the prophecy exactly describe the manner of a people like the Arabs when a city was captured. There are seven reproaches against them: they helped to pillage the place, stood in by-places to cut off any that escaped, and delivered them up to their enemies. These intimations of their assisting in the destruction of Jerusalem have led to the prophecy being usually dated B.C. 587, the year following the destruction.
The prophecy, however, probably looks onward to the last days, when Israel, restored to their land, will be attacked by Edom, and kindred nations. Psalm 83 . Idumea will be their rendezvous, and the sword of the Lord will be filled with blood. Isaiah 34:5,6 . Obadiah depicts the Jews themselves as God's instruments for the destruction of Esau; which agrees with Isaiah 11:14 ; Daniel 11:41 . "Upon mount Zion shall be deliverance . . . . the house of Jacob shall be a fire, and the house of Joseph a flame, and the house of Esau for stubble." Obadiah 17,18 . The destruction shall be complete: "every one of the mount of Esau" shall be cut off by slaughter; "there shall not be any remaining of the house of Esau." Obadiah 9,18 . Their land shall be possessed by Israel, for God's ways are retributive. The prophecy ends with "the kingdom shall be Jehovah's."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Obadiah
the prophet is thought to have been the same as the governor of Ahab's house, 1 Kings 18:3 , &c; and some are of opinion, he was that Obadiah whom Josiah made overseer of the works of the temple, 2 Chronicles 34:12 . Indeed, the age in which this prophet lived is very uncertain. Some think that he was contemporary with Hosea, Amos, and Joel; while others are of opinion that he lived in the time of Jeremiah and Ezekiel, and that he delivered his prophecy about B.C. 585, soon after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. His book, which consists of a single chapter, is written with great beauty and elegance, and contains predictions of the utter destruction of the Edomites, and of the future restoration and prosperity of the Jews.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Obadiah
1. The chief officer of king Ahab's household, who preserved the lives of one hundred prophets from the persecuting Jezebel, by concealing them in two caves and furnishing them with food, 1 Kings 18:4 .
2. The fourth of the minor prophets, supposed to have prophesied about 587 B. C. It cannot indeed be decided with certainty when he lived, but it is probable that he was contemporary with Jeremiah and Ezekiel, who denounced the same dreadful judgments on the Edomites, as the punishment of their pride, violence, and cruel insulting over the Jews after the destruction of their city. The prophecy, according to usher, was fulfilled about five years after the destruction of Jerusalem.
3. Eight or ten others of this name are mentioned in 1 Chronicles 3:21 7:3 8:38 9:16,44 12:9 27:19 2 Chronicles 17:7 34:12 Ezra 8:9 Nehemiah 10:5 .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Obadiah
We meet with many of this name in Scripture. The name is evidently derived from Habad, a slave, or labourer; and the Jah being connected with it, renders the name Obad-jah, the Lord's servant, or slave or labourer. In a gospel-sense this is very blessed; for as slaves were purchased, so believers are said "to be bought with a price," and therefore, above all men, are called upon to "glorify God in their body and in their spirit, which are God's." (1 Corinthians 6:20) But Peter, the apostle, makes a beautiful contrast between the purchase of the slaves of men, and the purchased of the Lord. "Forasmuch (saith he) as ye know that ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, as silver and gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot." (1 Peter 1:18-19)
We have no less than five men of the name of Obadiah in the first book of Chronicles, 1 Chronicles 3:21; 1Ch 7:3; 1Ch 8:38; 1Ch 9:16; and 1 Chronicles 12:9;—and one in the second book of the Chronicles, 2 Chronicles 17:7. There is another of this name, Nehemiah 10:5; and a principal man he was in signing the covenant. And we must not forget in this enumeration, the faithful Obadiah in the days of Ehjah. (See 1 Kings 18:1-46.) But the most important to us among the Obadiahs of the Scripture, is the one whom God the Holy Ghost raised up for a prophet and hath given to the church, even to this hour, this man's labours. See the prophecy of Obadiah. I do not presume to say as much, but I humbly would ask, whether the close of his man's vision hath not respect to the latter day glory, in a blessed event yet to be fulfilled. (See Obadiah 1:1:17-21)

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Obadiah, Book of - Obadiah, BOOK OF. Isaiah 1:1 , Nahum 1:1 ) and ascribes it to Obadiah. Obadiah is one of the commonest of Hebrew names, and occurs both before and after the Exile: see preceding article. ...
The book of Obadiah stands fourth in order (in the Greek version, fifth) of the prophets whose works were collected and edited in (probably) the 3rd cent. ...
The book contains two themes: (1) a prophetic Interpretation of an overwhelming disaster which has already befallen Edom ( Obadiah 1:1-7 ; Obadiah 1:10-14 ; Obadiah 1:16 b); (2) a prediction of a universal judgment and specifically of judgment on Edom which is now imminent ( Obadiah 1:8-9 ; Obadiah 1:16 a, Obadiah 1:16-21 ). The prophet describes the complete conquest of the Edomites and their expulsion from their land ( Obadiah 1:7 ) by a number of nations ( Obadiah 1:1 ) once their friends and allies ( Obadiah 1:7 ). In this calamity the writer sees Jahweh’s judgment on Edom for gloating over the fall of the Jews described as Edom’s brother ( Obadiah 1:12 ) and participating with foreign and alien enemies ( Obadiah 1:11 ) in the infliction of injuries on them. This interpretation is stated in simple and direct terms in Obadiah 1:10-11 , and dramatically in Obadiah 1:12-14 , where the writer, throwing himself back to the time of the Edomites’ ill-treatment of the Jews, adjures them not to do the things they actually did. The section closes with the effective assertion of the retributive character of the disasters that had befallen Edom and still affect it ‘As thou hast done, is it done unto thee; thy dealing returns upon thine own head’ ( Obadiah 1:15 b). ...
The verses thus summarized have these points in common: ( a ) the tenses are historical except in Obadiah 1:10 (‘shame doth cover thee, and thou art cut off for ever’) and Obadiah 1:15 b, which may be rendered as presents, and interpreted as at the end of the preceding paragraph; and ( b ) after Obadiah 1:1 , where Edom, in the present text, is spoken of in the 3rd person, Edom is throughout addressed in the 2nd pers. Among these verses are now interspersed others, Obadiah 1:6 , which speaks of Esau (=Edom) in the 3rd person (pl. in clause a , sing, in b ) and which may be an aside in the midst of the address, but is more probably an Interpolation; and Obadiah 1:8-9 (together with the last clause of Obadiah 1:7 ), which speak of Edom in the 3rd person and unmistakably regard the disaster as still future: these verses are best regarded as an addition by an editor who wished the prophetic interpretation of past fact to be read as a prophetic description of the future. ...
