What does North mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַצָּפ֔וֹן north (of direction) 8
צָפ֔וֹן north (of direction) 8
צָפ֑וֹן north (of direction) 7
צָפֽוֹן north (of direction) 6
צָפ֑וֹנָה north (of direction) 5
מִצָּפוֹן֙ north (of direction) 5
הַצָּפ֑וֹן north (of direction) 5
צָפֽוֹנָה north (of direction) 4
צָפ֔וֹנָה north (of direction) 4
מִצְּפ֖וֹן north (of direction) 4
מִצָּפ֖וֹן north (of direction) 4
צָפ֖וֹן north (of direction) 3
צָפוֹן֙ north (of direction) 3
צָפ֖וֹנָה north (of direction) 3
הַצָּפ֗וֹן north (of direction) 3
מִצָּפ֗וֹן north (of direction) 3
מִצָּפ֔וֹן north (of direction) 3
מִצְּפ֣וֹן north (of direction) 3
צָפ֜וֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפ֗וֹנָה north (of direction) 2
מִצָּפ֑וֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפ֣וֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפֹ֖נָה north (of direction) 2
צָפ֙וֹנָה֙ north (of direction) 2
צָפ֗וֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפ֜וֹנָה north (of direction) 2
βορρᾶ Boreas 2
צָפוֹנָה֒ north (of direction) 2
הַצָּפֽוֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפ֛וֹן north (of direction) 2
צָפ֡וֹנָה north (of direction) 2
וּמִצָּפ֖וֹן north (of direction) 1
שְׂמֹאולֵ֑ךְ the left 1
מִצָּפ֥וֹן north (of direction) 1
צָ֭פוֹן north (of direction) 1
צָפֹֽנָה north (of direction) 1
וּֽמִמְּזָרִ֥ים scatterer. 1
מִצְּפ֤וֹנָה north (of direction) 1
מִצָּפֽוֹן north (of direction) 1
לַצָּפ֤וֹנָה north (of direction) 1
צָפ֥וֹנָה north (of direction) 1
מִצָּפ֖וֹנָה north (of direction) 1
מִצְּפ֗וֹן north (of direction) 1
מִ֭צָּפוֹן north (of direction) 1
הַצָּפוֹן֮ north (of direction) 1
מִצָּפ֛וֹן north (of direction) 1
הַצָּפ֜וֹן north (of direction) 1
וּמִצָּפ֑וֹן north (of direction) 1
וְצָפֹ֛נָה north (of direction) 1
מִצָּפ֣וֹן north (of direction) 1
לַצָּפוֹן֙ north (of direction) 1
וְצָפֹ֣נָה north (of direction) 1
בַּצָּפ֑וֹן north (of direction) 1
הַצָּפ֑וֹנָה north (of direction) 1
צָפֹ֑נָה north (of direction) 1
וְהַצָּפֽוֹן north (of direction) 1
הַצָּפֹֽן north (of direction) 1
וְצָפ֥וֹן ׀ north (of direction) 1
לַצָּפֽוֹן north (of direction) 1
וּבָ֗א to go in 1
מִשְּׂמֹ֖אל the left 1

Definitions Related to North

H6828


   1 North (of direction), northward.
      1a North.
      1b northward.
      

G1005


   1 Boreas, the North-North-east wind.
   2 the North.
   

H4215


   1 scatterer.
   

H935


   1 to go in, enter, come, go, come in.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to enter, come in.
         1a2 to come.
            1a2a to come with.
            1a2b to come upon, fall or light upon, attack (enemy).
            1a2c to come to pass.
         1a3 to attain to.
         1a4 to be enumerated.
         1a5 to go.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to lead in.
         1b2 to carry in.
         1b3 to bring in, cause to come in, gather, cause to come, bring near, bring against, bring upon.
         1b4 to bring to pass.
      1c (Hophal).
         1c1 to be brought, brought in.
         1c2 to be introduced, be put.
         

H8040


   1 the left, the left hand, the left side.
      1a left.
      1b left hand.
      1c North (as one faces east).
      

Frequency of North (original languages)

Frequency of North (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Christian Reformed Church in North America
A group who withdrew from the Reformed Church in America. They organized as a separate body at Holland, Michigan in 1857. In doctrine they adhere to the Belgic Confession of Faith, the Heidelberg Catechism, and the Canons of Dort. They are strictly presbyterian in government. Two weekly periodicals are published by them. In 1890 the True Protestant Dutch Reformed Church merged with them. The Protestant Reformed Church split off in 1924, and during the 1990's, another group split off as the United Reformed Churches in North America. They have a web site.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - North Country
A general name for the countries that lay north of Palestine. Most of the invading armies entered Palestine from the north (Isaiah 41:25 ; Jeremiah 1:14,15 ; 50:3,9,41 ; 51:48 ; Ezekiel 26:7 ).
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - North East, North West
1: χῶρος (Strong's #5566 — Noun Masculine — choros — kho'-ros ) Lat., corus, the Latin name for "the north-west wind," hence, "the north-west," occurs in Acts 27:12 , AV, RV, "(north-east and) south-east," as the N.W. wind blows towards the S.E.
Note: In the same ver., lips, "the south-west (lit., 'Libyan') wind," hence, "the south-west" (so AV), is rendered "north-east" in RV, as the S.W. wind blows towards the N.E. The difficulty is that Lutro (commonly identified with Phoenix) faces E., not W. But there is a harbor opposite Lutro which does look S.W. and N.W., bearing the name Phineka (RV marg. renders the whole phrase literally). This seems the best solution.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - North-West,
χῶρος. The harbour of Phenice in Crete looked towards south-west (λίψ) and north-west. Acts 27:12 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Belmont, North Carolina, Abbey Nullius of
Comprised Catawba, Cleveland, Burke, Gaston, Lincoln, McDowell, Polk, and Rutherford counties, an area of 3,626 square miles. Belmont Abbey, also called Maryhelp Abbey, was founded as Saint Mary's College by the Benedictines, 1878, raised to an abbey in 1884, and erected into an abbey nullius on June 8, 1910. The college received its charter for secular education in 1886. Connected with it were an academy and a seminary, founded in 1888, for students for the abbey nullius and Southern missions. The abbey was suppressed in 1977, its territory incorporated into the diocese of Charlotte.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - North American College
Founded at Rome, 1859, by Pope Pius IX for the training of young men for the priesthood. The students, who number about 100, attend the lectures at the Propaganda. There is a fine collegiate church with marble altars and a painting of the Madonna over the high altar.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - North Country, Land of the North
NORTH COUNTRY, LAND OF THE NORTH. A phrase of somewhat vague application, but denoting in a general fashion 1 . The source or region from which dangerous foes were to come upon Palestine (so in Jeremiah 6:22 ; Jeremiah 10:22 , Zechariah 6:6 ; Zechariah 6:8 ). 2. The regions to which the people of Israel or Judah had been exiled, and whence they were to be restored (so in Jeremiah 3:18 ; Jeremiah 16:16 ; Jeremiah 23:8 ; Jeremiah 31:8 , Zechariah 2:6 ). 3. Northern Syria (so Jeremiah 46:10 ). The last-named Instance explains itself. The other applications of the term may be further illustrated by the usage of the word ‘north’ generally in OT. Here it is sufficient to recall the general fact that, while in the early history of Israel the land was invaded by many small peoples from the east and south, after the rise of the Assyrian and Chaldæan powers the attacks were made by larger armies which came in the course of their march down through Syria or the Mediterranean coast-land, the eastern desert route being impossible. Deportations of captives were naturally effected by the same routes, and by the same routes they would return. Thus, though Babylonia was in the same latitude as Palestine, it was included among the countries of the ‘north.’
J. F. M‘Curdy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - North Carolina
The 12th state to be admitted to the United States, November 21, 1789. Mass was first celebrated in North Carolina at Newbern, 1784, by a priest who had come on business from Madeira, Reverend Patrick Cleary of Funchal. He officiated in the home of Mrs Alexander Gaston, whose distinguished son, William Gaston, was to bring about the repeal, in 1835, of the article in the North Carolina Constitution of 1776 which kept from office "those who denied the truth of the Protestant religion." For nearly 50 years the few Catholics of North Carolina were served only by visiting priests. These included Father Le Mercier at Raleigh in 1805, Reverend Joseph de Cloriviere of Charleston at Fayetteville in 1812, Reverend Nicholas Kerney of Norfolk at Newbern and Wilmington in 1819. Finally in 1823Reverend Francis O'Donoghue was sent by Bishop England of Charleston to Washington, DC, and the church of Saint John the Evangelist was built. Saint Patrick's was erected in Fayetteville the next year, when Newbern was also organized as a parish, though it was only in 1840 that the first church there, Saint Paul's, was built.
Catholic influence on the place-names of the State is shown in the following:
Saint Paul's
Trinity
Valle Crucis
Ecclesiastically, the state is ruled by the dioceses of
Charlotte
Raleigh
See also
patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - North Dakota
The 39th state to be admitted to the United States, November 2, 1889. The first missionary within the limits of North Dakota was the Reverend Joseph Severe Dumoulin, sent by Bishop Plessis of Quebec to minister to a colony of Canadians who had been driven south from. Fort Douglas (now Saint Boniface), near Winnipeg, in 1818, by the destruction of their crops, and who settled at Pembina. Soon after Father Dumoulin had been recalled in 1823, an American priest, Reverend George Anthony Belcourt, took his place as resident pastor at Pembina and did missionary work among the Indians and in early white settlements. He even accompanied his people on their summer hunting excursions to the southwestern mountains, taking the opportunity to instruct the children. The tireless missionary, Father Pierre de Smet, visited the Mandans and the Gros Ventres, Indian tribes of North Dakota, in 1864. He passed through their country again in 1868 on the way to his famous peace-making conference with Sitting Bull. In 1865 a mission was established near Fort Totten by Father Jean Baptiste Genin.
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following:
Mount Carmel
Saint Anthony
Saint John
Saint Thomas
Ecclesiastically the state is governed by the dioceses of
Bismarck
Fargo
See also,
patron saints index
Holman Bible Dictionary - North Gate
Designation of two gates in Ezekiel's vision of the renewed Temple, a gate entering the outer court (Ezekiel 8:14 ; Ezekiel 44:4 ; Ezekiel 46:9 ; Ezekiel 47:2 ) and a gate entering the inner court (Ezekiel 40:35 ,Ezekiel 40:35,40:40 ,Ezekiel 40:40,40:44 ).
King James Dictionary - North
NORTH, n. I know not the origin of this word, nor its primary sense. It may have been applied first to the pole star, or to the wind, like Boreas. One of the cardinal points, being that point of the horizon which is directly opposite to the sun in the meridian, on the left hand when we stand with the face to the east or it is that point of intersection of the horizon and meridian which is nearest our pole.
NORTH, a. Being in the north as the north polar star.
Holman Bible Dictionary - North
See Directions, Geographical.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - North
Job 26:7 (c) There are many ideas about this expression. It is probably best to believe that it represents the great and unknown power of the unseen GOD. (See also Psalm 48:2; Isaiah 14:13). Let us remember that Satan endeavored to occupy GOD's throne, and that was his great sin.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abbey Nullius of Belmont, North Carolina
Comprised Catawba, Cleveland, Burke, Gaston, Lincoln, McDowell, Polk, and Rutherford counties, an area of 3,626 square miles. Belmont Abbey, also called Maryhelp Abbey, was founded as Saint Mary's College by the Benedictines, 1878, raised to an abbey in 1884, and erected into an abbey nullius on June 8, 1910. The college received its charter for secular education in 1886. Connected with it were an academy and a seminary, founded in 1888, for students for the abbey nullius and Southern missions. The abbey was suppressed in 1977, its territory incorporated into the diocese of Charlotte.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - North
1. mezarim, lit. 'the scattering': regarding the north wind as scattering the clouds and bringing severe cold. Elihu said the cold came out of the north. The word occurs only in Job 37:9 .
2. tsaphon, 'hidden, dark.' The ancients regarded the north as the region of gloom and darkness. This is the word commonly translated 'north' in the O.T. Job 37:9 , etc.
3. βορρᾶς, north. Luke 13:29 ; Revelation 21:13 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bangor, Carnarvonshire, North Wales, Diocese of
Probably founded in the 6th century, either by Saint Daniel (died 584?) or by Saint David. Its history before the Conquest is obscure. The cathedral, the smallest in England or Wales, destroyed by the Normans in 1071, rebuilt by them, burned 1402, and again rebuilt in the 16th century, has served since the Reformation, as both an Anglican cathedral and parish church. The diocese consisted of Anglesea, Carnarvonshire, the greater part of Merionethshire, and some parishes in the counties of Denbigh and Montgomery. Included in the episcopal list are Anian (1267-1305), who baptized Edward II, and Thomas Skevington, or Pace (1509-1533), who completed the cathedral. The last Catholic bishop was William Glynn (1553-1558).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America. A religious denomination formed in 1911 at Cincinnati by consolidation of the German Evangelical Protestant Ministers' Association, and the German Evangelical Ministers' Conference. Since October 20, 1925, the Association has been regularly affiliated with the National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United States. They believe in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, protesting against any compulsion in matters of faith and conscience, and granting to everyone the privilege of individual examination and research.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North
Includes the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Missouri, Ohio, and other states; the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin and other states; the Slovak Evangelical Lutheran Synod of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession; the Norwegian Synod of the American Evangelical Lutheran Church, and the Negro Mission. They are congregational in government, and the German language prevails in the Synodical Conference.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - General Eldership of the Churches of God in North
Religious denomination popularly known as "Winebrennerian," founded by John Winebrenner, and organized at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1845. The members are both orthodox and evangelistic in doctrine, and Arminian rather than Calvinistic. They adhere to three obligatory ordinances as mere symbols: Baptism (by immersion), the Lord's Supper, and "the religious washing of the saints' feet"; accept the Word of God as their only rule of faith and practise; and are presbyterian in their government. A weekly magazine is published by them. Foreign missionary work is carried on in the Bogra District, Bengal, where there were in 1916: 3 stations, 4 missionaries, and 11 native helpers; 1 organized church with 27 members; and 7 schools, 188 pupils. In the United States in 1925 there were: 449 ministers, 484 churches, and 28,484 communicants.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - North
1: βορρᾶς (Strong's #1005 — Noun Masculine — borras — bor-hras' ) primarily Boreas, the North Wind, came to denote the "north" (cp. "Borealis"), Luke 13:29 ; Revelation 21:13 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Raleigh, North Carolina, Diocese of
Established as the vicariate Apostolic of North Carolina on March 3, 1868. Elevated to the diocese of Raleigh on December 12, 1924. Originally a suffragan of the archdiocese of Baltimore; on February 10, 1962 the metropolitan was changed to the archdiocese of Atlanta.
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
diocese of Raleigh
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - North
See Jeremiah 1:14 46:6,24 Zephaniah 2:13 . "Fair weather," says Job, or golden weather, "cometh out of the north," Job 37:22 . This is as true in Syria and Arabia now as it was three thousand years ago. A traveler there remarks, "Our friends, who have been long residents, informed us that we should have fair weather for our start on the morrow, as the wind was from the north."
"... And so we have found it come to pass that the clouds of a golden hue always followed upon a north wind, and indicated a clear day; and as in the times of the Savior, we could always say when it was evening, It will be fair weather, for the sky is red,'" Matthew 16:2 .

