What does Money mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַכֶּ֖סֶף silver 11
ἀργύριον silver. / money. / a silver coin 6
הַכֶּ֗סֶף silver 5
הַכֶּ֔סֶף silver 5
כֶּ֣סֶף silver 5
הַכֶּ֙סֶף֙ silver 5
כֶ֖סֶף silver 3
כֶּ֤סֶף silver 3
κολλυβιστῶν a money-changer 3
כַּסְפּ֔וֹ silver 3
כֶּ֖סֶף silver 3
כָּֽסֶף silver 3
בַּכָּ֑סֶף silver 2
כֶּ֙סֶף֙ silver 2
כֶ֙סֶף֙ silver 2
בַּכֶּ֖סֶף silver 2
כָּ֑סֶף silver 2
הַכָּ֑סֶף silver 2
φιλάργυροι loving money 2
כֶּֽסֶף־ silver 2
γλωσσόκομον a case in which to keep mouth-pieces of wind instruments. 2
μαμωνᾷ mammon. 2
כָ֑סֶף silver 1
כֹּ֖פֶר price of a life 1
בְּכַסְפָּ֣א silver. 1
כָֽסֶף silver 1
כֶּ֣סֶף ׀ silver 1
כֶ֔סֶף silver 1
כַּסְפֶּ֑ךָ silver 1
כַּסְפּ֤וֹ ׀ silver 1
כַּסְפֵּֽנוּ silver 1
כַּסְפְּךָ֔ silver 1
הַ֭כֶּסֶף silver 1
כֶּ֧סֶף silver 1
בַכֶּ֙סֶף֙ silver 1
בְכֶ֖סֶף silver 1
הַכֶּ֤סֶף silver 1
כֶ֛סֶף silver 1
בְּכֶ֣סֶף silver 1
מִכֶּ֖סֶף silver 1
בַּכֶּ֣סֶף silver 1
וְכֶ֣סֶף silver 1
וְהַכֶּ֖סֶף silver 1
בְּכֶ֔סֶף silver 1
ἀργύρια silver. / money. / a silver coin 1
ἀφιλάργυρον not loving money 1
κερματιστὰς a money changer 1
φιλαργυρία love of money 1
χαλκὸν brass. / what is made of brass 1
χαλκόν brass. / what is made of brass 1
χρῆμα a thing 1
χρήματα a thing 1
χρημάτων a thing 1
בְכֶ֔סֶף silver 1
בַּכֶּ֤סֶף silver 1
כֶּ֜סֶף silver 1
הַכֶּסֶף֮ silver 1
כֶּ֨סֶף silver 1
כֶּ֥סֶף silver 1
כֶּ֗סֶף silver 1
הַכֶּ֣סֶף silver 1
ἀργύριά silver. / money. / a silver coin 1
הַכֶּ֜סֶף silver 1
הַכֶּ֡סֶף silver 1
מִנְחָֽה gift 1

Definitions Related to Money

H3701


   1 silver, Money.
      1a silver.
         1a1 as metal.
         1a2 as ornament.
         1a3 as colour.
      1b Money, shekels, talents.
      

G694


   1 silver.
   2 Money.
   3 a silver coin, silver piece, a shekel.
   

G2855


   1 a Money-changer, banker.
   

G3126


   1 mammon.
   2 treasure.
   3 riches (where it is personified and opposed to God).
   

G1101


   1 a case in which to keep mouth-pieces of wind instruments.
   2 a small box for other uses.
      2a esp.
      a casket, a purse to keep Money in.
      

G5366


   1 loving Money, avarice.
   

G5536


   1 a thing, a matter, affair, event, business.
      1a spec.
      Money, riches.
      

G5475


   1 brass.
   2 what is made of brass, Money, coins of brass (also of silver and gold).
   

G2773


   1 a Money changer, Money broker.
   Additional Information: In the court of the Gentiles in the temple of Jerusalem were the seats of those who sold such animals for sacrifice as had been selected, examined, and approved, together with incense, oil, and other things needed in making offerings and in worship; and the magnitude of this traffic had introduced the banker’s or broker’s business.
   

G866


   1 not loving Money, not avaricious.
   

H4503


   1 gift, tribute, offering, present, oblation, sacrifice, meat offering.
      1a gift, present.
      1b tribute.
      1c offering (to God).
      1d grain offering.
      

H3724


   1 price of a life, ransom, bribe.
   2 asphalt, pitch (as a covering).
   3 the henna plant, name of a plant (henna?).
   4 village.
   

H3702


   1 silver.
      1a as metal.
      1b as Money.
      

G5365


   1 love of Money, avarice.
   

Frequency of Money (original languages)

Frequency of Money (English)