If now Obadiah 1:1-7 (or Obadiah 1:1-5 ; Obadiah 1:7 ) Obadiah 1:10-15 b, which are held together by the common features just noticed, be a unity; the prophecy is later than b. 586; for Obadiah 1:11 cannot well be interpreted by any other disaster than the destruction of Jerusalem in that year. The prophecy also appears in Obadiah 1:5 ; Obadiah 1:7 to allude to the extrusion of the Edomites from ancient Edom owing to the northward movement of Arabs people who had often satisfied themselves with plundering expeditions (cf. Obadiah 1:5 ), but now permanently evicted settled populations from their lands (cf. Obadiah 1:7 ). In contrast with Obadiah 1:10-14 Obadiah 1:10-14 , the tenses in Obadiah 1:15-21 , are consistently imperfects (naturally suggesting the future), the persons addressed (2nd pl. The prophecy predicts as imminent: ( a ) a universal judgment ( Obadiah 1:15 a, Obadiah 1:15 , in which the annihilation of Edom by the Jews (not [2] nations as in Obadiah 1:1 ; Obadiah 1:5 ; Obadiah 1:7 ) and Israelites forms an episode which is specially described ( Obadiah 1:18 ), and ( b ) the restoration of the exiles alike of the Northern and of the Southern Kingdom ( Obadiah 1:18 , cf. Obadiah 1:17 ), who are to re-occupy the whole of their ancient territory the Negeb in the S. ( Obadiah 1:19 , which after elimination of glosses reads, ‘And they shall possess the Negeb and the Shephçlah, and the field of Ephraim and Gilead’); in particular, the Israelites will re-occupy as far N. as Zarephath (near Tyre), and the Jews as far south as the Negeb ( Obadiah 1:20 ). The prophecy closes with the announcement of Jahweh’s reign from Zion ( Obadiah 1:21 ). ...
The prediction (Obadiah 1:15-21 ) scarcely appears to be the original and immediate continuation of the former part of the chapter, but is, like Obadiah 1:8-9 , a subsequent addition. The theory of the origin and interpretation of the book just described is substantially that of Wellhausen; it has been adopted in the main by Nowack and Marti; and, so far as the separation of Obadiah 1:15-21 (with Obadiah 1:15 b) from the rest of the chapter is concerned, and the assignment of the whole to a date after the Exile, by Cheyne ( EBi
If the argument that Obadiah 1:1 ; Obadiah 1:6 ; Obadiah 1:8 is pre-exilic be accepted, it is necessary to account for what are now generally admitted to be the allusions to the events of 586 in Obadiah 1:10-14 . alike quote from a pre-exilic prophecy, but that Obadiah himself prophesied after b. As to the amount of matter cited by Obadiah, scholars differ: e. Driver considers that Obadiah 1:1-9 is derived from the old prophecy; G. Smith, that Obadiah 1:1-5 ; Obadiah 1:8-10 are quotations, but that Obadiah 1:7 , which he admits presupposes later conditions, is by Obadiah himself. The weakness of these theories lies in the fact that the distribution of the parts to the two authors does not follow the concrete differences of style indicated above, and that Obadiah 1:7 either receives no adequate interpretation, or is torn away from Obadiah 1:5 , with which it certainly seems closely connected. As to the more precise date of Obadiah 1:1-9 ( Obadiah 1:10 ) or so much of the verses as may be pre-exilic, no agreement has been reached among those who hold them to be pre-exilic; no known circumstances explain the allusions. see) in Obadiah 1:20
Sepharad - A country in which was a community of exiles from Judah in the days of the prophet Obadiah ( Obadiah 1:20 ). Obadiah, p
Obadiah, Book of - The book of Obadiah is largely an announcement of judgment upon Edom for its part in helping Babylon in the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BC (Obadiah 1:10-14; cf. Instead the Edomites took the opportunity to plunder the helpless city (Obadiah 1:11; Obadiah 1:13). They even captured the fleeing Jerusalemites and sold them to the Babylonian conquerors (Obadiah 1:14; for map and other details see EDOM). Neither, however, would save it from the divine judgment that would fall upon it because of its active cooperation in the destruction of Jerusalem (Obadiah 1:1-16). It would even spread its power into former Edomite territory (Obadiah 1:17-21)
Obadiah, the Book of - (See Obadiah
Obadiah - But as four only are mentioned, Kennicott with four manuscripts omits "and the sons of Israhiah," thus making him brother not father of Obadiah, and both sons of Uzzi. The pressure of the drought in the third year was such that Ahab could trust none so well as Obadiah to search throughout the land for water to preserve his "beasts," his stud of "horses and mules. " Ahab cared more for these than for his perishing subjects! In a corrupt court, in spite of the persecuting idolatrous queen Jezebel, "Obadiah feared Jehovah," not merely a little but "greatly. Ahab went in one direction in search of water, Obadiah another by himself. Obadiah knew him and reverently fell on his face saying, "art thou that my lord Elijah?"...
The suddenness of his appearing and Obadiah's past avoidance of direct contact with him for prudence sake made him ask in order to be sure he was not making a mistake. Obadiah in distrustful fear (for Scripture records the failings as well as the graces of its heroes, for our learning) regarded the message as tantamount to his destruction, supposing the Spirit would carry Elijah elsewhere and so Ahab, disappointed of his victim, would wreak his vengeance on Obadiah. Many conjecture Obadiah to be the same as (Obadiah 1:6), but that is too early a date. The prophecy of Obadiah is too terse and fresh and compact a whole to have been copied from Jeremiah. It must be Jeremiah who copies from Obadiah and stamps him as inpired; compare Obadiah 1:5 with Jeremiah 49:9; Obadiah 1:6 with Jeremiah 49:10; Obadiah 1:8 with Jeremiah 49:7. ...