Sentence search

Polestar - ) Polaris, or the North star. See North star, under North
Northward - North'WARD, a. Being towards the North, or nearer to the North than to the east and west points. ...
North'WARD, adv. Towards the North, or towards a point nearer to the North than the east and west points
North - 'the scattering': regarding the North wind as scattering the clouds and bringing severe cold. Elihu said the cold came out of the North. ' The ancients regarded the North as the region of gloom and darkness. This is the word commonly translated 'north' in the O. βορρᾶς, North
Polaris - See North star, under North
Septentrionate - ) To tend or point toward the North; to North
Gaston, William - Jurist, born Newbern, North Carolina, 1778; died Raleigh, North Carolina, 1844. After serving as state senator and Federalist congressman, he was elected judge of the Supreme Court of North Carolina
William Gaston - Jurist, born Newbern, North Carolina, 1778; died Raleigh, North Carolina, 1844. After serving as state senator and Federalist congressman, he was elected judge of the Supreme Court of North Carolina
Zior - Littleness, a city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:54 ); the modern Si'air, 4 1/2 miles North-north-east of Hebron
North - North, n. ...
North, a. Being in the North as the North polar star
North - 1: βορρᾶς (Strong's #1005 — Noun Masculine — borras — bor-hras' ) primarily Boreas, the North Wind, came to denote the "north" (cp
Sinites - A tribe of unknown Canaanites probably in the far North. The Targums give Orthosia, a town on the coast to the North-east of Tripolis
North Country - A general name for the countries that lay North of Palestine. Most of the invading armies entered Palestine from the North (Isaiah 41:25 ; Jeremiah 1:14,15 ; 50:3,9,41 ; 51:48 ; Ezekiel 26:7 )
Arkite - Tribe descended from Canaan, son of Ham; it probably resided in Arca, in the North of Phoenicia, about 15 miles North of Tripoli, now called Tell Arka
Merom, Waters of (See Also Jordan, Lake of Huleh) - A lake in the North of Palestine. It was connected with a large morass on its North side, in which there was an abundance of tall papyrus. The open water was about four and a half miles from North to south and three and a half miles at its widest. This was where Joshua defeated the confederate kings of the North
Northern - North'ERN, a. Being in the North, or nearer to that point than to the east or west. In a direction towards the North, or a point near it as, to steer a Northern course
Amphiscians - ) The inhabitants of the tropic, whose shadows in one part of the year are cast to the North, and in the other to the south, according as the sun is south or North of their zenith
North East, North West - , corus, the Latin name for "the North-west wind," hence, "the North-west," occurs in Acts 27:12 , AV, RV, "(north-east and) south-east," as the N. , 'Libyan') wind," hence, "the south-west" (so AV), is rendered "north-east" in RV, as the S
Illyricum - a province lying to the North and North-west of Macedonia, along the eastern coast of the Adriatic Gulf, or Gulf of Venice. It was distinguished into two parts: Liburnia to the North, where is now Croatia, and Dalmatia to the south, which still retains the same name, and to which, as St
Utes - ) An extensive tribe of North American Indians of the Shoshone stock, inhabiting Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, and adjacent regions. They are subdivided into several subordinate tribes, some of which are among the most degraded of North American Indians
South-West - See North-WEST
Algonkin - ) One of a widely spread family of Indians, including many distinct tribes, which formerly occupied most of the Northern and eastern part of North America. The name was originally applied to a group of Indian tribes North of the River St
Illyricum - A country of Europe, lying east of the Adriatic sea, North of Epirus, and west of Macedonian. It was anciently divided into Liburnia, now Croatia, on the North, and Dalmatia on the south, which still retains its name
Aquilon - ) The North wind
Sioux State - North Dakota; - a nickname
Church, Latin or Western - Comprehends all the churches of Italy, Portugal, Spain, Africa, the North, and all other countries whither the Romans carried their language. Great Britain, part of the Netherlands, of Germany, and of the North of Europe, have been separated from it almost ever since the reformation
Tuscaroras - ) A tribe of North American Indians formerly living on the Neuse and Tar rivers in North Carolina
Hermopolis Magna, Egypt, Diocese of - Comprises central Egypt, bounded North by the patriarchate; east by the Gulf of Hermopolis; south by 27° and 28° North latitude; west by the Libyan Desert; established, 1895; suffragan of Alexandria
ca'na - (John 21:2 ) The traditional site is at Kefr-Kenna , a small village about 4 1/2 miles Northwest of Nazareth. The rival site is a village situated farther North, about five miles North of Seffurieh (Sepphoris) and nine North of Nazareth
Atlanta, Georgia, Archdiocese of - Suffragen dioceses include ...
Charleston, South Carolina
Charlotte, North Carolina
Raleigh, North Carolina
Savannah, Georgia
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Migdol - Apparently distinct from another Migdol in the North of Egypt. In Ezekiel 29:10 , margin , 'from Migdol to Syene' implies from North to south of Egypt
Zaretan - Called also Zartnah and Zarthan, 1 Kings 4:12 7:46 ; a town on the west side of the Jordan, near Bethshean and North of Succoth. The reflux of the Jordan at the crossing of the Israelites was marked as far North as Zaretan, Joshua 3:16
Boreas - ) The North wind; - usually a personification
Cantoris - Derived from cantor, meaning a singer, and is used todesignate the North side of the choir, where the precentor sits. North side,therefore, is the left of the Altar as we face it
Cronian - ) Saturnian; - applied to the North Polar Sea
Septentrional - ) Of or pertaining to the North; Northern
Yorkshire - ) A county in the North of England
Baal-Zephon - The idol or possession of the North; hidden; secret
Cuthah - Some have conjectured that the "Cutheans" were identical with the "Cossaeans" who inhabited the hill-country to the North of the river Choaspes. Cuthah is now identified with Tell Ibrahim, 15 miles North-east of Babylon
Carolinian - ) A native or inhabitant of North or South Carolina
Pan-American - ) Of or pertaining to both North and South America
Polynia - ) The open sea supposed to surround the North pole
Hazar-Enan - Village of fountains, a place on the North-east frontier of Palestine (Numbers 34:9,10 ). More probably, however, it has been identified with Kuryetein, about 60 miles east-north-east of Damascus
Baal-Zephon - (bay' uhl-zee' fawn) Place name meaning, “lord of the North” or “Baal of the North
Ultramontanism - ) The principles of those within the Roman Catholic Church who maintain extreme views favoring the pope's supremacy; - so used by those living North of the Alps in reference to the Italians; - rarely used in an opposite sense, as referring to the views of those living North of the Alps and opposed to the papal claims
Accad - It was in the land of Shinar, and George Smith locates it at Agadi, on the Euphrates, North of Babylon. Rawlinson places it at Aker-Kuf, ten miles west by North of Bagdad
Ituraea - A district in the North-east of Palestine, forming, along with the adjacent territory of Trachonitis, the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1 ). It is bounded on the east by Trachonitis, on the south by Gaulanitis, on the west by Hermon, and on the North by the plain of Damascus
Turpentine State - North Carolina; - a nickname alluding to its extensive production of turpentine
Silverfin - ) A small North American fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Notropis Whipplei)
Heleph - Exchange, a city on the North border of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33 )
Septentrion - ) The North or Northern regions
Papoose - ) A babe or young child of Indian parentage in North America
Cora - ) The Arabian gazelle (Gazella Arabica), found from persia to North Africa
Shicron - Boundary in the North-west of Judah
Allotment - Reuben occupied a southern tract on the Northeast shore of the Dead Sea, bordered by Moab, Ammon, and the Arnon Valley. Gad settled immediately North of Reuben and was bordered on the east by Ammon. Manasseh claimed a vast territory even farther North, stretching from Mahanaim to Mt. Benjamin and Dan settled in a narrow strip of land North of Judah. Ephraim lay just North of Dan and Benjamin, bordered on the east by the Jordan and on the North by the brook Kanah. The second half of Manasseh lay North of Dan and Ephraim, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean. Issachar and Zebulun dwelt in small inland tracts North of Manasseh. Asher inhabited the Northernmost corner of Canaan, claiming much seacoast and reaching as far as Sidon the Great. Dan also occupied a small portion of land to the far North, between Manasseh and Naphtali
Brickfielder - ) By confusion, a midsummer hot wind from the North. , at Sydney, a cold and violent south or southwest wind, rising suddenly, and regularly preceded by a hot wind from the North; - now usually called southerly buster
Northward - A Hebrew in speaking of the points of the compass was considered as always having his face to the east, and hence "the left hand" (Genesis 14:15 ; Job 23:9 ) denotes the North. The "kingdoms of the North" are Chaldea, Assyria, Media, etc
Baal-Zephon - Exodus 14:2 , Numbers 33:7 ; the name of a place near the spot where the Israelites crossed the Red Sea, apparently a shrine of ‘Baal of the North. ’ The corresponding goddess ‘Baalit of the North’ is named along with the god of Kesem (Goshen), in an Egyp
ar'Kite, the, - from Arka , one of the families of the Canaanites, ( Genesis 10:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:16 ) and from the context evidently located in the North of Phoenicia. The site which now bears the name of 'Arka lies on the coast, 2 to 2 1/2 hours from the shore, about 12 miles North of Tripoli and 5 south of the Nahr el-Kebir
Sephardi - Sephardi: Jews of South European or North African origin; pertaining to such Jews
Semitransept - ) The half of a transept; as, the North semitransept of a church
Uchees - ) A tribe of North American Indians belonging to the Creek confederation
Leucoryx - ) A large antelope of North Africa (Oryx leucoryx), allied to the gemsbok
Labrador - ) A region of British America on the Atlantic coast, North of Newfoundland
Hobah - A place North of Damascus, visited by Abraham, Genesis 14:15 ; now unknown
Wenona - ) A sand snake (Charina plumbea) of Western North America, of the family Erycidae
Ibbartas - ) One of several finback whales of the North Atlantic; - called also Jupiter whale
Lakeweed - ) The water pepper (Polygonum Hydropiper), an aquatic plant of Europe and North America
Boreal - ) Designating or pertaining to a terrestrial division consisting of the Northern and mountainous parts of both the Old and the New World; - equivalent to the Holarctic region exclusive of the Transition, Sonoran, and corresponding areas. The Boreal region includes approximately all of North and Central America in which the mean temperature of the hottest season does not exceed 18� C. ) Northern; pertaining to the North, or to the North wind; as, a boreal bird; a boreal blast
Helbon - Formerly supposed to be Haleb, or as called in Europe, Aleppo, a city of Syria, about one hundred and eighty miles North of Damascus, and about eighty miles North from the Mediterranean Sea. But recently a valley has been found on the eastern slope of Anti-Lebanon, North of the Barada, called Helbon, from on of its principal villages
Canada - ) A British province in North America, giving its name to various plants and animals
Dromatherium - ) A small extinct triassic mammal from North Carolina, the earliest yet found in America
Bashan, Hill of - (Psalm 68:15 ), probably another name for Hermon, which lies to the North of Bashan
Alum Root - A North American herb (Heuchera Americana) of the Saxifrage family, whose root has astringent properties
Alfa Grass - ) A plant (Macrochloa tenacissima) of North Africa; also, its fiber, used in paper making
Beshow - ) A large food fish (Anoplopoma fimbria) of the North Pacific coast; - called also candlefish
Berites - People in the North of Palestine, possibly the descendants of Beri
Robinia - ) A genus of leguminous trees including the common locust of North America (Robinia Pseudocacia)
Migron - The direction of the march is from North to south: hence Migron ( Isaiah 10:28 ) lay North of Michmash (wh. see), and North of the Wady es-Suwçnît , which is the ‘pass’ of Isaiah 10:29 . ’ Probably ‘in Migron’ should rather be translated ‘in the threshing-floor’; if not, we must infer that there were two places not many miles apart, one North and the other south of the Wady es-Suwçnît , bearing the same name
Beadsnake - ) A small poisonous snake of North America (Elaps fulvius), banded with yellow, red, and black
Bobwhite - ) The common quail of North America (Colinus, or Ortyx, Virginianus); - so called from its note
Figwort - ) A genus of herbaceous plants (Scrophularia), mostly found in the North temperate zones
Chickadee - ) A small bird, the blackcap titmouse (Parus atricapillus), of North America; - named from its note
Loups - ) The Pawnees, a tribe of North American Indians whose principal totem was the wolf
Zemaraim -
A town of Benjamin (Joshua 18:22 ); now the ruin, rather two ruins, es-Sumrah, 4 miles North of Jericho. ...
...
A mount in the highlands of Ephraim, to the North of Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 13:4-20 )
Saint Paul-Minneapolis, Archdiocese of - Suffragen dioceses include ...
Bismarck, North Dakota
Crookston, Minnesota
Duluth, Minnesota
Fargo, North Dakota
New Ulm, Minnesota
Rapid City, South Dakota
Saint Cloud, Minnesota
Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Winona, Minnesota
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Laish -
A city of the Sidonians, in the extreme North of Palestine (Judges 18:7,14 ); called also Leshem (Joshua 19:47 ) and Dan (Judges 18:7,29 ; Jeremiah 8:16 ). It is identified with the ruin Tell-el-Kady, "the mound of the judge," to the North of the Waters of Merom (Joshua 11:5 ). It has been supposed to be the modern el-Isawiyeh, about a mile North-east of Jerusalem
Fabliau - ) One of the metrical tales of the Trouveres, or early poets of the North of France
Redskin - ) A common appellation for a North American Indian; - so called from the color of the skin
Hiddenite - ) An emerald-green variety of spodumene found in North Carolina; lithia emerald, - used as a gem
Withe-Rod - ) A North American shrub (Viburnum nudum) whose tough osierlike shoots are sometimes used for binding sheaves
Tullibee - ) A whitefish (Coregonus tullibee) found in the Great Lakes of North America; - called also mongrel whitefish
Ronchil - ) An American marine food fish (Bathymaster signatus) of the North Pacific coast, allied to the tilefish
Ziph'Ran - (fragrance ), appoint in the North boundary of the promised land as specified by Moses
Scythian - Wandering tribe or tribes North of the Black and Caspian Seas
Shaveh - A valley North of Jerusalem, called also the King's Dale, Genesis 14:17 ; 2 Samuel 18:18
Neballat - Wickedness in secret, (Nehemiah 11:34 ), probably the village of Beit Nebala, about 4 miles North of Lydda
North-West, - The harbour of Phenice in Crete looked towards south-west (λίψ) and North-west
Apaches - ) A group of nomadic North American Indians including several tribes native of Arizona, New Mexico, etc
Planer Tree - A small-leaved North American tree (Planera aquatica) related to the elm, but having a wingless, nutlike fruit
Remmon - And there was a Rammon a village, about fifteen miles North from Jerusalem
Water Arum - It is an inhabitant of the North temperate zone
Vespertilio - ) A genus of bats including some of the common small insectivorous species of North America and Europe
za'Phon - (north ), a place mentioned in the enumeration of the allotment of the tribe of Gad
Meroz - A plain in the North of Palestine, the inhabitants of which were severely condemned because they came not to help Barak against Sisera (Judges 5:23 : comp 21:8-10; 1 Samuel 11:7 ). It has been identified with Marassus, on a knoll to the North of Wady Jalud, but nothing certainly is known of it
Nimrim - The stream is either the wadi en-Numeirah which flows east into the Dead Sea about eight miles North of its lower end or the wadi Nimrin which flows east into the Jordan eight miles North of its mouth
Ahava - Some district North or North-west of Babylon, near the Northern boundary of Babylonia, is most probable
Whitefish - They inhabit the lakes of the colder parts of North America, Asia, and Europe. clupeiformis) is abundant in the Great Lakes, and in other lakes farther North
Colorado Group - A subdivision of the cretaceous formation of western North America, especially developed in Colorado and the upper Missouri region
Pennyroyal - ) An aromatic herb (Mentha Pulegium) of Europe; also, a North American plant (Hedeoma pulegioides) resembling it in flavor
Dowlas - ) A coarse linen cloth made in the North of England and in Scotland, now nearly replaced by calico
Fraxinus - ) A genus of deciduous forest trees, found in the North temperate zone, and including the true ash trees
North - "Fair weather," says Job, or golden weather, "cometh out of the North," Job 37:22 . A traveler there remarks, "Our friends, who have been long residents, informed us that we should have fair weather for our start on the morrow, as the wind was from the North. And so we have found it come to pass that the clouds of a golden hue always followed upon a North wind, and indicated a clear day; and as in the times of the Savior, we could always say when it was evening, It will be fair weather, for the sky is red,'" Matthew 16:2
Architeuthis - in the North Atlantic and about New Zealand
Hobah - Hiding-place, a place to the North of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued Chedorlaomer and his confederates (Genesis 14:15 )
Ulai - (yoo' li) Canal connecting the Kerkha and Abdizful rivers just North of Susa (Daniel 8:2 ,Daniel 8:2,8:16 )
Sandfish - ) A small marine fish of the Pacific coast of North America (Trichodon trichodon) which buries itself in the sand
Saw-Whet - ) A small North American owl (Nyctale Acadica), destitute of ear tufts and having feathered toes; - called also Acadian owl
Eoduck - ) A gigantic clam (Glycimeris generosa) of the Pacific coast of North America, highly valued as an article of food
Plattdeutsch - ) The modern dialects spoken in the North of Germany, taken collectively; modern Low German
Mesquit - ) A name for two trees of the southwestern part of North America, the honey mesquite, and screw-pod mesquite
Mastigure - They inhabit Southern Asia and North Africa
Sorek, Valley of - Eusebius and Jerome connect the valley with Capharsorec , a village to the North of Eleutheropolis and near Saraa, that is, Zorah, the home of Samson’s father. Capharsorec is now Khurbet Surîk , to the North of Wâdy es-Surâr , which is identified with ‘the valley of Sorek,’ and not far from Sur’ah
Shur - An enclosure; a wall, a part, probably, of the Arabian desert, on the North-eastern border of Egypt, giving its name to a wilderness extending from Egypt toward Philistia (Genesis 16:7 ; 20:1 ; 25:18 ; North-east from the desert tribes
Middle Gate - Archeologists have found evidence of battle (arrowheads, charred wood) located outside the remains of a gate in the middle of the North wall of the preexilic city. It seems probable that the Babylonians attacked the city from the North and that these are, in fact, the remains of the Middle Gate
Arnon - It has sources both North and south which unite, and its stream running nearly east and west, rushes through a deep ravine and falls into the Dead Sea at about its centre North and south
Winiad - ) A fish (Coregonus ferus) of North Wales and Northern Europe, allied to the lake whitefish; - called also powan, and schelly
Shalisha, Land of - Probably the district of Baal-shalisha (2 Kings 4:42 ), lying about 12 miles North of Lydda (1 Samuel 9:4 )
Bullfrog - ) A very large species of frog (Rana Catesbiana), found in North America; - so named from its loud bellowing in spring
Hognosesnake - A harmless North American snake of the genus Heterodon, esp
Antoecians - pl) Those who live under the same meridian, but on opposite parallels of latitude, North and south of the equator
Eelgrass - ) A plant (Zostera marina), with very long and narrow leaves, growing abundantly in shallow bays along the North Atlantic coast
Halhul - It is the modern Halhul , a large village 4 miles North of Hebron
Junco - ) Any bird of the genus Junco, which includes several species of North American finches; - called also snowbird, or blue snowbird
Chub - Probably in North Africa, and of a land near Egypt
Zaanannim - Joshua 19:33 , a town in the North of Naphtali, near Kedesh and the foot of Anti-Lebanon, Judges 4:11
Migron - A town in the vicinity of Ai and Gibeah, North of Michmash, now lost, 1 Samuel 14:2 ; Isaiah 10:28
Judea - The portion of the tribe of Judah comprised all the country between Edom, or Idumea, on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, the Salt Sea on the east, and an imaginary line on the North, from the Northern extremity of the Salt Sea to the Mediterranean. The portion of Benjamin was situated to the North of Judah, near the centre of the kingdom, bounded on the east by the river Jordan, and containing part of Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethel, Rama, &c. The portion of Dan lay to the North- west of Judah, between that of Benjamin and the Mediterranean, reaching as far North as the latter, and containing Accaron and Jamnia. The portion of Ephraim stretched along the Northern limits of Dan and Benjamin, between the river Jordan on the east, and the Mediterranean sea on the West; containing Sichem, Joppa, Lydda, Gazara, &c. The portion of the half tribe of Manasseh was situated North of Ephraim, between the river Jordan and the Mediterranean, reaching as far North as Dora, at the foot of Mount Carmel. The portion of Issachar stretched Northward from Manasseh, and westward from Jordan, as far as Mount Tabor. ...
The portion of Reuben lay to the eastward of the river Jordan, bounded on the south by the torrent of Arnon, and on the North by the river Jabok. The portion of Gad, also on the east of the Jordan, stretched from the Jabok toward the North, where it was bounded by the other half tribe of Manasseh, which occupied the country east of the lake Gennesareth, to the Northern limits of the country. The whole of this extent between Coelo- Syria on the North, and Arabia Petraea on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, and Arabia Deserta on the east, may be considered as situated between 31 10' and 33 15' of North latitude, about a hundred and forty miles in length, and nearly a hundred in breadth. But, if estimated from its boundaries in the reigns of David and Solomon, and several succeeding princes, its extent must be enlarged more than threefold; including both the land of Palestine, or of the Philistines, on the south, and the country of Phenice on the North, with part of Syria to the North-east. It is described in numerous passages of the sacred writings, as all comprised in the Holy Land, from Hamath on the North, to the river of Egypt on the south; and from the Great or Mediterranean Sea on the west, to the deserts of Arabia on the east; a tract of country at least four hundred and sixty miles in length, and more than a hundred in breadth, Joshua 15:2 , &c; Joshua 19:24 , &c; 1 Chronicles 13:5 ; 2 Chronicles 7:8 ; Ezekiel 47:16 ; Ezekiel 47:20 ; Amos 6:14 . All traces of its ancient division among the twelve tribes were now abolished, and it was distributed into four provinces; namely, Judea Proper in the south, Galilee in the North, Samaria in the centre, and Peraea on the east of the river Jordan. Judea Proper, situated in 31 40' North latitude, was bounded on the North by Samaria, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the east by the river Jordan, on the south by Arabia Petraea; and comprised the ancient settlements of Judah, Benjamin, Dan, and Simeon, with Philistia and Idumea. The principal places in the North-east quarter of the province were Jerusalem, the capital, which was entirely destroyed in the reign of Hadrian, and replaced by a new city named AElia, a little farther North, which is now the site of the modern Jerusalem; Jericho, the city of palm trees, about nineteen miles eastward of Jerusalem, and eight from the river Jordan; Phaselis, built by Herod in memory of his brother, fifteen miles North-west of Jericho; Archelais, built by Archelaus, ten miles North of Jericho; Gophna, fifteen miles North of Jerusalem, in the road to Sichem; Bethel, twelve miles North of Jerusalem, originally called Luz; Gilgal, about one mile and a half from Jericho; Engeddi, a hundred furlongs south south-east of Jericho, near the Northern extremity of the Dead Sea; Masada, a strong fortress built by Judas Maccabeus, the last refuge of the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem; Ephraim, a small town westward of Jericho; Anathoth, a Levitical town, nearly four miles North of Jerusalem. In the North-west quarter were Bethshemesh, or Heliopolis, a Levitical city, about ten miles west of the capital; Rama, six miles North from Jerusalem; Emmaus, a village eight miles North North-west from Jerusalem, afterward called Nicopolis, in consequence of a victory gained by Vespasian over the revolted Jews; Bethoron, a populous Levitical city on the road to Lydda, a few miles North-west of Emmaus; Kirjath-jearim, on the road to Joppa, nine miles westward from the capital; Lydda, now Lod, and called by the Greeks Diospolis, about twelve miles east of Joppa; Ramla, supposed to be the same as Arimathea, about five miles south-west of Lydda; Joppa, a maritime town, now Jaffa, about twelve leagues North-west of Jerusalem; Jabne, a walled sea-port town between Joppa and Azotus; and Ekron, a town on the North boundary of the Philistines. In the southwest quarter of Judea were Gath, about twenty miles west from Jerusalem, near to which were the city of Eleutheropolis, a flourishing place in the second century; Makkedah, a strong place, eight miles North-east from Eleutheropolis; Bersabe, or Beersheba, about twenty-six miles south from Eleutheropolis; Gerar, between Beersheba and the sea coast; Azotus, or Ashdod, to the west of Eleuthero-polis, within a few miles of the sea, and the seat of a bishop in the first ages of the Christian church; Ascalon, a considerable maritime town, above forty-three miles south-west of Jerusalem; Gaza, fifteen miles southward from Ascalon; and Raphia, between Gaza and Rhinocurura, remarkable for a great battle in its neighbourhood, in which Philopater, king of Egypt, defeated Antiochus, king of Syria. ...
Samaria, lying between Judea and Galilee, in 32 15' North latitude, extended along the sea coast from Joppa to Dora, and along the river Jordan from the rivulet of Alexandrium to the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; comprehending the territory of the tribe of Ephraim, of the half tribe of Manasseh, and part of Issachar. Its principal cities were Samaria, the capital of the kingdom of Israel, North of Sichem, and equally distant from Jordan and the sea coast, afterward named Sebaste by Herod, in honour of Augustus; Jezrael, or Esdraelon, about four leagues North from Samaria; Sichem, or Sychar, called by the Romans Neapolis, eight miles south of Samaria, in a valley between the mountains Gerizim and Ebal; Bethsan, called by the Greek writers Scythopolis, about twenty miles North-east of Sichem; Caesarea of Palestine, anciently called Turris Stratonis, greatly enlarged by Herod, and long the principal city of the province, about nineteen leagues North North-west from Jerusalem; Dora, now Tartura, nine miles North from Caesarea, on the road to Tyre; Apollonia, now Arzuf, on the sea coast, twenty-two miles south of Caesarea; and Hadadrimmon, afterward called Maximianopolis, about seventeen miles eastward of Caesarea. ...
Galilaea, in 33 North latitude, bounded on the south by Samaria, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the North by Syria, on the east by the river Jordan and the lake Gennesareth, comprehended the possessions of Asher, Naphtali, and Zabulon, with part of the allotment of Issachar. The Northern division of the province was thinly inhabited by Jews, and was sometimes called Galilee of the Gentiles; but the southern portion was very populous. Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the Northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues North-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues North North-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles North from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the North boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues North North-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district. ...
Peraea, though the name would denote any extent of country beyond Jordan, is more particularly applied to that district in 32 North latitude, which formerly composed the territories of Sihon, the Amorite, and Og, king of Bashan; extending from the river Arnon (which flows through an extensive plain into the Dead Sea) to the mount of Gilead, where the Jordan issues from the sea of Tiberias; and which fell to the lot of the tribes of Reuben and Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh. This province was about sixty miles from North to south, and forty from east to west. The principal places were Penuel, on the left of the Jabbok, which forms the Northern border of the country; Succoth, on the banks of the Jordan, a little farther south; Bethabara, a little below Succoth, where was a place of passage over the river; Amathus, afterward named Assalt, a strong town below the influx of the torrent Jazer; Livias, between Mount Nebo and the Northern extremity of the Dead Sea, a town which was so named by Herod, in honour of Livia, the wife of Augustus; Machaerus, a citadel on a steep rock, south of Livias, near the upper end of the Dead Sea; Lasa, or Callerhoe, celebrated for its hot springs, between Machaerus and the river Arnon; Herodium, a fort built by Herod a few miles farther inland, as a protection against the Moabites; Aroer, a town of Moab, seven leagues east of the Dead Sea; Castra Amonensia, a Roman station, supposed to be the ancient Mephoath, seven leagues North-east of Aroer; Hesbon, or Esbus, the capital of Sihon, anciently famed for its fish pools, seven leagues east from the Jordan, three from Mount Nebo, and nearly in the centre of the province; Madaba, now El-Belkaa, three leagues southeast of Hesbon; Jazer, or Tira, a Levitical city on a small lake, five leagues North-east of Hesbon. ...
To the North of Peraea were situated several districts, which, as forming part of the kingdom of Judea under Herod the Great, require to be briefly noticed in this account; and which do properly come under the general name of Peraea, as being situated on the eastward of the river Jordan. There were Galaadites, or Gileadites, in 32 20' North latitude, now Zarca, east from Jordan, and North from the Jabbok; containing the cities of Ramoth-Gilead, Mahanaim, Jabesh-Gilead, at the foot of Mount Gilead. Batanaea, anciently Basan, now Bitinia, in 32 25' North latitude, formerly celebrated for its oaks and pastures, was situated to the North of Galaadites, and contained the cities of Adrea, or Edrei, Astaroth, and Bathyra. Gaulonitis, a narrow strip of land between Batanaea and the shore of the sea of Tiberias, stretching Northward to Mount Hermon, and containing Gamala, a strong town near the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; Argob, between this sea and Mount Hippos; Julias, supposed to be the same as Chorazin, and by others to be Bethsaida; and Seleuca, a fortified place on the east border of Lacus Samochonitis. Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract North of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' North latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus. One of them, namely, Scythopolis, already described in the account of Samaria, was situated to the west of Jordan; but the other nine were all to the east of that river, namely, Gadara, or Kedar, a strong place on a hill, the capital of Peraea in the time of Josephus, about sixty stadia east from the sea of Tiberias, and much frequented for its hot baths: Hippos, sometimes called Susitha, thirty stadia Northwest of Gadara; Dium, or Dion, of which the situation is unknown, but conjectured by D'Anville to have been about seven leagues eastward from Pella, a considerable town supplied with copious fountains, on the river Jabbok, fourteen miles south-east of Gadara, and celebrated as the place to which the Christians retired, by divine admonition, before the destruction of Jerusalem; Canatha, south-east of Caesarea, and between the Jordan and Mount Hermon; Garasa, afterward Jaras, three leagues North- east from the upper extremity of the sea of Tiberias, and much noted during the crusades; Rabbath-Ammon, the capital of the Ammonites, south-east of Ramoth, and near the source of the Jabbok, on the confines of Arabia, afterward called Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, from whom it had received considerable improvements, of which the ruins are still visible; Abila, four leagues east from Gadara, in a fertile tract between the river Hieromax and Mount Gilead; and Capitolais, a town in Batanaea, five or six leagues east North-east of Gadara. Buckingham, who visited the same part in 1816, says, "As we proceeded to the Northward, we had on our left a lofty peak of the range of hills which border the plain of the Jordan on the west, and ended in this direction the mountains of Judea
Maarath - Desolation, a place in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:59 ), probably the modern village Beit Ummar, 6 miles North of Hebron
Old Gate - One of the gates in the North wall of Jerusalem, so called because built by the Jebusites (Nehemiah 3:6 ; 12:39 )
Chelone - ) A genus of hardy perennial flowering plants, of the order Scrophulariaceae, natives of North America; - called also snakehead, turtlehead, shellflower, etc
Pinweed - ) Any plant of the genus Lechea, low North American herbs with branching stems, and very small and abundant leaves and flowers
Deathbird - ) Tengmalm's or Richardson's owl (Nyctale Tengmalmi); - so called from a superstition of the North American Indians that its note presages death
Wampum - ) Beads made of shells, used by the North American Indians as money, and also wrought into belts, etc
Mysia - a country of Asia Minor, having the Propontis on the North, Bithynia on the North-east and east, Phrygia on the south-east, Lydia (from which it was separated by the river Hermus) on the south, the AEgean Sea on the west, and the narrow strait, called the Hellespont, on the North- west
Arabia - It extends 1,500 miles from North to south, and 1,200 from east to west. On the North it is bounded by part of Syria, on the east by the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates, on the south by the Arabian Sea and the straits of Babelmandel, and on the west by the Red sea, Egypt, and Palestine
Land of Hus - (Asitus in Jeremiah 25) The home of Job (Job 1), situated North of the Sabeans and west of Chaldea, near the great desert
Quarantania - A mountain some 1,200 feet high, about 7 miles North-west of Jericho, the traditional scene of our Lord's temptation (Matthew 4:8 )
Shaveh, Valley of - ), or Kidron, on the North side of Jerusalem (Genesis 14:17 )
Hazar-Hatticon - Village of the midway, a place near Hamath in the confines of Hauran (Ezekiel 47:16 ), probably on the North brow of Hermon
Hus, Land of - (Asitus in Jeremiah 25) The home of Job (Job 1), situated North of the Sabeans and west of Chaldea, near the great desert
Baneberry - ) A genus (Actaea) of plants, of the order Ranunculaceae, native in the North temperate zone
Astacus - ) A genus of crustaceans, containing the crawfish of fresh-water lobster of Europe, and allied species of western North America
Cacomixl - ) A North American carnivore (Bassaris astuta), about the size of a cat, related to the raccoons
Dalesman - ) One living in a dale; - a term applied particularly to the inhabitants of the valleys in the North of England, Norway, etc
Drome - ) The crab plover (Dromas ardeola), a peculiar North African bird, allied to the oyster catcher
Sego - ) A liliaceous plant (Calochortus Nuttallii) of Western North America, and its edible bulb; - so called by the Ute Indians and the Mormons
Jerker - ) A North American river chub (Hybopsis biguttatus)
Danjaan - Place in the North of Palestine
Willet - ) A large North American snipe (Symphemia semipalmata); - called also pill-willet, will-willet, semipalmated tattler, or snipe, duck snipe, and stone curlew
ge'Bim - (grasshoppers ), a village North of Jerusalem, ( Isaiah 10:31 ) apparently between Anathoth (the modern Anata ) and the ridge on which Nob was situated
Gospel Side - The North side of the Altar (the left side as we facethe Altar) at which the Holy Gospel is read
Left Hand - Among the Hebrews, denoted the North (Job 23:9 ; Genesis 14:15 ), the face of the person being supposed to be toward the east
Azalea - ) A genus of showy flowering shrubs, mostly natives of China or of North America; false honeysuckle
Dakota Group - A subdivision at the base of the cretaceous formation in Western North America; - so named from the region where the strata were first studied
Altarwise - ) In the proper position of an altar, that is, at the east of a church with its ends towards the North and south
Tahtimhodshi - Place visited by Joab during his taking the census of Israel, apparently in the North-east of Palestine
Kioways - They formerly inhabited the region about the head waters of the North Platte
Culex - ) A genus of mosquitoes to which most of the North American species belong. pipiens, breeding very widely in the fresh waters of North America
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-geber (along with its twin town Elath, or Eloth) was situated on the Northern tip of the Gulf of Aqabah, the North-eastern arm of the Red Sea. It was the port from which shipping routes went east and overland routes went North (Deuteronomy 2:8; 1 Kings 9:26)
Casiphia - see) In North Babylonia ( Ezra 8:17 ), whose site has not been identified
Shaveh-Kiriathaim - Now Kureiyat, North of Dibon, in the land of Moab
Naarath - Girl, a town on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:7 ), not far probably from Jericho, to the North (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Dinhabah - It is probably the modern Dibdiba, a little North-east of Petra
Carpathian - ) Of or pertaining to a range of mountains in Austro-Hungary, called the Carpathians, which partially inclose Hungary on the North, east, and south
Transpadane - ) Lying or being on the further side of the river Po with reference to Rome, that is, on the North side; - opposed to cispadane
Murrelet - ) One of several species of sea birds of the genera Synthliboramphus and Brachyramphus, inhabiting the North Pacific
Shalisha - Baal-shalisha is placed by Eusebius fifteen miles from Lydda, towards the North
ho'Bah - ( Genesis 14:15 ) It was situated "to the North of Damascus
Blackfeet - ) A tribe of North American Indians formerly inhabiting the country from the upper Missouri River to the Saskatchewan, but now much reduced in numbers
Hali - It may be khirbet Ras Ali, North of Mount Carmel
Lebonah - Frankincense, a town near Shiloh, on the North side of Bethel (Judges 21:19 )
Ephraim, Gate of - One of the gates of Jerusalem (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ), on the side of the city looking toward Ephraim, the North side
Migdal-Gad - Tower of fortune, a town in the plains of Judah, probably the modern el-Mejdel, a little to the North-east of Ascalon (Joshua 15:37 )
Pildash - ” Sixth son of Nahor (Genesis 22:22 ), probably the ancestor of an otherwise unknown North Arabian tribe
Madmenah - A place apparently North of Jerusalem, named only in the ideal description of the Assyrian invasion, Isaiah 10:31
Barbary - ) The countries on the North coast of Africa from Egypt to the Atlantic
Creeks - ) A tribe or confederacy of North American Indians, including the Muskogees, Seminoles, Uchees, and other subordinate tribes
Badiaga - ) A fresh-water sponge (Spongilla), common in the North of Europe, the powder of which is used to take away the livid marks of bruises
Fleet - FLEET, in English names, denotes a flood, a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, or a river as in Fleet-street, North-flete, Fleet-prison
York Use - The one of the three printed uses of England which was followed in the North
Ursula - ) A beautiful North American butterfly (Basilarchia, / Limenitis, astyanax)
Maypop - ) The edible fruit of a passion flower, especially that of the North American Passiflora incarnata, an oval yellowish berry as large as a small apple
Ono - A town of Benjamin, in the "plain of Ono" (1 Chronicles 8:12 ; Ezra 2:33 ); now Kefr 'Ana, 5 miles North of Lydda, and about 30 miles North-west of Jerusalem
Migdol -
A strongly-fortified place 12 miles from Pelusium, in the North of Egypt (Jeremiah 44:1 ; 46:14 ). , from Migdol in the North to Syene in the south, in other words, the whole of Egypt
Algonquian - ) Pertaining to or designating the most extensive of the linguistic families of North American Indians, their territory formerly including practically all of Canada east of the 115th meridian and south of Hudson's Bay and the part of the United States east of the Mississippi and North of Tennessee and Virginia, with the exception of the territory occupied by the Northern Iroquoian tribes
Riblah - A city of Syria, in the country of Hamath, at the North-east extremity of Canaan, Numbers 34:11 . Its site is probably found in the modern village Ribleh, on the river Orontes, at the Northern end of the great valley of Lebanon, El-Bukaa. Through this valley, by way of Hamath and Riblah, was the readiest access to Palestine from the North
Ur - It is usually called "Ur of the Chaldees," Hebrews 9:7 Acts 7:4 ; and is located, with strong probability, in the North-west part of Mesopotamia. Some, however, place Ur in Lower Chaldea, at extensive ruins now called Warka, in latitude 31 degrees 19' North, longitude 45 degrees 40' East
Arabah - In particular they used the word as a name for that deep, hot and dry valley that ran North-south from the Sea of Galilee to the Gulf of Aqabah (the North-eastern arm of the Red Sea) (Deuteronomy 1:1; Deuteronomy 2:8; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 11:2; Joshua 18:18-19)
Hellbender - ) A large North American aquatic salamander (Protonopsis horrida or Menopoma Alleghaniensis)
Pepperidge - ) A North American tree (Nyssa multiflora) with very tough wood, handsome oval polished leaves, and very acid berries, - the sour gum, or common tupelo
Shalim, Land of - Land of foxes, a place apparently to the North-west of Jerusalem (1 Samuel 9:4 ), perhaps in the neighbourhood of Shaalabbin in Dan (Joshua 19:42 )
Gaash - A shaking, a hill, on the North side of which Joshua was buried (Joshua 24:30 ; Judges 2:9 ), in the territory of Ephraim
Shi'Cron - (drunkenness ), one of the landmarks at the western end of the North boundary of Judah
to'Phel - (mortar ), (1:1) has been identified with Tufileh on a wady of the same name running North of Bozra toward the southeast corner of the Dead Sea
se'Neh - (thorn ), the name of one of the two isolated rocks which stood in the "passage of Michmash," ( 1 Samuel 14:4 ) 6 1/2Miles North of Jerusalem
Shawnees - ) A tribe of North American Indians who occupied Western New York and part of Ohio, but were driven away and widely dispersed by the Iroquois
Etesian - ) Periodical; annual; - applied to winds which annually blow from the North over the Mediterranean, esp
Sea Leopard - The North Pacific sea leopard is the harbor seal
Waterlandian - ) One of a body of Dutch Anabaptists who separated from the Mennonites in the sixteenth century; - so called from a district in North Holland denominated Waterland
Kalmia - ) A genus of North American shrubs with poisonous evergreen foliage and corymbs of showy flowers
Lipans - ) A tribe of North American Indians, inhabiting the Northern part of Mexico
Beri'Ites, the, - A tribe of people who are named with Abel and Beth-maachah, and who were therefore doubtless situated in the North of Palestine
Abana - Benjamin of Tudela will have that part of Barrady which runs through Damascus to be the Abana, and the streams which water the gardens without the city, to be Pharpar; but perhaps the Pharpar is the same with Orontes, the most noted river of Syria, which taking its rise a little to the North or North-east of Damascus, glides through a delightful plain, till, after passing Antioch, and running about two hundred miles to the North-west, it loses itself in the Mediterranean sea, 2 Kings 5:12
Saint Joseph's Society For Foreign Missions - Founded as a missionary college at Mill Hill, 10 miles North of London, by Herbert Cardinal Vaughan while still a priest in 1866. The following were under their care: ...
the Telugu mission, Madras, British India
the Prefecture Apostolic of Labuan and North Borneo
the Maori Mission, Auckland, New Zealand
the Prefecture Apostolic of Kafiristan and Kashmir, North of India
the Vicariate Apostolic of Uganda, British East Africa
stations in the Belgian Congo and in the Philippine Islands
The members include priests and lay brothers
North Country, Land of the North - North COUNTRY, LAND OF THE North. Northern Syria (so Jeremiah 46:10 ). The other applications of the term may be further illustrated by the usage of the word ‘north’ generally in OT. Thus, though Babylonia was in the same latitude as Palestine, it was included among the countries of the ‘north
Kirjath - , "city of grapes", about 7 1/2 miles west-north-west of Jerusalem
Ahlab - Fatness, a town of Asher lying within the unconquered Phoenician border (Judges 1:31 ), North-west of the Sea of Galilee; commonly identified with Giscala, now el-Jish
Jeshanah - It is the modern ‘Ain Sînia , about 3 1 / 4 miles North of Bethel
Muskogees - ) A powerful tribe of North American Indians that formerly occupied the region of Georgia, Florida, and Alabama
Bee'Roth - It is now El- Bireh, a village of 700 inhabitants, on a ridge seven miles North of Jerusalem
Cin'Neroth - (1 Kings 15:20 ) This was possibly the small enclosed district North of Tiberias, and by the side of the lake, afterwards known as "the plain of Gennesareth
Madme'Nah - (dunghill ), one of the, Benjamite villages North of Jerusalem the inhabitants of which were frightened away by the approach of Sennacherib along the Northern road
Beth-e'Mek - (house of the valley ), a place on or near the border of Asher, on the North side of which was the ravine of Jiphthah-el ( Joshua 19:27 )
Red Sea - The Biblical interest of the name centres at its Northern end in its two projections, the Gulf of Suez, running North-west, and the Bay of Akabah almost due North. The former once extended much farther to the North, along the route of the present Suez Canal. Anciently it was known as the Gulf of Heroöepolis, running as far North as the Bitter Lakes. ...
This primitive extension of the gulf to the North, the region of weeds, probably accounts for its name, Yam Suph , ‘ sea of weeds ’ ( Exodus 10:19 ; Exodus 15:4 ), which was later applied also to the eastern extension, the Bay of Akabah ( Numbers 21:4 ), to the entire body of water now known as the Red Sea, stretching from the Ras Mohammed southward to the straits, and perhaps even to the Persian Gulf ( Exodus 23:31 ). Those who locate the mountain of the Law farther North in the region North of Akahah, trace the wanderings directly eastward from the sea ( Judges 11:16 ). long, lies in the southern end of the long trench which extends from the Red Sea proper Northward to the Lehanons, the upper portion of which is occupied by the Jordan and the Dead Sea. At the Northern end was an important maritime highway in the reign of Solomon. At the harbour of Ezion-geber (near to, or perhaps the same as, Elath), at its Northern end, Solomon built his navy, with the help of Phœnician seamen ( 1 Kings 9:26 ), and sent out expeditions to India
Chinquapin - ) A branching, nut-bearing tree or shrub (Castanea pumila) of North America, from six to twenty feet high, allied to the chestnut
Totem - ) A rude picture, as of a bird, beast, or the like, used by the North American Indians as a symbolic designation, as of a family or a clan
Zedad - ” It is Sadad, 62 miles North of Damascus. The Northern border of Canaan (Numbers 34:8 ; Ezekiel 47:15 )
lo-Debar - No pasture, (2 Samuel 17:27 ), a town in Gilead not far from Mahanaim, North of the Jabbok (9:4,5)
Paran, Mount - Probably the hilly region or upland wilderness on the North of the desert of Paran forming the southern boundary of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 33:2 ; Habakkuk 3:3 )
Rumah - Others identify it with Tell Rumeh, in Galilee, about 6 miles North of Nazareth
Berothah - Place mentioned as a North border of the land when it will again be inhabited by the twelve tribes
Terek - ) A sandpiper (Terekia cinerea) of the Old World, breeding in the far North of eastern Europe and Asia and migrating to South Africa and Australia
Sheepberry - ) The edible fruit of a small North American tree of the genus Viburnum (V
Water Thrush - (1):...
A North American bird of the genus Seiurus, belonging to the Warbler family, especially the common species (S
Eurc'Quila, - the word used in the Revised Version instead of euroclydon in (Acts 27:14 ) It is compounded of two words meaning east and North , and means a Northeast gale
Rorqual - ) A very large North Atlantic whalebone whale (Physalus antiquorum, or Balaenoptera physalus)
Assos - A seaport in Mysia, opposite to the island of Lesbos on the North
Lalande, John, Blessed - As a layman he labored with the Jesuit missionaries in North America, and suffered martyrdom with Blessed Isaac Jogues
John Lalande, Blessed - As a layman he labored with the Jesuit missionaries in North America, and suffered martyrdom with Blessed Isaac Jogues
Gallim - It was probably in Benjamin, to the North of Jerusalem
Culver's Root - Veronica, Virginica) common in most moist woods of North America , used as an active cathartic and emetic; also, the plant itself
Amia - ) A genus of fresh-water ganoid fishes, exclusively confined to North America; called bowfin in Lake Champlain, dogfish in Lake Erie, and mudfish in South Carolina, etc
Judaea the Hill Country of - The central ridge of mountains stretching from North to south, and forming as it were the backbone of the land of Palestine
Cisco - ) The Lake herring (Coregonus Artedi), valuable food fish of the Great Lakes of North America
Amana - Probably the mountains near the river Abana or Amana, being connected with Hermon and Lebanon; or else Mount Amanus in the North of Syria
Tephrosia - ) A genus of leguminous shrubby plants and herbs, mostly found in tropical countries, a few herbaceous species being North American
Mollemoke - ) Any one of several species of large pelagic petrels and fulmars, as Fulmarus glacialis, of the North Atlantic, and several species of Aestrelata, of the Southern Ocean
Sichem - (Hebrew: shoulder) ...
Israelite city North of Bethel and Silo, in the tribe of Ephraim; first capital of the Kingdom of Israel, noted as the burial-place of Joseph (Josiah 24)
bo'Zes - It seems to have been that on the North
Zaphon - ZAPHON (‘north’). ]'>[1] ) instead of ‘northward’ (AV Nob - The site of Nob was perhaps on Mount Scopas about one mile Northeast of ancient Jerusalem, on the hill Qu'meh one mile further North, or Ras el-Mesharif about one mile North of Jerusalem
Cana - These are Kanat el-Jelil , perhaps the most probable, North of Sephurieh; ‘Ain Kana , east of Nazareth; and Kefr Kenna , North-east of, and a little farther from, the same town
Minaeans - Arabian people dwelling North of the Sabæans (Sheba), who in the 9th and 8th cents. became a powerful nation with a dominion stretching North to the peninsula of Sinai
Ephraim, Tribe of - Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the North, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the North
Tribe of Ephraim - Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the North, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the North
Peni'el - From the narrative it is evident that Peniel lay somewhere on the North bank of the Jabbok, and between that torrent and the fords of the Jordan at Succoth, a few miles North of the glen where the Jabbok falls into the Jordan
Halhul - It is modern Halhul, four miles North of Hebron
Sharaim - Two gates (Joshua 15:36 ), more correctly Shaaraim (1 Samuel 17:52 ), probably Tell Zakariya and Kefr Zakariya, in the valley of Elah, 3 1/2 miles North-west of Socoh
Belmaim - Bileam in Manasseh lay farther North than Dothan
Ruminated - ) Having a hard albumen penetrated by irregular channels filled with softer matter, as the nutmeg and the seeds of the North American papaw
Chickasaws - ) A tribe of North American Indians (Southern Appalachian) allied to the Choctaws. They formerly occupied the Northern part of Alabama and Mississippi, but now live in the Indian Territory
Abez - Tin, or white, a town in the tribe of Issachar (Joshua 19:20 ), at the North of the plain of Esdraelon
Myrica - It includes the bayberry or wax myrtle, the sweet gale, and the North American sweet fern, so called
Gog - ...
...
The name of the leader of the hostile party described in Ezekiel 38,39 , as coming from the "north country" and assailing the people of Israel to their own destruction. " It has been supposed to be the name of a district in the wild North-east steppes of Central Asia, North of the Hindu-Kush, now a part of Turkestan, a region about 2,000 miles North-east of Nineveh
Helbon - It is modern Halbun about eleven miles North of Damascus
Amana - The southern part or summit of Anti-Lebanon, adjacent to and North of Hermon, from which the river Amana or Abana poured down towards Damascus, Song of Song of Solomon 4:8
Arkite - (Genesis 10:17 ; 1 Chronicles 1:15 ), a designation of certain descendants from the Phoenicians or Sidonians, the inhabitants of Arka, 12 miles North of Tripoli, opposite the Northern extremity of Lebanon
Madon - Strife, a Canaanitish city in the North of Palestine (Joshua 11:1 ; 12:19 ), whose king was slain by Joshua; perhaps the ruin Madin, near Hattin, some 5 miles west of Tiberias
Kedemoth - It lay not far North-east of Dibon-gad, east of the Dead Sea
Ama Grass - A species of grass (Tripsacum dactyloides) tall, stout, and exceedingly productive; cultivated in the West Indies, Mexico, and the Southern States of North America as a forage grass; - called also sesame grass
Donatist - ) A follower of Donatus, the leader of a body of North African schismatics and purists, who greatly disturbed the church in the 4th century
Powwow - , as among the North American Indians
Baana - Solomon's commissariat officer in Jezreel and the North of the Jordan valley
Frozen - Cold frosty chill as the frozen climates of the North
Winnebagoes - ) A tribe of North American Indians who originally occupied the region about Green Bay, Lake Michigan, but were driven back from the lake and nearly exterminated in 1640 by the IIlinnois
Walnut - The seven or eight known species are all natives of the North temperate zone
Water Snake - ...
(2):...
A common North American colubrine snake (Tropidonotus sipedon) which lives chiefly in the water
Travois - ) A primitive vehicle, common among the North American Indians, usually two trailing poles serving as shafts and bearing a platform or net for a load
Stigmatine Fathers - The congregation has its mother-house at Rome and is represented in Italy, North and South America, and China
Land of Chanaan - (Semitic: kana, to bow down; hence, lowlands) ...
Term applied in a limited sense by biblical writers to the Northern coast of modern Palestine, or Phenicia; or to the lowland of the Philistines on the southern coast. They identify it more generally with the whole of Western Palestine, including the mountainous districts occupied by the Amorrhites, and enclosed within the generally accepted boundaries of 33 degrees 18 minutes North latitude. On the North, 30 degrees 33 minutes North latitude on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, and the Dead Sea and lower course of the Jordan on the east
Canaan, Land of - (Semitic: kana, to bow down; hence, lowlands) ...
Term applied in a limited sense by biblical writers to the Northern coast of modern Palestine, or Phenicia; or to the lowland of the Philistines on the southern coast. They identify it more generally with the whole of Western Palestine, including the mountainous districts occupied by the Amorrhites, and enclosed within the generally accepted boundaries of 33 degrees 18 minutes North latitude. On the North, 30 degrees 33 minutes North latitude on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, and the Dead Sea and lower course of the Jordan on the east
Chanaan, Land of - (Semitic: kana, to bow down; hence, lowlands) ...
Term applied in a limited sense by biblical writers to the Northern coast of modern Palestine, or Phenicia; or to the lowland of the Philistines on the southern coast. They identify it more generally with the whole of Western Palestine, including the mountainous districts occupied by the Amorrhites, and enclosed within the generally accepted boundaries of 33 degrees 18 minutes North latitude. On the North, 30 degrees 33 minutes North latitude on the south, the Mediterranean on the west, and the Dead Sea and lower course of the Jordan on the east
Tower of the Furnaces - (Nehemiah 3:11 ; 12:38 ), a tower at the North-western angle of the second wall of Jerusalem
Maralah - The site is perhaps tell Ghalta in the Jezreel Valley North of Megiddo or tell Thorah
Samothracia - A small island in the North-east of the AEgean Sea off which Paul's ship anchored for a night on his first visit to Europe
Eschscholtzia - ) A genus of papaveraceous plants, found in California and upon the west coast of North America, some species of which produce beautiful yellow, orange, rose-colored, or white flowers; the California poppy
Draco - ) The Dragon, a Northern constellation within which is the North pole of the ecliptic
Adami - ” Town in Naphtali's territory (Joshua 19:33 ), perhaps Khirbet Damiyeh North of Mount Tabor
Wind - The Hebrews, like us, acknowledge four principal winds, Ezekiel 42:16-18 : the east wind, the North wind, the south wind, and the west wind, or that from the Mediterranean sea
Locust Tree - A large North American tree of the genus Robinia (R
Mignonette - In Africa it is a low shrub, but further North it is usually an annual herb
Rosebay - ) An herb (Epilobium spicatum) with showy purple flowers, common in Europe and North America; - called also great willow herb
Lenni-Lenape - ) A general name for a group of Algonquin tribes which formerly occupied the coast region of North America from Connecticut to Virginia
Coyote - ) A carnivorous animal (Canis latrans), allied to the dog, found in the western part of North America; - called also prairie wolf
Cathay - ) China; - an old name for the Celestial Empire, said have been introduced by Marco Polo and to be a corruption of the Tartar name for North China (Khitai, the country of the Khitans
Jehud - It is located at modern Yehud about three miles south of Petah Tikvah and eight miles North of Joppa
Baal-Shalisha - It has been identified with Sirisia, 13 miles North of Lydda
Sirah - It is now called 'Ain Sarah, and is situated about a mile from Hebron, on the road to the North
Calumet - ) A kind of pipe, used by the North American Indians for smoking tobacco
Arpad - A city of Syria North-west of Aleppo ( 2 Kings 18:34 ; 2 Kings 19:13 , Isaiah 10:9 ; Isaiah 36:19 ; Isaiah 37:13 , Jeremiah 49:28 )
Gad, River of - Identified with Wady Mojib, the same as the ARNON that runs into the Dead Sea about midway North and south
Namaycush - ) A large North American lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)
Kanah - A brook which separated Ephraim and Manasseh, and fell into the Mediterranean North of Joppa, Joshua 16:8 17:9
Paran - Abounding in foliage, or abounding in caverns, (Genesis 21:21 ), a desert tract forming the North-eastern division of the peninsula of Sinai, lying between the 'Arabah on the east and the wilderness of Shur on the west. It is intersected in a North-western direction by the Wady el-'Arish
Antonia - A fortress in Jerusalem, at the North-west corner of the temple area. It was built on a plateau of rock, separated on the North from the hill Bezetha by a ditch about 30 feet deep and 165 feet wide
Geba - ), on the North border of Judah near Gibeah (Isaiah 10:29 ; Joshua 18:24,28 ). It has been identified with Gaba (Joshua 18:24 ; Ezra 2:26 ; Nehemiah 7:30 ), now Jeb'a, about 5 1/2 miles North of Jerusalem
Jabin - King of Hazor in the North, who, with confederate kings, raised an enormous army 'as the sand that is upon the sea shore,' but was signally defeated by Joshua, after he had overthrown the confederacy in the south. Thus early in the history of Israel the kings of the south and the North appear on the scene, and perish. Psalm 83:9 calls upon God to do to the great Northern confederacy in the last days as was done to this king
Whiting - ) Any one of several species of North American marine sciaenoid food fishes belonging to genus Menticirrhus, especially M. ) A North American fish (Merlucius vulgaris) allied to the preceding; - called also silver hake
Michmash - A town of Benjamin, nine miles North by east of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 7:31 ; 11:31 . It was a strong position and lay on the North side of a deep valley; for which reasons perhaps Sennacherib, on his way to Jerusalem, left his heavy equipage there, Isaiah 10:28,29
Zephon - (zee' fahn) Personal name perhaps meaning, “north
Fridelli, Xaver Ehbenbert - With Fathers Regis, Jartoux, and others, he made a cartographical survey of China, traversing the whole empire from south to North, 1708-1718
Eltekeh - It has been identified with Beit-Likia, North-east of latrum
Ananiah - It is probably the modern Beit Hanina, a small village 3 miles North of Jerusalem
uz, the Land of - Where Job lived (1:1; Jeremiah 25:20 ; Lamentations 4:21 ), probably somewhere to the east or south-east of Palestine and North of Edom
Eleutherus - Nahr el-Kebîr or ‘Great River,’ which divides the Lebanon in two North of Tripoli
Puccoon - ) Any one of several plants yielding a red pigment which is used by the North American Indians, as the bloodroot and two species of Lithospermum (L
Chun - City in the North captured by David, from whence he took much brass, which was used by Solomon in the Temple
Madon - Canaanitish city in the North
Iceland Moss - A kind of lichen (Cetraria Icelandica) found from the Arctic regions to the North Temperate zone
Assumption Abbey - Richardton, North Dakokta
Calah - From it the adjacent country, on the North-east of the Tigris, and south of the Gordian mountains of Armenia, was called Callachene, or Callacine
Kolushan - to, a linguistic stock of North American Indians comprising the Tlinkit tribes of the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska and adjacent coast lands
ge'Dor - (a wall ), a town int he mountainous part of Judah, ( Joshua 15:58 ) a few miles North of Hebron
be-e'Roth - ( Joshua 9:17 ) It is now el-Bireh , which stands about 10 miles North of Jerusalem
Congregation, Mount of - The mountain considered by Israel's neighbors to stand in the far North and serve as a meeting place of the gods
Gebim - Cisterns, (rendered "pits," Jeremiah 14:3 ; "locusts," Isaiah 33:4 ), a small place North of Jerusalem, whose inhabitants fled at the approach of the Assyrian army (Isaiah 10:31 )
Zedad - Side; sloping place, a town in the North of Palestine, near Hamath (Numbers 34:8 ; Ezekiel 47:15 )
Cahinca Root - The root of an American shrub (Chiococca racemosa), found as far North as Florida Keys, from which cahincic acid is obtained; also, the root of the South American Chiococca anguifuga, a celebrated antidote for snake poison
Sea Otter - An aquatic carnivore (Enhydris lutris, / marina) found in the North Pacific Ocean
Adamah - A fortified city of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:36 ); identified by Conder with ’Admah on the plateau North of Bethshean; placed by the Palestine explorers at ed-Damieh , 5 miles S
Shur - Wilderness towards the North east of Egypt; its situation is clearly shown in the various passages
Redfin - ) A small North American dace (Minnilus cornutus, or Notropis megalops)
Tupelo - ) A North American tree (Nyssa multiflora) of the Dogwood family, having brilliant, glossy foliage and acid red berries
Westing - ) The distance, reckoned toward the west, between the two meridians passing through the extremities of a course, or portion of a ship's path; the departure of a course which lies to the west of North
Almondiblathaim - The one after Dibon-gad, which has been identified with Dhiban in the North border of Moab, 31 30' N, 35 48' E
Illyr'Icum, - an extensive district lying along the eastern coast of the Adriatic, from the boundary of Italy on the North of Epirus on the south, and contiguous to Moessia and Macedonia on the east
Elam - Elam was an ancient kingdom North of the Persian Gulf in the region of Mesopotamia
Timnath-Heres - It was "in the mount of Ephraim, in the North side of the hill Gaash," 10 miles south-west of Shechem
Parah - The heifer, a town in Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ), supposed to be identical with the ruins called Far'ah, about 6 miles North-east of Jerusalem, in the Wady Far'ah, which is a branch of the Wady Kelt
Epistle Side - When the Priest celebrates alone, he first readsthe Epistle at the south side and then passes to the North sidewhere he reads the Gospel
Alewife - ) A North American fish (Clupea vernalis) of the Herring family
Beth-Arabah - A place in the Jericho plain, apparently North of Beth-hoglah, in the ‘wilderness
Baalath - Store-city of Solomon apparently in the North
Ephraim, Gate of - By its name it would evidentlyhave been on the North of the city, as is the present Damascus gate
Water Moccasin - A venomous North American snake (Ancistrodon piscivorus) allied to the rattlesnake but destitute of a rattle
Xanthorhiza - ) A genus of shrubby ranunculaceous plants of North America, including only the species Xanthorhiza apiifolia, which has roots of a deep yellow color; yellowroot
Jano'ah - (rest ), a place apparently in the North of Galilee, or the "land of Naphtali," --one of those taken by Tiglath-pileser in his first incursion into Palestine
Veer - ) To change direction; to turn; to shift; as, wind veers to the west or North
Lucius - His name is Latin, but his birthplace seems to indicate that he was one of the Jews of Cyrene, in North Africa
Nahaliel - tributary of the Arnon, or the Wâdy Zerka Ma‘in , farther North, which runs into the Dead Sea
Trachonitis - It was beyond the Jordan on the North-east, its centre being about 32 50' N, 36 30' E
Ches'Alon - (hopes ), a place named as one of the landmarks on the west part of the North boundary of Judah, ( Joshua 15:10 ) probably Kesla , about six miles to the Northeast of Ainshems , on the western mountains of Judah
Abilene - Abela, or Abila, the capital, was North of Damascus, and south of Heliopolis
Limulus - It includes only a few species from the East Indies, and one (Limulus polyphemus) from the Atlantic coast of North America
Gaash - A hill of Ephraim, North of which stood Timnath-seres, celebrated for Joshua's tomb, Joshua 24
Cana - It has been identified with the modern Kana el-Jelil, also called Khurbet Kana, a place 8 or 9 miles North of Nazareth. Others have identified it with Kefr Kenna, which lies on the direct road to the Sea of Galilee, about 5 miles North-east of Nazareth, and 12 in a direct course from Tiberias
Samothracia - An island in the North-Aegean Sea, on the coast of Thrace, nearly midway between Troas and Philippi. On his first visit to Europe, Paul anchored for the night on the North of the island, Acts 16:11
Lake - North of England. North America contains some of the largest lakes on the globe, particularly the lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior
Candleberry Tree - A shrub (the Myrica cerifera, or wax-bearing myrtle), common in North America, the little nuts of which are covered with a greenish white wax, which was formerly, used for hardening candles; - also called bayberry tree, bayberry, or candleberry
Tidal - Goyyim , translated "nations," is the country called Gutium, east of Tigris and North of Elam
Geliloth - ” A border point North of Jerusalem in tribal allotment of Benjamin (Joshua 18:17 )
Carib - , one of a tribe of Indians inhabiting a region of South America, North of the Amazon, and formerly most of the West India islands
Maarath - The site is possibly modern khirbet Qufin two miles North of Beth-zur
Sabta(h) - (ssab' tuh) Son of Cush and apparently the ancestor of citizens of Sabota, capital of Hadramaut about 270 miles North of Aden
Acre - Seaport, Palestine, lying North of Mount Carmel, and west of the mountains of Galilee
Chestnut Tree - This tree thrives best in low and rather moist situations in the North of Palestine, and resembles our sycamore or buttonwood ( Platanus occidentalis )
Dalmanutha - The exact situation of this place is uncertain; it lay, however, on the western shore of the sea of Galilee, North of Tiberias
East - ) The point in the heavens where the sun is seen to rise at the equinox, or the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of North and south, and which is toward the right hand of one who faces the North; the point directly opposite to the west. ) To move toward the east; to veer from the North or south toward the east; to orientate. that which is North of Maryland and the Ohio River; - usually with the definite article; as, the commerce of the East is not independent of the agriculture of the West
West - , that part which is North of the Indian Territory, New Mexico, etc. ) The point in the heavens where the sun is seen to set at the equinox; or, the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of North and south, and on the left hand of a person facing North; the point directly opposite to east. ) To turn or move toward the west; to veer from the North or south toward the west
Choctaws - ) A tribe of North American Indians (Southern Appalachian), in early times noted for their pursuit of agriculture, and for living at peace with the white settlers
Zior - Archaeological research indicates that the frequently suggested site Si'ir about five miles North Northeast of Hebron was uninhabited before A
Achzib - It was afterwards called by the Greeks, Ecdippa, and is now named Zib; it lay on the seacoast, ten miles North of Acre
Mearah - A cave, a place in the Northern boundary of Palestine (Joshua 13:4 ). This may be the cave of Jezzin in Lebanon, 10 miles east of Sidon, on the Damascus road; or probably, as others think, Mogheirizeh, North-east of Sidon
Madmannah - , however, suggest Umm Deimneh, 12 miles North-east of Beersheba, as the site
Mars Hill - The Areopagus or rocky hill in Athens, North-west of the Acropolis, where the Athenian supreme tribunal and court of morals was held
Rakkon - It is now Tell er-Rakkeit, 6 miles North of Joppa, on the sea-shore, near the mouth of the river 'Aujeh, i
Kartan - It was probably near the North-western shore of the Sea of Tiberias, identical with the ruined village el-Katanah
Zereda - The fortress, a city on the North of Mount Ephraim; the birthplace of Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 )
Heteroscian - ) One who lives either North or south of the tropics, as contrasted with one who lives on the other side of them; - so called because at noon the shadows always fall in opposite directions (the one Northward, the other southward)
Boomer - ) A North American rodent, so named because it is said to make a booming noise
