What does Mourning mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
קֹדֵ֥ר to mourn 3
πενθοῦντες to mourn. / to mourn for 3
πένθος mourning. 3
אֵ֔בֶל mourning. 3
ἐκόπτοντο to cut 2
הָאֵ֗בֶל mourning. 2
אֵ֖בֶל mourning. 2
אֵ֤בֶל mourning. 2
לְאֵ֖בֶל mourning. 2
אֵ֗בֶל mourning. 2
אֵ֣בֶל mourning. 2
אָבֵ֖ל mourning. 2
אֲבֵלִ֣ים mourning. 1
וּבְמִסְפֵּֽד wailing. 1
וַֽאֲנִיָּ֔ה mourning 1
וַאֲנִיָּֽה mourning 1
בְכִית֔וֹ weeping. 1
וָהֶ֖גֶה a rumbling 1
הֹמ֑וֹת to murmur 1
וּלְמִסְפֵּ֔ד wailing. 1
מִסְפְּדִי֮ wailing. 1
בְאֹנִ֜י trouble 1
הַמִּסְפֵּד֙ wailing. 1
כְּמִסְפַּ֥ד wailing. 1
מַרְזֵ֔חַ cry 1
קָדַ֕רְתִּי to mourn 1
קֹדֵ֣ר to mourn 1
ὀδυρμόν wailing 1
אַֽט gentleness 1
וְאֵ֖בֶל mourning. 1
אֲבֵל֗וֹת mourning. 1
אֵ֥בֶל mourning. 1
כַּאֲבֶל־ mourning. 1
הֶאֱבַ֜לְתִּי to mourn 1
מִתְאַבֵּ֔ל to mourn 1
וַיִּתְאַבֵּ֖ל to mourn 1
לְאֵ֗בֶל mourning. 1
כְּאֵ֣בֶל mourning. 1
מִתְאַבֶּ֖לֶת to mourn 1
לְ֭אֵבֶל mourning. 1
וּמֵאֵ֖בֶל mourning. 1
ὀδυρμὸς wailing 1
πενθοῦσι to mourn. / to mourn for 1
אֵֽבֶל־ mourning. 1
אֶבְלֵֽךְ mourning. 1
אֶבְלָ֤ם mourning. 1
לַמְקוֹנְנ֖וֹת to chant a dirge 1

Definitions Related to Mourning

G3997


   1 Mourning.
   

H60


   1 Mourning.
      1a for the dead.
      1b for rites of Mourning (metaph).
      1c Mourning garb.
      1d period of Mourning.
      

H6937


   1 to mourn, be dark.
      1a (Qal) to be dark.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to darken.
         1b2 to cause to mourn.
      1c (Hithpael) to grow dark.
      

G3996


   1 to mourn.
   2 to mourn for, lament one.
   

H57


   1 Mourning.
      1a for the dead.
      1b because of calamity.
      1c of rites of Mourning.
   2 mourner (subst.
   ).
      2a for the dead.
      2b for calamity.
      

H4553


   1 wailing.
   

G2875


   1 to cut, strike, smite.
   2 to cut from, cut off.
   3 to beat one’s breast for grief.
   

H56


   1 to mourn, lament.
      1a (Qal) to mourn, lament.
         1a1 of humans.
         1a2 of inanimate objects (fig.
         ).
            1a2a of gates.
            1a2b of land.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to mourn, cause to mourn (fig.
         ).
      1c (Hithpael).
         1c1 to mourn.
         1c2 play the mourner.
         

H592


   1 Mourning, lamentation.
   

G3602


   1 wailing, lamentation, Mourning.
   Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 214, alalazo; 1145, dakruo; 2354, threneo; 2799, klaio; and 4727, stenazo.
   See entry 5804 for comparison of synonyms.
   

H328


   1 gentleness, softness.
      1a gently.
      1b flowing.
      1c softly.
      1d enchanter, necromancer (substantive).
      

H205


   1 trouble, wickedness, sorrow.
      1a trouble, sorrow.
      1b idolatry.
      1c trouble of iniquity, wickedness.
      

H1899


   1 a rumbling, growling, moaning.
      1a a rumbling, growling.
      1b a moaning.
      1c a sigh, moan, sighing.
      

H1993


   1 to murmur, growl, roar, cry aloud, mourn, rage, sound, make noise, tumult, be clamorous, be disquieted, be loud, be moved, be troubled, be in an uproar.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to growl.
         1a2 to murmur (fig.
         of a soul in prayer).
         1a3 to roar.
         1a4 to be in a stir, be in a commotion.
         1a5 to be boisterous, be turbulent.
         

H6969


   1 to chant a dirge, chant, wail, lament.
      1a (Polel) to lament.
      

H1068


   1 weeping.
   

H4798


   1 cry, cry of joy, revelry.
      1a Mourning cry.
         1a1 perhaps, feast cry.
      1b cry of revelry.
      

Frequency of Mourning (original languages)