What is disjointed in Jeremiah is progressive and consecutive in Obadiah. The capture of Jerusalem alluded to by Obadiah is probably that by the Philistines and Arabs under Joram (2 Chronicles 21:8-10; 2 Chronicles 21:16-17), when Edom, who had just before revolted from under Judah and had been punished by Joram, in revenge gave an earnest of that unbrotherly cruelty which he in a still worse degree showed at Jerusalem's capture by Nebuchadnezzar. It cannot be that by Israelites under Pekah in Amaziah's reign, for Obadiah calls the captors "strangers" and "foreigners" (Obadiah 1:11). ...
Joel drew the outline which succeeding prophets fill in (compare Obadiah 1:10 with Joel 3:19; Amos 1:11; Obadiah 1:11 with Joel 3:3; Joel 3:5; Joel 3:17, where the language is the same, "strangers," "cast lots," "the day of the Lord," Obadiah 1:15; Joel 3:14. The same retribution in kind, Obadiah 1:15; Joel 3:4; Joel 3:7; Obadiah 1:17 also with Joel 3:17; Obadiah 1:18 with Joel 2:3; Joel 2:5; Obadiah 1:21 with Amos 9:12). Joel probably was in Joash's reign, Obadiah in Amaziah's, Amos in Uzziah's. Amaziah slew of Edom in the valley of Salt ten thousand, and took Selah by war (2 Kings 16:7), an earnest of Edom's foretold doom (Obadiah 1:1, etc. ) The doom of Edom (Obadiah 1:1-9). ) Cause of that doom (Obadiah 1:10-16). ") Obadiah quotes here Psalms 22:28, "the kingdom is the Lord's
Abdias - Obadiah the prophet
Ishmaiah - Son of Obadiah, and a ruler of Zebulun
Abadias - An exile who returned with Ezra; called Obadiah , Ezra 8:9
Obadiah, Book of - (oh buh di' uh) The shortest book of the Minor Prophets, preserving the message of Obadiah, the prophet. ...
The Prophet No source outside his book mentions Obadiah. “Obadiah” is a common name in the Old Testament. The title “The vision of Obadiah” turns attention to the divine author, “vision” being a technical term for a prophetic revelation received from God. Its central section, Obadiah 1:10-14 , deals with the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 586 B. Despite treaty ties (“brother,” Obadiah 1:10 ) the Edomitea, along with others, had failed to come to Judah's aid and had even helped Babylon by looting Jerusalem and handing over refugees. Moreover, the Edomites filled the vacuum caused by Judah's Exile by moving west and annexing the Negeb to the south of Judah and even its southern territory (compare Obadiah 1:19 ). Obadiah's oracle responded to an underlying impassioned prayer of lament, like Psalm 74:1 , Psalm 79:1 , or 137, in which Judah appealed to God to act as providential trial Judge and Savior to set right the situation. Obadiah 1:2-9 give the divine verdict. The end of Obadiah 1:1 appears to be a report from the prophet that already a coalition of neighboring groups was planning to attack Edom. ...
The catalog of Edom's crimes (Obadiah 1:10-14 ) functions as the accusation which warranted God's verdict of punishment. The underlying thought is that Judah had been the victim of “the day of the Lord” when God intervened in judgment, and had drunk the cup of God's wrath (Obadiah 1:15-16 ; compare Lamentations 1:12 ; Lamentations 2:21 ). This wider dimension is reflected in Obadiah 1:15-16 (compare Lamentations 1:21 ). Then would come the vindication of God's people, not for their own sakes but as earthly witnesses to His glory; and so “the kingdom shall be the Lord's” (Obadiah 1:21 ). ...
The Meaning Like the Book of Revelation, which proclaims the downfall of the persecuting Roman Empire, the aim of Obadiah is to sustain faith in God's moral government and hope in the eventual triumph of His just will
Sepharad - A place in Asia Minor near the Bosphorus, to which Jewish captives were conveyed, Obadiah 1:20
Obadiah - The Bible mentions at least twelve people named Obadiah. The most important is the prophet who wrote about the Edomites (see Obadiah, BOOK OF)
Zarephath - The prophet Obadiah mentions it as marking the limits of Israel's victory. Obadiah 1:20
Seph'Arad - (separated ), a name which occurs in ( Obadiah 1:20 ) only
Ishma'Iah - (Jehovah hears ), son of Obadiah; the ruler of the tribe of Zebulun in the time of King David
Abda - Nehemiah 11:17; the Obadiah of 1 Chronicles 9:16, "the principal to begin the thanksgiving in prayer
Abda - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:17 ); called Obadiah in 1 Chronicles 9:16
Obadiah, Book of - Edom (Esau) is characterised in scripture by his deadly hatred to his 'brother Jacob,' Obadiah 10 . Obadiah 12 to 14 of the prophecy exactly describe the manner of a people like the Arabs when a city was captured. Obadiah depicts the Jews themselves as God's instruments for the destruction of Esau; which agrees with Isaiah 11:14 ; Daniel 11:41 . " Obadiah 17,18 . " Obadiah 9,18
Abda - ...
A Levite of the family of Jeduthun (Nehemiah 11:17 ), also called Obadiah (1Chronicles 9:16)
Ishmaiah - ...
...
Son of Obadiah, and viceroy of Zebulun under David and Solomon (1 Chronicles 27:19 )
Abihud - ...
A descendant of Zerubbabel and father of Eliakim (Matthew 1:13 , "Abiud"); called also Juda (Luke 3:26 ), and Obadiah (1Chronicles 3:21)
Abda - He is also called Obadiah (1 Chronicles 9:16 )
Esau - His family has become extinct, "cut off forever," so that there is none "remaining of the house of Esau," Obadiah 1:18; Jeremiah 49:17; Ezekiel 25:13, and "the things of Esau" have been "so searched out and his hidden things sought up," Obadiah 1:6, "that not a relic can be found in their ancient dwellings
Obadiah - " (1 Peter 1:18-19)...
We have no less than five men of the name of Obadiah in the first book of Chronicles, 1 Chronicles 3:21; 1Ch 7:3; 1Ch 8:38; 1Ch 9:16; and 1 Chronicles 12:9;—and one in the second book of the Chronicles, 2 Chronicles 17:7. And we must not forget in this enumeration, the faithful Obadiah in the days of Ehjah. ) But the most important to us among the Obadiahs of the Scripture, is the one whom God the Holy Ghost raised up for a prophet and hath given to the church, even to this hour, this man's labours. See the prophecy of Obadiah. (See Obadiah 1:1:17-21)...
