What does Nippur mean in the Bible?

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Holman Bible Dictionary - Nippur
(nihp puhr') City located in Mesopotamia, approximately fifty miles southeast of the ancient city of Babylon and approximately one hundred miles south of modern Baghdad, Iraq. Although it is never mentioned in the Bible, its history is important in the larger context of the biblical world. It is believed to have been the center of one of the first true civilizations, that of Sumer.
The city was founded approximately 4000 B.C. by a primitive group called the “Ubaidians.” Nippur was for more than two thousand years the undisputed cultural and religious center, although it never was used as the capital city for any kingdom.
Nippur was a flourishing center of industry and scribal education. Documents discovered in the area describe a variety of commercial enterprises. Some of the tablets, dating back to 2500 B.C. and earlier, were found, as were records of a much later time. One of the most important later discoveries appeared in the ruins of a business house. The records, known as the Murashu documents after the banking family responsible for them, give some indication of the extent of Jewish involvement in the business world after the time of the Babylonian Exile. Scribal education concerned the use of one of the earliest forms of writing called cuneiform. See Cuneiform . Also part of education was an emphasis on mathematics.
Nippur was most important, however, for its religion. Various gods controlled every aspect of life. The chief deity was En-lil, also occasionally called Bel (“the lord”). He was thought of as god of the terrestrial world and the father of other gods. His significance made his home, Nippur, the place where people from peasants to kings came to offer gifts.
According to tradition, kingly authority descended from heaven after the flood. The several cities in the area, except for Nippur, took turns as the seat of government and often waged war against each other for political supremacy. The undisputed source of this supremacy, however, was En-lil, the principal deity. His authority was transmitted to the human kings through the priesthood of his temple, the Ekur (“mountain house”), the leading shrine in the area.
Nippur's influence and prominence began to wane with the rise of Babylonian power. By the time of Hammurabi, 1792-1750 B.C., Nippur had been replaced by Babylon as the religious and cultural center. It did, however, continue to be an influential city down about 250 B.C. See Babylon ; Cuneiform ; Hammurabi ; Mesopotamia ; Sumer .
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Calneh, Calno - The Talmudic assertion that ‘Calneh means Nippur’ receives some support from the age and importance of Nippur, but it is not known that this was ever the name of that city
Nippur - ” Nippur was for more than two thousand years the undisputed cultural and religious center, although it never was used as the capital city for any kingdom. ...
Nippur was a flourishing center of industry and scribal education. ...
Nippur was most important, however, for its religion. His significance made his home, Nippur, the place where people from peasants to kings came to offer gifts. The several cities in the area, except for Nippur, took turns as the seat of government and often waged war against each other for political supremacy. ...
Nippur's influence and prominence began to wane with the rise of Babylonian power. , Nippur had been replaced by Babylon as the religious and cultural center
Tel-Abib - ” Tel-Abib on the Chebar Canal near Nippur in Babylon was home to Ezekiel and other Exiles (Ezekiel 3:15 )
Chebar - It apparently lay to the east of Nippur
Bel - (behl) Name of Babylonian god, originally as city patron of Nippur, but then as a second name for the high god Marduk of Babylon
Arch - at Nippur, of the discovery of early arches by recent explorers, and of the vaulted roofs of later Jewish tombs, this view is now seen to be erroneous, although the arch is not mentioned in Scripture
Merodach - He gradually absorbed the attributes of other gods once supreme through the influence of their city seats of worship, particularly Ellil the old Bçl , or lord supreme of Nippur
Sumer - Its principal cities were Nippur, Adab, Lagash, Umma, Larsa, Erech, Ur, and Eridu, most of which were on or near the Euphrates
Babylon - Native tradition makes it as old as Erech and Nippur, the latter being proved by excavations to date back to prehistoric times
Library - Sumerian texts from among the 20,000 tablets at Nippur (before 1500 B
Babylon - , such as Erech, Kish, Nippur, Ur, Sippar, or Akkad
Babylon, History And Religion of - Enlil of Nippur was god of the earth
Assyria, History And Religion of - Enlil of Nippur was god of the earth
Gods, Pagan - Enlil of Nippur ruled over the earth
Ezekiel, Theology of - He settled near the "Kebar River" between Babylon and Nippur, and at age thirty was called to the prophetic office (so taking 1:1)