What does Nonconformists mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Nonconformists
Those who refuse to join the established church. Nonconformists in England may be considered of three sorts.
1. Such as absent themselves from divine worship in the established church through total irreligion, and attend the service of no other persuasion.
2. Such as absent themselves on the plea of conscience; as Presbyterians, Independents, Baptists, &c.
3. Internal Nonconformists, or unprincipled clergymen, who applaud and propagate doctrines quite inconsistent with several of those articles they promised on oath to defend. The word is generally used in reference to those ministers who were ejected from their livings by the act of Uniformity, in 1662. The number of these was about two thousand. However some affect to treat these men with indifference, and suppose that their consciences were more tender than they need be, it must be remembered, that they were men of as extensive learning, great abilities, and pious conduct as ever appeared. Mr. Locke, if his opinion have any weight, calls them "worthy, learned, pious, orthodox divines, who did not throw themselves out of service, but were forcibly ejected." Mr. Bogue thus draws their character: "As to their public ministration, " he says, "they were orthodox, experimental, serious, affectionate, regular, faithful, able, and popular preachers.
As to their moral qualities, they were devout and holy; faithful to Christ and the souls of men; wise and prudent; of great liberality and kindness; and strenuous advocates for liberty, civil and religious. As to their intellectual qualities, they were learned, eminent, and laborious." These men were driven from their houses, from the society of their friends, and exposed to the greatest difficulties. Their burdens were greatly increased by the Conventical act, whereby they were prohibited from meeting for any exercise of religion (above five in number) in any other manner than allowed by the liturgy or practice of the Church of England. For the first offence the penalty was three months imprisonment, or pay five pounds; for the second offence, six months imprisonment, or ten pounds; and for the third offence, to be banished to some of the American plantations for seven years, or pay one hundred pounds; and in case they returned, to suffer death without benefit of clergy. By virtue of this act, the gaols were quickly filled with dissenting Protestants, and the trade of an informer was very gainful. So great was the severity of these times, says Neale, that they were afraid to pray in their families, if above four of their acquaintance, who came only to visit them, were present: some families scrupled asking a blessing on their meat if five strangers were at table. But this was not all (to say nothing of the Test act:) in 1665, an act was brought into the House to banish them from their friends, commonly called the Oxford Five Mile Act, by which all dissenting ministers, on the penalty of forty pounds, who would not take an oath (that it was not lawful, upon any pretence whatever, to take arms against the king, &c) were prohibited from coming within five miles of any city, town corporate, or borough, or any place where they had exercised their ministry, and from teaching any school.
Some few took the oath; others could not, consequently suffered the penalty. In 1673, "the mouths of the high church pulpiteers, were encouraged to open as loud as possible. One, in his sermon before the House of Commons, told them, that the Nonconformists ought not to be tolerated, but to be cured by vengeance. He urged them to set fire to the faggot, and to teach them by scourges or scorpions, and open their eyes with gall." Such were the dreadful consequences of this intolerant spirit, that it is supposed near eight thousand died in prison in the reign of Charles II. It is said, that Mr. Jeremiah White had carefully collected a list of those who had suffered between Charles II. and the revolution, which amounted to sixty thousand. The same persecutions were carried on in Scotland; and there, as well as in England, many, to avoid persecution, fled from their country. But, notwithstanding all these dreadful and furious attacks upon the Dissenters, they were not extirpated. Their very persecution was in their favour. The infamous characters of their informers and persecutors; their piety, zeal, and fortitude, no doubt, had influence on considerate minds; and, indeed, they had additions from the established church, which "several clergymen in this reign deserted as a persecuting church, and took their lot among them. In addition to this, king James suddenly altered his measures, granted a universal toleration, and preferred Dissenters to places of trust and profit, though it was evidently with a view to restore popery. King William coming to the throne, the famous Toleration Act passed, by which they were exempted from suffering the penalties above-mentioned, and permission given them to worship God, according to the dictates of their own consciences. In the latter end of Queen Anne's reign they began to be a little alarmed.
An act of parliament passed, called the Occasional Conformity Bill, which prevented any person in office under the government entering into a meeting-house. Another, called the Schism Bill, had actually obtained the royal assent, which suffered no Dissenters to educate their own children, but required them to be put into the hands of Conformists; and which forbade all tutors and schoolmasters being present at any conventicle, or dissenting place of worship; but the very day this iniquitous act was to have taken place, the Queen died (August 1, 1714.) But his majesty king George I. being fully satisfied that these hardships were brought upon the Dissenters for their steady adherence to the Protestant succession in his illustrious house against a tory and jacobite ministry, who were paving the way for a popish pretender, procured the repeal of them in the fifth year of his reign; though a clause was left that forbade the mayor or other magistrate to go into any meeting for religious worship with the ensigns of his office.
