What does Nicodemus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
νικόδημος a member of the Sanhedrin who took the part of Jesus. 5

Definitions Related to Nicodemus

G3530


   1 a member of the Sanhedrin who took the part of Jesus.
   Additional Information: Nicodemus = “conqueror”.
   

Frequency of Nicodemus (original languages)

Frequency of Nicodemus (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
The people is victor, a Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin. He is first noticed as visiting Jesus by night (John 3:1-21 ) for the purpose of learning more of his doctrines, which our Lord then unfolded to him, giving prominence to the necessity of being "born again." He is next met with in the Sanhedrin (7:50-52), where he protested against the course they were taking in plotting against Christ. Once more he is mentioned as taking part in the preparation for the anointing and burial of the body of Christ (John 19:39 ). We hear nothing more of him. There can be little doubt that he became a true disciple.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nicodemus
Nicodemus (nĭk-o-dç'mus), conqueror of the people. A Pharisee, a ruler of the Jews, and a teacher of Israel, John 3:1; John 3:10, whose secret visit to our Lord was the occasion of the discourse recorded only by John. Nicodemus was a member of the Sanhedrin, and finally became a follower of Christ, and came with Joseph of Arimathæa to take down and embalm the body of Jesus. John 7:50; John 19:39.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nicodemus, Saint
Martyr. He was a Pharisee, mentioned in Saint John's Gospel, 7,19, as speaking in behalf of Jesus in the Sanhedrin, and assisting at His burial. Feast, of the finding of his relics, August 3,.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nicodemus
NICODEMUS. A Pharisee and a member of the Sanhedrin ( John 3:1 ; John 7:50 ), elderly ( John 3:4 ) and evidently well-to-do ( John 19:39 ). He is mentioned only in the Fourth Gospel, and there he figures thrice. (1) At the outset of His ministry Jesus went up to Jerusalem to keep the Feast of the Passover, and His miracles made a deep impression on Nicodemus, half persuading him that He was the Messiah; insomuch that he interviewed Him secretly under cover of the darkness ( John 3:1-21 ). He began by raising the question of the miracles, which, he allowed, proved Jesus at the least a God-commissioned teacher; but Jesus interrupted him and set him face to face with the urgent and personal matter of regeneration. Nicodemus went away bewildered, but a seed had been planted in his soul. (2) During the third year of His ministry, Jesus went up to the Feast of Tabernacles (October). The rulers were now His avowed enemies, and they convened a meeting of the Sanhedrin to devise measures against Him ( John 7:45-52 ). Nicodemus was present, and, a disciple at heart but afraid to avow his faith, he merely raised a point of order: ‘Doth our law judge a man, except it first hear himself and know what he doeth?’ (RV [1] ). (3) At the meeting of the Sanhedrin which condemned Jesus to death Nicodemus made no protest; probably he absented himself. But after the Crucifixion, ashamed of his cowardice, he at last avowed himself and joined with Joseph of Arimathæa in giving the Lord’s body a kingly burial ( John 19:39 ).
David Smith.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
A ruler of the Jews, a master ("teacher") of Israel, and a Pharisee. John (John 3:1-10) alone mentions him. John knew the high priest (John 18:15), so his knowledge of Nicodemus among the high priest's associates is natural. John watched with deep interest his growth in grace, which is marked in three stages (Mark 4:26-29).
(1) An anxious inquirer. The rich were ashamed to confess Jesus openly, in spite of convictions of the reality of His mission; so Joseph of Arimathea "a disciple, but secretly for fear of the Jews" (John 19:38). The poor "came" by day, but Nicodemus "by night." By an undesigned coincidence marking genuineness, Jesus' discourse is tinged, as was His custom (John 6:26-27; John 4:7-14; John 4:35), with a coloring drawn from the incidents of the moment: cf6 "this is the condemnation that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light", etc.; cf6 "every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light ... but he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest that they are wrought in God" (John 3:19-21). Nicodemus was now a timid but candid inquirer; sincere so far as his belief extended. Fear of man holds back many from decision for Christ (John 7:13; John 9:22; John 12:42-43; John 5:44; Proverbs 29:25; contrast Isaiah 51:7-8; Isaiah 66:5; Acts 5:41).
Where real grace is, however, Jesus does "not quench the smoking flax." Many of Nicodemus' fellow rulers attributed Jesus' miracles to Beelzebub; Nicodemus on the contrary avows " we (including others besides himself) know Thou art a teacher come from God, for no man can do these miracles which Thou doest, except God be with him." Nicodemus was probably one of the many who had "seen His miracles on the Passover feast day, and believed (in a superficial way, but in Nicodemus it ultimately became a deep and lasting faith) when they saw" (John 2:23-24); but "Jesus did not commit Himself unto them ... for He knew what was in man," as He shows now in dealing with Nicodemus. Recognition of the divine miracle. working Teacher is not enough for seeing the kingdom of God, Jesus with a twice repeated Amen solemnly declares; there must be new birth from above (margin John 3:3; John 3:5; John 3:7), "of water (the outward sign) and of the Spirit" (the essential thing, not inseparably joined to the water baptism: Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38 (See BAPTISM)), so that, as an infant just born, the person is a "new creature"; compare Naaman the type, 2 Kings 5:14; 2 Corinthians 5:17; Ezekiel 36:25-26.
For, being fleshly by birth, we must continue fleshly until being born of the Spirit we become spiritual (John 3:6). Nature can no more east out nature than Satan cast out Satan. Like the mysterious growth of the child in the womb, and like "the wind" whose motions we cannot control but know only its effects, "the sound," etc., so is the new birth (John 3:8; Ecclesiastes 11:5; 1 Corinthians 2:11). Such was the beginning and growth of the new life in Nicodemus (Mark 4:27). Regeneration and its fruits are inseparable; where that is, these are (1 John 3:9; 1 John 5:1; 1 John 5:4). Nicodemus viewed Jesus' solemn declaration as a natural man, "how can these things be?" (John 3:4; John 3:9; compare John 6:52; John 6:60; 1 Corinthians 2:14). Yet he was genuinely open to conviction, for Christ unfolds to him fully His own divine glory as having "come down from heaven," and as even then while speaking to him "being in heaven" in His divine nature; also God's love in giving His Son, and salvation through the Son who should be lifted up, as the brazen serpent was, to all who look to Him in faith, and condemnation to unbelievers.
(2) A sincere but as yet weak believer. The next stage in Nicodemus' spiritual history appears John 7:45-53. Naturally timid, Nicodemus nevertheless remonstrates with bigots. The Pharisees, chagrined at the failure of their officers to apprehend Jesus, said, "why have ye not brought Him?" They replied, "never man spoke like this man." The Pharisees retorted, "are ye also deceived? surely none of the rulers or the Pharisees have believed on Him, have they? (Greek) But this people who knoweth not the law are cursed." Here one who, as they thought, should have stood by them and echoed their language, ventures to cast a doubt on their proceedings: "doth our law judge any before it hear him and know what he doeth?" (compare Leviticus 19:15; Exodus 23:1). Indignantly they ask, "art thou also of Galilee? ... out of Galilee hath arisen (Greek) no prophet." Spite made them to ignore Jonah and Nahum. John marks the spiritual advance in Nicodemus by contrasting his first coming "by night" (John 7:50). He now virtually confesses Jesus, though in actual expression all he demands is fair play for an injured Person. As before he was an anxious inquirer, so now he is a decided though timid believer.
(3) The third stage is (John 19:39) when he appears as a bold and strong believer, the same Nicodemus (as John again reminds us) as "came at the first to Jesus by night." When even the twelve shrank from the danger to be apprehended from the mob who had clamored for Jesus' crucifixion, and whose appetite for blood might not yet be sated, and when Christ's cause seemed hopeless, the once timid Nicodemus shows extraordinary courage and faith Christ's crucifixion, which shook the faith of others, only confirms his. He remembers now Jesus had said He "must be lifted up," like the brazen "serpent," that all believers in Him might have eternal life. So Nicodemus had the honour of wrapping His sacred body in linen with 100 pounds of myrrh and aloes, in company, with Joseph of Arimathea.
Christ's resurrection richly rewarded the faith of him who stumbled not at His humiliation. Compare on the spiritual lesson Matthew 12:20; Zechariah 4:10; Proverbs 4:18. Like Mary who "anointed Christ's body to the burying," "what Nicodemus did is and shall be spoken of for a memorial of him wheresoever the gospel is preached throughout the whole world." Where real desire after the Saviour exists, it will in the end overcome the evil of the heart, and make a man strong in faith through the Holy Spirit. The Talmud tells of a Nicodemus ben Gorion who lived until the fall of Jerusalem, a Pharisee, wealthy, pious, and of the Sanhedrin; bearing originally a name borne by one of the five rabbinical disciples of Christ (Taanith, f. 19, Sanhedrin f. 43); and that his family fell into squalid poverty.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
Most of the Jewish leaders arrogantly rejected Jesus’ teaching, but Nicodemus had a sincere desire to know the truth. He was a respected Pharisee and a member of the Jewish Council, or Sanhedrin (John 3:1; John 7:50), but he was also willing to admit that Jesus’ miracles showed that God was with him (John 3:2; cf. John 2:23-25).
At first Nicodemus had difficulty understanding Jesus’ figurative teaching concerning the new birth (John 3:3-10), but he did not dismiss the teaching. He showed courage in opposing the prejudice of his fellow councillors against Jesus, and suggested that at least they ought to give Jesus a fair hearing (John 7:48-52).
When the Sanhedrin finally condemned Jesus to crucifixion, Nicodemus and at least one other member disagreed with the decision. That man was Joseph of Arimathea. He and Nicodemus showed publicly that they were followers of Jesus by taking his body down from the cross and giving him an honourable burial (Luke 23:50-53; John 19:38-42).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
(nih cuh dee' muhss) Personal name meaning, “innocent of blood.” John identifies Nicodemus as a Pharisee, “a ruler of the Jews” (John 3:1 ), that is, a member of the Sanhedrin, the Jewish ruling council, and as “a teacher of Israel” (John 3:10 ), that is, an authority on the interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures. Nicodemus' coming at night suggests his timidity and his trek from the darkness of his own sin and ignorance to the light of Jesus (John 3:2 ). Nicodemus greeted Jesus with a title of respect, “Rabbi” (teacher), recognizing Him as a God-sent teacher whose signs bore witness to the presence of God (John 3:2 ). Jesus replied that Nicodemus could never see the kingdom of God without being “born again” (John 3:3 ) or “born of water and of the Spirit” (John 3:5 ). Nicodemus could only marvel at the impossibility of such a thing (John 3:4 ,John 3:4,3:9 ), but the text does not indicate whether Jesus was finally able to make it clear to him.