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Money
MONEY
1. Antiquity of a metallic currency: weights and values. That the precious metals, gold and silver, and to a less extent copper, were the ordinary media of exchange in Palestine from a time long prior to the appearance there of the Hebrews, is now amply attested by evidence from Egypt and Babylonia, and even from the soil of Palestine itself. The predominance of silver as the metal currency for everyday transactions is further shown by the constant use in Hebrew literature of the word for ‘silver’ ( keseph ) in the sense of ‘money.’
As there can be no question of the existence of coined money in Palestine until the Persian period, the first step in the study of the money of OT is to master the system of weights adopted for the weighing of the precious metals. Money might indeed be ‘told’ or counted, but the accuracy of the ‘tale’ had to be tested by means of the balance; or rather, as we see from such passages as 2 Kings 12:10-11 (RV [1] ), money was told by being weighed . Now, all the weight-systems of Western Asia, and even of Europe, had their origin in Babylonia (for details see Weights and Measures). There, as required by the sexagesimal system of reckoning, the ancient unit of weight, the manu ( Heb. maneh as in Ezekiel 45:12 elsewhere in EV [2] ‘ pound ’) or mina , which weighed 7580 grains on the light, and 15,160 on the heavy standard, was divided into 60 shekels , while 60 minas went to the higher denomination, the talent. It will thus be seen that the light Babylonian trade shekel weighed, neglecting fractions, 126 grains troy, and the heavy shekel 252. The former, it will be useful to remember, was but three grains heavier than a British gold sovereign.
As this weight-system spread westwards with the march of Babylonian civilization and commerce, it came into conflict with the decimal system of calculation, and a compromise was effected, which resulted in the mina being reduced to 50 shekels, while the talent remained at 60 minas, although reduced in weight to 3000 shekels. That the Hebrew talent by which the precious metals were weighed contained 3000, not 3600, shekels may be seen by a simple calculation from the data of Exodus 38:25 ff., Further, the heavy Babylonian shekel of 252 grains remained in use among the Hebrews for the weighing of gold until NT times. For this we have the express testimony of Josephus, who tells us ( Ant . XIV. vii. 1) that the Hebrew gold mina was equal to 2 1 / 2 Roman pounds. On the basis of 5053 grains to the libra or pound, this gives a shekel of 252 2 /3 grains, the exact weight of the heavy Babylonian shekel of the common or trade standard.
For the weighing of silver, on the other hand, this shekel was discarded for practical reasons. Throughout the East in ancient times the ratio of gold to silver was 13 1 /3:1, which means that a shekel of gold could buy 13 1 /3 times the same weight of silver.
The latest explanation of this invariable ratio, it may be added in passing, is that advocated by Winckler and his followers. On this, the so-called ‘astral mythology’ theory of the origin of Babylonian culture, gold, the yellow metal, was specially associated with the sun, while the paler silver was the special ‘moon-metal.’ Accordingly it was natural to fix the ratio between them as that which existed between the year and the month, viz. 360: 27 or 40: 3.
In ordinary commerce, however, this ratio between the two chief media of exchange was extremely inconvenient, and to obviate this inconvenience, the weight of the shekel for weighing silver was altered so that a gold shekel might be exchanged for a whole number of silver shekels. This alteration was effected in two ways. On the one band, along the Babylonian trade-routes into Asia Minor the light Babylonian shekel of 126 grains was raised to 168 grains, so that 10 such shekels of silver now represented a single gold shekel, since 126 × 13 1 /3 = 168 × 10. On the other hand, the great commercial cities of Phœnicia introduced a silver shekel of 224 grains, 15 of which were equivalent to one heavy Babylonian gold shekel of 252 grains, since 252 × 13 1 /3 = 224 × 15. This 224-grain shekel is accordingly known as the Phœnician standard. It was on this standard that the sacred dues of the Hebrews were calculated (see § 3 ); on it also the famous silver shekels and half-shekels were struck at a later period (§ 5 ).
With regard, now, to the intrinsic value of the above gold and silver shekels, all calculations must start from the mint price of gold, which in Great Britain is £3, 17s. 10 1 /2d. per ounce of 480 grains. This gives £2, 1s. as the value of the Hebrew gold shekel of 252 grs., and since the latter was the equivalent of 15 heavy Phœnician shekels, 2s. 9d. represents the value as bullion of the Hebrew silver shekel . Of course the purchasing power of both in Bible times, which is the real test of the value of money, was many times greater than their equivalents in sterling money at the present day.
The results as to weights and values above set forth may be presented in tabular form as follows:
Denomination. Weight. Intrinsic Value. Gold Shekel 252 2 /3 grs. troy. £2 1 0 Mina = 50 shekels 12,630 grs. troy. 102 10 0 Talent = 3000 758,000 grs. troy. 6150 0 0 ( circa 108 lbs. avoir.) Silver Shekel 224½ grs. troy. 0 2 9 Mina 11,225 grs. troy. 6 16 8 ( circa 1 lb. 10 oz. avoir.) Talent 673,500 grs. troy. 410 0 0 ( circa 96 lbs. avoir.) Since the effective weight of the extant shekels is somewhat under the theoretical weight above given, the intrinsic value of any number of shekels of silver may be found with sufficient accuracy by equating the shekel roughly with our half-crown (2s. 6d.).
Although we have literary and numismatic evidence for the gold and silver shekels of these tables only, it may now be regarded as certain that other standards were in use in Palestine in historic times for weighing the precious metals. The best attested is that which the present writer, in his article ‘Weights and Measures’ in Hastings’ DB [3] lv. 904 f., termed the ‘Syrian 320-grain unit,’ a shekel which is the of a heavy Babylonian mina of 16,000 grains. That the light shekel of this standard, represented by the now familiar weights of 160 grains or thereby, inscribed netseph , was used for weighing silver or gold or both is evident from the small denominations which have been recovered, such as the quarter netseph of 40 grs., known as the Chaplin weight (see op. cit . and PEFSt [4] , 1903, p. 197, 1904, p. 209 ff., and later years).
2. Money in the pre-exilic period . Throughout the whole of this period, as has already been emphasized, in every transaction involving the payment of sums of considerable value, the money was reckoned by weight. Accordingly, when Abraham bought the field and cave of Machpelah he ‘weighed to Ephron the silver … four hundred shekels of silver, current money with the merchant’ ( Genesis 23:15 ). In view of what has just been said regarding the variety of standards in use in Palestine in early times, it would be unwise, in the present state of our knowledge, to pronounce as to the value of the price paid in this transaction. On the Phœnician standard it would be approximately £55 sterling; on the netseph standard, which stands to the Phœnician in the ratio of 5:7, it would be under £40. Similarly, the price which David paid for the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite, 50 shekels of silver ( 2 Samuel 24:24 ), will vary from £5 to £7 according to the standard adopted. On the other hand, where gold is concerned, as in the case of the 30 talents which Sennacherib ‘appointed unto Hezekiah’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ), we may with some confidence assume the gold standard common to Palestine and Assyria. In this case Hezekiah’s tribute will represent the respectable sum of £184, 500.
A noteworthy feature of the entries of prices in the pre-exilic writings of the Hebrews is the disappearance of the mina, the sums being stated in terms of shekels and talents exclusively. Thus Abraham, as we have seen, paid 400 shekels, not 8 minas, to the children of Heth; the weight, and therefore the value, of Achan’s ‘wedge of gold’ (see next paragraph) is given as 50 shekels, not as 1 mina, and so throughout.
In this period the precious metals circulated in three forms. The shekel, its subdivisions (cf. the quarter-shekel of 1 Samuel 9:8 ) and smaller multiples, had the form of ingots of metal, without any stamp or other mark, so far as our evidence goes, as a guarantee of their purity and weight. Larger values were made up in the shape of bars, such as Schliemann discovered at Troy and Macalister found at Gezer (illust. Bible Sidelights , etc., fig. 36). The ‘ wedge (lit. ‘tongue’) of gold ’ which Achan appropriated from the loot of Jericho ( Joshua 7:21 ) was probably such a thin bar of gold. Further, Rebekah’s nose-ring of half a shekel of gold, and her bracelets of ten shekels ( Genesis 24:22 ), represent a third form which the metal currency of the early period might assume. The vases and other vessels of gold and silver which are so frequently mentioned in ancient tribute lists also, in all probability, represented definite weights and values.
To such an extent was the shekel the exclusive unit in all ordinary transactions, that the Hebrew writers frequently omit it in their statements of prices. This applies to gold as well as to silver, e.g . 2 Kings 5:5 ‘six thousand’ of gold, where AV [5] and RV [1] supply ‘pieces,’ but RVm [7] has the correct ‘shekels’ (cf. silverling [8] in Isaiah 7:23 ).
3. Money in the Persian period: introduction of coins . In this period the money of the small Jewish community was still, as before the Exile, chiefly ingots and bars of the precious metals, without official mark of any kind. The addition of such a mark by the issuing authority serves as a public guarantee of the purity of the metal and the weight of the ingot, and transforms the latter into a coin. Coined money is usually regarded as the invention of the Lydians early in the 7th cent. b.c., but it is very improbable that any ‘coins’ reached Palestine before the fall of the Jewish State in b.c. 587. The first actual coins to reach Jerusalem were more probably those of Darius Hystaspis (b.c. 522 485), who struck two coins, the daric in gold, and the siglos or siktos (from sheket ) in silver. The daric was a light shekel of 130 grains 7 grains heavier than our ‘sovereign’ worth twenty-one shillings sterling. The siglos was really a half-shekel of 86 1 /2 grains, equal therefore to 1 /20th of the daric, on the ten-shekel basis set forth in § 1 , or a fraction more than a shilling.
In several passages of Chron., Ezr., and Neh. the RV [1] has substituted ‘darics’ for AV [5] ‘ drams ’ ( 1 Chronicles 29:7 , Ezra 2:69 , Nehemiah 7:70 ff. etc.). But there are valid reasons (see ‘Money’ in Hastings’ DB [3] iii. 421) for retaining the older rendering in the sense, not of coins, but of weights. On the other hand, since Nehemiah was a Persian official, the ‘forty shekels of silver’ of Nehemiah 5:15 may be Persian sigloi, although they may with equal probability be regarded as shekels of the usual Phœnician standard. There is, of course, no question of the Jewish community striking silver coins of their own, this jealously guarded right being then, as always, ‘the touchstone of sovereignty.’
In this period, however, the wealthy commercial cities on the Phœnician seaboard Aradus, Sidon, Tyre, and others acquired the right of issuing silver coins, which they naturally did on the native standard. The effective weight of these shekels or tetradrachms , as they are usually termed, averages about 220 grains, a few grains short of the normal 224. These coins have a special interest for the Bible student, from the fact that they are the numismatic representatives of ‘ the shekel of the sanctuary ,’ which is prescribed in the Priests’ Code as the monetary unit of the post-exilic community (see Leviticus 27:25 ‘all thy estimations shall be according to the shekel of the sanctuary’). In Exodus 30:13 and elsewhere this shekel is said to consist of 20 gerahs , which the Greek translators identified with the small silver obol of the Gr. coinage, 20 of which yield a shekel of 224 grains. Moreover, it is repeatedly stated in the Talmud that ‘all payments according to the shekel of the sanctuary are to be made in Phœnician currency’ (Mishna, Bekhoroth , viii. 7). For the mode of payment of the half-shekel tax for the Temple services see § 7 .
4. Money in the period from Alexander to the Maccabees . Alexander’s conquest of Syria was naturally followed by the introduction of his coinage in gold, silver, and bronze. On his death, Ptolemy I. established himself in Egypt, to which be soon added Palestine. During the following century (b.c. 301 198) the Jews had at their command the coins of the Ptolemaic dynasty, struck at Alexandria on the Phœnician standard, as well as those of the flourishing cities on the Mediterranean. The tribute paid by the Jews to the third Ptolemy did not exceed the modest sum of 20 talents of silver, or circa £4360.
In b.c. 198 Antiochus iii. wrested Palestine from the Ptolemys. Now the Seleucids had continued Alexander’s silver coinage on the Attic standard, the basis of which was the drachm of, originally, 67 grs., but the effective weight of the Syrian drachms and tetradrachms of this period is slightly below this standard, and may be valued at 11d. and 3s. 8d. respectively. The drachms (To 5:14, 2Ma 4:19 ; 2Ma 12:43 ) and talents (6000 drachms) of the Books of Maccabees are to be regarded as on this Syrian-Attic standard.
5. The first native coinage: the problem of the ‘shekel of Israel’ . In b.c. 139 138 Antiochus Sidetes granted to Simon Maccabæus the right to coin money (see 1Ma 15:5 f.). ‘The thorniest question of all Jewish numismatics,’ as it has been called, is the question whether and to what extent Simon availed himself of this privilege. A series of silver shekels and half-shekels on the Phœnician standard, bearing dates from ‘year 1’ to ‘year 5,’ has long been known to students. They show on the obverse and reverse respectively a cup or chalice and a spike of a lily with three flowers. The legends in old Hebrew letters on the shekels are: obv. ‘Shekel of Israel’; rev. ‘Jerusalem the holy’ (see illust. in plate accompanying art. ‘Money’ in Hastings’ DB [3] iii. Nos. 14, 15; Reinach, Jewish Coins , pl. ii.; and more fully in Madden’s Coins of the Jews the standard work on Jewish numismatics, 67 ff.). Only two alternatives are possible regarding the date of these famous coins. Either they belong to the governorship of Simon Maccabæus who died b.c. 135, or to the period of the great revolt against Rome, a.d. 66 70. The latest presentation of the arguments for the earlier date will be found in M. Theodore Reinach’s book cited above. It is not a point in his favour, however, that he is compelled to assign the shekels of the year 5 to John Hyrcanus, Simon’s son and successor.