Chorazin - It is with probability identified with Kerazeh , North of Tell Hum, where are remains of pillars, walls, etc
Santalaceous - ) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Santalaceae), of which the genus Santalum is the type, and which includes the buffalo nut and a few other North American plants, and many peculiar plants of the southern hemisphere
Bluebird - ) A small song bird (Sialia sialis), very common in the United States, and, in the North, one of the earliest to arrive in spring
Raccoon - ) A North American nocturnal carnivore (Procyon lotor) allied to the bears, but much smaller, and having a long, full tail, banded with black and gray
Devon - The small, longhorned variety, called North Devons, is distinguished by the superiority of its working oxen
Shoshones - ) A linguistic family or stock of North American Indians, comprising many tribes, which extends from Montana and Idaho into Mexico. In a restricted sense the name is applied especially to the Snakes, the most Northern of the tribes
pi?on - Parryana, cembroides, edulis, and monophylla, the nut pines of Western North America
Mearah - Place in the North of Canaan, mentioned by Joshua as a boundary of the land that had not then been possessed: it is called in the margin 'the cave
Mer'Arath - ( Joshua 15:59 ) The places which occur in company with have been identified at a few miles to the North of Hebron, but Maarath has hitherto eluded observation
Pisidia - a province of Asia Minor, having Lycaonia to the North, Pamphylia to the south, Cilicia and Cappadocia to the east, and the province of Asia to the west
ba'Ana -
The son of Ahilud, Solmon's commissariat officer in Jezreel and the North of the Jordan valley
Lawsonia - ) An Asiatic and North African shrub (Lawsonia inermis), with smooth oval leaves, and fragrant white flowers
Raamah - It is supposed to have adjoined the Persian gulf on its western shore towards the North, Ezekiel 27:12
Silo - (Hebrew: peace or rest) ...
City of Ephraim, North of Bethel (Judges 21)
Transepts - These projected wings, forming the arm of thecross, are called the transepts, North and south
Middlesbrough, England, Diocese of - Comprises the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire, and the city of York
Fort Wayne, Indiana, Diocese of - Embraces that part of Indiana North of the southern boundary of Warren, Fountain, Montgomery, Boone, Hamilton, Madison, Delaware, and Randolph counties; area, 17,431 square miles; established, 1857; suffragan of Cincinnati
Hethlon - Wrapped up, a place on the North border of Palestine
Kadmonites - Orientals, the name of a Canaanitish tribe which inhabited the North-eastern part of Palestine in the time of Abraham (Genesis 15:19 )
Tahash - ” Third son of Nahor and Reumah (Genesis 22:24 ) and ancestor of an Arab tribe, perhaps associated with Tahshi North of Damascus
Bocardo - ) A prison; - originally the name of the old North gate in Oxford, which was used as a prison
Frozen - ) Subject to frost, or to long and severe cold; chilly; as, the frozen North; the frozen zones
Woodchuck - ) A common large North American marmot (Arctomys monax)
Alexandria, Louisiana, Diocese of - Comprises Northern Louisiana above 31 degrees North latitude; area, 22,212 square miles; suffragan of New Orleans
Liriodendron - ) A genus of large and very beautiful trees of North America, having smooth, shining leaves, and handsome, tuliplike flowers; tulip tree; whitewood; - called also canoewood
Dodanim - They are associated, by the above passage, and by dim etymological inferences, with the island of Rhodes or some location on the North coast of the Mediterranean
a'Bel-Beth-ma'Achah - (meadow of the house of oppression ), a town of some importance, ( 2 Samuel 20:15 ) in the extreme North of Palestine, which fell an early prey to the invading kings of Syria, (1 Kings 15:20 ) and Assyria
ma'Don - (strife ) one of the principal cities of Canaan before the conquest, probably in the North
Campbell, Thomas - He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits
Troas - A city on the coast of Mysia, in the North-west of Asia Minor, named after ancient Troy, which was at some little distance from it (about 4 miles) to the North
Kanah - ...
...
A town in the North of Asher (Joshua 19:28 ). About a mile North of this place are many colossal ruins strown about
Thomas Campbell - He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits
Dead Sea - It is part of a deep North-south valley that extends along the Jordan River as far as the Gulf of Aqabah (north-eastern arm of the Red Sea) to the south
Directions (Geographical) - On the left hand is North and to the right hand is south. The North was designated as the mountains. In a biblical world reaching about 5300 kilometers from Persia in the east to Spain in the west and about 3000 kilometers from Armenia in the North to Yemen in the south, Israel was a small strip of land with geographical unity. ...
North and South “From Dan to Beersheba” (2 Samuel 3:10 ) describes the stretch of land the tribes of Israel claimed after their entrance into the land. The description ranges from North to south. For the Hebrew language North is the left and south is the right. Zaphon, the mountain on the Northern Syrian Mediterranean Coast, stands for the North. ...
Some prophets spoke of the enemy from the North, which was called the punishing tool of God on Israel. This was recognized in the appearance of the Babylonians from the North
Hamath - Fortress, the capital of one of the kingdoms of Upper Syria of the same name, on the Orontes, in the valley of Lebanon, at the Northern boundary of Palestine (Numbers 13:21 ; 34:8 ), at the foot of Hermon (Joshua 13:5 ) towards Damascus (Zechariah 9:2 ; Jeremiah 49:23 ). Hamah is beautifully situated on the Orontes, 32 miles North of Emesa, and 36 south of the ruins of Assamea. ...
The kingdom of Hamath comprehended the great plain lying on both banks of the Orontes from the fountain near Riblah to Assamea on the North, and from Lebanon on the west to the desert on the east. The "entrance of Hamath" (Numbers 34:8 ), which was the North boundary of Palestine, led from the west between the North end of Lebanon and the Nusairiyeh mountains
Rehoboam - ...
Aware that the Northern tribes were dissatisfied with the Jerusalem government, Rehoboam tried to hold their allegiance by going North to Shechem for his coronation ceremony (1 Kings 12:1). He also decided to take a firm stand against any tendency to weaken Jerusalem’s control of the North. But his efforts were in vain, with the result that the ten Northern tribes broke away from David’s dynasty and formed their own kingdom under Jeroboam (1 Kings 12:2-20). ...
Though Rehoboam thought of sending his army to force his rule upon the North, he changed his mind when a prophet told him that the division was a judgment sent by God (1 Kings 12:21-24). This was partly because of the good influence of a large number of priests and Levites who had fled from the North to Jerusalem rather than cooperate with Jeroboam’s idolatry (2 Chronicles 11:13-17)
Catalpa - ) A genus of American and East Indian trees, of which the best know species are the Catalpa bignonioides, a large, ornamental North American tree, with spotted white flowers and long cylindrical pods, and the C
Candlefish - ) A marine fish (Thaleichthys Pacificus), allied to the smelt, found on the North Pacific coast; - called also eulachon
Ain - Also of a place in the North of Canaan, Numbers 34:11
Zemaraim - It is generally identified with es-Sumra to the North of Jericho
Tahtim-Hodshi - It was apparently some region east of the Jordan and North of Gilead
Beeroth - It has by some been identified with el-Bireh on the way to Nablus, 10 miles North of Jerusalem
Hazar-Enan - ” Site marking Northeastern border of Promised Land (Numbers 34:9-10 ; Ezekiel 47:17 ). Its exact location is not known, but some locate it at Qaryatein about 70 miles east North east of Damascus
Tibhath - The site is likely in the vicinity of Zobah North of Damascus
Chidon - " It was a place not far North-west from Jerusalem
Chesulloth - It has been identified with Chisloth-tabor, 2 1/2 miles to the west of Mount Tabor, and North of Jezreel; now Iksal
Yaupon - The smooth elliptical leaves are used as a substitute for tea, and were formerly used in preparing the black drink of the Indians of North Carolina
Gaash - South of Tibneh, which is identified as Timnath-serah, is a hill, upon the North side of which are tombs; hence it is supposed to be "the hill Gaash
Mysis - One species inhabits the Great Lakes of North America, and is largely eaten by the whitefish
Dothan - It was on the caravan-route from Syria to Egypt, about eleven miles North of Samaria
Tema - An Ishmaelite tribe and district, in the North of Arabia Deserta towards Damascus, Genesis 25:15
en-She'Mesh - (fountain of the sun ), a spring which formed one of the landmarks on the North boundary of Judah, ( Joshua 15:7 ) and the south boundary of Benjamin, (Joshua 18:17 ) perhaps Ain Haud or Ain-Chot --the "well of apostles" --about a mile below Bethany
e'Phra-im, Mount, - is a district which seems to extend as far south as Ramah and Bethel, (1 Samuel 1:1 ; 7:17 ; 2 Chronicles 13:4,19 ) compared with 2 Chronicles 15:8 Places but a few miles North of Jerusalem, and within the limits of Benjamin
Latin America - Name applied to those parts of North, Central, and South America whose inhabitants speak Latin tongues, i
Mount of the Valley - The "valley" here was probably the Ghor or valley of the Jordan, and hence the "mount" would be the hilly region in the North end of the Dead Sea
Netophah - It has been identified with the ruins of Metoba, or Um Toba, to the North-east of Bethlehem
Butterwort - The species are found mostly in the North Temperate zone
Hobah - ‘to the North’) of Damascus
Sen'a-ah - ) The Magdal Senna of Eusebius and Jerome denotes a town seven miles North of Jericho ("Senna")
Shal'Isha, the Land of, - In it perhaps was situated the place called Baal-shalisha, (2 Kings 4:42 ) 15 Miles North of Lydda
Austral - to, a zone extending across North America between the Transition and Tropical zones, and including most of the United States and central Mexico except the mountainous parts
Seleucia - (ssih lew' cih uh) Syrian city on Mediterranean coast five miles North of the Orontes River and fifteen miles from Antioch
Eumenes ii - 190), including, not ‘India’ ( 1Ma 8:6-8 ), but the greater part of Asia North of the Taurus (Liv
America, Latin - Name applied to those parts of North, Central, and South America whose inhabitants speak Latin tongues, i
Redfish - ) The blueback salmon of the North Pacific; - called also nerka
Archite - ]'>[1] ] situated on the North border of Benjamin, possibly the modern ‘Ain ‘Arik , west of Bethel
Harosheth - A place in the North of Palestine, the home of Sisera, Judges 4:2; Judges 4:13; Judges 4:16, and the place of assembling of Jabin's army
Lebo'Nah - It lies to the west of and close to the Nablus road, about eight miles North of Beitan (Bethel) and two from Seilun (Shiloh)
Trachonitis - This province had Arabia Deserta to the east, Batanea to the west, Iturea to the south, and the country of Damascus to the North
Cinneroth - or CINNERETH, a city on the North-western side of the sea of Galilee; which, from it, is frequently called in the Old Testament the sea of Cinneroth: from which word, that of Genesaret, in the New Testament, is conjectured by Dr
Jazer - It lay some fifteen miles North of Heshbon, near a small stream, Numbers 1:1-36:13 32:1 Joshua 21:39 1 Chronicles 26:31 Jeremiah 48:32
Miph'Kad - ( Nehemiah 3:31 ) It was probably not in the wall of Jerusalem proper, but in that of the city of David, or Zion, and somewhere near to the junction of the two on the North side
Beth-ma'Achah - (house of oppression ), a place named only in ( 2 Samuel 20:14,15 ) In the absence of more information we can only conclude that it is identical with Maachah or Aram-maachah, one of the petty Syrian kingdoms in the North of Palestine
Naha'Liel - ( Numbers 21:19 ) It lay "beyond," that is, North of, the Amen, ver
Ibleam - It was probably the modern Jelamah, a village 2 1/2 miles North of Jenin
Quail - Enormous numbers of quails migrate North during the spring after wintering in Africa. ...
The quails mentioned in the OT differ from the North American bobwhite quails
Badger - vulgaris), called also brock, inhabits the North of Europe and Asia; another species (Taxidea Americana / Labradorica) inhabits the Northern parts of North America
Abel-Beth-Maachah - Meadow of the house of Maachah, a city in the North of Palestine, in the neighbourhood of Dan and Ijon, in the tribe of Naphtali. Its site is occupied by the modern Abil or Abil-el-kamh, on a rising ground to the east of the brook Derdarah, which flows through the plain of Huleh into the Jordan, about 6 miles to the west-north-west of Dan
East - The Hebrews express the east, west, North, and south by words which signify before, behind, left, and right, according to the situation of a man who has his face turned toward the east. By the east, they frequently describe, not only Arabia Deserta, and the lands of Moab and Ammon, which lay to the east of Palestine, but also Assyria, Mesopotamia, Babylonia, and Chaldea, though they are situated rather to the North than to the east of Judea
ge'ba - ( Joshua 21:17 ; 1 Chronicles 6:60 ) It is named amongst the first group of the Benjamite towns --apparently those lying near to and along the North boundary. It is now the modern village of Jeba , which stands picturesquely on the top of its steep terraced hill, six miles North of Jerusalem, on the very edge of the great Wady Suweinit , looking Northward to the opposite village of ancient Michmash, which also retains its old name of Mukhmas
Achor - Trouble, a valley North of Jericho; so called, perhaps, from the troubles occasioned by the sin of Achan, who was here put to death, Joshua 7:26
Ephraim in the Wilderness - It lay in the wild, uncultivated hill-country to the North-east of Jerusalem, betwen the central towns and the Jordan valley
Ishtob - An inhabitant of man of Tob, a country North of mount Gilead, where Jephtha resided
Shaalabbin - It is probably the modern village of Selbit, 3 miles North of Ajalon
Gibeah of Phinehas - It has been identified with the modern Khurbet Jibia, 5 miles North of Guphna towards Shechem
Neiel - It has been identified with the ruin Y'anin, near the outlet of the Wady esh Sha-ghur, less than 2 miles North of Kabul, and 16 miles east of Caesarea
Columbine - Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America
Hannathon - ” Town on Northern border of tribal territory of Zebulun (Joshua 19:14 ). It is probably present-day tell el-Badawiye, about six miles North of Nazareth
Hethlon - A place mentioned by Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 47:15 ; Ezekiel 48:1 ) as situated on the ideal Northern boundary of Israel. of Tripoli; and von Kasteren and others favour ’Adlun , North of the mouth of the Kasimiyyeh
Rampart - Because Jerusalem was ringed by steep valleys, only its North side had extensive ramparts
Merom - A lake in Northern Palestine, where Joshua won a victory. Lake Huleh is eleven miles North of the Sea of Galilee
Geshur - A principality on the North-east of Bashan
Rudbeckia - There are about thirty species, exclusively North American
Laish - City in the far North of Palestine, conquered by the tribe of Dan
Baal-Gad' - A city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon; the Northernmost point, to which the wars of Joshua reached, Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ; 13:5 . Some have supposed it was Baalbek; but this lay further North
Raleigh, North Carolina, Diocese of - Established as the vicariate Apostolic of North Carolina on March 3, 1868
el'Kosh - " ( Nahum 1:1 ) This place is located at the modern Alkush , a village on the east bank of the Tigris, about two miles North of Mosul
North Carolina - Mass was first celebrated in North Carolina at Newbern, 1784, by a priest who had come on business from Madeira, Reverend Patrick Cleary of Funchal. He officiated in the home of Mrs Alexander Gaston, whose distinguished son, William Gaston, was to bring about the repeal, in 1835, of the article in the North Carolina Constitution of 1776 which kept from office "those who denied the truth of the Protestant religion. " For nearly 50 years the few Catholics of North Carolina were served only by visiting priests
Hamath, Hemath - District and a noted city in the North of Syria. The district lay North of the Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon, but perhaps extended southward, as the Northern border of Israel is spoken of as 'the entering in of Hamath. It was more than a hundred miles farther North than Dan, but it became tributary to Solomon and he built store cities there
Misrephoth-Maim - It is identified with the ruin Musheirifeh, at the promontory of en-Nakhurah, some 11 miles North of Acre
Baal-Hazor - Probably it is the same with Hazor (Nehemiah 11:33 ), now Tell' Asur, 5 miles North-east of Bethel
Zebulun, Lot of - In Galilee, to the North of Issachar and south of Asher and Naphtali (Joshua 19:10-16 ), and between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean
Aenon - A place has been found called 'Ainun, four miles North of the springs
Thyine Wood - Revelation 18:12, Callitris quadrivalvis of Mount Atlas in North Africa, allied to the "arbor vitro ", Τhuja occidentalis or articulata
Bise - ) A cold North wind which prevails on the Northern coasts of the Mediterranean and in Switzerland, etc
Baal-Tamar - It may be ras et-Tawil North of Jerusalem
Naarath - (nay' uh rath) KJV form of Naarah, a city in the tribal territory of Ephraim just North of Jericho (Joshua 16:7 ). Suggested sites include Ain Duq, khirbet el Nayash about five miles Northeast of Jericho, and tell el-Jishr
Nahaliel - The stream bed is perhaps the wadi Zerqa Ma'in or the wadi Wala, a North tributary of the Arnon
Skilling - ) A money od account in Sweden, Norwey, Denmark, and North Germany, and also a coin
Agapetus ii, Pope - Elected to the papacy, 946, he labored to restore ecclesiastical discipline, and supported Otto the Great in evangelization of the North, urging him with other nobles to invade Italy for the purpose of restoring order
Hobah - Place 'on the left hand,' that is, to the North of Damascus, to which Abraham pursued the kings who had captured Lot
Hethlon - Place spoken of as 'the way of Hethlon:' only mentioned as the border of the land in the North to be possessed by Israel in the future
Herring - harengus) of the North Atlantic
Etheostomoid - The etheostomoids are small and often bright-colored fishes inhabiting the fresh waters of North America
Zelah - The site is probably khirbet Salah between Jerusalem and Gibeon or else another site in the hills North and west of Jerusalem
Transition Zone - The zone lying between the Boreal and Sonoran zones of North America. It includes an eastern or humid subdivision and a western arid one of corresponding temperature comprising the Northern Great Plains and the lower slopes of the mountains of the western United States and Mexico
Diblath - Place in the North of Canaan, conjectured by some to be the same as RIBLAH, but only by supposing an error of the copyist, D (ד) being written for R (ר)
Lycia - A province in the southwest of Asia Minor bounded west by Caria, east by Pamphylia, North by Phrygia and Pisidia, and south by the Mediterranean
Jahaz - JAHAZAH or JAHZAH, a city in the North of Moab, near which Moses defeated Sihon, Numbers 21:23
Bay-Tree - The bay tree is the Laurel of North America and the south of Europe; an evergreen tree, a wreath from which has been from time immemorial the symbolical crown of poets and warriors
Nim'Rah - It was ten miles North of the Dead Sea and three miles east of the Jordan, in the hill of Nimrim
Dan, City of - The portion of land that fell to Dan being found too small, a party of them went far North unto Leshem or Laish, which they took, and destroyed; they built a city there and called it after their father Dan. This is often named as the North border of Palestine; 'from Dan to Beersheba' implying the whole land
Bethsaida - A city in Galilee, on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, a little North of Capernaum; it was the birthplace of the apostles Philip, Andrew, and Peter, and was often visited by our Lord, Matthew 11:21 ; Mark 6:45 ; 8:22 . A city in Gaulonitis, North of the same lake, and east of the Jordan
Winds - That the Hebrews recognized the existence of four prevailing winds as issuing, broadly speaking, from the four cardinal points, North, south, east and west, may be inferred from their custom of using the expression "four winds" as equivalent to the "four quarters" of the hemisphere. (Ezekiel 37:9 ; Daniel 8:8 ; Zechariah 2:6 ; Matthew 24:31 ) The North wind, or, as it was usually called "the North," was naturally the coldest of the four, Sirach 43:20 and its presence is hence invoked as favorable to vegetation in ( Song of Solomon 4:16 ) It is described in (Proverbs 25:23 ) as bringing rain; in this case we must understand the Northwest wind. The Northwest wind prevails from the autumnal equinox to the beginning of November, and the North wind from June to the equinox. Paul's voyage we meet with the Greek term Lips to describe the southwest wind; the Latin Carus or Caurus , the Northwest wind ( Acts 27:12 ) and Euroclydon , a wind of a very violent character coming from east-northeast
Dan - The tribe therefore sent representatives North to look for a better place to live (Judges 1:34; Judges 18:1-2). The place they decided upon was Laish, located in the fertile region of the Jordan headwaters in the far North of Canaan. ...
From that time on, the towns of Dan and Beersheba marked respectively the Northern and southern limits of the land of Israel (Judges 20:1; 1 Samuel 3:20; 2 Samuel 17:11; 2 Samuel 24:2). When the nation was split in two after the death of Solomon, the southern tribes of Judah and Benjamin were separated from the Northern tribes, who still called themselves Israel. The new limits of Israel were now Dan in the North and Bethel in the south. ...
Dan’s isolated location meant that it was open to enemy attack from the North (1 Kings 15:20)
Seba - ...
...
The name of a country and nation (Isaiah 43:3 ; 45:14 ) mentioned along with Egypt and Ethiopia, and therefore probably in North-eastern Africa
Pontus - A Roman province in the North of Asia Minor, along the coast of the Euxine Sea (Pontus), from which circumstance the name was derived
Cherokees - (upland fields) The largest Indian tribe of Iroquoian stock, formerly occupying the Alleghany region, now living in Oklahoma with the exception of about 1,300 in North Carolina
Coos - (Written Cos in the RSV), a small island, one of the Sporades in the Aegean Sea, in the North-west of Rhodes, off the coast of Caria
Moreh, the Hill of - It is a gray ridge parallel to Gilboa on the North; and between the two lay the battle-field, the plain of Jezreel (q
Alemeth - ...
A sacerdotal city of Benjamin (1Chronicles 6:60), called also Almon (Joshua 21:18 ), now Almit, a mile North-east of the ancient Anathoth
Syene - " It was the frontier town of Egypt in the south, as Migdol was in the North-east
Beth-Azmaveth - It may be modern Hizmeh about two miles North of Anathoth
Boaz - The left or North pillar Solomon set up in the Temple (1 Kings 7:21 )
Hazeroth - A camping-ground of Israel, the second station Northward in the journey from Sinai ( Numbers 11:35 ; Numbers 12:16 ; Numbers 33:17 f. It is usually identified with the beautiful wady of ’Ain el-Khadrah , about 30 mlies North-east of Jebel Musa
Madon - A royal city of the Canaanites in the North ( Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:19 )
Berber - ) A member of a race somewhat resembling the Arabs, but often classed as Hamitic, who were formerly the inhabitants of the whole of North Africa from the Mediterranean southward into the Sahara, and who still occupy a large part of that region; - called also Kabyles
Daisy - ) The whiteweed (Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum), the plant commonly called daisy in North America; - called also oxeye daisy
Potato - It is native of South America, but a form of the species is found native as far North as New Mexico
Chebar - Some identify it with the Habor, but this is only conjecture, and others consider the Habor to be much too far North
Parthians - Inhabitants of Parthia, a country in the East, lying south of Hyrcania, North of Sagartia, and east of Media
Bracing - ) Imparting strength or tone; strengthening; invigorating; as, a bracing North wind
Bardsey - Island in Cardigan Bay, Carnarvonshire, North Wales; area, about 370 acres
Pecan - ) A species of hickory (Carya olivaeformis), growing in North America, chiefly in the Mississippi valley and in Texas, where it is one of the largest of forest trees; also, its fruit, a smooth, oblong nut, an inch or an inch and a half long, with a thin shell and well-flavored meat
Whelk - ) Any one numerous species of large marine gastropods belonging to Buccinum and allied genera; especially, Buccinum undatum, common on the coasts both of Europe and North America, and much used as food in Europe
Abel (of) Beth-Maacah - Where Sheba took refuge from Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:14-18 ); it was captured by Ben-hadad ( 1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser ( 2 Kings 15:29 ); corresponding to the modern Abil , west of Tell el-Kadi , and North of Lake Huleh
Emmaus - A village sixty furlongs (that is seven miles and a half,) North of Jerusalem, rendered memorable in being the place to which the two disciples walked on the day of our Lord's resurrection, and where he made himself known unto them, in breaking of bread, and blessing it
Kitchen Middens - The name is applied also to similar mounds found on the American coast from Canada to Florida, made by the North American Indians
Melungeon - In North Carolina the Croatan Indians, regarded as descended from Raleigh's lost colony of Croatan, formerly classed with negroes, are now legally recognized as distinct
Larkspur - They are natives of the North Temperate zone
Abel-Beth-Maachah - (â'bĕl-bĕth-mâ'a-kah), meadow of the house of oppression, 2 Kings 15:29, a town in the North of Palestine near Cæsarea-Philippi
Pamphylia - Lycia west, Pisidia North, and the Mediterranean south
Beth-ar'Abah - (house of the desert ), one of the six cities of Judah which were situated down in the Arabah, the sunk valley of the Jordan and Dead Sea, ( Joshua 15:61 ) on the North border of the tribe
Jat'Tir - See also (Joshua 21:14 ; 1 Samuel 30:27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57 ) By Robinson it is identified with 'Attir , six miles North of Molada and ten miles south of Hebron
Janoah -
A town on the North-eastern border of Ephraim, in the Jordan valley (Joshua 16:6,7 ). ...
...
A town of Northern Palestine, within the boundaries of Naphtali
Esh'Col, the Valley - ( Numbers 13:23,24 ; 1:24) The name is still attached to a spring of fine water called 'Ain Eshkali , in a valley about two miles North of Hebron
Ben-Deker - His district bordered the Philistine territory on the west, reached to Aphek in the North, and to Beth-shemesh in the south (1 Kings 4:9 )
Quicksands - On the North coast of Africa were two localities dangerous to sailors, called the Greater and Lesser Syrtis
Halhul - It is now a small village of the same name, and is situated about 5 miles North-east of Hebron on the way to Jerusalem
Elealeh - It is now an extensive ruin called el-A'al, about one mile North-east of Heshbon
Mejarkon - ” Stream in the territory of Dan (Joshua 19:46 ), probably the Nahr el-Auja (“winding river”), which, fed by springs at Ras el-Ain about ten miles from the coast, flows year-round to the Mediterranean about four miles North of Joppa
Cherith - Possibly now the Wadi Fasail, further North
Hemlock - ) An evergreen tree common in North America (Abies, / Tsuga, Canadensis); hemlock spruce
Europe - ...
The great quarter of the earth that lies between the Atlantic ocean and Asia, and between the Mediterranean sea and the North sea
Troubadour - ) One of a school of poets who flourished from the eleventh to the thirteenth century, principally in Provence, in the south of France, and also in the North of Italy
Adramyt'Tium - named form Adramys , brother of Croesus king of Lydia, a seaport in the province of Asia [1], situated on a bay of the Aegean Sea, about 70 miles North of Smyrna, in the district anciently called Aeolis, and also Mysia
Achzib - It is found near the sea coast, ten or twelve miles North of Ptolemais, and was visited by Buckingham in 1816
Mahanaim - It was assigned to the Levites, Joshua 13:26; Joshua 13:30; Joshua 21:38; 1 Chronicles 6:80, and lay within the territory of Gad, North of the torrent Jabbok. Merrill locates Mahanaim in the Jordan valley, six miles North of the Jabbok, at a ruin called Suleikhat
Wind - —‘The four winds’ (Matthew 24:31, Mark 13:27) is an expression standing for ‘north, south, east, and west,’ the winds in Palestine coming mainly from these directions. The North wind is cold; the west, from the sea, moist; the south, warm; and the east, from the desert, dry
Ophrah - City in Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ), likely North of Michmash (1 Samuel 13:17-18 ). This site is likely et-Taiyibeh five miles North of Michmash and four miles Northeast of Bethel
Dalmatia - (dal may' tih uh) Place name referring to the southern part of Illyricum North of Greece and across the Adriatic Sea from Italy
Arvad - A Phoenician city, on a small rocky island at the mouth of the river Eleutherus, twenty-two miles North of Tripolis
Anathoth - One of the cities given to the priests, in Benjamin; identified by Robinson in Anata, some four miles North by east of Jerusalem, Joshua 21:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:60
Ataroth - Robinson found traces of one of those in Ephraim, on a high hill about six miles North by west from Bethel
Madmenah - , a town in Benjamin, not far from Jerusalem, towards the North (Isaiah 10:31 )
Paphos - It lay on the west coast of the island, about 8 miles North of old Paphos
Fish Gate - A North gate of the second quarter of Jerusalem (Zephaniah 1:10 ) mentioned in connection with fortifications built by Manasseh (2 Chronicles 33:14 )
Giloh - It has been identified with Kurbet Jala, about 7 miles North of Hebron
Sychar - It has now, however, as the result of recent explorations, been identified with 'Askar, a small Samaritan town on the southern base of Ebal, about a mile to the North of Jacob's well
Plane Tree - This tree is frequently found in Palestine, both on the coast and in the North
Scyth'Ian - The name often included all the nomadic tribes, who dwelt mostly on the North of the Black and the Caspian Sea, stretching thence indefinitely into inner Asia, and were regarded by the ancients as standing extremely low In point of intelligence and civilization
Potlatch - ) Among the Kwakiutl, Chimmesyan, and other Indians of the Northwestern coast of North America, a ceremonial distribution by a man of gifts to his own and neighboring tribesmen, often, formerly, to his own impoverishment
American And Foreign Christian Union - It worked in North and South America and Europe, for a number of years, withdrew from France, 1866, and from all Europe, 1873, and ultimately limited its efforts to supporting an American church in Paris
Hill Country - Any part of the range of hills that runs through Palestine from North to south, in distinction from the plains towards the Mediterranean or the Jordan; and in distinction from the Shephelah which is a region in Judah that runs between the hill country and the plain on the west, called the 'lowlands
Sinim - " The land of the Sinae, who settled in Western China, has been suggested: this would not clash with 'north' and 'west,' which are also mentioned in the same passage
Redwing - (b) A North American passerine bird (Agelarius ph/niceus) of the family Icteridae
Foreland - ) A promontory or cape; a headland; as, the North and South Foreland in Kent, England
Orangeman - ) One of a secret society, organized in the North of Ireland in 1795, the professed objects of which are the defense of the regning sovereign of Great Britain, the support of the Protestant religion, the maintenance of the laws of the kingdom, etc
Orchis - ) A genus of endogenous plants growing in the North Temperate zone, and consisting of about eighty species
Turkey - ) Any large American gallinaceous bird belonging to the genus Meleagris, especially the North American wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and the domestic turkey, which was probably derived from the Mexican wild turkey, but had been domesticated by the Indians long before the discovery of America
Pinkroot - ) A perennial North American herb (Spigelia Marilandica), sometimes cultivated for its showy red blossoms
Empire, British - See articles on: ...
Antigua
Bahamas
Barbados
British Guiana
British Honduras
Canada
Ceylon
Dominica
England
Falkland Islands
Gibraltar
Grenada
Hong Kong
India
Ireland
Jamaica
Malta
Montserrat
Nevis
New Zealand
North Borneo
Palestine
Saint Christopher
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent
Samoa
Scotland
Shanghai
Union of South Africa
Virgin Islands
Wales
Weihaiwei
Lud, Ludim - His descendants are mentioned with Phut, and are held to have inhabited the North-west of Africa
Japan Current - A branch of the equatorial current of the Pacific, washing the eastern coast of Formosa and thence flowing Northeastward past Japan and merging into the easterly drift of the North Pacific; - called also Kuro-Siwo, or Black Stream, in allusion to the deep blue of its water
Kafir - They inhabit the country North of Cape Colony, the name being now specifically applied to the tribes living between Cape Colony and Natal; but the Zulus of Natal are true Kaffirs
Cush - ), North of Assyria
Dor - A royal city of the Canaanites, Joshua 11:2; Joshua 12:23, within the territory of Asher, but allotted to Manasseh, Joshua 17:11; Judges 1:27; 1 Chronicles 7:29, and it was one of Solomon's provision-districts, 1 Kings 4:11; now Tantûra, eight miles North of Cæsarea, where there are considerable ruins
ib'le-am - (Joshua 17:11 ) The ascent of Gur was "at Ibleam," (2 Kings 9:27 ) somewhere near the present Jenin , probably to the North of it
Quicksand, - The Syrtis is a quicksand on the North African coast between long
Tacamahaca - ) Any tree yielding tacamahac resin, especially, in North America, the balsam poplar, or balm of Gilead (Populus balsamifera)
Liquidambar - Liquidambar styraciflua is the North American sweet qum, and L
Seleucia - It was on the Mediterranean, about five miles North of the river Orontes, and was founded by Seleucus Nicator, died b
India - The India of the ancients extended more to the North and west than modern India; and the southern region, now best known to us, was comparatively unknown until the era of modern navigation
Sisters of the Assumption - The congregation has houses and schools in France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, England, Denmark, North America, Central America, South America, and the Philippines
Sacrament House - A tabernacle usually situated on the North or Gospel side of a church outside the sanctuary
Persepolis - Imposing ruins still mark its site about 30 miles North-east of Shiraz
Attali'a - Leake fixes Attalia at Adalia , on the south court of Asia Minor, North of the Duden Su , the ancient Catarrhactes
Ezion-Geber - The giant's backbone (so called from the head of a mountain which runs out into the sea), an ancient city and harbour at the North-east end of the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea, the Gulf of Akabah, near Elath or Eloth (Numbers 33:35 ; Deuteronomy 2:8 ). It is supposed that anciently the North end of the gulf flowed further into the country than now, as far as 'Ain el-Ghudyan, which Isaiah 10 miles up the dry bed of the Arabah, and that Ezion-geber may have been there
Tim'Nath-se'Rah - (Joshua 24:30 ) It is specified as "in Mount Ephraim on the North side of Mount Gaash. Opposite the town was a much higher hill, in the North side of which are several excavated sepulchres
Arimathea - It stands about thirty miles North-west of Jerusalem, on the high road to Jaffa. There was another Ramah, about six miles North of Jerusalem, in a pass which separated the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, which Baasha, king of Israel, took and began to fortify; but he was obliged to relinquish it, in consequence of the alliance formed between Asa, king of Judah, and Benhadad, king of Syria, 1 Kings 15
ar'Oer - (Jeremiah 48:19 ) It is the modern Ara'ir , upon the very edge of the precipitous North bank of the Wady Mojeb . ...
Aroer, in (Isaiah 17:2 ) if a place at all, must be still farther North than either of the two already named
Lebanon - A double mountain range to the North of Palestine, consisting of a western chain, Lebanon proper, and an eastern. The western range, the Lebanon proper, begins on the North near the banks of the Eleutherus, which passes through the plain of Emesa, the "entrance of Hamath," Numbers 34:8, to the Mediterranean, and runs for a distance of 90 geographical miles, in the direction from Northeast to southwest, parallel with the Mediterranean, to the banks of the Litany, the ancient Leontes, which, draining Cœlo-Syria and breaking through the Lebanon by a wild gorge, enters the Mediterranean a few miles North of Tyre
Powpow - ) A priest, or conjurer, among the North American Indians
Ono - It is named with Lod, and may be a few miles North of Lydda (Lod)
Hundred, Tower of - (KJV “Tower of Meah”) A tower located on the North wall of Jerusalem which was restored by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Achaia - Is used in the New Testament for the whole region of Greece south of Macedonia, including the Peloponnesus, or Morea, and some territory North of the gulf of Corinth, Acts 18:12 ; 19:21 ; 1 Corinthians 11:10 . Achaia Proper, however, was a province of Greece, of which Corinth was the capital, and embraced the Northwestern part of the Pelopennesus
Assos - A sea-port town of Proconsular Asia, in the district of Mysia, on the North shore of the Gulf of Adramyttium
Jaffna, Sri Lanka, Diocese of - Comprises the Northern and the North Central provinces, excepting the Tamankaduwa division
Pamphylia - Paul and his company, loosing from Paphos, sailed North-west and came to Perga, the capital of Pamphylia (Acts 13:13,14 ), a province about the middle of the southern sea-board of Asia Minor
Sihor - , in a North-easterly direction from Egypt, and enters the sea about 50 miles south-west of Gaza
Crayfish - The North American species are numerous and mostly belong to the genus Cambarus
Migron - The town of Isaiah 10:1 is generally located between Aiath (Ai) and Michmash, that is, to the North of Michmash
Bison - ) The American bison buffalo (Bison Americanus), a large, gregarious bovine quadruped with shaggy mane and short black horns, which formerly roamed in herds over most of the temperate portion of North America, but is now restricted to very limited districts in the region of the Rocky Mountains, and is rapidly decreasing in numbers
Carmel, Mount - The mountain is near the Mediterranean coast of Palestine between the Plain of Acco to the North and the Plain of Sharon to the south
Nicopolis - The site in which Paul most likely wintered (Titus 3:12 ) was Nicopolis in Epirus in Northwest Greece on the North side of the Sinus Ambracicus
Zephathah - The earliest Greek translation translated Zaphon , “north” instead of Zephathah. If Zephathah is identified with Safiyah, less than two miles Northeast of Beit Jibrin, the “valley of Zephathah” is the wadi Safiyah
Galilee, Mountain in - of Olives, whose North point is said to have borne the name ‘Galilee
Arkite - They apparently centered around Arqa, modern Tell Arqa in Syria 80 miles North of Sidon
Yuman - ) Designating, or pertaining to, an important linguistic stock of North American Indians of the southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico, nearly all agriculturists and adept potters and basket makers
Transalpine - ) Being on the farther side of the Alps in regard to Rome, that is, on the North or west side of the Alps; of or pertaining to the region or the people beyond the Alps; as, transalpine Gaul; - opposed to cisalpine
Zulu - ) One of the most important members of the South African, or Bantu, family of languages, spoken partly in Natal and partly in Zululand, but understood, and more or less in use, over a wide territory, at least as far North as the Zambezi; - called also Zulu-Kaffir
Ringneck - meloda) are common North American species
Lakes - Huleh in the North, four square miles in extent, and seven feet above the Mediterranean
Rouse - ) Any of the numerous species of gallinaceous birds of the family Tetraonidae, and subfamily Tetraoninae, inhabiting Europe, Asia, and North America
ze'Dad - (mountain side ), one of the landmarks on the North border of the land of Israel, as Promised by Moses, ( Numbers 34:8 ) and as restored by Ezekiel. (Ezekiel 47:15 ) A place named Sudud exists to the east of the Northern extremity of the chain of Anti-Libanus, about fifty miles east-northeast of Baalbec
Pamphylia - To the south it is bounded by the Mediterranean, and to the North by Pisidia; having Lycia to the west, and Cilicia to the east
Gilboa - MOUNT, a ridge of mountains on the North of Bethshan, or Scythopolis forming in that part the boundary of the plain of Jordan to the west
Rouse - ) Any of the numerous species of gallinaceous birds of the family Tetraonidae, and subfamily Tetraoninae, inhabiting Europe, Asia, and North America
Rama - (Hebrew: a high place) ...
City assigned by Josue to the tribe of Benjamin (Josue 18), six miles North of Jerusalem, the modern Er Ram
Harosheth of the Gentiles - A city in the North of Canaan, the residence of Sisera, Judges 4:2 ; Judges 13:1-25 ; 16:1-31
Elamites - Natives of Elam, a Persian province named after one of the sons of Sern (Genesis 10), south of Media and North of the Persian Gulf, seat of a mighty empire of which Susa was the capital, and the scene of wars between the Assyrians and the Babylonians; it was conquered by the Assyrians 640 B
Kite - In the North of England, the belly
Derbe - It lay at the foot of the Taurus mountains on the North, sixteen or twenty miles east of Lystra
ka'Nah - " (Joshua 19:28 ) ...
The river, a stream falling into the Mediterranean, which formed the division between the territories of Ephraim and Manasseh, the former on the sought, the latter on the North
Fitches - VETCHES), without doubt the Nigella sativa , an herbaceous annual plant belonging to the natural order Ranunculaceoe (the buttercup family), which grows in the south of Europe and in the North of Africa
Quicksands, the, - more properly THE SYRTIS , (Acts 27:17 ) the broad a deep bight on the North African coast between Carthage and Cyrene
Chippewa - A large and important tribe of Algonquian stock, numbering about 30,000, divided between the United States and Canada, with habitat in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, part of North Dakota, and the Northern shores of Lakes Huron and Superior
Dunod, Saint - He was a North British chieftain, driven into Wales, where he embraced the religious life, and founded the monastery of Bangor on the Dee
Ephron - ...
...
A mountain range which formed one of the landmarks on the North boundary of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:9 ), probably the range on the west side of the Wady Beit-Hanina
Bezer - It has been identified with the modern ruined village of Burazin, some 12 miles North of Heshbon; also with Kasur-el-Besheir, 2 miles south-west of Dibon
Euroclydon - , North-east wind)
Baal-Zephon - Baal of the North, an Egyptian town on the shores of the Gulf of Suez (Exodus 14:2 ; Numbers 33:7 ), over against which the children of Israel encamped before they crossed the Red Sea
Achzib - It is identified with the modern es-Zib, on the Mediterranean, about 8 miles North of Accho
Galeed - The heap of stones marking Galeed was in Gilead, North of the Jabbok River
Louisville, Kentucky, Archdiocese of - Comprises North central Kentucky
Shu'al, the Land of, - It is pretty certain from the passage that it lay North of Michmash
Misrephoth-Maim - The most likely site is khirbet el-Mushreifeh at the North end of the plain of Acco
Zemarites - (zehm' uh ritess) Canaanites inhabiting the area North of Lebanon between Arvad and Tripolis (Genesis 10:18 ; 1 Chronicles 1:16 )
Bithynia - A large district in the North of Asia Minor, bordering on the Black Sea
Assos - Seaport in Mysia, in the west of Asia Minor, on the North shore of the Gulf of Adramyttium 20 miles from Troas
Austin, Texas, Diocese of - Comprises 19,511 square miles in the counties of Mills, Hamilton, San Saba, Lampasas, Coryell, McLennan, Limestone, Bell, Falls, Robertson, Mason, Llano, Burnet, Williamson, Milam, Brazos, Blanco, Travis, Bastrop, Lee, Burleson, Washington, Hays, and Caldwell, and the part of Fayette county North of the Colorado River
Bardstown, Kentucky, Diocese of - Comprises North central Kentucky
Timnah - City on the North border of Judah
Zoba, Zobah - District in the North of Syria lying between Hamath and Damascus
Savine - ) A coniferous shrub (Juniperus Sabina) of Western Asia, occasionally found also in the Northern parts of the United States and in British America. ) The North American red cedar (Juniperus Virginiana
i'Jon - (a ruin ), a town in the North of Palestine, belonging to the tribe of Naphtali. (2 Kings 16:29 ) It was situated a few miles Northwest of the site of Dan, in a fertile and beautiful little plain called Merj' Ayun
Ach'Zib - North of Acre
Lobelia - Lobelia inflata, or Indian tobacco, is an annual plant of North America, whose leaves contain a poisonous white viscid juice, of an acrid taste
Fallow Deer - The Hebrew word, which is mentioned only in (14:5) and 1 Kings 4:23 Probably denotes the Alcelaphus bubalis (the bubale or wild cow) of Barbary and North Africa
je'Arim - (forests ) , Mount, a place named in specifying the Northern boundary of Judah. Kesla , seven miles due west of Jerusalem, stands on a high point on the North slope of a lofty ridge, which is probably Mount Jearim
Rem'Mon-Meth'o-ar - Van Deuteronomy Velde place Rummaneh on the south border of the plain of Buttauf , three miles North-northeast of Seffurieh
Jarmuth - It has been identified with the modern Yarmuk, a village about 7 miles North-east of Beit-Jibrin
Mountain of the Amorites, - Deuteronomy 1:44 It seems to be the range which rises abruptly from the plateau of et-Tih , south of Judea, running from a little south of west to North of east, and of which the extremities are the Jebel Araif en-Nakah westward and Jebel el-Mukrah eastward, and from which line the country continues mountainous all the way to Hebron
Moravian Church - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages. Foreign missionary work is carried on in North, Central, and South America, the West Indies, South Africa, Australia, the borders of Tibet, and among the lepers in Jerusalem. There are two other bodies: Evangelical Union of Bohemian and Moravian Brethren in North America, and Independent Bohemian and Moravian Brethren Churches
Merom - Height, a lake in Northern Palestine through which the Jordan flows. "The Ard el-Huleh, the centre of which the lake occupies, is a nearly level plain of 16 miles in length from North to south, and its breadth from east to west is from 7 to 8 miles. On the west it is walled in by the steep and lofty range of the hills of Kedesh-Naphtali; on the east it is bounded by the lower and more gradually ascending slopes of Bashan; on the North it is shut in by a line of hills hummocky and irregular in shape and of no great height, and stretching across from the mountains of Naphtali to the roots of Mount Hermon, which towers up at the North-eastern angle of the plain to a height of 10,000 feet
Hormah - Probably, as in so many other cases, the old name persisted, and may be represented by the modern es-Sebaitâ , 23 miles North of ‘Ain Kadîs , and 26 miles south of Beersheba. The probability is increased if Ziklag is correctly identified with ‘Aslûj , 14 miles North of es-Sebaitâ . On the other hand, Naqb es-Safâ agrees better with the position of Arad; but it seems too far from Kadesh, being more than 40 miles to the North-east (Robinson, BRP Unitas Fratrom - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages. Foreign missionary work is carried on in North, Central, and South America, the West Indies, South Africa, Australia, the borders of Tibet, and among the lepers in Jerusalem. There are two other bodies: Evangelical Union of Bohemian and Moravian Brethren in North America, and Independent Bohemian and Moravian Brethren Churches
Unity of Brethren - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages. Foreign missionary work is carried on in North, Central, and South America, the West Indies, South Africa, Australia, the borders of Tibet, and among the lepers in Jerusalem. There are two other bodies: Evangelical Union of Bohemian and Moravian Brethren in North America, and Independent Bohemian and Moravian Brethren Churches
Mohawks - A North American Indian tribe, the most easterly of the Iroquois confederation, represented in the federal council by nine chiefs, three from each clan. Their villages were in the Mohawk valley, their territory extending North towards the Saint Lawrence River; east to the Schoharie creek; south to the eastern branch of the Susquehanna River Champlain met them at Tadousae; the Dutch in 1626 were defeated by them; Father Jogues and his companion, John Lalande, suffered martyrdom at their hands, 1646, another companion, Rene Goupil, having already been put to death, 1642
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, Diocese of - Christianity was preached in North Borneo in 1687 by Father Ventimiglia, a Theatine. On September 4, 1855 the Northern part of the island was erected as the independent Prefecture Apostolic of Labuan e Borneo under Reverend Charles Cuarteron, a Spaniard. In 1881 the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples put the mission of North Borneo and Labuan under the jurisdiction of the Society for Foreign Missions of Mill Hill, England. Divided and changed to the Prefecture Apostolic of Northern Borneo on February 5, 1927
Beth-Shemesh -
A sacerdotal city in the tribe of Dan (Joshua 21:16 ; 1 Samuel 6:15 ), on the North border of Judah (Joshua 15:10 ). It is the modern ruined Arabic village 'Ain-shems, on the North-west slopes of the mountains of Judah, 14 miles west of Jerusalem
Gomer - He is generally regarded as the ancestor of the Celtae and the Cimmerii, who in early times settled to the North of the Black Sea, and gave their name to the Crimea, the ancient Chersonesus Taurica. They subsequently reappear in the times of the Romans as the Cimbri of the North and west of Europe, whence they crossed to the British Isles, where their descendants are still found in the Gaels and Cymry
Gilead - It was bounded on the North by Bashan, and on the south by Moab and Ammon (Genesis 31:21 ; Deuteronomy 3:12-17 ). The deep ravine of the river Hieromax (the modern Sheriat el-Mandhur) separated Bashan from Gilead, which was about 60 miles in length and 20 in breadth, extending from near the south end of the Lake of Gennesaret to the North end of the Dead Sea
Gog And Magog - ...
Ezekiel's prophecy is apparently built on Jeremiah's sermons against a foe from the North (Jeremiah 4-6 ). His name became a symbol for the powerful, feared king of the North
Ut - (Job 1:1 ) As far as we can gather, "the land of Uz" lay either east or southeast of Palestine, (Job 1:3 ) adjacent to the Sabaeans and the Chaldaeans, (Job 1:15,17 ) consequently North of the southern Arabians and west of the Euphrates; and, lastly, adjacent to the Edomites of Mount Seir, who at one period occupied Uz, probably as conquerors, (Lamentations 4:21 ) and whose troglodyte habits are described in (Job 30:6,7 ) From the above data we infer that the land of Uz corresponds to the Arabia Deserta of classical geography, at all events to so much of it as lies North of the 30th parallel of latitude
Lebo-Hamath - It could be Lebwe North of Baalbek or Labau east of the Jordan. If a definite city is not meant, Lebo-hamath would represent the territory bordering the Northwestern part of the Orontes River. Lebwe is close to the Litani River about 43 miles North of Damascus. Whatever its precise location, Lebo-hamath represented the Northern boundary of Canaan promised to Israel (Numbers 13:21 ; compare Ezekiel 48:1 ), not conquered by Joshua (Joshua 13:5 ; Judges 3:3 ), controlled by David (1 Chronicles 13:5 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 8:65 ), and restored to Israel by Jeroboam II about 793-753 B
Galilee, Sea of - The Jordan enters it on the North, and leaves it on the south. Chorazin was on its North; Capernaum on its N
me'Rom - (high place ) , The waters of, a lake formed by the river Jordan, about ten miles North of the Sea of Galilee. Here Joshua completely routed the confederacy of the Northern chiefs under Jabin. In form the lake is not far from a triangle, base being at the North and the apex at the south. (The Northern part is a dense swamp of papyrus reeds, as large as the lake itself
Ashkenaz - one of the sons of Gomer, and grandson of Japheth, who gave his name to the country first peopled by him in the North and North- western part of Asia Minor, answering to Bithynia; where were traces long after of his name, particularly in that of Ascanius, applied to a bay and city, as well as to some islands lying along the coast
Haran - Haran was situated in the North-western part of Mesopotamia on a river of the same name running into the Euphrates. It is situated in 36 52' North latitude, and 39 5' east longitude; in a flat and sandy plain
Anti-Libanus - The Greeks give this name to that chain of mountains east of Libanus, which, properly speaking, forms, together with Libanus, but one ridge of mountains, extending from North to south, and afterward from south to North, in the shape almost of a horse shoe, for the space of about fourscore leagues
mo'Reh - (Judges 7:1 ) It lay in the valley of Jezreel, rather on the North side of the valley, and North also of the eminence on which Gideon's little band of heroes was clustered. These conditions are most accurately fulfilled if we assume Jebel ed-Duhy , the "Little Hermon" of the modern travellers, 1815 feet above the Mediterranean, to be Moreh, the Ain-Jalood to be the spring of Harod, and Gideon's position to have been on the Northeast slope of Jebel Fukua (Mount Gilboa), between the village of Nuris and the last-mentioned spring
Naphtali, Tribe of - Along with Dan and Asher they formed "the camp of Dan," under a common standard (2:25-31), occupying a place during the march on the North side of the tabernacle. It lay in the North-eastern corner of the land, bounded on the east by the Jordan and the lakes of Merom and Galilee, and on the North it extended far into Coele-Syria, the valley between the two Lebanon ranges. The region around Kedesh, one of its towns, was originally called Galil, a name afterwards given to the whole Northern division of Canaan. In the reign of Pekah, king of Israel, the Assyrians under Tiglath-pileser swept over the whole North of Israel, and carried the people into captivity (2 Kings 15:29 )
Arabah - It refers to the plain situated between two series of hills that run from the slopes of Hermon in the North to the Gulf of Akaba in the far south. ' About 7 miles south of the Dead Sea the plain is crossed by some hills: all North of this is now called el-Ghor, but the plain south of it retains the name of the Wady-el-Arabah. This latter part is about 100 miles in length, and the Northern part about 150, so that for nearly 250 miles this wonderful plain or valley extends. ...
There can be no doubt that scripture uses the name 'Arabah' for the whole of the plain, both North and south. The Northern part is referred to in Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Deuteronomy 4:49 ; Joshua 3:16 ; Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 18:18 : and the southern part in Deuteronomy 1:1 ; Deuteronomy 2:8 . It extends nearly due North and south, but bears toward the west before it reaches the Gulf
Pisidia - Paul twice visited Pisidia, passing directly North from Perga to Antioch, Acts 13:14, and again returning through Pisidia to Pamphylia
Des Moines, Iowa, Diocese of - Comprises that part of the State of Iowa bounded east by the eastern boundaries of the counties of Polk, Warren, Lucas, and Wayne, south by the State of Missouri, west by the Missouri River, and North by the Northern boundaries of the counties of Harrison, Shelby, Audubon, Guthrie, Dallas, and Polk; area, 12,446 square miles; erected, 1911; suffragan of Dubuque
Abilene - The name of a district of country on the eastern declivity of Anti-Lebanon, from twelve to twenty miles North-west of Damascus, towards Heliopolis, or Baalbek; so called from the city of ABILA, and also called Abilene of Lysanias, to distinguish it from others
Achan - He was discovered by lot, and stoned with all his family in the valley of Achor, North of Jericho, Joshua 6:18 ; 7:1-26
Helbon - It has been usually identified with the modern Aleppo, called Haleb by the native Arabs, but is more probably to be found in one of the villages in the Wady Helbon, which is celebrated for its grapes, on the east slope of Anti-Lebanon, North of the river Barada (Abana)
Bezek - Probably the modern Ibzik, 13 miles North-east of Shechem
Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Count de Rochamb - During the French Revolution he commanded the army of the North, but when the Jacobins became supreme, he was forced to leave France
Mount of the Congregation - It was situated in the far North, and in Babylonian inscriptions is described as a mountain called Im-Kharasak, "the mighty mountain of Bel, whose head reaches heaven, whose root is the holy deep
Dedan - They probably settled among the sons of Cush, on the North-west coast of the Persian Gulf
Shoa - Opulent, the mountain district lying to the North-east of Babylonia, anciently the land of the Guti, or Kuti, the modern Kurdistan
Gederah - This place has by some been identified with Jedireh, a ruin 9 miles from Lydda, toward Eleutheropolis, and 4 miles North of Sur'ah (Zorah), in the valley of Elah
Trachonitis - The region of Trachonitis lay to the North-east of Palestine, between Lake Galilee and Damascus. It was on the Northern edge of the territory known in Old Testament times as Bashan (Numbers 32:33; Deuteronomy 32:14; see BASHAN)
Chamberlain - ) A treasurer or receiver of public money; as, the chamberlain of London, of North Wales, etc
Moreh - It lay in the valley of Jezreel, on the North side
Ijon - A town in the North part of the mountains of Naphtali, noticed in 1 Kings 15:20 (= 2 Chronicles 16:4 ) as taken by Benhadad
Nahalal - A possible site is ‘Ain Mahil , North of Nazareth, on the hill which formed the limit of Zebulun to the east
Beth-Arbel - 1), the other ( Irbid ) in the extreme North of Gilead, both noticed in the 4th cent
Hammerhead - The Sphyrna zygaena is found in the North Atlantic
Agnes of Assisi, Saint - From there she established several monasteries in the North of Italy
Arubboth - This would be territory belonging to the clan of Hepher of the tribe of Mannasseh in the Northern part of the Plain of Sharon, southwest of Megiddo and southeast of Dor. Arubboth is modern Arabbah nine miles North of Samaria
Scythian - As a race, the Scythians were located North of the Caspian and Black Seas
Arkite - ARKITE is used ( Genesis 10:17 , 1 Chronicles 1:15 ) for the people of Arka, a town and district of Phœnicia about 12 miles North of Tripolis
Osier - ) A kind of willow (Salix viminalis) growing in wet places in Europe and Asia, and introduced into North America
Orientate - ) To move or turn toward the east; to veer from the North or south toward the east
Gog - It was also a general name of a country North of the Caucacus or Mount Taurus, or for the people of that district
Lyd'ia - (land of Lydus ), a maritime province in the west of Asia Minor bounded by Mysia on the North, Phrygia on the east, and Caria on the south
a'Vim -
A people among the early inhabitants of Palestine, whom we meet with in the southwest corner of the seacoast, whither they may have made their way North-ward from the desert, (2:23) probably the same as the Hivites
Muskrat - ) A North American aquatic fur-bearing rodent (Fiber zibethicus)
Rochambeau, Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Coun - During the French Revolution he commanded the army of the North, but when the Jacobins became supreme, he was forced to leave France
Scythians - Wandering tribes in the immense regions North and Northeast of the Black and Caspian Seas
go'Lan - It lay east of Galilee and North of Gadaritis [1], and corresponds to the modern province of Jaulan
Lyd'ia - (land of Lydus ), a maritime province in the west of Asia Minor bounded by Mysia on the North, Phrygia on the east, and Caria on the south
do'Than - (2 Kings 6:13 ) It was known to Eusebius, who places it 12 miles to the North of Sebaste (Samaria); and here it has been discovered in our own times, still bearing its ancient name unimpaired
Jordan - The Jordan River, which formed the boundary along the eastern side of the land of Canaan, rose in the region of Mt Hermon in the North and finished in the Dead Sea in the south
Dallas, Texas, Diocese of - Comprises Northeast Texas North of Shelby, Nacogdoches, Cherokee, Anderson, Freestone, Limestone, McLennan, Coryell, and Lampasas counties and the Colorado River, and east of Coke, Nolan, Fisher, Stonewall, King, Cottle, and Childress counties; area, 52,850 square miles; established, 1890; suffragan of New Orleans
Abelbethmaachah - Meadow of the house of Maachah; a town in the tribe of Naphtali, North of lake Merom
Bethzur - House of rock, a town in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:58 ), about 4 miles to the North of Hebron
Baalah - ...
...
A city on the Northern border of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:10 ), called also Kirjath-jearim, q. ...
...
A mountain on the North-western boundary of Judah and Dan (Joshua 15:11 )
Ahava - In all probability this was one of the streams of Mesopotamia which flowed into the Euphrates somewhere in the North-west of Babylonia
Nullius, Abbey - The abbies of Saint Peter, Muenster, Saskatchewan, the Belmont Abbey, North Carolina, New Norcia, Australia, and Lindi, Senegal were abbies nullius, but their jurisdiction has been suppessed and made part of a diocese
Northampton, England, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Bedford, Buckingham, and Northampton, and that part of Berkshire (formerly in Buckinghamshire) that lies to the North of the River Thames. Elevated to the diocese of Northampton on September 29, 1850. Org
diocese of Northampton
Mamre - Its location was at Ramet et-Chalil, two miles North of Hebron
Abbey Nullius - The abbies of Saint Peter, Muenster, Saskatchewan, the Belmont Abbey, North Carolina, New Norcia, Australia, and Lindi, Senegal were abbies nullius, but their jurisdiction has been suppessed and made part of a diocese
Arbroath - The monks constructed a harbor and placed the bell on Inchcape Rock, a dangerous reef in the North Sea 12 miles southeast of the abbey, the subject of Southey's ballad
Abana - It rises in a cleft of the Anti-Lebanon range, about 23 miles North-west of Damascus, and after flowing southward for a little way parts into three smaller streams, the central one flowing through Damascus, and the other two on each side of the city, diffusing beauty and fertility where otherwise there would be barrenness
Uerrilla - ) An irregular mode of carrying on war, by the constant attacks of independent bands, adopted in the North of Spain during the Peninsular war
Pointer - ) The two stars (Merak and Dubhe) in the Great Bear, the line between which points nearly in the direction of the North star
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Archdiocese of - Comprises the part of Central Alberta bounded North by the 55th degree of latitude, south by the line dividing the 30th and 31townships, east by the Province of Saskatchewan, and west by the summits of the Rocky Mountains; established as Saint Albert, September 22, 1871; transferred to Edmonton and raised to archdiocese, November 30, 1912; suffragans: Diocese of Calgary and Vicariates of Grouard and Mackenzie
Lycaonia - It was separated from Phrygia, and bounded North by Galatia, east by Cappadocia, south by Cilicia, and west by Pisidia and Phrygia
Kir - The country whence the Syrians emigrated when they came to settle in the region North of Palestine, and to which Tiglath-pileser sent the captive Syrians after the conquest of Damascus
Shunem - It answers to the modern Sulem, on the southwestern slope of Little Hermon, about 53 miles North of Jerusalem
Jabin - A powerful king in the time of Joshua, at Hazor in the North of Canaan
Dibon - It lay in a plain just North of the Arnon, and was the first encampment of the Israelites upon crossing that river
Cana - It was called Cana of Galilee, now Kana-el-Jelil, and lay seven miles North of Nazareth
ar'Non - (roaring ), the river or torrent which formed the boundary between Moab and the Amorites, on the North of Moab, ( Numbers 21:13,14,24,26 ; Judges 11:22 ) and afterwards between Moab and Israel (Reuben)
Michmash - It lay on the line of march of an invading army from the North, on the North side of the steep and precipitous Wady es-Suweinit ("valley of the little thorn-tree" or "the acacia"), and now bears the name of Mukhmas
Jahaz - It has been variously located at Libb, six miles North of Dibon; Aleiyan; khirbet el-Medeiyineh; and khirbet Iskander, four miles North of Dibon, being the most popular suggestions
Megiddo - The town of Megiddo in Northern Canaan fell to Israel at the time of Joshua’s conquest, though the local inhabitants were not totally destroyed. ...
In the days of Solomon, Megiddo was an important administrative centre in the North. Being situated at the western end of the Plain of Esdraelon, at the point where the main North-south and east-west highways crossed, it was involved in a number of important battles (Judges 5:19; 2 Kings 9:27; 2 Kings 23:29)
de'Bir - (Joshua 21:15 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 ) Debir has not been discovered with certainty in modern times; but about three miles to the west of Hebron is a deep and secluded valley called the Wady Nunkur , enclosed on the North by hills, of which one bears a name certainly suggestive of Debir-- Dewir-ban. ...
A place on the North boundary of Judah, near the "valley of Achor. " (Joshua 15:7 ) A Wady Dabor is marked in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map as close to the south of Neby Musa , at the Northwest corner of the Dead Sea
Zebulun - His tribe was respectable for numbers, Numbers 1:30 26:26 ; and its portion in the Holy Land accorded with the prediction of Jacob, Genesis 49:13 , extending from the Mediterranean sea at Carmel to the sea of Gemnesaret, between Issachar on the south, and Naphtali and Asher on the North and North-west, Joshua 19:10
de'Bir - (Joshua 21:15 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 ) Debir has not been discovered with certainty in modern times; but about three miles to the west of Hebron is a deep and secluded valley called the Wady Nunkur , enclosed on the North by hills, of which one bears a name certainly suggestive of Debir-- Dewir-ban. ...
A place on the North boundary of Judah, near the "valley of Achor. " (Joshua 15:7 ) A Wady Dabor is marked in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map as close to the south of Neby Musa , at the Northwest corner of the Dead Sea
Zion, Sion, Mount Zion - Which part of Jerusalem was thus designated is now a disputed point: some few contend for the North-west; but most believe it to have been on the south-west, and to have extended farther south than the present wall of the city. In Psalm 48:2 , occur the words "the joy of the whole earth is mount Zion, on the sides of the North, the city of the great King. " This has been thought to mean that mount Zion was in the North of the city; but may it not signify that on the North side of Zion is the city of the great King, that is, Jerusalem? The psalm is clearly millennial
Peniel - Peniel lay somewhere on the Jabbok, now Zerka, a few miles North of the glen where the Jabbok falls into the Jordan
Magdala - 5 miles North of Tiberias, birthplace or home of Mary Magdalen (Luke 8); probably the Magdalel of the tribe of Nephtali (Joshua 19)
te'Lem - The name Dhullam is found in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map, attached to a district immediately to the North of the Kubbet el-Baul , south of el Milh and Ar'arah --a position very suitable
Luz - " It is identified with Luweiziyeh, 4 miles North-west of Banias
Charles Bell - Born November 1774 in Doun, Monteath, Edinburgh, Scotland; died April 28, 1842, in North Hallow, Worcestershire
Cantor - His place on the right of the choir has caused the North section of a church to be called the cantoris
Cantoris - His place on the right of the choir has caused the North section of a church to be called the cantoris
Irnahash - ” Modern deir Nahhas about five and one half miles North of Lydda or khirbet Nahash on the Northern end of the Arabah
Dibon - It has been identified with the modern Diban, about 3 miles North of the Arnon and 12 miles east of the Dead Sea
Scythian - The Scythians consisted of "all the pastoral tribes who dwelt to the North of the Black Sea and the Caspian, and were scattered far away toward the east
Girzite - Gizrite would refer to Gezer, which is too far North for the present context
Bell, Charles - Born November 1774 in Doun, Monteath, Edinburgh, Scotland; died April 28, 1842, in North Hallow, Worcestershire
Shu'Nem - This agrees with the position of the present Solam , a village three miles North of Jezreel and five from Gilboa
Lemuel - Exactly where his kingdom of Massa was is not known, although certain linguistic features in the text have led scholars to place it in North Arabia, possibly near Edom
Sepharad - The location is disputed: possibly a country south of Lake Urmia and North and west of Media, beyond the Babylonian Empire, but more likely the capital city of the Persian satrapy of Sepharad or Sardis in Lydia near the Aegean Sea
College - ]'>[2] correctly renders ‘second quarter,’ a quarter of the city lying to the North ( Zephaniah 1:10 ), and possibly referred to in Nehemiah 11:9 , where our versions have ‘second over the city
Following - ) (In the field of a telescope) In the direction from which stars are apparently moving (in consequence of the earth's rotation); as, a small star, North following or south following
Pemmican - ) Among the North American Indians, meat cut in thin slices, divested of fat, and dried in the sun
Gad - ...
Tribe of Israel dwelling east of the Jordan, between Manasses on the North and Ruben on the south
Caesarea Philippi - It is situated in the North of Palestine, near one of the sources of the Jordan
Ashdothpisgah - It lies due east of the North end of the Dead Sea, and is now called Ayun Musa
Illyricum - A Roman province of southeastern Europe, lying along the eastern coast of the Adriatic, from the boundary of Italy on the North to Epirus on the south, and contiguous to Mœsia and Macedonia on the east. the province was divided, and the Northern portion called Dalmatia: the southern portion remained one of the Senate's provinces
Acco - Place name for famous Mediterranean seaport North of Mount Carmel
Goss, Alexander - As a member of the Chetham Society he edited several archaeological treatises; he also collected materials for a history of Catholicity in the North, and edited Drioux's "Sacred History
Alexander Goss - As a member of the Chetham Society he edited several archaeological treatises; he also collected materials for a history of Catholicity in the North, and edited Drioux's "Sacred History
Morse Code - The Alphabetic code which is in use in North America is given below
Etam - Conder locates it at Beit ʾAtâb, a little North of Eshuʾa (Eshtaol), which he thinks fully meets all the requisites of the case