True to his name, Nicodemus defended Christ before his peers (John 7:51 ) who were unaware that one of their number might have believed in Him (John 7:48 ). Their response is a twofold rebuke which may be paraphrased “Are you a Galilean peasant?” and “Are you ignorant of the Scriptures?” (John 7:52 ).
The reference to Nicodemus' initial coming at night highlights his later public participation in Jesus' burial (John 19:39-41 ). Nicodemus' contribution was enough aloes and spices to prepare a king for burial, and so he did. On one level, the burial was a simple act of Pharisaic piety (compare Tobit 1:17 ). On a deeper level, it recognized that in His suffering and death, Christ fulfilled His role as King of the Jews.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nicodemus
Victory of the people
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
One of the Pharisees and a teacher in Israel. He came to the Lord by night for instruction, and was greatly astonished to find that, instead of instruction, he needed to be born again. See NEW BIRTH. To this the Lord added that the Son of man must be lifted up: sin must be condemned, and the Son of God be given in love, in order that whosoever believeth in Him should have everlasting life: that is, heavenly blessings in new creation. Nicodemus afterwards grew bolder, and suggested in the council that the Lord ought to be heard, and His acts examined before He was condemned. The last we read of Nicodemus is that after the crucifixion he brought about a hundred pounds' weight of myrrh and aloes to embalm the Lord's body. John 3:1-9 ; John 7:50 ; John 19:39 . This last act was a tacit acknowledgement of his attachment to the One to whom he had come for instruction, but who had spoken to him of God's love, and of heavenly blessings through the Son of man lifted up, and whom he had attempted to defend in the council.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Nicodemus
THIS, I feel sure, is not the first time that Jesus of Nazareth and Nicodemus of Jerusalem have met. The sudden and trenchant way in which our Lord receives the cautious old ruler's diplomatic certificates and civilities, and every single word of the whole subsequent conversation, all point unmistakably, as I feel sure, to some previous meeting. The meeting took place in this wise; it must have taken place in some such wise as this:
Nicodemus was one of the oldest and most honoured heads of that overawing deputation which was sent out to Bethabara by the Temple authorities to examine into the Baptist's preaching, and to report to the Temple on that whole movement. "Who art thou?" Nicodemus demanded. "lam not the Christ," the Baptist answered. "Why baptizest thou then?" "I indeed baptize thee with water unto repentance, but, Behold the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world, He will baptize thee, when thou comest to Him, with the Holy Ghost." And, had Nicodemus only been alone that day, there is no saying what he might not have said and done on the spot. Nicodemus was mightily impressed with all that he had seen and heard at the Jordan. But he was not free; he did not feel free and able to act as his conscience told him he ought immediately to act. He was at the head of that Temple embassy of inquisition, and he simply could not extricate himself from the duties, and the responsibilities, and the entanglements of his office. He and his colleagues had, by this time, seen and heard more than they well knew what to say to the Temple about it all. And, accordingly, glad to get away from Bethabara, they took up their carriages and set out for Jerusalem, compiling all the way home their perplexing and unsatisfactory report upon John and, especially upon Jesus of Nazareth.
The third chapter of the Fourth Gospel is in many things an absolutely classical chapter. In his third chapter the fourth Evangelist introduces us into an inquiry-room, as we would call it, in which our Lord is the director and the counsellor of souls, and in which Nicodemus is the inquirer and the convert. Nicodemus had not slept soundly one single night, nor spent one single day without remorse and fear, ever since that scene when he saw Jesus of Nazareth baptized by John, and coming up out of the water. And thus it was that he stole out of the city that night, and determined to see in secret this mysterious man. I cannot put you back into Nicodemus's state of mind as he stumbled out to Bethany in the dark that night. To you, Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, and your Saviour, and Lord, and Master. But to Nicodemus that night Jesus of Nazareth was-Nicodemus staggered and stood still-he was afraid to let himself think Who and What Jesus of Nazareth was, and might turn out to be. "Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God." But it took the old ruler's breath away when it was answered him in such a sudden and sword-like way: "Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit he cannot enter into the Kingdom of God." To me it is a most extraordinary and impossible hallucination. My whole mind and imagination and heart and conscience would have to be taken down and built up again upon an absolutely other pattern; my whole experience, observation, and study of all these divine things would have to be turned upside down before I could possibly believe in what is called "baptismal regeneration." No! there is no such thing. Believe me, whoever says it, and however long and learnedly and solemnly they have been saying it, there is no such thing. There could not be. And, certainly, there is no such materialistic, mechanical, immoral, and unspiritual doctrine and precept here. But there is in place of it a divine doctrine and a divine precept that goes at one stroke down into Nicodemus's self-deceiving heart, and cuts his self-deceiving heart open to the daylight. If our masters of Israel do not know what our Lord pointed at when he said "water" with such emphasis, Nicodemus could have told them. And had Nicodemus only been brave enough; had he only had brow enough for a good cause; had he only gone down into the waters of Jordan beside Jesus of Nazareth, we would have been counting up today Peter, and James, and John, and Nicodemus, as all apostles of Christ. And we would have had an Epistle of Nicodemus to the Pharisees, and in it such a key to this whole conversation as would have made it impossible for any man to preach regeneration by water out of it. But Nicodemus missed his great opportunity, and both he and the whole Church of Christ have been terrible losers thereby down to this disunited and distracted day. Nicodemus, ruler of Israel just because he was, he was not equal to face such a loss of reputation and of other things as would immediately have descended upon him on the day he was publicly baptized. And as he lay and tossed on his bed every night after Bethabara, he thought he had at last devised a compromise so as to get into sufficient step with this teacher come from God, or whatever else He was, and yet not needlessly break with the Temple and its honours and emoluments. But there is no deceiving of Jesus Christ. For, have we not been told just before Nicodemus knocked at Martha's door, that Jesus knew all men, and knew what was in all men? And thus it was that Nicodemus had scarcely got his lips opened to pay his prepared compliments to our Lord when he was met again with that dreadful "water," which had haunted him like an accusing spirit ever since he had not gone down into it at Bethabara. Nicodemus stood ripe and ready for his regeneration, and for his first entrance into the kingdom of heaven, and he was within one short step of its gate at the Jordan, but that step was far too strait and sore for Nicodemus to take. Nicodemus saw the pearl, and knew something of the value of it, but he could not make up his mind to sell all he possessed so as to pay the price. In our Lord's words, which He was always repeating, Nicodemus had not the strength of mind and heart to take up his cross and be born again. He was not able to be baptized-not into regeneration, there is no such baptism-but into evangelical repentance and the open loss of all things. And thus it was that our Lord, with all His affability, would not enter on any closer intimacy or confidence with Nicodemus till he had gone out to John at the Jordan. There were a thousand things that held Nicodemus back from John's baptism at his age and in his office, and our Lord saw and sympathised with every one of them. But, King of the kingdom of heaven as He was that night in Bethany, even He could not make the door of the kingdom one inch wider, or one atom easier, than it was out at Bethabara. 'No!' our Lord said to Nicodemus, as he lay struggling in the net of his old heart and life all that night-'No! We do not need to talk any more about my mighty works or your new birth. You know your first duty in this whole matter as well as I can tell you. John told you, and you would not do it. And I cannot relieve you of your first duty any more than I can do it for you. And you may go away tonight, again leaving your immediate duty undone, but mark my words, till the day of your death and judgment there will be no other way to a new heart and a new life for you but to go out to the waters of Jordan and be baptized of John before all Judea and Jerusalem, and then come after Me and be My disciple.' Nicodemus, that blind leader of the blind, had always taken it for granted that when the kingdom of God should come to Israel he would be taken up to sit in one of the highest seats ot it. It had never once entered his snow-white head to doubt for one moment but that be would sit on a throne up at the right hand of the Messiah. Imagine, then, what a sudden blow in the face it was to Nicodemus to be told, and that by the very Messiah Himself, that he had neither part nor lot in that kingdom, and could not have, until he had been baptized in Jordan confessing his sins beside the offscourings of the city.
At the same time, Nicodemus that night was in Martha's house beside Jesus Christ, and not out at the Jordan beside John the Baptist. And Jesus Christ did not open the door and dismiss Nicodemus as John the Baptist would certainly have done. The very opposite. Our Lord, with His utmost tenderness for the ensnared and struggling old man, took patience to put all John's best preaching over again to Nicodemus, and added some of His own best preaching to it, and, all the time, in His most attractive and most winning way. John had scoffed at Nicodemus's boasted birth from Abraham; but Jesus contented Himself with simply saying that Nicodemus must be born of water and of the Spirit. John had assailed the Temple representatives as a generation of vipers; and, while Jesus did not withdraw or apologise for one single syllable of His so-outspoken forerunner, He veiled His forerunner's strong language somewhat under the sacramental and evangelical typology of the serpent in the wilderness. And, then, from that He went on to honour and to win Nicodemus with that golden passage that "Even so must the Son of Man be lifted up." And that golden passage was, I feel sure, Nicodemus's salvation that very night, as it has been the salvation of so many sinners ever since. And then, as He shook hands with Nicodemus just as the cock was crowing in Martha's garden, Jesus said to Nicodemus, with a look and with a manner that the old ruler never forgot, "But he that doeth good cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest that they are wrought in God." John, our evangelist, was present all that night, and he has written this chapter also of his book so that we might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that believing we might have life through His name. And this evangelist, after that ever-memorable day at Bethabara, and that equally memorable midnight and morning at Bethany, never lets Nicodemus out of his sight. And thus it is that we read this in John's seventh chapter: "Then Nicodemus said to the chief priests and to the Pharisees, Doth our law judge any man before it hear him, and know what he doeth?" And then as we read John's nineteenth chapter, we come on this. "And there came also Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night, and he brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pounds weight."