The present writer is of opinion that the arguments he has advanced elsewhere in favour of the later date ( DB [3] iii. 424 f., 429 f.) still hold good. In this case the earliest Jewish coins will be certain small bronze coins struck by the above-mentioned Hyrcanus (b.c. 135 104), with the legend in minute old Hebrew characters: ‘John, the high priest, and the commonwealth ( or the executive) of the Jews.’ The title of ‘king’ first appears on bronze coins of Alexander Jannæus ‘Jonathan the king’ who also first introduced a Greek, in addition to a Hebrew, legend. No silver coins, it may be added, were struck by any of Simon’s successors, or even by the more powerful and wealthier Herod. The bronzes of the latter present no new feature of interest.
6. Money in Palestine under the Romans . From a numismatic point of view Judæa may be said to have formed a part of the Roman dominions from b.c. 53, from which date the Roman monetary unit, the silver denarius, with its subdivisions in copper, as quadrans, etc., was legal tender in Jerusalem. Since the denarius was almost equal in weight to the Syrian-Attic drachm (§ 4) the silver unit throughout the Seleucid empire the two coins were regarded as of equal value, and four denarii were in ordinary business the equivalent of a tetradrachm of Antioch.
The Roman gold coin, the aureus , representing 25 denarii, varied in weight in NT times from 126 to 120 grains. Since a British ‘sovereign’ weighs a little over 123 grains, the aureus may for approximate calculations be reckoned at £1. Similarly the denarius from Augustus to Nero weighed 60 grs. our sixpenny piece weighs 43.6 grs. and was equal to 16 copper asses. To reach the monetary value of the denarius in sterling money, which is on a gold standard, we have only to divide the value of the gold aureus by 25, which gives 9 3 /8 d., say nine pence halfpenny for convenience, or a French franc.
In addition to these two imperial coins, the system based on the Greek drachm was continued in the East, and both drachms and tetradrachms were issued from the imperial mint at Antioch. In our Lord’s day Tyre still continued to issue silver and bronze coins, the former mainly tetradrachms or shekels on the old Phœnician standard (220 224 grs.). As the nearest equivalent of the Heb. shekel these Tyrian coins were much in demand for the payment of the Temple tax of one half-shekel (see next §). Besides all these, the procurators issued small bronze coins, probably the quadrans ( 1 /4 of an as), from their mint at Cæsarea, not to mention the numerous cities, such as Samaria-Sebaste, which had similar rights.
7. The money of NT . This article may fitly close with a few notes on each of the various denominations mentioned in NT. The currency was in three metals: ‘get you no gold nor silver nor brass (copper) in your purses’ ( Matthew 10:9 RV [1] ). Following this order we have ( a ) the gold aureus here referred to only indirectly. Its value was £1 (see § 6 ). ( b ) The silver coin most frequently mentioned is the Roman denarius (AV [5] and RV [1] ‘ penny ,’ Amer. RV [1] , more correctly, ‘shilling’). In value equal to a franc or 9 1 /2d., it was the day’s wage of a Jewish labourer ( Matthew 20:2 ). A typical denarius of our Lord’s day, with which the Roman dues were paid ( Matthew 22:19 ), would have on its obverse the head of the Emperor Tiberius, and for ‘ superscription ’ the following legend in Latin: ‘Tiberius Cæsar, the son of the deified Augustus, (himself) Augustus’ (illust. No. 13 of plate in ‘Money,’ DB [3] iii.). ( c ) The drachm on the Attic standard (§ 5) is named only Luke 15:8 : ‘what woman having ten drachms (EV [2] ‘pieces of silver’), if she lose one drachm,’ etc. In ordinary usage, as we have seen, it was the equivalent of the denarius, but for Government purposes it was tariffed at only ¾ of the denarius. The 50,000 ‘pieces of silver’ (lit. ‘ silverlings ’) of Acts 19:19 were denarius-drachms. ( d ) Once there is mention of a didrachm ( Matthew 17:24 AV [5] ‘tribute money,’ RV [1] ‘the half-shekel’), but this was a two-drachm piece on the Phœnician standard, and was now very rare. Accordingly it was usual for two persons to join forces in paying the Temple tax of a half-shekel by presenting a Phœnician tetra-drachm. This is ( e ) the ‘piece of money’ of v. 27, which RV [1] has properly rendered by ‘shekel,’ with the word of the original, stater, in the margin. The thirty ‘pieces of silver’ for which Judas betrayed his Lord were also most probably Tyrian tetradrachms. Although these by Government tariff would be equal to only 90 denarii, their ordinary purchasing power was then equal to 120 denarii or francs, say £4, 16s. of our money.
Passing to the copper coins of the Gospels, we find three denominations in the original, the tepton , the kodrantes , and the assarion , rendered in Amer. RV [1] by ‘mite,’ ‘farthing,’ and ‘penny’ respectively. Our EV [2] , unfortunately, renders both the two last by ‘farthing,’ having used ‘penny’ for the denarius. There are great difficulties in the way of identifying these among the copper coins that have come down to us (for details see Hastings’ DB [3] iii. 428 f., EBi [26] iii. 3647). ( f ) The tepton , the widow’s mite ( Mark 12:42 , Luke 21:2 ), was the smallest coin in circulation, probably one of the minute Maccabæan bronzes. Its value was between 1 /4 and 1 /3 of an English farthing. ( g ) Two mites made a kodrantes (Lat. quadrans ), the ‘uttermost farthing ’ of Matthew 5:26 , which was either the actual Roman quadrans or its equivalent among the local bronze coins. As 1 /3; of the denarius, it was worth a trifle more than half a farthing. ( h ) The assarion is the ‘farthing’ (Amer. RV [1] ‘ penny ’) associated with the price of sparrows ( Matthew 10:29 , Luke 12:6 ), and was a copper coin on the Greek system, probably the dichatkus , of which in ordinary business 24 went to the denarius-drachm. Its value would thus be about 3 /8 of a penny. The relative values of the three coins may be represented by 1 /8, 1 /8, and 1 /3 of a penny respectively.
There remain the two larger denominations, the talent and the pound or mina, neither of which was any longer, as in the earlier period, a specific weight of bullion, but a definite sum of money. ( i ) The talent now contained 6000 denarius-drachms, which made 240 aurei or £240 (so Matthew 18:24 RVm [7] ). It is not always realized, perhaps, how vast was the difference in the amounts owing in this parable ( Matthew 18:23 ff.). The one servant owed 100 denarii, the other 10,000 talents or sixty million denarii. The one debt, occupying little more space than 100 sixpences, could be carried in the pocket; for the payment of the other, an army of nearly 8600 carriers, each with a sack 60 lbs. in weight, would be required. If these were placed in single file, a yard apart, the train would be almost five miles in length! ( j ) The pound , finally, of another parable ( Luke 19:13 ff.) was a mina, the sixtieth part of a talent, in other words 100 denarius-drachms or £4 sterling.
For the later coinage of the Jews, which was confined to the two periods of revolt against the Roman power, in a.d. 66 70 and 132 135, in addition to what has been said above (§ 5 ) regarding the shekels and half-shekels here assumed to belong to the first revolt, see Madden and Reinach, opp. citt .; Schürer, GJV [29] 3 i. 761 ff.; and Hastings’ DB [3] iii. 429 431.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Money-Changers
MONEY-CHANGERS . How indispensable were the services of the ‘money-changers’ ( Matthew 21:12 , Mark 11:15 ), ‘changers of money’ ( John 2:14 ), ‘changers’ ( John 2:15 ), and ‘exchangers’ ( Matthew 25:27 AV [1] , RV [2] ‘ bankers ’) in the first century of our era in Palestine may be seen from the summary of the varied currencies of the period in the preceding article (§§ 6. 7 ). The Jewish money-changer, like his modern counterpart the sarrâf (for whom see PEFSt [3] , 1904, p. 49 ff., where the complexity of exchange in the Palestine of to-day is graphically set forth), changed the large denominations into the smaller, giving denarii, for example, for tetradrachms, and gave silver for gold, copper for silver. An important department of his business was the exchange of foreign money and even money of the country of a non-Phœnician standard for shekels and half-shekels on this standard, the latter alone being accepted in payment of the Temple dues (cf. money, §§ 4. 6. 7 ). It was mainly for the convenience of the Jews of the Dispersion that the changers were allowed to set up their tables in the outer court of the Temple ( Matthew 21:12 ff.). The wealthier members of the profession, the ‘ exchangers ’ (RV [2] ‘ bankers ’) of Matthew 25:27 (cf. Luke 19:23 ), received money on deposit for purposes of investment, on which interest was paid (see Usury).
The money-changers had constantly to be on their guard against false money. This gives point to the frequently quoted unwritten saying ( agraphon ) of our Lord to His disciples: ‘Be ye expert money-changers’ be skilful in distinguishing true doctrine from false.
A. R. S. Kennedy.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Money-Changer
(Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ). Every Israelite from twenty years and upwards had to pay (Exodus 30:13-15 ) into the sacred treasury half a shekel every year as an offering to Jehovah, and that in the exact Hebrew half-shekel piece. There was a class of men, who frequented the temple courts, who exchanged at a certain premium foreign moneys for these half-shekels to the Jews who came up to Jerusalem from all parts of the world. (See PASSOVER .) When our Lord drove the traffickers out of the temple, these money-changers fared worst. Their tables were overturned and they themselves were expelled.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Money
Of uncoined money the first notice we have is in the history of Abraham (Genesis 13:2 ; 20:16 ; 24:35 ). Next, this word is used in connection with the purchase of the cave of Machpelah (23:16), and again in connection with Jacob's purchase of a field at Shalem (Genesis 33:18,19 ) for "an hundred pieces of money"=an hundred Hebrew kesitahs (q.v.), i.e., probably pieces of money, as is supposed, bearing the figure of a lamb. The history of Joseph affords evidence of the constant use of money, silver of a fixed weight. This appears also in all the subsequent history of the Jewish people, in all their internal as well as foreign transactions. There were in common use in trade silver pieces of a definite weight, shekels, half-shekels, and quarter-shekels. But these were not properly coins, which are pieces of metal authoritatively issued, and bearing a stamp.
Of the use of coined money we have no early notice among the Hebrews. The first mentioned is of Persian coinage, the daric (Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:70 ) and the 'adarkon (Ezra 8:27 ). The daric (q.v.) was a gold piece current in Palestine in the time of Cyrus. As long as the Jews, after the Exile, lived under Persian rule, they used Persian coins. These gave place to Greek coins when Palestine came under the dominion of the Greeks (B.C. 331), the coins consisting of gold, silver, and copper pieces. The usual gold pieces were staters (q.v.), and the silver coins tetradrachms and drachms.
In the year B.C. 140, Antiochus VII. gave permission to Simon the Maccabee to coin Jewish money. Shekels (q.v.) were then coined bearing the figure of the almond rod and the pot of manna.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Regium Donum Money
Money allowed by government to the Dissenters. The origin of it was in the year 1723. As the Dissenters approved themselves strong friends to the house of Brunswick, they enjoyed favour; and, being excluded all lucrative preferment in the church, the prime minister wished to reward them for their loyalty, and, by a retaining fee, preserve them steadfast. A considerable sum, therefore, was annually lodged with the heads of the Presbyterians, Independents, and Baptists, to be distributed among the necessitous ministers of their congregations.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Money
No coined money is mentioned in the Bible before Ezra'a time , when other evidence also exists of its having been current in Palestine. (See EZRA.) The first notice of coinage, occurring exactly when it ought, if the books professing to precede Ezra's really do so, confirms the accepted earliness of their dates. Money was originally weighed; in the form of rings, as represented on Egyptian monuments. So the Celtic gold rings all contain exact multiples or parts of a unit; probably a currency introduced by Phoenician traders. We know of Greek coinage as far back as the eighth century B.C. Asiatic is probably not older than Cyrus and Croesus who are said to have originated it. It was known probably in Samaria through commerce with Greece. Pheidon first coined silver in the isle Aegina in the eighth or ninth century before Christ, some time between Jehoshaphat's and Hezekiah's reigns. Lydia disputes with Greece priority of coinage. It is not mentioned as a currency in Judea before the return from Babylon.
"Shekel" previously meant a weight, not a coinage. The "thousand pieces of silver" which Abimelech gave Abraham (Genesis 20:16) were of this kind; so the 400 shekels "weighed" by Abraham to Ephron (Genesis 23:3; Genesis 23:9; Genesis 23:16), "current (money) with the merchant"; implying that the silver was in some conventional shapes, with a rude sign to mark its weight. The "weighing" however implies that this currency did not bear the stamp of authority, and so needed weighing for barter. Jacob paid 100 kesitahs for a field at Shalem (Genesis 23:18-19 margin); Chald. and Septuagint "lambs," namely, lamb shaped or lamb stamped pieces of silver, as pecunia , from pecus ; but the Arabic root implies equal division, or scales; Umbreit, "weighed out" (compare with Genesis 23:15-16), possibly each equal to four shekels; it is probably a ring-shaped ingot or a bar of silver of a definite weight; Bochart from qasat , "pure" (Job 42:11).
Joseph's brethren received their money "in full weight" (Genesis 43:21). Silver money alone was used, the standard shekel weight being kept in the sanctuary under charge of the priests, from whence arose the phrase "the shekel of the sanctuary" (Exodus 30:18). The wedge or tongue of gold that Achan took was not money probably, as the 200 shekels of silver were, but an article of value used for costly ornamentation. In Isaiah 46:6, however, gold seems to mean uncoined money, "they lavish gold out of the purse ('bag'), and weigh silver in the balance." The Attic talent was the standard one under Alexander, and subsequently down to Roman times; the drachma however becoming depreciated from 67.5 or 65.5 grains under Alexandra to 55 under the early Ceasars; the Roman coinage, gold and silver, in weights was conformed to the Greek, and the denarius the chief silver coin was equivalent to the then depreciated Attic drachma.