Lacrosse - ) A game of ball, originating among the North American Indians, now the popular field sport of Canada, and played also in England and the United States
Lodebar - A place in the tribe of Gad, not far from Mahanaim, North of the Jabbok, east of the Jordan
Salamis - The city was once the capital of Cyprus, and stood on the North side of the river Pediæus
Zobah - It was on the North of Damascus
Zin - It formed part of the great wilderness of Paran, Numbers 13:26 ; and in its North-east corner was Kadesh-barnea, memorable for the death of Miriam, the mission of the twelve spies into Canaan, the murmuring of the Israelites, the rock flowing with water, and the unholy passion of Moses, Numbers 13:21 20:1-13 27:14
Succentor - His place on the right of the choir has caused the North section of a church to be called the cantoris
Westminster, England, Archdiocese of - Comprises the greater London boroughs North of the Thames and west of Waltham Forest and Newham, plus the districts of Staines and Sunbury-on-Thames, and the county of Hertfordshire. Suffragen dioceses include ...
Brentwood
East Anglia
Northampton
Nottingham
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Emmaus - It lay about seven and a half miles, sixty furlongs, Northwest from Jerusalem, Luke 24:13 - 33 . Some manuscripts, however, read one hundred and sixty furlongs, instead of sixty; and Eusebius and Jerome locate Emmaus at the ancient Nicopolis, twenty miles west-north-west of Jerusalem, where a village called Amwas still exists
Der'be - It was in the eastern part of the great upland plain of Lycaonia, which stretched from Iconium eastward along the North side of the chain of Taurus
Kir - apparently as the country where they had dwelt before migrating to the region North of Palestine
Mount Sinai - (mownt ssi' nay i) Mountain in the south central part of a peninsula in the Northwestern end of Arabia. ...
The entire peninsula takes the shape of an inverted triangle whose base Isaiah 150 miles long and is bounded on the east by the North end of the Red Sea and on the west by the Gulf of Aqaba. The Gaza strip lies directly North. ) on the North, Northeast of Jebel Musa. Many explorers think Ras es-Safsafeh is the biblical Sinai because it has a plain, er Rahah , on its Northwest base, which is two miles long and about two thirds of a mile wide. ...
Another suggested location for Mount Sinai is far North and east of Jebel Musa, near the top of the Gulf of Aqaba. ...
Another location for Sinai is sought far North of Jebel Musa, primarily because of historical references such as the battle with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-16 )
Bethel - ...
(1) Ancient Chanaanite town formerly called Luza, situated 12 miles North of Jerusalem
Hobah - The town or region must lie somewhere North of Damascus, but its precise location is not known
Moabite Stone - Discovered in 1868 at Dhiban (Dibon) in the Land of Moab, it is about 3 feet 8 inches by 2 feet 3 inches, and 14 inches thick, bearing 34 lines of writing, in which Mesa gives the chief events of his reign; of great historical and geographical importance, and one of the oldest inscriptions in the North Semitic alphabet
Tiphsah - It is named as the North-east limit of the dominions of Solomon ( 1 Kings 4:24 )
Gebal - ...
...
A Phoenician city, not far from the sea coast, to the North of Beyrout (Ezekiel 27:9 ); called by the Greeks Byblos
Geshur - The Geshurites probably inhabited the rocky fastness of Argob, the modern Lejah, in the North-east corner of Bashan
Rabshakeh - See the speech he delivered, in the Hebrew language, in the hearing of all the people, as he stood near the wall on the North side of the city (2 Kings 18:17-37 )
Golan - Exile, a city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43 ), one of the three cities of refuge east of Jordan, about 12 miles North-east of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 20:8 )
Nob - A city in Benjamin, on the great road from the North to Jerusalem, in the immediate neighborhood of which it must have been; perhaps on the ridge of Olivet
Gezrite - Gezrite or Gizrite would refer to inhabitants of Gezer, but Gezer is too far North for the Samuel context
Petra - (peh' traw) Capital city of the Nabatean Arabs located about 60 miles North of the Gulf of Aqabah
Hyderabad, Pakistan, Archdiocese of - Erected as the Vicariate Apostolic of Hyderabad, India in 1851, bounded east by the Bay of Bengal, North by the River Godavari, west by the Bombay Presidency, and south by the Tungabhadra and Kistna rivers, as a suffragan of Madras
Pride: in Dictating to God - The petty sovereign of an insignificant tribe in North America every morning stalks out of his hovel, bids the sun good-morrow, and points out to him with his finger the course he is to take for the day
Salim - Its site is disputed: Northeast of Dead Sea near Bethabara; west bank of Northern Jordan valley eight miles south of Scythopolis; in Samaria four miles south southeast of Shechem. The second and third sites would have John leaving for the North, allowing Jesus to minister near Jerusalem
Beth-Aven - Close to Ai ( Joshua 7:2 ), by the wilderness ( Joshua 18:12 ), North-west of Michmash ( 1 Samuel 13:5 ), and on the way to Aijalon ( 1 Samuel 14:23 ), still inhabited in the 8th cent
Grand Island, Nebraska, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Arthur, Banner, Blaine, Box Butte, Brown, Buffalo, Cherry, Cheyenne, Custer, Dawes, Deuel, Garfield, Grant, Greeley, Hooker, Howard, Keyapaha, Kimball, Logan, Loup, McPherson, Rock, Scott's Bluff, Sheridan, Sherman, Wheeler, Sioux, Thomas, Valley, and those portions of Dawson, Hall, Lincoln, and Keith lying North of the South Platte River; area, 40,000 square miles; erected at Kearney, March 8, 1912; transferred to Grand Island, April 11, 1917; suffragan of Dubuque
Cilicia - Province in Asia Minor on the extreme North-east of the Mediterranean, separated from the other provinces by a range of mountains
Abelians - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Abelites - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Abelonians - Sect in North Africa, which claimed that Adam's son, Abel, though married, observed continence because there is no mention of his children in Scripture
Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregation - Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America - Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Latitude - ) Distance North or south of the equator, measured on a meridian
Dothan - It was on the south side of the plain of Jezreel, 12 miles North of Samaria; now called Tel-Dothân, five miles southwest of Jenin
Persia - an ancient kingdom of Asia, bounded on the North by Media, on the west by Susiana, on the east by Carmania, and on the south by the Persian Gulf
Salmon - The common salmon (Salmo salar) of Northern Europe and Eastern North America, and the California salmon, or quinnat, are the most important species
Cherith - Some identify it with Wady Fusail, a little farther North, and yet others think it was some stream on the other, or eastern, side of the Jordan
Stone, Moabite - Discovered in 1868 at Dhiban (Dibon) in the Land of Moab, it is about 3 feet 8 inches by 2 feet 3 inches, and 14 inches thick, bearing 34 lines of writing, in which Mesa gives the chief events of his reign; of great historical and geographical importance, and one of the oldest inscriptions in the North Semitic alphabet
German Evangelical Ministers' Conference - Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
German Evangelical Protestant Ministers' Associati - Formerly Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Ross, Scotland, Diocese of - It comprised territory on the Northeastern coast of Scotland, bounded on the North by the bishopric of Caithness, south by Argyll, and west by Moray and Moray Firth
Lycaonia - A small province of Asia Minor, bounded North by Galatia, east by Cappadocia, south by Isauria and Cilicia, and west by Phrygia
Orontes River - The Orontes, modern Asi (Turkish), Nahr el Assi (Arabic), rises near Heliopolis (Bealbek) in the Beka's valley of Lebanon, and flows North some 250 miles through Syria and Turkey before turning southwest through the great city of Antioch to reach the coast just south of ancient Seleucia, the seaport of Antioch
Mahanaim - It lay North of the Jabbok and near Penuel, and afterwards became a Levitical city in the tribe of Gad, Joshua 21:38
Cilic'ia - ( the land of Celix ), a maritime province int he southeast of Asia Minor, bordering on Pamphylia in the west, Lycaonia and Cappadocia in the North, and Syria in the east
Beth-She'Mesh -
One of the towns which marked the North boundary of Judah
za-Ana'im - Kedesh-naphtali, the name of which still lingers on the high ground North of Safed and two or three miles west of the lake of el-Huleh (waters of Merom)
Ash'Kelon, as'Kelon - Apocrypha As'calon ( migration ), one of the five cities of the Philistines, ( Joshua 113:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:17 ) a seaport on the Mediterranean, 10 miles North of Gaza
Jabneel -
A town in the North boundary of Judah (Joshua 15:11 ), called afterwards by the Greeks Jamnia, the modern Yebna, 11 miles south of Jaffa
Phoenicia - ” The narrow land between the Mediterranean Sea and the Lebanon Mountains between Tyre in the south and Arvad in the North. Invading armies from North (Hittites), east (Amorites and Assyrians), and south (Egyptians) dominated history until 1000 B. The most notable colony was Carthage on the North African coast
Races - North Semites : ( a ) Babylonians (Shinar, Accad, Bahel, Erech); ( b ) Assyrians (Asshur, Nineveh, Calah); ( c ) Aramæans (Syrians); ( d ) Canaanitish peoples (1) Ammonites, (2) Amorites, (3) Canaanites, (4) Edomites, (5) Hivites, (6) Israelites, (7) Jebusites, (8) Moabites, (9) Phœnicians (Tyre, Sidon, Arvad, etc. South Semites : ( a ) North Arabs (1) Amalekites, (2) Ishmaelites (Kedar, Nebaioth, Tema, etc
Nob - It has been identified by some with el-Isawiyeh, one mile and a half to the North-east of Jerusalem. This identification does not meet these conditions, and hence others (as Dean Stanley) think that it was the Northern summit of Mount Olivet, the place where David "worshipped God" when fleeing from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 15:32 ), or more probably (Conder) that it was the same as Mizpeh (q. ), Judges 20:1 ; Joshua 18:26 ; 1 Samuel 7:16 , at Nebi Samwil, about 5 miles North-west of Jerusalem
Rebekah - She decided to send him North to her brother in Paddan-aram. Again she deceived Isaac, this time by persuading him that the reason Jacob should go North was to find a wife among her people (Genesis 27:41-46; Genesis 28:1-5)
Northern Baptist Convention - A body delegated from the Baptist churches of the North and West and organized at Washington, DC, 1907. The Northern churches are not as strongly Calvinistic as the Southern, however they interchange membership and ministry on terms of equality. The dividing line between the white and black churches in the Northern Convention was not as stringent as in the Southern. In 1936 the General Association of Regular Baptist Churches, North split off from the Convention
Ziklag - (zihk' lag) A village in the southern Judean plain; variously identified either as tell el-Khuweilifeh, 10 miles North Northeast of Beersheba, tell esh-Shariah, 9 miles North Northwest of Beersheba, or khirbet el-Mashash
Caesara Philippi - A city on the Northeast of the marshy plain of el-Huleh, 120 miles North of Jerusalem, and 20 miles North of the Sea of Galilee, at the "upper source" of the Jordan, and near the base of Mount Hermon. It is mentioned in Matthew 16:13 and Mark 8:27 as the Northern limit of our Lord's public ministry
Kedron - This brook is stated by Pococke to have its rise a little way farther to the North, but its source does not appear to have been ascertained. Stephen; and they say, that when there is water, unless the torrent swells much, which very rarely occurs, it all runs under ground to the North of this bridge
Gibeah - Robinson found traces of Gebeah in the small and ruinous village of Jeba, near Ramah, separated from Michmash on the North by a deep valley, and about six miles North by east from Jerusalem
Lebanon - White, a long chain of mountains on the North of Palestine, so named from the whitish limestone of which they are composed and in part perhaps from their snowy whiteness in winter. It consists of two main ridges running Northeast and southwest, nearly parallel with each other and with the coast of the Mediterranean. It opens towards the North, but is exceedingly narrow towards the south, where the river Litany, anciently Orontes, issues form the valley and flows west to the sea, North of Tyre. " ...
The Hebrew writers often allude to this sublime mountain range, Isaiah 10:34 35:2 , rising like a vast barrier on their North, Isaiah 37:24
Memorial Day - In the Southern States, the Confederate Memorial Day is: May 30 in Virginia; April 26 in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10 in North Carolina and South Carolina; the second Friday in May in Tennessee; June 3 in Louisiana
Shaveh - It has also been located North, east, and west of Jerusalem
Antonia - A square fortress on the east side of Jerusalem, North of the temple area, with which it had a covered communication
Islamabad-Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Diocese of - It comprises the Rawalpindi Division, the Sargodha Division, the whole North West Frontier Province, the FATA (Federal Administrated Tribal Areas), the Azad Kashmir and the Northern Areas, Gujrat District of Gujranwala Division
Durban, South Africa, Archdiocese of - Comprises the civildistricts of Camperdown, North of the Umlaas River, (except the farms of Mariannhill, Klaarwater, Dassenhoek, Welbedag and portion of Stockville), Durban, Estcourt, Inanda, Kranskop, Lions River, Lower Tugela, Maphumulo, Umvoti, Weenen, Bergville and part of Msinga
Sabta, Sabtah - The relationship with Cush is to be accounted for on the ground that the Cushites were held to have extended across the Red Sea from Nubia North-eastward over the great peninsula
America, Central - Which physically speaking should comprise all the land between the low-lying isthmuses of Tehuantepec and Panama, is conventionally restricted to the modern political divisions of Guatemala, British Honduras, Honduras, Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Canal Zone (United States); Mexico, in spite of its including Yucatan and much country east of the isthmus of Tehuantepec, is considered to be all in North America
Shihor-Libnath - , the "crocodile brook," or "blue river", which rises in the Carmel range and enters the Mediterranean a little to the North of Caesarea (Joshua 19:26 )
Horeb - It is a huge mountain block, about 2 miles long by about 1 in breadth, with a very spacious plain at its North-east end, called the Er Rahah, in which the Israelites encamped for nearly a whole year
Central America - Which physically speaking should comprise all the land between the low-lying isthmuses of Tehuantepec and Panama, is conventionally restricted to the modern political divisions of Guatemala, British Honduras, Honduras, Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Canal Zone (United States); Mexico, in spite of its including Yucatan and much country east of the isthmus of Tehuantepec, is considered to be all in North America
Winnow - The North wind was too strong, and the east wind came in gusts
Sychar - The site has been identified variously with Shechem and a village just North of there called Askar
Beth-Togarmah - It was North of Carchemish on an Assyrian trade route
Nahalal - Tell-en-Nahl North of the Kishon River at the southern end of the plain of Acco is possible as are modern Nahalal about six miles west of Nazareth and tell el-Beida
Carmonians - A people occupying an extensive district North of the entrance to the Persian Gulf, between Persis on the west and Gedrosia on the east
Lotus - The lotus which serves as the habitat for behemoth (Job 40:21-22 ) is a thorny shrub (Zizyphus lotus ) which flourishes in hot, damp areas of North Africa and Syria
Cana of Galilee - It is identified by most with Kefr Kenna, 32 45' N, 35 20' E , but others prefer Kana el Jelil, about 8 miles North of Nazareth, the name of which more resembles Cana
Antonio Espejo - He reached a point some 50 miles North of Prescott, visiting Indian pueblos and noting rich silver deposits
Zebedee - Based at Capernaum on the North shore of the sea, Zebedee ran a considerable fishing business which included several hired servants, Simon Peter, and Andrew (Luke 5:10 )
Espejo, Antonio - He reached a point some 50 miles North of Prescott, visiting Indian pueblos and noting rich silver deposits
Eshowe, South Africa, Diocese of - Established as the Prefecture Apostolic of Zululand, August 27, 1921, formerly part of the Vicariate Apostolic of Natal; bounded east by Indian Ocean, south by Tugela River, west by districts of Utrecht and Swaziland, North by Transvaal and East Africa
Achzib - It is situated about ten miles North of Accho, or Ptolemais
Maacah - or BETH-MAACHA, a little province of Syria to the east and the North of the sources of the river Jordan, upon the road to Damascus
Issachar - The tribe of Issachar had its portion in one of the best parts of the land of Canaan, along the great plain or valley of Jezreel, with the half tribe of Manasseh to the south, that of Zebulun to the North, the Mediterranean to the west, and Jordan, with the extremity of the sea of Tiberias, to the east
Seir - Mount Seir, Genesis 14:6, or land of Seir, Genesis 32:3; Genesis 36:30, the mountainous region lying North of the eastern gulf of the Red Sea. Mount Seir, Joshua 15:10, was a landmark on the Northern boundary of Judah, between Kirjath-jearim and Bethshemesh
Chorazin - It has been identified with modern khirbet Kerazeh, ruins located about two miles North of the site of Capernaum
Geba - A Levitical town of Benjamin, Joshua 18:24 21:17 1 Chronicles 8:6 , near Ramah, Nehemiah 7:30 Isaiah 10:29 , and not far from the Northern border of the kingdom of Judah, 2 Kings 23:8 Zechariah 14:10 . It was six or seven miles from Jerusalem, and was separated from Michmash on the North by a deep valley
Way, Sudan, Diocese of - Comprises the territory bounded North by 10 degrees latitude, East by the Anglo-Ethiopian frontier, West by the Anglo-Belgian frontier, South by the White Nile and Lake Albert; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Bahr-el-Gazal, Sudanese Africa, Vicariate Apostoli - Comprises the territory bounded North by 10 degrees latitude, East by the Anglo-Ethiopian frontier, West by the Anglo-Belgian frontier, South by the White Nile and Lake Albert; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Pharathon - This seems to be too far to the North, as the towns mentioned are all ‘in Jud¿a
Utmost - Extreme being at the furthest point or extremity as the utmost limit of North America the utmost limits of the land the utmost extent of human knowledge
Fuller's Field, the, - But Rabshakeh and his "great host" must have come from the North; and the fuller's field was therefore, to judge from this circumstance, on the table-land on the Northern side of the city
Chinook - ) One of a tribe of North American Indians now living in the state of Washington, noted for the custom of flattening their skulls. ) A jargon of words from various languages (the largest proportion of which is from that of the Chinooks) generally understood by all the Indian tribes of the Northwestern territories of the United States
Hierapolis - The city was twelve miles Northwest of Colossae and six miles North of Laodicea on the Lycus River a short way above its junction with the Meander River
Christian Reformed Church in North America - The Protestant Reformed Church split off in 1924, and during the 1990's, another group split off as the United Reformed Churches in North America
Keetmanshoop, Namibia, Diocese of - Bounded North by the Northern limits of the civildistricts of Luderizbucht, Gibeon, and Rehoboth, west by the Atlantic Ocean, south by the Orange River, and east by the political boundary of Southwest Africa
Levi Ives - As Protestant Episcopal Bishop of North Carolina, influenced by the Oxford Movement, he founded a religious community called the Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost, later dissolved by the convention of his church, which also cited Bishop Ives for teaching Catholic doctrines
Ives, Levi Silliman - As Protestant Episcopal Bishop of North Carolina, influenced by the Oxford Movement, he founded a religious community called the Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost, later dissolved by the convention of his church, which also cited Bishop Ives for teaching Catholic doctrines
Danzig - Free city North of Poland and west of Prussia on the Gulf of Danzig; area, 754 square miles
Moors - General term for tribes in North Africa descended from Arabs and Berbers
Judea - It lay between Bethoron on the North, Emmaus on the west, Bethsur on the south, and the Jordan on the east
Thebez - Brightness, a place some 11 miles North-east of Shechem, on the road to Scythopolis, the modern Tabas
Kedar - It is the name for the nomadic tribes of Arabs, the Bedouins generally (Isaiah 21:16 ; 42:11 ; 60:7 ; Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:21 ), who dwelt in the North-west of Arabia
Smyrna - Myrrh, an ancient city of Ionia, on the western coast of Asia Minor, about 40 miles to the North of Ephesus
Rehob - ...
...
The same, probably, as Beth-rehob (2 Samuel 10:6,8 ; Judges 18:28 ), a place in the North of Palestine (Numbers 13:21 )
Tarsus - It stood on the banks of the river Cydnus, about 12 miles North of the Mediterranean
Armadillo - There are several species, one of which (the peba) is found as far North as Texas
tu'Bal - (Ezekiel 27:13 ) Tubal and Javan, (Isaiah 68:19 ) Meshech and Tubal, (Ezekiel 32:26 ; 38:2,3 ; 39:1 ) are nations of the North
Service of God: to be Constant - How does he grind his grist? Does he bargain that he will only grind in the west wind, because its gales are so full of health? No, but the east wind, which searches joints and marrow, makes the millstones revolve, and together with the North and the south it is yoked to his service
Aryan - ) One of a primitive people supposed to have lived in prehistoric times, in Central Asia, east of the Caspian Sea, and North of the Hindoo Koosh and Paropamisan Mountains, and to have been the stock from which sprang the Hindoo, Persian, Greek, Latin, Celtic, Teutonic, Slavonic, and other races; one of that ethnological division of mankind called also Indo-European or Indo-Germanic
Bezek - Bezek was located at khirbet Ibziq, twelve miles Northeast of Shechem and thirteen miles from Jabesh-Gilead, six miles North of Tirzah, though the Judges' site may be a distinctive city
Shunem - It is three miles east of Affuleh and three and a half miles North of Jezreel
Zemaraim - Town allotted to the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:22 ), likely Ras ex-Zeimara about five miles Northeast of Bethel. Some would place the town at khirbet es-Samra four miles North of Jericho
Fox - a larger animal of lighter colour, occurs farther North
Gomer - Their original home appears to have been North of the Euxine, but by the 7th cent
Aroer - Moabite city on the North bank of the Arnon
Hittite - Especially in the North they developed a considerable civilization, of which numerous monuments and inscriptions are extant
Troas - Seaport town and district in Mysia, in the North-west of Asia Minor: it was visited by Paul on his journeys to and from Macedonia
Sagitta - ) A small constellation North of Aquila; the Arrow
Ash'er, - ) The general position of his tribe was on the seashore from Carmel Northward with Manasseh on the south, Zebulun and Issachar on the southeast, and Naphtali on the North-east
Cilicia - Cilicia (sĭ-lĭsh'ĭ-ah), the southeasterly province of Asia Minor, having Cappadocia on the North, Syria on the east, the Mediterranean Sea on the south, and Pamphylia and Pisidia (?) on the west
Rehob - A Levitical city in Asher, Joshua 19:28 ; 21:31 , on the Northern border of the Holy Land, called also Beth-rehob, and lying in a valley south of Anti-Lebanon, not far North of Dan, Numbers 13:21 ; Judges 18:28
Southern Baptist Convention - Although doctrinally in accord with those of the North, the southern Baptist churches are more strictly Calvinistic, and the Philadelphia Confession of Faith is more firmly adhered to than in Northern churches
Reformed Church in America - It is North America's oldest Protestant church with a continuous ministry, and its oldest corporation
Scandinavian Evangelical Bodies - Three bodies have been organized: ...
Swedish Evangelical Mission Covenant
Swedish Evangelical Free Church
Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Free Church Association of North America
In doctrine the Covenant is strictly evangelical, accepting the Bible as the inspired Word of God unto men, the only infallible guide in matters of faith, doctrine, and practise, and His message regarding both this life and the life that is to come
San Xavier Del Bac - The church and mission buildings, which are the best examples of Spanish Mission style North of Mexico, were abandoned in 1827, and, until 1866, left to the care of the Papago Indians, who saved them from destruction by the Apaches
en'-Dor - Here to the North of Jebel Duhy the name still lingers
Har'Osheth - (workmanship ) "of the Gentiles" so called from the mixed races that inhabited it --a city in the North of the land of Canaan, supposed to have stood on the west coast of the lake Merom from which the Jordan issues forth in one unbroken stream
Illyricum - A country to the North-west of Macedonia, on the eastern shores of the Adriatic, now almost wholly comprehended in Dalmatia, a name formerly given to the southern part of Illyricum (2 Timothy 4:10 )
Ash'er, - ) The general position of his tribe was on the seashore from Carmel Northward with Manasseh on the south, Zebulun and Issachar on the southeast, and Naphtali on the North-east
Hermon - Mount Hermon was in the far North of Palestine, at the southern end of the Lebanon Range
Shushan - It lay in the uplands of Susiana, on the east of the Tigris, about 150 miles to the North of the head of the Persian Gulf. It is the modern Shush, on the Northwest of Shuster. These groups were arranged into a central phalanx of thirty-six columns (six rows of six each), flanked on the west, North, and east by an equal number, disposed in double rows of six each, and distant from them 64 feet 2 inches
North Dakota - The first missionary within the limits of North Dakota was the Reverend Joseph Severe Dumoulin, sent by Bishop Plessis of Quebec to minister to a colony of Canadians who had been driven south from. The tireless missionary, Father Pierre de Smet, visited the Mandans and the Gros Ventres, Indian tribes of North Dakota, in 1864
Salmone - Paul’s Alexandrian ship was beaten out of her course, which would have taken her straight to Cythera, North of Crete, and obliged to bear S. The season was autumn, during which the Etesian (north-west) winds blow in the aegean for forty days, beginning at the rise of the dog-star (Herodotus, vi
a'Phek -
A royal city of the Canaanites, the king of which was killed by Joshua, (Joshua 12:18 ) probably the same as APHEKAH in (Joshua 15:53 ) ...
A city, apparently in the extreme North of Asher, (Joshua 19:30 ) from which the Canaanites were not ejected, (Judges 1:31 ) though here it is APHIK . This is probably the same place as APHEK, (Joshua 13:4 ) on the extreme North "border of the Amorites,"; identified with the Aphaca of classical times, the modern Afka . (1 Samuel 4:1 ) This would be somewhere to the Northwest of and at no great distance from Jerusalem
Palestine - In length it is about 140 miles, in average breadth not more than 40 between the Mediterranean westward, and the deep Jordan valley to the east, while to the North it is closed in by Lebanon and Anti-libanus, and bordered on the south by the desert. It lay on the direct route between the great ancient empires of Asia and Northern Africa, and exposed to peril from both. To the North of this ridge the low plain widens and extends in one part its undulating surface quite across the country to the Jordan. And still farther to the North is Phœnicia with headlands down to the sea. Northward the country improves. There are more fertile plains winding among the lulls, more vegetation and more wood, till in the North the swelling hills are clothed with beautiful trees, and the scenery is pleasing, oftentimes romantic. In central and North Palestine, too, there are gushing fountains of water, imparting fertility to the valleys through which they pour their streams
Phut - These people probably occupied Libya, in North Africa, near the Mediterranean coast
Pisgah - It was in the territory afterward assigned to Reuben, and thus was North of the Arnon
Beuno, Saint - He studied in the monastery of Bangor, North Wales, where he was ordained priest, and became active in missionary work
Eshcol - This valley is believed to be one which closely adjoins Hebron on the North, and still furnishes the finest grapes in the country, as well as pomegranates, figs, olives etc
Joliet, Louis - Together with Marquette, he started out at Fox River, crossed Wisconsin, and sailed down the river as far as 30° 40' North latitude, and established the fact that it emptied into the Gulf of Mexico
Gedor - It is generally identified with the modern Jedûr North of Beit-sur
Saint Wilfrid's College - Roman Catholic boarding school in North Staffordshire, England
Castel Gandolfo - The Villa Santa Catarina, at Castel Gandolfo, was purchased as a summer residence for the students of the North American College at Rome
Magdala - It was on the west shore of the Lake of Tiberias, and is now probably the small obscure village called el-Mejdel, about 3 miles North-west of Tiberias
Heshbon - The ruins of this town are still seen about 20 miles east of Jordan from the North end of the Dead Sea
Ephraim, Mount - Joshua was buried at Timnath-heres among the mountains of Ephraim, on the North side of the hill of Gaash (Judges 2:9 )
Nain - It is identified with the village called Nein, standing on the North-western slope of Jebel ed-Duhy (=the "hill Moreh" = "Little hermon"), about 4 miles from Tabor and 25 southwest of Capernaum
Jabbok - It is a tributary of the Jordan, joining the larger river from the east about fifteen miles North of the Dead Sea
Buffalo - ) The bison of North America
Beth-Eden - Assyrian records refer to Bit-adini, a city-state between the Euphrates and Balik rivers, somewhat North of Syria proper
Derbe - The residents of Derbe and Lystra spoke a different language from the people to the North in Iconium
Punon - Two ancient smelting sites, khirbet en-Nahas and khirbet Nqeib Aseimer, lie to the North Northeast
Timna - A modern name for an ancient copper-mining site fourteen miles North of Elath
Louis Joliet - Together with Marquette, he started out at Fox River, crossed Wisconsin, and sailed down the river as far as 30° 40' North latitude, and established the fact that it emptied into the Gulf of Mexico
Sheep-Gate, the, - " The latter seems to have been at the angle formed by the junction of the wall of the city of David with that of the city of Jerusalem proper, having the sheep-gate on the North of it
Beth-Peor - A city belonging to Reuben ( Joshua 13:20 ), located most probably some four or five miles North of Mt
Cinnereth - ), and was probably that enclosed district North of Tiberias afterwards called "the plain of Gennesaret
Gandolfo, Castel - The Villa Santa Catarina, at Castel Gandolfo, was purchased as a summer residence for the students of the North American College at Rome
Ascending - ...
Ascending latitude is the latitude of a planet, when moving towards the North pole. ...
Ascending node is that point of a planet's orbit, wherein it passes the ecliptic to proceed Northward. It is also called the Northern node
Dedan - A North Arabian people, according to Genesis 10:7 descended from Cush, and according to Genesis 25:3 from Abraham through Keturah
Herod Agrippa i - He was an observer of the law of Moses, and added to the extent of Jerusalem by a wall on the North of the city
Arcturus - In the Northern hemisphere this constellation is seen all the year round, with its apparent ceaseless motion around the North star, which none but the mighty God can guide
Beeroth - It is identified with Bireh, 31 54' N, 35 13' E , about 7 miles North of Jerusalem
Abel-Beth-Maachah or Abel-Beth-Maacah - Abel-beth-maachah is identified with the modern Abil el-Oamh, twelve miles North of Lake Huleh near Dan
Caphtor - It may, however, have been a part of Egypt, the Caphtur in the North Delta, since the Caphtorim were of the same race as the Mizraite people (Genesis 10:14 ; 1 Chronicles 1:12 )
Castle - The "castle" into which the chief captain commanded Paul to be brought was the quarters of the Roman soldiers in the fortress of Antonia (so called by Herod after his patron Mark Antony), which was close to the North-west corner of the temple (Acts 21:34 ), which it commanded
Opher - ) One of several North American burrowing rodents of the genera Geomys and Thomomys, of the family Geomyidae; - called also pocket gopher and pouched rat
Kishon, River of, Kison - A brook that rises in the mountains of Esdraelon, and runs in a North-westerly course to the Mediterranean, close to mount Carmel
Troas - a city of Phrygia, or of Mysia, upon the Hellespont, having the old city of Troy to the North, and that of Assos to the south
Ashdod, Azoth - It lies upon the Mediterranean Sea, about nine or ten miles North of Gaza; and in the times when Christianity flourished in these parts was made an episcopal see, and continued a fair village till the days of St
Lily - ) That end of a compass needle which should point to the North; - so called as often ornamented with the figure of a lily or fleur-de-lis
Ashkelon - One of the five cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles North of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7
Zorah - It is now recognized in a secluded mountain village called Surah, on the edge of the hills North of Bethshemesh
Syene - "From Migdol," the tower, "unto Syene," denotes the whole length of Egypt from North to south, Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6
Gilboa - The valley Northeast of Gilboa is the proper Jezreel; that on the southwest side separates Gilboa from the hills of Samaria. Endor lay North from Gilboa, and Beth- shean Northeast
Pisidia - A province of Asia Minor, separated from the Mediterranean by Pamphylia, lying on Mount Taurus and the high table land North of it, and running up between Phrygia and Lycaonia as far as Antioch its capital
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - Since the third century, however, the name has been appropriated to the deep and narrow glen east of Jerusalem, running North and south between the city and the Mount of Olives, called in the Bible the brook Kidron
Invasion - The North of England and south of Scotland were for centuries subject to invasion, each from the other
Wrinkle - A keen North wind, blowing dry, wrinkled the face of deluge, as decayd
Pisid'ia - (pitchy ) was a district in Asia Minor North of Pamphylia, and reached to and was partly included in Phrygia. 2 Timothy 3:11 It is probable also that he traversed the Northern part of the district, with Silas and Timotheus, on the second missionary journey, ( Acts 18:8 ) but the word Pisidia does not occur except in reference to the former journey
East - The Hebrew term kedem properly means that which is before or in front of a person, and was applied to the east form the custom of turning in that direction when describing the points of the compass, before, behind, the right and the left representing respectively east, west, south and North
On - Light; the sun, (Genesis 41:45,50 ), the great seat of sun-worship, called also Bethshemesh (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and Aven (Ezekiel 30:17 ), stood on the east bank of the Nile, a few miles North of Memphis, and near Cairo, in the North-east
Galatia - They then occupied the Northern part of Asia Minor, bounded on the North by Pontus and Bithynia, on the east by Tavium and Pessinus in the west. Did he visit Phrygian-dominated cities or the true Galatians in the countryside? Was his letter addressed to the original territory in the North or to the Roman province with its southern additions? See Galatians
Bethesda - Tradition locates this pool in what is now a large dry reservoir, along the outside of he North wall of the temple area. Robinson, however, shows the probability that this is but a portion of the trench, which separated Mount Moriah from the adjacent hill on the North
Joppa - Hebrew Joshua 19:46 , on the coast of the Mediterranean sea, thirty miles south of Caesarea, and about thirty-five North-west of Jerusalem. Towards the west is extended the open sea; towards the south are spread the fertile plains of Philistia, reaching as far as Gaza; towards the North, as far as Carmel, the flowery meads of Sharon present themselves; and to the east, the hills of Ephraim and Judah raise their towering heads. The town is walled round on the south and east, towards the land, and partially so on the North and west, towards the sea
Moabites - At one period, however, it extended North as far as the Jabbok, and for a long time the region beyond the Jordan opposite Jericho retained the name of "the plains of Moab," Numbers 22:1 Deuteronomy 1:5 29:1 Joshua 13:32 . The Moabites had dispossessed a race of giants called Emin, Deuteronomy 2:11 , and had themselves been expelled by the Amorites from the territory North of the Arnon, Numbers 21:13,26 Judges 11:13-18 , which was again conquered by Moses, and assigned to the tribe of Reuben. They aided Nebuchadnezzar against the Jews, 2 Kings 24:2 Ezekiel 25:6-11 ; and after these began to be carried captive, appear to have regained their old possessions North of the Arnon, Isaiah 15:1-16:14
Catamaran - Modified forms are much used in the lumber regions of North America, and at life-saving stations
Pergamos - A city of Mysia, about three miles to the North of the river Caicus, and 20 miles from its present mouth
Armenia - A large country of Asia, having Media on the east, Cappadocia on the west, Colchis and Iberia on the North, Mesopotamia on the south, and the Euphrates and Syria on the southwest
Dutch East Indies - Islands in the Pacific Ocean, southeast of Asia, between 60 North and 110 south latitude and 950,1410 east longitude
Lombardic Architecture - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries
Millo -
Probably the Canaanite name of some fortification, consisting of walls filled in with earth and stones, which protected Jerusalem on the North as its outermost defence
Capharnaum - There is some doubt as to the site of Capharnaum, although it is identified with Tell-Hum on the North bank of the Lake of Tiberias
Emmaus - This has been identified with the modern el-Kubeibeh, lying over 7 miles North-west of Jerusalem
Zeboim - It was probably the ravine now bearing the name Wady Shakh-ed-Dub'a, or "ravine of the hyena," North of Jericho
Beth-Haccerem - ” City used to signal that enemies approached from the North (Jeremiah 6:1 )
Gederah - It is located at modern tell el-Judeireh North of Maraeshah and ten miles southeast of Lod
Gibbethon - Gibbethon has been variously identified as tell el-Melat North of Ekron, and with Agir, two and a half miles west of tell el-Melat
Hanes - Hanes has often been located at Heracleopolis Magna in southern Egypt just North of the Nile Delta, modern Ahnas. This would be a natural parallel to Northern Zoan or Tanis
Rehob - Father of a king of Zobah, an Aramaean city North of Damascus (2Samuel 8:3,2 Samuel 8:12 )
Tappuah - City of the North border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:8 ) whose environs were allotted to Manasseh (Joshua 17:7-8 ), likely the Tappuah of Joshua 12:17 and 2 Kings 15:16
Lombard Romanesque - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries
Moriah - The rocky outcropping in Jerusalem located just North of the ancient city of David
Machaerus - Mark's reference to Galilean nobles among Herod's guests has prompted some interpreters to suggest a site further North
Beeroth - Bireh , about 10 miles from Jerusalem on the main road to the North, is the usual identification, and there seems no special reason for objecting thereto
Allouez, Claude - There he became superior of the Three Rivers Mission, and vicar-general "of all the countries situated toward the North and west
Architecture, Lombardic - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries
Islands, Isles - Cyprus is the nearest, and that is about seventy miles from the nearest point of Syria, far North
Zaphon - (zay' pahn) Place name meaning, “north
Zoba(h) - Zobah seems to be roughly where Syria later became a nation, Northeast of Damascus. The Ammonites came from the South while the Zobaites came from the North causing David to fight on two fronts
Baptists, Regular - Found for the most part in North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and adjoining states, they are in general sympathy with the United Baptists, and Duck River and kindred associations of Baptists
Anguilla - Caribbean island between the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean, east of Puerto Rico
Metre - It was intended to be, and is very nearly, the ten millionth part of the distance from the equator to the North pole, as ascertained by actual measurement of an arc of a meridian
Cana - Tradition places it at Kefr-Kenna, about four English miles Northeast of Nazareth, and the traveller is now shown an earthen jar, which is claimed to be one of the water-jars used at the wedding. Robinson and others, with fair probability, identify Cana with Kâna-el-Jelîl, about nine miles North of Nazareth
Lentils - , the south of Europe, Asia and North Africa
Asher - The province allotted to this tribe was a maritime one, stretching along the coast from Sidon on the North to Mount Carmel on the south; including the cities Abdon, Achshaph, Accho, Achzib, Sarepta, Sidon, and Tyre. But of the Northern half of this territory, that is, from Tyre Northward, this tribe never became possessed, not having expelled the Phoenician inhabitants, who are supposed not to have been pure Canaanites, but a mixture of this people with a Cuthite colony from Egypt. Asher was the most Northerly of the tribes; and had that of Naphtali on the west, and Zebulun on the south
Ai - The city of Ai was east of Bethel, and about nine miles North of Jerusalem
Beth-Shemesh - A city on the North of Judah belonging to the priests, Joshua 15:10; Joshua 21:16; perhaps Ir-shemesh and Mount Heres, Joshua 19:41; Judges 1:35; noted as the place to which the ark was returned, 1 Samuel 6:9-20; now a heap of ruins near ʾAin Shems, about 14 miles west of Jerusalem
Regular Baptists - Found for the most part in North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and adjoining states, they are in general sympathy with the United Baptists, and Duck River and kindred associations of Baptists
Redmond, John Edward - He was the Parliamentary representative for New Ross from 1881 to 1885, for North Wexford from 1885 to 1891, and for Waterford City from 1891 until his death
Japheth - His seven sons, Genesis 10:2-5 1 Chronicles 1:5 , occupied with their posterity the North of Asia and most of Europe
Romanesque, Lombard - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries
Bethes'da - Stephen's Gate, and under the Northeast wall of the Haram area, is generally considered to be the modern representative of Bethesda. Robinson, however, suggests that the ancient Bethesda is identical with what is now called the Pool of the Virgin, an intermittent pool, south of Birket Israil and North of the pool of Siloam
Jahaz - Trodden down (called also Jahaza, Joshua 13:18 ; Jahazah, 21:36; Jahzah, 1 Chronicles 6:78 ), a town where Sihon was defeated, in the borders of Moab and in the land of the Ammonites beyond Jordan, and North of the river Arnon (Numbers 21:23 ; Deuteronomy 2:32 )
Antioch -
In Syria, on the river Orontes, about 16 miles from the Mediterranean, and some 300 miles North of Jerusalem. ...
...
In the extreme North of Pisidia; was visited by Paul and Barnabas on the first missionary journey (Acts 13:14 )
Hermon - It marks the North boundary of Palestine (Deuteronomy 3:8,4:48 ;; Joshua 11:3,17 ; 13:11 ; 12:1 ), and is seen from a great distance. It is about 40 miles North of the Sea of Galilee. "In whatever part of Palestine the Israelite turned his eye Northward, Hermon was there, terminating the view. From the plain along the coast, from the Jordan valley, from the heights of Moab and Gilead, from the plateau of Bashan, the pale, blue, snow-capped cone forms the one feature in the Northern horizon
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia reached, on the North, to the plains beneath the Masius range of hills. It thus formed a deep triangle with the apex to the south and the base along the foot of the Northern mountains. in the North to 65 ft. ...
The river Chaboras (Khabur), entering the Euphrates from the east near Circesium, marks off the three divisions of Mesopotamia-(a) the Northern tracts on its west side, (b) the similar tracts to east of it, and (c) the steppe-land stretching away south to the Median Wall. As to (a), the North-western tracts bore the name of Osrhœne, or Orrhœne, in Seleucid times, and the chief city of the district was Urfa, the Edessa of the Greeks and Romans. As to (b), the principal city of the North-eastern region was Nisibis, a busy trading centre and a place of frequent conflict between Roman and Persian armies
Continent - ), a large body of land differing from an island, not merely in its size, but in its structure, which is that of a large basin bordered by mountain chains; as, the continent of North America
Hazazon-Tamar - Some Bible students think Hazazon-tamar was actually located six miles North of Engedi at wadi Hasasa, while others point to Tamar in southern Judah, Kasr Ejuniyeh or ain Kusb, twenty miles southwest of the Dead Sea
Aliwal, South Africa, Diocese of - Established as the prefecture apostolic of Gariep, Cape Colony, Union of South Africa, June 12, 1923; bounded south by the southern limits of the Richmond, Sterkstroom, Middelberg, Steynsburg, Molteno, Wodehouse, and Barkly East Districts; east by the eastern limits of Barkly East and the western limits of Basutoland; North by the Northern limits of Rouxville, Smithfield, and the Reit River; and west by the western boundary of the Hopetown, Britstown, and Richmond Districts; entrusted to the Fathers of the Sacred Heart of Saint Quentin
Harosheth of the Gentiles - (Judges 4:2 ) or nations, a city near Hazor in Galilee of the Gentiles, or Upper Galilee, in the North of Palestine
Lycia - a country of Asia Minor, having Phrygia on the North, Pamphylia on the east, the Mediterranean on the south, and Caria on the west
Nile - These unite at the town of Khartoum, whence it pursues its course for 1,800 miles, and falls into the Mediterranean through its two branches, into which it is divided a few miles North of Cairo, the Rosetta and the Damietta branch
Chanaanites - They came into Palestine from the North about 3000 B
Penuel - Face of God, a place not far from Succoth, on the east of the Jordan and North of the river Jabbok
Ekron - Firm-rooted, the most Northerly of the five towns belonging to the lords of the Philistines, about 11 miles North of Gath
Quicksands - The Syrtes, Major and Minor, lie on the North coast of Africa, between the headlands of Tunis and Barca
Baalbec - It was a city of Coele-Syria, on the lowest declivity of Anti-Libanus, about 42 miles North-west of Damascus
Dothan - It is identified with the modern Tell-Dothan, on the south side of the plain of Jezreel, about 12 miles North of Samaria, among the hills of Gilboa
en-Gannim - It is located at modern Jenin west of Beth-shean and about 65 miles North of Jerusalem
Tema - ” Tema, a son of Ishmael (Genesis 25:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:30 ), is associated with Tema (modern Teima), a strategic oasis located on the Arabian penisula 250 miles southeast of Aqaba and 200 miles North-northeast of Medina
Ephraim, Forest of - Joshua 17:14-18 predicts Ephraim's expansion North into the wooded Jezreel valley and the vicinity of Beth Shan, both within Issachar's territory
Michmas - Michmash is identified with the modern village of Mukmas, about five miles North of Jerusalem, where are considerable ruins of columns, cisterns, etc
Niger - Blacks were a common sight among the populations of Egypt and North Africa in the Hellenistic period
Coup - ) Among some tribes of North American Indians, the act of striking or touching an enemy in warfare with the hand or at close quarters, as with a short stick, in such a manner as by custom to entitle the doer to count the deed an act of bravery; hence, any of various other deeds recognized by custom as acts of bravery or honor
Zarethan - Zarethan is most often identified with the two mounds of tell es-Saidiyah on the east bank of the Jordan about fourteen miles North of Adam (tell ed-Damiyeh)
Arvad - ARVAD (modern ( Ruwâd ) was the most important of the Northerly cities of Phœnicia. It was built on an island 70 miles North of Beyrout a sort of second Tyre, with another town on the mainland opposite
Geba - It was held by the Philistines, but taken by Jonathan, 1 Samuel 13:3 : was a Northern landmark of Judah, 2 Kings 23:8; was rebuilt by Asa, 1 Kings 15:22; held by the Assyrians, Isaiah 10:29; peopled by Benjamites after the captivity, Ezra 2:26. It has been identified with Jeba, a deserted village 6 miles North of Jerusalem
Abelbethmaachah - A city of importance in the extreme North of Palestine in the lot of Naphtali or Manassth: it is mentioned with Ijon and Dan
Dibon - It afterward returned to Moab, Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 48:18; Jeremiah 48:22; now called Dhîbân, about 12 miles east of the Dead Sea and 3 miles North of the Arnon
Tirzah - One of the 31 cities of the Canaanites taken by Joshua, Joshua 12:24, and for 50 years the capital of the Northern kingdom of Israel, until Omri built Samaria. Tirzah has been usually identified with Telluzah, five miles east of Samaria, and 30 miles North of Jerusalem
Merom - WATERS OF, or lacus Samechonitis: the most Northern and the smallest of the three lakes which are supplied by the waters of the Jordan. It is at present called the lake of Houle; and is situated in a hollow or valley, about twelve miles wide, called the Ard Houle, formed by the Djebel Heish on the west, Djebel Safat on the east, the two branches into which the mountains of Hasbeya, or Djebel Esheikh, the ancient Hermon, divides itself about fifteen miles to the North
Kishon - Being enlarged by several small streams, it passes between Mount Carmel and the hills to the North, and then falls into the sea at this point
Acra - King Antiochus gave orders for building a citadel at Jerusalem, North of the temple, on an eminence; which commanded the holy place; and for that reason was called Acra
Orontes - (oh rahn tehss) The principle river of Syria which originates east of the Lebanon ridge and flows 250 miles North before turning southwest into the Mediterranean south of Antioch-on-the-Orontes (Antakya)
Jabbok - It traverses at first an elevated and desert region, and receives a branch from the North and another from the south
Issachar - Their portion, having the Jordan on the east, Manasseh on the west, Zebulun North, and Ephraim south, included a considerable part of the fine plain Esdraelon, the most fertile in the country
Dor - Though Josephus refers to it as on the sea-coast, and it is traditionally equated to Tantura , North of Cæsarea, the reference to the ‘heights of Dor’ rather suggests that it was in some hilly district such as the slope of the range of Carmel
Cappadocia - The largest ancient province of Asia Minor; having Pontus on the North, mount Taurus, separating it from Cilicia and Syria, on the south, Galatia on the west, and the Euphrates and Armenia on the east
Pon'Tus, - a large district in the North of Asia Minor, extending along the coast of the Pontus Euxinus Sea (Pontus), from which circumstance the name was derived
pa'Dan-a'Ram - " (Hosea 12:13 ) The term was perhaps more especially applied to that portion which bordered on the Euphrates, to distinguish if from the mountainous districts in the North and Northeast of Mesopotamia
Syria, Syrian - In scripture this name mostly signifies the district lying North and North-east of Palestine, the inhabitants of which were Syrians. If from Dan to Beersheba be taken as the boundaries of Palestine, it leaves for Syria a district quite as large on its North, besides extending also to the Euphrates on the east
Galatia - A province of Asia Minor, lying south and southeast of Bithynia and Paphlagonia, west of Pontus, North and Northwest of Cappadocia, and North and Northwest of Cappadocia, and North and Northeast of Lycaonia and Phrygia
Rama - It is identified with the modern village of er-Ram, between Gibeon and Beeroth, about 5 miles due North of Jerusalem. ...
...
One of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:36 ), on a mountain slope, about seven and a half miles west-south-west of Safed, and 15 miles west of the North end of the Sea of Galilee, the present large and well-built village of Rameh
Galilee, Sea of - ” A freshwater lake nestled in the hills of Northern Palestine. To the North are the snow-covered Lebanon mountains. Fed chiefly by the Jordan River, which originates in the foothills of the Lebanon Mountains, the sea of Galilee is thirteen miles long North and south and eight miles wide at its greatest east-west distance
Mennonite Bodies - They soon spread Northward and westward. The Mennonite churches include: ...
Amish Mennonite Church
Central Conference of Mennonites
Church of God In Christ (Mennonite)
Conservative Amish Mennonite Church
Defenseless Mennonites
General Conference of the Mennonite Church of North America
Kleine Gemeinde
Krimmer Mennonite Brethren Church
Mennonite Brethren Church of North America
Mennonite Brethren in Christ
Mennonite Church
Old Order Amish Mennonite Church
Old Order Mennonites (Wisler)
Reformed Mennonite Church
Stauffer Mennonites
Nain - Ruins stretch to the North, showing that the place was once of some importance; but they are comparatively modern. The small sanctuary, Maqâm Sîdna ‘Isa , ‘Place of our Lord Jesus,’ on the North, doubtless commemorates the visit of the Saviour
Micah - After some time, representatives of the tribe of Dan stopped at Micah’s house while on a journey North in search of a new tribal homeland (Judges 18:1-6). When the Danites later moved North to settle, they again visited Micah
Gilead - The district on the east of the Jordan, extending from the river Yarmouk, a little south of the Sea of Galilee, to the North corner of the Dead Sea. It fell to the lot of Gad, except its Northern part, which, where it joined Bashan, was possessed by Manasseh. The district is divided into North and south by the river Jabbok (Zerka ). The Northern part is cultivated and has numerous villages; but the southern is mostly held by nomadic tribes, with but little cultivation, and having but one inhabited town now, called es Salt, 32 2' N, 35 42' E
Gilead - The district on the east of the Jordan, extending from the river Yarmouk, a little south of the Sea of Galilee, to the North corner of the Dead Sea. It fell to the lot of Gad, except its Northern part, which, where it joined Bashan, was possessed by Manasseh. The district is divided into North and south by the river Jabbok (Zerka ). The Northern part is cultivated and has numerous villages; but the southern is mostly held by nomadic tribes, with but little cultivation, and having but one inhabited town now, called es Salt, 32 2' N, 35 42' E
Syria - (ssihr' ih uh) The region or nation directly North of Palestine in the Northwest corner of the Mediterranean Sea. ...
Name and Geography Syria is most properly a geographical term for the Northwestern Mediterranean region situated between Palestine and Mesopotamia, roughly equal to the modern states of Syria and Lebanon with small portions of Turkey and Iraq. The Orontes flows North before abruptly turning west to the sea in the plain of Antioch, while the Leontes flows south then turns west through a narrow gorge and empties into the sea. The latter part of this period has been illuminated by the recent discovery of cuneiform tablets in the state archive at Ebla, the capital of a small empire in Northern Syria. ), the time of the Hebrew patriarchs, North Syria was home to the kingdoms of Yamhad, with its capital at Aleppo, and Qatna. ), Syria became the frontier and sometimes battlefield between the empires of the new kingdom Egypt in the south and initially Mitanni, then the Hittites to the North. The Arameans began to settle in Syria and Northern Mesopotamia around the beginning of the Iron Age (about 1200 B. The Old Testament mentions the Aramean kingdoms of Beth-eden in North Syria, Zobah in south-central Syria, and Damascus in the south. Hamath, a neo-Hittite state in North Syria which had been at war with Zobah, also established friendly relations with David (2 Samuel 8:9-10 ). Ben-hadad responded by conquering a number of cities and territory in the North of Israel (1 Kings 15:20 )
Blackmail - ) A certain rate of money, corn, cattle, or other thing, anciently paid, in the North of England and south of Scotland, to certain men who were allied to robbers, or moss troopers, to be by them protected from pillage
Riffon - ) A species of large vulture (Gyps fulvus) found in the mountainous parts of Southern Europe, North Africa, and Asia Minor; - called also gripe, and grype
Fallow-Deer - Some interpreters, however, regard the name as designating the bubale, Antelope bubale, the "wild cow" of North Africa, which is about the size of a stag, like the hartebeest of South Africa
Mehunim - ), Israelites dislocated the Meunites from the vicinity of Gedor in Transjordan about eighteen miles North-northwest of Heshbon (1 Chronicles 4:41 ; KJV reads “habitations”)
Ajalon or Aijalon - The valley lies towards the North, and is the place where Joshua commanded the sun and moon to stand still, and they obeyed him, Joshua 10:12 ...
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Aroer - An ancient city on the North side of the Arnon, in the southern border of the tribe of Reuben, Deuteronomy 2:36 4:48 Joshua 13:9
Sepharvaim - The context favours the supposition that the famous city Sippar in North Babylonia is intended
Teman - Ezekiel 25:13 implies that Edom stretches from Teman to Dedan, from which we infer that the former lay in the North-east of the territory claimed by Edom, that is, to the S
Mamre - Others identify it with er-Rameh, 2 miles North of Hebron
Tiphsah - Passing over; ford, one of the boundaries of Solomon's dominions (1 Kings 4:24 ), probably "Thapsacus, a great and wealthy town on the western bank of the Euphrates," about 100 miles North-east of Tadmor
Dor - It is about 8 miles North of Caesarea, "a sad and sickly hamlet of wretched huts on a naked sea-beach
Riblah - Fruitful, an ancient town on the Northern frontier of Palestine, 35 miles North-east of Baalbec, and 10 or 12 south of Lake Homs, on the eastern bank of the Orontes, in a wide and fertile plain
Smyrna - The port of Smyrna was in the Roman province of Asia, not far North of Ephesus
Siddim, Vale of - Some, however, contend that the "cities of the plain" were somewhere at the North of the Dead Sea
Dodanim - This was apparently North of Tyre
Elah - The valley runs east and west just North of Socoh
Hyacinth, Saint 17 Aug - (Greek: purple) ...
Confessor, apostle of the North, born castle of Lanka, Kamin, Silesia, Poland, 1185; died Krakow, Poland, 1257
Freedmen, Synagogue of the - Some early versions have Libyans in place of “libertines,” giving three groups of North African Jews
Asher - The portion of Asher lay along the seaboard, having Levanon and Zidon on the North, Carmel and the tribe of Issachar on the south, and Zebulun and Naphtali on the east
Achaia - The name originally of a narrow strip of territory in Greece, on the North-west of the Peloponnesus
Arpad - (ahr' pawd) or ARPHAD A city-state in Northern Syria closely identified with Hamath. Arpad is modern tell Erfad about 25 miles North of Aleppo
Seir, Mount - A Northern boundary of Judah. Probably the ridge North of Kirjath-jearim, about 31 47' N
Smyrna - Ancient city in the west of Asia Minor, about forty miles North of Ephesus
Anschar, Saint - Confessor of the faith; apostle of the North. A Benedictine monk at Corbie, he went as a missionary to Sweden and on his return was made first Archbishop of Hamburg and papal legate of the Northern nations
Antigua - Caribbean islands between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, east-southeast of Puerto Rico
Cabul - ...
...
A district in the North-west of Galilee, near to Tyre, containing twenty cities given to Hiram by Solomon as a reward for various services rendered to him in building the temple (1 Kings 9:13 ), and as payment of the six score talents of gold he had borrowed from him
Declination - ) The arc of the horizon, contained between the vertical plane and the prime vertical circle, if reckoned from the east or west, or between the meridian and the plane, reckoned from the North or south. ) The angular distance of any object from the celestial equator, either Northward or southward
Antonia - 5,8) says it was situated "at the corner of two cloisters of the court of the temple; of that on the west, and that on the North; it was erected upon a rock fifty cubits in height and was on a great precipice
Kedar - Son of Ishmael, and founder of an important tribe inhabiting the North-west of Arabia, though the name is probably also employed for Arabs generally
Medicine - ) Among the North American Indians, any object supposed to give control over natural or magical forces, to act as a protective charm, or to cause healing; also, magical power itself; the potency which a charm, token, or rite is supposed to exert
Paran - It extended from Mount Sinai on the south, to the southern border of the land of Canaan on the North; having the desert of Shur, with its subdivisions, the deserts of Etham and Sin, on the west, and the eastern branch of the Red Sea, the desert of Zin and Mount Seir, on the east
Gog And Magog - Magog signifies the country or people, and Gog the king of that country; the general name of the Northern nations of Europe and Asia, or the districts North of the Caucasus, or Mount Taurus
Winter - The cold of winter is not usually very severe, though the North winds, from the middle of December to the middle of February, are sharp
Gennes'Aret - It is generally believed that this term was applied to the fertile crescent-shaped plain on the western shore of the lake, extending from Khan Minyeh (two or three miles south of Capernaum ( Tel-Hum ) on the North to the steep hill behind Mejdel ( Magdala ) on the south, and called by the Arabs el-Ghuweir , "the little Ghor
Asher - In the division of Canaan under Joshua, this tribe received the coastal plain from Mt Carmel North to the Phoenician cities of Tyre and Sidon (Joshua 19:24-31; Judges 5:17)
Otto Eduard Leopold Von Bismarck - Bismarck now turned to the consolidation of the North German states. Germany emerged victorious, and the states of North and South Germany united under William, crowned first German Emperor in the Palace of Versailles, January 18, 1871
Esdraelon - , "the meadow of the son of Amer") which stretches across Central Palestine from the Jordan to the Mediterraanean, separating the mountain ranges of Carmel and Samaria from those of Galilee, extending about 14 miles from North to south, and 9 miles from east to west. From the foot of Mount Tabor it branches out into three valleys, that on the North passing between Tabor and Little Hermon (Judges 4:14 ); that on the south between Mount Gilboa and En-gannim (2 Kings 9:27 ); while the central portion, the "valley of Jezreel" proper, runs into the Jordan valley (which is about 1,000 feet lower than Esdraelon) by Bethshean
Gog - pictures as leading a great host of nations from the far North against the restored Israel, and as being ignominiously defeated, by J″ Acadia - (Micmac, akade, abundance) ...
Originally all North America from 40' to 46' North latitude, later, the peninsula of Nova Scotia; now, the small district on south shore of the Bay of Fundy from Annapolis to the Basin of Minas
Medes, Media - They occupied a large district, having the Caspian Sea on the North-east; Armenia on the North-west; Parthia on the east; Persia on the south; and Assyria on the west
Ephraim - The territory of Ephraim lay in the centre of Canaan, south of Manasseh and North of Benjamin and Dan, extending from the Jordan to the Mediterranean Sea. One of the gates of ancient Jerusalem, 2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 25:23; Nehemiah 8:16; Nehemiah 12:39; probably on the North side, as the present Damascus gate is
Tabor - An isolated mountain of Galilee, on the Northeastern side of the plain of Esdraelon, an arm of which extends beyond the mountain in the same direction. It is of limestone formation, conical in form, and well-wooded, especially on the North side, with fine oaks and other trees and odoriferous plants. It rises 1,350 feet above the plain at its base, which Isaiah 400 feet above the Mediterranean, and by a winding path on the North-west side one may ride to its summit in an hour
Chaldeans - ...
The Chaldeans were originally a warlike people, who at first inhabited the Carduchian or Koordish mountains North of Assyria and Mesopotamia, Jeremiah 50:17 . As the Assyrian monarchs extended their conquests towards the North and west, the Chaldeans also came under their dominion; and this rough and energetic people appear to have assumed, under the sway of their conquerors, a new character, and to have been transformed from a rude horde into a civilized people
Merom - The "waters of Merom," Joshua 11:5 , or lake of Semechon, is the most Northern of the three lakes supplied by the river Jordan. On the North lies the plain of the Huleh, which is a dead level for a distance of six miles or more. On the west side of the Jordan above the lake, a marsh extends up North as far as the junction of these streams, or even farther; while on the eastern side the land is tilled almost down to the lake. Near this lake Joshua defeated the kings of Northern Canaan, Joshua 11:1-8
Apostles Other Than the Twelve - The following are popularly known as apostles, of some region where, or of a people among whom, they planted or revived the Faith: ...
Saint Adalbert Prussia...
the Slavs...
Pope Adrian IV The North (Scandinavia)...
Saint Aidan Northumbria, England...
Albert, Bishop of Riga Livonia...
Charles Dominique Albini Corsica...
Saint Alexander Sauli Corsica...
Claude Allouez The Ottawas (Indians)...
Saint Amand Flanders...
Anchieta, Jose, S. Brazil...
Saint Andeol Switzerland...
Saint Andrew Corsini Florence, Italy...
Saint Anschar Denmark...
Sweden...
the North (Scandinavia)...
Saint Antoninus The Rouergue (district in southern France)...
Astericus Anastasius, O. )...
Father Bartolome Las Casas The West Indies...
Saint Lazarus Provence, France...
Saint Livinus Flanders...
Saint Ludger Westphalia...
Saint Martha Provence, France...
Saint Martin of Tours France...
Saint Maruthas Persia...
Saint Matthias Asiatic Ethiopia...
Saint Ninian North Britain...
the Picts...
Saint Nino Georgia (the nation)...
Saint Olaf Norway...
Saint Otto Pomerania...
Saint Palladius Scotland...
Saint Patrick Ireland...
Saint Paul The Gentiles...
Saint Paul de Leon Brittany...
Saint Peter Claver The Negro Slaves...
Saint Phillip Neri Rome...
Saint Piat Tournai, Belgium...
Picquet, Francois, P
Canaan, Land of - ; the Mediterranean being the western limit, the eastern being undefined; but the 'river Euphrates' boundary must be on the North part of that river, which indeed was reached by Solomon at Tiphsah (about 35 50' N, 39 E). In Numbers 34:9-11 the North border is also given, and though some of the places cannot be traced, it is yet clear that the border did not extend as far as was possessed under Solomon, who anticipated for the moment the possession which will yet be inherited by Israel under Christ. This comprised about 150 miles from North to south. In Deuteronomy 1:7 the borders are named as between 'the mount of the Amorites,' near the Dead Sea on the south, to 'Lebanon and the river Euphrates' on the North. ...
The land of Canaan may be described as having four zones: by the Mediterranean Sea a plain runs from North to south, much wider in the south thanin the North; it is broken into by Mount Carmel running across it
Salim - ’ This points to the neighbourhood of the ruin Umm el-‘Amdân , with Tell er-Ridhghah on the North, where the tomb of Sheik Selîm probably preserves the ancient name
en-Gannim -
A town in the plains of Judah (Joshua 15:34 ), North-west of Jerusalem, between Zanoah and Tappuah
Makkedah - It has been identified with the modern village called Sumeil, standing on a low hill about 7 miles to the North-west of Eleutheropolis (Beit Jibrin), where are ancient remains and a great cave
Ebal -
A mountain 3,076 feet above the level of the sea, and 1,200 feet above the level of the valley, on the North side of which stood the city of Shechem (q
Italy - (iht' uh lee) The boot-shaped peninsula between Greece and Spain which extends from the Alps on the North to the Mediterranean Sea on the south
Japheth - These names point to Japheth as having been the progenitor of the Indo-European peoples who lived to the North and west of Israel, farthest from Israel
Zaanaim - Wanderings; the unloading of tents, so called probably from the fact of nomads in tents encamping amid the cities and villages of that region, a place in the North-west of Lake Merom, near Kedesh, in Naphtali
Dimon - If Dimon is a separate town, it was probably located at modern khirbet Dimme, about seven miles North of Kerak
Balm - At times the reference seems to be to Balanites aegyptiaca Delile—a small shrub that still grows in North Africa and exudes a sticky resin used for medicinal purposes ( Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 46:11 ; Jeremiah 51:8 )
Hinge - ) One of the four cardinal points, east, west, North, or south
Hivites - We also find the Hivites in the North in mount Lebanon, and Israel was beguiled into making marriage contracts with them
Mount, Mountain - The ordinary word for this is har , which is employed both for the mountain ranges, some of which run through Palestine from North to south, and also for the higher mountains that rise upon those ranges or on the plains
Shittim Wood, Shittah Tree - They differ from the acacias known in England, which are from North America
Abdon - The ruins of Abdeh, some 8 miles (14 kilometers) North-east of Accho, probably mark its site
Oak - There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the Northern parts of South America and Africa
Ain - Ain, a fountain in the extreme North
Adul'Lam - 2 Maccabees 12:38 Adullam was probably near Deir Dubban , five or six miles North of Eleutheropolis
Ico'Nium - It was a large and rich city, 120 miles North from the Mediterranean Sea, at the foot of the Taurus mountains, and on the great line of communication between Ephesus and the western coast of the peninsula on one side, and Tarsus, Antioch and the Euphrates on the other
Ramoth - Jerom places it in the neighbourhood of Jabbok, and consequently to the North of Philadelphia
Beersheba - It was situated twenty miles south of Hebron, in the extreme south of the land of Israel, as Dan was on the North
Kenite - One family migrated to the far North
Rimmon - It is identified with the present village Rummaneh, about six miles North of Nazareth
Paran - Wilderness area south of Judah, west of Edom, and North of Sinai
Gebal - It is the Northern part of the range of mountains skirting the eastern side of the great valley El-Arabah, which runs from the Dead Sea to the Elanitic gulf of the Red Sea, Psalm 83:7 . A seaport and district of Phoenicia North of Beyroot, called Byblos by the Greeks, now Jebail; population, 2,000