"Now I saw that there would be no answer to me till I had entire purity of conscience, and no longer regarded any iniquity whatsoever in my heart. I saw that there were some secret affections still left in me, which, though they were not very bad in themselves perhaps, yet in a life of prayer, such as I was then attempting, these remanent affections certainly spoiled all." Just so. Just so in Teresa, and in Nicodemus, and in you, and in me. It was surely not so very bad in itself for Nicodemus to let himself be put at the head of that Temple embassy of inquisition upon the Baptist. It was surely not so very bad in itself for Nicodemus, once having set out, to keep true to his colleagues, even if that was done somewhat at the expense and the injury of John. It was not such a great crime, surely, for Nicodemus to yield to such strong pressure so far as to put his name to the somewhat unfriendly report that his less scrupulous colleagues wrote out for the Temple. And it could only be good, surely, and to Nicodemus's credit, that he went out to Bethany at an hour most convenient for a ruler of the Jews. And it is not so very bad surely in itself in you-everybody does it-to take up a distaste at some man or some movement that you know quite well you have absolutely nothing against. It is surely not enough to cost you in the end the loss of your soul for you to think first of your prospects in life, and how you will continue to stand with this great man and with that, according as you cast in your lot with this party in the state, or with that denomination in the church. Everybody does it. And who but John would denounce so fiercely and so contemptuously such secret affections as these are in you? But then, if John and then Jesus denounce, and despise, and deny you, what will it profit you if you gain the whole of this world? But, happily, there is a second lesson out of Nicodemus, and out of his subsequent history, and it is this: Though you have been a coward and a dark friend to truth and to duty up to this night, if God in His great goodness should give you yet another offer and opportunity, seize it on the spot. Jesus Christ is still among His enemies in many ways. Recognise and acknowledge Jesus Christ, and stand up for Him in your Sanhedrim like Nicodemus. Do you know Him? ask them. Have you ever gone to where He lodges and seen and heard Him for yourselves? Have you read the book you speak against? ask them. Do you love the writer, and do you wish him well? ask them. Do you rejoice in an evil report? demand boldly of them. Or do you rejoice, to your own loss, in the truth? The whole Seventy will turn on you, and will rend you. But what of that? For unless you are rent here for His name's sake, the Son of Man will be ashamed of you when He is suddenly revealed and suddenly descends on you in all His glory.
But for Nicodemus, and another timid friend to truth, the dead body of our Lord might have been taken out of the city and cast into the flames of Tophet, that type of Hell, along with the carcases of the two thieves. All the disciples had forsaken their crucified Master and had fled. But Joseph of Arimathæa and Nicodemus went boldly to Pilate and besought him to let them bury the dead body that all other men hid their faces from that day. And Joseph and Nicodemus took the body of Jesus and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury their dead. It was the same Joseph of Arimathæa who had been a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews; and it was the same Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nicodemus
a disciple of Jesus Christ, a Jew by nation, and a Pharisee, John 3:1 , &c. At the time when the priests and Pharisees had sent officers to seize Jesus, Nicodemus declared himself openly in his favour, John 7:45 , &c; and still more so when he went with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to his body, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in a sepulchre.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nicodemus
A well known name in the gospel, compounded, it should seem, of Nake, innocent—and Dam, blood. We have abundant reason to bless the Holy Ghost, in causing to be recorded that memorable conversation, as well as the character of Nicodemus manifested in it, that took place between the Lord Jesus and Nicodemus, as given at large John 3How blessed the light thereby thrown upon that most important doctrine of regeneration, and which Jesus declares to be indispensably necessary for an entrance into the kingdom of God. And it is blessed to trace the effects of this glorious work of God the Holy Ghost upon the heart of Nicodemus himself. When he first came to Christ it was by night. Some impressions, no doubt, of the Spirit had been wrought upon his mind, or he would not have sought after Jesus; but his views were so dark and indistinct, that when Jesus opened to him the doctrine of regeneration, he thought it an impossible thing. The next account we have of him is John 7:50. where he ventures in open day-light to stand up for Christ before the whole council, and got himself no small contempt upon the occasion. By the time the Lord Jesus had finished his redemption-work on the cross, we find Nicodemus so advanced in the divine life and his love to Christ, that, in company with Joseph of Arimathea, he went boldly unto Pilate and begged the body of Jesus. (See Luke 23:51-52 with John 19:38-39) It is very blessed thus to trace the progress of grace, and to prove the truth of that sweet Scripture, "the path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto a perfect day." (Proverbs 4:18)
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nicodemus
A member of the Jewish Sanhedrin, at first a Pharisee, and afterwards a disciple of Jesus. He was early convinced that Christ came from God, but was not ready at once to rank himself among His followers. In John 3:1-20 , he first appears as a timid inquirer after the truth, learning the great doctrines of regeneration and atonement. In John 7:45-52 , we see him cautiously defending the Savior before the Sanhedrin. At last, in the trying scene of the crucifixion, he avowed himself a believer, and came with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to the body of Christ, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in the sepulchre, John 19:39 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Nicodemus
NICODEMUS.—One of the persons mentioned only in the Fourth Gospel. He is described as a Pharisee and a ruler of the Jews. He had an interview with Jesus by night (John 3:1 ff.); and though he did not become an avowed disciple, he protested in the Sanhedrin against the hasty condemnation of Jesus (John 7:50 f.); and after the Crucifixion he brought spices to embalm the body of the Lord (John 19:39).
The name Nicodemus is Greek (from νίκη and δῆμος—‘conqueror of the people’). Josephus (Ant. xiv. iii. 2) gives Nicodemus as the name of an ambassador from Aristobulus to Pompey. In the Talmud we have the form נַקְדִּימו̇ן as the name given to a certain Bunai ben Gorion, because, it is said, of a miraculous answer to his prayer. This hen Gorion was a rich man, and is reported to have spent a vast sum on the marriage of his daughter, who afterwards sank into abject poverty. He appears to have had charge of the supply of water to the pilgrims at Jerusalem; and he was accused of being a Christian. Some have identified this man with the Nicodemus of the Gospel; but the positive grounds of identification are insufficient; and there is the negative consideration that ben Gorion is spoken of as living till the siege of Jerusalem, whereas Nicodemus, already in John 3 an elderly man (γέρων, John 3:4), could hardly have survived to so late a period. Some writers, who regard the Fourth Gospel as un-historical, suggest that our Nicodemus is simply a typical character, constructed by the Evangelist from the traditions of ben Gorion, with the aid of the Synoptic references to Joseph of Arimathaea. Thus E. [1] A. Abbott (Ency. Bib. art. ‘Nicodemus’) says: ‘Nicodemon ben Gorion passes into the Gospel under the shadow of Joseph of Arimathaea’; and speaks of ‘a conflate development of Joseph into two persons.’ He says that N. ben Gorion was one of three or four who were sometimes called βουλευταί, ‘rich men,’ ‘great men of the city,’ and suggests that as an official provider of water he was an appropriate character for a dialogue on regeneration, He concludes that Nicodemus is ‘a Johannine conception representing the liberal, moderate, and well-meaning Pharisee, whose fate it was to be crushed out of existence in the conflict between Judaism and its Roman and Christian adversaries.’ This reconstruction can hardly be persuasive except to those who on other grounds have already judged the Fourth Gospel to be without historic value. The general discussion goes beyond the limit of this article. It is enough to say here that there is nothing in what is related of Nicodemus, or in the circumstances of his connexion with Jesus, which is in itself improbable, or out of harmony with what we are told elsewhere. It is altogether probable that some men of the upper classes and of the Pharisees would be attracted by the personality and teaching of Jesus, and that they would seek with varying degrees of caution to know more of Him. To a certain extent the Synoptics confirm this (cf. Luke 7:36; Luke 8:3; Luke 19:5). We may add that the personality of Nicodemus stands out clearly in spite of the brevity of the reference to him. The protest in the Sanhedrin shows the same blending of courage with caution as the interview by night. There was a sufficient sense of truth and justice, and of personal interest in Jesus, to enable him to risk the anger of the majority by a protest, but enough of caution or timidity to put the protest into an indirect and tentative form rather than into a bold defence of the Master. The personality of Nicodemus and the conduct ascribed to him do not weaken the case for the historic credibility of the Evangelist.
It has been urged with some measure of plausibility that the conversation in John 3 bears the marks of artificial construction. It is said that it is really a brief sermon by the Evangelist, and follows the regular plan of the Johannine discourses:—a pregnant saying by the Master; a remark by an interlocutor who misunderstands the text by taking it literally and not spiritually; then a further exposition by the speaker: the whole being ‘a thoroughly artificial construction on a set plan’ (Gardner, A Historic View of the NT, sec. vi.). There is a very general agreement that the discourses in the Fourth Gospel owe something of their form to the Evangelist. Differences of opinion on that point are almost entirely confined to the question of the extent to which the writer has gone in condensing or re-shaping the Master’s utterances. Without surrendering the conviction that we have a faithful report of the substance of a real conversation, we may readily admit that the Evangelist has put his material into the form which seemed best fitted to make the truth clear to his readers. He is, we may suppose, chiefly interested in Nicodemus ‘as instrumental in eliciting from Jesus’ the sayings which he records. But this does not make Nicodemus a mere lay figure, and his questions mere ‘rhetorical artifice.’
Dr. Gardner says of the question in John 3:4 : ‘such crassness is scarcely in human nature.’ Yet when we give due weight to the prejudices of a Pharisee and allow for the deadening effect of respectable religious legalism, it is not hard to understand the sheer bewilderment of Nicodemus at the idea that he—no Gentile, no publican—needed to be born anew. How common it is for men of such a type to be utterly unable to understand even an elementary spiritual truth, if it cuts across their conventions and challenges their privileges. Nicodemus did not at all suppose that a second physical birth was meant. He was simply unable to conceive what kind of new birth could be needed by one who was already a Jew and a keeper of the Law. His questions are simply his bewilderment beating the air.
