What does Nehemiah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
נְחֶמְיָ֣ה the son of Hachaliah 3
נְ֠חֶמְיָה the son of Hachaliah 1
נְחֶמְיָ֖ה the son of Hachaliah 1
נְחֶמְיָ֧ה the son of Hachaliah 1
נְחֶמְיָ֗ה the son of Hachaliah 1
נְחֶמְיָ֡ה the son of Hachaliah 1

Definitions Related to Nehemiah

H5166


   1 the son of Hachaliah, cupbearer to king Artaxerxes, who became governor of Judah after the return from exile.
   2 one of the 12 heads of the people who returned from exile with Zerubbabel.
   3 son of Azbuk and ruler of the half part of Beth-zur, who helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Nehemiah = “Jehovah comforts”.
   

Frequency of Nehemiah (original languages)

Frequency of Nehemiah (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nehemiah
The hero of 2Esdras, and cupbearer at the Persian court of Susa, who obtained the commission to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem in the 20th year of the reign of Artaxerxes I (445 B.C.). Sanaballat, his chief opponent, was unsuccessful in trying to prevent the work which had been so divided among the Jews that each family agreed to build a section of the wall as a monument to its zeal. Nehemias cared for the famine-stricken and stopped usury. He repeopled Jerusalem with volunteers and a draft of one-tenth of the rural population. To accomplish this he made use of an older list of Jews who had returned to Jerusalem under Zorobabel (538 B.C.). Nehemias celebrated the completion of his work by a feast, on the occasion of which he confirmed the nation in its observance of the Law of Moses. After 12 years of labor, Nehemias returned to Susa, but was compelled to journey again to Judea, in order to correct abuses that had crept in there during his absence. Among these were marriages with Samaritans and heathens, and failure to support the Levites by tithes.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Nehemiah, Theology of
Doctrine of God . God is introduced as the God of heaven (1:4-5). He is great, mighty, powerful, and awesome (1:5; 6:16; 9:32). The one whose name is Yahweh is the only being worthy to be called God (9:6). Multitudes of heaven bow down before their Creator, who made all their host and gave life to all (9:6). This great Lord is exalted above all blessing (9:5).
God also enters into covenant with men. He brought Abram out of Ur and changed his name to Abraham (9:7). He was able to look into the man's heart and know that he was faithful. He himself makes his promises and fulfills them (9:8). Yahweh is reliable and can be counted on to do what he says (9:32). He preserves his covenant and lovingkindness for those who love him and keep his word (1:5). He fulfills his promises because he is righteous (9:8).
Yahweh is the redeemer who brought his people out of Egypt by his great power and strong hand (1:10). He first saw their affliction and then delivered them with wondrous signs (9:9). He is their lawgiver from Mount Sinai and their preserver and sustainer in the wilderness.
He is not only the God of redemptive history; he is also the God who was favorable to Nehemiah (2:18). Nehemiah recognized that all of his thoughts prompting him to rebuild were put into his heart by God (2:12). The carrying out of these thoughts was done by the help of his God (4:14).
The greatest emphasis on the nature of God in this book concerns his lovingkindness, grace, and mercy. The remnant based their hopes for survival on the ancient "mercy confession" of Exodus 34:6 . The Lord is a God of forgiveness, grace, and compassion, slow to anger and abounding in lovingkindness (9:17). Therefore he did not forsake Israel because of the golden calf episode (Exodus 32 ). He had great compassion on Israel in the wilderness, providing for all their needs (9:27-31).
For the small group of refugees God's mercy was not only a historical event but also a present reality. They base their ability to survive as a nation on it. Although God is compassionate, however, he is also just and righteous. Everything he brought upon the rebellious people was fair and just (9:33).
The People of God . To their enemies they are "feeble Jews" (4:2). They are in dire straights, having become slaves on their own land (9:36). Persian kings rule over their own bodies (9:37). Even their own brethren threaten to plunge them into serfdom (5:1-5). Yet, at the same time, they are the people whom Yahweh redeemed by his great power and strong hand (1:10).
In the midst of weakness and distress they "worked with all their heart" (4:6). Almost as one person they put their hand to the good work (2:18). Though there are some nobles who disdained to work on the wall, daughters are said to have worked alongside their father (3:5,12). With swords in one hand and tools in the other they worked from dawn until the stars came out (4:17,21).
In the past their fathers acted arrogantly, would not listen, and failed to remember God's wondrous deeds (9:16). They cast the law behind them and killed the prophets (9:25). Their sons are mourning and confessing their sins. They stand as one person shivering in the rain to listen to the Torah in chapters 8,9.
Over a hundred names are recorded on a written, sealed covenant (10:1-27). With knowledge and understanding they pledged themselves to walk in God's law. They renounce foreign marriages and working on the Sabbath. In the midst of poverty they pledge to renounce crops the seventh year and to remit slaves and debts in the year of jubilee. They promise in writing to honor their financial obligations to the house of God and to its ministers. Though they have meager means of existence, they will not neglect the house of God (10:32-39).
Scripture . On Mount Sinai Yahweh gave commands, decrees, and laws (9:14). He also gave his good spirit to instruct them (9:20). Their rule of faith and practice includes more than the law of Moses. Their manner of praise and worship goes back to the commandments of David and Solomon. David, like Moses, was a man of God. His prescriptions are considered binding (12:24,46). Information recorded in the historical books is also considered binding in moral situations (13:26).
Early in the book it is recognized that the law foretold their scattering and also their return (1:7). It is more than a historical record. It is something the people separate themselves to and a way of life in which they walk (10:29-30). The book of the law is not something restricted to temple worship.
The reading of the law was done in the city square at the Water Gate. This entrance led to the spring of Gihon, the source of the city's water supply. The reading was commenced on the first day of the seventh month. This would begin the civil new year. Thus it was emphasized that the Torah must overshadow secular as well as religious life (8:1-2).
A wooden tower was built large enough for fifteen people to stand on. The purpose of this tower was for the reading of the Word (8:4-5). It reminded the people that the Torah stood above everything in their lives.
It was the people themselves who requested this reading. They all stood when the scroll was opened. Scripture was read from early morning until noon before men, women, and children who could understand (8:3-5). Thirteen Levites went through the crowd assisting people in understanding the law (8:7).
The law was reverenced. People bowed low and worshiped when it was read (8:7). It was not, however, worshiped. Yahweh himself is the only one granted this service. Leaders reminded the people that gloom and holiness do not go together. When all the people are weeping and mourning, they are exhorted to rejoice and send gifts to each other (8:9-10). They are made to realize that the joy of the Lord is their strength. They celebrate a great festival because "they understood the words that had been made known to them" (8:12). This practice probably lies behind the "Simchat Torah" ("Joy of the Torah"), a special day observed in modern synagogues around this time of the year.
Prayer . The Book of Nehemiah probably contains the shortest prayer in the Bible and one of the longest. The shortest prayer occurs in 2:4 between the king's question about what Nehemiah wants from him and this man's reply. The longest prayer takes up most of chapter 9.
This prayer came after the festivals of Yom Kippur and Sukkoth. The fact that it was not on one of the prescribed holy days indicated that consecration is not to be restricted to certain special days in the year. The people separated themselves to the Lord. They read the law for a fourth of a day and confessed sins for another fourth (9:1-2).
In the Greek text of the Septuagint this is said to be Ezra's prayer but the Hebrew text is indefinite about the speaker in 9:6. The entire prayer is a national confession of sin and a plea for mercy in the midst of oppression and disgrace. It forms a centerpiece of the book.
There are thirteen instances of prayer in Nehemiah. The book opens with a prayer and closes with one (1:4-11; 13:31). The recorded prayer of the first chapter is the culmination of many days of praying and fasting for the ruined city of Jerusalem. Nehemiah has been praying night and day for this city. This man of God identifies himself with the sin of his people that he is confessing. He, himself, and his father's house have acted corruptly (1:7). He calls God's attention to Leviticus 26:33 , which promises a regathering of the nation in response to their repentance. He closes his prayer by requesting success and compassion before the king. This is truly one of the great intercessory prayers of the Bible.
At many points of crisis Nehemiah's short prayers are recorded. When news of conspiracy is heard, they pray and set up a guard (5:19). After five attempts to ambush him he breathes a brief prayer that is only three words in the Hebrew text: "Now strengthen my hands" (6:9). He continually requests that God remember his faithful Acts during his governorship. This man is possibly one of the most prayerful persons in the Bible outside of Christ. He realized there were times for long, sustained prayer and times for hard work and quick, whispered prayer.
Ethics . Before the wall was even finished a crisis concerning ethics must be dealt with. Wealthy Jewish landowners are forcing their brethren into serfdom by high-interest loans. Courageously the governor faces them with the wrongs they have done. To their lasting credit, they responded by remitting the debts (5:1-12).
Nehemiah is not a heartless legalist who slavishly follows the letter of the law. He is constantly sacrificing for the welfare of the people. He realizes that the law is built on both the love of God and love for one's neighbor. He disdains to take his legal right as governor to require a subsidy from the people for his official expenses. He did not domineer the people but rather paid for the expenses of his table from his own money (5:15-18). He did not consider common labor beneath his dignity as a governor, but diligently applied himself to the work on the wall (5:16).
When he discovers Levites and singers have had to leave their duties because tithes are not being paid, he quickly reorganized the country's financial policies. He placed reliable people in charge of storing the tithes (13:10-14). For sake of accountability the high priest was to be present when Levites gathered tithes (10:38).
Upon discovering Tobiah had commandeered a storeroom in the temple for his personal use, Nehemiah personally threw his household goods out into the street (13:4-9). The room was quickly cleansed and rededicated to temple use. Corruption and self-aggrandizement were not tolerated in any area.
People who were breaking the Sabbath were first admonished (13:15), then reprimanded (v. 17). After this, gates were locked and force was threatened (vv. 18-21). When the survival of the biblical Mosaic faith was concerned Nehemiah was not always gentle. At times he resorted to physical force (13:25). When foreign marriage laws were disregarded he struck the offenders and even pulled their hair out. The book simply reports these extreme methods without passing judgment on them.
These marriages were threatening to undermine the very core of Israel's national identity. They even resulted in offspring who could not speak the language of Judah and hence could not understand the laws that guaranteed their survival (13:24). Nehemiah realized from his own knowledge of Scripture that this had caused Solomon to sin and had brought the nation to disaster (13:26). His style of leadership differed from Ezra's, who pulled his own hair out over this situation (Ezra 9:3 ). One must remember Nehemiah was fighting for the spiritual and temporal survival of his nation.
The City of Jerusalem . Jerusalem is an important city. It is the place of the tombs of Nehemiah's fathers. It was also the place where God chose to have his Name dwell (1:9). It is to be a holy city. The first ones to start the building are the priests. As they build they consecrate the walls and gates (3:1). Guards were appointed to watch the gates. It was important who lived there and who entered the city. Lots were cast to insure there would be people residing there. The people who inhabited the city were blessed by the others (11:1-19). Their names and numbers were carefully recorded.
Dedication of the walls was a religious service accompanied with a great deal of gladness and celebration. Two great choirs lead a procession in two different directions up from the south end of the city to the temple on the north (12:31-43). The march was consummated with a great deal of sacrifice and rejoicing. Celebration was so loud that it was heard from afar (12:43).
This consecration of the city reminds us of dedication of the altar in Ezra 3:8-13 . Piety is not to be restricted to the altar site, but encompasses everything within the walls of the city. Building these walls was a great work commissioned by God himself.
Kings and Human Government . The book recognizes that their kings and leaders were given by God (9:34) and that he reserves the right to withdraw the blessing of the kingdom he gave them. The nation is to be a holy commonwealth. Foreign leaders have no portion, right, or memorial in it (2:20).Try as they might, they cannot stop the work because God himself frustrated their plans (4:15). They completely lost their confidence when the work was accomplished with God's help (6:16).
Paul Ferguson
See also Israel ; Jerusalem
Bibliography . J. Bright, History of Israel ; B. Childs, Introduction of the Old Testament as Scripture ; F. C. Fensham, Ezra and Nehemiah ; D. Kidner, Ezra and Nehemiah ; J. Myers, Ezra-Nehemiah ; H. G. Williamson, Ezra-Nehemiah .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah
(See EZRA; MALACHI.)
1. Son of Hachaliah, seemingly of Judah, as his kinsman Hanani was so (Nehemiah 1:2); and Jerusalem was "the place of his fathers' sepulchres" (Nehemiah 2:3). Probably he was of David's lineage, as his name varied appears in it, "Naum" (Luke 3:25), and his kinsman's name too, Hananiah, son of Zerubbabel (1 Chronicles 3:19); his "fathers' sepulchres" would be those of David's royal line. Cupbearer of Artaxerxes (Longimanus) according to his own autobiography, at Susa or Shushan, the principal Persian palace; Ecbatana was the royal summer residence, Babylon the spring, Persepolis the autumn, and Susa the winter. In Artaxerxes' 20th year Hanani with other Jews came from Jerusalem, reporting that the remnant there were in great affliction, the wall broken down, and the gates burned. Sorrow at the news drove him to fasting in expression of sadness, and prayer before the God of heaven, who alone could remedy the evil.
His prayer (Nehemiah 1:4-11) was marked by importunate continuity, "day and night" (compare Isaiah 62:6-7; Luke 18:7), intercession for Israel, confession of individual and national sin, pleading that God should remember His promises of mercy upon their turning to Him, however far cast out for transgression; also that He should remember they are His people redeemed by His strong hand, therefore His honour is at stake in their persons; and that Nehemiah and they who pray with him desire to fear God's name (Isaiah 26:8; contrast Psalms 66:18; compare Daniel 9, Leviticus 26:33-39; Deuteronomy 4:25-31); lastly he asks God to dispose Artaxerxes' heart to "mercy" (Proverbs 21:1). "Let Thine ear ... Thine eyes be open ... hear the prayer," is an allusion to Solomon's prayer (1 Kings 8:28-29). After four months (Nehemiah 1:1; Ezra 6:15-75), from Chisleu to Nisan, of praying and waiting, in Artaxerxes' 20th year Nehemiah with sad countenance ministered as his cupbearer.
The king noticed his melancholy (Proverbs 15:13) and asked its cause. Nehemiah was "sore afraid," but replied it was for the desolation of the city "the place of his fathers' sepulchres." Artaxerxes said, "for what dost thou ... request?" Nehemiah ejaculated his request to God first, then to the earthly king. There seemed no interval between the king's question and Nehemiah's answer, yet a momentous transaction had passed between earth and heaven that decided the issue in behalf of Nehemiah (Isaiah 65:24). Artaxerxes, "according to the good hand of Nehemiah's God upon him," granted him leave to go to Jerusalem for a time, and letters to the provincial governors beyond the Euphrates to convey him forward, and to Asaph to supply timber for the palace gates, etc. As "governor" (pechah , also tirshatha' ) he had an escort of cavalry, and so reached Jerusalem, where he stayed inactive three days, probably the usual term for purification after a journey.
Notwithstanding Ezra's commission in Artaxerxes' seventh year (457 B.C.), after the dead period from the sixth of Darius to that year, a period in which there is no history of the returned Jews (1618483526_99;Ezra 6:1, etc.) and only the history of the foreign Jews in Esther, and notwithstanding the additional numbers and resources which Ezra had brought, Nehemiah now, in Artaxerxes' 20th year, in his secret ride of observation by night found Jerusalem in deplorable plight (Nehemiah 2:12-16; compare Isaiah 64:9-12). (See EZRA.) The account is given in the first person, which often recurs; he forms his secret resolution to none but God in whose strength he moved. How the greatest movements for good often originate with one individual! He next enlisted in the restoration the nobles, priests, and rulers. But his continual dependence was "the hand of his God good upon him" (Nehemiah 2:8; Nehemiah 2:18), a phrase common to Ezra also (Ezra 7:6; Ezra 7:9; Ezra 7:28; compare Ezra 5:5), and marking their joint fellowship in God.
Where a good work is there will be opposition; so Sanballat the Horonite, and the slave Tobiah the Ammonite, and Geshem the Arabian mocked the work, and alleged it was rebellion against the king; Nehemiah told them he would persevere in reliance upon "the God of heaven," but "ye have no right in Jerusalem." Psalm 123 was eventually written at this time in reference to their "scorn" while "at ease themselves"; Nehemiah's "hear, O our God, for we are despised" (Nehemiah 4:3-4) answers to Israel's "unto Thee lift I up mine eyes, our soul is filled with the contempt," etc. His great work was the restoration of the city walls as the first step toward civil government, the revival of the national spirit, and the bringing back of the priests and Levites to reside with a feeling of security for their persons and for the tithes and offerings.
Messiah's advent was associated by Daniel (Daniel 9:25-27) with the command to "restore and build Jerusalem"; and Jeremiah too had foretold "the city shall be built to the Lord from the tower of Hananeel unto the gate of the corner, and the measuring line shall go forth over against it upon the hill Gareb ... to Gath" (Jeremiah 31:39). Each repaired over against his house (Nehemiah 3), teaching that in the spiritual building we must each begin with our own home and neighbourhood and circle; then charity beginning at home will not end there. "Shallum repaired, he and his daughters" (Nehemiah 3:12; compare Romans 16:1; Romans 16:3-5; Romans 16:6; Romans 16:12). Even Eliashib the half hearted high priest repaired. The Tekoite "nobles (alone) put not their necks to the work of their Lord" (compare Judges 5:23); but generally "the people had a mind to work" (Nehemiah 4:6), so that soon "all the wall was joined." The 42 stations of restoration (chapter 3) answer to the 42 stations of Israel's pilgrim march in the desert (Numbers 33).
Sanballat's party then "conspired to fight against Jerusalem and hinder it." Nehemiah used means, "setting a watch day and night," at the same time "praying unto our God" to bless the means. He had not only to contend with adversaries plotting to attack when the Jews should "not know nor see," but with his own men complaining "the strength of the bearers is decayed, and there is much rubbish, so that we are not able to build" (Nehemiah 4:8-11). Moreover, the Jews dwelling among the adversaries again and again kept him in alarm with warnings, "from all places (from whence) ye shall return unto us (i.e. from whence ye can come out to us) they will set upon you." L. De Dieu takes asher not "from whence" but "truly" (as in 1 Samuel 15:20): "yea, from all places, truly (yea) return to us," leaving off your work, for the foes are too many for you; counsel of pretended friends (compare Nehemiah 4:12 with Nehemiah 6:17-19).
But Nehemiah, by setting the people by families with weapons in the lower as well as the higher places of the wall, and encouraging them to "remember the Lord," baffled the enemy; thenceforward half wrought and half held the weapons, the builders and the bearers of burdens wrought with one hand and with the other held a weapon. Nehemiah had the trumpeter next him to give alarm, so as to gather the people against the foe wherever he should approach; none put off their clothes all the time (Nehemiah 4:23). Nehemiah also remedied the state of debt and bondage of many Jews by forbidding usury and bond service, and set an example by not being chargeable all the twelve years that he was governor, as former governors had been, on the Jews; "so did not I," says he, "because of the fear of God" (Nehemiah 5). Nay, more, he daily entertained 150 Jews, besides those that came from among the pagan. His prayer often repeated is "think upon me, my God, for good according to all that I have done for this people" (Nehemiah 5:19; Nehemiah 13:14; compare Hebrews 6:10; Acts 10:4; Matthew 10:42).
While he pleads his efforts, not feigning a mock humility, he closes with "remember me, O my God, and spare me according to the greatness of Thy mercy" (Nehemiah 13:22-31), the publican's and the dying thief's prayer. Sanballat in vain tried to decoy him to a conference (Nehemiah 6). Nehemiah replied, "I am doing a great work, I cannot come down" (Luke 9:62). Then Shemaiah, suborned by Sanballat, tried to frighten him to flee into the temple, where he was detained by a vow (1 Samuel 21:7), in order to delay the work and give an appearance of conscious guilt on the part of Nehemiah; but neither he nor the prophetess Noadiah could put him in fear, "should such a man as I (the governor who ought to animate others) flee!" Fearing God (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14; Nehemiah 5:15) I have none else to fear (Isaiah 28:16). His safeguard was prayer; "strengthen my hands, my God, think Thou upon" my enemies (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14). So David repelled the false friends' counsel to "flee" (Psalms 11:1).
Nehemiah's foes were "much cast down when they perceived that this work was wrought of our God." Psalms 126:2 is Israel's song at the time: "then said they among the pagan, the Lord hark done great things Jot them ... turn again our captivity (reverse our depression by bringing prosperity again) as the streams of the S. (as the rain streams in the Negeb or dry S. of Canaan return, filling the wadies and gladdening the parched country); they that sow in tears shall reap in joy." The Jews kept the Passover "with joy" on the dedication of God's house, the foundation of which had been laid amidst "loud weeping" mingled with shouts of joy (Ezra 3:11-13; Ezra 6:22). Psalm 125 belongs to the same period, encouraging the godly to persevere, "for they that trust in Jehovah shall be as Mount Zion which cannot be removed," for they have "Jehovah round about" them "as the mountains are round about Jerusalem," and "the sceptre (rod) of the wicked (Persia, the world power then) shall not (always) remain upon the lot of righteous" Israel, lest, patient faith giving way (Psalms 73:13), God's people should relieve themselves by unlawful means (Isaiah 57:16); "putting forth the hands" is said of presumptuous acts, as in Genesis 3:22.
"Turners aside unto their own crooked ways" were those who held correspondence with Tobiah, as Shemaiah and the nobles of Judah (Nehemiah 6:10-14; Nehemiah 6:17-19; Nehemiah 13:4, Eliashib). The wall having been built and the doors set up (Nehemiah 7), Nehemiah gave charge of Jerusalem to Hanani and Hananiah, "a faithful man who feared God above many," and set "every one in his watch over against his house." Next he found a register of the genealogy of those who first returned from Babylon, 42,360, and took the census; see Ezra 2, which is drawn from the same document. Nehemiah took the register in a later form than that given by Ezra, for the number of those who could not prove their pedigree is reduced by subsequent searches from 652 in Ezra 2:60 to 642 in Nehemiah 7:62. The tirshatha in Ezra 2:63 is Zerubbabel 90 years before, in Nehemiah Nehemiah himself. The items vary, the sum total 42,360 is the same, Ezra 2:64; Nehemiah 7:66; Ezra has 200, Nehemiah 245, singers, the number being augmented by his time.
In offerings, the drams of gold in sum are 61,000 in Ezra, but in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 7:70-72) Nehemiah 7:20; Nehemiah 7:000 from the chief fathers, 20,000 from the people, and 1,000 from the tirshatha. Only 100 priests' garments were needed in "setting up the house of God" at its foundation (Ezra 2:68-69); but at its dedication after complete renovation 530 were given by the tirshatha and 67 by the people (Nehemiah 7:70; Nehemiah 7:72). The occasions of Ezra 2 and Nehemiah 7 are palpably distinct, though each embodied from a common document sanctioned by Haggai and Zechariah (Zerubbabel's helpers) as much as suited their distinct purposes.
Ezra's reading of the law to the assembled people followed: Nehemiah 8 (he had just returned from Persia with Nehemiah), 445 B.C. Nehemiah comforted them when weeping at the words of the law: "weep not, for the joy of the Lord is your strength" (Isaiah 61:3; Matthew 5:4; Psalms 51:12-13); "send portions unto them for whom nothing is prepared" (Luke 14:13); and the keeping of the feast of tabernacles more formally according to the law than the earlier one in Ezra 3:4 at the setting up of the altar, indeed with greater enthusiasm of all as one man (not excepting 1 Kings 8:2; 1 Kings 8:65) than had been since Joshua's days, reading the law not merely the first and eighth days (as enjoined in Leviticus 23:35-36), but every day of the feast (Nehemiah 8:18). The 119th Psalm doubtless was written (probably by Ezra) at this time, expressing such burning love to the law throughout. A fast followed.
The law awakened a sense of sin (Nehemiah 9); so first they put away strangers, as Israel must be a separate people, and read the law a fourth of the day, and another fourth confessed sin and worshipped, the Levites leading; then they made a covenant to walk in God's law, not to intermarry with pagan, to keep the sabbath, and to pay a third of a shekel each for the service of God's temple, to bring the firstfruits and firstborn, and not to "forsake the house of our God," (Nehemiah 10) the princes, Levites, and priests sealing it. The reason for taking the census in Nehemiah 7:4-5, etc., now appears, namely, to arrange for so disposing the people who were "few" in the "large" but scantily built city as to secure its safety and future growth in houses (Nehemiah 11). Of the census the heads of Judah and Benjamin dwelling at Jerusalem are given, also of priests and Levites there; but merely the names of the villages and towns through the country (Nehemiah 11, compare 1 Chronicles 9).
Then the heads of the courses of priests, and the corresponding names at the time of the return from Babylon, with a few particulars of the priests' and Levites' genealogy (Nehemiah 12:1-26). The rulers were to dwell at Jerusalem; of the people one of ten by lot were to dwell there and nine in other cities (Nehemiah 11). In Nehemiah 12 the high priests are given from the national archives down to Jaddua, and the Levites down to his contemporary Darius the Persian, Codomanus. (See JADDUA; DARIUS.) The dedication of the walls by Nehemiah, the princes, priests, and Levite singers in two companies, followed (Nehemiah 12:27-47); Nehemiah 12:2 Maccabees alleges that the temple too was now dedicated after its repair by funds gathered from the people. This will explain Nehemiah's contributions including "priests' garments" (Nehemiah 7:70) after the census, besides other gifts.
Finally, in Artaxerxes' 32nd year (434 B.C.) Nehemiah severed from Israel all the mixed multitude (Nehemiah 13), Ammonites and Moabites, and boldly cast out Tobiah from the chamber in the temple which Eliashib his connection had assigned him, and restored to it, after its cleansing, the temple vessels, meat offerings, and frankincense which had been previously kept there. Firmly he reproved the rulers for breaking their covenant (Nehemiah 10:39 ff), saying "why is the house of God forsaken?" and insisting that the Levites' portions should be given them, for the neglect of this duty had driven the Levites to their country fields. Nehemiah caused Judah to bring the tithes to the temple treasuries (in which Malachi supported him, Malachi 3:8), and appointed Shelemiah the priest, Zadok the scribe, and the Levite Pedaiah, as "faithful" treasurers, to distribute unto their brethren. (See MALACHI.)
Also he "testified against" those selling victuals and treading winepresses, and contended with the nobles for trafficking with Tyrian and other waresmen on the sabbath, one great cause of God's past judgment on the nation (2 Chronicles 36:21; Nehemiah
Comforted by Jehovah.
Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 .
Nehemiah 3:16 .
The son of Hachaliah (Nehemiah 1:1 ), and probably of the tribe of Judah. His family must have belonged to Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:3 ). He was one of the "Jews of the dispersion," and in his youth was appointed to the important office of royal cup-bearer at the palace of Shushan. The king, Artaxerxes Longimanus, seems to have been on terms of friendly familiarity with his attendant. Through his brother Hanani, and perhaps from other sources (Nehemiah 1:2 ; 2:3 ), he heard of the mournful and desolate condition of the Holy City, and was filled with sadness of heart. For many days he fasted and mourned and prayed for the place of his fathers' sepulchres. At length the king observed his sadness of countenance and asked the reason of it. Nehemiah explained it all to the king, and obtained his permission to go up to Jerusalem and there to act as Tirshatha , Or governor of Judea. He went up in the spring of B.C. 446 (eleven years after Ezra), with a strong escort supplied by the king, and with letters to all the pashas of the provinces through which he had to pass, as also to Asaph, keeper of the royal forests, directing him to assist Nehemiah. On his arrival he set himself to survey the city, and to form a plan for its restoration; a plan which he carried out with great skill and energy, so that the whole was completed in about six months. He remained in Judea for thirteen years as governor, carrying out many reforms, notwithstanding much opposition that he encountered ( Nehemiah 13:11 ). He built up the state on the old lines, "supplementing and completing the work of Ezra," and making all arrangements for the safety and good government of the city. At the close of this important period of his public life, he returned to Persia to the service of his royal master at Shushan or Ecbatana. Very soon after this the old corrupt state of things returned, showing the worthlessness to a large extent of the professions that had been made at the feast of the dedication of the walls of the city (Nehemiah 12 . See EZRA). Malachi now appeared among the people with words of stern reproof and solemn warning; and Nehemiah again returned from Persia (after an absence of some two years), and was grieved to see the widespread moral degeneracy that had taken place during his absence. He set himself with vigour to rectify the flagrant abuses that had sprung up, and restored the orderly administration of public worship and the outward observance of the law of Moses. Of his subsequent history we know nothing. Probably he remained at his post as governor till his death (about B.C. 413) in a good old age. The place of his death and burial is, however, unknown. "He resembled Ezra in his fiery zeal, in his active spirit of enterprise, and in the piety of his life: but he was of a bluffer and a fiercer mood; he had less patience with transgressors; he was a man of action rather than a man of thought, and more inclined to use force than persuasion. His practical sagacity and high courage were very markedly shown in the arrangement with which he carried through the rebuilding of the wall and balked the cunning plans of the 'adversaries.' The piety of his heart, his deeply religious spirit and constant sense of communion with and absolute dependence upon God, are strikingly exhibited, first in the long prayer recorded in ch. 1:5-11, and secondly and most remarkably in what have been called his 'interjectional prayers', those short but moving addresses to Almighty God which occur so frequently in his writings, the instinctive outpouring of a heart deeply moved, but ever resting itself upon God, and looking to God alone for aid in trouble, for the frustration of evil designs, and for final reward and acceptance" (Rawlinson). Nehemiah was the last of the governors sent from the Persian court. Judea after this was annexed to the satrapy of Coele-Syria, and was governed by the high priest under the jurisdiction of the governor of Syria, and the internal government of the country became more and more a hierarchy.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah, Book of
The author of this book was no doubt Nehemiah himself. There are portions of the book written in the first person (ch. 1-7; 12:27-47, and 13). But there are also portions of it in which Nehemiah is spoken of in the third person (ch. 8; 9; 10). It is supposed that these portions may have been written by Ezra; of this, however, there is no distinct evidence. These portions had their place assigned them in the book, there can be no doubt, by Nehemiah. He was the responsible author of the whole book, with the exception of ch 12:11,22,23. The date at which the book was written was probably about B.C. 431-430, when Nehemiah had returned the second time to Jerusalem after his visit to Persia.
The book, which may historically be regarded as a continuation of the book of Ezra, consists of four parts.
An account of the rebuilding of the wall of Jerusalem, and of the register Nehemiah had found of those who had returned from Babylon (ch. 1-7).
An account of the state of religion among the Jews during this time (8-10).
Increase of the inhabitants of Jerusalem; the census of the adult male population, and names of the chiefs, together with lists of priests and Levites ((11-12:1-26).).
Dedication of the wall of Jerusalem, the arrangement of the temple officers, and the reforms carried out by Nehemiah Nehemiah 13 ). This book closes the history of the Old Testament. Malachi the prophet was contemporary with Nehemiah.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah, the Book of
The book is not an appendix to Ezra as its distinct title proves, "the words of Nehemiah the son of Hachaliah," nor would the same author give two lists of those returned from Babylon (Ezra 2; Nehemiah 7), and yet leave seeming discrepancies in details. In Nehemiah 8; Nehemiah 9; and Nehemiah 10, the prominence of Ezra is probably the cause why Nehemiah uses the third person of himself, instead of the first which he uses elsewhere. The "we" and "our" in Nehemiah 9 and Nehemiah 10, as to sealing the covenant, identifies the writer as an eye witness, yet not singled out for notice from the rest. The prayer in Nehemiah 9 is in style such as Ezra "the ready scribe in the law of Moses" would compose. The close fellowship of Nehemiah and him would naturally in these passages produce the similarity of phraseology (Ezra 4:18; Ezra 6:22, with Nehemiah 8:8; Nehemiah 8:17). Nehemiah 12:10-11-22-23 mentions Jaddua and Darius the Persian; it is probably the addition of those who closed the Old Testament canon, testifying the continuance to their time of the ordinances and word of God.
It is even possible that Nehemiah lived long enough to record there being an heir presumptive to the high priesthood, Jaddua, then an infant. The register of Levites in "the book of Chronicles" reached only down to "Johanan son of Eliashib," Nehemiah 12:23. The two "and's" in Nehemiah 12:22 show "and Jaddua" is a later addition. Nehemiah was governor for 12 years (Nehemiah 12:14), then in Artaxerxes' 32nd year returned to his post as "cupbearer"; he "at the end of days" (margin, so 1 Samuel 27:7 "a full year," margin "a year of days") after a full year obtained leave to return; "all this time," namely, a year, Nehemiah was not at Jerusalem, and Eliashib introduced the abuses (Nehemiah 13:1; Nehemiah 13:4-6 ff). How long Nehemiah stayed this second time is not recorded. "On that day" does not refer to the dedication, but to Nehemiah's return: Nehemiah 13:6-7. It is a general expression, not strictly chronological. Nehemiah's description of Artaxerxes' character as amiable (Nehemiah 2:1-8) accords with Plutarch (Vit. Artax., namely, Longimanus), "the first of the Persian monarchs for mildness and magnanimity."
Diodorus Siculus (Nehemiah 11:71, section 2) says the Persians celebrated the equity and moderation of his government. The mention of the building of the city "walls" in the adversaries' letter to Artaxerxes Pseudo Smerdis does not justify Smith's Bible Dictionary in the conjecture that this letter (Ezra 4:12, etc.) was written under Nehemiah's government, and is in its wrong place in Ezra, for it is an exaggeration of the adversaries, the truth being that only the temple walls, which might be regarded as a city wall on that side of the city, and the walls of private houses, were then being built. In style the book of Nehemiah resembles Chronicles and Ezra, proving that it is of the age it purports to be. The word metsiltaim , "cymbals," occurs in the three and nowhere else. So igartha , "a letter," in the three and Esther. Birah said of the palace or temple in the four and Daniel.
"The God of the heavens," in Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel. Peculiar to Nehemiah are certain words and meanings: sabar , "to view" (Nehemiah 2:13; Nehemiah 2:15); meah , "the hundredth part" interest (Nehemiah 5:11); guwph (hiphil ), "shut" (Nehemiah 7:3); moal , "lifting up" (Nehemiah 8:6); miqerah , "read" (Nehemiah 8:8); huyedot , "psalms of thanksgiving" (Nehemiah 12:8); tahalukaah , "procession" (Nehemiah 12:31); otsrah (Nehemiah 13:13), "treasurers." Aramaisms also agree with the age when Nehemiah wrote. (See CANON OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.)
Nehemiah and Malachi, under Ezra, the arranger and finisher of the canon, added their inspired writings as a seal to complete the whole. The Book of Nehemiah bears on it the impress of the author's earnest piety and intense patriotism. And though the opening words, "Dibhree Νehemiah ", could mean "the affairs of Nehemiah," yet the fact that the first person is used in Nehemiah 1 - 7:5 and mostly Nehemiah 11:1 - 12:47 and Nehemiah 13 renders it more likely that the heading is "the words of Nehemiah." Probably, as compiler as well as author of the whole, he inserted from public documents Nehemiah 8:1-10:39, for here the third person is used; also Nehemiah 12:26-27. But that as a whole the work is that of Nehemiah is almost a moral certainty.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nehemiah
Nehemiah (nç'he-mî'ah), comforted of Jehovah. 1. A Jew of piety and zeal, born during the exile; but his family and tribe are not known. Raised to the office of cup-bearer to the Persian monarch, Nehemiah did not forget his desolated country, and was commissioned, at his own request, to visit Jerusalem and rebuild the city; which he accomplished under the most perplexing difficulties. The twentieth year of Artaxerxes, when Nehemiah went to Jerusalem, is usually fixed in b.c. 444; others, with some degree of probability, fix it to b.c. 451 Nehemiah 1:1; Nehemiah 7:2. Nehemiah was made tirshatha = "governor" of Judea, under Artaxerxes Longimanus. Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1; Nehemiah 12:26. He is also called the pechah, whence the modern pasha, a governor of a province. Nehemiah 12:26. Nehemiah was governor of Jerusalem twelve years, Nehemiah 5:14-19; and then returned to the Persian court, where he remained "certain days." Nehemiah 13:6. After nine or ten months he returned to Jerusalem, as governor, the second time; and corrected the abuses which had crept in during his absence. Nehemiah 13:7-31; Malachi 2:9-17; Malachi 3:6-12. He remained in power till the restoration of affairs in Jerusalem, probably about ten years; and died at an advanced age, probably in that city.
Nehemiah, Book of, is the 16th in the order of the books of the Old Testament. It supplements the book of Ezra. It relates Nehemiah's great work of rebuilding Jerusalem and the reclamation of the customs and laws of Moses, which had fallen into disuse. The account of the walls and gates in chap. 3 is among the most valuable documents for the settlement of the topography of ancient Jerusalem. The registers and lists of names are also of value. Nehemiah is the author of the first seven chapters, and part of the twelfth and thirteenth. The change from the use of the first person to that of the third in the remaining chapters, and the fact that some names in the lists were not extant till after Nehemiah's death, point to some other hand as their author, 2. One who returned in the first expedition from Babylon under Zerubbabel. Ezra 2:2; Nehemiah 7:7. 3. The son of Azbuk, who helped to repair the gates of Jerusalem. Nehemiah 3:16.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nehemiah, Book of
NEHEMIAH, BOOK OF. The two books, separated in our Bible and appearing there as Ezra and Nehemiah , originally formed a single book (as appears from the Talmud, the LXX [1] , and from internal evidence), which was the sequel to Chronicles . In fact Ezra verbally continues the narrative of 2 Chronicles 36:1-23 (cf. 2 Chronicles 36:22-23 with Ezra 1:1-2 ), and the whole work 1 and 2 Chron., Ezra, and Nehemiah forms a single continuous narrative from Adam to Nehemiah’s second visit to Jerusalem, and was probably compiled by the Chronicler. That part of this voluminous work which now bears the title Nehemiah is so called because it deals largely with the career of the Jewish patriot whose name it carries, and embodies excerpts of considerable extent from his personal memoirs.
1. Extracts from the memoirs embodied in Nehemiah . ( a ) Nehemiah 1:1 to Nehemiah 7:5 . At the outset we meet with a long section where the first person sing, is used throughout, viz. Nehemiah 1:1 to Nehemiah 7:6 . These chapters are indubitably authentic extracts from Nehemiah’s personal memoirs. They are distinguished by individual characteristics which help us to form a distinct idea of the writer’s personality. Enthusiasm for a great idea, and unstinting and unselfish devotlon to its realization, are marked features. From Nehemiah 5:14 it is clear that the narrative can not have been put into its present form till some years after the events recounted. Doubts have been raised as to the authenticity of Nehemiah 6:15 (the walls finished in 52 days), but the objection is not a fatal one. It should be noted, however, that according to Josephus ( Ant . XI. Nehemiah 6:8 ) the building of the walls lasted 2 years and 8 months. On what authority Josephus bases this assertion is not known. ( Nehemiah 3:1-32 , a llst of persons who helped to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem, has also been the subject of doubt.)
( b ) Nehemiah 7:6-73 a. This section contains a list of the exiles who returned with Zerubbabel, which Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 7:5 ) says he ‘found’: it also appears in Ezra’s memoirs ( Ezra 2:1-70 ), with slight differences. It forms a natural and easy continuation to Nehemiah 7:5 , and probably from the very first stood as a constituent element in Nehemiah’s memoirs.
( c ) Ch. 11. This chapter, which contains a list of persons who drew lots to reside at Jerusalem, and other details regarding the settlement of the capital, probably also stood in the original memoirs. The list which partly recurs in 1 Chronicles 9:3-17 is to be regarded as the immediate continuation of ch. 7 (with Ewald), and refers to measures taken by Zerubbabel. Doubtless it was followed in the memoirs by an account of what Nehemiah did to resume and complete these measures (cf. Nehemiah 7:4 ; Nehemiah 7:6 ), but this has, unfortunately, not been preserved to us.
( d ) Nehemiah 12:27-43 . Account of the dedication of the walls. Notice the resumption of the 1st pers. sing, ( Nehemiah 12:31 ; Nehemiah 12:38 ; Nehemiah 12:40 ). This passage is an excerpt from the memoirs, but has been abridged and revised by the compiler.
( e ) Nehemiah 13:4-31 . Another extract from the memoirs, giving details of a time some 12 or more years later than that referred to in the earlier extracts. It deals with Nehemiah’s second visit.
2. Passages in Nehemiah not derived from the memoirs . ( a ) Neh 7:73 b 10:40 (39). This long section breaks the connexion which it is generally agreed exists between Nehemiah 7:73 a and ch. 11. In its present form it is doubtless due to the compiler; but it contains so many details of an apparently authentic character, its representation is often so vivid, that it is probable that the work of an eye-witness has been used and worked up by the compiler in producing the present narrative. Probably Nehemiah 9:6-38 ; Nehemiah 10:1-39 has been taken over directly from the memoirs of Ezra (the LXX [1] ascribes the prayer beginning in Nehemiah 9:6 ” to Ezra: ‘And Ezra said’). The whole section, therefore, can be regarded as of first-rate authority.
( b ) Nehemiah 12:1-26 . A list of priests and Levites who returned with Zerubbabel. Notice how the priestly genealogy is carried far down below Nehemiah’s time, as far, in fact, as the reign of Darius the Persian ( Nehemiah 12:22 ), i.e . Darius iii. Codomannus (reigned b.c. 335 331). The high priest Jaddua mentioned in Nehemiah 12:11 is known from Josephus to have been a contemporary of Alexander the Great.
3. Historical value of the Book . On the whole, recent criticism has been favourable to the older view as to the essential trustworthiness of the narrative of events given in Ezra-Nehemiah. Reference has already been made in the previous article to the view that the Artaxerxes mentioned is the second of that name. If this is accepted, Ezra’s visit and work of reform fall in the year 398. Kosters goes much further than this.
‘According to him, a return of exiles in the second year of Cyrus did not take place at all; the building of the Temple and the walls was rather the work of the population that had remained behind in the land (2 Kings 25:12 ), of whom Zerubbabel and Nehemiah were governors; Ezra’s visit and work of reform fall in the second governorship of Nehemiah, after the events narrated in Nehemiah 13:4-31 . Ezra arrived for the first time after 433; first of all the community was reconstituted by the dissolution of the mixed marriages, and then solemnly bound to the observance of the Law which had been brought with him by Ezra: the first return-journey under Zerubbabel, with all those who joined themselves with him, has been invented by the Chronicler, who reversed the order of events. Finally, according to Torrey, the “I” passages, with the exception of Nehemiah 1:1-11 ; Nehemiah 2:1-20 (mainly) and Nehemiah 3:32 to Nehemiah 6:19 (mainly), have been fabricated by the Chronicler, who in them created his masterpiece: and Nehemiah also belongs to the reign of Artaxerxes ii. (Cornill).
Kosters’ theory has been energetically opposed by Wellhausen, and since Ed. Meyer’s demonstration of the essential authenticity of the documents embodied in Ezra 4:1-24 ; Ezra 5:1-17 ; Ezra 6:1-22 ; Ezra 7:1-28 , the extreme form of the critical theory may be regarded as having lost most of its plausibility.
G. H. Box.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nehemiah
NEHEMIAH. 1 . One of the twelve heads of the Jewish community ( Ezra 2:2 = Nehemiah 7:7 ), 1E Esther 5:8 Nehemiah 2:1-20 . One of those who helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:16 ). 3. See the following article.
NEHEMIAH. Son of Hacaliah and cupbearer to king Artaxerxes. Our sole source of information regarding this great Jewish patriot is the book that bears his name. According to this, in the 20th year of Artaxerxes ( i.e ., as usually understood, of Artaxerxes i. Longimanus, 464 424), b.c. 445 444, Nehemiah is at Susa, the chief city of Elam and the winter residence of the Persian court. Here, in consequence of a report that reaches him regarding the ruined condition of Jerusalem and its people, Nehemiah is, on his own initiative, appointed governor ( pechah ) of the province of Judæa by the king. He is granted a limited leave of absence by the latter, furnished with royal letters and an escort to assure his safe passage; and also with a royal rescript to Asaph, the keeper of the king’s forests, commanding that he shall be furnished with sufficient supplies of timber. On arriving at Jerusalem, having satisfied himself as to the ruinous condition of the city walls, he energetically begins the task of rebuilding them, and, in spite of much opposition from without (from Sanballat and others), he, with the aid of the entire Jewish population drawn from the outlying villages, successfully accomplishes his undertaking within two months ( Nehemiah 1:1-11 ; Nehemiah 2:1-20 ; Nehemiah 3:1-32 ; Nehemiah 4:1-23 ; Nehemiah 5:1-19 ; Nehemiah 6:1-19 ; Nehemiah 7:1-73 ). All this, according to the usually accepted chronology, happened in the year 444. The wall was ‘finished’ on the 25th day of the 6th month ( Nehemiah 6:16 ), and on the first day of the following month the events of the religious reform described in chs. 8 10 apparently began. The Book of the Law was read by Ezra in the presence of Nehemiah before the people in solemn assembly; the Feast of Tabernacles was celebrated ( Nehemiah 8:18 ); national confession of sin was made (ch. 9); and the ‘covenant’ was sealed, the people pledging themselves to observe its obligations (ch. 10). In Nehemiah 12:27-43 a description of the solemn dedication of the completed walls is given. If 2Ma 1:19 can be relied on as preserving a true tradition, the dedication took place on the 25th of Chislev (December), i.e . three months after the completion, and two months after the reading of the Law and the celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles.
The exact sequence of these events is uncertain. Some would place the reading of the Law, etc., subsequent to the Dedication, in the following year. Rawlinson proposed to place the Dedication 12 years later, in Nehemiah’ s second governorship. But this view is improbable.
Shortly after these events, it would seem, Nehemiah returned to the Persian court, and was absent from Jerusalem for some years.
How long exactly Nehemiah’s first governorship lasted, and for how great an interval he was absent from Jerusalem, are uncertaio. In Nehemiah 5:14 it seems to he stated definitely that he was goveroor in the first instance for 12 years. But in Nehemiah 13:6 Nehemiah says: ‘But all this time I was not at Jerusalem: for in the two-and-thirtieth year of Artaxerxes, king of Babylon, I went unto the king, and, after certain days, asked I leave of the king.’ On the whole it seems probable that Nehemiah 5:14 means that during the twelve years Nehemiah, though absent on court duty, was actually governor, ruling by deputies; and that in the 32nd year of the king’s reign he again secured leave of absence, and came to Jerusalem (b.c. 433). The evils he found on his return must have taken some considerable time to develop.
On his return to Jerusalem in 433 Nehemiah found various abuses and internal disorders rampant in the community. Eliashib ‘the priest’ had provided Tobiah with quarters in one of the Temple-chambers (Nehemiah 13:4 f.), the Levites had not received their dues, the Sabbath was openly desecrated in and around Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 13:15 f.), and, in spite of Ezra’s great puritanical movement, mixed marriages were still common, and the children of such marriages spoke ‘half’ in their mothers’ foreign speech ( Nehemiah 13:23 f.). Possibly information as to these developments had impelled Nehemiah to return. At any rate, on his arrival he asserted himself with characteristic vigour, and inaugurated drastic measures of reform. One characteristic sentence vividly illustrates this relentless zeal: ‘And one of the sons of Joiada, the son of Eliashib the high priest, was son-in-law to San-ballat the Horonite: therefore I chased him from me’ ( Nehemiah 13:28 ). ‘Thus cleansed I them’ he proceeds ‘from every thing strange, and appointed wards for the priests and for the Levites, every one to his work: and for the wood offering at times appointed, and for the first-fruits’ ( Nehemiah 13:30 ).
The Book of Nehemiah (see next article) is composite in character, and the narrative is in part fragmentary. Hence the actual course of events is by no means always clear and certain. Some scholars are of opinion that the Artaxerxes referred to is Artaxerxes ii. Mnemon (reigned b.c. 404 358), and suppose that Nehemiah was governor for the 12 years 384 372, and again at a later period. Josephus places Nehemiah in the time of Xerxes.
The personality of Nehemiah, as revealed in his memoirs, is in many respects strangely attractive. He appears as a gifted and accomplished man of action, well versed in the ways of the world, and well equipped to meet difficult situations. The combination of strength and gracefulness, the generosity, fervent patriotism, and religious zeal of the man contributed to form a personality of striking force and power. He is a unique figure in the OT, and rendered services of incalculable value to the cause of Judaism. Even his limitations reveal a certain strength ( e.g . his naïve prayer: ‘Remember unto me, O my God, for good all that I have done for this people’). Like all great men, he has become the subject of legend (cf. 2Ma 1:18 f.). But he deserves in every respect the eulogium pronounced upon him by ben-Sira ( Sir 49:13 ) and by Josephus, who ( Ant . XI. v. 8) says of him: ‘He was a man of good and righteous character, and very ambitious to make his own nation happy; and he hath left the walls of Jerusalem as an eternal monument of himself.’
G. H. Box.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah
As governor of Jerusalem and author of a book, Nehemiah is an important character in the biblical record of Israel’s reconstruction after the captivity in Babylon. All that we know of Nehemiah comes from the book that he wrote (Nehemiah 1:1).
Circumstances of the time
When Persia conquered Babylon and released the captive peoples (539 BC), many Jews returned to Palestine. One of their first achievements, in spite of some early setbacks, was the reconstruction of the temple in Jerusalem. But the city wall remained in ruins, and only when Nehemiah came to Jerusalem as governor in 445 BC was it rebuilt. This was more than ninety years after the first group of people had returned from captivity (Nehemiah 2:1; cf. Ezra 1:1-4). (For events leading up to the time of Nehemiah see EZRA.)
Nehemiah was a man of forceful character who had the ability to motivate people. He was a good organizer and leader, but more importantly he was a man of prayer who trusted God, feared God and obeyed his commandments (Nehemiah 1:4; Nehemiah 2:4; Nehemiah 4:20; Nehemiah 5:15; Nehemiah 6:11; Nehemiah 7:2; Nehemiah 13:17; Nehemiah 13:25; Nehemiah 13:30). He was fearless in dealing with opponents (Nehemiah 4:14; Nehemiah 4:20; Nehemiah 6:8; Nehemiah 6:11; Nehemiah 13:8), yet sympathetic and self-sacrificing in helping the needy (Nehemiah 5:11; Nehemiah 5:14-18).
Most of the book of Nehemiah seems to have come from the personal records that Nehemiah kept during his governorship of Jerusalem. The book is therefore largely in the first person. Nehemiah had two periods as governor of Jerusalem, an earlier period lasting twelve years and a later period of unknown length (Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 13:6-7).
