What does Nazareth mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ναζαρὲθ the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 4
ναζωραίου an inhabitant of Nazareth. / a title given to Jesus in the NT. / a name given to Christians by the Jews 4
ναζωραῖον an inhabitant of Nazareth. / a title given to Jesus in the NT. / a name given to Christians by the Jews 3
ναζωραῖος an inhabitant of Nazareth. / a title given to Jesus in the NT. / a name given to Christians by the Jews 3
ναζαρέθ the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 2
ναζαρὲτ the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 2
ναζαρέτ the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 2
ναζαρηνέ a resident of Nazareth. 2
ναζαρά the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 1
ναζαρὰ the ordinary residence and home town of Christ. 1
ναζαρηνοῦ a resident of Nazareth. 1
ναζαρηνός a resident of Nazareth. 1
ναζωραιοσ an inhabitant of Nazareth. / a title given to Jesus in the NT. / a name given to Christians by the Jews 1

Definitions Related to Nazareth

G3480


   1 an inhabitant of Nazareth.
   2 a title given to Jesus in the NT.
   3 a name given to Christians by the Jews, Ac. 24:5.
               Additional Information: Nazarite = “one separated”.
               

G3478


   1 the ordinary residence and home town of Christ.
   Additional Information: Nazareth = “the guarded one”.
   

G3479


   1 a resident of Nazareth.
   

Frequency of Nazareth (original languages)

Frequency of Nazareth (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nazareth
Nazareth (năz'a-rĕth), separated? Matthew 2:23. A city of Galilee, famous as the home of Jesus during his childhood and youth until he began his public ministry. It was about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee, and 66 miles north of Jerusalem in a straight line. It is one of the most beautiful sites in the Holy Land. Nazareth is not mentioned in the Old Testament, nor by any classical author, nor by any writer before the time of Christ. It was for some unknown reason held in disrepute among the Jews of Judæa. John 1:46. It was situated in a mountain, Luke 4:29, within the province of Galilee, Mark 1:9, and near Cana, as John 2:1-2; John 2:11 seems to imply. There was a precipice near the town, down which the people proposed to cast Jesus. Luke 4:29. It is mentioned 29 times in the New Testament. At Nazareth the angel appeared to Mary: the home of Joseph, Luke 1:26; Luke 2:39, and to that place Joseph and Mary returned after their flight into Egypt. Matthew 2:23. The hills and places about the town possess a deep and hallowed interest to the Christian as the home of Jesus during his childhood and youth, until he entered upon his ministry, and had preached in the synagogue, and was rejected by his own townspeople. Even after Capernaum became "his own city" he was known as "Jesus of Nazareth," Matthew 13:54-58; Mark 6:1-6; Acts 2:22; Acts 3:6; Acts 4:10; Acts 6:14, and his disciples were called "Nazarenes." The town is now called En-Nâsirah, or Nasrah, and has from 6000 to 7000 population, though the Turkish officials estimate it at 10,000. The brow of the hill over which the enraged Nazarenes threatened to cast Jesus is probably near the Maronite church, though tradition places it at the "Mount of Precipitation," two or three miles south of the town.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Nazareth
The town of Galilee where the Blessed Virgin dwelt and where Christ lived the first 30 years of his life, situated in a hollow plateau between the hills of Lebanon, the ancient town occupying the triangular hillock in the north. In earliest times it was the home of priests on their way to the Temple of Jerusalem, and up to the time of Constantine, exclusively Jewish. By 570 the dwelling of Mary had been converted into a basilica and in the 7th century the church of the Nutrition of Jesus was erected. The toleration of the Moslems who conquered Galilee in 637 did not last, for thc Crusaders were compelled to leave the town, 1187, and all the Christian buildings were destroyed in 1263. The Franciscan friars, arriving in the 14th century, were driven out twice, but in 1629 were allowed to build a church, which was, however, ruined by the Bedouins. The friars built the present church in 1730. In 1909 explorations below and about it revealed the plans of the ancient basilica of Constantine, which the Crusaders copied. The Franciscans built their church so that fifteen steps led down to the ancient Chapel of the Angel, and two to the grotto with its altar of the Annunciation. The choir of the church is directly above the grotto; the chapel is the traditional site of the house of the Virgin; and the church of the Nutrition marks the home of the Holy Family.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nazareth
In a basin among hills descending into Esdraelon from Lebanon, and forming a valley which runs in a wavy line E. and W. On the northern side of the valley the rounded limestone hills rise to 400 or 500 ft. The valley and hill sides abound in gay flowers as the hollyhock growing wild, fig trees, olives, and oranges, gardens with cactus hedges, and grainfields. Now en Nazirah on a hill of Galilee (Mark 1:9), with a precipice nigh (Luke 4:29); near Cane (John 2:1-2; John 2:11). Its population of 4,000 is partly Muslim, but mainly of Latin and Greek Christians. It has a mosque, a Maronite, a Greek, and a Protestant church, and a large Franciscan convent. The rain pouring down the hills would sweep away a house founded on the surface, and often leaves the streets impassable with mud. So the houses generally are of stone, founded, after digging deep, upon the rock (Matthew 13:54-5849).
On a hill behind is the tomb of neby Ismail, commanding one of the most lovely prospects in the world, Lebanon and snowy Hermon on the N., Carmel and the Mediterranean and Acca on the W., Gilead and Tabor on the S.E., the Esdraelon plain and the Samaria mountains on the S., and villages on every side; Cana, Nain, Endor, Jezreel (Zerin), etc. Doubtless in early life Jesus often stood on this spot and held communion with His Father who, by His Son, had created this glorious scene. Nazareth is never named in Old Testament. It was there Gabriel was sent from God to announce to the Virgin her coming conception of Him who shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever, and of whose kingdom there shall be no end (Luke 1:26-33). After His birth and the sojourn in Egypt Joseph and Mary took the child to their original home in Nazareth, six miles W. of Mount Tabor (Matthew 2:23; Luke 2:39; Luke 4:16).
As "John the Baptist; was in the desert until the day of his showing unto Israel," so Messiah was growing up unknown to the world in the sequestered town among the mountains, until His baptism by the forerunner ushered in His public ministry. As Jews alone lived in Nazareth from before Josephus' time to the reign of Constantine (Epiphanius, Haer.), it is impossible to identify the sacred sites as tradition pretends to do, namely, the place of the annunciation to Mary, with the inscription on the pavement of the grotto, "Ηic Verbum caro factum est ", the mensa Christi , and the synagogue from whence Jesus was dragged to the brow of the hill. Of all Rome's lying legends, none exceeds that of Joseph's house (santa casa ) having been whisked from Nazareth to Loretto in the 13th century; in spite of the bull of Leo X endorsing the legend, the fact remains that the santa casa is of a dark red stone, such as is not found in or about Nazareth, where the grey white limestone prevails, and also the ground plan of the house at Loretto is at variance with the site of the house at Nazareth shown by the Franciscans within their convent walls.
Jesus taught in the synagogue of Nazareth, "His own country" (Matthew 13:54), and was there "thrust out of the city and led unto the brow of the hill whereon if was built, to be cast down headlong," but "passing through the midst of them He went His way" (Luke 4:16-30). The hill of precipitation" is not the one presumed, two miles S.E. of Nazareth. The present village is on the hill side, nearer the bottom than the top. Among the rocky ledges above the lower parts of the village is one 40 ft. high, and perpendicular, near the Maronite church: this is probably the true site. It is striking how accurately Luke steers clear of a mistake; he does not say they ascended or descended to reach the precipice, but "led" Jesus to it. He does not say the "city" was built on the brow of the hill, but that the precipice was "on the brow," without stating whether it was above (as is the case) or below the town.
A forger could hardly go so near a topographical mistake, without falling into it. "Jesus of Nazareth" was part of the inscription on the cross (John 19:19). It is the designation by which He revealed Himself to Saul (Acts 22:8). Nazareth bore a bad name even in Galilee (for Nathanael who said "can any good thing come out of Nazareth?" was of Galilee), which itself, because of its half pagan population and rude dialect, was despised by the people of Judea. The absence of "good" in Nazareth appears from the people's willful unbelief in spite of Jesus' miracles, and their attempt on His life (1618100697_1), so that He left them, to settle in Capernaum (Matthew 4:13). "The fountain of the Virgin" is at the N.E. of the town.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nazareth
Separated, generally supposed to be the Greek form of the Hebrew Netser , A "shoot" or "sprout." Some, however, think that the name of the city must be connected with the name of the hill behind it, from which one of the finest prospects in Palestine is obtained, and accordingly they derive it from the Hebrew Notserah , i.e., one guarding or watching, thus designating the hill which overlooks and thus guards an extensive region. This city is not mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the home of Joseph and Mary ( Luke 2:39 ), and here the angel announced to the Virgin the birth of the Messiah (1:26-28). Here Jesus grew up from his infancy to manhood (4:16); and here he began his public ministry in the synagogue (Matthew 13:54 ), at which the people were so offended that they sought to cast him down from the precipice whereon their city was built (Luke 4:29 ). Twice they expelled him from their borders (4:16-29; Matthew 13:54-58 ); and he finally retired from the city, where he did not many mighty works because of their unbelief (Matthew 13:58 ), and took up his residence in Capernaum.
Nazareth is situated among the southern ridges of Lebanon, on the steep slope of a hill, about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee and about 6 west from Mount Tabor. It is identified with the modern village en-Nazirah, of six or ten thousand inhabitants. It lies "as in a hollow cup" lower down upon the hill than the ancient city. The main road for traffic between Egypt and the interior of Asia passed by Nazareth near the foot of Tabor, and thence northward to Damascus.
It is supposed from the words of Nathanael in John 1:46 that the city of Nazareth was held in great disrepute, either because, it is said, the people of Galilee were a rude and less cultivated class, and were largely influenced by the Gentiles who mingled with them, or because of their lower type of moral and religious character. But there seems to be no sufficient reason for these suppositions. The Jews believed that, according to Micah 5:2 , the birth of the Messiah would take place at Bethlehem, and nowhere else. Nathanael held the same opinion as his countrymen, and believed that the great "good" which they were all expecting could not come from Nazareth. This is probably what Nathanael meant. Moreover, there does not seem to be any evidence that the inhabitants of Galilee were in any respect inferior, or that a Galilean was held in contempt, in the time of our Lord. (See Dr. Merrill's Galilee in the Time of Christ.)
The population of this city (now about 10,000) in the time of Christ probably amounted to 15,000 or 20,000 souls.
"The so-called 'Holy House' is a cave under the Latin church, which appears to have been originally a tank. The 'brow of the hill', site of the attempted precipitation, is probably the northern cliff: the traditional site has been shown since the middle ages at some distance to the south. None of the traditional sites are traceable very early, and they have no authority. The name Nazareth perhaps means 'a watch tower' (now en-Nasrah), but is connected in the New Testament with Netzer, 'a branch' (Isaiah 4:2 ; Jeremiah 23:5 ; Zechariah 3:8 ; 6:12 ; Matthew 2:23 ), Nazarene being quite a different word from Nazarite."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o House of Nazareth the Blest
Hymn for Lauds on the Feast of the Holy Family, first Sunday after Epiphany. Pope Leo III wrote it. Of the three translations, the title given above is by Monsignor Henry.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nazareth
NAZARETH (mod. en-Nâsira ). A town in the north border of the Plain of Esdraelon. It was a place of no history (being entirely unmentioned in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud), no importance, and, possibly, of bad reputation ( John 1:48 ). Here, however, lived Mary and Joseph. Hither, before their marriage, was the angel Gabriel sent to announce the coming birth of Christ ( Luke 1:26-38 ), and hither the Holy Family retired after the flight to Egypt ( Matthew 2:23 ). The obscure years of Christ’s boyhood were spent here, and in its synagogue He preached the sermon for which He was rejected by His fellow-townsmen ( Matthew 13:54 , Luke 4:28 ). After this, save as a centre of pilgrimage, Nazareth sank into obscurity. The Crusaders made it a bishopric; it is now the seat of a Turkish lientenant-governor. Many traditional sites are pointed out to pilgrims and tourists, for not one of which, with the possible exception of the ‘Virgin’s Well’ (which, being the only spring known in the neighbourhood, was not improbably that used by the Holy Family), is there any justification.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Nazareth
The chief importance of Nazareth is that it was the place where Jesus lived most of his life. It is not mentioned in the Old Testament, and is mentioned in the New Testament only in connection with the story of Jesus.
Nazareth was situated in the hilly country of the northern part of Palestine known as Galilee. It had no great political importance, though it was close to several trade routes that passed through Palestine. Citizens of rival towns did not have a high opinion of it (John 1:43-46). The town today is within the borders of modern Israel, and is larger and more important than it was in Jesus’ day.
Jesus’ parents were originally from Nazareth, but before his birth they moved south to Bethlehem in Judea (Luke 2:4). After Jesus’ birth the family went to Egypt to escape the murderous Herod, and it was probably about two years later that they returned to Palestine and settled again in Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23; Luke 2:39). Jesus spent his childhood in Nazareth (Luke 2:40; Luke 2:51; Luke 4:16), and seems to have continued living there till he was about thirty years of age, at which time he began his public ministry (Mark 1:9; Luke 3:23).
A common Jewish practice was to identify people by the name of the town they came from. Jesus was often referred to – by friends, enemies, angels, demons, common people, government officials, and even by himself – as Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 26:71; Mark 1:23-24; Mark 16:5-6; Luke 24:19; John 18:5; John 19:19; Acts 2:22; Acts 22:8).
The people of Nazareth, who had seen Jesus grow up in their town, were surprised that he could preach so well, especially since he had not studied at any of the schools of the rabbis. They were also angry that he would not perform miracles to please them. On one occasion they tried to throw him over one of the cliffs in the hills around Nazareth (Matthew 13:53-58; Luke 4:16-30; Mark 6:1-6).
In New Testament times the unbelieving Jews refused to call Jesus by his messianic name ‘Christ’, and refused to call his followers ‘Christians’. They called him simply Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, and called his followers Nazarenes (Acts 24:5). Even today, in Hebrew and Arabic speech, Christians may be called Nazarenes.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nazareth, Nazarene
(naz' uh ruhth; naz uh reene') Place name meaning, “branch.” Nazareth did not enjoy a place of prominence until its association with Jesus. It does not appear in the Old Testament. As He became known as “Jesus of Nazareth” (Matthew 26:71 ; Luke 18:37 ; Luke 24:19 ; John 1:45 ; Acts 2:22 ; Luke 2:39-40 ; Acts 10:38 ), His hometown became fixed in Christian memory.
Nazareth was located in lower Galilee about halfway between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean Sea. It lay in the hill country north of the Plain of Esdraelon. The hills formed a natural basin with three sides, but open toward the south. The city was on the slopes of the basin, facing east and southeast. Cana was about five miles to the northeast. A Roman road from Capernaum westward to the coast passed near Nazareth.
Was a small village in Jesus' day, having only one spring to supply fresh water to its inhabitants. Today, the spring is referred to as “Mary's well.” The modern city has about 20,000 citizens, mainly Moslems and Christians.
The angel went to Nazareth to announce to Mary and Joseph the coming birth of Jesus (Luke 1:26-28 ). Following Jesus' birth in Bethlehem and the sojourn in Egypt, Joseph and Mary returned with Jesus to Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23 ), where Jesus grew from boyhood to manhood (Acts 3:6 ; Luke 4:16 ), being stamped as a Nazarene (Matthew 2:23 ), apparently a midrashic play on the Hebrew term netser , “shoot” in Isaiah 11:1 .
Nazareth did not possess a good reputation, as reflected in the question of Nathanael, himself a Galilean (John 1:46 ). The early church received similar scorn as the Nazarene sect (Acts 24:5 ). Such lack of respect was likely due to an unpolished dialect, a lack of culture, and quite possibly a measure of irreligion and moral laxity.
Jesus was rejected by His townspeople near the beginning of His public ministry, being cast out of the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-30 ; see also Matthew 13:54-58 ; Mark 6:1-6 ). See Galilee .
Jerry W. Batson
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nazareth
Separated; crowned; sanctified
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nazareth
Town where the Lord was 'brought up.' Early in the Lord's ministry He visited Nazareth, and taught in the synagogue. The people wondered at His gracious words, but they said, "Is not this Joseph's son?" When He told them that no prophet is accepted in his own country, and proceeded to speak of the grace of God having gone out to the Gentiles in O.T. times, they were filled with wrath, thrust Him out of the city, and sought to hurl Him over the brow of the hill on which the city was built. But He, passing through the midst of them, went His way. Luke 4:16-30 . About twelve months later He visited 'his own country' again and taught in the synagogue. But the inhabitants only regarded Him as 'the carpenter,' and were offended in Him. He did not many mighty works there because of their unbelief. Matthew 13:54-58 ; Mark 6:1-6 . As far as is known the Lord did not visit Nazareth again.
It is identified with en Nasirah , in Lower Galilee, 32 42' N, 35 18' E . The town presents a striking appearance, the houses being built of the white limestone of the neighbourhood, which reflects the rays of the sun. There is a steep precipice which is probably the place where the enraged people intended to cast down the Lord. A spring, called the 'fountain of the virgin,' supplies the town with water, where the women may daily be seen with their pitchers, and whence doubtless the mother of the Lord also fetched water for her family. The name of the city often occurs in the gospels in the expression, 'Jesus of Nazareth,' and this designation was also placed on the cross. God has highly exalted the One who humbled Himself, and was in the eyes of the Jews merely 'Jesus of Nazareth.'
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Nazareth
a little city in the tribe of Zebulun, in Lower Galilee, to the west of Tabor, and to the east of Ptolemais. This city is much celebrated in the Scriptures for having been the usual place of the residence of Jesus Christ, during the first thirty years of his life, Luke 2:51 . It was here he lived in obedience to Joseph and Mary, and hence he took the name of Nazarene. After he had begun to execute his mission he preached here sometimes in the synagogue, Luke 4:16 . But because his countrymen had no faith in him, and were offended at the meanness of his original, he did not many miracles here, Matthew 13:54 ; Matthew 13:58 , nor would he dwell in the city. So he fixed his habitation at Capernaum for the latter part of his life, Matthew 4:13 . The city of Nazareth was situated upon an eminence, and on one side was a precipice, from whence the Nazarenes designed, at one time, to cast Christ down headlong, because he upbraided them for their incredulity, Luke 4:29 .
The present state of this celebrated place is thus described by modern travellers:—Nassara, or Naszera, is one of the principal towns in the pashalic of Acre. Its inhabitants are industrious, because they are treated with less severity than those of the country towns in general. The population is estimated at three thousand, of whom five hundred are Turks; the remainder are Christians. There are about ninety Latin families, according to Burckhardt; but Mr. Connor reports the Greeks to be the most numerous: there is, besides, a congregation of Greek Catholics, and another of Maronites. The Latin convent is a very spacious and commodious building, which was thoroughly repaired and considerably enlarged in 1730. The remains of the more ancient edifice, ascribed to the mother of Constantine, may be observed in the form of subverted columns, with fragments of capitals and bases of pillars, lying near the modern building. Pococke noticed, over a door, an old alto-relief of Judith cutting off the head of Holofernes. Within the convent is the church of the annunciation, containing the house of Joseph and Mary, the length of which is not quite the breadth of the church; but it forms the principal part of it. The columns and all the interior or the church are hung round with damask silk, which gives it a warm and rich appearance. Behind the great altar is a subterranean cavern, divided into small grottoes, where the virgin is said to have lived. Her kitchen, parlour, and bed room, are shown, and also a narrow hole in the rock, in which the child Jesus once hid himself from his persecutors. The pilgrims who visit these holy spots are in the habit of knocking off small pieces of stone from the walls, which are thus considerably enlarging. In the church a miracle is still exhibited to the faithful. In front of the altar are two granite columns, each two feet one inch in diameter, and about three feet apart. They are supposed to occupy the very places where the angel and the virgin stood at the precise moment of the annunciation. The innermost of these, that of the virgin, has been broken away, some say by the Turks, in expectation of finding treasure under it; "so that," as Maundrell states, "eighteen inches' length of it is clean gone between the pillar and the pedestal." Nevertheless, it remains erect, suspended from the roof, as if attracted by a loadstone. It has evidently no support below; and, though it touches the roof, the hierophant protests that it has none above. "All the Christians of Nazareth," says Burckhardt, "with the friars, of course, at their head, affect to believe in this miracle; though it is perfectly evident that the upper part of the column is connected with the roof." "The fact is," says Dr. E. D. Clarke, "that the capital and a piece of the shaft of a pillar of gray granite have been fastened on to the roof of the cave; and so clumsily is the rest of the hocus pocus contrived, that what is shown for the lower fragment of the same pillar resting upon the earth, is not of the same substance, but of Cipolino marble. About this pillar, a different story has been related by almost every traveller since the trick was devised. Maundrell, and Egmont and Heyman, were told that it was broken, in search of hidden treasure, by a pasha, who was struck with blindness for his impiety. We were assured that it was separated in this manner when the angel announced to the virgin the tidings of her conception. The monks had placed a rail, to prevent persons infected with the plague from coming to rub against these pillars: this had been, for many years, their constant practice, whenever afflicted with any sickness. The reputation of the broken pillar, for healing every kind of disease, prevails all over Galilee."
