What does Nabal mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
נָבָ֔ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 4
נָבָ֖ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 4
נָבָ֗ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 2
נָבָ֣ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 2
נָבָ֥ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 2
נָבָ֛ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
נָבָ֜ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
כְנָבָל֙ a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
לְנָבָ֛ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
נָבָ֡ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
נָבָל֙ a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
מִנָּבָ֔ל a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1
נָבָל֒ a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers 1

Definitions Related to Nabal

H5037


   1 a man of Carmel who spurned David’s messengers, then died of shock when he realised it might cause his death; his case was pleaded by his wife Abigail who became David’s wife after his death.
   Additional Information: Nabhal or Nabal = “fool”.
   

Frequency of Nabal (original languages)

Frequency of Nabal (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Nabal
Nabal (nâ'bal), foolish, impious. A man of the house of Caleb, who had large possessions in Carmel. He treated David very churlishly, and was saved from the disastrous consequence by his wife Abigail, whom David married after Nabal's death. 1 Samuel 25:1-44; 1 Samuel 27:8; 1 Samuel 30:5; 2 Samuel 2:2; 2 Samuel 3:3.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Nabal
Foolish, a descendant of Caleb who dwelt at Maon (1 Samuel 25 ), the modern Main, 7 miles south-east of Hebron. He was "very great, and he had 3,000 sheep and 1,000 goats...but the man was churlish and evil in his doings." During his wanderings David came into that district, and hearing that Nabal was about to shear his sheep, he sent ten of his young men to ask "whatsoever cometh unto thy hand for thy servants." Nabal insultingly resented the demand, saying, "Who is David, and who is the son of Jesse?" (1 Samuel 25:10,11 ). One of the shepherds that stood by and saw the reception David's messengers had met with, informed Abigail, Nabal's wife, who at once realized the danger that threatened her household. She forthwith proceeded to the camp of David, bringing with her ample stores of provisions (25:18). She so courteously and persuasively pled her cause that David's anger was appeased, and he said to her, "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel which sent thee this day to meet me." On her return she found her husband incapable from drunkenness of understanding the state of matters, and not till the following day did she explain to him what had happened. He was stunned by a sense of the danger to which his conduct had exposed him. "His heart died within him, and he became as a stone." and about ten days after "the Lord smote Nabal that he died" (1 Samuel 25:37,38 ). Not long after David married Abigail (q.v.).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Nabal
Of Maon. (See MAON.); 1 Samuel 25, compare 1 Samuel 23:25. (See DAVID.) A sheepmaster on the border of Judah which took its name from the great "Caleb" (3) (1 Samuel 30:14), next the wilderness. His history, as also that of Boaz, Barzillai, Naboth, is a sample of a Jew's private life (1 Samuel 25:2; 1 Samuel 25:4; 1 Samuel 25:36).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Nabal
NABAL. A wealthy but churlish sheep-owner ‘in Maon, whose business was in Carmel’ ( 1 Samuel 25:2 RVm [1] ). David, while living as an outlaw and freebooter, demanded at Nabal’s sheepshearing his reward for defending his flocks ( 1 Samuel 25:5 ff.). Nabal, inflamed with wine, returned an insolent answer, and David was prevented from wreaking terrible vengeance only by the timely arrival of Abigail, Nabal’s wife, with large gifts and abundant flattery. The word Nabal means ‘fool,’ and Abigail, with wifely candour, says to David, ‘Fool is his name and fool is he.’ The next day Nabal was informed of all that had happened, and the shock of discovery brought on an apoplectic seizure, which caused his death. Abigail then became David’s wife.
W. F. Boyd.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Nabal
(nay' bal) name meaning, “fool” or “rude, ill-bred.” See Abigail .
