What does Nile mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַיְאֹֽר river 6
הַיְאֹ֔ר river 5
הַיְאֹ֑ר river 4
בַּיְאֹ֖ר river 4
כַּיְאֹ֣ר river 2
יְא֖וֹר river 2
כָאֹר֙ river 1
הַיְאֹ֗ר river 1
כַּיְאֹ֑ר river 1
בַיְא֖וֹר river 1
יְא֔וֹר river 1
יְא֑וֹר river 1
הַיְאֹ֖ר river 1
יְאֹ֥ר river 1
הַיְאֹר֮ river 1
כִּיא֥וֹר river 1
בַּיְאֹ֥ר river 1
בַּיְאֹ֔ר river 1
בַּיְאֹ֛ר river 1
כִּיאֹ֥ר river 1
כַיְאֹר֙ river 1
יְאֹ֑ר river 1

Definitions Related to Nile

H2975


   1 river, stream, canal, Nile, Nile-canal.
      1a stream, river (Nile).
      1b Nile-arms, Nile-canals.
      1c watercourses.
      1d shafts (mining).
      1e river (in general).
      

Frequency of Nile (original languages)

Frequency of Nile (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Delta of the Nile, Egypt, Vicariate Apostolic of t
Prefecture apostolic erected on January 25, 1884. Elected to vicariate apostolic on September 17, 1909; entrusted to the priests of the African Missions of Lyons. Name changed to Vicariate Apostolic of Eliopoli di Egitto on January 27, 1951. United with other territories to form the Vicariate Apostolic of Alessandria di Egitto (-Eliopoli di Egitto-Port-Said) on November 30, 1987. See also:
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Equatorial Nile, Central Africa, Prefecture Aposto
The prefecture apostolic of Equatorial Nile, Central Africa was established June 12, 1923; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona. Elevated to a Vicariate Apostolic on December 10, 1934. Name changed to the Vicariate Apostolic of Gulu on December 1, 1950. Elevated to the Diocese of Gulu on March 25, 1953. Elevated to the Archdiocese of Gulu on January 2, 1999. See also:
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
archdiocese of Gulu
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nile
Dark; blue, not found in Scripture, but frequently referred to in the Old Testament under the name of Sihor, i.e., "the black stream" (Isaiah 23:3 ; Jeremiah 2:18 ) or simply "the river" (Genesis 41:1 ; Exodus 1:22 , etc.) and the "flood of Egypt" (Amos 8:8 ). It consists of two rivers, the White Nile, which takes its rise in the Victoria Nyanza, and the Blue Nile, which rises in the Abyssinian Mountains. These unite at the town of Khartoum, whence it pursues its course for 1,800 miles, and falls into the Mediterranean through its two branches, into which it is divided a few miles north of Cairo, the Rosetta and the Damietta branch. (See EGYPT .)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nile
Nile, blue, dark. The great river of Egypt and of Africa, its entire length being about 4000 miles. The word "Nile" does not occur in the A. V.. but the river is frequently referred to as Sihor or Shihor, which means a "black" or "turbid" stream, Joshua 13:3; Isaiah 23:1-18 î3; where the R. V. reads "Nile;" Jeremiah 2:18; Jeremiah 46:7-8, E. V. "Nile;" 1 Chronicles 13:5. It is also designated simply the "river," R. V. margin, "Nile," Genesis 41:1; Exodus 1:22; Exodus 2:3; Exodus 2:5, and the "flood of Egypt," R. V., "River of Egypt," Amos 8:8; Amos 9:5. In the plural form this word yeor, rendered "river," frequently refers to the branches and canals of the Nile. This famous river is connected with the earliest history of the Egyptian and the Israelitish nations. Exodus 2:3; Exodus 7:20-21; Numbers 11:5; Psalms 105:29; Jeremiah 46:7-8. The Nile is not named in the New Testament As rain seldom falls in Egypt proper, the fertility of the country is entirely dependent upon the annual rise of the Nile. This usually begins in June and continues until near the end of September, the river remaining stationary for two or more weeks, and then attaining its highest level in October, when it begins to subside. The successive years of famine in the days of Joseph were doubtless due to a deficient overflow of the Nile for those years. Formerly this annual inundation turned Egypt into a vast lake, but in later times the water has been distributed by a great network of canals, from which the huge basins of cultivated land into which the canals divide the country, are supplied with water of the depth required to leave a deposit of mud to fertilize the land. The native uses his feet to regulate the flow of water into each of the squares or basins of land, and by a dexterous movement of his toes forms or removes a tiny embankment, as may be required to admit the proper flow of water, another common mode is to use the "shadoof," a bucket attached to a long pole hung on a pivot, balanced by a stone or a lump of clay at one end, and having the bucket on the other end. To this day the Nile is lined for hundreds of miles with these shadoofs, worked by men, women, and children, who lift the water out of the river to Irrigate their fields. Both these methods are believed to be very ancient, and may be alluded to by Moses in contrasting the fountains and rainfalls in Palestine with the absence of this supply in Egypt: "For the land, whither thou goest in to possess it, is not as the land of Egypt, from whence ye came out, where thou sowedst thy seed, and wateredst it with thy foot as a garden of herbs." Deuteronomy 11:10-11. The ancient Egyptians worshipped the river Nile as a god. Two of the ten plagues sent upon Pharaoh and Egypt before the departure of the Israelites were turning the water of the Nile into blood and bringing forth frogs from the river. Exodus 7:15-25; Exodus 8:3-7. The papyrus reeds—whence paper is designated—the flags, the lotus, and the various colored flowers formerly beautifying the banks of the river have nearly all disappeared, thus fulfilling prophecy. Isaiah 19:6-7.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nile
NILE. The Greek name of the river, of uncertain derivation. The Egyptian name was Hopi , later Yer-‘o , ‘Great River,’ but the Hebrew generally designates the Nile by the plain Egyptian word for ‘river,’ Ye’ôr . The Nile was rich in fish, and the home of the crocodile and hippopotamus. It bore most of the internal traffic of Egypt; but it was pre-eminently the one source of water, and so of life and fertility, in a land which, without it, would have been desert. The White Nile sends down from the Central African lakes a steady stream, which is greatly increased in summer and autumn, when the half-dry beds of the Bahr el-Azrek and the Atbara are filled by the torrential rains annually poured on the mountains of Abyssinia. The waters of these tributaries are charged with organic matter washed down by the floods, and this is spread over the fields of Egypt by the inundation. The height of the Nile rise was measured and recorded by the Egyptians from the earliest times: on it depended almost wholly the harvest of the year, and a great excess might be as harmful as a deficiency. The rise begins about June 19, and after increasing slowly for a month the river gains rapidly till September; at the end of September it becomes stationary, but rises again, reaching its highest level about the middle of October. The crops were sown as the water retreated, and on the lower ground a second crop was obtained by artificial irrigation . Canals and embankments regulated the waters in ancient times. The water was raised for the irrigation of the fields by shadûfs , i.e. buckets hung from the end of dipping poles, and handscoops, and carried by small channels which could be opened or stopped with a little mud and cut herbage: by this means the flow was directed to particular fields or parts of fields as might be required. Water-wheels were probably introduced in Greek times. In modern days, vast dams to store the water against the time of low Nile, and steam pumps (in Lower Egypt) to raise it, have changed the aspect of high Nile and revolutionized the system of irrigation; but for the smaller operations the old methods are still practised. The Nile had seven mouths, of which the western (the Canopic) and the eastern (the Pelusiac) were the most important. The former secured most of the traffic with Greece and the islands, the latter with the Phœnicians. The Pelusiac arm, on which Tahpanhes and Pi-beseth lay, would be best known to the inhabitants of Palestine. Now the ancient mouths are silted up; only a western (Rosetta branch) and a central one (Damietta branch) survive. The worship of the Nile-god must have been prominent in popular festivals, but has not left much monumental trace. The Nile was not one of the great gods, and his figure appears chiefly as emblematic of the river, e.g . bringing offerings to the gods; the figure is that of an obese man with water-plants on his head.
The Egyptians seem to have imagined a connexion of the Nile southwards with the Indian Ocean, and the priests taught the absurd notion that it gushed out north and south from two springs at the First Cataract. They also fancied a Nile in heaven producing rain, and another underground feeding the springs. The ‘seven lean years’ in Genesis is paralleled by an Egyptian tradition of a much earlier seven years’ famine under the 3rd Dyn., and years of famine due to insufficient rise of the Nile are referred to in more than one hieroglyphic text.
F. Ll. Griffith.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Nile
Although the Bible mentions the Nile River mainly in relation to Egypt (Genesis 41:17-19; Ezekiel 29:3), the river passes through many countries, among them Ethiopia (GNB: Sudan) (Isaiah 18:1-2). The length of the Nile is about 5,600 kilometres.
Very little rain fell in Egypt, with the result that the country depended almost entirely upon the Nile for its water supply. The fertility of its land also depended upon the Nile. Because of the silt left behind after the river’s annual flooding, otherwise barren land became usable (Isaiah 23:3; Isaiah 23:10; Amos 8:8; Amos 9:5).
Apart from the land that extended out a few kilometres on either side of the river, plus the land of the well watered delta region (together totalling less than one twentieth of Egypt’s entire land area), Egypt was a desert. In Egypt the failure of the Nile to flood was the equivalent of a drought in other countries. It ruined the farming, fishing and cotton industries, and created widespread unemployment (Genesis 41:1-3; Isaiah 19:5-10). Prophetic announcements of judgment on Egypt therefore often included graphic pictures of the drying up of the Nile (Ezekiel 29:1-10; Ezekiel 30:12; Zechariah 10:11). It seems that God used some of the physical characteristics of the Nile Valley in bringing the plagues on Egypt during the time of Moses (Exodus 7:14-25; Exodus 8; Exodus 9; Exodus 10; see PLAGUE).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nile
Not so named in the Bible; related to Sanskrit Νilah , "blue." The Nile has two names: the sacred name Ηapi , or Ηapi-mu , "the abyss of waters," Ηp-ro-mu , "the waters whose source is hidden"; and the common name Υeor Αor , Aur (Atur): both Egyptian names. Shihor , "the black river," is its other Bible name, Greek Μelas or Κmelas , Latin Μelo , darkened by the fertilizing soil which it deposits at its overflow (Jeremiah 2:18). The hieroglyphic name of Egypt is Κam , "black." Egyptians distinguished between Ηapi-res , the "southern Nile" of Upper Egypt, and Ηapi-meheet , the "northern Nile" of Lower Egypt. Ηapi-ur , "the high Nile," fertilizes the land; the Nile low brought famine. The Nile god is painted red to represent the inundation, but blue at other times. An impersonation of Noah (Osburn). Famine and plenty are truly represented as coming up out of the river in Pharaoh's dream (Genesis 41). Therefore they worshipped it, and the plague on its waters, was a judgment on that idolatry (Exodus 7:21; Psalms 105:29). (See EGYPT; EXODUS.)
The rise begins at the summer solstice; the flood is two months later, after the autumnal equinox, at its height pouring through cuttings in the banks which are higher than the rest of the soil and covering the valley, and lasting three months. (Amos 8:8; Amos 9:5; Isaiah 23:3). The appointed S.W. bound of Palestine (Joshua 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:5; 2 Chronicles 9:26; Genesis 15:18). 1 Kings 8:65 "stream" (nachal , not "river".) Its confluent is still called the Blue river; so Nilah means "darkblue," or "black." The plural "rivers" is used for the different mouths, branches, and canals of the Nile. The tributaries are further up than Egypt (Psalms 78:44; Exodus 7:18-20; Isaiah 7:18; Isaiah 19:6; Ezekiel 29:3; Ezekiel 30:12). "The stream (nachal ) of Egypt" seems distinct (Isaiah 27:12), now "wady el Arish" (where was the frontier city Rhino-corura) on the confines of Palestine and Egypt (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47, where for "river" should stand "stream," nachal) ).
Smith's Bible Dictionary suggests that nachal) is related to the Nile and is that river; but the distinctness with which nachal) is mentioned, and not as elsewhere Sihor, or "river," Υe'or , forbids the identification. "The rivers of Ethiopia" (Isaiah 18:1-2), Cush, are the Atbara, the Astapus or Blue river, between which two rivers Meroe (the Ethiopia meant in Isaiah 18) lies, and the Astaboras or White Nile; these rivers conjoin in the one Nile, and wash down the soil along their banks from Upper Egypt, and deposit it on Lower Egypt; compare "whose land (Upper Egypt) the rivers have spoiled" or "cut up" or "divided." The Nile is called "the sea" (Isaiah 19:5), for it looks a sea at the overflow; the Egyptians still call it El Bahr "the sea" (Nahum 3:8). Its length measured by its course is probably 3,700 miles, the longest in the world. Its bed is cut through layers of nummulitic limestone (of which the pyramids of Ghizeh are built, full of nummulites, which the Arabs call "Pharaoh's beans"), sandstone under that, breccia verde under that, azoic rocks still lower, with red granite and syenite rising through all the upper strata at the first cataract.
Sir Samuel Baker has traced its (the White Nile's) source up to the Tanganyika, Victoria, and Albert Nyanza lakes, filled with the melting snows from the mountains and the periodical equatorial heavy rains. The Hindus call its source Αmana , the name of a region N.E. of the Nyanza. The shorter confluent, the Blue river, is what brings down from the Abyssinian mountains the alluvial soil that fertilizes Egypt. The two join at Khartoom, the capital of Soodan, the black country under Egypt's rule. The Atbara falls into the main stream further N. The river thenceforth for 2,300 miles receives no tributary. Through the breaking down of a barrier at Silsilis or at the first cataract, the river is so much below the level of the valley in lower Nubia that it does not overflow on the land. On the confines of Upper Egypt it forms two cataracts, the lower near Syene. Thence it runs 500 miles onward. A short way below Cairo and the pyramids it parts into two branches, bounding the Delta E. and W. and falling into the Mediterranean. Always diffusing its waters, and never receiving any accession of water from sky or tributary, its volume at Cairo is but half what it is at the cataract of Syene.
The water is sweet, especially when turbid. Stagnant waters left by the overflow in Nubia's sandy flats are carried into the Nile by the new overflow, thus the water is at first a green shiny color and unwholesome for two or three days. Twelve days later it becomes red like blood, and is then most wholesome and refreshing; and all living beings, men, beasts, birds, fish, and insects are gladdened by its advent. Egypt having only a little rain (Zechariah 14:17-18) depends on the Nile for its harvests; see in Deuteronomy 11:10-12 the contrast to the promised land, where the husbandman has to look up to heaven for rain instead of looking down, irrigating the land. with watercourses turned by the foot as in Egypt (a type of the spiritual state of the two respectively), and where Jehovah's eyes are upon it from the beginning to the end of the year. The waters reach their lowest in nine months groin their highest point in the autumn equinox; they remain stationary for a few days and then begin to rise again.
If they reach no higher than 22 ft. at the island Rhoda, between Cairo and Ghizeh, where a nilometer is kept, the rise is insufficient; if 27, good; if more, the flood injures the crops, and plague and murrain ensue. The further S. one goes, the earlier the inundation begins; at Khartoom as early as April. The seven years' famine under Joseph is confirmed by the seven years' famine in the reign of Fatimee Khaleefeh El-Mustansir bi-'llah, owing to the failure of water. The universal irrigation maintained, even during the low season of the Nile, made the results of failure of its waters more disastrous then than now. The mean rise above the lowest level registered at Semne, near the second cataract, in Moeris' reign, 2000 B.C., was 62 ft. 6 inches, i.e. 23 ft. 10 inches above the present rise which is 38 ft. 8 inches (Lepsius in the Imperial Dictionary) The average rate of deposit in Egypt now is four and a half inches in the century.
But other causes were at work formerly; the danger of inferences as to man's antiquity from such data is amusingly illustrated by Homer's (Philippians Transac. 148) inference from pottery found at a great depth that man must have lived there in civilization 13,000 years ago, which Bunsen accepted! Unfortunately for the theory the Greek honeysuckle was found on some of it. The burnt brick still lower, on which he laid stress, was itself enough to have confuted him, for burnt brick was first introduced into Egypt under Rome (see Quarterly Revue, April, 1859). Champollion holds no Egyptian monument to be older than 2,200 B.C. In Upper Egypt bore yellow mountains, a few hundred feet high, and pierced with numerous tombs, bound the N. on both sides; this gives point to Israel's sneer, "because there were no graves in Egypt hast thou taken us away to die in the wilderness?" (Exodus 14:11).