See Bogue's Charge at Mr. Knight's Ordination; Neale's History of the Puritans; De Laune's Plea for the Nonconformists; Palmer's Nonconformists; Mem. Martin's Letters on Nonconformity; Robinson's Lectures; Cornish's History of Nonconformity; Dr. Calamy's Life of Baxter; Pierce's Vindication of the Dissenters; Bogue and Bennet's History of the Dissenters.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nonconformists
dissenters from the church of England; but the term applies more particularly to those ministers who were ejected from their livings by the Act of Uniformity in 1662; the number of whom, according to Dr. Calamy, was nearly two thousand; and to the laity who adhered to them. The celebrated Mr. Locke says, "Bartholomew-day (the day fixed by the Act of Uniformity) was fatal to our church and religion, by throwing out a very great number of worthy, learned, pious, and orthodox divines, who could not come up to this and other things in that act. And it is worth your knowledge, that so great was the zeal in carrying on this church affair, and so blind was the obedience required, that if you compare the time of passing the act with the time allowed for the clergy to subscribe the book of Common Prayer thereby established, you shall plainly find, it could not be printed and distributed, so as one man in forty could have seen and read the book before they did so perfectly assent and consent thereto."
By this act, the clergy were required to subscribe, ex animo, [1] their "assent and consent to all and every thing contained in the book of Common Prayer," which had never before been insisted on, so rigidly as to deprive them of their livings and livelihood. Several other acts were passed about this time, very oppressive both to the clergy and laity. In the preceding year 1661, the Corporation Act incapacitated all persons from offices of trust and honour in a corporation, who did not receive the sacrament in the established church. The Conventicle Act, in 1663 and 1670, forbade the attendance at conventicles; that is, at places of worship other than the establishment, where more than five adults were present beside the resident family; and that under penalties of fine and imprisonment by the sentence of magistrates without a jury. The Oxford Act of 1665 banished nonconforming ministers five miles from any corporate town sending members to parliament, and prohibited them from keeping or teaching schools. The Test Act of the same year required all persons, accepting any office under government, to receive the sacrament in the established church.
Such were the dreadful consequences of this intolerant spirit, that it is supposed that near eight thousand died in prison in the reign of Charles II. It is said that Mr. Jeremiah White had carefully collected a list of those who had suffered between Charles II and the revolution, which amounted to sixty thousand. The same persecutions were carried on in Scotland; and there, as well as in England, numbers, to avoid the persecution, left their country. But, notwithstanding all these dreadful and furious attacks upon the dissenters, they were not extirpated. Their very persecution was in their favour. The infamous character of their informers and persecutors; their piety, zeal, and fortitude, no doubt, had influence on considerate minds; and, indeed, they had additions from the established church, which several clergymen in this reign deserted as a persecuting church, and took their lot among them. King William coming to the throne, the famous Toleration Act passed, by which they were exempted from suffering the penalties above mentioned, and permission was given them to worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences. In the reign of George III, the Act for the Protection of Religious Worship superseded the Act of Toleration, by still more liberal provisions in favour of religious liberty; and in the last reign the Test and Corporation Acts were repealed.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Nonconformists
A name given in England to those who do notconform to the usages and doctrines of the National Church. Theword as used now is practically synonymous with Dissenter.

Sentence search

Dissenters - ...
See those articles, as also Nonconformists and PURITANS
Conventicle - , such an assembly held privately, as in times of persecution, by Nonconformists or Dissenters in England, or by Covenanters in Scotland; - often used opprobriously, as if those assembled were heretics or schismatics
Dissenters - Since the middle of the 19th century they have been included under the title Nonconformists
Savoy Conference - or Introduction to Palmer's Nonconformists' Memorial
Advertisements, Book of - To this the Reformers objected and the dissensions consequent occasioned the breach between Nonconformists and The Church of England
Sins: Home-Born Our Worst Foes - We want more Protestants against sin, more Dissenters from carnal maxims, and more Nonconformists to the world
Directory - , a book of directions for the conduct of worship; as, the Directory used by the Nonconformists instead of the Prayer Book
Evangelicals - These beliefs are held largely by the Presbyterians in Scotland, the Nonconformists in England, and the corresponding churches in America
James ii - In 1687 he issued the Declaration of Indulgence by which all laws against all classes of Nonconformists were suspended and liberty of conscience inaugurated
Nonconformists - Nonconformists in England may be considered of three sorts. Internal Nonconformists, or unprincipled clergymen, who applaud and propagate doctrines quite inconsistent with several of those articles they promised on oath to defend. One, in his sermon before the House of Commons, told them, that the Nonconformists ought not to be tolerated, but to be cured by vengeance. Knight's Ordination; Neale's History of the Puritans; De Laune's Plea for the Nonconformists; Palmer's Nonconformists; Mem
Puritans - After this period, the term Nonconformists became common, to which succeeds the appellation Dissenter. Neither the Puritans before the passing of the Bartholomew act in 1662, nor the Nonconformists after it, appear to have disapproved of the articles of the established church in matters of doctrine. ...
See articles BROWNISTS, INDEPENDENTS, and Nonconformists, in this work
Independents - ...
See CHURCH CONGREGATIONAL; Nonconformists, and books under those articles
Baxterianism - I am not sure whether certain effects which began early in the last century to appear among the Presbyterian part of the Nonconformists, may not be traced, in some degree, to the speculative and argumentative writings of Baxter