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Nabal
1 Samuel 25:25 (c) We take this to be a type of the foolish man who is so in love with his sins that he has no time for GOD's message, GOD's messenger, nor GOD's ministry.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Nabal
A wealthy man in Maon, husband of Abigail. His shepherds and his flocks had been protected in the wilderness by David and his followers. David, therefore, during the sheep-shearing festivities, sent to greet Nabal and to ask for a share of his abundance — anything he liked to send him. Nabal, however, railed on David's men and refused to give them anything. He had no faith to discern in David the anointed of Jehovah. Abigail hastened to appease David's wrath. David accepted her person and her present, and left Nabal in God's hands. The next morning, when Abigail told him the danger he had escaped, his heart died within him. After about ten days God smote him and he died. Thus did God avenge the insult given to His servant when in rejection, and saved him from avenging himself. 1 Samuel 25:3-39 .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Nabal
Fool; senseless
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Nabal
THE MAN WAS CHURLISH
WE see Nabal on two occasions only. On the occasion of the sheep-shearing ten days before his marriage, and then on the occasion of the sheep-shearing ten days before his death. Had David been in the wilderness of Paran at that sunny sheep-shearing immediately before Nabal's marriage, and had he asked for the crumbs that fell from the bridegroom's table, David would have been set in the place of honour at the smiling sheep-master's right hand. All that happy time when their master went out to the sheep-folds, he said to the sheep-shearers, The Lord be with you. And they answered him, The Lord bless thee. The-Joy-of-her-father,-for that was the name of the sheep-master's beautiful bride,-was also the joy of her bridegroom, till he sent two hundred loaves of bread, and two bottles of wine, and five sheep ready dressed, and five measures of parched corn, and an hundred clusters of raisins, and two hundred cakes of figs to Adullam, so that every one that was in distress, and every one that was in debt, and every one that was discontented, ate and drank and said, Let the God of Abraham and Sarah, and Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Rachel be the God of that great man in Maon and Abigail his bride. 'The Lord make the woman that is come into his house like Rachel, and like Leah, which two did build the house of Israel.' And because of the blessing of all the poor and needy round about, and because of the beauty and the good understanding of Abigail, her husband was the happiest and the most open-handed man that day among all the men in Maon. And the man was very great, and he had three thousand sheep and a thousand goats, and he was shearing his sheep in Carmel.
The Bible has a way of its own of taking great leaps sometimes over long spaces of some men's lives. And thus it is that the next time we see Abigail's bridegroom we would not know him. And we are left of the sacred writer to compose the whole married life of Nabal and Abigail out of our own married lives. And the Bible, with great safety and great assurance, leaves us to do that. Because it knows that as face answers to face in water, so do betrothed, and married, and churlish lives in ancient Israel, answer to married and churlish lives among ourselves.
The second sheep-shearing scene is set before us in a chapter of great pictorial power. With quite extraordinary concentration and strength, Nabal and Abigail are made to stand out before us in their great pictorial chapter. Abigail is still a woman of a good understanding. But Matthew Henry says that her understanding was all little enough for her exercises in it, for the man was churlish and evil in his doings. Abigail to all appearances is the same woman she was at the first sheep-shearing, but her husband has sadly gone down. It was the season of the year when the most churlish of men were wont to melt for the moment into hospitality and self-enjoyment, and even Nabal held a feast in his house. David and his six hundred men were lying in exile in the adjoining wilderness. Persecuted and cast out as David and his men were, they never forgot that they were men of Israel; and up among the mountains, and out on the borders, they were a kind of volunteer protectors and patrolling police over the flocks and herds of men like Nabal. As a matter of fact, David had interposed again and again, and been a wall, as Nabal's shepherds themselves said, round them and their sheep against the sheep-stealing tribes. The starving exiles had looked for some reward for their work; but Nabal was Nabal. Till sheer famine made David send to Nabal's feast and ask a share of his hospitality to 'thy son David,' as he called himself in his courteous but bold message. But Nabal's softness of heart over his sheep-shearing was only skin-deep. 'Who is David,' Nabal snapped out, 'that I should share my feast with him and his vagabonds?' And no sooner did David hear Nabal's churlish and insulting answer than he said, and it was all he said, 'Gird ye on every man his sword.' But, as good providence would have it, Abigail had heard both of David's embassy and of her husband's churlish answer, and she lost not a moment. Sending on before her a present of meat and drink, she hastened after it, and met David and his four hundred men just in time. How Abigail behaved herself before the insulted and revengeful soldiers; with what tact and understanding she spake to David; and how she melted David and turned away his hot anger-all that we read in the matter and the manner of this sacred writer. And, then, in two verses of crowning strength of style we have Nabal's drunken debauch all night, and his sudden death of fear and hate and hardness of heart in the morning.