In Lower Egypt the land spreads out on either side of the Nile in a plain bounded E. and W. by the desert. At the inundation the Nile rushes along in a mighty torrent, made to appear more violent by the waves which the N. wind, blowing continually then, raises up (Jeremiah 46:7-8). Two alone of the seven noted branches of the mouth (of which the Pelusiac was the most eastern) remain, the Damietta (Phanitic) and Rosetta (Bolbitine) mouths, originally artificial (Herodotus ii. 10), fulfilling Isaiah 19:5 and probably Isaiah 11:11-15; Ezekiel 30:12. The Nile in the numerous canals besides the river itself formerly "abounded with incredible numbers of all sorts of fish" (Diodorus Siculus i.; Numbers 11:5). These too, as foretold (Isaiah 19:8-10), have failed except about lake Menzaleh. So also the papyrus reeds, from whence paper receives its designation, flags, reeds, and the lotus with its fragrant and various colored flowers, have almost disappeared as foretold (Isaiah 19:6-7), the papyrus boats no more skim its surface (Isaiah 18:2).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nile River
(Nile) The major river considered the “life” of ancient Egypt. The Hebrew word usually used for the Nile in the Old Testament is y' or . This is in fact borrowed from the Egyptian word itrw or itr by which the Egyptians referred to the Nile and the branches and canals that led from it.
The Egyptian Nile is formed by the union of the White Nile which flows out of Lake Victoria in Tanzania and the Blue Nile from Lake Tana in Ethiopia. These join at Khartum in the Sudan and are later fed by the Atbara. Thereafter the Nile flows, 1675 miles northward to the Mediterranean Sea without any further tributary. In antiquity six cataracts or falls prevented navigation at various points. The first of these, going upstream, is found at Aswan, generally recognised as the southern boundary of Egypt. From Aswan northwards, the Nile flows between two lines of cliffs which sometimes come directly down to its edge but in other places are up to nine miles away. The shore land could be cultivated as far as Nile water could be brought. This cultivated area the Egyptians called the Black Land from the color of the rich soil. Beyond lay the Red Land of the low desert stretching to the foot of the cliffs. At the cliff tops was the great inhospitable desert where few Egyptians ventured. elow the modern capital, Cairo, and the nearby ancient capital, Memphis, the Nile forms a huge delta. The many ancient cities in this area now lie below the water table. Little archaeological excavation has been done here, though this is the area where the closest links with Palestine are likely to have been located. The eastern edge of the Delta is the site of the land of Goshen where Jacob/Israel and his descendents were settled. See Goshen .
The Nile is the basis of Egypt's wealth, indeed of its very life. It is the only river to flow northwards across the Sahara. Egypt was unique as an agricultural community in not being dependent on rainfall. The secret was the black silt deposited on the fields by the annual flood caused when the Blue Nile was swollen by the run-off from the winter rains in Ethiopia. This silt was remarkably fertile. Irrigation waters raised laboriously from the river, let the Egyptians produce many varieties of crops in large quantities (Numbers 11:5 ; Genesis 42:1-2 ). If the winter rains failed, the consequent small or nonexistent inundation resulted in disastrous famine: some are recorded as lasting over a number of years (compare Genesis 41:1 ).
Even today water is brought to the individual fields by small channels leading off the arterial ditches. These channels are closed off by earth dams which can be broken down with the foot when it is a particular farmer's turn to use the water. (See Deuteronomy 11:10 .) Since life was concentrated in the valley, the river was also a natural highway. All major journeys in Egypt were undertaken by boat helped by the current when traveling north or by the prevailing wind when headed south. The first of the ten plagues is often linked with conditions in the river at the peak of the flood season in August when large numbers of tiny organisms turn the water red and could make it foul and undrinkable. It would also kill off the fish which would decompose and infect the frogs (the second plague) leading to successive plagues of lice, flies, and pestilences. God may have used such natural conditions with His timing to plague Egypt. See Egypt ; Plagues .
John Ruffle
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nile
See RIVER OF EGYPT.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nile
the river of Egypt, whose fountain is in the Upper Ethiopia. After having watered several kingdoms, the Nile continues its course far into the kingdom of Goiam. Then it winds about again, from the east to the north. Having crossed several kingdoms and provinces, it falls into Egypt at the cataracts, which are waterfalls over steep rocks of the length of two hundred feet. At the bottom of these rocks the Nile returns to its usual pace, and thus flows through the valley of Egypt. Its channel, according to Villamont, is about a league broad. At eight miles below Grand Cairo, it is divided into two arms, which make a triangle, whose base is at the Mediterranean Sea, and which the Greeks call the Delta, because of its figure Δ . These two arms are divided into others, which discharge themselves into the Mediterranean, the distance of which from the top of the Delta is about twenty leagues. These branches of the Nile the ancients commonly reckoned to be seven. Ptolemy makes them nine, some only four, some eleven, some fourteen. Homer, Xenophon, and Diodorus Siculus testify, that the ancient name of this river was Egyptus; and the latter of these writers says, that it took the name Nilus only since the time of a king of Egypt called by that name. The Greeks gave it the name of Melas; and Diodorus Siculus observes, that the most ancient name by which the Grecians have known the Nile was Oceanus. The Egyptians paid divine honours to this river, and called it Jupiter Nilus.
Very little rain ever falls in Egypt, never sufficient to fertilize the land; and but for the provision of this bountiful river, the country would be condemned to perpetual sterility. As it is, from the joint operation of the regularity of the flood, the deposit of mud from the water of the river, and the warmth of the climate, it is the most fertile country in the world; the produce exceeding all calculation. It has in consequence been, in all ages, the granary of the east; and has on more than one occasion, an instance of which is recorded in the history of Joseph, saved the neighbouring countries from starvation. It is probable, that, while in these countries, on the occasion referred to, the seven years' famine was the result of the absence of rain, in Egypt it was brought about by the inundation being withheld: and the consternation of the Egyptians, at witnessing this phenomenon for seven successive years, may easily be conceived. The origin and course of the Nile being unknown to the ancients, its stream was held, and is still held by the natives, in the greatest veneration; and its periodical overflow was viewed with mysterious wonder. But both of these are now, from the discoveries of the moderns, better understood. It is now known, that the sources, or permanent springs, of the Nile are situated in the mountains of Abyssinia, and the unexplored regions to the west and south-west of that country; and that the occasional supplies, or causes of the inundation, are the periodical rains which fall in those districts. For a correct knowledge of these facts, and of the true position of the source of that branch of the river, which has generally been considered to be the continuation of the true Nile, we are indebted to our countryman, the intrepid and indefatigable Bruce. Although the Nile, by way of eminence, has been called "the river of Egypt," it must not be confounded with another stream so denominated in Scripture, an insignificant rivulet in comparison, which falls into the Mediterranean below Gaza.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nile
The celebrated river of Egypt. It takes this name only after the junction of the two great streams of which it is composed, namely, the Bahr el Abiad, or White River, which rises in the mountains of the Moon, in the interior of Africa, and runs northeast till it is joined by the other branch, the Bahr el Azrek, or Blue river, which rises in Abyssinia, and after a large circuit to the southeast and southwest, in which it passes through the lake of Dembea, flows northwards to join the White river. This Abyssinian branch has in modern times been regarded as the real Nile, although the White River is much the largest and longest, and was in ancient times considered as the true Nile. The junction takes place about latitude sixteen degrees north. From this point the Nile flows always in a northerly direction, with the exception of one large bend to the west. About thirteen hundred miles form the sea it receives its last branch, the Tacazze, a large stream from Abyssinia, and having passed through Nubia, it enters Egypt at the cataracts near Syene, or Essuan, which are formed by a chain of rocks stretching east and west. There are here three falls; after which the river pursues its course in still and silent majesty through the whole length of the land of Egypt. Its average breadth is about seven hundred yards. In Lower Egypt it divides into several branches and forms the celebrated Delta; for which see under EGYPT . See also a view of the river in AMMON, or NoAmmon, or No.
As rain very seldom falls, even in winter, in Southern Egypt, and usually only slight and infrequent showers in Lower Egypt, the whole physical and political existence of Egypt may be said to depend on the Nile; since without this river, and even without its regular annual inundation's, the whole land would be but a desert. These inundation's, so mysterious in the view of ancient ignorance and superstition, are caused by the regular periodical rains in the countries farther south, around the sources of the Nile, in March and later. The river begins to rise in Egypt about the middle of June, and continues to increase through the month of July. In August it overflows its banks, and reaches its highest point early in September; and the country is then mostly covered with its waters, Amos 8:8 9:5 Nahum 3:8 . In the beginning of October, the inundation still continues; and it is only towards the end of this month that the stream returns within its banks. From the middle of August till towards the end of October, the whole land of Egypt resembles a great lake or sea, in which the towns and cities appear as islands.
The cause of the fertility which the Nile imparts lies not only in its thus watering the land, but also in the thick slimy mud which its waters bring down along with them and deposit on the soil of Egypt. It is like a coat of rich manure; and the seed being immediately sown upon it, without digging or ploughing, springs up rapidly, grows with luxuriance, and ripens into abundance. See EGYPT .
It must not, however, be supposed that the Nile spreads itself over every spot of land, and waters it sufficiently without artificial aid. Niebuhr justly remarks, "Some descriptions of Egypt would lead us to think that the Nile, when it swells, lays the whole province under water. The lands immediately adjoining to the banks of the river are indeed laid under water, but the natural inequality of the ground hinders it from overflowing the interior country. A great part of the lands would therefore remain barren, were not canals and reservoirs formed to receive water from the river, when at its greatest height, which is thus conveyed everywhere through the fields, and reserved for watering them when occasion requires." In order to raise the water to grounds, which lie higher, machines have been used in Egypt from times immemorial. These are chiefly wheels to which buckets are attached. One kind is turned by oxen; another smaller kind, by men seated, and pushing the lower spokes from them with their feet, while they pulled the upper spokes towards them with their hands, Deuteronomy 11:10 .
As the inundations of the Nile are of so much importance to the whole land, structures have been erected on which the beginning and progress of its rise might be observed. These are called Nilometers; that is, "Nile measures." At present there is one, one thousand years old and half in ruins, on the little island opposite Cairo; it is under the care of the government, and according to it the beginning and subsequent progress of the rise of the Nile were carefully observed and proclaimed by authority. If the inundation reached the height of twenty-two Paris feet, a rich harvest was expected; because then all the fields had received the requisite irrigation. If it fell short of this height and in proportion as it thus fell short, the land was threatened with want and famine of which many horrible examples occur in Egyptian history. Should the rise of the water exceed twenty-eight Paris feet, a famine was in like manner feared. The annual rise of the river also varies exceedingly in different parts of its course, being twenty feet greater where the river is narrow than in Lower Egypt. The channel is thought to be gradually filling up; and many of the ancient outlets at the Delta are dry in summer and almost obliterated. The drying up of the waters of Egypt would involve its destruction as a habitable land to the destruction as a habitable land to the same extent; and this fact is recognized in the prophetic denunciations of this remarkable country, Isaiah 11:15 19:1-10 Ezekiel 29:10 30:12 .
The water of the Nile, although during a great part of the year turbid, from the effects of the rains above, yet furnishes, when purified by settling, the softest and sweetest water for drinking. Its excellence is acknowledged by all travelers. The Egyptians are full of its praises, and even worshipped the river as a god.
The Hebrews sometimes gave both to the Euphrates and the Nile the name of "sea," Isaiah 19:5 Nahum 3:8 . In this they are borne out by Arabic writers, and also by the common people of Egypt, who to this day commonly speak of the Nile as "the sea." It is also still celebrated for its fish. Compare Numbers 11:5 Isaiah 19:8 . In its waters are likewise found the crocodile or leviathan, and the hippopotamus or behemoth. See EGYPT , and SIHOR .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Nile
(blue, dark ), the great river of Egypt. The word Nile nowhere occurs in the Authorized Version but it is spoken of under the names of Sihor [1] and the "river of Egypt." (Genesis 15:18 ) We cannot as yet determine the length of the Nile, although recent discoveries have narrowed the question. There is scarcely a doubt that its largest confluent is fed by the great lakes on and south of the equator. It has been traced upward for about 2700 miles, measured by its course, not in a direct line, and its extent is probably over 1000 miles more. (The course of the river has been traced for 3300 miles. For the first 1800 miles (McClintock and Strong say 2300) from its mouth it receives no tributary; but at Kartoom, the capital of Nubia, is the junction of the two great branches, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, so called from the color of the clay which tinges their waters. The Blue Nile rises in the mountains of Abyssinia and is the chief source of the deposit which the Nile brings to Egypt. The White Nile is the larger branch. Late travellers have found its source in Lake Victoria Nyanza, three degrees south of the equator. From this lake to the mouth of the Nile the distance Isaiah 2300 miles in a straight line --one eleventh the circumference of the globe. From the First Cataract, at Syene, the river flows smoothly at the rate of two or three miles an hour with a width of half a mile. to Cairo. A little north of Cairo it divides into two branches, one flowing to Rosetta and the other to Damietta, from which place the mouths are named. See Bartlett's "Egypt and Palestine," 1879. The great peculiarity of the river is its annual overflow, caused by the periodical tropical rains. "With wonderful clock-like regularity the river begins to swell about the end of June, rises 24 feet at Cairo between the 20th and 30th of September and falls as much by the middle of May. Six feet higher than this is devastation; six feet lower is destitution." -- Bartlett . So that the Nile increases one hundred days and decreases one hundred days, and the culmination scarcely varies three days from September 25 the autumnal equinox. Thus "Egypt is the gift of the Nile." As to the cause of the years of plenty and of famine in the time of Joseph, Mr. Osburn, in his "Monumental History of Egypt," thinks that the cause of the seven years of plenty was the bursting of the barriers (and gradually wearing them away) of "the great lake of Ethiopia," which once existed on the upper Nile, thus bringing more water and more sediment to lower Egypt for those years. And he shows how this same destruction of this immense sea would cause the absorption of the waters of the Nile over its dry bed for several years after thus causing the famine. There is another instance of a seven-years famine-A.D. 1064-1071.--ED.) The great difference between the Nile of Egypt in the present day and in ancient times is caused by the failure of some of its branches and the ceasing of some of its chief vegetable products; and the chief change in the aspect of the cultivable land, as dependent on the Nile, is the result of the ruin of the fish-pools and their conduits and the consequent decline of the fisheries. The river was famous for its seven branches, and under the Roman dominion eleven were counted, of which, however, there were but seven principal ones. The monuments and the narratives of ancient writers show us in the Nile of Egypt in old times a stream bordered By flags and reeds, the covert of abundant wild fowl, and bearing on its waters the fragrant flowers of the various-colored lotus. Now in Egypt scarcely any reeds or waterplants --the famous papyrus being nearly, if not quite extinct, and the lotus almost unknown--are to he seen, excepting in the marshes near the Mediterranean. Of old the great river must have shown a more fair and busy scene than now. Boats of many kinds were ever passing along it, by the painted walls of temples and the gardens that extended around the light summer pavilions, from the pleasure,valley, with one great square sail in pattern and many oars, to the little papyrus skiff dancing on the water and carrying the seekers of pleasure where they could shoot with arrows or knock down with the throw-stick the wild fowl that abounded among the reeds, or engage in the dangerous chase of the hippopotamus or the crocodile. The Nile is constantly before us in the history of Israel in Egypt.

Sentence search

Nile - Although the Bible mentions the Nile River mainly in relation to Egypt (Genesis 41:17-19; Ezekiel 29:3), the river passes through many countries, among them Ethiopia (GNB: Sudan) (Isaiah 18:1-2). The length of the Nile is about 5,600 kilometres. ...