Shuswaps - North American Indian tribe (Su-khapmuh), most important of Salishan limguistic stock in British Columbia, including groups at Kamloops, Adams Lake, Alkali Lake, Canoe Creek, Neskaintith, Spallumcheen, and Williams Lake
Candace - The Ethiopia over which she ruled was not Abyssinia, but that region of Upper Nubia called by the Greeks Meroe; and is supposed to correspond with the present province of Atbara, lying between thirteen and eighteen degrees North latitude
ma'Gog - The notices of Magog would lead us to fix a Northern locality: it is expressly stated by Ezekiel that "he was to come up from the sides of the North," (Ezekiel 39:2 ) from a country adjacent to that of Togarmah or Armenia, Elath, Eloth - Seaport town at the extreme North of the Gulf of Akaba branch of the Red Sea
Mizpah, Mizpeh - While the location of Mizpah of Gilead is not known, it was most likely located in the Northern part of Gilead, perhaps a site like Ramoth-gilead. The account of Joshua's encounter with Jabin, king of Hazor (Joshua 11:1 ) refers to “the land of Mizpah” (Joshua 11:3 ) and “the valley of Mizpeh” (Joshua 11:8 ), a region in North Palestine, the location of which is unknown. Two major sites have been suggested as possible locations: Nebi Samwil, located about five miles North of Jerusalem, and tell en-Nasbeh, located about eight miles North of Jerusalem
Cancer - ) A genus of decapod Crustacea, including some of the most common shore crabs of Europe and North America, as the rock crab, Jonah crab, etc. The first point is the Northern limit of the sun's course in summer; hence, the sign of the summer solstice. ) A Northern constellation between Gemini and Leo
Junipero Serra, Blessed - Franciscan missionary to southwestern North America
Jezreel, Valley of - Lying on the Northern side of the city, between the ridges of Gilboa and Moreh, an offshoot of Esdraelon, running east to the Jordan (Joshua 17:16 ; Judges 6:33 ; Hosea 1:5 ). It was only this plain of Jezreel and that North of Lake Huleh that were then accessible to the chariots of the Canaanites (Compare 2 Kings 9:21 ; 10:15 )
Aroer -
A town on the North bank of the Arnon (Deuteronomy 4:48 ; Judges 11:26 ; 2 Kings 10:33 ), the southern boundary of the kingdom of Sihon (Joshua 12:2 )
Eglon - It has been identified with Tell Nejileh, 6 miles south of Tell Hesy or Ajlan, North-west of Lachish
Terah - The wanderer; loiterer, for some unknown reason emigrated with his family from his native mountains in the North to the plains of Mesopotamia
Aphik - The ruins of the temple, "magnificent ruins" in a "spot of strange wildness and beauty", are still seen at Afka, on the North-west slopes of Lebanon, near the source of the river Adonis (now Nahr Ibrahim), 12 miles east of Gebal
Gibeah - , "hill of the bean"), about 3 miles North of Jerusalem
Ramoth-Gilead - It has with probability been identified with Reimun, on the Northern slope of the Jabbok, about 5 miles west of Jerash or Gerasa, one of the cities of Decapolis. Others identify it with Gerosh, about 25 miles North-east of es-Salt, with which also many have identified it
Troas - In New Testament times this region was part of the Roman province of Asia, and Troas was the main port in the province’s North-west
Simeon, the Tribe of - It lay in the south-west of the land, with Judah on the east and Dan on the North; but whether it was a compact territory or not cannot be determined
Gerasa - ...
The other Gerasa was located some twenty-six miles North of present-day Amman in Jordan
Lorenzo Ghiberti - In 1401, in a competition with Brunelleschi and others, he won the commission to execute the North doors of the baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence
Bethuel - It may be modern khirbet el-Qarjeten, three miles North of tell Arad
Beth-Peor - It was located at modern khirbet Uyun Musa, twenty miles east of the North end of the Dead Sea
Carmel - The mountain is near the Mediterranean coast of Palestine between the Plain of Acco to the North and the Plain of Sharon to the south
Shunem, Shunammites - It is modern Solem, about eight miles North of Jenin and three miles east of Affulah
Shushan - It was located on the caravan routes between Arabia and points North and west, and therefore it became a very rich city
Socoh, Soco, Shocho - It is as-Shuweikeh west of Nablus and two miles North of Tulkarm
Holywell - Market town of Flintshire, North Wales, taking its name from the miraculous well of Saint Winefride
Phenice, Phenicia - The same as PHOENICE, the coast of Northern Syria, extending south of Tyre, and North of Sidon, being a narrow strip of land in the south, but reaching to the Lebanon range in the N
Jabbok - A stream rising about 25 miles east of the North end of the Dead sea, and flowing east, then Northward and westward, and finally into the Jordan about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead sea
Bassein, India - Town, 29 miles North of Bombay, on the island of the same name. It was founded in 1536 and became the most important Portuguese settlement in Northern India and a center of missionary activity. The Franciscan Father Antonio do Porto, known as the apostle of Bassein, founded an orphanage in the Northern Bassein district in 1535 and it was there that the first Indian martyrs suffered in 1540
Height - ) Degree of latitude either North or south
Syene - Ezekiel 29:10 , describing the desolation to be brought upon Egypt, says, "Therefore thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will make the land of Egypt utterly desolate, from the tower of Syene even to the border of Cush," or Arabia or, as some read it, "from Migdol to Syene," implying, according to either version of the passage, the whole length of the country from North to south
Scalp - ) A part of the skin of the head, with the hair attached, cut or torn off from an enemy by the Indian warriors of North America, as a token of victory
Sela - Probably the city later known as Petra, the ruins of which are found about two days' journey North of the Gulf of Akabah, It was in the midst of Mount Seir, in the neighborhood of Mount Hor, and therefore Edomite territory
Gog And Magog - The Scythians, the Goths, the Persians, and several other nations, have been specified by interpreters as the Magog of the Scriptures; but most probably it is a name given generally to the Northern nations of Europe and Asia, or the districts North of the Caucasus
Serra, Junipero, Blessed - Franciscan missionary to southwestern North America
Sisters of Charity of the General Hospital of Mont - The original community of Montreal has schools, orphanages, a foundling asylum, hospitals, homes for working girls, and an institution for the blind in Canada, particularly in the far North, and in the United States
Rachel - Her sepulchre, half an hour's walk North of Bethlehem, is shown unto this day, the spot being marked by a Mohammedan wely or tomb, a stone enclosure and a dome
Havilah - From the statement in 1 Samuel 15:7 , that "Saul smote the Amalekites from Havilah unto Shurm that is over against Egypt," it would seen to have been somewhere in the North-western part of Arabia; since, from the circumstances of this campaign, we cannot well suppose that it extended over a great tract of country
Pontus - The sea, the Northeastern province of Asia Minor, bounded North by the Euxine Sea, west by Galatia and Paphlagonia, south by Cappadocia and part of Armenia, and east by Colchis
Ghiberti, Lorenzo di Cione - In 1401, in a competition with Brunelleschi and others, he won the commission to execute the North doors of the baptistery of San Giovanni in Florence
Syria - Aram), the name in the Old Testament given to the whole country which lay to the North-east of Phoenicia, extending to beyond the Euphrates and the Tigris. Second, this was followed by a short period of independence, when the Jewish nation in the south was growing in power, until it reached its early zenith in the golden days of Solomon; and when Tyre and Sidon were rich cities, sending their traders far and wide, over land and sea, as missionaries of civilization, while in the North the confederate tribes of the Hittites held back the armies of the kings of Assyria
Galilee - ” The Northern part of Palestine above the hill country of Ephraim and the hill country of Judah (Joshua 20:7 ). The Assyrians took the North under Tiglath-pileser in 733 (2 Kings 15:29 ) and divided it into three districts—the western coast or “the way of the sea” with capital at Dor, Galilee with capital at Megiddo, and beyond Jordan or Gilead (Isaiah 9:1 ). The tribes of Naphtali, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, and Dan occupied the territory which covered approximately the forty-five-mile stretch between the Litani River in Lebanon and the Valley of Jezreel in Israel North to south and from the Mediterranean Sea to the Jordan River west to east
Geba - ) Geba apparently represented the Northern border of Judah as opposed to the southern border in Beersheba (2 Kings 23:8 ). For Zechariah (Zechariah 14:10 ), Geba represented the Northern border of a Judah to be flattened out into a plain dominated by God ruling on Mount Zion in Jerusalem. ...
Geba is variously located, some scholars going so far as to locate a southern Geba of Benjamin at Jeba across the wadi Suweinit from Michmash, about five and a half miles North of Jerusalem, and a Northern Geba (Joshua 18:24 ) at khirbet et-Tell, seven miles North of Bethel
Table of Nations - The descendants of Ham (Genesis 10:6-20 ) were located especially in the regions of North Africa and the coastal regions of Canaan and Syria. The descendants of Shem were located generally in North Syria, that is, the region of the upper part of the Euphrates River, and Mesopotamia, especially the eastern part
Memphis - The pyramid-field extends on the edge of the desert about 20 miles, from Dahshur on the south to Abu Roash on the North, the Great Pyramids of Gizeh lying 12 miles North of the central ruins of Memphis
Micah - " The Danites however, seeking a larger inheritance, sent spies to the North, who came near Micah's house, and knowing the voice of the Levite, asked him to inquire of God for them. " A larger body of Danites afterwards came and carried away the gods of Micah, and the ephod and the teraphim, together with the Levite, and took them to the North, where they established themselves
he'Bron - (1 Chronicles 15:9 ; 23:19 ) ...
A city of Judah, (Joshua 15:54 ) situated among the mountains, (Joshua 20:7 ) 20 Roman miles south of Jerusalem, and the same distance North of Beersheba. The valley runs from North to south; and the main quarter of the town, surmounted by the lofty walls of the venerable Haram , lies partly on the eastern slope
Pheoenix - Ida]'>[2], having the settlement of Amphimalia on the Northern shore, and PhCEnix of the Lampeans on the southern’ (x. 3); and Hierocles (Synecdemus, 14) speaks of PhCEnix as near Aradena, which still retains its name, while Stephanus Byzantinus makes Aradena synonymous with Anopolis (‘Upper City’), a name which is now attached to ruins slightly farther North. If it is translated ‘looking toward the south-west and North-west’ (AV_), it is quite inapplicable to Loutró, which opens eastward. The RV_ translates the phrase ‘looking North-east and south-east,’ i. 400) note that ‘sailors speak of everything from their own point of view, and that such a harbour does “look”-from the water towards the land which encloses it-in the direction of “south-west and North-west
Olives - The Mount of Olives was situated to the east of Jerusalem, and divided from the city only by the brook Kidron, and by the valley of Jehoshaphat, which stretches out from the North to the south. The Mount of Olives forms part of a ridge of limestone hills, extending to the North and the south-west. On the lowest and most Northerly of these, which, he tells us, is called Sulman Tashy, the stone of Solomon, there is a large domed sepulchre, and several other Mohammedan tombs. The ascent to this point, which is to the North-east of the city, he describes as very gradual, through pleasant corn fields, planted with olive trees. There are two roads to it; one passes over the Mount of Olives; the other, which is the shorter and easier, winds round the eastern end, having the greater part of the hill on the North or left hand, and on the right the elevation called by some writers the Mount of Offence, which is, however, very little above the valley of Jehoshaphat. The village of Bethany is small and poor, and the cultivation of the soil is much neglected; but it is a pleasant and somewhat romantic spot, sheltered by Mount Olivet on the North, and abounding with trees and long grass
Hammath - It may be located at tell Raqqat, just North of Tiberias
Orkney, Scotland, Diocese of - The diocese comprised the Orkney Islands off the North coast of Scotland
Methodist Bodies - The different Methodist bodies are as follows: ...
African Methodist Episcopal Church
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church
Congregational Methodist Church
Free Methodist Church of North America
Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church, South
Methodist Protestant Church
Primitive Methodist Church
Reformed Methodist Union Episcopal Church (Colored)
Reformed Zion Union Apostolic Church (Colored)
Union American Methodist Episcopal Church
Wesleyan Methodist
Fertile Crescent - The Northeast is bordered by the Zagros Mountains, the North by the Taurus and Amanus ranges
Cyrene - A city (now Tripoli) in Upper Libya, North Africa, founded by a colony of Greeks (B
Tirza - It has been identified with the modern mud hamlet Teiasir, 11 miles North of Shechem
Moriah - It is usually included in Zion, to the North-east of which it lay, and from which it was separated by the Tyropoean valley
Fertile Crescent - The Northeast is bordered by the Zagros Mountains, the North by the Taurus and Amanus ranges
Red Sea, Passage of - The difficulty of arriving at any definite conclusion on the matter is much increased by the consideration that the head of the Gulf of Suez, which was the branch of the sea that was crossed, must have extended at the time of the Exodus probably 50 miles farther North than it does at present
Anathoth - It lay about 3 miles North of Jerusalem
Glass - A glass bottle with the name of Sargon on it was found among the ruins of the North-west palace of Nimroud
o'Reilly, Edmund - Taught theology for several years at Saint Beuno's College in North Wales
Massa - A son of Ishmael ( Genesis 25:14 = 1 Chronicles 1:39 ), representing a North Arabian tribe
Chittim - " Daniel prophesied (11:30) that the ships of Chittim would come against the king of the North
Receipt of Custom - Capernaum was close to the junction of the great North road to Damascus with the road that led eastwards round the Northern end of the Lake of Galilee, and the important revenue station situated at this point is what we are to understand by the ‘place of toll’ in the Gospel story
Beth-Zur - It is located at khirbet et-Tubeiqeh, eighteen miles southwest of Jerusalem and four miles North of Hebron on a major highway intersection
Jezreel (2) - It is about 25 miles long from east to west, and 12 miles wide from North to south
Tropic - ) One of the two small circles of the celestial sphere, situated on each side of the equator, at a distance of 23� 28/, and parallel to it, which the sun just reaches at its greatest declination North or south, and from which it turns again toward the equator, the Northern circle being called the Tropic of Cancer, and the southern the Tropic of Capricorn, from the names of the two signs at which they touch the ecliptic
Edmund o'Reilly - Taught theology for several years at Saint Beuno's College in North Wales
Aphek - City in the North border of Asher, from which in the time of Joshua the inhabitants were not expelled
Joppa - called also Japho in the Old Testament, which is still preserved in its modern name of Jaffa or Yafah, a sea port of Palestine, situated on an eminence in a sandy soil, about seventy miles North-west of Jerusalem
Solomon's Pools - The aqueduct crosses the valley of Hinnom below the southwest corner of the city wall, winds south around Mount Zion, and turns North again into the city towards the Haram area
East - Hence "before," or "forwards," means the east; "behind" is the west; the right-hand is south, and the left hand, North. Besides the ordinary meanings of the word east, Joshua 4:19 ; Psalm 103:12 , the Jews often used it to designate a large region lying Northeast and southeast of Palestine, including Syria and Arabia near at hand, and Babylonia, Assyria, Armenia, etc
Pekah - The result was, that Damascus was taken by Tiglath-Pileser king of Assyria, and with it all the lands of Israel east of the Jordan and North of the Sea of Galilee, their inhabitants being carried captive
Caesare'a Philip'pi - The spring rises from and the city was built on a limestone terrace in a valley at the base of Mount Hermon 20 miles North of the Sea of Galilee. It was visited by Christ shortly before his transfiguration, ( Matthew 16:13-28 ) and was the Northern limit of his journeys
Carmel - It rose steeply from the sea, then extended inland in a mountain range about twenty kilometres long that divided between the Plain of Esdraelon to the North and the Plain of Sharon to the south
Hamath - The city of Hamath was situated in the North of Lebanon, at the end of the Lebanon ranges and on the edge of the Syrian plain. ...
At the Northern end of the Lebanon ranges was a prominent gap known as ‘the entrance of Hamath’, where Lebanon opened on to the plains of Syria. This gap, or pass, marked Israel’s ideal Northern boundary (Joshua 13:5; Amos 6:14), but only in times of unusual growth and prosperity was it the actual boundary (2 Kings 14:25)
Shechem - It stood in the narrow sheltered valley between Ebal on the North and Gerizim on the south, these mountains at their base being only some 500 yards apart. It lies about a mile and a half up the valley on its southern slope, and on the North of Gerizim, which rises about 1,100 feet above it, and is about 34 miles North of Jerusalem
Canaan (2) - The boundaries of Canaan were Mount Lebanon on the North, the wilderness of Arabia on the south, and the Arabian desert on the east. Besides the possessions of the Israelites, the land of Canaan embraced Phœnicia on the North and Philistia on the southwest. The modern name of Palestine, or the land of the Philistines, was originally applied to the region lying along the coast of the Mediterranean, southwest of the Land of Promise, but in its present usage denotes the whole country bounded by the Jordan on the east the Mediterranean on the west, Arabia on the south, and Lebanon on the North
Palestine - ...
For the purposes of this article, Palestine extends to the North ten to fifteen miles beyond the ancient site of Dan and New Testament Caesarea Philippi into the gorges and mountains just south of Mount Hermon. ...
Geographical Features Palestine is naturally divided into four narrow strips of land running North and south. Coastal plain This very fertile plain begins ten to twelve miles south of Gaza, just North of the Egyptian border, and stretches Northward to the Sidon-Tyre area. Usually it is divided into three sections: (1) the Plain of Philistia, roughly from south of Gaza to Joppa (Tel Aviv); (2) the Plain of Sharon, from Joppa North to the promontory of the Carmel chain; and (3) the detached Plain of Acco, which merges with the Plain of Esdraelon, the historic gateway inland and to the regions to the North and east. Entrance from the south was impossible, however, and the North entrance was shallow and treacherous. Central Hill Country The second strip of land is the mountainous ridge beginning just North of Beer-sheba and extending through all of Judea and Samaria into upper Galilee. Actually, the rugged terrain running the length of the land is a continuation of the more clearly defined Lebanon Mountains to the North. Five valleys divide the region, from the Wadi el Hesy in the south to the Valley of Ajalon in Northern Judea. The openness of Samaria is a prominent feature of the land, making movement much easier than in Judea and thus inviting armies and chariots from the North. ...
From this region the main range of mountains sends out an arm to the Northwest that reaches the coast at Mount Carmel. ...
(3) Galilee North of the Plain of Esdraelon and south of the Leontes River lies the region called Galilee. Those on the Northwestern shore, such as Capernaum, were more Jewish than those to the south. The fault is part of a system that extends North to form the valley between the Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon chains, also extending south to form the Dead Sea, the dry Arabah Valley, the Gulf of Aqabah, and, eventually, the chain of lakes on the African continent. North of it the sea is deep, reaching a maximum depth of 1,319 feet—2,650 feet below sea level. ...
(1) Across from Galilee and North of the Yarmuk River is Bashan (Hauron), an area of rich volcanic soil with rainfall in excess of sixteen inches per year. Originally, its Northern border was the Arnon River, but the Moabites pushed North, giving their name to the plains east of the spot where the Jordan enters the Dead Sea (Ammon attempted to establish herself between Gilead and Moab using Rabbath-Ammon as her stronghold. ”...
Climate Palestine lies in the semitropical belt between 30 15' and 33 15' North latitude. From June through August no rain falls except in the extreme North
Corinth - ...
History of Corinth Corinth was located on the southwest end of the isthmus that joined the southern part of the Greek peninsula with the mainland to the North. Corinth was a maritime city located between two important seaports: the port of Lechaion on the Gulf of Corinth about two miles to the North and the port of Cenchreae on the Saronic Gulf about six miles east of Corinth. The Corinthians controlled the east-west trade across the isthmus as well as trade between Peloponnesus and the area of Greece to the North. The Lechaion road entered the city from the North, connecting it with the port on the Gulf of Corinth. ...
Approaching the city from the North, the Lechaion road passed through the Propylaea, the beautiful gate marking the entrance into the agora (market). A line of shops divided the agora into a Northern and a southern section. West of the Lechaion road and North of the agora stood the old temple of Apollo
Durham Rite - It was introduced into the Abbey of Durham and spread into the entire diocese and, by the middle of the 13th century, elsewhere in the North of England
Free Will Baptists - Religious body organized in Chowan County, North Carolina, in 1727 by Elder Paul Palmer
Etam - It was near Bethlehem and Tekoah, and some distance apparently to the North of (1)
Hazeroth - This third encampment of the Israelites has been identified with the modern 'Ain el-Hudhera, some 40 miles North-east of Sinai. From this encampment the Israelites marched Northward across the plateau of et-Tih, and at length reached KADESH
Bethsaida - It is supposed to have been at the modern 'Ain Tabighah, a bay to the North of Gennesaret
Steel - It has been inferred from a passage in (Jeremiah 15:12 ) that the "iron from the North" there spoken of denoted a superior kind of metal, hardened in an unusual manner, like the steel obtained from the Chalybes of the Pontus, the iron smiths of the ancient world
Macedonia - In New Testament times, was a Roman province lying North of Greece
Campion, Edmund, Blessed - An alarm was raised against him, and he was obliged to seek refuge in the North
Bethshemesh - A Levitical town on the North border of Judah, whither the ark was miraculously guided by God when sent back by the Philistines from Ekron, and where the people were smitten for looking into it
Shunem - Two resting-places, a little village in the tribe of Issachar, to the North of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa (Joshua 19:18 ), where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Samuel 28:4 ), and where Elisha was hospitably entertained by a rich woman of the place
Ebal - On the North of Shechem, it stands opposed to the fruitful Mount Gerazim, the mount of blessing to the south
Gates of Jerusalem And the Temple - On the North, the principal gateway (Damascus Gate) opened onto the Damascus Road
Sar'Gon - 721 to 706, he gives an account of his warlike expeditions against Babylonia and Susiana on the south, Media on the east, Armenia and Cappadocia toward the North, Syria, Palestine, Arabia and Egypt toward the west and southwest
Ramah - RAMAH (Matthew 2:18) was a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:25), the site of which has been identified with er-Râm, a small village situated about 5 miles North of Jerusalem, at an elevation of about 2600 feet above the sea
Medeba - ” City in Transjordan on the main North-south road (the King's Highway) about 25 miles south of Amman
Hermon - A noble mountain on the North-east border of Palestine, forming the highest part of the Anti-Lebanon range
Salem - of the Dead Sea is what necessitates its upholders to seek Salem far North of Jerusalem (Genesis 14:17-18)
Standard - Thus the standard of Judah is called the standard of the camp of Judah, which was on the east; the camp of Reuben on the south; the camp of Ephraim on the west; and the camp of Dan on the North
Aroer - ‘Aroer which is by the brink of the river Arnon’ ( Deuteronomy 2:36 ) is probably the ruin ‘Arâ‘ir , on the North bank of the Wady Mojib (Arnon)
Austria - Independent republic of central Europe, bounded on the North by Germany and Czechoslovakia, east by Czechoslovakia and Hungary, south by Italy and Yugoslavia, west by Switzerland
Galatia - A large district in the centre of Asia Minor, having Bithynia on its North, Pontus on its east, Lycaonia and Cappadocia on its south, and Phrygia on its west
Gad (2) - The territory given to the tribe of Gad lay east of the Jordan, North of that allotted to Reuben, and south of that given to Manasseh on that side of the river
Galatia - A central province of Asia Minor, subject to the Roman rule, bounded by Bithynia and Paphlagonia on the North, Pontus on the east, Cappadocia and Lycaonia on the south, and Phrygia on the west
Gibeah - Joshua 15:57; now probably Jebah, ten miles North of Hebron
Gibeon - A city of the Hivites, Joshua 9:3-21, about six miles North of Jerusalem
Hamath - It was 165 miles in a straight line North of Jerusalem; was visited by the spies, Numbers 13:21, and it is frequently noticed as the Northern boundary of Palestine
Edmund Campion, Saint - An alarm was raised against him, and he was obliged to seek refuge in the North
ze'Bah - ) While Oreb and Zeeb, two of the inferior leaders of the incursion, had been slain, with a vast number of their people, by the Ephraimites, at the central fords of the Jordan the two kings had succeeded in making their escape by a passage farther to the North (probably the ford near Bethshean), and thence by the Wady Yabis , through Gilead, to Kurkor, high up on the Hauran
Palestine - taken in a limited sense, denotes the country of the Philistines or Palestines, including that part of the land of promise which extended along the Mediterranean Sea, from Gaza south to Lydda North
Debir - Place on the North boundary of Judah, near the valley of Achor
Aroer - A city on the Northern bank of the Arnon. Another city, situated farther North, over against Rabbah of Ammon, on a brook of Gad, a branch of the Jabbok
Laver - In Solomon's temple, besides the great molten sea, there were ten lavers of brass, raised on bases, 1 Kings 7:27; 1 Kings 7:39, five on the North and five on the south side of the court of the priests
Shushan - The site is nearly due east of Babylon and North of the Persian Gulf. The king's gate, where Mordecai sat, was probably a hall 100 feet square, 150 feet from the Northern portico
Paran, or el-Paran - On the North, it included the deserts of Kadesh and Zin, Numbers 13:3,21,27 . The Northeast part is traversed from east to west by ranges of hills
Haran - An ancient city called in the New Testament Charran, in the Northwest part of Mesopotamia. Here also Crassus the Roman general was defeated and killed by the Parthiuated on a branch of the Euphrates, in 36 degrees 52' North latitude, and 39 degrees 5' east longitude, in a flat and sandy plain, and is only peopled by a few wandering Arabs, who select it for the delicious water it furnishes
Gibeon - It stood on an eminence, six miles North of Jerusalem
Libya - A country in the North of Africa, stretching along on the Mediterranean between Egypt and Carthage, and running back somewhat into the interior
Hermon - A lofty mountain on the Northeast border of Palestine, called also Sirion Shenir, and Sion, (not Zion,) Deuteronomy 3:8 ; 4:39 . ...
The "little Hermon" of modern travellers, not mentioned in Scripture, is a shapeless mass of hills North of the smaller valley of Jezreel
Baptists, Free Will - Religious body organized in Chowan County, North Carolina, in 1727 by Elder Paul Palmer
Miletus - ...
The apostle Paul, on his voyage from Macedonia toward Jerusalem, spent a day or two here, and held an affecting interview with the Christian elders of Ephesus, who at his summons came nearly thirty miles from the North to meet him, Acts 20:15-38
Rite, Durham - It was introduced into the Abbey of Durham and spread into the entire diocese and, by the middle of the 13th century, elsewhere in the North of England
South America - A southern continental division of the western hemisphere, separating the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and connected with North America by the Isthmus of Panama. The western and Northern regions were colonized by the Spaniards; the eastern by the Portuguese
Right-Hand - In regard to the points of the compass, the right-hand in Hebrew denotes the south, 1 Samuel 23:19 24:1-22 ; as the left-hand means the North, Genesis 14:15
Saba - Saba lies in the Southern Arabian Jof, about 200 miles Northwest of Aden. These details point to two Sabas, one in the south near Hadhramot, one in the North near Taima; the place of their original home cannot be decided, some identify it with the Saba whose queen visited Solomon (3Kings 10). They were very prosperous, agriculture flourished, gold, silver, and precious stones abounded, but their chief source of wealth was the trade route from India to Egypt and Northern Syria
Sabeans - Saba lies in the Southern Arabian Jof, about 200 miles Northwest of Aden. These details point to two Sabas, one in the south near Hadhramot, one in the North near Taima; the place of their original home cannot be decided, some identify it with the Saba whose queen visited Solomon (3Kings 10). They were very prosperous, agriculture flourished, gold, silver, and precious stones abounded, but their chief source of wealth was the trade route from India to Egypt and Northern Syria
Georgia - They were accompanied by the Abbe Le Moine (died 1796), who served them first in a little colony called Maryland, about 50 miles North of Augusta
Hawaii - The 50th state to be admitted to the United States, and comprising a group of islands situated in the Pacific Ocean between 18° 54' and 22° 15' North latitude, and between 154° 50' and 160° 30' west longitude
ha'Zor - (Joshua 11:1 ; Judges 4:2,17 ; 1 Samuel 12:9 ) It was the principal city of the whole of North Palestine
Philis'Tia - It was 40 miles long on the coast of the Mediterranean between Gerar and Joppa, and 10 miles wide at the Northern end and 20 at the southern. It was, moreover, a commercial country: from its position it must have been at all times the great thoroughfare between Phoenicia and Syria in the North and Egypt and Arabia in the south
Per'Gamos - (in Revised Version Pergamum ) ( height, elevation ), a city of Mysia, about 3 miles to the North of the river Caicus, and 20 miles from its present mouth
Gala'Tia - The Roman province of Galatia may be roughly described as the central region of the peninsula of Asia Minor, bounded on the North by Bithynia and Paphlagonia; on the east by Pontus; on the south by Cappadocia and Lycaonia; on the west by Phrygia
di'Bon - Jere 48:24 In modern times the name Dhiban has been discovered as attached to extensive ruins on the Roman road, about three miles North of the Arnon ( Wady Modjeb )
e'Bal, Mount, - (11:26-29) Ebal and Gerizim are the mounts which form the sides of the fertile valley in which lies Nablus , the ancient Shechem-Ebal on the North and Gerizim on the south
Berea - The town was in the province of Macedonia in Northern Greece, on the main road from Thessalonica in the North to Athens in the south
Euphrates - It was then the boundary of the kingdom to the North-east. , "the black river"), which rises 25 miles North-east of Erzeroum; and (2) the Muradchai (i. , "the river of desire"), which rises near Ararat, on the Northern slope of Ala-tagh
Euraquilo - The word is a hybrid, made up of Eurus (εὗρος), the cast wind-an ordinary meaning in the Latin poets, though εὖρος properly meant the south-east-and Aquilo, the North-east wind, so that it denotes the east-north-east wind
Sinai - The Sinai Peninsular is the dry region that lies south of Palestine between the two Northern arms of the Red Sea. Within it are the semi-desert regions known as the Wilderness of Shur in the North and the Wilderness of Paran in the North-east
Kadesh-Barnea - Both of these sites are in the Northern part of the Sinai Peninsula, and both have a spring. Most scholars today accept Ein el-Qudeirat because of its abundance of water (the largest springs and oasis in Northern Sinai). Likewise, the location of Kadesh-Barnea along the North-south road may explain the rationale for attempting the invasion of Canaan at Arad, since Arad lay North of Kadesh-Barnea on that road
Pole - ) Either extremity of an axis of a sphere; especially, one of the extremities of the earth's axis; as, the North pole. ) One of the opposite or contrasted parts or directions in which a polar force is manifested; a point of maximum intensity of a force which has two such points, or which has polarity; as, the poles of a magnet; the North pole of a needle
Gog And Magog - MAGOG, the son of Japheth (Genesis 10:2 ), whose descendants spread over the vast steppes in the North, after whom the land is here called. These, 'coming out of the North,' as a cloud to cover the land,' will attack Israel in the land of Palestine, but will be smitten by God
Macedonia - A large country lying North of Greece proper, bounded south by Thessaly and Epirus, east by Thrace and the Aegean sea, west by the Adriatic Sea and Illyria, and North by Dardania and Moesia
Galilee - In the time of Christ, included all the Northern part of Palestine lying west of the Jordan and North of Samaria. Before the exile the name seems to have been applied only to a small tract bordering on the Northern limits, 1 Kings 9:11 . Galilee, in the time of Christ, was divided into Upper and Lower, the former lying North of the territory of the tribe of Zebulun, and abounding in mountains; the latter being more level and fertile, and very populous; the whole comprehending the four tribes of Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher
Gibeah - This Gibeah has usually been located at el-Jeba, seven and a half miles southwest of Bethlehem, but this is too far North to be connected with clans of Caleb. ...
Isaiah shows it was on the natural path of march for an enemy army such as the Assyrians attacking Jerusalem from the North. ...
Gibeah is located at tell el-Ful on a high ridge three and a half miles North of Jerusalem
Rhegium - The actual place of crossing to Messana (now Messina) was, and still is, about 8 miles North of the city, at Columna Rhegina (ἡ Ῥηγίνων στυλίς), now Villa San Giovanni, where the channel is only 5 miles wide. Smith, who writes, ‘I am inclined to suppose that the wind was North-west, and that they worked to windward’ (The Voyage and Shipwreck of St. If the North-west breeze was still blowing, they could not go through the Straits, where there is scarcely enough sea-room for successful tacking; but when the wind veered to south they ran before it to Puteoli, a distance of 180 miles, in little more than a day (28:13)
Captivity - There is nothing in the passage to fix the date, but in 2 Kings 15:29 is another reference to Israel when Tiglath-pileser took Ijon, Abel-beth-maachah, Janoah, Kedesh, and Hazor, which are all in the North on the west of the Jordan; butthen is added Gilead, which is on the east, and this may be intended to embrace the two and a half tribes; then Galilee with all the land of Naphtali is added, which is again in the North on the west. These places are supposed to be in the North of Assyria; but in the above passage in Kings the words are added "and in the cities of the Medes
Zion or Sion - It was separated from Akra on the North and Moriah on the North-west by the valley Tyropeon; and had the valley of Gihon on the west, that of Hinnom on the south, and that of the Kidron on the south-east. He seems to have greatly delighted in its beauty and strength, and to have loved it as a type of the church of the Messiah: "Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion on the sides of the North, the city of the great King
Tabor - The ascent is so easy, that we rode up the North side by a winding road. The top of it, about half a mile long, and near a quarter of a mile broad, is encompassed with a wall, which Josephus says was built in forty days: there was also a wall along the middle of it, which divided the south part, on which the city stood, from the North part, which is lower, and is called the meidan, or place, being probably used for exercises when there was a city here, which Josephus mentions by the name of Ataburion. Within the outer wall on the North side are several deep fosses, out of which, it is probable, the stones were dug to build the walls; and these fosses seem to have answered the end of cisterns, to preserve the rain water, and were also some defence to the city. On the North- west you discern at a distance the Mediterranean, and all round you have the spacious and beautiful plains of Esdraelon and Galilee. A few points to the North appears that which they call the mount of Beatitudes
Golgotha - Two objections are urged against this: (a) that the Gospel narratives imply that the road passing Golgotha was a more frequented thoroughfare than this road to Bethany, and that the great highways of Jerusalem are all on the North and west of the city; and (b) that there is no skull-shaped site in this region. The first wall, that of David and Solomon, encompassed the Upper City (Zion), and its North line ran eastward from the tower of Hippicus to the wall bounding the temple area. ‘The second wall had its beginning from the gate called Gennath, which belonged to the first wall, and, encircling only the Northern quarter of the city, it extended as far as the Tower Antonia’ (BJ v. Immediately east of the Tower of David (at or near which Hippicus must have stood) a narrow ridge runs North and south, connecting the two hills Zion and Acra and separating the head of the Tyropœon Valley from the valley west of the Jaffa gate. One hundred and twenty feet of it were exposed in a line running North-west and south-east, at a depth of 10 or 12 ft. long, of similar work, was found farther North, besides traces at several other points. In explanation of the fact that entire sections are found towards the south and only debris of walls towards the North, Dr. Merrill cites the statement of Josephus, that Titus ‘threw down the entire Northern portion,’ but left the southern standing and placed garrisons in its towers. From the statement that Titus made his attack ‘against the central tower of the North wall’ he argues further, that if the wall ran from near Hippicus to Antonia in such a way as to exclude the traditional site of the Sepulchre, the two parts of the wall after it was broken in the middle should have been designated the ‘eastern’ and ‘western’; but Josephus calls them the ‘northern’ and ‘southern,’ a description which is obviously more appropriate to a wall which ran well to the west and North of the traditional site (Presb. ’ The third wall, which ran far to the North-west and North of the present city wall, was built by Agrippa only ten or eleven years after the Crucifixion, to enclose a large suburb that had gradually extended beyond the second wall. So that, even if it could be shown that the Sepulchre was outside the second wall, it certainly lay far within the line of the third, and in the midst of this new town which at the time of the Crucifixion must have been already growing North of the second wall. The theory that Golgotha is the skull-shaped knoll above Jeremiah’s grotto, outside the present North wall, near the Damascus gate, was first suggested by Otto Thenius in 1849. It answers all the requirements of the Gospel narratives, being outside the walls, nigh to the city, in a conspicuous position, near a frequented thoroughfare—the main North road, and near to ancient Jewish rock-hewn tombs, one of which was discovered by Conder about 700 ft. ’ The great cemetery of Jewish times lay North of the city. The castle seems to have been itself a part of the outer ramparts on the North-east, with the North wall of the temple area stretching from it to the east and the second city wall to the North-west. What more natural than that there should have been a road leading directly from Antonia to the open country Northwards? Here, accordingly, only a short distance North of the city, we find the remains of a Roman road
Loaves of Proposition - It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an altar-like table placed along the North wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
Madeleine Sophie Barat, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Rimmon - This Rimmon is the modern Rummâneh , North of Nazareth
Knownothingism - The adherents of the movement, mostly lawless bigots, and later called "Know-Nothings" from their habit of answering "I don't know," to all questions relating to their affairs, were united in New York City, 1852, under the title "National Council of the United States of North America
Merarites - Their place in marching and in the camp was on the North of the tabernacle
South - "The Negeb comprised a considerable but irregularly-shaped tract of country, its main portion stretching from the mountains and lowlands of Judah in the North to the mountains of Azazemeh in the south, and from the Dead Sea and southern Ghoron the east to the Mediterranean on the west
Siloam, Tower of - The place here spoken of is the village now called Silwan, or Kefr Silwan, on the east of the valley of Kidron, and to the North-east of the pool
Golgotha - " The hillock above Jeremiah's Grotto, to the North of the city, is in all probability the true site of Calvary
Ramathaim-Zophim - ...
This town has been identified with the modern Neby Samwil ("the prophet Samuel"), about 4 or 5 miles North-west of Jerusalem
Border - ) To be, or to have, contiguous to; to touch, or be touched, as by a border; to be, or to have, near the limits or boundary; as, the region borders a forest, or is bordered on the North by a forest
Gebal - and in many Egyptian and Assyrian texts through the centuries, Gebal was located at modern Dschebel about 25 miles North of Beirut. It is the Northern part of Arabia near Petra in the mountainous country south of the Dead Sea
Mesopotamia - At times in antiquity the culture of Mesopotamia dominated an even larger area, spreading east into Elam and Media, North into Asia Minor, and following the fertile cresent into Canaan and Egypt. Both the Northern Kingdom of Israel (2 Kings 15:29 ; 1 Chronicles 5:26 ) and the Southern Kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 24:14-16 ; 2 Chronicles 36:20 ; Ezra 2:1 ) went into Exile in Mesopotamia
Michmash - ” City in Benjamin about seven miles Northeast of Jerusalem, four and a half miles Northeast of Gibeah, rising 1980 feet above sea level overlooking a pass going from the Jordan River to Ephraim. It lay on the standard invasion route from the North (Isaiah 10:28 )
Macedonia - Macedonia is situated in a great basin North of Greece, nearly surrounded by the mountains and the sea
Libnah - Debate rages concerning Libnah's location: tell es-Safi at the head of the Elah Valley appears too far North; tell Bornat just west of Lachish; tell el-Judeideh, usually identified as Moresheth-gath
Naphtali - The tribe which bears his name inhabited a territory North of the Sea of Galilee that extend along the Northwest side of Jordan beyond Lake Huleh (Joshua 19:32-39 )
Holy Place - Inside the holy place, just in front of the veil screening the entrance of the holy of holies, stood the altar of incense; along the North wall stood the table of the shewbread, and the ten lamp-stands, five on the right side and five on the left, which seem to have superseded the seven-branched lamp-stand of the Tabernacle
Kenath - To speak of Qanawât as ‘in the remote North-east’ (Moore), conveys a wrong impression
Kir - It has been identified with Kur , a river flowing into the Caspian Sea; with Cyropolis ; with the Syrian province of Cyrrhestica ; with Cyrene ; with Kurenia in Media; with Kuris , North of Aleppo; with Koa of Ezekiel 23:23 , which has been supposed to be the same as the Gutium of the Bab
Olives, Mount of - Heavily covered with olive trees, the ridge juts out in a North-south direction (like a spur) from the range of mountains running down the center of the region. Both the central Mount of Olives and Mount Scopus, the peak on its Northern side, rise over two hundred feet above the Temple mount across the Kidron Valley
Midian - In the days of the Judges they extended further North and made inroads into central Palestine
Henry Coleridge - He served as professor of Scripture at Saint Beuno's in North Wales from 1859-1865
Barat, Madeleine Sophie, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Table of Showbread - The table was put in the holy place on the North side
Orient - ) To place (a map or chart) so that its east side, North side, etc
Sea - ) One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea
Hazor - " It is supposed to have been the home of Judas Iscariot, the man of Kerioth, Matthew 10:4; Conder suggested Kheshram, North of Beer-sheba, as the site of this Hazor
c Sarea-Philippi - Cæsarea-Philippi (sĕs-a-rç'ah-fĭ-lĭp'pî), now called Banias by the Arabs, is a town at the base of Mount Hermon, about 20 miles North of the Sea of Galilee and 45 miles southwest of Damascus. It was the Northern limit of our Lord's journeys, Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27, and was probably Baal-gad of Old Testament history
a'Ven -
The "plain of Aven" is mentioned by (Amos 1:5 ) in his denunciation of Syria and the country to the North of Palestine. It was situated in a plain near the foot of the Anti-Libanus range of mountains, 42 miles Northwest of Damascus
Rim'Mon -
A city of Zebulun (1 Chronicles 6:77 ; Nehemiah 11:29 ) a Levitical city, the present Rummaneh , six miles North of Nazareth
Laver - (Leviticus 8:10,11 ) ...
In Solomon's temple, besides the great molten sea, there were ten lavers of brass, raised on bases, (1 Kings 7:27,39 ) five on the North and five on the south side of the court of the priests
Aphek - A city of Asher, Joshua 19:30, in the North of Palestine, near Sidon, Joshua 13:4; supposed to be the same as Aphik, Judges 1:31, and the classical Aphaca, noted in later history for its temple of Venus; now Afka, near Lebanon. A place where the Philistines encamped before the ark was taken, 1 Samuel 4:1, Northwest of Jerusalem and near Shocho, now Belled el-Foka
Kedesh - Now it is a small village, Kades, ten miles North of Safed and four miles Northwest of Merom, beautifully situated on a high ridge jutting out in the depressed basin through which the Jordan flows to the Sea of Merom
Roman Empire - It reached to the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the African desert, the Nile cataracts, and the Arabian deserts on the south, the Rhine, the Danube, and the Black Sea on the North
Ur - They are of an oval shape, and measure about half a mile from North to south
Shewbread - It refers to twelve loaves of unleavened bread, made each of two-tenths of an epha (four-fifths of a peck) of the finest flour, set in two piles (Leviticus 24) upon an altar-like table placed along the North wall of the holy place (3Kings 7)
Pergamos - The modern city, called Bergamo, lies twenty miles from the sea on the North side of the river Caicus, and contains twelve thousand inhabitants
Tinneh - An aboriginal race of North America, also called Athapascans, found throughout the length of the Rockies, east and west. They form three groups: the Southern, composed of the Apaches, the Navajo, and several Mexican tribes; the Pacific Denes of Washington, Oregon, and California; and the Northern, the most important, to which the Loucheux, Chippewayans, Montagnais, Sekanais, Babines, and Nahanais belong
Ebal - Now Jebel esh-Shemali , a mountain North of Nablus (Shechem), 1207 ft
Conduit - The location of the Jerusalem conduit is a matter of debate with different scholars favoring the Pool of Siloam, the Gihon Spring, or outside the wall to the Northwest of the city beside the major North-south highway leading to Samaria
Society of the Blessed Sacrament - The general mother-house is at Rome; the novitiate for North America at Quebec, Canada
Cilicia - The south-eastern province of Asia Minor, bounded North by the Taurus range, separating it from Cappadocia, Lycaonia, and Isauria, south by the Mediterranean, east by Syria, and west by Pamphylia
ba'Shan - It extended from the "border of Gilead" on the south to Mount Hermon on the North, (3:3,10,14; Joshua 12:5 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) and from the Arabah or Jordan valley on the west to Salchah (Sulkhad ) and the border of the Geshurites and the Maachathites on the east
ra'Moth-Gil'Ead - It may correspond to the site bearing the name of Jel'ad , exactly identical with the ancient Hebrew Gilead, which is four or five miles North of es-Salt , 25 miles east of the Jordan and 13 miles south of the brook Jabbok
Lycao'Nia - "Cappadocia is on the east, Galatia on the North, Phrygia on the west and Cilicia on the south "Among its chief cities are Derbe, Lystra and Iconium
Rim'Mon -
A city of Zebulun (1 Chronicles 6:77 ; Nehemiah 11:29 ) a Levitical city, the present Rummaneh , six miles North of Nazareth
Naph'Tali - (Numbers 26:48-50 ) During the march through the wilderness Naphtali occupied a position on the North of the sacred tent with Dan and Asher. (In the division of the kingdom Naphtali belonged to the kingdom of Israel, and later was a part of Galilee, bordering on the Northwestern pert of the Sea of Galilee, and including Capernaum and Bethsaida
Judaea, Judea - The land was thus divided by Rome, with Samaria in the centre, and Galilee in the North
Edrei - City of Naphtali in the North, near Kedesh
Joppa - It lay between the plain of Sharon to the North and the land of the Philistines to the south
Issachar - The tribe descended from him inherited land that covered the important Plain of Esdraelon and Valley of Jezreel in Northern Israel (see PALESTINE; JEZREEL). This territory lay between Mt Tabor to the North and Mt Gilboa to the south (Joshua 19:17-23)
Corinth - An overland route went North from Corinth to Macedonia, and sea routes went east, west and south
Capernaum - The important town of Capernaum was on the North-west shore of the Sea of Galilee
Jerusalem - This sloping ground is also terminated on the south by the deep and narrow valley of Hinnom, which constituted the ancient southern boundary of the city, and which also ascends on its west side, and comes out upon the high ground on the Northwest. On its North and east sides lay the smaller valley "of the cheesemongers," or Tyropoeon also united, near the Northeast foot of Zion, with a valley coming down from the North. The Tyropoeon separated it from Acra on the North and Moriah on the Northeast. ACRA was less elevated than Zion, or than the ground to the Northwest beyond the walls. " MORIAH , the sacred hill, lay Northeast of Zion, with which it was anciently connected at its nearest corner, by a bridge over the Tyropoeon, some remnants of which have been identified by Dr. It was but a part of the continuous ridge on the east side of the city, overlooking the deep valley of the Kidron; rising on the North, after a slight depression, into the hill Bezetha, the "new city" of Joephus, and sinking away on the south into the hill Ophel. On the east of Jerusalem, and stretching from North to south, lies the Mount of Olives, divided from the city by the valley of the Kidron, and commanding a noble prospect of the city and surrounding county. Over against Moriah, or a little further North, lies the garden of Gethsemane, with its olive trees, at the foot of the Mount of Olives. In the valley west and Northwest of Zion are the two pools of Gihon, the lower being now broken and dry. ...
A second wall, built by Jotham, Hezekiah, and Manasseh, made some changes on the southern line, and inclosed a large additional space on the North. It commenced somewhat east of the tower of Hippicus, on the Northwest border of Zion, included Acra and part of Bezetha, and united with the old wall on the east. ...
The third wall, commenced by Herod Agrippa only ten years after the crucifixion of Christ, ran from the tower Hippicus nearly half a mile Northwest to the tower of Psephinos, and sweeping round by the "tombs of the kings," passed down east of Bezetha, and joined the old eastern wall. Now it is only two and three quarters at the most; and the large space on the North, which the wall of Agrippa inclosed, is proved to have been built upon by the numerous cisterns which yet remain, and the marble fragments which the plough often turns up. This area, 510 yards long from North to south, and 310 to 350 yards in breadth, is inclosed by high walls, the lower stones of which are in many parts very large, and much more ancient than the superstructure. From this corner, the wall runs irregularly west by south, crosses mount Zion, leaving the greater part of it uninclosed on the south, and at its western verge turns North to the Jaffa gate, where the lower part of a very old and strong tower still remains. Thence the wall sweeps irregularly round to the Northeast corner. There are now in use only four gates: the Jaffa or Bethlehem gate on the west, the Damascus gate on the North, St. In the eastern wall of El-Haram is the Golden gate, long since blocked up, and in the city wall two smaller gates, more recently closed, namely, Herod's gate on the North-east, and Dung gate in the Tyropoeon on the south. At the Northwest corner of Zion rises the high square citadel above referred to, ancient and grand. Still farther North is the Latin convent, in the most westerly part of Jerusalem; and between it and the center of the city stands the church of the Holy Sepulchre, over the traditional scenes of the death and the resurrection of our Lord. The Moslemim reside in the center of the city, and towards the North and east. The Jews' quarter is on the Northeast side of Zion
Bethlehem - It is first noticed in Scripture as the place where Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside," directly to the North of the city (Genesis 48:7 ). Now Beit-Lahm, a ruined village about 6 miles west-north-west of Nazareth
Gad - ...
The portion allotted to the tribe of Gad was on the east of Jordan, and comprehended the half of Gilead, a region of great beauty and fertility (Deuteronomy 3:12 ), bounded on the east by the Arabian desert, on the west by the Jordan (Joshua 13:27 ), and on the North by the river Jabbok. It thus included the whole of the Jordan valley as far North as to the Sea of Galilee, where it narrowed almost to a point. It was carried into captivity at the same time as the other tribes of the Northern kingdom by Tiglath-pileser (1 Chronicles 5:26 ), and in the time of (Jeremiah 49:1 ) their cities were inhabited by the Ammonites
Gibeah - The road to Jeba‘ leads off the main road immediately to the North of the site. It appears in the description of Sennacherib’s advance from the North ( Isaiah 10:28-32 )
Jericho - A city of Benjamin, Joshua 16:7 18:21 , about eighteen miles east North east of Jerusalem, and seven miles from the Jordan. The city destroyed by Joshua may have been nearer to the fountain of Elisha, supposed to be the present Ain es-Sultan, two miles Northwest of Rihah. On the west and North of Jericho rise high limestone hills, one of which, the dreary Quarantana, 1,200 or 1,500 feet high, derives its name from the modern tradition that it was the scene of our Lord's forty days' fast and temptation
Leb'Anon, - a mountain range in the North of Palestine. Lebanon is represented in Scripture as lying upon the Northern border of the land of Israel. They run in parallel lines from southwest to Northeast for about 90 geographical miles, enclosing between them a long, fertile valley from five to eight miles wide, anciently called Coele-Syria . ( Joshua 13:5 )
Lebanon --the western range-- commences on the south of the deep ravine of the Litany , the ancient river Leontes, which drains the valley of Cole-Syria, and falls into the Mediterranean five miles North of Tyre. It runs Northeast in a straight line parallel to the coast, to the opening from the Mediterranean into the plain of Emesa, called in Scripture the "entrance of Hamath. " ( Numbers 34:8 ) Here Nehr el-Kebir --the ancient river Eleutherus-- sweeps round its Northern end, as the Leontes does round its southern. --The main chain of Anti-Libanus commences in the plateau of Bashan, near the parallel of Caesarea Philippi, runs North to Hermon, and then Northeast in a straight line till it stinks down into the great plain of Emesa, not far from the site of Riblah. Hermon is the loftiest peak; the next highest is a few miles North of the site of Abila, beside the village of Bludan , and has an elevation of about 7000 feet
Galatians, Epistle to the - ...
The epistle was probably addressed to the churches in Galatia Proper, situated in the North-central part of Asia Minor. Hence there are two theories regarding the churches addressed, the North Galatian and the South Galatian theories. The North Galatian theory never lacked able defenders and in recent years has been coming into favor again; its chief recommendation is that it better satisfies the strict demands of the text of the epistle especially in the phrase "through infirmity of the flesh" (4:13) in which Paul says that he had first preached among the Galatians because of some illness
Cilicia - of Asia Minor, bounded on the west by Pamphylia, on the North by Lycaonia and Cappadocia, and on the east by the Amanus range. Though this country formed a part of the peninsula of Asia Minor, its political, social, and religious affinities were rather with Syria than with the lands to the North and west. It was comparatively easy to cross the Amanus range, either by the Syrian Gates (Beilan Pass) to Antioch and Syria, or by the Amanan Gates (Baghche Pass) to North Syria and the Euphrates
Epistle to the Galatians - ...
The epistle was probably addressed to the churches in Galatia Proper, situated in the North-central part of Asia Minor. Hence there are two theories regarding the churches addressed, the North Galatian and the South Galatian theories. The North Galatian theory never lacked able defenders and in recent years has been coming into favor again; its chief recommendation is that it better satisfies the strict demands of the text of the epistle especially in the phrase "through infirmity of the flesh" (4:13) in which Paul says that he had first preached among the Galatians because of some illness
Nazareth - A city of lower Galilee, about seventy miles North of Jerusalem, in the territory of the tribe of Zebulun. Nazareth is about six miles west North west of Mount Tabor, and nearly half way form the Jordan to the Mediterranean. Towards the North, the eye glances over the countless hills of Galilee, and reposes on the majestic and snow-crowned Hermon
Scotland - Nation in Northwest Europe and a constituent country of the United Kingdom. It occupies the Northern third of the island of Great Britain, shares a land border to the south with England and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the North and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the southwest. The earliest period of Scottish Church history was that of the monasteries, and the first and most notable figure was Saint Columba, apostle of the Northern Picts. The reign of Malcolm III and his queen, Saint Margaret, during which the Church of Scotland was brought into unity with the rest of Catholic Christendom, saw the restoration of the monastery of Iona, the building of numerous churches, and the spread of the faith into the islands North and west of Scotland. King James VI (I of England), although he promised conciliatory measures towards his Catholic subjects, personally led an at tack against the Catholic nobles of the North in 1594, which culminated in the extinction of Catholicism as a political force to be reckoned with in Scotland
Bulrush - It is no longer found in Egypt, but grows luxuriantly in Palestine, in the marshes of the Huleh, and in the swamps at the North end of the Lake of Gennesaret
Hormah - ...
The site controlled the east-west road in the Beersheba Valley and the North-south road to Hebron
Jerusalem - (Hebrew: salim, peace) ...
Ancient city in Palestine, the religious and political center of the Israelites, situated 15 miles west of the Jordan on the crest of a chain of mountains which traverses Palestine from North to south
Par'Thians - It lay south of Hyrcania, east of Media and North of Sagartia
Tabor - ) "The prominence and isolation of Tabor, standing, as it does, on the border-land between the Northern and southern tribes, between the mountains and the central plain, made it a place of note in all ages, and evidently led the psalmist to associate it with Hermon, the one emblematic of the south, the other of the North
Ziklag - Conder, however, identifies it with Khirbet Zuheilikah, ruins found on three hills half a mile apart, some seventeen miles North-west of Beersheba, on the confines of Philistia, Judah, and Amalek
Ajalon - ...
A city in the tribe of Zebulun (Judges 12:12 ), the modern Jalun, three miles North of Cabul
Succoth - ...
...
A city on the east of Jordan, identified with Tell Dar'ala, a high mound, a mass of debris, in the plain North of Jabbok and about one mile from it (Joshua 13:27 )
Kirjath-Jearim - , "city of grapes"), among the hills, about 8 miles North-east of 'Ain Shems (i
Abarim - ...
Some identify mount Attarous, the loftiest hill in this region, ten miles North of the river Arnon, with Nebo
Antiochus - He is regarded as the "king of the North" referred to in Daniel 11:13-19
Gedor - It is located at khirbet Judur three miles North of Hebron and Beth-zur and west of Tekoa
Nazareth - A town in the North border of the Plain of Esdraelon
Nicholas Breakspear - Apostle of the North; probably born c
Tim'Nah -
A place which formed one of the landmarks on the North boundary of the allotment of Judah
Baana - Another district supervisor over Asher, the western slopes of Galilee in the North
Kiriath-Jearim - ” Kiriath-Jearim was located at modern Abu Gosh nine miles North of Jerusalem. It was on the border where Dan, Benjamin, and Judah joined before Dan began their migration Northward (Joshua 15:9 ,Joshua 15:9,15:60 ; Joshua 18:14-15 )
Meshech - ), the former lying to the North-east of Cilicia and the latter eastward between them and the Euphrates
Ethiopians - In earlier days Napata, a town on the Nile, somewhat North or Meroë, which was likewise on the Nile, had been the capital; but though Napata still retained some of its prestige as the sacred city, yet the seat of government had been removed to Meroë
Andalusia, Spain - It is bounded on the North by the Sierra Morena, on the east by the provinces of Albacete and Murcia and the Mediterranean, on the south by the Mediterranean, Gibraltar, and the Atlantic Ocean, and on the west by Portugal
Border - ...
BORD'ER, To confine to touch at the edge, side or end to be contiguous or adjacent with on or upon as, Connecticut on the North borders on or upon Massachusetts
Sorek - On the south is Timnath, where Samson slew the lion; on the North are Sur'a and Eshu'a, the ancient Zoreah and Eshtaol
Amplitude - It is also Northern or southern, when North or south of the equator
Bite - To pinch or pain, as with cold as a biting North wind the frost bites
Incline - A road inclines to the North or south
Gilgal - As Bethel is 3300 feet above the Jordan plain, it must have been a Gilgal not in that plain, It has been identified with Jiljilia, 8 miles North of Bethel, where the school of the prophets was probably established
Adrian iv, Pope - Apostle of the North; probably born c
Abana - Here it turns eastward, and flowing along the North wall of the city takes its way across the plain to the two Northern lakes
Candlestick - In the first temple there were ten candelabra of pure gold, half of them standing on the North, and half on the south side, Within the Holy Place
Tabor - It rises abruptly from the Northeastern arm of the plain of Esdraelon, and stands entirely isolated except on the west, where a narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Nazareth. It is six miles east of Nazareth, and about 50 miles North of Jerusalem
Megid'do - It commanded one of those passes from the North into the hill country which were of such critical importance on various occasions in the history of Judea
Macedonia - a kingdom of Greece, having Thrace to the North, Thessaly south, Epirus west, and the AEgean Sea east
Left - ) That part of surrounding space toward which the left side of one's body is turned; as, the house is on the left when you face North
Bethel - A town about twelve miles North of Jerusalem
Nebo - , identify it with Mount Attarus, about ten miles North of the Arnon
Lean - We say, a column leans to the North or to the east it leans to the right or left
Benjamin - It was valiant, Genesis 49:27 , and "beloved of the Lord," dwelling safely by him, Deuteronomy 33:12 ; for its territory adjoined Judah and the Holy City on the North
Sabbath - The heathen nations in the North of Europe dedicated this day to the sun, and hence their christian descendants continue to call the day Sunday
Almond Tree; Almond - ( Jeremiah 1:11,12 ) The almond tree is a native of Asia and North Africa, but it is cultivated in the milder parts of Europe
Jezreel - Among the important centres of Northern Israel was the town of Jezreel in the tribal territory of Issachar (Joshua 19:17-18). ) Jezreel of the North was situated on the edge of the Plain of Esdraelon, where the plain began to slope down into the Valley of Jezreel
Wilderness - " This entire region is in the form of a triangle, having its base toward the North and its apex toward the south. Its extent from North to south is about 250 miles, and at its widest point it is about 150 miles broad. The Northern part of this triangular peninsula is properly the "wilderness of the wanderings" (et-Tih)
Eleazar - , in the city of Phinehas, which has been identified, in accordance with Jewish and Samaritan traditions, with Kefr Ghuweirah='Awertah, about 7 miles North of Shiloh, and a few miles south-east of Nablus. " Others, however, have identified it with the village of Gaba or Gebena of Eusebius, the modern Khurbet Jibia, 5 miles North of Guphna towards Nablus
Nob - A sacerdotal city in Benjamin, on a height near Jerusalem; the last stage of Sennacherib's march from the North on Jerusalem, from whence he could see and "shake his hand against Zion" (Isaiah 10:28-32). of the North road, opposite Shafat, is a tell with cisterns hewn in the rock and traces of a town (Courier, Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement)
Naphtali - ...
Their possession, which was mountainous and fertile, was in the North with the upper Jordan on the east and Asher in the west. Ijon, which was farther North than Dan, was in their land
Melita - And it lies North-west by North of the southwest promontory of Crete; and came nearly in the direction of a storm from the south-east quarter
Olives, Mount of - Ezekiel 11:23 , called also OLIVET, 2 Samuel 15:30 , a ridge running North and south on the east side of Jerusalem, its summit about half a mile from the city wall, and separated from it by the valley of the Kidron. ...
The central summit rises two hundred feet above Jerusalem, and presents a fine view of the city, and indeed of the whole region, including the mountains of Ephraim on the North, the valley of the Jordan on the east, a part of the Dead Sea on the southeast, and beyond it Kerak in the mountains of Moab
Olives, Mount of - It is a ridge of rather more than a mile in length, running in general direction North and south, covering the whole eastern side of the city. At its Northern end the ridge bends round to the west so as to form an enclosure to the city on that side also. On the North a space of nearly a mile of tolerably level surface intervenes between the walls of the city and the rising ground; on the east the mount is close to the walls, parted only by the narrow ravine of the Kidron. Proceeding from North to south there occur four independent summits, called -- 1, "Viri Galilaei:" 2, "Mount of Ascension;" 3, "Prophets" --subordinate to the last and almost a part of it; 4, "Mount of Offence. Three paths lead from the valley to the summit-one on the North, in the hollow between the two crests of the hill another over the summit, and a third winding around the southern shoulder still the most frequented and the best. " It stands directly opposite the Northeast corner of Jerusalem, and is approached by the path between it and the "Mount of Ascension. It is only in the deeper and more secluded slope leading up to the Northernmost summit that these venerable trees spread into anything like a forest
Paulinus, Missionary to Northumbria - Paulinus (20), the first Christian missionary from Rome to Northumbria, and the bishop who begins the recognized succession in the archiepiscopal see of York. ...
In 625 Edwin, king of Northumbria, wished to marry Ethelburga, daughter of Eadbald, king of Kent, who objected to a pagan son-in-law. Here was an opportunity for evangelizing Northumbria, and Eadbald sent his daughter. ...
Northumbria was now opened to the missionary work of Paulinus, and his time fully occupied. of Northumberland retains the great preacher's name. ...
In 633, after six years of unceasing and successful exertion, the labours of Paulinus in the North came abruptly to a close. Edwin fell in battle at Hatfield, near Doncaster, and the disaster was so complete that the newborn Christianity of the North seemed utterly overwhelmed by the old idolatry. Paulinus thought that he owed his first duty to the widowed queen who had come with him into Northumbria, and he took her back, with her children and suite, to Kent. In the autumn of 633 he received from the pope, who had not heard of the great disaster in the North, a pall designed for his use as archbp. Whether or no, by virtue of the gift of this pall, he has a just claim to be considered an archbishop, he never went back to Northumbria. Among the relics in York minster were a few of his bones and two teeth, but nothing else to commemorate his great work in the North, save an altar which bore his name and that of Chad conjoined
Galatia - His success, however, proved costly both to himself and to his neighbours, for his new barbaric allies established themselves as a robber-State and became the scourge of Asia Minor, exacting tribute from all the rulers North and west of Taurus, some of whom were fain to purchase exemption from their degradations by employing them as mercenary soldiers. Defeating them in a series of battles, which are commemorated in the famous Pergamene sculptures, he compelled them to form a permanent settlement with definite boundaries in North-eastern Phrygia. Both the old, or North Galatian, hypothesis and the new, or South Galatian, are championed by an apparently equal number of distinguished scholars. Paul’s first mission North of Taurus was conducted in the Greek-speaking cities of Antioch and Iconium (which were Phrygian), Lystra and Derbe (which were Lycaonian)-all in the Provincia Galatia, but far from Galatia proper. What more natural, ask the South Galatian theorists, than that this much-frequented district should become the storm-centre of a Judaistic controversy, and that the Apostle should write the most militant and impassioned of all his letters in defence of the spiritual liberty of the converts of his pioneer mission? On the North Galatian theory, the founding of churches, say in Pessinus, Ancyra, and Tavium, and their subsequent development, had much more to do with the extension and triumph of apostolic Christianity among the Gentiles-which was St. Luke’s theme-than the planting of the South Galatian churches, and the historian who manifests no interest in North Galatia stands convicted of shifting the centre of gravity to the wrong place. ...