'Nabal was of the house of Caleb.' But there is a Latin proverb to this effect, that to be the son of a good father is the shame of a bad son. Now, Caleb was a good father. Caleb was a large-hearted, hopeful, God-serving man. And Caleb and his house held their large estates in the land of Israel on that tenure. The family property was a witness to their father's great services in a dark day in Israel. Caleb lived to a green old age, crowned with all the love and honour that Nabal had by this time wholly lost. By his birth Nabal had come into great possessions in Carmel; and, as if to make him a man like his father-as if to keep his heart soft and full of love to God and man,-God had added to all that a wife who shines high up among the household saints of the house of Israel. But, all the time, Caleb and Abigail, great inheritance and great dowry, happy home, and all, there was a 'stone of obstination' in Nabal's heart that nothing could melt or remove, till his whole heart was turned to stone and he died.
'Our master flew at David's messengers,' reported the young man to Abigail. 'He railed on them,' as we excellently read it in the text. He snarled and snapped at them, as Josephus so graphically has it. You see the man. You know the man. Your young men know the man. Your wife knows the man. Your children know the man, 'Who is David? And who is the son of Jesse? There be many servants nowadays that break away every man from his master.' It is a glass, this chapter, in which we all see our churlish selves to the life. Who is he? we demand, with all the contempt and scorn we can call up out of our contemptuous and scornful hearts. Who is he to speak to me and to treat me in that way? And we go on to put the worst construction upon him, and upon his family, and upon his friends. A parcel of vagabonds! snarled out Nabal. And how much of our own speaking and writing about people we do not like is exactly like that churlish outbreak of Nabal. And what mischief Nabal's tongue and pen work among us also! Nothing roots our wicked hearts deeper into our whole life and character than a snarling tongue or a railing pen let loose. And nothing puts David and his men into a more wicked and murderous temper than to be railed at as Nabal railed. Do not do it. Do not listen to it. Do not read it. It is the death of your heart to speak it and to hear it. When you speak it your conversation is in hell; and when you write or read it, it is the literature of hell. It kindles hell in him who is railed at, and it spreads, and it feeds hell in him who writes it, or reads it, or speaks it. Nabal's railing tongue kindled such an outburst of murderous hate in David and in his men that, another half hour and it would have been put out in Nabal's blood.
'The man was churlish,' says this shorthand writer, giving us Nabal's whole character in a single word. That is to say, Nabal had allowed and indulged himself in his snarling, snappish ways till he was known in his own house, among his shepherds, and all round about, as Nabal the churl. 'A devil at home' is one of the sure marks of Thomas Shepard's 'evangelical hypocrite. He shines like an angel in the church. Christ and mercy are never out of his mouth. He is much to be heard on closing with Christ. He is raised up to heaven with liberty and joy on Sabbath, and especially on communion days. But he is a devil at home.' Whereas we find that 'hyperbole of sin,' Lancelot Andrewes, on his knees night and day, 'to be kind to mine own.' And you will remember that other portrait of the same family in John Bunyan. Obstinate also gave a great sheep-shearing feast before his marriage. And his bride also led her bridegroom to church and market in a silken bridle-for a time. But time passes, and there passes away with time all the hospitality, humility, pliability, and sweetness of the churlish and obstinate man. It is not that he has ceased to love his wife and his children. It is not that. But there is this in all genuine and inbred churlishness and obstinacy, that, after a time, it comes out worst beside those we love best. A man will be affable, accessible, entertaining, the best of company, and the very soul of it abroad, and, then, the instant he turns the latch-key in his own door, Nabal himself was not worse, he sinks back into such an utter boorishness, and mulishness, and doggedness. He swallows his meal in silence, and then he sits all night with a cloud on his brow. He is silent to no children but his own; he is a bear to nobody but his own wife. Nothing pleases him; nothing in his own house is to his mind. And all the time it is not that he does not pray to love his own, like Andrewes; but there is a law of obstinacy in his heart that still makes him a devil at home. And then hear Christiana: 'That which troubleth me most is my churlish carriages to my husband when he was in his distress. I am that woman that was so hard-hearted. And so guilt took hold of my mind, and would have drawn me to the pond.' Yes, constant fault-finding; constant correction, and that before strangers; gloomy looks; rough words and manners; all blame and no praise-with these things we are all driving one another to the brink of the pond every day.
