What does Nazarites mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nazarites
Nazarites (năz'a-rîtes), properly Nazirites, Numbers 6:2, from a Hebrew word signifying "to separate." A Nazirite, under the ancient law, was one, either male or female, under a vow to abstain from wine and all intoxicating liquors and the fruit of the vine. The hair should be allowed to grow without being shorn, and all contamination with dead bodies should be avoided. The Nazirite was not even to approach the corpse of father or mother, Numbers 6:7, and if by accident this should occur, he was required to shave his head, make offerings, and renew the vow. When the time of the vow expired, the person brought an offering to the temple; the priest then cut off his hair and burnt it; after which the Nazirite was free from his vow and might again drink wine. The term of the vow is left indefinite. "The days of the vow" is the expression in Numbers 6:1-27. We know, however, that there were perpetual Nazirites. Samson and probably Samuel and John the Baptist were perpetual Nazirites. Hannah promised the Lord that no razor should touch the head of her child if the Lord would give her one, 1 Samuel 1:11, and the angel predicted to Zacharias that John would abstain entirely from wine and strong drink. Luke 1:15.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Nazarites
Those under the ancient law who made a vow of observing as Samson and John the Baptist. The Nazarites engaged by a vow to abstain from wine and all intoxicating liquors; to let their hair grow without cutting or shaving; not to enter into any house that was polluted by having a dead corpse in it; nor to be present at any funeral. And if by chance any one should have died in their presence, they began again the whole ceremony of their consecration and Nazariteship
This ceremony generally lasted eight days, sometimes a month, and sometimes their whole lives. When the time of their Nazariteship was accomplished, the priest brought the person to the door of the temple, who there offered to the Lord a he- lamb for a burnt-offering, a she-lamb for an expiatory sacrifice, and a ram for a peace offering. They offered likewise loaves and cakes with wine necessary for the libations. After all this was sacrificed and offered to the Lord, the priest or some other person, shaved the head of the Nazarite at the door of the tabernacles, and burnt his hair, throwing it upon the fire of the altar. Then the priest put into the hand of the Nazarite the shoulder of the ram, roasted, with a loaf and a cake, which the Nazarite returning into the hands of the priest, he offered them to the Lord, lifting them up in the presence of the Nazarite. And from this Nazariteship being now accomplished. Numb. 6: Amos 2:11-12 . Those that made a vow of Nazariteship out of Palestine, and could not come to the temple when their vow was expired, contented themselves with observing the abstinence required by the law, and after that, cutting their hair in the place where they were: as to the offerings and sacrifices prescribed by Moses, which were to be offered at the temple by themselves, or by others for them, they deferred this till they could have a convenient opportunity.
Hence it was that St. Paul, being at Corinth, and having made a vow of a Nazarite, had his hair cut off at Cenchrea, and put off fulfilling the rest of his vow til he should arrive at Jerusalem, Acts 18:18 . When a person found that he was not in a condition to make a vow of Nazariteship, or had not leisure to perform the ceremonies belonging to it, he contented himself by contributing to the expense of the sacrifice and offerings of those that had made and fulfilled this vow; and by this means he became a partaker in the merit of such Nazariteship. When St. Paul came to Jerusalem, in the year of Christ 53, the apostle St. James the Less, with the other brethren, said to him (Acts 21:23-24 , ) that to quiet the minds of the converted Jews, who had been informed that he every where preached up the entire abolition of the law of Moses, he ought to join himself to four of the faithful who had a vow of Nazariteship upon them, and contribute to the charge of the ceremony at the shaving of their heads; by which the new converts would perceive that he continued to keep the law, and that what they had heard of him was not true.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nazarites
Or Nazarim, from Nezer or Nazar, separated. All were called by this name who voluntarily made themselves Nazarites, by their dedicating themselves to God. We have the law at large concerning Nazarites, (Numbers 6:1-27) to which I refer. I only beg to observe concerning Nazarites, that it is evident the design and good pleasure of God the Holy Ghost, in disposing the minds of his people to the vow of the Nazarite, and forming laws so particular as this chapter contains, had all along an eye to Christ, the one great and only true Nazarite. As if the Holy Ghost in this order would keep up in Israel the constant thought of this sanctification and separation towards God, until "he came who for their sakes sanctified himself," is made of God to them sanctification and redemption. (John 17:19 and 1 Corinthians 1:30)