Very little rain fell in Egypt, with the result that the country depended almost entirely upon the Nile for its water supply. The fertility of its land also depended upon the Nile. In Egypt the failure of the Nile to flood was the equivalent of a drought in other countries. Prophetic announcements of judgment on Egypt therefore often included graphic pictures of the drying up of the Nile (Ezekiel 29:1-10; Ezekiel 30:12; Zechariah 10:11). It seems that God used some of the physical characteristics of the Nile Valley in bringing the plagues on Egypt during the time of Moses (Exodus 7:14-25; Exodus 8; Exodus 9; Exodus 10; see PLAGUE)
Sihor - Black or turbid, the Nile. In Isaiah 23:3 and Jeremiah 2:18 , this name must necessarily be understood of the Nile
Sihor - Black; trouble (the river Nile)
Bolty - ) An edible fish of the Nile (genus Chromis)
si'Hor - (dark ), accurately Shi'hor, once The Shihor, or Shihor of Egypt, when unqualified a name of the Nile. " In Jeremiah the identity of Shihor with the Nile seems distinctly stated
Naphtuhim - The Naphtuhim were most likely residents of the Nile delta or else inhabitants of the oases to the west of the Nile Valley
Pithom - This is probably the Pathumos mentioned by Herodotus, which he places near Pi-beseth and the Pelusiac arm of the Nile, not far from the canal made by the kings Necho and Darius to join the Red Sea with the Nile
Nile - Nile, blue, dark. The word "Nile" does not occur in the A. reads "Nile;" Jeremiah 2:18; Jeremiah 46:7-8, E. "Nile;" 1 Chronicles 13:5. margin, "Nile," Genesis 41:1; Exodus 1:22; Exodus 2:3; Exodus 2:5, and the "flood of Egypt," R. In the plural form this word yeor, rendered "river," frequently refers to the branches and canals of the Nile. The Nile is not named in the New Testament As rain seldom falls in Egypt proper, the fertility of the country is entirely dependent upon the annual rise of the Nile. The successive years of famine in the days of Joseph were doubtless due to a deficient overflow of the Nile for those years. To this day the Nile is lined for hundreds of miles with these shadoofs, worked by men, women, and children, who lift the water out of the river to Irrigate their fields. The ancient Egyptians worshipped the river Nile as a god. Two of the ten plagues sent upon Pharaoh and Egypt before the departure of the Israelites were turning the water of the Nile into blood and bringing forth frogs from the river
Nile - Nile. The Egyptian name was Hopi , later Yer-‘o , ‘Great River,’ but the Hebrew generally designates the Nile by the plain Egyptian word for ‘river,’ Ye’ôr . The Nile was rich in fish, and the home of the crocodile and hippopotamus. The White Nile sends down from the Central African lakes a steady stream, which is greatly increased in summer and autumn, when the half-dry beds of the Bahr el-Azrek and the Atbara are filled by the torrential rains annually poured on the mountains of Abyssinia. The height of the Nile rise was measured and recorded by the Egyptians from the earliest times: on it depended almost wholly the harvest of the year, and a great excess might be as harmful as a deficiency. In modern days, vast dams to store the water against the time of low Nile, and steam pumps (in Lower Egypt) to raise it, have changed the aspect of high Nile and revolutionized the system of irrigation; but for the smaller operations the old methods are still practised. The Nile had seven mouths, of which the western (the Canopic) and the eastern (the Pelusiac) were the most important. The worship of the Nile-god must have been prominent in popular festivals, but has not left much monumental trace. The Nile was not one of the great gods, and his figure appears chiefly as emblematic of the river, e. ...
The Egyptians seem to have imagined a connexion of the Nile southwards with the Indian Ocean, and the priests taught the absurd notion that it gushed out north and south from two springs at the First Cataract. They also fancied a Nile in heaven producing rain, and another underground feeding the springs. , and years of famine due to insufficient rise of the Nile are referred to in more than one hieroglyphic text
River of Egypt - (1) Νehar Μitsraim (Genesis 15:18); "the Nile". ...
(2) Νahal Μitsaim (Numbers 34:5; Joshua 15:3-4; Joshua 15:47; 1 Kings 8:65; 2 Kings 24:7); "the torrent of Egypt": see above nahal , "a stream flowing rapidly in the rainy season, then drying up", inapplicable to the sluggish Nile ever flowing. The Rhinocorura or Rhinocolora (so Septuagint of Isaiah 27:12) on the sea coast, a wady and torrent running into the sea two or three days' journey from the nearest branch of the Nile. The Nile was not "before" (i. Shihor, "the black river," is the Nile's designation in Deuteronomy 23:3; Jeremiah 2:18
Dahabeah - ) A Nile boat constructed on the model of a floating house, having large lateen sails
Nile - The word Nile nowhere occurs in the Authorized Version but it is spoken of under the names of Sihor [1] and the "river of Egypt. " (Genesis 15:18 ) We cannot as yet determine the length of the Nile, although recent discoveries have narrowed the question. For the first 1800 miles (McClintock and Strong say 2300) from its mouth it receives no tributary; but at Kartoom, the capital of Nubia, is the junction of the two great branches, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, so called from the color of the clay which tinges their waters. The Blue Nile rises in the mountains of Abyssinia and is the chief source of the deposit which the Nile brings to Egypt. The White Nile is the larger branch. From this lake to the mouth of the Nile the distance Isaiah 2300 miles in a straight line --one eleventh the circumference of the globe. So that the Nile increases one hundred days and decreases one hundred days, and the culmination scarcely varies three days from September 25 the autumnal equinox. Thus "Egypt is the gift of the Nile. Osburn, in his "Monumental History of Egypt," thinks that the cause of the seven years of plenty was the bursting of the barriers (and gradually wearing them away) of "the great lake of Ethiopia," which once existed on the upper Nile, thus bringing more water and more sediment to lower Egypt for those years. And he shows how this same destruction of this immense sea would cause the absorption of the waters of the Nile over its dry bed for several years after thus causing the famine. ) The great difference between the Nile of Egypt in the present day and in ancient times is caused by the failure of some of its branches and the ceasing of some of its chief vegetable products; and the chief change in the aspect of the cultivable land, as dependent on the Nile, is the result of the ruin of the fish-pools and their conduits and the consequent decline of the fisheries. The monuments and the narratives of ancient writers show us in the Nile of Egypt in old times a stream bordered By flags and reeds, the covert of abundant wild fowl, and bearing on its waters the fragrant flowers of the various-colored lotus. The Nile is constantly before us in the history of Israel in Egypt
Shihor - (See SIHOR; Nile
Bayatte - ) A large, edible, siluroid fish of the Nile, of two species (Bagrina bayad and B
Binny - ) A large species of barbel (Barbus bynni), found in the Nile, and much esteemed for food
Water Lizard - Any aquatic lizard of the genus Varanus, as the monitor of the Nile
Shadoof - ) A machine, resembling a well sweep, used in Egypt for raising water from the Nile for irrigation
Nile River - (Nile) The major river considered the “life” of ancient Egypt. The Hebrew word usually used for the Nile in the Old Testament is y' or . This is in fact borrowed from the Egyptian word itrw or itr by which the Egyptians referred to the Nile and the branches and canals that led from it. ...
The Egyptian Nile is formed by the union of the White Nile which flows out of Lake Victoria in Tanzania and the Blue Nile from Lake Tana in Ethiopia. Thereafter the Nile flows, 1675 miles northward to the Mediterranean Sea without any further tributary. From Aswan northwards, the Nile flows between two lines of cliffs which sometimes come directly down to its edge but in other places are up to nine miles away. The shore land could be cultivated as far as Nile water could be brought. elow the modern capital, Cairo, and the nearby ancient capital, Memphis, the Nile forms a huge delta. ...
The Nile is the basis of Egypt's wealth, indeed of its very life. The secret was the black silt deposited on the fields by the annual flood caused when the Blue Nile was swollen by the run-off from the winter rains in Ethiopia
Hanes - A city of Egypt, Isaiah 30:4 , thought to be the modern Ehnes, in middle Egypt on the Nile
Batyah - Daughter of Pharaoh, saved Baby Moses when she saw him floating in the Nile and raised him as her own
Pelusiac - ) Of or pertaining to Pelusium, an ancient city of Egypt; as, the Pelusiac (or former eastern) outlet of the Nile
Bithiah - (Pharaoh's Daughter): Daughter of Pharaoh, saved Baby Moses when she saw him floating in the Nile and raised him as her own
pi-Hahiroth - The isthmus has been formed by the Nile deposits. This increase of deposit still goes on, and so rapidly that within the last fifty years the mouth of the Nile has advanced northward about four geographical miles. ) the mouths of the Nile are forty miles further south than at present
Ponds - Pools, left by the retiring of the river Nile, or formed by artificial means
Barrage - ) An artificial bar or obstruction placed in a river or water course to increase the depth of water; as, the barrages of the Nile
Shihor - In Isaiah 23:3 ; Jeremiah 2:18 , the term apparently refers to one of the branches of the Nile River inside Egypt, but the border point places it outside Egypt, identical with the Brook of Egypt or extending Israel's claim to the Nile
Ark of Bulrushes - It was made of bulrushes, or rather paper-reeds or papyrus which grew in the river Nile. Some of the heathen writers speak of the papyrus-woven craft of the Nile
Shihor of Egypt - " Not the Nile, which is called "the river" (haeor ; Genesis 41:1; Genesis 41:3; Exodus 1:22), and flowed not before but through the middle of Egypt. In Isaiah 23:3; Jeremiah 2:18; Sihor means the "Nile"
Canals - Translation of a Hebrew word that refers to the branches of the Nile river (Exodus 7:19 ; Exodus 8:5 ; Isaiah 19:6 )
Pond - The ponds of Egypt, (Exodus 7:19 ; 13:5 ) were doubtless water left by the inundation of the Nile
Goshen - The land of Goshen lay along the most easterly branch of the Nile, and on the east side of it; for it is evident that, at the time of the exode, the Israelites did not cross the Nile. In ancient times, the fertile land was considerably more extensive, both in length and breadth, than at present, in consequence of the general failure of the eastern branches of the Nile; the main body of the river verging more and more to the west continually, and deepening the channels on that side
Copts - ) The principal sect of Christians in Egypt and the valley of the Nile
Syene - A city on the southern frontiers of Egypt, towards Ethiopia, between Thebes and the cataracts of the Nile, and now called Assouan. Pliny says it stands in a peninsula on the eastern shore of the Nile; that is was mile in circumference, and had a Rome garrison
Serapis - ) An Egyptian deity, at first a symbol of the Nile, and so of fertility; later, one of the divinities of the lower world
Shoebill - It inhabits the valley of the White Nile
Lates - ) A genus of large percoid fishes, of which one species (Lates Niloticus) inhabits the Nile, and another (L
Flag - sûph ( Exodus 2:3 ; Exodus 2:6 , Isaiah 19:6 ), sedgy plants by the Nile and its canals
Rivet - ) A monkey of the upper Nile and Abyssinia (Cercopithecus griseo-viridis), having the upper parts dull green, the lower parts white, the hands, ears, and face black
Rivet - ) A monkey of the upper Nile and Abyssinia (Cercopithecus griseo-viridis), having the upper parts dull green, the lower parts white, the hands, ears, and face black
Nile - It consists of two rivers, the White Nile, which takes its rise in the Victoria Nyanza, and the Blue Nile, which rises in the Abyssinian Mountains
Sihor - This refers to the river Nile. In Jeremiah 2:18 Israel is warned against seeking the waters of the Nile; that is, trusting in Egypt instead of in God: cf
Nile - This Abyssinian branch has in modern times been regarded as the real Nile, although the White River is much the largest and longest, and was in ancient times considered as the true Nile. From this point the Nile flows always in a northerly direction, with the exception of one large bend to the west. ...
As rain very seldom falls, even in winter, in Southern Egypt, and usually only slight and infrequent showers in Lower Egypt, the whole physical and political existence of Egypt may be said to depend on the Nile; since without this river, and even without its regular annual inundation's, the whole land would be but a desert. These inundation's, so mysterious in the view of ancient ignorance and superstition, are caused by the regular periodical rains in the countries farther south, around the sources of the Nile, in March and later. ...
The cause of the fertility which the Nile imparts lies not only in its thus watering the land, but also in the thick slimy mud which its waters bring down along with them and deposit on the soil of Egypt. ...
It must not, however, be supposed that the Nile spreads itself over every spot of land, and waters it sufficiently without artificial aid. Niebuhr justly remarks, "Some descriptions of Egypt would lead us to think that the Nile, when it swells, lays the whole province under water. ...
As the inundations of the Nile are of so much importance to the whole land, structures have been erected on which the beginning and progress of its rise might be observed. These are called Nilometers; that is, "Nile measures. " At present there is one, one thousand years old and half in ruins, on the little island opposite Cairo; it is under the care of the government, and according to it the beginning and subsequent progress of the rise of the Nile were carefully observed and proclaimed by authority. ...
The water of the Nile, although during a great part of the year turbid, from the effects of the rains above, yet furnishes, when purified by settling, the softest and sweetest water for drinking. ...
The Hebrews sometimes gave both to the Euphrates and the Nile the name of "sea," Isaiah 19:5 Nahum 3:8 . In this they are borne out by Arabic writers, and also by the common people of Egypt, who to this day commonly speak of the Nile as "the sea
Rameses - The exact location is uncertain, although it appears to have been in the Nile delta and may be the same as Tanis or Zoan. Rameses accommodated seagoing vessels from the Mediterranean Sea and river traffic from the Nile
River of Egypt -
The Nile. (Genesis 15:18 ) [1] ...
A desert stream on the border of Egypt, still occasionally flowing in the valley called Wadi-l-'Areesh
Pul (1) - Philae, an island in the Nile, the border between Egypt and Ethiopia (Bochart)
Chameleon, - The reference in (Leviticus 11:30 ) is to some kind of an unclean animal, supposed to be the lizard, known by the name of the "monitor of the Nile," a large, strong reptile common in Egypt and other parts of Africa
Nile - After having watered several kingdoms, the Nile continues its course far into the kingdom of Goiam. At the bottom of these rocks the Nile returns to its usual pace, and thus flows through the valley of Egypt. These branches of the Nile the ancients commonly reckoned to be seven. The Greeks gave it the name of Melas; and Diodorus Siculus observes, that the most ancient name by which the Grecians have known the Nile was Oceanus. The origin and course of the Nile being unknown to the ancients, its stream was held, and is still held by the natives, in the greatest veneration; and its periodical overflow was viewed with mysterious wonder. It is now known, that the sources, or permanent springs, of the Nile are situated in the mountains of Abyssinia, and the unexplored regions to the west and south-west of that country; and that the occasional supplies, or causes of the inundation, are the periodical rains which fall in those districts. For a correct knowledge of these facts, and of the true position of the source of that branch of the river, which has generally been considered to be the continuation of the true Nile, we are indebted to our countryman, the intrepid and indefatigable Bruce. Although the Nile, by way of eminence, has been called "the river of Egypt," it must not be confounded with another stream so denominated in Scripture, an insignificant rivulet in comparison, which falls into the Mediterranean below Gaza
Flag - suph , a weed that grows on the banks of the Nile, among which Moses in the ark was laid
Shihor - SHIHOR in Isaiah 23:3 , Jeremiah 2:18 seems to mean Egypt (?), the Nile (?), or the waters of Egypt: in 1 Chronicles 13:5 , Joshua 13:3 , it is the S. name of a stream or canal, possibly the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, on or near the eastern border of Egypt (see Shur)
Thebes - The city of Thebes was situated on the Nile River, over five hundred kilometres from its mouth. ...
One reason for Thebes’ lengthy supremacy was the strong defence that the Nile River provided against enemy invasion
Pelusium - (peh' lew ssih uhm) Egyptian military outpost near the mouth of the easternmost branch of the Nile, about eighteen miles west of the Suez Canal, identified with modern el Farama. Sais was located on the westernmost branch of the Nile
Pyramids - ...