'And it came to pass in the morning, when the wine was gone out of Nabal, and his wife had told him all these things, that his heart died within him, and he became as a stone.' Nabal died of a stone in his heart. Nabal died of pride and rage. Nabal died of a strange disease-indebtedness to his wife. Nabal would rather have died of David's sword than have been saved from David's sword by the understanding and the interposition and the intercession of his wife. Nabal died rather than admit that he had played the fool through all that sheep-shearing time. Had Nabal kissed Abigail that morning; had he kissed her hand; had he kissed her feet; he would have been living to this day; and when he died like a shock of corn fully ripe, all Israel would have mourned that they had lost him, and David would have sung a psalm over him that we would have put upon the tombstones of all our magnanimous and much-lamented men. As it was, it became a proverb in Israel to ask when a madman, or a man possessed with a devil, or a man who took his own life, died, Died he as Nabal died? Take care, O churlish husband! Take care, O man with a heart of stone beginning in thy bosom. For Satan is fast entering into thee. Take care.
But, now, can such churlishness be cured? Can it really be cured? some of you who have that cruel stone for long spreading in your hearts will ask me. Yes, it can, if it is taken in time, and if it is treated in the right way. And the first thing in the cure is to admit and accept the disease. It is to say, I am Nabal. Had Nabal taken it to heart how it would end, as soon as he felt the tenderness, and the honourableness, and the nobleness, and the manliness of his betrothal and bridegroom days beginning to wear off his heart and his life; had he been man enough, and man of God enough, and husband enough to watch and know the stopping of his heart and the creeping-on coldness of his heart to God and man, and especially to Abigail; and had he confessed to himself his fears how all that would end, it would all have ended the entire opposite of how it did end. Had he been thankful also. Had he practised himself in going back upon Caleb and the inheritance he had got because of Caleb; had he taken his flocks and his herds, and all that he had, every sheep-shearing time, again from the hand of God; had he every night and every morning taken Abigail in all her understanding and all her beauty again from the hand of God; and had he prevented David's petition and sent him a share of the sheep-shearing feast before he asked for it-by all that, Nabal would have made himself a new heart, and he would have come down to us in as good a report as any of the elders of Israel. Kick, then, the dog out of your heart. Hammer the stone out of your heart, and you will get back the days of your first sheep-shearing; you will get back your bride, and your own tender, hopeful, noble, manful heart. But the one, the only real and sure cure for all our New Testament Nabals is that supreme antidote and counter-poison to all churlishness, the cross of Christ. Whatever we start with, we always end with the cross of Christ. Try it, for it cures everything, and especially churlishness and all its bad effects. It cures churlishness in Nabal; and impatience, and weariness, and despair of life in Abigail; and anger and revenge in David. Come near to the cross, both Nabal, and David, and Abigail, and look and hear. Hear those churlish men as they pass by and wag their heads, and rail at David's Son cast out upon the cross from among men, while, all the time, He dies to save and bless them. Great Example! Great Refuge and Great Strength to us all! The Butt, the Jest, the Scoff, the Flout of all who pass by! We come to Thee. We need Thee. We have no cure for our hearts, and no pardon for our hearts but Thee. Churls, and churls' victims, we come to Thee. Railing and railed at, we come to Thee. Nabal, and David, and Abigail, and the shepherds, and the soldiers, we all come to Thee. We hang by our hands and our feet and our hearts beside Thee. We forgive all those who revile us, and buffet us, and despitefully use us beside Thee. We die, and are buried, and rise again, and sit beside Thee. Finally, be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of another, love as brethren, be pitiful, be courteous. Not rendering evil for evil, or railing for railing, but contrariwise blessing; knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye should inherit a blessing.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Nabal
The Carmelite. We have his history, 1 Samuel 25:1-44. His name is very expressive, and signifies fool.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Nabal
Foolish, a descendant of Caleb, owner of a large property in lands and flocks, at Maon and Carmel in the south of Judah. He was under great obligations to David, for protecting him from the robbers of the desert; and yet, in the very hour most suggestive of a grateful generosity, he churlishly refused David's modest request of provisions for his needy troop. Indignant at this ingratitude and inhospitality, David was soon on his way to put him and his men to the sword. Happily, the discreet intervention of Abigail averted this catastrophe. Ten days after, the lord smote him, and he died, 1 Samuel 25:1-43 . See ABIGAIL .

Sentence search

Abigail - (9th century BCE) Appeased David after her husband Nabal had angered him, stopping David from killing Nabal. After Nabal's death, David married Abigail
Nabal - Nabal. David, while living as an outlaw and freebooter, demanded at Nabal’s sheepshearing his reward for defending his flocks ( 1 Samuel 25:5 ff. Nabal, inflamed with wine, returned an insolent answer, and David was prevented from wreaking terrible vengeance only by the timely arrival of Abigail, Nabal’s wife, with large gifts and abundant flattery. The word Nabal means ‘fool,’ and Abigail, with wifely candour, says to David, ‘Fool is his name and fool is he. ’ The next day Nabal was informed of all that had happened, and the shock of discovery brought on an apoplectic seizure, which caused his death
Abigail - The better known of the two is the wife of the foolish farmer, Nabal. Nabal almost brought disaster upon his household by his insulting refusal to supply David and his men with food in return for their service in protecting his farmlands against the raiding Philistines. ...
