What does Mot mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Mot
(1):
(Sing. pres. ind.) of Mot
(2):
(pl.) of Mot
(3):
(v.) May; must; might.
(4):
(n.) A word; hence, a motto; a device.
(5):
(n.) A pithy or witty saying; a witticism.
(6):
(n.) A note or brief strain on a bugle.

Sentence search

Mote - about the management of affairs; as, a folkmote. ) See 1st Mot. ) A meeting of persons for discussion; as, a wardmote in the city of London. ...
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(n. See Mot, n. ...
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Moote - of Mot...
Mot - ) of Mot...
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(v. ) A word; hence, a Motto; a device
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imp. of Mote
Matred - The name signifies rod, from Mot, a rod—and Jarad, to descend
Ahimoth - (uh hi' mahth) Personal name meaning literally, “My brother is death” or “my brother is Mot (god of death)
Moot - ...
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(n. ) See 1st Mot
Shibboleth - This incident should Mot be passed over without observing, that it affords proof of dialectical variations among the tribes of the same nation, and speaking the same language, in those early days
Ugarit - Baal's antagonists were Prince Sea (Yam) and Mot (god of the dry season and underworld). However, Baal's mightiest foe, Mot, defeated Baal, crushing him like a kid in his gullet, and taking him down to the netherworld. Mot boasted of his victory to Anath, whereupon she slew Mot, ground him up and scattered his remains over the fields. While Baal ruled half the year, giving rain and crops, Mot held dominion over the other half: the dry season. Many of these names are known in the Old Testament: El, Baal, Asherah, Anath, Yarih (moon), Shahar, Shalim, Mot, Dagon, for example. ...
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Canaan, History And Religion of - Athirat was acknowledged as the Mother of the deities, having given birth to some seventy gods and goddesses. Mot was the god of death and sterility. (In the Hebrew language the word for death is also Mot. ) Mot was associated with death, whether that refers to the seasonal cycle of vegetation, the sabbatical understanding of a seventh year of agricultural rest, or in some fashion to the individual's death. Mot was clearly understood as a power capable of rendering impotent Baal's regenerative powers. Through these events he established himself as the god of supreme power within the pantheon, built the palace or temple which he merited by virtue of his victory over Yam, and in the third scenario struggled with, succumbed to, and ultimately escaped from the clutches of Mot. ...
All should be well, but Baal had one more enemy to confront, Mot. While she could not find Baal, one day she chanced upon Mot. She had with her a blade with which she cut Mot into many pieces, which pieces she then sifted, with the remains being scattered across the ground, probably an allusion to some type of grain festival. During the period of Joshua and the Judges, a cultural struggle was waged which had to do more with the conflict between wilderness (Israelite) and agrarian (Canaanite) cultural Motifs than between Yahweh and Baal. Solomon's politically-motivated marriages brought many other gods and their worship into Jerusalem (2 Kings 11:1-8 ). ...
The Baalistic Canaanites influenced Israel in many ways: Temple construction, sacrificial rituals, the high places, a rejection of any sexual Motif as a worship instrument (Deuteronomy 23:17-18 ), and a lessening of the purely mythical with a concomitant emphasis upon the historical happening as with Yahweh's splitting of the sea (Yam Suph) rather than a struggle with a mythological Yam(Exodus 14-15 )
Monotheism - Principal among the gods of the Canaanite pantheon were the great father figure, El; the younger hero, Baal; the adversary against order in the created land, Yam; the consort for Baal, Anat; and the ruler of Sheol, the place of the dead, Mot
Areopagite, Areopagus - From time immemorial this court held its meetings on the hill in question, and was at once the Mot ancient and most revered tribunal in the city. Yet it can hardly be said that the proceedings were even remotely connected with a judicial inquiry
Gods, Pagan - Amenhotep IV changed his name to Akhenaton and embarked on a revolutionary reform which promoted worship of the sun disc Aton above all other gods. The following dynasty, while promoting Amen-Re seems to have favored gods of the north. The cycle of the seasons is represented in the myths by Baal's struggle with Mot (literally, “death”), who represented drought and brought forth dry barren fields. During the dry season (summer) Baal was forced temporarily into the underworld by Mot, but his recurring return brought forth the rainy season (winter) and restored fertility to the land. As the female counterpart of Baal, Astarte/Ashtoreth seems to have been worshiped through sacred prostitution designed to promote fertility. The great Mother goddess of Asia Minor worshiped at Ephesus was identified with Artemis, the Roman Diana. Hera, whose Roman equivalent was Juno, was the wife of Zeus and goddess of marriage, women, and Motherhood. Persephone was eventually released to her Mother but forced to spend a third of each year in the underworld, a cycle which reflected the annual growth cycle of grain. The cult of Cybele or Magna Mater (“Great Mother”) came from Asia Minor. The idea of a dying and rising god has been compared to the death and resurrection of Christ, but the death of those gods was mythical, cyclical, and involuntary, in contrast to the historical, once-for-all act of Christ Motivated by love
Destroy, Destruction - Abimelech killed his seventy half-brothers and roasted 1,000 people in his Canaanite Mother's city (Judges 9:4-5,45-49 ). Before Baal's trip to Mot's domain he had intercourse eighty-eight times with a cow, who was really his sister. But when confronted with delivering the coup de grace, Yahweh experiences the most intense emotional trauma ever written about deity. His inner emotions come to a boil (Hosea 11:8 ). ...
"Not completely" is a Motif of many destruction prophecies (Isaiah 6:11-13 ; Jeremiah 5:10 ; 30:11 ; 31:35 ; Joel 2:32 ; Amos 9:8 ). ...
In the Baal myth Mot, the god of death, swallows his victims. At the cross Christ rendered death ineffective (2 Timothy 1:10 ; Hebrews 2:14 )
Infancy - This, as well as the interpretation making αὑτῶν refer to Mother and child (see, e. There can be little doubt, however, that there is an affinity between this Hebrew custom and the sacrifice of firstlings amongst the Arabs, and that they have a common source in ideas of taboo as associated with the firstborn—ideas belonging to a remote Semitic antiquity (see W. , the use made of dream-warnings (Matthew 2:12-13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22); the peculiarities in the leading of the ‘star’ (seen first in the East, then lost sight of—else they had not gone to Jerusalem instead of Bethlehem—only to reappear and go before them to Bethlehem, moving in the heavens, and at last stopping ‘over where the young child was’); the symbolic character of the threefold offering (Matthew 2:11); and, lastly, the dominant interest in the element of prophetic fulfilment, making each turn in the story answer to some passage from the prophets (Matthew 2:6; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:17; Matthew 2:23), the correspondence in some cases being but remote and obscure. narrative should fail to notice such a notable circumstance! It is a curious passage, but evidently all its interest is in the Emperor’s bon Mot, playing on the Gr
Call, Calling - a Mother’s call to her brood (Bunyan, PP ii. 62)—not a mere emotional cry. Luke has the same narrative (Luke 5:1-11) in a more picturesque form; the borrowing of Peter’s boat, in order to teach from it as a pulpit; payment after sermon in the form of a miraculous draught of fishes; Peter’s fear as a sinner at the near presence of the supernatural; the same kindly bon Mot; all four fishermen [8] on the spot; all four becoming disciples