The last reference to Nicodemus (John 19:39) appears to show greater boldness and a more definite discipleship on his part. His gift of spices was certainly an expression of respect and reverence for the Master, and its amount is the lavish gift of a rich man. Whether it expressed faith in the Messiahship of the Crucified, ‘the Saviour typified by the brazen serpent which Jesus had explained to him beforehand (John 3:14)’ (Godet), is less certain. Nicodemus may have regarded Jesus simply as a martyred teacher, whose cause had perished, but who deserved to be held in loving memory. He could hardly at that moment have anticipated the Resurrection. He may even have been encouraged to bring his gift by the thought that Jesus dead was no longer feared by the authorities, and that it was no longer a serious risk to show respect to His name.
Christian tradition records many legends of Nicodemus, and his name is associated with one of the Apocryphal Gospels; but nothing further is recorded that has any historical value.
Literature.—Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , art. ‘Nicodemus’; Edersheim, Life and Times, i. 381; W. Boyd Carpenter, Son of Man, 185; W. M. Clow, In the Day of the Cross, 279; A. B. Davidson, The Called of God, 247; G. Matheson, Representative Men of the N.T. 115; Expos. Times, iv. (1893) 382, 478, 527, xii. (1901) 210, 307, xiv. (1903) 194; J. Reid, Jesus and Nicodemus (1906).
E. H. Titchmarsh.

Sentence search

Nicolas - Same as Nicodemus
Nicodemus - ” John identifies Nicodemus as a Pharisee, “a ruler of the Jews” (John 3:1 ), that is, a member of the Sanhedrin, the Jewish ruling council, and as “a teacher of Israel” (John 3:10 ), that is, an authority on the interpretation of the Hebrew scriptures. Nicodemus' coming at night suggests his timidity and his trek from the darkness of his own sin and ignorance to the light of Jesus (John 3:2 ). Nicodemus greeted Jesus with a title of respect, “Rabbi” (teacher), recognizing Him as a God-sent teacher whose signs bore witness to the presence of God (John 3:2 ). Jesus replied that Nicodemus could never see the kingdom of God without being “born again” (John 3:3 ) or “born of water and of the Spirit” (John 3:5 ). Nicodemus could only marvel at the impossibility of such a thing (John 3:4 ,John 3:4,3:9 ), but the text does not indicate whether Jesus was finally able to make it clear to him. ...
True to his name, Nicodemus defended Christ before his peers (John 7:51 ) who were unaware that one of their number might have believed in Him (John 7:48 ). ...
The reference to Nicodemus' initial coming at night highlights his later public participation in Jesus' burial (John 19:39-41 ). Nicodemus' contribution was enough aloes and spices to prepare a king for burial, and so he did
Nicodemus - Most of the Jewish leaders arrogantly rejected Jesus’ teaching, but Nicodemus had a sincere desire to know the truth. ...
At first Nicodemus had difficulty understanding Jesus’ figurative teaching concerning the new birth (John 3:3-10), but he did not dismiss the teaching. ...
When the Sanhedrin finally condemned Jesus to crucifixion, Nicodemus and at least one other member disagreed with the decision. He and Nicodemus showed publicly that they were followers of Jesus by taking his body down from the cross and giving him an honourable burial (Luke 23:50-53; John 19:38-42)
Nicodemus - Nicodemus (nĭk-o-dç'mus), conqueror of the people. Nicodemus was a member of the Sanhedrin, and finally became a follower of Christ, and came with Joseph of Arimathæa to take down and embalm the body of Jesus
Bunni - The alleged Jewish name of Nicodemus (John 3:1)
Nicodemus - THIS, I feel sure, is not the first time that Jesus of Nazareth and Nicodemus of Jerusalem have met. The meeting took place in this wise; it must have taken place in some such wise as this:...
Nicodemus was one of the oldest and most honoured heads of that overawing deputation which was sent out to Bethabara by the Temple authorities to examine into the Baptist's preaching, and to report to the Temple on that whole movement. "Who art thou?" Nicodemus demanded. " And, had Nicodemus only been alone that day, there is no saying what he might not have said and done on the spot. Nicodemus was mightily impressed with all that he had seen and heard at the Jordan. In his third chapter the fourth Evangelist introduces us into an inquiry-room, as we would call it, in which our Lord is the director and the counsellor of souls, and in which Nicodemus is the inquirer and the convert. Nicodemus had not slept soundly one single night, nor spent one single day without remorse and fear, ever since that scene when he saw Jesus of Nazareth baptized by John, and coming up out of the water. I cannot put you back into Nicodemus's state of mind as he stumbled out to Bethany in the dark that night. But to Nicodemus that night Jesus of Nazareth was-Nicodemus staggered and stood still-he was afraid to let himself think Who and What Jesus of Nazareth was, and might turn out to be. But there is in place of it a divine doctrine and a divine precept that goes at one stroke down into Nicodemus's self-deceiving heart, and cuts his self-deceiving heart open to the daylight. If our masters of Israel do not know what our Lord pointed at when he said "water" with such emphasis, Nicodemus could have told them. And had Nicodemus only been brave enough; had he only had brow enough for a good cause; had he only gone down into the waters of Jordan beside Jesus of Nazareth, we would have been counting up today Peter, and James, and John, and Nicodemus, as all apostles of Christ. And we would have had an Epistle of Nicodemus to the Pharisees, and in it such a key to this whole conversation as would have made it impossible for any man to preach regeneration by water out of it. But Nicodemus missed his great opportunity, and both he and the whole Church of Christ have been terrible losers thereby down to this disunited and distracted day. Nicodemus, ruler of Israel just because he was, he was not equal to face such a loss of reputation and of other things as would immediately have descended upon him on the day he was publicly baptized. For, have we not been told just before Nicodemus knocked at Martha's door, that Jesus knew all men, and knew what was in all men? And thus it was that Nicodemus had scarcely got his lips opened to pay his prepared compliments to our Lord when he was met again with that dreadful "water," which had haunted him like an accusing spirit ever since he had not gone down into it at Bethabara. Nicodemus stood ripe and ready for his regeneration, and for his first entrance into the kingdom of heaven, and he was within one short step of its gate at the Jordan, but that step was far too strait and sore for Nicodemus to take. Nicodemus saw the pearl, and knew something of the value of it, but he could not make up his mind to sell all he possessed so as to pay the price. In our Lord's words, which He was always repeating, Nicodemus had not the strength of mind and heart to take up his cross and be born again. And thus it was that our Lord, with all His affability, would not enter on any closer intimacy or confidence with Nicodemus till he had gone out to John at the Jordan. There were a thousand things that held Nicodemus back from John's baptism at his age and in his office, and our Lord saw and sympathised with every one of them. 'No!' our Lord said to Nicodemus, as he lay struggling in the net of his old heart and life all that night-'No! We do not need to talk any more about my mighty works or your new birth. ' Nicodemus, that blind leader of the blind, had always taken it for granted that when the kingdom of God should come to Israel he would be taken up to sit in one of the highest seats ot it. Imagine, then, what a sudden blow in the face it was to Nicodemus to be told, and that by the very Messiah Himself, that he had neither part nor lot in that kingdom, and could not have, until he had been baptized in Jordan confessing his sins beside the offscourings of the city. ...
At the same time, Nicodemus that night was in Martha's house beside Jesus Christ, and not out at the Jordan beside John the Baptist. And Jesus Christ did not open the door and dismiss Nicodemus as John the Baptist would certainly have done. Our Lord, with His utmost tenderness for the ensnared and struggling old man, took patience to put all John's best preaching over again to Nicodemus, and added some of His own best preaching to it, and, all the time, in His most attractive and most winning way. John had scoffed at Nicodemus's boasted birth from Abraham; but Jesus contented Himself with simply saying that Nicodemus must be born of water and of the Spirit. And, then, from that He went on to honour and to win Nicodemus with that golden passage that "Even so must the Son of Man be lifted up. " And that golden passage was, I feel sure, Nicodemus's salvation that very night, as it has been the salvation of so many sinners ever since. And then, as He shook hands with Nicodemus just as the cock was crowing in Martha's garden, Jesus said to Nicodemus, with a look and with a manner that the old ruler never forgot, "But he that doeth good cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest that they are wrought in God. And this evangelist, after that ever-memorable day at Bethabara, and that equally memorable midnight and morning at Bethany, never lets Nicodemus out of his sight. And thus it is that we read this in John's seventh chapter: "Then Nicodemus said to the chief priests and to the Pharisees, Doth our law judge any man before it hear him, and know what he doeth?" And then as we read John's nineteenth chapter, we come on this. "And there came also Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night, and he brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pounds weight. Just so in Teresa, and in Nicodemus, and in you, and in me. It was surely not so very bad in itself for Nicodemus to let himself be put at the head of that Temple embassy of inquisition upon the Baptist. It was surely not so very bad in itself for Nicodemus, once having set out, to keep true to his colleagues, even if that was done somewhat at the expense and the injury of John. It was not such a great crime, surely, for Nicodemus to yield to such strong pressure so far as to put his name to the somewhat unfriendly report that his less scrupulous colleagues wrote out for the Temple. And it could only be good, surely, and to Nicodemus's credit, that he went out to Bethany at an hour most convenient for a ruler of the Jews. And who but John would denounce so fiercely and so contemptuously such secret affections as these are in you? But then, if John and then Jesus denounce, and despise, and deny you, what will it profit you if you gain the whole of this world? But, happily, there is a second lesson out of Nicodemus, and out of his subsequent history, and it is this: Though you have been a coward and a dark friend to truth and to duty up to this night, if God in His great goodness should give you yet another offer and opportunity, seize it on the spot. Recognise and acknowledge Jesus Christ, and stand up for Him in your Sanhedrim like Nicodemus. ...