Burckhardt says that this church, next to that of the holy sepulchre, is the finest in Syria, and contains two tolerably good organs. Within the walls of the convent are two gardens, and a small burying ground: the walls are very thick, and serve occasionally as a fortress to all the Christians in the town. There are, at present, eleven friars in the convent: they are chiefly Spaniards. The yearly expenses of the establishment are stated to amount to upward of nine hundred pounds; a small part of which is defrayed by the rent of a few houses in the town, and by the produce of some acres of corn land: the rest is remitted from Jerusalem. The whole annual expenses of the Terra Santa convents are about fifteen thousand pounds; of which the pasha of Damascus receives about twelve thousand pounds. The Greek convent of Jerusalem, according to Burckhardt's authority, pays much more, as well to maintain its own privileges, as with a view to encroach upon those of the Latins. To the north-west of the convent is a small church, built over Joseph's work shop. Both Maundrell and Pococke describe it as in ruins; but Dr. E. D. Clarke says, "This is now a small chapel, perfectly modern, and neatly whitewashed." To the west of this is a small arched building, which, they say, is the synagogue where Christ exasperated the Jews, by applying the language of Isaiah to himself. It once belonged to the Greeks; but, Hasselquist says, was taken from them by the Arabs, who intended to convert it into a mosque, but afterward sold it to the Latins. This was then so late a transaction that they had not had time to embellish it. The "Mountain of the Precipitation" is at least two miles off; so that, according to this authentic tradition, the Jews must have led our Lord a marvellous way. But the said precipice is shown as that which the Messiah leaped down to escape from the Jews; and as the monks could not pitch upon any other place frightful enough for the miracle, they contend that Nazareth formerly stood eastward of its present situation, upon a more elevated spot. Dr. E. D. Clarke, however, remarks that the situation of the modern town answers exactly to the description of St. Luke. "Induced, by the words of the Gospel, to examine the place more attentively than we should otherwise have done, we went, as it is written, out of the city, ‘to the brow of the hill whereon the city is built,' and came to a precipice corresponding to the words of the evangelist. It is above the Maronite church, and, probably, the precise spot alluded to by the text."
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Nazareth
The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. After the Gospels, it is expressly mentioned only in the phrase Ἰησοῦν τὸν ἀπὸ Ναζαρέθ, ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 10:38), but an equivalent of this expression, Ἰησοῦς ὁ Ναζωραῖος, also translated ‘Jesus of Nazareth,’ but lit. [1] ‘the Nazaraean,’ or ‘Nazarene,’ is found six times in Acts; while the followers of Jesus are once called ‘the Nazarenes’ (οἱ Ναζωραῖοι, Acts 24:5). The name ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ has various shades of meaning, according to the spirit in which it is uttered. On the Day of Pentecost St. Peter uses it with an amazed sense of the identity of the lowly Nazarene, who met a felon’s death, with the glorious Being who, Risen and Exalted, has been made Lord and Christ (Acts 2:22; cf. Acts 3:6, Acts 4:10). The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses. St. Paul recalls the time when his unenlightened conscience drove him to take active measures against ‘Jesus the Nazarene,’ a name which he used at that time with fierce scorn (Acts 26:9). But on the road to Damascus he learned its true meaning, when his question ‘Who art thou, Lord?’ was answered, ‘I am Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 22:8). The Galilaean town, valley, and hills were for ever graven on the Saviour’s heart, and His own use of the familiar title made it doubly sacred. His followers could never object to be named ‘the Nazarenes,’ as they were, e.g., by Tertullus (Acts 24:5), just as they could not but glory in being called ‘the Christians’ (Acts 11:26). While the former name was of Jewish origin, and came to be their standing designation among the unbelieving Jews, the latter was a Gentile coinage. ‘The Nazarene’ and ‘the Nazarenes’ correspond to the terms which are used in the Talmud-הַנּוֹצְרִי (Sanh. 43a, 107b; Sot. 47a) and הַנּוֹצְרִים (Ta‛ǎn. 27b); and to the present day the word Nôṣrî is habitually applied in Jewish literature to Jesus’ followers, whom a strict orthodoxy can no more name ‘Christians’ than it can call their leader ‘Christ.’ The name ‘Nazarenes’ still designates the Christians in all Muslim lands.
It is a significant fact that Nazareth, which is so dear to Christendom, is never named in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud. Though it was a city (πόλις, Matthew 2:23), not a village (κώμη), it was a place without a history, and Nathanael of Cana-who may not have been quite free from the jealousy of neighbourhood-had great difficulty in imagining that it might produce the Messiah (John 1:46). But many things have been said, and uncritically repeated, about Nazareth, which are not well grounded on fact; e.g., that Jesus lived for thirty years ‘in the deep obscurity of a provincial village … not only in a despised province, but in its most disregarded valley’ (F. W. Farrar, The Life of Christ, new ed., 1894, p. 41), and that ‘probably public opinion looked upon the little town as morally degenerate’ (Meyer on John 1:47). There is no reason to believe that the Nazarenes were less brave, less devoted to their country’s cause, less zealous for the law, less inspired by Messianic hopes than the other Galilaeans. And one of the hills that ‘girdle quiet Nazareth’ was a perfect watch-tower, set in the midst of the Holy Land and the mighty Roman Empire, for the young Prophet who was to give the city so great a place in history. His feet climbed its summit easily and-as His love of hills would indicate-probably often; and while His eyes ranged over one of the fairest prospects on earth, He had ‘ears to hear’ the murmur of the world. If His youth was inwardly, it could scarcely be outwardly, peaceful. He loved solitude, and the words ‘in secret’ (ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6) were dear to Him; yet He was destined for society, and His early years were passed in no backwater, but in the full current of the events of His time. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) , 1897, p. 434; cf. Selah Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, 1885, p. 123f.). All the time that His talent (if the word may here be used) was growing in stillness, His character was being formed in the stream of the world. Nazareth was in truth the best of all places for the education of the Messiah (cf. W. M. Ramsay, The Education of Christ2, 1902).
Various etymologies of ‘Nazareth’ have been proposed. The idea that it means ‘consecrated,’ ‘devoted to God’ (from נָדַר, whence Nazirite), or that it denotes ‘my Saviour’ (נוֹצְרִי), may be dismissed at once. Equally improbable is the notion that it embodies a Messianic name, ‘the Shoot,’ or ‘the Sprout’ (נֵצֶר), which is found in Isaiah 11:1. The most likely suggestion is that it signifies ‘Watch-tower’ (from נֹצָרֶת, Aram. נָצְרֶה, נָצְרַת, a name which would be given first to the hill, and then to the town built on its flank.
Acting on a hint of Wellhausen’s (Israelitische und jüdische Geschichte, 1894, p. 222, footnote 3), T. K. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii. 3358 f.), but his reasoning, as G. A. Barton remarks in Jewish Encyclopedia , is ‘in the highest degree precarious.’
Literature.-A. P. Stanley, Sinai and Palestine23, 1912; V. Guérin, Description géog. de la Palestine, pt. iii.: ‘Galilée,’ 1880; F. Buhl, GAP [2] , 1896; W. Sanday, Sacred Sites of the Gospels, 1903; K. Baedeker, Palestine and Syria, 1912, p. 246.
James Strahan.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nazareth
A city of lower Galilee, about seventy miles north of Jerusalem, in the territory of the tribe of Zebulun. It was situated on the side of a hill overlooking a rich and beautiful valley, surrounded by hills, with a narrow outlet towards the south. At the mouth of this ravine the monks profess to show the place where the men of the city were about to cast Jesus from the precipice, Luke 4:29 . Nazareth is about six miles west north west of Mount Tabor, and nearly half way form the Jordan to the Mediterranean. It is said in the New Testament to be "the city of Jesus," because it was the place of his usual residence during the first thirty years of his life, Matthew 2:23 Luke 1:26 2:51 4:16 . He visited it during his public ministry, but did not perform many miracles there because of the unbelief of the people, Matthew 13:54-58 . It is not even named in the Old Testament, nor by Josephus; and appears to have been a small place, of no very good repute, John 1:46 . The modern town, en-Nasirah, is a secluded village of about three thousand inhabitants, most of whom are Latin and Greek Christians. It lies about eight hundred feet above the level of the sea; and is one of the pleasantest towns in Syria. Its houses are of stone, two stories high, with flat roofs. It contains a mosque, a large Latin convent, and two or three chapels. The traditionary "Mount of the Precipitation" is nearly two miles from the town, too remote to have answered the purpose of the enraged Nazarenes; while there were several precipitous spots close at hand, where the fall is still from thirty to fifty feet.
From the summit of the hill on the eastern slope of which Nazareth lies, is a truly magnificent prospect. Towards the north, the eye glances over the countless hills of Galilee, and reposes on the majestic and snow-crowned Hermon. On the east, the Jordan valley may be traced, and beyond it the dim heights of ancient Bashan. Towards the south, spreads the broad and beautiful plain of Esdraelon, with the bold outline of Mount Tabor, and parts of Little Hermon and Gilboa visible on its eastern border, and the hills of Samaria on the south, while Carmel rises on the west of the plain, and dips his feet in the blue waters of the Mediterranean.
Says Dr. Robinson in his "Biblical Researches in Palestine," "I remained for some hours upon this spot, lost in the contemplation of the wide prospect and of the events connected with the scenes around. In the village below, the Savior of the world had passed his childhood; and although we have few particulars of his life during those early years, yet there are certain features of nature which meet our eyes now, just as they once met his."
"He must often have visited the fountain near which we had pitched our tent; his feet must frequently have wandered over the adjacent hills, and his eyes have doubtless gazed upon the splendid prospect form this very spot. Here the Prince of peace looked down upon the great plain, where the din of battles so oft had rolled, and the garments of the warrior been dyed in blood; and he liked out, too, upon the sea over which the swift ships were to bear the tidings of his salvation to nations and to continents them unknown. How has the moral aspect to things been changed!"
"Battles and bloodshed have indeed not ceased to desolate this unhappy country, and gross darkness now covers the people; but from this region a light went forth, which has enlightened the world and unveiled new climes; and now the rays of that light begin to be reflected back form distant isles and continents, to illuminate anew the darkened land where it first sprung up."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Charity of Nazareth
Congregation founded by Father B. David at Nazareth, Kentucky in 1812, for the care of the poor and the sick, and the teaching of children. The congregation manages schools, orphanages, and hospitals in the United States. The mother-house is at Nazareth. They maintain a web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth
Founded by Frances Siedliska in Rome in 1874 for teaching, visiting the sick and poor, and taking charge of hospitals, and orphanages. The sisters also conduct schools, academies, a day nursery, and a house of studies. The mother-house is in Rome, Italy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Nazareth
The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. After the Gospels, it is expressly mentioned only in the phrase Ἰησοῦν τὸν ἀπὸ Ναζαρέθ, ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 10:38), but an equivalent of this expression, Ἰησοῦς ὁ Ναζωραῖος, also translated ‘Jesus of Nazareth,’ but lit. [1] ‘the Nazaraean,’ or ‘Nazarene,’ is found six times in Acts; while the followers of Jesus are once called ‘the Nazarenes’ (οἱ Ναζωραῖοι, Acts 24:5). The name ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ has various shades of meaning, according to the spirit in which it is uttered. On the Day of Pentecost St. Peter uses it with an amazed sense of the identity of the lowly Nazarene, who met a felon’s death, with the glorious Being who, Risen and Exalted, has been made Lord and Christ (Acts 2:22; cf. Acts 3:6, Acts 4:10). The accusers of Stephen refer with contemptuous anger to ‘this Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 6:14), whom the heretic would fain set above Moses. St. Paul recalls the time when his unenlightened conscience drove him to take active measures against ‘Jesus the Nazarene,’ a name which he used at that time with fierce scorn (Acts 26:9). But on the road to Damascus he learned its true meaning, when his question ‘Who art thou, Lord?’ was answered, ‘I am Jesus the Nazarene’ (Acts 22:8). The Galilaean town, valley, and hills were for ever graven on the Saviour’s heart, and His own use of the familiar title made it doubly sacred. His followers could never object to be named ‘the Nazarenes,’ as they were, e.g., by Tertullus (Acts 24:5), just as they could not but glory in being called ‘the Christians’ (Acts 11:26). While the former name was of Jewish origin, and came to be their standing designation among the unbelieving Jews, the latter was a Gentile coinage. ‘The Nazarene’ and ‘the Nazarenes’ correspond to the terms which are used in the Talmud-הַנּוֹצְרִי (Sanh. 43a, 107b; Sot. 47a) and הַנּוֹצְרִים (Ta‛ǎn. 27b); and to the present day the word Nôṣrî is habitually applied in Jewish literature to Jesus’ followers, whom a strict orthodoxy can no more name ‘Christians’ than it can call their leader ‘Christ.’ The name ‘Nazarenes’ still designates the Christians in all Muslim lands.
It is a significant fact that Nazareth, which is so dear to Christendom, is never named in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud. Though it was a city (πόλις, Matthew 2:23), not a village (κώμη), it was a place without a history, and Nathanael of Cana-who may not have been quite free from the jealousy of neighbourhood-had great difficulty in imagining that it might produce the Messiah (John 1:46). But many things have been said, and uncritically repeated, about Nazareth, which are not well grounded on fact; e.g., that Jesus lived for thirty years ‘in the deep obscurity of a provincial village … not only in a despised province, but in its most disregarded valley’ (F. W. Farrar, The Life of Christ, new ed., 1894, p. 41), and that ‘probably public opinion looked upon the little town as morally degenerate’ (Meyer on John 1:47). There is no reason to believe that the Nazarenes were less brave, less devoted to their country’s cause, less zealous for the law, less inspired by Messianic hopes than the other Galilaeans. And one of the hills that ‘girdle quiet Nazareth’ was a perfect watch-tower, set in the midst of the Holy Land and the mighty Roman Empire, for the young Prophet who was to give the city so great a place in history. His feet climbed its summit easily and-as His love of hills would indicate-probably often; and while His eyes ranged over one of the fairest prospects on earth, He had ‘ears to hear’ the murmur of the world. If His youth was inwardly, it could scarcely be outwardly, peaceful. He loved solitude, and the words ‘in secret’ (ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ, Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6) were dear to Him; yet He was destined for society, and His early years were passed in no backwater, but in the full current of the events of His time. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) , 1897, p. 434; cf. Selah Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, 1885, p. 123f.). All the time that His talent (if the word may here be used) was growing in stillness, His character was being formed in the stream of the world. Nazareth was in truth the best of all places for the education of the Messiah (cf. W. M. Ramsay, The Education of Christ2, 1902).
Various etymologies of ‘Nazareth’ have been proposed. The idea that it means ‘consecrated,’ ‘devoted to God’ (from נָדַר, whence Nazirite), or that it denotes ‘my Saviour’ (נוֹצְרִי), may be dismissed at once. Equally improbable is the notion that it embodies a Messianic name, ‘the Shoot,’ or ‘the Sprout’ (נֵצֶר), which is found in Isaiah 11:1. The most likely suggestion is that it signifies ‘Watch-tower’ (from נֹצָרֶת, Aram. נָצְרֶה, נָצְרַת, a name which would be given first to the hill, and then to the town built on its flank.
Acting on a hint of Wellhausen’s (Israelitische und jüdische Geschichte, 1894, p. 222, footnote 3), T. K. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii. 3358 f.), but his reasoning, as G. A. Barton remarks in Jewish Encyclopedia , is ‘in the highest degree precarious.’
Literature.-A. P. Stanley, Sinai and Palestine23, 1912; V. Guérin, Description géog. de la Palestine, pt. iii.: ‘Galilée,’ 1880; F. Buhl, GAP [2] , 1896; W. Sanday, Sacred Sites of the Gospels, 1903; K. Baedeker, Palestine and Syria, 1912, p. 246.
James Strahan.

Sentence search

Nazarene - An epithet applied to Christ, and usually translated "of Nazareth," as in Matthew 21:11 Acts 2:22 4:10 . Nazareth was a small town, in a despised part of Palestine. See GALILEE , and Nazareth
Sarid - ("hole"), "incision" (Knobel); perhaps the southern opening of the deep, narrow wady, coming down from the basin of Nazareth, about an hour to the S. of Nazareth, between two steep mountains
Sisters of Charity of Nazareth - David at Nazareth, Kentucky in 1812, for the care of the poor and the sick, and the teaching of children. The mother-house is at Nazareth
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Detroit) - The novitiate was transferred to Nazareth, Michigan in 1897. The mother-house is at Nazareth
Nazareth, Nazarene - ” Nazareth did not enjoy a place of prominence until its association with Jesus. As He became known as “Jesus of Nazareth” (Matthew 26:71 ; Luke 18:37 ; Luke 24:19 ; John 1:45 ; Acts 2:22 ; Acts 3:6 ; Acts 10:38 ), His hometown became fixed in Christian memory. ...
Nazareth was located in lower Galilee about halfway between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean Sea. A Roman road from Capernaum westward to the coast passed near Nazareth. ...
The angel went to Nazareth to announce to Mary and Joseph the coming birth of Jesus (Luke 1:26-28 ). Following Jesus' birth in Bethlehem and the sojourn in Egypt, Joseph and Mary returned with Jesus to Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23 ), where Jesus grew from boyhood to manhood (Luke 2:39-40 ; Luke 4:16 ), being stamped as a Nazarene (Matthew 2:23 ), apparently a midrashic play on the Hebrew term netser , “shoot” in Isaiah 11:1 . ...
Nazareth did not possess a good reputation, as reflected in the question of Nathanael, himself a Galilean (John 1:46 ). ...
Jesus was rejected by His townspeople near the beginning of His public ministry, being cast out of the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-30 ; see also Matthew 13:54-58 ; Mark 6:1-6 )
Nazareth - The chief importance of Nazareth is that it was the place where Jesus lived most of his life. ...
Nazareth was situated in the hilly country of the northern part of Palestine known as Galilee. ...
Jesus’ parents were originally from Nazareth, but before his birth they moved south to Bethlehem in Judea (Luke 2:4). After Jesus’ birth the family went to Egypt to escape the murderous Herod, and it was probably about two years later that they returned to Palestine and settled again in Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23; Luke 2:39). Jesus spent his childhood in Nazareth (Luke 2:40; Luke 2:51; Luke 4:16), and seems to have continued living there till he was about thirty years of age, at which time he began his public ministry (Mark 1:9; Luke 3:23). Jesus was often referred to – by friends, enemies, angels, demons, common people, government officials, and even by himself – as Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 26:71; Mark 1:23-24; Mark 16:5-6; Luke 24:19; John 18:5; John 19:19; Acts 2:22; Acts 22:8). ...
The people of Nazareth, who had seen Jesus grow up in their town, were surprised that he could preach so well, especially since he had not studied at any of the schools of the rabbis. On one occasion they tried to throw him over one of the cliffs in the hills around Nazareth (Matthew 13:53-58; Luke 4:16-30; Mark 6:1-6). They called him simply Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, and called his followers Nazarenes (Acts 24:5)
Nahalal - A possible site is ‘Ain Mahil , north of Nazareth, on the hill which formed the limit of Zebulun to the east. Another is Ma‘lul , a village west of Nazareth, and on the south border of Zebulun
Cana - It was called Cana of Galilee, now Kana-el-Jelil, and lay seven miles north of Nazareth. The commonly received site is nearer Nazareth
Nazarene - When our Lord was taken as a child to Nazareth, which thus became for many years his dwelling-place, the evangelist records this as a fulfilment of prophecy, Matthew 2:23, citing no particular place, but referring generally to "the prophets," who predicted Messiah's humble and despised condition. Jesus, living at Nazareth, was from that very circumstance contemned; and we find in the course of his public career his connection with that town repeatedly used against him. Matthew notes that event which branded him with an ill-omened name, "Jesus of Nazareth. It is an error to connect Matthew 2:23 with Isaiah 11:1-16, from a fancied relation of the original Hebrew word there translated "branch" with the name Nazareth
Shion - ‘Ayûn esh-Sha‘în , about 3 miles east of Nazareth
Japhia (2) - of Nazareth
ca'na - (John 21:2 ) The traditional site is at Kefr-Kenna , a small village about 4 1/2 miles northwest of Nazareth. The rival site is a village situated farther north, about five miles north of Seffurieh (Sepphoris) and nine north of Nazareth
Rumah - Others identify it with Tell Rumeh, in Galilee, about 6 miles north of Nazareth
Nazarene - A native of Nazareth. Joseph and Mary, when they returned from Egypt, went to reside at Nazareth, "that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene
ju'Das, the Lord's Brother - Among the brethren of our Lord mentioned by the people of Nazareth
Japhi'a - ( Joshua 19:12 ) Yafa , two miles south of Nazareth
Japhi'a - ( Joshua 19:12 ) Yafa , two miles south of Nazareth
i.n.r.i. - Letters found on the "title" or sign board of crucifix, which are the initials of the superscription placed thereon by order of Pilate: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum (Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews)
Shimron - Watch-post, an ancient city of the Canaanites; with its villages, allotted to Zebulun (Joshua 19:15 ); now probably Semunieh, on the northern edge of the plain of Esdraelon, 5 miles west of Nazareth
i.n.r.i. - Letters found on the "title" or sign board of crucifix, which are the initials of the superscription placed thereon by order of Pilate: Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum (Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews)
Nazareth - Nazareth is never named in Old Testament. After His birth and the sojourn in Egypt Joseph and Mary took the child to their original home in Nazareth, six miles W. As Jews alone lived in Nazareth from before Josephus' time to the reign of Constantine (Epiphanius, Haer. Of all Rome's lying legends, none exceeds that of Joseph's house (santa casa ) having been whisked from Nazareth to Loretto in the 13th century; in spite of the bull of Leo X endorsing the legend, the fact remains that the santa casa is of a dark red stone, such as is not found in or about Nazareth, where the grey white limestone prevails, and also the ground plan of the house at Loretto is at variance with the site of the house at Nazareth shown by the Franciscans within their convent walls. ...