Frequency of Mourning (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Grief And Mourning
Practices and emotions associated with the experience of the death of a loved one or of other catastrophe or tragedy. The Bible tells us of life and death. When it mentions death, the Bible frequently relates the experience of the participants. So we are told of the mourning of Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ). Jacob mourned for Joseph, thinking he was dead. “And Jacob rent his clothes, and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days;b3he refused to be comforted; and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning. Thus his father wept for him” (Genesis 37:34-45 ). The Egyptians mourned for Jacob 70 days (Genesis 50:3 ). Leaders were mourned, often for 30 days: Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ). David led the people as they mourned Abner (2 Samuel 3:31-32 ). Mary and Martha wept over their brother Lazarus (John 11:31 ). After Jesus watched Mary and her friends weeping, we are told, “Jesus wept” (John 11:35 ).
Mourning was expressed in three major ways:
Weeping was then, as now, the primary indication of grief. Tears are repeatedly mentioned, “My tears have been my meat day and night” (Psalm 42:3 ). “Thou tellest my wanderings: put thou my tears into thy bottle” (Psalm 56:8 ). We have already noted Mary's tears and even those of Jesus. The loud lamentation was also a feature of mourning. The Egyptians lifted up their voices, “There was a great cry in Egypt; for there was not a house where there was not one dead” (Exodus 12:30 ). Not only did the actual relatives mourn, but they hired professional mourners, “because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets” (Ecclesiastes 12:5 ). “Consider ye, and call for the mourning women” (Jeremiah 9:17 ). In this same verse they are also referred to as “cunning women,” which suggests that there were certain techniques which these women practiced with unusual skill. Jesus went to Jairus's house to heal his daughter and “saw the minstrels and the people making a noise” (Matthew 9:23 ).
Yet another feature was personal disfigurement which was probably done to convince onlookers that the person was really grieving. Sometimes they tore their garments, “Reuben;b3rent his clothes” (Genesis 37:29 ). On others they wore sackcloth, “And David said;b3Rend your clothes, and gird you with sackcloth, and mourn” (2 Samuel 3:31 ). The women wore black or somber material, “feign thyself to be a mourner, and put on now mourning apparel, and anoint not thyself with oil, but be as a women that had a long time mourned for the dead” (2 Samuel 14:2 ). Mourners covered their heads, “David; wept; and had his head covered,” and all people that was with him covered every man his head” (2 Samuel 15:30 ).
Job's friends came to help him, “So they sat down with him upon the ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him: for they saw that his grief was very great” (Job 2:13 ). From this and other statements we can learn ways in which we can minister to grief-stricken people:
1) Realize the gift of presence. Just calling and being there can be of value.
2) Do not overtalk the grieving person. Provide the awesome power of the listening ear.
3) Let them know it is alright for them to grieve. Even Jesus wept over the death of His friend Lazarus.
4) Be ready to minister to the griever for a long time. It sometimes takes as much as two years to work through a grief experience.
5) Tactfully remind the griever of Him who said, “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:25 ), and invoke His blessing.
John W. Drakeford
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Mourning
Mourning. Oriental mourning is public and careful of prescribed ceremonies. Genesis 23:2; Job 1:20; Job 2:12. Among the forms observed the following may be mentioned: Rending the clothes, Genesis 37:29; Genesis 37:34; Genesis 44:13, etc.; dressing in sackcloth, Genesis 37:34; 2 Samuel 3:31; 2 Samuel 21:10, etc.; ashes, dust or earth sprinkled on the person, 2 Samuel 13:19; 2 Samuel 15:32, etc.; black or sad-colored garments, 2 Samuel 14:2; Jeremiah 8:21, etc.; removal of ornaments or neglect of person, Deuteronomy 21:12-13, etc.; shaving the head, plucking out the hair of the head or beard, Leviticus 10:6; 2 Samuel 19:24, etc.; laying bare some part of the body, Isaiah 20:2; Isaiah 47:2, etc.; fasting or abstinence in meat and drink, 2 Samuel 1:12; 2 Samuel 3:35; 2 Samuel 12:16; 2 Samuel 12:22, etc. In later times for the employment of persons hired for the purpose of mourning, Ecclesiastes 12:5; Jeremiah 9:17; Amos 5:16; Matthew 9:23, friends or passers-by to join in the lamentations of bereaved or afflicted persons, Genesis 50:3; Judges 11:40; Job 2:11; Job 30:25, etc.; and in ancient times the sitting or lying posture in silence indicative of grief, Genesis 23:3; Judges 20:26, etc. The period of mourning varied. In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, Genesis 50:3; of Aaron, Numbers 20:29, and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8, thirty. A further period of seven days in Jacob's case. Genesis 50:10. Seven days for Saul, which may have been an abridged period in the time of national danger. 1 Samuel 31:13.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Mourning Customs
MOURNING CUSTOMS . The Oriental expression of grief has a twofold relationship. Towards God it is marked by silent and reverent submission symbolized by placing the hand on the mouth. ‘The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away’ ( Job 1:21 ); ‘I was dumb … because thou didst it’ ( Psalms 39:9 ). But towards the relatives and neighbours the case is altogether different. It is now an event that has to be announced as quickly and publicly as possible, and a loss which love has to deplore with passionate abandonment and an accumulation of conventional ceremony. At the moment of death a loud shrill wail is raised by those present. Its meaning is understood only too well. As the piercing, tremulous shrieks are repeated, a few inquiries are made as to the locality and circumstances, and the rapidly increasing cry is accepted as an invitation and claim to proceed to the house of mourning. Immediately after death the body is washed and robed for the burial , which usually takes place within twenty-four hours. In addition to the successive outbursts of grief by members of the family, who have to be comforted and pleaded with and led away from the prostrate figure of the dead, the sustained ceremony of mourning is attended to by the neighbours. These, usually assisted by hired mourners , arrange themselves around the bier , or on opposite sides of the room, and keep up the lamentation without intermission. In this way they afford the preoccupation of a recognized routine, and give the relief of physical outlet to feelings that either are, or are considered to be, beyond control. At times one of the chief mourners leans over the body, wringing her hands or wiping away the fast falling tears, and asking why he has left them, and who will discharge the duties that belonged to him alone, pleading for love’s sake to hear only once more the music of the voice now silent, or begging forgiveness on account of selfishness and imperfect service in the days that will never return. Meanwhile the band of mourners redouble their wailing, with beating of the breast and frantic clutching at their hair and clothes. As such paroxysms cannot last, the skilled mourners, usually women, endeavour to moderate and sustain the feeling of desolation by a plaintively descending chant. Among the singers there are usually one or two who are specially skilful in leading off with metrical phrases and rhymes of sympathetic appeal, which the others take up and repeat in concert. The invariable subject is the good qualities of the departed, and the extent of the loss which the family has been called upon to bear. In addition to the above allusions, new springs of tenderness are opened by referring to other members of the same family recently departed, and the loved one whose death they are lamenting is asked to bear messages of greeting to them. As the intimation of the bereavement reaches more distant parts of the town, or is carried to the neighbouring villages, companies of sympathizing friends come to show their regard for the dead. They announce their arrival by loud weeping and exclamations of grief; and as they enter the house the lamentation of the mourners in the room breaks out afresh. To the Western visitor unacquainted with the temperament and traditions of Oriental people, the whole scene is deeply distressing, and he has to check the feeling of repugnance by reminding himself that they would be equally shocked by the apparent callousness and ordered formality of our procedure on similar occasions. With cruel yet merciful swiftness the hour arrives for interment. The lamentation that was passionate before now becomes tumultuously defiant. Relatives lose all self-control, and, refusing to let the bearers discharge their sad office, have to be forcibly removed. The procession is then formed, and on the way to the cemetery is increased by those who join it to show their respect towards the family, and also to share the merit which the Lord attaches to service performed for those who can no longer reward it. Among the Jews, during the prescribed days of separation following upon a death in the family, the mourners are daily visited by the Rabbi, who reads the portions of Scripture and the prayers appointed by the synagogue. Over the door of the cemetery is inscribed in Hebrew’ The House of Eternity’ or ‘The House of the Living.’ The explanation given in regard to the latter term is either that the life beyond the grave is the real life, or, according to others, that the grave is the place of habitation to which all the living must come.
The references to mourning in the Bible show that the custom of to-day in Palestine is the same as in ancient times with regard to the house of mourning, although special features of liturgical form now belong to the Synagogue, the Church, and the Mosque. There is the same announcement by wailing (Micah 1:8 , Mark 5:38 ). Friends come to condole ( Job 2:11-13 ), and there is the same language of commendation and affectionate regret ( 2 Samuel 1:17-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ). The exclamations of to-day were then used ( 1 Kings 13:30 , Jeremiah 22:18 ). Hired mourners are alluded to ( Jeremiah 9:17-18 , Amos 5:16 ); and such manifestations as the beating of the breast ( Isaiah 32:12 ), tearing of the garments ( 2 Samuel 3:31 ), fasting ( 1 Samuel 31:13 , 2 Samuel 3:35 ), the putting of ashes on the head, and the wearing of sackcloth ( 2 Samuel 12:20 ). The form of lamentation for the individual is’ applied to afflicted Israel ( Jeremiah 9:1 , Lamentations 1:16 ; Lamentations 3:48-49 ), to the historical extinction of Tyre ( Ezekiel 27:28-36 ), and to the worship of Tammuz ( Ezekiel 8:14 ). Such a rich and widely recognized symbolism of sorrow might easily be pressed into the services of religious imposture by those who wish to appear bowed down by their own devout contemplations, or as bearing upon their hearts the sins of others. Hence Christ’s note of warning ( Matthew 6:16-18 ).
The Apostle Paul commends as a Christian duty the showing of sympathy towards those in affliction (Romans 12:15 ), but intimates that in Christ the familiar phrase of greeting to the afflicted, ‘Hope is cut off!’ has been made obsolete by the resurrection of the Lord Jesus ( 1 Thessalonians 4:18 ). One of the features to which the New Jerusalem owes its title is the absence of mourning and tears ( Revelation 7:17 ).
G. M. Mackie.
King James Dictionary - Mourning
MOURNING, ppr. Grieving lamenting sorrowing wearing the appearance of sorrow.
MOURNING, n. The act of sorrowing or expressing grief lamentation sorrow.
1. The dress or customary habit worn by mourners. And ev'n the pavements were with mourning hid.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Mourning
Noisy, violent, and demonstrative in the East as it is among the Irish, Highlanders, and Welsh; beating the breast or the thigh (Ezekiel 21:12), cutting the flesh (Ezekiel 24:16-1847), weeping with a loud cry, wearing dark colored garments, hiring women as professional mourners (Ecclesiastes 12:5; Matthew 9:23; Amos 5:16),"skillful in lamentation" (Jeremiah 9:17), singing elegies, having funeral feasts and the cup of consolation (Jeremiah 16:7-8). It was an occasion of studied publicity and ceremonial; so Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2), Jacob for Joseph (Genesis 37:34-35), Joseph and the Egyptians for Jacob 70 days and a further period of seven (Genesis 50:3-10), Israel for Aaron 80 days (Numbers 20:29), and for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8). Jabesh Gileadites for Saul fasted seven days (1 Samuel 31:13); David for Abner with fasting, rent clothes, and sackcloth, and with an elegy (2 Samuel 3:81-89).
Job for his calamities, with rent mantle, shaven head, sitting in ashes; so the three friends with dust upon their heads, etc., seven days and nights (Job 1:20-21; Job 2:8). In the open streets and upon the housetops (Isaiah 15:2-3); stripping off ornaments (Exodus 33:4); stripping the foot and some other part of the body (Isaiah 20:2). Penitent mourning was often expressed by fasting, so that the words are interchanged as synonymous (Matthew 9:15), and the day of atonement, when they "afflicted their souls," is called "the fast" (Acts 27:9; Leviticus 23:27; Israel, 1 Samuel 7:6; Nineveh, Jonah 3:5; the Jews when hereafter turning to Messiah, Zechariah 12:10-11). Exclusion from share in the sacrificial peace offerings (Leviticus 7:20), Covering the upper lip and the head, in token of silence: Leviticus 13:45, the leper; 2 Samuel 15:30, David. The high priest and Nazarites were not to go into mourning for even father or mother or children (Leviticus 21:10-11; Numbers 6:7).
So Aaron in the case of Nadab and Abihu (Leviticus 10:2-6); Ezekiel for his wife (1618104436_1); "the bread of men" is that usually brought to mourners by friends in sympathy. The lower priests only for nearest relatives (Leviticus 21:1-4). Antitypically, the gospel work is to take precedence of all ties (Luke 9:59-60): "let me first go and bury my father" means, let me wait at home until he die and, I bury him. The food eaten in mourning was considered impure (Deuteronomy 26:14; Hosea 9:4). The Jews still wail weekly, each Friday, at Jerusalem, in a spot below the temple wall, where its two courses of masonry (with blocks 30 ft. long) meet. (See JERUSALEM.) On the open flagged place, which they sweep with care as holy ground, taking off their shoes, they bewail the desolation of their holy places (Psalms 102:14; Psalms 137:5-6; Isaiah 63:15-19). Mourning shall cease forever to God's people when Christ shall return (Revelation 7:17; Revelation 21:4; Isaiah 25:8; Isaiah 35:10).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Mourning
Sorrow, grief.
See SORROW.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mourn, Mourner, Mourning
See Grief and Mourning .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Mourning
It was the habit of the Hebrews, as it still is in the East, to make a great demonstration of their mourning. They would beat their breasts, cover their heads, fast, put dust and ashes on their heads, neglect their hair, wear dull-coloured garments, rend their clothes, wear sackcloth, etc. For Asa and Zedekiah there was 'great burning' of odours at their death, which was most probably copied from the heathen. 2 Chronicles 16:14 ; Jeremiah 34:5 . At a death professional mourners were hired, mostly women. "Call for the mourning women . . . . let them make haste, and take up a wailing for us, that our eyes may run down with tears, and our eyelids gush out with waters." Jeremiah 9:17,18 ; cf. 2 Samuel 14:2 ; Amos 5:16 . Musicians also attended at deaths, who played mournful strains. Matthew 9:23 . God does not desire those who are bereaved to be without feeling: the Lord wept at the grave of Lazarus, but He would have reality in all things. He had to say to His people, "Rend your heart, and not your garments." Joel 2:13 .
Webster's Dictionary - Mourning
(1):
(p. pr. & vb. n.) of Mourn
(2):
(n.) The act of sorrowing or expressing grief; lamentation; sorrow.
(3):
(a.) Grieving; sorrowing; lamenting.
(4):
(a.) Employed to express sorrow or grief; worn or used as appropriate to the condition of one bereaved or sorrowing; as, mourning garments; a mourning ring; a mourning pin, and the like.
(5):
(n.) Garb, drapery, or emblems indicative of grief, esp. clothing or a badge of somber black.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Mourning
See BURIAL and See DEAD .
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mourning
We find in the early ages of the church, great lamentation observed at the death of their friends. The funeral of Sarah is set forth in this view. And still more, in that of the patriarch Jacob, Seven days the funeral halted at the threshing-floor of Atad. And the astonishment of the inhabitants of the land was so great, that they gave a name to it, and called it Abel-mizraim; that is, the mourning of the Egyptians, (Genesis 1:7-11. We find that the Israelites themselves called all places of their mourning by one name, Bochim, that is weepers. (See Judges 2:1-5.)
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Mourning
The Hebrews, at the death of their friends and relations, made striking demonstrations of grief and mourning. They wept, tore their clothes, smote their breasts, threw dust upon their heads, Joshua 7:6 , and lay upon the ground, went barefooted, pulled their hair and beards, or cut them, Ezra 9:3 Isaiah 15:2 , and made incisions on their breasts, or tore them with their nails, Leviticus 19:28 21:5 Jeremiah 16:6 48:37 . The time of mourning was commonly seven days, 1 Samuel 31:11-13 ; but it was lengthened or shortened according to circumstances, Zechariah 12:10 . That for Moses and Aaron was prolonged to thirty days, Numbers 20:29 Deuteronomy 34:8 ; and that for Jacob to seventy days, Genesis 50:3 .