The North Galatian school accounts for the historian’s neglect of Galatia proper, and for the curtness of his narrative at this vital point (Acts 16:6-8), by his desire ‘to got Paul across to Europe’ (Moffatt, Introd. ...
‘I would rather say that the writer passed on rapidly, because the journey itself was direct, and uninterrupted by any important incident such as the supposed preaching and founding of churches in Northern Galatia. One of these Divine interpositions occurred before, and one after the supposed digression into Northern Galatia. For the natural reference of the words ‘they went through (διῆλθον) the Phrygo-Galatic region, having been forbidden (κωλυθέντες) … to speak the word in Asia’ is to a district east of Asia and North of Iconium and Antioch, South Galatia being now left behind. 19) that in the present contest ‘the region of Phrygia and Galatia’ can only mean ‘the borderland of Phrygia and Galatia Northward of Antioch, through which the travellers passed after “having been forbidden to speak the word in Asia. ‘It could be taken for granted, therefore, in spite of the silence of Acts, which in 16:6 mentions merely a journey of the missionaries through these regions, that Paul and Silas on this occasion preached in Phrygia arid a portion of North Galatia; and that the disciples … whom Paul met on the third missionary journey to several places of the same regions (Acts 18:23) had been converted by the preaching of Paul and Silas on the second journey. ’...
The present tendency of the North Galatian theorists is greatly to restrict the field of the Apostle’s activity in Galatia proper. Lightfoot’s assumption that he carried his mission through the whole of North Galatia is felt to be ‘as gratuitous as it is embarrassing’ (Schmiedel, Encyclopaedia Biblica , ii. Tivium and Ancyra are now left out of account, and only ‘a few churches, none of them very far apart,’ are supposed to have been planted in the west of North Galatia (ib. Paul did not traverse North Galatia (Church in the Roman Emp. Paul was contending for the spiritual freedom of the Gentiles at the Jerusalem Council, which was held before the journey on which, according to the old theory, he preached in North Galatia. (6) The repeated allusion to Barnabas (Galatians 2:1; Galatians 2:9; Galatians 2:13), who was one of the founders of the South Galatian Church, would have much less appositeness in an Epistle addressed to North Galatia, where that apostle was not personally known. Paul’s helpers came from South Galatia (Acts 16:1; Acts 20:4), and while Gains and Timothy may have been delegated by ‘the churches of Galatia’ (1 Corinthians 16:1) to carry their offerings to the saints at Jerusalem (a somewhat doubtful inference from Acts 20:4), North Galatia did not, as far as is known, provide a single person ‘for the work of ministering. ’ (8) There is evidence that Christianity penetrated North Galatia much more slowly than South Galatia
New France - Name given to the French claim and possessions on the North American continent from 1524 when Verrazano reconnoitered the coast and claimed the country for Francis I of France, till their surrender in 1763. It comprised, with the exception of the English colonies of Virginia, Maryland, New England, and New York, the greater part of North America from Hudson Bay to Mexico, including the basins of the Saint Lawrence, the Great Lakes, and the Mississippi Valley, Labrador, Nova Scotia (till 1713), New Brunswick, and part of Maine. It was Dablon who appointed Marquette to undertake the expedition, joined by Louis Joliet as leader, which resulted in the discovery of the Mississippi from the North, and inspired La Salle's explorations of the great river with the Franciscan Father Louis Hennepin, in 1678, which added the vast territory of Louisiana to New France
Accho - ...
The town is situated on the coast of the Mediterranean sea, thirty miles south of Tyre, on the North angle of a bay to which it gives its name, and which extends in a semicircle of three leagues, as far as the point of Mount Carmel, south-west of Acre. ...
Accho and all the seacoast beyond it Northwards, was considered as the heathen land of the Jews
Hivites - Probably, therefore, they inhabited a region North of Jerusalem
Abana, And Pharpar - It is a clear, cold, and swift mountain stream, rising in Anti-Lebanon, North east of Hermon, flowing south east into the plain, and near Damascus turning eastward, skirting the Northern wall of the city, and terminating 20 miles east in one of three large lakes
Armada, the Spanish - The retreat around the North of Ireland caused a loss of half the fleet and three-quarters of the men
Thessalonica - , and at the North-eastern corner of the Thermaic Gulf
Ashkelon - It stood on the shore of the Mediterranean, 12 miles North of Gaza
Bethesda - But quite recently Schick has discovered a large tank, as sketched here, situated about 100 feet North-west of St
Fenced Cities - The tower of Hananeel, near the North-east corner of the city wall, is frequently referred to (Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 ; Zechariah 14:10 )
Jezreel - (jehz' reel), meaning “God sows”, refers to a major valley, a Northern city, a southern city, and the son of Hosea 1:1 . The geography of Palestine made Jezreel a major route for travel from North to south and from east to west. The Northern city of Jezreel, which guarded the corridor to Beth-shan, was the site of the royal residence of Omri and Ahab where the incident of Naboth's vineyard occurred (1 Kings 21:1 )
Kedesh - It was situated near the "plain" (rather "the oak") of Zaanaim, and has been identified with the modern Kedes, on the hills fully four miles North-west of Lake El Huleh
Gadara - "The most interesting remains of Gadara are its tombs, which dot the cliffs for a considerable distance round the city, chiefly on the North-east declivity; but many beautifully sculptured sarcophagi are scattered over the surrounding heights
Tophet - Tophet properly begins where the Vale of Hinnom bends round to the east, having the cliffs of Zion on the North, and the Hill of Evil Counsel on the south
Havilah - Others look for a Havilah further North and west than Havilah is usually located
Shamgar - There, however, he appears to be a foreign oppressor, and the connexion of the two passages is obscure, the song having to do with Canaanite oppression in the North
Shittah Tree, Shittim - This acacia must not be confounded with the tree ( Robinia pseudo-acacia ) popularly known by this name in England, which is a North American plant, and belongs to a different genus and suborder
se'la, - (the rock ), ( 2 Kings 14:7 ; Isaiah 16:1 ) so rendered in the Authorized Version in Judges city later (2 Chronicles 25:12 ) probably known as Petra, the ruins of which are found about two days journey North of the top of the Gulf of Akabah and three or four south from Jericho and about halfway between the southern end of the Dead Sea and the Northern end of the Gulf of Akabah
Ephron - It is located Northwest of Jerusalem near Mozah at el-Qastel. It is apparently identical with Ophrah in Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ; 1 Samuel 13:17 ), located at et-Taiyibeh about four miles North of Bethel
Nebo - It rises over 4000 feet above the Dead Sea and gives an excellent view of the southwest, west, and as far North as Mount Hermon
Caleb - ...
As a name of a clan , Caleb (= Calebites) formed a branch of the children of Kenaz, an Edomite tribe, who settled in the hill-country North of the Negeb; they had possessions also in the Negeb itself ( Joshua 14:13-15 , 1Sa 30:14 , 1 Chronicles 24:2 ff
Homines, Boni - Favored by the kings of England, then rulers of Normandy, they spread throughout the North of France
Market-Place - It was the new Roman Agora which lay to the North of the Acropolis in the Eretrian quarter
Poke - ) A large North American herb of the genus Phytolacca (P
Chaldea - The land of Shinar adjoined Chaldea on the North, in which were the early cities of Babel, Erech, Accad and Calneh
Sheba - Some judge his descendants to have settled 'far North'; others place them 'somewhere in Arabia
Gomorrah, Gomorrha - ...
It is not known where these cities were situated, except that they were near to the Dead Sea: at its North end is now considered to be most probable
Halicarnassus - 23), attests the existence of an early Jewish colony in the city; and this was natural, as Halicarnassus was a considerable centre of trade owing to its favourable position on a bay opposite Cos, on the North-west side of the Ceramic Gulf
Jehoahaz - A turn for the better seems to have come before his death, because the forces of Assyria pressing on the North of Damascus turned the attention of that country away from Israel ( 2 Kings 13:3-5 )
Side - The Lord uses the expression "the four sides" and the expression "the four corners" to represent North, south, east and west
Aij'Alon - It is represented by the modern Yalo , a little to the North of the Jaffa road, about 14 miles out of Jerusalem
Wilderness - What is known distinctively as the "wilderness of the Wandering" is the great central limestone plateau between the granite region of Sinai on the south, the sandy desert on the North, and the valley of the Arabah on the east
Kadesh or Kadesh-Barnea - At the first visit the mission and return of the twelve spies took place, the rebellion of the people, and their presumptuous effort to enter Canaan by the pass Zephath, immediately North of Kadesh, Numbers 13:1-14:45
Candlestick - In the first temple there were ten candelabra of pure gold, half of them standing on the North, and half on the south side, within the Holy Place, 1 Kings 7:49,50 2 Chronicles 4:7 Jeremiah 52:19
Pomegranate - The tree grows wild in Persia and Syria, as generally in the south of Europe and North of Africa
Spanish Armada, the - The retreat around the North of Ireland caused a loss of half the fleet and three-quarters of the men
Naphtali - ...
The tribe of Naphtali, called Nephtalim in Matthew 4:15 , were located in a rich and fertile portion of Northern Palestine; having Asher on the west, the upper Jordan and part of the sea of Tiberias on the east; and running North into the Lebanon range, some lower offshoots of which prolonged to the south formed the "mountains of Naphtali," Joshua 19:32-39 20:7
Mile'Tus, - (Acts 20:15 ) Moreover, to those who are sailing from the North it is in the direct line for Cos
Mich'Mas - It has been identified with great probability in a village which still bears the name of Mukhmas , about seven miles North of Jerusalem
Gil'e-ad -
A mountainous region bounded on the west by the Jordan, on the North by Bashan, on the east by the Arabian plateau, and on the south by Moab and Ammon
Ken'Ite, the, - " ( Judges 1:16 ) But one of the sheikhs of the tribe, Heber by name, had wandered North instead of south
Jabin -
A king of Hazor, at the time of the entrance of Israel into Canaan (Joshua 11:1-14 ), whose overthrow and that of the Northern chief with whom he had entered into a confederacy against Joshua was the crowning act in the conquest of the land (11:21-23; comp 14:6-15). ...
...
Another king of Hazor, called "the king of Canaan," who overpowered the Israelites of the North one hundred and sixty years after Joshua's death, and for twenty years held them in painful subjection
Sheba - Some judge his descendants to have settled 'far North'; others place them 'somewhere in Arabia
Persia - The boundaries of Persia varied from era to era, but the name Persia is usually associated with the territory on the Northern side of the Persian Gulf. In ancient times the North-western part of this territory (the area that bordered the Mesopotamian Plain) was known as Elam (Genesis 14:1). Regions to the North of Elam that were later closely allied with Persia were Media and Parthia (Esther 1:18; Acts 2:9)
Lycaonia - It is for the most part a level plain, which is merged on the North and east in the plains of Galatia and Cappadocia, and is bounded on the west and south by hills. 64 by Pompey, the North part was added to Galatia, the south-east to Cappadocia, and the west was added to the Roman Empire, to be administered by the governor of the Roman province Cilicia
e'Gypt - (land of the Copts ), a country occupying the Northeast angle of Africa. It is bounded on the North by the Mediterranean Sea, on the east by Palestine, Arabia and the Red Sea, on the south by Nubia, and on the west by the Great Desert. The Delta extends about 200 miles along the Mediterranean, and Egypt Isaiah 520 miles long from North to south from the sea to the First Cataract. Rain is not very unfrequent on the Northern coast, but inland is very rare
Galilee - Galilee was the province of Palestine North of Samaria. Northward and to the North-west it was bounded by Syria and Phœnicia; it reached the sea only in the region round the bay of Acca, and immediately North of it. Its maximum extent therefore was somewhere about 60 miles North to south, and 30 east to west. ’ This was originally the name of the district at the Northern boundary of Israel, which was a frontier surrounded by foreigners on three sides. ...
After the return of the Jews from the Exile, the population was concentrated for the greater part in Judæa, and the Northern parts of Palestine were left to the descendants of the settlers established by Assyria. Under the pressure of Egyptian and Roman invaders the national patriotism developed rapidly, and it became as intensely a Jewish State as Jerusalem itself, notwithstanding the contempt with which the haughty inhabitants of Judæa regarded the Northern provincials
Philippi - It stood near the head of the Sea, about 8 miles North-west of Kavalla. ...
...
When Philip the tetrarch, the son of Herod, succeeded to the government of the Northern portion of his kingdom, he enlarged the city of Paneas, and called it Caesarea, in honour of the emperor
Aram - Nearly synonymous with Syria; the Hebrew name of the whole region Northeast of Palestine, extending from the Tigris on the east nearly to the Mediterranean on the west, and to the Taurus range on the North
Old Catholics - There are three bodies of Old Catholics in America, in agreement with tbe Old Catholic churches of Europe: the Catholic Church of North America organized at Chicago; the American Catholic Church, independent of the Old Catholic Church in America; and the Old Catholic Church in America
Independency - Affiliated with it since October 20, 1925, is the Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregational Churches, formerly the Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Fathers, Pilgrim - Affiliated with it since October 20, 1925, is the Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregational Churches, formerly the Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
National Council of Congregational Churches in the - Affiliated with it since October 20, 1925, is the Evangelical Protestant Association of Congregational Churches, formerly the Evangelical Protestant Churches of North America
Indians, Maya - The most important of the cultured aborigines of North America, belonging to Mexico, Yucatan, and Guatemala
Maya Indians - The most important of the cultured aborigines of North America, belonging to Mexico, Yucatan, and Guatemala
Shiloh - Shiloh, a place of rest, a city of Ephraim, "on the North side of Bethel," from which it is distant 10 miles (Judges 21:19 ); the modern Seilun (the Arabic for Shiloh), a "mass of shapeless ruins
Kishon - Winding, a winter torrent of Central Palestine, which rises about the roots of Tabor and Gilboa, and passing in a Northerly direction through the plains of Esdraelon and Acre, falls into the Mediterranean at the North-eastern corner of the bay of Acre, at the foot of Carmel
Rain - Westerly winds from the Mediterranean Sea brought wet storms during the winter, most of the rain falling along the coastal plain, in the North, and in the central hills
Nebaioth - An important tribe of North Arabians
West - ...
The reference to North, South, East, and West as the equal sources from which the Kingdom of Heaven was to draw its membership, indicated the universal scope of His own relationship to the world
Caphtor - 1200), who tells of his having repelled a great invasion by enemies who had entered Syria and Palestine from the North
Judaea - It lay between Samaria on the North and the desert of Arabia Petræa on the south; but its exact boundaries cannot be stated more definitely
Gregory Xvi, Pope - He founded the Egyptian and Etruscan museums in the Vatican, the Christian Museum in the Lateran; tunneled Monte Catillo to avert the floods of the River Anio; established steamboats at Ostia, and a bureau of statistics at Rome; introduced a decimal currency; sent missionaries to China, North America, India, Abyssinia, and Polynesia; and erected numerous hospitals, orphanages, and public baths
Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari Colomba - He founded the Egyptian and Etruscan museums in the Vatican, the Christian Museum in the Lateran; tunneled Monte Catillo to avert the floods of the River Anio; established steamboats at Ostia, and a bureau of statistics at Rome; introduced a decimal currency; sent missionaries to China, North America, India, Abyssinia, and Polynesia; and erected numerous hospitals, orphanages, and public baths
Harvest - In Egypt and Syria, the wheat harvest is in April and May in the south of Europe and of the United States, in June in the Northern states of America, in July and in the North of Europe,in August and September
Labadists - After his death, his followers removed their wandering community to Wiewert, in the district of North Holland, where it soon fell into oblivion
Agrippa ii - At the age of 21Claudius gave him the tetrarchies of Trachonitis, Abilene, and other parts of the North East of Palestine
Manas'Seh - (Joshua 13:29-33 ) Here they throve exceedingly, pushing their way Northward over the rich plains of Jaulan and Jedur to the foot of Mount Hermon. (1 Chronicles 5:25,26 ) The other half tribe settled to the west of the Jordan, North of Ephraim
Meshech - Meshech was the sixth son of Japheth, and is generally mentioned in conjunction with his brother Tubal; and both were first seated in the North-eastern angle of Asia Minor, from the shores of the Euxine, along to the south of Caucasus; where were the Montes Moschisi, and where, in after times, were the Iberi, Tibareni, and Moschi; near to whom also, or mingled with them, were the Chalybes, who, it is probable, derived their Grecian appellation from the general occupation of the families of Tubal and Meshech, as workers in brass and iron, as the inhabitants of the same countries have been in all ages, for the supply of Tyre, Persia, Greece, and Armenia
Elath - Or ELOTH, a city of Idumea, situated at the Northern extremity of the eastern gulf of the Red Sea, which was anciently called the Elantic gulf, and now the gulf of Akaba. The great sand valley called El-Arabah, and towards the North El-Ghor, runs from this gulf to the Dead Sea
King - The latter Northroy officiates North of the Trent
Bashan - Fat, fruitful, Numbers 21:33 , a rich hilly district lying east of the Jordan, and between the mountains of Hermon on the North, and those of Gilead and Ammon on the south
Melita - The name of "St Paul's bay" is now borne by a small inlet on the North side of the island, opening towards the east, which answers well to the description in Acts 27:1-44
Gethsem'a-ne - (an oil-press ), a small "farm," ( Matthew 26:36 ; Mark 14:32 ) situated across the brook Kedron (John 18:1 ) probably at the foot of Mount Olivet, (Luke 22:39 ) to the Northwest and about one-half or three quarters of a mile English from the walls of Jerusalem, and 100 yards east of the bridge over the Kedron. A garden, with eight venerable olive trees, and a grotto to the North detached from it, and in closer connection with the church of the sepulchre of the Virgin, are pointed out as the Gethsemane
ra'Chel - It Is about two miles south of Jerusalem and one mile North of Bethlehem
Manas'Seh - (Joshua 13:29-33 ) Here they throve exceedingly, pushing their way Northward over the rich plains of Jaulan and Jedur to the foot of Mount Hermon. (1 Chronicles 5:25,26 ) The other half tribe settled to the west of the Jordan, North of Ephraim
Bethsa'Ida - The fact is that Bethsaida was a village on both sides of the Jordan as it enters the sea of Galilee on the North, so that the western part of the village was in Galilee and the eastern portion in Gaulonitis, part of the tetrarchy of Philip
pa'Ran, el-pa'Ran - (peace of caverns ), a desert or wilderness, bounded on the North by Palestine, on the east by the valley of Arabah, on the south by the desert of Sinai, and on the west by the wilderness of Etham, which separated it from the Gulf of Suez and Egypt. ) "Mount" Paran occurs only in two poetic passages, (33:2); Habb 3:3 It probably denotes the Northwestern member of the Sinaitic mountain group which lies adjacent to the Wady Teiran . (It is probably the ridge or series of ridges lying on the Northeastern part of the desert of Paran, not far from Kadesh
Ben-ha'Dad - He made an alliance with Asa, and conquered a great part of the North of Israel
no-a'Mon - It was emphatically the city of temples, in the ruins of which many monuments of ancient Egypt are preserved, The plan of the city was a parallelogram, two miles from North to south and four from east to west, but none suppose that in its glory if really extended 33 miles along both aides of the Nile
Gad - In this eastern area half of the tribe of Manasseh was in the North, the tribe of Gad in the centre and the tribe of Reuben in the south (Numbers 32:1-5; Numbers 32:33; Joshua 13:8-33)
Hebron - ...
One of the largest oaks in Palestine is found in the valley of Eshcol, about 3 miles North of the town. ...
...
A town in the North border of Asher (Joshua 19:28 )
Shiloh - ” About thirty miles North of Jerusalem sat the city which would be Israel's religious center for over a century after the conquest, being the home of Israel's tabernacle (Joshua 18:1 ). ...
Judges 21:19 described Shiloh's location as “on the North side of Bethel, on the east side of the highway that goeth up from Bethel to Shechem, and on the south of Lebonah
Caves - Carmel in the North, four caves carved out of the limestone have been excavated. Caves in these cliffs, from Qumran in the North to Masada approximately thirty miles south, have been investigated by archaeologists
Arabia - Its extreme length from North to south is about 1300 miles, its greatest breadth about 1500 miles, though from the Northern point of the Red Sea to the Persian Gulf is only about 900 miles. It has the sea on all sides except the North. The Sinaitic peninsula is a small triangular region in the Northwestern part, or corner, of Arabia
Canaanites - The Joshua 11:3 , where it is related that they, along with the united forces of Northern Canaan, were defeated by Joshua. On the east side of the Jordan also they had, before the time of Moses, founded two kingdoms, that of Bashan in the North, and another, bounded at first by the Jabbok, in the south. After the Israelites entered Canaan, the Hittites seem to have moved farther Northward. ...
Besides these seven tribes, there were several others of the same parentage, dwelling North of Canaan
a'Arat - In its biblical sense it is descriptive generally of the Armenian highlands--the lofty plateau which over looks the plain of the Araxes on the North and of Mesopotomia on the south. "The mountains of Ararat " are co-extensive with the Armenian plateau from the base of Ararat in the North to the range of Kurdistan in the south, we notice the following characteristics of that region as illustrating the Bible narrative; (1) its elevation
Medes, me'Dia - Media lay Northwest of Persia proper, south and southwest of the Caspian Sea, east of Armenia and Assyria, west and Northwest of the great salt desert of Iran. Its greatest length was from North to south, and in this direction it extended from the 32d to the 40th parallel, a distance of 550 miles.
Media Atropatene corresponded nearly to the modern Azerbijan , being the tract situated between the Caspian and the mountains which run North from Zagros. From North to south it was certainly confined between the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates on the one side, the Black and Caspian Seas on the other. Its greatest length may be reckoned at 1500 miles from Northwest to southeast, and its average breadth at 400 or 450 miles
Hazor - Hazor was located in upper Galilee on the site now known as tell el-Qedah, ten miles North of the Sea of Galilee and five miles southwest of Lake Huleh. It overlooked the Via Maris, the major overland trade route from Egypt to the North and east, and thus became a major trading center. Hazor also overlooked the Huleh Valley, a critical defense point against armies invading from the North. ...
Joshua 11:1-15 ; Joshua 12:19 relate how Jabin, king of Hazor, rallied the forces of the Northern cities of Canaan against Joshua. This may be modern khirbet Hazzur four miles North Northwest of Jerusalem
Mesopotamia - This province, which inclines from the southeast to the North-west, commenced at 33 20' N. Toward the North, it comprehended part of Taurus and the Mesius, which lay between the Euphrates and the Tigris. In this Northern part is found Osrhoene, which seems to have been the same place with Anthemusir. The Northern part of Mesopotamia is occupied by chains of mountains passing from North-west to south-east, in the situation of the rivers. According to Ptolemy, Mesopotamia had on the North a part of Armenia, on the west the Euphrates on the side of Syria, on the east the Tigris on the borders of Assyria, and on the south the Euphrates which joined the Tigris. The name of this king bespeaks him a descendant of Nimrod; and it was probably of the Lower Mesopotamia only, or Babylonia, of which he was sovereign; the Northern parts being in the possession of the Arameans. About four hundred years after Cushan-Rishathaim, we find the Northern parts of Mesopotamia in the hands of the Syrians of Zobah; as we are told, in 2 Samuel x, that Hadarezer, king of Zobah, after his defeat by Joab, "sent and brought out the Syrians that were beyond the river" Euphrates
Tribes of Israel, the - ” According to the biblical account, the family of Jacob, from which the tribes came, originated in North Syria during Jacob's stay at Haran with Laban his uncle. The Northern boundary of Judah was marked by the territories of Benjamin and Dan. The territory of Jerusalem may have formed something of a barrier between Judah and the tribes of the North because it was not finally secured until the time of David (2 Samuel 5:6-10 ). The territory allotted to the tribe of Zebulun was in the North in the region of southern Galilee bounded by Issachar on the south southeast, Naphtali on the east, and Asher on the west (Joshua 19:1 ). The blessing of Jacob speaks of Zebulun's territory including “the shore of the sea,” presumably the Mediterranean Sea, and “his border shall be at Sidon,” (Genesis 49:13 NRSV) a city on the coast North of Mount Carmel. Ephraim's territory consisted of the region just North of Dan and Benjamin and ran from the Jordan River on the east to the Mediterranean Sea on the west. , it was an Ephraimite named Jeroboam who led the Northern tribes in their plea for leniency (1 Kings 12:1-5 ). When Rehoboam rejected their plea, the Northern tribes broke their ties with the south, formed a separate kingdom (1618877896_3 ), and selected Jeroboam as their king (1 Kings 12:20 ). Manasseh's territory west of the Jordan was located North of Ephraim. Benjamin's tribal territory was a small area west of the Jordan, sandwiched between Ephraim to the North and Judah to the south (Joshua 18:11-28 ). The tribe of Dan originally occupied the territory just west of Benjamin with Ephraim on the North and Judah and the Philistines on the south (Joshua 19:40-48 ). The Philistine pressure resulted in the migration of the tribe to an area North of Lake Hula, to the city of Laish and its territory (Judges 18:14-27 ). This band of land ran from Issachar and Zebulun in the south to near Dan in the North (Joshua 19:32-39 ). The tribe's territory was the east side of the Jordan River and the Dead Sea, including a part of the region called Gilead ( Numbers 32:34-36 ; Joshua 13:24-28 ), extending from the region of the Jabbok River in the North to the region of the Arnon River in the south. The tribe of Asher occupied the region west of Zebulun and Naphtali, that is, the Northern coastal region of Palestine. The territory extended from near Mount Carmel in the south to near Tyre in the North (Joshua 19:24-31 ). Many scholars suggest that tribal jealousies and traditions played a major role in bringing about the division of the kingdom and the formation of two kingdoms, the Northern Kindgom and the Southern Kingdom in 922 B
Jerusalem - To the North the land is comparatively level, so that the attacks on the city were made on that side. Its North wall running S. Also on the North an additional wall enclosed a large portion, now called BEZETHA; but this latter enclosure was made by Herod Agrippa some ten or twelve years after the time of the Lord. On the North is the Damascus gate, and one called Herod's gate walled up; on the east an open gate called St. A street runs nearly North from Zion gate to Damascus gate; and a street from the Jaffa gate runs eastward to the Mosque enclosure These two streets divide the city into four quarters of unequal size. Since the formation of the State of Israel a large modern city has built up to the North West of the Old City. This lies on the west of the Mosque enclosure and runs nearly North and south. Another arch was found complete, farther North, by Captain Wilson, and is called the 'Wilson arch
Nazareth - The town of Galilee where the Blessed Virgin dwelt and where Christ lived the first 30 years of his life, situated in a hollow plateau between the hills of Lebanon, the ancient town occupying the triangular hillock in the North
Kibroth-Hattaavah - From this encampment they journeyed in a North-eastern direction to Hazeroth
Suc'Coth - Merrill identifies it with a site called Tell Darala , one mile North of the Jabbok
Smyr'na - (myrrh ), a city of Asia Minor, situated on the AEgean Sea, 40 miles North of Ephesus
Hadadezer - After this Hadadezer went North "to recover his border" (2 Samuel 8:3 , A
Beth-Horon - " They are about 2 miles apart, the former being about 10 miles North-west of Jerusalem
Nebo - It has been identified with Jebel Nebah, on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea, near its Northern end, and about 5 miles south-west of Heshbon. It was a town in Benjamin, probably the modern Beit Nubah, about 7 miles North-west of Hebron
Dothan - A city of the tribe of Manasseh, west of the Jordan, Northeast of Samaria, southeast of Megiddo, and now identified as Tell Dotha. Dothan Isaiah 5 miles southwest of Genin, 11 miles Northeast of Samaria, and 13 miles North of Shechem
Gomer - Togarmah was a city-state North of Carchemish near modern Gurun
Hierapolis - All three were situated in the valley of the Lycus, a tributary of the Mæander, in Phrygia, Hierapolis on the North side being about 6 miles from the former and 12 miles from the latter
Scythians - They were eventually driven back Northward into southern Russia by the Medes. ...
Scythian power was dominant in the area Northwest of the Black Sea until about 350 B. Earlier scholars identified the Scythians as Jeremiah's foe from the North and Zephaniah's threatened invader of Judah, but such theories rest on weak evidence
Geba - It occupied an important position commanding the passage of the valley from the North
Appius, Market of - It was the Northern terminus of a canal (fossa), which extended, parallel with the line of road, through the Pomptine marshes as far as the neighbourhood of Tarracina. Luke remembered it gratefully as the first of two places-Tres Tabernœ (see Three Taverns), 10 miles further North, being the other-whither brethren came from Rome to greet them and escort them on then way
Aphek - ...
Aphek is located at modern Tell Ras elAin near the source of the Yarkon River in the Sharon plain Northeast of Joppa. This may be modern Afqa, fifteen miles east of ancient Byblos and 23 miles North of Beirut, Lebanon
Camp And Encamp - The tabernacle was placed in the centre; and round it were the tents of the house of Levi, in four divisions; Moses and Aaron, with the priests, on the east side, the Gershonites westward, Numbers 3:1-51, the Kohathites southward, and the Memrites Northward. And on the North side was the camp of Dan, in the order of Dan, Asher, and Naphtali
Zeb'Ulun - On the south it was bounded by Issachar, who lay in the great plain or valley of the Kishon; on the North it had Naphtali and Asher. Thus remote from the centre of government, Zebulun remains throughout the history with one exception, in the obscurity which envelops the whole of the Northern tribes
Pergamus - It is about sixty miles North of Smyrna
Areopagus - A narrow naked ridge of limestone rock at Athens, sloping upwards from the North and terminating in an abrupt precipice on the south, 50 or 60 feet above a valley which divides it from the west end of the Acropolis
Aphek - ...
Aphek is located at modern Tell Ras elAin near the source of the Yarkon River in the Sharon plain Northeast of Joppa. This may be modern Afqa, fifteen miles east of ancient Byblos and 23 miles North of Beirut, Lebanon
Gilgal - And perhaps a third in the mountains of Ephraim, North of Bethel, Deuteronomy 11:30 2 Kings 2:1-6
Kidron or Cedron - This valley begins a little Northwest of the city, passes some two hundred rods North of the present wall, and turns to the south
Syria - In the New Testament, Syria may be considered as bounded west and North-west by the Mediterranean and by Mount Taurus, which separates it from Cilicia and Cataonia in Asia Minor, east by the Euphrates, and south by Arabia Deserta and Palestine, or rather Judea, for the name Syria included also the Northern part of Palestine
Reuben - Their inheritance was the fine pastureland east of the Jordan, between the Arnon on the south and Gilead on the North; it is now called Belka, Numbers 32:1-42 Joshua 22:1-34
Dibon - A city east of the Dead Sea and North of the Arnon, in the land which, before the coming of the Israelites, Sihon, king of the Amorites, had taken from a former king of Moab ( Numbers 21:26 ; Numbers 21:30 )
Ephraim - It extended from the Mediterranean across to the Jordan, North of the portions of Dan and Benjamin and included Shiloh, Shechem, etc. It is supposed to be the present Taiyibeh, on a hill overlooking the Jordan valley, five miles Northeast of Bethel
am'Orite, the am'Orites - This rich tract, bounded by the Jabbok on the North, the Arnon on the south, the Jordan on the west and "the wilderness" on the east, (Judges 11:21,22 ) was, perhaps in the most special sense the "land of the Amorites," (Numbers 21:31 ; Joshua 12:2,3 ; 13:10 ; Judges 11:21,22 ) but their possessions are distinctly stated to have extended to the very foot of Hermon, (3:8; 4:48) embracing "Gilead and all Bashan," (3:10) with the Jordan valley on the east of the river
Mid'Ian - (strife ), a son of Abraham and Keturah, ( Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ) progenitor of the Midianites, or Arabians dwelling principally in the desert North of the peninsula of Arabia. Southward they extended along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Eyleh (Sinus AElaniticus ); and Northward they stretched along the eastern frontier of Palestine
Dan - The tribe of Dan had their place in the march through the wilderness on the North side of the tabernacle (Numbers 2:25,31 ; 10:25 ). It included in it, among others, the cities of Lydda, Ekron, and Joppa, which formed its Northern boundary. They accordingly sent out five spies from two of their towns, who went North to the sources of the Jordan, and brought back a favourable report regarding that region. This new city of Dan became to them a new home, and was wont to be spoken of as the Northern limit of Palestine, the length of which came to be denoted by the expression "from Dan to Beersheba", i
Scythian - The Greek colonists who settled on the Northern shores of the Black Sea in the 7th cent. 1-82, 97-142) gives a great deal of information regarding the people, although the fact that the Greeks soon came to extend the name ‘Scythian’ to all the nations to the North and North-east of the Black Sea makes some of the statements of Greek writers regarding them questionable. At this time there took place one of those great movements among the uncivilized peoples of the North which the Germans call a Völkerwanderung. , buying off these Northern invaders who had come as far south as Philistia. Jeremiah’s description of ‘the evil coming from the North’ (1:13, 4:6, 5:15ff
Ara'Bia - Its extreme length, North and south, is about 1300 miles, and its greatest breadth 1500 miles. --Arabia may be divided into Arabia Proper , containing the whole peninsula as far as the limits of the Northern deserts; Northern Arabia (Arabia Deserta), constituting the great desert of Arabia; and Western Arabia , the desert of Petra and the peninsula of Sinai, or the country that has been called Arabia Petraea , I. Arabia Proper , or the Arabian penninsula consists of high tableland, declining towards the North. Northern Arabia , or the Arabian Desert, is a high, undulating, parched plain, of which the Euphrates forms the natural boundary from the Persian Gulf to the frontier of Syria, whence it is bounded by the latter country and the desert of Petra on the Northwest and west, the peninsula of Arabia forming its southern limit. ...
The ISHMAELITES appear to have entered the peninsula from the Northwest. They appear to have settled chiefly North of the peninsula in Desert Arabia, from Palestine to the Persian Gulf. ...
In Northern and western Arabia are other peoples, which, from their geographical position and mode of life are sometimes classed with the Arabs, of these are AMALEK , the descendants of ESAU , etc
Jeru'Salem - (the habitation of peace ), Jerusalem stands in latitude 31 degrees 46' 35" North and longitude 35 degrees 18' 30" east of Greenwich. This was the route commonly taken from the North and east of the country. This road led by the two Beth-horons up to the high ground at Gibeon, whence it turned south, and came to Jerusalem by Ramah and Gibeah, and over the ridge North of the city. These ravines leave the level of the table-land, the one on the west and the other on the Northeast of the city, and fall rapidly until they form a junction below its southeast corner. The eastern one --the valley of the Kedron, commonly called the valley of Jehoshaphat --runs nearly straight from North by south. The promontory thus encircled is itself divided by a longitudinal ravine running up it from south to North, called the valley of the Tyropoeon, rising gradually from the south, like the external ones, till at last it arrives at the level of the upper plateau, dividing the central mass into two unequal portions. The west wall measures 1601 feet, the south 922, the east 1530, the North 1042. ) Attached to the Northwest angle of the temple was the Antonia, a tower or fortress. North of the side of the temple is the building now known to Christians as the Mosque of Omar, but by Moslems called the Dome of the Rock. The southern continuation of the eastern hill was named OPHEL , which gradually came to a point at the junction of the valleys Tyropoeon and Jehoshaphat; and the Norther BEZETHA, "the new city," first noticed by Josephus, which was separated from Moriah by an artificial ditch, and overlooked the valley of Kedron on the east; this hill was enclosed within the walls of Herod Agrippa. Lastly, ACRA lay westward of Moriah and Northward of Zion, and formed the "lower city" in the time of Josephus. (The second wall enclosed a portion of the city called Acra or Millo, on the North of the city, from the tower of Mariamne to the tower of Antonia. ) The third wall was built by King Herod Agrippa, and was intended to enclose the suburbs which had grown out on the Northern sides of the city, which before this had been left exposed. Outside the walls on the west side were the Upper and Lower Pools of GIHON , the latter close under Zion, the former more to the Northwest on the Jaffa road. Within the walls, immediately North of Zion, was the "Pool of Hezekiah. The pool of which tradition has assigned the name of BETHESDA is situated on the North side of Moriah; it is now named Birket Israil . At the time of the final siege the space North of the wall of Agrippa was covered with gardens, groves and plantations of fruit trees, enclosed by hedges and walls; and to level these was one of Titus' first operations. Stephen's gate and the golden gate (now walled up), in the east wall; ...
The Damascus gate and ...
Herod's gate, in the North wall; and ...
The Jaffa gate, in the west wall
Philistia - " Philistia, or the "land of the Philistines," included the coast plain on the southwest of Palestine, from Joppa on the North to the valley of Gerar on the south, a distance of about 40 miles. Its breadth at the Northern end was ten miles, and at the southern about 20
Shunem - It is on the North of the Valley of Jezreel, and opposite to Gilboa, where Saul was encamped; the situation suits the scene of the battle well
Mohammedanism - At one time they extended their conquests to Western Asia, Spain and North Africa
Helkath-Hazzurim - Joab had the command of David's army of trained men, who encamped on the south of the pool, which was on the east of the hill on which the town of Gibeon was built, while Abner's army lay on the North of the pool
Deborah - She summoned Barak from Kadesh to take the command of 10,000 men of Zebulun and Naphtali, and lead them to Mount Tabor on the plain of Esdraelon at its North-east end
Necho ii - He led forth a powerful army and marched Northward, but was met by the king of Judah at Megiddo, who refused him a passage through his territory. Possibly, as some suppose, Necho may have brought his army by sea to some port to the North of Dor (Compare Joshua 11:2 ; 12:23 ), a Phoenician town at no great distance from Megiddo
Domestic And Foreign Missionary Society - This society is the Church's established agency, underthe authority and direction of the General Convention, for theprosecution of missions among the negroes of the South, the Indiansin the North, the people in the New States and Territories in theWest and in some of the older Dioceses; in all the Society maintainswork in forty-three Dioceses and seventeen Missionary Jurisdictionsin this country
Dibon - ...
Dibon stood on the Northern hill across the valley from modern Dhiban. It is about 40 miles south of Amman, Jordan, and three miles North of the Arnon River
Illyricum - Illyricum is a Latin word, and denotes the Roman province which extended along the Adriatic from Italy and Pannonia on the North to the province Macedonia on the south. The Northern half was called Liburnia and the southern Dalmatia (wh
Nob - of Anathoth, the ridge from the brow of which the pilgrim along the North road still catches his first view of the holy city
Sabean - Some scholars think this is too far south and seek biblical Sheba in Northern Arabia near Medina on the wadi esh-Shaba. Sheba in southern Arabia gained riches through trade with nearby Africa and with India, whose goods they transported and sold to the empires to the North
Esdraelon - The Greek name for Merj Ibn ‘Amr , the great plain North of the range of Carmel
Hermon - —A mountain on the North-eastern border of Palestine, the culminating point of the range of Anti-Lebanon, rising to an elevation of 9200 ft
South - In the same way their kinsmen and successors, the Moslem Arabs, called the southern part of their empire Yemen, the ‘right hand’ country, and designated Syria and Palestine to the North as al-Shâm, the ‘left’ region
Ethiopians - This, with degraded habits, had changed the features of those in the centre of Africa, from the more cultivated sons of Ham in the North
Hittites - This was near or at Hebron in the south of Palestine, whereas other passages speak of them in the North, between the Lebanon and the Euphrates, which was probably where they originally settled, Joshua 1:4 ; and there are intimations that they continued a powerful and warlike race after Palestine was possessed by Israel
Verge - ) To tend downward; to bend; to slope; as, a hill verges to the North
Splendor - This concept is equally prominent when the word is used of God: “Fair weather cometh out of the North: with God is terrible majesty” (Job 37:22)
Desert - This refers to that very depressed region—the deepest valley in the world—the sunken valley North and south of the Dead Sea, but more particularly the former
zo'ar - (Genesis 19:15 ; 23:27 ) The definite position of Sodom is, and probably will always be, a mystery; but there can be little doubt that the plain of the Jordan was at the North side of the Dead Sea and that the cities of the plain must therefore have been situated there instead of at the southern end of the lake, as it is generally taken for granted they were
Philippi - one of the chief cities of Macedonia, lying on the North-west of Neapolis, and formerly called Datum or Datos, but afterward taking its name from Philip, the celebrated king of Macedon, by whom it was repaired and beautified
Bear - Shaw gives us to understand that these rugged animals are not peculiar to the bleak regions of the North, being found in Barbary; and Thevenot informs us that they inhabit the wilderness adjoining the Holy Land, and that he saw one near the Northern extremities of the Red Sea
pi-Hahiroth - The place where this miracle is supposed to have happened, is still called Bahral- Kolsum, or the Sea of Destruction; and just opposite to the situation which answers to the opening called Pi-hahiroth, is a bay, where the North cape is called Ras Musa, or the Cape of Moses
ad'Der - , ( Isaiah 11:8 ; 14:29 ; 59:5 ) It represents four Hebrew words:
Acshub is found only in ( Psalm 140:3 ) and may be represented by the Toxicoa of Egypt and North Africa
Sharon - Towards the North and south far as the eye can reach spreads the beautiful plain, covered in many parts with fields of green or golden grain. Near by are the immense olive-groves of Ramleh and Lydda and amid them the picturesque towers, minarets, and domes of these villages; while the hillsides towards the Northeast are thickly studded with native hamlets
Shiloh - A famous city of Ephraim, about ten miles south of Shechem, and twenty-four North of Jerusalem
Crete - After some time, and against Paul's warning, they set sail for Phenice, a more commodious harbor on the western part of the island; but were overtaken by a fierce wind from the east-north-east, which compelled them to lie to, and drifted them to Malta
Mesopotamia - Eden was not far off; Ararat was near to it on the North, and the land of Shinar on the south
Pekah - The fall of Damascus was followed by the ravaging of the districts of Israel North and east of Samaria, and the transportation of their inhabitants to remote portions of the empire
Caper'Naum - This mound is situated close upon the seashore at the Northwestern extremity of the plain (now El Ghuweir ). ...
Three miles North of Khan Minyeh is the other claimant, Tell Hum , --ruins of walls and foundations covering a space of half a mile long by a quarter wide, on a point of the shore projecting into the lake and backed by a very gently-rising ground
Jabesh-Gilead - It is identified with the ruins of ed-Deir, about 6 miles south of Pella, on the North of the Wady Yabis
Desert - This word means that very depressed and enclosed region--the deepest and the hottest chasm in the world--the sunken valley North and south of the Dead Sea, but more particularly the former
Beersheba - Among these were the main North-south route from Canaan to Egypt, and the main west-east route from the Philistine coast to Edom (Genesis 46:1-6; 2 Kings 3:8). The expression ‘from Dan to Beersheba’ meant ‘from the Northern boundary to the southern’ (Judges 20:1; 2 Samuel 3:10; 2 Samuel 17:11; 2 Samuel 24:2; 1 Kings 4:25)
Hittites - It extended from Northern Palestine across Syria and into Asia Minor. ...
However, the Hittites most often mentioned in the Bible are not those of the ancient Hittite Empire in the North, but those of smaller tribal groups in Canaan
Hittites - In the book of Joshua they always appear as the dominant race to the North of Galilee. In the days of Solomon they were a powerful confederation in the North of Syria, and were ruled by "kings
Bethel - On a rocky knoll beside the great road to the North, about 12 miles from Jerusalem, stands the modern Beilîn , a village of some 400 inhabitants, which represents the ancient Bethel. This may have induced Jacob to come hither on his way to the North, and again on his return from Paddan-aram. It became the great sanctuary of the Northern Kingdom, and the centre of the idolatrous priests who served in the high places ( 1 Kings 12:32 ff
Benjamin - It was situated with Ephraim on its North, and Judah on its south, Dan on its west, and the Jordan on its east; it occupied about 28 miles east and west and 14 miles North and south at its widest parts
Hand - In determining the directions in the Orient, the face is turned to the east, not to the North as with us. ]'>[3] yamîn and shimâl , denote respectively ‘south’ and ‘north
Arabia - Most biblical references to Arab peoples or territory are to the Northern and western parts of this whole, but sometimes includes both the Northern and southern portions. ...
In the Northern portion of Arabia the mountains of the Anti-Lebanon, the Transjordanian Highlands, and the mountains of Edom flank the desert on the west. The central and Northern portions of the peninsula, and extending North into Syria and Iraq, are vast expanses of sandy and rocky desert, including some of the driest climate in the world. This refers to the people of the Northwestern parts of the Arabian territory, whom the Old Testament writers knew as nomadic herders of sheep and goats, and later, of camels. The Nabateans controlled what is today southern Jordan and the Negeb of Israel; for a time they controlled as far North as Damascus
Benjamin - It was situated with Ephraim on its North, and Judah on its south, Dan on its west, and the Jordan on its east; it occupied about 28 miles east and west and 14 miles North and south at its widest parts
Winds - Not infrequently a North wind arises, Job 37:9 , which, as in ancient days, is till the sure harbinger of fair weather; illustrating the truth of the observation in Proverbs 25:23 , "The North wind driveth away rain
Carmel - A celebrated range of hills running Northwest from the Plain of Esdraelon, and ending in the promontory which forms the bay of Acre. Its greatest height is about 1,500 feet; at its Northeastern foot runs the brook Kishon, and a little farther North, the river Belus. On its Northern point stands a convent of the Carmelite friars, an order established in the twelfth century, and having at the present day various branches in Europe. The foot of the Northern part approaches the water, so that, seen from the hills North-east of Acre, mount Carmel appears as if "dipping his feet in the western sea;" farther south it retires more inland, so that between the mountain and the sea there is an extensive plain covered with fields and olive-trees
Media - Called by the Hebrews Genesis 10:2 ; extended itself on the west and south of the Caspian Sea, from Armenia and Assyria on the North and west, to Farsistan or Persia proper on the south; and included the districts now called Shirvan, Adserbijan, Ghilan, Masanderan, and Irak Adjemi. It covered a territory larger than that of Spain, lying between 32 degrees and 40 degrees of North latitude, and was one of the most fertile and earliest cultivated among the kingdoms of Asia. It had two grand divisions, of which the Northwestern was called Atropatene, or Lesser Media, and the southern Greater Media
Babylonia - This celebrated province included the track of country lying on the river Euphrates, bounded North by Mesopotamia and Assyria and south by the Persian Gulf. This gulf was indeed its only definite and natural boundary; for towards the North, towards the east or Persia, and towards the west or desert Arabia, its limits were quite indefinite
Peraea - ’ In what sense he uses this term there is no means of ascertaining, but he must intend to include under the name ‘Peraea’ the region extending North from the Jabbok to the Yarmuk (Hieromax), close to which river Gadara stood, that is to say, all that the Hebrews meant by ‘beyond the Jordan. In its larger signification it was from 80 to 90 miles from North to south, and about 25 from east to west. As these two provinces had but a very short common boundary where Galilee touched the Jordan North of Samaria, it might have seemed more natural to combine Peraea with the regions North of the Yarmuk, or with Samaria. They used the fords opposite Beisan, North of Samaria, and Jericho, south of it. The Northern parts of Peraea mingled with the region of the Decapolis, where in the towns there was a vigorous Hellenistic civilization, and apparently North of the Yarmuk the Jewish element of the population was inconsiderable
New Zealand - ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Wellington
the dioceses of ...
Auckland
Christchurch
Dunedin
Hamilton
Palmerston North
and the ...
New Zealand Military Ordinariate
See also, ...
Catholic-Hiearchy
Seleucus - 246 226), son of Antiochus Soter , is entitled the ‘king of the North’ in the passage ( Daniel 11:7-9 ) which alludes to the utter discomfiture of the Syrian king and the capture of Seleucia
Joppa - , "Japho"), on a sandy promontory between Caesarea and Gaza, and at a distance of 30 miles North-west from Jerusalem
Hand - The right hand denoted the south, and the left the North ( Job 23:9 ; 1 Samuel 23:19 )
Kenites - Judges 1:16 Apparently Heber the Kenite travelled North, and was neutral between Israel and their enemies; but Jael his wife smote Sisera in her tent
Mahanaim - It has been identified with the modern Mukhumah, a ruin found in a depressed plain called el-Bukie'a, "the little vale," near Penuel, south of the Jabbok, and North-east of es-Salt
Rabbah - ...
...
A city in the hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:60 ), possibly the ruin Rubba, six miles North-east of Beit-Jibrin
se'ir - Its Northern, order is not so accurately determined. ...
Mount Seir, an entirely different place from the foregoing; one of the landmarks on the North boundary of the territory of Judah
Sar'Dis, - It was 60 miles Northeast of Smyrna. On the North side of the acropolis, overlooking the valley of the Hermus, is a theatre near 400 feet in diameter, attached to a stadium of about 1000
Tubal - 4:38, section 4) and copper vessels to the Phoenician markets (copper and metals of the neighbouring Mossynaeci and Chalybes were famed, and copper mines were at Chalvar in Armenia): Ezekiel 27:13; nations of the North (Ezekiel 32:26; Ezekiel 38:2-3; Ezekiel 38:15; Ezekiel 39:1-2). Tubal answers to the Tibareni, as Meshech to the Moschi; close to one another, on the Northern coast of Asia Minor, about the river Melanthius (Melet Irmak), in Herodotus' and Xenophon's days; previously among the most powerful races
Capernaum - The two sites most in favour are Tell Hum and Khan Minyeh , both on the North side of the Sea of Galilee, the former about midway between the latter and the mouth of the Jordan
Judah Territory of - The average extent of this district was 50 miles from east to west and 45 miles from North to south, and its area about half that of the State of Connecticut. A portion of the Northwestern part was also given to Dan
Aroer - City on North rim of Arnon Gorge east of Dead Sea on southern boundary of territory Israel claimed east of the Jordan River (Joshua 13:9 )
Bison - These animals inhabit the interior parts of North America, and some of the mountainous parts of Europe and Asia
Herd - ...
Bâqâr also refers to statues of oxen: “It [4] stood upon twelve oxen, three looking toward the North, and three looking toward the west, and three looking toward the south, and three looking toward the east …” (1 Kings 7:25)
Midian, Midianites - That they extended however much farther North is proved by the intercourse they had with the Israelites when in the land; unless, as some suppose, the term Midianites was not restricted to this tribe
Capernaum - This mound is situated close upon the seashore at the Northwestern extremity of the plain (now El Ghuweir). Three miles North of Khan Minieh is Tell Hum, where are ruins of walls and foundations covering a space of half a mile long by a quarter wide, on a point of the shore projecting into the lake and backed by a very gently rising ground
Candlestick - When Solomon had built the temple, he was not satisfied with placing one golden candlestick there, but had ten put up, of the same form and metal with that described by Moses, five on the North, and five on the south side of the holy place, 1 Kings 7:49
Benbadad - He made an alliance with Asa, and conquered a great part of the North of Israel
Smyrna - A celebrated Ionian city situated at the head of a deep gulf on the western coast of Asia Minor, forty miles North by west of Ephesus
Unite - The states of North America united, form one nation
Beth'Lehem - It covers the east and Northeast parts of the ridge of a long gray hill of Jura limestone, which stands nearly due east and west, and is about a mile in length. The hill has a deep valley on the North and another on the south
be-er'-Sheba, - According to the first, the well was dug by Abraham, and the name given to Judah, ( Joshua 15:28 ) and then to Simeon, (Joshua 19:2 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) In the often-quoted "from Dan even unto Beersheba," (Judges 20:1 ) it represents the southern boundary of Canaan, as Dan the Northern. The two principal wells are on or close to the Northern bank of the Wady es-Seba . On some low hills North of the large wells are scattered the foundations and ruins of a town of moderate size
Esdra-e'Lon - Its base on the east extends from Jenin (the ancient Engannim) to the foot of the hills below Nazareth, and is about 15 miles long; the North side, formed by the hills of Galilee, is about 12 miles long; and the south side, formed by the Samaria range, is about 18 miles
Gedaliah - ...
Gedaliah set up his headquarters at Mizpah, North of Jerusalem, and with Jeremiah’s support followed a policy of submission to Babylon
Babylon - ...
Location Traditionally, a mound called Babil, near the Euphrates River and some six miles Northeast of Hillah (southwest of Iraq's capital city Baghdad), has been identified as the location of ancient Babylon. The eastern section with the “Summer Palace” to the North was enclosed by a triangular defensive system of walls running over eight miles from the Euphrates about one and one half miles North of the city southeast to turn southwest to rejoin the river about 750 feet south of the city. ”...
Just inside the outer wall system at the North and along the Euphrates was the mound Babil, some 1 1/2-2 1/2 miles North of the other mounds. From the Euphrates along this street the distance was about 2000 feet to the Northern side of the rectangular wall system. The eastern wall was that of the Northern Fortress (sometimes called the Museum because of finds there) and the eastern that of the eastern outer bastion. ...
Babylon's principal palace was on the right upon passing through the Ishtar Gate, lying between a canal at its south and the city walls at its North. Its dimensions were expansive, 1020 feet east to west and 660 feet North to south
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - In the Delta at least three major branches facilitated irrigation in the extensive fan North of Memphis, the ancient capital of lower Egypt. From the mountainous region of Northeastern Turkey (Armenia), it flows southward into Northern Syria and turns southeasterly to join the Tigris and flows into the Persian Gulf. Two important tributaries, the Belikh and Khabur, flow into the Euphrates from the North before it continues on to the ancient trade center at Mari. ...
The course of the Upper Euphrates was described as the Northern border of the Promised Land (Genesis 15:18 ; Deuteronomy 1:7 ; Deuteronomy 11:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ). Halys River From its sources in the Armenian mountains, the Halys begins its 714-mile flow to the southwest only to be diverted by a secondary ridge into a broad loop until its direction is completely reversed into a Northeasterly direction through the mountainous regions bordering the southern shore of the Black Sea. Within this loop of the Halys in the Northern Anatolian plateau the Hittites established their capital Boghazkoy. From the watershed, the Orontes flows Northward and bends westward to empty into the Mediterranean near Antioch. The Litani flows southward and ultimately escapes to the sea North of Tyre. The Jabbok River reaches the Jordan from the east twenty-five miles North of the Dead Sea. Though anchorages and small harbors, such as tel Qasile, a Philistine town, were established along its course and the cedar timbers from Lebanon were floated inland to Aphek for transport to Jerusalem for the construction of Solomon's palace and Temple, the Yarkon historically formed a major barrier to North-south traffic because of the extensive swamps that formed along its course. ” The Yarkon, in biblical times, formed the border between the tribes of Dan and Ephraim to the North. ...
Formed by the movement of the European and North African continental plates, the greater Mediterranean consists of a series of basins and extended shoreline that historically contributed to the vitality of maritime commerce and trade. While limited port facilities existed at coastal towns such as Joppa, Dor, and Accho, they were hardly adequate to facilitate more than a local fishing fleet and an occasional refuge during a storm for the larger merchant ships that frequented the great harbors established farther to the North along the Phoenician coast. “Sea of Reeds”) is a long narrow body of water separating the Arabian Peninsula from the Northeastern coast of Africa (Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia). While its average depth is about 1,640 feet, as a part of the great rift or fault that runs Northward from Lake Victoria to the base of the Caucasus Mountains in southern Russia, the Red Sea plunges to 7,741 feet near Port Sudan. ...
In the North the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Elath (Aqaba) form the western and eastern arms making up the shorelines of the Sinai Peninsula. In the North and east, the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea, and the Persian Gulf with the mountain ranges that linked them basically formed the limits of the biblical world
Debir - A town on the Northern border of Judah (Joshua 15:7 ). The city may be modern Umm el-Dabar, twelve miles North of Pella
Netherlands - Constitutional monarchy of Europe, west of Germany, on the North Sea; area, 13,220 square miles, population 16,400,000
Frederick ii - His desire of reestablishing the imperial power in Northern Italy was opposed by a league of the Italian cities and also by the Holy See, as it endangered the liberties of the Papal States. He then resumed his North Italian policy, but was frustrated by the rebellion of his son Henry in Germany, whom he soon captured
Lithuania - Republic, on the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, North of Poland
Mystical Numbers - This signifies that they will judge all men, for there are four quarters of the world, East, West, North, and South
James Gibbons - Vicar Apostolic of North Carolina, he was consecrated Bishop of Adramytum, 1868, and was appointed to the See of Richmond, 1872
Hazor -
A stronghold of the Canaanites in the mountains North of Lake Merom (Joshua 11:1-5 )
Megiddo - Barak rallied the warriors of the Northern tribes, and under the encouragement of Deborah (q. Megiddo has been identified with the modern el-Lejjun, at the head of the Kishon, under the North-eastern brow of Carmel, on the south-western edge of the plain of Esdraelon, and 9 miles west of Jezreel
Corner - The corner gate of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 26:9 ) was on the North-west side of the city
Candlestick, Seven-Branched - The golden candlestick was placed along the south wall of the Holy Place, facing the table of the loaves of proposition, the nozzles of the lamps being turned towards the North
Kidron - It runs in a winding course through the wilderness of Judea to the North-western shore of the Dead Sea
Bashan - This country extended from Gilead in the south to Hermon in the North, and from the Jordan on the west to Salcah on the east
Debir - ...
...
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A place near the "valley of Achor" (Joshua 15:7 ), on the North boundary of Judah, between Jerusalem and Jericho
Gilgal - It is now known as Jiljilia, a place 8 miles North of Bethel
Philip - From there he moved North along the Mediterranean coast, preaching in all the towns as far as Caesarea (Acts 8:40)
Spies - They at once proceeded on their important errand, and went through the land as far North as the district round Lake Merom
Second - ) The sixtieth part of a minute of time or of a minute of space, that is, the second regular subdivision of the degree; as, sound moves about 1,140 English feet in a second; five minutes and ten seconds North of this place
Season - In the North temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized
Taanach - One of the sites along the Northern slope of the Mount Carmel range protecting the accesses from the Plain of Esdraelon to the region of Samaria. ...
Taanach thus sat along one fork of the major North-south road of antiquity that went through Palestine, usually called the Via Maris
Hungary - Independent kingdom of central Europe, bounded North by Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Ukraine, east by Rumania and Ukraine, south by Yugoslavia, west by Austria
Magog - Ezekiel 39:6 ) as under the rule of Gog , prince of ‘Rosh, Meshech , and Tubal ,’ who is to lead in the future a great expedition against the restored Israel, from ‘the uttermost parts of the North,’ and who has among his allies Gomer and Togarmah , the nations whose names are italicized being also mentioned in Genesis 10:2-3 as closely connected with ‘Magog
Numbers, Mystical - This signifies that they will judge all men, for there are four quarters of the world, East, West, North, and South
Wilderness of the Wandering, - On the south and south west were the granite mountains of Sinai and on the North the Mediterranean Sea and the mountainous region south of Judea
Accad - It has been identified with the mounds of Akker Kuf, some 50 miles to the North of Babylon; but this is doubtful. (See SEPHARVAIM ) It is also the name of the country of which this city was the capital, namely, Northern or upper Babylonia
Euphrates - ’ It rises in the Armenian mountains from two sources, the Northern branch being called the Frat or Kara-su, and the southern and larger branch the Murad-su (the Arsanias of ancient geography). The present length of the river is 1780 miles, but in ancient times it fell into the sea many miles to the North of its existing outlet, and through a separate mouth from that of the Tigris. The Hittite city of Carchemish stood at the point where the Euphrates touched Northern Syria, and commanded one of the chief fords over the river; south of it came the Belikh and Khabur, the last affluents of the Euphrates
Feud - In the North of Great Britain, the word is still used in its original sense denoting a combination of kindred to revenge the death of any of their blood, on the offender and all his race, or any other great enemy
Jericho - A city of Benjamin, situated in the valley of the Jordan, on the west side of that river, and North of its entrance into the Dead sea
Calvary - A much more probable place is that pointed out by the Jews on the North of the city, near the Grotto of Jeremiah
Jael - Wife of Heber the Kenite, a descendant of Jethro, father-in-law of Moses, who was head of an Arab clan which was established in the North of Palestine
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary - ...
Name Meaning; ad, to; sumere, to take (latin) ...
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England, John - His diocese, which included North and South Carolina, and Georgia, contained but three churches
Lachish - It was a fortified city in the route running from North to south
Phenicia - Sometimes it has been defined as extending from North to south, from Orthosia as far as Pelusium
Ai - called by the LXX, Gai, by Josephus, Aina, and by others Ajah, a town of Palestine, situate west of Bethel, and at a small distance North-west of Jericho
Iron - By the "northern iron,"...
Jeremiah 15:12 , we may probably understand the hardened iron, called in Greek χαλυψ , from the Chalybes, a people bordering on the Euxine sea, and consequently lying on the North of Judea, by whom the art of tempering steel is said to have been discovered
Lodge - ) A family of North American Indians, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge, - as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons; as, the tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals
Antioch - This city was about 300 miles North of Jerusalem, on the left bank of the river Orontes, 16½ miles from the Mediterranean, in a deep pass between the Lebanon and the Taurus ranges of mountains. It was situated on a ridge—Strabo calls it a "height"—near the foot of the mountain-range, and by the Northern shore of Lake Eyerdir
Sarids - It was situated at the foot of Mount Tmolus on the North, having a spacious and delightful plain before it, watered by several streams that flow from the neighboring hill and by the Pactolus
Gibbons, James - Vicar Apostolic of North Carolina, he was consecrated Bishop of Adramytum, 1868, and was appointed to the See of Richmond, 1872
Bethlehem - Half a mile North is the spot pointed out by traditional as Rachel's tomb, Genesis 35:16-20 ; and about two miles south-west are the great reservoirs described under Solomon's Pools
Seven-Branched Candlestick - The golden candlestick was placed along the south wall of the Holy Place, facing the table of the loaves of proposition, the nozzles of the lamps being turned towards the North
Talk - Among the Indians of North America, a public conference, as respecting peace or war, negotiation and the like or an official verbal communication made from them to another nation or its agents, or made to them by the same
South Carolina - Among the Jesuits sent out in 1566 by Saint Francis Borgia to the SpanisIi colonies of North America was Father John Rogel of Pamplona
Wild - Wild rice, a palatable and nutritious food, grows spontaneously in the lakes and ponds of the North West territory
Macedo'Nia - (extended land ), a large and celebrated country lying North of Greece, the first part of Europe which received the gospel directly from St. It was bounded by the range of Haemus or the Balkan Northward, by the chain of Pindus westward, by the Cambunian hills southward, by which it is separated from Thessaly, an is divided on the east from Thrace by a less definite mountain boundary running southward from Haemus