The most well known of these artificial mountains rises majestically on the edge of the Nile near Cairo (at Giza). Although not as grand, pyramids were constructed at various other places along the Nile including the distinctive “Bent Pyramid” at Dashur. They actually act as focal points for a whole complex of buildings including a funerary temple, a causeway to a valley building near the Nile, and buried barges to carry the deceased to his eternal abode
Sea - The Arabians and orientals in general frequently gave the name of sea to great rivers, as the Nile, the Euphrates, the Tigris, and others, which, by their magnitude, and by the extent of their overflowings, seemed as little seas, or great lakes. In Isaiah 11:15 , these words particularly apply to the Nile at the Delta
Rame'Ses, - (Exodus 1:11 ) (It was probably the capital of Goshen and situated in the valley of the Pelusiac mouth of the Nile. Brugsch thinks that it was at Zoan-Tanis, the modern San, on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, and that it was built or enlarged by Rameses II and made his capital
Nile - " The Nile has two names: the sacred name Ηapi , or Ηapi-mu , "the abyss of waters," Ηp-ro-mu , "the waters whose source is hidden"; and the common name Υeor Αor , Aur (Atur): both Egyptian names. " Egyptians distinguished between Ηapi-res , the "southern Nile" of Upper Egypt, and Ηapi-meheet , the "northern Nile" of Lower Egypt. Ηapi-ur , "the high Nile," fertilizes the land; the Nile low brought famine. The Nile god is painted red to represent the inundation, but blue at other times. " The plural "rivers" is used for the different mouths, branches, and canals of the Nile. ...
Smith's Bible Dictionary suggests that nachal) is related to the Nile and is that river; but the distinctness with which nachal) is mentioned, and not as elsewhere Sihor, or "river," Υe'or , forbids the identification. "The rivers of Ethiopia" (Isaiah 18:1-2), Cush, are the Atbara, the Astapus or Blue river, between which two rivers Meroe (the Ethiopia meant in Isaiah 18) lies, and the Astaboras or White Nile; these rivers conjoin in the one Nile, and wash down the soil along their banks from Upper Egypt, and deposit it on Lower Egypt; compare "whose land (Upper Egypt) the rivers have spoiled" or "cut up" or "divided. " The Nile is called "the sea" (Isaiah 19:5), for it looks a sea at the overflow; the Egyptians still call it El Bahr "the sea" (Nahum 3:8). ...
Sir Samuel Baker has traced its (the White Nile's) source up to the Tanganyika, Victoria, and Albert Nyanza lakes, filled with the melting snows from the mountains and the periodical equatorial heavy rains. Stagnant waters left by the overflow in Nubia's sandy flats are carried into the Nile by the new overflow, thus the water is at first a green shiny color and unwholesome for two or three days. Egypt having only a little rain (Zechariah 14:17-18) depends on the Nile for its harvests; see in Deuteronomy 11:10-12 the contrast to the promised land, where the husbandman has to look up to heaven for rain instead of looking down, irrigating the land. The universal irrigation maintained, even during the low season of the Nile, made the results of failure of its waters more disastrous then than now. ...
In Lower Egypt the land spreads out on either side of the Nile in a plain bounded E. At the inundation the Nile rushes along in a mighty torrent, made to appear more violent by the waves which the N. The Nile in the numerous canals besides the river itself formerly "abounded with incredible numbers of all sorts of fish" (Diodorus Siculus i
Syene - Opening (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ), a town of Egypt, on the borders of Ethiopia, now called Assouan, on the right bank of the Nile, notable for its quarries of beautiful red granite called "syenite
Rosetta Stone - The name stems from the site of the stone's discovery in the Nile delta in 1799
Paper, Paper Reeds - The paper reeds, aroth, were the papyrus, much of which grew in the Nile, and of which paper was made
pi'Thom - 1 159), a town on the borders of Egypt, nest which Necho constructed a canal from the Nile to the Arabian Gulf
pi-be'Seth, - It was situated on the west bank of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, about 40 miles front Memphis
Nubians - (nyoo' bih uhnss) Residents of an ancient kingdom along the Nile river in southern Egypt and northern Sudan (Daniel 11:43 , NIV; also NRSV margin)
River - The three principal rivers referred to in scripture are the Nile, the Jordan, and the Euphrates. The word employed for the Nile is yeor, 'a fosse or channel'; for the Jordan and the Euphrates the word used is nahar, 'a river' always supplied with water
Baal-Zephon - Some suggest tell Defenneh known in Egypt as Tahpanhes in the eastern Nile delta
Sin - It is close to the Pelusiac mouth of the Nile, about 31 4' N, 32 28' E
Ere - ...
Our fruitful Nile ...
Flow'd ere the wonted season
Cush - The country peopled by Cush or the Ethiopians, Genesis 10:6, lying to the south of Egypt, on the upper Nile, and possibly extending its rule into southern Arabia
Sin - It is close to the Pelusiac mouth of the Nile, about 31 4' N, 32 28' E
Paper - The expression in the Authorized Version (Isaiah 19:7 ), "the paper reeds by the brooks," is in the Revised Version more correctly "the meadows by the Nile. " The words undoubtedly refer to a grassy place on the banks of the Nile fit for pasturage
Flood - Sometimes a particular river is meant, the Euphrates, the Nile, or the Jordan. (2) The Nile in Psalms 78:44 , Amos 8:8 to Amos 9:5 , Jeremiah 46:7-8
Sihor - (Correctly Shi'hor) black; dark the name given to the river Nile in Isaiah 23:3 ; Jeremiah 2:18
Naphtuhim - Others identify this word with Napata, the name of the city and territory on the southern frontier of Mizraim, the modern Meroe, at the great bend of the Nile at Soudan
Brook - Yeor, the Nile canals, Isaiah 19:6-8; Isaiah 23:3; Isaiah 23:10, but general in Daniel 12:5-7
Hanes - of the Nile in central Egypt
Hippopotamus - The river-horse, an animal that inhabits the Nile and other rivers in Africa
e'Gypt - It is divided into upper Egypt --the valley of the Nile --and lower Egypt, the plain of the Delta, from the Greek letter; it is formed by the branching mouths of the Nile, and the Mediterranean Sea. The portions made fertile by the Nile comprise about 9582 square geographical miles, of which only about 5600 is under cultivation. The inundation of the Nile fertilizes and sustains the country, and makes the river its chief blessing. The Nile was on this account anciently worshipped
Erech - of the Nile Canal
pi-Beseth - The ruins of Pi-beseth, on the eastern arm of the Nile near the ancient canal to Suez, consist of extensive mounds of bricks and broken pottery, Ezekiel 30:17
Irrigation - For purposes of irrigation, water was raised from streams or pools by water-wheels, or by a shaduf, commonly used on the banks of the Nile to the present day
Bulrush - "Vessels of bulrushes," light canoes of papyrus of the Nile, daubed over with pitch; derived from gaamah , "to absorb. In Exodus 2:3; Isaiah 18:2, it means the papyrus of which the Egyptians made light boats for the Nile; the same Hebrew (gomeh ) is translated rush (Job 8:11; Isaiah 35:7)
Anthony, Saint - Later he withdrew to Der el Memun, a mountain on the east bank of the Nile, and lived there in solitude for 20 years. He again retired to the desert lying between the Nile and the Red Sea and lived for 45 years on the mountain where stands the monastery named for him, Der Mar Antonios
Equatorial Nile, Central Africa, Prefecture Aposto - The prefecture apostolic of Equatorial Nile, Central Africa was established June 12, 1923; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Lubim - of the Nile delta
Melon - Cultivated on the Nile banks after the inundation from May to July
Pihahiroth - ” Pihahiroth lay in the eastern Nile delta to the east of Baal-zephon
Gulu, Uganda, Archdiocese of - The prefecture apostolic of Equatorial Nile, Central Africa was established June 12, 1923; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Pachomius, Saint - Represented in hermit's garb, or crossing the Nile on the back of a crocodile
Bulrush - It was of this that the ark was made in which the infant Moses was put, Exodus 2:3 , and the smaller boats on the Nile
Pibeseth - Judged to be the city Bubastis on the west bank of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile
Bulrush - (or papyrus), a red growing in the shallow water on the banks of the Nile
River of Egypt - Here the word is nahar, and would seem to allude to the most eastern branch of the Delta of the Nile, called the Pelusiac mouth
Ethiopians - In earlier days Napata, a town on the Nile, somewhat north or Meroë, which was likewise on the Nile, had been the capital; but though Napata still retained some of its prestige as the sacred city, yet the seat of government had been removed to Meroë
Brook - ...
In Isaiah 19:7 the river Nile is meant, as rendered in the Revised Version
Bay - The same Hebrew word is rendered "tongue" in Isaiah 11:15 , where it is used with reference to the forked mouths of the Nile
Phibeseth - Bastet (Greek Boubastos ) was located on the right shore of the old Tanite branch of the Nile about forty-five miles northeast of Cairo
Tel-el-Amarna - ) A station on the Nile, midway between Thebes and Memphis, forming the site of the capital of Amenophis IV
Lice - These parasitic insects are still a pest in the Nile valley
Raamses - It is thought to have been on the line of the ancient canal from the Nile to the Red sea, and some thirty-five miles northwest of Suez
Flag - " It probably denotes the sedge, or long grass, which grows in the meadows of the Nile, very grateful to the cattle. '" Thus, Parkhurst defines it "a species of plant, sedge, or reed, so called from its fitness for making ropes, or the like, to connect or join things together; as the Latin juncus, a ‘bulrush,' a jungendo, from ‘joining,' for the same reason;" and he supposes that it is the plant, or reed, growing near the Nile, which Hasselquist describes as having numerous narrow leaves, and growing about eleven feet high, of the leaves of which the Egyptians make ropes. Geddes says there is little doubt of its being the sedge called sari, which, as we learn from Theophrastus and Pliny, grows on the marshy banks of the Nile, and rises to the height of almost two cubits
Naphtuhim - of the Nile
Shihor Libnath - "Shihor" is not confined to the Nile exclusively
Lily - In biblical usage, any of a number of distinctive flowers ranging from the lotus of the Nile (1 Kings 7:19 ) to wild field flowers in Palestine (Matthew 6:28 )
Raamses, Rameses - District in Goshen in Lower Egypt, east of the Nile, in which Jacob and his descendants were placed, and in which they built a treasure city of the same name for Pharaoh
Way, Sudan, Diocese of - Comprises the territory bounded North by 10 degrees latitude, East by the Anglo-Ethiopian frontier, West by the Anglo-Belgian frontier, South by the White Nile and Lake Albert; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Bahr-el-Gazal, Sudanese Africa, Vicariate Apostoli - Comprises the territory bounded North by 10 degrees latitude, East by the Anglo-Ethiopian frontier, West by the Anglo-Belgian frontier, South by the White Nile and Lake Albert; entrusted to the Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona
Africa - By far the most frequent mention of Africa in the Bible has to do with Egypt (see EGYPT; GOSHEN; Nile)
World: a Huge Desert - Living in the midst of the church of God is like sailing down the Nile in a boat
Flag - , or rather Egyptian, ahu, Job 8:11 ), rendered "meadow" in Genesis 41:2,18 ; probably the Cyperus esculentus, a species of rush eaten by cattle, the Nile reed
Noph - It was one of the most ancient and important cities of Egypt, and stood a little to the south of the modern Cairo, on the western bank of the Nile
Chameleon - Kuebel makes it "the croaking frog"; Gesenius, "the Nile lizard
Delta - ) A tract of land shaped like the letter delta (/), especially when the land is alluvial and inclosed between two or more mouths of a river; as, the delta of the Ganges, of the Nile, or of the Mississippi
River - The Hebrews give the name of "the river," without any addition, sometimes to the Nile, sometimes to the Euphrates, and sometimes to Jordan
Zoan - A very ancient city of Lower Egypt, Numbers 13:22 , on the east side of the Tanitic arm of the Nile, and called by the Greeks Tanis, now San
no - This is the scripture name of THEBES,a noted city in Egypt, built on both sides of the river Nile, having a hundred gates, situate about 25 46' N. Its position is alluded to in Nahum 3:8-10 , where the Nile is called 'the sea,' and 'the rivers' refer to the canals
no-a'Mon - (It lay on both sides of the Nile, and was celebrated for its hundred gates, for its temples, obelisks, statues. It was emphatically the city of temples, in the ruins of which many monuments of ancient Egypt are preserved, The plan of the city was a parallelogram, two miles from north to south and four from east to west, but none suppose that in its glory if really extended 33 miles along both aides of the Nile
Goshen - , the Delta and the Tanitic branch of the Nile on W. ...
The fresh water canal runs through it from the Nile to Ismailia. ...
Pharaoh calls Goshen "the best of the land" (Genesis 47:5-11), namely, for a pastoral people as Israel; for in tillage the parts of Egypt next the Nile are more fertile than Goshen. from Rameses (on the old canal from the Tanitic arm of the Nile to lake Timsah) 30 miles direct to the ancient western shore
Ethiopia - In a stricter sense the kingdom of Meroe from the junction of the Blue and the White Nile to the border of Egypt. Compare Jeremiah 13:23, "can the Ethiopian change his skin?" "The rivers of Ethiopia" (Zephaniah 3:10) are the two branches of the Nile and the Astabbras (Tacazze). The Nile forms a series of cataracts here. ...
Queen Candace reigned in this Nile-formed is land region; the name is the official designation of a female dynasty shortly before our Lord's time (Acts 8:27). The "vessels of bulrushes" or papyrus boats are peculiarly suited to the Upper Nile, as being capable of carriage on the shoulders at the rocks and cataracts. was gathered for transport either by the Nile or by caravans to northern Africa; compare Isaiah 45:14
Zoan - (zohuhn) Hebrew name for Egyptian city of Tanis located at San el-Hagar on the Tanitic arm of the Nile
Whale - In Ezekiel 32:2 , referring to Egypt and the Nile, it doubtless means the crocodile; as also in Psalm 74:13 ; Isaiah 27:1 ; 51:9 ; Ezekiel 29:3 , where it is translated "dragon
Gihon - ) The Septuagint, Jeremiah 2:18, identify it with the Nile; but the writer of Genesis, so well acquainted with Egypt, would never have connected the Nile with the Euphrates. The Cush which the Gihon "compassed" was the Asiatic not the African Cush (Genesis 10:7-10); The Septuagint being Alexandrian Jews, to glorify their adopted country, made the Nile one of the rivers of paradise
River of Egypt - nahar mitsraim, denotes in Genesis 15:18 the Nile, or its eastern branch ( 2 Chronicles 9:26 )
Crocodile - The best known species is that of the Nile (C
Papyrus - A plant growing along the Nile in Egypt during biblical times
Hanes - Hanes has often been located at Heracleopolis Magna in southern Egypt just north of the Nile Delta, modern Ahnas
Meadow - At Genesis 41:2 ,Genesis 41:2,41:18 , the reference is clearly to stretches of reed grass or papyrus thickets common along the Nile
Brook - yeor , Isaiah 19:6-8 , a river, canal, fosse: applied to the Nile in Exodus 1:22 , etc
Goshen - It is generally supposed that Goshen was situated on the east of the ancient Delta of the Nile
African Missions of Lyons - It has charge of the Vicariate Apostolic of Benin and the Prefectures Apostolic of the Ivory Coast, Gold Coast, Nigeria, Dahomey, and the Delta of the Nile Two Apostolic schools are at Clermont-Ferrand and Cork, Ireland, and two preparatory schools at Nantes, France, and Keer-Maestricht, Holland
Goshen - It was probably situated on the eastern border of the Nile, extending from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea
Brick - That brick-kilns were known is evident from (2 Samuel 12:31 ; Jeremiah 43:9 ) When made of the Nile mud they required straw to prevent cracking
Linen, - Some linen, made form the Egyptian byssus , a flax that grew on the banks of the Nile, was exceedingly soft and of dazzling whiteness
Mizraim - " They called themselves Κhemi , either "Hamites" or from Κhem "black," namely, the alluvial soil of the Nile
Sea - [1] ...
Any great collection of waters, as the river Nile (Isaiah 19:5 ) and the Euphrates
Memphis - The ancient Egyptian city of Memphis, though not in existence today, was situated on almost the same site as the present-day city of Cairo; that is, on the Nile River, about 180 kilometres from its mouth
Ark - The vessel in which Moses was set afloat upon the Nile was an ark of bulrushes
Tahpanhes - A city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, in lower Egypt, and called Tahapanes and Tehaphnehes, Ezekiel 30:18; possibly the Hanes of Isaiah 30:4; Jeremiah 2:16; Jeremiah 43:7-9; Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14
Linen - Some linen made from the Egyptian byssus, a flax that grew on the banks of the Nile, was soft like silk and of dazzling whiteness
Bulrush - Or papyrus, a reed growing on the banks of the Nile, in marshy ground, Job 8:11 , to the height of twelve or fifteen feet, Isaiah 35:7
Terror - Romans 13 ...