Zarephath - 1 Kings 17:9,10 ; Obadiah 20
Sepharad - ' Obadiah 20
Sepharad - Jerusalem's citizens, captives at Sepharad, shall return to occupy the city and southern Judaea (Obadiah 1:20). As Ζarephath , a Phoenician city, was mentioned in the previous clause, Sepharad is probably some Phoenician colony in Spain or some other place in the far West (compare Joel 3:6, to which Obadiah refers)
Obadiah - ...
Obadiah, the book of: The shortest book in Tanach, containing Obadiah's prophecy that foretells Edom's destruction
Teman - The men of Teman, Genesis 36:34 , like others of the Edomites, had the reputation of great wisdom, Jeremiah 49:7,20 Obadiah 1:21
Halah - Some Bible students think the original text of Obadiah 1:20 contained a promise for the captives in Halah
Teman - It was noted for the wisdom of its inhabitants (Amos 1:12 ; Obadiah 1:8 ; Jeremiah 49:7 ; Ezekiel 25:13 )
Obadiah - When Elijah sent Obadiah to tell Ahab that he was there, he feared that the Spirit of the Lord would catch away Elijah, and he would be slain; but he obeyed, and Elijah met the king . Obadiah is a remarkable instance of how a servant who feared the Lord could maintain his integrity amid flagrant wickedness, though otherwise he seems out of his right place, for he was not separate like Elijah. Obadiah 1:1
Jonah - (a) (7th century BCE) A contemporary of Obadiah
Juda - ...
...
Son of Joanna, and father of Joseph in Christ's maternal ancestry (26), probably identical with Abiud (Matthew 1:13 ), and with Obadiah (1 Chronicles 3:21 )
Sepharad - Obadiah promised them new possessions in the Negeb (Genesis 10:20 )
Zarephath - Phoenician city (Obadiah 1:20)
Zarephath - Obadiah 1:20 , a Phoenician seaport on the Mediterranean between Tyre and Zidon, usually subject to Tyre
Obadiah, Book of - (Obadiah 1:11-14 ) speaks of this capture as a thing past. We do not indeed read that the Edomites actually took part with the Chaldeans, but the probabilities are that they did so, and this explains the words of Obadiah in denouncing against Edom the judgments of God
Rezeph - 839 and 737 the prefects who had authority in the place were, to all appearance, Assyrians, only one, of unknown but apparently late date, having a name which may be West Semitic, namely, Abda’, possibly a form of ‘Abda or ‘ Obadiah
Teman - City of area associated with this clan (Jeremiah 49:7 ,Jeremiah 49:7,49:20 ; Ezekiel 25:13 ; Amos 1:12 ; Obadiah 1:9 ; Habakkuk 3:3 )
Nest - Used literally of birds’ nests ( Deuteronomy 22:6 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 , Job 39:27 , Psalms 84:3 ; Psalms 104:17 , Proverbs 27:8 , Isaiah 16:2 ); metaphorically for a lofty fortress ( Numbers 24:21 , Jeremiah 49:16 , Obadiah 1:4 , Habakkuk 2:9 ); Job refers to his lost home as a nest ( Job 29:18 ); in Genesis 6:14 the ‘ rooms ’ of the ark are (see mg
Governor - Obadiah was governor over Ahab's house
Obadiah - Obadiah is a name of a type common among the Semitic peoples; It occurs frequently in the OT, for the most part as the name of persons of whom little or nothing is known. The author of the Vision of Obadiah: see following article
Vision - ...
Among the classical prophets (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah, Obadiah, etc. “Vision” and “Word of Yahweh” became synonymous in these prophetic writings (see Obadiah 1:1 )
Sepharad - (Obadiah 1:20 ), some locality unknown
Obadiah - the prophet is thought to have been the same as the governor of Ahab's house, 1 Kings 18:3 , &c; and some are of opinion, he was that Obadiah whom Josiah made overseer of the works of the temple, 2 Chronicles 34:12
Obadiah - Obadiah (ôla-dî'ah or ŏb'a-dî'ah), servant of Jehovah
Teman - ; compare 1 Kings 4:30, and for "mighty men" Obadiah 1:8-9
Cave - Petra, in Idumea, was a city of caves, Numbers 24:21 Song of Song of Solomon 2:14 Jeremiah 49:16 Obadiah 1:3
Jehiel - ...
...
The father of Obadiah (Ezra 8:9 )
Cave - " ...
The cave in which Obadiah hid the prophets (1 Kings 18:4 ) was probably in the north, but it cannot be identified. ...
Caves were frequently used as dwelling-places (Numbers 24:21 ; Song of Solomon 2:14 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ; Obadiah 1:3 )
Obadiah, Theology of - Obadiah, the shortest Old Testament book with only twenty-one verses, was probably written shortly after the fall of Judah and Jerusalem to the Babylonians in 587 b. ...
Obadiah also provided the people concrete hope in that he declared the defeat of a perennial enemy, Edom. ...
Edom is the subject of the first part of Obadiah. Allen, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; D. Baker, Obadiah
Matthias - We have no particulars of his youth or education, for we may reckon as nothing, what is read in Abdias, or Obadiah, concerning this matter
Sela - ) It is mentioned by the prophets (Isaiah 16:1 ; Obadiah 1:3 ) as doomed to destruction
Jehiel - The father of Obadiah, a returned exile ( Ezra 8:9 ); called in 1Es 8:35 Jezelus
Ambassador - In the Old Testament the Hebrew word Tsir , Meaning "one who goes on an errand," is rendered thus ( Joshua 9:4 ; Proverbs 13:17 ; Isaiah 18:2 ; Jeremiah 49:14 ; Obadiah 1:1 )
Prophets, Sons of the - The hundred prophets whom Obadiah hid from the persecution of Jezebel may have been of the same
Interesting Facts About the Bible - ...
Shortest book in...