Jesus taught in the synagogue of Nazareth, "His own country" (Matthew 13:54), and was there "thrust out of the city and led unto the brow of the hill whereon if was built, to be cast down headlong," but "passing through the midst of them He went His way" (Luke 4:16-30). of Nazareth. "Jesus of Nazareth" was part of the inscription on the cross (John 19:19). Nazareth bore a bad name even in Galilee (for Nathanael who said "can any good thing come out of Nazareth?" was of Galilee), which itself, because of its half pagan population and rude dialect, was despised by the people of Judea. The absence of "good" in Nazareth appears from the people's willful unbelief in spite of Jesus' miracles, and their attempt on His life (Matthew 13:54-58), so that He left them, to settle in Capernaum (Matthew 4:13)
Cana - Tradition places it at Kefr-Kenna, about four English miles northeast of Nazareth, and the traveller is now shown an earthen jar, which is claimed to be one of the water-jars used at the wedding. Robinson and others, with fair probability, identify Cana with Kâna-el-Jelîl, about nine miles north of Nazareth
Nazarene - 1) A native or inhabitant of Nazareth of Galilee, especially applied to Jesus Christ. ...
Though Nazareth was a priest-center in the Old Covenant, it had no national or religious status; it could be called a country village. Jesus Christ's citizenship of Nazareth offered his detractors a motive to hurl contempt at him. No text of the Prophets announced that the Messias was to belong to Nazareth and was to be called a Nazarene for that reason
Chesulloth - Now the ruin Iksâl at the foot of the Nazareth hills, in the fertile plain W
i. n. r. i - : "Jesus NazarenusRex Judaeorum," and meaning "Jesus of Nazareth (the) King of (the)Jews
Cana - It has been identified with the modern Kana el-Jelil, also called Khurbet Kana, a place 8 or 9 miles north of Nazareth. Others have identified it with Kefr Kenna, which lies on the direct road to the Sea of Galilee, about 5 miles north-east of Nazareth, and 12 in a direct course from Tiberias
Cana - A small village near Nazareth
Herod Archelaus - 7; through fear of him the Holy Family went to reside in Nazareth
Nahallal - It has been by some identified with Malul in the plain of Esdraelon, 4 miles from Nazareth
Elisha - Jesus, preaching in the synagogue at Nazareth, reminds His fellow-townsmen, who were unwilling to receive His teaching because He was one of themselves, that Elisha, who was an Israelite, healed but one leper, and he was a Syrian. It is clear, however, that in this warning our Lord was looking far beyond Nazareth, and that He had in view the casting away of the Jews through unbelief, and the call of the Gentiles
Nazareth - ' Early in the Lord's ministry He visited Nazareth, and taught in the synagogue. As far as is known the Lord did not visit Nazareth again. The name of the city often occurs in the gospels in the expression, 'Jesus of Nazareth,' and this designation was also placed on the cross. God has highly exalted the One who humbled Himself, and was in the eyes of the Jews merely 'Jesus of Nazareth
Nain - It is now called Nein, and is on the northwestern edge of Little Hermon, six miles southeast of Nazareth, and 25 miles southwest of Tell Hum (Capernaum?)
Jokneam - It is the modern Tell Kaimon, about 12 miles south-west of Nazareth, on the south of the river Kishon
Sarid - Spelled Sedud by some early versions, Sarid is probably modern tell Shadud at the northern edge of the Jezreel Valley about six miles northeast of Megiddo and five miles southeast of Nazareth
Chesulloth - It is the modern Iksal, four miles south of Nazareth
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Chicago) - The mother-house was erected at Nazareth Park in 1900
Beatitudes, Mount of - Tradition locates it on the mountain of Karn Hattin in Galilee, near Nazareth and Cana
Mount of Beatitudes - Tradition locates it on the mountain of Karn Hattin in Galilee, near Nazareth and Cana
Hannathon - It is probably present-day tell el-Badawiye, about six miles north of Nazareth
ha'Dad-Rim'Mon - is, according to the ordinary interpretation of (12:11) a place in the valley of Megiddo (a part of the plain of Esdraelon, six miles from Mount Carmel and eleven from Nazareth), where a national lamentation was held for the death of King Josiah
Nazarene', - an inhabitant of Nazareth. Its application to Jesus, in consequence of the providential arrangements by which his Parents were led to take up their abode in Nazareth, was the filling out of the predictions in which the promised Messiah is described as a netser i
Nazareth - Nazareth (năz'a-rĕth), separated? Matthew 2:23. Nazareth is not mentioned in the Old Testament, nor by any classical author, nor by any writer before the time of Christ. At Nazareth the angel appeared to Mary: the home of Joseph, Luke 1:26; Luke 2:39, and to that place Joseph and Mary returned after their flight into Egypt. Even after Capernaum became "his own city" he was known as "Jesus of Nazareth," Matthew 13:54-58; Mark 6:1-6; Acts 2:22; Acts 3:6; Acts 4:10; Acts 6:14, and his disciples were called "Nazarenes
Nahalal - of Nazareth
Gath-Hepher - It is located at modern el-Meshed or nearby khirbet ez-Zurra, three miles northeast of Nazareth
Gabriel - Six months afterwards, he was sent to Nazareth, to the Virgin Mary, Luke 1:26-38
Sepphoris - It was near Nazareth and sat on a high ridge
Shimron Meron - of Nazareth
Nazareth - The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. After the Gospels, it is expressly mentioned only in the phrase Ἰησοῦν τὸν ἀπὸ Ναζαρέθ, ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 10:38), but an equivalent of this expression, Ἰησοῦς ὁ Ναζωραῖος, also translated ‘Jesus of Nazareth,’ but lit. The name ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ has various shades of meaning, according to the spirit in which it is uttered. ...
It is a significant fact that Nazareth, which is so dear to Christendom, is never named in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud. But many things have been said, and uncritically repeated, about Nazareth, which are not well grounded on fact; e. And one of the hills that ‘girdle quiet Nazareth’ was a perfect watch-tower, set in the midst of the Holy Land and the mighty Roman Empire, for the young Prophet who was to give the city so great a place in history. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. Nazareth was in truth the best of all places for the education of the Messiah (cf. ...
Various etymologies of ‘Nazareth’ have been proposed. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii
Nazareth - The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. After the Gospels, it is expressly mentioned only in the phrase Ἰησοῦν τὸν ἀπὸ Ναζαρέθ, ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 10:38), but an equivalent of this expression, Ἰησοῦς ὁ Ναζωραῖος, also translated ‘Jesus of Nazareth,’ but lit. The name ‘Jesus of Nazareth’ has various shades of meaning, according to the spirit in which it is uttered. ...
It is a significant fact that Nazareth, which is so dear to Christendom, is never named in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud. But many things have been said, and uncritically repeated, about Nazareth, which are not well grounded on fact; e. And one of the hills that ‘girdle quiet Nazareth’ was a perfect watch-tower, set in the midst of the Holy Land and the mighty Roman Empire, for the young Prophet who was to give the city so great a place in history. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. Nazareth was in truth the best of all places for the education of the Messiah (cf. ...
Various etymologies of ‘Nazareth’ have been proposed. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii
Nazarene - In all other cases the word is rendered "of Nazareth" (Mark 1:24 ; 10:47 ; 14:67 , etc. (See Nazareth
Zebulun - ...
In New Testament times the territory that formerly belonged to Zebulun was part of Galilee and included within it the town of Nazareth. The glory of Zebulun was that from its territory came the Messiah, who brought God’s light into a dark world (Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 4:12-16; see Nazareth)
Gath-Hepher - Wine-press of the well, a town of Lower Galilee, about 5 miles from Nazareth; the birthplace of Jonah (2 Kings 14:25 ); the same as Gittah-hepher (Joshua 19:13 )
Ibzan - of Nazareth
Aviators - By a decree of 1920, Our Lady of Loreto was proclaimed patroness of aviators by the Holy See, in reference to the ancient tradition that the Holy House of Nazareth was miraculously carried through the air by angels
Branch - And to shew the correspondence to Christ, the Netzer, or Nazareth, where Jesus dwelt, was named from the same root. Ezekiel, in allusion to the Lord Jesus, speaks of him under the similitude of the plants, like Nazareth, but describes him "as a plant of renown
Nazarene - Matthew, Matthew 2:23, writes "Jesus came and dwelt in Nazareth that it might be fulfilled which is spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene"; not "by the prophet," but "by the prophets," meaning no particular quotation but the general description of Messiah in them as abject and despised (Isaiah 53:2-3). Had the prophets expressly foretold He should be of Nazareth, it would not have been so despised; nor would the Pharisees, who were able from Micah 5 to tell Herod where Messiah's birthplace was - Bethlehem (Matthew 2) - have been so ignorant of the prophecy of His connection with Nazareth as to say, "out of Galilee ariseth no prophet" (John 7:52). (See NAZARITE; Nazareth
Naz'Areth - Merrill, in "Galilee in the Time of Christ" (1881), represents Nazareth in Christ's time as a city (so always called in the New Testament) of 15,000 to 20,000 inhabitants, of some importance and considerable antiquity, and not so insignificant and mean as has been represented. (Luke 4:29 ) The modern Nazareth belongs to the better class of eastern villages. ) The origin of the disrepute in which Nazareth stood, (John 1:47 ) is not certainly known. But Nazareth labored under a special opprobrium, for it was a Galilean and not a southern Jew who asked the reproachful question whether "any good thing" could come from that source
Rumah - 21), perhaps the modern Rumeh near Nazareth; and Pedaiah may have been a Galilæan
Loreto, Holy House of - So-called from the tradition that the house, wherein the Holy Family dwelt at Nazareth, was transported by angels to the city of Loreto, Italy
Holy House of Loreto - So-called from the tradition that the house, wherein the Holy Family dwelt at Nazareth, was transported by angels to the city of Loreto, Italy
Zarephath - of Nazareth, whence NT reference is made to it. Luke’s report of Christ’s sermon at Nazareth distinctly connects Zarephath with Sidon, as do the LXX Septuagint and Massoretic Text in the account of Elijah’s sustenance by the widow there. The choice, among all others, of the widow of pagan Phœnician Zarephath, and of Naaman the leper of heathen Syrian Damascus, to receive the favours of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, filled the crabbed synagogue hearers of Nazareth with wrath and murder (Luke 4:25 ff
Japhia - ...
...
A town in the southern boundary of Zebulum (Joshua 19:12 ); now Yafa, 2 miles south-west of Nazareth
Nazareth - Nazareth (mod. After this, save as a centre of pilgrimage, Nazareth sank into obscurity
Tabor - It rises abruptly from the northeastern arm of the plain of Esdraelon, and stands entirely isolated except on the west, where a narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Nazareth. It is six miles east of Nazareth, and about 50 miles north of Jerusalem
Bethabara - " It was the great ford, and still bears the name of "the ford," Makhadhet 'Abarah, "the ford of crossing over," about 25 miles from Nazareth
Nazareth - ...
Nazareth is situated among the southern ridges of Lebanon, on the steep slope of a hill, about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee and about 6 west from Mount Tabor. The main road for traffic between Egypt and the interior of Asia passed by Nazareth near the foot of Tabor, and thence northward to Damascus. ...
It is supposed from the words of Nathanael in John 1:46 that the city of Nazareth was held in great disrepute, either because, it is said, the people of Galilee were a rude and less cultivated class, and were largely influenced by the Gentiles who mingled with them, or because of their lower type of moral and religious character. Nathanael held the same opinion as his countrymen, and believed that the great "good" which they were all expecting could not come from Nazareth. The name Nazareth perhaps means 'a watch tower' (now en-Nasrah), but is connected in the New Testament with Netzer, 'a branch' (Isaiah 4:2 ; Jeremiah 23:5 ; Zechariah 3:8 ; 6:12 ; Matthew 2:23 ), Nazarene being quite a different word from Nazarite
Mount Tabor - (Arabic: Jebel et Tour; mountain of mountains) ...
Distinguished for its picturesque site and outline, rises above the Plains of Esdraelon, fives miles southeast of Nazareth
Mount Thabor - (Arabic: Jebel et Tour; mountain of mountains) ...
Distinguished for its picturesque site and outline, rises above the Plains of Esdraelon, fives miles southeast of Nazareth
Tabor, Mount - (Arabic: Jebel et Tour; mountain of mountains) ...
Distinguished for its picturesque site and outline, rises above the Plains of Esdraelon, fives miles southeast of Nazareth
Thabor, Mount - (Arabic: Jebel et Tour; mountain of mountains) ...
Distinguished for its picturesque site and outline, rises above the Plains of Esdraelon, fives miles southeast of Nazareth
Nazarene - As this name was given to our Lord Jesus Christ, and we are told by the evangelist, that his residence in Nazareth was on this account, that he might be so called, it will certainly merit particular attention. And as Nazareth itself was but a small city of Zebulun, they had yet greater contempt for Christ's person, for springing, as they supposed, from thence. "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" (John 1:46) But we shall find that this title, Jesus Christ of Nazareth, was all along designed of God, as of the highest import, and among the strongest testimonies to this peculiarity of character, as the one, yea, the only one great Nazarite of God. ...
And first, then, I request to remark on the expression of the evangelist Matthew, (Matthew 2:23) "And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets—he should be called a Nazarene?"...
The question is, what prophets are there who so spake concerning Christ? To which I answer, all the writers of the Old Testament are generally called prophets, because many of their sayings are really and truly prophesies. Luke; where I hope we shall discover, under the teaching of God the Holy Ghost, that Jesus, though born at Bethlehem to fulfil another prophecy, was literally and truly conceived at Nazareth, and as such became a real Nazarene. ) "And in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God, unto a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin espoused to a man, whose name was Joseph, of the house of David, and the virgin's name was Mary. The miraculous power of the Holy Ghost is no sooner announced, and Mary's consent obtained, than the impregnation takes place; so that "that Holy thing," or the man of the unction, as Christ is declared by the angel to be, is immediately conceived, and the Nazarite from the womb is formed in the city of Nazareth, as the prophet had foretold. ...
The first we meet with in the gospel who called our Lord Jesus of Nazareth, or the Nazarite, was Satan, when he said, "Let us alone; what, have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? Art thou come to destroy us? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God. " (Mark 1:24) Next we find the apostles giving in their testimony to the same blessed truth, John 1:45 "We have found him (saith Philip) of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. " When the band of men and officers from the chief priests came to apprehend Christ in the garden, they enquired after the Lord under the same name, Jesus of Nazareth, (John 18:5) The servant maid in the hall of Pilate spoke of our Lord by the same name; for charging Peter as an accomplice, she said, "And this fellow also was with Jesus of Galilee. " (Matthew 26:71) And yet more, the Roman governor, as if constrained by an overruling power, in giving a testimony to Christ the very reverse of the ignominy he meant to put upon him, both subscribed to his regal authority, at the same time he proclaimed him the Nazarite to God; and wrote a superscription in three different languages, and put it on the cross, "Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews. " (John 19:19) Still farther, the angels which attended the Lord's sepulchre, when he arose from the dead, announced to the pious women the resurrection of Christ by the same name, "Ye seek Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified; he is risen, he is not here; behold the place where the Lord lay. Jesus Christ of Nazareth, said Peter, in his sermon on the day of Pentecost, a man approved of God among you; as if to insist upon this glorious feature of the man, the Nazarite. (Acts 2:22) So again, when he healed the cripple at the gate of the temple, the blessed words he used were, "In the name of Jesus of Nazareth. And lastly, to mention no more, the Lord Jesus himself, when calling to Paul from heaven, called himself by this name, "I am Jesus of Nazareth," or, as it might be rendered, I am Jesus the Nazarite, not a Nazarite, but the Nazarite, the very identical, yea, the only one. Hail, thou precious blessed Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth! Blessings for ever be on the head of him that was separated from his brethren! Verily, "thy father's children shall bow down before thee:" here, and to all eternity, thou shalt be called the Nazarite of God!...
Nahalal - Tell-en-Nahl north of the Kishon River at the southern end of the plain of Acco is possible as are modern Nahalal about six miles west of Nazareth and tell el-Beida
Cana of Galilee - It is identified by most with Kefr Kenna, 32 45' N, 35 20' E , but others prefer Kana el Jelil, about 8 miles north of Nazareth, the name of which more resembles Cana
Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth - A community founded by Sister Xavier Ross in 1858, a member of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, for the education and care of children and the care of the sick, in the unexplored territory of the West, where they accompanied the pioneer settlers
Nazarene - The use of this designation agrees with the fact that Nazareth was His home until He entered on His public ministry. After the Egyptian episode, the family returned to Nazareth. The behaviour of the people (Luke 4:29) illustrates what is suggested respecting the repute of Nazareth in John 1:46. ...
As indicated above, the name ‘Jesus of Nazareth,’ in the Eng. Abbott makes it necessary to ask if both terms ‘Nazarene’ and ‘Nazoraean’ connote simply ‘belonging to Nazareth. His thesis is that Nazarene, meaning a man of Nazareth, and Nazoraean, meaning the Nçṣer or Rod of Jesse mentioned by Isaiah, were probably interchanged by a play on the two words; so that the populace, acclaiming Jesus as the Lifegiver and Healer, altered ‘Jesus the Nazarene’ into ‘Jesus the Nazoraean. ’ To state the theory more exactly, we should say that they called Him Jesus the Nçṣer, or the Na(t)zoraean, partly because there was a pre-existing belief that the Messiah would be the Nçṣer, and partly because they vaguely felt what Matthew ventured definitely to express, that His residence from childhood onward in Nazareth had been ordained to fulfil the prophecy, ‘He shall be called Nazoraean (i. This does not closely resemble Nazareth, but it does resemble Nôṣer as used in Ben Sira 40:15, referring to ‘the branch of violence which is not to be unpunished. ...
(The Nazirites had no connexion, linguistic or other, with Nazareth and the Nazarenes
Gabriel - Six months after this he appeared to a virgin, whose name was Mary, of the city of Nazareth, as related Luke 1:26 , &c
Headlong - ), said of the purpose of the people of Nazareth to destroy Christ, Luke 4:29
Bethlehem - (Hebrew: house of bread) ...
(1) Bethlehem of Zebulon (Josiah 19), a small town 7 miles northwest of Nazareth
ta'Anach - (1 Kings 4:12 ) It is still called Ta'annuk , and) stands about four miles southeast of Lejjun and 13 miles southwest of Nazareth
Cana - City of Galilee, Palestine, near Nazareth, the scene of Our Lord's first miracle (John 2) and His cure of the ruler's son (John 4) and the birthplace of Nathaniel or Saint Bartholomew (John 21)
Japhia - It is modern Yafa, southwest of Nazareth
Cana - of Nazareth
Shimron - Some commentators think the original name was Shimon and identify it with modern khirbet Sammuniyeh five miles west of Nazareth in the Esdraelon Valley
Cana - These are Kanat el-Jelil , perhaps the most probable, north of Sephurieh; ‘Ain Kana , east of Nazareth; and Kefr Kenna , north-east of, and a little farther from, the same town
Galilee - Joseph and Mary belonged to Nazareth, the chief city in the south, and there Jesus lived the greater part of His life
Gamaliel - A Pharisee and celebrated doctor of the law, who gave prudent worldly advice in the Sanhedrin respecting the treatment of the followers of Jesus of Nazareth
Fellow - Thus (1) Psalms 45:7 ‘God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows’; (2) Matthew 26:71 ‘This fellow was also with Jesus of Nazareth’ (RV Gama'Liel - ) ...