When Nabal unexpectedly died, David married Abigail (1 Samuel 25:39-42)
ab'Igail -
The beautiful wife of Nabal, a wealthy owner of goats and sheep in Carmel. ) When David's messengers were slighted by Nabal, Abigail supplies David and his followers with provisions, and succeeded in appeasing his anger. The days after this Nabal died, and David sent for Abigail and made her his wife
Abigail - The beautiful wife of Nabal, a wealthy owner of goats and sheep in Carmel. When David's messengers were slighted by Nabal, Abigail supplied David and his followers with provisions, and succeeded in appeasing his anger. Ten days after this Nabal died, and David sent for Abigail and made her his wife
Nabal - David, therefore, during the sheep-shearing festivities, sent to greet Nabal and to ask for a share of his abundance — anything he liked to send him. Nabal, however, railed on David's men and refused to give them anything. David accepted her person and her present, and left Nabal in God's hands
Chileab - The second son of David by Abigail, the widow of Nabal the Carmelite ( 2 Samuel 3:3 )
Abigail - Wife of David after being wife of Nabal. She was praised for wisdom in contrast to Nabal, her arrogant and overbearing husband, who was a large landowner and successful shepherd. Nabal held a feast for his sheep shearers while David was hiding from Saul in the wilderness of Paran. He heard about Nabal's feast and requested some food. Nabal, in a drunken state, refused the request and insulted David's ten messengers. In anger, David determined to kill all of Nabal's household. After Nabal became sober and heard about David's plans to kill him, he had a heart attack. Following Nabal's death, David married Abigail, the second of his eight wives
Muth-Labben - Labben is an anagram for Nabal ("the fool" or wicked); "concerning the dying (muth ) of the fool," as Psalms 9:12; Psalms 9:16-17, "Thou hast destroyed the wicked, Thou hast put out their name forever and ever. Saul slain by the Philistines by whom he had sought to slay David, and receiving the last thrust from one of the Amalekites whom he ought to have destroyed, and Nabal ("fool") dying after his selfish surfeit when churlishly he had refused aught to David's men who had guarded him and his, are instances of the death of such world-wise "fools" (1 Samuel 25:26; 1 Samuel 25:38; 2 Samuel 3:33; Psalms 14:1). (See Nabal
Hezrai - " Once perhaps an adherent of Nabal (1 Chronicles 11:37)
Maon - A town in the edge of the hill-country of Judah, Joshua 15:55 , near which Nabal lived and David took refuge from Saul, 1 Samuel 23:24 - 25 ; 25:2
Nabal - THE MAN WAS CHURLISH...
WE see Nabal on two occasions only. Had David been in the wilderness of Paran at that sunny sheep-shearing immediately before Nabal's marriage, and had he asked for the crumbs that fell from the bridegroom's table, David would have been set in the place of honour at the smiling sheep-master's right hand. And we are left of the sacred writer to compose the whole married life of Nabal and Abigail out of our own married lives. With quite extraordinary concentration and strength, Nabal and Abigail are made to stand out before us in their great pictorial chapter. It was the season of the year when the most churlish of men were wont to melt for the moment into hospitality and self-enjoyment, and even Nabal held a feast in his house. Persecuted and cast out as David and his men were, they never forgot that they were men of Israel; and up among the mountains, and out on the borders, they were a kind of volunteer protectors and patrolling police over the flocks and herds of men like Nabal. As a matter of fact, David had interposed again and again, and been a wall, as Nabal's shepherds themselves said, round them and their sheep against the sheep-stealing tribes. The starving exiles had looked for some reward for their work; but Nabal was Nabal. Till sheer famine made David send to Nabal's feast and ask a share of his hospitality to 'thy son David,' as he called himself in his courteous but bold message. But Nabal's softness of heart over his sheep-shearing was only skin-deep. 'Who is David,' Nabal snapped out, 'that I should share my feast with him and his vagabonds?' And no sooner did David hear Nabal's churlish and insulting answer than he said, and it was all he said, 'Gird ye on every man his sword. And, then, in two verses of crowning strength of style we have Nabal's drunken debauch all night, and his sudden death of fear and hate and hardness of heart in the morning. ...