Hin'Nom - (lamentation ) , Valley of, otherwise called "the valley of the son" or "children of Hinnom," a deep and narrow ravine, with steep, rocky sides, to the south and west of Jerusalem, separating Mount Zion to the North from the "hill of evil counsel," and the sloping rocky plateau of the "plain of Rephaim" to the south
Rhodes - (It is triangular in form, 60 miles long from North to south, and about 18 wide. with the founding of the city of Rhodes, at the Northeast extremity of the island, which still continues to be the capital
Gadarenes', Girgesenes', Gerasenes' - " It was situated some 30 miles southeast of Gadara, on the borders of Peraea and a little North of the river Jabbok
Caesarea - Being situated on the main North-south coastal road that linked Phoenicia and Egypt, the city developed into a prosperous centre for inland and overseas trade. The latter was in the hill country of Northern Galilee (Matthew 16:13; see CAESAREA PHILIPPI)
Bashan - Bashan was the region lying North of the Yarmuk River and east of the Sea of Galilee, though the name was occasionally used to cover a wider area. Israel lost Bashan again, this time without any hope of regaining it, when Assyria overran the Northern and eastern sections of Israel and took the people into captivity (2 Kings 15:29)
Hebron - It was situated at the point where two main highways crossed, the North-south route from central Canaan to Egypt, and the east-west route from the Dead Sea to the Mediterranean coast (for map see PALESTINE)
Anglican Communion, the - Under this term are included the Churchof England, the Church of Ireland, the Church of Scotland, theChurches in British North America, the West Indies, Australia, SouthAfrica and in all the English colonies throughout the worldwherever established
Drift - ) One of the slower movements of oceanic circulation; a general tendency of the water, subject to occasional or frequent diversion or reversal by the wind; as, the easterly drift of the North Pacific. ) A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes North of forty degrees, by the agency of ice
Joppa - ” Situated on the Mediterranean coast, Joppa is located some thirty-five miles Northwest of Jerusalem. To the North stretches the Plain of Sharon, to the south the Plain of Philistia. Entrance from the North was shallow and treacherous, but small vessels could navigate it
Praetorium - That Pilate’s house was in the lower city, a little to the North of the Temple, is altogether unlikely. More can be said in favour of Pilate’s occupation of the castle of Antonia, which stood to the North-west of the Temple area
Ptolemais - So strong a fortress, guarding so fertile a plain, and a port on the highroad to such rich lands to North, east, and south, could never have been overlooked by hostile armies, and so we find the Egyptian Thothmes iii. Extending from Carmel in the south to the ‘Ladder of Tyre’ in the North, and eastward to the foothills of Galilee, is the great and well-watered ‘Plain of Acre,’ a region which, though sandy and sterile close to the sea, is of rich fertility elsewhere
Persia - In Hebrew Paras, Ezekiel 27:10 , a vast region in Asia, the southwestern province of which lying between ancient media on the North and the Persian Gulf on the south, appears to have been the ancient Persia, and is still called Pharsistan, or Fars. Modern Persia is bounded North by Georgia, the Caspian sea, and Tartary; east by Afghanistan and Beloochistan; south by Ormus; and west by the dominions of Turkey
mo'ab - The Moabites first inhabited the rich highlands which crown the eastern side of the chasm of the Dead Sea, extending as far North as the mountain of Gilead, from which country they expelled the Emims, the original inhabitants, (2:11) but they themselves were afterward driven southward by the warlike Amorites, who had crossed the Jordan, and were confined to the country south of the river Arnon, which formed their Northern boundary. (2) The more open rolling country North of the Arnon, opposite Jericho, and up to the hills of Gilead, was the "land of Moab. (2 Samuel 8:2 ; 1 Chronicles 18:2 ) At the disruption of the kingdom Moab seems to have fallen to the Northern realm
Praetorium - That Pilate’s house was in the lower city, a little to the North of the Temple, is altogether unlikely. More can be said in favour of Pilate’s occupation of the castle of Antonia, which stood to the North-west of the Temple area
Phoeni'ce, Phoenic'ia - (land of palm trees ) a tract of country, of which Tyre and Sidon were the principal cities, to the North of Palestine, along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea bounded by that sea on the west, and by the mountain range of Lebanon on the east.
What may be termed Phoenicia proper was a narrow undulating plain, extending from the pass of Ras el-Beyad or Abyad , the Promontorium Album of the ancients, about six miles south of Tyre, to the Nahr el-Auly , the ancient Bostrenus, two miles North of Sidon. ...
A longer district, which afterward became entitled to the name of Phoenicia, extended up the coast to a point marked by the island of Aradus, and by Antaradus toward the North; the southern boundary remaining the same as in Phoenicia proper
Jerusalem - Jerusalem is in latitude 31° 47' North, and in longitude 35° 18' east from Greenwich, or about the latitude of Savannah, Ga. It is 35 miles east from the Mediterranean sea, and 18 miles west of the North end of the Dead sea. The hill on which the temple stood is 2440 feet high, "dropping abruptly," Bays Selah Merrill, "at the Northeast corner 100 feet, at the southeast corner 250 feet, at the southwest corner 140 feet, and on the west side about 100 feet, while toward the North, beyond what afterward became the temple area, the ridge rose gradually about 100 feet, its highest point being at the spot now known as Jeremiah's Grotto. This was the route commonly taken from the North and east of the country—as from Galilee by our Lord, Luke 17:11; Luke 18:35; Luke 19:1; Luke 19:29; Luke 19:37, etc. This road led by the two Bethhorons up to the high ground at Gibeon, whence it turned south, and came to Jerusalem by Ramah and Gibeah, and over the ridge North of the city. At the Northwest angle of the temple was the Antonia, a tower or fortress. North of the side of the temple is the building now known to Christians as the Mosque of Omar, but by Moslems it is called the Dome of the Rock. Lastly, Acra lay westward of Moriah and Northward of Zion, and formed the "Lower City" in the time of Josephus. The chief gates of Jerusalem, now are four: the Damascus gate on the North, the Jaffa gate on the west, David or Zion gate on the south, and St. Stephen's gate; before that they were located to the North about the Damascus gate. — According to Josephus, the first or old wall began on the North at the tower called Hippicus, the ruins now called Kasi-Jalud at the Northwest angle of the present city, and, extending to the Xystus, joined the council house, and ended at the west cloister of the temple. The second wall began at the gate Gennath, in the old wall, probably near the Hippicus, and passed round the Northern quarter of the city, enclosing the great valley of the Tyropœon, which leads up to the Damascus gate; and then, proceeding southward, joined the fortress Antonia. The third wall was built by King Herod Agrippa; and was intended to enclose the suburbs on the Northern sides of the city, which before this had been left exposed. The walls, measuring straight from point to point, are about 12,000 feet in length; the North wall being 3930 feet, the east wall 2754 feet, the south wall 3245 feet, and the west wall 2086 feet. In the Northwest corner of the city the foundations of one of the great towers of ancient Jerusalem have been uncovered, and massive work of the same age is found at the Damascus Gate. North of the city we have the tomb of Helena, the mother of Izates, built in the last century before Christ; and there are a few other objects, as the Tomb of Absalom and that of Jehoshaphat, which certainly belong to ancient times, but whose exact date cannot be determined
Ararat - Others maintain, that mount Ararat was situated toward the middle of Armenia, near the river Araxes, or Aras, about twelve miles from it, according to Tournefort, above two hundred and eighty miles distant from Al-Judi, to the North-east. It is a detached mountain in form of a sugar loaf, in the midst of a very extensive plain, consisting of two summits; the lesser, more sharp and pointed; the higher, which is that of the ark, lies North-west of it, and raises its head far above the neighbouring mountains, and is covered with perpetual snow. On viewing mount Ararat from the Northern side of the plain, its two heads are separated by a wide cleft, or rather glen, in the body of the mountain. The rocky side of the greater head runs almost perpendicularly down to the North-east, while the lesser head rises from the sloping bottom of the cleft, in a perfectly conical shape. The form of the greater is similar to the less, only broader and rounder at the top; and shows to the Northwest a broken and abrupt front, opening, about half way down, into a stupendous chasm, deep, rocky and peculiarly black. Shuckford argues that the true Ararat lies among the mountains of the North of India; but Mr
Chronicles, Theology of - ...
Unlike Samuel-Kings, Chronicles does not record the accounts of the kings of the Northern kingdom of Israel, the nation that was formed by the division of David's empire after the reign of Solomon. The North is mentioned only when its story overlaps with that of the south. The people of the North are still reckoned among the people of God, but are portrayed as having forsaken Yahweh by rejecting the institutions of the Davidic monarchy, the levitical priesthood, and the Jerusalem temple (see 2 Chronicles 10:19 ; 11:13-15 ; and particularly Abijah's homiletical speech 2 Chronicles 13:4-12 ). The south was not to attack the North, for they were still God's people (2 Chronicles 11:1-4 ). But it was not to ally with the North (2 Chronicles 18 ), for the Northern kingdom was not legitimate (2 Chronicles 19:2 ). When the Northern kingdom fell to the Assyrians (722 b. When the people of the Northern kingdom rejected this institution, they forsook Yahweh (2 Chronicles 13:4-12 ). According to Chronicles, the Northern kingdom forsook Yahweh by rejecting the institution of the levitical priesthood, as they rejected the Davidic monarchy (2 Chronicles 11:13-15 ; 13:8-12 ). " It may be used to refer to all of the Israelites (1 Chronicles 11:1 ), to those of the south (2 Chronicles 11:3 ), or to those of the North (2 Chronicles 13:4,15 ). When the division between the North and south occurs, those who comprise all Israel must decide whether or not to seek Yahweh (2 Chronicles 11:13-17 ). North, JBL 82 (1963): 369-81; G
Samaria, Samaritans - Forty-two miles North of Jerusalem and nine miles Northwest of Nablus, a hill protrudes from the broad valley which cuts across the central highlands of Israel. Following the Northern Kingdom's fall to Assyria (721 B. ...
Samaria is the only major city founded by Israel, the Northern Kingdom. Shechem had been the capital of the Northern Kingdom until Jeroboam relocated it at Tirzah. Finally, the name Samaria became synonymous with the entire Northern Kingdom ( 1 Kings 13:32 ; Jeremiah 31:5 ). By New Testament times, it became identified with the central region of Palestine, with Galilee to the North and Judea to the south. ...
The name Samaritans originally was identified with the Israelites of the Northern Kingdom ( 2 Kings 17:29 ). The old antagonism between Israel to the North and Judah to the south intensified the quarrel
Arnon - But the Amorite king, Sihon, attacked from the North and overran much of their land. The Arnon therefore became the boundary between the Amorites to the North and the Moabites to the south (Numbers 21:13). ...
When the Israelites under Moses were moving North towards Canaan, they conquered the Amorites and seized their territory (Numbers 21:24)
Nazareth - It was about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee, and 66 miles North of Jerusalem in a straight line
On - On was situated upon the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, about 20 miles Northeast of ancient Memphis, and 6 miles North from Cairo
Persia - The Persian empire extended from the Indus on the east to Thrace on the west, and from the Black and Caspian Seas on the North to the Indian Ocean, the Persian Gulf, and the Red Sea on the south
Hiram - ...
Hiram was the son of Abibaal (“my father is Baal”) and was nineteen years old when he succeeded his father as king of Tyre on the Phoenician coast, just North of Israel
Thomas - His doubts were removed, and he was one of the seven who journeyed North to meet the Lord at the Lake of Galilee ( John 21:2 )
Arabia - It comprehended all the North-west portion of the country, and is much better known to travellers than any other portion. This country is, however, divided by modern geographers into (1) Arabia Proper, or the Arabian Peninsula; (2) Northern Arabia, or the Arabian Desert; and (3) Western Arabia, which includes the peninsula of Sinai and the Desert of Petra, originally inhabited by the Horites (Genesis 14:6 , etc
Joab - He was buried in his own property in the "wilderness," probably in the North-east of Jerusalem (1 Kings 2:5,28-34 )
Zidon - A fishery, a town on the Mediterranean coast, about 25 miles North of Tyre
Coming to Christ: as a Sinner (2) - In one of the coal-pits of the North, while a considerable number of the miners were dawn below, the top of the pit fell in, and the shaft was completely blocked up
Siloam, Pool of - The pool Isaiah 53 feet in length from North to south, 18 feet wide, and 19 deep
Sycomore - In the extreme North of Syria it is not met with, as it is not hardy enough to withstand the occasional frosts (Psalms 78:47)
Thutmose - His military exploits expanded Egypt to include Nubia to the south and Syria, North to the Euphrates River
Pools of Solomon - These pools derive their chief supply of water from a spring called "the sealed fountain," about 200 yards to the North-west of the upper pool, to which it is conveyed by a large subterranean passage
Mizpah - ...
During the period of the divided kingdom, Mizpah became an important defence outpost on Judah’s Northern border with Israel (1 Kings 15:22). ...
Other places in Palestine named Mizpah were near Mount Hermon in the far North (Joshua 11:3), in Gilead east of Jordan (Judges 10:17; Judges 11:11; Judges 11:29; Judges 11:34), and in the low foothills west of the central highlands (Joshua 15:38)
Medes - Its greatest length from North to south was 550 miles, its average breadth 250 to 300 miles, and its area 150,000 square miles
Waterlandians - They are thus called in distinction from the Flemingians, or Flandrians, and likewise because they consisted at first of the inhabitants of a district in North Holland, called Waterland
Hill - It stands literally ‘on a mountain,’ to the North, nearly 3500 ft
Armageddon - ” Revelation promises that in the face of defeat of God's saints by military forces from the east, south, and the North, the Lord Jesus Christ will return to defeat His enemies and deliver His people
Apple - The native fruit is small and wanting in sweetness; almost all eatable apples are imported from the North
Bashan - Now best known for the Golan Heights, it is a large district on the east of the Jordan, having Gilead on the south and extending Northward to Mount Hermon; westward to the Jordan valley, and eastward nearly as far as 37 E. TRACHONITIS, on the North-east, also called ARGOB, q
Jeroboam (1) - Fearing that his subjects, if they went up to Jerusalem to worship, would be alienated from him, he made two golden calves, placing one in Beth-el in the south, and the other in Dan in the North; and declared that these were the gods that had brought Israel out of Egypt
Mizpah, Mizpeh - It was 'under Hermon,' and therefore in the North of Palestine, Joshua 11:3 ; this is possibly the same as ...
3
Samaria - It had the district of Galilee on the North, and Judaea on the south
Cave - " ...
The cave in which Obadiah hid the prophets (1 Kings 18:4 ) was probably in the North, but it cannot be identified
Zebulun - ...
Their lot fell towards the North, its centre being about 32 45' N
Gilead - Gilead was a region of country bounded on the North by Basban, east by the Arabian desert, south by Moab and Ammon, and west by the Jordan
Lebanon - The mountain range in the North of Palestine. It is mentioned as the Northern boundary of Palestine
Gad - Gad had his inheritance between Reuben south, and Manasseh North, with the mountains of Gilead east, and Jordan west
Dan - Dan, city of, the chief city of the Northern district held by this tribe. It was originally called Laish, Judges 18:29; noted for idolatry, Judges 18:30; now called Tel-el-Kâdy, or "Mound of the Judge," three miles from Banias, North of the waters of Merom
Shechem - It was 34 miles North of Jerusalem, about seven miles southeast of Samaria, and its site is unrivalled for beauty in Palestine
Cilicia - Through the Cilician Gates (pass) in the Taurus Mountains to the North, through “level” Cilicia itself, and through the Syrian Gates in the Ammanus Mountains to the east ran the great international highway between central Asia Minor and Syria, Mesopotamia, and Egypt
Stephen - Earlier traditions located it more to the North
Gad - The inheritance of the tribe of Gad lay between Manesseh on the North, Reuben on the south, the Jordan on the west, and the Ammonites on the east. The Northwest point stretched to the Sea of Galilee
Passage - Bird of passage, a fowl that passes at certain seasons from one climate to another, as in autumn to the south to avoid the winter's cold, and in spring to the North for breeding
Gil'Gal - (2 Samuel 19:40 ) A Gilgal is spoken of in (Joshua 15:7 ) in describing the North border of Judah. (Joshua 12:23 ) Possibly the site of this place is marked by the modern village Jiljulieh , about four miles south of Antipatris, which lies 16 miles Northeast of Joppa
na'Hum - Those who maintain the latter view assume that the prophet's parents were carried into captivity by Tiglath-pileser and that the prophet was born at the village of Alkush, on the east bank of the Tigris, two miles North of Mosul
ju'Dah - (Genesis 26:22 ) The boundaries and contents of the territory allotted to Judah are narrated at great length, and with greater minuteness than the others, in (Joshua 15:20-63 ) The North boundary, for the most part coincident with the south boundary of Benjamin, began at the embouchure of the Jordan and ended on the west at Jabneel on the coast of the Mediterranean, four miles south of Joppa
ga'za - There are a few palm trees in the town, and its fruit orchards are very productive; but the chief feature of the neighborhood is the wide-spread olive grove to the North and Northeast
Reed - Hooker saw it on the banks of Lake Tiberias, a few miles North of the town
Zebulun - ...
Their lot fell towards the North, its centre being about 32 45' N
Crete - Under the Romans it became part of a double province Crete with Cyrene, under a governor with the title “proconsul,” who ruled the island and the opposite coast of North Africa from the Roman capital Gortyna. The voyage followed the route south of Crete, which gave partial shelter from the Northwest winds and avoided the peril of the lee shore on the North coast, while still involving the need to beat up against largely adverse winds. The gentle south wind gave way to a violent Northeaster (Euroclydon, Acts 27:14 ) when they came out of the shelter of Cape Matala (Loukinos) into an open bay, and the ship was driven helplessly, managing only some emergency action in the lee of the offshore island of Cauda, and thence to shipwreck on Malta
Babylon, Kingdom of - Called "the land of the Chaldeans" (Jeremiah 24:5 ; Ezek 12:13 ), was an extensive province in Central Asia along the valley of the Tigris from the Persian Gulf Northward for some 300 miles. Babylonia was divided into the two districts of Accad in the North, and Summer (probably the Shinar of the Old Testament) in the south. Among its chief cities may be mentioned Ur (now Mugheir or Mugayyar), on the western bank of the Euphrates; Uruk, or Erech (Genesis 10:10 ) (now Warka), between Ur and Babylon; Larsa (now Senkereh), the Ellasar of Genesis 14:1 , a little to the east of Erech; Nipur (now Niffer), south-east of Babylon; Sepharvaim (2 Kings 17:24 ), "the two Sipparas" (now Abu-Habba), considerably to the North of Babylon; and Eridu, "the good city" (now Abu-Shahrein), which lay originally on the shore of the Persian Gulf, but is now, owing to the silting up of the sand, about 100 miles distant from it
Greece - This name Græci properly belonged only to a small tribe of Greeks, who lived in the North-west of Greece; but as this tribe was apparently the first to attract the attention of Rome, dwelling as it did on the other side of the Adriatic from Italy, the name came to be applied by the Romans to the whole race. The Empire had two official languages, Latin for Italy and all provinces North, south-west, and west of it; Greek for all east and south-east of Italy
Sinai - It stands in a kind of peninsula, formed by the two arms of the Red Sea; one extending North, called the Gulf of Kolsom; the other extending east, called the Gulf of Elan. Toward the extremity of this plain, on the North, two high mountains appear; the highest is called Sinai, the other Horeb
Bashan - or BASAN, one of the most fertile cantons of Canaan, which was bounded on the west by the river Jordan, on the east by the mountains of Gilead, on the south by the brook of Jabbok, and on the North by the land of Geshur. Buckingham, in his Travels, gives the following account: "We ascended the steep on the North side of the Zerkah, or Jabbok; and, on reaching the summit, came again on a beautiful plain, of an elevated level, and still covered with a very rich soil
Roman Empire - The generals of Augustus overran the Northwest Portion of Spain and the country between the Alps and the Danube. The boundaries of the empire were now the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the deserts of Africa, the cataracts of the Nile and the Arabian deserts on the south, the British Channel, the Rhine, the Danube and the Black Sea on the North. The only independent powers of importance were the Parthians on the east and the Germans on the North
Elam - They belonged to the great family of barbarous or semi-barbarous tribes which occupied the highlands to the east and North of the Semites before the influx of the Aryans. Shortly thereafter, when Assyria itself declined and fell, Elam was occupied by the rising Aryan tribes, the Medes from the North and the Persians from the south
Hosea - At the time of the prophet Hosea’s ministry (the eighth century BC) the ancient Israelite nation was divided into two kingdoms, Israel in the North and Judah in the south. ...
Unfaithful religion...
Hosea’s work was concerned with the North more than the south. They came from different parts of the country, but both were concerned more with the Northern kingdom than with the southern
Antiochus - These are so clear and definite that sceptics have foolishly said that at least this part of the prophecy of Daniel must have been writtenafter the events! The Greek kingdom, the third of the four great empires, was, on the death of Alexander the Great, divided amonghis four generals, and this resulted principally in a series of kings who ruled in Egypt bearing the general name of PTOLEMY, and are called in scripture 'Kings of the South;' and another series, called 'Kings of the North,' who bore the general name of either SELEUCUS or ANTIOCHUS. 'Shall enter into the fortress of the king of...
the North,' and carry away their precious vessels of silver and gold. Without doubt some of the acts of Antiochus Epiphanes are types of the deeds of the future king of the North — referred to in other prophecies as 'the Assyrian' — in respect to the Jews and Jerusalem
She'Chem -
An important city in central Palestine, in the valley between mounts Ebal and Gerizim, 34 miles North of Jerusalem and 7 miles southeast of Samaria. It lies in a sheltered valley, protected by Gerizim on the south and Ebal on the North. The tomb of Joseph lies about a quarter of a mile North of the well, exactly in the centre of the opening of the valley
Sea, the Salt, - It is the deepest portion of that very deep natural fissure which runs like a furrow from the Gulf of Akabah to the range of Lebanon, and from the range of Lebanon to the extreme North of Syria. Its surface is from North to south as nearly as possible 40 geographical or 46 English miles long. At its Northern end the lake receives the stream of the Jordan; on its eastern side the Zurka Ma'in (the ancient Callirrhoe, and possibly the more ancient en-Eglaim), the Mojib (the Arnon of the Bible), and the Beni-Hemad ; on the south the Kurahy or el-Ahsy ; and on the west that of Ain Jidy . Its depth, at about one third of its length from the North end, Isaiah 1308 feet. It is not only unsupported by Scripture, but is directly in the teeth of the evidence of the ground itself of the situation of those cities, we only know that, being in the "plain of the Jordan, they must have been to the North of the lake
Tarsus - The level plain stretches to the North of it for about 2 miles, and then begins to rise gradually till it merges in the lofty Taurus range, about 30 miles North. The climate of the low-lying city must always have been oppressive and unfavourable to energetic action, but the undulating country to the North was utilized to counteract its effects. About 9 to 12 miles North of the city propel there was a second Tarsus, within the territory of the main Tarsus, in theory a summer residence merely, but in reality a fortified town of importance, permanently inhabited. At the harbour town, which was called Aulai, all the larger ships discharged, and in ancient times buildings were continuous between the North of this lake and the city of Tarsus
Hamath - ” City-state located in the valley of the Orontes River, roughly 120 miles North of Damascus. ...
The southern boundary of Hamath served as the Northern boundary of Israel during the reigns of Solomon (1 Kings 8:65 ; 2 Chronicles 8:4 ) and Jeroboam II (2Kings 14:25,2 Kings 14:28 ). The “entrance of Hamath” was treated as the Northern border of Israel (Numbers 34:8 ; Joshua 13:5 ; Ezekiel 47:15-17 ,Ezekiel 47:15-17,47:20 ; Ezekiel 48:1 ) and served as an accepted geographical expression (Numbers 13:21 ; Judges 3:3 ). King Irhuleni of Hamath joined a coalition including Ben-hadad II of Damascus and Ahab of Israel which successfully thwarted the advance of Shalmaneser II of Assyria into Northern Syria
Heshbon - Ancient Heshbon, to be identified with present-day tell Hesban, was one of several ancient cities situated on the rolling and fertile plateau east of the Dead Sea and North of the Arnon River (present-day Wadi Mojib)
Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools - In that same period, however, 222 new foundations were made outside of France, in Europe and the Levant, England, Ireland, North and South America, the West Indies, Cape Colony, and Australia
New Mexico - He was accompanied by Father Alonzo Martinez and nine Franciscan companions and in 1598 the first mission was established and a church built at San Juan de los Caballeros, about 30 miles North of Santa Fe
Ararat - It consists of two peaks, one considerably higher than the other, and is connected with a chain of mountains running off to the North-west and west, which, though high, are not of sufficient elevation to detract at all from the lonely dignity of this stupendous mass
Sheba - " With his followers he proceeded Northward. Sheba took refuge in Abel-Bethmaachah, a fortified town some miles North of Lake Merom
Moabite - On their journey the Israelites did not pass through Moab, but through the "wilderness" to the east (Deuteronomy 2:8 ; Judges 11:18 ), at length reaching the country to the North of the Arnon
Gad - ...
Gad possessed a large district from a little above the North corner of the Dead Sea to near the south corner of the Sea of Galilee, then a very fertile plain suitable for their flocks and herds, including the highlands of Gilead
Ammonite - They inhabited the country east of the Jordan and North of Moab and the Dead Sea, from which they had expelled the Zamzummims or Zuzims (Deuteronomy 2:20 ; Genesis 14:5 )
Immanuel - Achaz seeks salvation from the danger presented by the war with Rasin, King of Syria, and Phacee, King of Northern Israel, in an alliance with the Assyrians. When the House of David sees the country overrun, first by the Syrians and the Israelites of the North and then by those very Assyrians in whom they place their trust, then they will be reminded of Isaias's teaching that "salvation is in Jehovah
Migdol - ” A town or a border fortress located in the Northeast corner of Egypt. Ezekiel prophesied that the land of Egypt would be laid waste, “from Migdol to Aswan” (Ezekiel 29:10 ; Ezekiel 30:6 NIV), that is from the Northern extremity of the land, Migdol, to the southern extremity of the land, Aswan. Some prefer to identify Tjeku with Succoth, modern-day tell el-Maskhutah, while others identify it with tell el-Her located further North near Pelusium
Lutheran - Among the larger Lutheran bodies in the United States are: ...
United Lutheran Church in America
Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America
Norwegian Lutheran Church
Joint Synod of Ohio
Iowa Synod
Lutheranism - Among the larger Lutheran bodies in the United States are: ...
United Lutheran Church in America
Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America
Norwegian Lutheran Church
Joint Synod of Ohio
Iowa Synod
Weather - In the central mountains the temperature dropped to about 10 degrees in the middle of winter, but only at Mt Hermon in the far North was there usually any snow (Jeremiah 18:14; cf
Nazareth, Nazarene - It lay in the hill country North of the Plain of Esdraelon. Cana was about five miles to the Northeast
Sharon - From the groves of oak which at one time covered a great part of its surface, especially in the North, it was also called ὁ δρυμός (Septuagint , Isaiah 33:9; Isaiah 35:2; Isaiah 65:10; Jos
Cubit - Many of the ancient stones in the base of the temple area, the breadth of the pilasters found in the North-western corner of the area, together with their distances apart, and also the Galilean synagogues, all give a measure of 16 inches
Chios - ‘When he had sailed by Rhodes and Cos, he touched at Lesbos, as thinking he should have overtaken Agrippa there; but he was taken short here by a North wind, which hindered his ship from going to the shore, so he remained many days at Chios
Ophir - Ophir is mentioned outside the Bible on a piece of broken pottery found at tell el-Qasileh, North of Tel Aviv on the plain of Sharon
Gibeon - A town in Palestine North of Jerusalem
Hadad - see) among the Aramæans of Damascus and apparently worshipped by all the Aramæan peoples, as well as among both South-Arabian and North-Arabian tribes, and also among the Assyrians
Inghamites - who in the last century was a character of great note in the North of England
Wilderness - ...
The wilderness of DAMASCUS was far North, and that of BEER-SHEBA far south; and that of SHUR, still farther south-west
Emmanuel Title - Achaz seeks salvation from the danger presented by the war with Rasin, King of Syria, and Phacee, King of Northern Israel, in an alliance with the Assyrians. When the House of David sees the country overrun, first by the Syrians and the Israelites of the North and then by those very Assyrians in whom they place their trust, then they will be reminded of Isaias's teaching that "salvation is in Jehovah
Media - Media Proper was bounded by Armenia and Assyria Proper on the west, by Persia on the east, by the Caspian provinces on the North, and by Susiana on the south
Naphtali - His limits were extended into upper and lower Galilee, having Jordan to the east, the tribes of Asher and Zebulun to the west, Libanus to the North, and the tribe of Issachar to the south
Siloam - The fountain is in an arched excavation in the foot of the cliff above the pool; and the small basin here is connected by a winding passage cut through the solid rock under the hill Ophel, with the "Fountain of the Virgin" eleven hundred feet North on the east side of Mount Moriah
Beth'el - (the house of God ) well known city and holy place of central Palestine, about 12 mlles North of Jerusalem. (2 Kings 10:29 ) After the desolation of the Northern kingdom by the king of Assyria, Bethel still remained an abode of priests
Gib'e-ah - In many particulars Gibeah agrees very closely with Tuleil-el-Ful , a conspicuous eminence just four mlles North of Jerusalem, to the right of the road
Damas'Cus, - It is situated 130 miles Northeast of Jerusalem, in a plain of vast size and of extreme fertility, which lies east of the great chain of Anti-Libanus, on the edge of the desert. Two other streams the Wady Helbon upon the North and the Awaj, which flows direct from Hermon upon the south, increase the fertility of the Damascene plain, and contend for the honor of representing the "Pharpar" of Scripture
America (Land) - Adam of Bremen, in "A Description of the Northern Islands" (1075), mentions Greenland and Vinland and gives the oldest written account of Norse discovery of America. Within sixty years of discovery, all Central and South America, except Brazil, and a large part of North America belonged to Spain. In 1584,1601 settlements were made in North Carolina and Virginia under the patronage of the crown, and later by the Puritans in New England, and by Catholics in Maryland
Sinai - The first is that originally suggested by Lepsius, who would place Sinai at Mount Serbal , some distance Northwest of Jebel Mûsa. It must, however, be freely granted that to place Sinai east or North of ‘Akabah would entirely disjoint all identifications of places along the line of the itinerary of the Exodus. The triangular tongue of land intercepted between the limestone plateau of the Tih desert in the North, and the Gulfs of Suez and ‘Akabah, at the head of the Red Sea, on the south-west and south-east
Phenicia - phoinix, "a palm", the land of palm-trees; a strip of land of an average breadth of about 20 miles along the shores of the Mediterranean, from the river Eleutherus in the North to the promotory of Carmel in the south, about 120 miles in length. Among the chief Phoenician cities were Tyre and Sidon, Gebal North of Beirut, Arvad or Arados and Zemar
Temple, Herod's - At the entrance to a graveyard at the North-western angle of the Haram wall, a stone was discovered by M. " This enclosure is about 1,500 feet from North to south, with a breadth of about 1,000 feet, covering in all a space of about 35 acres
Naphtali - On march Naphtali was North of the tabernacle, next Dan his kinsman, and Asher (Numbers 2:25-31), together forming "the camp of Dan," hindmost or rearward of all the camps (Numbers 10:25). Dan shortly after sent a number from his less desirable position next the Philistines to seek a settlement near his kinsman Napthtali in the far North. Pagan neighbours soon made it and Northern Israel "Galilee of the Gentiles
Desert - North of this is the wilderness of Judah (Judges 1:16 ), lying east of the road connecting Jerusalem and Hebron. ...
Negeb refers to the dry land and is a technical name for the southern desert whose Northern border lies North of Beersheba
Calvary - It was a small eminence or hill to the North of Mount Sion, and to the west of old Jerusalem, upon which our Lord was crucified. On this little mount is shown the hole in which the cross was fixed; and near it the position of the crosses of the two thieves: one, the penitent, on the North; and the other on the south
Edom - ...
Features of the land...
Edom’s territory stretched from the southern tip of the Dead Sea down to the Northern tip of the Gulf of Aqabah (the North-eastern arm of the Red Sea). From Ezion-geber it went North over the mountainous plateau on the east of the Arabah to Moab, Ammon and Syria
Jeroboam - Both of them ruled over the Northern part of the divided kingdom, but they were separated in time by more than a hundred years and they belonged to different dynasties. ...
Jeroboam the son of Nebat...
The books of Kings consistently condemn Jeroboam the son of Nebat, the man who led the Northern tribes to break away from the Davidic rule. But the chief reason they condemn him is religious rather than political; for Jeroboam established his own religion in the North in opposition to the Levitical system that was based on the Jerusalem temple (1 Kings 15:34; 1 Kings 16:19; 1 Kings 22:52; 2 Kings 10:31; 2 Kings 14:24; 2 Kings 23:15). This false religion, set up by Jeroboam and followed by other kings, was the reason God destroyed the Northern kingdom and sent the people into captivity (2 Kings 17:21-23). The ambitious Jeroboam cleverly used his position to gain a following among his fellow Northerners, in opposition to the southerner Solomon, whose policies he found oppressive. The Northern tribes readily crowned Jeroboam their king, in opposition to Solomon’s son, Rehoboam. ...
Jeroboam made his capital in Shechem, but later shifted it a few kilometres North to Tirzah (1 Kings 12:25; 1 Kings 14:17; cf. He built shrines at the towns of Bethel (near his southern border) and Dan (near his Northern border), complete with his own order of priests, sacrifices and feasts. ...
Jeroboam the son of Joash...
This Jeroboam is usually referred to as Jeroboam II, to distinguish him from the person who established the breakaway Northern kingdom
Jerusalem - The defining valleys are: (1) the Wady en-Nâr , the Biblical Valley of the Kidron or of Jehoshaphat , which, starting some distance North of the city, runs at first (under the name of Wady el-Jôz ) in a S. The chief intersecting valley is one identified with the Tyropœon of Josephus, which commences in some olive gardens North of the city (between the forks of the Y ), runs, ever deepening, right through the modern city, and finally enters the Wady en-Nâr , about 1 / 8 mils above the mouth of the Wady er-Rabâbi . respectively; and Ophel is further subdivided (but without any natural line of division) into Ophel proper and Moriah , the latter being the Northern and higher end. Probably the oldest known conduit is a channel hewn in the rock, entering Jerusalem from the North. That it also included the modern Acra is problematical, as we have no information as to the position of the North wall in preexilic times; and it is certain that the quite modern quarter commonly called Bezetha was not occupied. Turning Northward, we find the Fountain-gate ( Nehemiah 3:13 ) in close proximity to the ‘made pool,’ i. ’ The gates on the North-east and North sides of the wall cannot be identified, as the course of that part has not been definitely determined. Then on the North side followed the Sheep-gate , the Fish-gate , and, somewhere on the North or North-west side, the Old-gate . Stephen’s gate, North of the Temple enclosure: while of the Temple itself much remains in the substructures, and probably much more would be found were excavation possible. The authenticity of the traditional site falls at once, if it lie inside the North wall of Jerusalem as it was in Christ’s time, for Christ suffered and was buried without the walls. ) built an outer wall, the line of which is not known with certainty, on the North side of the city, and under his rule Jerusalem grew and prospered
Division of the Earth - But Chronus represented Noah, who divided the world among his three sons, allotting the upper regions of the North to Japheth, the maritime or middle regions to Shem, and the lower regions of the south to Ham. According to the Armenian tradition recorded by Abulfaragi, Noah distributed the habitable earth from North to south between his sons, and gave to Ham the region of the blacks, to Shem the region of the tawny, fuscorum, and to Japheth the region of the ruddy, rubrorum: and he dates the actual division of the earth in the hundred and fortieth year of Peleg, B. 2614, or five hundred and forty-one years after the deluge, and one hundred and ninety-one years after the death of Noah, in the following order:—"To the sons of Shem was allotted the middle of the earth, namely, Palestine, Syria, Assyria, Samaria, Singar, [4] Babel, [5] Persia, and Hegiaz; [2] to the sons of Ham, Teimen, [7] Africa, Nigritia, Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Scindia, and India; [3]0 to the sons of Japheth, also, Garbia, [9] Spain, France, the countries of the Greeks, Sclavonians, Bulgarians, Turks, and Armenians. These, spreading from the regions North of Armenia and Bactriana, Ezekiel 38:6 , extended themselves westward over nearly the whole continent of Europe; still retaining their paternal denomination, with some slight variation, as Cimmerians, in Asia; Cimbri and Umbri, in Gaul and Italy; and Cymri, Cambri, and Cumbri, in Wales and Cumberland at the present day. Riphat, the second son of Gomer, seems to have given name to the Riphean mountains of the North of Asia; and Togarmah, the third son, may be traced in the Trocmi of Strabo, the Trogmi of Cicero, and Trogmades of the council of Chalcedon, inhabiting the confines of Pontus and Cappadocia. ) Magog, Tubal, and Mesech, sons of Japhet, are noticed together by Ezekiel, as settled in the North, Ezekiel 38:2 ; Ezekiel 38:14-15 . Its western border, along the Mediterranean Sea, extended from Sidon, Southward, to Gaza; its southern border from thence, eastward, to Sodom and Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboim, the cities of the plain, afterward covered by the Dead Sea, or Asphaltite Lake; its eastern border extending from thence Northward, to Laish, Dan, or the springs of the Jordan; and its Northern border, from thence to Sidon, westward. Of Canaan's sons, Sidon, the eldest, occupied the North-west corner, and built the town of that name, so early celebrated for her luxury and commerce in Scripture, Judges 18:7 ; 1 Kings 5:6 ; and by Homer, who calls the Sidonians, πολυδαιδαλοι , skilled in many arts. ) The children of Aram planted the fertile country North of Babylonia, called Aram Naharaim, "Aram between the two rivers," the Euphrates and the Tigris, thence called by the Greeks, Mesopotamia, Genesis 24:10 , and Padan Aram, the level country of Aram, Genesis 25:20
Macedonia - (mass eh doh nih aw) Now the Northernmost province of Greece; in antiquity, the fertile plain North and west of the Thermaic Gulf from the Haliacmon river in the southwest to the Axios in the east (“Lower Macedonia”) and the mountainous areas to the west and North (“Upper Macedonia,” today divided between central Northern Greece, southeastern Albania, and the Yugoslav province of Macedonia). Macedonia is the link between the Balkan peninsula to the North and the Greek mainland and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. The important land route from Byzantium (Istanbul) in the east to the Adriatic Sea in the west (in Roman times the “Via Egnatia”) crosses it as does the North to south road from the central Balkan (the area of the Danube and Save rivers) which reached the Aegean Sea at the Thermaic Gulf and continued past Mount Olympus through the narrow valley of Tempe into Thessaly and central Greece
Wanderings of the Israelites - ...
Much farther North, near Kadesh, the Amalekites and Canaanites were able to live in the mountain. Rameses was on the east of the Nile, but some place it farther North than others. The western branch of the Red Sea doubtless then extended farther North than it does at present, and it cannot be ascertained at what point the sea was crossed. ...
The third part of their journey was from Sinai to Kadesh-barnea, some eighty miles farther North. ...
From Ezion-gaber they turned and travelled Northward again and arrived at Kadesh or Kadesh-barnea a second time, no stations being mentioned between those two distant places
Galatia - Gallogræci [1], to distinguish them from their kindred who lived in France and Northern Italy). After some fifty years’ raiding and warring, they found a permanent settlement in North-eastern Phrygia, where the population was un-warlike. The earlier sense of the term Galatia is, then, the country occupied by the Gaulish immigrants, the former North-eastern part of Phrygia, and the term Galatœ is used after the occupation to include the subject Phrygians as well as the Galatœ strictly so called ( e. Peter here appears as supervising or advising the whole body of Christians North of the Taurus range
Magdala - It is three miles North of Tiberias, and almost the same distance south of Khan Minyeh. Before it lies the Northward expanse of the Plain and the Lake; behind it rises a dark background of beetling cliffs, broken in one section by the deeply-cleft gorge of the Wady Hamam (Valley of Doves). Through this natural passage-way the caravan route from the Mediterranean coast follows the line of the old Roman road to Khan Minyeh, and thence Northward over the hills of Naphtali. A perennial stream, which waters the southern portion of the Plain, finds its way to the Lake a short distance North of the outskirts of the town. A watch-tower on the North border of the town is a present suggestion of the derivation of the name Mejdel or its Greek form Migdol
Lebanon - This mountain is the centre, or nucleus, of all the mountain ridges which, from the North, the south, and the east, converge toward this point; but it overtops them all. On either side, he first discovers, at a great distance, a clouded ridge, stretching from North to south, as far as the eye can see; the central summits of which are capped with clouds, or tipped with snow. Volney says, that it thus remains toward the North-east, where it is sheltered from the sea winds and the rays of the sun
Navarre - Former kingdom in the Northeastern part of the Iberian peninsula, now forming part of the department of Basses Pyrenees, France, and the districts of Pamplona, Aoiz, Estella, Tafalla, and Tudela in Spain. Lower Navarre North of the Pyrenees was left to France, and Spanish Navarre remained a vice-royalty until formally incorporated into the Spanish monarchy in 1833
Missions, California - These settlements increased rapidly and in 1823 there were 22, extending from Sonoma in the North to San Diego in the south
Liguorians - During the same period important foundations were made in North America; the fathers were called to Pittsburgh, 1839; Baltimore, 1840; to New York, 1842; to Philadelphia, 1843; to Buffalo, 1845; to Detroit, and New Orleans, 1847; and to Cumberland, 1849
Bethel -
A place in Central Palestine, about 10 miles North of Jerusalem, at the head of the pass of Michmash and Ai
California Missions - These settlements increased rapidly and in 1823 there were 22, extending from Sonoma in the North to San Diego in the south
Benjamin - ...
The gate of Benjamin, on the North side of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:13 ; 38:7 ; Zechariah 14:10 ), was so called because it led in the direction of the territory of the tribe of Benjamin
Gideon - These, strangely armed with torches and pitchers and trumpets, rushed in from three different points on the camp of Midian at midnight, in the valley to the North of Moreh, with the terrible war-cry, "For the Lord and for Gideon" (Judges 7:18 , RSV)
Simeon - Some have thought he might have been the man elsewhere called Simon of Cyrene, a place in North Africa (Mark 15:21)
Sharon - This is the great Maritime Plain extending from Jaffa, or a little south of it, to Mount Carmel in the North
Cnidus - Instead of taking a straight course to the North of Crete-the wind not permitting this (μὴ προσεῶντος ἡμᾶς τοῦ ἀνέμον)-she had to run under the lee of the island
Degree - Hence a degree of latitude is the 360th part of the earths surface North or south of the equator, and a degree of longitude, the same part of the surface east or west of any given meridian
Golgotha - This was the memorable spot where the Lord Jesus was crucified; a mountain North-west of Jerusalem
Travelling - They had been here eight days, and were going four hours' journey to the North-west, to another spring of water
Zebulun - For they shall suck of the abundance of the seas, and of treasures hid in the sand,"...
Deuteronomy 33:18 ; meaning, that these two tribes being at the greatest distance North, should come together to the temple at Jerusalem, to the holy mountain, and should bring with them such of the other tribes as dwelt in their way; and that being situated on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, they should apply themselves to trade and navigation, and to the melting of metals and glass, denoted by those words, "treasures hid in the sand
Redemptorists - During the same period important foundations were made in North America; the fathers were called to Pittsburgh, 1839; Baltimore, 1840; to New York, 1842; to Philadelphia, 1843; to Buffalo, 1845; to Detroit, and New Orleans, 1847; and to Cumberland, 1849
Dan - On the North and east it was completely embraced by its two brother tribes Ephraim and Benjamin, while on the southeast and south it joined Judah, and was thus surrounded by the three most powerful states of the whole confederacy. In the "security" and "quiet," (Judges 18:7,10 ) of their rich Northern possession the Danites enjoyed the leisure and repose which had been denied them in their original seat. (1 Chronicles 12:35 ) Asher is omitted, but the "prince of the tribe of Dan" is mentioned in the list of (1 Chronicles 27:22 ) But from this time forward the name as applied to the tribe vanishes; it is kept alive only by the Northern city. (Revelation 7:5-7 ) ...
The well-known city, so familiar as the most Northern landmark of Palestine, in the common expression "from Dan even to beersheba
Japheth - He was the progenitor of many tribes inhabiting the east of Europe and the North of Asia (Genesis 10:2-5 )
Myra - The corn-ships of Alexandria, which brought food to the population of Rome, were in the habit of sailing due North to Lycia, making Myra a place of call, and then proceeding westward
Artaxerxes - ...
When Baasha, king of Israel, seized a border town and built a fort just North of Jerusalem, Asa paid money to Syria to break its treaty with Israel and attack her
Joseph the Husband of Mary - Later they settled in Nazareth in the North (Matthew 2:23), but they went each year to Jerusalem for the Passover (Luke 2:41)
Gibeon - It is represented by the modern el-Jib, to the south-west of Ai, and about 5 1/2 miles North-north-west of Jerusalem
Tabor, Mount - —A notable landmark, of rare beauty and symmetry, six miles east of Nazareth, on the North-east arm of the plain of Esdraelon. As seen from the south and south-west, it resembles the segment of a sphere; from the North-west a truncated cone
Roads - The most Northerly, and in some respects the most important, was that connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Euphrates Valley. Skirting the shores of the Sea of Galilee, it crossed the Jordan near Bethsaida, and went over a spur of the Anti-Libanus, and then east by North to Damascus. From Jerusalem roads branched out to North, south, east, and west. (b) In ordinary circumstances the Jews preferred to avoid intercourse with the Samaritans, hence in going Northward they took the road leading down by Jericho, over the Jordan, and up through Peraea
Wind - Winds from the mountains and sea to the North and west brought rain and storm ( 1 Kings 18:43-45 ; see Exodus 10:19 ; Ezekiel 1:4 ); those coming from the deserts of the south and east could at times be balmy but more often would sear the land and dry up the vegetation (Genesis 41:6 ; Job 37:1-2 ). God answered Job out of the whirlwind (Job 38:1 ), and the four living creatures appeared to Ezekiel in a strong wind from the North (Job 1:4 )
Jacob's Well - He travelled by ‘the great North road’ through Samaria. Here it divides, one branch striking west, the other going North across the bay, past the ruins and spring of ʽAskar
Jericho - JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 North of the Dead Sea. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther North, lying east from Cana of Galilee
Asia - Only those who find ‘the Phrygian and Galatic region’ (Acts 16:6) in the North of Pisidian Antioch are obliged (like Conybeare-Howson, i. The four provinces named-Bithynia and Pontus, though here separated, being really one-sum up the whole of Asia Minor North of Taurus
Per'Sia - This tract was bounded on the west by Susiana or Elam, on the North by Media on the south by the Persian Gulf and on the east by Carmania. besides portions of Europe and Africa, the whole of western Asia between the Black Sea, the Caucasus, the Caspian and the Jaxartes on the North, the Arabian desert the Persian Gulf and the Indian Ocean on the south. This conquest was followed closely by the submission of the Greek settlements on the Asiatic coast, and by the reduction of Caria and Lycia The empire was soon afterward extended greatly toward the Northeast and east
Jericho - JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 North of the Dead Sea. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther North, lying east from Cana of Galilee
Zebedee - It was bounded on the east by that tribe, while on the south it seems to have touched the Northern edge of the plain of Esdraelon, and to have included a portion of it towards the Kishon at the foot of Carmel. On the west the slopes towards the plain of Acre, and on the North the plain of Suchnîn, seem to have been the boundaries. Apart from the southwest portion in the plain of Esdraelon, the tribal lands consist of undulating hills and narrow valleys, which, however, widen out at places into small but extremely fertile plains, the chief of which are the plain of Toran in the east, the plain of Suchnîn in the North, and el-Battauf or the plain of Asochis in the centre. Of this there are great barren ridges especially to the North of the plain of Toran and west of el-Battauf; but, as we have observed in Naphtali, they might easily be transformed into orchard land. other places, especially in the North, were well wooded (BJ iii. 28); Araba in the North was a great grain market; while Suchnîn, close by, produced the best wine, and Shikmona in the south was famous for its pomegranates, just as Kefr Kenna is renowned to-day for the size and quality of those it produces
Hittites And Hivites - ...
Hittite and Hivite peoples of Indo-European origin, identified within the population of Canaan (as “sons” of Canaan) in the Table of Nations (Genesis 10:15 ,Genesis 10:15,10:17 ), seemingly infiltrated from their cultural and political centers in the North and settled throughout Palestine. ...
The geographical reference to “all the land of the Hittites” (Joshua 1:4 ) on the Northern frontier of the Promised Land may indicate a recognition of the Hittite/Egyptian border treaty established by Rameses II and the Hittites under King Hattusilis III of about 1270 B. The Hittite woman among Solomon's foreign wives was probably the result of a foreign alliance with a neo-Hittite king of North Syria (1 Kings 10:29-11:2 ; 2 Chronicles 1:17 ). ...
Speakers of an Indo-European language appear to have arrived in Anatolia from the North shortly before 4000 B. These Northwestern Anatolian settlers between 4000,3000 B. He intended to gain control over the trade route along the Euphrates by capturing Aleppo, the route's Northern terminus. Following a treaty with Babylon and domination of Mitanni, he reorganized Northern Syria to ensure Hittite supremacy and control of the trade routes of the region. ) concentrated all the forces of the Hittite Empire in Northern Syria to meet the challenge of Ramses II of Egypt at Kadesh. ) in which Egypt conceded all territories North of Damascus to the Hittites would seem to suggest that the balance of power, for a time at least, favored the Hittites. ...
Neo-Hittite Period Following the end of the Hittite empire, a large number of Hittite principalities were established in Northern Syria, Cilicia, and the regions of the Taurus and Anti-Taurus. When Urartu was defeated as Assyria's rival for the resources of Anatolia, the neo-Hittite states of Northern Syria, now without Urartian support, could not withstand Assyrian pressure
Egypt - ...
Egypt consists geographically of two halves, the Northern being the Delta, and the southern Upper Egypt, between Cairo and the First Cataract. In the Old Testament, Northern or Lower Egypt is called Mazor, "the fortified land" (Isaiah 19:6 ; 37 :: 25 , where the A. The two kingdoms of the North and south were united by Menes, the founder of the first historical dynasty of kings. ...
The Middle Empire was overthrown by the invasion of the Hyksos, or shepherd princes from Asia, who ruled over Egypt, more especially in the North, for several centuries, and of whom there were three dynasties of kings. They had their capital at Zoan or Tanis (now San), in the North-eastern part of the Delta. Under them Egypt lost its empire in Asia, and was itself attacked by barbarians from Libya and the North
Bethesda - Now the sheep-gate is known to have been North of the Temple, and, as Bovet says, ‘the small cattle which entered Jerusalem came there certainly by the east; for it is on this side that the immense pastures of the wilderness of Judaea lie. It is at the North-east angle of the Temple area, and is the gate through which the Bedawîn still lead their flocks to Jerusalem for sale. Stephen’s Gate and under the North-east wall of the Haram area. (2) Warren and others would place Bethesda at the so-called Twin Pools, in the ditch at the Northwest angle of Antonia, under the convent of the Sisters of Zion. ” ’ Sixteen years later this anticipation was verified by the discovery of what is now very generally conceded to be the ancient Pool of Bethesda, a short distance North-west of the present Church of St
Order of Friars Minor Capuchins - The friars entered England in 1599, Ireland in 1615, and North America in 1632
Copper - Palestinian remains of copper mines have been found only in that area, and archaeologists have discovered at the North end of the Gulf of Aqabah the remains of copper mines
Iron - ...
Most likely, iron became common throughout the region due to disruption of sources of other metals and to increased trading to the North and over the sea
Tithes - According to both North Israelite ( Genesis 28:22 ) and Judæan ( Genesis 14:20 ) tradition, Israel’s patriarchs paid tithes; the custom, therefore, among the Israelites was evidently very ancient
Capuchin Friars Minor - The friars entered England in 1599, Ireland in 1615, and North America in 1632
Lebanon - Lebanon proper, Jebel es-Sharki, commences at its southern extremity in the gorge of the Leontes, the ancient Litany, and extends North-east, parallel to the Mediterranean coast, as far as the river Eleutherus, at the plain of Emesa, "the entering of Hamath" (Numbers 34:8 ; 1 Kings 8:65 ), in all about 90 geographical miles in extent
Damascus - Activity, the most ancient of Oriental cities; the capital of Syria (Isaiah 7:8 ; 17:3 ); situated about 133 miles to the North of Jerusalem
Pilate - (Galilee and other parts to the North and east were governed by Rome through the sons of Herod the Great
Iron - ...
Most likely, iron became common throughout the region due to disruption of sources of other metals and to increased trading to the North and over the sea
Simon - ...
...
A Jew of Cyrene, in North Africa, then a province of Libya
Mizpah - The land of Mizpeh, in the North of Palestine, the residence of the Hivites, Joshua 11:3; possibly identical with—4. Probably identical with Neby Samwil, standing on a peak about four miles Northwest of Jerusalem
Gerizim And Ebal - Shechem is located some 40 miles North of Jerusalem and, because of the mountainous terrain, controls all roads through the central hill country of Israel. After the Assyrians captured the Northern Kingdom, the mixed race of people began mixing pagan worship and worship of Yahweh (2 Kings 17:33 )
Ramah - It is to be identified with modern er-Ram five miles North of Jerusalem
Thessaloni'ca -
This was the chief station on the great Roman road called the Via Egnatia , which connected Rome with the whole region to the North of the AEgean Sea
Seleucia - It lay 5 miles to the North of the mouth of the Orontes, on the southern skirts of Mt
Sumer - , Sumer was conquered by invading tribesmen from the west and North
Dead Sea - Somewhere near the sea were Sodom and Gomorrah , but whether North or south of it is not settled; the one certain fact about their sites is that the popular belief that they are covered by the waters of the Lake is quite inadmissible
Cenchreae - From the town of Schœnus-4 miles North of Cenchreae-where the isthmus is less than 5 miles wide, a tramway (δίολκος) was laid to the other side, upon which vessels of smaller tonnage were conveyed bodily from sea to sea, avoiding a circuitous passage by the stormy headland of Malea
Grave - Those now bearing this name may be seen marked on maps to the North of Jerusalem; and others called the TOMBS OF THE PROPHETS are placed on the mount of Olives
Seasons - Harvest commences in sheltered places as early as the beginning of April: in the hill country it is a month later; and in the North it extends to the end of July
Aramaic - (ar uh may' ihc) A North Semitic language similar to Phoenician and Hebrew was the language of the Arameans whose presence in Northwestern Mesopotamia is known from about 2000 B
Mem'Phis - The caliph conquerors founded Fostat (old Cairo) upon the opposite bank of the Nile, a few miles North of Memphis, and brought materials from the old city to build their new capital, A
Armenia - a considerable country of Asia, having Colchis and Iberia on the North, Media on the east, Mesopotamia on the south, Pontus and Cappadocia on the west, and the Euphrates and Syria on the south-west. They have, in fact, in the Northern parts of the Asiatic continent, been what the Cushites and Ishmaelites were in the south, tenders of cattle, living on the produce of their flocks and herds, and carriers of merchandize between the neighbouring nations; a part living at home with their flocks, and a part travelling as merchants and dealers into distant countries
Dan - It was small in comparison with their numbers, which occasioned some going North and building the city of Dan, q
Incense - Thus; so called by the dealers of drugs in Egypt from thur, or thor, the name of a harbour in the North bay of the Red Sea, near Mount Sinai; thereby distinguishing it from the gum arabic, which is brought from Suez, another port in the Red Sea, not far from Cairo
Red Sea - It is the latter that the Israelites crossed, and, as is supposed, farther North than the gulf now extends, but the position is not known
Flood - Elephants and skeletons of whales have been found buried in England; mammoths near the North pole; crocodiles in Germany, etc
Red Sea - The Red Sea, from the straits of Bab el-Mandeb to its most Northerly point at Suez, is about 1400 miles in length, its greatest width being about 200 miles; it is divided by the Sinaitic peninsula into two large arms or gulfs, the eastern extending Northeast or Northerly about 100 miles, with an average width of 15 miles, while the western extends Northwest near 180 miles, with an average width of 20 miles. If the Red Sea then included the Bitter Lakes of Suez, the crossing may have been farther North than would now appear possible
Heliopolis - At present its site, six miles North Northeast from Cairo, is marked only by extensive ranges of low mounds full of ruinous fragments, and a solitary obelisk formed of a single block of red granite, rising about sixty feet above the sand, and covered on its four sides with hieroglyphics
Calvary - It is very doubtful whether the true localities of Calvary and the tomb are those covered by the present "Church of the Holy Sepulchre," a vast structure North of mount Zion and within the modern city, built on the site which was fixed under the empress Helena, A
Serpents - ...
The serpents mentioned in Numbers 21:1-35 Isaiah 14:29 30:6 , and by whom multitudes of the Israelites were destroyed in the desert North of the Gulf of Akabah, were probably called "fiery" and "flying" with reference to the agonizing heat caused by their poison, and the rapidity of their darting motion
an'Tioch - --This metropolis was situated where the chain of Lebanon, running Northward, and the chain of Taurus, running eastward. It is about 300 miles North of Jerusalem
Jordan - ...
From the western base of a hill on which once stood the city of Dan, the Northern border-city of Palestine, there gushes forth a considerable fountain called the Leddan, which is the largest fountain in Syria and the principal source of the Jordan. ...
But besides these two historical fountains there is a third, called the Hasbany, which rises in the bottom of a valley at the western base of Hermon, 12 miles North of Tell-el-Kady. ...
The Jabbok or Wady Zerka, formerly the Northern boundary of Ammon. It enters the Jordan about 20 miles North of Jericho
Naphtali - The territory reached on the North almost to the Lebanon. The greater part lay to the North-west of the Sea, and in this direction (N. When the Syrian kingdom fell before the Assyrian armies, Northern Israel was exposed, as never before, to the relentless legions of the East; and ‘in the days of Pekah, king of Israel, came Tiglath-pileser Geology of Palestine - North of Carmel, Esdraelon and the narrow strip that extends as far as Beyrout is the continuation of the same division. The Western Table-land extends from Lebanon to the Northern border of Sinai: the headland of Carmel is an intrusion from this division on to the preceding. The Eastern Table-land is composed of granite and other igneous rocks, overlaid towards the North by sandstones which are themselves covered by calcareous strata
Mark, Gospel by - For Himself ( Mark 7 ) He retired to the North-west into the district of Tyre and Sidon, and healed the daughter of the Syrophenician woman — His grace thus going out to the Gentiles. After returning through Decapolis, and ( Mark 8 ) feeding the four thousand at Gennesaret, He went to the North-east, and ( Mark 9 ) was transfigured before His three disciples; it was probably on Mount Hermon
Damascus - The city is nearly two miles in length from its North-east to its North-west extremity; but of very inconsiderable breadth, especially near the middle of its extent, where its width is much contracted
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - 37 30') upon the North, and upon the south the country about Baghdad (lat. -- On the North and east the high mountain-chains of Armenia and Kurdistan are succeeded by low ranges of limestone hills of a somewhat arid aspect
Moab, Moabites - boundary fluctuated at different periods between the Arnon and an indistinct line some distance North of Heshbon. The Northern portion consists of broad stretches of rolling country, the reddish soil of which is fertile, while in the southern portion more hills are found, and the deep wrinkles interfere more with agriculture. ...
At the time of the approach of the Hebrews to Palestine the Moabites were so strongly intrenched in their land that the invaders avoided all conflict with them (Deuteronomy 2:9 , Judges 11:15 , 2 Chronicles 20:16 ), although they conquered king Sihon, who had subdued all of Moab North of the Arnon ( Numbers 21:21-31 , Deuteronomy 2:24-35 ). ...
According to the Priestly narratives, the Israelites secured at this time the territory North of the Arnon; but the narratives differ as to whether its cities were all assigned to Reuben (so Joshua 13:16-21 ), or whether some of the most southerly (Dibon, Ataroth, and Aroer) were assigned to Gad ( Numbers 32:34 ff. The Gadites obtained some of the southern cities, and the Reubenites some of the Northern
Tomb - --Besides the tombs above enumerated, there are around Jerusalem, in the valleys of Hinnom and Jehoshaphat and on the plateau to the North, a number of remarkable rock-cut sepulchres, with more or less architectural decoration, sufficient to enable us to ascertain that they are all of nearly the same age, and to assert with very tolerable confidence that the epoch to which they belong must be between the introduction of Roman influence and the destruction of the city by Titus, A. Second those known as the tombs of the Judges, and the so-called Jewish tomb about a mile North of the city. Third, that known as the tomb of the kings, about half a mile North of the Damascus Gate
Galilee - Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the North; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south. Lower Galilee had the upper division of the same country to the North; the Mediterranean on the west; the sea of Galilee, or lake of Gennesareth, on the east; and Samaria on the south. To the North and south it has a plain country, or valley
Roman Empire - ) The result of an attack on these combined communities by the hardier Sabines from the hills to the North and east appears to have been the defeat of the Romans, and the absorption within the population of a strong Sabine element. A further absorption seems to have taken place as the result of struggles with their Northern neighbours on the banks of the Tiber, the mysterious Etruscans, who were believed to have come from Lydia in Asia Minor through Thrace to Italy. ...
The invasion and burning of Rome by a Northern Celtic race, the Gauls, in 390 b. North Italy had been thus opened up (the Via Flaminia had been built from Rome to Ariminum in 220 b. 218) in North Italy, at the Trasimene lake in Etruria (217), and at Cannae in Apulia (216). He was compelled to give up all his Asia Minor dominions North of Mt. About the same period the Gauls in the North of Italy had to be subdued, and from this time (191) Cisalpine Gaul was a Roman province. ), the result of which was that the territory of the city-State Rome now stretched from a point a little to the North of Florence as far as the extreme south of Italy. His conquests secured Rome a Northern frontier and saved the Empire for centuries. Though the greater part of Spain had long been part of the provincial system, the hardy tribes of the North-west, the Cantabri and Astures, had never been subdued. all the Northern and western part of his kingdom was taken over and made into the province Galatia. There he aimed at fixing the North-west frontier of the Empire. His first two years were probably spent in subduing North Wales. On the fascinating subject of the Roman Northern frontier the best account in English is E
Nin'Eveh - Nineveh is situated on the eastern bank of the river Tigris, 50 miles from its mouth and 250 miles North of Babylon. Asshur, or according to the marginal reading, which is generally preferred, Nimrod is there described, ( Genesis 10:11 ) as extending his kingdom from the land of Shinar or Babylonia, in the south, to Assyria in the North and founding four cities, of which the most famous was Nineveh. The principal ruins are-- (1) The group immediately opposite Mosul, including the great mounds of Kouyunjik and Nebbi Yunus ; (2) that near the junction of the Tigris and Zab comprising the mounds of Nimroud and Athur ; (3) Khorsabad , about ten miles to the east of the former river; (4) Shereef Khan , about 5 1/2 miles to the North Kouyunjik; and (5) Selamiyah , three miles to the North of Nimroud. ( Nahum 3:13,16 ) The gateway in the Northern wall of the Kouyunjik enclosure had been destroyed by fire as well as the palaces