Obadiah
Jezebel - Obadiah saved a hundred of them, at the risk of his own life
Ezekiel - 595-573, during part of which he was contemporary with (Daniel 14:14 ; 28:3 ) and Jeremiah, and probably also with Obadiah
Lot (2) - Early used to decide an issue; so in choosing each of the two goats on the day of atonement (two inscribed tablets of boxwood were the lots used according to Joma 3:9 (?)), Leviticus 16:8, and in assigning the inheritances in Canaan (Numbers 26:55; Numbers 34:13), in selecting men for an expedition (Judges 1:1; Judges 20:10), in electing a king (1 Samuel 10:20), in detecting the guilty (1 Samuel 14:41-42), in selecting an apostle (Acts 1:26), as formerly priests' offices among the 16 of Eleazar's family and the eight of Ithamar (1 Chronicles 24:3; 1 Chronicles 24:5; 1 Chronicles 24:19; Luke 1:9), in apportioning spoil (Obadiah 1:11; Joel 3:3), in dividing Jesus' garments (Matthew 27:35; Psalms 22:18)
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Canaanites, the - Here and elsewhere the Canaanites are only one people of many; whereas in other places the term Canaanite appears to include any of the inhabitants of Canaan, as in Joshua 17:12,13 ; Nehemiah 9:24 ; Obadiah 20 ; Zechariah 14:21
Ambassador, Ambassage - The ambassador of Jeremiah 49:14 (= Obadiah 1:1 ) is probably an angel
Himself - ...
Ahab went one way by himself,and Obadiah went another way by himself
Ambassador - Jeremiah announced that God had prompted an ambassador to call the nations to punish Edom (Jeremiah 49:14 ; compare Obadiah 1:1 )
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
599...
Zedekiah,...
Obadiah
Edom - Daniel 11:41 ; Isaiah 11:13,14 ; Obadiah 18,19 . Obadiah 10
Edom - ) The Edomites’ security depended largely on a strong defence system they had built throughout their mountains (2 Chronicles 25:11-12; Obadiah 1:1-4). Teman was famous for its wisdom teachers (Job 2:11; Jeremiah 49:7; Obadiah 1:8-9). They also joined the Babylonians in plundering the city (Psalms 137:7; Obadiah 1:10-14)
Obadiah - Ahab seems to have held Obadiah in great honour, although he had no sympathy with his piety (5,6,7)
Obadiah - Obadiah was second in command behind Ezer (1 Chronicles 12:8-9 )
Captivities of Israel - Obadiah observes. "The captivity of this host of the children of Israel shall possess that of the Canaanites," &c, Obadiah 1:18-19
Nest - ) So Edom, Obadiah 1:3-4; "thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock
Flame - ...
Obadiah 1:18 (a) GOD will make His people a powerful scourge to defeat the people of Esau
Nest - (See also Obadiah 1:4)
Saviour - Salvation from all kinds of danger and evil, bodily, spiritual, temporal, and eternal (Matthew 1:21; Ephesians 5:23; Philippians 3:20-21), including also the idea restorer and preserver, giver of positive life and blessedness, as well as saviour from evil (Isaiah 26:1; 2 Samuel 8:6; Isaiah 60:18; Isaiah 61:10; Psalms 118:25), deliverer, as the judges were saviours (margin Judges 3:9; Judges 3:15; Nehemiah 9:27; Jeroboam II, 2 Kings 13:5; Obadiah 1:21)
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --Of the sixteen prophets, four are usually called the great prophets, namely, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and twelve the Minor prophets, namely, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakuk,Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. They may be divided into four groups: the prophets of the northern kingdom --Hosea, Amos, Joel, Jonah; the prophets of the southern kingdom --Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah; the prophets of the captivity --Ezekiel and Daniel; the prophets of the return --Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. They may be arranged in the following chronological order, namely, Joel, Jonah, Hoses, Amos, Isaiah, Micah, Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Obadiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
Pride - It remains a characteristic feature of fallen human nature and one of the hardest evils to overcome (Proverbs 16:18; Daniel 5:20; Obadiah 1:3; Mark 7:21-22; Romans 1:28-30)
Gilead - Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Shemai'ah - (1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 ) ...
Father of Obadiah or Abda, a Levite
Eagle - Of all known birds, the eagle flies not only the highest, Proverbs 23:5 Jeremiah 49:16 Obadiah 1:4 , but also with the greatest rapidity
Grapes - A vineyard nearly stripped of its clustered treasures was a frequent image of desolation, Isaiah 17:6 24:13 Obadiah 1:5
Obadi'ah - The book of Obadiah is a sustained denunciation of the Edomites, melting into a vision of the future glories of Zion when the arm of the Lord should have wrought her deliverance and have repaid double upon her enemies
Caves - Obadiah hid the Lord's prophets by fifties in a cave (1 Kings 18:4), Elijah at Horeb was in a cave when the Lord revealed Himself (1 Kings 19:9)
Day - A — 1: ἡμέρα (Strong's #2250 — Noun Feminine — hemera — hay-mer'-ah ) "a day," is used of (a) the period of natural light, Genesis 1:5 ; Proverbs 4:18 ; Mark 4:35 ; (b) the same, but figuratively, for a period of opportunity for service, John 9:4 ; Romans 13:13 ; (c) one period of alternate light and darkness, Genesis 1:5 ; Mark 1:13 ; (d) a period of undefined length marked by certain characteristics, such as "the day of small things," Obadiah 1:12-14 ; of perplexity and distress, Isaiah 17:11 ; Zechariah 4:10 ; of prosperity and of adversity, Ecclesiastes 7:14 ; of trial or testing, Psalm 95:8 ; of salvation, Isaiah 49:8 ; 2 Corinthians 6:2 ; cp. That period, still future, will see the complete overthrow of gentile power and the establishment of Messiah's kingdom, Isaiah 13:9-11 ; 34:8 ; Daniel 2:34,44 ; Obadiah 1:15 ; cp
Handmaid - ), in the so-called Babylonian Penitential Psalms, in ancient Semitic names—Obadiah found both in the Bible and on an ancient seal, Abdeel (Jeremiah 36:26), Abdiel (1 Chronicles 5:15), Abednego (Daniel 1:7), Abd Ninip (Tell el-Amarna Letters, No
Election, - Obadiah 10 ; Ezekiel 35
Swallow - ...
Obadiah 1:16 (b) The suicide of the heathen is described in this way
Captives - The same allusion occurs in the prophecy of Obadiah: "Strangers carried away captive his forces, and foreigners entered into his gates, and cast lots upon Jerusalem," Obadiah 1:11
Edom - "The field of Edom" (Genesis 32:3 ), "the land of Edom" (Genesis 36:16 ), was mountainous (Obadiah 1:8,9,19,21 )
Eagle - When Balaam delivered his predictions respecting the fate that awaited the nations which he then particularized, he said of the Kenites, "Strong is thy dwelling, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock," Numbers 24:21 ; alluding to that princely bird, the eagle, which not only delights in soaring to the loftiest heights, but chooses the highest rocks, and most elevated mountains, as desirable situations for erecting its nest, Habakkuk 2:9 ; Obadiah 1:4 . There is an allusion to this lofty soaring in the prophecy of Obadiah, concerning the pride of Moab: "Though thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and though thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the Lord,"...