Antiochus VII granted Simon the Maccabee permission to coin money with his own stamp, the first recorded coining of Jewish money (1 Maccabees 15:6; 140 B.C.); inscribed "shekel of Israel"; a vase, possibly the pot of manna, and the Hebrew letter 'Αleph ( א ) above it (i.e. the first year of Jewish independence, namely, under the Maccabees); the reverse has "Jerusalem the holy," and a branch with three flowers, possibly Aaron's rod that budded or the pomegranate. In copper, on one side a palmtree with the name "Simon"; the reverse, a vine leaf, with the legend "for the freedom of Jerusalem." Shekel (from shaaqal "to weigh") was the Jewish stater ("standard"), 2 shillings, 6 pence. (See SHEKEL.) It corresponds to the tetradrachma or didrachma of the earlier Phoenician talent under the Persian rule. The shekel was of the same weight as the didrachmon, (the translation of "shekel" in Septuagint), and was the same as the Egyptian unit of weight.
The Alexandrian Jews adopted for "shekel" the term didrachma, the coin corresponding to it in weight. But as two drachmas each (1 shilling, 3 pence) was the ransom "tribute" (as the Greek didrachma in Matthew is translated in KJV) to the temple, so the "stater" or shekel found in the fish would be four drachmas (Exodus 30:12-13; Matthew 17:24-27). Four Attic drachmas equaled two Alexandrian drachmas. The minute accuracy of the evangelist confirms the genuineness; for at this time the only Greek imperial silver coin in the East was a tetra-drachma , i.e. four drachmas, the di-drachma being unknown or rarely coined. Darics ("drams"), a Persian coin, were the standard gold currency in Ezra's time (Ezra 2:69; Ezra 8:27; Nehemiah 7:70-72). Ezra the author of Chronicles uses the same name (1 Chronicles 29:7). The daric in the British Museum has the king of Persia with bow and javelin, kneeling; the reverse is an irregular incuse square.
Copper coins of Herod are extant in abundance, as the "farthing" of the New Testament, a piece of brass or copper (chalkous ), with "king Herod" and an anchor; the reverse, two cornua copiae "horns of plenty," within which is a caduceus , Mercury's wand. The Palestinian currency was mainly of copper, from whence Mark (Mark 6:8) uses "copper" or brass for "money" (margin, compare Matthew 10:9). The Roman denarius or "penny" in weight and value in New Testament is equivalent to the Greek drachma (Matthew 22:19; Luke 15:8, Greek text). The accuracy of the first three Gospels, and their date soon after the ascension, appear from their making Caesar's head be on the denarius. So, the penny coin extant of Tiberius has the title "Caesar," whereas most later emperors have the title Augustus. The most interesting extant coin is that struck by Pontius Pilate: on the obverse an augur's wand with "Tiberius Caesar" round; on the reverse the date in a wreath.
Tiberius' passion for augury and astrology suggested the augur's lithus. A Lydian coin extant mentions the Asiarchs, "chief of Asia" (Acts 19:31). A coin of Ephesus mentions its "town clerk"; also another its temple and statue of Diana. A coin of Domitian records rich Laodicea's restoration by its citizens after an earthquake which also destroyed Colessae and Hierapolis, which accounts for their omission in the addresses in Revelation. Coins exist of the time of Judea's revolt from Rome, inscribed with "the liberty of Zion," a vine stalk, leaf, and tendril. The famous Roman coin (see p. 405), struck after Titus took Jerusalem, has the legend Judaea Capta, with a female" sitting on the ground desolate" (fulfilling Isaiah 3:26) under a palm tree. Also a Greek coin has Titus' head, and the legend "the emperor Titus Caesar"; reverse, Victory writing on a shield, before her a palm. The Attic talent (the one current in New Testament period) had 100 drachmas, the drachma being = 7 3/4d.; the mina was 3 British pounds, 4 shillings, 7 pence, and the talent 193 British pounds, 15 shillings.
The talent was not a coin but a sum. The Hebrew talent = 3,000 shekels, or 375 British pounds (about the weight of the Aegina talent), for 603,550 persons paid 100 talents and 1,775 shekels of silver, i.e., as each paid a half shekel, 301,775 whole shekels; so that 100 talents contained 300,000 shekels. The gold talent was 100 manehs or minae , and the gold muneh was 100 shekels of gold; the gold talent weighed 1,290,000 grains, a computation agreeing with the shekels extant. The talent of copper had probably 1,500 copper shekels, copper being to silver as 1 to 72. The quadrans (Mark 12:42; Luke 12:59; Luke 21:2) or kodrantes (Greek), "farthing," was a fourth of an obolus , which was a sixth of a drachma. (See HAND.) The assarion , a diminutive of an "as," less than our penny, is loosely translated "farthing" in Matthew 10:29; Luke 12:6. The lepton , "mite," was a seventh of an obolus (Mark 12:42). The 30 pieces of silver paid to Judas for betraying Jesus were tetradrachmas or shekels, the sum paid for a slave accidentally killed (Zechariah 11:12; Zechariah 11:18; Matthew 26:15; Exodus 21:32).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Money-Changers
These were persons who supplied those who came from a distance to Jerusalem, to pay the regular tax to the temple, with a half-shekel, in exchange for any money they might possess. The Lord's language to such, when He drove them out of the temple, seems to imply that they took unfair advantage in the exchanges. Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Money Changers
Κollubistes and kermatistes , both denoting dealers in small coin (kollubos and kerma the profit money, 1 1/2d.). They set up tables in the court of the Gentiles, to supply at a profit foreign Jews with the Jewish half shekels (1 shillings, 3 pence) required for the yearly payment into the temple treasury, in exchange for foreign coin. The "exchangers" (Matthew 25:27), trapezitai , were bankers.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Money-Changers
Money-changers. Matthew 21:12; Mark 11:15; John 2:15. According to Exodus 30:13-15, every Israelite who had reached the age of twenty must pay into the treasury, whenever the nation was numbered, a half-shekel as an offering to Jehovah. The moneychangers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice, and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the world who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom money in the Hebrew coin.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Money
Money. Genesis 17:12. This word occurs about 130 times in the A. V., and represents three Hebrew words: keseph or k'saph occurring most frequently (about 110 times) in historical books, only a few times in the poetical books, as Psalms 15:5; Proverbs 7:20; Lamentations 5:4. Two other Hebrew words, qesitah and qinyon, also appear early in the Old Testament, Genesis 33:19; Leviticus 22:11. Money also represents six Greek words in the New Testament: argurion, meaning "silver," Matthew 25:18; kerma, a small coin, John 2:15; nomisma, meaning possibly "legal coin," Matthew 22:19; chalkos, a copper coin, Mark 6:8; chrema, Acts 8:18, and stater, rendered "shekel"in the R. V., equal to 24 drachmas. Matthew 17:27. Coined money, as now in use among civilized nations, was unknown in the world until about six hundred years before Christ. The Assyrians, Babylonians, and Egyptians had no coins until about b.c. 300. David and Solomon never saw any coined money. The Jews had none until the time of the Maccabees, about b.c. 139. Before the periods named, gold and silver were used as money by weight; and are now so used in some eastern countries. The first mention of money is in the touching story of Abraham's buying a burial place for his wife. It is said, "Abraham weighed the silver, four hundred shekels, current with the merchant." (Jen. 23:4-16. It appears to have been then in general use. The study of ancient coined money is interesting, showing the rise of the arts and their fall during the dark ages of priestcraft, from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries; the coins of 400 years before Christ being superb, while those a thousand years after Christ are hardly discernible. The early coins show, not only the likenesses of kings and emperors, but also many of the most important events of their reigns. For the corns mentioned in the Bible, see Shekel, Penny, Farthing.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Piece of Money
1. Translation of the Hebrew qesitah, a coin of uncertain weight and value (Genesis 33:19 ; Job 42:11 KJV, NAS, NRSV). NIV reads “pieces of silver.” 2. KJV translation of the Greek term stater ( Matthew 17:27 ). Modern translations read: stater (NAS); four drachma coin (NIV); shekel (RSV); coin (NRSV, REB). See Coins .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Tribute Money
[1]
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Changers of Money
Matthew 21:12; John 2:14. They set up their tables in the court of the Gentiles, to exchange at a price the foreign coin of Jews and proselytes coming from distant lands for the Hebrew half shekel (which was required from every adult from 20 years old and upward: Exodus 38:26) in presenting themselves to worship at the tabernacle or temple. At the beginning of His ministry, and at its close, Christ marked His mission as the foretold Purifier of the temple (Malachi 3:1-5), for the presence of Jehovah, of which His own divinely formed body was the type. The court of the Gentiles, as distinguished from that of Israel and that of the priests, was designed not only for an unclean Jew, but also for the uncircumcised Gentile proselytes.
The Jewish traffic here was an insult to the Gentiles. It made what God designed to be "a house of prayer for all people" (Isaiah 56:7) to become "a house of merchandise." The bustle around rendered prayer almost impossible. The priests let the court to the moneychangers, making godliness into a source of gain. Christ's clearing them oat with so puny a weapon as "a whip of small cords" is a warrant of His having "all power given" to Him by the Father, and of His future purging out of His kingdom "all things which offend, and them which do iniquity" (Matthew 13:41). Then and then only shall the temple be mate "a house of prayer for all people" (Isaiah 2:2-4).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Money
The Bible recognizes the possession and use of money as a legitimate part of life in human society. (Concerning the kinds of money in use in Bible times see COINS.) But the benefits that money brings are temporary, and those who become over-concerned with increasing their wealth eventually bring trouble upon themselves (Matthew 6:19-23; 1 Timothy 6:9-10; see WEALTH).
Poverty is not desirable either, and people should use their money to help those who are in need (Deuteronomy 15:7-10; James 2:15-16; see POOR). Christians have a responsibility to give their money generously, both as an offering to God and as a service to his work in the world (2 Corinthians 9:6-13; see GIVING).
Webster's Dictionary - Blood Money
(1):
Money obtained as the price, or at the cost, of another's life; - said of a reward for supporting a capital charge, of money obtained for betraying a fugitive or for committing murder, or of money obtained from the sale of that which will destroy the purchaser.
(2):
Money paid to the next of kin of a person who has been killed by another.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Money Belt
Modern rendering of the term the KJV translated as purse (Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8 ). See Purse .
King James Dictionary - Money
MONEY, n. plu. moneys.
1. Coin stamped metal any piece of metal, usually gold, silver or copper, stamped by public authority, and used as the medium of commerce. We sometimes give the name of money to other coined metals,and to any other material which rude nations use a medium of trade. But among modern commercial nations, gold, silver and copper are the only metals used for this purpose. Gold and silver, containing great value in small compass, and being therefore of easy conveyance, and being also durable and little liable to diminution by use, are the most convenient metals for coin or money, which is the representative of commodities of all kinds, of lands, and of every thing that is capable of being transferred in commerce. 2. Bank notes or bills of credit issued by authority, and exchangeable for coin or redeemable, are also called money as such notes in modern times represent coin, and are used as a substitute for it. If a man pays in hand for goods in bank notes which are current, he is said to pay in ready money. 3. Wealth affluence. Money can neither open new avenues to pleasure, nor block up the passages of anguish.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Money Changers
Persons whose profession was to sell or exchange Roman or other moneys for Jewish money acceptable in the Temple worship. In New Testament times regions and cities issued their own money. This caused Jews of the Dispersion, those who lived outside of Judea, to bring many kinds of money to Jerusalem. To help visitors change money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, money changers set up tables in the Temple court of the Gentiles. Syrian silver coins were the money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their Temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the altar.
Three words are translated “moneychangers”: kollubiston ( Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ) of Semitic origin referred to the exchange rate or commission; kermatistas ( John 2:14 ) referred to a dealer in small change; and trapetzitais ( Matthew 25:27 ) which Luke used in a slightly different form (trapetzan , Matthew 19:23 , or shulhanim in Hebrew) referred to a money agent who sat at a table.
Money changers were in the area with vendors who sold animals, birds, and other items used in Temple worship and sacrifices. Such transactions were numerous and required the service of brokers who knew the value of foreign money. Some exchangers profited greatly and loaned their money along with that others invested with them. Their interest rates ranged from 20 to 300 percent per year.
In anger at this corruption of the purpose of the Temple, Jesus turned over the tables of the money changers and drove them and the sellers of animals out of the Temple court (Matthew 21:12 ).
Elmer L. Gray
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Money
A variety of monetary systems are represented in the Bible, corresponding to the political powers that dominated the cultures represented there, from the darics named after the Persian monarch Darius (these are the first actual coins mentioned in the Bible see 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 8:27 ; Nehemiah 7:70-72 ) to the coins of the Roman Empire that bore Caesar's image (Matthew 22:20-21 ). Unlike the coinage of the United States, which by law cannot bear the image of a living person, the coins of the ancient world were more explicitly political, bearing the representation of the living monarch who sponsored the mint that produced the coins. As Jesus affirms in Matthew 22 , coins really belong to the person whose likeness appears on them, in contrast to God, who imprints his likeness (and hence his mark of ownership) on a living humanity (Genesis 1:27 ).