We find in the most degenerate state of the church, there were still persons of this order. The prophet Jeremiah speaks of them in his Book of Lamentations in a very affecting manner: "Her Nazarites (saith he) were purer than snow, they were whiter than milk, they were more ruddy in body than rubies, their polishing was of sapphire, their visage is blacker than a coal, they are not not known in the streets." (Lamentations 4:7-8) So the prophet Amos: "I raised up of your sons for prophets, and of your young men for Nazarites. Is it not even thus, O ye children Of Israel? saith the Lord. But ye gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the prophets, saying, Prophesy not." (Amos 2:11-12) Nothing can be more plain than that this order was altogether typical, when we consider the wretched condition of Israel in both those periods when Jeremiah and Amos exercised their ministry. The whole of both those men's preaching is reproof; and therefore, if at such a time the order of the Nazarites was preserved, and as the Lord himself saith, it was of his raising up, surely it proves to a demonstration, that God the Holy Ghost intended from it, like all the sacrifices under the law, to be continued only until he came in whom all types, shadows, sacrifices, and ordinances centered, and in whom all had their completion, and were done away.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nazarites
those under the ancient law who engaged by a vow to abstain from wine and all intoxicating liquors, to let their hair grow, not to enter any house polluted by having a dead corpse in it, nor to be present at any funeral. If, by accident, any one should have died in their presence, they recommenced the whole of their consecration and Nazariteship. This vow generally lasted eight days, sometimes a month, and sometimes their whole lives. When the time of their Nazariteship was expired, the priest brought the person to the door of the temple, who there offered to the Lord a he-lamb for a burnt-offering, a she-lamb for an expiatory sacrifice, and a ram for a peace-offering. They offered, likewise, loaves and cakes, with wine, for libations. After all was sacrificed and offered, the priest, or some other, shaved the head of the Nazarite at the door of the tabernacle, and burned his hair on the fire of the altar. Then the priest put into the hands of the Nazarite the shoulder of the ram roasted, with a loaf and a cake, which the Nazarite returning into the hands of the priest, he offered them to the Lord, lifting them up in the presence of the Nazarite. And from this time he might again drink wine, his Nazariteship being accomplished.
Perpetual Nazarites, as Samson and John the Baptist, were consecrated to their Nazariteship by their parents, and continued all their lives in this state, without drinking wine or cutting their hair. Those who made a vow of Nazariteship out of Palestine, and could not come to the temple when their vow was expired, contented themselves with observing the abstinence required by the law, and cutting off their hair in the place where they were: the offerings and sacrifices prescribed by Moses, to be offered at the temple, by themselves or by others for them, they deferred till a convenient opportunity. Hence it was that St. Paul, being at Corinth, and having made the vow of a Nazarite, had his hair cut off at Cenchrea, a port of Corinth, and deferred the rest of his vow till he came to Jerusalem, Acts 18:18 . When a person found he was not in a condition to make a vow of Nazariteship, or had not leisure fully to perform it, he contented himself by contributing to the expense of sacrifices and offerings of those who had made and were fulfilling this vow; and by this means he became a partaker in such Nazariteship. When St. Paul came to Jerusalem, A.D. 58, St.
James, with other brethren, said to him, that to quiet the minds of the converted Jews he should join himself to four persons who had a vow of Nazariteship, and contribute to their charges and ceremonies: by which the new converts would perceive that he did not totally disregard the law, as they had been led to suppose, Acts 21; Acts 23, 24. The institution of Nazaritism is involved in much mystery; and no satisfactory reason has ever been given of it. This is certain, that it had the approbation of God, and may be considered as affording a good example of self-denial in order to be given up to the study of the law, and the practice of exact righteousness.