During the time of their mourning, the near relations of the deceased continued sitting in their houses, and fasted, 2 Samuel 12:16 , or ate on the ground. The food they took was thought unclean, and even themselves were judged impure. "Their sacrifices shall be unto them as the bread of mourners: all that eat thereof shall be polluted," Hosea 9:4 . Their faces were covered, and in all that time they could not apply themselves to any occupation, nor read the book of the law, nor offer their usual prayers. They did not dress themselves, nor make their beds, nor uncover their heads, nor shave themselves, nor cut their nails, nor go into the bath, nor salute any body. Nobody spoke to them unless they spoke first, Job 2:11-13 . Their friends commonly went to visit and comfort them, John 11:19,39 , bringing them food, 2 Samuel 3:35 Jeremiah 16:7 . They also went up to the roof, or upon the platform of their houses, to bewail their misfortune: "They shall gird themselves with sackcloth; on the tops of their houses, and in their streets, every one shall howl, weeping abundantly," Isaiah 15:3 Jeremiah 48:38 . The mourning dress among the Hebrews was not fixed either by law or custom. We only find in Scripture that they used to tear their garments, a custom still observed; but now they tear a small part merely, and for form's sake, 2 Samuel 13:19 2 Chronicles 34:27 Ezra 9:3 Job 2:12 Joel 2:13 . Anciently in times of mourning, they clothed themselves in sackcloth, or haircloth, that is, in clothes of coarse brown or black stuff, 2 Samuel 3:31 1 Kings 21:27 Esther 4:1 Psalm 35:13 69:11 .
They hired women to weep and wail, and also persons to play on instruments, at the funerals of the rich or distinguished, Jeremiah 9:17 . In Matthew 9:23 , we observe a company of minstrels or players on the flute, at the funeral of a girl of twelve year of age. All that met a funeral procession were accustomed to join them for a time, to accompany them on their way, sometimes relieving the bearers of the bier, and mingling their tears with those of the mourners, Romans 12:15 .
The custom of hiring women to weep and wail has come down to modern times. The following account of such a scene at Nablous, the ancient Shechem, is form Dr. Jowett. The governor of the city had died the very morning of Dr. Jowett's arrival. "On coming within sight of the gate, we perceived a numerous company of females, who were singing in a kind of recitative, far from melancholy, and beating time with their hands. If this be mourning, I thought, it is of a strange kind. It had indeed sometimes more the air of angry defiance. But on our reaching the gate, it was suddenly exchanged for most hideous plaints and shrieks, which, with the feeling that we were entering a city at no time celebrated for its hospitality, struck a very dismal impression upon my mind. They accompanied us a few paces; but it soon appeared that the gate was their station, to which having received nothing from us, they returned. We learned, in the course of the evening, that these were only a small detachment of a very numerous body of cunning women' with the design, as of old, to make the eyes of all the inhabitants run down with tears, and their eyelids gush out with water,' Jeremiah 9:17-18 . For this good service, they would, the next morning wait upon the government and principal persons, to receive some trifling fee."
Some of the Jewish forms of mourning are the appropriate and universal language of grief; others, to our modern and occidental taste, savor of extravagance. None of these were enjoined by their religion, which rather restricted than encouraged them, Leviticus 10:6 19:27 21:1-11 Numbers 6:7 Deuteronomy 14:1 . They were the established customs of the times. Sorrow finds some relief in reversing all the usages of ordinary life. Christianity, however, moderates and assuages our grief; shows us a Father's hand holding the rod, and the dark valley itself penetrated by the heavenly light into which it emerges, 1 Corinthians 15:53-55 1 Thessalonians 4:14-18 Revelation 7:13-17 14:13 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Mourning
One marked feature of Oriental mourning is what may be called its studies publicity and the careful observance of the prescribed ceremonies. (Genesis 23:2 ; Job 1:20 ; 2:12 )
Among the particular forms observed the following may be mentioned: (a) Rending the clothes. (Genesis 37:29,34 ; 44:13 ) etc. (b) Dressing in sackcloth. (Genesis 37:34 ; 2 Samuel 3:31 ; 21:10 ) etc. (c) Ashes, dust or earth sprinkled on the person. (2 Samuel 13:19 ; 15:32 ) etc. (d) Black or sad-colored garments. (2 Samuel 14:2 ; Jeremiah 8:21 ) etc. (e) Removal of ornaments or neglect of person. (21:12,13) etc. (f) Shaving the head, plucking out the hair of the head or beard. (Leviticus 10:6 ; 2 Samuel 19:24 ) etc. (g) Laying bare some part of the body. (Isaiah 20:2 ; 47:2 ) etc. (h) Fasting or abstinence in meat and drink. (2 Samuel 1:12 ; 3:35 ; 12:16,22 ) etc. (i) In the same direction may be mentioned diminution in offerings to God, and prohibition to partake of sacrificial food. (Leviticus 7:20 ; 26:14) (k) Covering the "upper lip," i.e. the lower part of the face, and sometimes the head, in token of silence. (Leviticus 13:45 ; 2 Samuel 15:30 ; 19:4 ) (l) Cutting the flesh, (Jeremiah 16:6,7 ; 41:5 ) beating the body. (Ezekiel 21:12 ; Jeremiah 31:19 ) (m) Employment of persons hired for the purpose of mourning. (Ecclesiastes 12:5 ; Jeremiah 9:17 ; Amos 5:16 ; Matthew 9:23 ) (n) Akin to the foregoing usage the custom for friends or passers-by to join in the lamentations of bereaved or afflicted persons. (Genesis 50:3 ; Judges 11:40 ; Job 2:11 ; 30:25 ) etc. (o) The sitting or lying posture in silence indicative of grief. (Genesis 23:3 ; Judges 20:26 ) etc. (p) Mourning feast and cup of consolation. (Jeremiah 16:7,8 )
The period of mourning varied. In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, (Genesis 50:3 ) of Aaron, (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8 thirty. A further period of seven days in Jacob's case. ( Genesis 50:10 ) Seven days for Saul, which may have been an abridged period in the time of national danger. (1 Samuel 31:13 ) With the practices above mentioned, Oriental and other customs, ancient and modern, in great measure agree. Arab men are silent in grief, but the women scream, tear their hair, hands and face, and throw earth or sand on their heads. Both Mohammedans and Christians in Egypt hire wailing-women, and wail at stated times. Burckhardt says the women of Atbara in Nubia shave their heads on the death of their nearest relatives --a custom prevalent also among several of the peasant tribes of upper Egypt. He also mentions wailing-women, and a man in distress besmearing his face with dirt and dust in token of grief. In the "Arabian Nights" are frequent allusions to similar practices. It also mentions ten days and forty days as periods of mourning. Lane, speaking of the modern Egyptians, says, "After death the women of the family raise cries of lamentation called welweleh or wilwal , uttering the most piercing shrieks, and calling upon the name of the deceased, 'Oh, my master! Oh, my resource! Oh, my misfortune! Oh, my glory!" See ( Jeremiah 22:18 ) The females of the neighborhood come to join with them in this conclamation: generally, also, the family send for two or more neddabehs or public wailing-women. Each brings a tambourine, and beating them they exclaim, 'Alas for him!' The female relatives, domestics and friends, with their hair dishevelled and sometimes with rent clothes, beating their faces, cry in like manner, 'Alas for him!' These make no alteration in dress, but women, in some cases, dye their shirts, head-veils and handkerchiefs of a dark-blue color. They visit the tombs at stated periods." --Mod. Eg. iii. 152,171,195.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Mourn, Mourning
A — 1: κόπτω (Strong's #2875 — Verb — kopto — kop'-to ) "to cut or beat," used in the Middle Voice of "beating the breast or head in mourning" (cp. Luke 23:27 ), is translated "shall mourn" in Matthew 24:30 . See BEWAIL , No. 2, CUT, WAIL.
A — 2: πενθέω (Strong's #3996 — Verb — pentheo — pen-theh'-o ) "to mourn for, lament," is used (a) of mourning in general, Matthew 5:4 ; 9:15 ; Luke 6:25 ; (b) of sorrow for the death of a loved one, Mark 16:10 ; (c) of "mourning" for the overthrow of Babylon and the Babylonish system, Revelation 18:11,15 , RV, "mourning" (AV, "wailing"); Revelation 18:19 (ditto); (d) of sorrow for sin or for condoning it, James 4:9 ; 1 Corinthians 5:2 ; (e) of grief for those in a local church who show no repentance for evil committed, 2 Corinthians 12:21 , RV, "mourn" (AV, "bewail"). See BEWAIL , No. 3.
A — 3: θρηνέω (Strong's #2354 — Verb — threneo — thray-neh'-o ) "to lament, wail" (akin to threnos, "a lamentation, a dirge"), is used (a) in a general sense, of the disciples during the absence of the Lord, John 16:20 , "lament;" (b) of those who sorrowed for the sufferings and the impending crucifixion of the Lord, Luke 23:27 , "lamented;" the preceding word is kopto (No. 1); (c) of "mourning" as for the dead, Matthew 11:17 , RV, "wailed" (AV, "have mourned"); Luke 7:32 (ditto). See BEWAIL , Note (1).
Notes: (1) Trench points out that pentheo is often joined with klaio, "to weep," 2 Samuel 19:1 ; Mark 16:10 ; James 4:9 ; Revelation 18:15 , indicating that pentheo is used especially of external manifestation of grief (as with kopto and threneo), in contrast to lupeomai, which may be used of inward grief (Syn. xlv); though in Classical Greek pentheo was used of grief without violent manifestations (Grimm-Thayer). (2) Among the well-to-do it was common to hire professional mourners (men and women), who accompanied the dead body to the grave with formal music and the singing of dirges. At the death of Jairus' daughter male flute players were present, Matthew 9:23 (see, however, Jeremiah 9:17 ).
B — 1: ὀδυρμός (Strong's #3602 — Noun Masculine — odurmos — od-oor-mos' ) "lamentation, mourning," is translated "mourning" in Matthew 2:18 ; 2 Corinthians 7:7 : see BEWAIL , Note (2).
B — 2: πένθος (Strong's #3997 — Noun Neuter — penthos — pen'-thos ) akin to A, No. 2, "mourning," is used in James 4:9 ; Revelation 18:7 (twice), RV, "mourning" (AV, "sorrow"); Revelation 18:8 , "mourning;" Revelation 21:4 , RV, "mourning" (AV, "sorrow"). See SORROW.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mourning
Mourning is primarily the expression of sorrow for the dead; but the term is also applied to the grief over sin and to the distress over calamity.
1. A list of mourning customs among the Hebrews will be found in the article ‘Mourning’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) . Among them are weeping and wailing of an intentionally demonstrative and unrestrained kind, the rending of garments, the wearing of sackcloth, the sprinkling of dust and ashes on the head, the striking of breast and head, fasting, ejaculations of woe, the recital of elegies for the departed. Reference is made to several of these customs in the description given in Revelation 18 of the mourning over the destruction of Babylon. The worldly kings, the merchants and mariners, act as mourners: they weep and wail, cast dust upon their heads, utter exclamations of woe, and in turn dirgefully declare the past glories of the fallen (Revelation 18:10 f.). The term κοπετόν (used in Acts 8:2 to indicate the lamentation of the devout men over Stephen; cf. κόψονται [1]; derivation, κόπτειν, ‘to strike’) indicates the association of the beating of head and breast with mourning. In Acts 9:36 f. the widows gather round the body of Dorcas, weep and recount her good deeds. In James 5:1 the rich are bidden to weep and howl, i.e. as wailing mourners.
2. The Pauline version of the eucharist introduces the words, ‘Do this in remembrance of me’ (εἰς τὴν ἐμὴν ἀνάμνησιν), and the rite is regarded as a proclamation of the Lord’s death till He come (1 Corinthians 11:24-26). This language suggests a comparison with the customs of commemorative mourning for the dead (cf. the annual lamentation for Jephthah’s daughter [2]; see article ‘Jahrzeit’ in Jewish Encyclopedia ). If the Pauline version of the eucharist has been influenced by the mysteries, the mourning customs for Attis and Adonis (‘weeping for Tammuz,’ see J. G. Frazer’s Adonis, Attis, Osiris3, 1914) may not be without significance for the study of this feature of the Lord’s Supper.
3. The gravity with which sin was regarded is suggested by the application of terms of mourning to the grief over transgression. Sinners are bidden, as a sign of humble penitence, to be afflicted, mourn, and weep. Laughter is to be turned to mourning (James 4:9; cf. 1 Kings 1:27). Among the welcome indications of a repentant Corinthian church is its mourning (ὀδυρμός [3]). The idea in the writer’s mind in Revelation 1:7 (‘Behold, he cometh with the clouds, and every eye shall see him, and they that pierced him, and all the tribes of the earth shall mourn over him’) was probably the mourning of guilt, regret, and shame-there was no need to mourn a living Christ returning in glory. Possibly, however, the words indicate that now all nations recognized that the ignominiously crucified One was worthy of a world’s mourning.
4. National calamity is presented under the figure of a bereavement (cf. the mourning for Israel [3]). Babylon in her strength boasts, ‘No widow am I, and shall in no wise see mourning’ (Revelation 18:7). In a day she knows the widowhood of retributive disaster (Revelation 18:8). The representation changes-widowed Babylon is herself mourned for by others (Revelation 18:8-19); see 1.
5. The emphasis placed by the early Church on the overthrow of death as an elemental power by the resurrection of Jesus, on the certainty of a future life, the conception of a fuller, richer existence beyond the grave-a ‘clothing upon’ rather than a stripping of personality-all tended to rob death of its sting and the grave of its victory. The believer had no need to sorrow as did the rest that had no hope. On the other hand, it is significant that the parting of St. Paul from his children in the faith at Miletus, who expected to see him no more, was with loud lamentation (Acts 20:36), and the Apostle felt that the severance from the brethren at Caesarea was breaking his heart (Acts 21:13). Faith lights up the tomb, but does not make the human heart unnatural. Human grief ‘will have way’ until, as in the Apocalyptist’s vision, God shall wipe away all tears from men’s eyes, and death and mourning shall be no more (Revelation 21:4).
H. Bulcock.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mourning (2)
MOURNING.—An expression of grief for death or disaster. See also artt. Lamentation and Rending of Garments. Mourning is associated in the Gospels (1) with ‘the appearance of the sign of the Son of Man,’ Matthew 24:30; (2) with the removal of the visible presence of the Saviour, Matthew 9:15; (3) with the death of friends. It is also one of the conditions mentioned in the Beatitudes as bearing a special blessing (Matthew 5:4, but cf. Luke 6:21). The laws of mourning were very minute. The general time of mourning was seven days, during which the mourner was forbidden to work, wash, anoint himself, or wear his shoes. This last provision might, however, be evaded by putting earth or ashes into his boots. For seven days the mourner might not read in the Law, the Prophets, or the Talmud, because it was a ‘joy’ to do so; but a teacher could teach others through an interpreter. The mourner was allowed during this period to read only the books of Job, Jeremiah, Lamentations, and the הלבות אבילות (Laws of Mourning). He had to sit away from his dead, with his head tied up, and on the first day he might not wear his phylacteries. He was forbidden to shave his head or his neck, or do anything which might be considered to be for his comfort. He could take no part in rejoicings, and the rent in his garments was to be seen for thirty days. Even a poor man, or one who lived on charity, was forbidden to work for three days; but after that time, he might do work secretly, for his maintenance, or his wife might spin in his house. Travelling with goods was forbidden, and no business even at the risk of loss could be transacted by himself or his family or his servants. It was allowable, however, to have a business carried on, if he assigned it to another before the departure of the soul. The mourner was allowed to eat only in his own house; he might eat no flesh and drink no wine; nor could he ask blessing before or after food. Extra-Talmudical regulations enjoined that the mourner should sit on the floor and take his food from a chair instead of a table, and, as is still the custom, that he should eat eggs dipped in ashes with salt. He might not leave town for thirty days; and in the case of mourning for a parent he might not go out of town for the first year, till his friends told him to do so. After the death of a wife, a widower might not marry for a year (i.e. till after three feasts had passed); but if his wife had died childless, or if she had left young children, he might marry after seven days. A mourner being ‘free’ must attend the synagogue; when he appeared, the congregation faced him as he entered, and said: ברוד מינחם אבל ‘Blessed is He that comforteth the mourner.’ Immediately on a death, all water in the house and in three houses on either side was emptied out, because of the belief that the Angel of Death procured death by means of a knife which be washed in water close at hand. Between death and burial the mourner was free from all the Law, because he was supposed to be beside himself with grief. The following is the prescribed prayer before meat to be used in the house of the mourner after burial:—
‘Blessed art thou, O God our Lord, King of the universe, God of our Fathers, our Creator, our Redeemer, our Sanctifier, the Holy One of Jacob, the King of Life, who art good and doest good; the God of truth, the righteous Judge who judgest in righteousness, who takest the soul in judgment, and rulest alone in the universe, who doest in it according to His will, and all His ways are in Judgment, and we are His people and His servants, and in everything we are bound to praise Him and to bless Him, who shields all the calamities of Israel and will shield us in this calamity, and from this mourning will bring us to life and peace. Comfort, O God our Lord, all the mourners of Jerusalem, and all the mourners that mourn in our sorrow. Comfort them in their mourning, and make them rejoice in their agony as a man is comforted by his mother. Blessed art Thou, O God, the Comforter of Zion, and that buildest again Jerusalem’ (Jewish prayer-books from יודה רעה).
The practice of hiring mourners was common with such as could afford it, and, as in the story of Jairus’ daughter, these hired mourners used flutes to increase the sounds of woe. The apostasy of a member of the family was the occasion of mourning as for the dead, and a blasphemy spoken in the presence of the high priest was also a reason for a demonstration of mourning. See also Flute-Players, Rending of Garments.
Literature.—See under Rending of Garments.
W. H. Rankine.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Mourning
Sorrow, grief.
See SORROW.