But for Nicodemus, and another timid friend to truth, the dead body of our Lord might have been taken out of the city and cast into the flames of Tophet, that type of Hell, along with the carcases of the two thieves. But Joseph of Arimathæa and Nicodemus went boldly to Pilate and besought him to let them bury the dead body that all other men hid their faces from that day. And Joseph and Nicodemus took the body of Jesus and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury their dead. It was the same Joseph of Arimathæa who had been a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews; and it was the same Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night
Nicodemus - Nicodemus. (1) At the outset of His ministry Jesus went up to Jerusalem to keep the Feast of the Passover, and His miracles made a deep impression on Nicodemus, half persuading him that He was the Messiah; insomuch that he interviewed Him secretly under cover of the darkness ( John 3:1-21 ). Nicodemus went away bewildered, but a seed had been planted in his soul. Nicodemus was present, and, a disciple at heart but afraid to avow his faith, he merely raised a point of order: ‘Doth our law judge a man, except it first hear himself and know what he doeth?’ (RV Nicodemus - John knew the high priest (John 18:15), so his knowledge of Nicodemus among the high priest's associates is natural. The poor "came" by day, but Nicodemus "by night. Nicodemus was now a timid but candid inquirer; sincere so far as his belief extended. " Many of Nicodemus' fellow rulers attributed Jesus' miracles to Beelzebub; Nicodemus on the contrary avows " we (including others besides himself) know Thou art a teacher come from God, for no man can do these miracles which Thou doest, except God be with him. " Nicodemus was probably one of the many who had "seen His miracles on the Passover feast day, and believed (in a superficial way, but in Nicodemus it ultimately became a deep and lasting faith) when they saw" (John 2:23-24); but "Jesus did not commit Himself unto them . for He knew what was in man," as He shows now in dealing with Nicodemus. Such was the beginning and growth of the new life in Nicodemus (Mark 4:27). Nicodemus viewed Jesus' solemn declaration as a natural man, "how can these things be?" (John 3:4; John 3:9; compare John 6:52; John 6:60; 1 Corinthians 2:14). The next stage in Nicodemus' spiritual history appears John 7:45-53. Naturally timid, Nicodemus nevertheless remonstrates with bigots. John marks the spiritual advance in Nicodemus by contrasting his first coming "by night" (John 7:50). ...
(3) The third stage is (John 19:39) when he appears as a bold and strong believer, the same Nicodemus (as John again reminds us) as "came at the first to Jesus by night. " When even the twelve shrank from the danger to be apprehended from the mob who had clamored for Jesus' crucifixion, and whose appetite for blood might not yet be sated, and when Christ's cause seemed hopeless, the once timid Nicodemus shows extraordinary courage and faith Christ's crucifixion, which shook the faith of others, only confirms his. So Nicodemus had the honour of wrapping His sacred body in linen with 100 pounds of myrrh and aloes, in company, with Joseph of Arimathea. Like Mary who "anointed Christ's body to the burying," "what Nicodemus did is and shall be spoken of for a memorial of him wheresoever the gospel is preached throughout the whole world. The Talmud tells of a Nicodemus ben Gorion who lived until the fall of Jerusalem, a Pharisee, wealthy, pious, and of the Sanhedrin; bearing originally a name borne by one of the five rabbinical disciples of Christ (Taanith, f
Nicodemus - NICODEMUS. ...
The name Nicodemus is Greek (from νίκη and δῆμος—‘conqueror of the people’). 2) gives Nicodemus as the name of an ambassador from Aristobulus to Pompey. Some have identified this man with the Nicodemus of the Gospel; but the positive grounds of identification are insufficient; and there is the negative consideration that ben Gorion is spoken of as living till the siege of Jerusalem, whereas Nicodemus, already in John 3 an elderly man (γέρων, John 3:4), could hardly have survived to so late a period. Some writers, who regard the Fourth Gospel as un-historical, suggest that our Nicodemus is simply a typical character, constructed by the Evangelist from the traditions of ben Gorion, with the aid of the Synoptic references to Joseph of Arimathaea. ‘Nicodemus’) says: ‘Nicodemon ben Gorion passes into the Gospel under the shadow of Joseph of Arimathaea’; and speaks of ‘a conflate development of Joseph into two persons. ben Gorion was one of three or four who were sometimes called βουλευταί, ‘rich men,’ ‘great men of the city,’ and suggests that as an official provider of water he was an appropriate character for a dialogue on regeneration, He concludes that Nicodemus is ‘a Johannine conception representing the liberal, moderate, and well-meaning Pharisee, whose fate it was to be crushed out of existence in the conflict between Judaism and its Roman and Christian adversaries. It is enough to say here that there is nothing in what is related of Nicodemus, or in the circumstances of his connexion with Jesus, which is in itself improbable, or out of harmony with what we are told elsewhere. We may add that the personality of Nicodemus stands out clearly in spite of the brevity of the reference to him. The personality of Nicodemus and the conduct ascribed to him do not weaken the case for the historic credibility of the Evangelist. He is, we may suppose, chiefly interested in Nicodemus ‘as instrumental in eliciting from Jesus’ the sayings which he records. But this does not make Nicodemus a mere lay figure, and his questions mere ‘rhetorical artifice. ’ Yet when we give due weight to the prejudices of a Pharisee and allow for the deadening effect of respectable religious legalism, it is not hard to understand the sheer bewilderment of Nicodemus at the idea that he—no Gentile, no publican—needed to be born anew. Nicodemus did not at all suppose that a second physical birth was meant. ...
The last reference to Nicodemus (John 19:39) appears to show greater boldness and a more definite discipleship on his part. Nicodemus may have regarded Jesus simply as a martyred teacher, whose cause had perished, but who deserved to be held in loving memory. ...
Christian tradition records many legends of Nicodemus, and his name is associated with one of the Apocryphal Gospels; but nothing further is recorded that has any historical value. ‘Nicodemus’; Edersheim, Life and Times, i. Reid, Jesus and Nicodemus (1906)
Nicodemus - We have abundant reason to bless the Holy Ghost, in causing to be recorded that memorable conversation, as well as the character of Nicodemus manifested in it, that took place between the Lord Jesus and Nicodemus, as given at large John 3How blessed the light thereby thrown upon that most important doctrine of regeneration, and which Jesus declares to be indispensably necessary for an entrance into the kingdom of God. And it is blessed to trace the effects of this glorious work of God the Holy Ghost upon the heart of Nicodemus himself. By the time the Lord Jesus had finished his redemption-work on the cross, we find Nicodemus so advanced in the divine life and his love to Christ, that, in company with Joseph of Arimathea, he went boldly unto Pilate and begged the body of Jesus
Joseph of Arimathea - One was Nicodemus (cf. With Nicodemus he took the body down from the cross, anointed it with spices, wrapped it in linen and placed it in the tomb that he had prepared for himself (Matthew 27:58-60; John 19:38-42)
Earthly And Heavenly - ]'>[1] ) in Matthew 18:35, where some critical editors prefer οὐράνιος], in Christ’s conversation with Nicodemus, and are best interpreted in the light of the context. ...
It is evident from the conversation with Nicodemus that the contrast drawn by Christ between things earthly and things heavenly was not a contrast between things natural and things supernatural, or things physical and things spiritual, or things easily understood and things unsearchable and profound, or things belonging to the present and things belonging to the future economy, or things moral in which faith is active and things heavenly where it is passive (de Wette). It was a contrast between truths which were within the range of religious experience, and which should therefore have been within the knowledge and understanding of Nicodemus—‘a master of Israel,’ and truths pertaining to the gospel which were, for the time being, beyond the reach of the religious consciousness. The earthly things were those of which Christ had been speaking,—the necessity and mystery and reality of the new birth,—and also, as Godet rightly infers from John 3:12 (note use of plural instead of singular in addressing Nicodemus), the truths previously preached by Christ
Joseph of Arimathea, Saint - He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb
Arimathea, Joseph of, Saint - He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb
Nicodemus - At the time when the priests and Pharisees had sent officers to seize Jesus, Nicodemus declared himself openly in his favour, John 7:45 , &c; and still more so when he went with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to his body, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in a sepulchre
Nicodemus - Nicodemus afterwards grew bolder, and suggested in the council that the Lord ought to be heard, and His acts examined before He was condemned. The last we read of Nicodemus is that after the crucifixion he brought about a hundred pounds' weight of myrrh and aloes to embalm the Lord's body
Nicode'Mus - In Nicodemus a noble candor and a simple love of truth shine out in the midst of hesitation and fear of man
Aloes, Lign-Aloes - The ἀλόη was one of the perfumes which Nicodemus brought with which to embalm the body of our Lord
Aloe - Nicodemus brought aloe with myrrh to perfume Jesus' body for burial (John 19:39 )
Lawyer - Nicodemus was probably one, for the Lord called him a 'teacher of Israel
New Birth - This is specially the point in the conversation of the Lord with Nicodemus: "Except a man be born again [1], he cannot see the kingdom of God. ...
Nicodemus was astonished at what he heard, yet as a teacher in Israel he should have known the 'earthly' (not 'worldly') things concerning the kingdom of God
Doctors - Nicodemus, himself a doctor (διδασκαλος , teacher ) of the, law, comes to consult Jesus, whom he compliments in the same terms as he was accustomed to receive from his scholars: "Rabbi, we know that thou art διδασκαλος , a competent teacher from God
Rabbi - Nicodemus is also given this title by Christ (John 3)
Harrowing of Hell - Its origin is traced to the well-known apocryphal gospel of Nicodemus (Latin) of the 2nd or 3century, which was familiar to English writers, e
Hell, Harrowing of - Its origin is traced to the well-known apocryphal gospel of Nicodemus (Latin) of the 2nd or 3century, which was familiar to English writers, e
Aloes - Nicodemus brought it (pounded aloe-wood) to embalm the body of Christ (John 19:39 ); but whether this was the same as that mentioned elsewhere is uncertain
Aloe - Used by Nicodemus, along with myrrh, 100 lbs
Teacher, False Teachers - 1: διδάσκαλος (Strong's #1320 — Noun Masculine — didaskalos — did-as'-kal-os ) is rendered "teacher" or "teachers" in Matthew 23:8 , by Christ, of Himself; in John 3:2 of Christ; of Nicodemus in Israel, John 3:10 , RV; of "teachers" of the truth in the churches, Acts 13:1 ; 1 Corinthians 12:28,29 ; Ephesians 4:11 ; Hebrews 5:12 ; James 3:1 , RV; by Paul of his work among the churches, 1 Timothy 2:7 ; 2 Timothy 1:11 ; of "teachers," wrongfully chosen by those who have "itching ears," 2 Timothy 4:3
New Birth - In the central passage in the New Testament about the new birth (John 3 ), Jesus tells Nicodemus, a member of the Jewish ruling council, that he will not enter the kingdom of God unless he is born anew. The alternation between singular and plural Greek pronouns in the passage shows that Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus both personally and representatively. The need for the new birth is not only true of Nicodemus, but of the entire Sanhedrin, all Jews, and, by extension, all people. It fits well contextually in terms of Nicodemus' familiarity with the Old Testament and the need for some intelligibility on his part
Embalming - Also the women who had followed Jesus "bought sweet spices, that they might come and anoint him," Mark 16:1; Luke 23:56; and Nicodemus "brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes," and "wound" the body "in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury
Light of the World, Parable of the - In the nightly visit of Nicodemus Christ explained the mystery of redemption
Search - , "search," RV text, "ye search," either is possible grammatically; (f) of Nicodemus as commanded similarly by the chief priests and Pharisees, John 7:52
Pot - ...