A pharisee and celebrated doctor of the law, who gave prudent worldly advice in the Sanhedrin respecting the treatment of the followers of Jesus of Nazareth
Nathanael - (1) When told by Philip, ‘We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph,’ Nathanael hesitated. ‘Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?’ he asked
Nathanael - It was then that Nathanael made the infamous remark, “Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?” See Disciples
Galilee - Nazareth was a city of Galilee
Cana - It lay in the tribe of Zebulun, not far from Nazareth
Nazarene (2) - As usually understood, ‘Nazarene’ in the first place meant ‘of [1] Nazareth,’ and indeed this explicitly appears in some passages in the Gospels (e. Mark 1:9 ‘Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee,’ Luke 2:4 etc. ); but, according to Cheyne, the name Nazareth in its original significance was the designation not of a town but of a district, and ‘Nazarene’ is primarily equivalent to ‘Galilaean’ (see, further, below, and art. Nazareth). Matthew 21:11 ‘This is Jesus the prophet from Nazareth of Galilee’ (ὁ ἀπὸ Ναζαρὲθ τῆς Γαλιλαίας); cf. The points involved come to a head in Matthew 2:23, where it is stated that the child Jesus was brought to Nazareth that ‘it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, that he should be called a Nazarene’ (Ναζωραῖος). Later the word נצורי was taken to be a singular to correspond with the parallel עבר (‘servant’), and applied to Jesus (with a play upon the place-name Nazareth). ‘Nazareth. ’]'>[10] doubts whether Nazareth was ‘originally the name of a town (or village) at all. ‘Nazareth,’ ‘Nazarene’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , the EBi [19] ; ‘Nazareth’ (by Guthe) in PRE ma'ry the Virgin, - She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world. Her history at this time, her residence at Bethlehem, flight to Egypt, and return to her early home st Nazareth, are well known. ...
Capernaum, (John 2:12 ) and Nazareth, (Matthew 4:13 ; 13:54 ; Mark 6:1 ) appear to have been the residence of Mary for a considerable period
Nathanael - He was led by Philip to Jesus, He went doubting, with the words on bis lips, "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Jesus, however, at once convinces him that he is the Messiah by the exhibition of his knowledge, declaring that he had seen Nathanael under the fig tree before ever Philip had called him
Jonas - The home of Jonas is now identified with El Meshed, about five miles northeast of Nazareth, in the tribal territory of Zebulon; thus he belonged to the northern kingdom
Rimmon - It is identified with the present village Rummaneh, about six miles north of Nazareth
ta'Bor - It rises abruptly from the northeastern arm of the plain of Esdraelon, and stands entirely insulated, except on the west where a narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Nazareth. It lies about six or eight miles almost due east from Nazareth. The Latin Christians have now an altar here at which their priests from Nazareth perform an annual mass
ta'Bor - It rises abruptly from the northeastern arm of the plain of Esdraelon, and stands entirely insulated, except on the west where a narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Nazareth. It lies about six or eight miles almost due east from Nazareth. The Latin Christians have now an altar here at which their priests from Nazareth perform an annual mass
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Tabor - About six miles east of Nazareth, it has played an important role in Israel's history since the period of the conquest
Nathanael - At first he had difficulty believing that the Messiah should come from the small Galilean town of Nazareth, but he was quickly convinced when he learnt first-hand of Jesus’ supernatural knowledge (John 1:48-49)
Religious Orders - John Evangelist," orthe "Order of the Holy Cross," this latter also including laymen;others are bands of laymen alone, such as the "Order of the Brothersof Nazareth"; and others are Sisterhoods, composed of women whohave devoted themselves for life to the work of the Church, suchas the "Sisters of St
Emmanuel - Emmanuel: the meaning of the word was not exhausted in thoseblessed years, three and thirty in all, during which Christ wasseen in Judea and known as the Prophet of Nazareth
Apollos - 49), where he spake "boldly" in the synagogue (18:26), although he did not know as yet that Jesus of Nazareth was the Messiah
Stoning - So also in Luke 4:29 , where compare Nazareth
Galilee - Lower Galilee is aid to have contained four hundred and four towns and villages, of which Josephus mentions Tiberias, Sepphoris, and Gabara, as the principal; though Capernaum and Nazareth are the most frequently mentioned in the New Testament, Mark 1:9 Luke 2:39 John 7:52 , etc. The apostate emperor Julian constantly used it, and in his dying agony and rage cried out, "O Galilean, thou hast conquered!" Our Savior resided here from infancy till he was thirty years of age, and during much of his public ministry; and the cities of his public ministry; and the cities of Nazareth, Nain, Cana, Capernaum, with the whole region of the sea of Galilee, are sacredly endeared to all his people by the words he there spoke, and the wonders he wrought
Jesus - To distinguish him from others so called, he is spoken of as "Jesus of Nazareth" (John 18:7 ), and "Jesus the son of Joseph" (John 6:42 ). Herod's cruel jealousy led to Joseph's flight into Egypt with Mary and the infant Jesus, where they tarried till the death of this king (Matthew 2:13-23 ), when they returned and settled in Nazareth, in Lower Galilee (2:23; Compare Luke 4:16 ; John 1:46 , etc. ...
Eighteen years pass, of which we have no record beyond this, that he returned to Nazareth and "increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man" (Luke 2:52 )
Land of Chanaan - Among the famous places in what constituted the former country of Chanaan are Jerusalem, the Holy City; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Our Lord; Nazareth, the scene of His private life; Joppe, Hebron, Gaza, and Bersabee
Nazarene - Apart from the primary meaning of the word, ‘an inhabitant of Nazareth,’ there may have been, as is often the case in prophetic quotations, a secondary meaning in allusion to the Heb
Rimmon - This Rimmon is the modern Rummâneh , north of Nazareth
Canaan, Land of - Among the famous places in what constituted the former country of Chanaan are Jerusalem, the Holy City; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Our Lord; Nazareth, the scene of His private life; Joppe, Hebron, Gaza, and Bersabee
Chanaan, Land of - Among the famous places in what constituted the former country of Chanaan are Jerusalem, the Holy City; Bethlehem, the birthplace of Our Lord; Nazareth, the scene of His private life; Joppe, Hebron, Gaza, and Bersabee
Snow - At Nazareth it falls more frequently and deeply,a nd it has been observed to fall even in the maritime plain of Joppa and about Carmel
Crocodile - Zeller of Nazareth
Tabor - A conspicuous mountain in Galilee, about seven miles east of Nazareth
Rim'Mon -
A city of Zebulun (1 Chronicles 6:77 ; Nehemiah 11:29 ) a Levitical city, the present Rummaneh , six miles north of Nazareth
Nazarenes - or NAZARAEANS, a name originally given to Christians in general, on account of Jesus Christ's being of the city of Nazareth; but was, in the second century, restrained to certain judaizing Christians, who blended Christianity and Judaism together
Rochester, New York, Diocese of - Nazareth Academy for girls was established by the Sisters of Saint Joseph shortly afterwards
Rim'Mon -
A city of Zebulun (1 Chronicles 6:77 ; Nehemiah 11:29 ) a Levitical city, the present Rummaneh , six miles north of Nazareth
Joseph the Husband of Mary - Later they settled in Nazareth in the north (Matthew 2:23), but they went each year to Jerusalem for the Passover (Luke 2:41). ...
Joseph was a well known carpenter in Nazareth (Matthew 13:55) and he taught his carpentry skills to Jesus (Mark 6:3)
Cana - of Nazareth. of Nazareth, where there is a fine spring. 288) suggests as a possible site a spot nearer to Nazareth than Kefr Kennâ, called ‘Ain Kânâ, and not far from Reineh
Megid'do - (place of crowns ) was in a very marked position on the southern rim of the plain of Esdraelon, on the frontier line of the territories of the tribes of Issachar and Manasseh, 6 miles from Mount Carmel and 11 from Nazareth
Naaman - , whose cure by the instrumentality of Elisha is related in 2 Kings 5, and who was referred to by our Lord as ‘Naaman the Syrian’ in His discourse in the synagogue at Nazareth. ...
Whether our Lord’s visit to Nazareth took place early in His ministry as here related by St
Acceptable Year of the Lord - The Lord Jesus at the beginning of His ministry entered into the synagogue at Nazareth, and on the prophecy by Isaiah being handed to Him read from Isaiah 61 , the passage, "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised, to preach the acceptable year of the Lord " — leaving off in the middle of a sentence, for the next words are, "and the day of vengeance of our God" Luke 4:18,19 ; Isaiah 61:1,2
Hermon - At about six or seven hours' distance eastward, stood, within view, Nazareth, and the two mountains Tabor and Hermon
Galilee - It included the towns of Nain, Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Magdala, Dalmanutha, Bethsaida, Chorazin, and Capernaum. They were surprised to hear such men speak in foreign tongues, the more so because no prophet was ever looked for from thence, nor any good thing from Nazareth
Mary - While she resided at Nazareth with her parents, before she became the wife of Joseph, the angel Gabriel announced to her that she was to be the mother of the promised Messiah (Luke 1:35 ). After this she went to visit her cousin Elisabeth, who was living with her husband Zacharias (probably at Juttah, Joshua 15:55 ; 21:16 , in the neighbourhood of Maon), at a considerable distance, about 100 miles, from Nazareth. After three months Mary returned to Nazareth to her own home. Soon after this the decree of Augustus (Luke 2:1 ) required that they should proceed to Bethlehem (Micah 5:2 ), some 80 or 90 miles from Nazareth; and while they were there they found shelter in the inn or khan provided for strangers (Luke 2:6,7 ). This was followed by the presentation in the temple, the flight into Egypt, and their return in the following year and residence at Nazareth (Matthew 2 )
Joseph, Saint - Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary and foster-father of Our Lord, born probably Bethlehem; died probably Nazareth
Aenon - ) The Ainun site is on the main line from Jerusalem to Nazareth
Oppression - —The word does not occur in the Gospels or in connexion with the activity of Jesus except in the verbal form in Acts 10:38 (‘Jesus of Nazareth … went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed [1] of the devil’)
Capernaum - Visited by Jesus for a few days (John 2:12); afterward "His own city" and home, to which He retired from Nazareth (where He was reared, as in Bethlehem He was born), when He heard that Herod Antipas, who often resided at Sepphoris, or Diocaesarea, near Nazareth, had imprisoned John the Baptist. "...
Capernaum was lower than Nazareth and Cana, from whence He "went down" to it (John 2:12; Luke 4:31); the "exalted" in Matthew 11:23 is not in respect to physical but spiritual elevation
Israelite - ’ He does not allow his devout sense of privilege to destroy openness of heart towards the claim of Jesus of Nazareth
Hermon - Jesus in His youth must have often seen it from the hill west of Nazareth, and, during His ministry, from the Sea of Galilee
Joseph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee. When Jesus was twelve years old, Joseph took his mother and Jesus to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to act as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. Both movements, the Flight and the Return to Nazareth, are described as fulfilments of the word spoken ‘through the prophet’ (Matthew 2:15), or ‘through the prophets’ (Matthew 2:23). ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth. The angel directs Mary to return, and she goes with the child to Nazareth. , states the duration of the stay in Egypt as a whole year, and names Nazareth as the city in which Jesus and His parents lived after their return into the land of Israel
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. Both movements, the Flight and the Return to Nazareth, are described as fulfilments of the word spoken ‘through the prophet’ (Matthew 2:15), or ‘through the prophets’ (Matthew 2:23). ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth. The angel directs Mary to return, and she goes with the child to Nazareth. , states the duration of the stay in Egypt as a whole year, and names Nazareth as the city in which Jesus and His parents lived after their return into the land of Israel
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - All that is said about His origin is that He came to the river “from Nazareth” (Mark 1:9 ). “Jesus of Nazareth” was a designation that followed Him to the day of His death (John 19:19 ). His Origins Matthew's Gospel demonstrates that although Nazareth was Jesus' home when He came to John for baptism, He was not born there. This Child born in Bethlehem ended up as an adult in Nazareth, described sarcastically by his enemies as a “Nazarene” (literally, “Nazarite” Luke 3:21-23 ). Luke added that Nazareth was the family home of Jesus' parents all along (Luke 1:26-27 ). When He taught in Nazareth, the townspeople asked, “Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us?” (Mark 6:3 ; compare Luke 4:22 ). Ironically, the first intimation after the baptism that He was more than simply “Jesus of Nazareth” came not from His family or friends nor from the religious leaders of Israel, but from the devil!...
Twice the devil challenged him: “If thou be the Son of God, command this stone that it be made bread” (Luke 4:3 ), and (on the pinnacle of the Temple in Jerusalem), “If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down from hence” (Luke 4:9 ). Just as the devil challenged Jesus in the desert as “Son of God,” so in the course of His ministry the demons (or the demon-possessed) confronted Him with such words as “what have we to do with thee, thou Jesus of Nazareth? I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God” (Mark 1:24 ), or “What have I to do with thee Jesus, thou Son of the most high God?” (Mark 5:7 )
Mary - ...
At the time God revealed this to Mary, she lived in the town of Nazareth in Galilee, where she was engaged to be married to a local carpenter named Joseph. When she returned to Nazareth pregnant, Joseph was deeply troubled, but he too submitted to God’s will after he received a revelation of the divine purposes (Luke 1:56; Matthew 1:18-25). After Herod’s death the family returned to Palestine and settled in Nazareth (Matthew 2:13-14; Matthew 2:19-23)
Moravian Church - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages
Bethabara - of wady Jalud, two days journey from Nazareth and Cana (25 miles), is Makhadhet Abara, "the ford of crossing over
Nain - of Nazareth, on the N
Capernaum - The headquarters of Christ in His Galilæan ministry, after His rejection at Nazareth ( Matthew 4:13 , John 2:12 )
Manna - Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true bread out of heaven
Unitas Fratrom - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages
Unity of Brethren - During colonial times Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Lititz, in Pennsylvania, and Salem, North Carolina, were organized as exclusive Moravian villages
Esdra-e'Lon - Its base on the east extends from Jenin (the ancient Engannim) to the foot of the hills below Nazareth, and is about 15 miles long; the north side, formed by the hills of Galilee, is about 12 miles long; and the south side, formed by the Samaria range, is about 18 miles
Manna - Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true bread out of heaven
Kentucky - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Louisville
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Bardstown
Covington
Lexington
Owensboro
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Cardinal
Christmas
Gethsemane
Holy Cross
Loretto
Mount Carmel
Nazareth
Sacramento
Saint Catharine
Saint Charles
Saint Helen's
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Mary
Saint Mary's City
Saint Paul
Saint Vincent
Trappist
Trinity
See also, ...
patron saints index
Title - ( John 19:19 ) ‘Jesus of Nazareth
Messiah - Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah, the great Deliverer who was to come
Anoint - Jesus of Nazareth is this anointed One (John 1:41 ; Acts 9:22 ; 17:2,3 ; 18:5,28 ), the Messiah of the Old Testament
Thieves, the Two - They find themselves with one who bore the same name, but who was described in the superscription on his cross as Jesus of Nazareth
Brothers, Jesus - Jesus' Nazareth critics listed them in Mark 6:3 as James, Joses, Juda, and Simon
Oak - of Nazareth and Tabor
Mandrake - Speaking of Nazareth, in Galilee, he says, "What I found most remarkable at this village was the great number of mandrakes which grew in a vale below it
Tabor - Its general features are the same as those of the view from the heights of Nazareth, five miles to the west
Bartholomew - To say that a Galilaean would have remembered Isaiah 9:1, and therefore would not have asked whether any good could come out of Nazareth, is unsound criticism. A person with Isaiah 9:1 in his mind, and convinced that rich blessings would come from Galilee, might nevertheless think that Nazareth was not a likely place to be the dwelling-place of the Messiah
Nazareth - Nazareth is about six miles west north west of Mount Tabor, and nearly half way form the Jordan to the Mediterranean. ...
From the summit of the hill on the eastern slope of which Nazareth lies, is a truly magnificent prospect
Carpenter - The passage of Sirach quoted is from the chapter describing the honour of a physician, with which may be compared the proverb, ‘Physician, heal thyself,’ quoted by Christ in similar circumstances at Nazareth, when they said, ‘Is not this Joseph’s son?’...
An attempt to make Mark 6:3 conform to Matthew 13:55 is seen in some old MSS Mary, the Virgin - The Virgin Mary was born, we may suppose, at Nazareth. Some time after their betrothal, which came generally among the Jews a year before the marriage, the angel Gabriel was sent from God to Nazareth to tell her of One who was to be born of her, and who should ‘be called holy, the Son of God’ (Luke 1:35). Rather, as it has been said, ‘the first but the ever-deepening desire in the heart of Mary, when the angel left her, must have been to be away from Nazareth, and for the relief of opening her heart to a woman, in all things like-minded, who perhaps might speak blessed words to her’ (Edersheim, Life and Times, i. Whatever it was, it was distant from Nazareth by almost the whole length of the land. 36) till after the birth of John the Baptist, and then returned to Nazareth. The Return from Egypt was followed by a life in retirement at Nazareth. Here in Nazareth it was that those brothers and sisters of the Lord, of whom we read in the course of the Gospel narrative, were born to Mary and Joseph (for other views see art. ...
The silence of the life at Nazareth is broken but once before the commencement of the Ministry
Joseph (2) - Joseph, who was a carpenter (Matthew 13:55) and a poor man, as his offering in the temple showed Luke 2:24), lived in Nazareth (Luke 2:4) and was espoused to Mary, also of Nazareth (Luke 1:26). ...
Before the birth of Christ there was an Imperial decree that all the world should be taxed, and Joseph, being of the house and lineage of David, had to leave Nazareth and go to Bethlehem, to be taxed with Mary. Again the angel appeared in a dream, and after a warning Joseph proceeded to Nazareth, which was not under the rule of Archelaus, who had an evil reputation, but under that of the milder Antipas (Matthew 2:14-23). But after the incident in Jerusalem, Jesus went with them to Nazareth and ‘was subject unto them’ (Luke 2:41-51)
Michigan - Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Loretto
Marquette
Nazareth
Olivet
Saint Charles
Saint Clair
Saint Helen
Saint Ignace
Saint Jacques
Saint James
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Louis
Sault Sainte Marie
Ecclesiastical divisions include the archdiocese ...
Detroit
and the dioceses of ...
Gaylord
Grand Rapids
Kalamazoo
Lansing
Marquette
Saginaw
See also, ...
patron saints index
Name - That it has ultimate messianic significance in connection with Jesus of Nazareth is clear from Matthew 1:22-23
Bigotry - "When Jesus preached, prejudice cried, Can any good thing come out of Nazareth? Crucify him, crucify him, said bigotry
Hill - Ancient Nazareth, however, was built on the slope of a hill to which ‘mountain’ could hardly apply
Galilee - The noted mountains of Galilee were Carmel, Gilboa, and Tabor; the towns were Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum
Jezreel (1) - of Nazareth. The main body is an irregular triangle, its base stretching from Engannim to the hills below Nazareth, about 15 miles: one side formed by the Galilee hills, about 12 miles; the other 18, running on the northern side of the Samaritan range
Zebedee - ) draws a most enchanting picture of the regions around Nazareth, and he compares the district to Paradise (Itiner. He was doubtless controlled to a great extent by sentiment, but it must be admitted that even at the present day many of the valleys, especially to the west of Nazareth, and above all that of Seffurieh, justify his description, with their profusion of flowers, fruits, and greenness so pleasing to the eye in contrast to the white rocks. Such an event would be long impressed on the minds of the people, especially those of Nazareth, who from three miles distant would view the scene from the hill tops around their city. The tribe had given two judges to Israel, Ibzan of Bethlehem (Judges 12:8) and Elon (Judges 12:11), while 3 miles from Nazareth was Gath-hepher, the birthplace of Jonah, the first prophet to the Gentiles, and his tomb is still shown there. It is further to be remarked that, though the text seems doubtful, the town of Nazareth in this tribe is named in the songs of Eliezer Ha-kalîr as one of the meeting-places of the priests, when they assembled to go up to serve in the Temple. The flowers of Nazareth had fostered His love of Nature, the operations in its fields and the products of its gardens were to be used to teach lessons for eternity
Home (2) - All interest in this subject, so far as the Gospels are concerned, is focussed in the home at Nazareth, where Jesus spent nearly the whole of His life. There is room also for interesting reflexion as to the history and experience of that family circle at Nazareth during all the years that Jesus was a member of it. From the day of His leaving Nazareth for the Jordan, Jesus ceased to have any settled home. Still, during His public ministry He surrendered all the quiet joys of the old home life at Nazareth, and often in the course of His constant journeys must have had to endure the hardships and privations of a wanderer
Nicodemus - THIS, I feel sure, is not the first time that Jesus of Nazareth and Nicodemus of Jerusalem have met. And, accordingly, glad to get away from Bethabara, they took up their carriages and set out for Jerusalem, compiling all the way home their perplexing and unsatisfactory report upon John and, especially upon Jesus of Nazareth. Nicodemus had not slept soundly one single night, nor spent one single day without remorse and fear, ever since that scene when he saw Jesus of Nazareth baptized by John, and coming up out of the water. To you, Jesus of Nazareth is the Son of God, and your Saviour, and Lord, and Master. But to Nicodemus that night Jesus of Nazareth was-Nicodemus staggered and stood still-he was afraid to let himself think Who and What Jesus of Nazareth was, and might turn out to be. And had Nicodemus only been brave enough; had he only had brow enough for a good cause; had he only gone down into the waters of Jordan beside Jesus of Nazareth, we would have been counting up today Peter, and James, and John, and Nicodemus, as all apostles of Christ
Taxing - For the enrolment is mentioned in order to explain why Joseph and Mary came from Nazareth to Bethlehem at the time when Jesus was born
Charity: Spies Out the Good Points in All - ' Then the people turned to him with amazement, and said among themselves, 'Who is this? This must be Jesus of Nazareth, for only he could find something to pity and approve even in a dead dog
Nazirite - It is not to be confused with Nazarene (the name given to a person from the town of Nazareth), but comes from the Hebrew word nazir, whose meaning indicates that a Nazirite vow was one of separation (Numbers 6:2)
Capernaum - After our Lord's expulsion from Nazareth (Matthew 4:13-16 ; Luke 4:16-31 ), Capernaum became his "own city
Philip the Apostle - We have found Him (implying his sharing with Andrew, whose words he repeats, in the hope of Messiah, John 1:41) of whom Moses in the law did write, Jesus of Nazareth. To Nathanael's objection, "can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Philip replied with the best argument, experimental proof, "come and see" (Psalms 66:16; Psalms 34:8)
Jesus Christ - Mary, a virgin, betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth, gave birth to Jesus at Bethlehem according to Micah's prophecy. To escape Herod's threats, the child Jesus was taken to Egypt, but later settled with his parents at Nazareth. At Nazareth ho was rejected by the people, and went to Capernaum, which henceforth became "his own city. He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected
Nazareth - The city of Nazareth was situated upon an eminence, and on one side was a precipice, from whence the Nazarenes designed, at one time, to cast Christ down headlong, because he upbraided them for their incredulity, Luke 4:29 . "All the Christians of Nazareth," says Burckhardt, "with the friars, of course, at their head, affect to believe in this miracle; though it is perfectly evident that the upper part of the column is connected with the roof. But the said precipice is shown as that which the Messiah leaped down to escape from the Jews; and as the monks could not pitch upon any other place frightful enough for the miracle, they contend that Nazareth formerly stood eastward of its present situation, upon a more elevated spot
Bethlehem - Now Beit-Lahm, a ruined village about 6 miles west-north-west of Nazareth
Refreshing, Times of - The stunned amazement of the people at the temple who saw a crippled beggar healed in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth (Acts 3:10-11 ) prompted Peter to deliver a two-part sermon in which he traced the source of the miracle to the power of Jesus (vv
New Testament - Jesus preaches in Galilee Mark 1:14,15 ...