Although the word "money" appears frequently throughout some translations of the Old Testament, the first coins were not produced in the ancient Near East until the seventh century b.c. Consequently, when one finds the word "money" in Bible versions used to translate the Hebrew term kesep [1] (lit. "silver"), one must recognize that it is usually not coins that are to be understood but refined, unminted silver. When one exchanged this silver for a commodity, the silver was weighed (saqal [2]) in balances to determine the proper quantity of silver appropriate to the bargain. It was the term for the calibration of this weighing that gave the name of shekel [3] to the first Judean coins whose size corresponded to a shekel weight (a little less than half an ounce).
The genius of money is that it simplifies and facilitates the exchange of goods and services between humans. Greek Christians would not have been able to assist Christians in Judea had it not been for the existence of money, which functioned as a substitute for their labor and was easily transported (Romans 15:26-27 ). The Old Testament acknowledged that there could be times when it was difficult for God's people to bring the actual firstfruits of their harvests and flocks over the great distances separating them from the temple in Jerusalem. In such cases, the people were to sell the products in question for silver and bring the silver to Jerusalem, where one could purchase the appropriate products necessary for the cultic celebration (Deuteronomy 14:24-26 ; cf. Ezra 7:17 ).
This perception of a convenient exchange reappears when substitutions are required for other aspects of the cult. Since all firstborn Israelites originally belonged to God as a result of his saving their lives in the exodus (Exodus 13:11-16 ), firstborn Israelites had to find human substitutes if they wished to be released from God's full-time service (Numbers 3:40-45 ). The Levites fulfilled this function as substitutes, but since there were not enough Levites to take the place of all firstborn Israelites when this was first enacted, God also accepted a monetary substitution of five shekels for those firstborn who could find no Levite to substitute for them (Numbers 3:46-51 ). Ever after, any firstborn human (or unclean animal) that reached the age of one month had to be redeemed at the price of five shekels (Numbers 18:15-16 ).
This monetary evaluation of humans is not a simple matter, and a variety of standards appear in the Bible. In addition to the cultic redemption of five shekels for the firstborn, there was also a monetary redemption of a half-shekel "atonement" or "ransom" applied to all male Israelites over twenty years of age (Exodus 30:11-16 ; 38:25-26 ). Such evaluations were independent of other factors, for "the rich are not to give more and the poor are not to give less" (Deuteronomy 24:10-134 ).
There was also a monetary substitution that could be applied to those who vowed themselves into God's service contingent on God's fulfillment of a request they asked of him. Instead of personally fulfilling the vow, the individual could pay a monetary substitute, determined in accord with the person's sex, age, and economic class (Leviticus 27:1-8 ). Another monetary substitution was found in the legal sphere, where the general principle of lex talionis mandated that when one human takes another human's life, the offender must compensate by surrendering a human life in turn, usually his or her own. However, collections of laws in the ancient Near East allowed payment of money as a fine in cases of murder where the victim was from a lower social class. Sectors of the Old Testament echo the notion that money might serve to ransom one's life when one was legally liable to be put to death as a punishment (Exodus 21:29-30 ; 2 Samuel 21:4 ; 1 Kings 20:39 ), but Numbers 35:31 clarifies Israel's distinctiveness: "Do not accept a ransom for the life of a murderer." God did not permit monetary fines in such cases, but insisted on the death penalty for all murders. The single clear exception where monetary compensation covered a lost human life was in the case of the slave killed by a negligent owner's goring ox: thirty shekels (the general price of a slave) was to be paid to the dead slave's owner so that he could replace his lost property ( Exodus 21:32 ).
The ease with which money could substitute for goods and services allowed it to be a ready means of replacing items lost or damaged in civil conflicts. Money appears not as a punitive measure in biblical legislation but as a compensation for commodities such as dead cattle (Exodus 21:33-36 ) and lost virginity (the price determined by the general dowry expected for a virgin Exodus 22:16-17 ; Deuteronomy 22:28-29 ). Money could function as a punishment when damages were less tangible (e.g., one hundred shekels for slander in Deuteronomy 22:19 ; a variable amount for a miscarriage in Exodus 21:22 ), but these are infrequent in biblical law. Should money become a substitute for other punishments such as lex talionis or beatings, the law would become less fair in allowing the wealthy to be less affected by their misdeeds than the poor.
Although money had beneficial results in simplifying the exchange of goods and services, these advantages could be turned to evil purposes. In the same way that money facilitated the rewarding of work done well, it became equally easy to motivate individuals to do reprehensible crimes with bribes (Judges 16:5,18 ; Esther 3:9 ; 4:7 ; Matthew 28:12 ; Mark 14:11 ).
Money also could be used to affirm one's status as a subordinate who owed allegiance to another: it was humiliating for the kings of Israel and Judah to pay tribute to foreign monarchs (2 Kings 15:19-20 ; 18:14 ; 23:33,35 ), but it was a sign of Israel's high standing when other nations paid annual tribute to her (2 Chronicles 27:5 ). Of course, rulers could pay such money only if they had taxed their own people (2 Kings 15:20 ), and hence taxes were (and still are) a sign of the individual's submission to the government.
Expressing allegiance to a human authority in this fashion raises a dilemma for the one whose first allegiance is to God, a dilemma that Jesus resolves by insisting that one should return to any sovereign whatever has the sovereign's mark of ownership on it: "Whose portrait is this? Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's" (Matthew 22:20-21 ). Jesus provides a different perspective when asked to pay the temple tax, affirming that although he and his disciples are the sons of the divine King and need not pay the tax for God's temple, it should nevertheless still be paid so as not to offend fellow Jews (Matthew 17:24-27 ). There is a larger irony in this latter account, where the requisite amount for the tax is found in a fish's mouth. Unlike the righteous' gift to God, which must be personally costly (2 Samuel 24:24 ), it does not matter from what source one finds the tax or tribute to surrender to a human sovereign.
Money is one of the least trustworthy and most deceptive elements of human existence. It is an unpredictable and wildly vacillating guide to value. Large quantities of silver and gold, such as when one finds "silver as common as stones" (1 Kings 10:27 ; cf. v. 14), generate inflation, which devalues the currency and its buying power. A shortage of certain commodities may drive up prices exorbitantly (2 Kings 6:25 ; Lamentations 5:4 ; Revelation 6:6 ), while the sudden availability of products may cause the value of money to plunge (2 Kings 7:1,16,18 ). In response, one finds in the ancient Near East and the Bible attempts to stabilize currency and exchange rates (Ezekiel 45:12 ). But even the currency itself is subject to loss (Luke 15:8 ), theft (Matthew 6:19 ), destruction (James 5:3 ; 1 Peter 1:18 ), and misuse (Luke 15:13-14 ). Hordes of coins found in archaeological excavations echo the frequency with which money is described as buried in the Bible, for money is so vulnerable that there is little else one can do to protect it. It is ironic that money loses its ability to protect its owner (Luke 12:20-21 ), who on the contrary is soon consumed with protecting the money instead (Ecclesiastes 5:13 ). This is one reason why Jesus insists that his followers not accumulate money (Matthew 10:9 ) and why members of the earliest Jerusalem church did not claim that anything belonging to them was their own (Acts 4:32 ).
It is a repeated theme in the Bible that the monetary value of items does not reflect the value that God places on them. Jesus notes that although one can purchase a pair of sparrows in the market for a single copper coin comparable to a penny, this market value does not reflect the great attention that a single one of these birds receives from God (Matthew 10:29 ). So persistent is this theme of skewed values that it becomes predictable for items of low market value to figure high on God's list of valuables, and vice versa. Joseph was sold for less than the price of a slave (twenty shekels, Genesis 37:28 ), but he became the savior of Egypt who ironically purchased its entire population into slavery (Genesis 47:13-25 ). Jesus' betrayal price of thirty silver pieces is a tragic miscalculation of his true status (Zechariah 11:13 ; Mark 14:11 ; Luke 22:5 ). Others may look with disdain upon a donation of a few copper coins to the temple treasury, but it is not the market value of the widow's gift that Jesus finds important: "She put in everything—all she had to live on" (Mark 12:41-44 ). It is this confusion of market value with spiritual value that irritates Peter when Simon Magus offers to pay money in return for the power of the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:18-24 ). One should not even consider any amount of money in exchange for the most intense suffering for the sake of Jesus (1 Peter 1:7 ). It is for this reason that those who lead the church must have no fondness for money (Acts 20:33 ; 1 Timothy 3:3,8 ; Titus 1:7,11 ; 1 Peter 5:2 ; contrast the Pharisees in Luke 16:14 ). There is no greater demonstrations of the contrary value system represented by money than Paul's observation that the love of money is the root of all evil (1 Timothy 6:10 ).
Money is also unreliable because people falsify the standards of measurement for personal gain, or, in the words of Amos 8:5 , "make the shekel bigger" (cf. the ideal of just balances and weights in Leviticus 19:36 ; Deuteronomy 23:19-20 ; Ezekiel 45:10 ). The arbitrary and flexible nature of monetary standards, permitting easy manipulation, is evident in the variety of calibrations that are mentioned in the Bible: the royal standard (2 Samuel 14:26 ), the merchant's standard (Genesis 23:16 ), and the "sanctuary shekel" (Exodus 30:13 ; 38:24-26 ). Mesopotamia attested simultaneous usage of a "heavy" and "light" shekel in both a royal and a common standard; ancient Near Eastern standards not only varied within one geographical locale but fluctuated from place to place and over time. Such practices prompted legislation in Israel: "Do not have differing weights in your bagone heavy, one light" (Deuteronomy 25:13 ).
People tend to cling to money, addicted to its false security. Because money behaves like a spiritual narcotic, deadening one's sensitivity to real value, Jesus insists that one cannot be committed simultaneously to both God's values and "mammon" (an Aramaic word meaning money, wealth, or property Matthew 6:24 ). Ananias and Sapphira tried to pursue both and proved the veracity of Jesus' words as well as the spiritual corruption that money serves to catalyze (Acts 5:1-10 ). Money is therefore quite dangerous, prompting Jesus to advise his followers not to take any money with them on their preaching tours (Mark 6:8 ; Luke 9:3 ) and to give away any money that came from the sale of their estates (Luke 18:22 ; cf. Acts 4:34-37 ).
A further problem with money surfaces when one uses it to earn more money at the expense of others in need, specifically in the charging of interest for monetary loans. Jesus' parables portray the phenomenon of interest in order to underscore the point that God expects his people to use his gifts productively (Matthew 25:27 ). Extraordinarily high interest rates could make loans a lucrative enterprise, when, for example, annual interest rates on silver in Mesopotamia were attested as high as 80 percent. There was a stage when the interest on monetary loans was legally distinguished from the interest on loans of food (a distinction attested elsewhere in the ancient Near East). It was a general perception that one who borrowed was in a state of curse, while the one who lended was in a position of being blessed by God (Deuteronomy 28:12,44 ; Psalm 37:26 ; Proverbs 22:7 ). Nevertheless, lending freely to those in need was a sign of the godly person, and loans, even to the poor, were an accepted part of life governed by ideals that would prevent humiliation (1618420668_50 ). However, it was legally prohibited to use money to make money specifically at the expense of a poor Israelite (Exodus 22:25 ; Leviticus 25:35-37 ). This would seem to imply that interest on loans to those who were well-off was acceptable, but other passages clarify that although non-Israelites could be charged interest, one could not take interest from any Israelite, whether poor or not (Job 31:6 ). The righteous person does not use his money to make money at anyone's expense (Psalm 15:5 ), for it is the wicked person who becomes wealthy by taking interest (Proverbs 28:8 ). In spite of such guidelines, the postexilic Jewish community monetarily enslaved poor Jews by loaning money at interest so that they could pay their taxes, a travesty that angered Nehemiah and prompted a reform so that such loans became interest-free (Nehemiah 5:4-12 ).
The power of money is no more dramatically confronted than when one uses money to purchase another human being. When one paid money for a human in the Old Testament, that purchase brought the slave into the sphere of the owner's household comparable to the status of one born in the house, eradicating the slave's former ethnic and social ties as far as cultic matters were concerned. A slaveowner could mistreat a slave with impunity short of actually killing him or her for, in the words of Exodus 21:21 , "the slave is his property." The reality of purchasing humans become
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Money-Making: no Time For
A gentlemen of Boston (U. S.), an intimate friend of Professor Agassiz, once expressed his wonder that a man of such abilities as he (Agassiz) possessed should remain contented with such a moderate income. 'I have enough,' was Agassiz's reply. 'I have not time to make money. Life is not sufficiently long to enable a man to get rich, and do his duty to his fellow men at the same time.' Christian, have you time to serve your God and yet to give your whole soul to gaining wealth? The question is left for conscience to answer.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Money-Changers
MONEY-CHANGERS.—See preced. art. and Bank, No. 1.
 