John 2:6 (c) These may be taken as a type of the six people in John who are outstanding in their transformed lives; Nicodemus, the Samaritan woman, the lame man in chapter5, the blind man, Lazarus, and the nobleman's son in chapter4
Spice, Spices - The spices mentioned as being used by Nicodemus for the preparation of our Lord's body, ( John 19:39,40 ) are "myrrh and aloes," by which latter word must be understood not the aloes of medicine, but the highly-scented wood of the Aquilaria agallochum
Aloes - ...
It may have been in the mixture that Nicodemus brought to make His grave clothes fragrant
Embalming - Nicodemus furnished "a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight," and they wound the body of Jesus "in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury
Aloes - Aloe-wood is said by Herodotus to have been used by the Egyptians for embalming dead bodies, and Nicodemus brought it, mingled with myrrh, to embalm the body of our Lord, John 19:39
Myrrh - Nicodemus brought it to embalm His sacred body (John 19:39)
Balaam - (It is not improbable that in the Nicodemus of John 3 is enshrined a counter-play of words-the Jewish party also, it is hinted, had a false and carnal doctrine of their own
Pharisees - We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathæa, and Paul
Pharisees - Probably such men as Gamaliel, Nicodemus, and Saul were men of a different stamp, though all needed the regenerating power of grace to give them what they professed to seek
Secret, Secretly - , "(but) having been hidden"]'>[1], referring to Nicodemus as having been a "secret" disciple of Christ; in Matthew 13:35 , AV, it is translated "kept secret" (RV, "hidden")
Burial - Spices were enclosed among the cloths: Nicodemus furnished 100 pound weight of 'myrrh and aloes' at the burial of the Lord, besides what the devout women had brought
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - 171) records his having read in a writing of Chrysippus a statement relating to the baptism of Gamaliel and Nicodemus by SS
Jannes And Jambres - They are mentioned in the Gospel of Nicodemus (ch. 5) in the warning given to Pilate by Nicodemus that he should not act towards Jesus as Jannes and Jambres did to Moses
Aceldama - Now as the Lord Jesus, being considered by the law as a criminal, (John 18:30) was thus liable to have been cast out with the common dead; what an overruling power must it have been, to prompt the minds of the honourable counsellor, Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus a ruler of the Jews, to have begged the forfeited body from Pilate!...
And there was another providence, directing all this to the accomplishment of the purpose intended; in that the request was so well timed before the chief priests could influence Pilate's mind to refuse; and Pilate's mind so guided by the Lord, to grant the request before that he had power to deliberate. Had the Sanhedrim foreseen such a thing, no doubt they would have been beforehand with Joseph and Nicodemus, and prevailed upon the governor to deny
Jannes And Jambres - Jannes and Jambres are also referred to in the Apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus § 5 (4th or 5th cent
Baptism - " The Sacrament of Baptism is absolutely necessary for salvation, because all are subject to original sin: wherefore Christ's words to Nicodemus, "Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God" (John 3)
Again - Nicodemus was not puzzled about birth from Heaven; what perplexed him was that a person must be born a second time
Embalming - Thus the body of the Savior was embalmed entire by Joseph and Nicodemus, while, ignorant of this, the two Mary's and their friends were prepared to render him a similar honor when the Jewish Sabbath was past, John 19:38 - 40
Holy Grail, the - The origin of the legend is obscure; it may be traced to the Apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus (popular in Britain in the 12th century); the Arthurian legend and the Percival story are probably of Celtic origin
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Aloes - —We have in the NT only one reference to aloes, John 19:39, where Nicodemus brings myrrh and aloes with him, when he joins Joseph of Arimathea in taking away the body of Jesus for burial
Veronica - The Gospel of Nicodemus introduces her as one of the witnesses on behalf of Christ at His trial by Pilate; (Thilo Cod
Galilee - ...
When the Sanhedrin were about to proceed with some plan for the condemnation of our Lord (John 7:45-52 ), Nicodemus interposed in his behalf
Pitcher - …’ But apart altogether from the chronological inaccuracy,—the disciples must have entered Jerusalem early in the day (Mark 14:17, Matthew 26:20),—this statement is not confirmed by Mark 14:14 and Luke 22:11, from which it may be inferred that the head of the house, who has been identified in turn with John Mark, Joseph of Arimathaea, and Nicodemus, is not the bearer of the pitcher
Nicolaitans - The word is probably a nickname, as are Balaam and Nicodemus
Teacher (2) - The discourse with Nicodemus (John 3) was intended to emphasize this very fact, that Jesus was not only a Teacher but a Saviour, and that the passport into the Kingdom of God was not mere knowledge, but a new life which demands new birth
Pharisees - On the other hand, there appear to have been among them individuals of probity, and even of genuine piety; as in the case of Joseph of Arimathea, Nicodemus, the aged Simeon, etc
Can - Nicodemus said, How can these thing be? John 3
Embalm - The Lord's body was by Nicodemus wrapped in "a mixture of myrrh and aloes an hundred pounds weight,
Bronze Serpent - There, in His conversation with Nicodemus, Jesus compared His own purpose with that of the bronze serpent
Alexander And Rufus - This information as to the two sons of Simon being Alexander and Rufus, is also found in the Gospel of Nicodemus (Mark 4)
Joseph - Joseph and Nicodemus then, having enfolded the sacred body in the linen shroud which Joseph had bought, placed it in a tomb hewn in a rock, in a garden belonging to Joseph, and close to the place of crucifixion
Joseph - He therefore, with the aid of Nicodemus, wrapped the body in spices, for the time, and laid it in his own tomb, Mark 15:43-46 John 19:38-42
Apocrypha, New Testament - The two most important works in this category are the Gospel of Peter and the Gospel of Nicodemus (sometimes called the Acts of Pilate ). The Gospel of Nicodemus (Acts of Pilate) is another example of an apocryphal passion gospel. The trial and death of Jesus is expanded as Nicodemus, the chief narrator, tells of one witness after another coming forward to testify on Jesus' behalf. The Gospel of Nicodemus also includes a vivid account of Jesus' “Descent into Hell,” much like that of a Greek hero invading the underworld to defy its authorities or rescue its prisoners
Toleration, Tolerance - Persons of diverse views, habits, temperaments, were attracted to Him, so that Petrine and Johannine minds, the tax-gatherer Matthew and the tax-hater Simon, Nicodemus and Zacchaeus, Martha and Mary, found in Him what they needed
Man From Heaven - Jesus tells Nicodemus, for example, not only that he is from heaven but that those who wish to see the "kingdom of God" must be born from above by water and Spirit (3:5) because "flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit gives birth to spirit" (v
Water - This seems to be what Nicodemus, in the context, understood Jesus to be saying
Attraction - ); and Zacchaeus (Luke 19:4), Nicodemus (John 3:2), the ‘Greeks’ (John 12:21) are only instances of this attractive power which had its culmination in the response of the Apostles to their Master’s call
Descent Into Hades - The apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus works out, in picturesque detail, the story of the ‘Harrowing of Hell,’ a legend which deeply impressed the consciousness of Christendom. In these Odes there is the earliest appearance of the detailed doctrine of the Descensus which is found in the Gospel of Nicodemus, and was afterwards universally prevalent in Christian circles. The apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus tells (ii. Job 38:17 πυλωροὶ δὲ ᾅδου ἰδόντες σε ἔπτηξαν), and the Gospel of Nicodemus ii. ...
(d) The Gospel of Nicodemus describes the passage to Paradise of the saints redeemed from Hades by Christ
Burial - John the Baptist's disciples buried his body (Matthew 14:12 ), and Joseph of Arimathea buried Jesus (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:42-46 ; Luke 23:50-53 ; John 19:38-42 ; [1] )
Proselytes - The presumed existence of this proselyte baptism for males and females throws light on John's baptism and the priests' question, "why baptizest thou then?" (John 1:25) and John 3:5; John 3:10, the Lord's words to Nicodemus, "art thou a master (teacher) of Israel, and knowest not these things?" Nicodemus ought to have understood the deeper sense to which Christ applied the familiar phrase "new birth" in connection with "baptism" of proselytes
John, Gospel of - with Nicodemus in 1618397980_69 and with the Samaritan woman in John 4:1-26). Jesus spoke to Nicodemus about new birth (3:1-21), and John the Baptist spoke to the Jews about Jesus (3:22-36)
Scribes - he had forced his way into that aristocratic body, the Sanhedrin (Gamaliel in Acts 5:1-42 ; Nicodemus in John 3:1-36 ; John 7:1-53 )
Pharisees - At least one of the Pharisees, Nicodemus, became a believer in Jesus (John 3:1; John 7:45-52; John 19:38-40; see SANHEDRIN)
Joseph - There, assisted by Nicodemus, he took down the body and wrapped it in the fine linen, sprinkling it with the myrrh and aloes which Nicodemus had brought (John 19:39 ), and then conveyed the body to the new tomb hewn by Joseph himself out of a rock in his garden hard by
Regeneration - Jesus referred to regeneration when he told Nicodemus ( John 3:3 ) that he must be “born again ” (gennao anothen )
Fruit - Examples include myrrh (aromatic gum of the tree/bush of Arabia, Ethiopia, and Somalia), cinnamon (of the cinnamon tree), and olive oil for the sacred oil for the tabernacle (Exodus 30:22-33 ); the fragrant spices of gum resin (the aromatic myrrh gum), onycha (made from mollusk shells), galbanum (resin from plant roots), and frankincense (resin from a small tree/bush from Ubar, Oman) for the sacred fragrant tabernacle incense (Exodus 30:34-38 ); frankincense and myrrh given by the magi in their worship of Jesus (Matthew 2:11 ); the nard (perfume made from a Middle East plant) Mary poured out in worship on the feet of Jesus (John 12:3 ); the seventy-five-pound mixture of myrrh and aloes (aromatic resin of a Near Eastern tree) Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus used in wrapping up the body of Jesus (John 19:39-40 ) and the spices and perfumes the women took to the tomb to anoint the body of Jesus (Mark 16:1 ; Luke 23:56-24:1 )
Obedience - Jesus talks to Nicodemus about being born again or "from above" as the requirement for entering the kingdom of God (John 3:3-6 )
Aloe - Nicodemus is said, John 19:39 , to have brought one hundred pounds' weight of myrrh and aloes to embalm the body of Jesus
John, the Gospel of - The Gospel of John features episodes in which individuals are caught between Jesus' call for faith and the Jewish authorities' rejection of His claims (Nicodemus, John 3:1 ; the man at the Pool of Bethesda, John 5:1 ; the crowds in Galilee, John 6:1 ; and the man born blind, John 9:1 ). The Temple and Nicodemus (John 2:12-3:21 ) ...