Jesus at the synagogue at Nazareth: cast out of the city. Mark 5:1-20 ...
The Jews offended at Jesus at Nazareth
Mary of Cleophas - The widowed sisters then joined in the one house at Nazareth, and their children came to be regarded as "brethren" (Matthew 12:47; Matthew 13:55-56), there and at Capernaum (John 2:12)
Reader - At Nazareth, Jesus took the place of the public reader in the synagogue (Luke 4:16)
Bethlehem - of Nazareth
Honey - Hasselquist says, that between Acra and Nazareth, great numbers of wild bees breed, to the advantage of the inhabitants; and Maundrell observes of the great plain near Jericho, that he perceived in it, in many places, a smell of honey and wax as strong as if he had been in an apiary
James - By referring to ( Matthew 13:55 ) and Mark 6:3 We find that a James the Less and Joses, with two other brethren called Jude and Simon, and at least three sisters, were sisters with the Virgin Mary at Nazareth by referring to ( Luke 6:16 ) and Acts 1:13 We find that there were two brethren named James and Jude among the apostles
Anointing, - (Isaiah 61:1 ) see Luke 4:18 In the New Testament Jesus of Nazareth is shown to be the Messiah, or Christ or Anointed, of the Old Testament, ( John 1:41 ; Acts 9:22 ; 17:2,3 ; 18:4,28 ) and the historical fact of his being anointed with the Holy Ghost is asserted and recorded
Lazarus - LAZARUS of Bethany comes as near to Jesus of Nazareth, both in his character, and in his services, and in his unparalleled experiences, as mortal man can ever come. For, when Jesus of Nazareth and His twelve disciples came to Martha's house, Lazarus hewed wood, fetched water, and washed the feet of the whole discipleship; and then, when they were all asleep, 'though he was the staff and sustentation of the family,' he supped out of sight on the fragments that remained. And God's work stands still in our hands, and all around us, just because He has no men like-minded with Jesus of Nazareth and Lazarus of Bethany. Yes; God may have as terrible a service to ask of you, when you are ready for it, as when He asked His own Son to go down to Bethlehem, and to Nazareth, and to Gethsemane, and to Calvary. Are you able? Are you ready? Are you willing to be made able and ready? Let your answer be the answer of Jesus of Nazareth, and of Lazarus of Bethany: "Lo, I come
Galilee - "The entire province is encircled with a halo of holy associations connected with the life, works, and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth
Anoint - ” So the term Christ emphasizes the special anointing of Jesus of Nazareth for His role as God’s chosen one
Galilee - Almost the whole of His life, from His settlement as an infant in Nazareth, was spent within its borders. ‘Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?’ ( John 1:46 ) was one proverb
Tabor - The road from Nazareth lies for two hours between low hills; it then opens into the plain of Esdraelon. At about two or three furlongs within the plain, and six miles from Nazareth, rises this singular mount, which is almost entirely insulated, its figure representing a half sphere
Symbol - For the apostle Paul, the meaning conveyed by the cross changed radically as did his view of Jesus of Nazareth
Lunatics - Their language was, "What hast thou to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Art thou come to torment us before the time?" "I know thee who thou art, the Holy One of God:" "thou art the Christ, the Son of God, the Son of the most high God," Matthew 8:29 ; Mark 1:24 ; Mark 3:11 ; Luke 4:34-41
Society of Priests of Saint Sulpice - Father Joubert founded the the Oblates at Baltimore, and Father David the Sisters of Nazareth, in Kentucky
Sulpicians - Father Joubert founded the the Oblates at Baltimore, and Father David the Sisters of Nazareth, in Kentucky
Mother (2) - Granted that religious genius is not to be accounted for by environment, there still remains the overwhelming probability that the feminine qualities in the character of Jesus—His graciousness, gentleness, and sympathy—found a congenial setting in the home at Nazareth
Synagogue - ...
Jesus and Synagogues Jesus customarily went to the synagogue in His hometown of Nazareth on the Sabbath (Luke 4:16 ). Luke 4:16-30 tells what happened in His home synagogue of Nazareth (see also Matthew 13:54-58 ; Mark 6:1-6 )
Mary, the Virgin - ) Mary was living at Nazareth, by this time betrothed to Joseph, when the angel Gabriel came from God to her in the sixth month of Elisabeth's pregnancy. of Nazareth in Galilee. " Mary stayed with her cousin three months, and just before John the Baptist's birth returned to her own house at Nazareth. The flight to Egypt followed; then the return, at first designed to be back to Bethlehem, but through fear of Archelaus to Nazareth of Galilee, their former home
the Penitent Thief - There was not a Sabbath synagogue, nor a passover journey, nor a carpenter's shop, nor a tax-gatherer's booth, nor a robber's cave in all Israel where the name, and the teaching, and the mighty works of Jesus of Nazareth were not constantly discussed, and debated, and divided on. And Barabbas and his band must have had many a deliberation in their banishment about Jesus of Nazareth. He may have seen Jesus of Nazareth baptized that day. 'This is Jesus of Nazareth,' he would say to himself
Wine - It is five miles from Nazareth in a N. Khirbet Kana (Cana) is not on the road from Nazareth to Capernaum; one coming up from Capernaum to Nazareth and Cana as in the Gospel could not have come near Khirbet Kana, which is on the road from Sepphoris to Ptolemais (Acre), not on the road from Sepphoris to Tiberius
Devotion to the Holy Family - Since the three holiest persons the world has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family
Family, Holy - Since the three holiest persons the world has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family
Tabor (1) - of Nazareth
John the Baptist - ...
The fame of John reached the ears of Jesus in Nazareth (Matthew 3:5 ), and he came from Galilee to Jordan to be baptized of John, on the special ground that it became him to "fulfil all righteousness" (3:15)
Bartholomew - His prominent characteristics: narrowness of prejudice in him ("Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?") immediately gave place to conviction, when the Savior revealed Himself
Megiddo - ) Now El Lejjun; in Eusebius and Jerome "Legio," on the caravan route between Egypt and Damascus, "15 miles from Nazareth, four from Taanach
Tabor - however a narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Nazareth, which lies six or eight miles off due W
Kishon - In the first part of its course it is in winter a sluggish stream with a bottom of deep mud, and in summer but a chain of small marshes; from just below where the channel is crossed by the Nazareth road near Carmel it usually has a certain amount of water all the year round, and in parts the water, which is brackish, Isaiah 10 or 12 feet deep
Holy Family, Devotion to the - Since the three holiest persons the world has ever beheld, Jesus Christ, the Incarnate Son of God, His immaculate mother, Mary, and His foster-father, Saint Joseph, dwelt together for many years in the humble home of Nazareth, it is natural that Catholics should venerate them not only as individuals but also as a family
Son of God - Term used to express the deity of Jesus of Nazareth as the one, unique Son of God
Claudius, the Emperor - 7) and gain for the former the title of king they must have had some in their train who had known—perhaps those who had reported to him (Mat_14:1-2)—the "mighty works" of the prophet of Nazareth
Fountain - There were several celebrated fountains in Judea, such as that of Rogel, of Gihon, of Siloam, of Nazareth, &c; and allusions to them are often to be met with in both the Old and New Testament
Wells And Springs - ...
The cut above given presents a view of "The Fountain of the Virgin" at Nazareth, so called from the strong probability that the mother of our Lord was wont to draw water from it, as the women of Nazareth do at this day
jo'Seph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee. He espoused Mary, the daughter and heir of his uncle Jacob,a nd before he took her home as his wife received the angelic communication recorded in (Matthew 1:20 ) When Jesus was twelve years old Joseph and Mary took him with them to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to acct as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed
Matthew, Gospel According to - His great object is to prove that Jesus of Nazareth was the promised Messiah, and that in him the ancient prophecies had their fulfilment
Mary - She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world
Bethlehem - A town in the territory of Zebulun, about seven miles northwest of Nazareth (Joshua 19:15 ), which was the burial site of Ibzan (Judges 12:10 ), in modern beit Lahm
Kenosis - ...
According to the kenotic theory, when the Son of God was incarnated as Jesus of Nazareth, He “emptied himself” of some of His divine attributes (for example, omnipotence, omniscience, and omnipresence) and lived for a period on earth within the limitations of human existence
Naming - Geographical identities are attested as well (Goliath of Gath and Jesus of Nazareth
Locust - of the Jordan swarmed on to the Plain of Esdraelon, an eye-witness looking from Nazareth described the plain as stripped utterly bare, ‘just as if the locusts had been over it
Axe - ’ And when the Carpenter laid aside the axe of the workshop in Nazareth, the wood-cutter, ‘thoroughly furnished unto every good work, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed,’ was already prepared for going up against the trees
Mary, the Mother of Jesus - On returning they abode in Nazareth
zi'Don, - It is about fifty miles distant from Nazareth, and is the most northern city which is mentioned in connection with Christ's journeys
James the Lord's Brother - John and his baptism was the talk of week-day and Sabbath-day in Nazareth, as in all the land, till at last a company of young carpenters and fishermen went south to Bethabara beyond Jordan where John was baptizing. And Jesus of Nazareth, known as yet by that name only, was one of them. We have found Him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. And He came to Nazareth where He was brought up; and, as His custom was, He went into the synagogue on the Sabbath-day and stood up for to read
Joseph And Mary - They tell us that she was the espoused wife of Joseph a carpenter of Nazareth, and that the Divine Call came to her after her espousal to Joseph and before her marriage. ...
What a journey that must have been of Mary from Nazareth to Hebron, and occupied with what thoughts. Nazareth was empty to Joseph; it was worse than empty, it was a city of sepulchres in which he sought for death and could not find it. On one of those Sabbaths which the exiled Virgin was spending at Hebron Joseph went up again to the sanctuary in Nazareth seeking to hide his great grief with God
Galilee - There He first publicly preached, in Nazareth synagogue. As Nazareth was the scene of our Lord's childhood, so Capernaum in Galilee was for long the home of His manhood (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 9:1)
Discourse - Here we have: the beginning of His ministry (Matthew 4:17, 1618100697_9 Luke 4:14-15); the sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-28); the first preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 4:23-24, John 6:22-65 Luke 4:44); at Capernaum (Mark 2:1-2; Mark 2:13); the second preaching tour in Galilee (Luke 8:1-3); at Nazareth again (Matthew 13:54-58, Mark 6:1-6); the third preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 9:35-38, Mark 6:6); a tour alone after sending out the Twelve (Matthew 11:1); teaching and journeying (Luke 13:10; Luke 13:22, cf. —Broadus, Harmony of the Gospels, and Lectures on Jesus of Nazareth; Clark, Harmony of the Gospels; Weiss, Life of Christ; Stier, The Words of Jesus; Wendt, The Teaching of Jesus; Swete, Studies in the Teaching of our Lord; Brown, Exposition of the Discourses and Sayings of our Lord; Bruce, The Training of the Twelve, The Galilean Gospel, With Open Face; Nicoll, Life of Christ; Stalker
Ministry - ...
(1) The limits of the public ministry of Jesus are properly placed between His baptism and His burial, leaving out at the beginning the thirty years of retirement and preparation at Nazareth, and at the end the forty days of occasional appearances after His resurrection. The Lake and its cities,—Capernaum with others,—Nazareth, Cana, and other towns and a number of villages, the plains and mountains of populous Galilee shared in the deeds of His busy life. Nazareth. ...
Nazareth. Nazareth
Lives of Christ - The books we have spoken of are for adults; the needs of younger people are provided for by Mother Loyola's "Jesus of Nazareth," Father Cornelius Holland's "The Divine Story," and Mother Imogen Ryan's "Come and See
Queen (2) - We may also remark how here again, as in the discourse at Nazareth, our Lord chooses His examples from among Gentiles (cf
Widow - The widow of Sarepta or Zarephath, referred to by our Lord in the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:25-26) as an instance of a Gentile who had entertained Elijah, and had received a blessing by his means
Chorazin - The name Chorazin is, like that of Nazareth, an interesting illustration of the scantiness of our literary tradition
Deliverance - He sounds it in the beginning when, preaching in the Nazareth synagogue (Luke 4:18), He declares His work to be, in the words of Isaiah 61:1, ‘to preach deliverance to captives
Anointing - In the New Testament Jesus of Nazareth is shown to be the Messiah or Christ, or anointed of the Old Testament, John 1:41; Acts 9:22; Acts 17:2-3; Acts 18:4-5; Acts 18:28; and the historical fact of his being anointed with the Holy Ghost is asserted and recorded
Paronomasia - In the former of these passages the words Ναζωραῖος (=an inhabitant of Nazareth) κληθήσεται are not found in any prophet, but it seems not unlikely that they contain an allusion to the language of Isaiah 11:1 where Messiah is called נֵצֶר (= a branch), and possibly also to the word נָצַר (to preserve); cf
Galilee - Nazareth and Capernaum were in this division. Its principal cities were Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, Nazareth, Cana, Capernaum, Nain, Caesarea of Palestine, and Ptolemais
Tyre - The coming of Christianity to Tyre was foreshadowed when many of its inhabitants journeyed to Galilee to see the Prophet of Nazareth, and when He returned their visit (Mark 3:8, Luke 6:17, Mark 7:24, Matthew 15:21)
Fierceness - It is present in the Nazareth sermon in His OT illustrations of prophets not honoured in their own country (Luke 4); in His declaration of war with evil,—‘I am come to send fire on the earth’ (Luke 12:49), and ‘I came not to send peace but a sword’ (Matthew 10:34); it even finds expression in the very phrase γεννἠματα ἐχιδνῶν used by the Baptist (Matthew 12:34)
Matthew - ...
Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter's son, knew Matthew the publican quite well. Jesus and His mother had by this time migrated from Nazareth to Capernaum. But by this time Jesus, first of Nazareth and now of Capernaum, who had been every poor widow's cautioner for her rent and for her taxes, had left His father's inherited workshop, and had been baptized by John into a still larger Suretyship
Incarnation - (in cahr nay' shuhn) God's becoming human; the union of divinity and humanity in Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus, the Man from Nazareth, is the incarnate Word or Son of God, the focus of the God-human encounter
Manifestation - And this manifestation, first in the manger at Bethlehem, then in the home at Nazareth, was the outward setting of the Divine Life, both simple and natural. There were no miracles, no strange exhibitions of unseen powers, no external signs that led the men of Nazareth to mark out that home as being specially remarkable
Christ, Miracles of - There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4)
Miracles of Christ - There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4)
Repose - This feature of His experience, along with others, appears as a quite simple and natural thing in the picture of the Prophet of Nazareth as presented by the primitive Evangelical tradition
Logos - The Gospel of John declares that the logos of whom the philosophers and sages spoke had come in human form in Jesus of Nazareth
Childhood - ...
‘He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up’ (Luke 4:16)—how much that phrase covers! The great factors entering into His education were home training, the synagogue both as a place of worship and as a school, the many-coloured life of the district in which He spent His youth, the natural features of the locality, and all the scenery round about Nazareth, so full of beauty and stirring historical associations. For the rest, as a boy He would find abundant means of recreation in rambling round about Nazareth amidst the sights and sounds of nature. ...
On His visit to Nazareth, described in Luke 4, ‘He entered, as His custom was, into the synagogue on the Sabbath day’ (Luke 4:16): and that custom, we may be sure, was a growth from His earliest years. And Sabbath by Sabbath, throughout His early peaceful years, Jesus was found in the synagogue with His mother Mary; and a benediction and a joy it must have been to all the frequenters of that synagogue at Nazareth to look upon the fair, winsome, earnest face of the Child
Acts of the Apostles (2) - ...
But it would be a mistake to suppose that our author had no interest in the earthly Jesus of Nazareth. As the heavenly Christ says to Saul, ‘I am Jesus of Nazareth whom thou persecutest’ (Acts 22:8), so to the writer of the Acts ‘the Christ’ and ‘Jesus’ constitute an inseparable unity. ...
We may use as a collateral witness the words of the disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:19), for it is a mere accident, so to speak, that this story is found in the Gospel and not in the Acts: ‘Jesus of Nazareth, which was a prophet (ἀνὴρ προφήτης), mighty in deed and word before God and all the people. Peter: ‘Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God unto you by mighty works and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you’ (Acts 2:22). The primitive Jewish-Christian Church was far from saying: Jesus of Nazareth, as He journeyed through the land teaching and healing, was the Messiah; no, He was then merely the One destined for lordship
Galilee (2) - Nazareth, Capernaum, Shunem, Nain, Cana, etc. The southern chain consists of the Nazareth hills, with Mt. The main road from the shore of the Sea of Galilee to the highlands went by the Wady cl-Hammâm past Arbela, then between Tabor and the Nazareth hills to Esdraelon
Infancy - Excluding the story of the Birth, we have the following series of events:—the Circumcision, the Presentation, the Visit of the Magi, the Flight into Egypt, the Slaughter of the Innocents, the Return and Settlement at Nazareth. ) seems the most reasonable, arranging as follows:—Circumcision, Presentation (or Purification of Mary), Visit of the Magi, Flight into Egypt and Slaughter of the Innocents, Return to Nazareth. , in the implication that Joseph and Mary were continuously resident at Bethlehem probably until Jesus was nearly two years old, and that they went to Nazareth to live only after their return from Egypt
John the Baptist - John had drunk in the Sonship and the Messiahship of Jesus of Nazareth with his mother's milk. And thus it was that when Jesus of Nazareth came south to the Jordan to be baptized of John, the Baptist remonstrated and refused, and said: "I have need to be baptized of Thee. " No thanks to John not to be jealous of the Son of God! But had Jesus been simply a carpenter of Nazareth, and John's cousin to boot, turned suddenly such a popular preacher with all men, and with all John's baptized disciples going after him; and had John, in that case, said all this about his own decreasing, then I would down on the spot and kiss his feet
Healing, Divine - When Jesus was in Nazareth He bypassed the unbelief of some (Mark 6:5 )
Bethlehem - of Nazareth)
Tabor, Mount - —A notable landmark, of rare beauty and symmetry, six miles east of Nazareth, on the north-east arm of the plain of Esdraelon
King, Christ as - The biblical teaching that Jesus of Nazareth fulfilled the Old Testament promises of a perfect King and reigns over His people and the universe
Crowd - And yet from the shore of the Dead Sea one may view the glittering snow of Hermon, while from the hill above Nazareth may be seen on the one hand the ships in the Mediterranean, and on the other the rolling hills of Gilead
Mary - After the return from Egypt to Nazareth, she is but five times mentioned in the gospel history: three on the part of Christ, Matthew 12:46-50 Luke 2:49,50 John 2:4 ; one when he commended her to the care of John, John 19:26 ; and lastly as among the disciples at Jerusalem after his ascension, Acts 1:14
Jesus Christ - By anyone's account, Jesus of Nazareth is the most significant person who has ever lived. Bornkamm's Jesus of Nazareth (1956) and J. , the family decided to return to Nazareth after hearing that Archelaus was ruling over Judea (where Bethlehem was) in place of his father. ...