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Money (2)
MONEY.—We propose to treat first of money in general as referred to in the Gospels, and afterwards of the definite sums or coins which are there named.
I. Money in General.—In the Authorized Version six Greek words are rendered ‘money,’ ‘tribute money,’ or ‘piece of money.’ In two cases this is a mistranslation, and is rectified by the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 . The words are as follows: 1. ἀργύριον (Matthew 25:18; Matthew 25:27; Matthew 28:12; Matthew 28:15, Mark 14:11, Luke 9:3; Luke 19:15; Luke 19:23; Luke 22:5). (In three of the above passages it occurs in the plural without the sense being altered; thus, cf. Matthew 25:18 with 25:27). This word originally means silver, hence silver money (also translation ‘pieces of silver,’ Matthew 27:3; Matthew 27:5-6; Matthew 27:9; see below, under ‘Stater’); finally, as silver was the chief medium of exchange in the ancient world, money in general (cf. Fr. argent). 2. χαλκός (Mark 6:8; Mark 12:41). This word originally means brass, hence coins of brass (or copper), and, as copper money circulated largely among the common people, money in general. 3. κέρμα (John 2:15) comes from a verb meaning to cut, and means originally change or small coins. It is appropriately used in this passage for the stock-in-trade of the money-changers, a part of whose business it was to supply change for larger sums. 4. νόμισμα (Matthew 22:19) comes from a verb meaning to acknowledge as customary or lawful. It means, accordingly, money in the sense of lawful coin. The νόμισμα τοῦ κήνσου, or tribute money, was the currency in which the Roman tribute had to be paid, that is, the denarius. 5. τὰ δίδραχμα (Matthew 17:24 Authorized Version ‘tribute money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 the half-shekel’). As is rightly indicated by the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , this word is the name of a definite sum of money which was levied for the maintenance of the Temple (see below, under ‘Didrachm’). 6. στατήρ (Matthew 17:27 Authorized Version ‘piece of money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘shekel’). Here, too, the Authorized Version is at fault, the word meaning a definite coin (see below, under ‘Stater’).
To the above words used for money in general (though under slightly different aspects) may be added the comprehensive description of money in Matthew 10:9 in terms of the three metals used as specie—gold, silver, and brass (or copper). This verse may be taken as evidence that gold as well as silver and copper coins circulated in Palestine in the time of our Lord, although no gold coin is mentioned in the Gospels. The current gold coin was doubtless the Roman aureus, frequently referred to in the Mishna as a golden denarius. In silver there was more variety. The Roman denarius was, of course, largely, in evidence, and was probably the silver coin in most common use. But there were also coins of larger size, bearing Greek names. When Pompey made Syria a Roman province (b.c. 65), he found in circulation tetradrachms of two different kinds. There were those issued chiefly from Antioch by the Seleucid kings on the Attic standard, weighing 262 grains troy. There were also those issued by the semi-autonomous cities of Phœnicia on the Phœnician standard of 224 grains to the tetradrachm. Tetradrachms of both standards were recognized by Pompey as equivalent to four denarii (Mommsen, Gesch. des Röm. Münzwesens, 36, 715). Both would still be lawful coin in the time of our Lord, though, as Mommsen surmises (ib. 72), the heavier royal tetradrachms would tend to be driven out of circulation by the lighter Phœnician coins, which, besides, as corresponding exactly to the Hebrew shekel, were in special demand in Palestine for religious purposes (see below, under ‘Didrachm’). The supply of silver from the mints at Tyre and Sidon, which continued to issue tetradrachms and didrachms under the Emperors,* [1] was reinforced from the time of Augustus onwards by the tetradrachms coined in large numbers at Antioch for circulation in the province of Syria. These ranged in weight from 220 to 236 grains, and were no doubt reckoned for ordinary purposes as equal to four denarii, although, in accordance with the regular practice of the Romans of giving a preference to their own silver, they were tariffed for purposes of taxation as only equal to three denarii.
A vexed question, which cannot be held to be yet decided, is whether prior to the time of the first Jewish revolt any silver coins had been produced in Palestine itself. Until lately it has been usual for numismatologists to assign to Simon Meccabaeus certain silver shekels and half-shekels struck on the Phœnician standard, and bearing the inscription in Hebrew, ‘Jerusalem the Holy’ (Madden, Coins of the Jews, 65–71; Head, Hist. Num. 681, 682). Strong historical reasons, however, have been brought by Schürer (HJP [2] i. ii. 379–383) and others for dating these coins rather in the time of the revolt under Nero; and the opinion seems to he making headway that at the time of our Lord, and previously, the Jews were dependent for their silver money upon foreign sources. (For an able statement of the case, see Kennedy in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , vol. iii. s.v. ‘Money,’ § 5).
On the other hand, the supply of copper money must have been almost, if not quite, exclusively of native production. There were the copper coins of the Hasmonaean princes, those of the various Herods, and those which had been struck since a.d. 6 by successive procurators of Judaea. Unlike the foreign silver money, they have, in deference to Jewish feeling, no Imperial effigy or the likeness of any living thing; even those of the procurators have only the name of the reigning Emperor, and innocent ears of corn, palm-trees, lilies, and the like. As to their denomination we have no sure evidence. Schürer holds that the Romans imposed their monetary standard more rigorously in Palestine than elsewhere, and that even the Herodian coins followed the Roman system (HJP [2] ii. i. 38). Other writers consider it to be more probable that the copper coinage of Palestine followed the subdivisions of the drachm common in Greek-speaking countries. The extant coins contain no indication of value, nor can any safe inference be drawn from their weight, seeing that, where a silver standard prevails, the copper coinage must always be very much of the nature of token money. (See, further, under ‘Assarion,’ ‘Kodrantes,’ and ‘Lepton,’ below).
Before proceeding to speak in detail of the coins named in the Gospels, it will be well to give in tabular form the main elements of the two systems, the Greek and the Roman, which obtained concurrently in Palestine at the time of our Lord. For convenience of reference the average value in sterling money is put opposite the larger sums.
Greek system.
1 Talent (£240)
=
60 Minas.
1 Mina (£4)
=
100 Drachms
1 Drachm (9½d.)
=
6 Obols.
1 Obol
=
8 Chalki.
(To this system belong also the stater of four, and the didrachm of two, drachms and the lepton, whose relation to the chalkus is uncertain. See below, under ‘Lepton’).
Roman system.
1 Aureus (£1)
=
25 Denarii.
1 Denarius (9½d)
=
16 Asses.
1 As.
=
4 Quadrantes.
The point of connexion between the two systems is found in the identification of the Roman denarius with the Attic drachm. This identification was rendered easy by the fact that at the time when Rome began her career of conquest in the East the drachm of the Attic standard had fallen to a weight which only slightly exceeded that of the denarius; but there can be little doubt that it was made deliberately by the Romans as a matter of policy. Alexander the Great had made the Attic drachm the unit of his Imperial coinage, which he imposed upon all the lands he had conquered; and in adopting the Alexandrine drachm as equal to their own denarius, the Romans wished to indicate that they served themselves heirs to his kingdom in the East (Mommsen, op. cit. 691). In imperial times the identification was so completely established that Hellenistic writers regularly refer to the denarius as ‘the Attic drachm.’ This identification enables us to assign values to those coins which follow the Greek system. The weight of the gold aureus is known, and its value admits of easy calculation (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. 427), and the other values, as given above, follow at once. This method of ascertaining the value of the silver coins of the Gospels does justice to the fact that, in the Roman Empire then, as in Britain now, the value of silver coins was legally defined in terms of the gold standard.
II. Definite sums of money and coins mentioned in the gospels.—These may most conveniently be treated of under three heads: money of account, silver coins, and copper coins.
(i.) Money of account.—Two sums of money, to which no actual coin corresponded, receive a special name in the Gospels. These are the talent and the mina.
1. Talent (τάλαντον, Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15-16; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24-25; Matthew 25:28) is originally the name of the highest weight in the various systems of antiquity, hence the sum of money represented by that weight in gold or silver. The talent of the Gospels, which is, of course, a talent of silver, might conceivably be the Phœnician talent, but is far more probably to be identified with the talent on the reduced Attic scale which bad been formally recognized by the Romans (see above). It contained 6000 Attic drachms or denarii, and was thus worth 240 aurei or £240.
The talent is mentioned twice by our Lord. In the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23-35) the one servant owes the king 10,000 talents, or nearly two-and-a-half millions of our money—an enormous sum, of which the 100 denarii (= £4) owed him by his fellow-servant represents but an insignificant fraction (1/6000). It may be remarked that the juxtaposition in this parable of the talent and the denarius is a confirmation of the view that it is the Attic talent that is meant). In the parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30) the master intrusts his capital of eight talents or £1920 to his three servants in sums of £1200, £480, and £240 respectively. It will be seen that even he who received but one talent had yet quite a respectable capital to trade with, so that the excuse which is sometimes made by commentators on his behalf, viz. that he was discouraged by the smallness of the sum committed to him, is as little valid as that which he offered for himself. The real reason for his conduct was, of course, just his slothfulness.
2. Mina (μνᾶ, Luke 19:13; Luke 19:16; Luke 19:18; Luke 19:20; Luke 19:24-25 Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 pound) is the sixtieth part of the talent. Like the latter, it is to be calculated on the Roman-Attic scale. It contains 100 denarii, and is thus equal to £4.
The only mention of this sum in the Gospels is in the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), where a nobleman, going to a far country to get a kingdom, gives one mina to each of his ten servants, bidding them trade with it till his return. The smallness of the sum in such a connexion is remarkable, especially when compared with the companion parable of the Talents. The explanation (as far as the story is concerned) seems to be that the master is not in this case a trader making provision for the suitable employment of his capital in his absence, but one who, having in prospect the acquisition of a kingdom, desires to test capacity of his servants for high office in that kingdom. Ingenuity and diligence would be more thoroughly tested in multiplying a small sum than a large one.
(ii.) Silver coins.—Of these there are mentioned by name, the denarius, the drachm, the didrachm, and the stater. The ‘piece of money’ of the Authorized Version in Matthew 17:27 is the stater, the ‘pieces of silver’ in Luke 15:8 are drachms, while the ‘pieces of silver’ in Matthew 26:15 are probably staters, and are discussed under that heading.
1. Denarius (δηνάριον, Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 penny; American Revisers, more happily, shilling).—This is the most frequently mentioned coin in the Gospels (Matthew 18:28; Matthew 20:2; Matthew 20:9-10; Matthew 20:13; Matthew 22:19, Mark 6:37; Mark 12:15; Mark 14:5, Luke 7:41; Luke 10:35; Luke 20:24, John 6:7; John 12:5). It is the name of the most important Roman coin, which circulated throughout the Empire, and in terms of which all public accounts were made up. It received its name from being originally the equivalent of ten copper asses, but front b.c. 217 onwards it was equivalent to sixteen asses, and weighed 1/84; of the Roman pound, or 60 grains troy. Under Nero (c. [4] a.d. 60) it was reduced to 1/96; of the pound, or 52½ grains. At the time of our Lord its value was fixed at 1/23; of the aureus, which may be taken under the early emperors as equal on the average to our sovereign; thus the denarius was worth 9–6 pence, or roughly 9½d.
We find the denarius used in the Gospels for the reckoning of even fairly large sums. Thus in the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:28, see above under ‘Talent’) a sum of 100 denarii is mentioned, while in the parable of the Two Debtors (Luke 7:41) the two debts are stated at 500 and 50 denarii respectively (£20 and £2). In Mark 6:37 = John 6:7 the disciples estimate that it would seed bread to the value of at least 200 denarii (£8) to provide for the five thousand. (There is no probability in the suggestion that this figure was named as the amount of money then in ‘the bag.’ It is intended to indicate a sum far beyond the means of the little company). In Mark 14:5 = John 12:5 the vase of ointment with which Mary anointed our Lord is valued at 300 denarii (£12). The ‘exceeding costliness’ of this loving tribute is realized when we remember that the sum named represents at least the annual income of a labourer of those days. This appears from the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-15), where a denarius is evidently looked upon as liberal pay for a day’s work; for we may be quite sure that the employer who dealt so generously with the labourers engaged late in the day had struck no niggardly bargain with those hired in the morning. (A passage which may be quoted in confirmation is To 5:14, where the disguised angel is promised by Tobit a drachm a day—at that time a little less than a denarius—for acting as companion to his son. It is true that this was to be exclusive of his necessary expenses; but, on the other hand, the position was one of trust, and would naturally be more highly remunerated than field labour). In the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-37) two denarii are given to the innkeeper as a reasonable payment in advance for the keep of the wounded traveller for a day or two, to he supplemented if necessary on the return of the Samaritan. (This is the most natural way to explain the reference; see Jülicher, Gleichnisreden, ii. 591. On the other hand, Ramsay in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , Ext. Vol. 394, holds that the two denarii were simply payment for the one night that the two had spent in the inn).
Of special interest is the reference to the denarius in Matthew 22:19 = Mark 12:15 = Luke 20:24 in connexion with the Pharisees’ question as to the lawfulness of paying tribute to Caesar. The denarius was ‘the money of the tribute’ (Matthew 22:19), all Imperial taxes being payable in terms of it in accordance with a rescript of Germanicus (c. [4] a.d. 18). It bore upon it the name and title of the reigning Emperor, along with the effigy either of himself or of some member of the Imperial family—the ‘image and superscription’ to which our Lord alluded. It was issued by the Imperial authority, even the Roman Senate having only the right to mint copper coins, and could thus must appropriately be spoken of as ‘that which is Caesar’s.’
2. Drachm (δραχμή, Luke 15:8-9 Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 piece of silver).—This is the name of the unit of the Greek system of silver coinage, and, as such, might be applied to a great variety of coins front different mints and of different standards. In the Gospels it occurs only in the parable of the Lost Coin, where, of course, it must be understood of some coin current in Palestine. Few coins of this denomination were issued from the Phœnician cities or from Antioch, and the city of Caesarea in Cappadocia had only recently begun to coin drachms on the Phœnician standard (of 55 grains) for use in the provinces of Syria and Cappadocia (Mommsen, op. cit. 734, 897; Head, op. cit. 634). Thus, while it is not impossible that the coins in question may have been drachms of the Phœnician standard, they are with greater probability to be identified with the ‘Attic drachms’* [6] of the Hellenistic writers, that is, with Roman denarii. In any case, the value for ordinary purposes was the same—about 9½d. of our money. The ‘ten pieces of silver’ possessed by the woman thus amounted to eight shillings.
3. Didrachm (δίδραχμον, Matthew 17:24 Authorized Version ‘tribute money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘half-shekel’).—As the name implies, this is a coin of the value of two drachms. τὰ δίδραχμα in the passage quoted refers to the tax of half a shekel (Exodus 30:13) levied each year in the month of Adar from all Jews above the age of twenty for the maintenance of the Temple. The only coins then current in Palestine which answered exactly to the ‘shekel of the sanctuary’—leaving out of account the shekels commonly but probably erroneously assigned to Simon Maccabaeus (see above)—were those which had for long been coined in the Phœnician cities; and the Temple tax, along with other sacred dues, was paid in this currency.