C
Appreciation (of Christ) - He sees through the pure-minded hesitancy of Nathanael (John 1:47), He recognizes the true value of the widow’s mite (Luke 21:1-4), He draws Nicodemus the timid to Him (John 3:1), He knows what will satisfy Thomas (John 20:27), and what will please and win Zacchaeus (Luke 19:5); and His immediate followers include a Mary Magdalene as well as a Mary of Bethany, a Judas as well as a John. In the beginning, shepherds and magi, angels and stars bear witness to the newborn King; so that to the last it is a strange mixed company, that seems to include (by his long faltering before judgment) Pilate himself, the lone, mysterious figure of Joseph of Arimathaea, and Nicodemus ‘bringing myrrh and aloes’ (John 19:29)
Regeneration - " What a dreadful confession this for a man in his dying hours!...
Our blessed Lord, who brought life and immortality to light by his Gospel, brought this doctrine of regeneration also, as a fundamental part of that Gospel, to the full and complete testimony of it in his conversation with Nicodemus the Jew
Myrrh - ...
Myrrh was one of the gifts brought by the Magi to the Infant Christ (Matthew 2:11), and it was used, along with aloes, by Nicodemus to anoint the body of Christ before burial (John 19:39)
Pre-Existence - To Nicodemus (John 3:13), Christ claims to know the heavenly things as having Himself descended from heaven
Gospels, Apocryphal - Gospel of Nicodemus, Protevangelium of James, Gospel according to Thomas, Arabic Gospel of Infancy, Arabic Gospel of Joseph, Passing of Mary). The Gospel of Nicodemus . ...
Our present Gospel of Nicodemus, embodying this alleged report of Pilate, was not itself written until the 5th cent. It relates also that at the trial of Jesus a number of persons, including Nicodemus and Veronica, appeared to testify in His behalf. ...
Although the Gospel of Nicodemus was of a nature to acquire great popularity, and has had a profound influence upon the various poetical and homiletic presentations of the events supposed to have taken place between the death and resurrection of Jesus, and although the Acts of Pilate has been treated more seriously than the evidence in its favour warrants, the Gospel is obviously of the class of Jewish Haggadah or legend
Phar'Isees, - We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathea and Paul
Master - In John 3:10 , the Lord uses it in addressing Nicodemus, RV, "the teacher" (AV, "a master"), where the article does not specify a particular "teacher," but designates the member of a class; for the class see Luke 2:46 , "the doctors" (RV, marg
Amen - When Jesus instructed Nicodemus, for example, he appealed not to Scripture but to his own authority, saying "Amen, amen, I say to you" (John 3:3,5 ; see also Matthew 6:2,5 , 16 ; 18:3 ; Luke 13:35 ; John 5:19,24 , 25 ; 6:26,32 , 47,53 )
Unbelief (2) - ...
There is the conversation with Nicodemus. Possibly the case of Nicodemus may serve as illustration
Mary Magdalene - She, Salome, and Mary mother of James, "when it was yet dark," at early "dawn of the first day of the week," "came to see the sepulchre," "bringing the sweet spices which they had prepared" wherewith to "anoint Him," in a liquid state, since they regarded the use of the powdered spices of Nicodemus wrapped in the swathes as an incomplete and provisional interment (Matthew 28:1; Luke 24:1; Mark 16:1-2)
Burial - ...
Costly spices were wrapped up in the linen swathes round the corpse, and also were burnt at the funeral (2 Chronicles 16:14); so Nicodemus honored Jesus with 100 pounds weight of "myrrh and aloes
Jews in the New Testament - Other references are neutral as in John 3:1 , where Nicodemus is described as a ruler of the Jews
Enthusiasm - When Jesus presented the same contrast in His demand to Nicodemus (John 3:5), it is not probable that He referred to judgment, but to the inspiration which He brought to men in His ministry, the enthusiasm for God and His kingdom which He imparted
Rab - We find this title given to John the Baptist, John 3:26 ; and frequently to our blessed Saviour; as by John's disciples, by Nicodemus, and by the people that followed, John 1:38 ; John 3:2 ; John 6:20
jo'Seph - Joseph and Nicodemus then, having enfolded the sacred body in the linen shroud which Joseph had bought, consigned it to a tomb hewn in a rock, in a garden belonging to Joseph, and close to the place of crucifixion
Paradise - 5: ‘Christ, descending on earth shall lead thy father Adam to Paradise to the tree of mercy’ (this passage is an interpolation from the Christian apocryphal Gospel of Nicodemus); Apoc
Spirit - In His conversation with Nicodemus (John 3:1 ), Jesus said that the Spirit is like the wind in that one cannot see it but one can see its effects
Scribes - But when he converses with Nicodemus, John 3, who appears to have been convinced by his miracles that he was "a teacher sent from God," when he came to Jesus by night," anxious to obtain farther information concerning his nature and his doctrine, our Lord, after intimating the necessity of laying aside all prejudices against the spiritual nature of his kingdom, asks, "Art thou a master in Israel, and knowest not these things?" that is, knowest not that Moses and the prophets describe the Messiah as the Son of God? and he then proceeds to explain in very clear language the dignity of his person and office, and the purpose for which he came into the world, referring to the predictions of the ancient Scriptures
Announcements of Death - ]'>[1] occasion for the mention of His death by our Lord grew out of the failure of Nicodemus to understand the new birth and the spiritual nature of the kingdom of God (John 3:9). The consciousness of Jesus is clear, but He finds in Nicodemus an inability to grasp this great truth. The disciples could not yet, any more than Nicodemus, grasp the moral necessity of the death of Jesus
Conversion - They then experienced a radical change in their lives: Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1 ), the woman at the well at Sychar (John 4:1 ), the sinful woman in the house of Simon (Luke 7:1 ), and Nicodemus (John 3:1 )
Burial - Haste was required, as the Jews’ Preparation was close at hand, and the body, after being, perhaps, bathed (so Gospel of Peter, 6), was at once wrapped ‘in a clean linen cloth’ (Matthew 27:59), the ‘roll of myrrh and aloes,’ of which Nicodemus had brought about a hundred pound weight (John 19:39), being apparently crumbled between the folds of the linen (ὀθόνια)
Proselyte (2) - Tradition (earliest recorded in the Gospel of Nicodemus, ch
Influence - —(α) The visit of Nicodemus shows something of the power Jesus exercised in public. Although Nicodemus was a person of some importance, he treats our Lord, in spite of His humble circumstances, as not only a great but a Divine teacher from whom he would gladly learn (John 3:2)
Jesus Christ - He received a visit by night from Nicodemus
Burial - Why then should it be reckoned incredible, that Nicodemus brought of myrrh and aloes about a hundred pounds' weight, to embalm the body of Jesus?...