Jesus went from Nazareth to be baptized by John in order "to fulfill all righteousness" (Matthew 3:15 ). ...
After an initial rebuff in his hometown of Nazareth, Jesus settled in at Capernaum by the Sea of Galilee, using it as a base of operations for his ministry in Galilee
Poverty (2) - ...
(a) The home in Nazareth. Nor does the fact that Nazareth was an inconsiderable town Joseph - Directed through dreams, Joseph took his family to Egypt until it was safe to return to Nazareth (Matthew 2:13-23 )
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - He was drawn, as the others were, by the preaching of the Baptist, or his own Messianic hopes, or the "gracious words" of the new Teacher, to leave his former life, and to obey the call of the Prophet of Nazareth
Bethlehem - The site is now occupied by a miserable village, 6 miles south-west of Sepphoris and about the same distance north-west of Nazareth, in a well-wooded district of country, planted with oaks (Robinson, Researches, iii. That this Bethlehem cannot have been the scene of the Nativity, near as it is to Nazareth, is clear from the fact that both St. As in Nazareth so in Bethlehem, the associations with Jesus make residence repugnant to the Jews, and they have accordingly no desire to settle in the Christian Holy Places. ’...
It is in the 4th century that Bethlehem begins to receive that veneration as a Christian Holy Place in which it is now equalled only by Jerusalem and Nazareth
Son, Sonship - Mary’s surprised expostulation in Luke 2:48 suggests the perfect dutifulness of His childhood’s years; and we may be sure the child was ‘father of the man,’ as to what He was in the after-time as (probably) the mainstay and head of the home at Nazareth on the death of Joseph. ...
It is to be pointed out that it is only in the account of the visit to Nazareth, as above, that the Synoptists explicitly indicate such a designation of Jesus
Stone - And that great stone, which the Jewish rulers would fain have made the incontrovertible proof that the world had seen the last of Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 27:62 ff. Peter taking up Christ’s symbol, and boldly declaring to the Sanhedrin that Jesus Christ of Nazareth was the stone set at naught by them the builders, but made by God the head of the corner
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - 'Whether we were in the body, or out of the body, as she told me about Nazareth, and as I told her about Damascus and Arabia, I cannot tell: God knoweth. " And have we not ourselves already seen how Paul's progress was made? Paul's progress was made from the knowledge of Jesus of Nazareth risen from the dead, to the knowledge of the Son of God; and then from the knowledge of both back to the knowledge of the Holy Child Jesus, and the Holy Man Jesus, as He was known to His mother, to James His brother, and to Peter His so intimate disciple
Minister - The ‘minister’ ( Luke 4:20 ) to whom Jesus handed the roll in the synagogue at Nazareth was the hazzan , corresponding to the English verger or Scotch beadle
Galilee, Sea of - The view from the Nazareth road to Tiberias is beautiful
Elijah (2) - Here Jesus justifies His performance of miracles in Capernaum, while refraining from working them in Nazareth, by citing the well-known story of Elijah’s going away from Israel in time of famine to relieve the distress of a Sidonian widow (1 Kings 17:8-9)
Sisters - There is but one incidental reference to their existence (Mark 6:3 = Matthew 13:56 αἱ ἀδελφαί αὐτοῦ) by His fellow-townsmen of Nazareth, who were astonished and offended by His assumed claims to be their religious Teacher
Messiah - For one of the names of the Lord Jesus in the Old Testament is, the Messiah, that is the Anointed, as well as in the New; and as it is expressly said concerning him in the New Testament, when he appeared in the substance of our flesh, how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth: with the Holy Ghost, Acts 10:38 - so evidently was he called the Messiah, and consequently answer that name was, and is, from everlasting, the anointed of God by the Holy Ghost, before he openly manifested himself under that character in our flesh
Punishments - ...
Precipitation, attempted in the case of our Lord at Nazareth, and carried out in that of captives from the Edomites, and of St
Holy Spirit - The passage read by Jesus in the synagogue at Nazareth ( Luke 4:18-19 , Isaiah 61:1-2 ) forms a link between the Gospel and the OT in respect to the Spirit. So when Jesus of Nazareth begins His work as the Anointed One of Hebrew expectation, there lights upon Him what to the outward eye appears as a dove ( Mark 1:10 ||), emblem of that brooding presence (cf
Ebionites - Priestly, claiming the Ebionites as Jewish Unitarians, considers the ancient Nazarenes, that is, the first Jewish converts, as the true Ebionites; these, he thinks, were called Nazarenes, from their attachment to Jesus of Nazareth; and Ebionites, from their poor and mean condition, just as some of the reformers were called Beghards, or beggars. Horsley replies, that both Jews and Heathens called the first Christians Nazarenes, in allusion to the mean and obscure birthplace of their Master, Jesus of Nazareth, Matthew 2:23 ; Acts 10:38 ; but insists, and answers every pretended proof to the contrary, that the term Nazarenes was never applied to any distinct sect of Christians before the final destruction of Jerusalem by Adrian
Nathanael - , does not imply that Nazareth had a bad reputation, but that the insignificant village, so close to his own home, was not a likely birthplace for the Messiah. If Jesus had worked miracles at Nazareth, Nathanael at Cana must have heard of them
Zebulun - of Nazareth, it reached Jokneam, eight miles due W
Surprise - ‘How is it that ye sought me?’ (Luke 2:49); He ‘marvelled because of their unbelief, in Nazareth (Mark 6:6); He was disappointed at the dulness of understanding of His disciples (Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 16:11) and of His hearers in Jerusalem (John 8:43), and at the unbelief of His generation (Mark 8:12)
Loneliness - He was most often either in crowds, teaching and healing, or else seeking loneliness without success; He was lonely in the same sense as that in which Nazareth and Syria were lonely—placed close to the world’s highways, yet living a life of their own (cf
Elkesai, Elkesaites - The formula of baptism runs, In the name of the Most High God and of His Son, the Great King; but this Great King is not exclusively identified with Jesus of Nazareth, for He appeared in the world in successive incarnations, Adam being the first
Christianity - CHRISTIANITY is the name given to the religion founded by Jesus of Nazareth, which is professed by more than one-fourth of the human race, including the foremost nations of the world. ...
The question now arises, whether the normative period of the religion ends with the death of Christ, May it be said that when His life is over, the work of the prophet of Nazareth is complete, His words have all been spoken, His religion propounded—it remains that His followers obey His teaching? This position has often been taken, and is usually adopted by those who reject the supernatural element in Christianity. Not as a prophet of Nazareth, a religious and ethical teacher, however lofty and inspiring, does Christ stand at the centre of history. Fairbairn has said, ‘It is not Jesus of Nazareth who has so powerfully entered into history; it is the deified Christ who has been believed, loved, and obeyed as the Saviour of the world. … If the doctrine of the Person of Christ were explicable as the mere mythical apotheosis of Jesus of Nazareth, it would become the most insole
Palestine - ‘If, negatively,’ says Hausrath, ‘it be self-evident that Jesus’ mission would have assumed another character had He grown up under the oaks of Germany instead of under the palms of Nazareth, that the subject of Arminius or Maroboduus would have been different from that of Antipas, that the opponent of the Druids would have differed from the opponent of the Rabbis, so, positively, it is indisputable that for Jesus Himself the facts of His consciousness were given Him under those forms of viewing things in which Jewish thought in general was cast. From the hill above Nazareth He looked abroad on an endless field of mountain tops. Hermon dominated the landscape on the north-east, and Tabor thrust its irrelevant cone, conspicuous and unique, over the undulating sky-line of the mountains between Nazareth and the Lake—a gigantic intruder which had reared its huge head to look down into Nazareth from over the wall of mountains. From the heights of Nazareth He had seen the march of the legions on the Roman road across Esdraelon from Acre to the Jordan, and watched the long lines of laden camels moving slowly from the coast to Damascus and back, along the road that lies like a flung ribbon along the hillsides to the north
Paul as a Student - Saul of Tarsus was not born with the silver spoon in his mouth any more than was Jesus of Nazareth, his future Master. " Now Gamaliel would be almost sure to be one of those astonished doctors; and what more likely than that he had taken his best scholar up to the temple to explain the passover to him that day? And did not the young carpenter from Nazareth, and the young weaver from Tarsus, exchange glances of sympathy and shake hands of love that day at the gate of the temple? I, for one, will believe that they did. For a work lay before that weaver boy of Tarsus second only to the work that lay before that carpenter boy of Nazareth, though second to that by an infinite interval
Majesty (2) - And this poor Carpenter of Nazareth further assumes without the least hesitation the name and dignity of the promised Messiah of Israel; He affirms, in a sense altogether unique, that He is the Son of God, unto whom all things have been delivered of the Father (Matthew 11:27, Luke 10:22; cf. And is it not highly significant that, on the one solitary occasion on which a NT writer has set himself to describe the Lord’s personal appearance, the attempt is based upon no recollections or traditions regarding Jesus of Nazareth, but upon a splendid conception of the majesty of the exalted Christ—His eyes as a flame of fire, His voice as the sound of many waters, in His right hand seven stars, and His countenance as the sun shineth in his strength (Revelation 1:13 ff
Italy - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Acerenza
Agrigento
Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni
Ancona-Osimo
Bari-Bitonto
Benevento
Bologna
Brindisi-Ostuni
Cagliari
Camerino-San Severino Marche
Campagna
Campobasso-Boiano
Capua
Catania
Catanzaro-Squillace
Chieti-Vasto
Cosenza-Bisignano
Crotone-Santa Severina
Fermo
Ferrara-Comacchio
Firenze {Florence}
Foggia-Bovino
Gaeta
Genova
Gorizia
Lanciano-Ortona
L'Aquila
Lecce
Lucca
Manfredonia-Vieste-San Giovanni Rotondo
Matera
Matera-Irsina
Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela
Milano {Milan}
Modena-Nonantola
Monreale
Napoli {Naples}
Oristano
Otranto
Palermo
Perugia-Città della Pieve
Pesaro
Pescara-Penne
Pisa
Potenza-Muro Lucano-Marsico Nuovo
Ravenna-Cervia
Reggio Calabria-Bova
Rossano-Cariati
Salerno-Campagna-Acerno
Sant Angelo dei Lombardi-Conza-Nusco-Bisaccia
Santa Severina
Sassari
Siena-Colle di Val d'Elsa-Montalcino
Siracusa
Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia
Spoleto-Norcia
Taranto
Torino {Turin}
Trani-Barletta-Bisceglie (-Nazareth)
Trento
Udine
Urbino-Urbania-Sant'Angelo in Vado
Venezia
Vercelli
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Acerno
Acerra
Acireale
Acquapendente
Acqui
Adria-Rovigo
Alatri
Alba
Albenga-Imperia
Alessandria
Ales-Terralba
Alghero-Bosa
Alife-Caiazzo
Altamura-Gravina-Acquaviva delle Fonti
Amelia
Anagni-Alatri
Andria
Aosta
Aquino
Arezzo-Cortona-Sansepolcro
Ariano Irpino-Lacedonia
Ascoli Piceno
Assisi-Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino
Asti
Atri
Avellino
Aversa
Avezzano
Bagnoregio
Belluno-Feltre
Bergamo
Bertinoro
Biella
Bisaccia
Bisceglie
Bisignano
Bitonto
Bitonto
Bobbio-San Colombano
Bolzano-Bressanone {Bozen-Brixen}
Bosa
Bova
Bovino
Brescia
Brugnato
Cagli e Pergola
Caiazzo
Caltagirone
Caltanissetta
Campagna
Cariati
Carpi
Casale Monferrato
Caserta
Cassano all'Jonio
Castellammare di Stabia
Castellaneta
Cava e Sarno
Cefalù
Cerignola-Ascoli Satriano
Cerreto Sannita-Telese-Sant'Agata de' Goti
Cervia
Cesena-Sarsina
Chiavari
Chioggia
Chiusi-Pienza
Cingoli
Città della Pieve
Città di Castello
Civita Castellana (Orte, Gallese, Nepi e Sutri)
Civitaveccia
Civitaveccia-Tarquinia
Colle di Val d'Elsa
Comacchio (-Pomposa)
Como
Concordia-Pordenone
Conversano-Monopoli
Cortona
Crema
Cremona
Cuneo
Fabriano-Matelica
Faenza-Modigliana
Fano-Fossombrone-Cagli-Pergola
Feltre
Ferentino
Fidenza
Fiesole
Foligno
Forli-Bertinoro
Fossano
Fossombrone
Frosinone-Veroli-Ferentino
Gallese
Gallipoli
Giovinazzo
Gravina
Grosseto
Gualdo Tadino
Guastalla
Gubbio
Iglesias
Imola
Ischia
Isernia-Venafro
Ivrea
Jesi
Lacedonia
Lamezia Terme
Lanusei
Larino
La Spezia-Sarzana-Brugnato
Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno
Lipari
Livorno
Locri-Gerace (-Santa Maria di Polsi)
Lodi
Loreto
Lucera-Troia
Macerata-Tolentino-Recanati-Cingoli-Treia
Mantova
Marsico Nuovo
Massa Carrara-Pontremoli
Massa Marittima-Piombino
Matelica
Mazara del Vallo
Melfi-Rapolla-Venosa
Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea
Modigliana
Molfetta-Ruvo-Giovinazzo-Terlizzi
Mondovi
Monopoli
Montalcino
Montalto
Montefiascone
Montepeloso
Montepeloso
Montepulciano-Chiusi-Pienza
Muro Lucano
Nardò-Gallipoli
Narni
Nepi e Sutri
Nicosia
Nicotera-Tropea
Nocera Inferiore-Sarno
Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino
Nola
Noli
Norcia
Noto
Novara
Numana
Nuoro
Nusco
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - The bodily, living appearance of Jesus of Nazareth after He died and was buried, providing certain hope for resurrection of believers
Ignorance - Thus arose the ignorance of God (Acts 17:23), the yielding to lusts (1 Peter 1:14), the rejection of Jesus of Nazareth (Acts 3:17), and, in St
Redeem, Redemption - ...
Fundamental to the message of the New Testament is the announcement that Jesus of Nazareth is the fulfillment of Israel's messianic hope and that, in him, the long-awaited redemption has arrived
Comfort (2) - In His sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-27) He applied to Himself the prophecy of Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1-3), which tells that the Messiah was ‘to comfort all that mourn
Synagogue - In Luke 4 the Lord, in the synagogue at Nazareth, stood up to read, and there was handed to Him the book of the prophet Isaiah
Augustus (2) - ’ In ‘drawing up his narrative’ he makes it evident that Nazareth, not Bethlehem, was the home of Joseph and Mary, and that the ‘enrolment,’ originating in a decree of Caesar Augustus, was the occasion of the journey from Nazareth within a little time of the expected birth. The first 30 years of His life, with the exception of the brief sojourn in Egypt, were spent in the obscure, even despised, Nazareth. 14) this world-ruler from the Founder of Christianity:—Augustus, a perfect master in State-craft, merciful to his foes only when he had made his position absolutely sure, only somewhat more advanced in his morality than the men of his age, full of self-esteem, as the last scene of his life reveals, yet entitled to be considered by the world in which he lived as its ‘chief benefactor’ (Luke 22:25); Jesus, though in His twelfth year able to claim a relationship with the Father in heaven such as distinguishes Him from every other son of man, yet remaining for those 20 years of His life at Nazareth as the carpenter’s son, all unknown to the great world without, subject to His reputed father and His ‘highly favoured’ mother, ‘advancing in wisdom’ as in stature, and above all ‘in favour with God and man
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - Matthew is so conscious of this correlation that he creates a quotation from the Old Testament on a very broad analogy of Jesus as the rejected one in order to justify Jesus being raised in Nazareth (Matthew 2:23 ). , the JEDP theory), assumed antitheses between Jesus and Paul, and discontinuity between the historical Jesus and the kerygmatic Christ (which means the Christ preached by the early church without any necessary connection with what Jesus of Nazareth actually said)
Historical - They will describe the teacher of Nazareth, the martyr of Calvary; but the Christ of God will be a magnitude as inaccessible to them as physical miracle is to Dr. At any rate the majority, and those who know their business best, are found reducing Jesus of Nazareth to a symbol, very vaguely connected with any abiding spiritual reality
Claims (of Christ) - We see the presence of this consciousness in the Temptation narratives (Matthew 4:1-11 ||), in the sermon in the synagogue of Nazareth (Luke 4:17 ff. It was a great thing for Jesus of Nazareth to assume the titles and functions of the Hope of Israel, to declare Himself to be the Fulfiller of the Law and the Expected of the Prophets
Paul in Arabia - What an incomparable book waits to be written about those three immortal years in Arabia! After those thirty preparation-years at Nazareth, there is no other opportunity left for any sanctified pen, like those three revelation-years in Arabia. Jesus of Nazareth appeared to Saul the persecutor, as He had already appeared to Mary Magdalene, and to the ten disciples, and to Thomas
Wealth - As regards His practice , it is clear that, until He commenced His ministry, He obtained His livelihood by labour, toiling as a carpenter in Nazareth ( Mark 6:3 )
Title on the Cross - Wordsworth (on John 19:19) has even supposed that the title really ran thus: ‘This is Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews
Dereliction - He bore the sin of the world from Nazareth to Calvary, and, if God was angry with Him at the last, He must have been angry with Him all along
Foreknowledge - Peter, in addressing the Jewish multitudes on the day of Pentecost, describes them as having by the hand of lawless men crucified and slain Jesus of Nazareth, he speaks of Him as ‘delivered up by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God’ (Acts 2:23)
Water - Some of the Mohammedan villages in Palestine, not far from Nazareth, brought Mr
Preaching - The following example of an old Rabbinic address, based on the words ‘He hath clothed me with garments of salvation,’ which come from the chapter in Isaiah (61) from which Jesus took His text in His address in the synagogue at Nazareth, will illustrate the character of contemporary Jewish sermons:...
Seven garments the Holy One blessed be He has put on, and will put on from the time the world was created until the hour when He will punish the whole of wicked Edom (= the Roman Empire)
Luke, Gospel of - This material includes Jesus’ sermon in the synagogue at Nazareth (4:14-30), various healings (4:31-44), the call of his first disciples (5:1-11), further healings (5:12-26), the call of Matthew (5:27-32) and explanations of the nature of true religion (5:33-6:11)
Atonement (2) - This fact, reinforced by successive appearances of the risen Christ whether to individuals or the assembled disciples, led to the further conviction, the ultimate root of the doctrine of the Atonement, that Jesus of Nazareth, crucified, risen, ascended, was present in the midst of the Christian congregation. Whatever view it may be expedient to take of the relation between Hebrew prophecy and Jesus of Nazareth, this fact is of primary importance, because it exhibits what in the view of the first messengers of the Cross was the essential character of the good news it was their mission to proclaim; nor would the case be materially altered if the language of Law and Prophets had merely been chosen to illustrate the central idea of the Gospel. ’ The Prophet, who at the outset of His ministry read in the synagogue of Nazareth the words foreshadowing the deliverance which was to issue in the Kingdom of God (1618100698_44 = 1618100698_99), knew that for Himself it meant the Man of Sorrows, led like the lamb of the Hebrew ritual to the slaughter, and in the power of His healing wounds making intercession for the transgressors of His people (Isaiah 53; for the connexion with the Ceremonial Law see Davidson, OT Prophecy, ch
Person of Christ - The first article in the creed of the Apostles is the Messiahship of the crucified and risen Jesus of Nazareth. It is noticeable, therefore, that at Nazareth He announced Himself not as Messiah, but as a prophet ( Luke 4:18 ). His disciples, the crowd at Nazareth, and the possessed are alike conscious of this singular elevation. The words ‘Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs’ ( Birth of Christ - 25):—...
‘There are two Bethlehems, the second in Galilee, about seven miles west of Nazareth, and it has recently been suggested in the Encyc. There would be real advantages if Bethlehem could be thought of as near to Nazareth. ...