Those enormous terrors of the Nile
Goshen - It was in the East Nile Delta and was suitable for raising flocks and herds (Genesis 47:1-6)
Mem'Phis - (haven, of the good ), a city of ancient Egypt, situated on that western bank of the Nile, about nine miles south of Cairo and five from the great pyramids and the sphinx. The sacred cubit until other symbols used in measuring the rise of the Nile were deposited in the temple of Serapis. The caliph conquerors founded Fostat (old Cairo) upon the opposite bank of the Nile, a few miles north of Memphis, and brought materials from the old city to build their new capital, A
Plague - These were gods of nature and were therefore connected with the Nile River, upon which Egypt depended entirely for its agricultural life. God may have used the physical characteristics of the Nile Valley to produce the plagues, but the timing, intensity and extent of the plagues showed clearly that they were judgments sent directly by God (Exodus 8:21-23; Exodus 8:31; Exodus 9:1-6; Exodus 9:22; Exodus 9:33)
Rameses - Huge masses of bricks, made of Nile mud, sun-dried, some of them mixed with stubble, possibly moulded by Jewish hands, still mark the site of Rameses
Sea, the - yam), signifies (1) "the gathering together of the waters," the ocean (Genesis 1:10 ); (2) a river, as the Nile (Isaiah 19:5 ), the Euphrates (Isaiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 51:36 ); (3) the Red Sea (Exodus 14:16,27 ; 15:4 , etc
Tahapanes - Tahpanhes=Tehaphnehes, (called "Daphne" by the Greeks, now Tell Defenneh), an ancient Egyptian city, on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, about 16 miles from Pelusium
Ethiopia - (Greek: aitho, burn; ops, face) ...
In ancient geography a country south of Egypt and closely connected with it; all the land bounded by the upper Nile on the west, and the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf on the east
Ludim - The descendants of the latter only are mentioned in Scripture: they are mentioned by Isaiah 66:19 , with Pul, whose settlement is supposed to have been about the island Philoe, near the first cataract of the Nile; by Jeremiah 46:9 , with the Ethiopians and Lybians; by Ezekiel 27:10 , with Phut, as the mercenary soldiers of Tyre, and Ezekiel 30:5 , with the Ethiopians and Libyans; all plainly denoting their African position; but in what particular part of that continent this position was, is not known
Tahapanes - This city lay in the vicinity of Pelusium, towards the southwest, on the western bank of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, and is therefore called by Herodotus the Pelusiac Daphne
On - It was situated on the east side of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, just below the point of the Delta, and about twenty miles northeast of Memphis. The two famous obelisks, long called "Cleopatra's Needles," one of which now stands in London and the other in Central Park in New York city, once stood before this city, and were seen by the children of Israel before the exodus, having been quarried at Syene on the Nile, erected at On (Heliopolis) by Thothmes III
On - It was situated on the east side of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, just below the point of the Delta, and about twenty miles northeast of Memphis. The two famous obelisks, long called "Cleopatra's Needles," one of which now stands in London and the other in Central Park in New York city, once stood before this city, and were seen by the children of Israel before the exodus, having been quarried at Syene on the Nile, erected at On (Heliopolis) by Thothmes III
Egypt, Land of - The Nile forms at the Mediterranean what is called the Delta (from the Greek letter Δ inverted); it had formerly seven mouths, Isaiah 11:15 , but now there are only two branches. The Nile valley is rarely more than twelve miles wide
Biblical Institute of Jerusalem, the - Among its important contributions to biblical science is the discovery of the famous mosaic map of Madaba, a map which has shed considerable light on the history and geography of that part of ancient Palestine which lay between Samaria and the Nile delta
Meadow - " So Job 8:11 "rush," the paper reed or papyrus of the Nile; "can the achu grow without water?" The fat kine fed on the reed grass which in the plenteous years grew to the very margin of the water, but the lean stood on the dry "brink" (Genesis 41:2-3)
Candace - Bruce shows, is now called Atbara, up the Nile
Candace - Extensive ruins found in this neighborhood, and along the upper valley of the Nile, indicate high civilization among the ancient Ethiopians
Candace - Queen of Ethiopia (the island of Meroe, in upper Nubia, between the Nile on one side and the Atbara on the other)
Goshen - It probably bordered on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, hence called Zoan or Tanis, Psalms 78:12, and reached from the Mediterranean to the Red sea
Syene - The latitude of Syene, according to Bruce is 24 0'...
45'; that of Alexandria, 31 11' 33"; difference 7 10' 48", equal to four hundred and thirty geographical miles on the meridian, or about five hundred British miles; but the real length of the valley of Egypt, as it follows the windings of the Nile, is full six hundred miles
No - It stood on both sides of the Nile, and is by some supposed to have included Karnak and Luxor. The ruins of this city are still among the most notable in the valley of the Nile
Seba - A comparison with Isaiah 18:2 points to a supposed connexion with the tall Cushites or Nubians, though there is no evidence which directly associates either the people or the country with Nubia proper, in the region of the Nile
se'ba - The island of Meroe lay between the Astaboras, the Atbara, the most northern tributary of the Nile, and the Astapus, the Bahr el-Azrak, "Blue River," the eastern of its two great confluents
Egypt - In contrast to the modern nation, ancient Egypt was confined to the Nile River valley, a long, narrow ribbon of fertile land (the “black land”) surrounded by uninhabitable desert (the “red land”). Egypt proper, from the first cataract of the Nile to the Mediterranean, is some 750 miles long. ...
Classical historians remarked that Egypt was a gift of the Nile. The White Nile, with its source in Lake Victoria, provides a fairly constant water flow. The seasonal flow of the Blue Nile and Atbara caused an annual inundation beginning in June and cresting in September. The Nile also provided a vital communication link for the nation. ...
Despite the unifying nature of the Nile, the “Two Lands” of Egypt were quite distinct. Upper Egypt is the arable Nile Valley from the First Cataract to just south of Memphis in the north. Lower Egypt refers to the broad Delta of the Nile in the north, formed from alluvial deposits. Egypt was relatively isolated by a series of six Nile cataracts on the south and protected on the east and west by the desert. ...
Low Nile inundations, the resultant bad harvests, and incursions of Asiatics in the Delta region brought the political chaos of the Seventh through Tenth Dynasties, called the First Intermediate Period (2200-2040 B. Many of the great number of gods were personifications of the enduring natural forces in Egypt, such as the sun, Nile, air, earth, and so on. ...
The consistent provision of the Nile gave Egyptians, in contrast to Mesopotamians, a generally optimistic outlook on life
Rameses (ra'Amses) - )...
Rameses was located in that part of the Nile Delta where the family of Jacob had originally settled (Genesis 47:11)
Memphis - ” An ancient capital of Egypt located just south of modern Cairo on the west bank of the Nile River
Tahpanhes - ” City in the Nile Delta near the eastern border of Egypt (Jeremiah 2:16 )
Neco - Later Nebuchadrezzar would extend his control as far as the Nile (2 Kings 24:7 )
Seba - " The Astaboras is the Atbara, the most northern tributary of the Nile, and the Astapus and Astasobas unite to form the Blue river; these bound the island Meroe
Bulrush - A species of reed found on the marshes of the Nile, and grows to the height of twelve or fifteen feet
Ferret - Geddes renders it the newt, or rather the lizard of the Nile; and it evidently must be of the lizard species
Behemoth - As leviathan is most likely the crocodile, it is not unreasonable to suppose that behemoth is, like the crocodile, an inhabitant of the Nile; and that, as leviathan is amphibious, behemoth must be amphibious too, and hence the hippopotamus, a conclusion which is strengthened by the comparison of verses 15, 21, 22 with 24
Sea - To any great collection of waters, as the Nile or the Euphrates in time of a flood or high water
Famine - Famine is sometimes a natural effect, as when the Nile does not overflow in Egypt, or rains do not fall in Judea, at the customary season; or when caterpillars, locusts, or other insects, destroy the fruits
Mir'Iam - (rebellion ), the sister of Moses, was the eldest of that sacred family; and she first appears, probably as a young girl, watching her infant brother's cradle in the Nile, ( Exodus 2:4 ) and suggesting her mother as a nurse
Leviathan - " As behemoth is the hippopotamus, so leviathan is the crocodile, both found in Egypt along the Nile. In Isaiah 27:1, "leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked (wriggling) serpent," "the dragon in the sea," literally refers to the crocodile in the sea or Nile, or else to the great rock snakes
Dragon - Large whales do not often frequent the Mediterranean, which was the sea that the Israelites knew; they apply "sea" to the Nile and Euphrates, and so apply "tannin " to the crocodile, their horror in Egypt, as also to the large serpents which they saw in the desert. ...
In Psalms 74:13, "Thou brokest the heads of the dragons in the waters," Egypt's princes and Pharaoh are poetically represented hereby, just as crocodiles are the monarchs of the Nile waters
Bulrush - A plant growing on the banks of the Nile, and in marshy grounds. " Thus Pliny takes notice of the "naves papyraceas armamentaque Nili," " ships made of papyrus, and the equipments of the Nile; and he observes, "ex ipsa quidem papyro navigia texunt," "of the papyrus itself they construct sailing vessels
Red Sea - An ancient canal, begun by Sesostris, continued by Darius Hystaspes and Ptolemy Philadelphus, joined the Nile to it. This drying up has caused the ancient canal which conveyed the Red Sea commerce to the Nile (from about Hereopolis on the Birket et Timsah and lake of the crocodile to Bubastis at the Nile), and irrigated the country (wady Τumeylat ) to be neglected and ruined. Pliny says their ship were of papyrus, like the Nile boats
Sea - ...
Yâm is used of mighty rivers such as the Nile: “And the waters shall fail from the sea, and the river shall be wasted and dried up” ( Nile. But since the term “river” is in synonymous parallelism to “the sea,” this latter term also refers to the Nile. 32:2 uses yâm of the branches of the Nile: “… And thou art as a whale in the seas: and thou camest forth with thy rivers, and troubledst the waters with thy feet, and fouledst their rivers
Tahpanhes - It lay on the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, which is now silted up, and the whole region converted into a waste
Zoan - A city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, called by the Greeks Tanis
Tahpanhes - A city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, in Lower Egypt, called by the Greeks Daphne
Beth-Shemesh - A city in Egypt, a seat of heathen idolatry ( Jeremiah 43:13 ), identified with the ancient Heliopolis, called ‘Ain Shems by the Arabs (Wallis Budge, The Nile , 281f
Hanes - Some would place it in Lower Egypt, with Anysis in Herodotus, and Khininshi in the annals of Ashurbanipal; but there can be little doubt that it is the Egyptian Hnçs (Heracleopolis Magna) on the west side of the Nile, just south of the Fayyum
Brook - However, this distinction is not always observed in the Scripture; and one is not unfrequently taken for the other,—the great rivers, such as the Euphrates, the Nile, the Jordan, and others being called brooks
Roman Empire - It reached to the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the African desert, the Nile cataracts, and the Arabian deserts on the south, the Rhine, the Danube, and the Black Sea on the north
Goshen - It was probably the tract lying east of the Pelusian arm of the Nile, towards Arabia
Leviathan - Probably the animal denoted is the crocodile, the terror of the Nile; as Job 40:1-24 , is the hippopotamus of the same river. ...
The crocodile is a native of the Nile, and other Asiatis and African rivers; in some instances even thirty feet in length; of enormous voracity and strength, as well as fleetness in swimming; attacks mankind and the largest animals, with most daring impetuosity; when taken by means of a powerful net, will often overturn the boats that surround it; has proportionally the largest mouth of all monsters whatever; moves both its jaws alike, the upper of which has not less than thirty-six, and the lower thirty sharp, but strong and massy teeth; and is furnished with a coat of mail so scaly and callous as to resist the force of a musket-ball in every part, except under the belly
Memphis - or left bank of the Nile. Before Menes the Nile, emerging from the upper valley, bent W. ...
At the rise of the Nile a canal still led some of its waters westward through the former bed, irrigating the western plain. The sacred cubit used in measuring the Nile was in the temple of Serapis. of the Nile, from a little N
Goshen - It lay on the east of the Nile, and apparently not far from the royal residence
Flood - There is an annual flood in the Nile, and in the Mississippi
Pibeseth - On the western bank of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile
Irrigation - Water was drawn from the Nile River and offshoot irrigation canals by means of a hinged pole with a hanging bucket on the end. Egypt's canal system allowed agricultural use of the highly fertile desert lands that the annual flooding of the Nile did not cover
River - "...
(4) Υeor , "the river Nile" (Genesis 41:1-2; Exodus 1:22; Exodus 2:3; Exodus 2:5). " The Nile's sacred name was Ηapi , i. " Zechariah 10:11, "all the deeps of the river shall dry up," namely, the Nile or else the Euphrates
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Thus the early river civilizations of the Nile, the Tigris, and Euphrates starting about 3000 B. Nile River The name Nile is not explicitly mentioned in KJV, but modern translations most often translated the Hebrew yeor as the Nile. The Nile plays a prominent role in the early events in the life of Moses in Exodus (Moses, Exodus 2:3 ; the ten plagues, Exodus 7:15 ,Exodus 7:15,7:20 ). The Nile is alluded to in many other passages as “the river” (Genesis 41:1 ), the “river of Egypt” (Genesis 15:18 ), the “flood of Egypt” (Amos 8:8 ), Shihor (Joshua 13:3 ), river of Cush among other names. The prophets Amos (Amos 8:8 ; Amos 9:5 ) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 46:8 ) used the Nile as the symbol of Egypt, a concept that is readily understood in terms of the river's historical importance to the survival and well-being of the country. ...
For the Egyptians the predictable annual flooding of the Nile with the depositing of the fertile black alluvial soil meant the enrichment of the flood plain and the difference between food and famine. From the central highlands of East Africa, the Nile with a watershed of over one million square miles is formed by the union of the White and Blue Niles and flows a distance of nearly 3,500 miles. Historically, approximately 95 percent of Egypt's population depended upon the productivity of the 5 percent of the country's land area within the flood plain of the Nile. See Egypt ; Nile. ...
The flooding of the Mesopotamian rivers in March and April differs from the Nile schedule which during that season is at its low ebb. It was linked with the Bitter Lakes and the Nile by a canal that existed before 600 B. ...