The well-established correspondence of the didrachm to the half-shekel has been obscured for some writers by the fact that the LXX Septuagint regularly translate שֶׁקֶל by δ·δραχμον. From the narrative in Mt. it is evident that the tax was a voluntary one, although the Mishna declares that the goods of those who had not paid it by the 25th Adar might be distrained (Edersheim, Life and Times, ii. 112). After the destruction of Jerusalem, Vespasian made compulsory a poll-tax of the same amount to defray the cost of rebuilding the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
4. Stater (στατήρ, Matthew 17:27 Authorized Version piece of money, Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 shekel).—The word στατήρ is derived from the verb ἵστημι in the sense of to weigh. It hence means, in the first place, a standard weight, and then derivatively a standard coin. In Athens it was at first applied to the didrachm, which was looked upon as the standard coin of the monetary system, but afterwards to the tetradrachm or piece of four drachms. It is evidently so used in the passage before us, for the stater to be found in the fish’s mouth was to pay the Temple tax of a didrachm for two persons, our Lord and Peter. The tetradrachm of the Phœnician standard corresponded to the Hebrew shekel, and is no doubt the coin here indicated. Josephus refers in one passage (BJ ii. xxi. 2) to ‘the Tyrian coin which is of the value of four Attic drachms,’ and in another (Ant. iii. viii. 2) he gives the value of the Hebrew shekel as four Attic drachms. The stater would thus be worth 4s. 2d. of our money.
In Matthew 26:15 Cod. D [7] reads σριἁκοντα στατῆρας; and though this reading is rejected by critical editors, it probably embodies a correct paraphrase of the ἀργύρια (Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘pieces of silver’) of
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Money-Making: Nothing But Play
Mr. Ruskin, in his lecture on Work,* says:: 'Whatever we do to please ourselves, and only for the sake of the pleasure, not for an ultimate object, is 'play,' the 'pleasing thing,' not the useful thing. . . . The first of all English games is making money. That is an all-absorbing game ; and we knock each other down oftener in playing at that than at foot-ball, or any other rougher sport; and it is absolutely without purpose; no one who engages heartily in that game ever knows why. Ask a great money-maker what he wants to do with his money: he never knows. He doesn't make it to do anything with it. He gets it only that he may get it. 'What will you make of what you have got?' you ask. 'Well, I'll get more,' he says. Just as at cricket, you get more runs. There's no use in the runs, but to get more of them than other people is the game. And there's no use in the money, but to have more of it than other people is the game. So all that great foul city of London there: rattling, growling, smoking, stinking: a ghastly heap of fermenting brickwork, pouring out poison at every pore: you fancy it is a city of work? Not a street of it! It is a great city of play; very nasty play, and very hard play,. but still play. It is only Lord's Cricket Ground without the turf: a huge billiard-table without the cloth, and with pockets as deep as the bottomless pit, but mainly a billiard table after all.'
* In 'The Crown of Wild Olive, Three Lectures on Work, Traffic, and War.' By John Ruskin, M.A., 1866.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Money
See Wealth.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Money
Isaiah 55:1 (a) This type condemns every religion that offers salvation by works. The type represents everything considered of spiritual value by human beings if it is used to purchase forgiveness, and obtain entrance into Heaven. Salvation is not for sale. It cannot be bought, nor earned, nor merited by any person, or in any way.
Matthew 22:19 (c) This represents legitimate things which should be given to those with whom we are associated on earth. We should give to the family. to the community and to the government.
Matthew 25:18 (b) This word is typical of any gifts or talents given to a person by the Lord and which should be invested for Him in His service.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money
HAD we been with our Lord on the Mount of Olives that day, this parable would have ended far differently from the way we would have expected it to end. As we heard the servant with the five talents introduced, and then the servant with the two talents, and then the servant with the one talent, we would have felt sure that some very severe things were soon to be said about the greatly gifted among men, and the continually prosperous. All our sympathies would have been with that under-estimated and overlooked servant who had only one talent entrusted to him. And at the beginning of this parable we would have felt sure that before it closed the Divine Preacher would take the side of the despised and untalented servant, and would say some of His severest things about the rich, and about the great, and about those who were full of all manner of prosperity. But we would have been disappointed in our expectations. We would soon have seen that our Lord's thoughts are not our thoughts about such men and such matters. The talented and the privileged and the prosperous in life are always the few and not the many. It is the untalented and the unsuccessful and the obscure and the overlooked who are always the multitude. And it is to the multitude, and to the peculiar temptations of the multitude in the matter now in hand, that our Lord here speaks.
The servant with the one talent started on his stewardship with a great grudge at his master. He is a hard master, said that sullen servant in his heart. At any rate, he has been a hard master to me. He felt himself to be as good a man and as deserving as any of his fellow-servants, and he may very well have been in the right in so thinking and in so saying. And here was he treated in this hard and cruel manner. No wonder he was soured at his heart with the treatment he had got. No wonder that he took up his one talent with a scowl, and cast it into a hole of the earth with disgust, saying as he did so that a harder or a more unjust master no honest servant ever had. Those five talents, and those two talents, and then that one talent, all rankled in his heart, till he was the most embittered and resentful and rebellious of men.
When Ouranius first entered holy orders he had a great haughtiness in his temper. The rudeness, ill-nature, or perverse behaviour, of any of his flock used at first to betray Ouranius into impatience. At his first coming to his little village, it was as disagreeable to him as a prison, and every day seemed too tedious to be endured in so retired a place. He thought his parish was too full of poor and mean people, that were none of them fit for the conversation of a gentleman. This put him upon a close application to his studies. He kept much at home, writ notes upon Homer and Plautus, and sometimes thought it hard to be called to pray by any poor body's bedside when he was just in the midst of one of Homer's battles. The slothful servant was the father of Ouranius.
This servant who hid his talent in the earth was the father of that young Highland minister also who hid his sermon in the snow. His history was this. A city congregation was looking out for a colleague and successor to their old minister. They had heard of a preacher of great promise in a remote locality, but before they would commit themselves to him they sent four of their number to hear him in his own pulpit. It was mid-winter and a great snowstorm came on that Saturday night. The ambitious and not unfaithful young minister had his sermon all ready, but as there would be a small congregation that snowy morning he would not throw away his whole week's work on such a handful, and so he left his sermon at home. When he entered the pulpit it was too late now when he saw a seatful of city-looking men in the far end of the empty church. And the explanation he stammered out to them did not mend matters. Till it is to be feared that his Master's prophecy at the end of this parable was, some of it, fulfilled in that manse that Sabbath night. He had for long been ambitious of the city, and he had a sharp punishment that day for despising his small congregation; for hiding his talent at home because there would not be enough people to appreciate it.
This servant who hid his lord's money was the father also of all those ministers among us who will not do their ordained work because they have so little to do. Their field is so small that it is not worth their pains taking off their coat to gather out the stones, and to weed out the thorns, and to plough up the fallow ground, and to sow in their too small pulpit and pastorate the seed or the kingdom of heaven. If they had as large a field as that five-talented fellow-servant of theirs; if they had a city pulpit; if they had a people or education and intelligence, they would prepare for the Sabbath in a very different fashion from what they do. But as it is, what is the use? He was the father of all those probationers also who stand idle till they are settled. Once they are settled and married they will lay out their days, and read the best, and rise in the morning, and preach every Sabbath to the top of their ability. You will see if they will not. But a probationer with an unsettled mind cannot work in that way. He is here today and there tomorrow, and he has no heart to tackle a serious task of any kind. Indeed what can he do but wait on and on for a call? With all those drawbacks, two probationers rise up before me who had another father than this wicked and slothful servant. The one of them did this among other things all his probationer time. When he preached in a vacancy, or for a friend, as he was preaching it, for the first time he found out the faults of his sermon. He found out the loose links that were in it; the want of a beginning and a middle and an end there was in it; the want of order and proportion there was in it; the want of march, and of progress, and of coming to a head there was in it; and the many other faults of all kinds there were in it. And on Monday morning the first thing he did, while the shame and the pain of his bad work were still in his heart, he rose and took his sermon to pieces, re-arranged it in the light of yesterday, re-wrote it from beginning to end, and preached it again next Sabbath, a completely new creation, and a conscientious, a living, and a life-giving, message. Newman re-wrote all his sermons three times over, and one of his best-written books he re-wrote five times. And that probationer did that again and again and again till he not only made his first sermons perfect, but, better than that, by that fidelity and by that labour he worked his whole mind into a methodicalness, and into an order, and into a clearness, and into a consecutiveness, and into other high qualities, that have all combined to make him one of the foremost preachers of our day. The other probationer who rises up before me executed editorial and other work during that same period of his life: work which stands on all our shelves a quarry of resource to us, and a monument of honour to him. And at the same time he began to lay up those immense stores of reading and writing that make his every sentence today a model of fulness, and clearness, and finish.
The unprofitable servant was the father of Clemens, and Fervidus, and Eugenia also. For Clemens is always proposing to himself what he would do if he had a great estate. He would outdo all the charitable men that have gone before him; he would retire from the world; he would have no equipage; he would allow himself only necessaries, in order that widows and orphans, the sick and the distressed, might find relief out of his estate. Come to thy senses, Clemens. Do not talk what thou wouldst do if thou wert an angel, but consider what thou canst do as thou art a man. Make the best use of thy present state. Remember the poor widow's mite, Clemens. You will find Clemens in the Law gallery also. Fervidus, again, is only sorry that he is not in holy orders. He is often thinking what reformation he would make in the world if he was a priest or a bishop. He would then have devoted himself wholly to God and religion, and have had no other care but how to save souls. But do not believe yourself, Fervidus. For why do you neglect as you do those whose priest and bishop you already are? You hire a coachman to carry you to church, and to sit in the street with his horses whilst you are attending divine service. You never ask him how he supplies the loss of divine service, or what means he takes to preserve himself in a state of piety. And so on, Fervidus, through all your un-Christian life. Eugenia, again, is a good young woman, full of pious dispositions. She is intending if ever she has a family to be the best mistress of it that ever was. Her house shall be a school of religion, and her children and servants shall be brought up in the strictest practice of piety. She will spend her time in a very different manner from the rest of the world. It may be so, Eugenia. The piety of your mind makes one think that you intend all this with sincerity. But you are not yet the head of a family, and perhaps never may be. But, Eugenia, you have now one maid. She dresses you for church, you ask her for what you want, and then you leave her to have as little religion as she pleases. You turn her away, you hire another, she also comes, and after a time goes. You need not stay, Eugenia, to be so extraordinary a person. The opportunity is now in your own hands. Your lady's maid is your family at present. She is under your care. Be now that religious governess that you intend to be. Teach her the catechism, hear her read and exhort her to pray. Take her with you to church, and spare no pains to make her as holy and devout as yourself. When you do this much good in your present state, then you are already that extraordinary person you intend to be. And, till you thus live up to your present state, there is but little hope that the altering of your state will alter your way of life. Eugenia also, you will all see, is one of his daughters who said: If I had had five talents committed to me, or even two, I would have traded with the same and made them other five talents and other two.
But let Eugenia be done at once and for ever with such a father. Let Eugenia be born again till she has her Father in heaven, not in name only, but in deed and in truth. Come out this week to Fountainbridge, Eugenia. In our mission district in Fountainbridge you will find a prepared scope for all your talents of every number and of every kind. There are hundreds of girls out there who sorely need just such a friend as you could be to them. They need above everything else an elder sister and a more talented sister just like you. Solitary girls in lodgings have a hard fight of it to keep their heads above water. Poor girls starved to death for want of some one to love them, and befriend them, and counsel them, and encourage them in virtue and godliness. You may not have many talents, you may not be rich, you may not be very clever, or very far on yourself in the best things, but you are better off, a thousand times, than those poor sisters of yours out there. And you can speak to them, and know their names, and tell them your name, and go sometimes to see them. At your very poorest and very least talented you can teach two or three neglected children for an hour every Sabbath day. You can take them down to the water-side on a Saturday. You can take them home to a little tea-party every week or two. You can give them little books to read, and make them tell you what they have read, and better and better books as they grow up. Good books for children are so cheap nowadays that you do not need to be rich in order to have a delightful little library provided for every poor girl's lodgings, and for every Sabbath-school child's mother's house. Come out and make a beginning with your one talent this very week. We are all making a beginning again this very week in that famous old field so well known to your forefathers and foremothers in such noble work. Let Clemens, and Fervidus, and Eugenia all come. Let the five-talented, and the two-talented, and the one-talented, and the no-talented at all, come. For there is a field for all in Fountainbridge, and many a Well done, good and faithful servant! will before long be purchased there again, as in days gone by. Come away then, O servant of God with the one talent! Come and light a lamp, like Samuel. Come and keep a door, like David. Come and give two mites, like the poor widow. Come and give a cup of cold water in the name of a disciple. For,
Little drops of water,Little grains of sand,Make the mighty oceanAnd the pleasant land.Little deeds of kindness,Little words of love,Help to make earth happy,Like the heaven above.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Money
Mention is made of money as early as Genesis 17:12,13 , where persons are said to be 'bought with money;' and from Genesis to Zechariah it is spoken of as being not counted, but weighed, which would give the true value of the precious metals in the form of rings or in odd pieces of gold or silver. The names Gerah, Bekah, Shekel, Maneh, and Talent, being used for weights as well as money, the two are better considered together. See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.
On the return of the Jews, B.C. 536, Persian money was used by them. This would be followed by Greek money when they were under the dominion of the Greeks. Antiochus VII about B.C. 140, granted permission to Simon Maccabeus to coin Jewish money. Shekels were coined bearing a pot of manna and an almond rod. Under the Romans, Roman money was used.
Webster's Dictionary - Money-Maker
(1):
(n.) One who coins or prints money; also, a counterfeiter of money.
(2):
(n.) One who accumulates money or wealth; specifically, one who makes money-getting his governing motive.
Webster's Dictionary - Money-Making
(1):
(n.) The act or process of making money; the acquisition and accumulation of wealth.
(2):
(a.) Affording profitable returns; lucrative; as, a money-making business.
(3):
(a.) Sussessful in gaining money, and devoted to that aim; as, a money-making man.
Webster's Dictionary - Money