Obadiah 1:4
Prophecy - ...
Jonah...
856-784...
Amos...
810-785...
Hosea...
810-725...
Isaiah...
810-698...
Joel...
810-660...
Micah...
758-699...
Nahum...
720-698...
Zephaniah...
640-609...
Jeremiah...
628-586...
Habakkuk...
612-598...
Daniel...
606-534...
Obadiah...
588-583...
Ezekiel...
595-536...
Haggai...
520-518...
Zechariah...
520-518...
Malachi...
436-420...
Kenites - The Kenites did not as Edom dwell in the rocks (Obadiah 1:3-4), but by leaving their nomadic life near Horeb to join Israel wandering in quest of a home the Kenite really placed his rest upon a safe rock, and would only be carried away when Assyria and Babylon took Israel and Judah; with the difference however that Judah should be restored, but the Kenites not so because they forfeited God's blessing by maintaining independence of Israel though intimately joined and by never entering inwardly into God's covenant of grace with Israel
Esau - Obadiah announces Edom's final judgement: no remnant is restored
Sama'Ria - He also makes it the burial-place of the prophets Elisha and Obadiah
Joel, Theology of - Joel does draw on the teaching of his sacred literature, particularly the books of Deuteronomy and Obadiah, and he clearly embraces the traditions surrounding God's dwelling in Zion, his holy mountain (2:1; 3:16-17,21) and in its temple (1:9,13-16). The fact that the first mention of this theme in the book calls it simply "the day" (1:15) probably indicates that it was an established concept, that Joel was drawing on earlier prophetic voices such as Amos (5:18-20), Obadiah (15), or Zephaniah (1:7,14) in his depiction of the crisis present to his people. Allen, Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; T. Finley, Joel, Amos, Obadiah ; D
Day of the Lord - It is language that could be aimed at judging Israel or that could be used to promise deliverance from evil enemies (Isaiah 13:6 ,Isaiah 13:6,13:9 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; Obadiah 1:15 )
Doubt, Doubtful, Doubting - , in Micah 4:1 , of the "exaltation" of the Lord's house; in Ezekiel 10:16 , of the "lifting" up of the wings of the cherubim; in Obadiah 1:4 , of the "mounting" up of the eagle; in the NT metaphorically, of "being anxious," through a "distracted" state of mind, of "wavering" between hope and fear, Luke 12:29 , "neither be ye of doubtful mind" (AV, marg
Fire - ...
Fire is also used to symbolize: God's people victorious over all enemies (Obadiah 1:18 ); the word of God (Jeremiah 5:14 ); the Holy Spirit (Isaiah 4:4 ; Acts 2:3 ); the zeal of the saints (Psalm 39:3 ; Psalm 119:139 ); of angels (Hebrews 1:7 ); of lust (Proverbs 6:27-28 ); of wickedness (Isaiah 9:18 ); of the tongue (James 3:6 ); and of judgment (Jeremiah 48:45 )
Prophet - , Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
Philistines - They regained their full liberty, however, under the later kings of Judah; and we see by the menaces uttered against them by the prophets Isaiah, Amos, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, that they brought many calamities on Israel, for which God threatened to punish them with great misfortunes, Jeremiah 47:1-7 Ezekiel 25:15 Amos 1:6-8 Obadiah 1:19 Zechariah 9:5
Idumea - Many predictions of the prophets foreshadowed Edom's real doom, Obadiah 1:1-21 Jeremiah 49:7 Ezekiel 25:17 Malachi 1:3,4
Jonah, Theology of - Allen, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; J. Wolff, Obadiah and Jonah
Malachi, Theology of - According to Obadiah the Edomites rejoiced over the fall of Jerusalem and did not assist their "brother" Israel (Obadiah 1:10-12 )
Pride - ...
Finally, in the Old Testament, what are some of the results of pride? It led to Uzziah's downfall (2 Chronicles 26:16 ); it hardened the heart of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 5:20 ); it goes before destruction (Proverbs 16:18 ); it does not seek God (Psalm 10:4 ); it brings disgrace (Proverbs 11:2 ); it breeds quarrels (Proverbs 13:10 ); it deceives (Jeremiah 49:16 ; Obadiah 1:3 ); it brings low (Proverbs 29:23 ; Isaiah 2:11 ; 23:9 ); it humbles (Isaiah 2:17 ; Daniel 4:37 )
Lot - In the division of the spoil, after victory, lots were likewise cast, to give every man his portion, Obadiah 1:11 ; Nahum 3:10 , &c
Joseph - Directed through dreams, Joseph took his family to Egypt until it was safe to return to Nazareth (Obadiah 1:18 )
Edom - The Edomites became "dwellers in the clefts of the rocks" (Jeremiah 49:16; compare 2 Chronicles 25:11-12), like their Horite predecessors who were troglodytes or "dwellers in caves" (Obadiah 1:3-4) Petra (Sela, Hebrew, rock), their chief city, was cut in the rocks. Hence, the denunciations against Edom in Obadiah 1:1, etc
Rock - The rock meets us continually as a place of refuge, literal or metaphorical ( Numbers 24:21 , 1 Samuel 13:6 , Isaiah 2:19 , Jeremiah 48:28 ; Jeremiah 49:16 , Obadiah 1:6 ); cf
Jehovah - The Samaritans pronounced the name Υabe (Theodoret); found also in Epiphanius; Υahu in such names as Obadiah (Obad-yahu)
Elijah - Ahab and his chief steward, Obadiah, a devoted follower of the true God, are traversing the land in different directions in search of grass for the royal stables, when the latter encounters the strange figure of Jehovah’s relentless champion. Obadiah, after considerable hesitation and reluctance, is persuaded by the prophet to announce him to the king (1 Kings 18:7-15 )
Prophecy - Hence we read concerning the acts of Manasseh, that they were written among the sayings of the Seers, (2 Chronicles 33:19)...