Nor does the fact that our Lord was popularly known as Jesus of Nazareth in any way interfere with the truth that He was born at Bethlehem
Jesus Christ - " Full of this unction without measure (John 3:34) He preached at Nazareth as the Fulfiller of the scripture He read (Isaiah 61:1-3), giving "the oil of joy for mourning," "good tidings unto the meek" (Luke 4:17-21). The inspired summary of His life is, "God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power, who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil, for God was with Him" (Acts 10:38). The census of the Roman empire ordered by Augustus led Joseph and Mary from Nazareth to Bethlehem, the city of David their ancestor, in fulfillment of Micah's prophecy (Micah 5)
Proverbs - He was rejected by His townsfolk of Nazareth; He was pronounced mad by His kinsfolk; His brethren did not believe in Him. In the course of His dispute with the people of Nazareth, Jesus quoted another proverb, ‘Physician, heal thyself’ (Luke 4:23). It is a carpenter’s proverb, and has a special fitness on the lips of the Carpenter of Nazareth
Apostle - Their signal success at Jerusalem, where they opened their commission, alarmed the Jewish sanhedrim, before which Peter and John were summoned, and from which they received a strict charge never more to teach, publicly or privately, in the name of Jesus of Nazareth. The Apostles, however, were not discouraged nor restrained; they counted it an honour to suffer such indignities, in token of their affection to their Master, and zeal in his cause; and they persisted in preaching daily in the courts of the temple, and in other places, that Jesus of Nazareth was the promised and long expected Messiah
Fig Tree - Hasselquist, in his journey from Nazareth to Tiberias, says, "We refreshed ourselves under the shade of a fig tree, where a shepherd and his herd had their rendezvous; but without either house or hut
Matthew, Gospel of - ...
Summary of contents...
The opening section of Matthew begins with a genealogy of Jesus (1:1-17), the story of his birth (1:18-25), the escape from Herod (2:1-18) and the subsequent move to Nazareth (2:19-23)
Elisha - His miracles are deeds of mercy, and, like that of the Prophet of Nazareth, his ministry breathes a spirit ‘of gracious, soothing, holy beneficence
Caesar - The title on the cross, ‘Jesus of Nazareth, the king of the Jews’ (John 19:19), as Pilate actually wrote it, served him better than their proposed modification, ‘He said, I am king of the Jews’ (John 19:31)
Census - And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, to the city of David, because he was of the house and family of David, to enrol himself with Mary who was betrothed to him’ (Luke 2:3-5)
Annunciation, the - Luke (Luke 1:26-38) tells us that this announcement was made to Mary by the angel Gabriel at Nazareth six months after the same angel had told Zacharias in the Temple at Jerusalem that his wife Elisabeth should bear him a son, who was to be called John. Both state that at the time of the announcement Mary was espoused to Joseph, that the child was to be named ‘Jesus,’ that He was born at Bethlehem in Judaea, and that the parents brought Him up at Nazareth. Gabriel was sent, and entered some building in which she was living at Nazareth, and there delivered his message
Trinity - Consequently, instead of giving an intellectual statement of doctrine, which might have led to theological and philosophic discussion, and ended only in more Intense opposition to Christianity, the Apostles preached Jesus of Nazareth as a personal Redeemer from sin, and urged on every one the acceptance of Him and His claims. Peter the claim made for Jesus of Nazareth as the Source of healing ( Acts 3:6 ; Acts 3:16 ), the Prince-Leader of Life ( Acts 3:15 ), the Head Stone of the corner ( Acts 4:11 ), and the one and only Way of Salvation ( Acts 4:12 ), was an unmistakable assumption of the position and power of Godhead
Humiliation of Christ - Showing at the age of twelve a wisdom which astonished the wisest men of the nation, and which would have secured for Him recognition, position, power, and renown, He yet willingly returned to the obscure and humble home at Nazareth; and there for the space of nearly twenty years He submitted Himself, day after day, to the control of two plain peasant people, and to the occupation and drudgery of common manual labour. He did not even have a refuge among the friends of His youth, the people of His old home at Nazareth
Palestine - The whole land consists of rounded limestone hills, fretted into countless stony valleys, offering but rarely level tracts, of which Esdraelon alone, below Nazareth, is large enough to be seen on the map
Gentiles (2) - Luke’s chronology (see Naaman), Jesus defied the Jewish prejudices of His hearers in the synagogue at Nazareth by citing cases of Gentiles blessed through the agency of Israel’s prophets (Luke 4:25 ff
Burial - The empty grave-clothes, out of which the Risen Lord had passed, became thus a sign not only that no violence had been offered to His body by human hands, but also a parable of the true meaning of His Resurrection: ‘all that was of Jesus of Nazareth has suffered its change and is gone
je'Sus Christ - 4, the family returned to their Nazareth home, where Jesus lived till he was about thirty years old, subject to his parent, and increasing "in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man
Unitarians - Belsham says, "The Unitarian doctrine is, that Jesus of Nazareth was a man constituted in all respects like other men, subject to the same infirmities, the same ignorance, prejudices, and frailties; descended from the family of David, the son of Joseph and Mary, though some indeed still adhere to the popular opinion of the miraculous conception; that he was born in low circumstances, having no peculiar advantages of education or learning, but that he was a man of exemplary character; and that, in conformity to ancient prophecy, he was chosen and appointed by God to introduce a new moral dispensation into the world, the design of which was to abolish the Jewish economy, and to place believing Gentiles upon an equal ground of privilege and favour with the posterity of Abraham; in other words, he was authorized to reveal to all mankind, without distinction, the great doctrine of a future life, in which men shall be rewarded according to their works
Parents (2) - The home at Nazareth
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - Whether He returned at all, or frequently, during His youth and early manhood, to the Holy City, we have no means of ascertaining; but in Nazareth He would seem to have been a constant attender at the synagogue services, for such is noted in the Gospels as being His practice; and when He returned to the town, after His public ministry had begun, it was not His presence in the synagogue that surprised His fellow-townsmen, but the learning of one whom they had previously regarded as an ordinary comrade. It is at least permissible to think that Jesus may Himself have played this part many times in the quiet of the Nazareth synagogue, and by the exquisite appropriateness of His language have already shown Himself capable of making the word of God an attractive message to the common people. The latter two passages occur in the address in the synagogue of Nazareth, for which, of course, we have only the authority of Lk
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Matthew 2: Christ worshipped by the wise men, Herod's massacre of the children at Bethlehem, Herod's death, and Christ's return to Nazareth. Introduction; Christ's genealogy, birth; visit of the wise men; flight to Egypt; return to Nazareth; John the Baptist's preparatory ministry; Christ's baptism and consecration to His office by the Holy Spirit, with the Father's declared approval (Matthew 1-3)
Influence - His supposed birthplace,—Nazareth,—His humble parentage, His lack of a really good education, all these and many other objections were constantly urged (John 7:15), and must have caused some difficulty in the disciples’ minds. Now and again it flashed forth in a way that dazzled and overpowered, as when the men of Nazareth wished to fling Him over the cliff, as when those of Jerusalem would have stoned Him, as when those sent to arrest Him fell back when He declared who He was (Luke 4:29, John 8:59; John 18:6)
Joseph - His family belonged to Bethlehem, David’s city, but he had migrated to Nazareth ( Luke 2:4 ), where he followed the trade of carpenter ( Matthew 13:55 ). He was betrothed to Mary, a maiden of Nazareth, being probably much her senior, though the tradition of the apocryphal History of Joseph that he was in his ninety-third year and she in her fifteenth is a mere fable
David - in His Services - But when I trace that blessing up to its true source, I find that true and grace-gushing source in Jesus of Nazareth, whom I see growing in grace every day as He goes about in Galilee with David's Psalms never out of His hands. See Jesus of Nazareth on His knees in the Sabbath synagogue with this place open before Him for the first time,-Lo, I come; in the volume of the book it is written of Me, I delight to do Thy will, O My God; yea, Thy law is within my heart
Joseph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee (Luke 2:4 )
Messiah - Luke stressed the link between Jesus as the One anointed by the Holy Spirit (Luke 4:16-22 ) in a way that looks back to Isaiah 61:1 , and he recorded Peter's statement (in Acts 10:38 NIV) that “God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power” as a fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy
Liberty (2) - He begins His mission at Nazareth with the words of Isaiah that His work was ‘to set at liberty them that are bruised’ (Luke 4:18)
Marriage (i.) - In the larger villages, such as Bethlehem and Nazareth, the robing of the bride was more elaborate, and was carried out by the help of women after her arrival at the new home
Africanus, Julius - He then gives his own explanation, founded on the levirate law of the Jews, and professing to be traditionally derived from the Desposyni (or descendants of the kindred of our Lord), who dwelt near the villages of Nazareth and Cochaba
Joseph - The place of his stated residence was Nazareth, particularly after the time of his marriage
Premeditation - The choice of the passage from Isaiah as the text of His first sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:18) is too distinctive to have been the chance of an opening of the roll
Judea - Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district
Surname - -In Nazareth Joseph was known as ὁ τέκτων,5 Messiah - They called him Jesus of Nazareth, and his followers they called Nazarenes (Matthew 26:71; John 18:4-7; Acts 24:5)
Freedom - Moreover, Luke introduces Jesus' public ministry by relating the visit to the synagogue in Nazareth
Synagogue - The chazzan or "minister" (Ezekiel 8:1 where Christ by rising indicated that as a member of the synagogue at Nazareth
Stephen - " So they charged him before the Sanhedrin by suborned witnesses with speaking against Moses and God, the temple and the law, and asserting that, Jesus of Nazareth should destroy the temple and change the customs that Moses had delivered
Appreciation (of Christ) - Inspite of all the enmity written there; remembering that there were those who saw in Him an ally of Beelzebub (Matthew 12:24), working with the devil’s aid; that some called Him ‘a gluttonous man, a wine-bibber, friend of publicans and sinners’ (Matthew 11:19); that lawyers, and Pharisees, and Sadducees were ever watching to trip Him (Matthew 22:15), and plotting with Herodians (Matthew 22:16) to destroy Him; that the Galilaean cities, which should have known Him best,—Chorazin, Bethsaida, Capernaum (Matthew 11:21; Matthew 11:23), and even Nazareth,—rejected Him (Luke 4:28 f
Mary - Afterward, he returned with them to Nazareth, and lived in filial submission to them
Character of Christ - The home at Nazareth is as far removed from luxury and artificiality on the one hand, as it is from squalor or depravity on the other. Other educational influences must be remembered and their power duly estimated: the historic scenes which were within His view, with the splendid and tragic memories they were fitted to awaken; the highways of the world’s business which were visible from the hills behind which Nazareth lay; the pleasant country which was spread all around His home. ‘He went down with them, and came to Nazareth; and he was subject unto them’ (Luke 2:51)
Transfiguration (2) - Tabor, lying near Nazareth, far to the south from Caesarea Philippi in the N. A second regards as the reality underlying the occurrence an inner revelation made to Jesus alone, a short time before Peter’s confession and in his presence; Peter had discernment enough to recognize its effect on the Master’s mind and intuitively grasped its meaning (Réville, Jésus de Nazareth, ii
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - ...
The word "Christ" is used to identify Jesus of Nazareth as that person whom God anointed to be the redeemer of humanity. Someone possed with an evil spirit then cries out, "What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God!" (1:23-24)
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Peter in his speech on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2:30) mentions God’s promise to David, ‘that of the fruit of his loins he would set one upon his throne,’ and points to its fulfilment in Christ; but in addressing Cornelius (Acts 10:38) he speaks of Christ as ‘Jesus of Nazareth’; and this would seem to imply that the birth at Bethlehem, which brought into prominence the claim to Davidic descent, did not form part of his ordinary missionary preaching. show clearly that He did not choose to support His claim by an appeal to fleshly parentage; while the words of Philip (John 1:45 ‘We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph’), and of the crowd at Capernaum (John 6:42 ‘Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know?’), left, as they are, without comment by the Evangelist, suggest that he was unacquainted with the story of the birth at Bethlehem, and laid no stress on the Davidie descent
Christian - But it was their passionate contention that Jesus of Nazareth was not the Christ
Preach, Proclaim - However, in his distinctive account of Jesus' sermon at Nazareth (4:16-30), Luke records Jesus' own quotation of Isaiah 61:1-2 a, which contains the statement of his (the Servant's) task as "to proclaim freedom to the prisoners" (4:18) and "to proclaim the year of the Lord's favor" (4:19)
Nationality - He was a regular attendant at the synagogue at Nazareth (Luke 4:16); and His interest in these nurseries of nationality was so far recognized that the liberality of Jairus in providing one was assumed to be a claim on His favour (Luke 7:4-5)
Joshua - Now, in that Joshua was exactly like his Great Namesake in the New Testament whose wont it was to go up to the synagogue of Nazareth every Sabbath day, and who said to His father and mother when they sought Him all through Jerusalem sorrowing: 'How is it that ye seek Me? Wist ye not that I must be about My Father's business?' Joseph and Mary had sought the child Jesus in all those places where other sorrowing fathers and mothers were seeking their lost sons also,-among the theatres, and the circuses, and the shows, and the races, and the wrestling arenas, and the inns, and shops, and streets of Jerusalem; but He departed not out of the temple. Theodor Keim, in his volume of genius on our Lord's early life on earth, says that in His choice of a trade, which He was bound to choose, though He chose to be a carpenter, Jesus of Nazareth might have chosen anything else, anything but to be a soldier
Disease - It was easy to state the gospel of salvation in terms borrowed from unhappy experience of disease and afflictionas Jesus did at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-21 )and be sure of being understood
Jesus Christ - Upon returning, He went to Nazareth, was reared in the home of the man Joseph, was taken to Jerusalem where His knowledge of His Father's business surprised and inconvenienced them all—the doctors and the parents
Mark, the Gospel According to - The motto of this Gospel may be taken from its probable author, Peter (Acts 10:38) "God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power; who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil, for God was with Him
Sabbath - Neither the healing of Peter's mother-in-law (Mark 1:29-31 ) nor Jesus' synagogue address in Nazareth seems to have occasioned any opposition
Anointing (2) - When Jesus in the synagogue at Nazareth read from Isaiah 61 the prophetic words, ‘The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he anointed (χρίω me to preach good tidings to the poor …’ (Luke 4:18), and went on to say, after closing the book, ‘To-day hath this scripture been fulfilled in your ears’ (Luke 4:21), He definitely claimed to be set apart to the Messianic calling
Ideas (Leading) - And to them came John the Baptist and then Jesus of Nazareth, proclaiming the coming of a Kingdom. His very ‘greatness,’ as conceived by Aristotle, makes him a poor creature when placed beside Jesus of Nazareth
Gospel (2) - Paul quotes Isaiah 52:7 in Romans 10:15; and Jesus makes Isaiah 61:1 the text for His sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:18). He made frequent use of the word, and soon after the rejection in Nazareth He described His Messianic function by it: ‘I must preach the good tidings of the kingdom of God to the other cities also; for therefore was I sent’ (Luke 4:43)
Gospels - If this be lost sight of, the book remains as a mere narrative of disconnected incidents in the life of one Jesus of Nazareth. Its purpose is to prove that Jesus of Nazareth was, though rejected by the rulers of His people, the true Messiah, in whom were or would be fulfilled all the Messianic expectations of the OT
Matthew, Gospel According to - Hosea had foreseen the flight into Egypt, Jeremiah the massacre of the infants at Bethlehem (Matthew 2:17); and the settlement of His parents at the ill-famed village of Nazareth had been the subject of prophecy (Matthew 2:23). If His parents settled at Nazareth, it was that the tenor of prophecy might be fulfilled
Boyhood - That lassitude which is true of children in Bomhay, for instance, cannot at all seasons apply to those of Nazareth, which is about 1500 feet above sea-level. They were chiefly confined to the cities which had a large heathen population, and we cannot imagine a gymnasium at Nazareth or Hebron
Boyhood of Jesus - But if any pious persons and households were as yet free from the Rabbinical ‘yoke of bondage’ (Galatians 5:1), surely that freedom was to be found in the household of Nazareth. ...
During the stay at Nazareth, where Joseph and Mary settled after their return from Egypt (Matthew 2:23), the Babe (τὸ βρέφος, Luke 2:16) passed into the stage of young boyhood
John, Gospel of - ...
Does the Gospel, then, as a whole bear out this claim, directly or indirectly made? Is it such a book as may well have proceeded from one who ranked amongst the foremost figures in the sacred drama of which Jesus of Nazareth was the august centre? The answer cannot be given in a word. We cannot conceive, it is said, that one who had moved in the circle of the Immediate companions of Jesus of Nazareth could have spoken of Him in this fashion
Jerusalem - Here Jews from all the world came for religious festivals, and here Jesus from Nazareth came to bring His message to the leaders of the Jewish nation
Seven Words, the - Jesus from His cross beholds His mother, and is mindful of the years which He had spent under her tender care in the quiet home of Nazareth
Unbelief (2) - ’ If Luke 4:16 refers to a previous visit (which is unlikely), He will seek once more to win His fellow-townsmen when (Matthew 13:53-54, Mark 6:1-2) He takes His stand in the synagogue at Nazareth
Woman (2) - Her mind is full of the doings of the Prophet of Nazareth
Lord - ...
How can humans be convinced that the crucified Jesus from Nazareth is the Lord—that is, that in Him God acted in the way that the Bible says and in the way that the world needs? How can people be convinced that He is the Messiah of Israel and the Lord of all people, who comes near to all people as Friend and Brother? How does the Lord of the cosmos become our personal Lord in His church? This happens through the Holy Spirit
Gospel - ...
In the synagogue at Nazareth, Jesus reads from Isaiah 61 : "the Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor
Salvation - Peter's certainty of this relation between "Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified" and the "God [who raised him]'>[2] from the dead" moves him to the exclusive confession that salvation belongs only to the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 4:10-12 )
Messiah - Jesus proclaimed himself as the Messiah in Nazareth (Luke 4:16-22 ) and at Jacob's well to the Samaritan woman (John 4:24-25 )
Education (2) - Such stories are, of course, absolutely unhistorical; but it is indubitable that during His early years at Nazareth Jesus had to do with school and teacher
Keeping - Again, referring to what took place on the occasion of the visit to Jerusalem, the narrative goes on to say that Jesus went down with His parents ‘and came to Nazareth; and he was subject unto them; and his mother kept (διετήρει) all these sayings (or things) in her heart’ (Luke 2:51)
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - For a friend of mine on his journey has come to me, and I have nothing to set before him?" Now there is only too good ground for believing that the carpenter's house was one of the poorest houses in all Nazareth and Capernaum
Family (Jesus) - From Mark 6:3 it has been mistakenly concluded that they were still living at Nazareth, but the verse plainly draws a distinction between them and His sisters (named, acc
Holiness - (Matthew 3:16-17) And holiness is essentially and personally ascribed to God the Holy Ghost, in that gracious office of his, when it is said of the Lord Jesus, that God the Father anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost, and with power
Presentation - Luke’s mention of the Holy Family returning into Galilee and Nazareth (Luke 2:39) is of the nature of a foreshortening, and does not imply that no event intervened between the Presentation and the journey to the North
Jesus Christ - Prominence is given to the rejection of Jesus by Nazareth and Jerusalem ( Luke 4:16-30 , Luke 19:41-44 ), and to His discovery among the Gentiles of the faith for which He sought ( Luke 17:18-19 ). The discourses, again, have been expanded by the reporter, and cast in the moulds of his own thought, so that in them we really possess a combination of the words of Jesus of Nazareth with those of the glorified Christ speaking in the experience of a disciple
Chronology of the New Testament - also we see traces of three periods in the ministry: (1) Mark 3:21 to Mark 4:30 , preaching in the wilderness of Judæa and in Nazareth and Galilee, briefly recorded; (2) Mark 4:31 to Mark 9:50 , preaching in Galilee and the North, related at length; (3) 9:51-end, preaching in Central Palestine as far as Jerusalem
Jonah - of Sepphoris, and not far from Kefr Kennâ and Nazareth, in the neighbourhood of which is a grave of Nebi Yûnus or Yûnis
Synagogue - It was the haphtarâ , as the prophetic lesson was termed, that our Lord read in the synagogue of Nazareth ( Luke 4:16 ff
Cross, Crucifixion - John noted that the inscription on the cross (“JESUS OF Nazareth, THE KING OF THE JEWS”) was written in Aramaic, Latin, and Greek (John 19:19-20 ), thereby changing it into a universal proclamation of Jesus' royal status
Bible, Authority of the - Indeed, is not the implication of "Thus says the Lord" that those other sayings recorded by the prophet fall short of divine authority? Should not the quoted speech of Jesus of Nazareth be taken to have an authority to which the letters of Saul of Tarsus could never aspire?...
As it happens, the Scriptures themselves tell another story
Luke, the Gospel According to - ...