Summary of Nehemiah’s book
Nehemiah first became governor as a result of a visit to Persia by some Jews from Jerusalem. At that time Nehemiah held a trusted position in the Persian palace, and the Jews no doubt hoped he could persuade the king to support them against the attacks of their opponents (1:1-3). Being a man of prayer, Nehemiah prayed about the matter for four months before asking the king for help. The king responded by giving him authority, materials and finance to go to Jerusalem to repair the city and rebuild its walls (1:4-2:10). It was probably at this time that Nehemiah was appointed governor.
After surveying the damage, Nehemiah outlined his plans to the people, gained their support, and organized a building program in which people of all kinds participated (2:11-3:32). When opponents tried to stop the work, Nehemiah presented the matter to God, but at the same time made arrangements to strengthen the defence of the city (4:1-23). He also acted decisively to stop the rich in Jerusalem from taking advantage of the poor, who were suffering added hardship because of the current difficulties (5:1-19). Outside enemies tried by various means to stop the work, but without success. In the end the wall was finished (6:1-7:73).
Before the wall was dedicated, Ezra read and explained parts of the law of Moses, first to the people and then to the leaders. After that the people celebrated the Feast of Tabernacles (8:1-18).
After further confession, the people swore to God an oath of obedience, which their leaders put in writing and signed on their behalf (9:1-10:39). An added arrangement before the dedication ceremony was to increase Jerusalem’s security by increasing its population. Many people from country areas came to live in the city (11:1-12:26). Ezra and Nehemiah then led the people in an impressive dedication ceremony (12:27-13:3).
At the end of twelve years service, Nehemiah returned to Persia for a time. Without his strong leadership the people weakened and old enemies gained influence in the city. Upon arriving back in Jerusalem, Nehemiah dealt fearlessly with the enemies (13:4-9) and corrected Jerusalem’s social and religious disorders with his usual decisiveness (13:10-31).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah
(nee huh mi' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yah comforts or encourages” and name of Old Testament book featuring work of Nehemiah. Nehemiah, the son of Hachaliah, is the main character in the book which bears his name. Two other Nehemiahs appear in the OT: one in the group who returned with Sheshbazzar (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 ), and the other was the son of Azbuk, “the ruler of the half part of Bethzur” (Nehemiah 3:16 ), a helper with rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem.
Nehemiah and Ezra were one book in the ancient Hebrew and Greek OT, and probably were not divided until after the Interbiblical—Period (see Ezra for more details). Jewish tradition says Ezra or Nehemiah was the author. Because of the close connection between Chronicles and Ezra-Nehemiah, one person might have written or compiled all three books. Those who follow this argument refer to the author as the Chronicler.
The literary style of Nehemiah is similar to that in Ezra. There are many lists (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 10:1-27 ; Nehemiah 11:1 ; Nehemiah 12:1-26 ). The author/compiler wove Ezra's and Nehemiah's stories together, Ezra being featured in Nehemiah 8:1 .
The book has four major sections: the rebuilding of Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 1-7 ), the Great Revival (Nehemiah 8-10 ), population and census information (Nehemiah 11-12 ), and the reforms of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 13:1 ). Nehemiah made two visits from King Artaxerxes to Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:1-6 ; Nehemiah 13:6-7 ). His first, 445 B.C., was to repair the walls; they were in a state of disrepair almost a century after the first arrival from Exile in 538 B.C. The second was a problem-solving trip in the thiry-second year of Artaxerxes (Nehemiah 13:6 ), 432 B.C. Nehemiah was a contemporary of Ezra and Malachi, and also Socrates in Greece (470-339 B.C.), and only a few decades later than Gautama Buddha in India (560-480 B.C.) and Confucius in China (551-479 B.C.).
Nehemiah held the distinguished position of cupbearer to the king (Nehemiah 1:11 ). This was an office of trust; tasting the king's wine and food, the cupbearer stood between the king and death. That Nehemiah, a Jew and a captive, served this Gentile king in such a strategic capacity was an unusual credit and honor to this man of strong character.
Nehemiah's Memoirs include first person accounts (Nehemiah 1:1-7:5 ; Nehemiah 12:27-47 ; Nehemiah 13:4-31 ), and the other material uses the third person pronoun (Nehemiah 8-10 ). Thus his story is both autobiographical and biographical. Visitors to Susa informed him of the delapidation of Jerusalem's walls. He was so upset that he cried and mourned for days” (Nehemiah 1:4 ). He prayed a confession (Nehemiah 1:5-11 ). His grief became apparent to Artaxerxes who permitted him to go to Jerusalem.
Nehemiah's first act there was to inspect the walls at night (Nehemiah 2:15 ). He then called an assembly and convinced the people of the need for a building program. He was an excellent leader who demonstrated engineering knowledge and brilliant organizing ability (Nehemiah 3:1 ). The work began.
Trouble arose from without and from within. Sanballat and his friends tried to stop the work, but without success (Nehemiah 4:1 ). Trouble from within was economic. Building the walls caused a labor shortage; farms were mortgaged, and high rates of interest were charged. Nehemiah said, “The thing you are doing is not good” (Nehemiah 5:9 NRSV). He corrected the problem and even gave financial aid to those in need ( Nehemiah 5:1 ). Again Sanballat and other non-Jews made several attempts to lure Nehemiah away from the job and shut it down. They failed. Nehemiah proved to be a person of strong will and unusual boldness. “So the wall was finished in fifty and two days” (Nehemiah 6:15 ). The dedication of the wall is described later in Nehemiah 12:27-43 .
The theological climax of the Book of Nehemiah and of the life of Ezra is the Great Revival (Nehemiah 8-10 ). It was a grand experience. It warrants close study for revival attempts today. People assembled. They requested Ezra to read from the book of the law of Moses (Nehemiah 8:1 ). The book was probably the Pentateuch (Torah) or some part of it. Ezra read, and others helped by giving “the sense, so that the people understood the reading” (Nehemiah 8:8 NRSV). This probably included translating the Hebrew scripture into Aramaic, the commonly spoken language.
A great celebration occurred, and they observed the Feast of Tabernacles. Results were impressive: “They made confession and worshiped the Lord” (Nehemiah 9:3 NRSV) and “separated themselves from all strangers” ( Nehemiah 9:2 ) that is, they divorced their foreign spouses. They prayed a long prayer of confession (Nehemiah 9:6-37 ). The people responded, “Because of all this, we make a sure covenant and write it” (Nehemiah 9:38 ). The signers and terms of the covenant were then recorded (Nehemiah 10:1 ).
Nehemiah was dissatisfied with the small size of the population of Jerusalem. He made an ingenious proposal: to “cast lots to bring one out of ten to live in the holy city Jerusalem, while nine-tenths remained in the other towns” (Nehemiah 11:1 NRSV). Nehemiah's last chapter cites his reforms made during his second visit to Jerusalem in 432 B.C. He threw out a Gentile who was permitted to live in the Temple; he restored the practice of tithing to support the Levites; he corrected sabbath wrongs by those who bought and sold on the sabbath; and he dealt forthrightly with those who had married foreigners, those not in covenant relation with God.
Nehemiah was indeed an outstanding person. His theology was very practical; it affected every area of life. Note his prayers and how practical they were (Nehemiah 1:4-11 ; Nehemiah 2:4 ; Nehemiah 4:4-5 ,Nehemiah 4:4-5,4:9 ; Nehemiah 5:19 ; Nehemiah 6:9 ,Nehemiah 6:9,6:14 ; Nehemiah 13:14 ,Nehemiah 13:14,13:22 ,Nehemiah 13:22,13:29 ,Nehemiah 13:29,13:31 ). He boldly asked, “Remember for my good, O my God, all that I have done for this people” (Nehemiah 5:19 NRSV; compare Nehemiah 9:1-5 ,Nehemiah 13:14,13:31 ). His faith was practical: “And the king granted me what I asked, for the gracious hand of my God was upon me” (Nehemiah 2:8 NRSV; compare Nehemiah 2:18 for a practical application of this concept). He believed “the God of heaven is the one who will give us success” ( Nehemiah 2:11-16 NRSV) and that “our God will fight for us” ( Nehemiah 4:20 NRSV). He had respect for the sabbath, the Temple and its institutions, the Levites, and tithing.
Nehemiah was an unusual person. Nehemiah was a man of action; he got things done. He knew how to use persuasion but also force. One may properly call him the father of Judaism. Because of Nehemiah, Judaism had a fortified city, a purified people, a dedicated and unified nation, renewed economic stability, and a new commitment to God's law.
Outline
I. God's Work Must Be Done (Nehemiah 1:1-7:33 ).
A. God's leaders must be informed of needs in God's work (Nehemiah 1:1-3 ).
B. God's leaders must be responsive spiritually to needs in God's work and must pray (Nehemiah 1:4-11 ).
C. God's leaders must enlist the aid of others, sometimes outside the family of God (Nehemiah 2:1-9 ).
D. God's leaders likely will encounter opposition (Nehemiah 2:10 ).
E. God's leaders must exercise caution and discretion along with careful planning (Nehemiah 2:20 ).
F. God's leaders must inform and challenge God's people to work (Nehemiah 2:17-20 ).
G. God's work demands hard work, good organization, plenty of cooperation, and good records to give credit where credit is due (Nehemiah 3:1-32 ).
H. God's leaders will pray in the face of ridicule and insult (Nehemiah 4:1-9 ).
I. God's leaders may expect opposition from within as well as from without (Nehemiah 4:10-12 ).
J. God's leaders must encourage weary workers with practical, prayerful faith (Nehemiah 4:13-15 ).
K. God's work gets done by hard work and committed workers (Nehemiah 4:16-23 ).
L. God's work is slowed by internal problems of unfairness (Nehemiah 5:1-5 ).
M. God's leaders must confront profiteering problem causers (Nehemiah 5:6-13 ).
N. God's leaders at times can be sacrificially generous to meet a pressing need (Nehemiah 5:14-19 ).
O. God's leaders know opposition can be very personal and must deal with it head on (Nehemiah 6:1-14 ).
P. God's help and the cooperation of many workers bring success (Nehemiah 6:15-16 ).
Q. God's work can have traitors within (Nehemiah 6:17-19 ).
R. God's leaders will enlist others and give them clear instructions (Nehemiah 7:1-5 ).
S. God's leaders need to keep and use good records (Nehemiah 7:6-73 ).
II. God's Way Must Include Revival and Reformation (Nehemiah 8:1-13:31 ).
A. God's people want to hear God's Word (Nehemiah 8:1-3 ).
B. God's Word must be read and then interpreted (Nehemiah 8:4-8 ).
C. God's way calls for joyous celebration (Nehemiah 8:9-12 ).
D. God's way prescribes formal expressions of joyous worship (Nehemiah 8:13-18 ).
E. God's way elicits confession (Nehemiah 13:14 ).
F. God's people give practical expression to prayerful repentance (Nehemiah 9:6-37 ).
G. God's people are willing to commit themselves (Nehemiah 9:38 ).
H. God's people will sign pledges of commitment (Nehemiah 10:1-27 ).
I. God's people must give practical expressions of commitment (Nehemiah 10:28-39 ).
J. God's people must be willing to make some changes (Nehemiah 11:1-2 ).
K. God's work requires good records (Nehemiah 11:3-12:26 ).
L. God's work should be dedicated and celebrated (Nehemiah 12:27-47 ).
M. God's people must be a separated people (Nehemiah 13:1-9 ).
N. God's work, including His finance program, must not be neglected (Nehemiah 13:10-14 ).
O. God's day must be respected (Nehemiah 13:15-22 ).
P. God's way demands purity in marriage and in ministers (Nehemiah 13:23-31 ).
D. C. Martin
Chabad Knowledge Base - Nehemiah
(a) A minister in the Persian King Artaxerxes' court, he returned to Israel in 335 BCE to strengthen the fledgling Jewish commonwealth. Under his leadership, the walls surrounding Jerusalem were rebuilt, increasing the city's security against its hostile neighbors. Together with Ezra, he reintroduced the observance of laws of the Torah, many of which had been forgotten in exile. (b) A common Jewish name.
Nehemiah, the book of: The second part of the Book of Ezra, describing Nehemiah's activities as the Jewish leader during the early Second Holy Temple era; often considered an independent book of Tanach.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nehemiah
Consolation; repentance of the Lord
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Nehemiah
FOR a long time I was not much drawn to Nehemiah. I did not aright understand Nehemiah, and I did not love him. He was not my kind, as we say: the kind, that is, that I like best to read about, and to think about, and to imitate and to preach. I thought him, if a patriotic, at the same time, an outside, a surface, a hard, and an austere man. And, worst of all, a man who was always well pleased with himself; the first of Pharisees, in short, as Ezra was the first of Scribes. I should have remembered what Canon Gore puts so well in Lux Mundi: 'At starting, each of us, according to our disposition, is conscious of liking some books of Scripture better than others. This, however, should lead us to recognise that, in some way, we specially need the teaching that is less attractive to us. We should set ourselves to study what we less like, till that, too, has had its proper effect in moulding our conscience and shaping our character.' If I met a man from New England,' said Dr. Duncan, 'I would say to him, "Read the Marrow Men." If I met a Marrow Man, I would say, "Read the New-Englanders." '
Like Daniel and his three companions, and like Ezra his own colleague, Nehemiah was a child of the Captivity. They had all been born and brought up in the furnace of affliction. And they were all children in whom was no blemish, but well favoured, and skilful in all wisdom, and cunning in knowledge, and understanding science, and such as had ability in them to stand in the king's palace. Like Ezra also, Nehemiah has written his own biography, and like Ezra also, he both begins and ends his autobiography with great abruptness. We have neither Nehemiah's youth nor his old age in his autobiography. His whole memoir of himself is taken up with his leave of absence from Shushan the palace, and with what he was able to do for Jerusalem during his furlough from Shushan. By the time that Nehemiah's fragment of autobiography opens, the first return from the captivity has for some time taken place. Jerusalem, in a way, has been largely rebuilt. The temple also, after a fashion, has been restored, and the daily services of the temple are in full operation. But the walls and the gates and the towers and the battlements of the new Jerusalem still lie in ruins all round the city; and while that is the case, the whole city stands open to the inroads and the ravages of their enemies round about. Nor is all that the worst. It is a weariness and a despair to read it,-but the returned captives themselves were living in far greater poverty and bondage in Jerusalem than in all their seventy years in Babylon itself. Those of you who have ever read and at all understood the two sad little books of Ezra and Nehemiah, and the still more sad little book of Malachi,-that saddened and despairing reader will have seen in those three books what a hopeless people God had to do with. And, with still more self-disgust and self-despair, he will have seen what an Old Testament type and example the Jews always are of ourselves.
The schoolboys who have read the Cyropœdia can best picture Nehemiah to themselves when he says that he was the King of Persia's cupbearer. The amusing episode of Cyrus and his grandfather's cupbearer is the best commentary we possess on the position of Nehemiah in Shushan the palace. The Persian cupbearer was far more than a cupbearer. He was a kind of prime minister, and master of the ceremonies, both in one. He was the royal favourite above all the rest of the palace, till his privileges and his powers and his wealth were all a proverb. He was able to keep a table and set up an equipage at his own expense like a prince, Daniel's youthful beauty, his graces of character and manner, his shining talents, and his high state-services may all be borrowed and set down as the opening pages of Nehemiah's memoirs of himself. Where Josephus got it he does not tell us, but he gives us a most picturesque and pathetic account of the way in which the terrible state of Jerusalem came to the cupbearer's ears. Nehemiah was taking the air one evening outside the walls of Persepolis when some travel-stained men passed him on their way into the gate of the city. As they passed him he overheard them conversing together in the Hebrew tongue. You know how your mother-tongue would go to your heart if you were an exile in a far country, however prosperous outwardly you were. And Nehemiah forgot all about Artaxerxes' supper as he talked with the travellers, till he said to them as he bade them farewell, 'If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning; if I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy!' Young John Milton, you will remember, could not enjoy the skies, or the art, or the letters of Italy, while England at home was as she was. And it came to pass in the month Nisan, in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes the king, that wine was before him; and I took the wine and gave it to the king. Now I had not been sad in his presence heretofore. Wherefore the king said unto me, Why is thy countenance sad, seeing thou art not sick? This is nothing else but sorrow of heart. Then I was very sore afraid, and said unto the king, Let the king live for ever! Why should not my countenance be sad, when the city, the place of my fathers' sepulchres, lieth waste, and the gates thereof are consumed with fire? Then the king said to me, For what dost thou make request? So I prayed to the God of heaven, says the cupbearer. How he was heard, and how the king's heart was moved, and how Nehemiah got leave of absence to go and build the walls of Jerusalem, and the letters that he carried to the king's foresters, and to those that kept the royal quarries, and how he set out to the city of his fathers to finish it-all that is to be read in Nehemiah's own memoirs written out for us to this day by his own graphic hand.
If the style is the man in the Scriptures also, then we see Nehemiah to the very life in the whole of his book; but, especially, in his second and third chapters. We see him as well as if we had carried the candle before him all those three nights in which he went round the ruins of Jerusalem. So I came to Jerusalem, and was there three days. And I arose in the night, I and some few men with me: neither told I any man what my God had put in my heart to do at Jerusalem: neither was there any beast with me, save the beast that I rode upon. And I went out by night by the gate of the valley, even before the dragon well, and to the dungport, and viewed the walls of Jerusalem, which were broken down, and the gates thereof were consumed with fire. Then went I up in the night by the brook, and viewed the wall, and turned back, and entered by the gate of the valley, and so returned. And the rulers knew not whither I went, or what I did: neither had I as yet told it to the Jews, nor to the priests, nor to the nobles, nor to the rulers, nor to the rest that did the work. A self-contained man. A man of his own counsel. A man with the counsel of God alone in his mind and in his heart. A reserved and a resolute man. A man to take the command of other men. A man who will see things with his own eyes, and that without all eyes seeing him. A man in no haste or hurry. He will not begin till he has counted the cost. And then he will not stop till he has finished his work. The way that Nehemiah took to build and complete the whole wall round about Jerusalem was this: Every trade, and profession, and corporation, and outstanding city family took a portion, and undertook either to build that portion with their own hands or to see it built. And, to begin with, as was but natural and seemly, Eliashib the high priest began first to build; and, as was to be expected, he held a special sacrifice and spiritual service both at the beginning and at the end of his portion of the wall. A volunteer party from the neighbouring city of Jericho took up the portion of the wall adjoining Eliashib; and next to them a man whose name we do not know. 'I will take the fish gate,' said Hassenaah. 'I and my sons will lay the beams thereof, and set up the doors thereof, the locks thereof, and the bars thereof.' Then came three men,-but we have never heard their strange names before nor since: their names are only written in heaven, and in the third chapter of Nehemiah. And next unto them the Tekoites repaired; 'but their nobles,' Nehemiah takes this note on his tablets, 'put not their necks to the work of the Lord.' 'Let me have the old gate to repair,' said Jehoiada, the son of Paseah. 'My heart warms to the old gate.' And he and Meshullam divided the old gate between them. Then the guild of the goldsmiths did a large piece, and next to them the apothecaries. These last fortified a strong and a broad portion of the wall, as I have known apothecaries do among ourselves. And, then, after some unknown but noble men: look here at the ruler of the half of Jerusalem and his daughters. I opened Matthew Henry in a hurry here, so sure was I that he would have something specially shrewd on the daughters of Shallum. But even Homer sometimes nods. To my great disappointment I found nothing in the unfailing annotator worth repeating to you. But he wakens up when he comes to the thirtieth verse. Meshullam Matthew Henry holds to have been a lodger who undertook a piece of the wall the size of his own rented room. So that you see our adherents here, and our seat-holders, and those not yet full members, may take their part in all our work till the time comes when they shall have sons and daughters to help them. Thus, at any rate, did Berechiah's lodger, if he was not also his son. That is not the half of Nehemiah's roll of noble names; but you can go round the whole wall for yourselves, and see the rest of the builders at their work for yourselves, till you come to the goldsmith's son at the going up of the corner.
And let it not be overlooked, to their praise, that all the builders builded every man with his sword by his side because of the deadly envy and ill-will of their enemies round about. The enemies of Jerusalem 'took it heinously,' says Josephus, that the wall of Jerusalem was in the way to be rebuilt. They so laboured, Nehemiah proudly writes it about them, from the rising of the morning till the stars appeared. And all the time Artaxerxes' cupbearer had his eye on everything. He was everywhere, and he was the power and the success of everything. The young cupbearer has now become a great statesman and an experienced administrator, till he has left his mark on Jerusalem as long as one stone shall stand upon another. But you must really take time and read the whole of this inimitable little book for yourselves at a downsitting. And that, if only to see how Ezra and Nehemiah worked together, the old scribe and the young cupbearer. How the priests' pulpit of wood was set up, how the support of the altar and the pulpit was seen to, how the public sanctification of the Sabbath was secured, and other reforms instituted with a firmness of hand that there was no resisting. Altogether, this little book is full of Nehemiah's absolute mastery in Jerusalem, and his determination that Jerusalem shall be both a safe, a happy, and a holy city to dwell in. Speaking of the preachers of Jerusalem and their support, just as we get our Presbytery, and our Kirk-Session, and our Expository Pulpit, and our Puritan Sabbath from the new Jerusalem of that day, so we get our Deacons' Court and our Sustentation Fund from Ezra and Nehemiah. Ezra was an old preacher, full of years, full of learning, and full of an experienced piety, giving himself continually to prayer and to the ministry of the Word, while young Nehemiah, like Stephen in the Acts, served tables in the new Jerusalem. That is to say, he looked after the walls of Jerusalem, and the whole temple furniture, and the support of the temple ministry. If our pulpit of wood and its method of work on the Word of God is ancient and honourable, so also is our Deacons' Court. And neither in the new Jerusalem of Nehemiah's day, nor in the same Jerusalem in Peter's day, was the prophetic and apostolic and diaconate compact better observed, on the deacons' side at any rate, than it is in our own congregations at the present moment. And because of all this, says Nehemiah, we make a sure covenant and write it out, and our princes, Levites, and priests all seal unto it, that we will not forsake nor forget the house of our God.
Nehemiah was such a worker in and around the house of God that he would have satisfied James the Just himself. James, the brother of the Lord, was always insisting on work in all the twelve tribes scattered abroad. 'Even faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. Wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead? For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.' But for his love of work, Nehemiah again and again would have been a dead man. Again and again Sanballat would have had Nehemiah in his clutches, but that Nehemiah would not come down. 'Come out to a conference in the plains of Ono, at any rate,' said Sanballat. 'No,' answered Nehemiah, 'I have no time for conferences. I am doing such a great work on the wall up here that I cannot for one moment leave it.' Yes, it was the cupbearer's quenchless love of work that both saved his life on several occasions, as well as built and finished the wall of Jerusalem. Cupid, in the old fable, complained bitterly to Jupiter that he could never debauch the Muses, because he never could come on them sitting idle. If work is not worship, then it is surely the next thing to it, so much so that, just bring up your son in idleness, and your grey hairs are as good as in their grave already. Whereas, give your son something to do, from making tables to serving them, and you have as good as saved his soul. He has no time so much as to speak to Sanballat. Let every young man then begin early to do something. Let him be a student and a lover of good books. Let him teach a class. Let him be honoured, and trusted, and elected like Stephen to be a deacon. Let him do his noble duties with the understanding and the heart. Let him know what he is doing every time he does it, and he will thus purchase for himself a good degree; that is to say, good work, and a real love for the good work, and step after step, he will escape all the Sanballats of the city, and will go on from work to work, through a youth and a manhood of interest and usefulness, occupation and protection, to an old age of the best love among us and the highest honours.
And if any young minister should be ordained, like Nehemiah, over such a congregation as Jerusalem was in that day; if he finds the gates thereof burned with fire, and the walls laid waste, and the whole house of God in reproach round about; let him read the Book of Nehemiah till he has it by heart. Let him view the wreck and ruin on his arrival as the young cupbearer did. Let him say nothing to any man. Only let him rise up in the King's name and build. Let him come to the King's quarries for stone, and to the King's forests for timber. The good hand of his God being upon him. Let him preach his very best to his long-starved people every Sabbath morning; and better and better every year he lives. Let him visit his long-neglected people night and day. Let him be like Samuel Rutherford in as small a church as was in Scotland in that day, and now and for ever as famous. Let him be his people's boast. Let him be always in his study, always at their sickbeds, always preaching, always praying. So neither I, nor my brethren, nor my servants, nor the men of the guard that followed me, none of us put off our clothes, saving that every one put them off for the washing. And at the dedication of the wall there was great gladness, both with thanksgivings and with singing, with cymbals, with psalteries, and with harps. For God had made them to rejoice with great joy; the wives also and the children rejoiced. So that the joy of Jerusalem was heard even afar off. And it was Nehemiah's faith in God, his love of Jerusalem, and his hard work for Jerusalem that did it.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nehemiah
professes himself the author of the book which bears his name, in the very beginning of it, and he uniformly writes in the first person. He was of the tribe of Judah, and was probably born at Babylon during the captivity. He was so distinguished for his family and attainments, as to be selected for the office of cup bearer to the king of Persia, a situation of great honour and emolument. He was made governor of Judea, upon his own application, by Artaxerxes Longimanus; and his book, which in the Hebrew canon was joined to that of Ezra, gives an account of his appointment and administration through a space of about thirty-six years to A.M. 3595, at which time the Scripture history closes; and, consequently, the historical books, from Joshua to Nehemiah inclusive, contain the history of the Jewish people from the death of Moses, A.M. 2553, to the reformation established by Nehemiah, after the return from captivity, being a period of one thousand and forty-two years.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nehemiah
The Tirshatha or Governor under the Persian king; a well known faithful character in the church after the return of the people from Babylon. (See the Book of Nehemiah 1:1 - Nehemiah 13:31.) His name if derived from Nacham, signifies the comfort of the Lord. Nacham, or Nehem, and Jah.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nehemiah
The son of Hachaliah was born at Babylon during the captivity. He was, according to some, of the race of the priests; according to others, of the royal family of Judah. He sustained the office of cupbearer to the Persian king Artazerzes Longimanus. Touched with the calamitous state of the colony of Jews, which had formerly returned to Jerusalem, he besought the king of Persia to permit him to go to Jerusalem and aid in rebuilding it. He was accordingly sent thither as governor, in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes, about 444 B. C. He directed his attention chiefly to rebuilding the walls of the city.
The enmity of the Samaritans, under which the colony had formerly suffered, was now increased; and under Sanballat, the governor of the country, they cast all possible hindrances in the way of the Jews. They even went so far as to attack the laborers at their work; so that Nehemiah had to cause them to labor with arms in their hands; yet in one year their task was completed. In this great work and in his whole administration, his pious zeal and disinterestedness, his love for the people and city of god, and his prayerful reliance on divine aid were crowned with success. He had the cooperation of faithful friends, especially of Ezra, Nehemiah 8:1,9,13 12:36 , and instituted many excellent civil improvements. About 432 B. C., though perhaps not for the first time, he returned to his post at the court of Babylon, Nehemiah 2:6 5:14 13:6 ; but after a few years, was recalled to Jerusalem to reform certain growing irregularities neglect of the temple service, breaches of the Sabbath, marriages with the heathen, etc. He required of those Jews who had married heathen wives, that they should either abandon them, or else they quit the country. This voluntary exile of a number of discontented priests may have given occasion to the building of the temple on Mount Gerizim, and the establishment of the Samaritan worship. See SANBALLAT.
The book of Nehemiah contains the history of all these transactions, written by himself near the close of his long life, B. C. 434. It is a sort of a continuation of the book of Ezra, and was called by some of the fathers the Second Book of Ezra. Some portions of it, Ezra 8:1-9:15 10:44 , appear to be compilations from public registers, etc. With it the historical books of the Old Testament close.

Sentence search

Tobiah - A family which returned from exile, but could not trace their genealogy ( Ezra 2:60 = Nehemiah 7:62 ); corrupted in 1Es 5:37 to Ban . The Ammonite who, in conjunction with Sanballat and others, persistently opposed the work of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Nehemiah 4:7 ; Nehemiah 6:17 ; Nehemiah 13:4 ; Nehemiah 13:8 ). Nehemiah
Tobiah - Ezra 2:60 ; Nehemiah 7:62 . The Ammonite, who was a bitter enemy to Nehemiah. He afterwards became allied to Eliashib the priest, but Nehemiah turned out his goods from a chamber he occupied in the court of the house. Nehemiah said of him and others, "Ye have no portion, nor right, nor memorial in Jerusalem. " Nehemiah 2:10,19 ; Nehemiah 4:3,7 ; Nehemiah 6:1-19 ; Nehemiah 13:4,8
Sanballat - A Moabite of Horonaim (Nehemiah 2:10; Nehemiah 2:19; Nehemiah 13:28). Seemingly he had some command over "the army of Samaria" (Nehemiah 4:2) under Artaxerxes. A perpetual opponent of Nehemiah from the time of his arrival in Judaea. (See Nehemiah. ) Tobiah the Ammonite and Geshem the Arabian (Nehemiah 2:19; Nehemiah 4:7; Nehemiah 4:6) were in league with him. His daughter married the high-priest Eliashib's grandson, Joiada's son; therefore Nehemiah chased him from him (Nehemiah 13:28). Tobiah had formed a similar alliance with Eliashib, so that it looks as if Eliasbib concerted with the Samaritan party to thwart Nehemiah's reforming plans
Sallai - A Benjamite, Nehemiah 11:8 . Nehemiah 11:2 . A priestly family, Nehemiah 12:20 ; called in Nehemiah 12:7 Sallu
Hashub - (hassh uhb) KJV spelling of Hasshub in Nehemiah 3:11 ,Nehemiah 3:11,3:23 ; Nehemiah 10:23 ; Nehemiah 11:15
Shebani'ah - (Nehemiah 9:4,5 ) He sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:10 ) (B. ) ...
A priest or priestly family who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:4 ; 12:14 ) Called SHECHANIAH in (Nehemiah 12:3 ) ...
Another Levite who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:12 ) ...
One of the priests appointed by David to blow with the trumpets before the ark of God
Hachaliah - Father of Nehemiah. Nehemiah 1:1 ; Nehemiah 10:1
Harim - CHILDREN OF Harim; 1017 came up with Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:39; Ezra 10:21; Nehemiah 7:42; Nehemiah 10:5). Rehum or Harim (by transposition of letters): Nehemiah 12:3; Nehemiah 12:15. Ezra 2:32; Ezra 10:31; Nehemiah 7:35; Nehemiah 10:27
Nehemias - Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 = Nehemiah , Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 . Nehemiah 7:2 . 1Es 5:40 , Nehemiah the contemporary of Ezra
Hacaliah - The father of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 1:1 ; Nehemiah 10:1 )
Nehemiah - (nee huh mi' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yah comforts or encourages” and name of Old Testament book featuring work of Nehemiah. Nehemiah, the son of Hachaliah, is the main character in the book which bears his name. Two other Nehemiahs appear in the OT: one in the group who returned with Sheshbazzar (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 ), and the other was the son of Azbuk, “the ruler of the half part of Bethzur” (Nehemiah 3:16 ), a helper with rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem. ...
Nehemiah and Ezra were one book in the ancient Hebrew and Greek OT, and probably were not divided until after the Interbiblical—Period (see Ezra for more details). Jewish tradition says Ezra or Nehemiah was the author. Because of the close connection between Chronicles and Ezra-Nehemiah, one person might have written or compiled all three books. ...
The literary style of Nehemiah is similar to that in Ezra. There are many lists (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 10:1-27 ; Nehemiah 11:1 ; Nehemiah 12:1-26 ). The author/compiler wove Ezra's and Nehemiah's stories together, Ezra being featured in Nehemiah 8:1 . ...
The book has four major sections: the rebuilding of Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 1-7 ), the Great Revival (Nehemiah 8-10 ), population and census information (Nehemiah 11-12 ), and the reforms of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 13:1 ). Nehemiah made two visits from King Artaxerxes to Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:1-6 ; Nehemiah 13:6-7 ). The second was a problem-solving trip in the thiry-second year of Artaxerxes (Nehemiah 13:6 ), 432 B. Nehemiah was a contemporary of Ezra and Malachi, and also Socrates in Greece (470-339 B. ...
Nehemiah held the distinguished position of cupbearer to the king (Nehemiah 1:11 ). That Nehemiah, a Jew and a captive, served this Gentile king in such a strategic capacity was an unusual credit and honor to this man of strong character. ...
Nehemiah's Memoirs include first person accounts (Nehemiah 1:1-7:5 ; Nehemiah 12:27-47 ; Nehemiah 13:4-31 ), and the other material uses the third person pronoun (Nehemiah 8-10 ). He was so upset that he cried and mourned for days” (Nehemiah 1:4 ). He prayed a confession (Nehemiah 1:5-11 ). ...
Nehemiah's first act there was to inspect the walls at night (Nehemiah 2:15 ). He was an excellent leader who demonstrated engineering knowledge and brilliant organizing ability (Nehemiah 3:1 ). Sanballat and his friends tried to stop the work, but without success (Nehemiah 4:1 ). Nehemiah said, “The thing you are doing is not good” (Nehemiah 5:9 NRSV). He corrected the problem and even gave financial aid to those in need ( Nehemiah 5:1 ). Again Sanballat and other non-Jews made several attempts to lure Nehemiah away from the job and shut it down. Nehemiah proved to be a person of strong will and unusual boldness. “So the wall was finished in fifty and two days” (Nehemiah 6:15 ). The dedication of the wall is described later in Nehemiah 12:27-43 . ...
The theological climax of the Book of Nehemiah and of the life of Ezra is the Great Revival (Nehemiah 8-10 ). They requested Ezra to read from the book of the law of Moses (Nehemiah 8:1 ). Ezra read, and others helped by giving “the sense, so that the people understood the reading” (Nehemiah 8:8 NRSV). Results were impressive: “They made confession and worshiped the Lord” (Nehemiah 9:3 NRSV) and “separated themselves from all strangers” ( Nehemiah 9:2 ) that is, they divorced their foreign spouses. They prayed a long prayer of confession (Nehemiah 9:6-37 ). The people responded, “Because of all this, we make a sure covenant and write it” (Nehemiah 9:38 ). The signers and terms of the covenant were then recorded (Nehemiah 10:1 ). ...
Nehemiah was dissatisfied with the small size of the population of Jerusalem. He made an ingenious proposal: to “cast lots to bring one out of ten to live in the holy city Jerusalem, while nine-tenths remained in the other towns” (Nehemiah 11:1 NRSV). Nehemiah's last chapter cites his reforms made during his second visit to Jerusalem in 432 B. ...
Nehemiah was indeed an outstanding person. Note his prayers and how practical they were (Nehemiah 1:4-11 ; Nehemiah 2:4 ; Nehemiah 4:4-5 ,Nehemiah 4:4-5,4:9 ; Nehemiah 5:19 ; Nehemiah 6:9 ,Nehemiah 6:9,6:14 ; Nehemiah 13:14 ,Nehemiah 13:14,13:22 ,Nehemiah 13:22,13:29 ,Nehemiah 13:29,13:31 ). He boldly asked, “Remember for my good, O my God, all that I have done for this people” (Nehemiah 5:19 NRSV; compare Nehemiah 13:14 ,Nehemiah 13:14,13:31 ). His faith was practical: “And the king granted me what I asked, for the gracious hand of my God was upon me” (Nehemiah 2:8 NRSV; compare Nehemiah 2:18 for a practical application of this concept). He believed “the God of heaven is the one who will give us success” ( Nehemiah 2:20 NRSV) and that “our God will fight for us” ( Nehemiah 4:20 NRSV). ...
Nehemiah was an unusual person. Nehemiah was a man of action; he got things done. Because of Nehemiah, Judaism had a fortified city, a purified people, a dedicated and unified nation, renewed economic stability, and a new commitment to God's law. God's Work Must Be Done (Nehemiah 1:1-7:33 ). God's leaders must be informed of needs in God's work (Nehemiah 1:1-3 ). God's leaders must be responsive spiritually to needs in God's work and must pray (Nehemiah 1:4-11 ). God's leaders must enlist the aid of others, sometimes outside the family of God (Nehemiah 2:1-9 ). God's leaders likely will encounter opposition (Nehemiah 2:10 ). God's leaders must exercise caution and discretion along with careful planning (Nehemiah 2:11-16 ). God's leaders must inform and challenge God's people to work (Nehemiah 2:17-20 ). God's work demands hard work, good organization, plenty of cooperation, and good records to give credit where credit is due (Nehemiah 3:1-32 ). God's leaders will pray in the face of ridicule and insult (Nehemiah 4:1-9 ). God's leaders may expect opposition from within as well as from without (Nehemiah 4:10-12 ). God's leaders must encourage weary workers with practical, prayerful faith (Nehemiah 4:13-15 ). God's work gets done by hard work and committed workers (Nehemiah 4:16-23 ). God's work is slowed by internal problems of unfairness (Nehemiah 5:1-5 ). God's leaders must confront profiteering problem causers (Nehemiah 5:6-13 ). God's leaders at times can be sacrificially generous to meet a pressing need (Nehemiah 5:14-19 ). God's leaders know opposition can be very personal and must deal with it head on (Nehemiah 6:1-14 ). God's help and the cooperation of many workers bring success (Nehemiah 6:15-16 ). God's work can have traitors within (Nehemiah 6:17-19 ). God's leaders will enlist others and give them clear instructions (Nehemiah 7:1-5 ). God's leaders need to keep and use good records (Nehemiah 7:6-73 ). God's Way Must Include Revival and Reformation (Nehemiah 8:1-13:31 ). God's people want to hear God's Word (Nehemiah 8:1-3 ). God's Word must be read and then interpreted (Nehemiah 8:4-8 ). God's way calls for joyous celebration (Nehemiah 8:9-12 ). God's way prescribes formal expressions of joyous worship (Nehemiah 8:13-18 ). God's way elicits confession (Nehemiah 9:1-5 ). God's people give practical expression to prayerful repentance (Nehemiah 9:6-37 ). God's people are willing to commit themselves (Nehemiah 9:38 ). God's people will sign pledges of commitment (Nehemiah 10:1-27 ). God's people must give practical expressions of commitment (Nehemiah 10:28-39 ). God's people must be willing to make some changes (Nehemiah 11:1-2 ). God's work requires good records (Nehemiah 11:3-12:26 ). God's work should be dedicated and celebrated (Nehemiah 12:27-47 ). God's people must be a separated people (Nehemiah 13:1-9 ). God's work, including His finance program, must not be neglected (Nehemiah 13:10-14 ). God's day must be respected (Nehemiah 13:15-22 ). God's way demands purity in marriage and in ministers (Nehemiah 13:23-31 )
Shebaniah - A Levitical family ( Nehemiah 9:4 ; Nehemiah 10:10 ). A priest or Levite who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:4 ; Nehemiah 12:14 [1]). Another Levite who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:12 )
Miniamin - Nehemiah 12:17 = Mijamin of 1 Chronicles 24:8 , Nehemiah 10:7 ; Nehemiah 12:5 . Nehemiah 12:3 . A priest who took part in the ceremony of the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:41 )
Nehemiah, the Book of - The book is not an appendix to Ezra as its distinct title proves, "the words of Nehemiah the son of Hachaliah," nor would the same author give two lists of those returned from Babylon (Ezra 2; Nehemiah 7), and yet leave seeming discrepancies in details. In Nehemiah 8; Nehemiah 9; and Nehemiah 10, the prominence of Ezra is probably the cause why Nehemiah uses the third person of himself, instead of the first which he uses elsewhere. The "we" and "our" in Nehemiah 9 and Nehemiah 10, as to sealing the covenant, identifies the writer as an eye witness, yet not singled out for notice from the rest. The prayer in Nehemiah 9 is in style such as Ezra "the ready scribe in the law of Moses" would compose. The close fellowship of Nehemiah and him would naturally in these passages produce the similarity of phraseology (Ezra 4:18; Ezra 6:22, with Nehemiah 8:8; Nehemiah 8:17). Nehemiah 12:10-11-22-23 mentions Jaddua and Darius the Persian; it is probably the addition of those who closed the Old Testament canon, testifying the continuance to their time of the ordinances and word of God. ...
It is even possible that Nehemiah lived long enough to record there being an heir presumptive to the high priesthood, Jaddua, then an infant. The register of Levites in "the book of Chronicles" reached only down to "Johanan son of Eliashib," Nehemiah 12:23. The two "and's" in Nehemiah 12:22 show "and Jaddua" is a later addition. Nehemiah was governor for 12 years (Nehemiah 12:14), then in Artaxerxes' 32nd year returned to his post as "cupbearer"; he "at the end of days" (margin, so 1 Samuel 27:7 "a full year," margin "a year of days") after a full year obtained leave to return; "all this time," namely, a year, Nehemiah was not at Jerusalem, and Eliashib introduced the abuses (Nehemiah 13:1; Nehemiah 13:4-6 ff). How long Nehemiah stayed this second time is not recorded. "On that day" does not refer to the dedication, but to Nehemiah's return: Nehemiah 13:6-7. Nehemiah's description of Artaxerxes' character as amiable (Nehemiah 2:1-8) accords with Plutarch (Vit. "...
Diodorus Siculus (Nehemiah 11:71, section 2) says the Persians celebrated the equity and moderation of his government. ) was written under Nehemiah's government, and is in its wrong place in Ezra, for it is an exaggeration of the adversaries, the truth being that only the temple walls, which might be regarded as a city wall on that side of the city, and the walls of private houses, were then being built. In style the book of Nehemiah resembles Chronicles and Ezra, proving that it is of the age it purports to be. ...
"The God of the heavens," in Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel. Peculiar to Nehemiah are certain words and meanings: sabar , "to view" (Nehemiah 2:13; Nehemiah 2:15); meah , "the hundredth part" interest (Nehemiah 5:11); guwph (hiphil ), "shut" (Nehemiah 7:3); moal , "lifting up" (Nehemiah 8:6); miqerah , "read" (Nehemiah 8:8); huyedot , "psalms of thanksgiving" (Nehemiah 12:8); tahalukaah , "procession" (Nehemiah 12:31); otsrah (Nehemiah 13:13), "treasurers. " Aramaisms also agree with the age when Nehemiah wrote. )...
Nehemiah and Malachi, under Ezra, the arranger and finisher of the canon, added their inspired writings as a seal to complete the whole. The Book of Nehemiah bears on it the impress of the author's earnest piety and intense patriotism. And though the opening words, "Dibhree Νehemiah ", could mean "the affairs of Nehemiah," yet the fact that the first person is used in Nehemiah 1 - 7:5 and mostly Nehemiah 11:1 - 12:47 and Nehemiah 13 renders it more likely that the heading is "the words of Nehemiah. " Probably, as compiler as well as author of the whole, he inserted from public documents Nehemiah 8:1-10:39, for here the third person is used; also Nehemiah 12:26-27. But that as a whole the work is that of Nehemiah is almost a moral certainty
Hashabneiah - Father of a builder of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:10 ). A Levite ( Nehemiah 9:5 ). It is possible that we ought to Identify this name with Hashabiah of Ezra 8:19 ; Ezra 8:24 , Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 11:22 ; Nehemiah 12:24
Tirshatha - Persian title given to Nehemiah. Nehemiah 8:9 ; Nehemiah 10:1 . In Ezra 2:63 , and Nehemiah 7:65,70 , the same title doubtless refers to Zerubbabel. This is confirmed by the Hebrew word (pechah), used for the title of Nehemiah in Nehemiah 12:26 , and elsewhere for the Persian governors
Tirshatha - (tuhr sshuh' thaw) A title of honor designating respect for an official, sometimes translated, “your excellence” (Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65 ,Nehemiah 7:65,7:70 ; Nehemiah 8:9 ; Nehemiah 10:1 )
Horonite - HORONITE ( Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 13:28 ). see), the opponent of Nehemiah
Joiakim - A high priest, son of Jeshua ( Nehemiah 12:10 ; Nehemiah 12:12 ; Nehemiah 12:26 )
Sherebiah - One of the Levites who joined Ezra ( Ezra 8:18 ; Ezra 8:24 , Nehemiah 8:7 ; Nehemiah 9:4 ; Nehemiah 10:12 (13) Nehemiah 12:8 ; Nehemiah 12:24 )
Hodiah - A Levite ( Nehemiah 8:7 ; Nehemiah 9:5 ; Nehemiah 10:10 ). Another Levite ( Nehemiah 10:13 ). One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:18 )
Sanballat - He endeavored by every means to hinder Nehemiah in the work of rebuilding Jerusalem. Nehemiah 2:10; Nehemiah 4:1; Nehemiah 6:1-14; Nehemiah 13:28
Hodi'Jah -
A Levite in the time of Ezra and Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 8:7 ) and probably also (Nehemiah 9:5 ; 10:10 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:13 ) ...
A layman; one of the "heads" of the people at the same time. (Nehemiah 10:18 )
Tirshatha - The official title of the Persian governor of Judaea (Ezra 2:63; Nehemiah 7:65; Nehemiah 7:70); applied to Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1); also to Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:63). " Ρecheh (our pasha ) is the title of Nehemiah in Nehemiah 12:26; Haggai 1:1; Haggai 2:2; Ezra 5:3; implying governor of a province less than a satrapy
Jehohanan - Ezra 10:6 ( Jonas , Esther 9:1 Esther 9:1 ; Johanan , Nehemiah 12:22-23 ; Jonathan , Nehemiah 12:11 ) high priest. He is called son of Eliashib in Ezra 10:6 , Nehemiah 12:23 , but was probably his grandson, Joiada being his father ( Nehemiah 12:11 ; Nehemiah 12:22 ). Nehemiah 6:18 Nehemiah 6:18 son of Tobiah the Ammonite. Nehemiah 12:13 a priest in the days of Joiakim. Nehemiah 12:42 a priest present at the dedication of the walls
Shebaniah - ” A clan of Levites in which the name was used for several individuals (1 Chronicles 15:24 ; Nehemiah 9:4-5 ; Nehemiah 10:4 ,Nehemiah 10:4,10:10 ,Nehemiah 10:10,10:12 ; Nehemiah 12:14 )
Meshez'Abe-el -
Ancestor of Meshullam, who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 3:4 ) ...
One of the "heads of the people," probably a family, who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:21 ) ...
The father of Pethahiah, and descendant of Zerah the son of Judah. (Nehemiah 11:24 )
Zac'Cur - (1 Chronicles 25:2,10 ; Nehemiah 12:35 ) ...
The son of Imri who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the city wall. (Nehemiah 3:2 ) (B. ) ...
A Levite, or family of Levites, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:18 ) (B. ) ...
A Levite whose son or descendant Hanan was one of the treasurers over the treasuries appointed by Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 13:13 )
ha'Shub - (Nehemiah 3:11 ) (B. (Nehemiah 3:23 ) ...
One of the heads of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:23 ) (B. (Nehemiah 11:15 )
Hallohesh - Sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:24). Father of Shallum (Nehemiah 3:12)
Bunni - BUNNI , Nehemiah 9:4 ; Nehemiah 10:15 ; Nehemiah 11:15 , but in each case perhaps the text is corrupt
Ginnethoi - A priest among the returned exiles ( Nehemiah 12:4 ); called in Nehemiah 12:16 ; Nehemiah 10:6 Ginnethon
Azbuk - (az' buhk) Father of a Nehemiah who repaired Jerusalem under the leadership of Nehemiah, son of Hachaliah (Nehemiah 3:16 )
Jeshua - ...
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Ezra 2:6 ; Nehemiah 7:11 . ...
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Ezra 2:40 ; Nehemiah 7:43 . ...
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The son of Jozadak, and high priest of the Jews under Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 7:7 ; 12:1,7,10,26 ); called Joshua (Haggai 1:1,12 ; 2:2,4 ; Zechariah 3:1,3,6,8,9 ). ...
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Nehemiah 3:19 . ...
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A Levite who assisted in the reformation under (Nehemiah 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ). ...
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Son of Kadmiel (Nehemiah 12:24 ). ...
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A city of Judah (Nehemiah 11:26 ). ...
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Nehemiah 8:17 ; Joshua, the son of Nun
Zacc(h)ur - Son of Asaph (1 Chronicles 25:2 ; Nehemiah 12:35 ). Son of Imri who helped Nehemiah rebuild the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:2 ). One who sealed the covenant of reform during the time of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:12 ). Father of Hanan, one of the treasurers appointed by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Hasshub - Two builders of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:11 ; Nehemiah 3:23 ). One of those who signed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:23 ). A Levite of the sons of Merari ( 1 Chronicles 9:14 , Nehemiah 11:15 )
Nehemiah - As governor of Jerusalem and author of a book, Nehemiah is an important character in the biblical record of Israel’s reconstruction after the captivity in Babylon. All that we know of Nehemiah comes from the book that he wrote (Nehemiah 1:1). But the city wall remained in ruins, and only when Nehemiah came to Jerusalem as governor in 445 BC was it rebuilt. This was more than ninety years after the first group of people had returned from captivity (Nehemiah 2:1; cf. (For events leading up to the time of Nehemiah see EZRA. )...
Nehemiah was a man of forceful character who had the ability to motivate people. He was a good organizer and leader, but more importantly he was a man of prayer who trusted God, feared God and obeyed his commandments (Nehemiah 1:4; Nehemiah 2:4; Nehemiah 4:20; Nehemiah 5:15; Nehemiah 6:11; Nehemiah 7:2; Nehemiah 13:17; Nehemiah 13:25; Nehemiah 13:30). He was fearless in dealing with opponents (Nehemiah 4:14; Nehemiah 4:20; Nehemiah 6:8; Nehemiah 6:11; Nehemiah 13:8), yet sympathetic and self-sacrificing in helping the needy (Nehemiah 5:11; Nehemiah 5:14-18). ...
Most of the book of Nehemiah seems to have come from the personal records that Nehemiah kept during his governorship of Jerusalem. Nehemiah had two periods as governor of Jerusalem, an earlier period lasting twelve years and a later period of unknown length (Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 13:6-7). ...
Summary of Nehemiah’s book...
Nehemiah first became governor as a result of a visit to Persia by some Jews from Jerusalem. At that time Nehemiah held a trusted position in the Persian palace, and the Jews no doubt hoped he could persuade the king to support them against the attacks of their opponents (1:1-3). Being a man of prayer, Nehemiah prayed about the matter for four months before asking the king for help. It was probably at this time that Nehemiah was appointed governor. ...