Apart from the significant roles played by the Nile in Egypt and the Tigris and Euphrates in Mesopotamia, the rivers of the biblical world were small and mostly unnavigable
Ethiopia - Country of burnt faces; the Greek word by which the Hebrew Cush is rendered (Genesis 2:13 ; 2 Kings 19:9 ; Esther 1:1 ; Job 28:19 ; Psalm 68:31 ; 87:4 ), a country which lay to the south of Egypt, beginning at Syene on the First Cataract (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ), and extending to beyond the confluence of the White and Blue Nile
Goshen - ’ Now Arabia is defined by Ptolemy, the geographer, as an Egyptian nome on the East border of the Delta of the Nile, and this seems to be the locality most probably contemplated by the narrator
Paper Reed - These, when separated from the stalk, were laid on a table artfully matched and flatted together, and moistened with the water of the Nile, which, dissolving the glutinous juices of the plant, caused them to adhere closely together
Frog - When God plagued Pharaoh and his people, the river Nile, which was the object of great admiration to the Egyptians, was made to contribute to their punishment
Pool, Pond - The former may denote the water left in the hollows when the inundation of the Nile subsides, and the latter, reservoirs (cf
Ethiopia - (ee' thi oh' pi uh) The region of Nubia just south of Egypt, from the first cataract of the Nile into the Sudan. In biblical times, Ethiopia was equivalent to Nubia, the region beyond the first cataract of the Nile south, or upstream, of Egypt
Egypt - In Hebrew, Egypt is called Misraim, a dual form of the word, indicating the two divisions—Upper and Lower Egypt, or (as Tayler Lewis suggests), the two strips on the two sides of the Nile. The name Egypt first occurs in its Greek form in Homer, and is applied to the Nile and to the country, but afterward it is used for the country only. Egypt is in the northeastern part of Africa and lies on both sides of the Nile. In ancient times it included the land watered by the Nile as far as the First Cataract, the deserts on either side being included in Arabia and Libya. Ezekiel indicates that Egypt reached from Migdol, east of the Suez Canal, to Syene, now Assouan, on the border of Nubia, near the First Cataract of the Nile. Nubia, Ethiopia, and other smaller districts bordering on the Nile to the south of Egypt, were, at times, under its sway. The Nile Valley. The Delta is one vast triangular plain, chiefly formed by the washing down of mud and loose earth by the great river Nile and watered by its several mouths, and by numerous canals. The Delta extends along the Mediterranean for about 200 miles and up the Nile for 100 miles. The Tanitic branch of the Nile is on the east of the Delta, and the Canopic branch on the west, though the Delta is now limited chiefly to the space between the Rosetta and the Damietta branches, which is about 90 miles in extent. — The summers are hot and sultry, the winters mild; rain, except along the Mediterranean, is very rare, the fertility of the land depending almost entirely upon the annual overflow of the Nile, or upon artificial irrigation by canals, water-wheels, and the shadoof, winds are strong, those from a northerly source being the most prevalent, while the simoon, a violent whirlwind and hurricane of sand, is not infrequent. In this period the nomadic horde called Hyksos for several centuries occupied and made Egypt tributary; their capital was Memphis; they constructed an immense earth-camp, which they called Abaris; two independent kingdoms were formed in Egypt, one in the Thebaid, which held intimate relations with Ethiopia; another at Xois, among the marshes of the Nile; but finally the Egyptians regained their independence, and expelled the Hyksos; Manetho supposes they were called hyksos, from hyk, a king, and sos, a shepherd. The ruins are very extensive, and the city in its glory stretched over thirty miles along the banks of the Nile, covering the places now known as Luxor, Karnak, and Thebes
Paper - The papyrus reed grew in ancient times in great profusion in the Nile and was used as a material for writing
no, no-Amon - These two edifices dominated the east side of the Nile while the funerary temples, and the valleys of the kings (Biban el-Moluk) and queens occupied the west side
Noph - It stood above the dividing of the river Nile, where the Delta begins
Reed - Used to form boats on the Nile, also garments, shoes, baskets, and paper (Isaiah 18:2); Job 8:11 "can the papyrus plant grow without mire?" so the godless thrive only in outward prosperity, which soon ends, for they are without God "the fountain of life" (Psalms 36:9). ...
Αroth (Isaiah 19:7) not "paper reeds," but grassy pastures on the banks of the Nile; literally, places bare of wood, from 'aarah "to make bore" (Gesenius)
Plague - The plagues were upon Egypt's idols, the Nile water, the air, the frog, the cow, the beetle, etc. The first stroke affects the very source of the nation's life, the Nile; then the soil (the dust producing the plague); then the irrigating canals breeding flies
Behemoth - Commentators are now generally agreed that it is the hippopotamus, or river horse, which is found only in the Nile and other great rivers of Africa. Ruppell gives the following graphical account of a combat on the upper Nile
Plagues of Egypt - Canon Cook, in the Bible Commentary, distributes them thus: The first was toward the end of June, when the Nile begins to overflow
On - Light; the sun, (Genesis 41:45,50 ), the great seat of sun-worship, called also Bethshemesh (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and Aven (Ezekiel 30:17 ), stood on the east bank of the Nile, a few miles north of Memphis, and near Cairo, in the north-east
Zoan - ...
Moses' exposure must have been in a branch of the Nile not infested by crocodiles, for neither would the parents have exposed him nor would Thermuthis ("the great mother", a designation of Neith the deity of Lower Egypt), Pharaoh's daughter, have bathed in a place infested by them; therefore not at Memphis where anciently they were common, but at Zoan on the Tanitic branch, near the sea, where crocodiles are never found, probably the western boundary of the district occupied by Israel
Memphis - It is now held to have been on the west of the Nile, about 29 53' N, where a few relies have been discovered
Leviathan - The crocodile, on the contrary, is a natural inhabitant of the Nile, and other Asiatic and African rivers; of enormous voracity and strength, as well as fleetness in swimming; attacks mankind and the largest animals with most daring impetuosity; when taken by means of a powerful net, will often overturn the boats that surround it; has, proportionally, the largest mouth of all monsters whatever; moves both its jaws equally, the upper of which has not less than forty, and the lower than thirty-eight sharp, but strong and massy, teeth; and is furnished with a coat of mail, so scaly and callous as to resist the force of a musket ball in every part, except under the belly
River - It is always applied to the Nile and its various canals, except in Job 28:10 Daniel 12:5,6,7 2
Fish, Fisher - The Nile had an early celebrity, which it still retains, for the abundance and excellence of its fish, Exodus 7:18-21 Numbers 11:5
Goshen - Goshen is primarily recognized as an area in the northeast sector of the Nile Delta. (4) It is generally agreed that Goshen is to be located in wadi Tumilat which stretches from the eastern arm of the Nile to the Great Bitter Lakes
Lead - of the Nile toward the Red Sea
Sabean - These are often identified with people of Meroe in Upper Egypt between the white and blue Nile, thus the capital of Ethiopia
Pathros - ; soldiers and traders of many nations must have passed frequently up and down the Nile in those days, yet without giving to their fellow-countrymen at home any clear idea of the Upper Country
Egypt - ...
The habitable land of Egypt is for the most part a great valley, through which the river Nile pours its waters, extending in a straight line from north to south, and skirted on the east and west by ranges of mountains, which approach and recede from the river more or less in different parts. Where this valley terminates, towards the north, the Nile divides itself, about forty or fifty miles from the seacoast, into several arms, which inclose the so-called Delta. Here the Nile issues from the granite rocks of the cataracts, and enters Egypt proper. This fertility, as is well known, depends upon the annual and regular inundations of the Nile. Hence Egypt was called by Herodotus, "the gift of the Nile. " See Nile . The Fellahs suffer so much oppression, and are so despised by the Bedaween or wandering Arabs, and by their despotic rulers, that they seldom acquire property, and very rarely enjoy it in security; yet they are an interesting race, and devotedly attached to their native country and the Nile. ...
But besides these imperishable monuments of kings long forgotten, Egypt abounds in other structures hardly less wonderful; on the beautiful islands above the cataracts, near Syene, and at other places in Upper Egypt; and especially in the whole valley of the Nile near Thebes, including Carnac, Luxor, etc
Memphis - From certain remains found half buried in the sand, the site of this ancient city has been discovered near the modern village of Minyet Rahinch, or Mitraheny, about 16 miles above the ancient head of the Delta, and 9 miles south of Cairo, on the west bank of the Nile
Bathing - However, two notable exceptions are: (1) that of Pharaoh's daughter in the Nile River, (Exodus 2:5 ), (2) that of Bathsheba on her rooftop, (2 Samuel 11:2 )
Famine - ...
Failure of the heavy rains in November and December in Palestine (Genesis 12:10; Genesis 26:1-2), and of the due overflow of the Nile, along with E
Melon - ...
It is cultivated, says Hasselquist, on the banks of the Nile, in the rich clayey earth, which subsides during the inundation
Brook - Ye’ôr almost always used of the Nile and water-trenches of Egypt
Amarna, Tell el - Tell el-Amarna lies on the east bank of the Nile River
Embalm - Some have said, that necessity first taught the Egyptians the art of embalming, for when the river Nile overflowed, sometimes the inundation continued for near two months; during which time the bodies of the dead not only remained unburied, but remained unavoidably in the tents
zo'an - It stood on the eastern bank of the Tanitic branch of the Nile
Miriam - She might be ten or twelve years old when her brother Moses was exposed on the banks of the Nile, since Miriam was watching there, and offered herself to Pharaoh's daughter to fetch her a nurse
Eden, Garden of - One is that the Gihon is the Nile, and the Pishon the Persian and Arabian Gulfs, conceived of as a great river, with its source and that of the Nile not far from those of the Euphrates and the Tigris
Galilee, Sea of - The water is sweet, sparkling and transparent; the fish abundant as of old, many species being those of the Nile, the silurus, mugil, and sparers Galiloeus. Africa, the Nile, the Zambesi, and the great lakes in the interior. The papyrus also, no longer found in the Nile, is found on the shores of the sea of Galilee
Plagues, the Ten, - After this warning to Pharaoh, Aaron, at the word of Moses, waved his rod over the Nile, and the river was turned into blood, with all its canals and reservoirs, and every vessel of water drawn from them; the fish died, and the river stank. This plague was doubly humiliating to the religion of the country, as the Nile was held sacred, as well as some kinds of its fish, not to speak of the crocodiles, which probably were destroyed. (Exodus 7:16-25 ) Those who have endeavored to explain this plague by natural causes have referred to the changes of color to which the Nile is subject, the appearance of the Red Sea, and the so called rain and dew of blood of the middle ages; the last two occasioned by small fungi of very rapid growth. But such theories do not explain why the wonder happened at a time of year when the Nile is most clear nor why it killed the fish and made the water unfit to he drunk. The first plague occurred probably during the annual inundation of the Nile, hence about the middle of June (Edersheim). The first plague was directed against the Nile one of the Egyptian deities, adored as a source of life, not only to the produce of the land, but to its inhabitants
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - The early development of the two major centers of civilization along the major river systems of the Near Eastern world, the Tigris/Euphrates and the Nile, surely was not coincidental. Along the marshy stretches of the Nile, Tigris, and Euphrates, rafts of reed bundles were refined into the reed canoe. In water free from rocks, such as the Nile delta where adequate materials for branch frames were lacking, clay tublike boats made their appearance. Boats on Egypt's Nile The Nile provided 750 miles of unobstructed waterway with a current that carried boats from Aswan and the First Cataract to its mouth and prevailing north winds that brought those boats under sail back again. Thus, the Egyptians turned to the abundant reeds along the Nile to create simple rafts. , those Nile rafts had become long slender and pointed vessels outfitted with paddles and steering oars. The light weight and shallow draft made such craft most useful in the canals and marshes of the Nile River system. , these fragile reed boats, reinforced with planks, ferried the massive granite and stone blocks used for the impressive stone architecture that began to grace the Nile's banks. Pictorial representations in paintings, reliefs, and models indicate that Nile rivercraft primarily constructed of Asia Minor and Lebanon cedar dramatically grew in size and diversity. Cargo boats 150 feet in length requiring 40 to 50 rowers, and, later, massive 200-by-70-foot barges towed by a fleet of oar-powered tugs, shuttled up and down the Nile to the massive building operations between Aswan and the Delta
On - On was situated upon the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, about 20 miles northeast of ancient Memphis, and 6 miles north from Cairo
Hittites - Smith has just discovered their capital lying about half way between the mighty cities of the Euphrates valley and those of the Nile
Tirhakah - Isaiah (Isaiah 17:12-18;Isaiah 17:7) announces Sennacherib's overthrow, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, now in Jerusalem, having arrived from Meroe, the island between "the river of Ethiopia," the Nile, and the Astaboras, in "vessels of bulrushes"' or pitchcovered papyrus canoes, to bring word to their own nation (not "woe," but "ho!" calling the Ethiopians' attention to his prophetic announcement of the fall of Judah's and their common foe; Vulgate translated "the land of the clanging sound of wings," i
Fly - Found in swarms about the arms and canals of the Nile
Alexandria - ...
Alexandria was designed to act as the principal port of Egypt located on the western edge of the Nile delta
Jannes - Jerom translates their names Johannes and Mambres; and there is a tradition, they say, in the Talmud, that Juhanni and Mamre, chief of Pharaoh's physicians, said to Moses, "Thou bringest straw into Egypt, where abundance of corn grew;" that is, to bring your magical arts hither is to as much purpose as to bring water to the Nile
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - An Egyptian king, mentioned not only in Scripture, but by Herodotus, who says that he was son of Psammetichus, king of Egypt: and that, having succeeded him in the kingdom, he raised great armies, and sent out great fleets, as well on the Mediterranean as the Red Sea; that he expended a vast sum and many thousands of lives in a fruitless effort to unite and Nile and the Red Sea by a canal; and that he was the first to send a ship wholly around Africa
Reed - It has a jointed stalk like the bamboo, and is very abundant on the Nile
Moses - ), at a time of grievous persecution, when Pharao had ordered the killing of all male Hebrew children (Exodus 1) Exposed on the waters of the Nile, he was rescued by Pharao's daughter and educated at court
Hyksos - ) large numbers of Asiatics, mostly Semites like the Hebrew patriarchs, migrated into the Nile Delta of northern Egypt from Canaan
Euphrates - " Just as the Nile represented in prophecy the power of Egypt, so the Euphrates represented the Assyrian power (Isaiah 8:7 ; Jeremiah 2:18 )
no-Amon - There can be no doubt that the city intended was that called Thebes, in upper Egypt, seated on both banks of the Nile, renowned for its hundred gates and vast population, and as being the principal seat of the worship of the god Amon
Fountain - either by treadwheels working pumps, or by artificial rills led in ducts from the Nile, the petty embankments being removed with the foot to let in the stream
Ethiopia - In the Scriptures "Ethiopia" usually refers to the region extending from Egypt southward beyond the junction of the White and Blue Nile
Alexan'Dria, - -- (Alexandria was situated on the Mediterranean Sea directly opposite the island of Pharos, 12 miles west of the Canopic branch of the Nile and 120 miles from the present city of Cairo
Whale - " "The sea there is the river Nile, and the dragon the crocodile, Ezekiel 32:2
Paper, Papyrus - The papyrus plant once grew in abundance along the Nile delta (“Can the papyrus grow tall where there is no marsh?” [1]), providing the Egyptians with an inexpensive writing material which was exported throughout the Mediterranean world
Ethiopia - It bordered Egypt to Egypt’s south and, like Egypt, was centred on the Nile River
Phenicia - "In the Egyptian inscriptions Phoenicia is called Keft, the inhabitants being Kefa; and since Keft-ur, or 'Greater Phoenicia,' was the name given to the delta of the Nile from the Phoenician colonies settled upon it, the Philistines who came from Caphtor or Keft-ur must have been of Phoenician origin" (Compare Deuteronomy 2:23 ; Jeremiah 47:4 ; Amos 9:7 ). " "The trade routes from all Asia converged on the Phoenician coast; the centres of commerce on the Euphrates and Tigris forwarding their goods by way of Tyre to the Nile, to Arabia, and to the west; and, on the other hand, the productions of the vast regions bordering the Mediterranean passing through the Canaanite capital to the eastern world
Foot - On the contrary, Egypt has no river except the Nile: there it seldom rains, and the lands which are not within reach of the inundation continue parched and barren. Notwithstanding these precautions, many places have no water; and in the course of the year, those places which are nearest the Nile require to be watered again by means of art and labour
River - , "great river", probably from an Egyptian word (Aur), commonly applied to the Nile (Genesis 41:1-3 ), but also to other rivers (Job 28:10 ; Isaiah 33:21 )
Beriah - In Joshua 13:2-3 the Sihor, or (Pelusiac branch of) the Nile, is the boundary between Egypt and Canaan; and in Genesis 46:34 the pastoral population in Goshen being an "abomination to the Egyptians," Goshen must have been regarded as non-Egyptian, but a kind of border land between the two countries, Egypt and Canaan
Caphtor - the maritime or even the river bordering coast) of Caphtor" is mentioned, implying their neighborhood to either the sea (the Philistines' position) or to the Nile (whose waters are called "the sea," Nahum 3:8)
Brick - Those made of Nile mud need straw to prevent cracking; and frequently a layer of reeds at intervals acted as binders
No - Nahum seems to imagine Thebes as resembling the cities of the less remote Delta surrounded by canals, which were their chief protection; in reality it lay on both banks of the Nile, with desert bounding it on either side, and water probably played little part in its defence
Plague - ...