Sentence search

Nazarites - All were called by this name who voluntarily made themselves Nazarites, by their dedicating themselves to God. We have the law at large concerning Nazarites, (Numbers 6:1-27) to which I refer. I only beg to observe concerning Nazarites, that it is evident the design and good pleasure of God the Holy Ghost, in disposing the minds of his people to the vow of the Nazarite, and forming laws so particular as this chapter contains, had all along an eye to Christ, the one great and only true Nazarite. The prophet Jeremiah speaks of them in his Book of Lamentations in a very affecting manner: "Her Nazarites (saith he) were purer than snow, they were whiter than milk, they were more ruddy in body than rubies, their polishing was of sapphire, their visage is blacker than a coal, they are not not known in the streets. " (Lamentations 4:7-8) So the prophet Amos: "I raised up of your sons for prophets, and of your young men for Nazarites. But ye gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the prophets, saying, Prophesy not. The whole of both those men's preaching is reproof; and therefore, if at such a time the order of the Nazarites was preserved, and as the Lord himself saith, it was of his raising up, surely it proves to a demonstration, that God the Holy Ghost intended from it, like all the sacrifices under the law, to be continued only until he came in whom all types, shadows, sacrifices, and ordinances centered, and in whom all had their completion, and were done away
Razor - The Nazarites were forbidden to make use of the razor (Numbers 6:5 ; Judges 13:5 )
Barber - The Nazarites were untouched by the razor from their birth (Numbers 6:5 )
Dried Grapes - Nazarites were prohibited from eating dried grapes (Numbers 6:3 )
Rubies, - In Lamentations 4:7 , where the Nazarites are said to be "more ruddy in body than rubies," some translate 'corals,' though the Hebrew is the same
Nazarite - According to this law, Nazarites might be of either sex
Nazirite - According to this law, Nazarites might be of either sex
Hair - The Jewish men, except Nazarites, Numbers 6:5,9 , and cases like that of Absalom, 2 Samuel 14:26 , cut their hair moderately short, 1 Corinthians 11:14 , and applied fragrant ointments to it, Exodus 30:30-33 Psalm 23:5 Ecclesiastes 9:8
Nazarite - If by accident any one died in their presence, they recommenced the whole of their consecration and Nazariteship. When the time of Nazariteship expired, the person brought a umber of sacrifices and offerings to the temple; the priest then cut off his hair and burnt it; after which he was free from his vow, Numbers 6:1-27 Amos 2:11,12 . ...
Perpetual Nazarites were consecrated as such by their parents from their birth, as was proposed by the mother of Samuel, 1 Samuel 1:11 , and continued all their lives in this state, neither drinking wine, nor cutting their hair. ...
As the cost of the offerings required at the expiration of the term of Nazariteship was very considerable for the poor, they were often relieved by persons not Nazarites, who assumed these charges for them for the sake of performing an act of piety and charity. He took four Christian Jews whose vow of Nazariteship was accomplished, assumed the expense of their offerings, and with them went through the customary services and purification's at the temple, Acts 21:20-26
Say, Utter, Affirm - The word may also be found in the middle of an argument: “And I raised up of your sons for prophets, and of your young men for Nazarites. But ye gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the prophets, saying, Prophesy not” (Amos 2:11-12)
Separate - There were two kinds of “Nazarites”: the temporary and the perpetual. From the Bible we have knowledge only of Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist as persons who were lifelong “Nazarites. ...