After surveying the damage, Nehemiah outlined his plans to the people, gained their support, and organized a building program in which people of all kinds participated (2:11-3:32). When opponents tried to stop the work, Nehemiah presented the matter to God, but at the same time made arrangements to strengthen the defence of the city (4:1-23). Ezra and Nehemiah then led the people in an impressive dedication ceremony (12:27-13:3). ...
At the end of twelve years service, Nehemiah returned to Persia for a time. Upon arriving back in Jerusalem, Nehemiah dealt fearlessly with the enemies (13:4-9) and corrected Jerusalem’s social and religious disorders with his usual decisiveness (13:10-31)
Hashabniah - Nehemiah 3:10 . Levite who assisted at the great fast under Ezra and Nehemiah. Nehemiah 9:5
Jedaiah - A priestly family ( 1 Chronicles 9:10 ; 1 Chronicles 24:7 , Ezra 2:36 [1], Nehemiah 7:39 ; Nehemiah 11:10 ; Nehemiah 12:6-7 ; Nehemiah 12:19 ; Nehemiah 12:21 ). One of those who repaired the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:10 )
Joiada - One of the two who repaired the ‘old gate’ ( Nehemiah 3:6 ). High priest, son of Eliashib ( Nehemiah 12:10-11 ; Nehemiah 12:22 ). One of his sons married the daughter of Sanballat the Horonite ( Nehemiah 13:28 f
Hattush -
A priest who returned with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:2 ). ...
Nehemiah 3:10 . ...
Nehemiah 10:4
Bakbukiah - A leader of the temple service in the days of Nehemiah. Nehemiah 11:17 . Nehemiah 12:9,25
Sallai - Nehemiah 11:8 . Nehemiah 12:20 . Apparently called SALLU in Nehemiah 12:7
Ananiah - Grandfather of Azariah, who helped Nehemiah repair Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:23 ). Village where tribe of Benjamin dwelt in time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:32 )
Joiada - Man who helped repair the old gate of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:6 , KJV reads, Jehoiada). (Nehemiah 12:10-11 ,Nehemiah 12:10-11,12:22 ). Ezra suspected one of his sons, who married Sanballat's daughter, of being a traitor (Nehemiah 13:28 )
Anai'ah - (Nehemiah 8:4 ) ...
One of the "heads of the people" who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:22 )
Malluchi - ( Nehemiah 12:14 ); probably the same as Malluch of Nehemiah 10:4 ; Nehemiah 12:2
Bun'ni -
One of the Levites in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 9:4 ) ...
Another Levite, but of earlier date than the preceding. (Nehemiah 11:15 )
Amariah - Head of one of the 24 courses of priests which bore his name under David, Hezekiah, and Nehemiah (1 Chronicles 24:14 Nehemiah or Immer; 2 Chronicles 31:15; Nehemiah 10:3; Nehemiah 12:2; Nehemiah 12:13). Nehemiah 11:4; Ezra 10:42
Bani - There are also several persons named Bani, mentioned in connection with Nehemiah, who cannot be separately distinguished. Nehemiah 3:17 ; Nehemiah 8:7 ; Nehemiah 9:4,5 ; Nehemiah 10:13,14 ; Nehemiah 11:22
Sanballat - A Horonite, who seemed to act as a governor under the Persian king when Nehemiah returned from exile to rebuild Jerusalem. A descendant of the priests had become his son-in-law, whom Nehemiah rejected. Nehemiah 2:10,19 ; Nehemiah 4:1,7 ; Nehemiah 6:1-14 ; Nehemiah 13:28
Meremoth - Priest who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:3 ). Priest in the time of Ezra and Nehemiah who assisted with the Temple treasury (Ezra 8:33 ), with the repair of the walls (Nehemiah 3:4 ,Nehemiah 3:4,3:21 ), and witnessed the renewal of the covenant (Nehemiah 10:5 )
Geshem - Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 6:1,2 . Called also GASHMU in Nehemiah 6:6
Sanballat - The most inveterate of the opponents of Nehemiah. When Nehemiah came to Jerusalem to repair the walls, he, with his allies ( Tobiah the Ammonite and Geshem the Arabian), met him with derision; and after the work was well under way he stirred up the garrison of Samaria and planned an attack against the builders. This was prevented by the watchfulness of Nehemiah and the workmen. Several devices aimed against the life of Nehemiah were also thwarted by the sagacity of the latter. On Nehemiah’s second visit he banished from Jerusalem Manasseh (a son-in-law of Sanballat, and grandson of Eliashib ), who founded the Samaritan sect. See Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:1 ff. ; Nehemiah 4:6 ; Nehemiah 13:28
Malchijah - Priest in David's time (1 Chronicles 24:9 ; compare 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ). One standing with Ezra at the reading of the law ( Nehemiah 8:4 ). Priest signing Ezra's covenant (Nehemiah 10:3 ); 9. Four contemporaries of Nehemiah involved in the rebuilding (Nehemiah 3:11 ,Nehemiah 3:11,3:14 ,Nehemiah 3:14,3:31 ) or dedication of the walls (Nehemiah 12:42 ). Several of the references in Ezra and Nehemiah may refer to the same person(s)
Bakbukiah - ” Leader among the Levites in Jerusalem after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:17 ; Nehemiah 12:9 ,Nehemiah 12:9,12:25 )
Sherebiah - ” Ancestor of a family of Levites (Ezra 8:18 ,Ezra 8:18,8:24 ; Nehemiah 8:7 ; Nehemiah 9:4-5 ; Nehemiah 10:12 ; Nehemiah 12:8 ,Nehemiah 12:8,12:24 )
Hachaliah - Nehemiah's father (Nehemiah 1:1; Nehemiah 10:1)
Henadad - Clan members also helped Nehemiah rebuild Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 3:18 ,Nehemiah 3:18,3:24 ) and signed Nehemiah's covenant of obedience (Nehemiah 10:10 )
Broad Wall - This section of the wall was restored by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:8 ; Nehemiah 12:38 )
Hananel - Nehemiah led the nation to rebuild the tower along with the rest of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 12:39 ). It may well have been part of the earliest fortress protecting the Temple (Nehemiah 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:2 NAS)
Zaccur - An Asaphite ( 1 Chronicles 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 25:10 , Nehemiah 12:35 ). One of those who helped to re-build the wall ( Nehemiah 3:2 ). One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:12 ), prob. same as mentioned in Nehemiah 13:13 . Nehemiah 13:7
Kadmiel - ( Ezra 2:40 = Nehemiah 7:43 ; cf. 1Es 5:58 ), in connexion with the laying of the foundation of the Temple, as well as in Nehemiah 9:4 f. (the day of humiliation) and Nehemiah 10:9 (the sealing of the covenant), Kadmiel appears to be an individual. The name occurs further in Nehemiah 12:8 ; Nehemiah 12:24
Hashum, the Children of - 223 in Ezra, 328 in Nehemiah, came back with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 7:22; Ezra 2:19). Many causes which we can only conjecture may have produced the variation; some gave in their names to go who did not go; others joined the caravan subsequently (Nehemiah 10:18; Ezra 10:33). Nehemiah 8:4
Mehetabeel - Ancestor of Shemaiah, an enemy of Nehemiah. Nehemiah 6:10
Meshezabel - One of those who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:4 ). One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:21 ). The father of Pethahiah ( Nehemiah 11:24 )
Hassenaah - Nehemiah 3:3 . Probably the same as SENAAH in Nehemiah 7:38 and Ezra 2:35 , the article being added in Nehemiah 3:3
Kel'Ita - (Nehemiah 8:7 ) and signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:10 ) (B
Jaddua - Nehemiah 12:11; Nehemiah 12:22. One of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. Nehemiah 10:21
Fish Gate - The gate was rebuilt during the time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:3 ; Nehemiah 12:39 ). (Compare Nehemiah 13:16-22
Dung Gate - A Jerusalem landmark in the time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 2:13 ; Nehemiah 3:13-14 ; Nehemiah 12:31 )
Bunni - ” Levite leader of worship service confessing Israel's sin in days of Ezra (Nehemiah 9:4 ). A man of same name, probably same man, signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's Law (Nehemiah 10:15 ). His son Hasabiah was one of the Levites living in Jerusalem in time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:15 )
Immer - Eponym of a priestly family ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; 1 Chronicles 24:14 , Ezra 2:37 ; Ezra 10:20 , Nehemiah 3:29 ; Nehemiah 7:40 ; Nehemiah 11:18 ). The name of a place (?) ( Ezra 2:59 = Nehemiah 7:61 )
Nehemiah - Nehemiah (nç'he-mî'ah), comforted of Jehovah. Raised to the office of cup-bearer to the Persian monarch, Nehemiah did not forget his desolated country, and was commissioned, at his own request, to visit Jerusalem and rebuild the city; which he accomplished under the most perplexing difficulties. The twentieth year of Artaxerxes, when Nehemiah went to Jerusalem, is usually fixed in b. 451 Nehemiah 1:1; Nehemiah 7:2. Nehemiah was made tirshatha = "governor" of Judea, under Artaxerxes Longimanus. Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1; Nehemiah 12:26. Nehemiah 12:26. Nehemiah was governor of Jerusalem twelve years, Nehemiah 5:14-19; and then returned to the Persian court, where he remained "certain days. " Nehemiah 13:6. Nehemiah 13:7-31; Malachi 2:9-17; Malachi 3:6-12. ...
Nehemiah, Book of, is the 16th in the order of the books of the Old Testament. It relates Nehemiah's great work of rebuilding Jerusalem and the reclamation of the customs and laws of Moses, which had fallen into disuse. Nehemiah is the author of the first seven chapters, and part of the twelfth and thirteenth. The change from the use of the first person to that of the third in the remaining chapters, and the fact that some names in the lists were not extant till after Nehemiah's death, point to some other hand as their author, 2. Ezra 2:2; Nehemiah 7:7. Nehemiah 3:16
Bilgah - ( Nehemiah 12:5 ; Nehemiah 12:18 ). The same as Bilgai ( Nehemiah 10:8 )
Immer - ...
Ezra 2:37 ; Nehemiah 7:40 . ...
Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 . ...
The father of Zadok (Nehemiah 3:29 )
Tirshatha - A Persian word = ‘His Excellency,’ or more probably ‘His Reverence,’ mentioned Ezra 2:63 (= Nehemiah 7:65 ), Nehemiah 7:70 ; Nehemiah 8:9 ; Nehemiah 10:1 . In the first three passages he is unnamed, but is apparently Zerubbabel; in the last two he is Nehemiah
Malchiah - ...
...
One of the priests appointed as musicians to celebrate the completion of the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:42 ). ...
...
A priest who stood by Ezra when he "read in the book of the law of God" (Nehemiah 8:4 ). ...
...
Nehemiah 3:11 . ...
...
Nehemiah 3:31 . ...
...
Nehemiah 3:14
Hasshub - Man who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:23 ). He was apparently a Levite at the Temple (1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 ). Man who helped repair the bakers' ovens and apparently two parts of the wall, Nehemiah 3:23 describing the “other piece” or a “second section” (REB). He may be the one who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God ( Nehemiah 10:23 )
Talmon - The name of a family of Temple gate-keepers ( 1 Chronicles 9:17 , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45 ; Nehemiah 11:19 ; Nehemiah 12:25 ); called in 1Es 5:28 Tolman
Hashabni'ah - (Nehemiah 3:10 ) ...
A Levite who was among those who officiated at the great fast under Ezra and Nehemiah when the covenant was sealed. (Nehemiah 9:5 ) (B
Harim - A lay family which appears in the list of the returning exiles ( Ezra 2:32 = Nehemiah 7:35 ); of those who had married foreign wives ( Ezra 10:31 ); and of those who signed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:27 ). A priestly family in the same lists ( Ezra 2:39 = Nehemiah 7:42 = 1Es 5:25 Harim ; Ezra 10:21 , Nehemiah 10:5 ). The name is found also among ‘the priests and Levites that went up with Zerubbabel’ ( Nehemiah 12:3 , where it is miswritten Rehum ); among the heads of priestly families in the days of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:15 ); and as the third of the 24 courses ( 1 Chronicles 24:8 ). To which family Malchijah the son of Harim, one of the builders of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:11 ), belonged cannot be determined
Jedaiah - ” Man who helped Nehemiah repair the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:10 ) and a descendant of the tribe of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:37 ). ” A priest or priests heading the second course or division of priests (1 Chronicles 24:7 ), returned from Babylonian Exile (1 Chronicles 9:10 ; compare Ezra 2:36 ; Nehemiah 7:39 ; Nehemiah 11:10 ; Nehemiah 12:6-7 ,Nehemiah 12:6-7,12:19 ,Nehemiah 12:19,12:21 )
Eliashib - High priest when Nehemiah rebuilt the walls (Nehemiah 3:1-20-21). Nehemiah was angry with him for preparing a room therein for his pagan connection (Nehemiah 13:4-7), in opposition to God's prohibition (Deuteronomy 23:3-4). His grandson too had married the pagan Horonite Sanballat's daughter (Nehemiah 13:28). "Therefore (says Nehemiah) I chased him from me. " His genealogy is given (Nehemiah 12:10; Nehemiah 12:22), see Ezra 10:6
Hachali'ah - (whom Jehovah enlightens ), the father of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 1:1 ; 10:1 )
Meremoth - The head of the 7th course of priests ( Ezra 8:33 , Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:21 ; Nehemiah 10:5 ); called in 1Es 8:52 Marmoth
Hundred, Tower of - (KJV “Tower of Meah”) A tower located on the north wall of Jerusalem which was restored by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 12:39 ). It may have been part of the Temple fortress (Nehemiah 2:8 )
Tal'Mon - " ( 1 Chronicles 9:17 ; Nehemiah 11:19 ) (B. ) Some of his descendants returned with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ) and were employed in their hereditary office in the days of Nehemiah and Ezra. (Nehemiah 12:25 )
a'Ter - (Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ) ...
The children of ATER OF HEZEKIAH to the number of 98 returned with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:16 ; Nehemiah 7:21 ) and were among the heads of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:17 )
pu'Rosh - ( Ezra 2:3 ; Nehemiah 7:8 ) Another detachment of 150 males, with Zechariah at their head, accompanied Ezra. (Ezra 8:3 ) They assisted in the building of the well of Jerusalem, (Nehemiah 3:26 ) and signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:14 ) (B
Big'va-i -
"Children of Bigvai," 2056 (Nehemiah 2067 ) in number, returned from the captivity with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:14 ; Nehemiah 7:19 ) and 72 of them at a later date with Ezra. ) ...
Apparently one of the chiefs of Zerubbabel's expedition, (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 ) whose family afterwards signed the covenant. (Nehemiah 10:16 ) (B
Bakbukiah - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:17 ). A porter ( Nehemiah 12:25 )
mi'Cha - (2 Samuel 9:12 ) ...
A Levite who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:11 ) ...
The father of Mattaniah, a Gershonite Levite and descendant of Ashaph. (Nehemiah 11:17,22 )
Sanballat - He was a native of Horon, a city beyond Jordan, in the country of the Moabites, Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:6
Tobiah - He was one of those who strenuously opposed the rebuilding of the temple, after the return from the captivity of Babylon, Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Nehemiah 5:1 ; Nehemiah 5:12 ; Nehemiah 5:14 . This Tobiah is called "the servant," or "slave," in some parts of Nehemiah; probably because he was of a servile condition, However, he was of great consideration in the land of the Samaritans, of which he was governor with Sanballat. This Tobiah married the daughter of Shechaniah, one of the principal Jews of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 6:18 , and had a powerful party in Jerusalem itself, who were opposed to that of Nehemiah. He maintained a correspondence by letter with this party against the interest of Nehemiah 6:17-19 ; but that prudent governor, by his wisdom and moderation, defeated all their machinations. After some time, Nehemiah was obliged to return to Babylon, subsequent to having repaired the walls of Jerusalem. But at Nehemiah's return from Babylon, some years after, he drove Tobiah out of the courts of the temple, and threw his goods out of the holy place, Nehemiah 13:4-8
Zidkijah - The Lord is righteous, one who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:1 )
Gin'Nethon - (gardener ), a priest who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:6 ) (B
Sheep Gate - Entrance in northeastern corner of Jerusalem's city wall (Nehemiah 3:1 ,Nehemiah 3:1,3:32 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Shebaniah - ...
...
Another Levite (Nehemiah 9:4,5 ). ...
...
A priest (Nehemiah 10:12 ). ...
...
A Levite (Nehemiah 10:4 )
Rehum -
One of "the children of the province" who returned from the Captivity (Ezra 2:2 ); the same as "Nehum" (Nehemiah 7:7 ). ...
...
A Levite (Nehemiah 3:17 ). ...
...
Nehemiah 10:25 . ...
...
A priest (Nehemiah 12:3 )
Azbuk - Father of Nehemiah, who repaired a part of the wall of Jerusalem. Nehemiah 3:16
Sallu -
A priest (Nehemiah 12:7 ). ...
...
A Benjamite (1 Chronicles 9:7 ; Nehemiah 11:7 )
Melicu - Priest mentioned in Nehemiah 12:14 . Apparently the same as MALLUCH in Nehemiah 12:2
Mica - Variant spelling modern translations used for Micah reflecting Aramaic spelling in text of 2 Samuel 9:12 ; Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 11:17 ,Nehemiah 11:17,11:22 ; 1 Chronicles 9:15
Bigvai - A companion of Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:2 = Nehemiah 7:7 ; cf. Ezra 2:14 [1] = Nehemiah 7:19 , Ezra 8:14 ). A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:16 )
Hacaliah - ” Father of Nehemiah. See Nehemiah
Beni'nu - (our son ), a Levite; one of those who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:13,14 )
az'Buk - (strong devastation ), father or ancestor of Nehemiah, the prince of part of Bethzur. ( Nehemiah 3:16 )
Sherebi'ah - (Nehemiah 8:7 ) He signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:12 )
Maadiah - A priest who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5 ). He is perhaps the same as Moadiah (Nehemiah 12:17 ) or Maaziah (Nehemiah 10:8 )
Miniamin - Priest mentioned in Nehemiah 12:17 ; probably the same as MIAMIN in Nehemiah 12:5 . Nehemiah 12:41
ha'Shum - (Ezra 2:19 ; 10:33 ; Nehemiah 7:22 ) (B. ) The chief man of the family was among these who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:18 ) (B. (Nehemiah 8:4 ) (B
Nehemiah, Book of - Nehemiah, BOOK OF. The two books, separated in our Bible and appearing there as Ezra and Nehemiah , originally formed a single book (as appears from the Talmud, the LXX
( b ) Nehemiah 7:6-73 a. This section contains a list of the exiles who returned with Zerubbabel, which Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 7:5 ) says he ‘found’: it also appears in Ezra’s memoirs ( Ezra 2:1-70 ), with slight differences. It forms a natural and easy continuation to Nehemiah 7:5 , and probably from the very first stood as a constituent element in Nehemiah’s memoirs. Doubtless it was followed in the memoirs by an account of what Nehemiah did to resume and complete these measures (cf. Nehemiah 7:4 ; Nehemiah 7:6 ), but this has, unfortunately, not been preserved to us. ...
( d ) Nehemiah 12:27-43 . sing, ( Ezra 6:1-22 ; Nehemiah 12:38 ; Nehemiah 12:40 ). ...
( e ) Nehemiah 13:4-31 . It deals with Nehemiah’s second visit. Passages in Nehemiah not derived from the memoirs . This long section breaks the connexion which it is generally agreed exists between Nehemiah 7:73 a and ch. Probably Nehemiah 9:6-38 ; Nehemiah 10:1-39 has been taken over directly from the memoirs of Ezra (the LXX [1] ascribes the prayer beginning in Nehemiah 9:6 ” to Ezra: ‘And Ezra said’). ...
( b ) Nehemiah 12:1-26 . Notice how the priestly genealogy is carried far down below Nehemiah’s time, as far, in fact, as the reign of Darius the Persian ( Nehemiah 12:22 ), i. The high priest Jaddua mentioned in Nehemiah 12:11 is known from Josephus to have been a contemporary of Alexander the Great. On the whole, recent criticism has been favourable to the older view as to the essential trustworthiness of the narrative of events given in Ezra-Nehemiah. ...
‘According to him, a return of exiles in the second year of Cyrus did not take place at all; the building of the Temple and the walls was rather the work of the population that had remained behind in the land (2 Kings 25:12 ), of whom Zerubbabel and Nehemiah were governors; Ezra’s visit and work of reform fall in the second governorship of Nehemiah, after the events narrated in Nehemiah 13:4-31 . Finally, according to Torrey, the “I” passages, with the exception of Nehemiah 1:1-11 ; Nehemiah 2:1-20 (mainly) and Nehemiah 3:32 to Nehemiah 6:19 (mainly), have been fabricated by the Chronicler, who in them created his masterpiece: and Nehemiah also belongs to the reign of Artaxerxes ii. Meyer’s demonstration of the essential authenticity of the documents embodied in Ezra 4:1-24 ; Ezra 5:1-17 ; Nehemiah 12:31 ; 1618483526_78 , the extreme form of the critical theory may be regarded as having lost most of its plausibility
Geshem - GESHEM ( Nehemiah 2:18 ; Nehemiah 6:1-2 ; in Nehemiah 6:6 the form Gashmu occurs). An Arabian who is named, along with Sanballat the Horonite and Tobiah the Ammonite, as an opponent of Nehemiah during the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 2:16 ; Nehemiah 6:1 ff
Pedaiah - Father (so 1 Chronicles 3:18-19 ) or uncle (so Ezra 3:2 ,Ezra 3:2,3:8 ; Ezra 5:2 ; Nehemiah 12:1 ; Haggai 1:1 ,Haggai 1:1,1:12 ,Haggai 1:12,1:14 ; Haggai 2:2 ,Haggai 2:2,2:23 ) of Zerubbabel. Son of Parosh assisting in Nehemiah's repair of the wall (Nehemiah 3:25 ). Witness to Ezra's renewal of the covenant (Nehemiah 8:4 ), perhaps identical with 4. Benjaminite father of Joed (Nehemiah 11:7 ). Levite whom Nehemiah appointed a Temple treasurer (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Maadiah - A priestly family which returned with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 12:5 ); called in Nehemiah 12:17 Moadiah
Misael - 1Es 9:44 = Mishael , Nehemiah 8:4 ; Nehemiah 8:2 , Three 66 = Mishael, No
Moadiah - Nehemiah 12:17 . Probably the same as MAADIAH in Nehemiah 12:5
Maadiah - Nehemiah 12:5 . Probably the same as MOADIAH in Nehemiah 12:17
Hizkl'Jah - who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:17 ) (B
Shemaiah - A Levite (Nehemiah 11:15 ; compare 1 Chronicles 9:14 ). (Nehemiah 11:17 ). Keeper of east gate who helped Nehemiah repair Jerusalem's wall about 445 B. (Nehemiah 3:29 ). Prophet Tobiah and Sanballat hired against Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:10-12 ). Original ancestor of a priestly family (Nehemiah 10:8 ; Nehemiah 12:6 ,Nehemiah 12:6,12:18 ). Leader of Judah who participated with Nehemiah in dedicating the rebuilt walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:34 ). Priest who helped Nehemiah dedicate the walls (Nehemiah 12:42 ). Priest whose grandson helped Nehemiah dedicate the walls (Nehemiah 12:35 ). Levitical musician who helped Nehemiah dedicate the walls (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Jedaiah (1) - Some "children of Jedaiah of the house of Jeshua, 973," returned from Babylon (Ezra 2:36; Nehemiah 7:39). These are thus distinguished from a second priestly "house" named "Jedaiah" (Nehemiah 12:6-7; Nehemiah 12:19; Nehemiah 12:21). It is a corrupt reading in Nehemiah 11:10 which makes Jedaiah son of Joiarib
Jehoiarib - ( Nehemiah 12:6 ) and of the high priest Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:19 ). The name is omitted, probably by accident, in the list of the priests that ‘sealed to the covenant’ ( Nehemiah 10:1-39 ). The clan is mentioned among those that dwelt in Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 11:10 )
Meshullam - A son of Berechiah, he helped Nehemiah repair the walls around Jerusalem following the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 3:4 ). A son of Besodiah who helped repair the old gate (the Jeshanah Gate, NIV) when Nehemiah repaired the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:6 ). See Nehemiah 8:2-4 ). One of the priests who joined Nehemiah and others setting his seal to the covenant between the people and God (Nehemiah 10:7 ). One of the leaders of the people who set his seal to the covenant between the people and God (Nehemiah 10:20 ). A son of Ezra, head of a priestly house during the time of Jehoiakim was high priest (Nehemiah 12:13 ). Another head of a priestly house when Jehoiakim was high priest; son of Ginnethon (Nehemiah 12:16 ). A guard of the storerooms at the gates (Nehemiah 12:25 NIV). A prince of Judah who participated in the procession to dedicate the rebuilt walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 12:33 )
Jeshua - Joshua the son of Nun ( Nehemiah 8:17 ). ( Ezra 2:6 , Nehemiah 7:11 [1]); perhaps identical with No. , Ezra, and Nehemiah; mentioned in connexion with the building of the Temple ( Ezra 3:9 ), the explanation of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:7 ; cf. Nehemiah 9:4 f. ), and the sealing of the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:9 ). also Ezra 2:40 161848352693 1Es 8:33 [3], Nehemiah 7:43 ; Nehemiah 12:8 ; Nehemiah 12:24 . Nehemiah 12:6 . A priestly family, Ezra 2:36 = Nehemiah 7:39 = 1Es 5:24 [4]. A town in the south of Judah ( Nehemiah 11:26 )
Joiarib -
The founder of one of the courses of the priests (Nehemiah 11:10 ). ...
...
Nehemiah 11:5 ; a descendant of Judah. ...
...
Nehemiah 12:6
Immer - 1 Chronicles 9:12; Nehemiah 11:13; 1 Chronicles 24:14; Ezra 2:37; Nehemiah 7:40. A place in Babylonia from which went, with the first caravan, men who could not prove their Israelite birth (Ezra 2:59; Nehemiah 7:61)
Meah - An hundred, a tower in Jersalem on the east wall (Nehemiah 3:1 ) in the time of Nehemiah
Colhozeh - A man of Judah in Nehemiah's time (Nehemiah 3:15; Nehemiah 11:5); father of Shallum and Baruch
Amok - A priestly family in the time of Zerubbabel and of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:7 ; Nehemiah 12:20 )
Neba'i - (fruitful ), a family of the heads of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:19 )
Bakbuki'ah - (wasting of Jehovah ), a Levite in the time of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 11:17 ; 12:9 ) (B
ma-Adi'ah, - one of the priests who returned with Zerubbabel, (Nehemiah 12:5 ) elsewhere (ver. (Nehemiah 12:17 ) ) called MOADIAH
Joiarib - See Nehemiah 11:5 ). Father of priest who lived in Jerusalem after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:10 ). with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:6 ). Leading priestly family after return from Exile (Nehemiah 12:19 )
u'za-i - (strong ), the father of Palal who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the city wail. ( Nehemiah 3:25 ) (B
Hariph, the Children of - (Nehemiah 7:24), called also Jorah in Ezra 2:18; 112 returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 10:19)
Sallai -
A Benjamite (Nehemiah 11:8 ). ...
...
A priest in the days of Joshua and Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:20 )
Sho'Bek - (free ), one of the heads of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:24 ) (B
Athaiah - (uh' thawee' uh) Leader of tribe of Judah who lived in Jerusalem in time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:4 )
Hallo'Hesh - (enchanter ), one of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:24 ) (B
Bav'a-i - son of Henadad, ruler of the district of Keilah in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:18 ) (B
Meremoth - He weighed and registered the golden and silver vessels of the temple, which Ezra had brought from Babylon (Ezra 8:24-30; Ezra 8:33; Nehemiah 3:4). (See MERAIOTH); Nehemiah 12:3; Nehemiah 12:15
Hashabneiah - Father of man who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:10 ). Levite who led worship in Nehemiah's covenant ceremony in which people reaffirmed their commitment to obey God (Nehemiah 9:5 )
Micha - One in a family line of Temple musicians (Nehemiah 11:17 ,Nehemiah 11:17,11:22 ). Nehemiah 12:35 uses the longer form Micaiah
Pela'Iah - ) ...
One of the Levites who assisted Ezra in expounding the law, (Nehemiah 8:7 ) He afterward sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:10 ) (B
Joiarib - Nehemiah 11:5 ...
3. Nehemiah 11:10 . Perhaps the same that is mentioned in Nehemiah 12:6,19
Mattaniah - " Son of Micha or Michaiah (Nehemiah 11:27; Nehemiah 12:8; Nehemiah 12:28-29; Nehemiah 12:25; Nehemiah 12:35); lived in the Netophathite villages of the singers near Jerusalem. Nehemiah 13:13
Meshullam - Son of Berechiah, one of those who helped to repair the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:30 ). His daughter was married to Tobiah ( Nehemiah 6:18 ). He helped to repair the old gate ( Nehemiah 3:5 ). One of the company that stood at Ezra’s left hand during the reading of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 ). A priest and a chief of the people who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:7 ; Nehemiah 10:20 ). One of the princes of Judah who marched in procession at the dedication of the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 12:33 ). Two heads of priestly houses and a porter in the time of the high priest Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:13 ; Nehemiah 12:16 ; Nehemiah 12:25 [1])
Hashabniah -
Nehemiah 3:10 . ...
One of the Levites whom Ezra appointed to interpret the law to the people (Nehemiah 9:5 )
Ziha - A family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:43 = Nehemiah 7:46 ; Nehemiah 11:21 ); called in 1Es 5:29 Esau
Hashub -
A Levite of the family of Merari (Nehemiah 11:15 ; 1 Chronicles 9:14 ). ...
Nehemiah 3:23 3:11
Hashum -
Ezra 2:19 ; Nehemiah 7:22 . ...
Stood on Ezra's left hand while he read the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Mehetabeel - Whose benefactor is God, the father of Delaiah, and grandfather of Shemaiah, who joined Sanballat against Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:10 )
a'Nan - (a cloud ), one of the "heads of the people" who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:26 ) (B
Zidki'Jah - (justice of Jehovah ) a priest or family of priests who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:1 ) (B
Jaddua - Levite who placed his seal on Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:22 ). (Nehemiah 12:11 ,Nehemiah 12:11,12:22 )
Talmon - Levite whom David and Samuel appointed a gatekeeper (1 Chronicles 9:17 ), ancestor of a family of Temple gatekeepers who returned from Exile (Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ); 2 . Leader of the postexilic gatekeepers (Nehemiah 11:19 ; Nehemiah 12:25 )
Parosh - The name of a post-exilic family ( Ezra 2:3 = Nehemiah 7:8 ) Ezra 8:3 ; Ezra 10:25 , Nehemiah 3:25 ; Nehemiah 10:14
Eliashib - High priest at Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah. Ezra 10:6 ; Nehemiah 3:1,20,21 ; Nehemiah 12:10,22,23 ; Nehemiah 13:4,7,28
Hananiah - ...
Nehemiah 10:23 . ...
The "ruler of the palace; he was a faithful man, and feared God above many" (Nehemiah 7:2 ). ...
Nehemiah 3:8 . ...
Nehemiah 3:30 ...
A priest, son of Jeremiah ( Nehemiah 12:12 )
Tobiah - Ezra 2:60; Nehemiah 7:62. Tobiah though a slave, Nehemiah 2:10; Nehemiah 2:19—unless this is a title of opprobrium—and an Ammonite, found means to ally himself with a priestly family, and his son Johanan married the daughter of Meshullam the son of Berechiah. Nehemiah 6:18. He himself was the son-in-law of Shechaniah the son of Arah, Nehemiah 6:17, and these family relations created for him a strong faction among the Jews
Hana'ni - (Ezra 10:20 ) ...
A brother of Nehemiah, (Nehemiah 1:2 ) who was made governor of Jerusalem under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 7:2 ) ...
A priest mentioned in (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Amashai - The son of Azareel, appointed by Nehemiah to reside at Jerusalem and do the work of the temple (Nehemiah 11:13 )
Melatiah - ” Man assisting Nehemiah in building the wall (Nehemiah 3:7 )
Amok - ” A priestly family after the return from Exile (Nehemiah 12:7 ,Nehemiah 12:7,12:20 )
Col-ho'Zeh - (all-seeing ), a man of the tribe of Judah in the time of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 3:15 ; 11:5 ) (B
Hashab'Nah - (whom Jehovah regards ), one of the chief of the "people" who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:25 ) (B
Azani'ah - (whom the Lord hears ), the father or immediate ancestor of Jeshua the Levite, in the time of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:9 )
Kadmiel - A Levite who returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:40; Nehemiah 7:43): set forward the temple workmen, and joined in the thanksgiving at the laying of the foundation (Ezra 3:9). His house took part in the general confession (Nehemiah 9:4-5) and in the covenant (Nehemiah 10:9)
Jaddua - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:21 ). A high priest ( Nehemiah 12:11 ; Nehemiah 12:22 )
Adin - Ancestor of Jews who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel and Joshua (Ezra 2:15 ; Nehemiah 7:20 ). Signer of the covenant of Nehemiah to obey God's Law (Nehemiah 10:16 )
a'Din - (dainty, delicate ), ancestor of a family who returned form Babylon with Zerubbabel, to the number of 454, ( Ezra 2:15 ) or 655 according to the parallel list in (Nehemiah 7:20 ) (B. ) They joined with Nehemiah in a covenant to separate themselves from the heathen. (Nehemiah 10:16 ) (B
az'Gad - The children of Azgad, to the number of 1222 (2322 according to) ( Nehemiah 7:17 ) were among the laymen who returned with Zerubbabel. (Ezra 2:12 ; 8:12 ) With the other heads of the People they joined in the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:15 ) (B
Ziha -
The name of a family of Nethinim (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:46 ). ...
A ruler among the Nethinim (Nehemiah 11:21 )
Harumaph - ” Father of worker who helped Nehemiah rebuild the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:10 )
Beninu - ” A Levite who sealed the covenant Nehemiah made to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:13 )
Zalaph - ” Father of Hanun, who helped Nehemiah repair the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:30 )
Bavvai - The son of Henadad ( Nehemiah 3:18 ); rebuilt a portion of the wall of Jerusalem; called in Nehemiah 3:24 Binnui
Pileha - One of the chief priests in the days of Nehemiah, (See Nehemiah 10:24) The name is probably from Palach, to divide
Turning of the Wall - It was fortified by Uzziah (2 Chronicles 26:9 ) and rebuilt by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:19-20 ,Nehemiah 3:19-20,3:24 ). Not to be confused with “the corner” (Nehemiah 3:31 ) nor associated with the corner gate
Zaccur - Son of Asaph (1 Chronicles 25:2; 1 Chronicles 25:10); "prophesied according to the order of the king"; over the third division of the temple choir (Nehemiah 12:35). Son of Imri; aided at the wall (Nehemiah 3:2). A Levite, signed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:12). A Levite, father of Hanan (Nehemiah 13:13)
Mattaniah - 1 Chronicles 9:15 ; Nehemiah 11:17,22 ; Nehemiah 12:8,25,35 . Ancestor of Hanan, who assisted Nehemiah. Nehemiah 13:13
Anan - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:26 ). 1Es 5:30 = Hanan , Ezra 2:46 , Nehemiah 7:49
pa'Ial - (judge ), the son of Uzai who assisted in restoring the walls of Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 3:25 ) (B
Tirshatha - The Persian governor of Judea is so called (Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65,70 ). Nehemiah is called by this name in Nehemiah 8:9 ; 10:1 , and the "governor" (pehah) in 5:18
Hashabiah - Two Levites of the sons of Merari ( 1 Chronicles 6:45 ; 1 Chronicles 9:14 , Nehemiah 11:15 ). The ‘ruler of half the district of Keilah,’ who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:17 ), and sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 12:24 ; Nehemiah 12:26 ). A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:22 ). A priest ( Nehemiah 12:21 )
ha'Nan - (Ezra 2:46 ; Nehemiah 7:49 ) (B. (Nehemiah 8:7 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:10 ) ...
One of the "heads" of "the people," who also sealed the covenant. (Nehemiah 10:22 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:26 ) ...
Son of Zaccur, son of Mattaniah, whom Nehemiah made one of the store. (Nehemiah 13:13 ) ...
Son of Igdaliah
Akkub - Gatekeeper of the Temple after the return from Exile (1 Chronicles 9:17 ; Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ; Nehemiah 11:19 ). They were Levites (Nehemiah 12:25 ). Since “the children of Akkub” are mentioned (Nehemiah 7:45 ), the family apparently served for several generations, with more than one person in the family line named Akkub. A Levite who helped Ezra teach the Law to God's returned people (Nehemiah 8:7 )
Harhaiah - Member of goldsmiths' guild whose son helped Nehemiah repair the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:8 )
Besodeiah - ” Father of Meshullam, who helped Nehemiah repair the gate of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:6 )
Meah, Tower of - (mee' uh) KJV transliteration of a Hebrew phrase meaning “Tower of the Hundred” (Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Ananiah - Nehemiah 3:23. A place between Nob and Hazor, where the Benjamites lived on returning from the Babylonian captivity (Nehemiah 11:32)
Hachaliah - The father of Nehemiah the Tirshatha. (See Nehemiah 1:1)...
Cupbearer - Nehemiah was cupbearer to Artaxerxes Longimanus, king of Persia (Nehemiah 1:11; Nehemiah 2:1)
Gishpa - Supervisor of Temple servants in days of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:21 ). It does not appear in the lists in Chronicles and Ezra, so some Bible students think the name is a copyist's change from Hasupha, which the Jews would pronounce similarly (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:46 )
Sallai - Benjaminite who lived in Jerusalem after Exile (Nehemiah 11:8 ). Priestly family after the Exile (Nehemiah 12:20 ), apparently the same as Sallu (Nehemiah 12:7 )
Delaiah - Ezra 2:60 ; Nehemiah 7:62 . Father of Shemaiah who sought to dishearten Nehemiah. Nehemiah 6:10
Jehohanan - ...
...
The son of Tobiah, an enemy of the Jews (Nehemiah 6:18 ). ...
...
Nehemiah 12:42 . ...
...
Nehemiah 12:13
Malluch - Two of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:4 ; Nehemiah 10:27 ). 4 is probably identical with Malluch of Nehemiah 12:2 , called in Nehemiah 12:14 Malluchi
Malluch - Priest who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:2 , perhaps identical with the Malluchi of Nehemiah 12:14 ); 3. Four contemporaries of Ezra, two men with foreign wives (Ezra 10:29 ,Ezra 10:29,10:32 ) and a priest (Nehemiah 10:4 ) and layperson (Nehemiah 10:27 ) who witnessed the covenant renewal
Binnui - ( Nehemiah 7:15 = Bani of Ezra 2:10 ). = Bani of Nehemiah 8:7 and Bunni of Nehemiah 9:4 ]'>[1], Nehemiah 12:8 )
Mal'Luch - (Nehemiah 10:4 ) and ...
One of the heads of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:27 ) ...
One of the families of priests who returned with Zerubbabel, (Nehemiah 12:2 ) probably the same as No
Shalma'i - ( Ezra 2:46 ; Nehemiah 7:48 ) In Nehemiah SALMAI
Noadiah - One called a prophetess who attempted to terrify Nehemiah. Nehemiah 6:14
Tirshatha - Perhaps meaning severe or august, a title of honor borne by Zerubbabel and Nehemiah as Persian governors of Judea, Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65
Amasha'i - (burdensome ), son of Azareel, a priest in the time of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 11:13 ) apparently the same as MAASIAI
Pil'Eha - (worship ), the name of one of the chief of the people, probably a family, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:24 ) (B
Nehemiah - Nehemiah. One of the twelve heads of the Jewish community ( Ezra 2:2 = Nehemiah 7:7 ), 1E Esther 5:8 Nehemiah 2:1-20 . One of those who helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:16 ). ...
Nehemiah. 445 444, Nehemiah is at Susa, the chief city of Elam and the winter residence of the Persian court. Here, in consequence of a report that reaches him regarding the ruined condition of Jerusalem and its people, Nehemiah is, on his own initiative, appointed governor ( pechah ) of the province of Judæa by the king. On arriving at Jerusalem, having satisfied himself as to the ruinous condition of the city walls, he energetically begins the task of rebuilding them, and, in spite of much opposition from without (from Sanballat and others), he, with the aid of the entire Jewish population drawn from the outlying villages, successfully accomplishes his undertaking within two months ( Nehemiah 1:1-11 ; Nehemiah 2:1-20 ; Nehemiah 3:1-32 ; Nehemiah 4:1-23 ; Nehemiah 5:1-19 ; Nehemiah 6:1-19 ; Nehemiah 7:1-73 ). The wall was ‘finished’ on the 25th day of the 6th month ( Nehemiah 6:16 ), and on the first day of the following month the events of the religious reform described in chs. The Book of the Law was read by Ezra in the presence of Nehemiah before the people in solemn assembly; the Feast of Tabernacles was celebrated ( Nehemiah 8:18 ); national confession of sin was made (ch. In Nehemiah 12:27-43 a description of the solemn dedication of the completed walls is given. Rawlinson proposed to place the Dedication 12 years later, in Nehemiah’ s second governorship. ...
Shortly after these events, it would seem, Nehemiah returned to the Persian court, and was absent from Jerusalem for some years. ...
How long exactly Nehemiah’s first governorship lasted, and for how great an interval he was absent from Jerusalem, are uncertaio. In Nehemiah 5:14 it seems to he stated definitely that he was goveroor in the first instance for 12 years. But in Nehemiah 13:6 Nehemiah says: ‘But all this time I was not at Jerusalem: for in the two-and-thirtieth year of Artaxerxes, king of Babylon, I went unto the king, and, after certain days, asked I leave of the king. ’ On the whole it seems probable that Nehemiah 5:14 means that during the twelve years Nehemiah, though absent on court duty, was actually governor, ruling by deputies; and that in the 32nd year of the king’s reign he again secured leave of absence, and came to Jerusalem (b. ...
On his return to Jerusalem in 433 Nehemiah found various abuses and internal disorders rampant in the community. Eliashib ‘the priest’ had provided Tobiah with quarters in one of the Temple-chambers (Nehemiah 13:4 f. ), the Levites had not received their dues, the Sabbath was openly desecrated in and around Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 13:15 f. ), and, in spite of Ezra’s great puritanical movement, mixed marriages were still common, and the children of such marriages spoke ‘half’ in their mothers’ foreign speech ( Nehemiah 13:23 f. Possibly information as to these developments had impelled Nehemiah to return. One characteristic sentence vividly illustrates this relentless zeal: ‘And one of the sons of Joiada, the son of Eliashib the high priest, was son-in-law to San-ballat the Horonite: therefore I chased him from me’ ( Nehemiah 13:28 ). ‘Thus cleansed I them’ he proceeds ‘from every thing strange, and appointed wards for the priests and for the Levites, every one to his work: and for the wood offering at times appointed, and for the first-fruits’ ( Nehemiah 13:30 ). ...
The Book of Nehemiah (see next article) is composite in character, and the narrative is in part fragmentary. 404 358), and suppose that Nehemiah was governor for the 12 years 384 372, and again at a later period. Josephus places Nehemiah in the time of Xerxes. ...
The personality of Nehemiah, as revealed in his memoirs, is in many respects strangely attractive
Sanballat - Held some place of authority in Samaria when Nehemiah went up to Jerusalem to rebuild its ruined walls. He vainly attempted to hinder this work (Nehemiah 2:10,19 ; 4:1-12 ; 6 ). His daughter became the wife of one of the sons of Joiada, a son of the high priest, much to the grief of (Nehemiah 13:28 )
Meshezabeel - Ancestor of one of those working on the wall (Nehemiah 3:4 ). One of the chiefs of the people witnessing Ezra's covenant renewal (Nehemiah 10:21 ). Member of the tribe of Judah (Nehemiah 11:24 )
Register - KJV term for a record of names, a genealogical registry (Ezra 2:62 ; Nehemiah 7:5 ,Nehemiah 7:5,7:64 ). Modern translations use register more often in the verbal sense, to record in formal records (NAS: Numbers 1:18 ; Numbers 11:26 ; 2Samuel 24:2,2 Samuel 24:4 ; Nehemiah 12:22-23 ; Psalm 87:6 )
Mijamin - ( Nehemiah 12:5 ), and was represented at the sealing of the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:7 ) = Miniamin of Nehemiah 12:17
Ono - The men of Lod, Hadid, and Ono, 721 in number, returned from Babylon (Nehemiah 7:37). Its plain is mentioned (Nehemiah 6:2); identified by some with "the valley of craftsmen" (Nehemiah 11:35)
Geshem - An Arab who, with Sanballat of Horonaim, and Tobiah the servant, the Ammonite, opposed Nehemiah in repairing Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 2:19; Nehemiah 6:1, etc. ) Frustrated in this as well as in the plot against Nehemiah's life
Jaddu'a - (Nehemiah 12:11,22 ) (B. ) ...
One of the chief of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:21 ) (B
Colhozeh - ” Father whose son Shallun was ruler of part of Mizpah and who helped Nehemiah repair Jerusalem's gates (Nehemiah 3:15 ). Apparently he had a grandson living in Jerusalem in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:5 )
Parosh - Ancestor of a postexilic family (Ezra 2:3 ; Ezra 8:3 ; KJV, Pharosh; Ezra 10:25 ; Nehemiah 7:8 ). One of the witnesses to Ezra's renewal of the convenant (Nehemiah 10:14 ), possibly the father of Pedaiah (Nehemiah 3:25 )
Eliashib - A high priest in the days of Nehemiah, who took part in rebuilding of the wall of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 3:1 . The same person probably was afterwards censured for profaning the temple, by giving the use of one of its chambers to a heathen and an Ammonite, his relative, Deuteronomy 23:3,4 Nehemiah 12:10 13:1-9
Noadiah - A prophetess, who opposed Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 6:14 )
Mag'Piash - (moth-killer ) one of the heads of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:20 ) The same as MAGBISH in (Ezra 2:30 )
Jezrahi'ah - (produced by Jehovah ), a Levite, the leader of the choristers at the solemn dedication of the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 12:42 ) (B
Immer - A priest whose son Zadok helped Nehemiah repair Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 3:29 ). Compare Ezra 2:37-38 ; Ezra 10:20 ; Nehemiah 7:40 ; Nehemiah 11:13
Rehum - One of the twelve heads of the Jewish community ( Ezra 2:2 ; in Nehemiah 7:7 , perhaps by a copyist’s error, Nehum ; in 1E Esther 5:8 Roimus ). A Levite who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:17 ). One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:25 (26)). The eponym of a priestly family ( Nehemiah 12:3 )
Tobiah - Pleasing to Jehovah, the "servant," the "Ammonite," who joined with those who opposed the rebuilding of Jerusalem after the Exile (Nehemiah 2:10 ). He was a man of great influence, which he exerted in opposition to the Jews, and "sent letters" to Nehemiah "to put him in fear" (Nehemiah 6:17-19 ). "Eliashib the priest" prepared for him during Nehemiah's absence "a chamber in the courts of the house of God," which on his return grieved Nehemiah sore, and therefore he "cast forth all the household stuff of Tobiah out of the chamber" (13:7,8)
Rehum - One returning from Exile with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:2 ); the parallel (Nehemiah 7:7 ) reads Nehum. Levite engaged in Nehemiah's repair of the wall (Nehemiah 3:17 ). Witness to Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:25 ). Priest or priestly clan (Nehemiah 12:3 ), perhaps a corruption of Harim
Akkub - gate of the Temple; the eponym of a family that returned from the Exile ( 1 Chronicles 9:17 , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45 ; Nehemiah 11:19 ; Nehemiah 12:25 ); called in 1Es 5:28 Dacubi . A Levite who helped to expound the Law ( Nehemiah 8:7 ); called in 1Es 9:48 Jacubus
Mehetabeel - ” Ancestor of Shemiah, a contemporary of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:10 )
Malluchi - (mawl' lyoo ki) Family of priests in the time of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:14 ). Some suggest Malluchi is a transcriptional error for Malluch (compare Nehemiah 12:2 )
Ziha - Chief of the Nethinim in Ophel (Nehemiah 11:21). The children of Ziha were Nethinims who returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:43; Nehemiah 7:46)
Hallohesh - An individual or a family mentioned in connexion with the repairing of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:12 ) and the sealing of the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:24 )
Jaddua -
One of the chiefs who subscribed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:21 ). ...
...
The last high priest mentioned in the Old Testament (Nehemiah 12:11,22 ), sons of Jonathan
Binnui - Man who helped Nehemiah repair the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:24 ). (Nehemiah 7:15 ; Ezra 2:10 —spells it “Bani” with 642 people). Levite who sealed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:9 ). He came up with Zerubbabel from Babylonian Exile (Nehemiah 12:8 )
Shecaniah - The father of Shemaiah ( Nehemiah 3:29 ). The father-in-law of Tobiah the Ammonite ( Nehemiah 6:18 ). The eponym of a family which returned with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 12:3 ). It is the same name which, by interchange of b and k , appears as Shebaniah in Nehemiah 10:4 ; Nehemiah 12:14
Artaxerxes - (ahr tuh xuhr' xeess) Persian royal name meaning, “kingdom of righteousness,” belonging to four Persian rulers and forming a major piece of evidence in dating Ezra and Nehemiah. Nehemiah served as cupbearer to Artaxerxes (Nehemiah 2:1 ), and the king proved sensitive to Nehemiah's mood (Nehemiah 2:2 ). He granted Nehemiah's request to go to Judah (Nehemiah 2:5-6 ), making him governor of Judah (Nehemiah 5:14 )
Hanan - One of the Levites who assisted Ezra in reading and explaining the Law to the people ( Nehemiah 8:7 ; in 1Es 9:48 Ananias ); probably the same as the signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:10 ). over the storehouses in which the tithes were kept ( Nehemiah 13:13 ). ( Ezra 2:46 , Nehemiah 7:49 ); called Anan in 1Es 5:30 . Two of ‘the chiefs of the people’ who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:22 ; Nehemiah 10:26 )
Pahath Moab - Their high rank appears from their being fourth in the two lists (Ezra 2:6; Nehemiah 7:11). Their chief signed second among the lay princes (Nehemiah 10:14). The most numerous family (2,818) in the lists, except the Benjamite house of Senaah (Nehemiah 7:38). Hence they repair two portions of the wall (Nehemiah 3:11-23). As the Benjamites and Shilonites are together in 1 Chronicles 9:5-7; Nehemiah 11:5-7, so Benjamin and Hashub of Pahath Moab are together in Nehemiah 3:23
Eliashib - High priest in time of Nehemiah who led in rebuilding the sheep gate in the Jerusalem wall, a gate through which sheep were led to the nearby Temple for sacrifice (Nehemiah 3:1 ). His house was built into the city wall (Nehemiah 3:20 ). He was the son of Joiakim and the father of Joiada (Nehemiah 12:10 ). His grandson married the daughter of Sanballat, who strongly opposed Nehemiah's efforts (Nehemiah 13:28 ), possibly indicating some tension between Nehemiah and the priestly leaders. A priest in the time of Nehemiah who administered the Temple storerooms and provided a place for Tobiah, Nehemiah's strong opponent (Nehemiah 13:4-9 )
Hodijah -
One of the Levites who assisted Ezra in expounding the law (Nehemiah 8:7 ; 9:5 ). ...
Nehemiah 10:18 , a Levite who sealed the covenant
Mehet'Able-el - The ancestor of Shemaiah the prophet who was hired against Nehemiah by Tobiah and Sanballat. ( Nehemiah 6:10 )
Anani'ah - (protected by Jehovah ) probably a priest, and ancestor of Azariah, who assisted in rebuilding the city wall in the days of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 3:23 ) (B
Geshem or Gashmu - An Arabian, who opposed the work of the Lord in the time of Nehemiah, by ridicule and plots, Nehemiah 2:19 ; 6:1-9 ; about 445 B
Anani'ah - (protected by Jehovah ) probably a priest, and ancestor of Azariah, who assisted in rebuilding the city wall in the days of Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 3:23 ) (B
Halo'Hesh - Shallum, son of Halohesh was "ruler of the half part of Jerusalem" at the time of the repair of the wall by Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:12 ) (B
Hallohesh - ” Father of Shallum, who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall. He is called, “ruler of the half part of Jerusalem” (Nehemiah 3:12 ), apparently meaning he administered one of the outlying districts near Jerusalem. The same man or a man of the same name sealed his name to Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:24 )
Hashabiah - ...
A Levite (Nehemiah 11:22 ). ...
A chief of the Levites (Nehemiah 12:24 ). ...
Nehemiah 3:17
Zaccur - ...
...
Son of Imri (Nehemiah 3:2 ). ...
...
A Levite (Nehemiah 10:12 ). ...
...
The son of Mattaniah (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Meraioth - (Ezra 7:3 ; 1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Nehemiah 11:11 ). Priestly family in the postexilic period (Nehemiah 12:15 ), perhaps a scribal corruption of Meremoth (Nehemiah 12:3 )
Azgad - Clan of which 1222 (Nehemiah 7:17 says 2,322) returned from Exile in Babylon with Zerubbabel to Jerusalem in 537 B. A Levite who signed the covenant Nehemiah made to keep God's law (Nehemiah 10:15 )
Meraioth - Son of Ahitub and father of Zadok ( 1 Chronicles 9:11 , Nehemiah 11:11 ). A priestly house in the days of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:15 = Meremoth of Nehemiah 12:3 )
Horse Gate - Jeremiah promised its rebuilding (Jeremiah 31:40 ), and the priests under Nehemiah rebuilt it (Nehemiah 3:28 )
Zatthu - Nehemiah 10:14. The sons of Zatthu were a family of laymen who returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:8; Nehemiah 7:13)
Miamin - Nehemiah 12:5 . Probably the same as MINIAMIN in Nehemiah 12:17
Jadon - ” Man from Meronoth near Gibeon who helped Nehemiah repair the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:7 )
Talmon -
A Levite porter (1 Chronicles 9:17 ; Nehemiah 11:19 ). ...
...
One whose descendants returned with Zerubbabel to Jerusalem (Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ); probably the same as (1)
Pulpit, - Some temporary platform on which Ezra stood, Nehemiah 8:4 ; probably the same as that called 'the stairs' in Nehemiah 9:4
Hodiah - A Levite who helped Ezra explain the meaning of the Law to the people (Nehemiah 8:7 ; note KJV spelling, Hodijah) and had a leading part in Israel's confession of sin and worship (Nehemiah 9:5 ). He signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:10 ). Another Levite and a leader of the people with the same name also signed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:13 ,Nehemiah 10:13,10:18 )
Sheep-Gate, the, - one of the gates of Jerusalem as rebuilt by Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:1,32 ; 12:39 ) It stood between the tower of Meah and the chamber of the corner, ch. (Nehemiah 3:1,32 ) or gate of the guard-house, ch. (Nehemiah 12:39 ) Authorized Version, "prison-gate
Ono - Ono was home to some of those who returned from Exile (Ezra 2:33 ; Nehemiah 7:37 ; Nehemiah 11:36 ). This broad wadi is called the valley of craftsmen (Nehemiah 11:35 ) and the Plain of Ono (Nehemiah 6:2 )
Mer'Emoth - In the rebuilding of the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah we find Meremoth taking an active part. (Nehemiah 3:4 ) ...
A layman of the sons of Bani, who had married a foreign wife. (Ezra 10:36 ) ...
A priest, or more probably a family of priests, who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:5 )
ba'ni - (Ezra 2:10 ; 10:29,34 ; Nehemiah 10:14 ) Nehemiah 3:17 ) ...
A Levite. (Nehemiah 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ; 10:13 ) ...
Another Levite, of the sons of Asaph. (Nehemiah 11:22 )
re'Hum - (Nehemiah 3:17 ) (B. ) ...
One of the chief of the people, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:25 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:3 ) (B
Shallun - ” Man who helped Nehemiah by repairing the Fountain Gate (Nehemiah 3:15 )
Sallu - A Benjaminite (1 Chronicles 9:7 ; Nehemiah 11:7 ). A leading priest after the Exile (Nehemiah 12:7 )
Arah - His family returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:5 , Nehemiah 6:18 ; Nehemiah 7:10 , 1E Esther 5:10 mg
Anaiah - A Levite ( Nehemiah 8:4 ), called Ananias in 1Es 9:43 . One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:22 )
Hakkoz - Compare Nehemiah 3:4 ,Nehemiah 3:4,3:21 . In the time of Ezra and Nehemiah members of this clan could not prove their family roots, so they were not allowed to function as priests (Ezra 2:61 )
Uzzi - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:22 ). A priestly family ( Nehemiah 12:19 ; Nehemiah 12:42 )
Meraioth - Meraioth and Ahitub are perhaps transposed in Azariah's genealogy (1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 11:11). Nehemiah 12:15; MEREMOTH in Nehemiah 12:3
Fountain Gate - A city gate at the southeast corner of the walls of ancient Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:14 ; Nehemiah 3:15 ; Nehemiah 12:37 ), probably so named because people brought water from the En-rogel or Gihon springs into the city through this gate
Tirshatha - (always written with the article), the title of the governor of Judea under the Persians, perhaps derived from a Persian root signifying stern, severe, is added as a title after the name of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 8:9 ; 10:1 ) and occurs also in three other places. In the margin of the Authorized Version (Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65 ; 10:1 ) it is rendered "governor
Zabbai - The father of Baruch who worked on the wall of Jerusalem with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:20 ). The early scribal note (qere ) in Nehemiah writes the name, Zaccai
Bin'nu-i - (Nehemiah 7:15 ) ...
A Levite, son of Henadad, who assisted at the reparation of the wall of Jerusalem, under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:24 ; 10:9 )
Noadiah - The prophetess, suborned by Sanballat and Tobiah to frighten Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:14; compare Ezekiel 13:17)
Malchijah - A priest, the father of Pashhur ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 ), same as Malchiah of Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 . In Nehemiah 3:11 he is mentioned as taking part in the repairing of the wall. Malchijah the son of Rechab repaired the dung-gate ( Nehemiah 3:14 ). One of the guild of the goldsmiths who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:31 ). One of those who stood at Ezra’s left hand at the reading of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 ). One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:3 ), probably the same as No. A priest who took part in the ceremony of dedicating the wall ( Nehemiah 12:42 )
Jehoiarib - A descendant of his is mentioned in Nehemiah 11:10, also descendant representatives of nearly all the old courses (1 Chronicles 12:6; 1 Chronicles 12:19). But the Talmud makes these professed representatives of the old 24 courses to have been not really descendants from the original heads, except from four of them, Jedaiah, Immer, Pashur, and Harim, for which the Babylonian Talmud has Joiarib (as implied in Ezra 2:36-39; Nehemiah 7:39-42); and that these four were subdivided into six each to make the 24; and that the 24 took the old names (Luke 1:5). The Talmud view is not favored by Nehemiah 10:2-8, which enumerates 21 courses, of Nehemiah's time: Nehemiah 12:1-7; Nehemiah 12:19, also enumerates 22 courses of Zerubbabel's time, among them Jehoiarib, of whose course Mattenai was chief in Jehoiakim's days. Jehoiarib is added in Nehemiah 12:6, not appearing in Nehemiah 10:2-8; from which Lord A
Bani - Nehemiah 7:15 spells the name Binnui and says 648 returned. Father of Rehum, a Levite who helped Nehemiah repair the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:17 ). May be same man who helped Ezra interpret the law to the people (Nehemiah 8:7 ), led the worship service of repentance leading to Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 9:4-5 ; a second Bani was also involved here), sealed Nehemiah's covenant along with the second Bani (Nehemiah 10:13-14 ). His son Uzzi was overseer of the Levites (Nehemiah 12:22 )
Eliashib - The high priest who was contemporary with Nehemiah. He was son of Joiakim, grandson of Jeshua the son of Jozadak, the contemporary of Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 12:10 , Ezra 3:1 ), and father of Joiada ( Nehemiah 12:10 ; Nehemiah 13:28 ). He assisted in the rebuilding of the walls of Jerus, during Nehemiah’s governorship ( Nehemiah 3:1 ). He can have had no sympathy with the exclusive policy of Ezra and Nehemiah, for both he himself and members of his family allied themselves with the leading foreign opponents of Nehemiah
Tobiah - " With Sanballat and Geshem tried by fair means and foul to thwart Nehemiah (Nehemiah 2:10; Nehemiah 2:19; Nehemiah 6:17-18; Nehemiah 13:1-8). Eliashib was allied to Tobiah; possibly Sanballat, Eliashib's son in law, was related to Tobiah, and so Tobiah was connected with Eliashib (Nehemiah 13:4). Hence, it was deemed necessary to read before the people the law that "the Ammonite and the Moabite should not come into the congregation of God forever" (Nehemiah 13:1). Tobiah was notorious for contemptuous sarcasm (Nehemiah 4:3-5), "even that which they build, if a fox go up, he shall even break down their stone wall. "...
Nehemiah winced under his scorn and appealed to God for vindication: "hear, O God, for we are despised, and turn their reproach upon their own head. " The psalmist of Psalm 123 (possibly Nehemiah) speaks in the person of Israel similarly of Moab's, Ammon's, and Samaria's contempt: "behold as the eyes of servants look unto the hand of their masters (glancing in contrast at 'Tobiah the servant' or slave) so our eyes wait upon the Lord our God . These reported his good deeds before Nehemiah to win him over, and then reported Nehemiah's words to Tobiah, and wrote intimidating letters to Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:17-19). Nehemiah was sorely grieved, and cast all Tobiah's stuff out, and commanded the cleansing of the chambers (Nehemiah 13:1-9)
Hanan - Man Nehemiah appointed as assistant Temple treasurer to receive and disperse tithes brought to care for the Levites (Nehemiah 13:13 ). Levite who instructed the people in the Lord's law while Ezra read it (Nehemiah 8:7 ). Levite who sealed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:10 ). Another signer of Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:22 ). Another who signed Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:26 )
Bezai - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:18 ). ( Ezra 2:17 , Nehemiah 7:23 ) = Bassai of 1Es 5:16
ma-Azi'ah -
One of the priests who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:8 ) ...
A priest in the reign of David, head of the twenty-fourth course
Nehemiah - Son of Hachaliah, seemingly of Judah, as his kinsman Hanani was so (Nehemiah 1:2); and Jerusalem was "the place of his fathers' sepulchres" (Nehemiah 2:3). ...
His prayer (Nehemiah 1:4-11) was marked by importunate continuity, "day and night" (compare Isaiah 62:6-7; Luke 18:7), intercession for Israel, confession of individual and national sin, pleading that God should remember His promises of mercy upon their turning to Him, however far cast out for transgression; also that He should remember they are His people redeemed by His strong hand, therefore His honour is at stake in their persons; and that Nehemiah and they who pray with him desire to fear God's name (Isaiah 26:8; contrast Psalms 66:18; compare Daniel 9, Leviticus 26:33-39; Deuteronomy 4:25-31); lastly he asks God to dispose Artaxerxes' heart to "mercy" (Proverbs 21:1). After four months (Nehemiah 1:1; Nehemiah 2:1), from Chisleu to Nisan, of praying and waiting, in Artaxerxes' 20th year Nehemiah with sad countenance ministered as his cupbearer. Nehemiah was "sore afraid," but replied it was for the desolation of the city "the place of his fathers' sepulchres. request?" Nehemiah ejaculated his request to God first, then to the earthly king. There seemed no interval between the king's question and Nehemiah's answer, yet a momentous transaction had passed between earth and heaven that decided the issue in behalf of Nehemiah (Isaiah 65:24). Artaxerxes, "according to the good hand of Nehemiah's God upon him," granted him leave to go to Jerusalem for a time, and letters to the provincial governors beyond the Euphrates to convey him forward, and to Asaph to supply timber for the palace gates, etc. ) and only the history of the foreign Jews in Esther, and notwithstanding the additional numbers and resources which Ezra had brought, Nehemiah now, in Artaxerxes' 20th year, in his secret ride of observation by night found Jerusalem in deplorable plight (Nehemiah 2:12-16; compare Isaiah 64:9-12). But his continual dependence was "the hand of his God good upon him" (Nehemiah 2:8; Nehemiah 2:18), a phrase common to Ezra also (Ezra 7:6; Ezra 7:9; Ezra 7:28; compare Ezra 5:5), and marking their joint fellowship in God. ...
Where a good work is there will be opposition; so Sanballat the Horonite, and the slave Tobiah the Ammonite, and Geshem the Arabian mocked the work, and alleged it was rebellion against the king; Nehemiah told them he would persevere in reliance upon "the God of heaven," but "ye have no right in Jerusalem. " Psalm 123 was eventually written at this time in reference to their "scorn" while "at ease themselves"; Nehemiah's "hear, O our God, for we are despised" (Nehemiah 4:3-4) answers to Israel's "unto Thee lift I up mine eyes, our soul is filled with the contempt," etc. Each repaired over against his house (Nehemiah 3), teaching that in the spiritual building we must each begin with our own home and neighbourhood and circle; then charity beginning at home will not end there. "Shallum repaired, he and his daughters" (Nehemiah 3:12; compare Romans 16:1; Romans 16:3-5; Romans 16:6; Romans 16:12). The Tekoite "nobles (alone) put not their necks to the work of their Lord" (compare Judges 5:23); but generally "the people had a mind to work" (Nehemiah 4:6), so that soon "all the wall was joined. " Nehemiah used means, "setting a watch day and night," at the same time "praying unto our God" to bless the means. He had not only to contend with adversaries plotting to attack when the Jews should "not know nor see," but with his own men complaining "the strength of the bearers is decayed, and there is much rubbish, so that we are not able to build" (Nehemiah 4:8-11). De Dieu takes asher not "from whence" but "truly" (as in 1 Samuel 15:20): "yea, from all places, truly (yea) return to us," leaving off your work, for the foes are too many for you; counsel of pretended friends (compare Nehemiah 4:12 with Nehemiah 6:17-19). ...
But Nehemiah, by setting the people by families with weapons in the lower as well as the higher places of the wall, and encouraging them to "remember the Lord," baffled the enemy; thenceforward half wrought and half held the weapons, the builders and the bearers of burdens wrought with one hand and with the other held a weapon. Nehemiah had the trumpeter next him to give alarm, so as to gather the people against the foe wherever he should approach; none put off their clothes all the time (Nehemiah 4:23). Nehemiah also remedied the state of debt and bondage of many Jews by forbidding usury and bond service, and set an example by not being chargeable all the twelve years that he was governor, as former governors had been, on the Jews; "so did not I," says he, "because of the fear of God" (Nehemiah 5). His prayer often repeated is "think upon me, my God, for good according to all that I have done for this people" (Nehemiah 5:19; Nehemiah 13:14; compare Hebrews 6:10; Acts 10:4; Matthew 10:42). ...
While he pleads his efforts, not feigning a mock humility, he closes with "remember me, O my God, and spare me according to the greatness of Thy mercy" (Nehemiah 13:22-31), the publican's and the dying thief's prayer. Sanballat in vain tried to decoy him to a conference (Nehemiah 6). Nehemiah replied, "I am doing a great work, I cannot come down" (Luke 9:62). Then Shemaiah, suborned by Sanballat, tried to frighten him to flee into the temple, where he was detained by a vow (1 Samuel 21:7), in order to delay the work and give an appearance of conscious guilt on the part of Nehemiah; but neither he nor the prophetess Noadiah could put him in fear, "should such a man as I (the governor who ought to animate others) flee!" Fearing God (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14; Nehemiah 5:15) I have none else to fear (Isaiah 28:16). His safeguard was prayer; "strengthen my hands, my God, think Thou upon" my enemies (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14). ...
Nehemiah's foes were "much cast down when they perceived that this work was wrought of our God. ...
"Turners aside unto their own crooked ways" were those who held correspondence with Tobiah, as Shemaiah and the nobles of Judah (Nehemiah 6:10-14; Nehemiah 6:17-19; Nehemiah 13:4, Eliashib). The wall having been built and the doors set up (Nehemiah 7), Nehemiah gave charge of Jerusalem to Hanani and Hananiah, "a faithful man who feared God above many," and set "every one in his watch over against his house. Nehemiah took the register in a later form than that given by Ezra, for the number of those who could not prove their pedigree is reduced by subsequent searches from 652 in Ezra 2:60 to 642 in Nehemiah 7:62. The tirshatha in Ezra 2:63 is Zerubbabel 90 years before, in Nehemiah Nehemiah himself. The items vary, the sum total 42,360 is the same, Ezra 2:64; Nehemiah 7:66; Ezra has 200, Nehemiah 245, singers, the number being augmented by his time. ...
In offerings, the drams of gold in sum are 61,000 in Ezra, but in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 7:70-72) Nehemiah 7:20; Nehemiah 7:000 from the chief fathers, 20,000 from the people, and 1,000 from the tirshatha. Only 100 priests' garments were needed in "setting up the house of God" at its foundation (Ezra 2:68-69); but at its dedication after complete renovation 530 were given by the tirshatha and 67 by the people (Nehemiah 7:70; Nehemiah 7:72). The occasions of Ezra 2 and Nehemiah 7 are palpably distinct, though each embodied from a common document sanctioned by Haggai and Zechariah (Zerubbabel's helpers) as much as suited their distinct purposes. ...
Ezra's reading of the law to the assembled people followed: Nehemiah 8 (he had just returned from Persia with Nehemiah), 445 B. Nehemiah comforted them when weeping at the words of the law: "weep not, for the joy of the Lord is your strength" (Isaiah 61:3; Matthew 5:4; Psalms 51:12-13); "send portions unto them for whom nothing is prepared" (Luke 14:13); and the keeping of the feast of tabernacles more formally according to the law than the earlier one in Ezra 3:4 at the setting up of the altar, indeed with greater enthusiasm of all as one man (not excepting 1 Kings 8:2; 1 Kings 8:65) than had been since Joshua's days, reading the law not merely the first and eighth days (as enjoined in Leviticus 23:35-36), but every day of the feast (Nehemiah 8:18). ...
The law awakened a sense of sin (Nehemiah 9); so first they put away strangers, as Israel must be a separate people, and read the law a fourth of the day, and another fourth confessed sin and worshipped, the Levites leading; then they made a covenant to walk in God's law, not to intermarry with pagan, to keep the sabbath, and to pay a third of a shekel each for the service of God's temple, to bring the firstfruits and firstborn, and not to "forsake the house of our God," (Nehemiah 10) the princes, Levites, and priests sealing it. The reason for taking the census in Nehemiah 7:4-5, etc. , now appears, namely, to arrange for so disposing the people who were "few" in the "large" but scantily built city as to secure its safety and future growth in houses (Nehemiah 11). Of the census the heads of Judah and Benjamin dwelling at Jerusalem are given, also of priests and Levites there; but merely the names of the villages and towns through the country (Nehemiah 11, compare 1 Chronicles 9). ...
Then the heads of the courses of priests, and the corresponding names at the time of the return from Babylon, with a few particulars of the priests' and Levites' genealogy (Nehemiah 12:1-26). The rulers were to dwell at Jerusalem; of the people one of ten by lot were to dwell there and nine in other cities (Nehemiah 11). In Nehemiah 12 the high priests are given from the national archives down to Jaddua, and the Levites down to his contemporary Darius the Persian, Codomanus. ) The dedication of the walls by Nehemiah, the princes, priests, and Levite singers in two companies, followed (Nehemiah 12:27-47); Nehemiah 12:2 Maccabees alleges that the temple too was now dedicated after its repair by funds gathered from the people. This will explain Nehemiah's contributions including "priests' garments" (Nehemiah 7:70) after the census, besides other gifts. ) Nehemiah severed from Israel all the mixed multitude (Nehemiah 13), Ammonites and Moabites, and boldly cast out Tobiah from the chamber in the temple which Eliashib his connection had assigned him, and restored to it, after its cleansing, the temple vessels, meat offerings, and frankincense which had been previously kept there. Firmly he reproved the rulers for breaking their covenant (Nehemiah 10:39 ff), saying "why is the house of God forsaken?" and insisting that the Levites' portions should be given them, for the neglect of this duty had driven the Levites to their country fields. Nehemiah caused Judah to bring the tithes to the temple treasuries (in which Malachi supported him, Malachi 3:8), and appointed Shelemiah the priest, Zadok the scribe, and the Levite Pedaiah, as "faithful" treasurers, to distribute unto their brethren
Mattaniah - Levitic leader of the Temple choir in Zerubbabel's time (Nehemiah 11:17 ,Nehemiah 11:17,11:22 ). Levitic Temple gatekeeper (Nehemiah 12:25 ). Father of the Levite Shemaiah (Nehemiah 12:35 ). Grandfather of Hanan (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Eliashib - ...
...
A high priest in the time of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:22,23 ). His indulgence of Tobiah the Ammonite provoked the indignation of (Nehemiah 13:4,7 )
Ginnetho - (gihn' nih thoh) KJV spelling in Nehemiah 12:4 of Levite who returned from Babylonian captivity with Zerubbabel about 537 B. This is apparently the same person listed as head of a clan of priests in Nehemiah 12:16 . Probably the person who signed Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:6 ) belonged to the same family
Berechiah - Father of Meshullam, one of Nehemiah’s chiefs ( Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:30 ; Nehemiah 6:19 )
Shelemiah - Nehemiah 3:30; probably the same as in Nehemiah 8:8, one of the priests who made the sacred perfumes and incense, "apothecaries. Over "the treasuries" of Levitical tithes (Nehemiah 13:13)
Sherebiah - Flame of the Lord, a priest whose name is prominent in connection with the work carried on by Ezra and Nehemiah at Jerusalem (Ezra 8:17,18,24-30 ; Nehemiah 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ; 10:12 )
Moadiah - ” Priestly clan in the time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:17 ), perhaps to be identified with Maadiah (Nehemiah 12:5 )
Ziha - Family of Temple servants (nethinim) (Ezra 2:43 ); Nehemiah 7:46 ). Overseer of postexilic Temple servants (Nehemiah 11:21 )
Pelaiah - A Levite who helped Ezra to expound the Law ( Nehemiah 8:7 [1]), and sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:10 )
Hananiah - A member of the perfumers' guild who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:8 NAS). Man who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall ( Nehemiah 3:30 ). Ruler of the Temple fortress under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 7:2 NAS). Nehemiah set him up as one of two administrators of Jerusalem because he was trustworthy and reverenced God more than other men. Man who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law; perhaps the same as 12. above ( Nehemiah 10:23 ). A priest immediately after the time of return from Babylonian Exile (Nehemiah 12:12 ) when Joiakim was high priest. Priest musician who helped Nehemiah celebrate the completion of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:41 )
Azarel - Father of Amashai, head of a priestly family who lived in Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:13 ). Priest who played a musical instrument in time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:36 ), probably the same as 5
Hattush - A priest who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God (Nehemiah 10:4 ). (Nehemiah 12:2 ). Man who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem walls (Nehemiah 3:10 )
Sanbal'Lat - ( Nehemiah 2:10,13 ; 13:28 ) He held apparently some command in Samaria at the time Nehemiah was preparing to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem, B. 445, (Nehemiah 4:2 ) and from the moment of Nehemiah's arrival in Judea he set himself to oppose every measure for the welfare of Jerusalem. The only other incident in his life is his alliance with the high priest's family by the marriage of his daughter with one of the grandsons of Eliashib; but the expulsion from the priesthood of the guilty son of Joiada by Nehemiah promptly followed
Horonite - A description of Sanballat, who led opposition to Nehemiah (Nehemiah 2:10 )
Fish Ate - Nehemiah 3:3 (c) This may be taken as a figure of the fruitful life of the one who has entered through the sheep gate into GOD's Kingdom. (See Nehemiah 12:39; Zephaniah 1:10)
Meraioth - ...
...
Nehemiah 12:15 , a priest who went to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel. He is called Meremoth in Nehemiah 12:3
Prison Gate - KJV designation for a gate in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:39 ). The gate is perhaps identical with the Miphkad (Muster) Gate (Nehemiah 3:31 )
Zabdiel - An overseer in Jerusalem during the time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:14 )
Pethahiah - A Levite ( Ezra 10:23 , Nehemiah 9:5 ); in 1E Esther 9:23 Patheus. A Judahite officer ( Nehemiah 11:24 )
Nehemiah, Book of - The author of this book was no doubt Nehemiah himself. But there are also portions of it in which Nehemiah is spoken of in the third person (ch. These portions had their place assigned them in the book, there can be no doubt, by Nehemiah. 431-430, when Nehemiah had returned the second time to Jerusalem after his visit to Persia. ...
An account of the rebuilding of the wall of Jerusalem, and of the register Nehemiah had found of those who had returned from Babylon (ch. ...
Dedication of the wall of Jerusalem, the arrangement of the temple officers, and the reforms carried out by Nehemiah Nehemiah 13 ). Malachi the prophet was contemporary with Nehemiah
Telem - A gatekeeper who had married a foreign wife ( Ezra 10:24 ); called in Esther 9:25 Esther 9:25 Tolbanes ; perhaps the same as Talmon of Nehemiah 12:25 . Nehemiah 12:2
Hassenaah - His sons built the Fish-gate ( Nehemiah 3:6 ). Ezra 2:35 , Nehemiah 7:38 )
Butler - Nehemiah held the office at Shushan, and was highly esteemed by the king. Nehemiah 2:1
Lod - (Ezra 2:33 ; Nehemiah 7:37 ; Nehemiah 11:35 ) at what appears as the westernmost postexilic settlement though probably outside the governing authority of Sanballat of Samaria and of Judah (Nehemiah 6:2 )
Arah - Nehemiah 7:10 gives the number as 652. Father of Schechaniah, father-in-law of Tobiah, who led opposition to Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 6:18 )
Rehum - Apparently called NEHUM in Nehemiah 7:7 . Nehemiah 3:17 . Nehemiah 12:3
Mattaniah - An Asaphite ( 1 Chronicles 9:18 ), leader of the Temple choir ( Nehemiah 11:17 ; Nehemiah 12:8 ), door-keeper ( Nehemiah 12:25 ; Nehemiah 12:35 ). A Levite who had charge of the offerings ( Nehemiah 13:18 )
Sanaballat - When Nehemiah came from Shushan to Jerusalem, Nehemiah 2:10,19 , B. Nehemiah nevereless proceeded with vigor in his undertaking, and completed the walls of the city, Nehemiah 2:10 4:6 . ...
Nehemiah being obliged to return to king Artaxerxes at Shushan, Nehemiah 13:6 , B. Nehemiah, on his return to Jerusalem, (the exact year of which is not known,) drove Tobiah out of the temple, and would not suffer Manasseh the high priest's grandson to continue in the city, nor to perform the functions of the priesthood
ha'Riph - ( Nehemiah 7:24 ) The name occurs again among the "heads of the people" who sealed the covenant. (Nehemiah 10:19 )
Meremoth - Exaltations, heights, a priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:3 ), to whom were sent the sacred vessels (Ezra 8:33 ) belonging to the temple. He took part in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:4 )
Maaziah - Nehemiah 10:8. The coincidence of names between David's 24 courses, and the signers of Nehemiah's covenants, and the returners with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12) implies that these names were applied to the families
zi'ha - (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:46 ) (B. (Nehemiah 11:21 ) The name is probably identical with the preceding
Adoni'Kam, - (Ezra 2:13 ; Nehemiah 7:18 ); 1 Esd 5:14 (B. ) The name is given as ADONIJAH in (Nehemiah 10:16 )
Paseah - Ancestor of a family of Temple servants (Nehemiah 7:51 ; KJV Phaseah). Father of Joiada (Nehemiah 3:6 )
Uzzi - Overseer of Jerusalem Levites after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:22 ). Postexilic priest (Nehemiah 12:19 ). Musician involved in Nehemiah's dedication of Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 12:42 )
Koz - The KJV transliterates the name Hakkoz in Ezra 2:61 ; Nehemiah 3:4 ,Nehemiah 3:4,3:21 ; Nehemiah 7:63 with “Koz,” apparently taking Hak to be the Hebrew article “the
Astad, Astath - books; and 1222 descendants are mentioned in the parallel list in Ezra 2:12 ; Ezra 2:23 in Nehemiah 7:17 . Azgad appears among the leaders who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:15 )
Shemaiah - 1 Chronicles 3:22 ; Nehemiah 3:29 . 1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 . 1 Chronicles 9:16 , Called SHAMMUAin Nehemiah 6:17 . Son of Delaiah: he sought to entrap Nehemiah. Nehemiah 6:10 . Priest who sealed the covenant, Nehemiah 10:8 ; his family went up with Zerubbabel. Nehemiah 12:6,18 . Nehemiah 12:34 . Nehemiah 12:35 . Nehemiah 12:36 . Nehemiah 12:42
Cup-Bearer - Nehemiah held the same post under Artaxerxes. Nehemiah 1:11; Nehemiah 2:1. And it was not only an honorable appointment, but must have been a source of great emolument, for Nehemiah was evidently a man of wealth. Nehemiah 5:14-19
ba'Ruch - ...
The son of Zabbai, who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 3:20 ) (B. ) ...
A priest, or family of priests, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:6 ) (B. (Nehemiah 11:5 ) (B
Ophel - 2 Chronicles 27:3; 2 Chronicles 33:14; Nehemiah 3:26-27; Nehemiah 11:21, but it is now outside the walls of the city
Anaiah - ” Ezra's assistant when Ezra read the law to the post-exilic community (Nehemiah 8:4 ). He or another man of the same name signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:22 )
Hariph - (Nehemiah 7:24 ). Leader of people who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:19 )
Magbish - An unknown town, presumably in Benjamin, whose ‘children’ to the number of 156 are said to have returned from the Exile ( Ezra 2:30 ); omitted in the parallel passage Nehemiah 7:33 , perhaps identical with Magpiash of Nehemiah 10:20
Nekoda - Family of Temple servants returning to Jerusalem after the Exile (Ezra 2:48 ; Nehemiah 7:50 ). Family who returned from Exile but were unable to establish their Israelite descent (Nehemiah 7:62 )
Meronothite - Jadon ( Nehemiah 3:7 ). From the context of Nehemiah 3:7 Meronoth would appear to have been in the neighbourhood of Gibeon and Mizpah
Pethahiah - Ezra 10:23; Nehemiah 9:5. "At the king's (Artaxerxes) hand (one of his council) in all matters concerning the people" (Nehemiah 11:24; Ezra 7:1-20)
ba'Ana - C 1000) ...
Father of Zadok, who assisted in rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:4 ) (B
Baanah - One of those who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 ; Nehemiah 10:27 [1])
Mini'Amin - (Nehemiah 12:17 ) ...
One of the priests at the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 12:41 )
az'Zur - (one who helps ), one of the heads of the People who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. ( Nehemiah 10:17 ) (B
Zab'ba-i - ) ...
Father of Baruch who assisted Nehemiah in rebuilding the city wall. (Nehemiah 3:20 ) (B
o'no - (strong ), one of the towns of Benjamin, is first found in ( 1 Chronicles 8:12 ) A plain was attached to the town called "the plain of Ono" (Nehemiah 6:2 ) perhaps identical with the valley of craftsmen" (Nehemiah 11:35 )
Hanun - Man who repaired the valley gate of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:13 ). See Nehemiah 3:30 )
Teko'Ite, the - (2 Samuel 23:26 ; 1 Chronicles 11:28 ; 27:8 ) The common people among the Tekoites displayed great activity in the repairs of the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:6,27 )
Jehonathan - Nehemiah 12:18 . Apparently called Jonathan in Nehemiah 12:35
Sophereth - ” One of Solomon's servants whose descendants returned to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:55 ; Nehemiah 7:57 ). Modern translations translate it “Hassophereth” in Ezra 2:55 and “Sophereth” in Nehemiah 7:57 (NAS, NIV, NRSV)
Hananiah - A pious and faithful officer under Nehemiah, Nehemiah 7:2
Paseah - The father of Joiada ( Nehemiah 3:6 ). The eponym of a family of Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:49 = Nehemiah 7:51 ); in 1Es 5:31 Peter hinoe
me'ah - (a hundred ) , The tower of, one of the towers of the wall of Jerusalem when rebuilt by Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 ) appears to have been situated somewhere at the northeast part of the city, outside of the walls of Zion
Kad'mi-el - ( Ezra 2:40 ; Nehemiah 7:43 ) He and his house are mentioned in history on three occasions - (Ezra 3:9 ; Nehemiah 9:4,5 ; 10:9 ) (B
Mij'Amin - (1 Chronicles 24:9 ) ...
A family of priests who signed the covenant with Nehemiah; probably the descendants of the preceding. (Nehemiah 10:7 )
Meshullam - ...
...
A priest, father of Hilkiah (1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Nehemiah 11:11 ), in the reign of Ammon; called Shallum in 1 Chronicles 6:12 . ...
...
Nehemiah 12:13 . ...
...
A chief priest (Nehemiah 12:16 ). ...
...
One of the principal Israelites who supported Ezra when expounding the law to the people (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Imri - Father of Zaccur, who helped Nehemiah rebuild Jerusalem's wall (Nehemiah 3:2 )
Zanoah - A town in the Shephçlah ( Joshua 15:34 , Nehemiah 3:13 ; Nehemiah 11:30 , 1 Chronicles 4:18 )
Beth-Gilgal - ” A village of Levitical singers near Jerusalem whose occupants participated in the dedication of the newly built city wall under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:29 )
Bebai - The eponym of a family of returning exiles ( Ezra 2:11 ; Ezra 8:11 ; Ezra 10:28 , Nehemiah 7:16 ; Nehemiah 10:15 , Esther 5:13 Esther 5:13 ; 1E Esther 9:29 )
Ater - The ancestor of certain Temple porters who returned with Zerubbabel, Ezra 2:15 ; Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:21 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ; cf
Giddel - The eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:47 = Nehemiah 7:49 ); called in 1Es 5:30 Cathua . The eponym of a family of ‘Solomon’s servants’ ( Ezra 2:56 = Nehemiah 7:58 ); called in 1Es 5:33 Isdael
Hakkoz - The eponym of a priestly family ( 1 Chronicles 24:10 , Ezra 2:61 ; Ezr 7:63, Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:21 ); called in 1Es 5:38 Akkos
Hakkoz - Some priests are alluded to as the descendants of Koz (the prefix being taken as the article) in Ezra 2:61 ; Nehemiah 3:4,21 ; Nehemiah 7:63
Ward - Also a garrison or military post, Nehemiah 12:25, or a class or detachment of persons for any particular service. 1 Chronicles 9:23; 1 Chronicles 25:8; Nehemiah 13:30
Pelaiah - Levite assisting in Ezra's public reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:7 ). Levite witnessing Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:10 ), perhaps identical to 2
he'Zir - ) ...
One of the heads of the people (lay-men) who sealed the solemn covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:20 ) (B
Senaah - The children of Senaah, or more correctly Hassenaah , were a clan or family who, according to Ezra 2:35 , Nehemiah 7:38 , 1Es 5:23 [1], were among the exiles of the first Restoration under Zerub. , and had a share in re-building the walls ( Nehemiah 3:3 ). They are elsewhere unknown, unless they should be identified with Hassenuah of Benjamin ( 1 Chronicles 9:7 , Nehemiah 11:9 )
Hanani - ...
Probably a brother of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:2 ; 7:2 ), who reported to him the melancholy condition of Jerusalem. Nehemiah afterwards appointed him to have charge of the city gates
Hattush - An Hattush in Nehemiah 12:2. But the same name in the same family may be repeated in different generations; the Hattush in 1 Chronicles 3:22 seems distinct from the Hattush of Ezra 8:2; Nehemiah 12:2. Nehemiah 3:10
Hanan - Nehemiah 8:7; Nehemiah 10:10. Storekeeper of the tithes ("treasurer of the treasuries"), Nehemiah 13:13, where priests, scribes, Levites, and laymen are represented
Malachi - He was joined in 445 BC by another Jew from Persia, Nehemiah, who became Judea’s new governor (Nehemiah 2:1-8). Jerusalem was full of social and religious disorders, and these two men worked together in an effort to lead the people back to God (Nehemiah 8:1; Nehemiah 8:8-9; Nehemiah 12:26; Nehemiah 12:31; Nehemiah 10:35-38; Nehemiah 12:38). It seems that Malachi brought his message to the people some time during this period of reform by Ezra and Nehemiah. He does not give the date of his prophecy, but the sins he rebukes are similar to those that Ezra and Nehemiah had to deal with (cf. Malachi 2:7-9 with Ezra 10:18-19; Nehemiah 13:28-29; cf. Malachi 2:10-11; Malachi 2:14-16 with Ezra 9; Ezra 10; Nehemiah 10:30; Nehemiah 13:23-27; cf. Malachi 3:5 with Nehemiah 5:1-13; cf. Malachi 3:8-12 with Nehemiah 12:36; Nehemiah 13:10-14)
Zatthu - A sprout, Nehemiah 10:14
Pethahiah - ...
Nehemiah 9:5 . ...
A descendant of Judah who had some office at the court of Persia (Nehemiah 11:24 )
Hadid - of Diospolis (Lydda or Lod, with which it is named Ezra 2:33; Nehemiah 7:37; Nehemiah 11:34), is probably Hadid)
Date - This was a common tree in Palestine (Joel 1:12 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ). Palm branches were carried by the Jews on festive occasions, and especially at the feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:40 ; Nehemiah 8:15 )
Bazlith - (Nehemiah 7:54 ). Name is spelled Bazluth in Ezra 2:52 , which NIV reads in Nehemiah 7:54
Ananiah - Nehemiah 3:23 , the father of Maaseiah, and grandfather of Azariah, who took part in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem. A town inhabited by Benjamites after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:32 )
Pahath-Moab - ” A family of returned Exiles likely descended from the Hebrew governor of Moab in the time of David (2 Samuel 8:2 ; Ezra 2:6 ; Ezra 8:4 ; Ezra 10:30 ; Nehemiah 7:11 ; Nehemiah 10:14 )
Gid'Del - (Ezra 2:47 ; Nehemiah 7:49 ) ...
Bene-Giddel were also among the "servants of Solomon" who returned to Judea in the name caravan. (Ezra 2:56 ; Nehemiah 7:58 ) (B
Amariah - Nehemiah 12:2 ; Nehemiah 12:18 ; Nehemiah 10:3 , a priestly clan which returned to Jerusalem, and sealed the covenant under Nehemiah (probably the same as Immer , 1 Chronicles 24:14 , Ezra 2:37 ; Ezra 10:20 , Nehemiah 7:40 [2]). Nehemiah 11:4 , a Judahite who offered to dwell in Jerusalem. Nehemiah 12:12 , where Meraiah is probably a corruption of Amariah (which is found in Syr
Malachi - He was contemporary with Nehemiah (Compare Malachi 2:8 with Nehemiah 13:15 ; Malachi 2:10-16 with Nehemiah 13:23 ). 420, after the second return of Nehemiah from Persia (Nehemiah 13:6 ), or possibly before his return
Shelemiah - Father of man who helped Nehemiah rebuild Jerusalem's wall (Nehemiah 3:30 ). Priest whom Nehemiah made treasurer (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Zichri - Levite (1 Chronicles 9:15 ), perhaps identical to Zaccur (1Chronicles 25:2,1 Chronicles 25:10 ; Nehemiah 12:35 ) and Zabdi (Nehemiah 11:17 ). Father of the leading Benjaminite in postexilic Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:9 ). Postexilic priest (Nehemiah 12:17 )
Pedaiah - A man of the family of Parosh, who repaired the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:25 ). One of those who stood by Ezra when he read the Law to the people ( Nehemiah 8:4 ; 1Es 9:44 Phaldeus ), perhaps identical with 4. A Levite ( Nehemiah 13:18 ). A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:7 )
ha'Rim - (Ezra 2:39 ; Nehemiah 7:42 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:16 ) ...
Another family of Bene-Harim, 320 in number, came from the captivity in the same caravan. (Ezra 2:82 ; Nehemiah 7:35 ) (B. ) They also appear among those who had married foreign wives, (Ezra 10:31 ) as well as those who sealed the covenant- (Nehemiah 10:27 ) (B
Chenani - A Levite ( Nehemiah 9:4 )
Perida - Kernel, Nehemiah 7:57
Helkai - A priest ( Nehemiah 12:15 )
Melatiah - A Gibeonite ( Nehemiah 3:7 )
Uzai - Father of Palal (Nehemiah 3:25)
Azaniah - A Levite ( Nehemiah 10:9 )
Zalaph - Father of Hanun (Nehemiah 3:30)
Jekabzeel - JEKABZEEL ( Nehemiah 11:25 )
Joed - A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:7 )
Pelaliah - A priest ( Nehemiah 11:12 )
Shemaiah - Son of Shecaniah, ‘keeper of the east gate,’ and assistant to Nehemiah in repairing the wall ( Nehemiah 3:29 ). A Merarite Levite dwelling in Jerusalem ( 1 Chronicles 9:14 , Nehemiah 11:15 ). A Levite of the family of Jeduthun ( 1 Chronicles 9:16 ), called Shammua in Nehemiah 11:17 . Nehemiah 11:8 . A prophet, son of Delaiah, hired by Sanballat and Tobiah to terrify Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 6:10-14 ). One of the 24 courses of priests ( Nehemiah 10:8 ; Nehemiah 12:6 ; Nehemiah 12:18 ). A man present at the dedication of the wall ( Nehemiah 12:34 ). A priest, descendant of Asaph ( Nehemiah 12:35 ). A singer (or clan) having part in the dedication of the wall ( Nehemiah 12:36 ). Another, or perhaps the same ( Nehemiah 12:42 )
Hattush - A priestly family that went up with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 12:2 ) and signed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:4 ). A builder at the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:10 )
Zattu - A family of exiles that returned ( Ezra 2:8 = Nehemiah 7:13 [1]); several members of this family had married foreign wives ( Ezra 10:27 [2]); its head sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:14 (15))
Wood-Offering - (Nehemiah 10:34 ; 13:31 ). It would seem that in the time of Nehemiah arrangements were made, probably on account of the comparative scarcity of wood, by which certain districts were required, as chosen by lot, to furnish wood to keep the altar fire perpetually burning (Leviticus 6:13 )
Malchiah - A priest, the father of Pashhur ( Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 ), same as Malchijah of 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 . Nehemiah 11:2
Arah - Ezra 2:5 ; Nehemiah 7:10 . A Jew whose grand-daughter married Tobiah the Ammonite, who greatly hindered the building of the city Nehemiah 6:18
Uzai - Father of Palal ( Nehemiah 3:25 )
Shiloah, the Waters of - =Siloah, (Nehemiah 3:15 ) and Siloam (q
Telen - TALMON, Nehemiah 12:25
Beth-Azmaveth - BETH-AZMAVETH ( Nehemiah 7:28 )
Gilalai - A Levitical musician ( Nehemiah 12:36 )
Outlandish - KJV term meaning, “foreign” (Nehemiah 13:26 )
Piltai - A priestly house ( Nehemiah 12:17 )
Hashabi'ah - ) ...
Ruler of half the circuit or environs of Keilah; he repaired a portion of the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:17 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:11 ; 12:24 ) comp. (Nehemiah 11:15 ) ...
A Levite, son of Mattaniah. (Nehemiah 11:22 ) ...
A priest of the family of Hilkiah in the days of Joiakim son of Jeshua. (Nehemiah 12:21 )
Shemai'ah - (1 Chronicles 3:23 ; Nehemiah 3:28 ) ...
A prince of the tribe of Simeon. (1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 ) ...
Father of Obadiah or Abda, a Levite. ) ...
Son of Delaiah the son of Mehetabeel, a prophet in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 6:10 ) (B. ) ...
The head of a priestly house who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:8 ; 12:6,18 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:34 ) ...
One of the choir on the same occasion. (Nehemiah 12:38 ) ...
A priest. (Nehemiah 12:42 ) ...
A false prophet in the time of Jeremiah
Shelemiah - ...
...
The father of Hananiah (Nehemiah 3:30 ). ...
...
A priest in the time of (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Nekoda - Eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:48 = Nehemiah 7:60 ); called in 1Es 5:31 Noeba. Name of a family which returned from the Exile, but were unable to prove their Israelitish descent ( Ezra 2:60 = Nehemiah 7:62 ); called in 1Es 5:37 Nekodan
Miniamin - Priestly family in the time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:17 ). Priest who participated in Nehemiah's dedication of the wall (Nehemiah 12:41 )
Nehemiah - (See the Book of Nehemiah 1:1 - Nehemiah 13:31
jo-i'Arib - (Nehemiah 12:6,19 ) ...
A Shilonite --i. (Nehemiah 11:5 ) (B
Uzzi - A Levite, son of Bani, overseer of the Levites at Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:22). A priest, chief of the fathers' house of Jedaiah, in the high priesthood of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:19). A priest who assisted Nehemiah at the dedication of the wall (Nehemiah 12:42)
Artaxerxes - He also favoured the similar mission of his cup-bearer Nehemiah thirteen years later ( Nehemiah 2:1 ; Nehemiah 5:14 ; Nehemiah 13:6 )
Jacubus - JACUBUS ( 1Es 9:48 ) = Nehemiah 8:7 Akkub
Sabateus - SABATEUS ( 1Es 9:48 ) = Shabbethai , Nehemiah 8:7
Sammus - SAMMUS ( 1Es 9:43 ) = Shema , Nehemiah 8:4
Sarabias - SARABIAS ( 1Es 9:48 ) = Sherebiah , Nehemiah 8:7
Zalaph - The father of Hanun ( Nehemiah 3:30 )
Hizkijah - (Nehemiah 10:17 ), one who sealed the covenant
Neziah - Victory; pure, Ezra 2:54 ; Nehemiah 7:56
Hazaiah - A descendant of Judah ( Nehemiah 11:5 )
Maiannas - MAIANNAS ( 1Es 9:48 ) = Maaseiah , Nehemiah 8:7
Nabarias - NABARIAS ( 1Es 9:44 ) = Nehemiah 8:4 , Hashbaddanah
Aija - AIJA , Nehemiah 11:31
Palal - The son of Uzal ( Nehemiah 3:25 )
Phaldeus - PHALDEUS ( 1Es 9:44 ) = Pedaiah , Nehemiah 8:4
Jorah - In Nehemiah 7:24 Hariph
Hoshaiah - Leader of Jewish group in celebration upon the completion of the Jerusalem wall under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:32 )
Holy City - Designation for Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:1 ,Nehemiah 11:1,11:18 ; Isaiah 48:2 ; Isaiah 52:1 ; Daniel 9:24 ; Matthew 4:5 ; Matthew 27:53 ; Revelation 11:2 ) and for the new, heavenly Jerusalem (Revelation 21:2 ,Revelation 21:2,21:10 ; Revelation 22:19 ) because the holy God lived there
Shammua - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:17 ) = Shemaiah of 1 Chronicles 9:16 . The head of a priestly family ( Nehemiah 12:18 )
Hadid - Named along with Lod and Ono ( Ezra 2:38 = Nehemiah 7:37 ), peopled by Benjamites after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:34 ), probably to be identified also with Adida of 1Ma 12:38 ; 1Ma 13:13
im'Mer - (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Nehemiah 11:13 ) This family had charge of, and gave its name to, the sixteenth course of the service. (Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 )
a'Rah - (1 Chronicles 7:39 ) ...
The sons of Arah returned with Zerubbabel in number 775 according to (Ezra 2:5 ) but 652 according to (Nehemiah 7:10 ) (B. (Nehemiah 6:18 )
Shecaniah - ...
...
The father of Shemaiah, who repaired the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:29 ). ...
...
The father-in-law of Tobiah (Nehemiah 6:18 ). ...
...
A priest who returned from the Captivity with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:3 ; marg
Uzzi - He had the oversight of the Levites after the return from captivity (Nehemiah 11:22 ). ...
...
The head of the house of Jedaiah, one of "the chief of the priests" (Nehemiah 12:19 ). ...
...
A priest who assisted in the dedication of the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:42 )
Mehetabeel - MEHETABEL: Nehemiah 6:10
Tamah - (tay muh) KJV form of Temah (Nehemiah 7:55 )
Iadinus - IADINUS ( 1Es 9:48 ) = Jamin of Nehemiah 8:7
Midday - Noon or thereabouts (Nehemiah 8:3 ; Acts 26:13 )
Shallun - The son of Col-hozeh ( Nehemiah 3:15 )
Jahzerah - AHASAI in Nehemiah 11:13
Hizkiah - HIZKIJAH, Nehemiah 10:17
Gabbai - A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:8 , but text doubtful)
Zatthu - (zat' thyoo) KJV form of Zattu (Nehemiah 10:14 )
Baalsamus - BAALSAMUS ( 1Es 9:43 ) = Maaseiah of Nehemiah 8:7
Pilha - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:24 )
mo-Adi'ah - (Nehemiah 12:17 ) Elsewhere Nehe 12:5 Called MAADIAH
Hanani - Nehemiah's brother who reported the poor conditions in Jerusalem to him while Nehemiah was still in Persia (Nehemiah 1:2 ). Nehemiah placed him in charge of the military protection of the restored Jerusalem (Nehemiah 7:2 ). Priest musician at dedication of Jerusalem walls (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Shemaiah - ...
...
Nehemiah 3:29 . ...
...
A priest (Nehemiah 12:42 ). ...
...
1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 . ...
...
A false prophet who hindered the rebuilding of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 6:10 ). ...
...
A prince of Judah who assisted at the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:34-36 )
Hanan - ...
One of the Levites who assisted Ezra (Nehemiah 8:7 ). ...
One of the chiefs who subscribed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:22 )
Bani - ...
A Levite who was prominent in the reforms on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ). His son Rehum took part in rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:17 )
Hariph - A family which returned with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 7:24 ) and signed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:19 ) = Ezra 2:18 Jorah , 1Es 5:16 Arsiphurith ; one of David’s companions in 1 Chronicles 12:5 is termed a Haruphite ( Kethibh ), or Hariphite ( Qerç )
Neko'da - (Ezra 2:48 ; Nehemiah 7:50 ) ...
The sons of Nekoda were among those who went up after the captivity from Tel-melah, Tel-harsa, and other places, but were unable to prove their descent from Israel. (Ezra 2:60 ; Nehemiah 7:62 )
no-Adi'ah - ) ...
The prophetess Noadiah joined Sanballet and Tobiah in their attempt to intimidate Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 6:14 ) (B
East Gate - This gate may be identified with the Valley Gate (2 Chronicles 26:9 ; Nehemiah 2:13 ,Nehemiah 2:13,2:15 ; Nehemiah 3:13 ) or perhaps to the Refuse or Dung Gate (Nehemiah 2:13 ; Nehemiah 3:13-14 ; Nehemiah 12:31 ) located 1,000 cubits away
Hananiah - Nehemiah 3:8,30 . Ruler of the palace, who had charge over Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah: he is described as a faithful man who feared God above many. Nehemiah 7:2 . Nehemiah 10:23 . Nehemiah 12:12 . Nehemiah 12:41
Shobek - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:24 (25)
Melicu - (meh' lih cyoo) KJV form of Malluchi (Nehemiah 12:14 )
Kallai - The head of a priestly family ( Nehemiah 12:20 )
Meraiah - The head of a priestly house ( Nehemiah 12:12 )
Milalai - The eponym of a priestly family ( Nehemiah 12:36 )
Zareah - (zay' rih uh) KJV form of Zorah (Nehemiah 11:29 )
Jehohanan - This Jehohanan is sometimes equated with the high priest of Nehemiah 12:22-23 who is considered then to be a grandson of the high priest Eliashib and also to be the high priest mentioned in the Elephantine Papyri as serving about 411 B. rather than being in the time of Nehemiah. This Jehohanan may have been related to the Eliashib of Nehemiah 13:4 who was not a high priest but was closely connected to Temple chambers. Son of Tobiah, who opposed Nehemiah's work in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 6:18 ). (Nehemiah 12:13 ). Priest who helped Nehemiah celebrate completion of Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:42 )
Hashabiah - Another member of the Merari priesthood (1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 ). Compare Nehemiah 12:24 . Levite with administrative duties over city of Keilah who joined Nehemiah in repairing wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:17 ). He is probably the same one as the signer of Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:11 ) and could be the same as both 7. Ancestor of chief Levite in Jerusalem in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:22 ). Priest one generation after the return from Exile (Nehemiah 12:21 )
Maaseiah - A wall-builder ( Nehemiah 3:23 ). One of those who stood upon the right hand of Ezra at the reading of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 ); called in 1Es 9:43 Baalsamus . One of those who expounded the Law to the people ( Nehemiah 8:7 ); called in 1Es 9:48 Maiannas . One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:26 ). A Judahite ( Nehemiah 11:5 ); in 1 Chronicles 9:5 Asaiah . A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:7 ). Two priests ( Nehemiah 12:41 f
Maaseiah - Postexilic resident of Jerusalem from tribe of Judah (Nehemiah 11:5 ), likely identical with Asaiah (1 Chronicles 9:5 ). Benjaminite ancestor of some returned exiles (Nehemiah 11:7 ). Father/ancestor of the Azariah participating in Nehemiah's rebuilding of the wall (Nehemiah 3:23 ). Chief of the people who signed Ezra's covenant (Nehemiah 10:25 ), possibly identical with 14 and/or 18. One of those standing beside Ezra at the reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:4 ), possibly 14 and/or 16. One of the Levites interpreting the law which Ezra read (Nehemiah 8:7 ), possibly identical with 17. Priest participating in the dedication of the rebuilt walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:41 ), perhaps identical with 11,12, or 13
Shemaiah - The words (1 Chronicles 3:21) "the sons of Rephaiah" to the end of the chapter are a genealogical fragment inserted subsequently; the copula is wanting before "the sons of Rephaiah"; their connection with Zerubbabel's descendants who are mentioned before is not stated (Nehemiah 3:29). Nehemiah 11:15-16. 1 Chronicles 9:16; SHAMMUA, Nehemiah 11:17. Son of Delaiah; a prophet bribed by Sanballat and Tobiah to frighten Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:10, etc. ); Shemaiah pretended to be "shut up" through fear, his action corroborating his word, and proposed all should meet in the temple and shut its doors; Nehemiah heroically replied, "should such a man as I flee?" (compare Psalms 11:1. ) Shemaiah's aim was to entrap Nehemiah into sinful fear, so as to have matter of "evil reproach" against him. Nehemiah 10:8; Nehemiah 12:6; Nehemiah 12:18; Nehemiah 12:35. Nehemiah 12:34. Nehemiah 12:36. Nehemiah 12:42
Noadiah - ...
...
A false prophetess who assisted Tobiah and Sanballat against the Jews (Nehemiah 6:14 ). Being bribed by them, she tried to stir up discontent among the inhabitants of Jerusalem, and so to embarrass Nehemiah in his great work of rebuilding the ruined walls of the city
Jorah - The parallel list (Nehemiah 7:24 ) has Hariph instead of Jorah (compare Nehemiah 10:19 )
Gabbai - ” Member of tribe of Benjamin who settled in Jerusalem in time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:8 )
Hassenaah - Members of the clan helped Nehemiah rebuild the fish gate of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:3 )
Shammu'a - (Nehemiah 11:17 ) The same as SHEMAIAH , 6. (Nehemiah 12:18 ) (B
Horonaim - " Ptolemy's "Avara" is identified with Horonaim Sanballet, the opponent of the rebuilding of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 4:7; Nehemiah 2:10), was an Horonite
Zabdi - Son of Asaph (Nehemiah 11:17); Zaccur in Nehemiah 12:35, Zichri in 1 Chronicles 9:15
Hoshai'ah -
A man who assisted in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem after it had been rebuilt by Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 12:32 ) (B
Charea - CHAREA , 1Es 5:32 = Harsha , Ezra 2:52 , Nehemiah 7:54
Sabi - SABI ( 1Es 5:28 ) = Shobai , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45
Serar - SERAR ( 1Es 5:32 ) = Sisera , Ezra 2:53 , Nehemiah 7:55
Hasupha - Uncovered, one of the Nethinim (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:46 )
Phaseah - (fuh ssee' uh) KJV alternate form of Paseah (Nehemiah 7:51 )
Choir - CHOIR ( Nehemiah 12:8 RVm Lozon - LOZON ( 1Es 5:33 ) = Darkon , Ezra 2:56 , Nehemiah 7:58
Maani - MAANI ( 1Es 5:31 ) = Meunim , Ezra 2:50 , Nehemiah 7:52
Meedda - MEEDDA ( 1Es 5:32 ) = Mehida , Ezra 2:52 , Nehemiah 7:54
Nasi - NASI ( 1Es 5:32 ) = Neziah , Ezra 2:54 , Nehemiah 7:58
Nekodan - NEKODAN ( 1Es 5:37 ) = Nekoda , Ezra 2:60 , Nehemiah 7:62
Zidkijah - (zi ki' juh) KJV alternate form of Zedekiah (Nehemiah 10:1 )
Amzi - A priest (Nehemiah 11:12)
Athaiah - A man of Judah dwelling in Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 11:4 )
Dacubi - DACUBI , 1Es 5:28 = Akkub , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45
Ahzai - A priest ( Nehemiah 11:13 ) = Jahzerah ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 )
Hashabnah - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:25 )
Jerechu - JERECHU ( 1Es 5:22 ) = Ezra 2:34 , Nehemiah 7:36 Jericho
Phinoe - PHINOE ( 1Es 5:31 ) Paseah , Ezra 2:49 , Nehemiah 7:51
Shechaniah - Father of Shemaiah, who helped repair the wall around Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:29 ; compare 1 Chronicles 24:11 ). Father-in-law of the infamous Tobiah (Nehemiah 6:18 ) who opposed Nehemiah's efforts. Priest who accompanied Zerubbabel back to Jerusalem from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:3 )
Kadmiel - A representative of the line of Hodaviah (Ezra 2:40 ; Nehemiah 7:43 has Hodevah), also known as the line of Judah ( Ezra 3:9 ). Levite who helped Ezra in the reaffirmation of the covenant after the return from the Exile (Nehemiah 9:4-5 ). Levite who signed the covenant after the Exile (Nehemiah 10:9 )
Shechaniah - Father of Shemaiah, who helped repair the wall around Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:29 ; compare 1 Chronicles 24:11 ). Father-in-law of the infamous Tobiah (Nehemiah 6:18 ) who opposed Nehemiah's efforts. Priest who accompanied Zerubbabel back to Jerusalem from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:3 )
Neto'Phah - ( Ezra 2:22 ; Nehemiah 7:26 ) Nehemiah 12:28 ) To judge from (Nehemiah 7:26 ) the town was in the neighborhood of, or closely connected with, Bethlehem
Beyond the River - The official Persian usage is reflected in the Books of Ezra (Ezekiel 4:10-20 ; Ezekiel 5:3 ,Ezekiel 5:3,5:6 ; Ezekiel 6:6 ,Ezekiel 6:6,6:8 ,Ezekiel 6:8,6:13 ; Ezekiel 7:21 ,Ezekiel 7:21,7:25 ; Ezekiel 8:36 ) and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 2:7 ,Nehemiah 2:7,2:9 ; Nehemiah 3:7 )
Artaxerxes - He greatly favoured both Ezra and Nehemiah; he beautified the temple or bore the expense of its being done, Ezra 7:27 , and under his protection the wall of the city was finished. Ezra 6:14 ; Ezra 7:1-21 ; Ezra 8:1 ; Nehemiah 2:1 ; Nehemiah 5:14 ; Nehemiah 13:6
Sotai - A family of ‘Solomon’s servants’ ( Ezra 2:55 = Nehemiah 7:67 )
Subai - SUBAI ( 1Es 5:30 ) = Ezra 2:46 Shamlai , Nehemiah 7:48 Salmai
Sudias - SUDIAS ( 1Es 5:26 ) = Ezra 2:40 Hodaviah , Nehemiah 7:43 Hodevah
Lothasubus - A corruption of Hashum in Nehemiah 8:4
Naphisi - NAPHISI ( 1Es 5:31 ) = Nephisim , Ezra 2:50 ; Nephushesim , Nehemiah 7:52
Netophas - NETOPHAS ( 1Es 5:18 ) = Netophah of Ezra 2:22 || Nehemiah 7:26
Obdia - OBDIA ( 1Es 5:38 ) = Habaiah Ezra 2:61 , Hobaiah Nehemiah 7:63
Hattil, the Children of - "Children of Solomon's slaves" (Ezra 2:57-58; Nehemiah 7:59-60)
Isdael - ISDAEL ( 1Es 5:33 ) = Ezra 2:56 and Nehemiah 7:58 Giddel
Jeeli - JEELI ( 1Es 5:33 ) = Ezra 2:56 Jaalah , Nehemiah 7:58 Jaala
Keras - KERAS ( 1Es 5:29 ) = Ezra 2:44 and Nehemiah 7:47 Keros
Agia - In Ezra 2:57 , Nehemiah 7:59 Hattil
Auteas - A Levite ( 1Es 9:48 ); called in Nehemiah 8:7 Hodiah
Zidkijah - That is, ZEDEKIAH, a priest who signed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:1)
Aija - (ay i' juh) Alternate spelling of Ai (Nehemiah 11:31 )
Reproach - A source of blame, discredit, or disgrace due to barrenness (Genesis 30:23 ; Luke 1:25 ); rape by the uncircumcised (Genesis 34:2-5 ); uncircumcision (Joshua 5:9 ); forced mutilation (1 Samuel 11:2 ); Jerusalem in ruins (Nehemiah 2:17 ; Psalm 89:41 ); illness (Psalm 31:11 ); fasting (Psalm 69:10 ); military defeat (Psalm 79:4 ); sin (Proverbs 14:34 ); mistreatment of parents (Proverbs 19:26 ); singleness (Isaiah 4:1 ); widowhood (Isaiah 54:4 ); famine (Ezekiel 36:30 ). A state of shame, disgrace, or humiliation (Nehemiah 1:3 ; Job 19:5 ; Job 27:6 ; Psalm 15:3 ). An expression of rebuke or disapproval; a taunt (1 Samuel 17:26 ; 2Kings 19:4,2 Kings 19:16 ; Nehemiah 4:4 ; Nehemiah 5:9 ). To express disappointment or disapproval (Ruth 2:15 ; Nehemiah 6:13 )
Hanani - Nehemiah's brother, who returned from Jerusalem to Susa and informed him as to Jerusalem, 446 B. ; afterward made governor of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:2; Nehemiah 7:2). Nehemiah 12:31; Nehemiah 12:36
Nethinim - (nehth' ih nihm) Name meaning, “those given (to the priests and Levites),” which Ezra and Nehemiah apply to persons of foreign extraction who performed menial tasks in the Temple. (Ezra 2:43-54 ; Nehemiah 7:46-56 ). They were prohibited from mixed marriages with the people of the land (Nehemiah 10:28-30 ) and shared in the responsibility for repair of the Jerusalem city walls (Nehemiah 3:26 ; contrast Ezra 4:1-3 ). The Nethinim resided in the Ophel district of Jerusalem, likely near the water gate (Nehemiah 3:26 ), a site conducive with their task as water bearers
Hananiah - A priest, head of the house of Jeremiah, who returned with Nehemiah from Babylon ( Nehemiah 12:12 ). Governor of ‘the castle,’ who, together with Hanani, was appointed by Nehemiah to the ‘charge over Jerusalem’ ( Nehemiah 7:2 ). Several others also bear this name, but they are not of importance (see Ezra 10:28 , Nehemiah 3:8 ; Nehemiah 3:30 ; Nehemiah 10:23 ; Nehemiah 12:41 ; these are not necessarily all different people)
ma-Ase'Iah - (Nehemiah 3:23 ) ...
One of those who stood on the right hand of Ezra when he read the law to the people. (Nehemiah 8:4 ) ...
A Levite who assisted on the same occasion. (Nehemiah 8:7 ) ...
One of the heads of the people whose descendants signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:25 ) ...
Son of Baruch the descendant of Pharez the son of Judah, (Nehemiah 11:5 ) ...
A Benjamite, ancestor of Sallu. (Nehemiah 11:7 ) ...
Two priests of this name are mentioned, (Nehemiah 12:41,42 ) as taking part in the musical service which accompanied the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem under Ezra
Shammua(h) - Father of a Levite (Nehemiah 11:17 ; spelled Shemaiah in 1 Chronicles 9:16 ). (Nehemiah 12:18 )
Addan - The name does not appear in the later lists in Ezra 10:1-44 , Nehemiah 10:1-39 . In Nehemiah 7:61 it appears as Addon
Pethahiah - Royal advisor to the Persian king, either at his court or as his representative in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:24 ). Levite participating in Ezra's covenant renewal (Nehemiah 9:5 )
Zabdi - Nehemiah 11:17 . Apparently the same as ZACCUR in Nehemiah 12:35 and ZICHRI in 1 Chronicles 9:15
Pethahi'ah - (Ezra 10:23 ) He is probably the same who is mentioned in (Nehemiah 9:5 ) (B. (Nehemiah 11:24 ) (B
Shealtiel - Asked for of God, father of Zerubbabel (Ezra 3:2,8 ; Nehemiah 12:1 )
Ashdodites, - the inhabitants of Ashdod, (Nehemiah 4:7 ) called Ashdothites in (Joshua 13:3 )
Harsha - Worker or enchanter, one of the Nethinim (Ezra 2:52 ; Nehemiah 7:54 )
Azarael - (az uh ray' ehl) KJV spelling of Azarel (Nehemiah 13:36 )
Gashmu - (gassh' myoo) Aramaic form of Geshem used in Nehemiah 6:6
Tekoite - (teh koh' ite) Resident of Tekoa (2 Samuel 23:26 ; Nehemiah 3:5 )
Jahzerah - A priest ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 ); called in Nehemiah 11:13 Ahzai
Labana - LABANA ( 1Es 5:29 ) = Ezra 2:48 and Nehemiah 7:48 Lebana (h)
Meshillemith - A priest ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 ); called in Nehemiah 11:13 Meshillemoth
Aggaba - In Ezra 2:45 Hagabah , Nehemiah 7:48 Hagaba
Meu'Nim - ( Nehemiah 7:52 ) Elsewhere given in Authorized Version as Mehunim and Mehunims
Pelaiah - (See Nehemiah 8:7) A thing secret, from Pelah, to hide
Palal - (Nehemiah 3:25) So called from Pillel, to beseech
Gishpa - An overseer of the Nethinim ( Nehemiah 11:21 ), but text is probably corrupt
Meraiah - Resistance, a chief priest, a contemporary of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:12 )
Dragon Well - (Nehemiah 2:13 ), supposed by some to be identical with the Pool of Gihon
Barkos - Painter, (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 )
Tel-Haresha - (tehl-huh ree' sshuh) KJV, NIV alternate form of Tel-harsha (Nehemiah 7:61 )
Chislev - ]'>[1] Chisleu , Nehemiah 1:1 , Zechariah 7:1 )
Nobai - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:19 )
Beninu - One of those who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:13 )
Galal - The name of two Levites ( 1 Chronicles 9:15-16 , Nehemiah 11:17 )
a'mi - (builder ), one of Solomon's servants, ( Ezra 2:57 ) called AMON in (Nehemiah 7:59 )
Dragon-Well - Nehemiah 2:13 ; probably the fountain of Gihon, on the west side of Jerusalem
Jadon - Judge, a Meronothite who assisted in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:7 )
Amari'ah - (2 Chronicles 31:15 ; Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2,13 ) ...
One of the sons of Bani in the time of Ezra. (Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2,13 ) ...
A descendant of Pharez. (Nehemiah 11:4 ) ...
An ancestor of Zephaniah the prophet
Shabbethai - ” Levite who explained the law to the people as Ezra read it (Nehemiah 8:7 ). He was in charge of “external business of the house of God” (Nehemiah 11:16 REB): either maintaining outward appearance of the Temple or collecting the tithes
Perez - ), breach, the son of Judah (Nehemiah 11:4 ). Four hundred and sixty-eight of his "sons" came back from captivity with Zerubbabel, who himself was one of them (1 Chronicles 9:4 ; Nehemiah 11:6 )
Kabzeel - (kab' zih uhl) Place name meaning, “may God gather”; same as Jekabzeel in Nehemiah 11:25 . One of the towns reoccupied by the Jews after the return from the Exile (Nehemiah 11:25 )
Adinu - to the number of 454 ( Esther 5:14 Esther 5:14 , Ezra 2:15 ) or 655 ( Nehemiah 7:20 ). They are mentioned among ‘the chiefs of the people’ who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:16 )
Azarel - A priest ( Nehemiah 11:13 ). A Levite ( Nehemiah 12:36 )
Basaloth - 1Es 5:31 = Bazluth of Ezra 2:62 or Bazlith of Nehemiah 7:54
Shobai - A family of porters ( Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45 [1])
Temah - A family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:53 , Nehemiah 7:55 ) = 1Es 5:32 Thomei
Peruda - One whose descendants returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:55 ); called also Perida (Nehemiah 7:57 )
Helkai - Smooth-tongued, one of the chief priests in the time of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Bilgai - (bihl' gaw i) Priest who sealed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:8 )
Pilha - ” Lay leader witnessing Ezra's covenant renewal (Nehemiah 10:24 )
Netophites - (nih tahf' uh thitess) Residents of Netophah (1 Chronicles 9:16 ; Nehemiah 12:27-28 )
Shobek - ” Jewish leader who signed Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:24 )
Sia - ” Family of Temple servants or nethanim (Nehemiah 7:47 )
Hammiphkad - ]'>[1] Miphkad) , Nehemiah 3:31
Harumaph - Father of Jedaiah, who assisted in repairing the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:10 )
Mattani'ah - (1 Chronicles 9:15 ) He was leader of the temple choir after its restoration, (Nehemiah 11:17 ; 12:8 ) in the time of Nehemiah, and took part in the musical service which accompanied the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 12:25,35 ) ...
A descendant of Asaph, and ancestor of Jahaziel the Levite, in the reign of Jehoshaphat. ...
A Levite, father of Zaccur and ancestor of Hanan the under-treasurer who had charge of the offerings for the Levites in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 13:13 ) ...
One of the fourteen sons of Heman, whose office it was to blow the horns in the temple service appointed by David
Uriah - Priest in time of Ezra and Nehemiah (Ezra 8:33 ; Nehemiah 3:4 ,Nehemiah 3:4,3:21 ). Person who helped Ezra in informing the people of God's word (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Tobi'ah -
"The children of Tobiah" were a family who returned with Zerubbabel, but were unable to prove their connection with Israel -- (Ezra 2:60 ; Nehemiah 7:62 ) (B. But Tobiah, though a slave, (Nehemiah 2:10,19 ) --unless, this is a title of opprobrium --and an Ammonite, found means to ally himself with a priestly family, and his son Johanan married the daughter of Meshullam the son of Berechiah. (Nehemiah 6:18 ) He himself was the son-in-law of Shechaniah the son of Arah, (Nehemiah 6:17 ) and these family relations created for him a strong faction among the Jews
uz'zi - (1 Chronicles 9:8 ) ...
A Levite, son of Bani and overseer of the Levites dwelling at Jerusalem, in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 11:22 ) ...
A priest, chief of the father's house of Jedaiah, in the time of Joiakim the high priest. (Nehemiah 12:19 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:42 ) Perhaps the same as the preceding
Hodevah - (hoh' dih vah) Transliteration of Hebrew text in Nehemiah 7:43 for original Hodaviah
Bassai - ]'>[1] Bassa ), 1Es 5:16 = Bezai , Ezra 2:17 , Nehemiah 7:23
Chaseba - There is no corresponding name in the lists of Ezra and Nehemiah
Sallu - A Benjamite family ( 1 Chronicles 9:7 , Nehemiah 11:7 )
Sophereth - A family of Nethinim, Nehemiah 7:67 = Ezra 2:55 Hassophereth , 1Es 5:33 Assaphioth
Mekonah - A base or foundation, a town in the south of Judah (Nehemiah 11:28 ), near Ziklag
Hashbadana - Consideration in judging, stood at Ezra's left hand when he read the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Joed - ” Member of tribe of Benjamin (Nehemiah 11:7 )
Ward - A prison (Genesis 40:3,4 ); a watch-station (Isaiah 21:8 ); a guard (Nehemiah 13:30 )
Neballat - A town of Benjamin (Nehemiah 11:34)
Raamiah - (ray uh mi' uh) Returning Exile (Nehemiah 7:7 )
Maaziah - A priestly family which constituted the 24th course ( Nehemiah 10:8 , 1 Chronicles 24:18 )
Dimonah - A city in southern Judah, near the Idumean desert (Joshua 15:22 Dibon), Nehemiah 11:25
Basthai - ]'>[1] Bastai ), 1Es 5:31 = Besai , Ezra 2:40 , Nehemiah 7:52
Besai - ( Ezra 2:49 , Nehemiah 7:52 ; = Basthai , 1Es 5:31 )
Besodeiah - BESODEIAH ( Nehemiah 3:6 )
Ateta - ]'>[1] Teta ), 1Es 5:28 = Hatita , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45
Bethpalet - Joshua 15:27 : called BETH-PHELET in Nehemiah 11:26
Anan - ” Signer of Nehemiah's covenant to obey God (Nehemiah 10:26 )
ja'Don - ( Nehemiah 3:7 ) (B
Zadok - Son of Baanah (see Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 ), a helper of Nehemiah in re-building the wall ( Nehemiah 3:4 ). Son of Immer, repairer of a portion of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:29 ). ‘The scribe,’ probably a priest, appointed a treasurer by Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 13:13 ); perhaps to be identified with 5. One of the ‘chiefs of the people’ who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:21 ). Ezra 7:2 , Nehemiah 11:11 ]'>[2] a passage of doubtful historicity)
Zechariah - Man who helped Ezra as he taught the law (Nehemiah 8:4 ), perhaps identical with 12. Ancestor of postexilic resident of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:4 ). Ancestor of postexilic resident of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:5 ). Ancestor of priest in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:12 ). Leading priest in time of Joiakim's high priesthood, possibly the same as the prophet (Nehemiah 12:16 ). Priestly musicians who helped Nehemiah celebrate (Nehemiah 12:35 ,Nehemiah 12:35,12:41 )
Thresholds, the - This word, Asuppe , appears to be inaccurately rendered in ( Nehemiah 12:25 ) though its real force has perhaps not yet been discovered. The allusion in (Nehemiah 12:29 ) is undoubtedly to the same place
Zabdi - ...
...
A Levite, one of the sons of Asaph (Nehemiah 11:17 ); probably the same as Zichri (1 Chronicles 9:15 ), and Zaccur (Nehemiah 12:35 )
Hashum - Community leader who stood with Ezra while he read the law to the people (Nehemiah 8:4 ). He also signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God (Nehemiah 10:18 )
Sanballat - The great enemy to Israel after their return from the captivity of Babylon: (see Nehemiah 2:19 and Nehemiah 6:1-19) The name is not strictly derived from the Hebrew: it hath been thought that as Sene means bush, and Lut, to hide, the union of those words forming a suitable name for the enemies of God's people, Sanballat was so called to imply an enemy in secret
Anathoth - It was the home of Abiathar ( 1 Kings 2:26 ) and of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 1:1 ); re-occupied after the exile ( Nehemiah 7:27 ; Nehemiah 10:19 )
Mera'Ioth - (1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Nehemiah 11:11 ) ...
The head of one of the houses of priests, which in the time of Joiakim the son of Jeshua was represented by helkai. (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Asaph - An inspired seer, as well as a composer of music (2 Chronicles 29:30; Nehemiah 12:46). Nehemiah 2:8. Nehemiah 11:17
Shelemi'ah - (Nehemiah 3:30 ) ...
A priest in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 13:13 ) ...
The father of Jehueal, or Jucal, in the time of Zedekiah
Michaiah - Nehemiah 12:35 . Apparently called MICAH in 1 Chronicles 9:15 ; and MICHA in Nehemiah 11:17,22 . Nehemiah 12:41
Temah - (tee' muh) A family of Temple servants (Nethinim) returning from Exile (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 )
Anan - Cloud, one of the Israelites who sealed the covenant after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 10:26 )
Zaccai - Pure, one whose "sons" returned with Zerubbabel to Jerusalem (Ezra 2:9 ; Nehemiah 7:14 )
Shiloni - (sshi loh' ni) Transliteration of Hebrew for Shilonite, taken by KJV as personal name (Nehemiah 11:5 )
Bilshan - A companion of Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 = Beelsarus , 1E Esther 5:8 )
Reelaiah - Apparently the same as RAAMIAH in Nehemiah 7:7
Chephirim - (chehf' ih rihm) Hebrew term for villages that NAS transliterates as place name in Nehemiah 6:2
Perida - A family of ‘Solomon’s servants,’ Nehemiah 7:57 = Ezra 2:55 Peruda , 1Es 5:33 Pharida
Jaala - A wild she-goat, one of the Nethinim, whose descendants returned from the Captivity (Nehemiah 7:58 )
Jorah - Apparently called HARIPH in Nehemiah 7:24
Pelaliah - (Nehemiah 11:12) Compounded of Pillel, to meditate or pray—and Jah, the Lord
e'Lam - (Ezra 2:7 ; Nehemiah 7:12 ) Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:14 ) ...
In the same lists is a second Elam, whose sons, to the same number as in the former case, returned with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:31 ; Nehemiah 7:34 ) and which for the sake of distinction is called "the other Elam. " ...
One of the priests who accompanied Nehemiah at the dedication of the new wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 12:42 )
Hizkijah - (hihz ki' juh) KJV spelling of Hizkiah in Nehemiah 10:17
Zathui - ZATHUI ( 1E Esther 5:12 ) = Zattu , Ezra 2:8 , Nehemiah 7:13 ; called also Zathoes , 1Es 8:32
Joiakim - (Whom Jehovah has set up) = Jehoiakim, a high priest, the son and successor of Jeshua (Nehemiah 12:10,12,26 )
Milaiai - Eloquent, a Levitical musician (Nehemiah 12:36 ) who took part in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem
Meshillemoth - ...
...
A priest, the son of Immer (Nehemiah 11:13 )
Kelita - Dwarf, a Levite who assisted Ezra in expounding the law to the people (Nehemiah 8:7 ; 10:10 )
Mehunims - Plural of Maon (Ezra 2:43; Ezra 2:50; Nehemiah 7:52); numbered with the Nethinims
Neballat - Wickedness in secret, (Nehemiah 11:34 ), probably the village of Beit Nebala, about 4 miles north of Lydda
Miamin - (mi' uh mihn) KJV form of Mijamin used at Ezra 10:25 and Nehemiah 12:5
Ami - The head of a family of ‘Solomon’s servants’ ( Ezra 2:57 ); called in Nehemiah 7:59 Amon
Amzi - A priest in the second Temple ( Nehemiah 11:12 )
Hagaba - HAGABA ( Nehemiah 7:48 )
Harhaiah - Father of Uzziah, a goldsmith who repaired a portion of the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:8 )
Amashai - Personal name of priest after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:13 )
Ithiel - (Nehemiah 11:7) The name signifies, with God; from Eth, with-and El, God
Ahas'a-i - (whom Jehovah holds ), a priest, ancestor of Maasiai, ( Nehemiah 11:13 ) called JAHZERAH in (1 Chronicles 9:12 )
Seraiah - One of the twelve leaders who returned with Zerub babel, Ezra 2:2 = Nehemiah 7:7 Azariah , l Esther 5:8 Zaraias 7 . A priestly clan ( Nehemiah 10:2 ; Nehemiah 11:11 ; Nehemiah 12:2 ; Nehemiah 12:12 , Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 = 1 Chronicles 9:11 Azariah )
Daniel - A priest who accompanied Ezra from Babylon to Jerusalem ( Ezra 8:2 , Nehemiah 10:6 ). ) notes that amongst his contemporaries were ‘a Hananiah ( Nehemiah 10:23 ), a Mishael ( Nehemiah 8:4 ), and an Azariah ( Nehemiah 10:2 ); but the coincidence is probably accidental. borrowed the three names from Nehemiah
People - In the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah the ‘people of the land’ are the half-heathen, half-Jewish population with whom the less scrupulous Jews intermarried, but who were avoided by the stricter party represented by Ezra and Nehemiah ( Ezra 10:2 ; Ezra 10:11 , Nehemiah 10:30-31 ; cf. Nehemiah 9:1 , Nehemiah 9:30 )
Michaiah - ...
...
A Levite (Nehemiah 12:35 ). ...
...
A priest (Nehemiah 12:41 )
Zabbai - Father of Baruch who assisted in the re-building of the wall ( Nehemiah 3:20 ). The Kerç has, perhaps rightly, Zaccai , a name which occurs in Ezra 2:9 = Nehemiah 7:14 , and is the origin of the Zacchæus of 2Ma 10:19 and the NT
Cup-Bearer - Nehemiah filled this office to the king of Persia (Nehemiah 1:11 )
Bethhaccerem - The ruler of the region round Bethhaccerem helped Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:14) in rebuilding the Jerusalem wall
Jehoiarib - (1 Chronicles 9:10 ; compare Nehemiah 12:6 ). Head of first course or division of priests (1 Chronicles 24:7 ; compare Nehemiah 12:19 )
Mijamin - Priest who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5 ). Priest witnessing Ezra's covenant renewal (Nehemiah 10:7 )
Mortgage, to - The money was lent by rich Jews, and Nehemiah was very angry at their exacting usury and strongly condemned them. Nehemiah 5:3
Jehonathan - Nehemiah 12:18 Nehemiah 12:18 the head of the priestly family of Shemaiah in the days of Joiakim the son of Jeshua
Tobiah - An Ammonite prince, in league with Sanballat and the Samaritans against the pious Jews, who were rebuilding the ruined temple, Nehemiah 2:10 ; 4:3 . During Nehemiah's absence, Tobiah was unlawfully established by some of the chief men of Judah, his relatives, in a fine apartment of the new temple; but was ignominiously expelled on the governor's return, Nehemiah 6:17-19 ; 13:1-9
Zab'di - ) ...
Son of Asaph the minstrel, (Nehemiah 11:17 ) called ZACCUR in (Nehemiah 12:35 ) and ZICHRI in (1 Chronicles 9:15 ) (B
Harhur - Eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53 ); called in 1Es 5:31 Asur
Salmai - A family of Nethinim, Nehemiah 7:48 ; called in Ezra 2:46 Shamlai , in 1Es 5:30 Subai
Nisan - Month of flowers, (Nehemiah 2:1 ) the first month of the Jewish sacred year
Mizpar - Number, one of the Jews who accompanied Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:2 ); called also Mispereth (Nehemiah 7:7 )
Harhaiah - Zeal of Jehovah, (Nehemiah 3:8 ) "of the goldsmiths," one whose son helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem
Hashabnah - ” Signer of Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:25 )
Chorbe - ]'>[1] Corbe ), Esther 5:12 Esther 5:12 = Zaccai , Ezra 2:9 , Nehemiah 7:14
Hatipha - Eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:54 , Nehemiah 7:56 ); called in 1Es 5:32 Atipha
Hatita - Eponym of a guild of porters ( Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45 ); called in 1Es 5:29 Ateta
Maai - One of the sons of Asaph who took part in the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:35 )
Sotai - (ssoh' tay) One of Solomon's servants whose descendants returned to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:55 ; Nehemiah 7:57 )
Zacchai - ) Hebrew of Zacchaeus; 760 of the family of Zacchai returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:9; Nehemiah 7:14)
Zareah - Nehemiah 11:29, the Hebrew form which KJV elsewhere inaccurately renders ZORAH or ZOREAH; (1 Chronicles 2:53), ZAREATHITES
Hakupha - Eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53 ); called in 1Es 5:31 Achipha
Harsha - Eponym of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:52 , Nehemiah 7:54 ); called in 1Es 5:32 Charea
Leb'Ana - ( Nehemiah 7:48 ) He is called Lebanah
Noadiah - (See Nehemiah 6:14) The name is a compound of Nuach, rest—and Jah, the Lord
Pelaliah - ” Ancestor of a priest in Ezra's time (Nehemiah 11:12 )
Chisleu - The ninth month of the Hebrews, beginning with the new moon of December, Nehemiah 1:1 ; Zechariah 7:1
Dimo'Nah, - a city in the south of Judah, (Joshua 15:22 ) perhaps the same as DIBON in (Nehemiah 11:25 )
Shephatiah - (Ezra 2:4 ; Ezra 8:8 ; Nehemiah 7:9 ). Ancestor of family included among “Solomon's servants,” that is royal officials, perhaps with Temple responsibilities (Ezra 2:57 ; Nehemiah 7:59 ). Member of tribe of Judah (Nehemiah 11:4 )
Bethzur - The people of Bethzur helped Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:16) to rebuild the wall of Jerusalem. A district was attached to it, half of which Nehemiah, son of Azbuk, was ruler over
Geshem - ” Arabian ruler of Kedar who joined Sanballat and Tobiah in opposing Nehemiah's efforts to rebuild the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 6:1-19 ). In Nehemiah 6:6 a variant spelling of his name—Gashmu—appears
a'Saph - ( 2 Chronicles 29:30 ; Nehemiah 12:46 ) (B. ...
The keeper of the royal forest or "paradise" of Artaxerxes, (Nehemiah 2:8 ) a Jew, in high office at the court of Persia. (1 Chronicles 9:16 ; Nehemiah 11:17 ) Most probably the same as 1,2
Sera'Iah - (Ezra 7:1 ) ...
A priest, or priestly family, who signed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:2 ) ...
A priest, the son of Hilkiah. (Nehemiah 11:11 ) ...
The head of a priestly house which went up from Babylon with Zerubbabel. (Nehemiah 12:12 ) ...
The son of Neriah and brother of Baruch
Lock - In the Old Testament period, door locks were bolts with holes into which small iron or wooden pins would drop to secure the bolt ( Nehemiah 3:3 ,Nehemiah 3:3,3:6 ,Nehemiah 3:6,3:13 ,Nehemiah 3:13,3:15 ; Song of Song of Solomon 5:5 ; compare Song of Solomon 6:7 )
Michmash - It was one of the smaller places to which the returning exiles belonged, contributing only 122 men to the enumeration of Ezra ( Ezra 2:27 ) and Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 7:31 ) [1]. Nehemiah further alludes to it as a border city of Benjamin ( Nehemiah 11:31 )
Micha - ...
...
The son of Zabdi, a Levite of the family of Asaph ( Nehemiah 11:17,22 )
Senaah - Thorny, a place many of the inhabitants of which returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:35 ; Nehemiah 7:38 )
Goldsmith - (Nehemiah 3:8,32 ; Isaiah 40:19 ; 41:7 ; 46:6 )
Gittaim - Two wine-presses, (2 Samuel 4:3 ; Nehemiah 11:33 ), a town probably in Benjamin to which the Beerothites fled
Mehida - ” Family of Temple servants (KJV, Nethinim) at Ezra 2:52 ; Nehemiah 7:54
Gashmu - GASHMU ( Nehemiah 6:6 )
Ami - Ezra 2:57 : called AMON in Nehemiah 7:59
Joz'Adak - ( Ezra 3:2,8 ; 5:2 ; 10:18 ; Nehemiah 12:26 ) The contracted form of Jehozadak
Ezer - A son of Jeshua who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:19 ). A priest who officiated at the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:42 )
Shelemiah - Father of Hananiah ( Nehemiah 3:30 ). A priest ( Nehemiah 13:18 )
Bebai - Original ancestor of clan of whom 623 (Nehemiah 7:16,628 ) returned with Zerubbabel from Exile in Babylon about 537 B. Signer of Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:15 )
Siloam, Tower of - Probably connected with "the wall of the pool of Siloah by the king's garden" (Nehemiah 3:15); "at the wall's bend to the S. Jotham "built much on the wall of Ophel" (2 Chronicles 27:3); "Manasseh compassed about Ophel" (2 Chronicles 33:14); a "tower lay (projecting) out" in Ophel (Nehemiah 3:26); such a projection might easily fall
Hanani - A brother of Nehemiah, who brought to Babylon an account of the wretched state of the Jews then at Jerusalem, and afterwards had charge of the gates of the city, Nehemiah 1:1-3 7:2,3 , B
Shalmai - Servant (Nethanim) in Temple (Ezra 2:46 ; Nehemiah 7:48 )
Sia - SIA ( Nehemiah 7:47 ) or SIAHA ( Ezra 2:44 )
Tabaoth - TABAOTH ( 1Es 5:29 (60); and TABBAOTH ( Ezra 2:43 = Nehemiah 7:46 )
Pelaiah - ...
...
A Levite who expounded the law (Nehemiah 8:7 )
Magbish - " A person "Magpiash" is named as sealing the covenant (Nehemiah 10:20)
Siloah, the Pool of - , "the dart", Nehemiah 3:15 ; with the art
Zattu - , one whose descendants returned from the Captivity with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:13 ); probably the same as Zatthu
Nebai - ” One of the witnesses to Ezra's renewal of the covenant (Nehemiah 10:19 )
Barkos - Ancestor of certain Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:53 , Nehemiah 7:55 ; called Barchus in 1Es 5:32 )
Gahar - ( Ezra 2:47 , Nehemiah 7:49 ), called in 1Es 5:30 Geddur
Gittaim - A town of Benjamin (?), 2 Samuel 4:3 , noticed with Hazor and Ramah ( Nehemiah 11:33 )
Imri - Father of Zaccur, who helped to build the wall ( Nehemiah 3:2 )
Meshillemoth - A priest ( Nehemiah 11:13 ); called in 1 Chronicles 9:12 Meshillemith
Mispar - ( Ezra 2:2 ) = Nehemiah 7:7 Mispereth , 1E Esther 5:8 Aspharasus
Gazzam - ( Ezra 2:48 , Nehemiah 7:51 ), called in 1Es 5:31 Gazera
Padon - , Ezra 2:44 = Nehemiah 7:47 ; called in 1Es 5:29 Phaleas
Telmelah - A Babylonian town of unknown site ( Ezra 2:59 , Nehemiah 7:61 ); called in 1Es 5:36 Thermeleth
Tel-Haresha - Hill of the wood, a place in Babylon from which some captive Jews returned to Jerusalem (Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 )
Old Gate - One of the gates in the north wall of Jerusalem, so called because built by the Jebusites (Nehemiah 3:6 ; 12:39 )
Sheep-Gate - One of the gates of Jerusalem mentioned by (Nehemiah 3:1,32 ; 12:39 )
Raamiah - Thunder of the Lord, one of the princes who returned from the Exile (Nehemiah 7:7 ); called also Reelaiah (Ezra 2:2 )
Piltai - ” Head of a family of postexilic priests (Nehemiah 12:17 )
Neballat - A town inhabited by Benjamites ( Nehemiah 11:34 ); prob
Maai - A musician participating in Nehemiah's dedication of the rebuilt Jerusalem walls (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Bazlith - BAZLITH ( Nehemiah 7:54 ), Bazluth ( Ezra 2:52 = Basaloth , 1Es 5:31 )
Keros - Name of a family of Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:44 = Nehemiah 7:47 ); in 1Es 5:29 Keras
Darkon - His sons were among those who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:56 , Nehemiah 7:58 ); called in 1Es 5:33 Lozon
Gibbar - The name is probably an error for Gibeon of Nehemiah 7:25
ig'e-al - (whom God will avenge ), a son of Nehemiah; a descendant of the royal house of Judah
Padon - ” Ancestor of a family of postexilic Temple servants (Ezra 2:44 ; Nehemiah 7:47 )
Palal - ” One of those assisting in Nehemiah's repair of the wall (Nehemiah 3:25 )
Bakbuk - The ancestor of certain Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53 ); called Acub in 1Es 5:31
be'za-i - "Children of Bezai," to the number of 328, returned from captivity with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:17 ; Nehemiah 7:23 ; 10:18 )
Nezi'ah - The descendants of Neziah were among the Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel, ( Ezra 2:54 ; Nehemiah 7:56 ) (B
Shephatiah - ( Ezra 2:4 = Nehemiah 7:9 ) and Ezra ( Ezra 8:8 ). A family of the ‘sons’ of Solomon’s servants ( Ezra 2:57 = Nehemiah 7:59 ) = 1Es 5:33 Saphuthi. A Judahite family ( Nehemiah 11:4 )
Berechiah - Father of Meshullam, who repaired the wall with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:4 ). His family was tied in marriage to Tobiah, Nehemiah's enemy (Nehemiah 6:17-19 )
Jeho'Hanan - ) ...
A priest, (Nehemiah 12:13 ) during the high priesthood of Joiakim. (Nehemiah 12:12 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:42 ) (B
Berechiah - Nehemiah 3:4,30 ; Nehemiah 6 : 18
Beb'a-i -
"Sons of Bebai," 623 (Nehe 6:28) in number, returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel, (2:11; Nehemiah 7:16 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:15 ) ...
Father of Zechariah, who was the leader of the twenty-eight men of his tribe mentioned above
Hananiah - Exodus 30:22-28; 1 Chronicles 9:30; Nehemiah 3:8; Nehemiah 3:30, compare . Nehemiah 12:12. Ruler of the palace (as Eliakim "over the house" of Hezekiah) along with Hanani, Nehemiah's brother, at Jerusalem. Nehemiah 7:2-3, "a faithful man who feared God above many. Prideaux argues from this Nehemiah at this time returned to Persia; but his presence in Jerusalem some time after the wall's completion is implied in Nehemiah 7:5-65; Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1. Moreover, Gesenius (from Nehemiah 2:8) thinks habbirah in Nehemiah 7:2 means not the governor's (tirshatha ) palace, but the fortress of the Lord's "house"; in this case Hananiah was a priest. Nehemiah 10:23
Kadmiel - , his servant, one of the Levites who returned with Zerubbabel from the Captivity (Nehemiah 9:4 ; 10:9 ; 12:8 )
Zabbai - ...
...
The father of Baruch, who "earnestly repaired" part of the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:20 ; marg
Azaniah - ” Father of Levite who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:9 )
Uzai - ” Father of one helping with Nehemiah's repair of the wall (Nehemiah 3:25 )
Hattil - Eponym of a family of ‘the children of Solomon’s servants’ ( Ezra 2:57 , Nehemiah 7:58 ); called in 1Es 5:34 Agia
Zaccai - ” One whose descendants returned to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:9 ; Nehemiah 7:14 )
Beth-Gilgal - BETH-GILGAL ( Nehemiah 12:29 , AV Lebana - LEBANA ( Nehemiah 7:48 ) or LEBANAH ( Ezra 2:45 )
Muster Gate - NRSV, REB designation for a Jerusalem city gate where troops were mustered, that is, gathered for enlistment (Nehemiah 3:31 )
Acub - Called Bakbuk , Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53
Asipha - His sons were among the Temple servants who returned with Zerubbabel; called Hasupha , Ezra 2:43 , Nehemiah 7:46
Hoshaiah - His name is a compound of Hosha and Jah, from Jasha, Saviour; and Jah, Lord, (See Nehemiah 12:32
Malachi - He supported or followed up the governor Nehemiah in the restoration of the national polity civil and religious, as Haggai and Zechariah previously had supported Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the civil governor in building the temple, Malachi (Zechariah 1:10; Zechariah 3:1-10) presupposes the temple already built. Like Nehemiah (Nehemiah 13:5; Nehemiah 13:15-22; Nehemiah 13:23-30) he censures the secular and mercenary spirit of the priests (Malachi 1:10; Malachi 2:14-16; Malachi 3:8-10); the people's marriages with foreigners; the non-payment of the tithes (Nehemiah states the cause, the high priest's alliance with Tobiah the Ammonite and Sanballat); and the rich men's want of sympathy toward the poor. Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:7) implies that "prophets" supported him, by his desire, in his reformation. Thus kingly (Zerubbabel and Nehemiah), priestly (Joshua and Ezra), and prophetic men (Haggai and Zechariah and Malachi) headed God's people at the earlier and the later stage in the restoration of Jerusalem. These became intermingled with the pagan during the 60 years that elapsed before Ezra (Ezra 9:6-15; Nehemiah 1:3); "the remnant . This was the work of Ezra and Nehemiah with the aid of Malachi in about 50 years, ending with the death of Malachi and Nehemiah, at the close of the fifth century B. ...
Ezra the priest purified the nation from within of pagan elements and restored the law; Nehemiah did the outer work of rebuilding the city and restoring the national polity (Auberlen). The time following Nehemiah's second return to Jerusalem from Persia (subsequently to the 32nd year of Artaxerxes Longimanus, Nehemiah 13:6) is the probable date of Malachi's prophecies, about 420 B. ...
Nehemiah bore this very title (pechah, Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 12:26), and its equivalent "tirshatha" (Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1; Malachi 2:10-1665; Ezra 2:63), the prefect of a province less extensive than a satrapy. It is curious that Malachi is not mentioned in Nehemiah nor Nehemiah in Malachi. But the same evils are sought to be remedied by both: see above; also compare Malachi 2:8, "ye have corrupted the covenant of Levi, saith the Lord of hosts," with Nehemiah 13:29, "they have defiled the covenant of the priesthood and of the Levites
Amariah - Priest who sealed Nehemiah's covenant to obey the law (Nehemiah 10:3 ). Ancestor of a member of tribe of Judah living in Jerusalem during Nehemiah's time (Nehemiah 11:4 ). A priest who returned to Jerusalem from Exile in Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:2 ). Head of a course of priests in Judah after the Exile (Nehemiah 12:13 )
Pashhur - Perhaps he is the father of Gedaliah ( Jeremiah 38:1 ), and likely identical with Pashhur, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 , as the ancestor of Adalah. The head of a priestly family, ‘the sons of Pashhur’ mentioned in Ezra 2:38 , Nehemiah 7:41 , Ezra 10:22 , 1Es 5:25 ( Phassurus ) Esther 9:22 Esther 9:22 ( Phaisur ). A priest who signed the covenant with Nehemiah, probably identical with 4 , or used of the clan as a whole ( Nehemiah 10:3 )
Magpiash - ” Magpiash was among the chiefs of the people who signed Ezra's covenant (Nehemiah 10:20 )
Raamiah - One of the twelve chiefs who returned with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 7:7 = Ezra 2:2 [1], Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 [2] )
Bilshan - , "eloquent", a man of some note who returned from the Captivity with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 )
Hezir - ...
Nehemiah 10:20 , one who sealed Nehemiah's covenant
Enrimmon - Reinhabited by the Jews who returned from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:29)
Hazaiah - ” Member of tribe of Judah and ancestor of Jerusalem descendants in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:5 )
Tabbaoth - ” Head of a family of Temple servants (Nethinim) returning from Exile (Ezra 2:43 ; Nehemiah 7:46 )
Hasupha - ( Ezra 2:43 , Nehemiah 7:46 ); called in 1Es 5:28 Asipha
Mehida - ( Ezra 2:52 = Nehemiah 7:54 ), called in 1Es 5:32 Meedda
Zabbai - Father of Baruch, who helped at the wall (Nehemiah 3:20)
Aspharasus - One of the leaders of the return under Zerubbabel, called Mispar , Ezra 2:2 , and Mispereth, Nehemiah 7:7
ra-Ami'ah - ( Nehemiah 7:7 ) In (Ezra 2:2 ) he is called REELAIAH
Daric - Offerings for the reconstruction of the Temple were made in darics (Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:70 ,Nehemiah 7:70,7:72 )
Zeboim - The same locality appears to be referred to in the Zeboim of Nehemiah 11:34 . Nehemiah 11:2
Geharashim - It is listed as a place where members of the tribe of Benjamin lived in the time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:35 )
Michaiah - Priest participating in Nehemiah's dedication of the walls (Nehemiah 12:41 ) and ancestor of a participating priest (Nehemiah 12:35 )
Kelita - ” A Levite who assisted in interpreting the Law when it was read to the assembly of the people during the time of Ezra (Nehemiah 8:7 ) and who participated in the sealing of the covenant (Nehemiah 10:10 )
Azmaveth - Ezra 2:24 ; Nehemiah 12:29 . Called BETH-AZMAVETH in Nehemiah 7:28
o'Phel - (2 Chronicles 33:14 ) It appears to have been near the "water-gate," (Nehemiah 3:26 ) and the "great tower that lieth out. (Nehemiah 3:27 ) It was evidently the residence of the Levites. (Nehemiah 11:21 )
Ezra, Book of - ” Several had the name: a family head in Judah (1 Chronicles 4:17 ), a priest in the return with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:1 ,Nehemiah 12:1,12:13 ), and a prince at the dedication of Jerusalem's walls built by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:32-33 ). The Book of Ezra is intimately connected with Chronicles and Nehemiah. ...
Ezra and Nehemiah were actually one book in the ancient Hebrew and Greek Old Testament. , the list in Ezra 2:1 is also in Nehemiah 7:1 ). Each book completes the other; Ezra's story is continued in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8-10 ). ), historically, apart from Ezra and Nehemiah. Scripture possibly intimates that Nehemiah preceded Ezra to Jerusalem. For example, Ezra prayed as though walls were already in place in Jerusalem (Ezra 9:9 ), yet they were built by Nehemiah. Also Nehemiah's reforms (Nehemiah 13:1 ) seem to have preceded Ezra's teaching the law and his reforms. Jewish tradition is strong that Ezra was the actual author of the entire book, as well as Chronicles and Nehemiah. ...
The book has two major stories, that of Zerubbabel and the group of returnees who rebuilt the Temple (Ezra 1-6 ), and that of Ezra (Ezra 7-10 , completed in Nehemiah 8-10 ). Peculiarities in the book include the naming of Sheshbazzar (Nehemiah 1:1 ) as the leader of the first group to return and not Zerubbabel. ...
Another peculiarity, found in both Ezra and Nehemiah, is the use of lists. The list in Ezra 2:1 of those who returned with Zerubbabel is in Nehemiah 7:1 . Other lists include those who returned with Ezra (Ezra 8:1-14 ); “the sons of the priests there were found who had taken strange wives” (Ezra 10:18-43 ); those who helped rebuild Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 3:1 ); signers of the covenant (Nehemiah 10:1 ); residents in Jerusalem at the time of Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:1 ); and another list of “the priests and the Levites that went up with Zerubbabel” (Nehemiah 12:1-26 ). Ezra's story reaches its climax in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8-10 ). There he read from “the book of the law of Moses, which the Lord had commanded to Israel” (Nehemiah 8:1 ). ...
Ezra's greatest contribution was his teaching, establishing, and implementing “the book of the law of the Lord” (Nehemiah 9:3 ) among the Jews. Jewish tradition says he authored Chronicles and Ezra-Nehemiah. He was a person of prayer; note his long confessional prayers (Ezra 9:5-15 ; Nehemiah 9:6-37 ). He was a preacher: he used a pulpit (Nehemiah 8:4 ); he publicly read the Scriptures; and he helped to interpret them to his congregation (Ezra 8:31-36 ). (Nehemiah 8:8 )...
J
Maaziah - ...
...
A priest (Nehemiah 10:8 )
Reelaiah - ” Exile who returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:2 ); identical to Raamaiah (Nehemiah 7:7 )
Nahamani - One of the twelve heads of the Jewish community ( Nehemiah 7:7 ); omitted in Ezra 2:2 ; called in 1E Esther 5:8 Eneneus
Keros - ” One of the Temple servants whose descendants returned from the Exile with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:44 ; Nehemiah 7:47 )
Lebana - ” Original ancestor of clan of Temple servants (Ezra 2:45 ; Nehemiah 7:48 )
Nephisim - (neh fi' ssihm) Family of Temple servants who returned from Exile (Ezra 2:50 ), probably identical with the Nephushesim (Nephishesim, KJV) of Nehemiah 7:52
King's Pool - Probably the same as the Pool of Shelah, a reservoir in the king's garden in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:14 )
Achipha - His children were among the ‘temple servants’ or Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel; called Hakupha , Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53
Addus - ( 1Es 5:34 ); omitted in the parallel lists in Ezra 2:1-70 , Nehemiah 7:2
Daisan - DAISAN , 1Es 5:31 = Rezin , Ezra 2:48 , Nehemiah 7:50
Ammidioi - One of the families that returned with Zerubbabel ( 1Es 5:20 ); omitted in the parallel lists ( Ezra 2:1-70 = Nehemiah 7:1-73 )
Zanoah - The inhabitants of one of them aided in rebuilding Jerusalem, Nehemiah 3:13 ; 11:30
Beth-Baalmaveth - Under this name is mentioned, in ( Nehemiah 7:28 ) only, the town of Benjamin which is elsewhere called AZMAVETH and BETH-SAMOS
Hag'Aba - ( Nehemiah 7:48 ) The name is slightly different in form from
Sabie - ‘The children of Pochereth-hazzebaim,’ Ezra 2:57 , Nehemiah 7:59 , appear as ‘the sons of Phacereth, the sons of Sabie’ in 1Es 5:34
Horse-Gate - A gate in the wall of Jerusalem, at the west end of the bridge, leading from Zion to the temple (Nehemiah 3:28 ; Jeremiah 31:40 )
Mekonah - ) A town with daughter villages, reinhabited after the captivity by men of Judah (Nehemiah 11:28)
Mehetabel - The grandfather of Shemaiah ( Nehemiah 6:10 )
Lebanah - (lih bay' nuh) Alternate spelling of Lebana (Nehemiah 7:48 ) in most English translations despite the same names in the Hebrew text
Beelsarus - ; called Bilshan , Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7
Abda - Nehemiah 11:17; the Obadiah of 1 Chronicles 9:16, "the principal to begin the thanksgiving in prayer
Asur - His sons returned among the Temple servants under Zerubbabel; called Harhur , Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:53
Shiloni - Nehemiah 11:5, translated "the Shilohite," i
Imri - (See Nehemiah 3:2) The name is from Marah, bitter
Abda - Nehemiah 11:17 : apparently called OBADIAHthe Son of Shemaiah in 1 Chronicles 9:16
Gin'Netho - ( Nehemiah 12:4 ) He is doubtless the same person as
Hashu'Pha - (stripped ), one of the families of Nethinim who returned from captivity in the first caravan ( Nehemiah 7:46 ) Called HASUPHA in (Ezra 2:43 ) (B
Ono - Not succeeding in their attempts to deter Nehemiah from rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem, Sanballat and Tobiah resorted to strategem, and pretending to wish a conference with him, they invited him to meet them at Ono. Four times they made the request, and every time Nehemiah refused to come
Kelaiah - Kelita appears in Nehemiah 8:7 as one of the Levites who assisted Ezra in expounding the Law (cf. 1Es 9:48 Calitas ), and his name occurs amongst the signatories to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:10 )
re'Hob - ) ...
A Levite or family of Levites who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:11 ) (B
Siloah - , "Shelah," Nehemiah 3:15; or Siloam, John 9:7; John 9:11; or Shiloah. There were two pools, the upper, Isaiah 7:3, or king's pool, Nehemiah 2:14, and the lower pool
Oil Tree - The Hebrew words occur in ( Nehemiah 8:15 ) (Authorized Version "pine branches"), (1 Kings 6:23 ) ("olive tree") and in (Isaiah 41:19 ) ("oil tree"). From the passage in Nehemiah, where the ets shemen is mentioned as distinct from the olive tree, if may perhaps be identified with the zackum tree of the Arabs, the Balanites aegyptiaca , a well-known and abundant shrub or small tree in the plain of Jordan
Lachish - It was resettled after the Jews’ return from captivity, but never regained its previous importance (Nehemiah 11:25; Nehemiah 11:30)
Helkai - ” Priest when Joiakim was high priest one generation after the return from the Exile under Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Bilgah - ...
A priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5,18 )
Hananeel - God has graciously given, a tower in the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 )
Shabbethai - Sabbath-born, a Levite who assisted in expounding the law and investigating into the illegal marriages of the Jews (Ezra 10:15 ; Nehemiah 8:7 ; 11:16 )
Meraiah - ” Head of a priestly family in the time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:12 )
Hezir - A lay family, which signed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:22 )
Hazar-Shual - ("fox or jackal village"); in southern Judah, between Hazar-Gaddah and Beersheba (Joshua 15:28; Joshua 19:3; 1 Chronicles 4:28; Nehemiah 11:27); now Saweh
Kallai - ” A chief priest who returned from Exile during the time of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:20 )
King's Garden - A portion of Jerusalem containing the Pool of Shelah which was rebuilt by Shallum, ruler of the district of Mizpah (Nehemiah 3:15 )
Mishael - One of Ezra’s supporters ( Nehemiah 8:4 ); called in 1Es 9:44 Misael
Adna - The head of the priestly house of Harim ( Nehemiah 12:15 )
Zebaim - The sons of Pochereth were of Zebaim which some identify with ZEBOIM; others translated Pochereth hatsebaim , "the snarer (hunter) of roes" (Ezra 2:57; Nehemiah 7:59)
Chisleu - the third month of the Jewish civil year, and the ninth of their sacred, answering to our November and December, Nehemiah 1:1
Chenani - ” A Levite who led Israel in a prayer of renewal and praise (Nehemiah 9:4 )
Netophah - A town near Bethlehem, of which little more than the name is known, 2 Samuel 24:25,25 ; 2 Kings 25:23 ; Ezra 2:22 ; Nehemiah 7:26
Baz'Lith - ( Nehemiah 7:54 ) In (Ezra 2:52 ) the name is given as BAZLUTH
Beth-Hac'Cerem - ( Nehemiah 3:14 ; Jeremiah 6:1 ) A beacon station near Tekoa, supposed to be the Frank Mountain , a few miles southeast of Bethlehem
Adaiah - A descendant of Judah by Pharez, Nehemiah 11:5 . Nehemiah 11:9 . A Levite of the family of Aaron, Nehemiah 11:12 ; probably the same as No
Tobiah - One of the major adversaries to Nehemiah's rebuilding efforts at Jerusalem, Tobiah was a practicing Jew who lived in a residence chamber in the Temple. He is called an “Ammonite” (Nehemiah 2:10 ,Nehemiah 2:10,2:19 ) probably because his family fled to that territory at the destruction of Jerusalem. Tobiah allied with Sanballat and Geshem in trying to thwart Nehemiah
Arabians - ...
During the captivity some Arabians became settlers in Palestine and were enemies to Nehemiah. Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:7 ; Nehemiah 6:1
Mahalaleel - ...
...
Nehemiah 11:4 , a descendant of Perez
Zabdiel - ...
...
An overseer of the priests after the Captivity (Nehemiah 11:14 )
Baana - ...
...
Father of Zadok (Nehemiah 3:4 )
Treasure Houses - The houses or magazines built for the safe keeping of treasure and valuable articles of any kind (Ezra 5:17 ; 7:20 ; Nehemiah 10:38 ; Daniel 1:2 )
Hassenuah - A family name found in two different connexions in the two lists of Benjamite inhabitants of Jerusalem ( 1 Chronicles 9:7 , Nehemiah 11:9 )
Mekonah - ]'>[2] needlessly changes to Meconah), A town inhabited after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:28 )
Nahamani - ” Exile who returned with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 7:7 )
Acud - Called Akkub , Ezra 2:45 ; omitted in Nehemiah 7:1-73
Addan - Also called Addon (Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 )
Ares - : they correspond to the 775 ( Ezra 2:5 ) or 652 ( Nehemiah 7:10 ) children of Arah
Cupbearer - Nehemiah 1
Hashbaddanah - One of the men who stood on the left hand of Ezra at the reading of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 ): called in 1Es 9:44 Nabarias
Galal - Levite, son of another Jeduthun, Nehemiah 11:17
Confectioner - Modern translations read, “perfumer” (Exodus 30:25 ,Exodus 30:25,30:35 ; 1 Samuel 8:13 ; Nehemiah 3:8 )
Nehemiah -
Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 . ...
Nehemiah 3:16 . ...
...
The son of Hachaliah (Nehemiah 1:1 ), and probably of the tribe of Judah. His family must have belonged to Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:3 ). Through his brother Hanani, and perhaps from other sources (Nehemiah 1:2 ; 2:3 ), he heard of the mournful and desolate condition of the Holy City, and was filled with sadness of heart. Nehemiah explained it all to the king, and obtained his permission to go up to Jerusalem and there to act as Tirshatha , Or governor of Judea. 446 (eleven years after Ezra), with a strong escort supplied by the king, and with letters to all the pashas of the provinces through which he had to pass, as also to Asaph, keeper of the royal forests, directing him to assist Nehemiah. He remained in Judea for thirteen years as governor, carrying out many reforms, notwithstanding much opposition that he encountered ( Nehemiah 13:11 ). Very soon after this the old corrupt state of things returned, showing the worthlessness to a large extent of the professions that had been made at the feast of the dedication of the walls of the city (Nehemiah 12 . Malachi now appeared among the people with words of stern reproof and solemn warning; and Nehemiah again returned from Persia (after an absence of some two years), and was grieved to see the widespread moral degeneracy that had taken place during his absence. Nehemiah was the last of the governors sent from the Persian court
Beth-Gilgal - House of Gilgal, a place from which the inhabitants gathered for the purpose of celebrating the rebuilding of the walls on the return exile (Nehemiah 12:29 )
Horonite - The designation of Sanballat (Nehemiah 2:10,19 ), a native of Horonaim, or of one of the two Beth-horons, the "upper" or the "nether," mentioned in Joshua 16:3,5
Kolaiah - The name of a Benjamite family which settled in Jerusalem after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:7 )
Shelemiah - There were several of this nameThe (Ezra 10:41; Nehemiah 13:13) Lord is my peace, is the meaning of this name, from Jab, the Lord—and Shalem, peace
Assaphioth - Called Hassophereth , Ezra 2:55 ; Sophereth , Nehemiah 7:57
Pine - The shemen , in Nehemiah 8:15 is rather the olive or oil tree, as in Isaiah 41:19
Perida - ” Head of a family of Solomon's servants, some of whom returned from Exile (Nehemiah 7:57 ; compare Peruda, Ezra 2:55 )
Malluch - ...
...
A priest who returned from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:2 )
Jaala - JAALA ( Nehemiah 7:58 ) or JAALAH ( Ezra 2:56 )
Charashim - In Nehemiah 11:35 the Hebrew word is rendered "valley of craftsmen" (RSV marg
Zabdiel - A priest, "son of (one of) the great men," overseer of 128 brethren (Nehemiah 11:14)
Atar - His sons were among the porters or door-keepers who returned with Zerubbabel; called Ater , Ezra 2:42 , Nehemiah 7:45
Corruptly - Nehemiah 1
ge-Harashim - GE-HARASHIM (‘valley of craftsmen,’ 1 Chronicles 4:14 , Nehemiah 11:35 )
Hagab - The name is absent from the parallel list in Nehemiah 7:1-73 ; it appears in 1Es 5:30 as Accaba
Haggedolim - Father of Zabdiel ( Nehemiah 11:14 )
Jorah - The name of a family which returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:18 ); called in Nehemiah 7:24 Hariph , which is probably the true form
Beth-Haccerem - Conjectured to be the Frank mountain, between Tekoa and Bethlehem, Nehemiah 3:14 ; Jeremiah 6:1
Athai'ah - (whom Jehovah made ), a descendant of Pharez, the son of Judah, who dwelt at Jerusalem after the return from Babylon, ( Nehemiah 11:4 ) called UTHAI in (1 Chronicles 9:4 )
Shelah - Probably ‘the Shelanite’ should be read also for ‘the Shilonite ’ of Nehemiah 11:5 and 1 Chronicles 9:5 . Nehemiah 3:15
Ithiel - Member of tribe of Benjamin in the time of Nehemiah after the return from Exile (Nehemiah 11:7 )
Jaddua - 11:8, section 7; Nehemiah 12:11-22). Nehemiah 10:21
Lydda - According to Ezra 2:33 it was resettled after the Exile (See Nehemiah 7:37 ; Nehemiah 11:35 )
Miphkad Gate - (mihf' kad) KJV, TEV transliteration of the Hebrew name of a gate of Jerusalem or of the Temple (Nehemiah 3:31 ), following the earliest Greek translation in taking Miphkad as a proper name. If the Miphkad Gate is a city gate, it is perhaps identical with the Benjamin Gate (Jeremiah 37:13 ; Jeremiah 38:7 ; Zechariah 14:10 ), located at the northernmost point on the east wall (perhaps identical with the Gate of the Guard, Nehemiah 12:39 )
Jozabad - An expounder of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:7 [5]). An inhabitant of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 11:16 )
ba'Anah - (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 ) Possibly the same person is intended in (Nehemiah 10:27 ) (B
Zorah - Zorah (zô'rah), and Zoreah (zô're-ah), hornet's town, and Zareah (zâ're-ah), Nehemiah 11:29, a town in the low country of Judah—afterward assigned to Dan, Joshua 15:33; Joshua 19:41; the birthplace and burialplace of Samson. Nehemiah 11:29
az'Rikam - ) ...
A Levite, ancestor of Shemaiah, who lived in the time of Nehemiah. (1 Chronicles 9:14 ; Nehemiah 11:15 ) (B
Micha'Iah - (1 Chronicles 9:15 ; Nehemiah 12:35 ) ...
One of the priests at the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 12:41 ) ...
The daughter of Uriel of Gibeah, wife of Rehoboam and mother of Abijah king of Judah
Eli'Ashib - (1 Chronicles 3:24 ) ...
High priest at Jerusalem at the time of the rebuilding of the walls under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:1,20,21 ) (B
Ahasuerus - The completion of the city walls, however, awaited the governorship of Nehemiah (who arrived in Jerusalem in 445 BC). Ahasuerus is therefore not involved in the events narrated in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, though he is referred to in Ezra 4:6
Uthai - A family of Judah after the Captivity ( 1 Chronicles 9:4 ) = Nehemiah 11:4 Athaiah
Pulpit - KJV, RSV term for a raised platform (NRSV, REB, NIV, TEV) on which a speaker stood (Nehemiah 8:4 ); not a lectern or high reading desk behind which a reader stands
si'a - (Nehemiah 7:47 ) The name is written SIAHA in (Ezra 2:44 ) and SUD in Jozabdus - 1Es 9:48 = Nehemiah 8:7 Jozabad
Kilan - ( 1Es 5:15 ); in the lists of Ezra 2:1-70 and Nehemiah 7:1-73 the names are omitted
Adna - A post-exilic priest (Nehemiah 12:15 )
Arsiphurith - The corresponding name in Ezra 2:18 is Jorah; and in Nehemiah 7:24 Hariph
Elul - A Hebrew month, the twelfth of the civil year, and sixth of the ecclesiastical, Nehemiah 6:15
Obadiah - He joined other priests along with princes and Levites in putting his seal upon the covenant (Nehemiah 9:38 ) made between the people and God (Nehemiah 10:5 ). A gatekeeper and guardian of “the ward” (“the storerooms at the gates,” NIV) during the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 12:25 )
Seraiah - Supposed, as in the margin, to be called AZARIAHin Nehemiah 7:7 . Nehemiah 10:2 . ' Nehemiah 11:11 . Nehemiah 12:1,12
Zarhite - (zahr' hite) KJV form of Zerahites, descendants of Zerah, one of the two twins born to Judah by Tamar (Numbers 26:20 ; compare 1 Chronicles 9:6 ; Nehemiah 11:24 )
Charme - Called Harim , Ezra 2:39 , Nehemiah 7:42 The form in 1 Es
Nehum - One of the twelve heads of the Jewish community ( Nehemiah 7:7 ); prob
Tel-Harsa - whether they were of Israel" returned to Judaea with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:59; Nehemiah 7:61)
Servitude - Hard labor done by servants or conscripted workers (Genesis 47:21 ; 2 Chronicles 10:4 ; Nehemiah 5:18 ; Jeremiah 28:14 ; Lamentations 1:3 )
Abda - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:17 ); called Obadiah in 1 Chronicles 9:16
Pine Tree - ...
Shemen , ( Nehemiah 8:16 ) is probably the wild olive
Pillar of Cloud And Fire - Nehemiah used the pillar as a sign of God's faithfulness (Nehemiah 9:12 ,Nehemiah 9:12,9:19 )
Anathoth - Anathoth was overrun by the Babylonians, but resettled following the Exile (Nehemiah 7:27 ; Nehemiah 11:32 ). A chief that is a family or clan leader, who along with 84 other priests, Levites, and leaders signed a covenant that the Israelites would obey the law of God given through Moses (Nehemiah 10:19 )
Nethinim - The name does not occur until 1 Chronicles 9:2 , and afterwards in Ezra and Nehemiah. A list of them is given in Ezra 2:43-54 ; Nehemiah 7:46-56,60 ; Nehemiah 10:28 ; etc
Hadid - Pointed, a place in the tribe of Benjamin near Lydda, or Lod, and Ono (Ezra 2:33 ; Nehemiah 7:37 )
Dung-Gate - (Nehemiah 2:13 ), a gate of ancient Jerusalem, on the south-west quarter
Tower of the Furnaces - (Nehemiah 3:11 ; 12:38 ), a tower at the north-western angle of the second wall of Jerusalem
Miphkad - A gate of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:31), in the wall of Zion, the city of David
Mattenai - Priestly contemporary of the high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:19 )
Kabzeel - A town in the extreme south of Judah, on the border of Edom ( Joshua 15:21 , 2 Samuel 23:20 ); called in Nehemiah 11:25 Jekabzeel
Pine Tree - ets shemen , 'trees of oil,' Nehemiah 8:15
Ith'i-el - (Nehemiah 11:7 ) ...
One of two persons --Ithiel and Ucal-- to whom Agur ben-Jakeh delivered his discourse
e'Phra-im, Gate of, - one of the gates of the city of Jerusalem, (2 Kings 14:13 ; 2 Chronicles 25:23 ; Nehemiah 8:16 ; 12:39 ) probably at or near the position of the present "Damascus gate
Hadid - Compare Nehemiah 11:34
Cherub - CHERUB ( Ezra 2:59 , Nehemiah 7:61 )
Jahzerah - A similar list in Nehemiah 11:13 lists Ahasai instead of Jahzerah
Chisleu - The name adopted from the Babylonians by the Jews after the Captivity for the third civil, or ninth ecclesiastical, month (Nehemiah 1:1 ; Zechariah 7:1 )
Uzza - Children of Uzza; Nethinim who returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:49; Nehemiah 7:51)
Armoury - In Nehemiah 3:19 the word is nesheq also translated 'armour
Meshullam - (See 1 Chronicles 9:7-8; 1Ch 9:12; 2 Chronicles 34:12; Nehemiah 3:4; Neh 3:6) The name is derived from Shalam, peace
ad'Dan - ( Ezra 2:59 ) Called ADDON (Nehemiah 7:61 )
Jeshua - Nehemiah 8:17. Chief of a Levitical house that assisted Zerubbabel, and long subsequently Ezra and Nehemiah (Ezra 2:40; Ezra 3:9; Nehemiah 3:17-19; Nehemiah 8:7; Nehemiah 9:45; Nehemiah 12:8). Jeshua and Kadmiel were "sons (descendants) of Hodaviah," or Judah (Ezra 3:9; Ezra 2:40), but Jeshua's immediate ancestor was Azaniah (Nehemiah 10:9). In Nehemiah 12:24, the text is corrupt probably; "Jeshua and Kadmiel," or "and the sons of Kadmiel" may be conjectured:...
6. Nehemiah 7:11; Nehemiah 10:14; Ezra 10:30. A town reinhabited by the people of Judah on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:26)
Uriah - ]'>[1] 1 below appears as Uriah [2], 2 as Uriah in Isaiah 8:2 and Urijah in 2 Kings 16:10-16 ; 2 Kings 16:4 as Uriah in Ezra 8:33 and Urijah in Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:21 ; while Urijah only is found in the case of 3 and 5 . A priest ( Nehemiah 3:4 ; Nehemiah 3:21 ), son (representative) of Hakkoz, doubtless one of the courses of the priests ( 1 Chronicles 24:10 ). A man who stood on the right hand of Ezra when he read the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 [6])
Hizkiah - See Nehemiah 7:21 ; parallel passage Ezra 2:16 in Hebrew has another variant spelling—Jehizhykiah). Both Ater and Hizkijah appear, however, in the list of those who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law ( Nehemiah 10:17 )
Geba - The hill, (2 Samuel 5:25 [1]; 2 Kings 23:8 ; Nehemiah 11:31 ), a Levitical city of Benjamin (1 Kings 15:22 ; 1 Samuel 13:16 ; 14:5 , wrongly "Gibeah" in the A. It has been identified with Gaba (Joshua 18:24 ; Ezra 2:26 ; Nehemiah 7:30 ), now Jeb'a, about 5 1/2 miles north of Jerusalem
Beth-Haccerem - Its leading official helped Nehemiah repair the dung gate (Nehemiah 3:14 )
Asaph - This service appears to have been hereditary in his family, Nehemiah 7:44 11:22 . Keeper of forests under Artaxerxes, Nehemiah 2:8
Barzillai - His descendants are mentioned in Ezra 2:51 , Nehemiah 7:63 ; Nehemiah 7:2
Old Gate - KJV, NAS, NRSV designation for a Jerusalem city gate repaired in Nehemiah's time (Nehemiah 3:6 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Hammeah, the Tower of - HAMMEAH, THE TOWER OF ( Nehemiah 3:1 ; Nehemiah 12:39 )
Nebo - (Jeremiah 48:1-47) There was also a city of Judah of this name in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah. (Ezra 2:29; Nehemiah 7:33) And the famous mountain on which Moses died was called Nebo
Pelati'ah - ) ...
One of the heads of the people, and probably the name of a family who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:22 ) (B
Chadiasai - There are no corresponding names in the lists of Ezra and Nehemiah
Asuppim - In Nehemiah 12:25 the Authorized Version has "thresholds," marg
Hazar-Shual - Village or enclosure of the jackal, a city on the south border of Judah (Joshua 15:28 ; Nehemiah 11:27 )
Ananiah - Protected by Jehovah, the name of a town in the tribe of Benjamin between Nob and Hazor (Nehemiah 11:32 )
Unni - A Levite who returned with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:9)
Bezai - A man who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:18 )
Maaziah - Priest who signed Ezra's covenant (Nehemiah 10:8 )
Keilah - A city in the plains of Judah, which David once relieved from a siege by the Philistines, but which afterwards sought to deliver him up to Saul, 1 Samuel 23:1-13 ; Nehemiah 3:17
Ono - The "plain of Ono" is supposed to denote a portion of the Plain of Sharon near Ono, Nehemiah 6:2 ; 11:35
Shephatiah - The name of seven distinguished Jews, alluded to in the following passages: 2 Samuel 3:4 1 Chronicles 12:5 27:16 2 Chronicles 21:2 Ezra 2:4,57 Nehemiah 11:4 Jeremiah 38:1
Goodly Trees - This was probably the olive tree (Nehemiah 8:15 ), although no special tree is mentioned
Mekonah - ” KJV form of Meconah, town in southern Judah between Ziklag and Ain-rimmon (Nehemiah 11:28 )
Neziah - The name of a family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:54 , Nehemiah 7:66 ); called in 1Es 5:32 Nasi or Nasith (the latter form in AV Shilo'ni - This word occurs in the Authorized Version only in (Nehemiah 11:5 ) where it should be rendered --as it is in other cases-- "the Shilonite," that is the descendant of Sheluh the youngest son of Judah
Kolaiah - Son of Maaseiah whose descendants lived in Jerusalem after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:7 )
Maasai - One of the priests returning from Exile (1 Chronicles 9:12 ), Maasai is likely identical with Amashai (Nehemiah 11:13 )
Allon - He may be the same as Ami ( Ezra 2:57 ), or Amon ( Nehemiah 7:59 )
Joda - A Levite ( 1Es 5:58 ); called in Ezra 3:9 Judah ; elsewhere Hodaviah , Ezra 2:40 ; Hodevah , Nehemiah 7:43 ; Sudias , 1Es 5:26
Abda - ...
A Levite of the family of Jeduthun (Nehemiah 11:17 ), also called Obadiah (1Chronicles 9:16)
Amzi - Ancestor of Adaiah, who helped build the second Temple (Nehemiah 11:12 )
Ami - Ami is apparently called Amon in Nehemiah 7:59
Meron'Othithe, the, - The Meronothites are named in the Bible--
Jehdeiah, (1 Chronicles 27:30 ) ...
Jadon, (Nehemiah 3:7 )
Jehoiarib - His "course" went up from Babylon after the Exile (Ezra 2:36-39 ; Nehemiah 7:39-42 )
Unno - ( Nehemiah 12:8 (9))
Elul - (Nehemiah 6:15 ), the name of the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year, and the twelfth of the civil year
Addon - Low, one of the persons named in Nehemiah 7:61 who could not "shew their father's house" on the return from captivity
Nisan - (ni' ssan) A foreign term used after the Exile for the first month of the Hebrew calendar (Nehemiah 2:1 ; Esther 3:7 )
Izrahiah - The same Hebrew name appears in Nehemiah 12:42 but is usually transliterated into English as Jezrahiah
Hodaviah - Head of "the children of Hodaviah" or Hodevah (who returned with Zerubbabel); akin to the name Judah (Ezra 2:40; Ezra 3:9, margin; Nehemiah 7:43)
Ahzai - ” A priest after the return from Exile (Nehemiah 11:13 )
Salathiel - 1 Corinthians 3:17 , or SHEALTIEL, father of Zerubbabel, Ezra 3:2 Nehemiah 12:1 Haggai 1:1 ; one of the ancestors of Christ, named in both the gospel genealogies, Matthew 1:14 Luke 3:27
Reelias - REELIAS , Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 , corresponds in position to Bigvai in Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 ; the form of the name may be due to a duplication of Reelaiah in the same verse of Ezra
Ezra, Book of - Our present Book of Ezra, which consists of 10 chapters, is really part of a composite work, Ezra-Nehemiah, which, again, is the continuation of Chronicles. The entire work Chronicles-Ezra-Nehemiah is a compilation made by the Chronicler. See, further, Nehemiah [1], § 1 . In its present form the Book of Ezra-Nehemiah is, as has been pointed out, the work of the Chronicler. The most important parts of this latter are undoubtedly the autobiographical sections, which have been taken partly from Ezra’s, partly from Nehemiah’s, personal memoirs. [1], § 2 ). ...
The Imperial firman an Aramaic document (Ezra 7:12-26 ) the essential authenticity of which has now been made certain is an extract from the memoirs preserved in the same compiler’s work, from which Ezra 2:1-70 (= Nehemiah 7:6-73 ) was also derived. It would appear that after the great work of the Chronicler had been completed (1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah), the part which contained narratives of otherwise unrecorded events was first received into the Canon. Hence, in the Jewish Canon, Ezra-Nehemiah precedes the Books of Chronicles. what is said under Nehemiah [1], § 3
Shallum - A gatekeeper (1Chronicles 9:17,1Chronicles 9:19,1 Chronicles 9:31 ; compare Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ). Supervisor of half of Jerusalem who helped Nehemiah rebuild the walls (Nehemiah 3:12 )
Castle - ’ A different word ( birah ) is used of the castle or fort which in Nehemiah’s day defended the Temple ( Nehemiah 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:2 ), and of the fortified royal residence of the Persian kings at Susa ( Nehemiah 1:1 , Esther 1:2 etc
Baana - Father of Zadok, who repaired walls of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:4 ). One who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:27 )
Sanballat - His daughter was married to the grandson of Jerusalem's high priest (Nehemiah 13:28 ), indicating harmonious relations between Judah and Samaria at that time. Nehemiah referred to Sanballat as the “Horonite,” suggesting a connection with Upper or Lower Beth-horon. (Nehemiah 2:10 ). Sanballat, in league with Tobiah and Shemiah, opposed Nehemiah's rebuilding of Jerusalem
Abi'Jah - (1 Chronicles 24:10 ; 2 Chronicles 8:14 ; Nehemiah 12:4,17 ) ...
One of the priests who entered into a covenant with Nehemiah to walk in God's law, (Nehemiah 10:7 ) unless the name is rather that of a family, and the same with the preceding
Deputy - It is applied elsewhere ( Ezra 9:2 , Nehemiah 2:16 ; Nehemiah 4:14 ; Nehemiah 4:19 etc
Nehemi'ah, the Book of, - [1] By far the most important portion, indeed is the work of Nehemiah but other portions are either extracts from various chronicles and registers or supplementary narratives and reflections, some apparently by Ezra, others, perhaps the work of the same person who inserted the latest, genealogical extracts from the public chronicles. The main history contained in the book of Nehemiah covers about twelve years, viz. The whole narrative gives us a graphic and interesting account of the state of Jerusalem and the returned captives in the writer's times, and, incidentally, of the nature of the Persian government and the condition of its remote provinces, The book of Nehemiah has always had an undisputed place in the Canon, being included by the Hebrews under the general head of the book of Ezra, and, as Jerome tells us in the Prolog
Cupbearer - Nehemiah was the highly esteemed cupbearer for Artaxerxes (Nehemiah 1:11 ; see also 1 Kings 10:5 ; 2 Chronicles 9:4 )
Asaph - ...
...
The "keeper of the king's forest," to whom Nehemiah requested from Artaxerxes a "letter" that he might give him timber for the temple at Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:8 )
Bigvai - 2056 (Ezra 2:14), 2067 (Nehemiah 7:19), children of Bigvai returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel; 72 subsequently with Ezra (Ezra 8:14). The different circumstances under which the two registers were made account for the variation of numbers: Ezra's in Babylon, Nehemiah's in Judaea, after the walls had been built. A chief of Zerubbabel's expedition, who subsequently signed the covenant (Ezra 2:2; Nehemiah 7:7)
Dragon Well - A Jerusalem landmark in the time of Nehemiah which can no longer be identified with certainty (Nehemiah 2:13 )
Zanoah - A town in the low hall country (shephelah ) of Judah (Joshua 15:34; Nehemiah 11:30; repairers of the wall, Nehemiah 3:13)
Miamin - ...
...
A chief priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5 ), called Mijamin (10:7) and Miniamin (12:17)
Mehetabel - Modern translations follow the Hebrew and also use Mehetabel for the KJV's Mehetabeel (Nehemiah 6:10 )
Noadiah - Prophetess who discouraged Nehemiah's building of the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 6:14 )
Adonikam - The head of a Jewish family after the Exile; apparently called in Nehemiah 10:16 Adonijah
Perez - ) An important family of Judah, of whom one was "chief of all the captains of the host for the first month" (1 Chronicles 27:3); 468 returned from Babylon; some settled in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:4-6)
Apothecary - (uh pahth' eh cehr ih) KJV translation of a word translated as perfumer in modern versions (Exodus 30:25 ,Exodus 30:25,30:35 ; Exodus 37:29 ; 2 Chronicles 16:14 ; Nehemiah 3:8 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1 )
Azariah - Nehemiah 12:44-47. Chief priest of the house of Zadok, in Hezekiah's reign, who appointed chambers in the house of the Lord for storing the tithes and offerings, on which were dependent the attendance of the priests at the temple services (Nehemiah 10:35-39; Nehemiah 12:27-80; 1 Chronicles 2:8; 2 Chronicles 31:10-13). Several others: 1 Chronicles 6:36 = Ezra, 1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 3:23-24; Nehemiah 8:7; 2 Chronicles 29:12; 2 Chronicles 28:12; compare Jeremiah 43:2; Nehemiah 12:32-33; 1 Chronicles 2:38-39; Azariah whose name proves that the genealogy in 1 Chronicles 2:36-41 was made in Hezekiah's reign, for Azariah (1 Chronicles 2:38) appears from 2 Chronicles 23:1; 2 Chronicles 24:1, to have been captain when Joash was seven years old, i
Zadok - Men who helped Nehemiah rebuild the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 3:4 ,Nehemiah 3:4,3:29 ). Leader who signed Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:21 ). A faithful scribe whom Nehemiah appointed as a treasurer (Nehemiah 13:13 )
Abijah - A priest under Nehemiah who signed a covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:7 ). A leading priest in the days of the return from Exile (Nehemiah 12:4 ), and then a priestly house (Nehemiah 12:17 ) to which Zechariah, father of John the Baptist, belonged (Luke 1:5 )
Ezer - Person who helped Nehemiah repair the Jerusalem wall. His father had political authority over Mizpah (Nehemiah 3:19 ). Temple musician who helped Nehemiah dedicate the completion of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:42 , with a slightly different Hebrew spelling)
Pash'ur - (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; 24:9 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1 ) In the time of Nehemiah this family appears to have become a chief house, and its head the head of a course. (Ezra 2:38 ; Nehemiah 7:41 ; 10:3 ) The individual from whom the family was named was probably Pushur the son of Malchiah, who in the reign of Zedekiah was one of the chief princes of the court. (Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2 ) etc
Reaiah - A Nethinim family name ( Ezra 2:47 = Nehemiah 7:50 = 1Es 5:31 Jairus )
Court - The enclosure of the tabernacle (Exodus 27:9-19 ; 40:8 ), of the temple (1 Kings 6:36 ), of a prison (Nehemiah 3:25 ), of a private house (2 Samuel 17:18 ), and of a king's palace (2 Kings 20:4 )
Tel-Harsha - ” Home of Babylonian Jews unable to demonstrate their lineage (Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 )
Hazar-Shual - Judah ( Joshua 15:28 = 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) or Simeon ( Joshua 19:3 ), re-peopled by Jews after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:27 )
Hoshaiah - A man who led half the princes of Judah in the procession at the dedication of the walls of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 12:32 )
Chephirah - returned with Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:25; Nehemiah 7:29)
Jachin - Eponym of a priestly family ( 1 Chronicles 9:10 , Nehemiah 11:10 )
Raamah - (Genesis 10:7) There was a Raamiah also among them that returned from Babylon (Nehemiah 7:7) And as Raam, or Raamah is derived from Rabam, thunder, Raam-jah, means thunder of the Lord
Siloah - the same as Siloam, Nehemiah 3:15 ; Luke 13:4 ; a fountain under the walls of Jerusalem, toward the east, between the city and the brook Kidron, perhaps the same with Enrogel
Port - The ‘port’ of Nehemiah 2:13 is a ‘gate,’ the same Heb
jo'Rah - ( Ezra 2:18 ) In (Nehemiah 7:24 ) he appears under the name HARIPH , or more correctly the same family are represented as the Bene-Hariph
Addan - In the parallel passage in Nehemiah 7:61 , it is ADDON
Pedaiah - —the son of Parosh, Nehemiah 3:25, Saved of the Lord, from Padah and Jah
Meshelemiah - The eponym of a family of Korahite doorkeepers ( 1 Chronicles 9:21 ; 1 Chronicles 26:1 ) = Shelemiah of 1 Chronicles 26:14 , Shallum of 1 Chronicles 9:17 ; 1Ch 9:19 ; 1 Chronicles 9:31 , and Meshullam of Nehemiah 12:25
Mordecai - ( Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 ); called in Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 Mardocheus
Shema - ...
...
One who stood by Ezra when he read the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Geshem - Or Gashmu, firmness, probably chief of the Arabs south of Palestine, one of the enemies of the Jews after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 2:19 ; 6:1,2 )
Gibbar - The corresponding list in Nehemiah 7:25 has Gibeon
Tel-Melah - ” Babylonian home of a group of Jews unable to demonstrate their lineage (Ezra 2:59 ; Nehemiah 7:61 )
Hodaviah - A Levitical family name ( Ezra 2:40 ); called in Nehemiah 7:43 Hodevah
Bavai - (bay' vay i) (KJV), BAVVAI (NAS, TEV, RSV) Government official in Keilah who helped Nehemiah rebuild wall of Jerusalem (1 Chronicles 3:18 )
Eneneus - The name is omitted in the parallel list in Ezra 2:1-70 , which gives only eleven leaders; but answers to Nahamani , Nehemiah 7:7
Asuppim - In 1 Chronicles 26:15,17 the Hebrew word is given untranslated; but the same occurs in Nehemiah 12:25 , where it is translated 'thresholds,' and in the margin 'treasuries
Booths - Temporary habitations made of branches of trees, used especially at the Feast of Tabernacles, Leviticus 23:42,43 ; Nehemiah 8:14-17
Hodaviah - Called HODEVAHin Nehemiah 7:43
Habaiah - The head of a priestly family which returned with Zerubbabel, but, being unable to trace their genealogy, were not allowed to serve ( Ezra 2:61 ); called in Nehemiah 7:63 Hobaiah , and in 1Es 5:38 Obdia
Joiarib - Nehemiah 11:5 , one of ‘the chiefs of the province that dwelt in Jerusalem’ in Nehemiah’s time
Nob - A city of priests, in Benjamin, near Jerusalem; its inhabitants were once put to the sword by command of Saul, for their hospitality to David, 1 Samuel 21:2 ; 22:9-23 ; Nehemiah 11:32 ; Isaiah 10:32
Banking - Still banking was carried out in transactions between individuals, not as an institution, as we see in an example from Nehemiah. As Nehemiah led in the rebuilding of the city of Jerusalem, he addressed the banking needs of the city (Nehemiah 5:1-13 ). Apparently wealthy individuals loaned money to poor farmers with children, land, and crops put up as security (Nehemiah 5:2-3 ). These wealthy nobles, including Nehemiah (Nehemiah 5:10 ) and priests (Nehemiah 5:12 ), functioned as bankers
Banking - Still banking was carried out in transactions between individuals, not as an institution, as we see in an example from Nehemiah. As Nehemiah led in the rebuilding of the city of Jerusalem, he addressed the banking needs of the city (Nehemiah 5:1-13 ). Apparently wealthy individuals loaned money to poor farmers with children, land, and crops put up as security (Nehemiah 5:2-3 ). These wealthy nobles, including Nehemiah (Nehemiah 5:10 ) and priests (Nehemiah 5:12 ), functioned as bankers
Ezra - 464 424), who played, as is well known, a prominent part in Jerusalem during the critical period of reform associated with the governorship of Nehemiah. Our sources of information regarding him are (1) the autobiographical narratives embodied in Ezra 7:1-28 ; Ezra 8:1-36 ; Ezra 9:1-15 ; Ezra 10:1-44 , and Nehemiah 8:1-18 ; Nehemiah 9:1-38 ; Nehemiah 10:1-39 ; and (2) later tradition as embodied in the narrative of the compiler of Ezr. *
In the present form of the narrative Ezra does not emerge again till after an interval of 13 years, after Nehemiah had arrived in Jerusalem and re-erected and dedicated the city walls. Tishri, the seventh month) the first of its injunctions to be carried out was the due celebration of the Feast of Booths ( Nehemiah 8:13-18 ). Or and there is some probability in this view the chronology may have become dislocated in the present composite narrative, and Ezra may really have accomplished the bulk of his work before Nehemiah’s arrival. Perhaps with even greater plausibility a case may be made out for placing Ezra’s work subsequent to Nehemiah’s governorship. See, further, Nehemiah [3], § 3 . It is certainly remarkable that in their respective memoirs Ezra and Nehemiah mention each other but once. ( Nehemiah 12:1 ; Nehemiah 12:13 ; Nehemiah 12:33 )
Nethaneel - ...
...
Nehemiah 12:21 . ...
...
A priest's son who bore a trumpet at the dedication of the walls of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Shephathiah - A family of 372; returned with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:4; Nehemiah 7:9); a second company of 80 under Zebadiah came up with Ezra (Ezra 8:8). Nehemiah 11:4
Shephati'ah - (Ezra 2:4 ; Nehemiah 7:9 ) see also Ezra 8:8 (B. (Nehemiah 11:4 ) ...
One of the princes of Judah who counselled Zedekiah to put Jeremiah in the dungeon
Adaiah - A member of the tribe of Judah in Jerusalem after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:5 ). A priest in the Temple after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:12 ), probably the same as 4
Nehemi'ah - 445, certain Jews arrived from Judea, and gave Nehemiah a deplorable account of the state of Jerusalem. Nehemiah's great work was rebuilding, for the first time since their destruction by Nebuzar-adan, the walls of Jerusalem, and restoring that city to its former state and dignity as a fortified town. To this great object therefore Nehemiah directed his whole energies without an hour's unnecessary delay. It soon became apparent how wisely Nehemiah had acted in hastening on the work. The project was defeated by the vigilance and prudence of Nehemiah. Various stratagems were then resorted to get Nehemiah away from Jerusalem and if possible to take his life; but that which most nearly succeeded was the attempt to bring him into suspicion with the king of Persia, as if he intended to set himself up as an independent king as soon as the walls were completed. If is probable that at the same time he recalled Nehemiah, or perhaps his leave of absence had previously expired. During his government Nehemiah firmly repressed the exactions of the nobles and the usury of the rich, and rescued the poor Jews from spoliation and slavery. Beyond the thirty-second year of Artaxerxes, to which Nehemiah's own narrative leads us, we have no account of him whatever. (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 ) ...
Son of Azbuk and ruler of the half part of Beth-zur, who helped to repair the wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 3:18 )
Iddo - Returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:4; Nehemiah 12:12; Nehemiah 12:16)
Seraiah - Leader of returning Exiles under Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:2 ); apparently the same as Azariah (Nehemiah 7:7 ). Priestly family (Nehemiah 10:2 ; Nehemiah 12:12 )
Cupbearer - The position of Nehemiah as cupbearer to Artaxerxes Longimanus was evidently high. 34) speaks of the office at the court of Cambyses, king of Persia, as ‘an honour of no small account,’ and the narrative of Nehemiah shows the high esteem of the king, who is so solicitous for his welfare that he asks the cause of his sadness ( Nehemiah 2:2 )
Jesh'ua - (Nehemiah 8:17 ) [1] ...
A priest in the reign of David, to whom the nine course fell by David, to whom the ninth course fell by lot. (Ezra 2:40 ; 3:9 ; Nehemiah 3:19 ; 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ; 12:8 ) etc. (Nehemiah 10:14 ; 7:11 ) etc
Months - ניסן , Nisan, from the new moon of April, Nehemiah 2:1 . אלול , Elul, of September, Nehemiah 6:15 . כסלו , Kisleu, of December, Nehemiah 1:1
Jesh'ua - (Nehemiah 8:17 ) [1] ...
A priest in the reign of David, to whom the nine course fell by David, to whom the ninth course fell by lot. (Ezra 2:40 ; 3:9 ; Nehemiah 3:19 ; 8:7 ; 9:4,5 ; 12:8 ) etc. (Nehemiah 10:14 ; 7:11 ) etc
Nethan'e-el - (Nehemiah 12:21 ) (B. ) ...
A Levite, of the sons of Asaph, who with his brethren played upon the musical instruments of David at the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem under Ezra and Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 12:36 ) (B
Obadiah - A priestly contemporary of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:5 ). A door-keeper ( Nehemiah 12:25 ). Various persons in the genealogies or stories of the Chronicler ( 1 Chronicles 9:16 [2] 1 Chronicles 12:9 , 1Ch 27:19 , 2 Chronicles 17:7 ; 2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Ashdod - ...
In Nehemiah's time Ashdod still retained its distinctive language and race, and ensnared by marriages the Jews returned from Babylon, after vainly striving to prevent the walls of Jerusalem being built (Nehemiah 4:7-8; Nehemiah 13:23-24). Compare Nehemiah 4:7; Nehemiah 13:24
Tekoa - ...
The Tekoites repaired the wall under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:5; Nehemiah 3:27); but "their nobles put not their necks to the work of their Lord. " Contrast Nehemiah 4:6, "the people had a mind to work" (Judges 5:28; Colossians 3:28)
Ezra - Ezra 7-10 ; Nehemiah 8:1-18 ; Nehemiah 12:26,36 . Nehemiah 12:1 . (An Ezra is also mentioned in Nehemiah 12:13,33
Abijah - The head of one of the courses of priests, 1 Chronicles 24:10; Nehemiah 12:17; termed Abia in Luke 1:5. Nehemiah 10:7. Nehemiah 12:4; Nehemiah 12:17
Azekah - A town in the tribe of Judah, about fifteen miles south-west of Jerusalem; mentioned in the narratives of Joshua and Saul, Joshua 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; taken by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 34:7 , but afterwards repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:30
Zabdiel - A prominent official in Nehemiah’s time ( Nehemiah 11:14 )
Ezer - ...
A Levite (Nehemiah 3:19 )
Jaala - (Ezra 2:56 ; Nehemiah 7:58 , which has an Aramaic ending rather than the Hebrew ending of the Ezra passage)
Unni - ...
...
A Levite who returned with Zerubbabel from the Captivity (Nehemiah 12:9 )
Kabzeel - It was called also Jekabzeel (Nehemiah 11:25 ), after the Captivity
Hassenuah - The name without the Hebrew article h appears in Nehemiah 11:9 as father of a leader in post-exilic Jerusalem from the tribe of Benjamin
Pochereth-Hazzebaim - ” Head of a family of Solomon's servants included in those returning from Exile (Ezra 2:57 ; Nehemiah 7:59 )
Unni - Levite returning from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:9 )
Uthai - Son of Ammihud, of the children of Pharez of Judah (1 Chronicles 9:4), called Athaiah son of Uzziah, Nehemiah 11:4; dwelt in Jerusalem on the return from Babylon
Beth-Pelet - After the return from Exile in Babylon, the Jews lived there (Nehemiah 11:26 )
Zadok - ...
Others of this name are mentioned in 2 Kings 15:33 1 Chronicles 6:12 Ezra 7:2 Nehemiah 3:4 13:13
en-Rim'Mon - ( Nehemiah 11:29 ) Perhaps the same as "Ain and Rimmon," (Joshua 15:32 ) and "Ain, Remmon," (Joshua 19:7 ) and see (1 Chronicles 4:32 )
Nethinim - ) Nehemiah 11:21; Ezra 2:43; Ezra 7:24; Ezra 8:17; Ezra 8:20; 1 Chronicles 9:2. ) Nethinim occurs only in the later books: Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah. So "Solomon's servants" (Ezra 2:55; Nehemiah 7:60), those "left of the Amorites, Hittites . ...
But when the Levites were slow in coming forward at the return from Babylon, 341 only under Zerubbabel as contrasted with 4,289 priests (Ezra 2:36-58) and none under Ezra until especially called (Ezra 8:15; Ezra 8:17; Ezra 8:20), the Nethinim became more conspicuous, 392 under Zerubbabel, 220 under Ezra, "all expressed by name," registered after the Levites (1 Chronicles 9:2) and admitted to join the covenant (Nehemiah 10:28, compare Deuteronomy 29:11). Ophel and the Levite cities were their dwelling place, and they had their own rulers (Ezra 2:70; Nehemiah 11:21). 17, section 6) mentions "a feast of carrying wood", xylophoria , in which all the people brought wood for the sacrifices of the year, probably relieving the Nethinim; its beginning may be traced in Nehemiah 10:34
Ezra -
A priest among those that returned to Jerusalem under Zerubabel (Nehemiah 12:1 ). All we know of his personal history is contained in the last four chapters of his book, and in Nehemiah 8,12:26 . It is significant that the earliest mention of the pulpit occurs in the history of Ezra's ministry (Nehemiah 8:4 ). We learn from the account of his labours in the book of Nehemiah that he was careful to have the whole people instructed in the law of Moses; and there is no reason to reject the constant tradition of the Jews which connects his name with the collecting and editing of the Old Testament canon. In that year another distinguished personage, Nehemiah, appears on the scene. After the ruined wall of the city had been built by Nehemiah, there was a great gathering of the people at Jerusalem preparatory to the dedication of the wall. On the appointed day the whole population assembled, and the law was read aloud to them by Ezra and his assistants (Nehemiah 8:3 ). Abuses were rectified, and arrangements for the temple service completed, and now nothing remained but the dedication of the walls of the city (Nehemiah 12 )
Zechariah - Zechariah was probably, like Ezekiel, priest as well as prophet, Iddo being the priest who returned with Zerubbabel and Joshua from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:4; Nehemiah 12:16). The two, "Haggai the prophet and Zechariah the son of Iddo" the priest prophet, according to a probable tradition composed psalms for the liturgy of the temple: Psalms 137; 146 to 148, according to Septuagint; Psalm 125, 126 (See Nehemiah) according to the Peshito; Psalm 111 according to Vulgate. Probably sung at the consecration of the walls under Nehemiah; but Hengstenberg thinks at the consecration of the second temple. A chief, summoned by Ezra to the consultation at the river Ahava, before the second caravan returned (Ezra 8:16); at Ezra's left, in expounding the law (Nehemiah 8:4). Of Elam's family; married a foreign wife (Nehemiah 10:26). Ancestor of Uthai or Athaiah (Nehemiah 11:4). A Shilonite, ancestor of Maaseiah (Nehemiah 11:5). A priest, son of Pashur, ancestor of Adaiah (Nehemiah 11:12). Representing Iddo the priest's family, in the time of Joiakim, son of Jeshua (Nehemiah 12:16); probably the same as Zechariah the prophet, son (descendant) of Iddo. A priest, son of Jonathan, blew the trumpet at the dedication of the city wall (Nehemiah 12:35; Nehemiah 12:41)
Netophah - Distillation; dropping, a town in Judah, in the neighbourhood, probably, of Bethlehem (Nehemiah 7:26 ; 1 Chronicles 2:54 )
Akkub - ...
A Levite who kept the gate of the temple after the return from Babylon (1Chronicles 9:17; Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 )
Jezrahiah - Leader of Levite singers at Nehemiah's celebration of finishing the rebuilding of Jerusalem's wall (Nehemiah 12:42 )
Dimonah - It may be the same as Dibon mentioned in Nehemiah 11:25
Zorzelleus - ]'>[1] Berzelus , 1Es 5:28 = Barzillai of Ezra 2:51 and Nehemiah 7:55 )
Miph'Kad - ( Nehemiah 3:31 ) It was probably not in the wall of Jerusalem proper, but in that of the city of David, or Zion, and somewhere near to the junction of the two on the north side
ha'Did - ( Ezra 2:33 ; Nehemiah 7:37 ; 11:34 ) In the time of Eusebius a town called Aditha or Adatha existed to the east of Diospolis (Lydda)
Hilkiah - Person who stood with Ezra the scribe at the reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:4 ). Priest who was among the exiles that returned (Nehemiah 12:7 )
Mixed Multitude - As at the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 13:1-3; Nehemiah 13:30) "they separated from Israel all the mixed multitude
Nethanel - A priest in time of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:21 ). A Levite musician ( Nehemiah 12:35 )
Zadok - Even while the line of Ithamar in the person of Eli was foremost, Eleazar's house held its ground on a kind of parity, Ahitub, Zadok's father, being called "ruler of the house of God" (1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 11:11). Son of Baana, repaired the wall (Nehemiah 3:4), signed the covenant (Nehemiah 10:21); a chief of the people, of the tribe of Judah (for Baana was a Netophathite of Judah, 2 Samuel 23:29). Son of Immer, a priest; repaired over against his own house (Nehemiah 3:29); of the 16th course (1 Chronicles 24:14). Nehemiah 11:11; 1 Chronicles 9:11. Set over the treasuries by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 13:13) to distribute to brethren; "the scribe
Hanani'ah - ) ...
A priest, one of the makers of the sacred ointments and incense, who built a portion of the wall of Jerusalem in the days of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 12:12 ) (B. ) ...
Ruler of the palace at Jerusalem under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 7:2,3 ) (B. (Nehemiah 10:23 )
Hezir - A Levite who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:20 )
Chephirah - CHEPHIRAH (‘village,’ Joshua 9:17 ; Joshua 18:26 , Ezra 2:25 , Nehemiah 7:29 )
Maneh - Portion (Ezekiel 45:12 ), rendered "pound" (1 Kings 10:17 ; Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:71,72 ), a weight variously estimated, probably about 2 1/2 or 3 lbs
Azmaveth - ...
...
A town in the tribe of Judah, near Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:29 ; Ezra 2:24 )
Reaiah - Head of a family of Temple servants (Nethanim) returning from Exile (Ezra 2:47 ; Nehemiah 7:50 )
Ater - The head of the clan signed Nehemiah's covenant to keep God's Law (Nehemiah 10:17 )
Hagiographa - It comprises Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles
Kabzeel - Called Jekabzeel when rebuilt after the captivity, Nehemiah 11:25, a city of the tribe of Judah, situated farthest to the south, Joshua 15:21; was the birthplace of Benaiah, the son of Jehoiada
Bethuzur - It was fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:7 , and assisted in rebuilding Jerusalem, Nehemiah 3:16
Outlandish - ...
Nehemiah 13
Pound - A weight and a sum of money, put, in the Old Testament, 1 Kings 10:17 Ezra 2:69 Nehemiah 7:71 , for the Hebrew MANEH, which see; and in the New Testament, for the Attic MINA, which was equivalent to one hundred drachmae, or about fourteen dollars
Baana - Father of Zadok, one of those who rebuilt Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:4 )
Ward, or Guard - Ward also seems to mean a guard-room, Nehemiah 12:25 ; Isaiah 21:8 , and the guards themselves, Acts 12:10 , or any small band, 1 Chronicles 25:8 ; 26:16
Zadok - ...
...
"The scribe" set over the treasuries of the temple by Nehemiah along with a priest and a Levite (Nehemiah 13:13 ). ...
...
The sons of Baana, one of those who assisted in rebuilding the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:4 )
Hobaiah - ” Clan of priests in time of Zerrubbabel who did not have family records to prove their descent from pure priestly lines and were excluded from the priesthood (Ezra 2:61 ; Nehemiah 7:63 )
Baal-Hazor - Probably it is the same with Hazor (Nehemiah 11:33 ), now Tell' Asur, 5 miles north-east of Bethel
Mattenai - Representative of the priestly house of Joiarib in the days of Joiakim ( Nehemiah 12:19 )
Abda - A Levite living in Jerusalem rather than in one of the levitical cities (Nehemiah 11:17 )
Zattu - (zat' tyoo) Head of family who returned to Jerusalem after the Exile (Ezra 2:8 ; Nehemiah 7:13 ). He seems to be the same as the “Zatthu” who signed the covenant in Nehemiah's time (Ezra 10:14 )
Nethaneel - Representative of Jedaiah in the days of Joiakim, son of Jeshua (Nehemiah 12:21). A Levite, of the sons of Asaph; performed with the musical instruments of David, at the dedication of the wall (Nehemiah 12:36)
Artaxerxes - Ezra 7:7, and Nehemiah 2:1, both speak of a second Artaxerxes, who is generally regarded as the same with Artaxerxes Longimanus, i. In the seventh year of his reign he permitted Ezra to return into Judæa, with such of his countrymen as chose to follow him; and 14 years afterwards he allowed Nehemiah to return and build up Jerusalem
Joz'Abad - He is probably identical with Jozabad the Levite, (Nehemiah 8:7 ) and with Jozabad who presided over the outer work of the temple. (Nehemiah 11:16 ) (B
Hazar-Shual - Jews returning from Exile in Babylon lived there (Nehemiah 11:27 )
Rephaiah - One of those who helped to repair the wall ( Nehemiah 3:9 )
Galal - Grandfather of Adda, a Levite who led in Nehemiah's thanksgiving (Nehemiah 11:17 )
Furnaces, Tower of - KJV and NAS designation (Nehemiah 3:11 ) for a tower designated “Tower of the Ovens” in other modern translations
Ono - ), to which his enemies invited Nehemiah to conference ( Ezra 6:2 )
Sisera - A man in a list of Nethinim descendants who returned to Palestine with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 )
Gittaim - of Jerusalem, on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:33)
Sisera - A man in a list of Nethinim descendants who returned to Palestine with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 )
Jeduthun - His descendants held the same office, 2 Chronicles 35:15 Nehemiah 11:7 ; and the name of one of them appears in the title of Psalm 39:1-13 62:1-12 77:1-20
Paltite, the - A native of Beth-pelet in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:27 , Nehemiah 11:26 )
ge'Shem - and Gash'mu ( rain ), an Arabian, mentioned in ( Nehemiah 2:19 ) and Nehe 6:1,2,6 (B
Nethinim - A very similar class of persons, ‘the children of Solomon’s servants ,’ is mentioned in Ezra 2:55 ; Ezra 2:58 , Nehemiah 7:57 ; Nehemiah 7:60 ; Nehemiah 11:3 ; their descent was evidently traced to the non-Israelite slaves employed by Solomon in connexion with his buildings, some of whom must have laboured in the new royal sanctuary (cf. In Ezra 2:48-58 ; Ezra 2:70 = Nehemiah 7:46-58 ; Nehemiah 7:73 are given the names of the Nethinim who are reported to have returned with Zerubbabel; and they are mentioned together with priests, Levites, singers, and porters. the southern and eastern slope of the Temple hill, or more particularly that part of it which reached to the Water-gate on the east, and to the tower projecting from the royal palace ( Nehemiah 3:28 ). And Nehemiah 3:31 mentions ‘the house of the Nethinim,’ which must have been an official building used by them during their periods of duty. They were under the command of two chiefs of whom one, at least, was a member of their own body Ziha and Gishpa ( Nehemiah 11:21 ); the former is the first in the list, in Ezra 2:45 = Nehemiah 7:48 , and Gishpa may possibly be the same as Hasupha, the second name. Further, only a portion of them, like the priests, Levites, singers, and porters, dwelt in Jerusalem; the others ‘dwelt in their cities’ ( Ezra 2:70 = Nehemiah 7:73 , 1 Chronicles 9:2 ). And so far were they from being regarded as foreign slaves, that they joined, as full members of the community, in the oath that they would not (among other things) allow their sons and daughters to marry any but Israelites ( Nehemiah 10:28-30 )
Malachi - Evidently, Malachi was a contemporary of Nehemiah. The same social and religious conditions prevail in both, and Nehemiah's reforms were probably intended to correct some of the social and religious abuses outlined by Malachi (Malachi 3:5 ; Nehemiah 5:1-13 ). Tithing is stressed in both (Malachi 3:7-10 ; Nehemiah 10:37-39 ). Divorce and mixed marriages were problems in both (Malachi 2:10-16 ; Nehemiah 10:30 ; Nehemiah 13:23-28 ). Nehemiah first returned to Jerusalem from Persia in 444 B. (Nehemiah 1:1 ; Nehemiah 2:1 ); therefore, Malachi should be dated after 450 B
Azariah - Nehemiah 3:23,24 . One who returned from exile, Nehemiah 7:7 : supposed, as in the margin , to be the same as SERAIAHin Ezra 2:2 . Nehemiah 8:7 . Nehemiah 10:2 . Nehemiah 12:33
Mixed Multitude - These were probably miscellaneous hangers-on to the Hebrews, whether Egyptians of the lower orders, or the remains of the Hyksos (see Nehemiah 13:3 ), a "mixed multitude" accompanied them so far
Men of the great assembly - A panel of 120 prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
Azekah - It was one of the places re-occupied by the Jews on their return from the Captivity (Nehemiah 11:30 )
Mahalalel - The son of Perez, who dwelt at Jerusalem after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:4 )
Anshei knesset hagdolah - A panel of 120 prophets and sages--including Ezra, Nehemiah, Mordecai, Daniel, Simeon the Righteous and the prophets Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi--which constituted the ultimate religious authority at the onset of the Second Temple Era (4th century BCE)
Josedech - He is called JOZADAK in Ezra 3:2,8 ; Ezra 5:2 ; Ezra 10:18 ; Nehemiah 12:26
Guard - The KJV often translated these terms by “watch” ( Nehemiah 4:9 ; Nehemiah 7:3 ). Modern translation frequently use the expression “court of the guard” where the KJV used “court of the prison” (Nehemiah 3:25 ; Jeremiah 32:2 )
Nethaneel - He might have participated in the dedication of the wall around Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:36 ). Head of the priestly family of Jedaiah when Joiakim was high priest (Nehemiah 12:21 ). A priest, one of Asaph's associates, who played a trumpet, in dedicating the rebuilding of Jerusalem's wall (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Asaph - The ‘keeper of the king’s forest,’ to whom king Artaxerxes addressed a letter directing him to supply Nehemiah with timber ( Nehemiah 2:8 ). At first the Asaphites alone seemed to have formed the Temple choir, and in the time of Ezra and Nehemiah (wherever we have the memoirs of the latter in their original form) they are not yet reckoned among the Levites
Ashdod - The Ashdodites joined with Sanballat in opposing Nehemiah s restoration of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 4:7 ), yet some of the Jews of the period married wives from Ashdod, and their children spoke in its dialect ( Nehemiah 13:23-24 )
Netophah - ) A town coupled with Bethlehem in Nehemiah 7:26, also in 1 Chronicles 2:54; therefore near it. "Villages of Netophathites" were Levite singers' residences (1 Chronicles 9:16; Nehemiah 12:28)
Beth-Zur - A city official of Beth-zur helped Nehemiah repair Jerusalem and its wall (Nehemiah 3:16 )
Zichri - Father of Joel (Nehemiah 11:9). A priest of Abijah's family, contemporary of Joiakim, Jeshua's son (Nehemiah 12:17)
Province - The Jews had their "governor" (tirsbatha' ), of their own race (Ezra 2:63; Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 8:9), subject to the "satrap" (pathath ) of the provinces W
Usury - On the return of the Jews, Nehemiah sharply rebuked the nobles and the rulers for taking interest of their poorer brethren. Nehemiah 5:3-13
Ada'Iah - (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ) ...
Ancestor of Maaseiah, one of the captains who supported Jehoiada. (Nehemiah 11:5 )
Shemaiah - A false prophet in the pay of Sanballat and Tobiah, who sought to terrify Nehemiah into the cowardly in forbidden step of taking refuge within the temple, Numbers 3:38 Nehemiah 6:10-14
Eli'Akim - (2 Kings 23:34 ; 2 Chronicles 36:4 ) ...
A priest in the days of Nehemiah, who assisted at the dedication of the new wall of Jerusalem. (Nehemiah 12:41 ) (B
Prophetess - The prophetess Noadiah opposed Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:14)
Judah - The province set up by the Persian government to rule a conquered Judean kingdom (Nehemiah 5:14 ; Haggai 1:1 ). (Ezra 3:9 ; compare Nehemiah 12:8 ). Member of tribe of Benjamin who lived in Jerusalem after the return from Exile and was second in command over the city (Nehemiah 11:9 ). He may be the official who joined Nehemiah in leading the celebration of the completion of the Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:34 ). Priestly musician who helped in Nehemiah's celebration (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Azari'ah - ...
Son of Maaseiah who repaired part of the wall of Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 3:23,24 ) (B. (Nehemiah 7:7 ) ...
One of the Levites who assisted Ezra in instructing the people in the knowledge of the law. (Nehemiah 8:7 ) ...
One of the priests who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:2 ) and probably the same with the Azariah who assisted in the dedication of the city wall. (Nehemiah 12:33 ) ...
(Jeremiah 13:2 ) (Jezaniah)
Beth-Pelet - ]'>[2] Beth-palet , Job 15:27 , Beth-phelet , Nehemiah 11:26 )
Revive - In 1 Kings 17:22 , 2 Kings 13:21 , Nehemiah 4:2 , Romans 14:9 , ‘to revive’ is literally ‘to come to life again,’ as in Shaks
Shushan - SHUSHAN ( Daniel 8:2 , Nehemiah 1:1 etc
Mattithiah - ...
...
One who stood by Ezra while reading the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Baths - The "pools" mentioned in Neh Nehemiah 20:20 , Isaiah 22:11 , John 9:7 , were public bathing-places
Jackal's Well - Water source outside Jerusalem, accessible from the Valley Gate (Nehemiah 2:13 , NIV, RSV)
Hashbaddanah - A member of the community leaders who stood with Ezra as he read the law to the people (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Neballat - Neballat was resettled by Benjaminites after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:34 )
Beth-Haccherem - BETH-HACCHEREM (‘place of the vineyard’), Nehemiah 3:14 , Jeremiah 6:1
Jamin - A priest (? or Levite) who took part in the promulgating of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:7 ; in 1Es 9:48 Iadinus)
Coat of Mail - The same word in the plural form is translated "habergeons" in 2 Chronicles 26:14 and Nehemiah 4:16
Phares, Pharez - The Hebrew is the same as PEREZ in 1 Chronicles 27:3 ; Nehemiah 11:4,6
Jedaiah - ...
...
One of those who repaired the walls of Jerusalem after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 3:10 )
Anathoth - A Levitical city in Benjamin, Joshua 21:18; 1 Chronicles 6:60; the birthplace of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 1:1; Jeremiah 11:21; Jeremiah 11:23; Jeremiah 32:7-9; on the route of the Assyrians, Isaiah 10:30; some of its people returned with Zerubbabel, Ezra 2:23; Nehemiah 7:27
Zeboim - A valley and town of the Benjamites, east of Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:18 Nehemiah 11:34
Booth - The great feast of tabernacles, or booths, had its name from the circumstance that the Jews were directed by their law to dwell in booths during the seen days of this feast, Leviticus 23:40-42 ; Nehemiah 8:14
Git'Tites - Obed-edom "the Gittite" may have been so named from the town of Gittaim in Benjamin, (2 Samuel 4:3 ; Nehemiah 11:33 ) or from Gath-rimmon
Artaxerxes - In the twentieth year of Artaxerxes Longimanus, Nehemiah was sent to Jerusalem as governor, Nehemiah 2:1 ; 5:14
Gibeon - Near it Joshua commanded the sun to stand still, Joshua 10:12-13; Isaiah 28:21; the city was given to Benjamin and to the Levites, Joshua 18:25; Joshua 21:17; it was the scene of a notable battle, 2 Samuel 2:12-24; 2 Samuel 20:8-10; of the hanging of seven of Saul's sons, 2 Samuel 21:1-6; the tabernacle was set up at Gibeon, 1 Chronicles 16:39; and Solomon offered great sacrifices there, 1 Kings 3:4-5; 1 Kings 9:2; 2 Chronicles 1:3; 2 Chronicles 1:13; Jehoram recovered captives at Gibeon, Jeremiah 41:12-16; its people helped to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem after the captivity, Nehemiah 3:7; Nehemiah 7:25; Ezra 2:20, margin
Ahijah - One who with Nehemiah sealed the covenant. Nehemiah 10:26
Streets - They were wider, however, than in many modern cities, Luke 14:21 , and terminated in large public areas around the gates, Nehemiah 8:1 . They were named, like our own streets, Acts 9:11 , and often resembled the bazaars of modern eastern cities, the shops of the same kind being in the same street and giving it its name, as the bakers' street, Nehemiah 3:31,32 ; Jeremiah 37:21 , and the valley of the cheesemongers
Merchant - Abuses by mercants were often condemned: holding back grain to force up prices (Proverbs 11:26 ); impatience for sabbath or holy days to conclude so that commerce might resume; dishonest scales (Amos 8:5 ); forcing fellow Israelites into slavery to buy food (Nehemiah 5:1-8 ); violation of the Sabbath (Nehemiah 13:15-21 ). Jerusalem merchants assisted in Nehemiah's reconstruction of the walls, perhaps by providing finances (Nehemiah 3:32 ). Men of Tyre sold fish and all kinds of merchandise in postexilic Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 13:16 )
Pound - maneh, equal to 100 shekels (1 Kings 10:17 ; Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:71,72 )
Kirjath-Arba - The city of Arba, Arba being its founder, or the city of Four—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam having been buried there—is mentioned Genesis 23:2; Genesis 35:27; Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 15:54; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; Judges 1:10; Nehemiah 11:25
Jachin - A priest who lived in Jerusalem in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:10 ; compare 1 Chronicles 9:10 )
Delaiah - ...
...
The head of one of the bands of exiles that returned under Zerubbabel to Jerusalem (Ezra 2:60 ; Nehemiah 7:62 )
Zanoah - It was re-occupied after the return from the Captivity (Nehemiah 11:30 )
Hassophereth - The parallel passage ( Nehemiah 7:57 ) omits h, the Hebrew article, from the name, possibly indicating a guild is indicated
Milalai - ” Musician participating in Nehemiah's dedication of the wall (Nehemiah 12:36 )
Mahalaleel - Ancestor of a postexilic members of the tribes of Judah (Nehemiah 11:4 )
Zabdi - Son of Asaph who led in thanksgiving and prayer (Nehemiah 11:17 )
Jadon - A Meronothite, who took part in rebuilding the wail of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:7 )
Mixed Multitude - The term is used for those foreigners who joined with the Israelites in the Exodus from Egypt (Exodus 12:38 ), who became associated with the people of Judah during the Exile (Nehemiah 13:3 ), or who were associated with the Egyptians (Jeremiah 25:20 ) or Babylonians (Jeremiah 50:37 )
Adonikam - Some Bible students think Adonikam is the same person as Adonijah in Nehemiah 10:16
Allar - The name seems to correspond to Immer in Ezra 2:59 , Nehemiah 7:61 , one of the places from which these Jews returned
Joy - Nehemiah 8:10 (c) This is symbolical of the great satisfaction in the heart of our Lord over the victory made possible by His provision for sin and for the sinner
Pelatiah - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:22 )
Artaxerx'es - ...
In (Nehemiah 2:1 ) we have another Artaxerxes
Cupbearer, - (Nehemiah 1:11 ) The chief cupbearer, or butler, to the king of Egypt was the means of raising Joseph to his high position
Elam - The region is also named Susiana or Susis from its capital Susa, called Shushah in Daniel 8:2, where Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:1) waited on king Artaxerxes, and where Ahasuerus (Xerxes) held his court in Esther's (Esther 1:2; Esther 2:5) time. Children of Elam, 1,254, returned with Zerubbabel from Babylon (Ezra 2:7; Nehemiah 7:12). Another Elam, of whose sons also the same number returned, is mentioned (Ezra 2:31; Nehemiah 7:34). A priest who accompanied Nehemiah in dedicating the wall (Nehemiah 12:42)
Ezra - ("the helper," as Nehemiah means "the comforter". See Ezra 7-10; also Nehemiah 8; Nehemiah 12:26. His great aim, as Malachi, his and Nehemiah's helper, expresses it, was "Remember ye the law of Moses My servant, which I commanded unto him in Horeb for all Israel, with the statutes and judgments. The relapse of the Jews into their former disorders, such as Nehemiah describes, could not have occurred had Ezra been there continually. In Nehemiah 8, Ezra "the priest, the scribe," 13 years later reappears in charge of the spiritual interests of the people, as Nehemiah, the tirshatha or governor, of their political interests, the two acting in harmonious cooperation (Nehemiah 12:26). He probably did not return with Nehemiah, but a little later, to Jerusalem; for he is not mentioned until after the completion of the wall. ...
As Ezra is not mentioned after Nehemiah's departure for Babylon in Artaxerxes' 32nd year, and the Jews relapsed into irregularity during Nehemiah's absence (Nehemiah 13), it is likely Ezra died or returned to Babylon shortly after Nehemiah's departure. Nehemiah 12:2
Zabdi - A Levite ( Nehemiah 11:17 ); but read probably Zichri , as in || 1 Chronicles 9:16
Siloam, Tower, in - In connection with Ophel, there is mention made of "a tower that lieth out ," ( Nehemiah 3:26 ) and there is no unlikelihood in connecting this projecting tower with the tower in Siloam, while one may be almost excused for the conjecture that its projection was the cause of its ultimate fall
Jamin - A Levite who interpreted the law for the people as Ezra read it (Nehemiah 8:7 )
Moladah - It reverted to Judah after the captivity (Nehemiah 11:25-26)
Susa (Shushan) - When Elam was absorbed by Persia, Susa became capital of Persia, and remained so throughout the era of the Persian Empire (Ezra 4:9; Nehemiah 1:1; Esther 1:2; Esther 1:5; Esther 4:8; Esther 8:14; Daniel 8:2; see PERSIA)
Ephraim Gate - In Nehemiah's time the city square at the Ephraim Gate was one of the sites where booths for the celebration of the feast of tabernacles were set up (Nehemiah 8:16 )
Oil Tree - eets shemen (Isaiah 41:19), but in KJV Nehemiah 8:15 "pine branches
Zeboim - One of the towns the Benjamites occupied upon returning to Palestine from Exile (Nehemiah 11:34 )
Jeshaiah - A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:7 )
Pine - In Nehemiah 8:15 , denotes some tree of a resinous nature
Book of Life - Allied with this was another conception, derived from the custom of enrolling citizens ( Jeremiah 22:30 , Nehemiah 7:5 ; Nehemiah 7:64 ; Nehemiah 12:22 f
Azariah - Helper of Nehemiah in rebuilding wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:23 ). Man who returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 7:7 ) about 537 B. Man who helped Ezra interpret the law to the people in Jerusalem (Nehemiah 8:7 ). Man who put his seal on Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:2 ). A leader of Judah, possibly a priest, who marched with Nehemiah and others on the walls of Jerusalem to celebrate the completion of rebuilding the city defense walls (Nehemiah 12:33 )
Ezra, the Book of - ...
The second part combined with Nehemiah is a complete historical picture. But the distinct title to Nehemiah shows it is a separate book. The second (Ezra 7-10) is that of the priest Ezra and the governor Nehemiah, aided by the prophet Malachi. ); and these intermingled with the pagan, and were in "affliction and reproach" (Ezra 9:6-15; Nehemiah 1:3). ...
Hence the need of restoring the holy nationality, as well as the temple, under Ezra and Nehemiah. Ezra the priest took charge of the inner restoration, by purging out paganism and bringing back the law; Nehemiah the governor did the outer work, restoring the city and its polity. Ezra received permission to go to Jerusalem in the seventh year of Artaxerxes Longimanus (Ezra 7:6-26); Nehemiah in the 20th year (Nehemiah 2:1). Ezra is supposed by some to have used the Babylonian era, Nehemiah the Persian. ), because the re-establishment of the theocracy then began, though the actual rebuilding was not until 13 years later under Nehemiah. ...
Ezra's placing of Daniel in the canon immediately before his own book and Nehemiah's implies that his commission began the fulfillment of Daniel's prophecy; Christ's 30th year in beginning His ministry would be A. , the probable date of Malachi's prophecy and Nehemiah's work, which the prophet supported, ending; then (2) 62 weeks (434 years) of no revelation; then seven years of special and brightest revelation to Israel, first by Messiah in person, then by His still more powerful presence by the Holy Spirit, in the middle of which week His one sacrifice supersedes all other sacrifices. ...
But Ezra says Cyrus' decree was found at Achmetha (Ecbatana), Nehemiah 2:5-8. The three books Ezra, (See CHRONICLES , probably compiled by Ezra, and Nehemiah have many phrases in common, peculiar to them, and that mixture of Chaldee and Hebrew which we should expect if the three were written at the new epoch in Jewish literature, when its writers were men brought up in Babylon and restored to Judaea. After Ezra had carried through the extreme but needful measure of divorcing all alien wives, which probably caused him some loss of popularity, he gave place to a new agent of God, Nehemiah, the nation's political restorer as Ezra was its religious reformer. Ezra still cooperated with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8) in ministering the word of God. Nehemiah marks his book as distinct from Ezra by the opening. ...
The transitions of first to third persons, and vice versa, are found in Daniel, Ezra, and Nehemiah; so Moses of old uses the third person of himself in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, but in the recapitulation in Deuteronomy the first. The lists of those who returned with Zerubbabel to Jerusalem in Ezra 2, also in Nehemiah 7:5, Ezra drew from existing documents. in Jerusalem" alludes to that part of Artaxerxes' decree which remained yet to be done, namely, the building of the wall by Nehemiah; this was implied virtually in his commission to Ezra, but expressed in his commission to Nehemiah (Ezra 6:2). The unity of plan lies in its passing over periods of time and history not appropriate to the main aim (these very transitions giving the fragmentary appearance alleged against the unity of the book), and dwelling only on the epochs which bring out features essential to the Israelite church's history (Ezra 2:70; Ezra 3:1 with Nehemiah 7:5; Nehemiah 7:73; Nehemiah 8:1; Nehemiah 12:1-26; Nehemiah 12:47). Ezra 2 is identical with Nehemiah 7:6-73, evidently drawn by both from a common document or list of the captives returning with Zerubbabel
Hilkiah - ) ...
...
Nehemiah 12:7 . ...
Nehemiah 8:4
Michmash - Exiles returning from Babylon reinhabited the city (Nehemiah 11:31 ; compare Nehemiah 7:31 )
Iddo - Nehemiah 12:4 ; Nehemiah 12:16 one of the priestly clans that went up with Zerubbabel
Ophel - It was near the water gate (Nehemiah 3:26-27; Nehemiah 11:21)
Ophel - It served as the living quarters for those who rebuilt the ramparts following the Exile (Nehemiah 3:26-27 ). Micah used the Hebrew term to name “the strong hold of the daughter of Zion” (Nehemiah 4:8 )
ai, Hai - It was near Bethel, in Benjamin's lot, and apparently rebuilt, for it is mentioned in Ezra 2:28 ; Nehemiah 7:32 . It is probable that the AIATH of Isaiah 10:28 and the AIJA of Nehemiah 11:31 are the same as Ai, by the places named in association with them
Zich'ri - (Nehemiah 11:9 ) ...
A priest of the family of Abijah, in the days of Joiakim the son of Jeshua. (Nehemiah 12:17 ) (B
Nehemiah - 3595, at which time the Scripture history closes; and, consequently, the historical books, from Joshua to Nehemiah inclusive, contain the history of the Jewish people from the death of Moses, A. 2553, to the reformation established by Nehemiah, after the return from captivity, being a period of one thousand and forty-two years
Baruch - Another Baruch is mentioned among the friends of Nehemiah, Nehemiah 3:20 10:6 11:5
Nethinim - Many of them appear to have been first assigned to David, Solomon, and other princes, and by them transferred to the temple service, 1 Kings 9:20,21 Ezra 2:58,70 8:20 Nehemiah 11:3 . It is probable that they became proselytes, Nehemiah 10:28 , and that many of them could cordially unite with David in saying, "I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness," Psalm 84:10
Jeshua - Father of Exer, the Jewish governor of the district of Mizpah under Persian rule (Nehemiah 3:19 ). A Levite who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:9 ). Name for conquest hero Joshua, son of Nun (Nehemiah 8:17 ). Village in Judah where some Jews lived after returning from Exile (Nehemiah 11:26 )
Artaxerxes - As Persian Emperor from 465 to 424 BC, Artaxerxes had control over Jerusalem during the time of the reforms of Ezra and Nehemiah. His other significant decision in favour of the Jerusalem Jews came in the twentieth year of his reign, when he appointed Nehemiah governor and gave him full imperial support to rebuild and secure the city (Nehemiah 2:1-8). For further details see EZRA; Nehemiah; PERSIA
Threshold - (Nehemiah 12:25 ), rendered correctly "storehouses" in the Revised Version
Shealtiel - ” Father of Zerubbabel, the governor of Jerusalem under the Persian regime following the Exile (Ezra 3:2 , Nehemiah 12:1 ; Haggai 1:1 )
Dappled - ” The Hebrew term also appears in Genesis 31:10 ,Genesis 31:10,31:12 and in a few manuscripts of Nehemiah 5:18
Pine Tree - In Nehemiah 8:15 the Revised Version has "wild olive" instead of "pine
Lock - The key with its pins raises the sliding pins of the lock so that the bolt can be drawn back (Judges 3:23; Judges 3:25; Song of Solomon 5:5; Nehemiah 3:3)
Inspection Gate - A Jerusalem city gate (Nehemiah 3:31 NAS, NIV)
Bar - Used to denote the means by which a door is bolted (Nehemiah 3:3 ); a rock in the sea (Jonah 2:6 ); the shore of the sea (Job 38:10 ); strong fortifications and powerful impediments, etc
Rephaiah - One helping with Nehemiah's repair of the wall who had oversight of one half of the administrative district embracing Jerusalem (Nehemiah 3:9 )
Netophah - A town, the name of which first occurs in the list of the exiles who returned under Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:22 = Nehemiah 7:26 = 1Es 5:18 Netophas )
Ithiel - A Benjamite ( Nehemiah 11:7 )
Jaddus - In Ezra 2:61 and Nehemiah 7:63 he is called by his adopted name Barziliai
Rehob - There was also a Rehob among the captives of Israel which returned from Babylon, Nehemiah 10:11
Apothecary - ]'>[2] in half of these ( Exodus 30:25 ; Exodus 30:35 ; Exodus 37:29 , Ecclesiastes 10:1 ); elsewhere the former is retained ( 2 Chronicles 16:14 , Nehemiah 3:8 (cf
Lydda - It seems to have been inhabited by the Benjamites, at the return of the Jews from the Babylonish captivity, Nehemiah 11:35
Keilah - After the captivity its rulers aided in restoring the walk of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 3:17-18; now Kîla, seven miles east of Beit Jibrîn
Habergeon - Nehemiah 4:16 ; Job 41:26 , a coat of mail; an ancient piece of defensive armor, in the form of a coat or tunic, descending from the neck to the middle of the body, and formed of tough hide, or many quilted linen folds, or of scales of brass overlapping each other like fishes' scales, or of small iron rings or meshes linked into each other, Exodus 28:32 ; 39:23
Jehon'Athan - ) ...
A priest, (Nehemiah 12:18 ) the representative of the family of Shemaiah, ver
Ate - Twelve of them are described in Nehemiah and the thirteenth, called the "new gate," is found in Jeremiah 26:10. ...
They are listed as follows:...
Valley Gate Nehemiah 2:13 (c) This gate portrays the humbleness of heart and mind which is essential before one can be saved. ...
Fountain Gate Nehemiah 2:14 (c) This represents the fountain opened for sin and for uncleanness whereby the sinner may be saved through the shed Blood of JESUS. ...
Sheep Gate Nehemiah 3:1 (c) We are assured here that having been humbled and washed in the fountain, we now are His sheep. ...
Fish Gate Nehemiah 3:3 (c) This gate represents fruitfulness. ...
Old Gate Nehemiah 3:6 (c) We are warned here against new-fangled religions and the Christian is encouraged to stay by the old Book and the old path. ...
Dung Gate Nehemiah 3:14 (c) There are always things to be removed from the life. ...
Water Gate Nehemiah 3:26 (c) There is living water to drink (the Holy Spirit), and there is water for cleansing (the water of His Word). ...
Horse Gate Nehemiah 3:28 (c) The Christian here is called to the service of the King and to hard work for Him in His vineyard. ...
East Gate Nehemiah 3:29 (c) The Son of Righteousness will arise. ...
Miphkad Gate Nehemiah 3:31 (c) The word means "registry. ...
Ephraim Gate Nehemiah 8:16 (c) Ephraim is the name applied to Israel when she was in a backslidden state. ...
Prison Gate Nehemiah 12:39 (c) This reminds us that there is a rebel within each of us, who is to be kept down under lest he injure and harm the work of GOD
Shallum - The eponym of a family of gatekeepers ( 1 Chronicles 9:17 bis , Ezra 2:42 = Nehemiah 7:45 ); called in 1Es 5:23 Salum , and (possibly) in Nehemiah 12:25 Meshullam. The son of Hallohesh ( Nehemiah 3:12 )
Baruch - One of the wall-builders ( Nehemiah 3:20 ). A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:5 ). A Judahite ( Nehemiah 11:5 )
Shallum - Probably the same as MESHULLAM in Nehemiah 11:11 . 1 Chronicles 9:17 ; Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 . Nehemiah 3:12
Obadiah - Apparently called ABDA in Nehemiah 11:17 . Nehemiah 10:5 . Nehemiah 12:25
Abijah - The name occurs also in the lists of priests who ‘went up with Zerubbabel’ ( Nehemiah 12:4 ), and of those who ‘sealed unto the covenant’ in the time of Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:7 )
Judea - First so-called as a "province" of Persia (Daniel 5:13; Ezra 5:8; Nehemiah 11:3; Esther 8:9). On the return from Babylon the Jews, besides Judah, included large portions of Benjamin, Levi, Ephraim, and Manasseh (Ezra 1:5; Ezra 10:5-9; Nehemiah 11:4-36; 1 Chronicles 9:3; "Israel," Ezra 2:70; Ezra 2:59; Ezra 3:1; Ezra 10:5; Nehemiah 7:73), and many whose pedigree could not be found
Beer-Sheba - (bee' uhr-sshee' baw) Beer-sheba and its surrounding area factors significantly in the Old Testament from the earliest sojourns of the patriarchs (Genesis 21:1 ; Genesis 22:1 ; Genesis 26:1 ) to the return of the Hebrew exiles with Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 ). After the punitive Exile of Judah, the people returned to Beer-sheba and its surrounding satellite towns with Nehemiah in the fifth century (Nehemiah 11:27 ,Nehemiah 11:27,11:30 )
Throne - It denotes the seat of the high priest in 1 Samuel 1:9 ; 4:13 , and of a provincial governor in Nehemiah 3:7 and Psalm 122:5
Armoury - The place in which armour was deposited when not used (Nehemiah 3:19 ; Jeremiah 50:25 )
Usury - After the Return, and later, this law was much neglected (Nehemiah 5:7,10 )
Bigvai - One who sealed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:16 )
Meshelemiah - Other shortened forms include Shallum (1Chronicles 9:17,1Chronicles 9:19,1 Chronicles 9:31 ; Ezra 2:42 ) and Meshullam (Nehemiah 12:25 )
Mishael - One standing with Ezra at the public reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Oil Tree - The same Hebrew phrase is rendered “olivewood” at 1Kings 6:23,1 Kings 6:31-33 and “wild olive” at Nehemiah 8:15
Jeroham - A priestly family ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 )
Pound - [1] ...
A sum of money put in the Old Testament, (1 Kings 10:17 ; Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:71 ) for the Hebrew maneh , worth in silver about
Sheep Market - The original might with at least equal propriety be rendered sheep gate; and a gate so called is mentioned in Nehemiah 3:1 - 32 ; 12:39
Ziklag - Hither many other refugees from Judah resorted, and David was thus enabled to aid Achish, and to chastise the Amalekites who had sacked Ziklag during his absence, 1 Samuel 27:1 - 6 ; 30:1-31 ; Nehemiah 11:28
Jeroham - ...
...
1 Chronicles 9:12 ; a priest, perhaps the same as in Nehemiah 11:12
Zechariah - A descendant of Perez ( Nehemiah 11:4 ). A Shilonite ( Nehemiah 11:5 ). Son of Pashhur ( Nehemiah 11:12 ). An Asaphite ( Nehemiah 12:35 ). A priest ( Nehemiah 12:41 )
Hinnom, Valley of - HINNOM, VALLEY OF (called also ‘valley of the son [1] or children [2] of Hinnom,’ and ‘the valley’ [3]). Evidently the Valley-gate opened into it ( Nehemiah 2:13 ; Nehemiah 3:13 )
Lod, Lydda - Elsewhere it is mentioned only in the post-Captivity lists ( Ezra 2:33 , Nehemiah 7:37 ; Nehemiah 11:35 ); and in connexion with the healing of Æneas at this place ( Acts 9:32 )
Mixed Multitude - A description given (1) to certain persons who joined Israel in the Exodus from Egypt ( Exodus 12:38 ), and who fell a lusting at Kibroth-hattaavah ( Numbers 11:4 ); (2) to those who were separated from the Israelites after the return from the Captivity ( Nehemiah 13:3 ). ...
The context in Nehemiah 13:3 leaves no doubt as to the meaning
Snare - Nehemiah, led of God, wisely avoided all the snares that were laid for him by the enemy. Nehemiah 6
Governor - Several of these governors presided over districts on the western side of the Euphrates, Nehemiah 2:7; Nehemiah 2:9; and they were inferior to the satraps, or king's lieutenants
Ahi'ah - (1 Chronicles 26:20 ) ...
One of the "heads of the people" who joined in the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:26 )
Beard - These facts explain many passages of Scripture: as the gross insult offered to David's ambassadors, 2 Samuel 10:4-14 ; the zealous indignation of Nehemiah, Nehemiah 13:25 ; the mode in which the feigned insanity of David was expressed, 1 Samuel 21:12 , and the grief of Mephibosheth, 1 Samuel 19:24 ; the treachery of Judas; also several passages in the prophets, Isaiah 7:20 50:6 Ezekiel 5:1-5
Nehemiah - FOR a long time I was not much drawn to Nehemiah. I did not aright understand Nehemiah, and I did not love him. " '...
Like Daniel and his three companions, and like Ezra his own colleague, Nehemiah was a child of the Captivity. Like Ezra also, Nehemiah has written his own biography, and like Ezra also, he both begins and ends his autobiography with great abruptness. We have neither Nehemiah's youth nor his old age in his autobiography. By the time that Nehemiah's fragment of autobiography opens, the first return from the captivity has for some time taken place. Those of you who have ever read and at all understood the two sad little books of Ezra and Nehemiah, and the still more sad little book of Malachi,-that saddened and despairing reader will have seen in those three books what a hopeless people God had to do with. ...
The schoolboys who have read the Cyropœdia can best picture Nehemiah to themselves when he says that he was the King of Persia's cupbearer. The amusing episode of Cyrus and his grandfather's cupbearer is the best commentary we possess on the position of Nehemiah in Shushan the palace. He was able to keep a table and set up an equipage at his own expense like a prince, Daniel's youthful beauty, his graces of character and manner, his shining talents, and his high state-services may all be borrowed and set down as the opening pages of Nehemiah's memoirs of himself. Nehemiah was taking the air one evening outside the walls of Persepolis when some travel-stained men passed him on their way into the gate of the city. And Nehemiah forgot all about Artaxerxes' supper as he talked with the travellers, till he said to them as he bade them farewell, 'If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning; if I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy!' Young John Milton, you will remember, could not enjoy the skies, or the art, or the letters of Italy, while England at home was as she was. How he was heard, and how the king's heart was moved, and how Nehemiah got leave of absence to go and build the walls of Jerusalem, and the letters that he carried to the king's foresters, and to those that kept the royal quarries, and how he set out to the city of his fathers to finish it-all that is to be read in Nehemiah's own memoirs written out for us to this day by his own graphic hand. ...
If the style is the man in the Scriptures also, then we see Nehemiah to the very life in the whole of his book; but, especially, in his second and third chapters. The way that Nehemiah took to build and complete the whole wall round about Jerusalem was this: Every trade, and profession, and corporation, and outstanding city family took a portion, and undertook either to build that portion with their own hands or to see it built. ' Then came three men,-but we have never heard their strange names before nor since: their names are only written in heaven, and in the third chapter of Nehemiah. And next unto them the Tekoites repaired; 'but their nobles,' Nehemiah takes this note on his tablets, 'put not their necks to the work of the Lord. That is not the half of Nehemiah's roll of noble names; but you can go round the whole wall for yourselves, and see the rest of the builders at their work for yourselves, till you come to the goldsmith's son at the going up of the corner. They so laboured, Nehemiah proudly writes it about them, from the rising of the morning till the stars appeared. And that, if only to see how Ezra and Nehemiah worked together, the old scribe and the young cupbearer. Altogether, this little book is full of Nehemiah's absolute mastery in Jerusalem, and his determination that Jerusalem shall be both a safe, a happy, and a holy city to dwell in. Speaking of the preachers of Jerusalem and their support, just as we get our Presbytery, and our Kirk-Session, and our Expository Pulpit, and our Puritan Sabbath from the new Jerusalem of that day, so we get our Deacons' Court and our Sustentation Fund from Ezra and Nehemiah. Ezra was an old preacher, full of years, full of learning, and full of an experienced piety, giving himself continually to prayer and to the ministry of the Word, while young Nehemiah, like Stephen in the Acts, served tables in the new Jerusalem. And neither in the new Jerusalem of Nehemiah's day, nor in the same Jerusalem in Peter's day, was the prophetic and apostolic and diaconate compact better observed, on the deacons' side at any rate, than it is in our own congregations at the present moment. And because of all this, says Nehemiah, we make a sure covenant and write it out, and our princes, Levites, and priests all seal unto it, that we will not forsake nor forget the house of our God. ...
Nehemiah was such a worker in and around the house of God that he would have satisfied James the Just himself. ' But for his love of work, Nehemiah again and again would have been a dead man. Again and again Sanballat would have had Nehemiah in his clutches, but that Nehemiah would not come down. 'No,' answered Nehemiah, 'I have no time for conferences. ...
And if any young minister should be ordained, like Nehemiah, over such a congregation as Jerusalem was in that day; if he finds the gates thereof burned with fire, and the walls laid waste, and the whole house of God in reproach round about; let him read the Book of Nehemiah till he has it by heart. And it was Nehemiah's faith in God, his love of Jerusalem, and his hard work for Jerusalem that did it
Nehemiah - They even went so far as to attack the laborers at their work; so that Nehemiah had to cause them to labor with arms in their hands; yet in one year their task was completed. He had the cooperation of faithful friends, especially of Ezra, Nehemiah 8:1,9,13 12:36 , and instituted many excellent civil improvements. , though perhaps not for the first time, he returned to his post at the court of Babylon, Nehemiah 2:6 5:14 13:6 ; but after a few years, was recalled to Jerusalem to reform certain growing irregularities neglect of the temple service, breaches of the Sabbath, marriages with the heathen, etc. ...
The book of Nehemiah contains the history of all these transactions, written by himself near the close of his long life, B
Haggedolim - ” Zabdiel a leading priest was the son of Haggedolim (Nehemiah 11:14 KJV, “the great men”; TEV, “a leading family”)
te'Lem - (Ezra 10:24 ) He is probably the same as TALMON in (Nehemiah 12:25 )
Asuppim - In Nehemiah 12:25 the same Hebrew is translated "thresholds," margin "treasuries," "assemblies
Jekabzeel - ” A city in southern Judah settled by members of the tribe of Judah after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:25 )
Dibon - ) ...
...
A city of the tribe of Judah, inhabited after the Captivity (Nehemiah 11:25 ); called also Dimonah (Joshua 15:22 )
Ur - Though it is mentioned in the Bible only as the place from which Abraham originally came (Genesis 11:27-31; Genesis 15:7; Nehemiah 9:7), it was an important city in the ancient world
Mattithiah - Man standing beside Ezra at the public reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
College - ]'>[2] correctly renders ‘second quarter,’ a quarter of the city lying to the north ( Zephaniah 1:10 ), and possibly referred to in Nehemiah 11:9 , where our versions have ‘second over the city
Elioenai - A priest ( Nehemiah 12:41 )
Butler - The term that is translated “butler” (Genesis 40:1-23 ; Genesis 41:9 ) is also translated “cupbearer” (1 Kings 10:5 ; 2 Chronicles 9:4 ; Nehemiah 1:11 )
Oil Tree - (Isaiah 41:19 ), but the Hebrew (ets shemen ) occurs also in 1 Kings 6:23 , where it is translated 'olive tree;' and in Nehemiah 8:15 , where it is rendered 'pine branches:' 'olive branches' being mentioned in the same verse would seem to indicate that the 'tree of oil' is distinct from the olive tree
Abib - It was called Nisan, after the Captivity (Nehemiah 2:1 )
Mehetabel - The son of Delaiah, Nehemiah 6:10
Dibon - City inhabited on the return from exile, Nehemiah 11:25 : perhaps the same as DIMONAH
Beth-Haccerem - House of a vineyard, a place in the tribe of Judah (Nehemiah 3:14 ) where the Benjamites were to set up a beacon when they heard the trumpet against the invading army of the Babylonians (Jeremiah 6:1 )
Artaxerxes - 464-425); the grandson of Darius, who, fourteen years later, permitted Nehemiah to return and rebuild Jerusalem
Naphish - In the parallel passage ( Nehemiah 7:52 ) the reading is Nephushesim (RV Gatekeeper - Temple gatekeepers were charged with preventing anyone unclean from entering the Temple (2 Chronicles 23:19 ) and with guarding the Temple treasuries and storehouses (1 Chronicles 9:26 ; 1 Chronicles 26:20-22 ; Nehemiah 12:25 )
Mordecai - A man who returned from Babylon to Jerusalem with Zerrubbabel (Ezra 2:2 ; Nehemiah 7:7 )
Susa - See Esther ; Nehemiah ; Persia
Dung Ate - Nehemiah 3:13 (c) Probably this figure is used to describe the care we should exercise in ridding ourselves of those unhappy things in our lives, bad habits, evil ways, harmful practices, that should not be permitted either in our words or actions
Fowl - " In the sense "poultry," see Nehemiah 5:18; 1 Kings 4:23; "fatted fowl," barburim , from barar , "to be pure
Pelatiah - Witness to Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:22 )
Perfumer - In Nehemiah 3:8 we read of a guild of perfumers
Berechi'ah - (Nehemiah 3:4,30 ; 6:18 ) ...