It were unnecessary to remark, what every reader of the Bible is supposed to know, that we have recorded, from the grace of God the Holy Spirit, the writings of four of what, by way of distinction, are called the greater prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel; and the Writings of the twelve of lesser prophets, as they are named, Hoses, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi
Judges - None of the nation's deliverers called "judges" (Judges 2:16-19; Acts 13:20) were of a priest's family; Eli was not a deliverer or saviour (Obadiah 1:21; Judges 3:9; Judges 3:15)
Prophecy, Prophets - The advent of the Persian Empire in the latter part of the sixth century set the stage for prophets such as Obadiah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Similarly prophecies of “the day of the Lord” had several fulfillments (partial) which also foreshadowed a final fulfillment (Obadiah 1:15 ; Joel 1:15 ; Joel 2:1 ; Zephaniah 1:7 ,Zephaniah 1:7,1:14 ; Ezekiel 30:3 ; compare 2 Peter 3:10 )
Poetry - ...
Poetry in the Old Testament...
Genesis 2:23 ; Genesis 3:14-19 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Genesis 9:25-27 ; Genesis 14:19-20 ; Genesis 16:11-12 ; Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:27-29 ,Genesis 27:27-29,27:39-40 ; Genesis 48:15-16 ; Genesis 49:2-27 ...
Exodus 15:1-18 ,Exodus 15:1-18,15:21 ...
Leviticus 10:3 ...
Numbers 6:24-27 ; Numbers 10:35-36 ; Numbers 12:6-8 ; Numbers 21:14-15 ; Numbers 21:17-18 ,Numbers 21:17-18,21:27-30 ; Numbers 23:7-10 ; Numbers 23:18-24 ; Numbers 24:3-9 ,Numbers 24:3-9,24:15-24 ...
Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ; Deuteronomy 33:2-29 ...
Joshua 10:12-13 ...
Judges 5:2-31 ; Judges 14:14 ,Judges 14:14,14:18 ; Judges 15:16 ...
Ruth 1:16-17 ,Ruth 1:16-17,1:20-21 ...
1 Samuel 2:1-10 ; 1Samuel 15:22-23,1 Samuel 15:33 ; 1 Samuel 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 21:11 ; 1 Samuel 29:5 ...
2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ; 2 Samuel 22:2-51 ; 2 Samuel 23:1-7 ...
1 Kings 8:12-13 ; 1 Kings 12:16 ...
2 Kings 19:21-28 ...
1 Chronicles 16:8-36 ...
2 Chronicles 5:13 ; 2 Chronicles 6:41-42 ; 2 Chronicles 7:3 ; Ecclesiastes 11:1-4 ; 2 Chronicles 20:21 ...
Ecclesiastes 7:1-134 ...
Job 3:2-42:6 ...
Psalm 1-150 ...
Proverbs 1-31 ...
Ecclesiastes 1:2-11 ,Ecclesiastes 1:2-11,1:15 ,Ecclesiastes 1:15,1:18 ; Ecclesiastes 3:2-9 ; 1618103202_20 ; Ecclesiastes 8:1 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1-4 ,Ecclesiastes 10:1-4,10:8-20 ; 2 Chronicles 10:16 ...
Song of Song of Solomon 1-8 ...
Isaiah—largely poetry...
Jeremiah—poetic selections throughout except for 32–45...
Lamentations 1-5 ...
Ezekiel 19:2-14 ; Ezekiel 23:32-34 ; Ezekiel 24:3-5 ; Ezekiel 26:17-18 ; Ezekiel 27:3-9 ; Ezekiel 27:25-36 ; Ezekiel 28:1-10 ; Ezekiel 28:12-19 ; Ezekiel 28:22-23 ; Ezekiel 29:3-5 ; Ezekiel 30:2-4 ; Ezekiel 30:6-8 ; Ezekiel 30:10-19 ; Ezekiel 31:2-9 ; Ezekiel 32:2-8 ; Ezekiel 32:12-15 ; Ezekiel 32:19 ...
Daniel 2:20-23 ; Daniel 2:16-20 ; Daniel 4:34-35 ; Daniel 6:26-27 ; Daniel 7:9-10 ; Daniel 7:13-14 ; 7:23-27 Hosea—all poetry except for 1; Daniel 4:3 ; Daniel 3:1-5 ...
Joel—all poetry except for Daniel 2:30-3:8 ...
Amos—largely poetry...
Obadiah 1:1 ...
Jonah 2:2-9 ...
Micah 1-7 ...
Nahum 1-3 ...
Habakkuk 1-3 ...
Zephaniah 1-3 ...
Zechariah 9-11:3 ; Zechariah 11:17 ; Zechariah 13:7-9 ...
Parallelism The predominant feature of Hebrew poetry is parallelism
Edom - This would explain, for example, the bitter verbal attacks on Edom in passages such as Jeremiah 49:7-22 and the Book of Obadiah
Crimes And Punishments - Often the phrase “cut off” is used in parallel with words or phrases or in contexts which clearly indicate death (Exodus 31:14 ; Deuteronomy 12:29 ; Deuteronomy 19:1 ; 2 Samuel 7:9 ; 1 Kings 11:16 ; Jeremiah 7:28 ; Jeremiah 11:19 ; Ezekiel 14:13 ,Ezekiel 14:13,14:17 ,Ezekiel 14:17,14:19 ,Ezekiel 14:19,14:21 ; Ezekiel 17:17 ; Ezekiel 25:7 ; Ezekiel 29:8 ; Amos 1:5 ,Amos 1:5,1:8 ; Amos 2:3 ; Obadiah 1:9-10 ; Nahum 3:15 ; Zechariah 13:8 )
Elijah - At the close of this period of retirement and of preparation for his work (Compare Galatians 1:17,18 ) Elijah met Obadiah, one of Ahab's officers, whom he had sent out to seek for pasturage for the cattle, and bade him go and tell his master that Elijah was there
Prophets - Obadiah, near the fall and captivity of Jerusalem, B
Servant of the Lord - Thus it will be readily understood that any Israelite might be called ‘the servant of Jahweh,’ and as a matter of fact a large number of individuals received this phrase as their name; it is familiar to English readers in the form Obadiah , which was originally pronounced, as the LXX Job - Ezekiel, Amos, and Obadiah, Jeremiah 49:7 ; Jeremiah 49:20 ; Ezekiel 25:13 ; Amos 1:11-12 ; Obadiah 1:8-9 , formed a principal part of Idumea; Bildad, of Shuah, who is always mentioned in conjunction with Sheba and Dedan, the first of whom was probably named after one of the brothers of Joktan or Kahtan, and the two last from two of his sons, all of them being uniformly placed in the vicinity of Idumea, Genesis 25:2-3 ; Jeremiah 49:8 ; Zophar of Naama, a city importing pleasantness, which is also stated by Joshua, Joshua 15:21 ; Joshua 15:41 , to have been situate in Idumea, and to have lain in a southern direction toward its coast, on the shores of the Red Sea; and Elihu, of Buz, which, as the name of a place, occurs only once in Sacred Writ, Jeremiah 25:23 , but is there mentioned in conjunction with Temen and Dedan; and hence necessarily, like them, a border city upon Uz or Idumea
Habakkuk, Theology of - Watts, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah
Elijah - Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender
Elijah - Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - From the first mention of the expression by Amos (although some date Obadiah 15 and Joel earlier), the notion of divine intervention, of a "God who comes" is evident. Obadiah announces that the deeds of the nations will return on their own heads (v
Exile - ...