There is but one reference in the prophetic literature to “Nazarites”: The prophet Amos complained that the Lord had given the Israelites, Nazarites and prophets as spiritual leaders, but that the people “gave the Nazarites wine to drink; and commanded the prophets, saying, Prophesy not” (Amos 2:11-12)
Lock - As a sign of their dedication to God, Nazarites were not permitted to cut their locks (Numbers 6:5 ; Judges 16:19 )
Naz'Arite, - There is no notice in the Pentateuch of Nazarites for life; but the regulations for the vow of a Nazarite of days are given. Of the Nazarites for life three are mentioned in the Scriptures --Samson, Samuel and St
Nazarites - Nazarites (năz'a-rîtes), properly Nazirites, Numbers 6:2, from a Hebrew word signifying "to separate
Nazarite - Nazarites retired to the temple during the last period of seven days, because they could be secure there against any accidental defilement" (Lindsay's Acts). There is mention made in Scripture of only three who were Nazarites for life, Samson, Samuel, and John the Baptist (Judges 13:4,5 ; 1 Samuel 1:11 ; Luke 1:15 )
Vow - See CORBAN , and Nazarites
Purification, - (Mark 7:3 ) What play have been the specific causes of uncleanness in those who came up to purify themselves before the Passover, (John 11:55 ) or in those who had taken upon themselves the Nazarites' vow, (Acts 21:24,26 ) we are not informed
Nazarite - The Nazarites did not form an ascetic fraternity, but followed observances typifying restraint of self will and fleshly appetite and separation unto God; Romans 12:1-2, expresses the corresponding obligation of our Christian life to "present our bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God," etc. ...
God by Amos (Amos 2:11-12) complains, "I raised up of your young men for Nazarites. "Her Nazarites were purer than snow
Abstinence - The same abstinence was enjoined upon the Nazarites, during the time of their Nazariteship, or separation, Numbers 6:3
Abstinence - So the priests, from wine, during their ministration (See AARON) (Leviticus 10:1-9); also the Nazarites during their separation (Numbers 6:3-4); also the Rechabites, constantly, by voluntary vow (Jeremiah 35)
Black - ...
Lamentations 4:8 (b) Here is described how completely the Nazarites of Jerusalem had turned away from the beautiful life they were supposed to live, and had become sinful and wicked in their manner of living
Hair - ...
Long hair is especially noticed in the description of Absalom's person (2 Samuel 14:26 ); but the wearing of long hair was unusual, and was only practised as an act of religious observance by Nazarites (Numbers 6:5 ; Judges 13:5 ) and others in token of special mercies (Acts 18:18 )
Hair - Nazarites wore it uncut, a sign of humiliation and self-denial, at the same time of dedication of all the strength, of which hair was a token, to God (Numbers 6:5; Judges 13:5; Judges 16:17)
Wine - People in special states of holiness were forbidden to drink “wine,” such as the Nazarites ( Samson - ...
(2) Both are Nazarites (1 Samuel 1:11), Samson's exploits probably moving Hannah to her vow. Amos (Amos 2:11-12) alludes to them, the only allusion elsewhere to Nazarites in the Old Testament being Lamentations 4:7
Nazarene - and Matthew 1:20-21) I do not think it necessary to insert in this place, at large, the law concerning Nazarites to God. ...
I have only one thing more to add, in order to shew that this our glorious Nazarite was the one, and the only one, to whom all that went before were mere types and shadows, and only ministered in this character to him; and also that the law concerning Nazarites had an eye wholly to him, and in him alone was completed. And I trust that the reader will also see with me from the Lord's own teaching, that the law of the Nazarites, (Numbers 6:1-27) and especially the striking typical representation in the case of Samson, had no other meaning but to set forth the feature of the Lord Jesus Christ. Any sanctity or supposed sanctity in themselves, or any Nazarites under the law, is foreign to the very spirit of the Gospel of Christ
Mourning - The high priest and Nazarites were not to go into mourning for even father or mother or children (Leviticus 21:10-11; Numbers 6:7)
Lamentations of Jeremiah - Jeremiah as in the presence of Jehovah spreads out all the humiliating reverses that had fallen upon them, mentioning separately the Nazarites, the prophets, the priests, and the people; and then he foretells that God's wrath should pass also unto Edom, who had doubtless rejoiced at the calamities of Jerusalem
Nazarite - " Christians also are Nazarites to God, not because of any vow, but as sanctified in Christ Jesus
Nazarites - The Nazarites engaged by a vow to abstain from wine and all intoxicating liquors; to let their hair grow without cutting or shaving; not to enter into any house that was polluted by having a dead corpse in it; nor to be present at any funeral. And if by chance any one should have died in their presence, they began again the whole ceremony of their consecration and Nazariteship...