Sea of Galilee - Then to the North of this comes a strip (Heb. 447) about 2½ miles long and ¼ of a mile broad at its widest part, and at the North end of this is the modern town of Tiberias. The maximum depth is from North to south along the course of the Jordan, and here it is 130 to 148 ft. In the present unwooded state, with its uncultivated fields and barren hills often, as at the North end of the Lake, washed down to the bare rock by the rains of centuries, there may be little to attract, especially when the whole country has been blackened by the summer suns and the burning siroccos. There would be rocky stretches, especially to the North-east of the Lake, covered with brambles, wild mustard, and coarse grass, or dotted with prickly bushes (nubk), where the wolf, the jackal, the fox, and the hyaena would make their homes, and where the brown serpent and the silvery-breasted poisonous snake would glide about. The North end of the Lake does not suffer to the same extent, because to the west of the Plain of Gennesaret the hills are somewhat lower and farther back, and, besides, the wind blows freely down the Valley of Pigeons, and gives the district around Capernaum all that the east side enjoys at such seasons. Strong winds sometimes come from the North-east, and when they diverge to the North and come over Hermon the temperature is still more reduced, and a sensation of chill is felt in the atmosphere. This may be understood by the fact that when a westerly wind is blowing, all may be smooth along the shores to the North and south of Tiberias and for a mile out, but there we may pass in a moment from the region of perfect calm into a gale so violent that the only chance of safety is to run before the wind to the eastern shore. At other times the south end of the Lake may be comparatively peaceful, but, sailing Northward, we no sooner reach Mejdel than the wind from Wady el-Hamâm will seize the sail, and, unless it be instantly lowered, overturn the boat. These winds are from the west, but it is generally the wind from the North-east that raises a general storm over the whole Sea
Egypt - A land in Northeastern Africa, home to one of the earliest civilizations, and an important cultural and political influence on ancient Israel. ...
Geography Egypt lies at the Northeastern corner of Africa, separated from Palestine by the Sinai Wilderness. While the river's flow carried boats Northward, prevailing Northerly winds allowed easy sailing upstream. Upper Egypt is the arable Nile Valley from the First Cataract to just south of Memphis in the North. Lower Egypt refers to the broad Delta of the Nile in the North, formed from alluvial deposits. As Thebes was dominated by the powerful priesthood of Amen-Re, Akhenaton moved the capital over two hundred miles North to Akhetaton, modern tell el-Amarna. ) reestablished Egyptian control in Canaan and campaigned against the Hittites, who had taken Egyptian territory in North Syria during the Amarna Age. In his fifth year, he fought the Hittites at Kadesh-on-the-Orontes in North Syria
Quebec, Canada, City of - Other historic monuments are: ...
the church of Notre Dame des Victoires which dates from 1690, when, after several unsuccessful attacks upon the city, Admiral Phipps withdrew, and Bishop Saint-Vallier dedicated the church to Our Lady of Victory
the Ursuline church and convent, the oldest educational establishment for women in North America, occupying the same ground granted to the religious by the Company of New France upon their arrival in 1639; here Montcalm is buried
the General Hospital of Quebec, established in 1693
the Hotel Dieu, rebuilt after the fire which destroyed it in 1755
Laval University, founded in 1852, the outgrowth of the first Council of Quebec, held in 1851
During the celebration of the tercentenary of the founding of Quebec in 1908, a monument was erected to Bishop Laval
Cush - " The Hamite races, soon after their arrival in Africa, began to spread North, east, and west
Ephraim, the Tribe of - It thus lay in the centre of all traffic, from North to south, and from Jordan to the sea, and was about 55 miles long and 30 broad
Galilee - " In the time of our Lord, Galilee embraced more than one-third of Western Palestine, extending "from Dan on the North, at the base of Mount Hermon, to the ridges of Carmel and Gilboa on the south, and from the Jordan valley on the east away across the splendid plains of Jezreel and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean on the west. " Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria, and Galilee, which comprehended the whole Northern section of the country (Acts 9:31 ), and was the largest of the three
Titus - Titus then apparently went to Nicopolis on the west coast of Greece to meet Paul as planned (Titus 3:12), and from there went North to Dalmatia (2 Timothy 4:10)
Sign - ) Hence, one of the gestures of pantomime, or of a language of a signs such as those used by the North American Indians, or those used by the deaf and dumb
Amos - He toiled for God in the Northern kingdom, preaching particularly at Bethel, about 12 miles North of Jerusalem, the king's sanctuary and center of idolatrous worship
Asher - The two last theories imply an amalgamation of original inhabitants with a Hebrew clan or tribe, which, probably prior to the entrance of the southern tribes, had found its way into the North. , the Song of Deborah, the other Northern tribes, Zebulun to the south and Naphtali to the east of it, flung themselves with fierce abandon against the army of Sisera, while ‘Asher sat still at the haven of the sea’ ( Judges 5:17 f
Jericho - A city situated in the Jordan valley about 5 miles from the North end of the Dead Sea, now represented by the miserable village of er-Rîha
Carmel - On its North-west summit there is an ancient establishment of Carmelite monks
Galilee - It was bounded on the south by Samaria, and embraced the whole of the North part of Palestine
Amorites - Amorites also were among those in the North who unsuccessfully united to repel the Israelites (Joshua 11:1-15 ). ...
Amorite culture laid at the root of Jerusalem's decadence, according to Ezekiel (Ezekiel 16:3 ,Ezekiel 16:3,16:45 ); and Amorite idolatry tainted the religion of the Northern and Southern Kingdoms (1 Kings 21:26 ; 2 Kings 21:11 )
Eden - Here, within a circle but a few miles in diameter, four large rivers rise: the Euphrates, and Tigris, or Hiddekel, flowing south into the Persian Gulf; the Araxes, flowing Northeast into the Caspian Sea; and the Phasis, or the Halys, flowing Northwest into the Black Sea. ...
Another location of Eden is now preferred by many interpreters-near the spot where the Euphrates and Tigris from a junction after their long wanderings, a hundred and twenty miles North of the Persian gulf, and where the river Ulai flows in from the Northeast
Judea - Judah thus occupied all the southern portion of Palestine, while the Northern part was called Galilee, and the middle Samaria. Josephus describes Judea in his day as bounded North by Samaria, east by the Jordan, west by the Mediterranean, and south by the territory of the Arabs
Sela - He says, "At the distance of a two long days' journey Northeast from Akabah, is a rivulet and valley in the Djebel Shera, on the east side of the Arabah, called Wady Mousa. The valley of Petra, 2,200 feet above the great valley El-Arabah, is about a mile long from North to south, and half a mile wide, with numerous short ravines in its sides, making its whole circuit perhaps four miles. It is accessible through ravines at the North and the south; but the cliffs, which define it on the east and west, are precipitous, and vary from two hundred to one thousand feet in height. Here you enter a wider ravine, which leads Northwest, passes the amphitheatre in a recess on the left, and at length opens on the great valley of the main city towards the west
Palestine - ...
The territory promised as an inheritance to the seed of Abraham (Genesis 15:18-21 ; Numbers 34:1-12 ) was bounded on the east by the river Euphrates, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the North by the "entrance of Hamath," and on the south by the "river of Egypt. This vast empire was the Promised Land; but Palestine was only a part of it, terminating in the North at the southern extremity of the Lebanon range, and in the south in the wilderness of Paran, thus extending in all to about 144 miles in length. " Western Palestine, on the south of Gaza, is only about 40 miles in breadth from the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea, narrowing gradually toward the North, where it is only 20 miles from the sea-coast to the Jordan. On the death of Solomon, his son Rehoboam ascended the throne; but his conduct was such that ten of the tribes revolted, and formed an independent monarchy, called the kingdom of Israel, or the Northern kingdom, the capital of which was first Shechem and afterwards Samaria. These four provinces were, (1) Judea, the southern portion of the country; (2) Samaria, the middle province, the Northern boundary of which ran along the hills to the south of the plain of Esdraelon; (3) Galilee, the Northern province; and (4) Peraea (a Greek name meaning the "opposite country"), the country lying east of the Jordan and the Dead Sea
Rome, - Modern Rome lies to the North of the ancient city, covering with its principal portion the plain to the North of the seven hills, once known as the Campus Martius, and on the opposite bank extending over the low ground beneath the Vatican to the North of the ancient Janiculum. ( Acts 28:15 ) [1] (2) "The palace," Or "Caesar's court" (praetorium,) (Philippians 1:13 ) This may mean either the great camp of the Praetorian guards which Tiberius established outside the walls on the Northeast of the city, or, as seems more probable, a barrack attached to the imperial residence on the Palatine
Red Sea - At Ras Mohammed, on the North, the Red Sea is split by the granitic peninsula of Sinai into two gulfs; the westernmost, or Gulf of Suez, is now about 150 miles in length, with an average width of about 20, though it contracts to less than 10 miles; the easternmost or Gulf of el-'Akabeh, is about 100 miles long, from the Straits of Tiran to the 'Akabeh, and 15 miles wide. --The most important change in the Red Sea has been the drying up of its Northern extremity, "the tongue of the Egyptian Sea. " At the Northern extremity of this salt waste is a small lake, sometimes called the Lake of Heropolis; the lake is now Birket-et-Timsah "the lake of the crocodile," and is supposed to mark the ancient head of the gulf. The land North of the ancient gulf is a plain of heavy sand, merging into marsh-land near the Mediterranean coast, and extending to Palestine. It is usual to suppose that the most Northern place at which the Red Sea could have been crossed is the present head of the Gulf of Suez. This supposition depends upon the erroneous idea that in the time of Moses the gulf did not extend farther to the Northward then at present. An examination of the country North of Suez has shown, however, that the sea has receded many miles. The old bed is indicated by the Birket-et Timsah , or "lake of the crocodile," and the more southern Bitter Lakes, the Northernmost part of the former probably corresponding to the head of it the at the time of the exodus. " From it the traveller reaches the sea beneath the lofty Gebel-et-Takah , which rises in the North and shuts off all escape in that direction excepting by a narrow way along the seashore, which Pharaoh might have occupied. The latest theory is that which Brugsch-bey has lately revived that the word translated Red Sea is "Sea of Reeds or Weeds," and refers to the Serbonian bog in the Northeastern part of Egypt, and that the Israelites crossed here instead of the Red Sea
Phoenicia, phNicians - Its Northern and southern limits are Indefinite, being differently defined by different ancient geographers. ...
The extent of the country may be roughly determined by its chief cities Arvad or Arados, on the island now called Ruad, eighty miles North of Sidon, Simyra, Arka, Gebal or Byblos, Biruta on the site of the modern Beyrout, Sidon, Sarepta, Tyre, Achzib, and Acco. The latter, the modern Acre, not far North of Mt. Scholars now suppose that this refers really to the Persian Gulf, and that the Canaanites , of whom the Phœnicians were a part, came from North Arabia by way of the shore of the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates valley. 1471) he came out to the coast and conquered Arvad, the most Northerly of the important Phœnician cities (cf. pushed Northward to Biruta ( ib . Cooke, North Sem
Midianite - They inhabited principally the desert North of the peninsula of Arabia
Mizpah - It was some 4 miles North-west of Jerusalem, and was situated on the loftiest hill in the neighbourhood, some 600 feet above the plain of Gibeon
Chaldea - The contemporaneous king of Babylon in the North, in the country termed Shinar in Scripture, was Khammu-rabi
Locust - A strong North-west wind from the Mediterranean swept the locusts into the Red Sea
Dan (2) - The city at the Northern bound of Israel, as Beersheba was the southern, so that" from Dan even to Beersheba" (Judges 20:1, etc. ...
But its ordinary name was even then Lasha or Laish, the North-eastern bound of Canaan, as Sodom was the southwestern bound (Genesis 10:19). But probably, as Judah is mentioned in Ezekiel 27:17, so Dan in Ezekiel 27:19 represents Northern Israel
Manasseh - — The portion of the half-tribe of Manasseh on the west of the Jordan extended from the Mediterranean to the Jordan, and lay between Asher and Issachar on the North and Ephraim on the south
Balaam - As the great nation journeyed North on the east side of Jordan, King Balak of Moab faced the invasion of Israel
Laodicea - This need was met by bringing water six miles North from Denizli through a system of stone pipes (another sign of Laodicea's wealth)
Cyrene - CYRENE (Κυρήνη) was a Greek settlement on the North coast of Africa, in the district now called Benghazi or Barca, which forms the E
Hermenigild, a Saint - ), who shortly afterwards formed a close alliance with the Byzantines in the south, and with the recently catholicized Suevi in the North, i
Bishop - This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of christianity into the west and North of Europe
Canaanites - They thence "spread to the west, across the mountain chain of Lebanon to the very edge of the Mediterranean Sea, occupying all the land which later became Palestine, also to the North-west as far as the mountain chain of Taurus
Albion - In Liguria (the western half of North Italy), Genoa, with some cities of the Riviera, alone escaped
Midst - 35:5 the word means “in the center”: “And ye shall measure from without the city on the east side two thousand cubits, and on the south side two thousand cubits, and on the west side two thousand cubits, and on the North side two thousand cubits; and the city shall be in the midst
Babylon (2) - Asshur or Assyria and Mesopotamia were on the North, Elam and Media on the east, Chaldæa on the south
Jezreel - Jezreel was called Esdraela in the time of the Maccabees, and is now replaced by a small and ruinous Arab village, called Zerin, at the Northwest point of mount Gilboa. The body of this beautiful plain forms a triangle, rising gradually from the Mediterranean four hundred feet, and being about thirteen or fourteen miles long on the North side, seventeen on the east, and twenty on the south-west
Reu'Ben - It was a fine pasture-land east of the Jordan, lying between the river Arnon on the south and Gilead on the North
Edom - When the king of the North in a future day invades Palestine and overthrows countries as far as Egypt, "Edom, and Moab, and the chief of the children of Ammon" will escape, being reserved to be subdued by Israel
Gilead - )...
Geographically, Gilead was the region between the Yarmuk River (southern boundary of the land once known as Bashan) and the Northern tip of the Dead Sea (Deuteronomy 3:10). The eastern part of the tribe of Manasseh lived in the Northern half, and the tribe of Gad in the southern half (Deuteronomy 3:12-13). It calls the Northern half (Manasseh) Gilead in Joshua 17:1; Joshua 17:6 and half-Gilead in Joshua 13:29-31. This area included the land of Bashan in the far North and the tribal area of Reuben in the far south
Zebulun - Thence it continued in a North-easterly direction, passing Gath-hepher and Rimmon, and across the plain until it reached Hannathon, known to Babylonians, c Manasseh - It was bounded on the south by Mahanaim, and extended North to the foot of Lebanon. Manasseh's portion was immediately to the North of that of Ephraim ( Joshua 16 )
Naphtali - The tribe descended from him settled in the North of Canaan, and together with the neighbouring tribe of Zebulun occupied much of the region later known as Galilee. This was the region to the North and west of the Sea of Chinnereth (Lake Galilee) where Jesus grew up and where he spent most of the time recorded of him in the New Testament
Hand - The right hand commonly denotes the south, as the left does the North; for the Hebrews speak of the quarters of the world, in respect of themselves, having their faces turned to the east, their backs to the west, their right hands to the south, and their left to the North
Sepulchre - Travellers find them along the bases of hills and mountains in all parts of Syria; as on the south side of Hinnom, the west side of Olivet, at Tiberias, in Petra, in the gorge of the Barada, and in the sea-cliffs North on the Acre. ...
Maundrell's description of the sepulchre North of Jerusalemsupposed by many to be the work of Helena queen of Adiabene, though now known as "the tombs of the kings,"may be useful for illustrating some passages of Scripture: ...
"The next place we came to was those famous grots called the sepulchres of the kings; but for what reason they go by that name is hard to resolve; for it is certain none of the kings, either of Israel or Judah, were buried here, the holy Scriptures assigning other places for their sepulchres
Ath'Ens - This mountain, which was not included within the ancient walls, lies to the Northeast of Athens, and forms the most striking feature in the environs of the city. Of these the nearest to Lycabettus and at the distance of a mile from the latter, was the Aeropolis , or citadel of Athens, a square craggy rock rising abruptly about 150 feet, with a flat summit of about 1000 feet long from east to west, by 500 feet broad from North to south. Between the Pnyx on the west) the Areopagus on the North and the Acropolis on the east, and closely adjoining the base of these hills, stood the Agora or "Market," where St
Palesti'na - On the North it is shut in by the high ranges of Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, and by the chasm of the Litany. North of Carmel the lowland resumes its position by the seaside till it is again interrupted and finally put an end to by the Northern mountains, which push their way out of the sea, ending in the white promontory of the Ras Nakhura . The Northern portion is Galilee; the centre, Samaria; the south, Judea. The highland district, surrounded and intersected by its broad lowland plains, preserves from North to south a remarkably even and horizontal profile. The south, as being nearer the arid desert and farther removed from the drainage of the mountains, is drier and less productive than the North. As the traveller advances North of this tract there is an improvement; but perhaps no country equally cultivated is more monotonous, bare or uninviting in its aspect than a great part of the highlands of Judah and Benjamin during the larger portion of the year. To the west and Northwest of the highlands, where the sea-breezes are felt, there is considerably more vegetation, Hitherto we have spoken of the central and Northern portions of Judea. Advancing Northward from Judea, the country (Samaria) becomes gradually more open and pleasant. Hardly less rich is the extensive region which lies Northwest of the city of Shechem ( Nablus ), between it and Carmel, in which the mountains gradually break down into the plain of Sharon. Roads led from these various cities to each other to Jerusalem, Neapolis and Sebaste in the interior, and to Ptolemais and Gaza on the North and south. This valley begins with the river at its remotest springs of Hasbeiya , on the Northwest side of Hermon, and accompanies it to the lower end of the Dead Sea, a length of about 1,50 miles. During the whole of this distance its course is straight and its direction nearly due North and south. The springs of Hasbeiya are 1700 feet above the level of the Mediterranean and the Northern end of the Dead Sea Isaiah 1317 feet below it, so that between these two points the valley falls with more or less regularity through a height of more than 3000 feet. North of Jericho they recede in a kind of wide amphitheatre, and the valley becomes twelve miles broad--a breadth which it thenceforward retains to the southern extremity of the Dead Sea. On Mount Hermon, at its Northern border there is perpetual snow. It has been remarked that in its physical character Palestine presents on a small scale an epitome of the natural features of all regions, mountainous and desert, Northern and tropical, maritime and inland, pastoral, arable and volcanic
Babylon, History And Religion of - , when Babylonian kings corresponded with Egypt and struggled with the growing power of Assyria to the North. ...
During the period of the Assyrian Empire, Babylon was dominated by this warlike neighbor to the North. The remnants of the Assyrian army rallied at Haran in North Syria, which was abandoned at the approach of the Babylonians in 610 B. It could be entered through eight gates, the most famous of which was the Northern Ishtar Gate, used in the annual New Year Festival and decorated with reliefs of dragons and bulls in enameled brick. Just North of Esagila lay the huge stepped tower of Babylon, a ziggurat called Etemenanki and its sacred enclosure
Daniel, Book of - ...
Daniel 11 : Daniel 11:1-35 are a history of the contests between the king of the North (Syria) and the king of the south (Egypt) — branches of the Grecian empire — often in the land of Palestine which lay between them. Daniel 11:21 to 35 refer to Antiochus Epiphanes, type of the king of the North, or Assyrian of the last days: cf. This is the final contest between a king of the North and a king of the South. The king of the North (elsewhere spoken of as 'the Assyrian,' antitype of Epiphanes) succeeds and passes into 'the glorious land,' and is generally victorious (but not against Edom and Moab, and the children of Ammon: these are judged later by the instrumentality of Israel
Sea - The prevailing direction of the wind in spring is from the southeast and southwest and from the Northeast and Northwest the rest of the year. It lies between Arabia on the east and Northeast, and Abyssinia and Egypt on the west and southwest, and extends from the straits of Babelmandel to Suez, a distance of about 1,400 miles, with an average width of 150 miles, and a depth of 1,800 feet. At the Northern end it is divided into the two gulfs Suez and Akaba, anciently called the Gulf of Heroopolis and the Elanitic Gulf. It lay at the southeast corner of the Holy Land, and receives the wastes of the Jordan from the North, and of the Arnon and several smaller streams from the east. From the eastern side, some eight miles from the south end, a low promontory projects three-fourths of the way towards the western cliffs, and sends up a point five miles towards the North. It is thought by some that the Northern and principal part of the sea was the product of some convulsion of nature, long before that which destroyed Sodom and formed the south bay; that the Jordan at first flowed into the Red Sea through the remarkable crevasse which extends from its sources to the Gulf of Akabah; and that at some period beyond the reach of history, its bed and valley sunk down to their present level and formed the Dead Sea. Lieutenant Lynch in sounding discovered a ravine in the bed of the sea, corresponding to the channel of the Jordan in its valley North of the sea. The Jordan passes through it from North to south
Sinai - Some have thought there were two adjacent summits, called, in the time of Moses, Horeb and Sinai; and indeed the monks give these names to the Northern and southern heights of the same ridge, three miles long. ...
In approaching this elevated region from the Northwest, Burckhardt writes, "We now approached the central summits of Mount Sinai, which we had had in view for several days. These cliffs inclose the holy mountain on three sides, leaving the east and Northeast sides only, towards the Gulf of Akaba, more open to the view. Its is two miles long from Northwest to southeast, and on an average half a mile wide. The square mile thus afforded is nearly doubled by the addition of those portions of side valleys, particularly Esh-Sheikh towards the Northnortheast, from which the summit Tas-Sufsafeh can be seen. The former commences near the Red Sea, and opens into the latter, which making a circuit to the North of Sinai enters the plain at its foot from the North-northeast. By the same Northern entrance most travellers have approached the sacred mountain. To the spectator on Jebel Musa, it presents to trace of any plain, valley, or level ground to be compared with that on the North; yet some writers maintain that the Hebrews received the law at the southern foot of Sinai. ...
In many of the western Sinaite valleys, and most of all in ElMukatteb, which enters Wady Feiran from the Northwest, the more accessible parts of the rocky sides are covered by thousands of inscriptions, usually short, and rudely carved in spots where travellers would naturally stop to rest at noon; frequently accompanied by a cross and mingled with representations of animals
Uz - Arabian people who had settlements in the North
Levite - The Gershonites pitched their tents on the west of the tabernacle (3:23), the Kohathites on the south (3:29), the Merarites on the North (3:35), and the priests on the east (3:38)
Catholic Indian Missions of Canada - Missionary work began along the Saint Lawrence River and in the Northeast country; spread to Lakes Erie and Ontario, 1648; then to the country North of the Great Lakes after the dispersion, and almost total extinction, of the Huron nation in 1648
Josiah - Pharoah Neco's troups were passing through territory North of Judah en route to join forces with Assyria
Ship - North of Mt Carmel, however, there were good harbours at Tyre and Sidon
Beth-Shean - ” Beth-shean stood at the crossroad of the Jezreel and Jordan Valleys, commanding the routes North-south along the Jordan and east-west from Gilead to the Mediterranean Sea. Afterward, the city played little role in Israelite history, though the city was occupied by Israelites of the Northern Kingdom from 815-721 B. This city formed the foundation of a significant Hellenistic and Roman occupation that included temples, theater, amphitheater, colonnaded street, hippodrome, tombs, and many public buildings, which had spread to the Northern, eastern, and southern quadrants around the earlier “tell
Banking - banking had spread eastward to the sea-traders of Phoenicia on the Northern coast of Palestine. , including Rome, Athens, Carthage in North Africa, and Memphis on the Nile
Merari, Merarites - (1) During the desert wanderings the Merarites were on the North side of the Tent ( Numbers 3:35 ); their duty was to carry the less sacred parts of it, the ‘boards’ (or rather frames), pegs, cords, etc
Asherah - ...
The Asherah existed in both the Southern and Northern Kingdoms of Israel. Jezebel of Tyre apparently installed Asherah worship in the North when she married King Ahab (1 Kings 18:18-19 )
Bethel - It is now identified with Beitin, 31 56' N, 35 14' E , some 10 miles North of Jerusalem
Captivities of Israel - Jeremiah is equally express: "The house of Judah shall walk with the house of Israel; and they shall come together out of the North, to the land which I have given for an inheritance to their fathers," Jeremiah 3:18
Hebron - Hebron was situated upon an eminence, twenty miles southward from Jerusalem, and twenty miles North from Beersheba
Banking - banking had spread eastward to the sea-traders of Phoenicia on the Northern coast of Palestine. , including Rome, Athens, Carthage in North Africa, and Memphis on the Nile
Ramah - The principal Ramah was a city of Benjamin, near Gibeah, towards the mountains of Ephraim, six miles from Jerusalem North, and on the road from Samaria to Jerusalem, Joshua 18:25 Judges 19:13 Nehemiah 11:33 . Arimathea, there is little doubt, lay on one of the hills east of Lydda, some twenty miles Northwest of Jerusalem; and this site would meet most of the scriptural intimations as to the Ramah of Samuel
Hinnom - That is, the valley of Hinnom, or of the son of Hinnom, a narrow valley just south of Jerusalem, running up westward from the valley of the Cedron, and passing into the valley of the Cedron, and passing into the valley of Gihon, which follows the base of mount Zion North, up to the Joppa gate
Miz'Pah - (1 Samuel 22:3 ) ...
A third was "the land of Mizpeh," or more accurately "of Mizpah," the residence of the Hivites who joined the Northern confederacy against Israel, headed by Jabin king of Hazor. (Joshua 18:26 ; 1 Kings 15:22 ; 2 Chronicles 16:6 ; Nehemiah 3:7 ) It was one of the places fortified by Asa against the incursions of the kings of Northern Israel, (1 Kings 15:22 ; 2 Chronicles 16:6 ; Jeremiah 41:10 ) and after the destruction of Jerusalem it became the residence of the superintendent appointed by the king of Babylon, (Jeremiah 40:7 ) etc. These conditions are satisfied by the position of Scopus, the broad ridge which forms the continuation of the Mount of Olives to the North and cast, from which the traveller gains, like Titus, his first view, and takes his last farewell, of the domes, walls and towers of the holy city
Aram - ...
Arameans...
By the time the Arameans first appear in the Bible story, they were living in the North-western part of Mesopotamia
Transjordan - The Transjordan which figures in the biblical narratives is not the whole desert expanse, but rather the North-south strip of highlands sandwiched between the Jordan Valley and the desert. ...
The Israelite tribes of Reuben and Gad along with certain Manassite clans settled in the Transjordan—primarily in Gilead, it seems, although with some spillover into Bashan and into the traditionally Moabite territory immediately North of the Arnon (see especially Numbers 32:1 ). ...
By New Testament times, a cluster of Greco-Roman-oriented cities with primarily Gentile populations (the so-called “Decapolis” cities) had emerged in the Northern Transjordan (earlier Bashan, Gilead, and Ammon). Domitian annexed the Northern Transjordan in A
Philistines, the - As they moved eastward from the Aegean region, the Sea Peoples made war with people in their path including the Hittites in Anatolia and the inhabitants at sites in North Syria such as those at the site of Ugarit. The threat intensified as the Philistines encroached on the territory of the tribe of Dan ultimately forcing Dan to move North (Judges 18:11 ,Judges 18:11,18:29 )
Moab And the Moabite Stone - The Mujib/Arnon, which flows essentially east-west and enters the Dead Sea approximately mid-way along the latter's western shore, separates Northern Moab from Moab proper. ...
The chief cities of Northern Moab were Hesbon, Medeba, and Dibon. Other biblical passages which pertain to the region immediately North of the Arnon clearly recognize it as Moabite territory (Ruth 4:18-22 ; Jeremiah 48:1 ), as does the inscription of the Moabite Stone (see below). A crux passage for understanding the whole matter is Numbers 21:25-30 , which explains that King Sihon of the Amorites took Northern Moab from the Moabites and that the Israelites took it from him. ...
Moab proper was more isolated from the outside world, bounded by the Dead Sea escarpment on the west, the desert on the east, the Mujib/Arnon on the North, and a second river canyon on the south—called today Wady el-Hesa, probably, but not certainly, the River Zered of biblical times (Numbers 21:12 ). The chief cities of Moab proper were Kir-hareseth (present-day Kerak) and a place called Ar Moab (possibly to be identified with the present-day village of Rabbah approximately nine miles Northeast of Kerak). He boasts especially of having recovered Moabite independence from Israel and of having restored Moabite control over Northern Moab. We learn that Omri conquered Northern Moab and gained some degree of domination over Moab proper
Aenon - Three-quarters of a mile to the North of these springs van de Velde found a tomb bearing the name of Sheikh Salim. More probable as a Judaean site for aenon is Wady Fârʿah, a secluded valley with copious springs about 6 miles North-east of Jerusalem (quite different, of course, from the great Wady Fârʿah of Samaria)
Babel - An hour's walk, indulged in intense reflection, brought me to the grandest and most gigantic Northern mass, on the eastern bank of the Euphrates, and distant about four miles and a half from the eastern suburb of Hillah. This solid mound, which I consider, from its situation and magnitude, to be...
the remains of the Tower of Babel, (an opinion likewise adopted by...
that venerable and highly distinguished geographer, Major Rennell,) is a vast oblong square, composed of kiln-burnt and sun-dried bricks, rising irregularly to the height of one hundred and thirty- nine feet, at the south-west; whence it slopes toward the North-east to a depth of one hundred and ten feet. I measured them carefully, and the following is the full extent of each face: that to the North, along the visible face, is two hundred and seventy-four yards; to the south, two hundred and fifty-six yards; to the east, two hundred and twenty-six yards; and...
to the west, two hundred and forty yards
Israel, History of - The Book of Joshua records the settlement of the Israelites into Canaan, first in mid-country, then in the south, and finally in the North. Having united the North and the south, he established Jerusalem as the capital of the kingdom, contained the Philistines, expanded Israel's borders and her trade, and established a monarchical line that ruled in uninterrupted fashion, save one exception (Athaliah, 842-837), until the fall of Judah to Babylonia in 587. Nonetheless, when Solomon died, his legacy was a division in the kingdom, so that, henceforth, we speak of Israel in the North and Judah in the south. The Divided Monarchy (1–2Kings; Amos; Hosea; Isaiah 1–39 ; Micah; Jeremiah) The North was contextually tied into international politics more than was the south, in part because the primary east-west trade route traversed Israel at the Valley of Jezreel. During an approximate fifty-year period, two primary prophets spoke in the south—Isaiah (742-701) and Micah (724-701)—while two prophets spoke in the North—Amos (about 750) and Hosea (about 745). ...
Hosea, the only Northern prophet whose message is recorded in a book bearing his name, was Israel's eighth-century proponent of hesed (“covenant fidelity”) theology. The Southern Kingdom, in part because it housed the Jerusalem Temple and was thus the focus of Yahwism, did not embrace Baalism in the fashion of the North. On the one hand, Josiah sought to take advantage of the weakened conditions of both the Mesopotamian and Egyptian powers to unite anew the Northern and Southern Kingdoms
Ezekiel, Theology of - ...
First, he saw the "idol of jealousy" in the North gate (vv. Its position in the North is significant since that is the direction from which Israel's enemies, as executioners of Yahweh's anger, generally came. ...
Next, again at the North gate, he saw women "mourning for Tammuz" (v. The terms "Magog, " "Meshech, " and so forth refer to tribes in the Black Sea area (such as the Scythians), but the specific identity is not nearly so important as the fact that they were pagan, warlike peoples in the North. Biblical eschatology regularly speaks of the "enemies to the North" as the source of conflict and judgment, and the reference here is typological rather than literal. A trickle of water comes out of the North gate of the temple, but in the short space of a few thousand meters, it is a mighty river too great and apparently too swift for any man to swim across
Alexandria - From the gate of the sea ran one magnificent street, 2,000 feet broad, through the entire length of the city, to the gate of Canopus, affording a view of the shipping in the port, whether North in the Mediterranean, or south in the noble basin of the Mareotic lake
Transfiguration, the - Much more likely is Mount Hermon (9,100 feet) to the North of Caesarea Philippi
Asher, Aser - Its portion in the land was in the extreme North, extending Northward from Mount Carmel
Sun - (Genesis 3:8 ) The sun also served to fix the quarters of the hemisphere, east, west North and south, which were represented respectively by the rising sun, the setting sun, (Isaiah 45:6 ; Psalm 50:1 ) the dark quarter, (Genesis 13:14 ; Joel 2:20 ) and the brilliant quarter, (33:23; Job 37:17 ; Ezekiel 40:24 ) or otherwise by their position relative to a person facing the rising sun--before, behind, on the left hand and on the right hand
Dispersion - In general, it may be said that the descendants of Japheth were scattered over the North, those of Shem over the central regions, and those of Ham over the extreme south
Galilee, Sea of - It Isaiah 27 miles east of the Mediterranean, and about 60 miles North-east of Jerusalem
Inheritance - Jeremiah used the concept of “inheritance” to refer to the restoration of Israel to the land from “the North” after the time of punishment (Jeremiah 3:18-19 )
Gilgal - This Gilgal apparently became Israel's military base of operations (Joshua 9:6 ; Joshua 10:6 ; Joshua 14:6 ), though some scholars would identify this with a Gilgal farther North near Shechem
Iconium, - , as the words quoted above from Acts 16:6 ; Acts 18:23 refer to a different district to the far North of Iconium, and that the Epistle to the Galatians, being addressed to that Northern district, had no connexion with Iconium
Olives, Mount of - The peak North of this is commonly called Olivet proper; it is unfortunately spoilt by a hideous bell-tower and some other modern monastic buildings
si'na-i, - These mountains may be divided into two great masses-that of Jebel Serbal (8759 feet high), in the Northwest above Wady Feiran , and the central group, roughly denoted by the general name of Sinai. This group rises abruptly from the Wady es-Sheikh at its North foot, first to the cliffs of the Ras Sufsafeh , behind which towers the pinnacle of Jebel Musa (the Mount of Moses), and farther back to the right of it the summit of Jebel Katerin (Mount St. the Northwest and lower face of the Jebel Musa, crowned with a range of magnificent cliffs, the highest point called Ras Sufsafeh, as overlooking the plain er Rahah --is the scene of the giving of the law, and that peak the mountain into which Moses ascended. It is a mountain mass two miles long and one mile broad, The southern peak Isaiah 7363 feet high; the Northern peak, Ras Sufsafeh Isaiah 6830 feet high
Sama'Ria - This city is situated 30 miles North of Jerusalem and about six miles to the Northwest of Shechem, in a wide basin-shaped valley, six miles in diameter, encircled with high hills, almost on the edge of the great plain which borders upon the Mediterranean. 925, Samaria retained its dignity as the capital of the ten tribes, and the name is given to the Northern kingdom as well as to the city
Salamis - Situated at the eastern extremity of the island, about equidistant from Cilicia in the North and Syria in the east, it was the emporium of the wide and fertile plain of Salaminia, which stretched inward between two mountain ranges as far as Nicosia, the present capital of Cyprus
Molech - However, it lingered on in North Africa and among the Carthaginian Phoenicians into the Christian era
Saul - He made his capital at “Gibeah of Saul” (“Saul's hill,” 1 Samuel 11:4 ), probably tell el-Ful, three miles North of Jerusalem where excavations have uncovered contemporary foundations of a modest fortresslike palace
Sidon - After the coming of Alexander the Great, whom Sidon rapturously welcomed and Tyre frantically opposed, the two cities shared the same political fortunes, being for two centuries bones of contention between the Greek kings of Syria in the North and Egypt in the south
Ashkelon - Ashkelon was a Mediterranean coastal city twelve miles North of Gaza and ten miles south of Ashdod
Sinai - ...
To the North stand el Μeshrifeh or Ζephath "the watchtower," and Sbaita, all built of stone, without timber, "the city of the Zephath," afterward called Hormah (Judges 1:17). Ras Sufsafeh, the Northern end of (2), with the vast plain er Rahab ("the wilderness of Sinai") for Israel below, is the Mount Sinai of the law
Brook - Scopus on the North
Castle - Situated at the corner of the North and west cloisters of the Temple, it commanded, especially from its lofty S
Ai - The general location of the city is known to be about 10-12 miles North of Jerusalem in the central hills of Palestine
Amalek, Amalekites - ...
It was formerly supposed, on the basis of Judges 5:14 ; Judges 12:15 , that there was at one time a settlement of Amalekites farther North, in the hill country of Ephraim
Antioch - It lay about 20 miles inland from the Mediterranean in ancient Syria on the Orontes River nearly three hundred miles North of Jerusalem
Antichrist - This evil leader was referred to as the king of the North (Daniel 11:40 ) who would come with a mighty army to crush the nations, to persecute the righteous (Daniel 7:25 ), to bring death (Daniel 8:10 ), and to set up his throne in the Temple (Daniel 8:13 )
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - ...
When the king of the North, in a future day, shall enter into 'the glorious land,' Edom, Moab, and Ammon shall escape his hand, Daniel 11:41 ; they are reserved to be subdued by Israel, whom they seduced and persecuted in by-gone ages
zi'Don, - (Genesis 10:15,19 ; Joshua 11:8 ; 19:28 ; Judges 1:31 ; 18:28 ; Isaiah 23:2,4,12 ; Jeremiah 25:22 ; 27:3 ; Ezekiel 28:21,22 ; Joel 3:4 ) ( Joel 4:4 ); Zechariah 9:2 ; Matthew 11:21,22 ; 15:21 ; Mark 3:8 ; 1:24,31 ; Luke 6:17 ; 10:13,14 An ancient and wealthy city of Phoenicia, on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, less than twenty English miles to the North of Tyre. It is about fifty miles distant from Nazareth, and is the most Northern city which is mentioned in connection with Christ's journeys
Divination - The divining rod, which is mentioned in Scripture, is still in some repute in the North of England, though its application is now confined principally to the discovery of veins of lead ore, seams of coal, or springs
Baptists - In Holland, Germany, and the North, they went by the names of Anabaptists and Mennonites; and in Piedmont and the south, they were found among the Albisenses and Waldenses
Shushan - After the union of the kingdoms of Media and Persia by Cyrus, Susa was made the winter residence of the kings of Persia, from its southern position, and the shelter afforded by a range of mountains on the North and east, which rendered the heat insupportable in the summer season; while Ecbatana, in Media, from its greater elevation, and more Northern situation, was preferred at this season, as being more cool and agreeable
Sion - To the North, the wall of Jerusalem, which passes over the top of Sion, intercepts the view of the city, the site of which gradually slopes toward the Valley of Jehoshaphat
Wind - Winds are denominated from the point of compass from which they blow as a North wind an east wind a south wind a west wind a southwest wind, &c
Phoenicia - In the end, however, it was neither of the Western tongues, but Aramaic, that displaced Phcenician, which was still spoken in North Africa till the 4th or 5th century
Pamphylia - The hot, moist, enervating plain, rarely swept by bracing Northern winds, was unsuitable for a race of hardy colonists, and though many Greeks and some Jews (1 Maccabees 15:23, Acts 2:10) settled in its towns, the native Anatolian elements were too strong for an exotic Hellenism, so that Pamphylia as a whole remained one of the least civilized parts of Asia Minor. Landing at the river-harbour of Perga, they merely ‘passed through from’ the city (Acts 13:14), hastening Northward over the Taurus to Antioch in Pisidia. The provinces named in 1 Peter 1:1 as having Christian converts within their borders sum up the whole of Asia Minor North of the Taurus, but Pamphylia and Lycia are conspicuous by their absence
Amos - These two kings between them expanded Israelite-Judean rule from Syria in the North to Egypt in the south, and from Philistia in the west to Ammon in the east (2 Kings 14:23-27; 2 Chronicles 26:1-15). He warned, however, that judgment was coming for Judah also (2:4-5), and particularly for Israel, the corrupt Northern kingdom with whom Amos was mainly concerned (2:6-16)
Nard - Royle, director of the Government Botanical Gardens at Saharunpore from 1823 to 1831, have conclusively proved that it is to be identified with Nardostachys Jatamansi, a plant of the order Valerianaceae, found at great altitudes in North India
Exodus - They are supposed to have been assembled at Rameses, or Heroopolis, in the land of Goshen, about thirty-five miles Northwest of Suez, on the ancient canal, which united the Nile with the Red Sea. ...
Breaking up at this time from Sinai, they marched Northwards through the desert of Paran, or perhaps along the eastern arm of the Red Sea and North through El-Arabah, to Kadesh-barnea, near the southeast border of Canaan. Rephidim near Mount Sinai, and Taberah, Kibroth-hattaaveh, and Hazerorh, on their journey North, were the scenes of incidents, which may be found, described under their several heads. Proceeding southward along the valley El-Arabah to Ezion-gaber, at the head of the eastern gulf of the Red Sea, they here passed through the eastern mountains, and then turned North along the eastern desert, by the route which the great Syrian caravan of Mohammedan pilgrims now passes in going to Mecca
Temple - The outer court was no doubt double the size of that of the tabernacle; and we may therefore safely assume that if was 10 cubits in height, 100 cubits North and south, and 200 east and west. What Herod did apparently, was to take in the whole space between the temple and the city wall on its east side, and to add a considerable space on the North and south to support the porticos which he added there. The North side, too, where not covered by the fortress Antonia, became part of the defenses of the city, and was likewise without external gates. The cloisters in the west, North and east sides were composed of double rows of Corinthian columns, 25 cubits or 37 feet 6 inches in height, with flat roof, and resting against the outer wall of the temple. The great ornament of these inner courts seems to have been their gateways, the three especially on the North end south leading to the temple court
Temple - To the North and south sides, and the west end of the Holy and Most Holy places, or all around the edifice, from the back of the porch on one side, to the back of the porch on the other side, certain buildings were attached. Those on the east, west, and North sides were of the same dimensions; but that on the south was much larger. " The whole length of the court from east to west was one hundred and eighty-seven cubits, and the breadth from North to south, one hundred and thirty-five cubits. Near the southwest corner certain huge stones mark the beginning of an arch, a part of the stately bridge which anciently connected the temple are with Mount Zion; and a little North of this spot is the celebrated wailing-place of the Jews. During the supremacy of the Romans there was a Roman garrison in the strong tower of Antonia, which, with its various courts and fortifications, adjoined the temple area on the North, and was connected with it by passages both above and under ground, John 18:12 Acts 4:1 5:26 21:31-40
Jerusalem (2) - To the North and south, where the ancient caravan road from Hebron and the Negeb runs towards Samaria and Galilee, it is separated from the main backbone by only shallow and open valleys. The Eastern Valley commences a mile North of the city wall in a shallow depression near the watershed, a little to the N. This ravine, on reaching the Northern extremity of the village of Silwan, turns S. The buildings on it extended southward to the Valley of Hinnom, but to the North it is bounded by a valley which runs eastward from near the modern Jaffa Gate to join the Tyropœon Valley opposite the Western wall of the Temple area. edge of this valley, and the suburbs which grew up to its North were enclosed by the second wall. Akra cannot have lain North of the Temple, for here lay the Antonia (Ant. 8), the ancient Baris or tower, a fortress distinct from the Akra, indeed largely its successor; and North of this again was Bezetha, the New City. ...
The older view of Robinson, Warren, Conder, and others, that Akra was the hill now sustaining the Muristan and the Church of the Sepulchre, North of the W. This was the area enclosed by the second wall, and Josephus calls it not the Lower City, but ‘the Northern quarter of the city. Quite possibly before the area to the North was so thickly inhabited, when, for example, this well was outside the walls, a certain amount of good water may have been obtainable here, but now what collects is a foul and smelling liquid which percolates to the valley bottom from the neighbouring inhabited area, and it is unfit for even its present use—in a Turkish bath. arm of the Tyropœon Valley; there are indications that it extended at one time further North than it does at present. The other, built on an altogether different principle, is a four-mile channel which gathers water from a long chain of wells in the Wady Biâr on the plan of a Persian kharîz, such as is extensively used in Northern Syria
Canaan - The territory of Tyre and Sidon was its ancient border on the North-west; the range of the Libanus and Anti-libanus forms a natural boundary on the North and North-east; while in the south it is pressed upon by the Syrian and Arabian deserts. In a North-eastern direction, it was bounded only by the river Euphrates, and included a considerable part of Syria. "Tadmore in the wilderness," (Palmyra,) which the Jewish monarch is stated to have built, (that is, either founded or fortified,) is considerably to the North-east of Damascus, being only a day's journey from the Euphrates; and Hamath, the Epiphania of the Greeks, (still called Hamah,) in the territory belonging, to which city Solomon had several "store cities," is seated on the Orontes, in latitude 34...
45' N. " Judea is beautifully diversified with hills and plains— hills now barren and gloomy, but once cultivated to their summits, and smiling in the variety of their produce, chiefly the olive and the vine; and plains, over which the Bedouin now roves to collect a scanty herbage for his cattle, but once yielding an abundance of which the inhabitants of a Northern climate can form no idea. ...
The hills of Judea frequently rise into mountains; the most considerable of which are those of Lebanon and Hermon, on the North; those which surround the sea of Galilee, and the Dead Sea, also attain a respectable elevation. The cold of winter is, indeed, sometimes greater than in European climates situated some degrees farther to the North; but it is of short duration, and the general character of the climate is that of heat
Reuben - As Dan and Naphtali were settled together in the North, it is not improbable (and there are some indications of this) that at an earlier time they may have been neighbours in the south, and there have come into conflict with Reuben. ]'>[2] , in describing the lot of Judah, makes the North border’ go up by the stone of Bohan, the son of Reuben
Solomon - Unable to repay his debts, Solomon decided to cut off twenty cities in Northern Israel and give them to Hiram (1 Kings 9:10-11). This only increased the resentment that the people of Northern Israel, and especially the farmers, felt towards Solomon and his showpiece city in the south. The ten tribes to the North broke away from the Davidic rule, though for the sake of David, God withheld the inevitable judgment until after Solomon’s death (1 Kings 11:11-13). ...
The rebellion against Solomon was led by a young man from the North, Jeroboam. Solomon had recognized Jeroboam’s abilities earlier, and put him in charge of a large portion of the workforce from the Northern tribes (1 Kings 11:28). When Solomon felt that Jeroboam was gaining support among the Northerners, he tried to kill him, but Jeroboam escaped to the safety of Egypt (1 Kings 11:29-32; 1 Kings 11:40)
Raca - He accompanied the exiles on their way to Babylon as far as Ramah, 5 miles North of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:1), and the impression produced by his last sight of them took the form of a poetic picture of Rachel, the ancestral mother of the Israelites (who according to one tradition—1 Samuel 10:2—was buried in the neighbourhood), bewailing the fate of her descendants (Jeremiah 31:15). , about 4 miles south of Jerusalem, and one mile North of Bethlehem
Arabia - To the North ‘their territory reached as far as Damascus, which was under their protection, and even beyond Damascus, and enclosed as with a girdle the whole of Palestinian Syria’ (Mommsen, Provinces2, Lond. Cooke, North-Semitic Inscriptions, London, 1903; and the article ‘Arabs (Ancient),’ by Th
Columba (1) Columcille - But whatever they may have been, he is said to have used his influence to excite a quarrel between the families of the North and south Hy Neill, and the consequence was the battle fought in the barony of Carberry, between Drumcliff and Sligo, on the borders of Ulster and Connaught, a. 561, and gained by the Neills of the North, the party of St
Shechem - A city of central Canaan, between the mountains Gerizim and Ebal, thirty-four miles North of Jerusalem; called also Sychar and Sychem, Acts 7:16 . ...
The valley of Shechem extends several miles Northwest between Mount Ebal and Mount Gerizim, and is about five hundred yards wide; so that in the pure and elastic air of Palestine the two mountains are within hailing distance of each other, one circumstance among thousands evincing the exact truthfulness of Bible narratives, Deuteronomy 27:11-14 Judges 9:7 . The rocky base of Mount Ebal on the North of the valley is full of ancient excavated tombs
Pass - The North limit of Massachusetts passes three miles North of the Merrimac
Jerusalem - ...
Valleys and streams...
The only convenient access to the city in ancient times was from the North, access on the other sides being hindered by cliffs that fell away into deep valleys. In the rainy season a swiftly flowing stream ran from the hills North of Jerusalem through this valley, ending in the Dead Sea (2 Samuel 15:23; 1 Kings 2:37; 1 Kings 15:13; 2 Chronicles 30:14; Joel 3:2; Joel 3:12; John 18:1)
Kings, Books of - The ten tribes to the North broke away and formed their own kingdom (still called Israel) under the rebel leader, Jeroboam (12:1-33). ...
False religion in the North soon brought an announcement of divine punishment (13:1-14:20). Meanwhile the Northern kingdom suffered from wars and assassinations, till Omri established a new dynasty (15:25-16:28). The Northern kingdom likewise declined after the death of Jeroboam II
Judaea - With some variations on the North and west borders at different periods, Judaea covered all of the territory south of the Wady Ishar and the village of Akrabbeh (PEFSt Judaea - With some variations on the North and west borders at different periods, Judaea covered all of the territory south of the Wady Ishar and the village of Akrabbeh (PEFSt Cyprus - The island Isaiah 138 miles long east to west and 60 miles wide from North to south; it is eclipsed in size only by Sicily and Sardinia. Much of Cyprus is mountainous; the Troodos Mountains (5900 feet) dominate the western and central sections, while the Kyrenia Mountains (3100 feet) extend along the Northern coast
Ramah - The name, and not improbably the site, of this place is preserved by a little village on a hillside North of Jerusalem known as er-Râm , which answers the geographical requirements of these incidents
Elam - The Zagros Mountains lie east and North while the Persian Gulf is to the south and the Tigris River is on the west
Nile - ...
The Egyptians seem to have imagined a connexion of the Nile southwards with the Indian Ocean, and the priests taught the absurd notion that it gushed out North and south from two springs at the First Cataract
Nile River - Thereafter the Nile flows, 1675 miles Northward to the Mediterranean Sea without any further tributary. From Aswan Northwards, the Nile flows between two lines of cliffs which sometimes come directly down to its edge but in other places are up to nine miles away. It is the only river to flow Northwards across the Sahara. All major journeys in Egypt were undertaken by boat helped by the current when traveling North or by the prevailing wind when headed south
Solomon - This system, combined with control of vital North/south trade routes between the Red Sea and what was later known as Asia Minor, made it possible for Solomon to accumulate vast wealth
Ashdod - ...
Asdod was ten miles North of Ashkelon and two and a half miles east of the Mediterranean Sea on the Philistine plain. It was the Northernmost city of the Philistine pentapolis recorded in Joshua 13:3 . Ashdod occurs in written history first in the Late Bronze period where it is mentioned in the trade documents of the Ras Shamra tablets discovered at Ugarit (ancient trade center near the Mediterranean coast in Northern Syria)
High - Remote from the equator North or south as a high latitude
Ephraim - ...
The territory of the tribe was in the heart of Palestine, having Manasseh on the North, Benjamin on the south, and Dan on the west
Return - ) The continuation in a different direction, most often at a right angle, of a building, face of a building, or any member, as a molding or mold; - applied to the shorter in contradistinction to the longer; thus, a facade of sixty feet east and west has a return of twenty feet North and south
Gaza - The suburbs and environs of Gaza are rendered infinitely agreeable by a number of large gardens, cultivated with the nicest care, which lie in a direction North and south of the town; while others of the same description run to a considerable distance westward
Tabernacle - The end was thirty cubits high; the upper curtain hung on the North and south sides eight cubits, and on the east and west four cubits
Carmel - It had the plain of Sharon on the south; overlooked the port of Ptolemais on the North; and was bounded on the west by the Mediterranean sea; forming one of the most remarkable promontories that present themselves on the shores of that great sea. The brook Kishon, which issues from Mount Tabor, waters the bottom of Carmel, and falls into the sea toward the Northern side of the mountain, and not the southern, as some writers have erroneously stated
Manasseh - One half tribe of Manasseh settled beyond the river Jordan, and possessed the country of Bashan, from the river Jabbok, to Mount Libanus; and the other half tribe of Manasseh settled on this side Jordan, and possessed the country between the tribe of Ephraim south, and the tribe of Issachar North, having the river Jordan east, and the Mediterranean Sea west, Joshua xvi; 17
Nile - Then it winds about again, from the east to the North
Samaria - One of the three divisions of the Holy Land in the time of our Savior, having Galilee on the North and Judea on the south, the Jordan on the east and the Mediterranean on the west, and occupying parts of the territory assigned at first to Ephraim, Mahasseh, and Issachar, Luke 17:11 John 4:4 . A city situated near the middle of Palestine, some six miles Northwest of Shechem
Damascus - The region around and North of Damascus, including probably the valley between the ridges of Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, is called in the Scriptures, "Syria of Damascus," 2 Samuel 8:5 , and by Strabo, Coelesyria
Greece - This country was bounded North by Macedonia and Illyricum, from which it was separated by mountains, south by the Mediterranean sea, east by the Aegean sea, and west by the Ionian sea. It was generally known under the three great divisions of Peloponnesus, Hellas, and Northern Greece
Edom, Edomites - ...
The Edomites, because of this, occupied the territory of Judah as far as the town of Beth-zur, to the North of Hebron, which became the Idumæa (wh
Under - The American revolution commenced under the administration of lord North
Gal'Ilee - The latter included the whole Northern section of the country, including the ancient territories of Issachar, Zebulun, Asher and Naphtali. The river Jordan, the Sea of Galilee, and the upper Jordan to the fountain at Dan, formed the eastern border; and the Northern ran from Dan westward across the mountain ridge till it touched the territory of the Phoenicians. " Lower Galilee included the great plain of Esdraelon with its offshoots, which ran down to the Jordan and the Lake of Tiberias, and the whole of the hill country adjoining it on the North to the foot of the mountain range
Ephraim - ...
The territory of the tribe was in the heart of Palestine, having Manasseh on the North, Benjamin on the south, and Dan on the west
Galilee - Most of the apostles belonged to this Northern province (Acts 1:11; Acts 13:31). As applied to this particular district in North-western Palestine, the form used is either הַנָּלִיל, ‘the district’ (Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32, 1 Kings 9:11, 2 Kings 15:29, 1 Chronicles 6:76), or נְּלִיל הַנּוֹיִם, ‘district of the nations’ (Isaiah 9:1). Given originally to the highlands on the extreme Northern border, this name gradually extended itself southwards over the hill-country till it reached and eventually included the Plain of Esdraelon (G. The mountains separate very clearly into a higher Northern and a lower southern group, and the ‘valley’ is the valley of the Upper Jordan. The dividing-line between Upper and Lower Galilee is the range of mountains running right across the country along the Northern edge of the Plain of Rameh. Six miles North of the lake, the river is crossed by the ‘Bridge of the daughters of Jacob,’ on the famous Via Maris of the Middle Ages, the principal thoroughfare between Damascus and the Mediterranean ports. It had rich alluvial plains on the North and south, a belt of populous and flourishing cities round its border, abundance of fish in its depths, and a climate that attracted both workers and pleasure-seekers to its shores. The best fishing-grounds were, and still are, at el-Bataiha in the North, and in the bay of Tabigha, at the N. Along the western and Northern borders were the Syrophœnicians (Mark 7:26), or Tyrians (as Josephus calls them), while from the east nomadic Bedouins were continually pressing in upon the lower-lying tracts
Israel - composed in the Northern Kingdom by E Arabia - A vast country of Asia, extending one thousand five hundred miles from North to south, and one thousand two hundred from east to west; containing a surface equal to four times that of France. ...
Arabia, or at least the eastern and Northern parts of it, were first peopled by some of the numerous families of Cush, who appear to have extended themselves, or to have given their name as the land of Cush, or Asiatic Ethiopia, to all the country from the Indus on the east, to the borders of Egypt on the west, and from Armenia on the North to Arabia Deserta on the south. ...
The first, or Arabia Petraea, is the Northwestern division, and is bounded on the North by Palestine and the Dead Sea, on the east by Arabia Deserta, on the south by Arabia Felix, and on the west by the Heroopolitan branch of the Red Sea and the Isthmus of Suez. ...
The second region, or Arabia Deserta, is bounded on the North and North- east by the Euphrates, on the east by a ridge of mountains which separates it from Chaldea, on the south by Arabia Felix, and on the west by Syria, Judea, and Arabia Petraea. It is bounded on the North by the two other divisions of the country; on the south and south-east by the Indian Ocean; on the east by part of the same ocean and the Persian Gulf; and on the west by the Red Sea. This division is subdivided into the kingdoms or provinces of Yemen, at the southern extremity of the peninsula; Hejaz, on the North of the former, and toward the Red Sea; Nejed, in the central region; and Hadramant and Oman, on the shores of the Indian Ocean. During the whole of the succeeding century, their rapid career was unchecked; the disciplined armies of the Greeks and Romans were unable to stand against them; the Christian churches of Asia and Africa were annihilated; and from India to the Atlantic, through Persia, Arabia, Syria, Palestine, Asia Minor, Egypt, with the whole of Northern Africa, Spain, and part of France, the impostor was acknowledged
England - Christianity was introduced into England by Saint Augustine of Canterbury in 597; it spread rapidly in southern Britain, and was brought to Northumbria by Paulinus. Saint Aidan, founder of the monastery of Lindisfarne, spread the Faith in the North; and from Lindisfarne came Saint Cedd and Saint Chad who labored as missionaries in Essex and Mercia, Saint Cuthbert who strengthened Christianity in the North, and Saint Wilfrid, who besides converting the South Saxons, reconciled the Christians of Northumberland to the Roman Easter and other institutions sanctioned by the Holy See. Pope Innocent XI in 1688 created the four districts or vicariates of London, Midland, Northern, and Western. In 1840 Pope Gregory XVI created the eight districts or vicariates of London, Western, Eastern, Central, Welsh, Lancashire, Yorkshire, and Northern. ...
Ecclesiastically the country is governed by the archdioceses of ...
Birmingham Liverpool Southwark Westminster and the dioceses of ...
Arundel and Brighton Brentwood Clifton East Anglia Hallam Hexham and Newcastle Lancaster Leeds Middlesbrough Northampton Nottingham Plymouth Portsmouth Salford Shrewsbury See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Red Sea - Pi-hahiroth signifies "the mouth of the ridge," or chain of mountains, which line the western coast of the Red Sea, called Attaka, "deliverance," in which was a gap, which formed the extremity of the valley of Bedea, ending at the sea eastward, and running westward to some distance, toward Cairo; Migdol, signifying "a tower," probably lay in that direction; and Baal-zephon, signifying "the Northern Baal," was probably a temple on the opposite promontory, built on the eastern coast of the Red Sea. ...
In the queries of Michaelis, sent to Niebuhr, when in Egypt, it was proposed to him to inquire upon the spot, whether there were not some ridges of rocks where the water was shallow, so that an army at particular times may pass over; secondly, whether the Etesian winds, which blow strongly all summer from the North-west could not blow so violently against the sea as to keep it back on a heap, so that the Israelites might have passed without a miracle. If the Etesian wind, blowing from the North-west in summer, could keep up the sea as a wall on the right, or to the south, of fifty feet high, still the difficulty would remain of building the wall on the left hand, or to the North. And the second query, about the Etesian or Northerly wind, is refuted by the express mention of a strong easterly wind blowing across, and scooping out a dry passage; not that it was necessary for Omnipotence to employ it there as an instrument, any more than at Jordan; but it seems to be introduced in the sacred history by way of anticipation, to exclude the natural agency that might in after times be employed for solving the miracle; and it is remarkable that the monsoon in the Red Sea blows the summer half of the year from the North, the winter half from the south, neither of which therefore, even if the wind could be supposed to operate so violently upon the waters, could produce the miracle in question. The passage would have been naturally more difficult for the Israelites some thousands of years back, when the gulf was probably larger, deeper, and more extended toward the North; for, in all appearance, the water has retired, and the ground near this end has been raised by the sands of the neighbouring desert
Sardis - As time advanced, extension was necessary, and a lower city was built on the west and North sides of the original city, near the little river Pactolus, and probably also on the east side
Bethsaida - As it belonged to the tribe of Naphtali, it was in a country remarkable for plenty of deer; and as it lay on the North end of the lake Gennesareth, just where the river Jordan runs into it, it became the residence of fishermen
Samaria - In the heart of the mountains of Israel, a few miles North-west of Shechem, stands the "hill of Shomeron," a solitary mountain, a great "mamelon
Berôa - 26), and commanded an extensive view to North, east, and south over the plain of the Axios and the Haliacmon. Its name survives in the modern Verria or Kara-Verria, which is one of the most pleasant towns in Rumili (Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, iii. Leake, Travels in Northern Greece, 1835, iii
Nebo - Oshâ some 20 miles North of Mt. Northward (or, strictly, between N
Thebes - The plan of the city, as indicated by the principal monuments, was nearly quadrangular, measuring two miles from North to south and four from east to west. toward the Northwest
Lebanon - The Lebanon range extends for about 105 miles along the coast, from modern-day Tripoli in the North to Tyre in the south. It is frequently featured in the Old Testament, in a general way, as the Northern boundry of Palestine (Deuteronomy 1:24 ; Joshua 1:4 ), dividing it from Phoenicia and Syria
Gaza - It was ‘the frontier city of Syria and the Desert, on the south-west, as Damascus on the North-east’ (Stanley, Sinai and Palestine, London, 1877, p. Well watered, with broad gardens, and a great olive grove stretching Northwards, it drives a considerable trade with the nomadic Arabs
Exodus, the - The Red Sea may have extended farther North than at present, but this does not affect the question
Gilead - The name of the territory bounded on the North by Bashan, on the west by the Jordan between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, on the east by the desert, and on the south by the territory of Moab. On the partition of the land, Gilead was divided into two, the southern half being given to Reuben and Gad, the Northern half to the trans-Jordanic half of Manasseh
Anglo-Saxon Church - The church of the Teutonic tribes from Northwestern Germany who invaded Britain south of the Rivers Forth and Clyde in the 5th century, displacing the Celtic inhabitants towards Wales and Cornwall. The invaders set up a number of independent kingdoms, often at war with each other; they were evangelized, as the chances of peace or alliance might offer, in the following order: Kent (See of Canterbury founded 597; Rochester, 604); Essex (London, 604); Northumbria (including the district called Deira; York, 625); East Anglia (Dunwich, 630); Mercia (Lichfield, 656); Wessex (Winchester, 669); Sussex, the neighboring kingdom to Kent, was the last to be converted (Selsey, 708). Northumbria was evangelized by the Irish Saint Aidan, a monk of Iona, Scotland, who followed the Celtic traditions regarding the keeping of Easter, which differed from the Roman custom. He founded the monastery of Lindisfarne, from whence came the brothers Saints Cedd and Chad, who were the apostles of Essex and Mercia respectively, Saint Cuthbert, who labored in the North, and Saint Wilfrid, who converted Sussex and reconciled Northumbria to the Roman Easter. At the Synod of Whitby, 664, Oswiu, King of Northumbria, elected to stand by "the Roman Keybearer" (Saint Peter)
Tribes, the Twelve - North to South
Manasseh - Being a numerous tribe they had a large possession in the North on the east of the upper Jordan and of the Sea of Galilee
Tadmor - The riches of India, thus brought into Judea, were from thence disseminated over those countries of the North and west at that time inhabited or known; while the same country, Judea, became, for a season, like Tyre, the point of return and exchange of the money and the commodities of those countries, the centre of communication between the east and the west
Galatia - a province of the Lesser Asia, bounded on the west by Phrygia, on the east by the river Haylys, on the North by Paphlagonia, and on the south by Lycaonia
Mennonites - In some parts of North Holland, young people are baptized on the day of their marriage
Accho - Clarke describes the remains of a very considerable edifice, exhibiting a conspicuous appearance among the buildings on the North side of the city
Japheth - ...
Japheth signifies enlargement; and how wonderfully did Providence enlarge the boundaries of Japheth! His poste