The river Nile was turned into blood, and the fish died, and the river stank, so that the Egyptians loathed to drink of the river (Exodus 7:14-25 )
Bethshemesh - of the Nile, a few miles N
Gihon - It has been identified with the Nile
Cup - The sacred cup symbolized the Nile (which was "the cup of Egypt," Pliny H
Moses - In his infancy, because of the cruel edict of Pharaoh, he was hid in a boat-cradle in the Nile; but was found and adopted by the daughter of Pharaoh
On - or AVEN, a city of Egypt, situated in the land of Goshen, on the east of the Nile, and about five miles from the modern Cairo
Ammon - ...
The word Amoun, which imports "shining," according to Jablonski, denoted the effects produced by the sun on attaining the equator, such as the increase of the days; a more splendid light; and above all, the fortunate presage of the inundation of the Nile, and its consequent abundance
Hand - 25 applies this word to the “banks” of the Nile River: “And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to wash herself at the river, and her maidens walked along by the [6]
Cush - The Cushites appear to have spread along extensive tracts, stretching from the Upper Nile to the Euphrates and Tigris
Fish - ...
The fish of the Lake of Galilee are mainly identical with those especially found in the Nile
Canaan, Land of - The word used here thrice for 'river' is nahar, which is not applicable to a winter stream, so that 'river of Egypt' doubtless refers to the most easterly branch of the Nile, called Pelusiac. ' This word signifies 'brook in a valley,' and cannot refer to the Nile; indeed the places also mentioned are more in the latitude of the wady called el Arish, 31 5' N, near to the ancient city Rhinocolura
Alexandria - Planned by Dinocrates under the king’s supervision, and built on a neck of land two miles wide interposed between the Mediterranean Sea and Lake Mareotis (Mariut), about 14 miles from the Canopic mouth of the Nile, it became successively the capital of Hellenic, Roman, and Christian Egypt, ‘the greatest mart in the world’ (μέγιστον ἐμπόριον τῆς οἰκουμένης, Strabo, xvii. ...
‘Its fine air,’ says Strabo, ‘is worthy of remark: this results from the city being on two sides surrounded by water, and from the favourable effects of the rise of the Nile,’ one canal joining the great river to the lake, and another the lake to the sea. ‘The Nile, being full, fills the lake also, and leaves no marshy matter which is likely to cause exhalations’ (xvii. The trade which came to Lake Mareotis from the Nile and the Red Sea was equally important
Cush - Other Bible students would see Gihon here as another name for the Nile River and Cush as referring to the land south of Egypt
Chaldea - The wants of a teeming population were supplied by a rich soil, not less bountiful than that on the banks of the Egyptian Nile
Sin - It defended the northeast frontier of Egypt, and lay near the Mediterranean, of the eastern arm of the Nile
Euphrates - It overflows in summer like the Nile, when the snow on the mountains of Armenia, the nearest springs of both are but a few miles apart
Mouth - The Mississippi and the Nile discharge their waters by several mouths
Famine - ’ In Egypt, famine is due to the failure of the annual inundation of the Nile, which is ultimately traceable to lack of rain in the Abyssinian highlands of the interior
Banking - , including Rome, Athens, Carthage in north Africa, and Memphis on the Nile
Hospitality - The sun was then setting, and the shades of the western mountains had reached across the Nile, and covered the town
Banking - , including Rome, Athens, Carthage in north Africa, and Memphis on the Nile
Pharaoh - , the Sesostris of the Greeks, the master-builder of Egypt, whose statues and temples in ruins are found all over the Nile valley from Zoan (Tanis) to Karnak
Alexandria - A celebrated city in Lower Egypt, situated between the Mediterranean Sea and the lake Mareotis, not far from the most westerly mouth of the Nile
Sennacherib - Isaiah 37:25 should be rendered "dried up all the Nile-arms of Matsor," i
Elam - The Greek traditions of Memnon and his Ethiopian bands rest on this subjugation, the Kissians of Elam being connected with the Cushite inhabitants of the upper valley of the Nile
Miriam - She watched her infant brother in the ark on the Nile, and suggested to Pharaoh's daughter the mother as a nurse
Book - These strips were laid side by side upon a flat horizontal surface, and then immersed in the water of the Nile, which not only served "as a kind of sizing, but also caused the edges of the strips to adhere together as if glued
Alexandria - It was a noted seaport of Lower Egypt, and was situated on a low, narrow tract of land which divides Lake Mareotis from the Mediterranean, and near the western mouth of the Nile, about 120 miles from the present city of Cairo
Egypt - Many scholars believe that it was in Southern Arabia, and recent excavations have shown that the valley of the Nile was originally inhabited by a low-class population, perhaps belonging to the Nigritian stock, before the Egyptians of history entered it. When the Old Empire of Menes came to an end, the seat of empire was shifted to Thebes, some 300 miles farther up the Nile. A short time after that, the Delta was conquered by the Hyksos, or shepherd kings, who fixed their capital at Zoan, the Greek Tanis, now San, on the Tanic arm of the Nile
No - ) Nahum describes Thebes as "situate among the rivers" (including the canals watering the city) on both sides of the Nile, which no other town of ancient Egypt is. Her "rampart was the sea, and her wall from (or, as Maurer, consisted of) the sea," namely, the Nile (Isaiah 19:5). ...
The Nile's deposit has accumulated to the depth of seven feet around them
Canaan - The four Hamitic races occupied a continuous tract comprising the Nile valley, Palestine, S. "The river (nahar ) of Egypt" is the Nile, or Sihor, here representing (according to Grove) Egypt in general, as "Euphrates" represents Assyria (compare Isaiah 8:7-8). The Israelite kingdom even in Solomon's time did not literally reach to the Nile. But Joshua 13:3 expressly mentions Sihor, "the black turbid river," Nile, as the ultimately appointed border; this extended dominion twice foretold (for the simple language in histories as Genesis and Joshua hardly sanctions Grove's view that the river represents merely Egypt, in general), and so accurately defining the limits, awaits Israel in the last days (Isaiah 2:11; Zechariah 9:9-10). Part of the shephelah was called Goshen, from its resembling in fertility the old Goshen at the mouth of the Nile (Joshua 10:41; Joshua 11:16); it perhaps contained Beersheba
on (2) - of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, 30 miles N
Wayfaring Men - Irwin, speaking of his passing through the deserts on the eastern side of the Nile, in his going from Upper Egypt to Cairo, tells us, that, after leaving a certain valley, which he mentions, their road lay over level ground
Red Sea - Journeying southward from Suez, on our left is the peninsula of Sinai; on the right is the desert coast of Egypt, of limestone formation like the greater part of the Nile valley in Egypt, the cliff's on the sea margin stretching landward in a great rocky plateau while more inland a chain of volcanic mountains, beginning about lat. An ancient canal conveyed the waters of the Nile to the Red Sea, flowing through the Wadi-t Tumeylat and irrigating with its system of water-channels a large extent of country. The canal that connected this with the Nile was of Pharaonic origin
Agriculture - ...
How did the agriculture of Egypt differ from that of Canaan? The essential difference between Egyptian and Canaanite agriculture was that Canaan depended on rainfall (Deuteronomy 11:11 ), while Egypt depended on the River Nile and its annual flood (Amos 8:8 ). In July the Nile rose following rainfall in Ethiopia and flooded the land on both sides
Directions (Geographical) - In this Israel differed from the Egyptians, who oriented themselves to the south, the source of the Nile River
Thebes - It was situated on both sides of the Nile, 400 or 500 miles from its mouth
Roman Empire - The boundaries of the empire were now the Atlantic on the west, the Euphrates on the east, the deserts of Africa, the cataracts of the Nile and the Arabian deserts on the south, the British Channel, the Rhine, the Danube and the Black Sea on the north
Joseph the Son of Jacob - ...
Joseph arranged for all Jacob’s family to settle in Goshen in the Nile Delta
Plagues of Egypt - When the Nile rises in June, its waters become discoloured from fragments of vegetable matter, which gradually turn to a dull red colour as the river rises to its height in August. Plagues of frogs were not unknown in ancient times; and Haggard tells of a plague in the upper Nile valley in modern times ( Under Crescent and Star , p. The insects come to maturity after the waters of the Nile inundation have receded, and the pools in which the larvæ have lived have dried up
Syria - Separated from one another by great mountain barriers, they have never formed a political unity, but during the centuries in which their freedom was undisturbed by the military powers on the Nile and Euphrates valleys they developed types of civilization and culture which, through the commerce of Phcenicia and the religion of Judaea , have powerfully influenced mankind
Head - ) The source, fountain, spring, or beginning, as of a stream or river; as, the head of the Nile; hence, the altitude of the source, or the height of the surface, as of water, above a given place, as above an orifice at which it issues, and the pressure resulting from the height or from motion; sometimes also, the quantity in reserve; as, a mill or reservoir has a good head of water, or ten feet head; also, that part of a gulf or bay most remote from the outlet or the sea
River; Wadi - ...
In some passages nâhâr may represent a “canal(s)”: “Say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and stretch out thine hand upon the waters of Egypt, upon their streams [1], upon their rivers [2], and upon their ponds …” ( Egypt - The fertility of soil was extraordinary, due to the Nile's overflow and irrigation; not, as in Palestine, due to rain, which in the interior is rare (Genesis 13:10; Deuteronomy 11:10-11; Zechariah 14:18). Rocky sandstrewn deserts mostly bound the Nilebordering fertile strip of land, somewhat lower, which generally in Upper Egypt is about 12 miles wide. The delta is a triangle at the Nile's mouth, formed by the Mediterranean and the Pelusiac and Canopic branches of the river. ...
But now political oppression has combined with the drying up of the branches and canals from the Nile and of the artificial lakes (e. The Nile's overflow lasts only about 100 days, but is made available for agriculture throughout the year by tanks, canals, and forcing machines. Papyrus is now no longer found in the Nile below Nubia. The hippopotamus, the behemoth of Job, was anciently found in the Nile and hunted. Thus, the turning of the Nile into blood was a stroke upon Hapi, the Nile god. ...
The third plague of dust-sprung lice fell upon the earth, worshipped in the Egyptian pantheism as Seb, father of the gods (Exodus 8:16); the black fertile soil of the Nile basin was especially sacred, called Chemi, from which Egypt took its ancient name
Jordan - Shaw, than all the brooks and streams of the Holy Land united together; and, excepting the Nile, is by far the most considerable river either of the coast of Syria or of Barbary. Harmer argues: "Might not the over-flowings of the Jordan be like those of the Euphrates, not annual, but much more rare?" The difficulty, therefore, will be completely removed by supposing, that it does not, like the Nile, overflow every year, as some authors, by mistake, had supposed, but, like the Euphrates, only in some particular years; but when it does it is in the time of harvest
Capernaum - Some have thought this fountain a vein of the Nile, since it produces a fish like the coracinus in the lake near Alexandria
Aloe - That other water, also, requires some correction, and that such a correction is applied to it, appears from the custom in Egypt in respect to that of the Nile, which, though somewhat muddy, is rendered pure and salutary by being put into jars, the inside of which is rubbed with a paste made of bitter almonds
Land (of Israel) - Some have suggested it is the Nile River or one of its tributaries. Every year the Nile River overflowed its banks with rich alluvial soil
Exodus - It was only by the mighty hand of God that their deliverance was effected; and there seems to have been a special vindication of his glory in the fact that the Nile, the flies, the frogs, fishes, cattle, etc. They are supposed to have been assembled at Rameses, or Heroopolis, in the land of Goshen, about thirty-five miles northwest of Suez, on the ancient canal, which united the Nile with the Red Sea
Games - Another game commonly referred to as “hounds and jackals” was played throughout the Fertile Crescent (Tigris-Euphrates and Nile valleys with intervening land)
Geology of Palestine - The Coast Plain extends from the mouth of the Nile to Carmel (the political boundary line, the valley known as Wady el-’Arîsh , or the River of Egypt, is of no importance geologically)
Egypt - During its decline, the Nile kingdom remained a potential threat to the Hebrew state as exemplified, by the attack of Shishak in the fifth year of Rehoboam (1 Kings 14:25 ), but this threat diminished over time
Head - The principal source of a stream as the head of the Nile
Moses - The first extends from his infancy, when he was exposed in the Nile, and found and adopted y the daughter of Pharaoh, to his flight to Midian
Genesis - The result was that the whole of Jacob’s household migrated to Egypt and settled in the fertile Nile Delta (42:1-47:26)
Whirlwind - "On the 25th," says Bruce, "at four o'clock in the afternoon, we set out from the villages of the Nuba, intending to arrive at Basbock, where is the ferry over the Nile; but we had scarcely advanced two miles into the plain, when we were enclosed in a violent whirlwind, or what is called at sea the water spout
Plagues of Egypt - ...
The first was that of turning the waters of their famous river the Nile into blood. (John 2:11) And was it not in both instances figurative of the different dispensations of the law and the gospel? Every thing under the law, like the full flowing streams of the Nile turned into blood, is made a source of condemnation: it is called indeed the ministration of death, (2 Corinthians 3:7) Every thing under the gospel brings with it life and liberty
Houses - The Nile rose this season three feet and a half above the highest mark left by the former inundation, with uncommon rapidity, and carried off several villages, and some hundreds of their inhabitants. I never saw any picture that could give a more correct idea of a deluge than the valley of the Nile in this season
Sea - The Hebrews give the name of sea to any large collection of water, Job 14:11 ; as to the lakes of Tiberias and Asphaltites, and also to the rivers Nile and Euphrates, Isaiah 11:15 18:2 21:1 Jeremiah 51:36,42 . That of Akaba is connected with the Dead Sea by the great sand valley El Arabah described under the article Zechariah 10:11 , both the Red Sea and the Nile appear to be mentioned
Bible, Egypt in the - There, in the "land of Gessen," located by some near the mouth of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, by others half-way up that same channel, by others still south of Memphis, in the Fayum district, they increased and multiplied; and from there, after a long period of persecution which is supposed to have taken place following the overthrow of the Hyksos by native princes, they left at God's bidding, under the leadership of Moses, for the Promised Land
Manasseh (1) - Their name should be a formula of blessing, "God make thee as Ephraim and Manasseh," and they should "grow as fish do increase" (a natural image near the fish abounding Nile): Genesis 48:16; Genesis 48:20
Antonius - Anthony retired by degrees farther and farther from his native village, fixing his abode first in a tomb, afterwards in a ruined castle near the Nile
Plagues of Egypt - The water of the Nile and of the canals and pools was turned into blood
Pharaoh - ...
Joseph was under an early Pharaoh of the 13th dynasty, when as yet Pharaoh ruled over all Egypt, or probably under Amenemha III, sixth king of the 12th, who first regulated by dykes, locks, and reservoirs the Nile's inundation, and made the lake Moeris to receive the overflow. Celebrated for a canal he proposed to cut connecting the Nile and Red Sea
Egypt in the Bible - There, in the "land of Gessen," located by some near the mouth of the Pelusiac branch of the Nile, by others half-way up that same channel, by others still south of Memphis, in the Fayum district, they increased and multiplied; and from there, after a long period of persecution which is supposed to have taken place following the overthrow of the Hyksos by native princes, they left at God's bidding, under the leadership of Moses, for the Promised Land
Dualism - This name is used as a symbolic name of Egypt ( Psalms 87:4 , Isaiah 30:7 ), probably on account of its position on the Nile, and its hostility to the people of God
Pha'Raoh, - He seems to have been an enterprising king, as he is related to have attempted to complete the canal connecting the Red Sea with the Nile, and to have sent an expedition of Phoenicians to circumnavigate Africa, which was successfully accomplished
Joram - word meaning ‘watercourse,’ and used especially in reference to the Nile. ...
The only passages in which Yardçn is used without the article are: (a) Job 40:23, where it may be equally well translated by ‘the Jordan’ or ‘a river’; but several commentators doubt whether the text is reliable; Budde suggests deleting this word as a gloss; Gunkel and Winckler change it into Yĕ’ôr (יְאד) because in the same passage reference is made to the Nile; Cheyne into îhôn (נִיחוֹן) for the same reason. … The Nile and the Jordan, otherwise so different, are alike in this, that the historical singularity of each has behind it as remarkable a singularity of physical formation. … Every one knows the incomparableness of the Nile
Exodus, the - ...