4
Doctrines - ‘Except ye be converted (στραφῆτε, ‘turn’), and become as little children, ye shall in no wise enter into the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 18:3), is the teaching of Jesus according to the Synoptics, to which His words to Nicodemus in the Fourth Gospel almost exactly correspond: ‘Except a man be born again (or ‘from above,’ ἄνωθεν), he cannot see the kingdom of God’ (John 3:3). Such a complete change as these words imply—‘change of mind’ (μετάνοια), ‘convert,’ ‘turn round’ (ἐπιστρέφειν, Matthew 13:15), ‘new birth’ or ‘birth from above’ (γεννηθῇ ἄνωθεν, John 3:3), is necessary for all, as Jesus shows by addressing His teaching on this theme not only to Pharisees like Nicodemus, but to His own disciples—notably in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:21-35), in which, in answer to a question of Peter, He likens the condition of all recipients of the Divine forgiveness to that of a man who owes a debt of ten thousand talents, clearly meaning by that the infinitude of
Joseph (2) - In the Fourth Gospel it is told how Nicodemus, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight, joined Joseph, and how they took the body and wound it in linen clothes with the spices (John 19:40)
Scribes - This school was better disposed to Christ than Shammai's; to it probably belonged Nicodemus, Joseph of Arimathea, and others too timid to confess Jesus (John 12:42; John 19:38; Luke 23:50-51)
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - The institution of Baptism is represented by the discourses with Nicodemus and the Samaritan woman; that of the Eucharist by the miracle in ch. Whenever the Johannine Christ begins to teach—whether His words are addressed to Nicodemus, the Samaritan woman, ‘the Jews,’ or His own disciples—He nearly always begins by enunciating a proposition which contains, under a sensible and symbolic image, a religious truth. The numbers, as has been said, seem often to have a symbolic meaning; the figures, such as Nicodemus and the Greeks who asked for an introduction to Jesus, disappear from the writer’s mind as soon as the point is made
Regeneration - Many do marvel, like Nicodemus, at the strangeness and universality of this demand of Christ; yet the strangeness will disappear, and the need of a supernatural agent to effect the change will be felt, if due consideration is given (1) to the vastness of the change, and (2) to the condition of the human nature in which the change is to be made
Weights And Measures - As remarked before, the amount of ointment Mary used to anoint Jesus ( John 12:3 ) was a Roman pound of twelve ounces (a measure of both weight and capacity), and Nicodemus brought a hundred such pounds of mixed spices to anoint Jesus' body (John 19:39 )
Stone - If so, the first bed on which the Lord was laid, like the last one to which He was carried by Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathaea (John 19:38 ff
Ave Maria - And among those who came into more incidental contact with Him by simple inquiry or importunate need, Nicodemus was attracted by the persuasion that He was a teacher come from God (John 3:2); an admission to the same effect was made on one occasion by the Pharisees and Herodians (Mark 12:14); the chief priests and scribes were driven to assign a Satanic origin to His unquestionable power (Matthew 12:24); while the Pharisees reached a stage in their controversy with Him after which no man durst ask Him any question (Matthew 22:46, Mark 12:34)
Discourse - —Leaving out colloquies with particular persons in presence of others, there are to be mentioned under this head only (1) the discourse with Nicodemus on Regeneration (John 3:1-21), and (2) the discourse with the woman of Samaria on Worship and Salvation (John 4:5-26)
Pharisees - Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea) were friendly towards Him
Education in Bible Times - Jesus was recognized and acknowledged as a teacher (or rabbi) by his disciples, the general public, and contemporary Jewish religious leaders, including Nicodemus who identified Jesus as "a teacher who has come from God" (John 3:2 ). , the Samaritan woman in John 4 ), but many times the learner(s) actually engaged Jesus in a teaching moment (Nicodemus in John 3 )
Gospels (Uncanonical) - The Gospels of Thomas and of Nicodemus are instances in point
Disciple, Discipleship - Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea apparently became followers of Jesus sometime during his earthly ministry (John 3:1-14 ; 19:38-42 ), yet presumably remained with the religious establishment and retained their wealth
Holy Spirit - But it remains true that in these cases a new and unexpected development is given to old ideas, as when Nicodemus fails to understand the spiritual birth ( John 3:10 ), or disciples are scandalized by the spiritual food ( John 6:60 ), yet both the terms used and the thoughts represented are familiar, and postulate a previous history of doctrine, the results of which ‘a master in Israel’ ought at least to have apprehended
Apocrypha - The Gospel of Nicodemus (also called the Acts of Pilate), provides a detailed account of Jesus' trial and descent into hell
Pharisees - Among even the Pharisees some accepted the truth, Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea, and John 12:42 and Acts 15:5
John the Apostle - Hence, probably arose his knowledge of the history of Nicodemus which he alone records
Regeneration (2) - ...
The word ‘regeneration’ occurs in Authorized Version only in Matthew 19:28, Titus 3:5 (παλινγενεσία), and the figure of a new or second birth is most distinctly expressed in our Lord’s conversation with Nicodemus, John 3 (γεννηθῆναι ἄνωθεν). The fundamental passage here is that in John 3, in which Jesus explains the new birth to Nicodemus
John, Theology of - In the case of Nicodemus the metaphor is rebirth, a powerful engagement with God that again is life-giving (3:15-17). In particular, the Nicodemus dialogue in chapter 3 and the Passover discourse of chapter 6 betray hints of baptism and the Lord's Supper respectively. The description of Nicodemus's rebirth focuses exclusively on spirit, leaving water behind
Tiberius - ), and the so-called Acts of Pilate (Gospel of Nicodemus) (C
Baptism - ) that to Nicodemus the words would suggest a reference to John’s baptism
Gospels (Apocryphal) - In the Acts of Pilate (Gospel of Nicodemus) the movement has reached its climax in the reverence which the Romans pay to Jesus at His trial, in the miraculous homage of the Roman standards, and in the irrefutable evidence given of Christ’s resurrection, to the conviction of His enemies. , and translated in the following century into many languages, transcribed large portions of pseudo-Matthew and the Gospel of Nicodemus, etc
Sepulchre - And surely Joseph Arimathaea and Nicodemus were both Jews and members of the Sanhedrin
Tombs - The so-called sepulchres of Joseph and Nicodemus are unmistakably Jewish kokim , rock-hewn
Woe - Nicodemus was a Pharisee (John 3:1), and there were, doubtless, many others (cf
Individuality - Nicodemus, the man dried to parchment and swathed in conventional considerations, needs to be born again into a new and fresh life (John 3:1-15)
Individuality - Nicodemus, the man dried to parchment and swathed in conventional considerations, needs to be born again into a new and fresh life (John 3:1-15)
Night (2) - Nicodemus for fear of his colleagues came to Jesus by night at the Passover season; the interview may have been on the roof of some friendly house, or in one of the tents used by the pilgrims (John 3:2; John 19:39); night was also the time for theft, and drunkenness, and revelling (Luke 12:39, cf
Spirit - When, in His conversation with Nicodemus, Jesus refers to fleshly (ἐκ τῇς σαρκός) birth and spiritual (ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος) birth, He is not contrasting the limitations of the one with the inherent independence, as to time, space, etc
Coming to Christ - Nicodemus to some extent (John 3), Zacchaeus the chief publican (Luke 19:2 ff
Baptism - ) that to Nicodemus the words would suggest a reference to John’s baptism
Pilate - The Acts of Pilate (Gospel of Nicodemus) which we possess, however, with kindred pieces, is not of earlier date than the 4th or 5th century
Ministry - It appears in the announcement of the Forerunner (John 1:29; John 1:36), in the great saying to Nicodemus (John 3:14-16), in the discourse at Capernaum (John 6:32-33; John 6:48-51), in the parable of the Good Shepherd (John 10:11; Mark 3:21-317; John 10:17-18), in the remarks on the visit of the Greeks (John 12:20-33), and in the words of comfort to the disciples (John 15:13)
Holy Spirit - 1 Corinthians 13:13, Ephesians 4:4-6); and it appears also in the account of what Jesus said to Nicodemus (John 3:3-21), where the sequence is the new birth duo to the Spirit, belief in the Son, and the deeds ‘wrought in God
Joseph - Joseph had a garden close to Calvary, where he had hewn a sepulchre in the rock for his own last resting-place; and there, aided by Nicodemus, he laid the body swathed in clean linen ( Matthew 27:57-61 = Mark 15:42-47 = Luke 23:50-56 = John 19:38-42 )
Begetting - ...
Again, in His discourse to Nicodemus, Jesus Himself alludes clearly to His pre-existence and essential Sonship when He says that God ‘gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life’; and in the next sentence it is added, ‘For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world’ (John 3:16-17)
Foresight - Westcott on John 1:47), Peter (John 1:42), Philip (John 1:43), Nathanael (John 1:47), Mary (John 2:4), Nicodemus (John 2:3), the woman of Samaria (John 2:4)
Necessity - Almost at the beginning of it He declares to Nicodemus that His purpose to give eternal life to believers can be achieved only by His death: ‘As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must (δεῖ) the Son of Man be lifted up’ (John 3:14)
Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life - Nicodemus' questions about Jesus' ministry and teaching lead Jesus to speak of it (3:15-16)
Abraham - The women of Galilee who ministered to Him of their substance will be brought forward; Martha will be brought forward, and the woman at the well; the owner of the ass's colt, and the owner of the upper room, and the owner of Gethsemane; Simon the Cyrenian also, who helped Him to carry His cross; the soldier also who gave Him some of his vinegar to drink; and Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus, and the women with their spices, and the angel who rolled away the stone
Philanthropy - Whether He spoke the words to Nicodemus or not, it is clear that John learnt from Him that the love of God was not the exclusive privilege of the Jew, but that God loved ‘the world,’ and that His salvation was within the reach of whosoever should believe (John 3:16)
Property (2) - Nicodemus must have been a man of substance, but no question of his relation to his property was raised (John 3:1-21)
Sanctify, Sanctification - This teaching finds exact expression in the words addressed to Nicodemus: ‘Except a man be born anew, he cannot see the kingdom of God’ (John 3:3)
Holy Spirit - He will make possible the new birth, over which Nicodemus so marvels (1618397980_10 ), and will create new spiritual lives (6:63)
Golgotha - The very spots are pointed out where Christ was bound, where He was scourged, where His friends stood afar off during the Crucifixion, where His garments were parted, where His body was anointed, where He appeared to His mother after the Resurrection, and to Mary Magdalene; the rock tombs also of Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathaea; the place where Helena’s throne stood during the ‘Invention of the Cross,’—and many others
Miracles - that of Nicodemus, the Ebionites, etc
Atonement - As early as the Judæan ministry, accordingly, we find Him speaking to Nicodemus of the Son of Man being lifted up, that whosoever believeth on Him should not perish ( John 3:14 f
Humility - —Christ’s interview with Nicodemus teaches that the assumption of knowledge (‘we know,’ John 3:2) may cover only ignorance and confusion
Trial of Jesus - Afterwards, they were able to piece together, from their own observation and from the information of councillors like Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathaea, or of sympathizers in the crowd, or of some of the women, several of the words and experiences of their Lord before the Council and the procurator
Jesus Christ - ...
Jesus' body was hastily placed in a tomb by Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus, because the day ended at 6 p
Gospels - the Nicodemus narrative, John 3:1-36 ), the Eucharist (cf
John (the Apostle) - Here also He conversed with Nicodemus (John 2:13 to John 3:21)
John, Theology of - The Gospel gives a full account of the discourse of Christ with Nicodemus on this subject, but both Gospel and Epistle contain many of the Apostle’s own statements, which show no slavish imitation on his part either of the words of the Master or of Paul, but present his own views as a Christian teacher consistently worked out
Christianity - Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
Pharisees (2) - 16); but Jesus showed Nicodemus that all Pharisaic learning could not give the new life of the Spirit of God and the Son of God
John, Gospel of (Critical) - As regards the impossibility of a second physical birth, it is to be noted that this somewhat wistful, and, at the same time, wilfully absurd, objection of Nicodemus—which in the Gospel is the symptom of a heart profoundly moved, and has a living place in the context—is prosaically reproduced by Justin
Perfection (of Jesus) - He was equally at home in Simon the Pharisee’s house and at the table of Levi or Zacchaeus, with their different clientèle; in private talk with Nicodemus, a master in Israel, and at the wayside well with the woman of Samaria