Theophilus, to whom he writes, was a Gentile believer, as appears from the geographical and other explanations given of many things, which would have been needless had he been a Jew (Luke 1:26, Nazareth; Luke 4:31, Capernaum; Luke 23:51, Arimathea; Luke 24:13, Emmaus; Acts 1:12, Olivet)
Scripture - His example, as well as his precepts, is full of precious and most important instruction; and it is a remarkable circumstance, which ought never to be forgotten, that he began his public ministry, in the synagogue of Nazareth, by reading a portion of Scripture out of the book of the prophet Isaiah; Luke 4:15 ; Luke 4:19
Salvation Save Saviour - Peter’s speech in Acts 4:12 it is said that ‘in none other’ than ‘Jesus Christ of Nazareth’ ‘is there salvation; for neither is there any other name under heaven that is given among men whereby we must be saved
Rufus - Pilate’s remitting our Lord to ‘Herod’s jurisdiction’ (Luke 23:7 ἐξουσίας) was intended as an act of civility to a reigning prince (‘Jesus of Nazareth’ being under Herod’s tetrarchate), and perhaps also in order to gain time
Jonah - (3) The clause is unnecessary, and interferes with the balance which without it exists in Matthew 12:41-42 || Luke 11:31-32, for it was Jonah’s preaching and the consequent repentance of the Ninevites, in contrast with His own preaching and the indifference of the men of His generation, to which Jesus especially alluded; His words without Luke 11:40 are a complete answer to their demand for a sign: the repentance-preaching Jonah was a sign to the Ninevites of God’s mercy; the repentance-preaching Jesus of Nazareth was a sign, though a greater one, to the Jews
Manliness - ), His denunciations of the Pharisees (Matthew 23), His woes against the cities of Galilee (Matthew 11:20-24), His acts of healing upon the Sabbath, His rebuke to the people of Nazareth (Luke 4:16-30), His statement about the Temple (John 2:18-22), His refusal of a sign to the scribes (Matthew 12:38-42; Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12, Luke 11:16 f
Knowledge - -Much of the earliest teaching of the apostles was to demonstrate that Jesus of Nazareth was the Christ of God (Acts 2:36), and the object of all their knowledge and preaching might be summed up in the phrase of St
Thomas - We see now that the disciples of Jesus of Nazareth had the very best cause for high hope and full assurance
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - We must accustom ourselves to return to those early days when our Lord was still half a carpenter of Nazareth, and half a preacher at the street corner
Name (2) - Peter cures the lame beggar at the gate of the Temple by commanding him in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth to walk
Providence - The long years of silence at Nazareth were evidently spent in a deliberate preparation of Himself for the high tasks that lay before Him
Rufus - Pilate’s remitting our Lord to ‘Herod’s jurisdiction’ (Luke 23:7 ἐξουσίας) was intended as an act of civility to a reigning prince (‘Jesus of Nazareth’ being under Herod’s tetrarchate), and perhaps also in order to gain time
Apostles - On the way Philip encountered his friend Nathanael, who lived in the village of Cana, at no great distance from his own home at Bethsaida, and informed him of the discovery of the Messiah, in the person of Jesus of Nazareth. This new type of ministry was marked by a change of residence from Nazareth to Capernaum (Matthew 4:13)
Jesus Christ - Jesus of Nazareth was the Christ or Messiah promised under the Old Testament. But if Jesus of Nazareth was the Messiah, in that character his Deity also is necessarily involved, because the Messiah is surrounded with attributes of divinity in the Old Testament; and our Lord himself as certainly lays claim to those attributes as to the office of "the Christ
Paul (2) - The glorified Christ was none the less identical with the crucified Jesus of Nazareth. It was proof that Jesus of Nazareth, whose followers the Apostle in his blindness had persecuted, was no mere ambitious pretender, but all that His disciples believed Him to be—both Lord and Christ
Perfection (of Jesus) - How can we be sure that no stain ever touched the purity of His soul during all those buried years, silent for ever now in quiet Nazareth? (2) There is also the whole story of a man’s inward life; the dreams of the secret heart, the fancies cherished in the recesses of fond imagination, the converse which the soul holds with itself. It was felt at Nazareth when they took up stone to stone Him and He passed through their midst (Luke 4:30), and at Gethsemane when the soldiers fell back before the majesty of His bearing (John 18:6)
Lord - Jesus of Nazareth, ‘a man approved of God’ (v
Baptize, Baptism - Jesus never returned to the secluded life of Nazareth, but was "driven" by the Spirit into the wilderness, where his sonship was tested (Matthew 4:3,6 ) and his messianic work was prepared for
James - Clopas (Alexandrinus and Vaticanus manuscripts, John 19:25) or Cleophas (Sinaiticus manuscript) is the Hebrew, Alphaeus the Greek, of the same name: he married Mary, sister of the Virgin Mary, and had by her James, Joses, Jude, and Simon, and three daughters (Mary is sometimes designated "mother of James and Joses," Matthew 27:56, as these were the two oldest); he died before our Lord's ministry began, and his widow went to live with her sister the Virgin Mary, a widow also herself (for Joseph's name never occurs after Luke 2), at Nazareth (Matthew 13:55), Capernaum (John 2:12), and Jerusalem (Acts 1:14)
Matthew, the Gospel of - ...
Matthew 13:53-18:35 opens with the story of Jesus' teaching in the synagogue in Nazareth
Mark, Theology of - Jesus, the Son of God, is also a person from Nazareth (1:9,24; 10:47; 14:67; 16:6) who reacts with anger (3:5; 8:33; 10:14; 11:15-16), is disappointed (6:5-6; 9:19; 11:12-14), and not only dies (15:45) but is deeply disturbed at the inevitability of death (14:33-34) and its meaning (15:34)
Jews, Judaism - ...
The intertestamental period established the Jewish matrix into which Jesus of Nazareth was born at the turn of the era
Gestures - Corresponding with this gesture of Jesus is the keen ‘gaze’ or ‘fastening of the eyes’ which we read of in the case of the people of Nazareth (Luke 4:20), the maidservant (Luke 22:56), St
Eschatology - -The belief that Jesus of Nazareth was and is the Christ, and that His life fulfilled the Scriptural prophecies, is the central truth of the apostolic preaching (Acts 2:36; Acts 3:22; Acts 5:42; Acts 17:2 f
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - " And here are we tonight, and in this church, suddenly transported back into Mary's little kitchen in Nazareth, in order to learn there yet another of her Son's parables about the kingdom of God
Call, Calling - It is an irrelevant sentimentality that dwells too much on the ‘carpenter of Nazareth
Capernaum - 261) that down to the time of Constantine no one had ever dared to erect a church either at Nazareth or Capernaum, or at other places mentioned in the neighbourhood
Christian (the Name) - ’ Nor could the title have been coined by the Jews, who would never have admitted that Jesus of Nazareth was the ‘Christ
Common Life - For thirty years He lived the common life of a labouring man, working like any one of His brethren in the carpenter’s shop at Nazareth
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - NOT only in Jerusalem, and at the passover, but in Nazareth, and on days of release from labour, we may well believe that something like this would sometimes take place
the Ethiopian Eunuch - Thou must surely have heard the name of Jesus of Nazareth?' 'I did hear that name,' answered the eunuch
Night (2) - ’ ‘This freedom Jesus had from childhood’ in Nazareth, Capernaum, Bethany, and other resting-places
Simon Magus - Moreover, Justin's Simon could hardly have carried his doctrine of transmigration of souls to the point of pretending that it was he himself who had appeared as Jesus of Nazareth, unless he had been born after our Lord's death
Entry Into Jerusalem - there is a description of the commotion (ἐσείσθη) in the whole city; the question, ‘Who is this?’; the answer, ‘This is the prophet Jesus, he who is from Nazareth of Galilee,’ and the greeting, ‘Hosanna to the Son of David
Humanity of Christ - In His home in Nazareth He followed a life of obedience (Luke 2:51 ‘subject’)
Confession (of Christ) - And yet even this was a great thing—to see in the man of Nazareth the Messiah of prophecy and hope
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - THE Son of Man lived in obscurity in Nazareth till He began to be about thirty years of age, growing in wisdom every day, and every day saving to Himself-...
-What if EarthBe but the shadow of Heaven, and things thereinEach to other like more than on Earth is thought?And one day in His solitary and meditating walks He came on a field in which blades of tares were springing up among the blades of the wheat all over the field
Heman - No wonder that Jesus of Nazareth was often, even to His mother and His brethren, like a man that should be kept close watch over at home
Presence (2) - He gave up the workshop at Nazareth for the theatre of the world, because He knew Himself as God’s beloved Son (Luke 3:22; Luke 4:1; Luke 4:14)
Isaiah - ...
Luke (Luke 4:17) quotes Isaiah 61 as Isaiah's, the passage read by Jesus Christ in the Nazareth synagogue
Luke, Gospel According to - on the Baptist and on the Temptation, and also the genealogy, the miraculous draught of fishes, the anointing by the sinful woman, and some sayings (especially those at Nazareth) peculiar to himself
Abortion - The incarnation took place not in a Bethlehem stable but nine months earlier in Nazareth, as the Holy Spirit caused a virgin to conceive
Ethics - The priesthood meanwhile maintained the elaborate ritual of sacrifice and festivals; many common people worshiped at synagogues and sustained a simpler domestic pietyas at Nazareth
Miracle - , Jairus Matthew 15:29-39 ; and the hemorrhaging woman 9:22) or are hindered by their lack thereof (the disbelief in Nazareth Mark 6:4-6 a)
Philippians, Theology of - In this combined name he makes it clear to his friends at Philippi that the longed-for deliverer, the long-awaited Savior, the hope of ancient Israel and of the world, the Messiah, was Jesus of Nazareth
Gentiles - Luke’s account of our Lord’s discourse at Nazareth it is clear that His hearers understood the references to the ministries of Elijah and Elisha as pointing to the admission of Gentiles into the Kingdom (Luke 4:28)
Evolution (Christ And) - —The historical realization of this possibility of Incarnation in Jesus of Nazareth raises the further question of His place in a philosophy of history, and in Christian theology
Jeremiah - Those men of Cæsarea Philippi showed their own sensibility of soul when some said John the Baptist; some, Elias; but they would have it that Jesus of Nazareth was none other than Hilkiah's son, come back again with his broken heart
David - in His Races - Then pass on to far on in his life, and open the hundred and thirty-ninth psalm; and I am safe to say that David, the author of that psalm, and Jesus of Nazareth, whom I may call the finisher of it, have been the only two saints and sons of God on the face of this earth who have ever taken, up, understood, and imaginatively and unceasingly employed in their prayers that great believing psalm
Christ, Christology - John boldly claimed both roles for Jesus of Nazareth (John 1:3 ,John 1:3,1:18 ; John 14:6 ,John 14:6,14:9 )
Necessity - Matthew, Christ is born of a virgin at Bethlehem, is named Jesus, sojourns in Egypt, resides at Nazareth, migrates to Capernaum, heals the sick, speaks in parables, enters Jerusalem riding an ass, is deserted by the disciples, is betrayed and put to death, ‘that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the Lord through the prophet’ (ἵνα πληρωθῆ το ῥηθεν ὑτὸ τον Κυρίου διὰ τοῦ προφήτου λέγοντος, κ
Restoration - Upon that revelation in the actual Jesus of Nazareth, and upon their increasing sense of the infinite importance of the Christ who ever liveth, the Apostles found their thought and speculation, so far as these find place in their writings, regarding the larger and ultimate issues of redemption
Miracles - ( d ) While faith in the petitioner for, or recipient of, the act of healing was a condition Jesus seemingly required in all cases, while He was prevented doing His mighty works, as at Nazareth, by unbelief ( Matthew 13:58 ), while the exercise of His power was accompanied by prayer to God ( John 11:41-42 ), His healing acts were never tentative; there is in the records no trace of a failure
Gospel - our Lord’s discourse [2] in the synagogue of Nazareth concerning the glad tidings of His Mission, based on Isaiah 61:1)
Humility - His cradle in the manger at Bethlehem and His subjection in the home at Nazareth, His quiet entrance, at the hands of the Baptist, on public life, His restraint in the use of His supernatural powers, and His dislike of consequent honour and fame, His frequent periods of retirement, His choice of followers and friends, His sympathies with little children and humble suppliants (Mark 10:13-16; Mark 7:24-30), His appreciation of the smallest offering and the simplest service (Luke 21:1-4, Matthew 10:42), and, finally, His submission to the experiences concentrated in the week of His Passion and Crucifixion, all attest the consistency of His character as One who was ‘meek and lowly in heart,’ and who, at every step of His career, plainly and profoundly ‘humbled himself’ (Philippians 2:8)
Leprosy - They are as follows:—From Ramallah and ‘Ain Arîk, 3 cases each; from Zeta, Bait Ammar, Nahalîn, Saidna Ali, ed-Dîr, Deir Diwân, and Nazareth, 2 cases each; from Abu Dîs,’ Ain Kairem, Bîr Zait, Bait Ummar, Bait Jebrîn, Bettîr, Beita, Biddu, Bait Hanîna, Bait Jala, Bait Safafa, ‘Asîreh, Dûra, Jerusalem, Feddar, Yasîneh, ‘Allâr, Mesar‘a, Fara‘un, Marassa, Kefrenji, Kefr Akâb, Kefr Hâris, Shafât, es-Salt, and Jummain, 1 each
Christ, Christology - Nahum 1:15), proceeds to remind his hearers of something already familiar to them-the ministry of ‘Jesus the one from Nazareth,’ which began from Galilee after the baptism proclaimed by John
Doctrines - And although, when He received the first disciples, John and Andrew, Peter, Nathanael and Philip, He accepted their confession that in Him they had found the Messiah (John 1:41-51), it was in but few cases that He declared Himself in so many words to be the Christ of God; as, for example, in that of His conversation with the woman of Samaria (John 4:26); again when He declared to His townsmen in Nazareth that Isaiah’s prophecy of the Messiah as the great preacher and healer was fulfilled in Himself (Luke 4:21); and again when He answered the doubting question of the Baptist, ‘Art thou he that should come, or do we look for another?’, by pointing to the testimony of His teaching and of His works of mercy (Matthew 11:2-6 || Luke 7:19-23)
Property (2) - He laboured as a carpenter in Nazareth (Mark 6:3, cf
Death of Christ - " Luke (4:29) tells of an attempt on Jesus' life made in Nazareth in what appears to have been a very early stage in his ministry
Synagogue - The Gospels mention the synagogues of Capernaum (Mark 1:21 and ||s) and Nazareth (Luke 4:16 and ||) wherein Jesus taught
Synagogue (2) - Mention is made in the Gospels of those at Nazareth (Matthew 13:54, Mark 6:2, Luke 4:16) and at Capernanm (Mark 1:21, Luke 7:5, John 6:59)
Metaphor - We still have the familiar conceptions drawn from everyday life-sowing, reaping, and harvest, animals and birds, the seasons, light and darkness, life and death-but as the scene shifts from the hillsides of Nazareth and the streets of Jerusalem to the busy cities of the Graeco-Roman world with their ceaseless and varied activity, there are many phrases and metaphors in the Acts, the Epistles, and the Apocalypse which could hardly have fallen from the lips of our Lord Himself
Sin (2) - Fundamentally this is the appeal to personal experience, and it is clear from the Epistle to the Romans, as from the whole Pauline theology, that the Apostle is universalizing his own experience, as he saw himself in the light of the vision of Jesus of Nazareth (Galatians 1:11-17, Romans 7:7-25)
Conscience - Paul himself once believed it to be his duty ‘to do many things contrary to the name of Jesus of Nazareth’ (Acts 26:9)
Brethren of the Lord (2) - The present passage seems to indicate that they were married, and resided at Nazareth
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - In the Lutheran field of vision stands the figure of the Divine, omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent Christ, upon which the humanity hangs like a thin transparent garment; while, for the Reformed Church, the human Jesus of Nazareth stands in the foreground, and the Divinity lies in the background of faith, constituting a union with the human Jesus that is beyond comprehension
Religious Experience - ’ Nathaniel Schmidt (Prophet of Nazareth, 1905) also makes a suggestive admission when he says that, while Jesus never claimed to be the Messiah, yet all the hopes of OT prophets embodied in King, Redeemer, and Divine Manifestation were more than fulfilled in Him; and although He never, probably, claimed to forgive sins, yet He could forgive them, and historically He has actually been the Saviour of the world, and is saving men yet (pp
James And John, the Sons of Zebedee - Luke in his Gospel places the incident later, after his record of events at Nazareth and Capernaum
Baptism - Would they begin to proselyte persons to their religion by baptism in imitation of the disciples of Jesus of Nazareth, whom they held accursed? And yet if this proselyte baptism were adopted by the Jews since the time of Christ, it must have been a mere innovation in imitation of Christians, which is not very likely
Humility - His cradle in the manger at Bethlehem and His subjection in the home at Nazareth, His quiet entrance, at the hands of the Baptist, on public life, His restraint in the use of His supernatural powers, and His dislike of consequent honour and fame, His frequent periods of retirement, His choice of followers and friends, His sympathies with little children and humble suppliants (Mark 10:13-16; Mark 7:24-30), His appreciation of the smallest offering and the simplest service (Luke 21:1-4, Matthew 10:42), and, finally, His submission to the experiences concentrated in the week of His Passion and Crucifixion, all attest the consistency of His character as One who was ‘meek and lowly in heart,’ and who, at every step of His career, plainly and profoundly ‘humbled himself’ (Philippians 2:8)
Offence (2) - —When Jesus visited Nazareth, and taught in the synagogue so that all were astonished, astonishment soon passed into a kind of carping criticism
Biblical Theology - ...
In Jesus of Nazareth God's deliverance and fulfillment arrive
Religion (2) - Unlearned men, the weak and foolish of this world, have more than held their own in the name of Jesus of Nazareth (Acts 4, cf
Trial of Jesus - Réville (Jésus de Nazareth, ii
Gospels (2) - ’...
It cannot be denied, however, that the language of the heavenly vision (Acts 26:14), ‘It is hard for thee to kick against the goad,’ points most naturally to a long previous struggle between prejudices inborn and trained and the strange attractiveness of Jesus of Nazareth, whose glorious deeds and gracious words may have become known to the young Pharisee when he first arrived in Jerusalem from Tarsus
John the Baptist - ), that when the Man from Nazareth presented Himself at the Jordan, John declined at first to baptize Him, on the ground of his own unworthiness in comparison
Mediator - ...
(a) The ‘wisdom’ of our Lord impressed His hearers at Nazareth, and when they were offended at the difference which they noted between Him and His humble family, Jesus said, ‘A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house’ (Matthew 13:54-58)
Faith - Paul’s experience on the way to Damascus when he was convinced of the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus of Nazareth became the dominant factor in all his life, and led to his abandonment of allegiance to law and to the strenuous vindication of the place of faith in the religious life
Palesti'na - Eastward of these hills rises the round mass of Tabor dark with its copses of oak, and set on by contrast with the bare slopes of Jebel ed-Duhy (the so called "Little Hermon") and the white hills of Nazareth
Faith - Paul’s experience on the way to Damascus when he was convinced of the Messiahship and Lordship of Jesus of Nazareth became the dominant factor in all his life, and led to his abandonment of allegiance to law and to the strenuous vindication of the place of faith in the religious life
Samaria, Samaritans - At a still later period we find the Jews excluding the Samaritans, as also Christians and pagans, from Capernaum, Nazareth, and Sepphoris (Epiphanius, adv
Sea of Galilee - The termination in Gennesaret might then be regarded as the Aramaic determinative form, and compared with Nazareth from Nazara
Gospels - John 1:14 ), the Birth of our Lord (it is assumed that the answer to the objection that Christ could not come from Nazareth is well known, John 1:46 , John 7:41 ; John 7:52 ), the Ascension (cf
John Epistles of - And it is probable that in the development of christological thought theories of pure Docetism are a later stage than the assumption of a temporary connexion between a Heavenly Power and the real manhood of Jesus of Nazareth (cf
Dates (2) - ‘Marriage’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible), and it was quite possible for Him and His disciples to have accomplished the journey from the vicinity of Jericho to Nazareth (about 60 miles) in three or four days; so that there is no necessity to select a site for His baptism within one day’s journey of Cana
Divinity of Christ - ’ It seeks by a study of the original records in the light of all the historical and critical aids now open to us, and guided by the modern idea of evolution, not only to bring us face to face with Jesus of Nazareth, to listen to His direct words of wisdom, but to trace all the steps of His spiritual advance, all the steps by which He grew into the Messiah of Israel and the Ideal of humanity, giving the deepest interpretation to the prophetic dream of His nation, and so lifting it into that higher region in which the freely accepted Cross became the necessary means to the deliverance of man
Poet - There is the outburst on the occasion of His first appearance in the synagogue of Nazareth, with the memories of thirty years behind the exhilaration
Prophet - As soon as He became known, the general judgment was pronounced that ‘a great prophet had arisen, and that God had visited his people’ (Luke 7:16); and when at the close of His ministry He allowed the populace openly to express their feelings regarding Him, they, in answer to the question ‘Who is this?’ replied, ‘This is Jesus, the prophet of Nazareth’ (Matthew 21:11; also Mark 6:15, Matthew 21:46, Luke 24:19, John 4:19; John 6:14; John 7:40; John 9:17)
John, Gospel of (Critical) - thought, but with the historic fact of the consciousness of Jesus of Nazareth
Incarnation (2) - Illustrative passages: (1) the Baptism, (2) the sermon at Nazareth, (3) the reply to John the Baptist, (4) the estimate of John the Baptist, (5) the threefold call of the disciples, (6) the answer to Peter, (7) later or more explicit announcements
Christ in Jewish Literature - ...
The question has often been raised whether there is any mention at all, in the Talmud, of the historical Jesus of Nazareth