The ready supply of their bodily wants in Egypt (Numbers 11:5) and the rich valley of the Nile rendered this corrective discipline the more needful, in order to rouse them to realize their high destiny and to be willing to depart. ...
The first two days' march brought Israel from Rameses (the general name of the district, and the city built by Israel on the canal from the Nile to lake Timsah) by way of Succoth, to Etham or Pithom, the frontier city of Egypt (Heroopolis) near the S
Roman Empire - ; the African deserts, the Nile cataracts, and the Arabian deserts on the S
Arabia - So uncertain was the application of the term, that there was no part of the semi-desert fringe extending from the lower Tigris to the lower Nile which was not at one time or another called Arabia
Water - In this northern climate no idea can be formed of the luxury of drinking in Egypt: little appetite for food is felt; but when, after crossing the burning sands, you reach the rich line of woods on the brink of the Nile, and pluck the fresh limes, and mixing their juice with Egyptian sugar and the soft river water, drink repeated bowls of lemonade, you feel that every other pleasure of the senses must yield to this
Flies - This is not a partial emigration; the inhabitants of all the countries, from the mountains of Abyssinia northward, to the confluence of the Nile and Astaboras, are, once in a year, obliged to change their abode, and seek protection in the sands of Beja, till the danger of the insect is over
Miracle - ...
The Nile turned to blood, Exodus 7:20
Flowers - This tall, slender reedlike plant grew along the banks of the Nile River and provided the earliest known material for making paper and covering the frames of boats (Isaiah 18:2 )
Exodus - No extra-biblical witnesses directly speak of the sojourn of Israel's ancestors in the land of the Nile
Jehoiakim - In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2)
Exodus, Book of - The chosen descendants of Abraham settled in Egypt in the fertile region of the Nile Delta
Theophilus, Bishop of Alexandria - But when the Nile-gauge was removed from the Serapeum to the church, the pagans asked, Would not the god avenge himself by withholding the yearly inundation his power had been wont to effect? It was, in fact, delayed. Theodosius's answer was: "If the Nile would not rise except by means of enchantments or sacrifices, let Egypt remain unwatered
Moses - “Every boy that is born to the Hebrews you shall throw into the Nile, but you shall let every girl live” (Exodus 1:22 , NRSV)
Tyre - They trafficked up the Nile as far as Memphis; worked copper mines in Cyprus and Crete (cf
Moses - But his existence cannot be disproved, either, since other prominent Old Testament figures have neither names nor monuments, as, for example, the Pharaoh with whom Moses contended, and the Egyptian princess who rescued the infant Moses from the Nile
Agriculture - The water supply was from rain, and rills from the hills, and the river Jordan, whereas Egypt depended solely on the Nile overflow
Assyria - He is said to have reigned from the Euphrates to the Nile
Wanderings of the Israelites - Rameses was on the east of the Nile, but some place it farther north than others
Solomon - He enjoyed a profound peace throughout his dominions; Judah and Israel lived in security; and his neighbours either paid him tribute, or were his allies; he ruled over all the countries and kingdoms from the Euphrates to the Nile, and his dominions extended even beyond the former; he had abundance of horses and chariots of war; he exceeded the orientals, and all the Egyptians, in wisdom and prudence; he was the wisest of mankind, and his reputation was spread through all nations
Rain - For though the river Nile, which the Egyptians prided themselves so much upon, did indeed overflow the banks of it at certain seasons, yet the higher and remote ground from it could not be benefited thereby; and therefore the inhabitants were obliged occasionally to water their ground, in order to render it fruit ful
Egypt - Habitable and cultivable Egypt consists practically of the broad fan-shaped’ Delta opening on to the Mediterranean, and the narrow valley of the Nile bordered by deserts as far as the First Cataract (beyond which is Nubia, i. Its fertility is independent of rainfall, that being quite insignificant except along the Mediterranean coast; it depends on the annual rise of the Nile, which commences in June and continues till October. In ancient times there may have been extensive groves of acacia trees on the borders of the alluvium kept moist by soakage from the Nile; but at most seasons of the year there was practically no natural pasture or other spontaneous growth except in marshy districts
Jordan - The river abounds in fish of numerous species, many of them resembling those found in the Nile and the lakes of tropical Africa
Miracles - )...
Thus the first plague turning the Nile to blood answers to the natural phenomenon of the water becoming, before the rise, first green, then clear yellow about the 25th of June, and gradually ochre red through microscopic cryptogams and infusoria, at times smelling offensively (Exodus 7:17-21). So the dust, or black fertile soil of the Nile basin, called "chemi ," from whence Egypt's ancient name was derived, producing "lice" or tick
Sea - The priests of Isis are said to have shunned it as impure and unsocial for swallowing up the sacred Nile
Amos - Amos knows, too, that the Aramæans migrated from Kir, and the Philistines from Caphtor ( Amos 9:7 ); he has heard of the swellings of the Nile ( Amos 8:8 , Amos 9:5 ), and regards the fact with a curious dread
Miracles - God gave him three signs to perform before them: his rod became a serpent, and was again a rod; his hand became leprous, and was then restored; and he could turn the water of the Nile into blood
Jordan - of Sodom seeing the plain well watered by it, as Egypt is by the Nile (Lot's allusion to Egypt is apposite, Abram having just left it: Genesis 12:10-20), chose that district as his home, in spite of the notorious wickedness of the people (Genesis 13:10)
Trade And Commerce - From Alexandria the journey to Coptos up the Nile took twelve days, with a favourable wind. From the Great Lakes, East Africa, and Somaliland ivory was brought via Abyssinia to the Nile
Joseph - After two years Pharaoh's two dreams of the seven fat and seven lean kine out of the river (Nile, yeowr Hebrew, aa Αur Egyptian, "great river": also Hapi, i. ...
Having in vain consulted his magicians or "sacred scribes" (chartumim , "bearers of spells"; the "sorcerers" do not occur until Exodus 7:11), Pharaoh through Joseph learned the interpretation, that seven years of famine (doubtless owing to failure of the Nile's overflow) should succeed to and consume all the stores remaining from the seven plenteous years. Amenemha III, sixth of the 12th dynasty, established a complete system of dikes, locks, and reservoirs, to regulate the Nile's overflow. Africa, Ethiopia, Arabia, Syria, which shared in the drought (for the tropical rains on the Abyssinian mountains, on which the Nile's rise depends, have the same origin as the Palestine rains), and which partially depended on Egypt the granary of many countries (Acts 27:6; Acts 27:38), came to buy grain. Joseph's policy was to centralize power in the monarch's hands, a well ordered monarchy being the best in the existing state of Egypt to guard against the recurrence of famines by stores laid by systematically, and by irrigation in the absence of the Nile's overthrow, and by such like governmental works, instead of leaving all to the unthrifty and unenterprising cultivators. The Nile was "the cup of Egypt," the sacred cup symbolized it
Pharaoh - , stone and metal imitations of the beetle (symbols of immortality), originally worn as amulets by royal personages, which were evidently genuine relics of the time of the ancient Pharaohs, were being sold at Thebes and different places along the Nile
Spinning And Weaving - Isaiah 19:9 also refers to the flax industry on the banks of the Nile; the emended text runs: ‘And confounded shall be the workers in linen; the combing-women and weavers shall grow pale, and they that lay the warp shall be broken in spirit; (even) all that work for hire shall be grieved in soul
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - The Nile is the Gihon of Eden
House - Travellers near the Ganges and the Nile speak of multitudes of huts on the sandy banks of those rivers being swept away in a night by sudden freshets, leaving not a trace behind
mo'Ses - This was placed among the aquatic vegetation by the side of one of the canals of the Nile
Time, Meaning of - The Israelites were unique in the ancient world in their belief that God had not made them with the land of Canaan, like the Egyptians with the Nile, but had brought them as strangers to settle in a land that was not theirs (Genesis 12:1-3 ) through a mighty act at the commencement of their existence as a people
Bible, Texts And Versions - These writings were preserved at first mostly on papyrus, a form of paper made from the papyrus plant which grew in the Nile Delta
Adam (1) - Rawlinson identified with Babylonia; the Babylonian documents giving an exact geographical account of the garden of Eden, and the rivers bearing the same names: the Hiddekel is certainly the Tigris, and the Phrath the Euphrates; the other two seem tributary branches, though some make Gihon the Nile and Pison the Indus (?)
Ships And Boats - The Egyptians used ‘ vessels of papyrus ’ for the navigation of the Nile ( Isaiah 18:2 , cf
Assur - Assyrian monuments, pillars, boundary tablets, and inscriptions are found as far as in Cyprus at Larnaka (a portrait of a king with a tablet, now in Berlin), and in the desert between the Nile and the Red Sea
Plants in the Bible - cr...
Papyrus sedge (Cyperus papyrus ) also grows in shallow water in hot places such as in Lake Huleh and along the Nile, but it is now extinct in Egypt except in cultivation
Gennesaret, Land of - Some have thought it to be a vein of the Nile, because it produces the coracin fish as well as that lake does which is near to Alexandria
Greece, Religion And Society of - During this era the Greeks established trade colonies on the shores of the Black Sea, the region of the Dardanelles, on the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea, the islands of Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Sidon and Tyre, Naucratis in the Nile delta, Italy, Sicily, and Spain
Solomon - Solomon was able to control, and no doubt profited by, the caravan trade between the Euphrates and the Nile
Exodus, the Book of - ...
Two months elapsed between Moses' first and second interviews with Pharaoh; the former in April, when the Israelites were scattered throughout all Egypt gathering the stubble of the harvest just reaped (the reapers leaving the stalks standing and cut close to the ears), the latter in June at the time of the Nile's yearly overflow when "the king went out unto the water" to offer his devotions to Apis, whose embodiment the river was (Exodus 5:12; Exodus 7:15). The Nile, the center of Egypt's national and religious life, was smitten, assuring Israel of Jehovah's interposition. This plague, exceeding the former in severity, came in November at the critical time to Egyptian agriculture when the Nile's inundation has subsided
Agriculture - —Unlike Egypt, which owed its fertility exclusively to the Nile, Palestine had its time of rain (Deuteronomy 11:10-11; Deuteronomy 11:14, Jeremiah 5:24 etc
Mission - A river (as the Nile) may not originate in the land that it waters, and yet may be indispensable thereto; similarly Christ’s Kingdom is the blessing the world needs most, and its coining must be uppermost in prayerful minds (Matthew 6:9-10), yet it takes its rise in the unseen heaven (John 18:36)
Messiah - The last kings of Judah became mere puppets in the hands of foreign princes, who pulled the strings from the banks of the Nile or of the Euphrates
Joseph - Famines in that country are due generally to failure or deficiency in the annual inundation of the Nile, and several of long endurance have been recorded
Division of the Earth - The Caphtorim and the Casluhim, whose descendants were the Philistim of Palestine, occupied the district which lies between the delta of the Nile and the southern extremity of Palestine, Deuteronomy 2:23 ; Amos 9:7
Hezekiah - of the Nile; and that swarms of field mice ate the Assyrians' quivers, bowstrings, and shield thongs in the night, so in the morning, they fled, and multitudes fell, having no arms to defend themselves
Solomon - The Nile, Mediterranean, and Euphrates, were then Israel's bounds (1 Kings 4:21; 2 Chronicles 9:26) as promised in Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 11:24
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - Isidore discourses of the days, the night, the seasons, the solstice and equinox, the world and its five zones, heaven and its name, the planets, the waters, the heavens, the nature, size, and course of the sun, the light and course of the moon, the eclipse of sun and moon, the course of the stars, the position of the seven planets, the light of the stars, falling stars, the names of the stars and whether they have any soul, thunder, lightning, the rainbow, clouds, showers, snow, hail, the nature and names of the winds, the signs of storms, pestilence, the heat, size, and saltness of the ocean, the river Nile, the names of sea and rivers, the position and motion of the earth, mount Etna, and the parts of the earth
Serpent - AElian says, they come from the deserts of Libya and Arabia, to inhabit the streams of the Nile; and that they have the form of the hydrus
Plagues of Egypt - The Nile was the principal divinity of the Egyptians
Trade And Commerce - From Alexandria the journey to Coptos up the Nile took twelve days, with a favourable wind
Palestine - 2800 2500, according to the opinions of various chronologists) are not infrequently found in excavations, which speak of close intercourse between the Canaanites and the civilization of the Nile valley
Papyri And Ostraca - The pith of the papyrus plant, which thrives excellently in the damp levels of the Nile, was cut into strips, and from these strips, laid cross-wise, horizontally and vertically, upon each other, the sheets of papyrus were manufactured by gumming and pressing
Jeremiah - )...
Jeremiah, like Isaiah (Isaiah 30:1-7), foresaw that the tendency of many to desire an alliance with Egypt, upon the dissolution of the Assyrian empire whose vassal Manasseh was, would end in sorrow (Jeremiah 2:18): "what hast thou to do in the way of (with going down to) Egypt? to drink the waters of Sihor (to seek hosts as allies from the Nile land)?" Josiah so far molded his policy according to Jeremiah's counsel; but he forgot that it was equally against God's will for His people to lean upon Assyrian or Babylonian "confidences" as upon Egyptian (Jeremiah 36 - 37); so taking the field as ally of Assyria and Babylon against the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho he fell (2 Kings 23:29)
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - The place he selected was near Pelusium, an ancient border-town at one of the Nile mouths
Esther - A cabin-boy saved Nelson's life at Teneriffe, and thus won the Nile, and Copenhagen, and Trafalgar, for England
Egypt - Its extraordinary fertility was owing to the periodical inundation of the Nile; and sufficient proofs of the ancient accounts which we have of its productiveness are afforded to this day
Moses - ...
Pharaoh's daughter (holding an independent position and separate household under the ancient empire; childless herself, therefore ready to adopt Moses; Thermutis according to Josephus) coming down to bathe in the sacred and life giving Nile (as it was regarded) saw the ark and sent her maidens to fetch it
Sirach - Since in Sirach 43:24 he quotes hearsay for the dangers of the sea, we should infer that he had not himself crossed it; it is noticeable that he gives the correct seasons for the overflow of the rivers Jordan, Tigris, and Nile (Sirach 24:23-25), and, though the first of these may have been got from Joshua 3:15, the others could scarcely have been learned from the Bible
Terah - His childhood spent in ancient Chaldea; his very crossing of the flood Euphrates on such an errand; the snows of Lebanon; the oaks of Bashan; Damascus; Salem; the Nile; the pyramids; the great temples; the famous schools and schoolmasters of Egypt, at whose feet Moses was to sit in after days,-all that, and much more that we neither know nor can imagine
Palestine - The Jordan valley, in its light fertile soil and torrid atmosphere where breezes never penetrate, somewhat resembles the valley of the Nile (Genesis 13:10)
Israel - The famous Hyksos kings and their people found access to the land of the Nile in this way
Education - No doubt it was a roll of this translation which the Ethiopian eunuch was carrying back with him to his home far up the Nile, when Philip the Evangelist joined him in his chariot on the Gaza road (Acts 8:27 ff
Josephus - Thus Josephus, in spite of his Hellenic guise, is in all things a genuine Jew, a Palestinian Rabbi: witness, for instance-as compared with the tractates of Philo-his version of the story of Moses, where he not only gives us the name of Pharaoh’s daughter (Thermuthis), but also relates how Moses as a child was presented to Pharaoh, and how, when the king put his diadem on the child’s head, the latter threw it upon the ground; and again, how, when Moses had grown to manhood, and was in command of an Egyptian army in a war against Ethiopia, he broke a way into that all but inaccessible country by making use of ibises to destroy the serpents which obstructed the march, and further, how he captured the impregnable city of Saba (or Meroë; Philae, an island in the Nile?) by gaining the love of Tharbis, the daughter of the Ethiopian king (Ant
Christ in Art - In this connexion may also be mentioned the ancient Egyptian symbol of the so-called Nile key ,* Moses - By a singular providence, the infant Moses, when exposed on the river Nile, through fear of the royal decree, after his mother had hid him three months, because he was a goodly child, was taken up and adopted by Pharaoh's daughter, and nursed by his own mother, whom she hired at the suggestion of his sister Miriam
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - The deacon ascertained that Arsenius was concealed in a monastery at Ptemencyrcis, on the eastern side of the Nile