This ceremony generally lasted eight days, sometimes a month, and sometimes their whole lives. When the time of their Nazariteship was accomplished, the priest brought the person to the door of the temple, who there offered to the Lord a he- lamb for a burnt-offering, a she-lamb for an expiatory sacrifice, and a ram for a peace offering. And from this Nazariteship being now accomplished. Those that made a vow of Nazariteship out of Palestine, and could not come to the temple when their vow was expired, contented themselves with observing the abstinence required by the law, and after that, cutting their hair in the place where they were: as to the offerings and sacrifices prescribed by Moses, which were to be offered at the temple by themselves, or by others for them, they deferred this till they could have a convenient opportunity. When a person found that he was not in a condition to make a vow of Nazariteship, or had not leisure to perform the ceremonies belonging to it, he contented himself by contributing to the expense of the sacrifice and offerings of those that had made and fulfilled this vow; and by this means he became a partaker in the merit of such Nazariteship. James the Less, with the other brethren, said to him (Acts 21:23-24 , ) that to quiet the minds of the converted Jews, who had been informed that he every where preached up the entire abolition of the law of Moses, he ought to join himself to four of the faithful who had a vow of Nazariteship upon them, and contribute to the charge of the ceremony at the shaving of their heads; by which the new converts would perceive that he continued to keep the law, and that what they had heard of him was not true
Samson - It is a striking instance of the foolish things a Nazarite (and all Christians are morally Nazarites) may do if he gets out of communion with the Lord
Nazarites - If, by accident, any one should have died in their presence, they recommenced the whole of their consecration and Nazariteship. When the time of their Nazariteship was expired, the priest brought the person to the door of the temple, who there offered to the Lord a he-lamb for a burnt-offering, a she-lamb for an expiatory sacrifice, and a ram for a peace-offering. And from this time he might again drink wine, his Nazariteship being accomplished. ...
Perpetual Nazarites, as Samson and John the Baptist, were consecrated to their Nazariteship by their parents, and continued all their lives in this state, without drinking wine or cutting their hair. Those who made a vow of Nazariteship out of Palestine, and could not come to the temple when their vow was expired, contented themselves with observing the abstinence required by the law, and cutting off their hair in the place where they were: the offerings and sacrifices prescribed by Moses, to be offered at the temple, by themselves or by others for them, they deferred till a convenient opportunity. When a person found he was not in a condition to make a vow of Nazariteship, or had not leisure fully to perform it, he contented himself by contributing to the expense of sacrifices and offerings of those who had made and were fulfilling this vow; and by this means he became a partaker in such Nazariteship. ...
James, with other brethren, said to him, that to quiet the minds of the converted Jews he should join himself to four persons who had a vow of Nazariteship, and contribute to their charges and ceremonies: by which the new converts would perceive that he did not totally disregard the law, as they had been led to suppose, Acts 21; Acts 23, 24
Consecrate - " The firstborn are holy (Numbers 3:13 ), as are the Levites who replace them (Numbers 3:12-13 ), the Nazarites (Numbers 6:8 ; cf
Offerings - Nazarites, who had been unexpectedly rendered unclean, presented a lamb of a year old, Numbers 6:11
James - He is said to have been a priest, and to have observed the laws of the Nazarites from his birth
Wine - The Nazarites' Vow against wine was voluntary (Numbers 6:3); it justifies voluntary total abstinence, but does not enjoin it
Lamentations - " The fourth elegy recapitulates the woes of Zion, contrasting the past preciousness of Zion's sons, and her pure Nazarites, with the worthlessness of their present estimation
Ebionites - At last, it seems, the Nazarites, whose error was rather a superstitious severity in their practice, than any deficiency in their faith, were included by Origen in the infamy of the appellation
Numbers, Book of - ...
Numbers 6 : The law of the Nazarites, q
Nazirite - ’ In Lamentations 4:7 ‘her Nazarites’ (Authorized Version ) probably means ‘her nobles’ (Revised Version )
Nazirite - ’ In Lamentations 4:7 ‘her Nazarites’ (Authorized Version ) probably means ‘her nobles’ (Revised Version )