Sentence search

Mourning - Mourning, ppr. ...
Mourning, n. And ev'n the pavements were with Mourning hid
Abel-Beth-Maachah - And as Abel means vanity, Mourning, and emptiness; so Beth, an house: and therefore the whole taken together implies; vanity or Mourning to the house of Maachah
Mourning - ) Employed to express sorrow or grief; worn or used as appropriate to the condition of one bereaved or sorrowing; as, Mourning garments; a Mourning ring; a Mourning pin, and the like
Hadad-Rimmon - Zechariah 12:11 describes the tragedy of the day of the Lord, including weeping and Mourning in the Valley of Megiddo for Jerusalem. Such Mourning could be compared only to the “mourning of Hadad-rimmon,” apparently a reference to pagan worship ceremonies, perhaps for a dying and rising god
Mourn - When it is used of Mourning for the dead in a literal sense, the word is found in prose sections and in the reflexive form, indicating action back on the subject. ”...
When used in the figurative sense, 'âbal expresses “mourning” by gates ( Mourning for the dead, “mourning” may be over Jerusalem ( Mourning clothes
Zipporah - Beauty; trumpet; Mourning
Abel-Meholah - Mourning of sickness
Abel-Shittim - Mourning of thorns
Abel-Maim - Mourning of waters
Wailing - See Mourning Customs
Weeping - See Mourning Customs
Mourn, Mourner, Mourning - See Grief and Mourning
Weeping - See Grief and Mourning
Abilene - The father of Mourning
Abel-Mizraim - The Mourning of Egyptians
Ashes - See Heifer and Mourning
Grave - See Mourning Customs, Tomb
Bier - See Mourning Customs, Tomb
Burial - See Mourning Customs, Tomb
Wail - See Grief and Mourning ; Repentance
Mourningly - ) In a Mourning manner
Mourn, Mourning - A — 1: κόπτω (Strong's #2875 — Verb — kopto — kop'-to ) "to cut or beat," used in the Middle Voice of "beating the breast or head in Mourning" (cp. ...
A — 2: πενθέω (Strong's #3996 — Verb — pentheo — pen-theh'-o ) "to mourn for, lament," is used (a) of Mourning in general, Matthew 5:4 ; 9:15 ; Luke 6:25 ; (b) of sorrow for the death of a loved one, Mark 16:10 ; (c) of "mourning" for the overthrow of Babylon and the Babylonish system, Revelation 18:11,15 , RV, "mourning" (AV, "wailing"); Revelation 18:19 (ditto); (d) of sorrow for sin or for condoning it, James 4:9 ; 1 Corinthians 5:2 ; (e) of grief for those in a local church who show no repentance for evil committed, 2 Corinthians 12:21 , RV, "mourn" (AV, "bewail"). 1); (c) of "mourning" as for the dead, Matthew 11:17 , RV, "wailed" (AV, "have mourned"); Luke 7:32 (ditto). ...
B — 1: ὀδυρμός (Strong's #3602 — Noun Masculine — odurmos — od-oor-mos' ) "lamentation, Mourning," is translated "mourning" in Matthew 2:18 ; 2 Corinthians 7:7 : see BEWAIL , Note (2). 2, "mourning," is used in James 4:9 ; Revelation 18:7 (twice), RV, "mourning" (AV, "sorrow"); Revelation 18:8 , "mourning;" Revelation 21:4 , RV, "mourning" (AV, "sorrow")
Lament - See Grief and Mourning ; Lamentations; Psalms
Shehariah - Mourning or blackness of the Lord
Abel-Beth-Maachah - Mourning to the house of Maachah
Hadadrimmon - Place in the valley of Megiddo where there had been great Mourning. It is quoted as an illustration of the great Mourning there will be at Jerusalem when the sin of Judah is brought home to their conscience for having demanded the death of their Messiah. The allusion is considered to be the occasion when Josiah was smitten in that same valley, though the histories do not speak of any Mourning there
Abel-Meholah - The Mourning of sickness
Condolement - ) Sorrow; Mourning; lamentation
Abel-Maim - The Mourning of the waters
Tabering - See Grief and Mourning
Grieving - Sorrowing exercised with grief Mourning
Wayment - ) Grief; lamentation; Mourning
Menachem av - the fifth month, whose first nine days of Mourning climax in the Fast of Tishah B'Av...
Shiva - seven) The seven day Mourning period following the funeral of a deceased next of kin
Mourning - Mourning is primarily the expression of sorrow for the dead; but the term is also applied to the grief over sin and to the distress over calamity. A list of Mourning customs among the Hebrews will be found in the article ‘Mourning’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) . Reference is made to several of these customs in the description given in Revelation 18 of the Mourning over the destruction of Babylon. κόψονται [1]; derivation, κόπτειν, ‘to strike’) indicates the association of the beating of head and breast with Mourning. This language suggests a comparison with the customs of commemorative Mourning for the dead (cf. If the Pauline version of the eucharist has been influenced by the mysteries, the Mourning customs for Attis and Adonis (‘weeping for Tammuz,’ see J. The gravity with which sin was regarded is suggested by the application of terms of Mourning to the grief over transgression. Laughter is to be turned to Mourning (James 4:9; cf. Among the welcome indications of a repentant Corinthian church is its Mourning (ὀδυρμός [3]). The idea in the writer’s mind in Revelation 1:7 (‘Behold, he cometh with the clouds, and every eye shall see him, and they that pierced him, and all the tribes of the earth shall mourn over him’) was probably the Mourning of guilt, regret, and shame-there was no need to mourn a living Christ returning in glory. Possibly, however, the words indicate that now all nations recognized that the ignominiously crucified One was worthy of a world’s Mourning. the Mourning for Israel [3]2). Babylon in her strength boasts, ‘No widow am I, and shall in no wise see Mourning’ (Revelation 18:7). Human grief ‘will have way’ until, as in the Apocalyptist’s vision, God shall wipe away all tears from men’s eyes, and death and Mourning shall be no more (Revelation 21:4)
Rending of Garments - Tearing or pulling garments apart, often as a sign of Mourning (Genesis 37:34 ; Leviticus 10:6 ; Leviticus 21:10 ; 1 Samuel 4:12 ; 2 Samuel 3:31 ), repentance (Genesis 37:29 ; Joshua 7:6 ; 2 Chronicles 34:27 ; Joel 2:13 ), or as a response to the rejection of God's plan (Numbers 14:6 ) or (perceived) blasphemy (Matthew 26:65 ; Mark 14:63 ; Acts 14:14 ). See Blasphemy ; Mourning
Abel-Shittim - A place in the encampments of Israel; meaning the Mourning in Shittim, in the plains of Moab
Bein hametzarim - "between the straits"); refers to the Three Weeks of Mourning from the Seventeenth of Tammuz through the Ninth of Av...
Tammuz - Hebrew month corresponding to June-July; the Three Weeks of Mourning for the destruction of the Beit Hamkidash begin in this month ...
Hadadrimmon - A proper name occurring in Zechariah 12:11 ‘as the Mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon. An equally good translation would be ‘as the Mourning for Hadadrimmon,’ and it has been plausibly conjectured that it is the weeping for Tammuz referred to in Ezekiel 8:14 , that is here meant. There is no ground for supposing an allusion to the Mourning for king Josiah, which, of course, took place in Jerusalem, not in the valley of Megiddo
Abelmizraim - This signifies, with the Hebrew points, 'meadow of the Egyptians;' but 'mourning of the Egyptians' if read without or with different points. The context in Genesis 50:11 indicates 'mourning' as a part of the name. ' This would seem to place the seven days' Mourning on the east of Jordan, before the body was carried into Canaan, for interment: cf
Hatband - , worn as a badge of Mourning
Half-Mast - ) A point some distance below the top of a mast or staff; as, a flag a half-mast (a token of Mourning, etc
Cockbill - ) To tilt up one end of so as to make almost vertical; as, to cockbill the yards as a sign of Mourning
Bombazine - Black bombazine has been much used for Mourning garments
Sackcloth - ) Linen or cotton cloth such as sacks are made of; coarse cloth; anciently, a cloth or garment worn in Mourning, distress, mortification, or penitence
Av 9 - "ninth of Av"); day of fasting and Mourning on the ninth of Av commemorating the Destruction of the first and the second Holy Temples ...
Mournful - ) Full of sorrow; expressing, or intended to express, sorrow; Mourning; grieving; sad; also, causing sorrow; saddening; grievous; as, a mournful person; mournful looks, tones, loss
Cyprus - It was either white or black, the latter being most common, and used for Mourning
Coffin - Israelitish burial rites (see Mourning Customs, Tomb) did not include the use of coffins
Minstrel - These musicians were hired to assist in Mourning the child's death
Three weeks - the Three Weeks of Mourning from the Seventeenth of Tammuz through Tishah B'Av, commemorating the period between the fall of Jerusalem and the Destruction of the Temple ...
Abel-Mizraim - The scene of the Mourning for Jacob ( Genesis 50:11 )
Tishah b'av - "ninth of Av"); day of fasting and Mourning on the ninth of Av commemorating the Destruction of the first and the second Holy Temples ...
Atad - A Canaanite, at whose threshing-floor a solemn Mourning was held over the remains of Jacob, on their way from Egypt to Hebron, Genesis 50:10,11
Aniam - (uh ni' am) Personal name meaning, “I am a people,” “I am an uncle,” or “mourning of the people
Sackcloth - Used for sacks, also for close fitting raiment in Mourning; secured by a girdle (Genesis 42:25; 1 Kings 21:27; 2 Samuel 3:31)
Abel-Mizraim - The margin of the Bible renders it, "the Mourning of the Egyptians
Weeper - ) A white band or border worn on the sleeve as a badge of Mourning
Mourning - And the astonishment of the inhabitants of the land was so great, that they gave a name to it, and called it Abel-mizraim; that is, the Mourning of the Egyptians, (Genesis 1:7-11. We find that the Israelites themselves called all places of their Mourning by one name, Bochim, that is weepers
Gash - In modern translations to cut the skin as a sign of Mourning (Jeremiah 41:5 ; Jeremiah 47:5 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ) or in the worship of pagan dieties (1 Kings 18:28 )
Abel-Mizraim - Meadow of Egypt, or Mourning of Egypt, a place "beyond," i
Lamentable - ) Mourning; sorrowful; expressing grief; as, a lamentable countenance
Ashes - Sitting down in, or covering one's self with, is the symbol of Mourning (Job 2:8; Job 42:6; Esther 4:1; Isaiah 61:3; Matthew 11:21). To eat asides expresses figuratively Mourning is one's food, i
Dirge - (Latin: dirigo, direct) ...
Song, hymn of Mourning sung at funerals or services in memory of the dead
Barber - Found only once, in Ezekiel 5:1 , where reference is made to the Jewish custom of shaving the head as a sign of Mourning
Mourn - Frequent references are found in Scripture to,
Mourning for the dead. ...
...
Penitential Mourning, by the Israelites on the day of atonement (Leviticus 23:27 ; Acts 27:9 ); under Samuel's ministry (1 Samuel 7:6 ); predicted in Zechariah (Zechariah 12:10,11 ); in many of the psalms (51, etc. Mourning was expressed, (1) by weeping (Genesis 35:8 , marg. ...
The period of Mourning for the dead varied. In 2 Samuel 3:31-35 , we have a description of the great Mourning for the death of Abner
Baldness - This probably arose from their custom of constantly shaving the head, only allowing the hair to grow as a sign of Mourning. With the Jews artificial baldness was a sign of Mourning (Isaiah 22:12 ; Jeremiah 7:29 ; 16:6 ); it also marked the conclusion of a Nazarite's vow (Acts 18:18 ; 21:24 ; Numbers 6:9 )
Mourning - Mourning. Oriental Mourning is public and careful of prescribed ceremonies. In later times for the employment of persons hired for the purpose of Mourning, Ecclesiastes 12:5; Jeremiah 9:17; Amos 5:16; Matthew 9:23, friends or passers-by to join in the lamentations of bereaved or afflicted persons, Genesis 50:3; Judges 11:40; Job 2:11; Job 30:25, etc. The period of Mourning varied
Gold, Cloth of - Gold may not replace colors of Mourning or penance, i
Weedy - ) Dressed in weeds, or Mourning garments
Sackcloth - This word is chiefly used in Scripture to denote a cloth or garment worn in Mourning, distress or mortification
Crape - Black crape is much used for Mourning garments, also for the dress of some clergymen
Abel-Mizraim - (ay' behl-mihz' ray' ihm) Place name meaning either “brook of Egypt,” or if derived from a different Hebrew word with similar spelling, “mourning of the Egyptians
Tammuz - In Amos 8:10 and Zechariah 12:10 the Mourning for ‘the only son’ may be a reference to this annual Mourning, and the words of the refrain, ‘Ah me, ah me l’ ( Jeremiah 22:18 ) may be recalled
Ashes - Ashes on the head formed one of the ordinary tokens of Mourning for the dead (see Mourning Customs as of private ( 2 Samuel 13:19 ) and national humiliation ( Nehemiah 9:1 , 1Ma 3:47 )
Baldness - (Leviticus 13:29 ; 2 Kings 2:23 ; Isaiah 3:24 ; 15:2 ; Jeremiah 47:5 ; Ezekiel 7:18 ) Artificial baldness marked the conclusion of a Nazarite's vow, (Numbers 6:9 ; Acts 18:18 ) and was a sign of Mourning
Mourning (2) - MOURNING. Mourning is associated in the Gospels (1) with ‘the appearance of the sign of the Son of Man,’ Matthew 24:30; (2) with the removal of the visible presence of the Saviour, Matthew 9:15; (3) with the death of friends. The laws of Mourning were very minute. The general time of Mourning was seven days, during which the mourner was forbidden to work, wash, anoint himself, or wear his shoes. The mourner was allowed during this period to read only the books of Job, Jeremiah, Lamentations, and the הלבות אבילות (Laws of Mourning). He might not leave town for thirty days; and in the case of Mourning for a parent he might not go out of town for the first year, till his friends told him to do so. The following is the prescribed prayer before meat to be used in the house of the mourner after burial:—...
‘Blessed art thou, O God our Lord, King of the universe, God of our Fathers, our Creator, our Redeemer, our Sanctifier, the Holy One of Jacob, the King of Life, who art good and doest good; the God of truth, the righteous Judge who judgest in righteousness, who takest the soul in judgment, and rulest alone in the universe, who doest in it according to His will, and all His ways are in Judgment, and we are His people and His servants, and in everything we are bound to praise Him and to bless Him, who shields all the calamities of Israel and will shield us in this calamity, and from this Mourning will bring us to life and peace. Comfort them in their Mourning, and make them rejoice in their agony as a man is comforted by his mother. The apostasy of a member of the family was the occasion of Mourning as for the dead, and a blasphemy spoken in the presence of the high priest was also a reason for a demonstration of Mourning
Bethezel - near Zaanan, it got no comfort from Zaanan's inhabitants in its Mourning (Micah 1:11)
Beth-le-Aphrah - The house of dust would roll in dust, a ritual expressing grief and Mourning (Micah 1:10 )
Pare - The paring of nails served as a sign of Mourning for lost parents (Deuteronomy 21:12 KJV, REB, NRSV)
Sackcloth - שַׂק), used in ordinary life for sacking, sieves, strainers, and the like, but in the Gospels twice named in connexion with prevalent Mourning customs (Matthew 11:21, Luke 10:13), coupled with ‘ashes’ (wh. The mourner wore the sackcloth garment, sometimes next the skin; and because of the garment’s coarseness it became a constant reminder of his grief, its irritation being a sort of penance; sometimes it was worn as an outer garment as a visible expression of Mourning
Sackcloth - שַׂק), used in ordinary life for sacking, sieves, strainers, and the like, but in the Gospels twice named in connexion with prevalent Mourning customs (Matthew 11:21, Luke 10:13), coupled with ‘ashes’ (wh. The mourner wore the sackcloth garment, sometimes next the skin; and because of the garment’s coarseness it became a constant reminder of his grief, its irritation being a sort of penance; sometimes it was worn as an outer garment as a visible expression of Mourning
Beer-Elim - ” Place involved in Mourning according to Isaiah's lament over Moab (Isaiah 15:8 )
Sackcloth - 2 Samuel 3:31 (b) This is a type of sorrow, grief and Mourning
a'Bel-Mizra'im - (meadow of Egypt ), the name given by the Canaanites to the floor of Atad, at which Joseph, his brothers and the Egyptians made their Mourning for Jacob
Weed - ) An article of dress worn in token of grief; a Mourning garment or badge; as, he wore a weed on his hat; especially, in the plural, Mourning garb, as of a woman; as, a widow's weeds
Lamentation - It was a frequent accompaniment of Mourning (Amos 8:10 )
Minstrel - The minstrels mentioned in Matthew 9:23 were pipers or flute-players hired to assist in Mourning
Grief And Mourning - So we are told of the Mourning of Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ). “And Jacob rent his clothes, and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days;b3he refused to be comforted; and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son Mourning. ...
Mourning was expressed in three major ways:...
Weeping was then, as now, the primary indication of grief. The loud lamentation was also a feature of Mourning. “Consider ye, and call for the Mourning women” (Jeremiah 9:17 ). The women wore black or somber material, “feign thyself to be a mourner, and put on now Mourning apparel, and anoint not thyself with oil, but be as a women that had a long time mourned for the dead” (2 Samuel 14:2 )
Dedication, Feast of the - It was observed with great joy, without Mourning or fasting
Feast of the Dedication - It was observed with great joy, without Mourning or fasting
Feast of Lights - It was observed with great joy, without Mourning or fasting
Lights, Feast of - It was observed with great joy, without Mourning or fasting
Abel the Great - " The Septuagint and the Chaldee versions so read; but "Abel" is probably right, and refers to the Mourning caused by the destruction of so many Bethshemites for looking into the ark
Turtledove - ) Any one of several species of pigeons more or less resembling the true turtledoves, as the American Mourning dove (see under Dove), and the Australian turtledove (Stictopelia cuneata)
Shaving - The Jews shaved their beards and hair in time of Mourning, repentance, or distress, Job 1:20 Jeremiah 48:37 , and in certain ceremonial purifications, Leviticus 14:9 Numbers 8:7
Widow - The widowd isle in Mourning--...
Lamentation - When a young person dies unmarried, part of the ceremony of Mourning is a form of marriage (see art. Mourning)
Mourning - It was the habit of the Hebrews, as it still is in the East, to make a great demonstration of their Mourning. "Call for the Mourning women
Weep, Weeping - A — 1: κλαίω (Strong's #2799 — Verb — klaio — klah'-yo ) is used of "any loud expression of grief," especially in Mourning for the dead, Matthew 2:18 ; Mark 5:38,39 ; 16:10 ; Luke 7:13 ; 8:52 (twice); John 11:31,33 (twice); 20:11 (twice),13,15; Acts 9:39 ; otherwise, e. ...
Note: Other synonymous verbs are threneo, "to mourn," of formal lamentation: see BEWAIL , Note (1); alalazo, "to wail;" stenazo, "to groan" (oduromai, "to lament audibly," is not used in NT; see the noun odurmos, "mourning")
Poll - Polling one's hair could be understood as a sign of Mourning
Turban - Removal of one's turban was a sign of Mourning or shame (Isaiah 3:18-23 ; Ezekiel 24:17 ,Ezekiel 24:17,24:23 )
Sackcloth - A garment of coarse material fashioned from goat or camel hair worn as a sign of Mourning or anguish, also marked by fasting and sitting on an ash heap (Isaiah 58:5 )
Ferret - It was perhaps the Lacerta gecko which was intended by the Hebrew word (anakah, a cry, "mourning," the creature which groans) here used, i
Lips - Mourning is expressed in part by covering the upper lip with one's hand (Leviticus 13:45 )
Sackcloth - In the extant literature it is almost always associated with Mourning for the dead ( Genesis 37:34 , 2 Samuel 3:31 and oft. For other tokens of grief and penitence, associated with the donning of sackcloth, such as ashes or dust on the head, and the rending of garments (this being a later substitute for their entire removal), see Mourning Customs. The waistcloth is known to have been the oldest article of dress among the Semites (see Dress, § 2 ), and as such it appears to have been retained in Mourning customs and in humiliation before God, and perhaps in the exercise of the cultus, long after it had ceased to be the only garment of the people
Baldness - A mark of Mourning (Jeremiah 16:6; Jeremiah 47:5; Ezekiel 7:18; Isaiah 15:2). The Egyptians, contrary to oriental custom, shaved on joyous occasions and only let the hair grow in Mourning; the mention of Joseph's "shaving" when summoned before Pharaoh is therefore an undesigned coincidence in Genesis 41:14, and mark of the truth of the Scripture record
Wailing - On both of these occasions Mourning with loud cries is indicated (Matthew 9:23 ‘flute-players,’ ‘tumult’; Mark 5:38 ‘wailing’; Luke 23:27 ‘lamented,’ ἐθρήνουν). ’ See also Mourning
Meditate - 31:4) and the “mourning” of doves ( Mourning, as seen in this parallelism: “Therefore will I howl for Moab, and I will cry out for all Moab; mine heart shall mourn for the men of Kir-heres” ( Tammuz - This caused great Mourning in the ancient world, and was why the women in Jerusalem wept
Pipe - Also suited by its plaintive softness to Mourning (Matthew 9:23; Jeremiah 48:36)
Mitre - Priests were prohibited from showing signs of Mourning such as dishevelled hair (Ezekiel 24:17 ; Leviticus 21:10 )
Taber - ’ Beating the breast was a familiar Oriental custom in Mourning (cf
Sackcloth - , Genesis 42:25 , and for garments worn as expressing Mourning or penitence, Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 , or for purposes of prophetic testimony, Revelation 11:3
Regret - ) Pain of mind on account of something done or experienced in the past, with a wish that it had been different; a looking back with dissatisfaction or with longing; grief; sorrow; especially, a Mourning on account of the loss of some joy, advantage, or satisfaction
Reet - ) Mourning
Sable - ) A Mourning garment; a funeral robe; - generally in the plural
Bochim - See Baca; see Mourning; see also Mulberry-tree
Baldness - Deuteronomy 21:11 may refer to a practice of making captives bald, to baldness in Mourning, or to a symbol of a change in life-style. See Mourning; Leprosy ; Hair
Mourning - One marked feature of Oriental Mourning is what may be called its studies publicity and the careful observance of the prescribed ceremonies. (Ezekiel 21:12 ; Jeremiah 31:19 ) (m) Employment of persons hired for the purpose of Mourning. (p) Mourning feast and cup of consolation. (Jeremiah 16:7,8 ) ...
The period of Mourning varied. It also mentions ten days and forty days as periods of Mourning
Mourning - The Hebrews, at the death of their friends and relations, made striking demonstrations of grief and Mourning. The time of Mourning was commonly seven days, 1 Samuel 31:11-13 ; but it was lengthened or shortened according to circumstances, Zechariah 12:10 . ...
During the time of their Mourning, the near relations of the deceased continued sitting in their houses, and fasted, 2 Samuel 12:16 , or ate on the ground. The Mourning dress among the Hebrews was not fixed either by law or custom. Anciently in times of Mourning, they clothed themselves in sackcloth, or haircloth, that is, in clothes of coarse brown or black stuff, 2 Samuel 3:31 1 Kings 21:27 Esther 4:1 Psalm 35:13 69:11 . If this be Mourning, I thought, it is of a strange kind. " ...
Some of the Jewish forms of Mourning are the appropriate and universal language of grief; others, to our modern and occidental taste, savor of extravagance
Tale - In Job 37:2 this word is rendered "sound;" Revised Version margin, "muttering;" and in Ezekiel 2:10 , "mourning
Sackcloth - People put on sackcloth as a sign of Mourning, whether for those who had just died (Genesis 37:34; 2 Samuel 3:31), for some personal distress (Job 16:15), or for a national disaster (Esther 4:1; Lamentations 2:10)
Beriah - Son of Ephraim, begotten in the days of Mourning occasioned by the death of Ephraim’s four sons, who were killed by the men of Gath whilst cattle-raiding; hence the false etymology, bera‘ah = ‘in affliction’ ( 1 Chronicles 7:23 )
Razors, Shaving - Egyptians were known for their fastidious attention to personal cleanliness and did not shave the hair of their beard and head only in times of Mourning. Shaving was practiced as a sign of Mourning (Job 1:20 ; Jeremiah 7:29 ), as a sign of subservience to a superior (Numbers 8:7 ; Genesis 41:14 ), and as a treatment for a person with leprosy (Leviticus 14:9 )
Nail - Among the ancient Arabs it was the custom for a widow to allow her nails to grow during her term of Mourning. The former passage, however, refers only to the case of a foreign captive whom a Hebrew might take to wife after a month’s seclusion, during which the care of the person was neglected in token of Mourning for the captive’s condition
Bewail - penthos, "mourning. ...
(2) Odurmos from oduromai, "to wail" (a verb not found in the NT), denotes "mourning," Matthew 2:18 ; 2 Corinthians 7:7
Mourning - Penitent Mourning was often expressed by fasting, so that the words are interchanged as synonymous (Matthew 9:15), and the day of atonement, when they "afflicted their souls," is called "the fast" (Acts 27:9; Leviticus 23:27; Israel, 1 Samuel 7:6; Nineveh, Jonah 3:5; the Jews when hereafter turning to Messiah, Zechariah 12:10-11). The high priest and Nazarites were not to go into Mourning for even father or mother or children (Leviticus 21:10-11; Numbers 6:7). The food eaten in Mourning was considered impure (Deuteronomy 26:14; Hosea 9:4). Mourning shall cease forever to God's people when Christ shall return (Revelation 7:17; Revelation 21:4; Isaiah 25:8; Isaiah 35:10)
Head - The hand on the head was a sign of Mourning ( 2 Samuel 13:19 , Jeremiah 2:37 ); so dust or ashes ( 2 Samuel 1:2 , Lamentations 2:10 ); or covering the head ( 2 Samuel 15:30 , Jeremiah 14:3 ). to loose the turban and leave the hair in disorder, was also a sign of Mourning (see AV Joah - They did so in Mourning (2 Kings 18:37 )
Naomi - In course of time he died, as also his two sons Mahlon and Chilion, who had married women of Moab, and three widows were left Mourning the loss of their husbands
Garland - Israel's days of Exile, pictured as Mourning, would give way to the celebration of God's salvation, pictured as a wedding
Ashes - often were associated with sacrifices, Mourning, and fasting
Willow - ...
The "weeping willow," memorable in connection with the Mourning Hebrew captives, Psalm 137:2 , is a native of Babylonica
Burial - The procession carried out the Mourning ritual, which could include (1) baldness and cutting of beard, (2) rending garments and wearing sackcloth, (3) loud and agonized weeping, and (4) putting dust on the head and sitting in ashes (2 Samuel 1:11-12 ; 2 Samuel 13:31 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 ; Isaiah 3:24 , Isaiah 22:12 ; Jeremiah 7:29 ; Ezekiel 7:18 ; Joel 1:8 ). ...
The period of Mourning varied in response to circumstances. Mourning for Jacob lasted seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ), while for Aaron and Moses it lasted thirty days (Numbers 20:29 ; Deuteronomy 34:5-8 ). ...
Israel's Mourning rites reflect in part the belief that death is something evil. In addition to personal sorrow, the Mourning rites reflected at least to a degree the mourner's humiliation because of his necessarily close contact with the body of the deceased
Abel-Mizraim - ("the Mourning of the Egyptians" or "the funeral from Egypt". of Jordan; but Genesis 50:13 plainly shows it was not till after the Mourning at Abel-Mizraim that "Jacob's sons carried him into the land of Canaan
Black - “Black” is also used figuratively to describe Mourning (Job 30:28 ; Jeremiah 4:28 ; Jeremiah 8:21 ; Jeremiah 14:2 ), a visionless day (Micah 3:6 ), the abode of the dead (Job 3:5 ; Jude 1:13 ), and the treachery of Job's friends (Job 6:16 )
Cutting - The tearing of the flesh from grief and anguish of spirit in Mourning for the dead was regarded as a mark of affection (Jeremiah 16:6 ; 41:5 ; 48:37 )
Forehead - Shaving the forehead in sign of Mourning is forbidden ( Deuteronomy 14:1 )
Leviathan - In Job 3:8 it should be translated 'leviathan,' instead of 'their Mourning,' and this confirms the general meaning of some monster
Sackcloth - It was used for straining liquids, for sacks, and for Mourning garments
Baldness (Natural or Artificial) - It was customary among eastern nations to cut off the hair of the head, or to shave the head, as a token of Mourning, on the death of a relative, Job 1:20 Jeremiah 16:6
Abigail - Her manners and conversation gained for her his esteem, and as soon as the days of Mourning for Nabal's death, which happened soon afterwards, were over, he made her his wife
Black - A black dress, or Mourning as, to be clothed in black
Leviathan - , and once in the margin, Job 3:8, where the text has "mourning
Bath, Bathing - This was a prescribed part of the Jewish ritual of purification in cases of accident, or of leprous or ordinary uncleanness, (Leviticus 15 ; 16:28 ; 22:6 ; Numbers 19:7 ; 19 ; 2 Samuel 11:2,4 ; 2 Kings 5:10 ) as also after Mourning, which always implied defilement
Rending of Garments - It was not to be repaired in the case of Mourning for parents till the time of Mourning was past, but for others it might be loosely drawn together, leaving a ragged tear, after seven days, and properly repaired after thirty days. ‘Mourning’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Hushai - As David escaped, leaving Jerusalem to his son Absalom, Hushai joined him, Mourning (2 Samuel 15:32 )
Hair - In Mourning they wholly neglected it, or shaved it close, or plucked it out by handfuls, Jeremiah 7:29
Beard - The law forbade them to 'mar the corners of their beards,' Leviticus 19:27 , and a priest must not shave off the corner of his beard as a sign of Mourning
Armageddon - If so, the term must have been a proverbial one for a place of destruction and Mourning
Rachel - The prophecy, Jeremiah 31:15 , representing her as Mourning over her posterity, the tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, is quoted in Matthew 2:18 , in reference to the massacre at Bethlehem, in which undoubtedly many of her descendants suffered
Headdress - In Leviticus 10:6 the sense of "uncover (literally, "let loose") not your heads" is "let not your hair fall loosely from your head" as in Mourning. The pe-eer was a holiday ornamental head-dress; (Isaiah 61:3) "beauty for ashes" (a play on similar sounds, pe-eer epher ), to give them the ornamental headdress worn on joyous occasions (Ezekiel 24:17) for the ashes cast on the head in Mourning (2 Samuel 13:19)
Ashes - Ashes, mostly from burnt wood, were used as a sign of sorrow or Mourning, either put on the head, 2 Samuel 13:19 , or on the body with sackcloth, Esther 4:1 ; Jeremiah 6:26 ; Lamentations 3:16 ; Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 ; or strewn on a couch on which to lie, Esther 4:3 ; Isaiah 58:5 ; Jonah 3:6
Zaanan - " Maurer and Pusey construe, "the Mourning of Bethezel takes away from you her shelter" (its stay or standing)
Mourning Customs - Mourning CUSTOMS . As the piercing, tremulous shrieks are repeated, a few inquiries are made as to the locality and circumstances, and the rapidly increasing cry is accepted as an invitation and claim to proceed to the house of Mourning. In addition to the successive outbursts of grief by members of the family, who have to be comforted and pleaded with and led away from the prostrate figure of the dead, the sustained ceremony of Mourning is attended to by the neighbours. ...
The references to Mourning in the Bible show that the custom of to-day in Palestine is the same as in ancient times with regard to the house of Mourning, although special features of liturgical form now belong to the Synagogue, the Church, and the Mosque. One of the features to which the New Jerusalem owes its title is the absence of Mourning and tears ( Revelation 7:17 )
Fast, Fasting - ...
As a whole, however, fasting appears to be a private matter in the Bible, an expression of personal devotion linked to three major kinds of crisis in life: lamentation/penitence, Mourning, and petition. ...
Fasting also appears as a sign of Mourning. Such behavior was a sign of his Mourning over them (v. Zechariah describes the commemoration of Israel's tragic days of past defeat and judgment as times of Mourning attended by fasting (7:5). Jesus speaks of the time of his departure from his disciples as a time of Mourning when it will be entirely appropriate to fast (Matthew 9:14-15 ; Mark 2:18-20 ; Luke 5:33-35 ). ...
The purpose of fasting is never explicitly stated in Scripture but its connection to penitence, Mourning, and supplication suggests a self-denial that opens one to God and to the immaterial aspects of life
Mission Indians of California - Among the principal ceremonies enacted were the boys' initiation and annual Mourning rite
Atad - ) A trodden space for threshing, beyond Jordan, where Joseph and his brethren and the Egyptian retinue made for seven days "great and very sore lamentation" over the body of Jacob, whence the Canaanites called the place Abel Mizraim, "the Mourning of the Egyptians
Ember Days - Others derive it from theAnglo-Saxon word aemyrian, meaning "ashes," because these days areappointed to be kept as fasts, and ashes, as a sign of humiliationand Mourning, were constantly associated with fasting
Beard - The custom was to shave or pluck off the hair as a sign of Mourning (Isaiah 50:6 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ; Ezra 9:3 )
Sackcloth - And at any time when a reverse of circumstances took place, they rent the sackcloth from their loins: hence David is represented as saying, "Thou hast turned for me my Mourning into dancing; thou hast put off my sackcloth, and girded me with gladness
Jet - ) A variety of lignite, of a very compact texture and velvet black color, susceptible of a good polish, and often wrought into Mourning jewelry, toys, buttons, etc
Beard - The Egyptians mostly shaved the hair of the face and head, except in Mourning. It was shaved in Mourning (Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 41:5; Jeremiah 48:37)
Nail - If an Israelite desired to marry a prisoner of war, she was to cut her nails either as a sign of Mourning for her parents or as part of her purification on entering the community of Israel (Deuteronomy 21:12 )
Domino - ) A Mourning veil formerly worn by women
Ashes (2) - —Used twice in the Gospels, referring to an ancient and widespread Eastern Mourning custom
Wedding Guests, Bridegroom And the - The disciples of the Baptist are reminded that their master had referred to Christ as the Bridegroom, and all the questioners are taught that the time of the visible presence of Jesus among His disciples should be for them a time of rejoicing and not of Mourning and fasting; but when His visible presence is withdrawn, then they shall lament and be made sorrowful and then fasting and Mourning shall be consistently their portion
Dust - To place dust on one's head was a sign of Mourning (Lamentations 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:30 ; Revelation 18:19 ). Dust on the head may have been a sign of defeat and shame as well as Mourning in Joshua 7:6
Jahaz - Isaiah's oracle against Moab described the isolated city of Jahaz as hearing the Mourning of Heshbon and Elealeh (Isaiah 15:4 )
Sighing - ’ In the second, where a stronger expression is used through the compound, the Pharisees are asking for a sign, and He ‘sighed in his spirit,’ evidently thinking of the speedy appearance of the sign for which they asked, and Mourning over the terrible nature which it would bear
Dedication, Feast of the - ) It was an occasion for feasting and jollity: the people assembled at the synagogues, carrying branches of palms and other trees; the services were jubilant, no fast or Mourning could begin during the period, and the Hallel ( Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 114:1-8 ; Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 ; Psalms 118:1-29 ) was chanted
Leviathan - (jointed monster ) occurs five times in the text of the Authorized Version, and once in the margin of ( Job 3:8 ) where the text has "mourning
Sackcloth - a sort of Mourning worn at the death of a friend or relation
Baldness - Artificial baldness was used as a token of Mourning; it is threatened to the voluptuous daughters of Israel, instead of well set hair, Isaiah 3:24
Dance - The dance is spoken of in Holy Scripture universally as symbolical of some rejoicing, and is often coupled for the sake of contrast with Mourning, as in (Ecclesiastes 3:4 ) comp
Dance - The dance is spoken of in Holy Scripture universally as symbolical of some rejoicing, and is often coupled for the sake of contrast with Mourning, as in (Ecclesiastes 3:4 ) comp
Beard - The custom was and is to shave or pluck it and the hair out in Mourning, (Ezra 9:3 ; Isaiah 15:2 ; 50:6 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ; 48:37 ) Baruch 6:31 ; to neglect it in seasons of permanent affliction, (2 Samuel 19:24 ) and to regard any insult to it as the last outrage which enmity can inflict
Sandal - (Exodus 3:5 ; Joshua 5:15 ) It was also an indication of violent emotion, or of Mourning, if a person appeared barefoot in public
Laugh - Laughter is frequently contrasted with signs of Mourning (Job 8:21 ; Psalm 126:2 ; Luke 6:21 ,Luke 6:21,6:25 )
Sandals, Shoes - Shoes were removed at the doorway of the tent or house, or during a period of Mourning
Armageddon - ...
The Mourning at Josiah's death in the valley of Megiddo became proverbial for the most poignant grief
Coming to Christ: as a Sinner - ' So without Mourning because he had lost his silken habit, he put on the rags of a beggar, and he saw the king's face as well as if he had worn his scarlet and fine linen
Hair - The Hebrew wore long beards; the Egyptians only in Mourning did so. The law forbad them to "round the corners of their heads, or mar the cornners of the beard"; for the Arabs in honour of the idol Orotal cut the hair from the temples in a circular form, and in Mourning marred their beards (Leviticus 19:27; Jeremiah 9:26 margin, Jeremiah 48:37)
Plague - Instruments of Divine punishment are insects, beasts, angels, hail-stones, death, Mourning, want, and fire
Foot - Nakedness of feet was a sign of Mourning. God says to Ezekiel, "Make no Mourning for the dead, and put on thy shoes upon thy feet," Ezekiel 24:17
Black - ) Mourning garments of a black color; funereal drapery
Anointing - Was a custom in general use among the Hebrews and other oriental nations, and its omission was one sign of Mourning, Isaiah 61:3
Cup - The "cup of consolation" (Jeremiah 16:7 ) refers to the custom of friends sending viands and wine to console relatives in Mourning (Proverbs 31:6 )
Dibon - In pronouncing judgment on Moab, Isaiah described the religious Mourning at the worship place in Dibon (Isaiah 15:2 ), showing that Moab had gained control of Dibon by about 730 B
Megiddo - ...
After returning from Exile, Zechariah prophesied that the Mourning for the false deities of Hadad and Rimmon (Hadad-rimmon) that took place in the plain below Megiddon (Megiddo) would be matched by Israel's Mourning for its smitten Lord (Zechariah 12:11 )
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the Gloria in excelsis and Hallelujah are omitted; and, it being a day of Mourning, the altar is of a violet colour. At these masses the altar is put in Mourning, and the only decorations are a cross in the middle of six yellow wax lights; the dress of the celebrant, and the very mass book, are black; many parts of the office are omitted, and the people are dismissed without the benediction
Hair - Cutting off the hair was a sign of Mourning, Jeremiah 7:29 ; but sometimes in Mourning they suffered it to grow long
Ezer - It may be history of clans of Ephraim and refer to a moment of Mourning in the history of families descended from Ephraim
Sorrow, Sorrowful - ...
A — 4: πένθος (Strong's #3997 — Noun Neuter — penthos — pen'-thos ) "mourning," "sorrow," Revelation 18:7 (twice); 21:4; see MOURN
Bathing - During a time of Mourning or fasting, the face and clothes were left unwashed (2 Samuel 12:20 ), a practice forbidden by Jesus (Matthew 6:17 )
Josiah - Indeed, the Mourning was such as to become proverbial
Pipe - (Isaiah 30:29 ) The sound of the pipe was apparently a soft wailing note, which made it appropriate to be used in Mourning and at funerals (Matthew 9:23 ) and in the lament of the prophet over the destruction of Moab
Megiddo - So general and bitter was this Mourning that it became a proverb, to which (Zechariah 12:11,12 ) alludes
Church Colors - The use of the Church colors,besides "decking the place of His Sanctuary" is also most helpfulto the devotions of the people, in that it teaches them by the eyethe various Seasons of the Church's joy or Mourning
Josiah - That he was beloved by his people is indicated by their deep and long-continued Mourning
Burial - At the death of Lazarus 'Jews' were present, Mourning with the family four days after the death; and in the case of the daughter of Jairus there was a 'tumult' with weeping and great wailing; these were probably hired mourners (as is the custom to this day), for 'musicians' were also present
Give Drink - In this time of judgment and Mourning, Israel was not to be given “the cup of consolation to drink” ( Shaving - In time of Mourning the Jews shaved their heads, and neglected to trim their beards
Abner - David, though unable to punish the powerful brothers, solemnized Abner's funeral with great respect and general Mourning, and poured forth a simple dirge over the slain hero
Beard - In this respect they differed from the Egyptians, who shaved, except when Mourning, Genesis 41:14; though they had the custom of wearing false beards, made of plaited hair, and graduated according to rank
Cuttings in the Flesh - The reference is to the practice, not confined to the Hebrews or even to their Semitic kinsfolk, of making incisions in the face, hands ( Jeremiah 48:37 ), and other parts of the body to the effusion of blood, as part of the rites of Mourning for the dead (see Marks, § 4), and by a natural transition, to which the wearing of sackcloth forms a parallel, in times of national calamity. Bar 6:31 ) or part of the head hair or of the beard in token of Mourning ( Isaiah 15:2 ; Isaiah 22:12 , Ezekiel 7:18 , Amos 8:10 etc
Dead - ...
DEAD, MourningS FOR THE. " ...
"We found her busy at the loom, in a cheap Mourning habit, which she wore I suppose for the old woman's death. To sit in sackcloth and ashes, was a frequent expression of Mourning in the oriental regions; and persons overwhelmed with grief, and unable to sustain the weight of their calamities, often threw themselves upon the earth, and rolled in the dust; and the more dirty the ground was, the better it served to defile them, and to express their sorrow and dejection. To cover the lips was a very ancient sign of Mourning; and it continues to be practised among the Jews of Barbary to this day. This allusion is perhaps revolved in the charge which Ezekiel received when his wife died, to abstain from the customary forms of Mourning: "Forbear to cry; make no Mourning for the dead; bind the tire of thy head upon thee, and put on thy shoes upon thy feet, and cover not thy lips, and eat not the bread of men,"...
Ezekiel 24:17
Week - celebrate the marriage feast for a week with Leah (Genesis 29:27), are explicit allusions to this division of time (compare Judges 14:12); also Joseph's Mourning for Jacob seven days (Genesis 50:10)
Raven - The shrewd and ill visage of the raven, its Mourning hue, its solitary haunts, harsh croak, instant scenting of premonitory decomposition even before death, made it be regarded as of ill omen
Sheol - In the first biblical appearance of the word Jacob said that he would “go down into the grave unto my son Mourning” ( Fasting - Because of the association of fasting with Mourning, Jesus’ disciples did not fast while he was with them
Lamentations, Book of - (lay mehn tay' shuhnss) Twenty-fifth book of Bible preserving Mourning over the fall of Jerusalem in 587 B. While Lamentations 3:1 further extends the Mourning over Jerusalem's destruction, it also declares that God's steadfast love gives reason to hope that He will extend mercy in the future
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the gloria in excelsis and hallelujah are omitted, and, it being a day of Mourning, the altar is of a violet colour. At these masses the altar is put in Mourning, and the only decorations are a cross in the middle of six yellow wax lights: the dress of the celebrant, and the very mass-book, are black; many parts of the office are omitted, and the people are dismissed without the benediction
Dry - Without tears as dry eyes dry Mourning
Rachel - Centuries later, Jeremiah imagined the dead Rachel Mourning from her tomb as her descendants were led past on their way to captivity in a foreign land (Jeremiah 31:15)
Stephen - His Christian brethren forsook not the remains of this holy man; but took care to bury him, and accompanied his funeral with great Mourning, Acts 8:2
Gate - The woes of a city were disclosed in the Mourning or loneliness of these places of resort, Isaiah 14:31 Jeremiah 14:2
Foot - Nakedness of feet was a sign of Mourning. God says to Ezekiel, "Make no Mourning for the dead, and put on thy shoes upon thy feet," &c
Hair - Mourning was indicated by disheveled, unkept hair (Joshua 7:6 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 )
Esther - Mordecai and Esther put forth two decrees: first, that the 14th and 15th days of the month Adar were to be kept annually as ‘days of feasting and gladness, and of sending portions one to another, and gifts to the poor’ ( Esther 9:22 ); and, second, that a day of Mourning and fasting should be observed in memory of the sorrow which the king’s first decree had occasioned to the Jewish people ( Esther 9:29-32 , cf
Leper - , "the hill of scraping," Leviticus 14:33-53,; Job 2:8—and the leper was compelled to wear Mourning
Bethshemesh - In the field of Joshua the Bethshemite was "the great Abel" (the Septuagint reads Aben "stone"; others retaining Abel explain it "the stone of Mourning," compare 1 Samuel 6:19) whereon the ark was set (1 Samuel 6:18)
Leviathan - ]'>[3] ‘their Mourning’) aroused by magicians ( Job 3:8 ) is most likely a denizen of the abyss which threatens the world with destruction
Flute-Players - The other use, the employment of flutes for Mourning, seems to have been widely diffused and of great antiquity, for it is clearly alluded to by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 48:36); and can be traced over a large part of the Gentile world—Phœnicians, Carians, Greeks, Romans, and probably Assyrians
Hair - Still this seems to have been a Hebrew custom in Mourning, Jeremiah 7:29; while, on the contrary, the Egyptians let their hair grow when in distress, and shaved or cut it on returning prosperity
Fasting - ...
Fasting probably meant complete abstinence, though the Talmud allowed lentils to be eaten during the period of Mourning. The usual reasons for a fast were either Mourning ( 1 Samuel 31:13 ) or a wish to deprecate the Divine wrath ( 2 Samuel 12:16-17 )
Hair -
The Egyptians let the hair of their head and beard grow only when they were in Mourning, shaving it off at other times
Gestures - See Hand, Mourning Customs, Salutation
Anointing - To neglect this was a sign of Mourning 2 Samuel 14:2 ; Daniel 10:3
Adonis - The eastern people, in imitation of her Mourning, generally established some solemn days for the bewailing of Adonis
Fasting - " In Matthew 9:14 "fast" is explained by "mourn" in Matthew 9:15, so that fasting was but an outward expression of Mourning (Psalms 69:10), not meritorious, nor sanctifying in itself. Instances of special fasts of individuals and of the people in the Old Testament, either in Mourning and humiliation or in prayer, occur in Judges 20:26; 1 Samuel 1:7; 1 Samuel 20:34; 1 Samuel 31:13; 2 Samuel 1:12; 2 Samuel 12:21; 2 Samuel 3:35; 1 Kings 21:9-12; Ezra 8:21-23; Ezra 10:6; Esther 4:16; Nehemiah 1:4
Garments - ...
The garments of Mourning among the Hebrews were sackcloth and haircloth, and their color dark brown or black, Isaiah 50:3 Revelation 6:12 . As the prophets were penitents by profession, their common clothing was Mourning
Aaron - Yet the people loved him, and the Mourning over his death, which lasted 30 days, Numbers 20:28, was sincere
Sandals - The poor of course often went barefoot but this was not customary among the rich, except as a sign of Mourning, ...
2 Samuel 15:30 Isaiah 20:2-4 Ezekiel 24:17,23
Ancestor-Worship - Many Mourning customs find their explanation in this same dread of the spirit but lately set free from its human home. ...
( b ) Evidence from Mourning customs
Shimei, Shimeites - In Zechariah 12:13 the family of the Shimeites are mentioned as participants in the Mourning for national guilt; they appear in this connexion as representatives of the Levites
Color, Symbolic Meaning of - ...
Black signifies gloom, Mourning, evil, judgment, and death (Lamentations 4:8 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 6:2,6 ; Revelation 6:5,12 )
Embalm - Diodorus long subsequently mentions 30 days as the time of embalming, and the Mourning for a king 72 days
Josiah - There was great Mourning for him throughout the land (2 Chronicles 35:24-25 )
Bag - The same Hebrew word is translated as sackcloth worn during times of Mourning or humiliation
Sandal - A sign of Mourning (2 Samuel 15:30; Ezekiel 24:17); humiliation (Isaiah 20:2; Isaiah 20:4; Ezekiel 16:10), "I shod thee with badgers' skins" or seal skins, and skins of other marine animals of the Red Sea; the material of the Hebrew shoes and of the tabernacle covering
Esau - Esau hated his brother, and intended, when the days of Mourning for his father were ended, to kill him
Sepulchres - These were formed with great care, and finished with extraordinary neatness: and at the foot of each grave was enclosed a small earthen vessel, in which was planted a sprig of myrtle, regularly watered everyday by the Mourning friend who visited it
Fasting (2) - Alluding to a Rabbinic ordinance that all Mourning be suspended during the marriage-week, He says that fasting, which is a sign of Mourning, would be inconsistent with the joy which ‘the children of the bride-chamber’ experience ‘while the bridegroom is with them
Liturgy - The vestments used mark out the wearer as the representative of the great High Priest, Christ; their fine texture indicates the solemnity of the occasion, the various colors, white, red, green, violet, and black, signify purity and joy, charity, hope, penance, and Mourning respectively
Repentance - A legal repentance flows only from a sense of danger and fear of wrath; but an evangelical repentance is a true Mourning for sin, and an earnest desire of deliverance from it
Dance - Gesenius however translates machalath "a stringed instrument," and machol "dancing" Mendelssohn makes machol , "a hollow musical instrument" (Psalms 150:4, margin) Expressing joy, as contrasted with Mourning (Ecclesiastes 3:4; Psalms 30:11)
Har-Magedon - The primary reference, no doubt, would be to Israel’s victory ‘by the waters of Megiddo’ over the kings of Canaan (Judges 5:19), which might be taken as typical of the triumph of God and His Kingdom over the hostile world-powers; but the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan at the eastern extremity of the plain (1 Samuel 31:1), the disastrous struggle of Josiah on the same field against Pharaohnecoh (2 Kings 23:29, 2 Chronicles 35:22), and Zechariah’s reference to ‘the Mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon’ (Zechariah 12:11), would heighten the suggestion of a great day of overthrow and destruction
Gedaliah - "...
Even reverence for the temple, though in ruins, revived under him; and men from Shechem, Shiloh, and Samaria came with their offerings and badges of Mourning for the destruction of the Lord's house and the holy city (Jeremiah 41:5)
Shoe Sandal - Mourning)
Voice - 39:14), Mourning for present or anticipated tragedy ( Elder; Aged - “Then shall the virgin rejoice in the dance, both young men [4] and old together: for I will turn their Mourning into joy, and will comfort them, and make them rejoice from their sorrow” ( Music - The ancient Hebrews had a great taste for music, which they used in their religious services, in their public and private rejoicing, at their weddings and feasts, and even in their Mourning. We have in Scripture canticles of joy, of thanksgiving, of praise, of Mourning; also mournful elegies or songs, as those of David on the death of Saul and Abner, and the Lamentations of Jeremiah on the destruction of Jerusalem; so, too, songs of victory, triumph, and gratulation, as that which Moses sung after passing the Red Sea, that of Deborah and Barak, and others
Nail - Margin: "suffer to grow," the opposite sense, will refer to her seclusion a month in Mourning with shaven head and unpared nails
Zechariah - ...
Chapters 7,8, delivered two years later, are an answer to the question whether the days of Mourning for the destruction of the city should be any longer kept, and an encouraging address to the people, assuring them of God's presence and blessing
Eagle - In Micah 1:16, "make thee bald (shaving the head betokening Mourning)
Foot - To walk barefoot was the symbol of Mourning ( 2 Samuel 15:30 ) or slavery ( Isaiah 20:2 )
Games (2) - But in Galilee the children played their immemorial games:...
‘A wedding or a festival,...
A Mourning or a funeral,...
As if his whole vocation...
Were endless imitation
Anointing - Abstinence from it was a sign of Mourning
Pipe Flute - But the flute was also the characteristic instrument in the ritual of Mourning
Head, Headship - Blushing, tears, paleness, and flushing may show fear, anger, or Mourning. Men covered their heads in times of despair, Mourning, and defeat (2 Samuel 15:30 ; Esther 6:12 ; Jeremiah 14:3 )
Consolation - Consolation is the attendant to Mourning (Job 29:25 ; Jeremiah 16:7 ), due perhaps to the loss of a close relative (2 Samuel 12:24 ; 1 Chronicles 7:22 ; John 11:19 )
Face - When in Mourning, the face is covered (2 Samuel 19:4 )
Torment - ’ The torments of Babylon the Great consist of plagues, death, Mourning, famine, and burning with fire (Revelation 18:7 f
Samuel - Finally, Samuel's death brought national Mourning (1 Samuel 25:1 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 )
Face - Covering the face in 2 Samuel 19:4 is a sign of Mourning (cf
Hand, Right Hand - Mourning can involve the slashing of the hand (Jeremiah 48:37 )
Anoint - To cease anointing was a mark of Mourning (2 Samuel 14:2; Daniel 10:3; Matthew 6:17)
Fasting - has been practised in all ages, and among all nations, in times of Mourning, sorrow, and affliction
Jacob - The days of Mourning for my father are at hand; then will I slay my brother Jacob,"...
Genesis 27:36-41 . After a general Mourning of seventy days, he solicited the king's permission to go with the remains of Jacob into Canaan, to which Pharaoh consented; and with Joseph went up all the state officers and principal nobility of Egypt, so that when they came to the place of interment, the Canaanites were astonished, and said, "This is a grievous Mourning to the Egyptians," Genesis 50:1-11
Joel - Assemble the congregation for Mourning and repentance (Joel 2:15-17 ). God Will Respond to His People's Mourning and Repentance (Joel 2:18-27 )
Nahum, Theology of - As with the woe-oracle, the dirge has its origin in funerary Mourning. Janzen, Mourning Cry and Woe Oracle ; B
Josiah - the hill of Megiddo, the scene of godly Josiah's fall through descending to the world's carnal strifes as Babylon's ally (Revelation 16:14-18); the Jews' future Mourning for Him whom they pierced, before God's interposition against all nations confederate against Jerusalem, answers to their Mourning for Josiah at Megiddo (Zechariah 12:10-11)
Fertility Cult - Both skin and earth were cut as a sign of Mourning (prohibited by Deuteronomy 14:1 )
Herod the Great - He ordered that the heads of the chief families in Judaea should be shut up in the Hippodrome at Jericho, to be put to death as soon as he expired, that there might be Mourning at his death! This cruel order was not carried out
Levites - They wore no particular habit to distinguish them from the other Israelites, and God ordained nothing particularly for their Mourning, 2 Chronicles 29:34
Light - ...
Thy sun shall no more decline; Neither shall thy moon wane; ...
For Jehovah shall be thine everlasting light; And the days of thy Mourning shall cease
Burial - It is evident that this sort of Mourning and lamentation was a kind of art among the Jews: "Wailing shall be in the streets; and they shall call such as are skilful of lamentation to wail," Amos 5:16 . To the dreadful noise and tumult of the hired mourners, the following passage of Jeremiah indisputably refers; and shows the custom to be derived from a very remote antiquity: "Call for the Mourning women that they may come; and send for cunning women, that they may come, and let them make haste, and take up a wailing for us, that our eyes may run down with tears, and our eyelids gush out with waters," Jeremiah 9:17
Colour - It was the emblem of Mourning, affliction, calamity (Jeremiah 14:2 ; Lamentations 4:8 ; 5:10 )
Funeral, Rites - This Mourning lasted from forty to seventy days, during which time they embalmed the body
Dove - Their plaintive note symbolizes the Mourning penitent (Isaiah 59:11)
Locusts - "Therefore also now saith the Lord, Turn ye even to me with all your heart, and with fasting, and with weeping, and with Mourning: and rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the Lord your God: for he is gracious and merciful; slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil
Inquisition - ...
As soon as they are imprisoned, their friends go into Mourning, and speak of them as dead, not daring to solicit their pardon, lest they should be brought in as accomplices
Pass Over - 50:4 where the days of Mourning over Jacob “were past
Habits - Their stuffs were fabricated of various materials; but wool was generally used in their finer fabrics; and the hair of goats, camels, and even of horses, was manufactured for coarser purposes, especially for sackcloth, which they wore in time of Mourning and distress. Sackcloth of black goat's hair was manufactured for Mournings; the colour and the coarseness of which being reckoned more suitable to the circumstances of the wearer, than the finer and more valuable texture which the hair of white goats supplied. The ancient Jews very seldom wore any covering upon the head, except when they were in Mourning, or worshipping in the temple, or in the synagogue
Mephibosheth - His squalid appearance, with unwashed feet, unattended beard, and soiled clothes, indicating the deepest Mourning ever since the king departed, attested his truthfulness
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - Thence he passed into Illyria, and so to Italy, which, in the words of Jerome, "put off its Mourning on Eusebius's return
Greetings - ...
The Rabbis forbade one Mourning for the dead to salute
Offer - The word is also used of the imminence of foreboding events: “… Esau said in his heart, The days of Mourning for my father are at hand [1] …” ( House - 50:4, however, uses bayith in the sense of “a royal court” or all the people in a king’s court: “And when the days of his Mourning were past, Joseph spake unto the house of Pharaoh
Lord's Supper - It is not a time of Mourning, but a time of joyful fellowship with the risen Lord (1 Corinthians 10:16; 1 Corinthians 11:26; cf
Repentance - Fasting, the wearing of sackcloth (the traditional attire for Mourning), the scattering of ashes (Isaiah 58:5 ; Nehemiah 9:1 ; Daniel 9:3 ), and the recitation of prayers and psalms in a penitential liturgy characterized this collective experience of worship
Music - Music also accompanied Mourning and singing at funerals (Matthew 9:23; Luke 7:32; see FUNERAL)
Hair - Arab women cut off their hair in Mourning
Ostrich - " The prophet beautifully makes allusion to it when he saith, "I will make a wailing like the dragon, and Mourning as the ostrich
Oil - Ruth 3:3, 2 Samuel 12:20), except in time of Mourning (2 Samuel 14:2, Daniel 10:3)
Work - “To make a Mourning” is to observe it: “… And he [4] made a Mourning for his father seven days” ( Go Down - When Jacob mourned over Joseph whom he thought to be dead, he said: “For I will go down into the grave unto my son Mourning” ( Nehemiah, Theology of - Their sons are Mourning and confessing their sins. When all the people are weeping and Mourning, they are exhorted to rejoice and send gifts to each other (8:9-10)
Fasting - It is concerning fasts we are now speaking; and the subject is, what authority do they derive for observance in Scripture? When holy men of old were, in their hallowed seasons, Mourning over the sins of fallen nature, no doubt the bodies were neglected, in numberless instances, in refusing to take food
Esther - Mourning rites are appropriate responses to national danger (Esther 4:1-4 )
Burial - By the law also nothing ought to be carried into a Mourning house (as being unclean) of that which was sanctified, as for instance tithes
Piety - It turns the curse into a blessing; it enters the house of Mourning, and soothes the troubled mind; it prepares us for all, sustains us in all, sanctifies us by all, and delivers us from all
Ezekiel, Theology of - When she passed away, God told him not to enter into the customary period of Mourning. Times of sorrow for which no Mourning could be adequate were about to descend upon them. ...
Next, again at the north gate, he saw women "mourning for Tammuz" (v
Music And Musical Instruments - (They were unsuitable for times of Mourning; see Psalms 137:2 , a passage which further shows that the instrument must have been, unlike a modern harp, easily portable. It was used in Mourning ( Jeremiah 48:36 , cf
Sanhedrin - ’ The prisoner had always to be dressed in Mourning
Marks - This was not a sign of Mourning, as is often, but erroneously, supposed; it was an act of homage done to the departed, with the object of inducing the spirit not to molest those left behind
Know, Knowledge - ...
The word "know" reflects a variety of skills and professional abilities such as hunting (Genesis 25:27 ), sailing (1 Kings 9:27 ), playing the harp (1 Samuel 16:16 ), professional Mourning (Amos 5:16 ), and reading (Isaiah 29:11 )
Vine - The vintage was a season of great mirth, Isaiah 16:9,10 , and often of excesses and idolatry, Judges 9:27 ; while the Mourning and languishing of the vine was a symbol of general distress, Isaiah 24:7 Habakkuk 3:17 Malachi 3:11
Daniel - On another occasion his prayers were accompanied by three weeks of Mourning and fasting (Daniel 10:2-3), and once again his faith was rewarded by answered prayer (Daniel 10:11)
Samuel - While Mourning over the many evils which now fell upon the nation, he is suddenly summoned (ch
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - or May, 586, at Toledo, according to some reports constant to the beliefs in which he had lived, according to others—less trustworthy—a repentant convert to Catholicism, Mourning over the unrighteous death of his first-born son
Terah - But such was the depth, and the sincerity, and the true piety of Abram's Mourning for his father, that, by the time that the days of his Mourning were accomplished, Abram's first faith in God had come back again to his dead heart. The call of God sounded more and more commanding in his Mourning heart; till the promise became, even more than at the beginning, both a staff of God in his hand and a cordial of God in his heart
Dispersion - Their Mourning for his death (‘noctibus continuis bustum frequentarunt,’ Suet. Iulius Caesar, 84) reminds us of the Mourning of the Jews in London for Edward VII
Dispersion - Their Mourning for his death (‘noctibus continuis bustum frequentarunt,’ Suet. Iulius Caesar, 84) reminds us of the Mourning of the Jews in London for Edward VII
Ephraim (1) - The last notice we have of him is his Mourning for his sons killed in the foray by the men of Gath, and naming his new-born son (See BERIAH from the calamity, unconscious that that son would be the progenitor of the most remarkable of all his descendants, Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:20-23)
Leper - " Hence he had to wear the badges of Mourning, a covering upon his upper lip, and was regarded "as one dead" (Leviticus 13:45; Numbers 12:12)
Burial - ; Thomson, Land and Book; Bender, ‘Beliefs, Rites, and Customs of the Jews connected with Death, Burial, and Mourning,’ in JQR Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - Mourning is the evidence of the break-up of the self-complacency which is the chief obstacle to the Kingdom of God. The Beatitudes express His own humanly discovered secret of happiness; He has Himself known the blessedness or Mourning, though never, of course, over His own sin, and He imparts the secret to His follower
Slave, Slavery (2) - And in later literature the life of the Jewish home is represented as united and happy, master and slave partaking of the same food, exchanging words of respect and tenderness, and Mourning over the separation effected by death (Berakhôth 16b, Kethubôth 61)
Joseph - When the bloody garment was brought in, Jacob in his affection for him,—that same affection which, on a subsequent occasion, when it was told him that after all Joseph was alive, made him as slow to believe the good tidings as he was now quick to apprehend the sad; in this his affection for him, I say, Jacob at once concluded the worst, and "he rent his clothes and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days, and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted, and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son Mourning
Holiness - ); and, for priests, compliance with special rules about Mourning and marriage ( Leviticus 21:1-15 )
Idolatry - Related to such nature-worship perhaps was the Mourning for Tammuz [3] ( Ezekiel 8:14 , Isaiah 17:10 RVm High Priest - This meant he had to avoid defilement by contact with the dead, even in the case of his own parents and was forbidden to show any outward sign of Mourning
Isaac - Esau's words imply his thinking Isaac near death, "the days of Mourning for my father are at hand
Ugarit - The world went into Mourning
Head - The Mourning custom of casting dust on the head (Revelation 18:19; cf
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - Led in by Peter Paul sat at the same Lord's table, and ate the same bread, and drank the same wine, with both old and young communicants, who had not yet put off their garments of Mourning because of Paul
Arms - ...
The loss of the shield in fight was excessively resented by the Jewish warriors, as well as lamented by them; for it was a signal aggravation of the public Mourning, that "the shield of the mighty was vilely cast away," 2 Samuel 1:21
da'Vid - The reception of the tidings of the death of his rival and of his friend, the solemn Mourning, the vent of his indignation against the bearer of the message, the pathetic lamentation that followed, will close the second period of David's life
Head - The Mourning custom of casting dust on the head (Revelation 18:19; cf
Sabbath - The joyous character of the Sabbath is reflected in, among other things, the Jewish tradition of eating richly, which derives from its inclusion in the list of "festivals of the Lord" ( Leviticus 23 ) the prohibition of fasting, and the forbidding of outward expressions of grief and Mourning
Widow - Weeping (Job 27:15 ; Psalm 78:64 ), Mourning (2 Samuel 14:2 ), and desolation (Lamentations 1:1 ) describe her personal experience after the loss of her spouse
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - The Ζεὺς Τραγῳδός shews Lucian's disbelief in any divine governance of the world; the treatise περὶ πένθους , on Mourning, his disbelief in immortality
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - ...
While the "sacred assembly" to which Joel called the people (2:15-16) may have been simply an ad hoc ceremony of Mourning, it is in some ways reminiscent (albeit ironically) of the day of Pentecost. Instead of a thanksgiving harvest festival, in that year the Israelites held a special day of Mourning and repentance because of the devastation of the crops
God - Traces of ‘Animism,’ or belief in the activity of the spirits of one’s dead relations, and its consequence ‘Ancestor-worship,’ have been found in the Mourning customs of Israel, such as cutting the hair, wounding the flesh, wearing sackcloth, funeral feasts, reverence for tombs, and the levirate marriage, and in the name elohim ( i. Kautzsch thinks that these results are not proved, and that the belief in demoniacal powers explains the Mourning customs without its being necessary to suppose that Animism had developed into Ancestor-worship
Festivals - Israel understood that this was a day for Mourning over their sins
Jehoram - The tale of a mother who had slain her child for food, and complained of another mother having hidden hers contrary to agreement, roused Jehoram to rend his clothes; then appeared the hair sackcloth of Mourning penitence "within" (mibaait ), a bore sign without the real repentance of heart, as his threat of murdering Elisha proves, Romans 12:31
Imagination - Thus He was fond of drawing His word-pictures from the occupations of such familiar folk as shepherds, husbandmen, fishermen; from social customs in the home,—marriage ceremonies, feasts, salutations, journeyings; and even from bodily life and sensations,—the eye, ear, bones, feet, hunger and thirst, laughing, Mourning, sickness, sleep, etc
Joel, Book of - Let them turn back, giving expression to their penitent sorrow in tears, Mourning garb, general fasting, and prayer offered by priests in the Temple ( Joel 2:12-17 )
Ezekiel - The phrase shows how tenderly he loved her; yet with priestly prostration of every affection before God's will he puts on no Mourning, in order to convey a prophetical lesson to his people (Ezekiel 24:15-25)
Numbers, the Book of - The first month Mourning for Aaron occupies, Numbers 20:29; part of the host in this month avenged Arad's attack during Israel's journey from Kadesh to Mount Hor
the Children of Capernaum Playing at Marriages And Funerals in the Market-Place - And I will be the dead man, and you and you and you will take me up and carry me out of the gate, and all the rest will come out after us lamenting and Mourning and weeping
Jonah - His name, meaning "dove," symbolizes Mourning love, his feeling toward his people, either given prophetically or assumed by him as a watchword of his feeling
Deuteronomy, the Book of - Thirty days before were spent in Mourning for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8); so that Moses' death would be on the seventh day of the twelfth month, and Moses began his address the first day of the eleventh month, fortieth year (Deuteronomy 1:3)
Aaron - All other manifestations of Mourning on the part of the priests were forbidden; compare, as to our spiritual priesthood, Luke 9:60
the Rich Man And Lazarus - And then he goes on with his fearful satire to give us the conversations about this and that lost soul that go on in every Mourning coach on the way home from every such rich man's funeral
Devotion - He evidently looked forward to its practice by His disciples not only in their association and in times of general calamity and Mourning (Matthew 9:14-15, Mark 2:18-20, Luke 5:34-35), but individually under the prompting of personal need and as a preparation for personal blessing
Sanballat - Thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself; for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy Mourning shall be ended
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Used in the expression of joy (1 Kings 1:39-40 ) or Mourning (Jeremiah 48:36 ; Matthew 9:23 ), the khalil was primarily a secular instrument that could be played at funerals or feasts
Job, the Book of - ...
After the traditional time of Mourning had passed, Job cried out wondering why he was ever born or allowed to reach maturity (Job 3:1-26 )
Winter - ’ This is manifest from the figures of wailing versus piping, Mourning versus dancing, fasting versus feasting, preaching of Jonah versus wisdom of Solomon
Samson - Turn my Mourning into dancing, my dreaming into earnestness, my falls into clearings of myself, my guilt into indignation, my sin into fear, my transgression into vehement desire, and my pollution into revenge
Saul - Henceforth Samuel, after tearing himself from the king, to the rending of his garment (the symbol of the transference of the kingdom to a better successor), came to Saul no more though Mourning for him
Zechariah, Theology of - A double fulfillment is recorded for Zechariah 12:10 , which predicts Mourning for a pierced one by those who pierced him: first, when Jesus' side was pierced on the cross (John 19:34-37 ), and second, when Jesus returns at the end of time (Revelation 1:7 )
Pentateuch - One passage in the Pentateuch which contributed to the serious questioning of Mosaic authorship is Deuteronomy 34:5-8 , describing Moses' death and the following period of Mourning
Dress - The universal sign of Mourning, for example, was the ‘girding’ of the waist with an ’çzôr of hair-cloth (EV Clean And Unclean - Indeed, Mourning customs were in origin probably warnings of such impurity
Joseph - After Mourning for the royal period of seventy days ( Genesis 50:3 ; cf
Ahithophel - Why is he no longer here? Why is he where he now is?...
And, then, what did David think when Ahithophel's terrible end was told him? And what did Bathsheba think? Did she curse David to his face when it was told her what her grandfather had done to himself? Did Uriah's wife fling David's psalms in his face in her agony of horror and self-disgust? Did she scream in her sleep till all Jerusalem heard her as she saw in her sleep her grandfather's gallows at Giloh? Or was this prophecy fulfilled before it was spoken: In that day there shall be a great Mourning in Jerusalem, the house of David apart, and their wives apart, till there shall be a fountain opened to the house of David for sin and for uncleanness? And then did David go out to Giloh, and over the sepulchre of the suicide did David fall down and cry, past all consolation, O Ahithophel, the friend of my youth and my best counsellor, Ahithophel! Would God I had died for thee! O Ahithophel, mine equal, my guide, and mine acquaintance! If he did-then this would come in, The sacrifices of God are a broken heart
Poetry of the Hebrews - Of elegiac poetry, many very beautiful specimens occur in Scripture; such as the lamentation of David over his friend Jonathan; several passages in the prophetical books; and several of David's Psalms, composed on occasions of distress and Mourning
Gods, Pagan - This event was commemorated by an annual Mourning for the god in the fourth month which fell during summer
Synagogue (2) - It was the place for funeral orations over the death of men of distinction, and at a later period could be used for some of the ceremonies of private Mourning (ib
Revelation, the Book of - ...
To encourage Christian faithfulness, the Revelation points to the glorious world to come (a world of “no more death or Mourning or crying or pain,” Revelation 21:4 NIV; compare Revelation 2:18-299 ) at the reappearing of the crucified and risen Jesus
High Priest - His not going out of the sanctuary to mourn for the dead typifies that death and Mourning shall be abolished by Christ, that where He is they cannot come (Revelation 21:4; Isaiah 35:10; Isaiah 25:8)
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - " He regrets his departure from Caesarea, as Adam might bewail his expulsion from Eden, having to eat of the soil, to contend with thorns and thistles, and dwell in darkness, weeping and Mourning
Jesus Christ - " Full of this unction without measure (John 3:34) He preached at Nazareth as the Fulfiller of the scripture He read (Isaiah 61:1-3), giving "the oil of joy for Mourning," "good tidings unto the meek" (Luke 4:17-21)
Quakers - Compliments, superfluity of apparel and furniture, outward shows of rejoicing and Mourning, and the observation of days and times, we esteem to be incompatible with the simplicity and sincerity of a Christian life; and public diversions, gaming, and other vain amusements of the world, we cannot but condemn
Second Coming of Christ - This will be seen also in the Mourning of "all the nations of the earth" when they "see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of the sky, with power and great glory" (Matthew 24:30 ; in Luke Jesus speaks on "the day the Son of Man is revealed, " Luke 17:30 )
Offering - 25:6; 2 Kings 9:6); one’s head as a sign of Mourning ( Trial-at-Law - The effect of this appeal was heightened by the appearance of the accused (now a reus), who sat in court often in Mourning, and with the deepest marks of grief on his face
Egypt - The Egyptian Mourning of 70 days for Jacob is characteristic ( Genesis 50:3 ), so also may be the baker’s habit of carrying on the head ( Genesis 40:16-17 )
Perfection (of Jesus) - His help in sickness was for rich and poor, in all circumstances and conditions—the solitary leper, and the Mourning widow in the streets of Nain; the paralytic of thirty-eight years, friendless and helpless, and the bond-servant of the household of the Roman centurion, whose name was held in honour throughout all Capernaum; the daughter of Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue, and the daughter of a nameless Gentile woman of Syro-Phœnicia
Mahometanism - ...
For which reason this year is called the year of Mourning