'Nabal was of the house of Caleb. Caleb lived to a green old age, crowned with all the love and honour that Nabal had by this time wholly lost. By his birth Nabal had come into great possessions in Carmel; and, as if to make him a man like his father-as if to keep his heart soft and full of love to God and man,-God had added to all that a wife who shines high up among the household saints of the house of Israel. But, all the time, Caleb and Abigail, great inheritance and great dowry, happy home, and all, there was a 'stone of obstination' in Nabal's heart that nothing could melt or remove, till his whole heart was turned to stone and he died. A parcel of vagabonds! snarled out Nabal. And how much of our own speaking and writing about people we do not like is exactly like that churlish outbreak of Nabal. And what mischief Nabal's tongue and pen work among us also! Nothing roots our wicked hearts deeper into our whole life and character than a snarling tongue or a railing pen let loose. And nothing puts David and his men into a more wicked and murderous temper than to be railed at as Nabal railed. Nabal's railing tongue kindled such an outburst of murderous hate in David and in his men that, another half hour and it would have been put out in Nabal's blood. ...
'The man was churlish,' says this shorthand writer, giving us Nabal's whole character in a single word. That is to say, Nabal had allowed and indulged himself in his snarling, snappish ways till he was known in his own house, among his shepherds, and all round about, as Nabal the churl. A man will be affable, accessible, entertaining, the best of company, and the very soul of it abroad, and, then, the instant he turns the latch-key in his own door, Nabal himself was not worse, he sinks back into such an utter boorishness, and mulishness, and doggedness. ...
'And it came to pass in the morning, when the wine was gone out of Nabal, and his wife had told him all these things, that his heart died within him, and he became as a stone. ' Nabal died of a stone in his heart. Nabal died of pride and rage. Nabal died of a strange disease-indebtedness to his wife. Nabal would rather have died of David's sword than have been saved from David's sword by the understanding and the interposition and the intercession of his wife. Nabal died rather than admit that he had played the fool through all that sheep-shearing time. Had Nabal kissed Abigail that morning; had he kissed her hand; had he kissed her feet; he would have been living to this day; and when he died like a shock of corn fully ripe, all Israel would have mourned that they had lost him, and David would have sung a psalm over him that we would have put upon the tombstones of all our magnanimous and much-lamented men. As it was, it became a proverb in Israel to ask when a madman, or a man possessed with a devil, or a man who took his own life, died, Died he as Nabal died? Take care, O churlish husband! Take care, O man with a heart of stone beginning in thy bosom. It is to say, I am Nabal. Had Nabal taken it to heart how it would end, as soon as he felt the tenderness, and the honourableness, and the nobleness, and the manliness of his betrothal and bridegroom days beginning to wear off his heart and his life; had he been man enough, and man of God enough, and husband enough to watch and know the stopping of his heart and the creeping-on coldness of his heart to God and man, and especially to Abigail; and had he confessed to himself his fears how all that would end, it would all have ended the entire opposite of how it did end. Had he practised himself in going back upon Caleb and the inheritance he had got because of Caleb; had he taken his flocks and his herds, and all that he had, every sheep-shearing time, again from the hand of God; had he every night and every morning taken Abigail in all her understanding and all her beauty again from the hand of God; and had he prevented David's petition and sent him a share of the sheep-shearing feast before he asked for it-by all that, Nabal would have made himself a new heart, and he would have come down to us in as good a report as any of the elders of Israel. But the one, the only real and sure cure for all our New Testament Nabals is that supreme antidote and counter-poison to all churlishness, the cross of Christ. It cures churlishness in Nabal; and impatience, and weariness, and despair of life in Abigail; and anger and revenge in David. Come near to the cross, both Nabal, and David, and Abigail, and look and hear. Nabal, and David, and Abigail, and the shepherds, and the soldiers, we all come to Thee
Muth-Labben - It may be either upon the death ( muth ) of the fool ( labben ), as an anagram on Nabal or as Gesenius, "to be chanted by boys with virgins' voices," i
Carmel - There are two different places of this name in Scripture; Mount Carmel, near the brook Kishon; and Carmel, a city of Judah, where Nabal dwelt
Nabal - " During his wanderings David came into that district, and hearing that Nabal was about to shear his sheep, he sent ten of his young men to ask "whatsoever cometh unto thy hand for thy servants. " Nabal insultingly resented the demand, saying, "Who is David, and who is the son of Jesse?" (1 Samuel 25:10,11 ). One of the shepherds that stood by and saw the reception David's messengers had met with, informed Abigail, Nabal's wife, who at once realized the danger that threatened her household. " and about ten days after "the Lord smote Nabal that he died" (1 Samuel 25:37,38 )
Nabal - Nabal (nâ'bal), foolish, impious. He treated David very churlishly, and was saved from the disastrous consequence by his wife Abigail, whom David married after Nabal's death
Maon - Joshua 15:55, and a district where David hid from Saul, and near which Nabal had possessions
na'Bal - (1 Samuel 25:2,4 ; 36 ) It was on one of these occasions that ten youths from the chief of the freebooters approached Nabal, enumerated the services of their master, and ended by claiming, with a mixture of courtesy and defiance characteristic of the East, "whatsoever cometh into thy hand for thy servants and for thy son David. To Nabal himself they durst not speak. Nabal was then at the height of his orgies and his wife dared not communicate to him either his danger or his escape. Ten days he lingered "and the Lord smote Nabal, and he died
Maon - Here David hid from Saul, and here Nabal had his possessions and his home (1 Samuel 23:24,25 ; 25:2 ). Are they the remains of Nabal's great establishment?" The hill is now called Tell M'ain
Abigail, - Wife of Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:14 )
Maon - Nabal, who foolishly refused hospitality to David, was a resident of Maon (1 Samuel 25:2 )
Abigail - Formerly the wife of Nabal of Carmel, and afterwards of David. Upon receiving information of Nabal's ingratitude to David, 1 Samuel 25:14 , she loaded several asses with provisions, and attended by some of here domestics went out to meet him. Her manners and conversation gained for her his esteem, and as soon as the days of mourning for Nabal's death, which happened soon afterwards, were over, he made her his wife
Abigail - ...
The wife of the churlish Nabal, who dwelt in the district of Carmel (1Samuel 25:3). " After Nabal's death she became the wife of David (1Samuel 25:14-42), and was his companion in all his future fortunes (1Samuel 27:3; 30:5; 2 Samuel 2:2 )
Abigail - The Carmelitess who became the wife of David after the death of her churlish husband Nabal
Abigail - The churl Nabal's beautiful wife, of Carmel. Taking on herself the blame of Nabal's insult to David's messengers, she promptly, and with a discreet woman's tact, averted David's just anger by liberally supplying the wants of his forces, and by deprecating in person at his feet the shedding of blood in vengeance. God did "plead His cause" against Nabal: compare the undesigned coincidence of phrase between the history and the independent psalm, a proof of genuineness: Psalms 35:1; Psalms 7:16; Psalms 17:4; Psalms 14:1 with 1 Samuel 25:25; 1 Samuel 25:36-38 with Luke 12:19-21; 1 Samuel 25:29; the image of a "sling, slinging out the souls of the enemy" with 1 Samuel 17:49. At Nabal's death by God's visitation David made her his wife, and by her David had a son, Chileab (2 Samuel 3:3), or Daniel (1 Chronicles 3:1), i. God is my judge, a name which apparently alludes to the divine judgment on Nabal
Carmel - There Nabal treated David and his men with disrespect and disregard, an action eventually resulting in Nabal's death and David's marriage to his widow Abigail (1 Samuel 25:2-40 )
Carmel - A town in the mountainous country of Judah, Joshua 15:55, familiar to us as the residence of Nabal
Maon, Maonites - It was in the ‘wilderness’ of Maon that Nabal dwelt ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ), and in this district David sojourned on two occasions during the period of his outlaw life ( 1Sa 23:24 ff
Car'Mel - ...
A town in the mountainous country of Judah, (Joshua 15:55 ) familiar to us as the residence of Nabal
Synzygus - ’ We may also compare Abigail’s use of her husband’s name ‘Nabal,’ to describe his character: ‘Nabal [2] is his name, and folly is with him’ (1 Samuel 25:25)
Name - The name Nabal [ 1 Samuel 25:25 )
Carmel - City in the hill-country of Judah, Joshua 15:55 , the abode of Nabal and Abigail the Carmelitess
Carmel - Here Saul set up a memorial of his conquest of the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:12 ), and here Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ) and Uzziah ( 2 Chronicles 26:10 AV Goat - Nabal had a thousand goats ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ; see also Genesis 30:33 ; Genesis 30:35 ; Genesis 32:14 etc
Carmel - ...
...
A town in the hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:55 ), the residence of Nabal (1 Samuel 25:2,5,7,40 ), and the native place of Abigail, who became David's wife (1 Samuel 27:3 )
Naming - ”...
Simple names functioning as epithets, such as Nabal meaning “fool” and Sarah meaning “princess,” gave way to compound names factual or wishful in nature, such as Mattaniah meaning “gift of Yahweh” and Ezekiel meaning “may God strengthen
Carmel - On this mountain Saul, returning from his expedition against Amalek, erected a trophy; and here Nabal the Carmelite, Abigail's husband, dwelt, 1 Samuel 15:12,25
Carmel - in the southern part of Palestine, where Nabal the Carmelite, Abigail's husband, dwelt, Joshua 15:55 ; 1 Samuel 25
Caleb - Hebron was afterward a priests' city, belonging to the Kohathites; but the territory about continued in Caleb's family (from which sprang the churl Nabal, for faith does not always come by blood descent)at the time of David (1 Samuel 25:3; 1 Samuel 30:14)
Fool, Foolishness, And Folly - Nabal and Saul represent this kind of intentional and malicious folly toward David (1 Samuel 25:25 ; 1 Samuel 26:21 )
Fool, Foolishness, Folly - ...
A further insight into the nature of the fool is provided by the Hebrew word Nabal [ 1 Samuel 25:25 )
Angel - David took personally the insult of Nabal ( Carmel - The abode of the churl Nabal and Abigail "the Carmelitess" (1 Samuel 25; 1 Samuel 27:3)
Dog - In 1 Samuel 25:3 , Nabal is said to have been "churlish and evil in his manners; and he was of the house of Caleb;" but Caleb here is not a proper name
David - ...
When Nabal had repulsed David's messengers Abigail brought a present, and rehearsed what God would do for David, and appeased his wrath. God smote Nabal, and Abigail became David's wife
Agur - In the names Eve, Cain, Seth, Noah, &c, before alluded to; in the appellation Nabal; in the enigmatical names in the first chapter of Hosea; in the descriptive names given to places, as Beer-sheba, Jehovah-jireh, Peniel, Bethel, Gilgal; and in many other instances, the meaning of the terms is either explained, or the circumstances are mentioned which led to their selection
Wealth - Abram ( Genesis 13:2 ), Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ), Barzillai ( James 5:1-57 ), Zacchæus ( Luke 19:2 ), Joseph of Arimathæa ( Matthew 27:57 )
Water - Nabal says in an insulting manner to David's messengers, "Shall I then take my bread and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men whom I know not whence they be?" 1 Samuel 25:11
David - ...
Abigail of Maon intervened with David to prevent him from punishing her foolish husband Nabal. God brought Nabal's death, and David married Abigail
Slave, Slavery - the experiences of the churl Nabal ( 1 Samuel 25:10 ), of the passionate Shimei ( 1 Kings 2:39 ), and of Sarah ( Genesis 16:6 ); the implications as to the frequency of such cases in the law of Deuteronomy 23:15 ff
Disease - We would probably speak of Saul's manic-depressive insanity (1 Samuel 16:14-23 ; 18:10-16 ; 19:9-10 ); of Nebuchadnezzar's "paranoia with (ox?) delusions" (see Daniel 4:16,25 , 33 ); and of the "apoplexy" of Nabal (1 Samuel 25:37-38 ); and possibly also of Ananias and Sapphira (Acts 5:5,10 )
David - To this period, belong the circumstances narrated in the concluding chapters of the first book of Samuel—the adventure with Nabal, and David's marriage with Abigail; his twice sparing Saul's life; perhaps the battle for the water of the well of Bethlehem, 1 Chronicles 11:15-19; and also the residence with Achish, who gave him Ziklag
David - Here occurred the incident connected with Nabal and his wife Abigail (1 Samuel 25 ), whom David married after Nabal's death
David - The episode connected with David’s dealings with Nabal, and his taking Abigail and Ahinoam for his wives, also falls within this period ( 1Sa 24:1-22 ; 1 Samuel 25:1-44 ; 1 Samuel 26:1-25 )
Palestine - corner of the Negeb (Joshua 15:19); here too Nabal lived, so reluctant to give "his water" (1 Samuel 25:11)