The Assyrians exiled the Israelites into Halah, Gozan, and Media (2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:11 ; Obadiah 1:20 )
Remnant - Obadiah, whose book targets Edom, asserts, "There will be no survivors from the house of Esau" (v
Ahab - Jezebel cut off Jehovah's prophets, except 100 saved by Obadiah
Prophets, the - It may be premised that the burden of the prophets Obadiah, Jonah, and Nahum has special reference to Edom and to Nineveh, that is, to peoples that were always hostile to Israel
Lord's Prayer - ’ In the OT we may compare with clause 1, Isaiah 63:16 ; clause 2, Exodus 20:7 ; clauses 2, 3, Zechariah 14:9 ; clause 4, Psalms 103:20 ; Psalms 135:6 ; clause 5, Exodus 16:4 , Proverbs 30:8 ; clause 6, Obadiah 1:15
Commentary - Obadiah Hughes; the epistle of St
Prophets - It should seem, that these sons of the prophets were very numerous; for of this sort were probably the prophets of the Lord, whom Jezebel cut off; "but Obadiah took a hundred of them, and hid them by fifty in a cave," 1 Kings 18:4
Micah, Theology of - Waltke, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; R
Lots - A war was the war primarily not of Israel but of Jahweh, and that specially if it was for the punishment of wrong-doing; hence the members of a punitive expedition were chosen by lot (Judges 20:9), hence also the spoil taken in war (Judges 5:30), whether captives (Joshua 17:4-17,2 Nahum 3:10, Joel 3:3) or sections of a conquered city (Obadiah 1:11), The services of the sanctuary were sacred; hence the priestly functions were assigned to the orders by lot (1 Chronicles 24:5; 1 Chronicles 24:7, Luke 1:9), Shemaiah the scribe writing out the lots in the presence of a committee consisting of the king, the high priest, and other functionaries (1 Chronicles 24:6; 1 Chronicles 24:31)
Elijah - Obadiah, an officer of the king's household, being thus employed, Elijah presented himself, and directed him to tell Ahab, "Behold, Elijah is here!" Ahab came to meet the prophet, and reproached him as the cause of the famine
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - It was on the prophet Obadiah, which he interpreted mystically (pref. on Obadiah )
Covenant - They could also be called “men of the covenant” (Obadiah 1:7 )
War - Sacrifices were also offered, in reference to which the soldiers were said to consecrate themselves to the war, Isaiah 13:3 ; Jeremiah 6:4 ; Jeremiah 51:27 ; Joel 3:9 ; Obadiah 1:1
Ethics - ...
Long sections in the Old Testament text are specifically addressed to the nations at large including Isaiah 13-23 ; Jeremiah 45-51 ; Ezekiel 25-32 ; Daniel 2:1 ; Daniel 7:1 ; Amos 1-2 , Obadiah; Jonah; and Nahum
Lots - A war was the war primarily not of Israel but of Jahweh, and that specially if it was for the punishment of wrong-doing; hence the members of a punitive expedition were chosen by lot (Judges 20:9), hence also the spoil taken in war (Joshua 18:6-11), whether captives (2 Samuel 8:2, Nahum 3:10, Joel 3:3) or sections of a conquered city (Obadiah 1:11), The services of the sanctuary were sacred; hence the priestly functions were assigned to the orders by lot (1 Chronicles 24:5; 1 Chronicles 24:7, Luke 1:9), Shemaiah the scribe writing out the lots in the presence of a committee consisting of the king, the high priest, and other functionaries (1 Chronicles 24:6; 1 Chronicles 24:31)
Messiah - Zephaniah and Obadiah make no reference to the Messianic King
Fire - ...
Obadiah 1:18 (a) By this is represented the wrath of Israel against the people of Esau, their enemies
Israel, History of - The Persian Period (Ezra 1 ; 5–6;9–10 ; Nehemiah 1–6 ; 8–9 ; 13 ; Haggai; Zechariah; Obadiah; Malachi; Job; Ecclesiastes; Proverbs; Ruth; Jonah; Esther) Judah's postexilic era began in late 539 with the entrance of the troops of Cyrus of Persia into Babylon. Obadiah's brief message was a hymn of hate against the Edomites, who had assumed Judah's lands and homes when the people were taken into Exile
Evil - Edomites are chided for gloating over the disaster of the destruction of Jerusalem, called "his [7] evil" (Obadiah 1:13 )
Bible - also we have Obadiah (?), Ezekiel, part, if not all, of the Deutero-Isaiah (40 50), Haggai, Zechariah (1 8), Lamentations, Ruth
Elijah - " Toward the close of the three and a half years of famine, when it attacked Samaria the capital, Ahab directed his governor of the palace, the Godfearing Obadiah who had saved and fed a hundred prophets in a cave, to go in one direction and seek some grass to save if possible the horses and mules, while he himself went in the opposite direction for the same purpose. Overcoming the awestruck Obadiah's fear, lest, when he should tell the king, Behold Elijah is here, meanwhile the Spirit should carry him away, Elijah, whom Ahab's servants had been seeking everywhere in vain for three years, now suddenly stands before Ahab with stern dignity
Bible - the Pentateuch or five books of Moses, called Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth , 1 & 2 Samuel , 1 & 2 Kings , 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Solomon, the prophecies of Isaiah, Jeremiah with his Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi