What does Nebuchadnezzar mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 6
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 6
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֗ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 4
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 4
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 4
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֧ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 3
נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 3
נְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶצַּר֙ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶצַּ֔ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֻֽכַדְנֶצַּר֙ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֜ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֨ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֻכַדְנֶאצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֤ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶאצַּר֙ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
נְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּר֙ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 2
לִנְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּר֒ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
וּנְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּר֙ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּֽר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֑ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶצַּ֜ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֑ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּר֒ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבֻכַדְנֶצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
(נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּ֥ר) the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶצַּ֗ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֑ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻכַדְנֶאצַּֽר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּר֮ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻֽכַדְנֶצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֔ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻכַדְנֶאצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻכַדְנֶאצַּ֨ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻכַדְנֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֧ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻכַדְנֶצַּֽר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻֽכַדְנֶצַּ֔ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֥ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֖ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדנֶאצַּ֤ר‪‬ the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֻֽכַדְנֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבֽוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֛ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֛ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
לִנְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּֽר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
וּנְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֣ר the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1
(נְבֽוּכַדְרֶאצַּ֣ר) the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive. 1

Definitions Related to Nebuchadnezzar

H5020


   1 the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive.
   Additional Information: Nebuchadnezzar = “may Nebo protect the crown”.
   

H5019


   1 the great king of Babylon who captured Jerusalem and carried Judah captive.
   Additional Information: Nebuchadnezzar or Nebuchadrezzar = “may Nebo protect the crown”.
   

Frequency of Nebuchadnezzar (original languages)

Frequency of Nebuchadnezzar (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
Necho II., the king of Egypt, gained a victory over the Assyrians at Carchemish. (See JOSIAH; MEGIDDO .) This secured to Egypt the possession of the Syrian provinces of Assyria, including Palestine. The remaining provinces of the Assyrian empire were divided between Babylonia and Media. But Nabopolassar was ambitious of reconquering from Necho the western provinces of Syria, and for this purpose he sent his son with a powerful army westward (Daniel 1:1 ). The Egyptians met him at Carchemish, where a furious battle was fought, resulting in the complete rout of the Egyptians, who were driven back (Jeremiah 46:2-12 ), and Syria and Phoenicia brought under the sway of Babylon (B.C. 606). From that time "the king of Egypt came not again any more out of his land" (2 Kings 24:7 ). Nebuchadnezzar also subdued the whole of Palestine, and took Jerusalem, carrying away captive a great multitude of the Jews, among whom were Daniel and his companions (Daniel 1:1,2 ; Jeremiah 27:19 ; 40:1 ).
Three years after this, Jehoiakim, who had reigned in Jerusalem as a Babylonian vassal, rebelled against the oppressor, trusting to help from Egypt (2 Kings 24:1 ). This led Nebuchadnezzar to march an army again to the conquest of Jerusalem, which at once yielded to him (B.C. 598). A third time he came against it, and deposed Jehoiachin, whom he carried into Babylon, with a large portion of the population of the city, and the sacred vessels of the temple, placing Zedekiah on the throne of Judah in his stead. He also, heedless of the warnings of the prophet, entered into an alliance with Egypt, and rebelled against Babylon. This brought about the final siege of the city, which was at length taken and utterly destroyed (B.C. 586). Zedekiah was taken captive, and had his eyes put out by order of the king of Babylon, who made him a prisoner for the remainder of his life.
An onyx cameo, now in the museum of Florence, bears on it an arrow-headed inscription, which is certainly ancient and genuine. The helmeted profile is said (Schrader) to be genuine also, but it is more probable that it is the portrait of a usurper in the time of Darius (Hystaspes), called Nidinta-Bel, who took the name of "Nebuchadrezzar." The inscription has been thus translated:, "In honour of Merodach, his lord, Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, in his lifetime had this made."
A clay tablet, now in the British Museum, bears the following inscription, the only one as yet found which refers to his wars: "In the thirty-seventh year of Nebuchadnezzar, king of the country of Babylon, he went to Egypt [1] to make war. Amasis, king of Egypt, collected [2], and marched and spread abroad." Thus were fulfilled the words of the prophet (Jeremiah 46:13-26 ; Ezekiel 29:2-20 ). Having completed the subjugation of Phoenicia, and inflicted chastisement on Egypt, Nebuchadnezzar now set himself to rebuild and adorn the city of Babylon (Daniel 4:30 ), and to add to the greatness and prosperity of his kingdom by constructing canals and aqueducts and reservoirs surpassing in grandeur and magnificence everything of the kind mentioned in history (Daniel 2:37 ). He is represented as a "king of kings," ruling over a vast kingdom of many provinces, with a long list of officers and rulers under him, "princes, governors, captains," etc. (3:2,3,27). He may, indeed, be said to have created the mighty empire over which he ruled.
"Modern research has shown that Nebuchadnezzar was the greatest monarch that Babylon, or perhaps the East generally, ever produced. He must have possessed an enormous command of human labour, nine-tenths of Babylon itself, and nineteen-twentieths of all the other ruins that in almost countless profusion cover the land, are composed of bricks stamped with his name. He appears to have built or restored almost every city and temple in the whole country. His inscriptions give an elaborate account of the immense works which he constructed in and about Babylon itself, abundantly illustrating the boast, 'Is not this great Babylon which I have build?'" Rawlinson, Hist. Illustrations.
After the incident of the "burning fiery furnace" (Daniel 3 ) into which the three Hebrew confessors were cast, Nebuchadnezzar was afflicted with some peculiar mental aberration as a punishment for his pride and vanity, probably the form of madness known as lycanthropy (i.e, "the change of a man into a wolf"). A remarkable confirmation of the Scripture narrative is afforded by the recent discovery of a bronze door-step, which bears an inscription to the effect that it was presented by Nebuchadnezzar to the great temple at Borsippa as a votive offering on account of his recovery from a terrible illness. (See DANIEL .)
He survived his recovery for some years, and died B.C. 562, in the eighty-third or eighty-fourth year of his age, after a reign of forty-three years, and was succeeded by his son Evil-merodach, who, after a reign of two years, was succeeded by Neriglissar (559-555), who was succeeded by Nabonadius (555-538), at the close of whose reign (less than a quarter of a century after the death of Nebuchadnezzar) Babylon fell under Cyrus at the head of the combined armies of Media and Persia.
"I have examined," says Sir H. Rawlinson, "the bricks belonging perhaps to a hundred different towns and cities in the neighbourhood of Baghdad, and I never found any other legend than that of Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon." Nine-tenths of all the bricks amid the ruins of Babylon are stamped with his name.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
In the monuments Nabu-juduri-utsur, the middle syllable being the same as Kudur or Chedor-laomer. Explained by Gesenius "the prince favored by Nebo"; Oppert, "Nebo, kadr ("power"), and zar ("prince")"; Rawlinson, "Nebo his protector (participle from naatsar "protect") against misfortune" (kidor "trouble".) His father Nabo-polassar having overthrown Nineveh, Babylon became supreme. Married his father's Median ally, Cyaxares' daughter, Amuhia, at the time of their alliance against Assyria 625 B.C. (Abydenus in Eusebius, Chronicles Can., i. 9). Possibly is the Labynetus (Herodotus i. 74) who led the Babylonian force under Cyaxares in his Lydian war and whose interposition at the eclipse (610 B.C.) concluded the campaign. Sent by Nabopolassar to punish Pharaoh Necho, the conqueror of Josiah at Megiddo. Defeated Necho at Carchemish (605 B.C.) and wrested from him all the territory from Euphrates to Egypt (Jeremiah 46:2; Jeremiah 46:12; 2 Kings 24:7) which he had held for three years, so that "he came not again any more out of his land."
Became master of Coelo-Syria, Phoenicia, and Palestine. Took Jerusalem in the third year of Jehoiakim, and "carried into the land of Shinar, to the house of his god (Merodach), part of the vessels of the house of God" (Daniel 1:1-2; 2 Chronicles 36:6). Daniel and the three children of the royal seed were at that time taken to Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar mounted the throne 604 B.C., having rapidly re-crossed the desert with his light troops and reached Babylon before any disturbance could take place. He brought with him Jehovah's vessels and the Jewish captives. The fourth year of Jehoiakim coincided with the first of Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 25:1). In the earlier part of the (year Nebuchadnezzar smote Necho at Carchemish, Jeremiah 46:2). The deportation from Jerusalem was shortly before, namely, in the end of Jehoiakim's third year; with it begins the Babylonian captivity, 605 B.C. (Jeremiah 29:1-10). Jehoiakim after three years of vassalage revolted, in reliance on Egypt (2 Kings 24:1). Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldees, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites against him (2 Kings 24:2).
Next, Phoenicia revolted. Then in person Nebuchadnezzar marched against Tyre. In the seventh year of his reign he marched thence against Jerusalem; it surrendered, and Jehoiakim fell, probably in battle. Josephus says Nebuchadnezzar put him to death (Ant. 10:6 section 3). (See JEHOIAKIM.) Jehoiakim after a three months' reign was carried away to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar with the princes, warriors, and craftsmen, and the palace treasures, and Solomon's gold vessels cut in pieces, at his third advance against Jerusalem (2 Kings 24:8-16). Tyre fell 585 B.C., after a 13 years' siege. Meantime Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar's sworn vassal, in treaty with Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) revolted (Ezekiel 17:15). Nebuchadnezzar besieged him 588-586 B.C., and in spite of a temporary raising of the siege through Hophra (Jeremiah 37:5-8) took and destroyed Jerusalem after an 18 months' siege (2 Kings 25). Zedekiah's eyes were put out after he had seen his sons slain first at Riblah, where Nebuchadnezzar "gave judgment upon him," and was kept a prisoner in Babylon the rest of his life. (See GEDALIAH; NEBUZARADAN; JERUSALEM.)
Phoenicia submitted to him (Ezekiel 26-28; Josephus, Ap. 1:21), and Egypt was punished (Jeremiah 46:13-26; Ezekiel 29:2-10, Josephus, Ant. 10:9, section 7). Nebuchadnezzar is most celebrated for his buildings: the temple of Bel Merodach at Babylon (the Kasr), built with his Syrian spoils (Josephus, Ant. 10:11, section 1); the fortifications of Babylon, three lines of walls 80 ft. broad, 300 ft. high, enclosing 130 square miles; a new palace near his father's which he finished in 15 days, attached to it were his "hanging gardens," a square 400 ft. on each side and 75 ft. high, supported on arched galleries increasing in height from the base to the summit; in these were chambers, one containing the engines for raising the water to the mound; immense stones imitated the surface of the Median mountain, to remind his wife of her native land. The standard inscription ("I completely made strong the defenses of Babylon, may it last forever ... the city which I have glorified," etc.) accords with Berosus' statement, and nine-tenths of the bricks in situ are stamped with Nebuchadnezzar's name.
Daniel (Daniel 4:30) also records his boast, "is not this great Babylon which I have built by the might of my power and for the honour of my majesty?" Sir H. Rawlinson (Inscr. Assyr. and Babyl., 76-77) states that the bricks of 100 different towns about Bagdad all bear the one inscription, "Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon." Abydenus states Nebuchadnezzar made the nahr malcha , "royal river," a branch from the Euphrates, and the Acracanus; also the reservoir above the city Sippara, 90 miles round and 120 ft. deep, with sluices to irrigate the low land; also a quay on the Persian gulf, and the city Teredon on the Arabian border. The network of irrigation by canals between the Tigris and Euphrates, and on the right bank of the Euphrates to the stony desert, was his work; also the canal still traceable from Hit at the Euphrates, framing 400 miles S.E. to the bay of Grane in the Persian gulf. His system of irrigation made Babylonia a garden, enriching at once the people and himself.
The long list of various officers in Daniel 3:1-3; Daniel 3:27, also of diviners forming a hierarchy (Daniel 2:48), shows the extent of the organization of the empire, so that the emblem of so vast a polity is "a tree ... the height reaching unto heaven, and the sight to the end of all the earth ... in which was meat for all, under which the beasts ... had shadow and the fowls dwelt in the boughs and all flesh was fed of it" (Daniel 4:10-12). In Daniel 2:37 he is called "king of kings," i.e. of the various kingdoms wheresoever he turned his arms, Egypt, Nineveh, Arabia, Phoenicia, Tyre. Isaiah's patriotism was shown in counseling resistance to Assyria; Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 27) in urging submission to Babylon as the only safety; for God promised Judah's deliverance from the former, but "gave all the lands into Nebuchadnezzar's hands, and the beasts of the field also, to serve him and his son and his son's son."
The kingdom originally given to Adam (Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19-20), forfeited by sin, God temporarily delegated to Nebuchadnezzar, the "head of gold," the first of the four great world powers (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). As Nebuchadnezzar and the other three abused the trust, for self not, for God, the Son of Man, the Fifth, to whom of right it belongs, shall wrest it from them and restore to man his lost inheritance, ruling with the saints for God's glory and man's blessedness (Psalms 8:4-6; Revelation 11:15-18; Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44-45; Daniel 7:13-27). Nebuchadnezzar was punished with the form of insanity called lycanthropy (fancying himself to be a beast and living in their haunts) for pride generated by his great conquest and buildings (Daniel 4). When man would be as God, like Adam and Nebuchadnezzar he sinks from lordship over creation to the brute level and loses his true manhood, which is likeness to God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:19; Genesis 3:5; Psalms 49:6; Psalms 49:10-12; Psalms 82:6-7); a key to the symbolism which represents the mighty world kingdoms as "beasts" (Daniel 7).
Angel "watchers" demand that every mortal be humbled whosoever would obscure God's glory. Abydenus (268 B.C.) states: "Nebuchadnezzar having ascended upon his palace roof predicted the Persian conquest of Babylon (which he knew from Daniel 2:39), praying that the conqueror might be borne where there is no path of men and where the wild beasts graze"; a corruption of the true story and confirming it. The panorama of the world's glory that overcame Nebuchadnezzar through the lust of the eye, as he stood on his palace roof, Satan tried upon Jesus in vain (Matthew 4:8-10). In the standard inscription Nebuchadnezzar says, "for four years in Babylon buildings for the honour of my kingdom I did not lay out. In the worship of Merodach my lord I did not sing his praises, I did not furnish his altar with victims, nor clear out the canals" (Rawlinson, Herodotus, ii. 586). It was "while the word was in the king's mouth there fell a voice from heaven ... thy kingdom is departed from thee" (compare Herod, Acts 12:19-20).
His nobles cooperated in his being "driven from men" (Daniel 4:33); these same "counselors and lords sought unto him," weary of anarchy after the "seven times," i.e. a complete sacred cycle of time, a week of years, had passed over him, and with the glimmer of reason left he "lifted up his eyes unto heaven," instead of beast like turning his eyes downward (compare Jonah 2:1-2; Jonah 2:4), and turned to Him that smote him (Isaiah 9:13), and "honoured Him" whom before he had robbed of His due honour. Psalms 116:12; Psalms 116:14; Mark 5:15; Mark 5:18-19; compare on the spiritual lesson Job 33:17-18; 1 Samuel 2:8; Proverbs 16:18. Messiah's kingdom alone will be the "tree" under whose shadow all nations, and even the dumb creatures, shall dwell in blissful harmony (Ezekiel 17:23; Matthew 13:32; Isaiah 11:6-9). Nitocris was probably his second queen, an Egyptian (for this ancient name was revived about this time, as the Egyptian monuments prove), for he lived 60 years after his marriage to his first queen Amuhia (625 B.C.).
Herodotus ascribes to Nitocris many of the works assigned by Berosus to Nebuchadnezzar. On his recovery, according to the standard inscription, which confirms Scripture, he added "wonders" in old age to those of his earlier reign. He died 561 B.C., 83 or 84 years old, after reigning 43 years. Devotion to the gods, especially Bel Merodach, from whom he named his son and successor Evil Merodach, and the desire to rest his fame on his great works and the arts of peace rather than his warlike deeds, are his favorable characteristics in the monuments. Pride, violence and fury, and cruel sternness, were Nebuchadnezzar's faults (Daniel 2:12; Daniel 3:19; 2 Kings 25:7; 2 Kings 24:8). Not to Daniel but to Nebuchadnezzar, the first representative head of the world power who overcame the theocracy, the dreams were given announcing its doom.
The dream was the appropriate form for one outside the kingdom of God, as Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh (Genesis 41). But an Israelite must interpret it; and Nebuchadnezzar worshipped Daniel, an earnest of the future prostration of the world power before Christ and the church (Revelation 3:9; 1 Corinthians 14:25; Philippians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 6:2; Luke 19:17). The image set up by Nebuchadnezzar represented himself the head of the first world power, of whom Daniel had said "thou art this head of gold." Daniel was regarded by Nebuchadnezzar as divine, and so was not asked to worship it (Daniel 2:46). The 60 cubits' height includes together the image, 27 cubits (40 1/2 ft.), and the pedestal, 33 cubits (50 ft.). Herodotus, i. 183, similarly mentions Belus' image in the temple at Babylon as 40 ft. high. Oppert found in the Dura (Dowair) plain the pedestal of what must have been a colossal statue. Nebuchadnezzar is the forerunner of antichrist, to whose "image" whosoever will not offer worship shall be killed (Revelation 13:14).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar (nĕb'u-kad-nĕz'zar), may Nebo protect the crown or, more correctly, Nebuchadrezzar, the son and successor of Nabopolassar, the founder of the Babylonish monarchy, was the most illustrious of these kings. 2 Kings 24:1; Dan. chaps. 1-4 We know of him through the book of Daniel. In the Berlin Museum there is a black cameo with his head upon it, cut by his order, with the inscription: "In honor of Merodach, his lord, Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, in bis lifetime had this made." Nebuchadnezzar was intrusted by his father with repelling Pharaoh-necho, and succeeded in defeating him at Carchemish, on the Euphrates, b.c. 605, Jeremiah 46:2, taking Jerusalem and carrying off a portion of the inhabitants as prisoners, including Daniel and his companions. Daniel 1:1-4. Having learned that his father had died, Nebuchadnezzar hastened back to Babylon. Thus the remark, "In his days Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, came up, and Jehoiakim became his servant three years," 2 Kings 24:1, is easily explained. The title is given by anticipation, and the "three years" are to be reckoned from 605 to 603 inclusive. The rebellion of Jehoiakim, entered upon, probably, because Nebuchadnezzar was carrying on wars in other parts of Asia, took place b.c. 602, and was punished by the irruption of Chaldæans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, incited, perhaps, by Nebuchadnezzar, who, as soon as possible, sent his troops against Jerusalem, and had him taken prisoner, but ultimately released him. 2 Kings 24:2. After his death his son Jehoiachin reigned, and against him Nebuchadnezzar, for the third time, invaded Palestine and besieged Jerusalem, and all the principal inhabitants were carried to Babylon. 2 Kings 24:12-16. Mattaniah, whose name was changed to Zedekiah, after a reign of nearly ten years, rebelled, and was punished by Nebuchadnezzar, who went up against Jerusalem and reduced the city to the horrors of famine before taking it. Zedekiah's two sons were killed before his eyes, and then his eyes put out, and he, as a captive, was carried to Babylon, b.c. 588. 2 Kings 25:7. On Nebuchadnezzar's order, Jeremiah was kindly treated. Jeremiah 39:11-14. The words, "The king spake and said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of my kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honor of my majesty?" Daniel 4:30, are proved to be characteristic by those on an inscription: "I say it, I have built the great house which is the centre of Babylon for the seat of my rule in Babylon." of the king's madness there is, of course, no direct mention. There is an inscription which is read by Sir H. Rawlinson in a manner which finds its readiest explanation in the fact stated in Daniel 4:33 : "For four years the residence of my kingdom did not delight my heart: in no one of my possessions did I erect any important building by my might. I did not put up buildings in Babylon for myself and for the honor of my name. In the worship of Merodach, my god, I did not sing his praise, nor did I provide his altar with sacrifices, nor clean the canals." Nebuchadnezzar is denominated "king of kings" by Daniel 2:37, and ruler of a "kingdom with power and strength and glory." He built the hanging-gardens of Babylon on a large and artificial mound, terraced up to look like a hill. This great work was called by the ancients one of the seven wonders of the world. An idea of the extent of this monarch's building enterprises may be drawn from the fact that nine-tenths of the bricks found amongst the ruins of the ancient capital are inscribed with his name. He is said to have worshipped the "King of heaven," Daniel 4:37, but it may be questioned whether he did not conceive of the Jehovah of the Hebrews to be only one of many gods. He died about b.c. 561, after a reign of 44 years.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nebuchadnezzar
NEBUCHADNEZZAR. See next article.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
Towards the end of the seventh century BC, the ancient nation Babylon rose again to international prominence, largely through the new dynasty that had been established by Nabopolassar. The greatest king of this dynasty was Nabopolassar’s son and successor, Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebuchadrezzar).
Nebuchadnezzar became king soon after he led Babylonian forces to victory over Egypt at the Battle of Carchemish in 605 BC (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2). One outcome of this was that Judah fell under Babylonian power. After a series of Babylonian attacks over several years, Jerusalem was finally destroyed and its people taken captive to Babylon (587 BC). Nebuchadnezzar was the Babylonian king throughout this time, and the books of 2 Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel mention him by name repeatedly. (For details of his dealings with Judah and his military successes among the nations of the region see BABYLON.)
Through his contact with Jews at his court in Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar learnt about the Jews’ God, Yahweh. Upon seeing how this God revealed mysteries and miraculously saved people from death, he concluded that Yahweh must have been the greatest of all the gods (Daniel 2:47; Daniel 3:29). However, he was a proud man, whose empire-building achievements led him to believe that he could ignore God and take no notice of the warnings given him by God’s messenger Daniel. The result was that God punished Nebuchadnezzar with a disease of temporary madness, till he learnt that God was the sovereign ruler over the kingdoms of the world (Daniel 4:27-33).
The Bible gives no clear indication whether Nebuchadnezzar’s acknowledgment of the sovereign rule of God had any lasting effect on his behaviour. Babylon proved to be an arrogant nation, and God’s prophet saw all its pride and evil embodied in its king (Isaiah 14:4-11). There is no certainty that the prophet had Nebuchadnezzar or any other king specifically in mind, but his warning has a timeless relevance. Those who ambitiously desire the highest place, the greatest honour and supreme power are in danger of being brought down to the lowest place, the greatest shame and complete weakness (Isaiah 14:12-20).
Nebuchadnezzar was undoubtedly the greatest king of this period of Babylonian supremacy. He reigned more than forty years and died in 562 BC. He was succeeded by his son Evil-merodach (Jeremiah 52:31).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
(nehb yoo kad nehz' zuhr) Personal name meaning, “Nabu protects.” King of Babylon 602-562 B.C. He was the son of Nabopolassar and inherited the throne upon the death of his father. Nebuchadnezzar served as a general under his father and was a brilliant strategist. His victory over the Egyptian forces at Carchemish (605) signaled the completion of abylon's conquest of Palestine. See Babylon, History and Religion of .
Chabad Knowledge Base - Nebuchadnezzar
(d. 397 BCE) Babylonian king. During the reign of Joiakim and Jehoiachin, Nebuchadnezzar exiled to Babylon many of the politically powerful Jews and members of the royal family, including Daniel and his colleagues Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah. When the last Jewish monarch, Zedekiah, revolted, Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the Temple, and exiled most of the remaining Jews. Towards the end of his life he suffered a seven year bout of insanity.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadrezzar
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Nebuchadnezzar
I FRANKLY confess myself a convert to Nebuchadnezzar. I frankly acknowledge my great debt to Nebuchadnezzar. I frankly confess that I had wholly misunderstood Nebuchadnezzar, and both the design and the end of God's ways with Nebuchadnezzar. And I would like to share with you tonight the great lesson in humility and in obedience that I have been led to learn out of Nebuchadnezzar.
Nebuchadnezzar was by far the most famous of all the kings of the East. In his early years, and before he came to his great throne, Nebuchadnezzar had won victory after victory over all the surrounding nations. Jerusalem fell before his army after eighteen months' siege, and Tyre, the proudest of ancient cities, succumbed to him after an investiture of thirteen years. The proud position of the king of Babylon among all the kings of that day will best be seen from the words of Daniel who assuredly was no flatterer of great men. 'Thou, O king, art a king of kings, for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, and strength, and glory. The tree which thou sawest, which grew, and was strong, whose height reached to heaven, and the sight thereof to all the earth: whose leaves were fair and the fruit thereof much, and in it was meat for all: under which the beasts of the field dwelt, and upon whose branches the fowls of the heavens had their habitation: It is thou, O king, that art grown, and become strong: for thy greatness is grown, and reached unto heaven, and thy dominion to the end of the earth.' It could have been no ordinary greatness that drew from a man like Daniel an estimate and an eulogium like that.
But the fame of this magnificent monarch has rested even more on his unparalleled works of peace than on his great successes in war. Great as Nebuchadnezzar was as a warrior, he was still greater as a statesman and an administrator. The vast public works that he planned and executed for his capital and his kingdom in walls and in water-works: in parks and in gardens: in palaces and in temples-all these things, in their vastness, in their usefulness, in their beauty, and in their immense cost make Nebuchadnezzar to stand out absolutely unapproached among the great builder-kings of the ancient East. After we have read all that the historians and the travellers have to tell us about ancient Babylon, no wonder, we say to ourselves, that Nebuchadnezzar's dreams were the dreams of a magnificent imagination. No wonder that his heart swelled within him with pride: and no wonder that it took a stroke such as God has seldom struck before or since to humble and to abase Nebuchadnezzar, this great king of Babylon. 'This is the interpretation, O king, and this is the decree of the Most High: that they shall drive thee from men, and thy dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field, and they shall make thee to eat grass like an ox, and they shall wet thee with the dew of heaven, and seven times shall pass over thee, till thou know that the Most High ruleth in the kingdom of men, and giveth it to whomsoever He will.' All this came to Nebuchadnezzar the ting, till at the end of it all he said-'I thought it good to show the signs and wonders the high God hath wrought toward me. Those that walk in pride the King of heaven is able to abase.' Though long dead, King Nebuchadnezzar still speaks in the Book of Daniel, and on a thousand cylinders in the British Museum; and, as on every page of Daniel, so on every brick of Babylon, he that runs may read this evening's text:-'Those that walk in pride the King of heaven is able to abase.'
But Nebuchadnezzar's pride, after all is said, was but the petty pride of a puffed-up and self-important child. If you have eyes in your hearts you will see all Nebuchadnezzar's pride in your own nursery every day. Nebuchadnezzar's bricks were made of clay; whereas the bricks of your nursery-Nebuchadnezzar are made of wood. That, and their ages, is all the difference. Look! your little Nebuchadnezzar cries after you as he pulls your gown, and will not give you peace till you lift up your hands in wonder over his great Babylon with its wonderful doors, and windows, and bridges, and portcullises. Is not this a great house that I have built? he demands of you. Is my house not far bigger, and far better every way, than my brother's house that he has built? Look, father! Look, mother! Look, nurse! Look, visitor! All wise-hearted mothers see and hear all that with tears behind their eyes, till they are at their wits' end how to deal with their so boastful and so imperious little emperor. The ancient Areopagus sentenced an Athenian boy to death because he had plucked out the eyes of a captive quail. For, said the wise and prescient judges, if that little savage does that to a tame bird when he is still young, what will he not do to the men who are in his power when he is hardened in vice? And they put him to death, and paid no attention to the prayers of his mother. Let all fathers and mothers give their best heed to their little Nebuchadnezzar and to his little Babylon which he has built for the honour of his majesty. This is the beginning. And you know what a great fire sometimes a little spark, if it is let fall and let burn, kindleth. You know the prophetic proverb also about the letting out of water. Let every father, and mother, and nurse, and tutor, and school-master read and lay to heart, as they shall answer for it, William Law's eighteenth chapter, in which he shows 'How the education which men receive in their youth makes the doctrine of humility so difficult to be practised all their after-days.'
But, with alt that, I see in my own children every day a far worse kind of pride than any that the big child Nebuchadnezzar shows either in the Book of Daniel, or on the bricks of Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar never, that I have read of, got one single lesson from God or man that he did not instantly lay it to heart. As I read of Nebuchadnezzar's humility, and makeableness, and teachableness in Daniel's hands I am amazed at the boldness of the young Belteshazzar, and still more at the behaviour of his mighty master. When I put myself into Nebuchadnezzar's place, when I recall my own temper and my own conduct, I honour Nebuchadnezzar, and I cannot cease from wondering that the king of Babylon has not been far more made of as a pattern of humility and meekness both under the dispensations of God and under the doctrines of Daniel. After his orders had been disobeyed-in his own palace, remember, and at his own table-in the matter of the meat that Daniel and his three companions were to eat, and the wine they were to drink: and after he was compelled publicly to admit that the prince of the eunuchs had acted on far better advice than the king's commandment,-instead of Melzar's head being endangered to the king, Nebuchadnezzar communed with Daniel, and Daniel stood before the king. Then, again, after his great dream, and its interpretation to the destruction of his kingdom, 'King Nebuchadnezzar fell upon his face, and worshipped Daniel, and commanded that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours unto Daniel.' And, then, after his abominably despotic edict about the image of gold in the plain of Dura, and the furnace seven times heated, when the intoxicated king came to himself he said, Lo! I see four men loose, walking in the midst of the fire, and they have no hurt; and the form of the fourth is like the Son of God. Then Nebuchadnezzar spake and said, Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, who hath sent His angels, and delivered His servants that trusted in Him, and have changed the king's word and yielded their bodies that they might not serve nor worship any god except their own God. And, then, at the end of his life, the king not only let Daniel say this to him, 'Wherefore, O king, break off thy sins by righteousness, and thine iniquities by showing mercy to the poor, if it may be a lengthening of thy tranquillity,' but he bowed his head and did it. A nobler state paper was never sent out even by the most Christian of kings than is that great document that we have in the fourth chapter of the Book of Daniel. Nebuchadnezzar is another illustration how we go on traditionally calling good men by bad names without looking at what is written out plain before our eyes. I cannot conceive where I got my bad opinion about Nebuchadnezzar. At any rate, I cannot entertain it any longer after I have read that magnificent chapter. I have read nothing nobler about the best kings of Judah, or Israel, or Scotland, or England. I do not know where among them all to look for its equal. But it was not great and ancient kings, but our own little children I was speaking about; and about our proud-blooded little children inevitably growing up into proud-blooded and bad men. And the hopeless unteachableness of the proud child and the proud man was the all-important point in hand. The proud man holds you henceforth to be his mortal enemy if you tell him the truth as Daniel told Nebuchadnezzar, and as Daniel was honoured and rewarded for telling it. Try to teach, try to correct a proud man, and you will not readily do it a second time. It may now be many years since some one found a true and notorious fault with some of us; but we cannot hide from ourselves the state of our heart after all these years at the mere mention of that insolent man's name. But Daniel's counsel was acceptable to Nebuchadnezzar, till that king broke off all the sins and all the iniquities that Daniel so boldly named to him. Can it be said about any of our living preachers of righteousness that his counsels have been acceptable to us, and that we have forgiven and obeyed him to the tranquillity of our conscience to this day?
Rather than bear the pain of truth, fools stray;The proud will rather lose than ask their way.It is true Nebuchadnezzar got a tremendous lesson. It was a lesson, as we would have thought, away out of all proportion to the king's transgression. It was one of those tremendous lessons that God only gives to His own sons whom He loves, and whom He is to chasten till they are made partakers of His holiness. To any man who is not a chastened son and a true saint of God it must look a small sin, if it is a sin at all, for a great king to walk in his own palace and to say to himself the simple truth. For Babylon was undoubtedly great. No greater city has ever been seen on the face of the earth than Babylon. And if Nebuchadnezzar had not built every single street of it, this, at any rate, he could say, that he had found Babylon a city of brick and had made it a city of marble. We hear of baptized kings every day walking in their palaces in Christendom at the end of the nineteenth century, and speaking far more proudly than heathen Nebuchadnezzar spake, and no Daniel dares to stand up and tell them that their feet are partly iron mixed with miry clay. It is as if God had predestinated Nebuchadnezzar to come out of that heathen dispensation, and to sit down in the kingdom of heaven, while the emperors of our modern Christendom are to be cast out. It would look like that; God took such unheard-of vengeance on Nebuchadnezzar's inventions. Did you ever read the fourth chapter of the Book of Daniel?-that splendid autobiographic chapter which king Nebuchadnezzar wrote out of his own inkhorn, and gave the document to Daniel to embody in his book? 'Come, all ye that fear God,' Nebuchadnezzar begins, 'and I will tell you what He did for my soul. I have thought it good to show the signs and wonders that the high God had wrought towards me. For how great are His signs, and how mighty are His wonders! I was walking proudly in my palace in the kingdom of Babylon, and I said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty? And while the word was yet in my mouth, there fell a Voice from heaven, saying, O King Nebuchadnezzar, to thee it is spoken; The kingdom is departed from thee. And they shall drive thee from among men, and thy dwelling shall be with the beasts of the field; they shall make thee to eat grass as oxen, and seven times shall pass over thee until thou know that the Most High ruleth in the kingdom of men, and giveth it to whomsoever He will. The same hour was the thing fulfilled upon Nebuchadnezzar, and he was driven from men, and did eat grass as oxen, and his body was wet with the dew of heaven, till his hairs were grown as eagles' feathers, and his nails like birds' claws. And at the end of the days I, Nebuchadnezzar, lifted up mine eyes to heaven, and mine understanding returned to me, and I blessed the Most High, and I praised and honoured Him who liveth for ever, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and His kingdom is from generation to generation: and all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing: and He doeth according to His will in the army of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth: and none can stay His hand, or say to Him, What doest Thou? Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and His ways judgment; and those that walk in pride He is able to abase.' Has our own Christendom another royal edict anywhere to show like that chapter? If it has, I do not know where to find it.
To be driven out among the oxen made Nebuchadnezzar a new man. Asaph in Israel also, for his humiliation and his sanctification, was as a beast before God. The blessed Behmen, as his disciples all call him, teaches his disciples the same doctrine. 'Listen to my own process,' says that great spiritual genius. 'My soul will sometimes be all of a sudden turned into a wolf within me. Again, I am a dog at home; churlish, snappish, malicious, envious; my heart hides its bone that it cannot eat, lest another dog should get it. Then there is a lion within me; not in his nobility, but in his strong and proud cruelty. At another time, and at the proper provocation, I am a viper, as John preached to his hearers from Jerusalem, venomous, poisonous, and with a stealthy sting. At another time I am Joathsome as a toad: at another time timorous as a hare.' Yes; our souls are now this beast within us, and now that,-when the law enters. Only, the law has not entered one in a hundred of us to that depth: and thus it is that we are all still so proud and so disputatious at the hearing of all these things. But when we see and feel ourselves to be oxen in our stupidity, and dogs in our selfishness, and swine in our miryness, and vipers in our poisonousness-then we have got the key within ourselves to God's great dispensation of humiliation with Nebuchadnezzar. Then we say to Belteshazzar, and to Behmen, Thou art able: and the spirit of the God of holiness is in thee. And then we leave it like Nebuchadnezzar to be read on our tombstone by all that pass by-
Those that walk in pride He is able to abase.
But Nebuchadnezzar would not have needed to be made to eat grass as an ox if he had early enough and often enough asked Daniel to teach him to pray. Prayer would have done it to Nebuchadnezzar also. Daniel himself was mightily tempted to pride far more than Nebuchadnezzar ever was with all his wars and with all his palaces. For, was not Nebuchadnezzar, with all his power and with all his pride, prostrate again and again at Daniel's feet? Did not king Nebuchadnezzar fall upon his face, and worship Daniel, and command that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours to Daniel? What could it have been, then, that kept Daniel's heart so sweetly humble through all that, till Daniel was a man greatly beloved of Him who resisteth the proud and giveth grace to the humble? It was prayer that did it. It was secret prayer that did it. It was his place of secret prayer three times a day every day he lived that did it. Look in at that window in Babylon that stands open toward Jerusalem, and you will see Daniel on his knees and on the palms of his hands till all his comeliness is turned to corruption. It was that that did it. Seneca says somewhere that nothing is bought so dear as that which is bought with prayer-that is to say, you must sell all if you would truly pray. You must begin with selling all your pride, and everything else as you proceed in prayer, down to your whole soul. I am dust and ashes, said Abraham, not at the beginning, but as he went on in prayer. We are dust and ashes, and far worse than that, says Hooker also, as he went on in prayer. Count the cost, then, before you propose to be a man of prayer. But, then, on the other hand, if any man has come to this, that he would fain, if it were possible, put on humility before both God and man, then let that man pray without ceasing. Enough prayer will work all possible humility into the proudest heart. Prayer every day, and many times every day, and all the day, would bring down and would abase into the very dust very Lucifer himself.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar, or Nebuchadrezzar
Son of Nabopolassar and virtually founder of the later kingdom of Babylon, the first of the four great Gentile empires. Nebuchadnezzar acted as his father's general and defeated Pharaoh-necho at Carchemish, B.C. 606. Jeremiah 46:2 . Judah about this time became tributary to Babylon, and some captives (including Daniel) and holy vessels were carried away. 2 Chronicles 36:5-7 ; Daniel 1:1-4 . This is called 'the first captivity' of Judah.
Three years later, Judah revolted and Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem. In B.C. 599 the king and many captives, with the treasures of the temple, were taken to Babylon: this is called 'the great captivity.' In B.C. 588 Nebuchadnezzar again besieged Jerusalem, burnt the temple, and destroyed the city. He also took Tyre, B.C. 573, after a siege of thirteen years, for which "he had no wages, nor his army" (the inhabitants having escaped with their riches by sea); but God rewarded him with the spoils of Egypt, which he conquered. 2Kings 24,2 Kings 25 ; 2 Chronicles 36 ; Ezekiel 29:18-20 .
The more personal history of Nebuchadnezzar is given by Daniel. Nebuchadnezzar had selected him, and some of his fellow captives, to fill honourable positions in the state. In the second year of Nebuchadnezzar's reign (B.C. 603) he had the remarkable dream of the Great Image, in the interpretation of which the fact was made known that he had been chosen by God as the first king of an entirely new era, the times of the Gentiles. The house of David had for the time been set aside as God's ruler on earth, and in Nebuchadnezzar the Gentiles had been entrusted with supreme authority. Daniel could say to him, "Thou, O king, art a king of kings: for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory . . . . thou art this head of gold."
Nebuchadnezzar was a heathen, but he had now learned that he held his kingdom from the God of heaven, and was responsible to Him. In setting up the image of gold he denied the God of heaven, and the head of Gentile power became idolatrous; but on the occasion of his casting into the fiery furnace the three Hebrew companions of Daniel, because they would not worship the image he had set up, he was amazed to see another Person in the furnace like a son of God. He called the three out of the furnace, addressing them as 'servants of the most high God'; he blessed their God, and said that no one must speak anything against Him; but the miracle had no practical moral effect upon him. He had another dream, showing that for his pride God was going to humble him. Daniel counselled him to break off his sins by righteousness, and his iniquities by showing mercy to the poor. Twelve months were given him for repentance; but at the end of that time in his pride he said, "Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?" Then a voice from heaven declared that his kingdom was departed from him. (A monument of Nebuchadnezzar says, "I completely made strong the defences of Babylon, may it last for ever . . . . the city which I have glorified for ever," etc.)
He was now a maniac, and was driven away from men, and ate grass as the ox. He remained thus apparently seven years, signified by 'seven times' (as a time, times, and half a time signify three and a half years in Daniel 12:7 ); then his reason returned, and the kingdom was restored to him. He now said, "I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase." Daniel 2 — Daniel 4 .
Thus Nebuchadnezzar learnt to honour the God who had made him the head of gold. How long he survived this is not known. Evil-merodach, his son, succeeded him in B.C. 561. There is evidence that many towns were built during his reign in his name being found on the bricks among their ruins in every direction.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
King of Babylon. We have much said in Scripture concerning this monarch, in the book of Daniel. His name is formed from several words not of Hebrew, but of the Chaldean. The idol name of Nebo forms apart in it, for the Babylonians were much disposed to this. Various have been the opinions of men concerning the wonderful change wrought upon Nebuchadnezzar, as related Daniel 4:28; Dan 4:33; but, after all that hath been said on this subject, the matter stands just where the Scriptures have left it. And those who do not desire to be wise above what is written, will do well to accept of this and all the other parts of sacred Scripture in the Lord's own way, referring all into his sovereign decree, "who worketh all things according to the purpose of his own will." My counsel (saith he) shall stand, and I will do all my pleasure. (Isaiah 46:10) Let the reader read the close of Isaiah 44:1-28, and form his conclusions accordingly.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar the Great
son and successor of Nabopolassar, succeeded to the kingdom of Chaldea, A.M. 3399. Some time previously to this, Nabopolassar had associated him in the kingdom, and sent him to recover Carchemish, which had been conquered from him four years before by Necho, king of Egypt. Nebuchadnezzar, having been successful, marched against the governor of Phenicia, and Jehoiakim, king of Judah, who was tributary to Necho, king of Egypt. He took Jehoiakim, and put him in chains in order to carry him captive to Babylon; but afterward left him in Judea, on condition of paying a large tribute. He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully instructed in the language and in the learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at court, Daniel , 1. Nabopolassar dying about the end of A.M. 3399, Nebuchadnezzar, who was then either in Egypt or in Judea, hastened to Babylon, leaving to his generals the care of bringing to Chaldea the captives whom he had taken in Syria, Judea, Phenicia, and Egypt; for, according to Berosus, he had subdued all those countries. He distributed these captives into several colonies; and deposited the sacred vessels of the temple of Jerusalem, and other rich spoils in the temple or Belus. Jehoiakim, king of Judah, continued three years, in fealty to King Nebuchadnezzar; but being then weary of paying tribute, he threw off the yoke. The king of Chaldea sent troops of Chaldeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, who harassed Judea during three of four years, and at last Jehoiakim was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air, according to the predictions of Jeremiah. See JEHOIAKIM .
In the mean time, Nebuchadnezzar being at Babylon in the second year of his reign, had a mysterious dream, in which he saw a statue composed of several metals, a head of gold, a breast of silver, belly and thighs of brass, legs of iron, and feet half of iron and half clay; and a little stone rolling by its own impulse from the mountain struck the statue and broke it. This dream gave him great uneasiness, yet it faded away from his memory, and he could not recover more than the general impression of it. He ordered all his diviners and interpreters of dreams to be sent for; but none could tell him the dream or the interpretation: and, in wrath, he sentenced them all to death, which was about to be put in execution, when Daniel was informed of it. He went immediately to the king, and desired him to respite the sentence a little, and he would endeavour to satisfy his desire. God in the night revealed to him the king's dream, and also the interpretation: "Thou," said Daniel, "art represented by the golden head of the statue. After thee will arise a kingdom inferior to thine, represented by the breast of silver; and after this, another, still inferior, denoted by the belly and thighs of brass. After these three empires," which, are the Chaldeans, Persians, and Greeks, "will arise a fourth, denoted by the legs of iron," the Romans. "Under this last empire God will raise a new one, of greater strength, power, and extent, than all the other. This last is that of the Messiah, represented by the little stone coming out from the mountain and overthrowing the statue." Then the king raised Daniel to great honour, set him over all the wise men of Babylon, and gave him the government of that province. At his request he granted to Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, the oversight of the works of the same province of Babylon.
In the same year, as Dr. Hales thinks, in which he had this dream, he erected a golden statue, whose height was sixty cubits, and breadth six cubits, in the plains of Dura, in the province of Babylon. Having appointed a day for the dedication of this statue, he assembled the principal officers of his kingdom, and published by a herald, that all should adore this image, at the sound of music, on penalty of being cast into a burning fiery furnace. The result, as to the three Jews, companions of Daniel, who would not bend the knee to the image, is stated in Daniel 3. Daniel probably was absent. The effect of the miracle was so great that Nebuchadnezzar gave glory to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; and he exalted the three Hebrews to great dignity in the province of Babylon, Daniel 4.
Jehoiachin, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, this prince besieged him in Jerusalem, and forced him to surrender. Nebuchadnezzar took him, with his chief officers, captive to Babylon, with his mother, his wives, and the best workmen of Jerusalem, to the number of ten thousand men. Among the captives were Mordecai, the uncle of Esther, and Ezekiel the prophet. He took, also, all the vessels of gold which Solomon made for the temple, and the king's treasury, and he set up Mattaniah, Jehoiachin's uncle by his father's side, whom he named Zedekiah. This prince continued faithful to Nebuchadnezzar nine years: being then weary of subjection, he revolted and confederated with the neighbouring princes. The king of Babylon came into Judea, reduced the chief places of the country, and besieged Jerusalem: but Pharaoh-Hophra coming out of Egypt to assist Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar overcame him in battle, and forced him to retire into his own country. After this he returned to the siege of Jerusalem, and was three hundred and ninety days before the place before he could take it. But in the eleventh year of Zedekiah, A.M. 3416, the city was taken. Zedekiah attempted to escape, but was taken and brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria. The king of Babylon condemned him to die, caused his children to be put to death in his presence, and then bored out his eyes, loaded him with chains, and sent him to Babylon.
Three years after the Jewish war Nebuchadnezzar besieged the city of Tyre, which siege held thirteen years. But during this interval, he made war, also, on the Sidonians, Moabites, Ammonites, and Idumeans; and these he treated in nearly the same manner as the Jews. Josephus says these wars happened five years after the destruction of Jerusalem, consequently in A.M. 3421. The city of Tyre was taken in A.M. 3432. Ithobaal, who was then king, was put to death, and Baal succeeded him. The Lord, as a reward to the army of Nebuchadnezzar, which had lain so long before Tyre, gave up to them Egypt and its spoils. Nebuchadnezzar made an easy conquest of it, because the Egyptians were divided by civil wars among themselves: he enriched himself with booty, and returned in triumph to Babylon, with a great number of captives. Being now at peace, he applied himself to the adorning, aggrandizing, and enriching of Babylon with magnificent buildings. To him some ascribe those famous gardens, supported by arches, reckoned among the wonders of the world; and also the walls of Babylon, though many give the honour of this work to Semiramis.
About this time Nebuchadnezzar had a dream of a great tree, loaded with fruit. Suddenly, an angel descending from heaven, commanded that the tree should be cut down, but that the root should be preserved in the earth, Daniel 4. The king sent for all the diviners in the country, but none could explain his dream, till Daniel, by divine revelation, showed that it represented his present greatness, his signal approaching humiliation, and his restoration to reason and dignity. A year after, as Nebuchadnezzar was walking on his palace at Babylon, he began to say, "Is not this great Babylon, which I have built for the house of the kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?" and scarcely had he pronounced these words, when he fell into a distemper or distraction, which so altered his imagination that he fled into the fields and assumed the manners of an ox. After having been seven years in this state, God opened his eyes, his understanding was restored to him, and he recovered his royal dignity.
Nebuchadnezzar died, A.M. 3442, after having reigned forty-three years. Megasthenes, quoted by Eusebius, says, that this prince having ascended to the top of his palace, was there seized with a fit of divine enthusiasm, and cried out, "O Babylonians, I declare to you a misfortune, that neither our father Belus, nor Queen Baltis has been able to prevent. A Persian mule shall one day come into this country, who, supported by the power of your gods, shall bring you into slavery. He shall be assisted by the Mede, the glory of the Assyrians." This Persian mule is Cyrus, whose mother was a Mede, and whose father was a Persian. The Mede who assisted Cyrus was Cyaxares, or Darius the Mede. This story at least shows that the Heathens had traditions of an extraordinary kind respecting this monarch, and that the fate of Babylon had been the subject of prophecy.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nebuchadnezzar
Called in Jeremiah Nebuchadnezzar, the son and successor of Nabopolassar, succeeded to the kingdom of Chaldea about 600 B. C. He had been some time before associated in the kingdom, and sent to recover Carchemish, which had been wrested from the empire by Necho king of Egypt. Having been successful, he marched against the governor of Phoenicia, and Jehoiakim king of Judah, tributary of Necho king of Egypt. He took Jehoiakim, and put him in chains to carry him captive to Babylon; but afterwards he left him in Judea, on condition of his paying a large annual tribute. He took away several persons from Jerusalem; among others, Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, all of the royal family, whom the king of Babylon caused to be carefully educated in the language and learning of the Chaldeans, that they might be employed at court, 2 Kings 24:1 2 Chronicles 36:6 Daniel 1:1 .
Nabopolassar dying, Nebuchadnezzar, who was then either in Egypt or in Judea, hastened to Babylon, leaving to his generals the care of bringing to Chaldea the captives taken in Syria, Judea, Phoenicia, and Egypt; for according to Berosus, he had subdued all these countries. He distributed these captives into several colonies, and in the temple of Belus he deposited the sacred vessels of the temple of Jerusalem, and other rich spoils. Jehoiakim king of Judah continued three years in fealty to Nebuchadnezzar, and then revolted; but after three or four years, he was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air according to the predictions of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:1-30 .
His successor, Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, was besieged in Jerusalem, forced to surrender, and taken, with his chief officers, captive to Babylon; also his mother, his wives, and the best workmen of Jerusalem, to the number of ten thousand men. Among the captives were Mordecai, the uncle of Esther, and Ezekiel the prophet, Esther 2:6 . Nebuchadnezzar also took all the vessels of gold, which Solomon made for the temple and the king's treasury, and set up Mattaniah, Jeconiah's uncle by the father's side, whom he named Zedekiah. Zedekiah continued faithful to Nebuchadnezzar nine years, at the end of which time he rebelled, and confederated with the neighboring princes. The king of Babylon came into Judea, reduced the chief places of the country, and besieged Jerusalem; but Pharaoh Hophra coming out of Egypt to assist Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar went to meet him, and forced him to retire to his own country. This done, he resumed the siege of Jerusalem, and was three hundred and ninety days before the place. In the eleventh year of Zedekiah, B. C. 588, the city was taken and Zedekiah, being seized, was brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria. The king of Babylon condemned him to die, caused his children to be put to death in his presence, and then bored out his eyes, loaded him with chains, and sent him to Babylon, 2 Kings 24:1-25:30 2 Chronicles 36:1-23 .
During the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, the city of Babylon and the kingdom of Babylonia attained their highest pitch of splendor. He took great pains in adorning Babylon; and this was one great object of his pride. "Is not this," said he, "great Babylon that I have built for the house of my kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honor of my majesty?" But God vanquished his pride, and he was reduced for a time to the condition of a brute, according to the predictions of Daniel. See Daniel 1.1-4.37 . An inscription found among the ruins on the Tigris, and now in the East India House at London, gives an account of the various works of Nebuchadnezzar at Babylon and Borsippa. Abruptly breaking off, the record says the king's heart was hardened against the Chaldee astrologers. "He would grant no benefactions for religious purposes. He intermitted the worship of Merodach, and put an end to the sacrifice of victims. He labored under the effects of enchantment." Nebuchadnezzar is supposed to have died B. C. 562, after a reign of about forty years.
One of the famous structures ascribed to Nebuchadnezzar, and in which no doubt he took much pride, was the famous "hanging gardens," which he is said to have erected to gratify the wish of his queen Amytis for elevated groves such as she was accustomed to in her native Media. This could only be done in a country so level as Babylonia, by constructing an artificial mountain; and accordingly the king caused on e to be made, four hundred feet square and over three hundred feet high. The successive terraces were supported on ranges of regular piers, covered by large stones, on which were placed thick layers of matting and of bitumen and two courses of stones, which were again covered, with a solid coating of lead. On such a platform another similar, but smaller, was built, etc. The various terraces were then covered with earth, and furnished with trees, shrubbery, and flowers. The whole was watered from the Euphrates, which flowed at its base, by machinery within the mound. These gardens occupied but a small portion of the prodigious area of the palace, the wall inclosing the whole being six miles in circumference. Within this were two other walls and a great tower, besides the palace buildings, courts, gardens, etc. Al the gates were of brass, which agrees with the language used by Isaiah in predicting the capture of Babylon by Cyrus, Isaiah 45:25 . The ruins of the hanging gardens are believed to be found in the vast irregular mound called Kasr, on the East Side of the Euphrates, eight hundred yards by six hundred at its base. The bricks taken from this mound are of fine quality, and are all stamped with the name of Nebuchadnezzar.
Another labor of this monarch was that the ruins of which are now called Birs, Nimroud, about eight miles southwest of the above structure. See BABEL . The researches of Sir Henry Rawlinson have shown that this was built by Nebuchadnezzar, on the platform of a ruinous edifice of more ancient days. It consisted of six distinct terraces, each twenty feet high, and forty-two feet less horizontally than the one below it. On the top was the sanctum and observatory of the temple, now a vitrified mass. Each story was dedicated to a different planet, and stained with the color appropriated to that planet in their astrological system. The lowest, in honor of Saturn, was black; that of Jupiter was orange; that of Mars red, that of the sun yellow, that of Venus green, and that of Mercury blue. The temple was white, probably for the moon. In the corners of this longruined edifice, recently explored were found cylinders with arrowhead inscriptions, in the name of Nebuchadnezzar, which inform us that the building was named "The Stages of the Seven Spheres of Borsippa;" that it had been in a dilapidated condition; and that, moved by Merodach his god, he had reconstructed it with bricks enriched with lapis lazuli, "without changing its site or destroying its foundation platform." This restoration is also stated to have taken place five hundred and four years after its first erection in that form by Tiglath Pileser I., 1100 B. C. If not actually on the site of the tower of Babel mentioned in the Bible, and the temple of Belus described by Herodotus, this building would seem to have been erected on the same general plan. Every brick yet taken from it bears the impress of Nebuchadnezzar. Borsippa would seem to have been a suburb of ancient Babylon.

Sentence search

Nebuchadrezzar - (See Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar
e'Vil-Mero'Dach - (the fool of Merodach ), ( 2 Kings 25:27 ) the son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar. He reigned but a short time, having ascended the throne on the death of Nebuchadnezzar in B
Ashpenaz - Prince of the eunuchs under Nebuchadnezzar
Ash'Penaz - (horse-nose ), the master of the eunuchs of Nebuchadnezzar
Dura - The plain in Babylon where Nebuchadnezzar set up his golden image
Shadrach - Aku's command, the Chaldean name given to Hananiah, one of the Hebrew youths whom Nebuchadnezzar carried captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:6,7 ; 3:12-30 ). He and his two companions refused to bow down before the image which Nebuchadnezzar had set up on the plains of Dura. " Thus Nebuchadnezzar learned the greatness of the God of Israel
Belteshazzar - Beltis protect the king!, the Chaldee name given to Daniel by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:7 )
Nebushasban - Officer of Nebuchadnezzar, called Rab-saris, which is thought to mean 'chief chamberlain
Belteshazzar - Nebuchadnezzar is said to have conferred this name on the youthful Daniel ( Daniel 1:7 ). 5); and pseudo-Epiphanius repeats a legend that Nebuchadnezzar wished to make the two men co-heirs
Nebuchadnezzar - During the reign of Joiakim and Jehoiachin, Nebuchadnezzar exiled to Babylon many of the politically powerful Jews and members of the royal family, including Daniel and his colleagues Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah. When the last Jewish monarch, Zedekiah, revolted, Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the Temple, and exiled most of the remaining Jews
Shadrach - A Chaldean name given to Ananias at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7
Watcher - Daniel 4:13,17,23 , a figurative designation of heavenly beings, apparently angels, as seen by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream
Nebuchadrezzar - Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 21:2,7 ; 22:25 ; 24:1 , etc
Belshazzar - Prince of Bel, the Chaldean name given to Daniel at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:7 4:8
ba'Alis, - king of the Ammonites at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuzar-a'Dan - chief of the slaughterers (Authorized Version "captain of the guard"), a high officer in the court of Nebuchadnezzar. On the capture of Jerusalem he was left by Nebuchadnezzar in charge of the city. (Jeremiah 52:30 ) Nebuchadnezzar in his twenty-third year made a descent on the regions east of Jordan, including the Ammonites and Moabites, who escaped when Jerusalem was destroyed
Coniah - Name given to Jehoiachin king of Judah, who was carried captive by Nebuchadnezzar
Melzar - The name or the official title of a butler or steward at the court of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:11-16
Chub, - the name of a people in alliance with Egypt in the time of Nebuchadnezzar, (Ezekiel 30:5 ) and probably of northern Africa
Nebuchadnezzar - The greatest king of this dynasty was Nabopolassar’s son and successor, Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebuchadrezzar). ...
Nebuchadnezzar became king soon after he led Babylonian forces to victory over Egypt at the Battle of Carchemish in 605 BC (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2). Nebuchadnezzar was the Babylonian king throughout this time, and the books of 2 Kings, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel mention him by name repeatedly. )...
Through his contact with Jews at his court in Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar learnt about the Jews’ God, Yahweh. The result was that God punished Nebuchadnezzar with a disease of temporary madness, till he learnt that God was the sovereign ruler over the kingdoms of the world (Daniel 4:27-33). ...
The Bible gives no clear indication whether Nebuchadnezzar’s acknowledgment of the sovereign rule of God had any lasting effect on his behaviour. There is no certainty that the prophet had Nebuchadnezzar or any other king specifically in mind, but his warning has a timeless relevance. ...
Nebuchadnezzar was undoubtedly the greatest king of this period of Babylonian supremacy
Jeho-i'Achin - ) At his accession Jerusalem was quite defenseless, and unable to offer any resistance to the army which Nebuchadnezzar sent to besiege it. ( 2 Kings 24:10,11 ) In a very short time Jehoiachin surrendered at discretion; and he, and the queen-mother, and all his servants, captains and officers, came out and gave themselves up to Nebuchadnezzar, who carried them, with the harem and the eunuchs, to Babylon. , till the death of Nebuchadnezzar, when Evilmerodach, succeeding to the throne of Babylon, brought him out of prison, and made him sit at this own table
Belteshazzar - The name given to the prophet Daniel at the court of Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuzaradan - A general of king Nebuchadnezzar, and his agent in the sacking and destruction of Jerusalem, 1 Kings 22:53 ; Jeremiah 39:9 ; 40:1 ; 52:12-30
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - (prince of fire ) occurs only in ( Jeremiah 39:3 ) and Jere 39:13 There appear to have been two persons in the name among the "princes of the king of Babylon" who accompanied Nebuchadnezzar on his last expedition against Jerusalem. In sacred Scripture he appears among the persons who, by command of Nebuchadnezzar, released Jeremiah from prison. He is the same as the monarch called Neriglissar or Neriglissor, who murdered Evil-merodach, the son of Nebuchadnezzar and succeeded him upon the throne
Belteshazzar - ” Name prince of eunuchs under Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, gave to Daniel (Daniel 1:7 )
Vashti - (4th century BCE) Great-granddaughter of Nebuchadnezzar, wife of Ahasuerus
Ashpenaz - The master of the eunuchs of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:3 ), the "Rabsaris" of the court
Elasah - Ambassador whom Zedekiah sent to Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar (nĕb'u-kad-nĕz'zar), may Nebo protect the crown or, more correctly, Nebuchadrezzar, the son and successor of Nabopolassar, the founder of the Babylonish monarchy, was the most illustrious of these kings. In the Berlin Museum there is a black cameo with his head upon it, cut by his order, with the inscription: "In honor of Merodach, his lord, Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, in bis lifetime had this made. " Nebuchadnezzar was intrusted by his father with repelling Pharaoh-necho, and succeeded in defeating him at Carchemish, on the Euphrates, b. Having learned that his father had died, Nebuchadnezzar hastened back to Babylon. Thus the remark, "In his days Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, came up, and Jehoiakim became his servant three years," 2 Kings 24:1, is easily explained. The rebellion of Jehoiakim, entered upon, probably, because Nebuchadnezzar was carrying on wars in other parts of Asia, took place b. 602, and was punished by the irruption of Chaldæans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, incited, perhaps, by Nebuchadnezzar, who, as soon as possible, sent his troops against Jerusalem, and had him taken prisoner, but ultimately released him. After his death his son Jehoiachin reigned, and against him Nebuchadnezzar, for the third time, invaded Palestine and besieged Jerusalem, and all the principal inhabitants were carried to Babylon. Mattaniah, whose name was changed to Zedekiah, after a reign of nearly ten years, rebelled, and was punished by Nebuchadnezzar, who went up against Jerusalem and reduced the city to the horrors of famine before taking it. On Nebuchadnezzar's order, Jeremiah was kindly treated. " Nebuchadnezzar is denominated "king of kings" by Daniel 2:37, and ruler of a "kingdom with power and strength and glory
Nebuchadnezzar, or Nebuchadrezzar - Nebuchadnezzar acted as his father's general and defeated Pharaoh-necho at Carchemish, B. ...
Three years later, Judah revolted and Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem. 588 Nebuchadnezzar again besieged Jerusalem, burnt the temple, and destroyed the city. ...
The more personal history of Nebuchadnezzar is given by Daniel. Nebuchadnezzar had selected him, and some of his fellow captives, to fill honourable positions in the state. In the second year of Nebuchadnezzar's reign (B. The house of David had for the time been set aside as God's ruler on earth, and in Nebuchadnezzar the Gentiles had been entrusted with supreme authority. "...
Nebuchadnezzar was a heathen, but he had now learned that he held his kingdom from the God of heaven, and was responsible to Him. (A monument of Nebuchadnezzar says, "I completely made strong the defences of Babylon, may it last for ever . He now said, "I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase. ...
Thus Nebuchadnezzar learnt to honour the God who had made him the head of gold
Holofer'Nes, - or more correctly OLOFERNES, was, according to the book of Judith, a general of Nebuchadnezzar king of the Assyrians
Nebuchadnezzar - I FRANKLY confess myself a convert to Nebuchadnezzar. I frankly acknowledge my great debt to Nebuchadnezzar. I frankly confess that I had wholly misunderstood Nebuchadnezzar, and both the design and the end of God's ways with Nebuchadnezzar. And I would like to share with you tonight the great lesson in humility and in obedience that I have been led to learn out of Nebuchadnezzar. ...
Nebuchadnezzar was by far the most famous of all the kings of the East. In his early years, and before he came to his great throne, Nebuchadnezzar had won victory after victory over all the surrounding nations. Great as Nebuchadnezzar was as a warrior, he was still greater as a statesman and an administrator. The vast public works that he planned and executed for his capital and his kingdom in walls and in water-works: in parks and in gardens: in palaces and in temples-all these things, in their vastness, in their usefulness, in their beauty, and in their immense cost make Nebuchadnezzar to stand out absolutely unapproached among the great builder-kings of the ancient East. After we have read all that the historians and the travellers have to tell us about ancient Babylon, no wonder, we say to ourselves, that Nebuchadnezzar's dreams were the dreams of a magnificent imagination. No wonder that his heart swelled within him with pride: and no wonder that it took a stroke such as God has seldom struck before or since to humble and to abase Nebuchadnezzar, this great king of Babylon. ' All this came to Nebuchadnezzar the ting, till at the end of it all he said-'I thought it good to show the signs and wonders the high God hath wrought toward me. ' Though long dead, King Nebuchadnezzar still speaks in the Book of Daniel, and on a thousand cylinders in the British Museum; and, as on every page of Daniel, so on every brick of Babylon, he that runs may read this evening's text:-'Those that walk in pride the King of heaven is able to abase. '...
But Nebuchadnezzar's pride, after all is said, was but the petty pride of a puffed-up and self-important child. If you have eyes in your hearts you will see all Nebuchadnezzar's pride in your own nursery every day. Nebuchadnezzar's bricks were made of clay; whereas the bricks of your nursery-Nebuchadnezzar are made of wood. Look! your little Nebuchadnezzar cries after you as he pulls your gown, and will not give you peace till you lift up your hands in wonder over his great Babylon with its wonderful doors, and windows, and bridges, and portcullises. Let all fathers and mothers give their best heed to their little Nebuchadnezzar and to his little Babylon which he has built for the honour of his majesty. '...
But, with alt that, I see in my own children every day a far worse kind of pride than any that the big child Nebuchadnezzar shows either in the Book of Daniel, or on the bricks of Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar never, that I have read of, got one single lesson from God or man that he did not instantly lay it to heart. As I read of Nebuchadnezzar's humility, and makeableness, and teachableness in Daniel's hands I am amazed at the boldness of the young Belteshazzar, and still more at the behaviour of his mighty master. When I put myself into Nebuchadnezzar's place, when I recall my own temper and my own conduct, I honour Nebuchadnezzar, and I cannot cease from wondering that the king of Babylon has not been far more made of as a pattern of humility and meekness both under the dispensations of God and under the doctrines of Daniel. After his orders had been disobeyed-in his own palace, remember, and at his own table-in the matter of the meat that Daniel and his three companions were to eat, and the wine they were to drink: and after he was compelled publicly to admit that the prince of the eunuchs had acted on far better advice than the king's commandment,-instead of Melzar's head being endangered to the king, Nebuchadnezzar communed with Daniel, and Daniel stood before the king. Then, again, after his great dream, and its interpretation to the destruction of his kingdom, 'King Nebuchadnezzar fell upon his face, and worshipped Daniel, and commanded that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours unto Daniel. Then Nebuchadnezzar spake and said, Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego, who hath sent His angels, and delivered His servants that trusted in Him, and have changed the king's word and yielded their bodies that they might not serve nor worship any god except their own God. Nebuchadnezzar is another illustration how we go on traditionally calling good men by bad names without looking at what is written out plain before our eyes. I cannot conceive where I got my bad opinion about Nebuchadnezzar. The proud man holds you henceforth to be his mortal enemy if you tell him the truth as Daniel told Nebuchadnezzar, and as Daniel was honoured and rewarded for telling it. But Daniel's counsel was acceptable to Nebuchadnezzar, till that king broke off all the sins and all the iniquities that Daniel so boldly named to him. It is true Nebuchadnezzar got a tremendous lesson. And if Nebuchadnezzar had not built every single street of it, this, at any rate, he could say, that he had found Babylon a city of brick and had made it a city of marble. We hear of baptized kings every day walking in their palaces in Christendom at the end of the nineteenth century, and speaking far more proudly than heathen Nebuchadnezzar spake, and no Daniel dares to stand up and tell them that their feet are partly iron mixed with miry clay. It is as if God had predestinated Nebuchadnezzar to come out of that heathen dispensation, and to sit down in the kingdom of heaven, while the emperors of our modern Christendom are to be cast out. It would look like that; God took such unheard-of vengeance on Nebuchadnezzar's inventions. Did you ever read the fourth chapter of the Book of Daniel?-that splendid autobiographic chapter which king Nebuchadnezzar wrote out of his own inkhorn, and gave the document to Daniel to embody in his book? 'Come, all ye that fear God,' Nebuchadnezzar begins, 'and I will tell you what He did for my soul. For how great are His signs, and how mighty are His wonders! I was walking proudly in my palace in the kingdom of Babylon, and I said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty? And while the word was yet in my mouth, there fell a Voice from heaven, saying, O King Nebuchadnezzar, to thee it is spoken; The kingdom is departed from thee. The same hour was the thing fulfilled upon Nebuchadnezzar, and he was driven from men, and did eat grass as oxen, and his body was wet with the dew of heaven, till his hairs were grown as eagles' feathers, and his nails like birds' claws. And at the end of the days I, Nebuchadnezzar, lifted up mine eyes to heaven, and mine understanding returned to me, and I blessed the Most High, and I praised and honoured Him who liveth for ever, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and His kingdom is from generation to generation: and all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing: and He doeth according to His will in the army of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth: and none can stay His hand, or say to Him, What doest Thou? Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and His ways judgment; and those that walk in pride He is able to abase. ...
To be driven out among the oxen made Nebuchadnezzar a new man. But when we see and feel ourselves to be oxen in our stupidity, and dogs in our selfishness, and swine in our miryness, and vipers in our poisonousness-then we have got the key within ourselves to God's great dispensation of humiliation with Nebuchadnezzar. And then we leave it like Nebuchadnezzar to be read on our tombstone by all that pass by-...
Those that walk in pride He is able to abase. ...
But Nebuchadnezzar would not have needed to be made to eat grass as an ox if he had early enough and often enough asked Daniel to teach him to pray. Prayer would have done it to Nebuchadnezzar also. Daniel himself was mightily tempted to pride far more than Nebuchadnezzar ever was with all his wars and with all his palaces. For, was not Nebuchadnezzar, with all his power and with all his pride, prostrate again and again at Daniel's feet? Did not king Nebuchadnezzar fall upon his face, and worship Daniel, and command that they should offer an oblation and sweet odours to Daniel? What could it have been, then, that kept Daniel's heart so sweetly humble through all that, till Daniel was a man greatly beloved of Him who resisteth the proud and giveth grace to the humble? It was prayer that did it
Jehoiakim - In the third year, Nebuchadnezzar carried to Babylon a part of his princes and treasures. At length he rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, but was defeated and ingloriously slain, B
Dura - ” Plain in Babylonia where King Nebuchadnezzar set up a mammoth golden image of a god or of himself (Daniel 3:1 )
Chub - The name of a people in alliance with Egypt in the time of Nebuchadnezzar
Array - Jeremiah 43:12 (a) When Nebuchadnezzar conquered Egypt and added it to his magnificent kingdom, GOD speaks of it as though the king had put on another and expensive garment
Shadrach - Name given to HANANIAHin Babylon, one of the three faithful ones who refused to worship the golden image of Nebuchadnezzar, and were cast into the fiery furnace, and there miraculously preserved
Shadrach - ) A mass of iron on which the operation of smelting has failed of its intended effect; - so called from Shadrach, one of the three Hebrews who came forth unharmed from the fiery furnace of Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar - Called in Jeremiah Nebuchadnezzar, the son and successor of Nabopolassar, succeeded to the kingdom of Chaldea about 600 B. ...
Nabopolassar dying, Nebuchadnezzar, who was then either in Egypt or in Judea, hastened to Babylon, leaving to his generals the care of bringing to Chaldea the captives taken in Syria, Judea, Phoenicia, and Egypt; for according to Berosus, he had subdued all these countries. Jehoiakim king of Judah continued three years in fealty to Nebuchadnezzar, and then revolted; but after three or four years, he was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air according to the predictions of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:1-30 . ...
His successor, Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, was besieged in Jerusalem, forced to surrender, and taken, with his chief officers, captive to Babylon; also his mother, his wives, and the best workmen of Jerusalem, to the number of ten thousand men. Nebuchadnezzar also took all the vessels of gold, which Solomon made for the temple and the king's treasury, and set up Mattaniah, Jeconiah's uncle by the father's side, whom he named Zedekiah. Zedekiah continued faithful to Nebuchadnezzar nine years, at the end of which time he rebelled, and confederated with the neighboring princes. The king of Babylon came into Judea, reduced the chief places of the country, and besieged Jerusalem; but Pharaoh Hophra coming out of Egypt to assist Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar went to meet him, and forced him to retire to his own country. 588, the city was taken and Zedekiah, being seized, was brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria. ...
During the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, the city of Babylon and the kingdom of Babylonia attained their highest pitch of splendor. An inscription found among the ruins on the Tigris, and now in the East India House at London, gives an account of the various works of Nebuchadnezzar at Babylon and Borsippa. " Nebuchadnezzar is supposed to have died B. ...
One of the famous structures ascribed to Nebuchadnezzar, and in which no doubt he took much pride, was the famous "hanging gardens," which he is said to have erected to gratify the wish of his queen Amytis for elevated groves such as she was accustomed to in her native Media. The bricks taken from this mound are of fine quality, and are all stamped with the name of Nebuchadnezzar. The researches of Sir Henry Rawlinson have shown that this was built by Nebuchadnezzar, on the platform of a ruinous edifice of more ancient days. In the corners of this longruined edifice, recently explored were found cylinders with arrowhead inscriptions, in the name of Nebuchadnezzar, which inform us that the building was named "The Stages of the Seven Spheres of Borsippa;" that it had been in a dilapidated condition; and that, moved by Merodach his god, he had reconstructed it with bricks enriched with lapis lazuli, "without changing its site or destroying its foundation platform. Every brick yet taken from it bears the impress of Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar mounted the throne 604 B. The fourth year of Jehoiakim coincided with the first of Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 25:1). In the earlier part of the (year Nebuchadnezzar smote Necho at Carchemish, Jeremiah 46:2). Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldees, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites against him (2 Kings 24:2). Then in person Nebuchadnezzar marched against Tyre. Josephus says Nebuchadnezzar put him to death ( Nebuchadnezzar with the princes, warriors, and craftsmen, and the palace treasures, and Solomon's gold vessels cut in pieces, at his third advance against Jerusalem (2 Kings 24:8-16). Meantime Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar's sworn vassal, in treaty with Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) revolted (Ezekiel 17:15). Nebuchadnezzar besieged him 588-586 B. Zedekiah's eyes were put out after he had seen his sons slain first at Riblah, where Nebuchadnezzar "gave judgment upon him," and was kept a prisoner in Babylon the rest of his life. Nebuchadnezzar is most celebrated for his buildings: the temple of Bel Merodach at Babylon (the Kasr), built with his Syrian spoils (Josephus, Nebuchadnezzar's name. , 76-77) states that the bricks of 100 different towns about Bagdad all bear the one inscription, "Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon. " Abydenus states Nebuchadnezzar made the nahr malcha , "royal river," a branch from the Euphrates, and the Acracanus; also the reservoir above the city Sippara, 90 miles round and 120 ft. Isaiah's patriotism was shown in counseling resistance to Assyria; Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 27) in urging submission to Babylon as the only safety; for God promised Judah's deliverance from the former, but "gave all the lands into Nebuchadnezzar's hands, and the beasts of the field also, to serve him and his son and his son's son. "...
The kingdom originally given to Adam (
Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:19-20), forfeited by sin, God temporarily delegated to Nebuchadnezzar, the "head of gold," the first of the four great world powers (Daniel 2 and Daniel 7). As Nebuchadnezzar and the other three abused the trust, for self not, for God, the Son of Man, the Fifth, to whom of right it belongs, shall wrest it from them and restore to man his lost inheritance, ruling with the saints for God's glory and man's blessedness (Psalms 8:4-6; Revelation 11:15-18; Daniel 2:34-35; Daniel 2:44-45; Daniel 7:13-27). Nebuchadnezzar was punished with the form of insanity called lycanthropy (fancying himself to be a beast and living in their haunts) for pride generated by his great conquest and buildings (Daniel 4). When man would be as God, like Adam and Nebuchadnezzar he sinks from lordship over creation to the brute level and loses his true manhood, which is likeness to God (Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:19; Genesis 3:5; Psalms 49:6; Psalms 49:10-12; Psalms 82:6-7); a key to the symbolism which represents the mighty world kingdoms as "beasts" (Daniel 7). ) states: "Nebuchadnezzar having ascended upon his palace roof predicted the Persian conquest of Babylon (which he knew from Daniel 2:39), praying that the conqueror might be borne where there is no path of men and where the wild beasts graze"; a corruption of the true story and confirming it. The panorama of the world's glory that overcame Nebuchadnezzar through the lust of the eye, as he stood on his palace roof, Satan tried upon Jesus in vain (Matthew 4:8-10). In the standard inscription Nebuchadnezzar says, "for four years in Babylon buildings for the honour of my kingdom I did not lay out. ...
Herodotus ascribes to Nitocris many of the works assigned by Berosus to Nebuchadnezzar. Pride, violence and fury, and cruel sternness, were Nebuchadnezzar's faults (Daniel 2:12; Daniel 3:19; 2 Kings 25:7; 2 Kings 24:8). Not to Daniel but to Nebuchadnezzar, the first representative head of the world power who overcame the theocracy, the dreams were given announcing its doom. ...
The dream was the appropriate form for one outside the kingdom of God, as Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh (Genesis 41). But an Israelite must interpret it; and Nebuchadnezzar worshipped Daniel, an earnest of the future prostration of the world power before Christ and the church (Revelation 3:9; 1 Corinthians 14:25; Philippians 2:10; 1 Corinthians 6:2; Luke 19:17). The image set up by Nebuchadnezzar represented himself the head of the first world power, of whom Daniel had said "thou art this head of gold. " Daniel was regarded by Nebuchadnezzar as divine, and so was not asked to worship it (Daniel 2:46). Nebuchadnezzar is the forerunner of antichrist, to whose "image" whosoever will not offer worship shall be killed (Revelation 13:14)
Elasah - Son of Shaphan, one of the two sent by king Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar at Babylon (by whose permission alone be reigned) after the first deportation
Che'Bar - It is commonly regarded as identical with the Habor, (2 Kings 17:6 ) and perhaps the Royal Canal of Nebuchadnezzar, --the greatest of all the cuttings in Mesopotamia
Azekah - A town in the tribe of Judah, about fifteen miles south-west of Jerusalem; mentioned in the narratives of Joshua and Saul, Joshua 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; taken by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 34:7 , but afterwards repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:30
Gedaliah - The governor of Judæa, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar after its subjection
Carchemish - A chief city of northern Syria, on the Euphrates, where a great and decisive battle was fought, in which Nebuchadnezzar defeated Pharaoh-necho
Jehozadak - He was carried into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar, and probably died in Babylon
el'Asah - ...
Son of Shaphan, one of the two men who were sent on a mission by King Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar at Babylon
Meshach - Nebuchadnezzar blessed their God, who had thus delivered them, and they were promoted in the province of Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar, head of the Gentile power, having been brought into a prominent position by God is compelled to own the God of this captive but faithful remnant, who had shown His power in protecting those who were faithful to Him
Nebushasban - Derived from Nebo; an officer of Nebuchadnezzar at the taking of Jerusalem; he was Rabsaris, i
Ashpenaz - (assh' peh naz) Chief eunuch guarding the family of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (605-562 B
Gemariah - The son of Hilkiah, sent on an embassy from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar
Jehoiakim - For four years Jehoiakim was subject to Egypt, when Nebuchadnezzar, after a short siege, entered Jerusalem, took the king prisoner, and bound him in fetters to carry him to Babylon. Jehoiakim became tributary to Nebuchadnezzar, but after three years broke his oath of allegiance and rebelled against him. Nebuchadnezzar sent against him numerous bands of Chaldeans, with Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, 2 Kings 24:2, and who cruelly harassed the whole country
Rabsaris - One of the princes of Nebuchadnezzar at the siege of Jerusalem also bore this title
Jehucal - He was one of the two persons whom Zedekiah sent to request the prophet Jeremiah to pray for the kingdom (Jeremiah 37:3 ) during the time of its final siege by Nebuchadnezzar
Zedekiah - When Nebuchadnezzar took Jerusalem, he carried Jehoiachin to Babylon, with his wives, children, officers, and the best artificers in Judea, and put in his place his uncle Mattaniah, whose name he changed into Zedekiah, and made him promise, with an oath, that he would continue in fidelity to him, A. In the first year of his reign, Zedekiah sent to Babylon Elasah, the son of Shaphan, and Gemariah, the son of Hilkiah, probably to carry his tribute to Nebuchadnezzar. The chief design of this deputation was to entreat Nebuchadnezzar to return the sacred vessels of the temple, Bar_1:8 . In the ninth year of his reign, he revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, 2 Kings 25. ...
Then King Nebuchadnezzar marched his army against Zedekiah, and took all the fortified places of his kingdom, except Lachish, Azekah, and Jerusalem. Nebuchadnezzar left Jerusalem, and went to meet him, defeated him, and obliged him to return into Egypt; after which he resumed the siege of Jerusalem. In the mean while, the people of Jerusalem, as if freed from the fear of Nebuchadnezzar, retook the slaves whom they had set at liberty, which drew upon them great reproaches and threatenings from Jeremiah 34:11 ; Jeremiah 34:22 . He was seized and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, a city of Syria. Thus were accomplished two prophecies which seemed contradictory: one of Jeremiah, who said that Zedekiah should see and yet not see, Nebuchadnezzar with his eyes, Jeremiah 32:4-5 ; Jeremiah 34:3 ; and the other of Ezekiel 12:13 , which intimated that he should not see Babylon, though he should die there
Belshazzar - Belshazzar (bel-shăs'zar), Bel's prince, or may Bel protect the king, was the son or grandson of Nebuchadnezzar, and the last Assyrian king of Babylon. During the siege of the city of Babylon he gave a sumptuous entertainment to his courtiers, and impiously made use of the temple furniture (of which Nebuchadnezzar had plundered the temple at Jerusalem) as drinking-vessels
Pathros - After the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, colonies of Jews settled "in the country of Pathros" and other parts of Egypt
Gadfly - Jeremiah 46:20 pictured Nebuchadnezzar as a gadfly attacking Egypt which was pictured as a fat heifer
Gemariah - Son of Hilkiah: he was sent by Zedekiah to Babylon with a letter from Jeremiah unto the captives taken by Nebuchadnezzar
Flute - , PIPE ), A musical instrument mentioned amongst others, (Daniel 3:5,7,10,15 ) as used at the worship of the golden image which Nebuchadnezzar had set up
Elasah - ...
...
The son of Shaphan, one of the two who were sent by Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and also took charge of Jeremiah's letter to the captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3 )
Dura - The circle, the plain near Babylon in which Nebuchadnezzar set up a golden image, mentioned in Daniel 3:1
Dura - The place where Nebuchadnezzar set up his golden image
Gedaliah - Son of Ahikam, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar to govern Judea after the destruction of Jerusalem
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - Nebuchadnezzar, having been successful, marched against the governor of Phenicia, and Jehoiakim, king of Judah, who was tributary to Necho, king of Egypt. 3399, Nebuchadnezzar, who was then either in Egypt or in Judea, hastened to Babylon, leaving to his generals the care of bringing to Chaldea the captives whom he had taken in Syria, Judea, Phenicia, and Egypt; for, according to Berosus, he had subdued all those countries. Jehoiakim, king of Judah, continued three years, in fealty to King Nebuchadnezzar; but being then weary of paying tribute, he threw off the yoke. ...
In the mean time, Nebuchadnezzar being at Babylon in the second year of his reign, had a mysterious dream, in which he saw a statue composed of several metals, a head of gold, a breast of silver, belly and thighs of brass, legs of iron, and feet half of iron and half clay; and a little stone rolling by its own impulse from the mountain struck the statue and broke it. The effect of the miracle was so great that Nebuchadnezzar gave glory to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; and he exalted the three Hebrews to great dignity in the province of Babylon, Daniel 4. ...
Jehoiachin, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, this prince besieged him in Jerusalem, and forced him to surrender. Nebuchadnezzar took him, with his chief officers, captive to Babylon, with his mother, his wives, and the best workmen of Jerusalem, to the number of ten thousand men. This prince continued faithful to Nebuchadnezzar nine years: being then weary of subjection, he revolted and confederated with the neighbouring princes. The king of Babylon came into Judea, reduced the chief places of the country, and besieged Jerusalem: but Pharaoh-Hophra coming out of Egypt to assist Zedekiah, Nebuchadnezzar overcame him in battle, and forced him to retire into his own country. Zedekiah attempted to escape, but was taken and brought to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah in Syria. ...
Three years after the Jewish war Nebuchadnezzar besieged the city of Tyre, which siege held thirteen years. The Lord, as a reward to the army of Nebuchadnezzar, which had lain so long before Tyre, gave up to them Egypt and its spoils. Nebuchadnezzar made an easy conquest of it, because the Egyptians were divided by civil wars among themselves: he enriched himself with booty, and returned in triumph to Babylon, with a great number of captives. ...
About this time Nebuchadnezzar had a dream of a great tree, loaded with fruit. A year after, as Nebuchadnezzar was walking on his palace at Babylon, he began to say, "Is not this great Babylon, which I have built for the house of the kingdom, by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty?" and scarcely had he pronounced these words, when he fell into a distemper or distraction, which so altered his imagination that he fled into the fields and assumed the manners of an ox. ...
Nebuchadnezzar died, A
Jeho-i'Akim - For four years Jehoiakim was subject toi Egypt, when Nebuchadnezzar, after a short siege, entered Jerusalem, took the king prisoner, bound him in fetters to carry him to Babylon, and took also some of the precious vessels of the temple and carried them to the land of Shinar. Jehoiakim became tributary to Nebuchadnezzar after his invasion of Judah, and continued so for three years, but at the end of that time broke his oath of allegiance and rebelled against him. ( 2 Kings 24:1 ) Nebuchadnezzar sent against him numerous bands of Chaldeans, with Syrians, Moabites and Ammonites, (2 Kings 24:7 ) and who cruelly harassed the whole country
Jehoiakim - Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. ...
Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:2 ) to chastise his rebellious vassal. Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him
Nebuzaradan - He showed kindness toward Jeremiah, as commanded by Nebuchadnezzar (40:1)
Chebar - On its fertile banks Nebuchadnezzar located a part of the captive Jews, and here the sublime visions of Ezekiel took place, Ezekiel 1:3 ; 3:15 ; 10:15 ; 43:3
Rab'Saris - ) ...
One of the princes of Nebuchadnezzar, who was present at the capture of Jerusalem, B
Car'Chemish - 608), and retaken by Nebuchadnezzar after a battle three years later, B
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar also subdued the whole of Palestine, and took Jerusalem, carrying away captive a great multitude of the Jews, among whom were Daniel and his companions (Daniel 1:1,2 ; Jeremiah 27:19 ; 40:1 ). This led Nebuchadnezzar to march an army again to the conquest of Jerusalem, which at once yielded to him (B. " The inscription has been thus translated:, "In honour of Merodach, his lord, Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, in his lifetime had this made. " ...
A clay tablet, now in the British Museum, bears the following inscription, the only one as yet found which refers to his wars: "In the thirty-seventh year of Nebuchadnezzar, king of the country of Babylon, he went to Egypt [1] to make war. Having completed the subjugation of Phoenicia, and inflicted chastisement on Egypt, Nebuchadnezzar now set himself to rebuild and adorn the city of Babylon (Daniel 4:30 ), and to add to the greatness and prosperity of his kingdom by constructing canals and aqueducts and reservoirs surpassing in grandeur and magnificence everything of the kind mentioned in history (Daniel 2:37 ). ...
"Modern research has shown that Nebuchadnezzar was the greatest monarch that Babylon, or perhaps the East generally, ever produced. ...
After the incident of the "burning fiery furnace" (Daniel 3 ) into which the three Hebrew confessors were cast, Nebuchadnezzar was afflicted with some peculiar mental aberration as a punishment for his pride and vanity, probably the form of madness known as lycanthropy (i. A remarkable confirmation of the Scripture narrative is afforded by the recent discovery of a bronze door-step, which bears an inscription to the effect that it was presented by Nebuchadnezzar to the great temple at Borsippa as a votive offering on account of his recovery from a terrible illness. 562, in the eighty-third or eighty-fourth year of his age, after a reign of forty-three years, and was succeeded by his son Evil-merodach, who, after a reign of two years, was succeeded by Neriglissar (559-555), who was succeeded by Nabonadius (555-538), at the close of whose reign (less than a quarter of a century after the death of Nebuchadnezzar) Babylon fell under Cyrus at the head of the combined armies of Media and Persia. Rawlinson, "the bricks belonging perhaps to a hundred different towns and cities in the neighbourhood of Baghdad, and I never found any other legend than that of Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon
Evil-Merodach - The son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, B
Zedekiah - His proper name was Mattaniah, but Nebuchadnezzar changed it to Zedekiah when raising him to the throne. In the ninth year of his reign he revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, in consequence of which the Assyrian monarch marched his army into Judæa and took all the fortified places. Zedekiah was seized and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, in Syria, who reproached him with his perfidy, caused all his children to be slain before his face and his own eyes to be put out, and then, loading him with chains of brass, ordered him to be sent to Babylon
Nergal-Sharezer - " Two are mentioned (Jeremiah 39:3; Jeremiah 39:13) as accompanying Nebuchadnezzar at the capture of Jerusalem, and as releasing Jeremiah: one has the title (for it is not a distinct person) Rubmag, "chief priest. 1:20) who murdered his brother-in-law, Evil Merodach, Nebuchadnezzar's son, and succeeded to the throne as having married Nebuchadnezzar's daughter. The bricks state he was "son of Belzikkariskun, king of Babylon," possibly the "chief Chaldaean" (Berosus) who kept the throne for Nebuchadnezzar at Nabopolassar's death, until his arrival at Babylon
Zedekiah - The name given by Nebuchadnezzar to Mattaniah, son of Josiah, whom he set on the throne of Judah. On Zedekiah revolting from Nebuchadnezzar, he formed an alliance with Egypt (cf. Ezekiel 17:3-20 ); but Egypt was defeated, and then Nebuchadnezzar pushed on the siege of Jerusalem. And thus it came to pass: on being carried before Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah, his sons were slain before his face, then his eyes were put out, and he was carried to Babylon
Shadrach - The three were cast into a fiery furnace for refusing to worship a graven image set up by King Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar served as a general under his father and was a brilliant strategist
Mishael - They were thrown into a furnace after refusing to bow to an idol erected by Nebuchadnezzar
Zephaniah - Son of Maaseiah and 'second' priest in the reign of Zedekiah; he was carried captive to Nebuchadnezzar and slain at Riblah
Nergal-Sharezer - From profane history and the inscriptions, we are led to conclude that he was the Neriglissar who murdered Evil-merodach, the son of Nebuchadnezzar, and succeeded him on the throne of Babylon (B. He was married to a daughter of Nebuchadnezzar. Belshazzar, who comes into notice in connection with the taking of Babylon, was by some supposed to have been the same as Nabonadius, who was called Nebuchadnezzar's son (Daniel 5:11,18,22 ), because he had married his daughter. But it is known from the inscriptions that Nabonadius had a son called Belshazzar, who may have been his father's associate on the throne at the time of the fall of Babylon, and who therefore would be the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar
Evil-Merodach - Merodach's man, the son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31,34 )
Jehozadak - High priest at the time Nebuchadnezzar carried Judah into Babylonian Exile about 587 B
Exile - Nebuchadnezzar, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 25:1 ), invaded Judah, and carried away some royal youths, including Daniel and his companions (B. 598 (Jeremiah 52:28 ; 2 Kings 24:12 ), in the beginning of Jehoiachin's reign (2 Kings 24:8 ), Nebuchadnezzar carried away captive 3,023 eminent Jews, including the king (2 Chronicles 36:10 ), with his family and officers (2 Kings 24:12 ), and a large number of warriors (16), with very many persons of note (14), and artisans (16), leaving behind only those who were poor and helpless. ), there was a second general deportation of Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 52:29 ; 2 Kings 25:8 ), including 832 more of the principal men of the kingdom. The entire number Nebuchadnezzar carried captive was 4,600 heads of families with their wives and children and dependants (Jeremiah 52:30 ; 43:5-7 ; 2 Chronicles 36:20 , etc
Image, Nebuchadnezzar's - The figure in Nebuchadnezzar's dream (Daniel 2:31-45 ); 2 . a colossal figure Nebuchadnezzar erected on the plains of Dura (Daniel 3:1-18 ). ...
The interpretation of the statue in Nebuchadnezzar's dream is debated. Nebuchadnezzar is clearly the head of gold (Daniel 2:38 ). ...
The charge of not worshipping the gods of Nebuchadnezzar leveled against the Jews (Daniel 3:12 ,Daniel 3:12,3:14 ) suggests a statue of Bel-merodach, the patron deity of Babylon, though the statue was possibly of Nebuchadnezzar himself
Gedaliah ben ahikam - 423 BCE) After Nebuchadnezzar exiled most of the Jews from Israel, he appointed Gedaliah to govern those who remained
Bricks - (See Nebuchadnezzar
Hananiah - They were thrown into a furnace after refusing to bow to an idol erected by Nebuchadnezzar
Ahikam - He was father of Gedaliah whom Nebuchadnezzar made governor of the land
Jehoiakim - When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, this prince was also taken and put to death, and his body thrown into the common sewer, according to the prediction of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:18-19
du'ra - (a circle ), the plain where Nebuchadnezzar set up the golden image, ( Daniel 3:1 ) has been sometimes identified with a tract a little below Tekrit , on the left bank of the Tigris, where the name Dur is still found
Azariah - They were thrown into a furnace after refusing to bow to an idol erected by Nebuchadnezzar
Chananiah - They were thrown into a furnace after refusing to bow to an idol erected by Nebuchadnezzar
Boaz - These pillars were broken up and carried to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar
Riblah - Later, when Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon, he was taken to Riblah as a prisoner and viewed the execution of his sons before having his eyes put out (2 Kings 25:4-7 )
Carchemish - Five years afterwards Necho was signally defeated by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 46:1-12
Jehoz'Adak - ( 1 Chronicles 6:14,15 ) When his father was slain at Riblah by order of Nebuchadnezzar, (2 Kings 25:18,21 ) Jehozadak was led away captive to Babylon
Hophra - Hophra must have been defeated by Nebuchadnezzar in Syria in attempting to resist the progress of the Babylonian army, and he received the fugitives from Palestine after the destruction of Jerusalem in b. There is no evidence that Nebuchadnezzar plundered Egypt, as was anticipated by Ezekiel, though he seems to have attacked Hophra’s successor Amasis in b
Evilmerodach - Son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar
Ahikam - His son Gedaliah headed the Jews left in Judah after Nebuchadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem (586 B
Gedali'ah - 588, Nebuchadnezzar departed from Judea, leaving Gedaliah with a Chaldean guard, (Jeremiah 40:5 ) at Mizpah to govern the vinedressers and husbandmen, (Jeremiah 52:16 ) who were exempted from captivity
Jehoiachin - "Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren about the time they were carried away to Babylon," fixing his birth to the time of Nebuchadnezzar's invasion (2 Kings 24:1), namely, three years after Jehoiakim's accession, and eight before his reign ended and Jehoiachin succeeded; but Matthew's language hardly justifies this; Jeremiah's language implies Jehoiachin was a "man," and capable of having a "child" (2 Kings 22:28; 2 Kings 22:30). Jerusalem was an easy prey to Nebuchadnezzar at this time, Judah having been wasted for three or four years by Chaldaean, Ammonite, and Moabite bands, sent by Nebuchadnezzar (as Jehovah's executioner of judgment) in consequence of Jehoiakim's rebellion. Egypt, after its defeat at Carchemish by Nebuchadnezzar, could not interpose (2 Kings 23:7-17). ...
After sending his servants (generals distinct from the Chaldaean and other bands) to besiege Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezzar in person came (2 Chronicles 36:10 margin) at the turn of the year, i. Jehoiachin seeing the impossibility of resistance made a virtue of necessity by going out to Nebuchadnezzar, he, the queen mother (who, as the king was only 18, held chief power; Jeremiah 13:18 undesignedly coincides with and confirms the history, "Say unto the king and to the queen, Humble yourselves," etc. ...
Nebuchadnezzar, after Jehoiakim's rebellion (notwithstanding his agreement at Nebuchadnezzar's first advance to be his vassal) (2 Kings 24:1; Daniel 1:1), would not trust his son Jehoiachin, but carried him away, the queen mother, his wives, chamberlains, and all the men of might, 7,000, and 1,000 crafts. ...
Nebuchadnezzar also carried off the treasures of Jeconiah's house (2 Kings 24:13), "as Jehovah had spoken" to Hezekiah long before (2 Kings 20:17; Jeremiah 15:13; Jeremiah 17:3; Jeremiah 29:2). In 2 Kings 24:14 they are said to be 10,000; the details are specified in 2 Kings 24:15-16; "none remained save the poorest sort of the people of the land," having neither wealth nor skill to raise war, and therefore giving Nebuchadnezzar no fear of rebellion. " In Jeremiah 52:28 the number is 3,023, but that was the number carried away "in the seventh year," "in the eighth year" of Nebuchadnezzar the 10,000 were carried away. ...
Jehoiachin wore prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Genesis 40:13-20; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death. )...
God, in sparing and at last elevating him, rewarded his having surrendered to Nebuchadnezzar, which was God's will (Jeremiah 38:17; Jeremiah 27:6-12; compare 2 Kings 24:12). In the fourth year of his uncle Zedekiah (so called by Nebuchadnezzar instead of Mattaniah), false prophets encouraged the popular hope of the return of Jehoiachin to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 28:4). ) A party of the captives at Babylon also, through the false prophets, expected restoration with Jehoiachin and Nebuchadnezzar's overthrow
Kedar - The Kedarites suffered at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 49:28,29 )
Bridle - The king in one representation is thrusting out the captive's eye with a spear, as Zedekiah was treated by Nebuchadnezzar
Diblath - Here it was that Nebuchadnezzar had sat in judgment on the last Jewish king, Zedekiah, and killed his sons before his eyes, and then blinded him and slain the chief men of Jerusalem
Hoshama - In Jehoiachin's capture by Nebuchadnezzar his mother and wives are mentioned, but not his sons (2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15), and he is doomed to be "childless" in Jeremiah 22:30
Peeled - The Lord is telling us in this passage that Nebuchadnezzar would bruise Tyrus, injure their shipping, and wreck their work
Bul - On the sixth day of this month the Jews fasted, because on that day Nebuchadnezzar put to death the children of Zedekiah in the presence of their unhappy father, whose eyes, after they had been witnesses of this sad spectacle, he ordered to be put out, 2 Kings 25:7
Riblah - At Riblah king Jehoahaz was taken and deposed by Pharaoh- necho; here also Nebuchadnezzar established his headquarters when warring against Judah, 2 Kings 23:33 ; 25:6,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; 52:10
no - The account in Jeremiah 46 speaks of the city being delivered into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar, though afterwards it should be inhabited as in days of old. Nebuchadnezzar overran Egypt in B
Ab - ...
The first day of this month is observed as a fast by the Jews, in memory of Aaron's death; and the ninth, in commemoration of the destruction of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar, in the year before Christ 587. Josephus observes, that the burning of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar happened on the same day of the year on which it was afterward burned by Titus
Zedekiah - His original name was Mattaniah; but when Nebuchadnezzar placed him on the throne as the successor to Jehoiachin he changed his name to Zedekiah. The kingdom was at that time tributary to Nebuchadnezzar; but, despite the strong remonstrances of Jeremiah and others, as well as the example of Jehoiachin, he threw off the yoke of Babylon, and entered into an alliance with Hophra, king of Egypt. This brought up Nebuchadnezzar, "with all his host" (2King 25:1), against Jerusalem
Belshazzar - See MENE...
For a long time Daniel's account of the taking of the city and of Belshazzar being the last king, was held to be contradicted by history, which names several kings between Nebuchadnezzar and the close of the empire. Belshazzar is called the son of Nebuchadnezzar, but this in scripture often means grandson, and Nabonadius is supposed to have married a daughter of Nebuchadnezzar
Zedekiah - When Nebuchadnezzar took Jerusalem, he carried Jeconiah to Babylon, with his wives, children, officers, and the best artificers in Judea, and put in his place his uncle Mattaniah, whose name he changed to Zedekiah, and made him promise with an oath that he would maintain fidelity to him. In the ninth year of his reign, he revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, trusting to the support of Pharaoh-hophra king of Egypt, which proved ineffectual, and despising the faithful remonstrance's of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 37:2,5,7-10 . Zedekiah was taken and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, in Syria, who reproached him with his perfidy, caused his children to be slain before his face and his own eyes to be put out; and then loading him with chains of brass, he ordered him to be sent to Babylon, 2 Kings 25:1-30 Jeremiah 39:1-18 52:1-34 Ezekiel 19:1-14
Babylon (2) - 625, Babylonia speedily extended its sway over most of western Asia and Egypt, and under Nebuchadnezzar became a vast empire, lasting, however, less than a century, and fell before the Medians under Cyrus and Darius, b. Images of the gods were exhibited, probably on frames or sacred vehicles, and, as some suppose, were sometimes set up in a public place, as on the plain of Dura, Daniel 3:1; but late investigations indicate that the image there set up was a statue of Nebuchadnezzar. 625; was in its greatest prosperity during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, lasting 44 years, to b. See Nebuchadnezzar
Merodach - ) Epithet of Bel the Babylonian Jupiter, termed "the senior of the gods," "the judge," and by Nebuchadnezzar in inscriptions "the great lord, the most ancient," and by Neriglissar "the firstborn of gods, the layer up of treasures
Carchemish - Three years later it was taken by Nebuchadnezzar
Carchemish - The Babylonian army, under Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, here met and conquered the army of Pharaoh-necho, king of Egypt (B
Nebo - The name Nebo, or Nabo, is found in the composition of the names of several princes of Babylon; as Nabonassar, Nabopolassar, Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuzaradan, Nebushasban, &c
Gemariah - The son of Hilkiah, sent to Babylon by King Hezekiah with tribute money for Nebuchadnezzar
Pharaoh - ) (See JOSIAH; Nebuchadnezzar; JERUSALEM; EGYPT, on Pharaoh Necho II and Pharaoh Hophra. , Egypt, Syria, and Phoenicia revolted; so he sent his son Nebuchadnezzar to recover those countries. Nebuchadnezzar defeated Necho at Carchemish, 606 B. Ezekiel (Ezekiel 29-32) foretold the conquest of Pharaoh and invasion of Egypt by Nebuchadnezzar. Jerusalem, under Zedekiah, fell before Nebuchadnezzar, 588 B. The civil war between Amasis and Apries would give an opportunity for the invader Nebuchadnezzar (in the 23rd year of his reign: Josephus Nebuchadnezzar gave an opportunity for the revolt which ended in Hophra's death and Amasis' elevation. ...
Berosus alone records Nebuchadnezzar's invasion, but similarly we find Assyrian monuments recording conquests of Egypt either unnoticed by our historians extant or mentioned only by inferior authorities. National vanity would prevent the Egyptian priests from telling Herodotus of Egypt's loss of territory in Syria (which Josephus records) and of Nebuchadnezzar's share in raising Amasis to the throne instead of Hophra The language of
Jeremiah 44:30 is exact to the truth: "I will give Pharaoh Hophra into the hands of his enemies, and of them that seek his life," namely, Amasis and his party; Nebuchadnezzar is not mentioned until the end of the verse
Chaldeans, Chaldees - Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon was called a Chaldean, Ezra 5:12 , and on the taking of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar it was the Chaldeans who destroyed the city, 2 Kings 25 ; and in 2 Chronicles 36:17 Nebuchadnezzar is called 'the king of the Chaldees
Riblah - Here the Egyptian king Pharaoh-nechoh put Jehoahaz in chains and made Eliakim king, and here Nebuchadnezzar brought Zedekiah, murdered his sons before his eyes, and then put out his eyes and bound him in chains to be carried to Babylon
Belshazzar - Son of Nebuchadnezzar, last king of Babylon, before its capture by Cyrus ( Daniel 5:1 )
Garrison - Or rather (Maurer), the obelisks in honor of the tutelary gods of Tyre (as Melecarte, the Tyrian Hercules whose temple stood in Old Tyre) shall go down to the ground before Nebuchadnezzar, the conqueror, just as he treated Egypt's idol statues (Jeremiah 43:11)
Jehoiachin - In his brief reign Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried the king and royal family, the chief men of the nation, and great treasures, unto Babylon
Pavilion - In Jeremiah 43:10 shaphrur , "Nebuchadnezzar shall spread his royal pavilion (literally, rich ornamental tapestry hanging from above round the throne) over these stones
Hazor - A region in Arabia, laid waste by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 49:28 - 33
Seraiah - He was carried captive by Nebuchadnezzar to Babylon, and there put to death (2 Kings 25:18,23 ). When Zedekiah made a journey to Babylon to do homage to Nebuchadnezzar, Seraiah had charge of the royal gifts to be presented on that occasion
Necho ii - 606) under Nebuchadnezzar, who drove the Egyptians back, and took from them all the territory they had conquered, from the Euphrates unto the "river of Egypt" (Jeremiah 46:2 ; 2 Kings 24:7,8 ). (See Nebuchadnezzar
Babylon - ...
We also read of 'hanging gardens' which Nebuchadnezzar built for his wife Amyitis, or Amyhia, daughter of a Median king,to give the place a measure of resemblance to the mountains and wooded hills of her native country. In Jeremiah 50:11 of Babylon it is said, 'O ye destroyers of mine heritage, because ye are grown fat as the heifer at grass, and bellow as bulls;' its broad walls are mentioned, Jeremiah 51:12,58 ; its gates of brass and bars of iron, Isaiah 45:2 ; and Nebuchadnezzar boasted of the 'great Babylon' which he had built by the might of his power and for the honour of his majesty. ...
Among the relies recovered from the various mounds of ruins are some bricks with the names of the kings Neriglissar and Labynetus stamped upon them, but the great majority of those found bear the name of Nebuchadnezzar. Nebuchadnezzar, co-regent with Nabo-polassar, took Jerusalem, and carried many captives and the holy vessels to Babylon, about B. 604Nabo-polassar died and Nebuchadnezzar reigned alone. 603Jehoiakim revolted and in 599 Nebuchadnezzar again took Jerusalem, and Ezekiel was carried to Babylon: this is called the great captivity. Having rebelled against Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, after a siege of eighteen months, once more took Jerusalem, destroyed the city and burnt the house of the Lord, bringing the kingdom of Judah to an end: B. For the personal history of the king see Nebuchadnezzar. 561Nebuchadnezzar died. ...
606 Nebuchadnezzar, co-regent. Nebuchadnezzar reigns alone. * Of Nebuchadnezzar it was said, "Thou, O king, art a king of kings: for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength and glory . ...
The destruction of Babylon was fully foretold in scripture, though some of these prophecies may refer also to still future events, namely, the overthrow by the Lord (typified by Cyrus) of the last holder of Nebuchadnezzar-like authority, namely, the beast, the last head of the revived Roman empire. For 24 years after the death of Nebuchadnezzar Babylon continued the seat of the imperial court
Gemariah - ...
...
The son of Hilkiah, who accompanied Shaphan with the tribute-money from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and was the bearer at the same time of a letter from Jeremiah to the Jewish captives at Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3,4 )
Tema - Jeremiah 25:23 perhaps refers to a campaign of Nebuchadnezzar
Chebar - An opinion that has much to support it is that the "Chebar" was the royal canal of Nebuchadnezzar, the Nahr Malcha, the greatest in Mesopotamia, which connected the Tigris with the Euphrates, in the excavation of which the Jewish captives were probably employed
Captivities of Judah - The captivities of Judah are generally reckoned four: the first, in the year of the world 3398, under King Jehoiakim, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon; the second, in the year of the world 3401, and in the seventh year of the reign of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried three thousand and twenty-three Jews to Babylon; the third, in the year of the world 3406, and in the fourth of Jehoiachin, when this prince, with part of people, was sent to Babylon; and the fourth in the year 3416, under Zedekiah, from which period begins the captivity of seventy years, foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah. The Jews were removed to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, who, designing to render that city the capital of the east, transplanted thither very great numbers of people, subdued by him in different countries. Nebuchadnezzar carried away only the principal inhabitants, the warriors, and artisans of every kind; and he left the husbandmen, the labourers, and in general, the poorer classes, that constitute the great body of the people
Carchemish - Retaken by Nebuchadnezzar three years later, 607 B
Riblah - Here Nebuchadnezzar had his head-quarters in his campaign against Jerusalem, and here also Necho fixed his camp after he had routed Josiah's army at Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29-35 ; 25:6,20,21 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; 52:10 )
Tahapanes - , pavement of brick]'>[1] took place before the chiefs of the fugitives assembled on the platform, and here Nebuchadnezzar spread his royal pavilion" (RSV, "brickwork")
Chebar - Nebuchadnezzar had planted many of the captives taken with Jehoiachin there (2 Kings 24:15). More probably the Chebar is the nahr Malcha, Nebuchadnezzar's royal canal, the greatest (chabeer means great) in Mesopotamia
Euphra'Tes - The great hydraulic works ascribed to Nebuchadnezzar had for their chief object to control the inundation. On its banks stood the city of Babylon; the army of Necho was defeated on its banks by Nebuchadnezzar; Cyrus the Younger and Crassus perished after crossing it; Alexander crossed it, and Trajan and Severus descended it
Hilkiah - Father of Gemariah, who was an emissary from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3 )
Rab-Saris - ]'>[2] officials, one of whom is recorded to have been present at the capture of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, while the other is mentioned among the officials who ordered the release of Jeremiah after the capture of the city ( Jeremiah 39:3 ; Jeremiah 39:13 )
Mattaniah - King Zedekiah's (Jehovah's justice) original name, changed when Nebuchadnezzar put him on the throne instead of his nephew Jehoiachin (2 Kings 24:17)
Teraphim - , and 2 Kings 23:24 And by the Babylonians in the case of Nebuchadnezzar
Nergal-Sharezer - ” He is mentioned as being among the officers of Nebuchadnezzar's court who helped destroy Jerusalem in 586 B. He was a son-in-law of Nebuchadnezzar who usurped the Babylonian throne following the death of Evil-merodach
Gedaliah - Son of Ahikam: he was made governor over those left in the land, with a Chaldean guard, by Nebuchadnezzar
Obadiah - 585, soon after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Zedekiah - Originally named Mattaniah; Nebuchadnezzar changed his name to Zedekiah when he deposed Zedekiah's nephew Jehoiachin. This proves that Nebuchadnezzar treated his vassal kindly, allowing him to choose a new name (Zedekiah is Hebrew, "righteousness of Jehovah") and confirming it as a mark of his supremacy; this name was to be the pledge of his righteously keeping his covenant with Nebuchadnezzar who made him swear by God (Ezekiel 17:12-16; 2 Chronicles 36:13). of the reign of Zedekiah") The kings of Edom, Moab, Ammon, Tyre, and Sidon sent ambassadors in his fourth year to urge Zedekiah to conspire with them against Nebuchadnezzar. Baruch (Baruch 1:8) represents Zedekiah as having caused silver vessels to be made to replace the golden ones carried off by Nebuchadnezzar; possibly this may have been owing to the impression made on Zedekiah by Hananiah's death. 10:7, Section 3) Zedekiah actually leagued with Egypt in treacherous violation of his compact with Nebuchadnezzar. But evidently (Jeremiah 27-28) Zedekiah had been secretly plotting before, in his fourth year; in that year he had gone to Babylon to allay Nebuchadnezzar's suspicion (Jeremiah 51:59), and also sent messengers to Babylon (Jeremiah 37:5-11; Jeremiah 34:21; Ezekiel 17:13-20). ...
Nebuchadnezzar on learning Zedekiah's treachery had sent a Chaldaean army which reduced all Judaea except Jerusalem, Lachish, and Azekah (Jeremiah 34). He was taken for judgment to Riblah at the upper end of Lebanon; there Nebuchadnezzar first killed his sons before his eyes, then caused the eyes of Zedekiah to be "dug out" (Jeremiah 39; Jeremiah 52:4-11). He probably died before Evil Merodach, successor of Nebuchadnezzar, treated kindly Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity, 26 years after the fall of Jerusalem; for no mention is made of him (Jeremiah 52:31)
Apries - Jeremiah threatened this prince with being delivered into the hands of his enemies, as he had delivered Zedekiah, king of Judah, into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. Zedekiah, therefore, relying on his forces, revolted from Nebuchadnezzar, in the year of the world 3414, and before Jesus Christ 590. Early in the year following, Nebuchadnezzar marched against Hezekiah; but as other nations of Syria had shaken off their obedience, he first reduced them to their duty, and toward the end of the year besieged Jerusalem, 2 Kings 25:5 ; 2 Chronicles 36:17 ; Jeremiah 39:1 ; Jeremiah 52:4
Obadiah - The captivity of this verse is in all probability that by Nebuchadnezzar in b
Samgar-Nebo - SAMGAR-NEBO One of the Babylonian princes who, at the taking of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, in the 11th year of Zedekiah, came and sat in the middle gate ( Jeremiah 39:3 )
Johanan - ...
...
Son of Careah, one of the Jewish chiefs who rallied round Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made governor in Jerusalem (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 )
Father - Nebuchadnezzar is called the father of Belshazzar, though he was his grandfather
me'Shach - (guest of a king ), the name given to Mishael, one of the companions of Daniel, who with three others was taught, ( Daniel 1:4 ) and qualified to "stand before" King Nebuchadnezzar, (Daniel 1:5 ) as his personal attendants and advisers
Ahab - The Lord threatened them with a public and ignominious death, before such as they had deceived; and that their names should become a curse; men wishing that their foes might be made like Ahab and Zedekiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon roasted in the fire, Jeremiah 29:21-22
Daniel - ...
A man of faith...
As a youth Daniel had been carried off captive to Babylon when Nebuchadnezzar first attacked Jerusalem (605 BC; Daniel 1:1-6). Being handsome and intelligent, he was trained to be a courtier in Nebuchadnezzar’s palace. ...
This ability enabled Daniel to interpret a puzzling dream for Nebuchadnezzar. As a reward he was promoted to chief administrator in Babylon and head over Nebuchadnezzar’s council of advisers (Daniel 2:48). Daniel knew, however, that his success in interpreting Nebuchadnezzar’s dream came only through his faith in God (Daniel 2:16-19; Daniel 2:24). ...
Daniel’s trust in God showed itself also in the fearless way he told Nebuchadnezzar of the judgment that would fall upon him because of his pride (Daniel 4:19; Daniel 4:25). But Daniel had no joy in announcing the punishment, preferring rather that Nebuchadnezzar change his ways and so avoid the threatened judgment (Daniel 4:27). Nebuchadnezzar had a dream which, Daniel explained, showed that God is the ruler of the world and he sets up and destroys kingdoms according to his will (2:1-49). When Nebuchadnezzar refused to heed Daniel’s warning of the danger of pride, God humbled him. Nebuchadnezzar was then forced to acknowledge that Daniel’s God was the one and only true God (4:1-37). ...
A succeeding king, Belshazzar, failing to learn from Nebuchadnezzar’s experience, brought about his nation’s destruction
Magician - Daniel also speaks of magicians and diviners in Chaldea, under Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 1:20 , &c; ולאשפים ...
זלמכשפים זלכשדים לחרטמים . The fourth word, Casdim, or Chaldeans, has two significations: first, the Chaldean people, over whom Nebuchadnezzar was monarch; the second, a sort of philosophers, who dwelt in a separate part of the city, who were exempt from all public offices and employments
Dream - Other significant dreams are also recorded, such as those of Abimelech (Genesis 20:3-7 ), Pharaoh's chief butler and baker (40:5), Pharaoh (41:1-8), the Midianites (Judges 7:13 ), Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:1 ; 4:10,18 ), the wise men from the east (Matthew 2:12 ), and Pilate's wife (27:19)
Bear - The three ribs probably refer to the three great kings who had gone before, but now had been destroyed; Nebuchadnezzar, his son, and his grandson, Belshazzar
Jehoiachin - He was carried captive to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, along with the flower of the nobility, all the leading men in Jerusalem, and a great body of the general population, some thirteen thousand in all (2 Kings 24:12-16 ; Jeremiah 52:28 )
Hammer - Metaphorically of Babylon (Jeremiah 50:23 ) or Nebuchadnezzar
Rages - In Judith ( Jdt 1:5 ; Jdt 1:15 ) it is said that in Ragau (evidently the same place) Nebuchadnezzar slew in battle ‘Arphaxad’ prince of the Medes
Evil Merodach - Son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar. On Nebuchadnezzar's resuming it at the end of seven years, he heard of his son's misconduct and that Evil Merodach had exulted in his father's calamity
Zerubbabel - In the second year after the Return, he erected an altar and laid the foundation of the temple on the ruins of that which had been destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (3:8-13; ch
Merodach - Nebuchadnezzar was specially devoted to his worship, but the Assyrians reverenced him no less; and even Cyrus, on his conquest of Babylon, treated him with the deepest respect
Artificer - Nebuchadnezzar carried off all the craftsmen (same word as artificers) and smiths from Jerusalem, 2 Kings 24:14 , and he may have made use of their skill to adorn Babylon
Astyages - He had two daughters, Mandane and Amyit: Mandane married Cambyses, the Persian, and was the mother of Cyrus; Amyit married Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, and was the mother of Evil-merodach
ba'Ruch - By the permission of Nebuchadnezzar he remained with Jeremiah at Mizpeh, Jos
Hananiah - The prophecy of Hananiah was to the effect that king Jeconiah and the captives in Babylon would all return in two years’ time, bringing back with them the vessels of the Lord’s house which Nebuchadnezzar had carried away (cf. Jeremiah 27:2 ) from Jeremiah’s neck and breaking it, with the words, ‘Thus saith the Lord: Even so will I break the yoke of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon within two full years from off the neck of all the nations’ ( Jeremiah 28:11 )
Pharaoh - Necho's army was afterward defeated at Carchemish by Nebuchadnezzar, and he lost all his Asiatic possessions. 590, in order to relieve Jerusalem, which was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar. Jerusalem fell, and Nebuchadnezzar made a successful invasion into Egypt
Jeremiah - He was there when Nebuchadnezzar besieged the city (Jeremiah 37:4,5 ), B. He lived till the reign of Evil-Merodach, son of Nebuchadnezzar, and must have been about ninety years of age at his death. He may have died at Tahpanhes, or, according to a tradition, may have gone to Babylon with the army of Nebuchadnezzar; but of this there is nothing certain
Daniel - At the first deportation of the Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (the kingdom of Israel had come to an end nearly a century before), or immediately after his victory over the Egyptians at the second battle of Carchemish, in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim (B. , "prince of Bel," or "Bel protect the king!" His residence in Babylon was very probably in the palace of Nebuchadnezzar, now identified with a mass of shapeless mounds called the Kasr, on the right bank of the river. He made known and also interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream; and many years afterwards, when he was now an old man, amid the alarm and consternation of the terrible night of Belshazzar's impious feast, he was called in at the instance of the queen-mother (perhaps Nitocris, the daughter of Nebuchadnezzar) to interpret the mysterious handwriting on the wall. (See Nebuchadnezzar
Baruch - During the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, he was the keeper of the deed of purchase Jeremiah had made of the territory of Hanameel (Jeremiah 32:12 )
Necho - Josiah, king of Judah, being tributary to the king of Babylon, opposed Necho on his first expedition against Nebuchadnezzar, and gave him battle at Megiddo, where he received the wound of which he died
Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - ”...
Daniel's interpretation was that Nebuchadnezzar and his kingdom had been weighed in the balance and found wanting
Magi - Daniel describes them as men of wisdom, Daniel 1:20; he intercedes for them with Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 2:24; and accepts a position as their chief or master
Gemariah - Son of Hilkiah, the high priest who found the book of the law in the Lord's house, and showed it to Shaphan (2 Kings 22:8); sent by king Zedekiah on an embassy to Nebuchadnezzar; entrusted by Jeremiah with a letter to the captives in Babylon
Jehoiachin - 599, when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, and the great captivity of Judah was accomplished
Nebuchadnezzar - Various have been the opinions of men concerning the wonderful change wrought upon Nebuchadnezzar, as related Daniel 4:28; Dan 4:33; but, after all that hath been said on this subject, the matter stands just where the Scriptures have left it
Arrow - Ezekiel 21:21 , informs us, that Nebuchadnezzar, putting himself at the head of his armies, to march against Zedekiah, king of the Jews, and against the king of the Ammonites, stood at the parting of two ways, to mingle his arrows together in a quiver, in order to divine from thence which way he should march
Habakkuk - 605, and to have been alive at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Mizpah or Mizpeh - It was fortified by Asa as a defense against Israel, 1 Kings 15:22 , was the residence of the governor, under Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 40:6 , and was reoccupied after the captivity, Nehemiah 3:19
Rechabites - This they continued to observe for above three hundred years; but in the last year of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar coming to besiege Jerusalem, the Rechabites were forced to take refuge in the city, though still lodging in tents
Zedeki'ah - 2 Kings 23:31 His original name was Mattaniah, which was changed to Zedekiah by Nebuchadnezzar when he carried off his nephew Jehoiachim to Babylon and left him on the throne of Jerusalem. ) Nebuchadnezzar at once sent an army to ravage Judea. The king's party were overtaken near Jericho and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah, at the upper end of the valley of Lebanon. Nebuchadnezzar, with a refinement of barbarity characteristic of those cruel times ordered the sons of Zedekiah to be killed before him, and lastly his own eyes to be thrust out
Babylon, History And Religion of - After a brief period of glory in which Nebuchadnezzar I (about 1124-1103 B. , Babylonian forces under the crown prince Nebuchadnezzar routed the Egyptians at the decisive Battle of Carchemish (Jeremiah 46:2-12 ). The Babylonian advance, however, was delayed by Nabopolassar's death which obliged Nebuchadnezzar to return to Babylon and assume power. , Nebuchadnezzar II (605-562 B. , Nebuchadnezzar marched on Jerusalem. ...
Nebuchadnezzar appointed Zedekiah over Judah. ...
Apart from his military conquests, Nebuchadnezzar is noteworthy for a massive rebuilding program in Babylon itself. The city spanned the Euphrates and was surrounded by an eleven-mile long outer wall which enclosed suburbs and Nebuchadnezzar's summer palace. Inside the gate was the main palace built by Nebuchadnezzar with its huge throne room. Rebuilt by Nebuchadnezzar, the temple was lavishly decorated with gold. ...
Nebuchadnezzar was the greatest king of the Neo-Babylonian Period and the last truly great ruler of Babylon
Daniel - ) Carried to Babylon in Nebuchadnezzar's first deportation of captives, in the fourth (Jeremiah 25:1; Jeremiah 46:2) or third (Daniel 1:1 counting only complete years) year of Jehoiakim, the first of Nebuchadnezzar (acting under Nabopolassar in the last year of the latter's reign, but reigning alone not until the year after; as Daniel 2:1 proves, for after Daniel's three years' training the year is nevertheless called the "second" of Nebuchadnezzar, i. ...
Daniel was made by Nebuchadnezzar, governor of Babylonia and president of the Babylonian "wise men," not to be confounded with the later Persian magi. Belshazzar or Bel-shar-ezer (on the mother's side descended front Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:11) was joint king with his father; having shut himself up in Babylon he fell there while his father at Borsippa survived. In Daniel 3:2, Hebrew for "princes," Nebuchadnezzar summons his satraps ('achashdarpni , Persian khshtrapa ). But Gedaliah was virtually a satrap under Nebuchadnezzar in Judaea, i. ...
It is not stated in Daniel 3 why Daniel was not among the rulers summoned to worship Nebuchadnezzar's golden image. The king also, regarding him as divine (Daniel 2:46), forbore to summon him to worship the image, the self-deifying formation and setting up of which Daniel's own interpretation probably had suggested unintentionally to Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 2:37-39). ...
The pair Daniel 4 and Daniel 5 shows God's power to humble the world power in the height of its impious arrogance; first Nebuchadnezzar, whose coming hypochondriacal exile among the beasts Daniel foretells with fidelity and tenderness; then Belshazzar, whose blasphemy he more sternly reproves
Nebuzaradan - ) Took the chief Jews for judgment to Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah. By Nebuchadnezzar's direction, Nebuzaradan "looked well to Jeremiah," gave him his choice of going to Babylon or staying, then sent him with victuals and a present, to be protected by Gedaliah the governor left over Judah, after having first told the Jews "Jehovah hath done according as He hath said, because ye have sinned against Jehovah" (Jeremiah 39:11-14; Jeremiah 40:2-5)
Thummim - They were probably lost at the destruction of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar
Hazor - Place in 'the east' that was to be smitten by Nebuchadnezzar, and be a desolation for ever
Thigh - The nation of Greece was to be the third after Nebuchadnezzar, even as the head is first, the breast is second, and the thigh is the third in the body
Lamentations of Jeremiah - Contents— The lamentations are an elegaic poem on the destruction of Jerusalem and Judah by Nebuchadnezzar
Nebo - The extensive prevalence of this worship among the Chaldeans and Assyrians, is evident from the many compound proper names occurring in the Scriptures, of which this word forms part; as Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuzaradan, Nebushasban, Jeremiah 39:9,13 ; and also in the classics, as Naboned, Nabonassar, Nabopolassar, etc
Emperor Worship - King Nebuchadnezzar made an image of gold, presumably of himself, and commanded everyone to fall down and worship the image or be killed (Daniel 3:5-6 ). Thereafter, Nebuchadnezzar permitted them to worship their God unhindered (Daniel 3:29 )
Tongues, Confusion of - TOWER OF]'>[1] Inscription of Nebuchadnezzar . --In the Borsippa inscription of Nebuchadnezzar there is an allusion to the confusion of tongues
Zidon, Sidon - A warning message from Jeremiah was sent to the king of Zidon and neighbouring kings, exhorting them to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, who was Jehovah's servant. We do not read that Nebuchadnezzar took Zidon, indeed his lengthy siege of Tyre probably enriched Zidon
Captivity - 605), Nebuchadnezzar having overcome the Egyptians at Carchemish, advanced to Jerusalem with a great army. In the same spirit he rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 24:1 ), who again a second time (B. But Jehoiachin's counsellors displeasing Nebuchadnezzar, he again a third time turned his army against Jerusalem, and carried away to Babylon a second detachment of Jews as captives, to the number of 10,000 (2 Kings 24:13 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; 2 Chronicles 36:10 ), among whom were the king, with his mother and all his princes and officers, also Ezekiel, who with many of his companions were settled on the banks of the river Chebar (q. Nebuchadnezzar, with a powerful army, besieged Jerusalem, and Zedekiah became a prisoner in Babylon
Babylon - Wit this coincide many ancient traditions, while some speak of Semiramis as the founder, and others of Nebuchadnezzar. These accounts may all be reconciled, by supposing that Semiramis rebuilt the ancient city, and the Nebuchadnezzar. These accounts may all be reconciled, by supposing that Semiramis rebuilt the ancient city, and that Nebuchadnezzar afterwards greatly enlarged and adorned it. Nebuchadnezzar's palace was in an inclosure six miles in circumference. ...
Under Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon reached the summit of her greatness and splendor. Under the reign of Nebuchadnezzar's grandson
Alexander - In the statue seen by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream, Daniel 2:39 , the belly of brass was the emblem of Alexander
Conceive - ...
Nebuchadnezzar hath conceived a purpose against you
Dragon - The same term, tannîn , is also applied metaphorically to Pharaoh ( Psalms 74:13 , Isaiah 51:9 ; and thus perhaps refers to the crocodile), and to Nebuchadnezzar ( Jeremiah 51:34 )
Obadiah, Book of - There are on record the account of four captures of Jerusalem, (1) by Shishak in the reign of Rehoboam (1 Kings 14:25 ); (2) by the Philistines and Arabians in the reign of Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:16 ); (3) by Joash, the king of Israel, in the reign of Amaziah (2 Kings 14:13 ); and (4) by the Babylonians, when Jerusalem was taken and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (B
Nebo (2) - At Birs Nimrud (Borsippa) was his ancient temple, which Nebuchadnezzar rebuilt
Bricks - There is a brick from Babylon in the British Museum, which bears the inscription in cuneiform characters "I am Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, the restorer of the temples Sag-ili and Zida, the eldest son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon
Baruch - It relates that the Jews in Babylon sent a deputation to Jerusalem with money for sacrifices, and requested that prayers might be offered for Nebuchadnezzar and his son Belshazzar
Mattani'ah -
The original name of Zedekiah king of Judah, which was changed when Nebuchadnezzar placed him on the throne
Guard - Tabbach (literally butcher or slaughterer) is a Hebrew term used only for officers of foreign kings (of Pharaoh, Genesis 37:36 ; Genesis 39:1 ; of Nebuchadnezzar, 2 Kings 25:8-20 ; Jeremiah 39:9-13 )
Seraiah - He was put to death, with other distinguished captives, by order of Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18 ; 2 Kings 25:21 , Jeremiah 52:24 ; Jeremiah 52:27
Seraiah - When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar he was carried to Riblah, and there put to death
Zedekiah - Zedekiah was made king in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (2 Kings 24:17 )
Gentiles, Times of the - After long patience of God with Israel the house of David was set aside and carried into captivity, the power of government for God was transferred to the Gentile, and the times of the Gentiles commenced in the person of Nebuchadnezzar
Babel - Several of them bear an inscription of Nebuchadnezzar
Lamentations of Jeremiah - An elegiac poem, composed by the prophet on occasion of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Daniel - This young man of nobility was taken captive by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, and elevated to high rank in the Babylonian and Persian kingdoms. ...
He was active throughout the long reign of Nebuchadnezzar (604-562 B
Babel, Tower of - The treasures Nebuchadnezzar brought from Jerusalem were laid up in this temple ( 2 Chronicles 36:7 )
Dibon - Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the city in 582 B
Dreams - He also used dreams in the case of Nebuchadnezzar and of Daniel in order to reveal His will and purpose concerning, the future
Famine And Drought - The siege of cities also resulted in famine, such as the siege of Samaria by Ben-hadad (2 Kings 6:24-25 ) and the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:2-3 ). See Ben-hadad ; Jerusalem ; Nebuchadnezzar ; Samaria; Water
Daniel - He was chosen, with his three companions, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, to reside at Nebuchadnezzar's court, where he received a suitable education, and made great progress in all the sciences of the Chaldeans, but declined to pollute himself by eating provisions from the king's table, which would often be ceremonially unclean to a Jew, or defiled by some connection with idol-worship. Here Daniel soon displayed his prophetic gifts in interpreting a dream of Nebuchadnezzar, by whom he was made governor of Babylon, and head of the learned and priestly class. At a later period he interpreted another dream of Nebuchadnezzar, and afterwards the celebrated vision of Belshazzar-one of whose last works was to promote Daniel to an office much higher than he had previously held during his reign, Daniel 5:29 8:27
Pharaoh - Pharaoh Hophra, contemporary with Nebuchadnezzar. Zedekiah formed an alliance with him against Nebuchadnezzar, and he drove the Assyrians from Palestine, took Zidon and Tyre, and returned to Egypt with great spoil
Haggai - He may have been one of the captives taken to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar
Rama - (Isaiah 10:29 ) refers to it, and also Jeremiah, who was once a prisoner there among the other captives of Jerusalem when it was taken by Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 39:8-12 ; 40:1 )
Boaz - The pillars, which were hollow, were broken up and carried to Babylon at the fall of Jerusalem before Nebuchadnezzar
Azekah - The tribe of Judah occupied it in Nehemiah's day (Nehemiah 11:30 ), after it had been one of the last cities to fall to Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in 588 B
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar visited Jerusalem, bound Jehoiakim in chains to carry him to Babylon, but apparently altered his plans and left him at Jerusalem as a vassal; or, if he carried him to Babylon, allowed him to return
Jeremiah - The fidelity of the prophet often endangered his life, and he was in prison when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar
Captivity - Thirdly, Nebuchadnezzar carried away Judith under Zedekiah to Babylon, 588 B. From Jeremiah 52:12; Jeremiah 52:15; Jeremiah 52:28-29; Jeremiah 52:30 we learn Nebuchadnezzar in his seventh (or eighth, according to the month with which the counting of the year begins) year carried away 3,023; but in 2 Kings 24:14; 2 Kings 24:16; Luke 21:20-24; 2 Kings 24:000, and 7,000 men of might, and 1,000 craftsmen; the 3,023 were probably of Judah, the remaining 7,000 were of the other tribes of Israel, of whom some still had been left after the Assyrian deportation; the 1,000 craftsmen were exclusive of the 10,000. In the 18th or 19th year of Nebuchadnezzar 832 of the most illustrious persons were carried away. In the 23rd year of Nebuchadnezzar, 745 persons, besides the general multitude of the poor, and the residue of the people in the city, and the deserters, were carried away by Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard. In Daniel 1:1-2, we find that in the third year of Jehoiakim Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried away part of the temple vessels of Jehovah to the land of Shinar, to the house of his god Bel. ...
Nebuchadnezzar had intended to carry Jehoiakim to Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:6-7); but Jehoiakim died before Nebuchadnezzar's intention could be effected (Jeremiah 22:18-19; Jeremiah 36:30), and. Now Jehoiachin's third year was one year before Nebuchadnezzar's accession (2 Kings 23:36; 2 Kings 24:12)
Babel - Nebuchadnezzar included it in the great circumvallation of 480 stadia. Nebuchadnezzar's temple or tower of Nebo stood on the basement of the old tower of Babel. broad, 75 high; on it Nebuchadnezzar built seven other stages. "...
But the earliest Babylonian monuments show that the primitive Babylonians whose structures by Nebuchadnezzar's time were in ruins, had a vocabulary undoubtedly Cushite or Ethiopian, analogous to the Galla tongue in Abyssinia. ...
The palace of Nebuchadnezzar, E. It was originally coated with fine burnt brick; all the inscribed bricks bear the name of Nebuchadnezzar, who rebuilt it. Kasr is Nebuchadnezzar's great palace, a square of 700 yards each way. The pale yellow burnt bricks are stamped with Nebuchadnezzar's name and titles; "Nebuchadnezzar, son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon. ...
The Amram mound is the ancient palace, as old as Babylon itself; its bricks containing the names of kings before Nebuchadnezzar; that king mentions it in his inscriptions. The two lines of rampart parallel to the river are probably embankments of the great reservoir mentioned by Nebuchadnezzar in the monuments, and lying E. Kudur Lagomer was the great conqueror, subduing distant Palestine and Syria, a feat not again achieved until Nebuchadnezzar, 1,600 years later. Twelve monarchs and two interreigns interpose between Nabonassar and Nabopolassar; then come consecutively Nebuchadnezzar, Illoarudamus, Nerigassolassarus, Nabonadius, Cyrus. Nabopolassar deserted to the enemy, arranged a marriage between his son Nebuchadnezzar and the Median leader's daughter, and joined hi besieging the Assyrian capital. (See Nebuchadnezzar. Nabopolassar sent Nebuchadnezzar; and the latter at the battle of Carchemish, on the Euphrates, regained all the lost territory for Babylon (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2-12. ) Nebuchadnezzar was already at Egypt when news of his father's death recalled him, and he ascended the throne 604 B. Herodotus makes him son of a queen Nitocris and Labynetus; but the inscriptions do not directly support his having any connection with Nebuchadnezzar. Probably Balshazzar was grandson of Nebuchadnezzar, as indeed is asserted by Scripture (Jeremiah 27:7; Daniel 5:2; Daniel 5:11; Daniel 5:13), and was suffered by the usurper Nabonahit (as Nabonidus is called in the inscriptions), who adopted him as son, to be subordinate king and his acknowledged successor, in order to conciliate the legitimate party; perhaps Nabonahit married Nebuchadnezzar's daughter or granddaughter (Nitocris) to strengthen his throne, and by her was father to Belshazzar
Abednego - Abednego was thrown into a fiery furnace, at Babylon, with his two companions Shadrach and Meshach for refusing to adore the statue erected by the command of Nebuchadnezzar
Esdraelon - " "It has been a chosen place for encampment in every contest carried on in this country, from the days of Nebuchadnezzar, king of the Assyrians, in the history of whose wars with Arphaxad it is mentioned as the Great Plain of Esdraelon, until the disastrous march of Napoleon Bonaparte from Egypt into Syria
Dragon - The second term has four possible uses: (1) “great sea monster” (KJV, “great whales”) in the sense of a large sea creature (Genesis 1:21 ; Psalm 148:7 ), possibly a whale; this sense of tannin as created being may serve as a correction of sense 4; (2) a snake ( Exodus 7:9-10 ,Exodus 7:9-10,7:12 ; Deuteronomy 32:33 ; Psalm 91:13 ); (3) a crocodile (Jeremiah 51:34 ; Ezekiel 29:3 ; Revelation 20:1-3 ); here the beast is used as a symbol of Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon or the Egyptian Pharaoh; (4) a mythological sea monster symbolic of the forces of chaos and evil in opposition to God's creative and redemptive work (Psalm 74:12-14 ; Job 7:12 ; Job 26:12-13 ; Isaiah 27:1 ; Isaiah 51:9-10 )
Heifer - As the gadfly attacks the heifer so "destruction cometh" on Egypt, namely, Nebuchadnezzar the destroyer or agitator sent by Jehovah; Vulgate translated suitably to the image of a heifer, "a goader," qerets
Zerubbabel - by Nebuchadnezzar; 2 Kings 24:10-17 ) and the son of Shealtiel (Ezra 3:2 ), second son of Jehoiachin (1 Chronicles 3:16-17 )
Left, Remain - So, yether is used to refer to “the rest of the vessels” left in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar ( Kenites - They were conquered and carried into captivity, by Nebuchadnezzar
Chaldeans - His son Nebuchadnezzar invaded Palestine, as foretold by Jeremiah and Habakkuk, Ezra 5:12 Jeremiah 39:5
Rab'Bah - (2 Samuel 12:26-31 ) Long after, at the date of the invasion of Nebuchadnezzar, (Jeremiah 49:2,3 ) it had walls and palaces
Belshazzar - Rawlinson, strews that Nabonedus admitted his son Belshazzar into a share of the kingdom, just as Nabopolassar admitted Nebuchadnezzar his sort to share in the government, Xerxes admitted his son Artaxerxes, and Augustus his successor Tiberius; so that the discrepancy is cleared. ...
Daniel having been summoned at the suggestion of Nitocris, the queen mother, probably wife of Evil Merodach, Nebuchadnezzar's son, faithfully reproved him for that though knowing how God had humbled his forefather Nebuchadnezzar for God-despising, self-magnifying pride, he yet "lifted himself against the Lord of heaven"; therefore ΜΕΝΕ , God has numbered thy years of reign and the number is complete, compare Psalms 90:12
on (2) - "Nebuchadnezzar shall break the standing images of Beth Shemesh in Egypt. Josephus (Ant 10:9, section 7) says Nebuchadnezzar, the fifth year after Jerusalem's fall, left the siege of Tyre to march against Egypt
Daniel - He was placed in the court of Nebuchadnezzar, and was afterward raised to situations of great rank and power, both in the empire of Babylon and of Persia. The book of Daniel is a mixture of history and prophecy: in the first six chapters is recorded a variety of events which occurred in the reigns of Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar, and Darius; and, in particular, the second chapter contains Nebuchadnezzar's prophetic dream concerning the four great successive monarchies, and the everlasting kingdom of the Messiah, which dream God enabled Daniel to interpret
Jehoiakim - In this case not so; the pagan kings Pharaoh and Nebuchadnezzar made Jehoiakim and Zedekiah ("Jehovah's righteousness") confirm their covenant of subjection with the seal of Jehovah's name, the Jews' own God, by whom they had sworn fealty. " Nebuchadnezzar from Carchemish marched to Jerusalem, and fettered him as Pharaoh Necho's tributary, in the third (Dan 1) or fourth year of his reign (the diversity being caused by reckoning Jehoahaz' reign as a year, or not), intending to take him to Babylon; bat afterward for the sake of his former ally Josiah, his father, restored him as a vassal. Nebuchadnezzar, not able in person to chastise him, sent marauding "bands" of Chaldaeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:1-7). ...
Ammon had seized on Gad's territory, upon Israel's exile, and acted as Nebuchadnezzar's agent to scourge Judah (Jeremiah 49:1-2; Ezekiel 25:3). Jehovah was the primary sender of these scourges (rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar, after promising fealty, was rebellion against God: Jeremiah 27:6-8; Ezra 5:14), not only for Jehoiakim's sins but for those of his forefather Manasseh, in whose steps he trod, and the "innocent blood which Jehovah would not pardon. )...
Jehoiakim was probably slain in a battle with Nebuchadnezzar's Chaldean and other "bands," and had no burial; possibly his own oppressed subjects slew him, and "cast out" his body to conciliate his invaders
Egypt - By Necho being able to attack the king of Assyria, in so distant a place as Carchemish shows the strength of Egypt at that time, but the power of Babylon was increasing, and after three years Nebuchadnezzar defeated the army of Necho at Carchemish, and recovered every place from the river of Egypt to the Euphrates; and "the king of Egypt came not again any more out of his land. Zedekiah had been made governor of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, but he revolted and formed an alliance with Hophra. Nebuchadnezzar raised the siege, attacked and defeated him, and then returned and re-established the siege of Jerusalem. ' Abdallatif, an Arab writer, says that Nebuchadnezzar ravaged Egypt and ruined all the country for giving an asylum to the Jews who fled from him, and that it remained in desolation forty years. ...
When Nebuchadnezzar had destroyed Jerusalem, he left some Jews in the land under Gedaliah the Governor; but Gedaliah being slain, they fled into Egypt, taking Jeremiah with them, to Tahpanhes. The series of prophecies give an approximate date for the devastation of Egypt by Nebuchadnezzar. 572, and Nebuchadnezzar died B. ...
After Nebuchadnezzar, Egypt became tributary to Cyrus: Cambyses was its first Persian king of the twenty-seventh dynasty. Afterwards he was defeated by Nebuchadnezzar at the same place. ) Hophra, or Apries, ally of Zedekiah, was conquered by Nebuchadnezzar (B
ba'Bel - The mound of the Kasr marks the site of the great palace of Nebuchadnezzar. The mound of Amram is thought to represent the "hanging gardens" of Nebuchadnezzar; but most probably it represents the ancient palace, coeval with Babylon itself, of which Nebuchadnezzar speaks in his inscriptions as adjoining his own more magnificent residence
No - It was afterwards "delivered into the hand" of Nebuchadnezzar and Assurbani-pal (Jeremiah 46:25,26 )
Adoration - Demanded by Nebuchadnezzar in honour of his image, Daniel 3:5 ; requested by Satan, at the temptation of our Lord, Matthew 4:9 ; paid to the Lord when an infant by the wise men, and often in the Gospels, Matthew 2:11 ; Mark 5:33 ; Luke 5:8 ; John 11:32 ; and in heaven by the elders to God and the Lord Jesus, Revelation 4:10 ; Revelation 5:8,14 ; Revelation 19:4
Sepharvaim - )...
Nebuchadnezzar built the old temple, as the sacred spot where Xisuthrus deposited the antediluvian annals before entering the ark, from whence his posterity afterward recovered them (Berosus Nebuchadnezzar's reservoir adjoining
Chald a - Chaldæa is noticed in Scripture as the native country of Abram, Genesis 11:31; its people attacked Job, Job 1:17, and it was the term by which the empire of Nebuchadnezzar was sometimes called
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - Josiah king of Judah being tributary to the king of Babylon, opposed Necho on his first expedition against Nebuchadnezzar, and gave him battle at Megiddo, where he received the wound of which he died; and Necho pressed forward, without making any long stay in Judea
Ark of the Covenant - It was probably taken captive or destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, Idumea - When Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem, the Idumaeans joined him, and encouraged him to raze the very foundation of the city; but their cruelty did not long continue unpunished. Five years after the taking of Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezzar humbled all the states around Judea, particularly Idumaea, though he did not carry them captive; and subsequently John Hyrcanus drove them from Southern Judea, into which they had penetrated, entirely conquered them, and obliged them to receive circumcision and law
Daniel, Book of - The times of Gentile domination had begun by Nebuchadnezzar taking Jerusalem and being called king of kings, to whom God had given a kingdom, and made him ruler over all the children of men. The prophetical aspect of the first division begins with Nebuchadnezzar's dream. Nebuchadnezzar commanded all to worship the image he had set up; but three faithful ones refused to obey, and were thrown into the fiery furnace. ...
Daniel 4 : The dream and the interpretation shows that Nebuchadnezzar himself was thegreat tree to be cut down, and the prophet exhorted him to renounce his sins and reform his ways, and peradventure the judgement might be postponed. Now he could say, "I Nebuchadnezzar praise and extol and honour the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgement: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase. Daniel faithfully reminded Belshazzar of how God had dealt with his father (or rather his grandfather) Nebuchadnezzar for his pride; adding that though the king knew all this he had lifted up himself against the God of heaven, and had desecrated the vessels of God's house by drinking wine in them to his gods, and foretells his destruction. It is important to remember that Daniel's prophecy embraces the 'times of the Gentiles' — running on from the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar to the restoration of the Jews whenruled over by the Son of David
Jeremiah, Book of - 599, when Zedekiah was left in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, and Jerusalem was not destroyed until B. When Nebuchadnezzar came against Jerusalem, Zedekiah sent to the prophet to know whether the Lord would appear for them. The people carried away with Jeconiah to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar are compared to good figs; but those left in the land under Zedekiah to bad ones. ...
Jeremiah 25 gives a summary of God's judgements by Nebuchadnezzar, with a seventy years' captivity for Judah: then Babylon and all the nations that surrounded Palestine should come under God's judgements, but judgement begins with the city called by God's name. Jeremiah was protected by Nebuchadnezzar
Daniel, Book of - , Nebuchadnezzar]'>[1] away to Babylon; where they were servants to him and his sons until the reign of the kingdom of Persia'" (2 Chronicles 36:20 )
Kings, the Books of - They contain the annals of the Jewish commonwealth from the accession of Solomon till the subjugation of the kingdom by Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonians (apparently a period of about four hundred and fifty-three years)
Migdol - The coming doom of Egypt at the hand of Nebuchadnezzar was to be proclaimed there (Jeremiah 46:13-14 )
Jeremiah - He appears to have stood high in the estimation of Nebuchadnezzar
Judah the Kingdom of - Tiglath-pileser distressed Judah during the reign of Ahaz, 2 Chronicles 28:20; Sennacherib's host of 185,000 men was destroyed by the angel of the Lord in Hezekiah's reign, 2 Chronicles 32:21; 2 Kings 19:35; Manasseh was carried away captive into Babylon, 2 Chronicles 33:11 : Jehoiachin was also made captive; Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, and was defeated, his sons slain before his eyes, and he made captive; Jerusalem was taken in b
Eagle - The march of Nebuchadnezzar against Jerusalem, is predicted in similar terms: "Behold, he shall come up as clouds, and his chariots as a whirlwind: his horses are swifter than eagles," Jeremiah 4:13 48:40 49:22 Hosea 8:1
Dan'Iel - (Daniel 1:8-16 ) At the close of his three years discipline, (Daniel 1:5,18 ) Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, (Daniel 1:17 ) of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. " (Daniel 2:48 ) He afterwards interpreted the second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, (Daniel 4:8-27 ) and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar
re'Chab - The invasion of Judah by Nebuchadnezzar, in B
Obadi'ah - He there speaks of the conquest of Jerusalem and the captivity of Jacob as having occurred, He probably refers to the captivity by Nebuchadnezzar, B
Captivity - In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3023 Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, in the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, b
Captivity - In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3,023Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, that is, in the seventh and eighth years of Nebuchadnezzar, B
Exile - King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon dashed Egypt's hopes when he defeated the Egyptians at the battle of Carchemish in 605 B. ...
After defeating the Egyptians, Nebuchadnezzar laid siege to Jerusalem, the capital city of Judah, in 598 B. ) before Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the city of Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:34-24:6 ; 2 Chronicles 36:4-8 ). ...
Nebuchadnezzar appointed Zedekiah, a third son of Joshua to rule the vassal state of Judah for eleven years (597-586 B
Ammon, Ammonites - When next we hear of the Ammonites, Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon is employing them to harass the refractory Judæan king Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 24:2 ). Later, the domination of the Babylonian compelled Ammon and Israel to become friends, for Ammon conspired with King Zedekiah against Nebuchadnezzar ( Jeremiah 27:3 ), and during the sieges of Jerusalem many Judæans had migrated to Ammon ( Jeremiah 40:11 ). ’...
After the destruction of Jerusalem, Baalis, king of Ammon, sent a man to assassinate Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made governor of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Fast - ...
...
The fast of the tenth month (Compare Jeremiah 52:4 ; Ezekiel 33:21 ; 2 Kings 25:1 ), to commemorate the beginning of the siege of the holy city by Nebuchadnezzar
Jeshua - High priest taken into the Exile by King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in 586 B
Drunk - ...
Jeremiah 46:10 (a) By this figure we are told that the land of Egypt was completely overwhelmed and overcome by the sword of GOD's wrath through His servant, Nebuchadnezzar
Ahab - A false prophet among the captives of Babylon who prophesied a lie, and was roasted in the fire by Nebuchadnezzar
a'Hab - (2 Kings 9:26 ) ...
A lying prophet, who deceived the captive Israelites in Babylon, and was burnt to death by Nebuchadnezzar
Dreams - Pharaoh himself, and Nebuchadnezzar, are instances
Daniel - At the close of his three years' discipline, Daniel 1:5; Daniel 1:18, Daniel had an opportunity of exercising his peculiar gift, Daniel 1:17, of interpreting dreams, on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's decree against the Magi. He afterwards interpreted a second dream of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 4:8-27, and the handwriting on the wall which disturbed the feast of Belshazzar
Moabites - They aided Nebuchadnezzar against the Jews, 2 Kings 24:2 Ezekiel 25:6-11 ; and after these began to be carried captive, appear to have regained their old possessions north of the Arnon, Isaiah 15:1-16:14
e'Dom, Idumae'a - (2 Chronicles 20:22 ) They joined Nebuchadnezzar when that king besieged Jerusalem
Dreams - The dreams of Nebuchadnezzar described in Daniel 2:1 and Daniel 4:1 are good examples of this kind of dream. First, Nebuchadnezzar believed his dream to have meaning
Daniel, Theology of - The first verse of the book asserts that Nebuchadnezzar came to besiege Jerusalem. But the next verse makes it clear that Nebuchadnezzar was not acting in opposition to the will of God. In fact, whatever success [1] hand" (v. ...
After Daniel steadfastly resisted the cultural pressure to compromise, God "gave" (natan [2]) him favor before Nebuchadnezzar's chief of staff (v. The stone cut by supernatural forces in chapter 2 demolished the statue of Nebuchadnezzar's dream symbolizing the human kingdoms of the earth. The God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego controlled the forces of nature with startling effect on Nebuchadnezzar (chap. ...
In the narratives of chapters 1-6, Nebuchadnezzar and Belshazzar are perfect examples of human leaders who rebel against God's authority
Gentiles - ...
"The times of the Gentiles" began with Judah's depression and captivity under Nebuchadnezzar, to whom God delegated the world empire (Jeremiah 27:6-7), from whence Jeremiah's counsel to the Jews to submit to hint was true patriotism, not cowardice
On - It was predicted by Jeremiah 43:13 , and by Ezekiel 30:17 , that this place, with its temples and inhabitants, should be destroyed; which was probably fulfilled by Nebuchadnezzar
Rechabites - This was the institution of the children of Rechab; and this they continued to observe for upward of three hundred years, from the time of Jehu to that of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, when Nebuchadnezzar coming to besiege Jerusalem, the Rechabites were obliged to leave the country and take refuge in the city
Babel - See Nebuchadnezzar
Servant - So Nebuchadnezzar is called the servant of God
Captivities of the Jews - ( 2 Kings 18:13 ) Nebuchadnezzar, in the first half of his reign (B
Babylon - Nebuchadnezzar's palace, an immense pile of buildings, believed to be nearly six miles in circumference. The hanging-gardens, one of the seven wonders of the world, built by Nebuchadnezzar to please his Median queen, Amytis, who longed for her native mountains. 625, it became an independent kingdom, and under Nebuchadnezzar was enlarged, beautified, and reached the height of its magnificence
Assyria - Playfair is of opinion that there were two princesses of this name, who flourished at different periods; one, the consort of Ninus; and another, who lived five generations before Nitocris, queen of Nebuchadnezzar. Cyaxares, king of Media, assisted Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, in the siege of Nineveh, which they took and destroyed, B. At length Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, married Amyit, the daughter of Astyages, king of the Medes, and sister of Cyaxares and by this marriage, the two families having contracted affinity, they conspired against the Assyrians. Nabopolassar being old, and Astyages dead, their sons Nebuchadnezzar and Cyaxares led the armies of the two nations against Nineveh, slew Sarac, destroyed the city, and shared the kingdom of the Assyrians. With this victory commenced the great successes of Nebuchadnezzar and Cyaxares, and it laid the foundation of the two collateral empires of the Babylonians and Medes, which were branches of the Assyrian empire; and hence the time of the fall of the Assyrian empire is determined, the conquerors being then in their youth
Babylon - This was the great palace of Nebuchadnezzar
Lamentations, Book of - According to tradition, he retired after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar to a cavern outside the Damascus gate, where he wrote this book
Ezekiel, Book of - ...
...
Prophecies delivered after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar: the triumphs of Israel and of the kingdom of God on earth (Ezekiel 33-39 ); Messianic times, and the establishment and prosperity of the kingdom of God (40;48)
Moab - Under Nebuchadnezzar the Moabites acted as the auxiliaries of the Chaldeans, 2 Kings 24:2; 2 Samuel 8:2; and during the exile they took possession once more of their ancient territory, vacated by the tribes of Reuben and Gad; as did the Ammonites also
Pride - ...
See the cases of Pharaoh, Haman, Nebuchadnezzar, Herod, and others
Bel - It was, probably, the statue of this god which Nebuchadnezzar, being returned to Babylon after the end of the Jewish war, set up and dedicated in the plain of Dura; the story of which is related at large, Daniel 3
Edom - They took part with the Chaldeans when Nebuchadnezzar captured Jerusalem, and afterwards they invaded and held possession of the south of Palestine as far as Hebron
Babel, Tower of - In the third were found two terra cotta cylinders, now in the British Museum, stating that having fallen into decay since it was erected it was repaired by Nebuchadnezzar
Lachish - "...
It held out against Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 34:7)
Gaza - the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar conquered Gaza and made it a part of his empire
Iron - ...
Jeremiah 28:13 (b) As wood is easily broken, but iron cannot be broken, so the oppression of former invaders would not be as severe and difficult as the oppression brought by Nebuchadnezzar
Lamentations of Jeremiah - Josephus, and several other learned men, have referred them to the death of Josiah; but the more common opinion is, that they were applicable only to some period subsequent to the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Decrees - ...
God delivers Daniel and his friends from various human decrees—one by Nebuchadnezzar to kill the sages of Babylon (Daniel 2:13 ), another to cremate anyone not worshiping the image of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 3:10-11 ), a third "immutable" decree to cast to lions anyone praying to a god or person besides Darius the Mede (Daniel 6:7-9 )
Chronology - This began in the 1st year ...
of Nebuchadnezzar, and Jerusalem was destroyed in his 19th year: 70 - 18 = 52. ...
605 Nebuchadnezzar reigns alone
Belshazzar - the last king of Babylon, and, according to Hales and others, the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar, Daniel 5:18 . Isaiah, who represents the Babylonian dynasty as "the scourge of Palestine," styles Nebuchadnezzar "a serpent," Evil Merodach "a cockatrice," and Belshazzar "a fiery flying serpent," the worst of all, Isaiah 14:4-29
Tabor - as it towers high and unique by itself, so Nebuchadnezzar is one not to be matched as a foe
Zephaniah - Slain by Nebuchadnezzar as an accomplice in Zedekiah's rebellion (Jeremiah 52:24; Jeremiah 52:27)
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - Within four years of the close of Josiah's reign Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, the holy vessels carried away, and the captivity of Judah commenced
Tribe - Nebuchadnezzar took the city of Jerusalem, entirely ruined it, and took away all the inhabitants of Judah and Benjamin to Babylon, and the other provinces of his empire, A
Artaxerxes - He took Babylon from Belshazzar, son of Nebuchadnezzar; and he put in his place Kiresch, who by us is called Cyrus
Kings - The first book of Kings commences with an account of the death of David, and contains a period of a hundred and twenty-six years, to the death of Jehoshaphat; and the second book of Kings continues the history of the kings of Israel and Judah through a period of three hundred years, to the destruction of the city and temple of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Mordecai - He was carried captive, to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, with Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah, king of Judah, A
Bird - Bar_3:17 , speaking of the kings of Babylon says, "They had their pastime with the fowls of the air;" and Daniel 2:38 , tells Nebuchadnezzar that God had made the fowls of the air subject to him
Exaltation - Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon did conquer Jerusalem and was overcome with pride, but after God struck him down with insanity, Nebuchadnezzar praised and exalted the King of heaven (Daniel 4:30,37 )
Pha'Raoh, - The army was probably posted at Carchemish, and was there defeated by Nebuchadnezzar in the fourth year of Necho, B. In the Bible it is related that Zedekiah, the last king of Judah was aided by a Pharaoh against Nebuchadnezzar, in fulfillment of it treaty, and that an army came out of Egypt, so that the Chaldeans were obliged to raise the siege of Jerusalem
Jehonadab - The name Rechab, "rider," may also imply their unsettled pilgrim state, from which they deviated only when in fear of Nebuchadnezzar they took refuge within Jerusalem; but even there they would not for any consideration violate the law of their forefather
Servant, Service - ...
Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (1 Samuel 17:58 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-Hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Gedaliah - Left by Nebuchadnezzar, after the destruction of the temple (588 B
Alliances - ...
Zedekiah, the last king of Judah, leant on Egypt, and Pharaoh Hophra raised the siege of Jerusalem for a time; but Nebuchadnezzar returned and took it (Jeremiah 37:1-5; Jeremiah 37:39)
Captivity - Nebuchadnezzar, B
Names - When power was committed to the Gentiles under the headship of Nebuchadnezzar it was said, "THE GOD OF HEAVEN hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory
zi'Don, - ( Joshua 13:6 ; Judges 18:7 ) From the time of Solomon to the invasion of Nebuchadnezzar Zidon is not often directly mentioned in the Bible, and it appears to have been subordinate to Tyre
Habakkuk - The Babylonian armies were led by the energetic Nebuchadnezzar, who was soon to succeed his father Nabopolassar as king. Over the next ten or eleven years, Jehoiakim tried to play the Babylonians off against the Egyptians until he finally exhausted the patience of Nebuchadnezzar. That same year, Jehoiakim died, leaving his son, Jehoiachin, to become Nebuchadnezzar's prisoner when Jerusalem fell in 597 B
Prophets - , and before the coming of Nebuchadnezzar. 590; and continued, under Nebuchadnezzar, till fourteen years, after the final capture of Jerusalem B
Jeremiah - and now have I given all these lands into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar . "...
So in Jehoiakim's fourth year Judah's hopes from Egypt were crushed by Nebuchadnezzar's defeat of Pharaoh Necho at Carchemish (Jeremiah 46:2, a prophecy uttered shortly before the event). Nebuchadnezzar was evidently acquainted with him, but whether it was by an actual journey of Jeremiah to Babylon is uncertain (Jeremiah 39:11). ...
So in his ninth year, tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar began the siege of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:1). Zedekiah in the tenth year, through Jehucal and Zephaniah, begged Jeremiah, "pray for us," as the issue between Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) was at that time as yet undecided. After many days in the dungeon Zedekiah the king took him out, and inquired secretly (compare John 3:2; John 5:44; John 12:43; John 19:38), "is there any word from Jehovah?" Jeremiah without regard to his earthly interests (contrast Jeremiah 6:14; Isaiah 30:10; Ezekiel 13:10) foretold Zedekiah's being delivered up to Nebuchadnezzar, and begged not to be left to "die" in Jonathan's house. Nebuchadnezzar directed Nebuzaradan, and he gave him liberty to stay with the remnant or go to Babylon, and added "victuals and a reward. Early in Jehoiakim's reign (Jeremiah 27:1) he had by symbolic yokes foretold Nebuchadnezzar's subjugation of Judah, etc
Babylon - Nebuchadnezzar first built this awesome defense network. Inside the gate the Processional Way, sloping downward, extends some 4000 feet southward to turn west between the ziggurat enclosure and the Marduk temple toward the Euphrates bridge built by either Nabopolassar or his son Nebuchadnezzar. On the west Nebuchadnezzar built a huge fortified citadel which was 85 feet thick, apparently to keep out dampness from the adjacent river
Rabbah - 750 Rabbah was still the capital of the Ammonites ( Amos 1:14 ), and such it continued to be down to the time of Nebuchadnezzar, who, if we may judge from the prophecies of Jeremiah and Ezekiel ( Jeremiah 49:2 , Ezekiel 21:20 ; Ezekiel 25:5 ), punished Rabbah for a rebellion of the Ammonites by a siege
Babylon - Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, is punished with madness because he denied God's control over "Babylon the Great" (4:30)
Rabbah - Nebuchadnezzar attacked Ammon because of Baalis their king having instigated Ishmael to slay Gedaliah the Chaldaean governor (Jeremiah 40:14). Ezekiel (Ezekiel 21:20) depicts Nebuchadnezzar's divination to decide whether he should attack Jerusalem or Rabbah the first
Hananiah - Their ambassadors had therefore come to Jerusalem, but were sent back with yokes and a divine message from Jeremiah that their several masters must submit to Nebuchadnezzar's yoke, to whom God had given these lands and the very beasts of the field, or else be punished with sword, famine, and pestilence (Jeremiah 27). ...
Hananiah broke off the yokes on Jeremiah's neck, in token of God's breaking off Nebuchadnezzar's yoke. " In Zedekiah's 6th year the league with Pharaoh Hophra tempted Zedekiah to open revolt in violation of his oath to Nebuchadnezzar (Ezekiel 17:12-20)
Greatness - Nebuchadnezzar's greatness returned to him after he humbled himself before the Lord (Daniel 4:36 ). It is something that may be taken away, as in the case of Nebuchadnezzar, or may be lost, as in the case of the greatness of the nation of Egypt (Ezekiel 31 )
Ashdod - Under Nebuchadnezzar (604-562 B
Sidon - Rivalry with Tyre influenced Sidon to submit without resistance to Nebuchadnezzar
Witness - To Nebuchadnezzar God was witnessed to as the 'GOD OF HEAVEN
Alexander the Great - It is first spoken of as a part of the great image seen in a dream by Nebuchadnezzar; it is foreshadowed by the belly and thighs, which are of brass, a depreciation in the character of the kingdom in comparison with the empires of Babylon and of the Medes and Persians, though it was larger in extent: it "shall bear rule over all the earth
Dispensation, - ...
During this 'Dispensation of Law' the Times of the Gentiles commenced in the political supremacy of Nebuchadnezzar, the head of gold and king of kings
Edom, Edomites - ...
In connexion with the wars of Nebuchadnezzar, which resulted in the destruction of Jerusalem in 586, many Jews migrated to Edom; but the Edomites rejoiced in the overthrow of the Jews
Azari'ah - ) ...
Another Azariah is inserted between Hilkiah, in Josiah's reign, and Seraiah who was put to death by Nebuchadnezzar, in (1 Chronicles 6:13,14 ) ...
Son of Zephaniah, a Kohathite, and ancestor of Samuel the prophet
Moab, Moabites - ...
Moabites aided Nebuchadnezzar against Jehoiakim at the very end of the same century (2 Kings 24:2 ). Some infer from Jeremiah’s prophecy that Moab rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar as Israel and Ammon did, and that he carried enough of them captive to weaken them and render them an easy prey to the Nabatæans
Locust - , 1867) notices the Hebrew letters of gazam = 50, exactly the number of years that the Chaldees ruled the Jews from the temple's destruction by Nebuchadnezzar, 588 B
Euphrates - ...
Nebuchadnezzar (Abyden
Understanding - This can be seen in references to the understanding of a foreign language (Isaiah 33:19 ) and Daniel's understanding of all the subjects in which he was interrogated by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 1:20 )
Gaza - Or "Pharaoh" Hophra, on his return from the unavailing attempt to save Jerusalem from Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 37:5; Jeremiah 37:7; Jeremiah 47:1) (Calvin) In Zephaniah 2:4 there is a play on like sounds; Gazah gazuwbah , "Gaza shall be forsaken
Oath - An oath even to a pagan king is so binding that Jehovah's chief reason for dethroning Zedekiah and giving him over to die in Babylon was his violating his oath to Nebuchadnezzar (Ezekiel 17:13-20; 2 Chronicles 36:13)
Jeremi'ah - 597-586, who was appointed by Nebuchadnezzar, was more friendly to the prophet, though powerless to help him
Ezekiel - From the fourth to the twenty- fourth chapter inclusive, he describes, under a variety of visions and similitudes, the calamities impending over Judea, and the total destruction of the temple and city of Jerusalem, by Nebuchadnezzar, occasionally predicting another period of yet greater desolation, and more general dispersion
Daniel the Prophet - One of the tribe of Judah and of the royal family of David, he was carried to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel was also able to interpret the dream that foretold Nebuchadnezzar's lunacy
Baruch - After his return to Jerusalem, Baruch continued his constant attendance on Jeremiah; and when Jerusalem was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar, and Jeremiah thrown into prison, Baruch also was confined with him: but when the city had surrendered, Nebuzaraddan showed him much kindness, granted him his liberty, and permitted him to go with Jeremiah wherever he chose
Philistines - ...
They were partially subdued by Esar-haddon king of Assyria and afterwards by Psammetichus king of Egypt; and there is great probability that they were reduced by Nebuchadnezzar, as well as the other people of Syria, Phoenicia, and Palestine, during the siege of Tyre
Dispersion - Nebuchadnezzar transplanted to Babylonia the choicest of the Judæan population (2 Kings 24:12-16 ; 2 Kings 25:11 , Jeremiah 52:15 )
Table - Nebuchadnezzar tabled with the beasts
Jeremi'ah - 597-586, who was appointed by Nebuchadnezzar, was more friendly to the prophet, though powerless to help him
Ammonites - Their ambassadors were exhorted to submit to Nebuchadnezzar, and threatened, on their refusal, with captivity and slavery, Jeremiah 27:2-4 . This malediction began to be inflicted upon them in the fifth year after the taking of Jerusalem, when Nebuchadnezzar made war against all the people around Judea, A. It is probable that Cyrus granted to the Ammonites and Moabites liberty to return into their own country, whence they had been removed by Nebuchadnezzar; for they were exposed to the revolutions that were common to the people of Syria and Palestine, and were subject sometimes to the kings of Egypt, and sometimes to the kings of Syria
Pride - ...
Finally, in the Old Testament, what are some of the results of pride? It led to Uzziah's downfall (2 Chronicles 26:16 ); it hardened the heart of Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 5:20 ); it goes before destruction (Proverbs 16:18 ); it does not seek God (Psalm 10:4 ); it brings disgrace (Proverbs 11:2 ); it breeds quarrels (Proverbs 13:10 ); it deceives (Jeremiah 49:16 ; Obadiah 1:3 ); it brings low (Proverbs 29:23 ; Isaiah 2:11 ; 23:9 ); it humbles (Isaiah 2:17 ; Daniel 4:37 )
Book - ” The prophet Jeremiah wrote a letter to the Babylonian exiles, instructing them to settle themselves, as they were to be in Babylon for 70 years: “Now these are the words of the letter (sêpher) that Jeremiah the prophet sent from Jerusalem unto the residue of the elders which were carried away captives, and to the priests, and to the prophets, and to all the people whom Nebuchadnezzar had carried away captive from Jerusalem to Babylon …” ( Persia, Persians - In the great image of Daniel 2 Nebuchadnezzar was represented by the head of gold
Ark - It was probably taken captive or destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar
Ezekiel - by King Nebuchadnezzar along with King Jehoiachin and 10,000 others, including political and military leaders and skilled craftsmen (2 Kings 24:14-16 ). Nebuchadnezzar led an army to quell the insurrection. He also rebelled, and Nebuchadnezzar led an army that besieged Jerusalem for eighteen months before the city fell
Tyre - Nebuchadnezzar II. She was involved in the struggle between Nebuchadnezzar II
Eagle - Jeremiah when he beheld in vision the march of Nebuchadnezzar cried, "Behold, he shall come up as clouds, and his chariots shall be as a whirlwind. The words of these prophets received a full accomplishment in the irresistible impetuosity, and complete success with which the Babylonian monarchs, and particularly Nebuchadnezzar, pursued their plans of conquest
Ark - When the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and plundered the temple, the ark was probably taken away by Nebuchadnezzar and destroyed, as no trace of it is afterwards to be found
Gibeon - When the temple was built "all the men of Israel assembled themselves" to king Solomon, and brought up from Gibeon the tabernacle and "all the holy vessels that were in the tabernacle" to Jerusalem, where they remained till they were carried away by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 24:13 )
Prayer - ...
"Daniel prayed, and God enabled him both to tell Nebuchadnezzar his dream and to give the interpretation of it (Daniel 2 :: 1623-23 )
Fasting - On 17th Tammuz (July) a fast was ordained to commemorate the capture of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar ( Jeremiah 39:2 ; Jeremiah 52:6 )
Mark of the Beast - Irenaeus notes that the image set up by Nebuchadnezzar was 60 cubits high by 6 cubits wide
Moab, Moabites - They revived to some extent, but were again subdued by Nebuchadnezzar
Damascus - It was taken and plundered, also, by Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, the generals of Alexander the Great, Judas Maccabeus, and at length by the Romans in the war conducted by Pompey against Tigranes, in the year before Christ, 65
Deliver - Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 3:15,28 ), Pharaoh (Exodus 5:2 ), and Sennacherib (2 Chronicles 32:10-15 ) railed against Israel for trusting in God's deliverance
Darius - Abydenus makes Nebuchadnezzar prophesy that a Persian and a Mede," the pride of the Assyrians," should take Babylon, i
Age, Old (the Aged) - Nebuchadnezzar had no compassion on the aged or the feeble ( 2 Chronicles 36:17 )
Jehoahaz - The people set up Jehoahaz out of order; Johanan is never after mentioned; the pagan Pharaoh set up Jehoiakim; Nebuchadnezzar Zedekiah
Fasting - ...
The only other periodical fasts in the Old Testament were those connected with the capture of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar: the fast of the 4th month commemorated its capture (Jeremiah 39:2; Jeremiah 52:6-7); that of the 5th month the burning of the temple and the chief houses (Jeremiah 52:12-14); that of the 7th the murder of Gedaliah (Jeremiah 41:1-3); that of the 10th the beginning of the siege (Zechariah 7:3-5; Zechariah 8:19)
Remnant - ...
Jeremiah discussed the plight of the Jews who fled to Egypt after Jerusalem’s capture by Nebuchadnezzar: “Likewise when all the Jews that were in Moab, and among the Ammonites, and in Edom, and that were in all the countries, heard that the King of Babylon had left a remnant of Judah
Think, Devise - God had a controversy with Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, because he “conceived” a plan against Him and His people ( Head - The same figure was used in regard to the image which Nebuchadnezzar saw and in which he was the head of gold. ...
Daniel 2:38 (a) This is a type of Nebuchadnezzar and his kingdom, which was more excellent than any of the other world kingdoms that would follow
Dan - The partially rebuilt city survived until the onslaught of the Babylonian army of Nebuchadnezzar (about 589 B
Hazor - Name of “kingdoms” that Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon threatened (Jeremiah 49:28-33 )
Bone - ...
Jeremiah 50:17 (a) These bones represent the elders and rulers of Israel who were conquered by Nebuchadnezzar
Tree - ...
Daniel 4:10 (a) This tree is King Nebuchadnezzar
Daniel, the Book of - When Nebuchadnezzar glorified and deified self, becoming severed from God, he became beast-like and consorted with the beasts, that look downward to the earth, having lost his true humanity; but when "he lifted up his eyes to heaven his understanding returned, and he blessed the Most High, whose dominion is an everlasting dominion" (Daniel 4:28-34). ...
Nebuchadnezzar's degradation, repentance, and restoration contrast strikingly with Belshazzar's sacrilegious luxury and consequent doom; and Daniel develops definitely the prophetical germs already existing as to Messiah (Daniel 7; Daniel 9), the resurrection (Daniel 12:2-3), and the ministry of angels (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 8:10; Daniel 12:1). , 18 years before the actual destruction of Jerusalem, when Judah's independent theocracy ceased, Jehoiakim being put in fetters by Nebuchadnezzar
Chronicles, the Books of - The writer of the closing chapters of Kings lived in Judah, and died under Nebuchadnezzar; the writer of the close of Chronicles lived at Babylon and survived until the Persian dynasty began. Hervey conjectures that Daniel at Babylon, under Nebuchadnezzar, and afterward under the Persian kings, vividly remembering Jeremiah's prophecies and bewailing the nation's perversity, wrote the close of Chronicles and Ezra 1, just as Jeremiah wrote the close of Kings
Temple, Solomon's - At last it was pillaged and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 24:13 ; 2 Chronicles 36:7 )
Vision(s) - It was Daniel's vision of the night that saved Daniel and the wisemen of Babylon from the irrational Nebuchadnezzar, who had been frightened by his own bizarre dream (Daniel 2:1,19 ). Daniel was the only "wiseman" in Babylon who could interpret Nebuchadnezzar's second dream (chap
Magi - ) The word is Persian or Median; it appears in Rab-mag, "chief of the magicians" (Jeremiah 39:3), brought with Nebuchadnezzar's expedition, that its issue might be foreknown. Nebuchadnezzar gathered round him the religious teachers and wise men of the nations he conquered (Daniel 1:3-4; Daniel 1:20)
Memphis - the military caste with all the famed "wisdom of Egypt" err in fancying themselves secure, namely, from Sargon, Nebuchadnezzar, and Cambyses, who successively conquered Egypt
Haggai, Theology of - The obscure reference to the signet ring is illuminated by Jeremiah 22:24 , where Zerubbabel's ancestor, Jehoiachin, is pulled off like a signet ring and handed over to Nebuchadnezzar
Daniel, Book of - It is doubtful whether Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem in b
Faustus (11), Sometimes Called the Breton - which is entitled Gentes Deum Naturaliter Sapuisse Faustus calls attention to the language of Daniel towards Nebuchadnezzar and his censure of Belshazzar as a heathen recognition of God (Daniel 4 5 )
Ezra - But the Seraiah there mentioned cannot be his father, as this Seraiah had been executed by Nebuchadnezzar in b
Ark of the Covenant - What became of the ark at the destruction of the temple by Nebuchadnezzar, is a dispute among the rabbins
Fuel - " These statements exhibit, in a very strong light, the extreme misery of the Jews, who escaped from the devouring sword of Nebuchadnezzar: "They that did feed delicately are desolate in the streets; they that were brought up in scarlet embrace dunghills," Lamentations 4:5
Philistines - It is probable that the Philistines suffered at the hand of Nebuchadnezzar, but no record of his doings among them has been preserved
Philis'Tines - After the death of Necho the contest was renewed between the Egyptians and the Chaldeans under Nebuchadnezzar, and the result was specially disastrous to the Philistines
Ezekiel - the 30th from the era of Nabopolassar, Nebuchadnezzar's father (525 B. Believing the prophets they obeyed Nebuchadnezzar's first summons to surrender, as the only path of safety. The first scene of his prophecies was near the river Chebar (identified by some with Khabour, but rather the nahr Malcha or royal canal of Nebuchadnezzar) (See BABEL; BABYLON. His prophecies against seven (the number for completeness) foreign nations stand between these two divisions, and were uttered in the interval between the knowledge of Nebuchadnezzar's siege (Ezekiel 24:2, etc. yet shall he not see it though he shall die there"; because he was blinded by Nebuchadnezzar before arriving there (Jeremiah 52:11)
Apocrypha - In this book Nebuchadnezzar, the king of the Assyrians, reigned at the time the Jews returned from Exile. In the story Nebuchadnezzar sent one of his generals, Holofernes, to subjugate the nations in the western part of his empire
Obadiah - The capture of Jerusalem alluded to by Obadiah is probably that by the Philistines and Arabs under Joram (2 Chronicles 21:8-10; 2 Chronicles 21:16-17), when Edom, who had just before revolted from under Judah and had been punished by Joram, in revenge gave an earnest of that unbrotherly cruelty which he in a still worse degree showed at Jerusalem's capture by Nebuchadnezzar
Arms - Nebuchadnezzar, undecided whether to attack Jerusalem or Ammon first, wrote their names on distinct arrows; the arrow first drawn from the quiver decided his course (Ezekiel 21:21-22)
No - ...
A still heavier blow was dealt by Nebuchadnezzar, as Jeremiah (Jeremiah 46:25-26) foretells: "Behold I will punish Anjou No and Pharaoh and Egypt, with their gods and their kings. " This last prophecy was fulfilled 40 years after Nebuchadnezzar's conquest of Egypt, when under Cyrus it threw off the Babylonian yoke
Lamentations, Book of - 586 Nebuchadnezzar captured Jerusalem, put out the eyes of Zedekiah, slew the princes, burned the Temple and palaces, razed the walls, and deported the inhabitants (save some of the poorest sort) to forced labour in Babylon ( 2 Kings 25:1-30 )
Joel - Gazare, the first, "the palmerworm," represents the 50 years of Babylon's oppression, from the temple's destruction by Nebuchadnezzar (588 B
Son of God - Nebuchadnezzar called Him "the Son of God," unconsciously expressing a truth the significance of which he imperfectly comprehended (Daniel 3:25)
Apocalyptic - The idea that the devil is lord of the present age was not shared by all apocalyptists; for example, in Daniel 4:25 , Nebuchadnezzar was told that he would be humbled until he learned that “the most High ruleth in the kingdom of men, and giveth it to whomsoever he will,” (compare Revelation 13:5-10 )
Alexander - In the statue beheld by Nebuchadnezzar in his dream, Daniel 2:39 , the belly of brass was the emblem of Alexander
Zechariah, Theology of - Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, destroyed Jerusalem and its temple, exiling many of Judah's leaders to Babylon. Not only did he liberate them; he returned the temple vessels that Nebuchadnezzar had plundered and gave them permission to rebuild their temple with Persian funds (Ezra 6:3-5 )
Edom - When Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem, the Idumeans joined him, and encouraged him to rase the very foundations of that city. Five years after the taking of Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezzar humbled all the states around Judea, and in particular Idumea
Conversion - One of the most notable conversions in the Old Testament would have to be that of the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar, who through a series of unusual circumstances turned to “the King of heaven, all whose works are truth, and his ways judgment: and those that walk in pride he is able to abase” (Daniel 4:37 )
Palestine - ...
Nebuchadnezzar came up against the kingdom of the two tribes, the kingdom of Judah, the capital of which was Jerusalem, one hundred and thirty-four years after the overthrow of the kingdom of Israel
Jehoiada - Either carried away to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, or deposed by the Jewish rulers as a favorer of Jeremiah
Number - Daniel 4:16; Daniel 4:25, "seven times shall pass over thee" (Nebuchadnezzar)
Gods - Nebuchadnezzar procured his statue to be worshipped while living; and Virgil shows that Augustus had altars and sacrifices offered to him; as we learn from other hands that he had priests called Augustales, and temples at Lyons, Narbona, and several other places, and he must be allowed the first of the Romans in whose behalf idolatry was carried to such a pitch
Lion - The lion from the swelling of Jordan, Jeremiah 50:44 , is Nebuchadnezzar marching against Judea, with the strength and fierceness of a lion
Judah, Kingdom of - ...
After the reigns of the worthless Jehoahaz, set aside by Pharaoh Necho who promoted Jehoiakim, and Jehoiachin or Coniah, Zedekiah (promoted by Nebuchadnezzar) through treachery in violation of his oath brought destruction on himself and Jerusalem (588 B
Jerusalem - Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon captured and looted it, and carried away captive first Jehoiachin ( 2 Kings 24:12 ), and finally Zedekiah, the last king of Judah (ch. ...
The aspect and area of the Jerusalem captured by Nebuchadnezzar must have been very different from that conquered about 420 years before by David. The destruction by Nebuchadnezzar and the deportation of the people were complete: the city was left in ruins, and only the poorest of the people were left to carry on the work of agriculture
Egypt - The army of Necho was after a short space routed at Carchemish by Nebuchadnezzar, b. Pharaoh-hophra aided Zedekiah, Jeremiah 37:5-11, so that the siege of Jerusalem was raised, but he appears to have been afterward attacked by Nebuchadnezzar
Jeremiah - He recommended national surrender to the rule of the Babylonian Empire and called Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon's emperor and Judah's most hated enemy, the “servant of the Lord” (Jeremiah 25:9 ; Jeremiah 27:6 )
Ahab - A false prophet, who deceived with flattering prophecies of an immediate return the Jews in Babylon, and was burnt to death by Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 29:21-22)
Genealogy - So in Ezra's genealogy (Ezra 7:1-5, compare 1 Chronicles 6:4-15) five descents are omitted between Azariah Meraloth's son and Azariah Johanan's son; and several between Ezra himself and Seraiah, put to death 150 years before Ezra by Nebuchadnezzar
Prophets, the - Those referring to the times of the Gentiles, which began with Nebuchadnezzar, and, continuing beyond the days of the Messiah on earth, are still running on: these are almost entirely given in Daniel
Philistia - After the Babylonian captivity (Ezekiel 25:15-17) the Philistines vented their "old hatred" on the Jews, for which God as He foretold "executed vengeance on them with furious rebukes, and destroyed the remnant," namely, by Psammetichus, Necho (Jeremiah 25:20), and Nebuchadnezzar who overran their cities on his way to Egypt (Jeremiah 47), and finally by Alexander the Great, as foretold (Zechariah 9:5-6, "the king shall perish from Gaza"; Alexander bound Betis the satrap to his chariot by thongs thrust through his feet, and dragged round the city; the conqueror slew 10,000, and sold the rest as slaves: Zephaniah 2:4-5)
Jordan - A destroyer equally fierce, and cruel, and irresistible, the devoted Edomites were to find in Nebuchadnezzar and his armies
Kings, the Books of - The mention of Seraiah and Zephaniah as slain by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:18) accords with Jeremiah 21:1; 1618390807_34 wherein Zephaniah appears as of the faction that opposed Jeremiah and was headed by priests and false prophets. The Egyptian king Psinaches' patronage of Hadad the Edomite (1 Kings 11:19-20): Solomon's alliance with his successor Psusennes who reigned 35 years; Shishak's (Sesonchis I) accession toward the close of Solomon's reign (1 Kings 11:40); his conquest of Judea under Rehoboam, represented on a monument still at Karnak which mentions "the king of Judah," the time of the Ethiopian dynasty of So (Sabak) and Tirhakah, of the 25th dynasty; the rise and speedy fall of Syrian power, Assyria overshadowing it; the account of Mesha harmonizing with the (See DIBON stone; Assyria's struggles with Egypt and Babylon's' sudden supremacy under Nebuchadnezzar over both Assyria and Egypt: all these notices in Kings accord with independent pagan history and inscriptions
Ark of the Covenant - ...
It was not moved from its "rest" (Psalms 132:8; Psalms 132:14) when once Jerusalem became the fixed capital, and the hill of Zion God's chosen seat, until its forcible removal under Nebuchadnezzar; God giving up the apostate Jews to the pagan world power
Lamentations - ...
The young children fainting for hunger (Lamentations 2:6; Lamentations 2:11-12; Lamentations 2:20-21; Lamentations 4:4; Lamentations 4:9; 2 Kings 25:3), the city stormed (Lamentations 2:7; Lamentations 4:12; 2 Chronicles 36:17; 2 Chronicles 36:19), the priests slain in the sanctuary, the citizens carried captive (Lamentations 1:5; Lamentations 2:9; 2 Kings 25:11) with the king and princes, the feasts, sabbaths, and the law no more (Lamentations 1:4; Lamentations 2:6), all point to Jerusalem's capture by Nebuchadnezzar
James, the Letter - when the Southern Kingdom of Judah fell to the marauding Babylonians under Nebuchadnezzar
Dead - If the conjecture of that intelligent traveller be well founded, the venerable prophet had been forced by the established etiquette of the court to retire from the management of public affairs at the death of Nebuchadnezzar; and had remained in a private station for twenty- three years, neglected or forgotten, till the awful occurrence of that memorable night rendered his assistance necessary, and brought him again into public notice
Jerusalem - It was subsequently often taken and retaken by the Egyptians, the Assyrians, and by the kings of Israel (2 Kings 14:13,14 ; 18:15,16 ; 23:33-35 ; 24:14 ; 2 Chronicles 12:9 ; 26:9 ; 27:3,4 ; 29:3 ; 32:30 ; 33:11 ), till finally, for the abounding iniquities of the nation, after a siege of three years, it was taken and utterly destroyed, its walls razed to the ground, and its temple and palaces consumed by fire, by Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon (2 Kings 25 ; 2 Chronicles 36 ; Jeremiah 39 ), B
Genseric, King of the Vandals - Every allusion in a sermon to Pharaoh, Nebuchadnezzar, or Holofernes was regarded as aimed at the king, and the preacher punished with exile
Philistim - During the siege of Tyre, which held out thirteen years, Nebuchadnezzar used part of his army to subdue the Ammonites, the Moabites, the Egyptians, and other nations bordering on the Jews
Eye - Nebuchadnezzar recommends to Nebuzaradan that he would "set his eyes" on Jeremiah, and permit him to go where he pleased, Jeremiah 39:12 ; Jeremiah 40:4
Jeremiah - When Jehoiakim later tried to become independent of Babylon, the Babylonian army, under Nebuchadnezzar, besieged Jerusalem
Apocrypha - Set in the time of Nebuchadnezzar, Judith is a vivid and dramatic narrative of a beautiful Jewish widow, who, through a combination of extraordinary courage and trust in God, delivers her people in a time of crisis
Sabbath - , and Jehoiakim's deposition by Nebuchadnezzar 606 B
Prophets - Thus Jeremiah made bonds and yokes, and put them upon his neck, Jeremiah 27, strongly to intimate the subjection that God would bring on the nations whom Nebuchadnezzar should subdue
Phoenicia, phNicians - We next hear that king Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (604 562) unsuccessfully besieged Tyre for many years ( Ezekiel 26:1 ff; Ezekiel 29:17 ff
Temple - ) Shishak of Egypt, Asa of Judah, Joash of Israel, and finally Nebuchadnezzar despoiled it in succession (1 Kings 14:26; 1 Kings 15:18; 2 Chronicles 25:23-24). The golden and silver vessels taken by Nebuchadnezzar were restored; the altar was first set up by Jeshua and Zerubbabel, then the foundations were laid (Ezra 3) amidst weeping in remembrance of the glorious former temple and joy at the restoration
Pharaoh - ) ...
...
Pharaoh-hophra, who in vain sought to relieve Jerusalem when it was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar (q
Religion - To serve his historical purposes, God calls Assyria "the rod of my anger , the club of my wrath" (Isaiah 10:5 ), Nebuchadnezzar "my servant" (Jeremiah 25:9 ), and Cyrus "my shepherd" to "accomplish all that I plan" (Isaiah 44:28 )
Mind/Reason - Daniel 5:20 has the mind-set or determination of the will in view in this description of Nebuchadnezzar: "his heart [4] became arrogant and hardened with pride
God - The Chaldean priests told Nebuchadnezzar: “And it is a rare thing that the king requireth, and there is none other that can show it before the king, except the gods, whose dwelling is not with flesh” ( Nebuchadnezzar’s neglect of the worship of Israel’s one true “God” ( Destroy, Destruction - ...
Nebuchadnezzar saw all these kingdoms in a dream as a mighty statue made of various metals
Nineveh - Then Asshurdahil, Mutaggil Nebo, Asshur-ris-ilim (conqueror of a Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon), Tiglath Pileser I (subdued Meshech), Asshur-belkala; a blank of two centuries follows when David's and Solomon's extensive dominion has place
Chronology - Bosanquet, coincide in making Nebuchadnezzar's reign begin 581 B. The former begins the 1st of Nebuchadnezzar and the 4th of Jehoiakim (606 or 607 B
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - The author of Kings is also concerned about recording the occasions when the temple treasury was appropriated for war indemnity, whether by foreigners (Shiskak, 1 Kings 14:25-28 ; and NebuchadnezzarKings 24:13 ; 25:13-17 ) or Judeans (Asa, 1 Kings 15:18 ; Jehoash 2 Kings 12:18 ; 14:14 ; and Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:16 )
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - Similarly Daniel says that God has shown Nebuchadnezzar what is to happen in "the latter days" (2:28; for other examples of his use of the expression, see 8:23; 10:14; 11:29)
Babylon - It was under Nebuchadnezzar that Babylon, then become the seat of universal empire, is supposed to have acquired that extent and magnificence, and that those stupendous works were completed which rendered it the wonder of the world and of posterity: and accordingly, this prince, then the most potent on the earth, arrogated to himself the whole glory of its erection; and in the pride of his heart exclaimed, "Is not this great Babylon that I have built?" The city at this period stood on both sides of the river, which intersected it in the middle. " The king of the forest now ranges over the site of that Babylon which Nebuchadnezzar built for his own glory
Jerusalem - Jerusalem was three times besieged and taken by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon within a very few years. ...
During seventy years, the city and temple lay in ruins: when those Jews who chose to take immediate advantage of the proclamation of Cyrus, under the conduct of Zerubbabel, returned to Jerusalem, and began to build the temple; all the vessels of gold and silver belonging to which, that had been taken away by Nebuchadnezzar, being restored by Cyrus
War - In the later times of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, we observe their kings bearing the shock of the greatest powers of Asia, of the kings of Assyria and Chaldea, Shalmaneser, Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Nebuchadnezzar, who made the whole east tremble
Moab - Amos 1:13 , &c, also foretold great miseries to them, which, probably, they suffered under Uzziah and Jothan, kings of Judah, or under Shalmaneser, 2 Chronicles 26:7-8 ; 2 Chronicles 27:5 ; or, lastly, in the war of Nebuchadnezzar, five years after the destruction of Jerusalem
Temple - The temple was destroyed on the capture of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, B
Scripture - Thus it had been questioned whether such a king as Nebuchadnezzar ever reigned. But now bricks in abundance have been found inscribed with Nebuchadnezzar's name, proving that he had built and adorned a magnificent capital
Temple - , 2 Kings 12:1-21 16:1-20 18:1-37 ; and was at length utterly destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, B
Prayer - Jews of Babylon ask those of Jerusalem to pray for welfare of Nebuchadnezzar (1:11; cf
Bible - Pharaoh, Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus while doing their own will, appear in the Bible as God's instruments, overruled to carry out His purposes
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Nebuchadnezzar II defeated Pharaoh Necho as he began his successful drive to claim the former Assyrian Empire for Babylon ( 2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:1 )
Diseases - Perhaps the most dramatic example of mental illness related in the Bible concerns the Babylonian king, Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel 4:1 )
Temple - It retained its pristine splendour only thirty-three or thirty-four years, when Shishak, king of Egypt, took Jerusalem, and carried away the treasures of the temple; and after undergoing subsequent profanations and pillages, this stupendous building was finally plundered and burnt by the Chaldeans under Nebuchadnezzar, A
Gods, Pagan - Marduk's son Nabu (Nebo in Isaiah 46:1 ), the god of nearby Borsippa and of scribes, became especially exalted in the neo-Babylonian period as seen in the name Nebuchadnezzar
Judea - 720; and that of Judah, by Nebuchadnezzar, about a hundred and fourteen years later
Jeru'Salem - It was thrice taken by Nebuchadnezzar, in the years B
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - Nebuchadnezzar is represented as deciding in this manner his line of march ( Ezekiel 21:21 ), and, as the result of casting the lot, holding in his hand ‘the divination Jerusalem,’ i
High Priest - ) Seraiah ends the series, taken by Nebuzaradan and slain by Nebuchadnezzar, along with Zephaniah, the second priest or sagan (2 Kings 25:18)
Jerusalem - It was thrice taken by Nebuchadnezzar, in the years b
Fortification And Siegecraft - ...
When Nebuchadnezzar laid siege to Jerusalem, his troops are said to have ‘built forts against it round about’ ( 2 Kings 25:1 , cf
Egypt - The prophecies respecting this haughty and idolatrous kingdom, uttered by Jeremiah and Ezekiel when it was in the height of its splendour and prosperity, were fulfilled in the terrible invasions of Nebuchadnezzar, Cambyses, and the Persian monarchs
Sanhedrin - , Leviticus 24:12); and speak of its existence under Joshua, Jabez, Jerubbaal, Boaz, Jephthah, Samuel, David, and Solomon, and until the time of the captivity by Nebuchadnezzar (Bâbâ bathrâ, 121b; Yômâ, 80a; Mak
Dream (2) - We have but to think of Abraham and Abimelech, of Jacob and Laban, of Joseph and Pharaoh, of Daniel and Nebuchadnezzar, of Joseph and the Magi, to observe how near at hand the suggestion lies that the choice of dreams in these instances as the medium of revelation has some connexion with the relation in which the recipient stood at the moment to influences arising from the outer world, or at least to some special interaction between Israel and that world
Canaan - That of Judah survived about one hundred and thirty years, Judea being finally subdued and laid waste by Nebuchadnezzar, and the temple burned B
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - For example, the head of gold on Daniel's image was the nation Babylon with its king Nebuchadnezzar while the stone that grew to fill the whole earth was the kingdom of God (Daniel 2:37-39 )
Jews - Provoked by Zedekiah's treachery, Nebuchadnezzar invaded the kingdom, murdered vast numbers, and reduced them to captivity
Tatianus - Berosus, the Babylonian historian, "a most competent authority," spoke of the wars of Nebuchadnezzar against the Phoenicians and Jews which happened 70 years before the Persian rule, and long after the age of Moses
Jews - He was called "the prince of Judah," and was appointed their governor by Cyrus, and with his permission carried back a part of the gold and silver vessels which Nebuchadnezzar had taken out the temple of Jerusalem