A Levite
Nob - (high place ) ( 1 Samuel 22:19 ; Nehemiah 11:32 ) a sacerdotal city in the tribe of Benjamin and situated on some eminence near Jerusalem
Confession - It is beautiful to see how Ezra, Nehemiah, and Daniel confessed the sins of the people as if they had been their own. Ezra 9:1-15 ; Ezra 10:1 ; Nehemiah 1:6 ; Nehemiah 9:2,3 ; Daniel 9:4-20
Fenced Cities - The tower of Hananeel, near the north-east corner of the city wall, is frequently referred to (Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 ; Zechariah 14:10 ). The gateways of such cities were also fortified (Nehemiah 2:8 ; 3:3,6 ; Judges 16:2,3 ; 1 Samuel 23:7 )
Oil Tree - ]'>[3] ‘olive wood’; Nehemiah 8:15 AV Hoshea - One of the heads of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. Nehemiah 10:23
Seal - The ring or the seal as an emblem of authority in Egypt, Persia, and elsewhere is mentioned in Genesis 41:42; 1 Kings 21:8; Esther 3:10; Esther 3:12; Esther 8:2; Daniel 6:17; and as an evidence of a covenant, in Jeremiah 32:10; Jeremiah 32:44; Nehemiah 9:38; Nehemiah 10:1; Haggai 2:23
Hup'Pim - ...
Father of Rephaiah, who was ruler of half of the environs of Jerusalem, and assisted Nehemiah in the repair of the wall. (Nehemiah 3:9 ) (B
Hoshe'a - ) ...
One of the heads of the people who sealed the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:23 ) (B
Ai - Called also Hai, Genesis 12:8 ; Aija, Nehemiah 11:31 ; and Aiath, Isaiah 10:28
Solomon's Servants - (Ezra 2:55,58 ; Nehemiah 7:57,60 ) The persons thus named appear in the lists of the exiles who returned from the captivity
Dram - The Authorized Version understood the word 'adarkonim (1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 8:27 ), and the similar word darkomnim (Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:70 ), as equivalent to the Greek silver coin the drachma
Gittaim - After the Exile, part of the tribe of Benjamin settled there (Nehemiah 11:33 )
Booth - The booths used at the Feast of Booths were made of twigs woven together (Leviticus 23:40-43 ; Nehemiah 8:15 )
Watch - Nehemiah set watches which may mean armed persons or just citizens on guard ( Mark 4:9 ; Mark 7:3 )
Hananel - It is four times mentioned in OT; in Nehemiah 3:1 in connexion with the repairing, and in 12:39 in connexion with the dedication, of the walls; in Jeremiah 31:38 and Zechariah 14:10 as a boundary of the restored and glorified Jerusalem
Jehozadak - The name is shortened to Jozadak in Ezra 3:2 ; Ezra 3:8 ; Ezra 5:2 ; Ezra 10:18 , Nehemiah 12:26
Shilhim - ) The Imperial Bible Dictionary connects Shilhim with Shiloah or Siloam from shaalach "send," waters sent from a fountain (John 9:7; Nehemiah 3:15), and identifies with el Birein, "the wells" four in number, each 25 or 30 ft
Iddo - He returned from Babylon (Nehemiah 12:4 )
Geba - A Levitical town of Benjamin, Joshua 18:24 21:17 1 Chronicles 8:6 , near Ramah, Nehemiah 7:30 Isaiah 10:29 , and not far from the northern border of the kingdom of Judah, 2 Kings 23:8 Zechariah 14:10
Debtor - If the house, cattle, or goods of a Hebrew would not meet his debts, his land might be appropriated for this purpose until the year of Jubilee, or his person might be reduced into servitude till he had paid his debt by his labor, or till the year of Jubilee, which terminated Hebrew bondage in all cases, Leviticus 25:29-41 2 Kings 4:1 Nehemiah 5:3-5
Rehob - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:11 )
Pahath-Moab - See Ezra 2:6 ; Ezra 8:4 , Nehemiah 7:11 ; in 1E Esther 5:11 ; 1Es 8:31 Peter haath Moab
Pine Tree - ‘çts-shemen , Nehemiah 8:15 , see Oil Tree
Dung -
Used as manure (Luke 13:8 ); collected outside the city walls (Nehemiah 2:13 )
en-Rimmon - One of the settlements of the Judahites after the return from the Exile ( Nehemiah 11:29 )
Ashdod - One of the five chief cities of the Philistines, assigned to the tribe of Judah, but never conquered by them, Joshua 13:3 ; 15:47 ; 1 Samuel 5:1 ; 6:17 ; Nehemiah 4:7
Shema - One of those who stood at Ezra’s right hand, at the reading of the Law ( Nehemiah 8:4 , called in 1Es 9:43 Sammus)
Ziklag - In the national register of cities it is assigned to Judah ( Joshua 15:31 ) or to Simeon ( Joshua 19:5 ), and is mentioned also in the post-exilic list ( Nehemiah 11:28 )
Sis'Era - (Ezra 2:53 ; Nehemiah 7:55 ) It doubtless tells of Canaanite captives devoted to the lowest offices of the temple
Oil-Tree - 'etz shemen, rendered "olive tree" in 1 Kings 6:23,31,32,33 (RSV, "olive wood") and "pine branches" in Nehemiah 8:15 (RSV, "branches of wild olive"), was some tree distinct from the olive
Eber - ...
...
The head of the priestly family of Amok in the time of Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:20 )
Pardon - The forgiveness of sins granted freely (Isaiah 43:25 ), readily (Nehemiah 9:17 ; Psalm 86:5 ), abundantly (Isaiah 55:7 ; Romans 5:20 )
Tatnai - It is given to ( Nehemiah 5:14 ) and to Zerubbabel (Haggai 1:1 )
Rehob - ...
...
Nehemiah 10:11
en-Rimmon - ” A town in Judah (Nehemiah 11:29 ) where people lived in Nehemiah's day (about 445 B
Rechab - Father or ancestor of Malchijah, who assisted in Nehemiah's repair of Jerusalem's walls (Nehemiah 3:14 ), possibly identical with 2
Netophah - ” A village and surrounding district in the hill country of Judah (2 Samuel 23:28-29 ; 1 Chronicles 11:30 ; 1 Chronicles 27:13 ; Nehemiah 7:26 )
Captain of the Temple - Pashhur (“chief governor in the house of the Lord,” Jeremiah 20:1 ) and Seraiah (“ruler of the house of God,” Nehemiah 11:11 ) held this office in the Old Testament times
Adullam - Rehoboam fortified it ( 2 Chronicles 11:7 ), and the children of Judah returned to it after the captivity ( Nehemiah 11:30 )
Zeboim - Mention is made of the valley of Zeboim, 1 Samuel 13:18 , and of a city of the same name in the tribe of Benjamin, Nehemiah 11:34
Quake - Nehemiah 1
Remnant - Nehemiah 1
Prophetess - Five women are exhyplicitly identified as prophetesses: Miriam (Exodus 15:20 ); Deborah (Judges 4:4 ); Huldah (2 Kings 22:14 ); Noadiah, a “false” prophetess (Nehemiah 6:14 ); and Anna (Luke 2:36 ). The false prophetess Noadiah sought to frighten Nehemiah
Kabzeel - On its reoccupation after the return from Babylon it was called Jekabzeel (Nehemiah 11:25, where "its hamlets," Hebrew, are spoken of, namely, outlying pastoral settlements). to Petra; a spot likely to be occupied, though remote, as a stronghold, the key of Palestine toward Moat and Edom, guarding the pass Ez Zuweirah, by which the Moabites under Sanballat, the Ammonites under Tobiah, and the Arabians under Geshem, might attack the Jews (Nehemiah 4:12)
Shushan - Here Daniel saw one of his visions (Daniel 8 ); and here also Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1 ) began his public life
Usury - ...
Nehemiah (Nehemiah 5:3-13) denounces the usurious exactions of some after the return from Babylon; he put a stop to the practice
Pine Tree - The pine appears in our translation three times, Nehemiah 8:15 ; Isaiah 41:19 ; Isaiah 60:13 . Nehemiah 8:15 , giving directions for observing the feast of tabernacles, says, "Fetch olive branches, pine branches, myrtle branches, and branches of thick trees, to make booths
Joha'Nan - (Ezra 10:6 ; Nehemiah 12:23 ) ...
The son of Tobiah the Ammonite. (Nehemiah 6:18 )
Loan - (Psalm 15:5 ; Proverbs 6:1,4 ; 11:15 ; 17:18 ; 20:16 ; 22:26 ; Jeremiah 15:10 ; Ezekiel 18:13 ) Systematic breach of the law in this respect was corrected by Nehemiah after the return from captivity. (Nehemiah 5:1,13 ) The money-changers, who had seats and tables in the temple, where traders whose profits arose chiefly from the exchange of money with those who came to pay their annual half-shekel
Education - The priests' and Levites' duty especially was to teach the people (2 Chronicles 15:3; Leviticus 10:11; Malachi 2:7; Nehemiah 8:2; Nehemiah 8:8-9; Nehemiah 8:13; Jeremiah 18:18)
Obadi'ah - (1 Chronicles 9:16 ; Nehemiah 12:25 ) ...
The second of the lion-faced Gadites who joined David at Ziklag. (Ezra 8:9 ) ...
A priest, or family of priests, who settled the covenant with Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 10:5 ) ...
The fourth of the twelve minor prophets
Firstfruits - Times of apostasy brought a neglect of this duty; the restoration of the offering of both kinds was a leading point in the reformation under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:5; 2 Chronicles 31:11), and under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:35; Nehemiah 10:37; Nehemiah 12:44)
Joel - On this theory the most likely time of writing is either 520-510 BC, after the ministry of Haggai and Zechariah and the rebuilding of the Jerusalem temple (Ezra 5:1-2; Ezra 5:15), or about 400 BC, a generation or so after the reforms of Ezra and Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:1-3; Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 13:30)
Hagiographa - The hagiographa in their Hebrew order include: Psalms, Proverbs, and Job; the “five scrolls” (Megilloth ) read at major festivals, namely, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, and Esther; Daniel; and Ezra-Nehemiah and Chronicles
Ophel - Hill; mound, the long, narrow, rounded promontory on the southern slope of the temple hill, between the Tyropoeon and the Kedron valley (2 Chronicles 27:3 ; 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:26,27 )
Sackcloth - They also put on sackcloth as a sign of sorrow for personal sins (1 Kings 21:27-29; Nehemiah 9:1-2) or urgency in prayer (Daniel 9:3)
Uzziel - Goldsmith assisting in Nehemiah's repair of the Jerusalem walls (Nehemiah 3:8 )
Jarmuth - Occupied by children of Judah on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:29)
Keilah - The city was rebuilt by the returning exiles (Nehemiah 3:17-18 )
Nob - (nahb) City in Benjamin likely situated between Anathoth and Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:31-32 ; Isaiah 10:32 )
Nehemiah - ...
Nehemiah, the book of: The second part of the Book of Ezra, describing Nehemiah's activities as the Jewish leader during the early Second Holy Temple era; often considered an independent book of Tanach
Asaiah - The first-born of the Shilonites, 1 Chronicles 9:5 ; called in Nehemiah 11:5 Maaseiah
Gileadites - We also read of Jair a Gileadite, Judges 10:3 ; and Barzillai, 2 Samuel 17:27 ; 2 Samuel 19:31 ; 1 Kings 2:7 ; Ezra 2:61 ; Nehemiah 7:63
Mortar - (Genesis 11:3 ; Exodus 1:14 ; Leviticus 14:42,45 ; Isaiah 41:25 ; Ezekiel 13:10,11,14,15 ; 22:28 ; Nehemiah 3:14 ) The various compacting substances used in Oriental buildings appear to be --
Bitumen, as in the Babylonian structures; ...
Common mud or moistened clay; ...
A very firm cement compounded of sand, ashes and lime, in the proportions respectively of 1,2,3, well pounded, sometimes mixed and sometimes coated with oil, so as to form a surface almost impenetrable to wet or the weather
Ain - The same place as Ashan, 1 Chronicles 6:59; and possibly as En-rimmon, Nehemiah 11:29
Restitution - The repairing of wrongs done, and the restoring of what one has wrongfully taken from another, are strictly enjoined in Scripture, and are a necessary evidence of true repentance, Exodus 22:1-15 ; Nehemiah 5:1-13 ; Luke 19:8
Mol'Adah - (Nehemiah 11:26 ) It may be placed at el-Milh , which is about 4English miles from Tell Arad , 17 or 18 from Hebron, and 9 or 10 due east of Beersheba
Mortar - (Genesis 11:3 ; Exodus 1:14 ; Leviticus 14:42,45 ; Isaiah 41:25 ; Ezekiel 13:10,11,14,15 ; 22:28 ; Nehemiah 3:14 ) The various compacting substances used in Oriental buildings appear to be --
Bitumen, as in the Babylonian structures; ...
Common mud or moistened clay; ...
A very firm cement compounded of sand, ashes and lime, in the proportions respectively of 1,2,3, well pounded, sometimes mixed and sometimes coated with oil, so as to form a surface almost impenetrable to wet or the weather
Zano'ah -
A town of Judah in the Shefelah or plain, (Joshua 15:34 ; Nehemiah 3:13 ; 11:30 ) possibly identical with Zanu'a
e'Hud - (Nehemiah 9:27 ) As a Benjamite he was specially chosen to destroy Eglon, who had established himself in Jericho, which was included in the boundaries of that tribe
Hanan'e-el - (whom God graciously gave ) , The tower of, a tower which formed part of the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 3:1 ; 12:39 ) From these two passages, particularly from the former, it might almost be inferred that Hananeel was but another name for the tower of Meah; at any rate they were close together, and stood between the sheep-gate and the fish-gate
Jeduthun - " His descendants are mentioned as singers and players on instruments ( Nehemiah 11:17 )
Gate -
Of cities, as of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:13 ; Nehemiah 1:3 ; 2:3 ; 3:3 ), of Sodom (Genesis 19:1 ), of Gaza (Judges 16:3 ). ...
...
Of royal palaces (Nehemiah 2:8 )
Interest - Nehemiah challenged neglect of the Mosaic prohibition which had resulted in dire poverty for some of the returned exiles (Nehemiah 5:6-13 )
Seal, Signet - ...
A covenant was sealed by Nehemiah and those with him. Nehemiah 10:1
Bread - 1: ἄρτος (Strong's #740 — Noun Masculine — artos — ar'-tos ) "bread" (perhaps derived from aro, "to fit together," or from a root ar---, "the earth"), signifies (a) "a small loaf or cake," composed of flour and water, and baked, in shape either oblong or round, and about as thick as the thumb; these were not cut, but broken and were consecrated to the Lord every Sabbath and called the "shewbread" (loaves of presentation), Matthew 12:4 ; when the "shewbread" was reinstituted by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:32 ) a poll-tax of 1/3 shekel was laid on the Jews, Matthew 17:24 ; (b) "the loaf at the Lord's Supper," e
Elea'Zar - (1 Chronicles 23:21,22 ; 24:28 ) ...
A priest who took part in the feast of dedication under Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 12:42 ) (B
Canon of the Old Testament - Nehemiah, according to 2 Maccabees 2:13, "gathered together the acts of the kings, and the prophets, and of David. Nehemiah (Nehemiah 9:30) saith, "Thou testifiedst by Thy Spirit in Thy prophets. ...
Psalm 119, one continued glorification of the law or word of God, was probably the composition of Ezra "the priest and ready scribe in the law of Moses" (Ezra 7:6; Nehemiah 8:9). Their keenness to return to the law appears in Nehemiah 8:1-8; Ezra the priest read to "all the people gathered as one man into the street before the water gate . Nehemiah and Malachi added their own writings as the seal to the canon. ) Josephus refers to the 22 books of Scripture, namely, 5 of Moses, 13 of the prophets extending to the reign of Artaxerxes (the time of Nehemiah), 4 containing hymns and directions for life (c. the FIVE of MOSES; THIRTEEN prophetical books, namely,...
(1) Joshua,...
(2) Judges and Ruth,...
(3) the two of Samuel,...
(4) the two of Kings...
(5) the two of Chronicles,...
(6) Ezra and Nehemiah,...
(7) Esther,...
(8) Isaiah,...
(9) Jeremiah and Lamentations,...
(10) Ezekiel,...
(11) Daniel,...
(12) the twelve minor prophets,...
(13) Job; and FOUR remaining, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon: the 22 thus being made to answer to the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. " The warnings: "add thou not to His words, lest He reprove thee and thou be found a liar" (Proverbs 30:6), "neither shall ye diminish ought from it" (Deuteronomy 4:2; Deuteronomy 12:32), fenced in the Old Testament canon as Revelation 22:18-19 fences in the New Testament The Lord and His apostles quote all the books of the Old Testament except Ruth, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, the Song of Solomon, Lamentations, and Ezekiel. 179), after an exact inquiry in the East gives the Old Testament books substantially the stone as ours, including under "Esdras" Nehemiah, Ezra, and Esther
Jerusalem - The religious and political capital of Israel; called also "the Holy City," Nehemiah 11:1; "City of the Great King," Psalms 48:2 : "City of David" and "Zion. 2 Chronicles 25:23; Nehemiah 8:16; Nehemiah 12:39. Nehemiah 3:28; 2 Chronicles 23:15; Jeremiah 31:40. 2 Chronicles 26:9; Nehemiah 2:13; Nehemiah 2:15; Nehemiah 3:13. 2 Chronicles 33:14; Nehemiah 12:39. Nehemiah 2:13; Nehemiah 3:1-32; Nehemiah 13:10. Nehemiah 3:1; Nehemiah 3:32; Nehemiah 12:39. Nehemiah 3:29. " Nehemiah 3:31. Nehemiah 12:37. Nehemiah 12:37. Nehemiah 12:39. Nehemiah 12:39. ...
The king's garden, Nehemiah 3:15, was probably outside the city at the south, as Gethsemane, Matthew 26:36, was eastward at the foot of the Mount of Olives. , "broad place facing the water gate," Nehemiah 8:1; Nehemiah 8:3, or, according to the parallel account in 1 Esdras 9:38, the "broad place of the temple towards the east;" the "street of the house of God," Ezra 10:9, R. , "broad place of the gate of Ephraim," Nehemiah 8:16; and the "open place of the first gate toward the east" could not have been "streets," in our sense of the word, but rather open spaces found in eastern towns near the inside of the gates. 457, and Nehemiah, b. Nehemiah 4:7-22; Nehemiah 6:1-16
Zechari'ah - (Nehemiah 8:4 ) (B. (Nehemiah 11:4 ) ...
A Shilonite, descendant of Perez. (Nehemiah 11:5 ) ...
A priest, son of Pashur. (Nehemiah 11:12 ) ...
The representative of the priestly family of Iddo in the days of Joiakim the son of Jeshua. (Nehemiah 12:16 ) (B. ...
One of the priests, son of Jonathan, who blew with the trumpets at the dedication of the city wall by Ezra and Nehemiah. (Nehemiah 12:36,41 ) (B
Fenced Cities - The tower of Hananeel is mentioned Jeremiah 31:38; Zechariah 14:10; Nehemiah 3:1, where also is mentioned "the tower of Meah," "the tower of the furnaces" (Nehemiah 3:11), "the great tower that lieth out even unto the wall of Ophel" (Nehemiah 3:27)
Governor - (Nehemiah 2:7,9 ) It is impossible to determine the precise limits of their authority or the functions which they had to perform. It appears from (Ezra 6:8 ) that these governors were intrusted with the collection of the king's taxes; and from (Nehemiah 5:18 ; 12:26 ) that they were supported by a contribution levied upon the people, which was technically termed "the bread of the governor" comp. (Nehemiah 3:7 ) At the time of Christ Judea was a Roman province, governed by a procurator (governor) appointed by Rome
Habergeon - The first (2 Chronicles 26:14 ; Nehemiah 4:16 ) is translated coats of mail or armor, body armor, or breastplate by modern translations
Zeboim - ...
...
A place mentioned only in Nehemiah 11:34 , inhabited by the Benjamites after the Captivity
Rehob - Witness to Nehemiah's covenant (Nehemiah 10:11 )
District - In the Old Testament district often connotes a part of a larger whole, either the provinces of an empire (1 Kings 20:14-19 ), regions within a country (2 Chronicles 11:23 ), or sections of a city (Nehemiah 3:9-18 )
Beeroth - A Gibeonite city, usually coupled in enumeration with Chephirah and Kiriath-jearim ( Joshua 9:17 , Ezra 2:25 , Nehemiah 7:29 ); assigned to the tribe of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:25 , 2 Samuel 4:2 ); the home of Rechab, murderer of Ish-bosheth ( 2 Samuel 4:2 ), and of Naharai, armour-bearer of Joab ( 2 Samuel 23:37 )
Feign - Nehemiah 6
Keilah - It was reoccupied after the Exile ( Nehemiah 3:17 f
Miphkad - A gate somewhere near the northern end of the East wall of Jerusalem, as may be deduced from the one reference to it ( Nehemiah 3:31 AV Solomon's Servants - Their "children" or descendants discharged menial offices in the temple on the return from Babylon (Ezra 2:55-58; Nehemiah 7:57-60)
Gracious - Nehemiah 9 ...
3
Hazor - Cities in Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:23 ; Nehemiah 11:33
Shallum - ...
Others of the time are alluded to in Numbers 26:49 1 Chronicles 2:40 9:17,19,31 Ezra 2:42 7:2 10:24,42 Nehemiah 3:12 7:45
Michmash - A town of Benjamin, nine miles north by east of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 7:31 ; 11:31
Daric - (from dara , a king ), Authorized Version "dram," ( 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 2:69 ; 8:27 ; Nehemiah 7:70,71,72 ) a gold coin current in Palestine in the period after the return from Babylon
Asai'ah - ) In (Nehemiah 11:5 ) he is called MAASEIAH
Kenites - The Israelites allowed the Kenite in-laws of Moses, and their descendants, to live among them in Canaan, and at times showed a special concern for them (Judges 1:16; 1 Samuel 15:6; 1 Samuel 30:26-29; 1 Chronicles 2:55; Nehemiah 3:14)
Elam - ( Ezra 2:7 , Nehemiah 7:12 , 1E Esther 5:12 ) and 71 with Ezra ( Ezra 8:7 , 1Es 8:33 ). to Nehemiah 10:14 ‘sealed the covenant. In the parallel lists Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:34 ‘the other Elam’ has also 1254 descendants who return with Zerubbabel. A priest who took part in the dedication of the walls ( Nehemiah 12:42 ). An effect of this participation is curiously shown in the fact that after the Exile, Elam was a fairly common name among the Jews themselves ( Ezra 2:7 ; Ezra 2:31 , Nehemiah 7:12 , 1 Chronicles 8:24 et al
Nehemiah, Theology of - ...
He is not only the God of redemptive history; he is also the God who was favorable to Nehemiah (2:18). Nehemiah recognized that all of his thoughts prompting him to rebuild were put into his heart by God (2:12). The Book of Nehemiah probably contains the shortest prayer in the Bible and one of the longest. The shortest prayer occurs in 2:4 between the king's question about what Nehemiah wants from him and this man's reply. ...
There are thirteen instances of prayer in Nehemiah. Nehemiah has been praying night and day for this city. ...
At many points of crisis Nehemiah's short prayers are recorded. ...
Nehemiah is not a heartless legalist who slavishly follows the letter of the law. ...
Upon discovering Tobiah had commandeered a storeroom in the temple for his personal use, Nehemiah personally threw his household goods out into the street (13:4-9). When the survival of the biblical Mosaic faith was concerned Nehemiah was not always gentle. Nehemiah realized from his own knowledge of Scripture that this had caused Solomon to sin and had brought the nation to disaster (13:26). One must remember Nehemiah was fighting for the spiritual and temporal survival of his nation. It is the place of the tombs of Nehemiah's fathers. Fensham, Ezra and Nehemiah ; D. Kidner, Ezra and Nehemiah ; J. Myers, Ezra-Nehemiah ; H. Williamson, Ezra-Nehemiah
Seraiah - ...
...
A ruler of the temple (Nehemiah 11:11 ). ...
...
A priest of the days of Jehoiakim (Nehemiah 12:1,12 )
Bethesda - ) A water reservoir, or swimming pool (as John 5:2, kolumbeethra , means), with five porches, or colonnades, close to the sheep gate (Nehemiah 3:1) in Jerusalem. Robinson suggested that "the pool of the Virgin" may answer to "the pool of Bethesda," "the king's pool" in Nehemiah
Nob - A place of this name is mentioned in three passages 1 Samuel 21:1-15 ; 1 Samuel 22:1-23 , Nehemiah 11:33 , Isaiah 10:32 (text not quite certain). In Nehemiah 11:33 and Isaiah 10:32 Nob is closely connected with Anathoth, 2 1 / 2 miles N
Ahijah - Nehemiah 10:26 (RV [6] Ahiah ), a layman who joined Nehemiah in signing the covenant
Ananias - This name occurs several times in the Apocrypha: in Esther 9:21 Esther 9:21 ; Esther 9:29 Esther 9:29 ; 1Es 9:43 ; 1Es 9:48 (representing ‘Hanani’ and ‘Hananiah’ of Ezra 10:20 ; Ezra 10:28 , ‘Anaiah’ and ‘Hanan’ of Nehemiah 8:4 ; Nehemiah 8:7 ) and in Tob 5:12 f
Castle - RSV uses castle in Proverbs 18:19 and for a different Hebrew term in Nehemiah 7:2 . ...
Birah is a late loan word from Accadian and refers to the fortified acropolis, usually built at the highest and most easily defensible part of a city ( Nehemiah 1:1 ; Esther 1:2 ). It referred to the fortress near the Temple in the rebuilt Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:8 ). A military commander ruled the fortress (Nehemiah 7:2 )
Adonijah - Nehemiah 10:16, called Adonikam in Ezra 2:13, whose children were 666 (compare Revelation 13:18, the numerical mark of the beast), Revelation 8:13; Nehemiah 7:18; Nehemiah 10:16, but 667 in Nehemiah 7:18
Gershon, Gershonites - Certain of them are mentioned in 1 Chronicles 9:15 and Nehemiah 11:17 a, Nehemiah 11:22 as dwelling in Jerusalem immediately after the Return. Of the ‘sons of Asaph’ (Gershonites), 128 ( Ezra 2:41 ) or 148 ( Nehemiah 7:44 ) returned with Ezra to the city in b. Asaphites led the music at the foundation of the Temple ( Ezra 3:10 ); and certain of them blew trumpets in the procession at the dedication of the city walls ( Nehemiah 12:25 )
Jonathan - Nehemiah 12:11 . ' Nehemiah 12:14 . Nehemiah 12:35 . Apparently called JEHONATHAN in Nehemiah 12:18
Mehunims - They are mentioned in the list of those from whom the Nethinim were made up ( Ezra 2:50 ; Nehemiah 7:52 )
Myrtle - (Isaiah 41:19 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ; Zechariah 1:8 ), Hebrew hadas, known in the East by the name As , the Myrtus communis of the botanist
Daric - In the Revised Version of 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 2:69 ; 8:27 ; Nehemiah 7:70-72 , where the Authorized Version has "dram
Urijah - ...
...
One of the priests who stood at the right hand of Ezra's pulpit when he read and expounded the law (Nehemiah 8:4 )
Elioenai - A priest who led in the service of dedication and thanksgiving for the completion of repairs of the wall around Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:41 )
Villages - Caphar designates a regular village, and appears in "Caper-naum," which subsequently became a town; from kaphar "to cover" or "protect" (Nehemiah 6:2; 1 Chronicles 27:25)
Azmaveth - It apparently is near Jerusalem, perhaps modern Hizmeh, five miles northeast of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:29 )
Ahitub - In Nehemiah 11:11 Ahitub appears as grandfather of Zadok and father of Meraioth, of the house of Eleazar
Example - ...
Nehemiah, model man of business
Adonijah - A leader of the Jews after the Exile who signed Nehemiah's covenant to obey God's law (Nehemiah 10:16 )
Geliloth - Identical with the Gilgal of Joshua 15:7 , and possibly with the Bath-gilgal of Nehemiah 12:29
Prayer - We can pray standing (Nehemiah 9:5), kneeling (Ezra 9:5), sitting (1 Chronicles 17:16-27), bowing (Exodus 34:8), and with lifted hands (1 Timothy 2:8)
Dibon - A town in the south of Judah, Nehemiah 11:25; the same as Dimonah, Joshua 15:22, and probably modern ed-Dheib
Mehu'Nims, the, - (Ezra 2:50 ) Authorized Version "Mehunim;" (Nehemiah 7:52 ) Authorized Version "Meunim
Letter - When sent to inferiors they were often sent open, Nehemiah 6:5; but when sent to equals or superiors they were enclosed in a purse or bag
Usury - The exacting of usury is often rebuked, Nehemiah 5:7,10 Proverbs 28:8 Ezekiel 22:12-14
Nob - Inhabited again on the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 11:31-35). Mizpeh is mentioned in Joshua (Joshua 18:26) and in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:7) in connection with Gibeon
Jeduthun - ) 1 Chronicles 16:38; Psalm 39, 62, 77, titles, implying that these psalms were to be sung by Jeduthun's choir; Nehemiah 11:17. In Hezekiah's reign (2 Chronicles 29:13-14), again in Josiah's (2 Chronicles 35:15), lastly under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 11:17), Jeduthun's choir or descendants officiated in the sanctuary music
Gibeon - Ninety-five men of Gibeon returned with Zerubbabel, and helped in repairing the wall of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:7; Nehemiah 7:25)
Azariah - Nehemiah 3:23 , one of those who repaired the wall of Jerusalem. Nehemiah 7:7 (called Seraiah, Ezra 2:2 ; Zacharias , 1E Esther 5:8 ), one of the twelve leaders of Israel who returned with Zerubbabel. Nehemiah 8:7 ( Azarias , 1Es 9:48 ), one of those who helped the Levites to ‘cause the people to understand the law
Abijah - Members of only four courses seem to have returned from the Captivity (Nehemiah 7:39-42, Ezra 2:36-39; Ezra 10:18-22). The authority for this statement is not of the best kind; but the statement itself is substantially confirmed by Nehemiah 12:1-7, where twenty-two groups are referred to (in Nehemiah 12:12-21 the number has fallen to twenty-one, and two of the courses are grouped under a single representative), and by Ezra 8:2, where two other priestly families are mentioned
Hilkiah - Possibly Moses' own autograph copy, but "by the hand of Moses" may mean only that God gave it by means of him (2 Chronicles 35:6; John 1:17; Galatians 3:19; Exodus 9:35 margin, Deuteronomy 17:18-1938; Nehemiah 10:29). Deuteronomy, the repetition of the law in a summary, was the leading portion read, just as at the reading in the feast of tabernacles every seventh year, the year of release, not the whole Pentateuch but lessons from it day by day were read (Nehemiah 8:18; Nehemiah 9:3-5, etc. Nehemiah 8:4; perhaps the same as the Hilkiah in Nehemiah 12:7; Nehemiah 12:21
Fasting - Nehemiah 7:73 to Nehemiah 9:38 records a general fast on the 24th day of the 7th month, and therefore the 10th day of that month the proper date for the Day of Atonement was probably not yet set apart for this purpose. Moreover, the characteristic ideas of the fast its public confession, its emphasis on sin and atonement are late, and can be compared with post-exilic analogies ( Ezra 9:1-15 , Nehemiah 1:4-11 ; Nehemiah 9:3 ). Ezra 8:21-23 , Nehemiah 1:4 ; Nehemiah 9:1 )
Jozabad - Levite who helped the people understand God's law as Ezra read it (Nehemiah 8:7 ). Levite in charge of external affairs of the Temple (Nehemiah 11:16 )
Pool - Mention is made of the pool of Gibeon (2 Samuel 2:13 ); the pool of Hebron (4:12); the upper pool at Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17 ; 20:20 ); the pool of Samaria (1 Kings 22:38 ); the king's pool (Nehemiah 2:14 ); the pool of Siloah (Nehemiah 3:15 ; Ecclesiastes 2:6 ); the fishpools of Heshbon (Song of Solomon 7:4 ); the "lower pool," and the "old pool" (Isaiah 22:9,11 )
Amen - Amen was the proper response to a prayer, an oath, or a solemn promise (1 Kings 1:30; Nehemiah 5:13; Nehemiah 8:6; 1 Chronicles 16:36; Jeremiah 11:5); the God of Amen witnesses our covenants
Ai - "Men of Bethel and Ai," (223 according to Ezra 2:28, but 123 according to Nehemiah 7:32,) returned from Babylon with Zerubbzbel. Ezra's list was made in Babylon; Nehemiah's in Judaea long after. Death and change of purpose would make many in Ezra's list of intending returners not appear in Nehemiah's list of those actually arriving. ...
Aija is mentioned among the towns reoccupied by the Benjamites (Nehemiah 11:31)
Ammon, Ammonites - Again, 140 years later, the Ammonites did everything in their power to prevent the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 2:10 ; Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 4:3 ; Nehemiah 4:7 ). Nehemiah and Ezra fomented this enmity by making illegal the marriages of Ammonitish women with Israelitish peasantry who had remained in Judah ( Nehemiah 13:23 ). ...
Between the time of Nehemiah and Alexander the Great the country east of the Jordan was overrun by the Nabatæans
Mehunim - The Meunites are listed as Temple servants in the postexilic period (Ezra 2:50 ; Nehemiah 7:52 )
Adullam - It was one of the cities rebuilt and fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:7 Micah 1:15 , and was reoccupied by the Jews after the captivity, Nehemiah 11:30
Zedekiah - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:1 )
Field - Cultivated land of any extent was called a field (Genesis 23:13,17 ; 41:8 ; Leviticus 27:16 ; Ruth 4:5 ; Nehemiah 12:29 )
Nephthar - The name given by Nehemiah to a ‘thick substance’ which was found in a dry pit after the return from Babylon ( 2Ma 1:18-35 )
Zorah - It was fortified by Rehoboam ( 2 Chronicles 11:10 ), and is mentioned in Nehemiah 11:29 as peopled by Judahites after the Captivity
Lap (Noun) - Sense 2 is perhaps intended at Nehemiah 5:13 , though sense 1 is possible (so NIV, NRSV)
Moladah - The city was among those repopulated by Jews returning from Exile (Nehemiah 11:26 )
Chamber - Included are sleeping quarters (2 Kings 6:12 ); bathroom (Judges 3:24 ); private inner room reserved for a bride (Judges 15:1 ; Joel 2:16 ); private, personal cubicle in the Temple furnished with benches (1 Samuel 9:22 ; 2 Kings 23:11 ); storage rooms (Nehemiah 12:44 ); a cool upper room built on the roof (Judges 3:20 ) or over the city gate (2 Samuel 18:33 ); and the ribs or beams forming side rooms in the Temple (1 Kings 7:3 )
Paradise - (par' uh disse) Old Persian term which means literally “enclosure” or “wooded park,” used in the Old Testament to speak of King Artaxerxes' forest (Nehemiah 2:8 ), and twice of orchards (Ecclesiastes 2:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 4:13 )
Circuit - The villages around Jerusalem formed a circuit ( Nehemiah 12:28 NRSV)
Rimmon - A town of Palestine, near the frontier of Edom, Joshua 15:21,32 Zechariah 14:10 , in the region assigned to the tribe of Simeon, Joshua 19:7 1 Chronicles 4:32 Nehemiah 11:29
Zedekiah - A signatory to the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:1 )
Bath, Bathing - The "pools," such as that of Siloam and Hezekiah, (2 Kings 20:20 ; Nehemiah 3:15,16 ; Isaiah 22:11 ; John 9:7 ) often sheltered by porticos, (John 5:2 ) are the first indications we have of public bathing accommodation
Iddo - He is included among the priestly families in the early postexilic community ( Nehemiah 12:4 ,Nehemiah 12:4,12:16 )
Johanan - known in the Elephantine papyri as Jehohanan but in Nehemiah 12:22-23 as Johanan. He was high priest at time Nehemiah's list of priests was compiled. Some interpreters would say that Jonathan ( Nehemiah 12:11 ) is a copyist's error for Johanan, but this is not likely
Shu'Shan, - Nehemiah resided here. (Nehemiah 1:1 ) Shushan was situated on the Ulai or Choaspes
Tribute (2) - In the days of Nehemiah the amount was a third of a shekel (Nehemiah 10:32-33), but in NT times it was half a shekel (Josephus Ant
Siloah, Siloam - It is mentioned in the Old Testament as being 'by the king's garden'when the walls of Jerusalem were being rebuilt by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 3:15 )
Tribute - The institution of this yearly payment apparently began in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah. " Nehemiah 10:32
Ephraim - One of the gates of ancient Jerusalem, 2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 25:23; Nehemiah 8:16; Nehemiah 12:39; probably on the north side, as the present Damascus gate is
ez'ra - With the detailed account of this important transaction Ezra's autobiography ends abruptly, and we hear nothing more of him till, thirteen years afterwards, in the twentieth of Artaxerxes, we find him again at Jerusalem with Nehemiah. The functions he executed under Nehemiah's government were purely of a priestly and ecclesiastical character. The principal works ascribed to him by the Jews are--
The instruction of the great synagogue; ...
The settling the canon of Scripture, and restoring, correcting and editing the whole sacred volume; ...
The introduction of the Chaldee character instead of the old Hebrew or Samaritan; ...
The authorship of the books of Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and, some add, Esther; and, many of the Jews say, also of the books of Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve prophets; ...
The establishment of synagogues
Fish - The "fishgate" at Jerusalem implies an adjoining fish market, supplied chiefly through Tyrian traders who imported it (Nehemiah 13:16; Nehemiah 3:3; Nehemiah 12:39; 2 Chronicles 33:14)
Tax Taxing Taxation - This, however, was but occasional—yet see perhaps some traces of it in 2 Kings 12:4; 2 Chronicles 24:6-9; but it formed the basis of the annual impost agreed to after the captivity, Nehemiah 10:32-33, then the third of a shekel, but afterwards a half-shekel, Matthew 17:24; Matthew 17:27, levied on all Jews wheresoever they resided. This Nehemiah when in office did not exact. Nehemiah 5:14-15
Jon'Athan, - (Nehemiah 12:14 ) ...
One of the sons of Kareah, and brother of Johanan. (Nehemiah 12:11,22,23 ) (B. (Nehemiah 12:35 ) ...
Judah - Nehemiah 11:9 . Nehemiah 12:8 . Nehemiah 12:34,36
Zechariah - ...
...
A chief of the people in the time of Ezra, who consulted him about the return from captivity (Ezra 8:16 ); probably the same as mentioned in Nehemiah 8:4 , ...
...
Nehemiah 11:12 . ...
...
Nehemiah 12:16 . ...
...
Nehemiah 12:35,41
Jonathan - A high priest ( Nehemiah 12:11 ): called in Nehemiah 12:22 f. A Levite ( Nehemiah 12:35 ). A priest ( Nehemiah 12:14 )
Eber - Head of priestly family of Amok (Nehemiah 12:20 ) in days of Jehoiakim (609-597 B
Hyena - ...
The Hebrew term for hyena is used as a man's name (Zibeon, Genesis 36:20 ) and as the name for a town (Zeboim, Nehemiah 11:34 ) and valley (1 Samuel 13:18 ) in the territory of Benjamin
Lydda - fortified and enlarged, it originally (1 Chronicles 8:12) and reoccupied it after the return from Babylon (Ezra 2:33; Nehemiah 11:35)
Ai - It lay rebuilt and inhibited by the Benjamites (Ezra 2:28 ; Nehemiah 7:32 ; 11:31 )
Malachi - He flourished after the captivity, later than Haggai and Zechariah, at a time when the temple was completed, and was probably a contemporary of Nehemiah, b
Ben-Hinnom - The valley served as the northern boundary of the Judean villages where the returning exiles settled (Nehemiah 11:30 )
Kiln - It is possible that the part of the wall around Jerusalem known as the “Tower of the Ovens” ( Nehemiah 3:11 REB) got its name from a potter's kiln
Amon - An ancestor of Temple staff members after the Exile (Nehemiah 7:59 ), called Ami in Ezra 2:57
Jonathan - ...
·Jonathan, the High Preist, Nehemiah 12:10
Abijah - ) For the several persons in Scripture, called Abijah, I refer to the several chapters (1 Kings 14:1; 1 Chronicles 24:10; 2 Chronicles 29:1; Nehemiah 10:7
Adul'Lam - (Genesis 38:1,12,20 ) Fortified by Rehoboam, (2 Chronicles 11:7 ) it was one of the towns reoccupied by the Jews after their return from Babylon, (Nehemiah 11:30 ) and still a city in the time of the Macabees
is'Rael - (Ezra 6:16 ; 9:1 ; 10:25 ; Nehemiah 11:3 ) etc
Paradise - There are three places in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament where this word is found, namely, Nehemiah 2:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:13 ; Ecclesiastes 2:5
Fat - (Nehemiah 8:10 ) Certain restrictions were imposed upon them in reference to the former; some parts of the suet, viz
Ophel - A quarter of Jerusalem adjacent to the temple, and therefore occupied by the Nethinim, Nehemiah 3:26,27 11:21
Zaccheus - Just, from the Hebrew Zaccai, Nehemiah 7:14 , a worthy tax-gatherer at Jericho, who in order to see Christ took a position in a sycamore-tree, by which He was about to pass
Laugh - Nehemiah 2
Fat - (Nehemiah 8:10 ) Certain restrictions were imposed upon them in reference to the former; some parts of the suet, viz
Tithes - Hezekiah rectified the abuse (2 Chronicles 31:5; 2 Chronicles 31:12; 2 Chronicles 31:19); also Nehemiah after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 10:38-39; Nehemiah 13:5; Nehemiah 13:12; Nehemiah 12:44). Malachi (Malachi 3:10) seconded Nehemiah's efforts
Zacchaeus - ZACCHÆUS (= Zaccai, Ezra 2:9 , Nehemiah 7:14 , lit
Beeroth - Its original occupants repaired to the Philistine Gittaim (Nehemiah 11:33; 2 Samuel 4:2-3; 2 Samuel 4:7)
Eliakim - A priest who was involved in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 12:41 )
Portion - To have a portion in the Lord is to share the right of joining the community in worship of God (Joshua 22:25 ,Joshua 22:25,22:27 ; compare Nehemiah 2:20 )
Neck - To put the neck to work ( Nehemiah 3:5 ) was a phrase equivalent to our own ‘put a hand to
Rezin - A family of the Nethinim (Ezra 2:48; Nehemiah 7:50)
Jehozadak - Father of Jeshua the high priest, who with Zerubbabel led the returning Jews from Babylon (Ezra 3:2; Nehemiah 12:26)
Kiriath-Arba - Only in Genesis 35:27 and Nehemiah 11:25 is Arba‘ written with the article
Ashes - Ashes on the head formed one of the ordinary tokens of mourning for the dead (see Mourning Customs as of private ( 2 Samuel 13:19 ) and national humiliation ( Nehemiah 9:1 , 1Ma 3:47 )
Barzillai - A priest who married a daughter of the above, Ezra 2:61 Nehemiah 7:63
Enrogel - This is believed to be the "well of Nehemiah," now called Bir Eyub, Job's well
David, City of - ...
Nehemiah's day saw “stairs that go down from the city of David,” presumably to the rest of the city (Nehemiah 3:15 ; compare Nehemiah 12:37 )
Shushan - At a later date Nehemiah was cupbearer to the king at Shushan. Nehemiah 1:1
Geba - Some citizens of Geba lived in Michmash and other cities in Nehemiah's day, unless the Hebrew text is read differently (REB) to mean they lived in Geba as well as the other towns (Nehemiah 11:31 ). Levite singers lived there (Nehemiah 12:29 )
Micah - Apparently called MICHA in Nehemiah 11:17,22 ; and MICHAIAH in Nehemiah 12:35
Fasts - (Nehemiah 9:1 ) ...
Private occasional fasts are recognized in one passage of the law -- (Numbers 30:13 ) The instances given of individuals fasting under the influence of grief, vexation or anxiety are numerous. (1 Kings 21:27 ; Nehemiah 9:1 ; Psalm 35:13 ) ...
The sacrifice of the personal will, which gives to fasting all its value, is expressed in the old term used in the law, afflicting the soul
First-Fruits - (Numbers 18:11 ; 18:4) Nehemiah, at the return from captivity, took pains to reorganize the offerings of first-fruits of both kinds, and to appoint places to receive them. (Nehemiah 10:35,37 ; 12:44 ) An offering of first-fruits is mentioned as an acceptable one to the prophet Elisha
ra'Mah - (Ezra 2:26 ; Nehemiah 7:30 ) ...
The home of Elkanah, Samuel's father, (1 Samuel 1:19 ; 2:11 ) the birthplace of Samuel himself, his home and official residence, the site of his altar ch. (Nehemiah 11:33 )
Micah, Micaiah - One of the priests who took part in the dedication of the wall ( Nehemiah 12:41 ). ), 2 Chronicles 13:2 (see Maacah, 4), Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 12:35 [2] Nehemiah 12:41 , Jdt 6:15
Siloam, the Pool of - Shelach in Nehemiah 3:15, KJV "Siloah," "Shiloah" (Isaiah 8:16), Siloam (John 9:7; John 9:11). of the temple mountain), the wall above the house of David, the water gate, and the king's garden (compare Nehemiah 12:37 with Nehemiah 3:15). The water passes hence by a channel cut in the rock, and covered for a short way, into the gardens below which occupy the site of "the lower pool" or "the king's pool" (Nehemiah 2:14)
Chronicles, the Books of - One genealogy, indeed, of a later date, namely, Zerubbabel's, was doubtless added by a more recent hand (1 Chronicles 3:22-24) as was Nehemiah 12:10-11-22-23. Ezra and Nehemiah therefore, as restorers of that polity, gave primary attention to this. Zerubbabel, and subsequently Ezra and Nehemiah, not only strove in the face of difficulties (Ezra 2-3; Ezra 5-6; Ezra 8; Nehemiah 7-8) to restore the temple service to its state under the kings of Judah, but also to infuse into the people a national spirit. Accordingly, 1 Chronicles 1-8 give the genealogies and settlements; 1 Chronicles 9:1-24 their disturbance by the captivity, and partial restoration at the return; this portion is reinserted in Nehemiah 11:3-22 with additional matter from the archives, as to times succeeding the return from Babylon, down to Nehemiah 12:27, where Nehemiah's narrative is resumed from Nehemiah 11:2. ...
There were besides the national records, "the book of the chronicles" (Nehemiah 12:23), which began as early as David (1 Chronicles 27:24), "the chronicles of king David," probably the same as Samuel's, Nathan's and Gad's books above noticed. Chronicles, with Ezra and Nehemiah, form the last link of the Old Testament genealogical chain which is resumed in the New Testament (Matthew 1). Also from its giving the very words of the documents used, even when inappropriate in the compiler's time, "unto this day" (Nehemiah 7:5; 2 Chronicles 5:9). ) Akkub and Talmon, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 9:17-18, are stated in Nehemiah 12:25-26 to have been Levitical porters "in the days of Nehemiah and of Ezra, the priest, the scribe
Judah - Nehemiah 12:8 ) = 1Es 5:58 Joda. An overseer, Nehemiah 11:9 . Nehemiah 11:5 . A priest’s son, Nehemiah 12:36 . Nehemiah 12:6
Uzza - A family of Nethinim ( Ezra 2:48 = Nehemiah 7:51 [1])
Anathoth - It suffered greatly from the army of Sennacherib, and only 128 men returned to it from the Exile (Nehemiah 7:27 ; Ezra 2:23 )
Dominion - Dominion may have a positive connotation as when humankind is given dominion over creation (Genesis 1:26 ,Genesis 1:26,1:28 ; Psalm 8:6 ) or a negative connotation that approximates the idea of domination (Genesis 37:8 ; Judges 14:4 ; Nehemiah 9:28 )
Forest - pardçs , Nehemiah 2:3 AV Hur - Father of Rephaiah who returned from exile, Nehemiah 3:9
Girgashites - ]'>[2] ], Joshua 3:10 ; Jos 24:11 , 1 Chronicles 1:14 , Nehemiah 9:8 ), affords no indication of their position, or to what branch of the Canaanites they belonged, except in two instances, namely, Genesis 10:16 , where the ‘Girgashite’ is given as the name of the fifth son of Canaan; and Joshua 24:11 , where the Girgashites would seem to have inhabited the tract on the west of Jordan, the Israelites having been obliged to cross over that river in order to fight the men of Jericho, among whom were the Girgashites
Uriah - Called URIJAHin Nehemiah 3:4,21
es'Dras - 6, are the original portions of the book, and the rest is a transcript more or less exact of the book of Ezra, with the chapters transposed and quite otherwise arranged, and a portion of Nehemiah
es'Dras - 6, are the original portions of the book, and the rest is a transcript more or less exact of the book of Ezra, with the chapters transposed and quite otherwise arranged, and a portion of Nehemiah
Darius - A later Darius, called Darius the Persian (Nehemiah 12:22), ruled Persia from 423 to 408 BC
Goshen - ” The change probably resulted from the translators identifying Gesem with Geshem (Nehemiah 2:19 ; Nehemiah 6:1-2 ,Nehemiah 6:1-2,6:6 ), the Arabian king who was Nehemiah's foe (see Genesis 46:28 ) in the Septuagint
Taxes - This became an annual payment on the return from Babylon; at first only a third of a shekel (Nehemiah 10:32); afterward a half, the didrachma (Matthew 17:24); paid by every Jew wherever in the world he might be (Josephus Nehemiah 5:14-15). The distress of the people by taxes and forced service is pathetically described (Nehemiah 9:37)
Artaxerxes - Afterward, Nehemiah also obtained leave to return, and to build the walls and gates of Jerusalem, in the year of the world 3550, Nehemiah 1:11 . Prideaux, who discourses very copiously, and with great learning, on this prophecy, maintains that the decree mentioned in it for the restoring and rebuilding of Jerusalem, cannot be understood of that granted to Nehemiah, in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes; but of that granted to Ezra, by the same Artaxerxes, in the seventh year of his reign
People of the Land - Disapproval is expressed in Ezra and Nehemiah for the pagan half-Jew and half-Gentile, essentially non-observant Jews (see Ezra 10:2 ,Ezra 10:2,10:11 ; Nehemiah 10:28-31 ). The later postexilic use as witnessed in Ezra and Nehemiah as well as in the Synoptic Gospels (see also John 7:49 ) is further reflected in the rabbinical classification of the “people of the land” as those ignorant of the law and non-observant in their daily lives
Zerubbabel - ...
At Babylon he bore the Babylonian or Persian name Shesh-bazzar, being governor or tirshatha there (Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1; Ezra 1:8-11; Ezra 5:14-16; Nehemiah 7:65). He and Jeshua in the seventh month (wherein they kept the feast of tabernacles less formal than the celebration,<