(1):
(v. t.) To supply with money.
(2):
(n.) A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.
(3):
(n.) Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling.
(4):
(n.) In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.
Webster's Dictionary - Money
(1):
(v. t.) To supply with money.
(2):
(n.) A piece of metal, as gold, silver, copper, etc., coined, or stamped, and issued by the sovereign authority as a medium of exchange in financial transactions between citizens and with government; also, any number of such pieces; coin.
(3):
(n.) Any written or stamped promise, certificate, or order, as a government note, a bank note, a certificate of deposit, etc., which is payable in standard coined money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling.
(4):
(n.) In general, wealth; property; as, he has much money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, money.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Tables of Measures Weights And Money in the Bible
These tables are based upon the latest and highest authorities, as Schrader, Brandis and F. W. Madden (Jewish Coinage and Money), Whitehouse and Bissell. Updates to the monetary values were added by Josh Bond on 3/28/2012.
I. MEASURE OF LENGTH
ft.
in.
Digit, or finger. Jeremiah 52:21,.
79/100
4 digits =1 palm. Exodus 26:25,
3 17/100
3 palms = 1 span. Exodus 28:16,
9 52/100
2 spans = 1 cubit. Genesis 6:15,
4 cubits=1 fathom. Acts 27:28,
6 cubits = 1 Teed. Ezekiel 40:3; Ezekiel 40:5,
1 Roman foot,
11 64/100
5 Roman feet = 1 Roman pace,
10 ¼
6¼ Roman ft. = 6 Greek ft. = Greek fathom,
81/100
625 Roman ft. = 1 furlong (Greek stadium), .
606
1 Roman mile = about 9/10 of an English mile,
4854
15 furlongs = Sabbath day's journey. Compare John 11:18 with Acts 1:12.
2. MEASURE OF CAPACITY (Dry)
pks.
pts.
1 4/5 kab (cab) = 1 omer,
5
6 " 3⅓ omers = 1 seah,
18 " 3 seah = 1 ephah,
180 " 10 ephahs = 1 homer or kor
3. MEASURE OF CAPACITY (Liquid)
gals.
qts.
pts.
1 log, Leviticus 14:10,.. about
4/5
4 logs = 1 cab (kab),.. "
3⅓
3 kabs == 1 hin. Exodus 30:24, "
2 hins = 1 seah,... "
3 seahs = 1 bath or ephah, 1 Kings 7:26,... "
10 ephahs=1 kor or homer. Ezekiel 45:14,...."
 75
4. WEIGHT (Troy)
lbs.
oz.
grs.
1 gerah.
Exodus 30:13,
12 65/100
10 gerahs
= 1 bekah.
Exodus 38:26,
126 ½
lbs.
oz.
grs.
2 bekahs = 1 shekel. Genesis 23:15.
½
60 shekels = 1 maneh. Ezekiel 45:12
9,
300
60 manehs = Kikkar (Heb. Kikkar. Exodus 25:29); or king's talent,
158
240
5. SILVER MONEY
(According to Bissell's Bib. Antiq.)
[1]
cents.
1 gerah =
.03 65/100
10 gerahs = 1 bekah,
.36 ½
2 bekahs = 1 shekel,
.73
60 shekels = 1 maneh,
$43.80
50 manehs = 1 talent,
$2190.00
(According to Madden and Whitehouse.—Old Testament period.)
1 shekel (holy shekel),
.64
50 shekels = 1 maneh or mina,
$32.00
60 manehs or minas = 1 talent,
1920.00
6. GOLD MONEY (Troy oz. = $19.47 6/10) [2]
According to Bissell.
1 shekel (gold),
$5.35
100 shekels = 1 maneh,
535.00
100 manehs = 1 talent,
53,500.00
(According to Madden and Whitehouse.—Old Testament period?)
1 shekel,
$9.60
50 shekels = 1 maneh or mina,
480.60
60 manehs or minas = 1 talent,
28,800.00
7. ROMAN COPPER MONEY
(New Testament period, coins were:)
1 lepton = 1 mite,
about 1/8 ct.
2 leptons or mites = 1 quadrans, (the farthing of Matthew 5:26),
4 quadrans = 1 as, (the farthing of Matthew 10:29),
" 1 ct.
(The "as" of N. T. times was much reduced from the earlier coin of that denomination.)
8. SILVER GREEK AND ROMAN MONEY
(According to Madden and Whitehouse.—New Testament Period.)[1]
1 denarius = 1 "penny" (Matthew 22:16;) drachma or 16 ases,
cents. about .16
2 denarii or drachmas = didrachma,
" .32
4 drachmas = stater or shekel,
.64
30 shekels (Attic) = 1 mina or
$19.10
60 minas or shekels = 1 talent (Attic),
1,146.00
1 denarius "penny " = 1 drachma
= .18 3/10
2 denarii = didrachma (½ shekel)
Money-Changers
in the Gospels, were persons who exchanged native for foreign coin, to enable those who came to Jerusalem from distant countries to purchase the necessary sacrifices. In our Lord's time they had established themselves in the court of the temple; a profanation which had probably grown up with the influence of Roman manners, which allowed the argentarii [1] to establish their usurious mensas, tables, by the statues of the gods, even at the feet of Janus, in the most holy places, in porticibus Basilicarum, or in the temples, pone aedem Castoris. The following extract from Buckingham's Travels among the Arabs, is illustrative:—"The mosque at the time of our passing through it was full of people, though these were not worshippers, nor was it at either of the usual hours of public prayers. Some of the parties were assembled to smoke, others to play at chess, and some apparently to drive bargains of trade, but certainly none to pray. It was, indeed, a living picture of what we might believe the temple at Jerusalem to have been, when those who sold oxen, and sheep, and doves, and the changers of money sitting there, were driven out by Jesus, with a scourge of cords, and their tables overturned. It was, in short, a place of public resort and thoroughfare, a house of merchandise, as the temple of the Jews had become in the days of the Messiah."
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Money
Scripture often speaks of gold, silver, brass, of certain sums of money, of purchases made with money, of current money, of money of a certain weight; but we do not observe coined or stamped money till a late period; which makes it probable that the ancient Hebrews took gold and silver only by weight; that they only considered the purity of the metal, and not the stamp. The most ancient commerce was conducted by barter, or exchanging one sort of merchandise for another. One man gave what he could spare to another, who gave him in return part of his superabundance. Afterward, the more precious metals were used in traffic, as a value more generally known and fixed. Lastly, they gave this metal, by public authority, a certain mark, a certain weight, and a certain degree of alloy, to fix its value, and to save buyers and sellers the trouble of weighing and examining the coins. At the siege of Troy in Homer, no reference is made to gold or silver coined; but the value of things is estimated by the number of oxen they were worth. For instance: they bought wine, by exchanging oxen, slaves, skins, iron, &c: for it. When the Greeks first used money, it was only little pieces of iron or copper, called oboli or spits, of which a handful was a drachma, says Plutarch. Herodotus thinks that the Lydians were the first that stamped money of gold or silver, and introduced it into commerce. Others say it was Ishon, king of Thessaly, a son of Deucalion. Others ascribe this honour to Erichthonius, who had been educated by the daughters of Cecrops, king of Athens: others, again, to Phidon, king of Argos. Among the Persians it is said Darius, son of Hystaspes, first coined golden money. Lycurgus banished gold and silver from his commonwealth of Lacedaemon, and only allowed a rude sort of money, made of iron. Janus, or rather the kings of Rome, made a kind of gross money of copper, having on one side the double face of Janus, on the other the prow of a ship. We find nothing concerning the money of the Egyptians, Phenicians, Arabians, or Syrians, before Alexander the Great. In China, to this day, they stamp no money of gold or silver, but only of copper. Gold and silver pass as merchandise. If gold or silver be offered, they take it and pay it by weight, as other goods: so that they are obliged to cut it into pieces with shears for that purpose, and they carry a steel yard at their girdles to weigh it.
But to return to the Hebrews. Abraham weighed out four hundred shekels of silver, to purchase Sarah's tomb, Genesis 23:15-16 ; and Scripture observes that he paid this in "current money with the merchant." Joseph was sold by his brethren to the Midianites for twenty pieces (in Hebrew twenty shekels) of silver, Genesis 37:28 . The brethren of Joseph bring back with them into Egypt the money they found in their sacks, in the same weight as before, Genesis 43:21 . The bracelets that Eliezer gave Rebekah weighed ten shekels, and the ear rings two shekels, Genesis 24:22 . Moses ordered that the weight of five hundred shekels of myrrh, and two hundred and fifty shekels of cinnamon, of the weight of the sanctuary, should be taken, to make the perfume which was to be burnt to the Lord on the golden altar, Exodus 30:24 . He acquaints us that the Israelites offered for the works of the tabernacle seventy-two thousand talents of brass, Exodus 38:29 . We read, in the books of Samuel, that the weight of Absalom's hair was two hundred shekels of the ordinary weight, or of the king's weight, 2 Samuel 14:26 . Isaiah 46:6 , describes the wicked as weighing silver in a balance, to make an idol of it; and Jeremiah 32:10 , weighs seventeen pieces of silver in a pair of scales, to pay for a field he had bought. Isaiah says, "Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. Wherefore do ye weigh money for that which is not bread?" Amos 8:5 , represents the merchants as encouraging one another to make the ephah small, wherewith to sell, and the shekel great, wherewith to buy, and to falsify the balances by deceit.
In all these passages three things only are mentioned:
1. The metal, that is, gold or silver, and never copper, that not being used in traffic as money.
2. The weight, a talent, a shekel, a gerah or obolus, the weight of the sanctuary, and the king's weight.
3. The alloy (standard) of pure or fine gold and silver, and of good quality, as received by the merchant. The impression of the coinage is not referred to; but it is said they weighed the silver, or other commodities, by the shekel and by the talent. This shekel, therefore, and this talent, were not fixed and determined pieces of money, but weights applied to things used in commerce. Hence those deceitful balances of the merchants, who would increase the shekel, that is, would augment the weight by which they weighed the gold and silver they were to receive, that they might have a greater quantity than was their due; hence the weight of the sanctuary, the standard of which was preserved in the temple to prevent fraud; hence those prohibitions in the law, "Thou shalt not have in thy bag divers weights," in Hebrew, stones, "a great and a small," Deuteronomy 25:13 ; hence those scales that the Hebrews wore at their girdles, Hosea 12:7 , and the Canaanites carried in their hands, to weigh the gold and silver which they received in payment. It is true that in the Hebrew we find Jacob bought a field for a hundred kesitahs, Genesis 33:19 ; and that the friends of Job, after his recovery, gave to that model of patience each a kesitah, and a golden pendant for the ears, Job 42:11 . We also find there darics, (in Hebrew, darcmonim or adarcmonim, ) and mina, staterae, oboli; but this last kind of money was foreign, and is put for other terms, which in the Hebrew only signifies the weight of the metal. The kesitah is not well known to us; some take it for a sheep or a lamb; others, for a kind of money, having the impression of a lamb or a sheep; but it was more probably a purse of money. The darcmonim or darics are money of the kings of Persia; and it is agreed that Darius, son of Hystaspes, first coined golden money. Ezekiel 45:12 , tells us that the mina makes fifty shekels: he reduces this foreign money to the weight of the Hebrews. The mina might probably be a Persian money originally, and adopted by the Greeks and by the Hebrews. But under the dominion of the Persians, the Hebrews were hardly at liberty to coin money of their own, being in subjection to those princes, and very low in their own country. They were still less able under the Chaldeans, during the Babylonish captivity; or afterward under the Grecians, to whom they were subject till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, to whom Antiochus Sidetes, king of Syria, granted the privilege of coining money in Judea, 1Ma_15:6 . And this is the first Hebrew money, properly so called, that we know of. There were shekels and demi-shekels, also the third part of a shekel, and a quarter of a shekel, of silver.
The shekel of silver, or the silverling, Isaiah 7:23 , originally weighed three hundred and twenty barleycorns; but it was afterward increased to three hundred and eighty-four barleycorns, its value being considered equal to four Roman denarii, was two shillings and seven pence, or according to Bishop Cumberland, two shillings and four pence farthing. It is said to have had Aaron's rod on the one side, and the pot of manna on the other. The bekah was equal to half a shekel, Exodus 38:26 . The denarius was one- fourth of a shekel, seven pence three farthings of our money. The gerah, or meah, Exodus 30:13 , was the sixth part of the denarius, or diner, and the twenty-fourth part of the shekel. The assar, or assarion, Matthew 10:29 , was the ninety-sixth part of a shekel: its value was rather more than a farthing. The farthing, Matthew 5:26 , was in value the thirteenth part of a penny sterling. The mite was the half of a farthing, or the twenty-sixth part of a penny sterling. The mina, or maneh, Ezekiel 45:12 , was equal to sixty shekels, which, taken at two shillings and seven pence, was seven pounds fifteen shillings. The talent was fifty minas; and its value, therefore, three hundred and eighty-seven pounds ten shillings. The gold coins were as follows; a shekel of gold was about fourteen and a half times the value of silver, that is, one pound seventeen shillings and five pence halfpenny. A talent of gold consisted of three thousand shekels. The drachma was equal to a Roman denarius, or seven pence three farthings of our money. The didrachma, or tribute money, Matthew 17:24 , was equal to fifteen pence halfpenny. It is said to have been stamped with a harp on one side, and a vine on the other. The stater, or piece of money which Peter found in the fish's mouth, Matthew 17:27 , was two half shekels. A daric, dram, 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 8:27 , was a gold coin struck by Darius the Mede. According to Parkhurst its value was one pound five shillings. A gold penny is stated by Lightfoot to have been equal to twenty-five silver pence.
Hug derives a satisfactory argument for the veracity of the Gospels from the different kinds of money mentioned in them:—The admixture of foreign manners and constitutions proceeded through numberless circumstances of life. Take, for example, the circulation of coin; at one time it is Greek coin; at another, Roman; at another time ancient Jewish. But how accurately is even this stated according to history, and the arrangement of things! The ancient imposts which were introduced before the Roman dominion were valued according to the Greek coinage; for example, the taxes of the temple, the διδραχμον , Matthew 17:24 . The offerings were paid in these, Mark 12:42 ; Luke 21:2 . A payment which proceeded from the temple treasury was made according to the ancient national payment by weight, Matthew 26:15 ; but in common business, trade, wages, sale &c, the assis and denarius and Roman coin were usual, Matthew 10:29 ; Matthew 20:3 ; Luke 12:6 ; Mark 14:5 ; John 12:5 ; John 6:7 . The more modern state taxes are likewise paid in the coin of the nation which exercises at the time the greatest authority, Matthew 22:19 ; Mark 12:15 ; Luke 20:24 . Writers, who, in each little circumstance, which otherwise would pass by unnoticed, so accurately describe the period of time, must certainly have had a personal knowledge of it.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Money
Uncointed money. --It is well known that ancient nations that were without a coinage weighed the precious metals, a practice represented on the Egyptian monuments, on which gold and silver are shown to have been kept in the form of rings. We have no evidence of the use of coined money before the return from the Babylonian captivity; but silver was used for money, in quantities determined by weight, at least as early as the time of Abraham; and its earliest mention is in the generic sense of the price paid for a slave. ( Genesis 17:13 ) The 1000 pieces of silver paid by Abimelech to Abraham, ( Matthew 17:24-2756 ) and the 20 pieces of silver for which Joseph was sold to the Ishmaelites, ( Genesis 37:28 ) were probably rings such as we see on the Egyptian monuments in the act of being weighed. In the first recorded transaction of commerce, the cave of Machpelah is purchased by Abraham for 400 shekels of silver. The shekel weight of silver was the unit of value through the whole age of Hebrew history, down to the Babylonian captivity.
Coined money. --After the captivity we have the earliest mention of coined money , in allusion, as might have been expected, to the Persian coinage, the gold daric (Authorized version dram ). ( Ezra 2:69 ; 8:27 ; Nehemiah 7:70,71,72 ) [1] No native Jewish coinage appears to have existed till Antiochus VII. Sidetes granted Simon Maccabaeus the license to coin money, B.C. 140; and it is now generally agreed that the oldest Jewish silver coins belong to this period. They are shekels and half-shekels, of the weight of 220,110 grains. With this silver there was associated a copper coinage. The abundant money of Herod the Great, which is of a thoroughly Greek character, and of copper only, seems to have been a continuation of the copper coinage of the Maccabees, with some adaptation to the Roman standard. In the money of the New Testament we see the native copper coinage side by side with the Graeco-Roman copper, silver and gold. (The first coined money mentioned in the Bible refers to the Persian coinage, ( 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 2:69 ) and translated dram . It is the Persian daric , a gold coin worth about .50. The coins mentioned by the evangelists, and first those of silver, are the following: The stater , ( 1618420668_8 ) called piece of money , was a Roman coin equal to four drachmas. It was worth 55 to 60 cents, and is of about the same value as the Jewish stater , or coined shekel. The denarius , or Roman penny, as well as the Greek drachma , then of about the same weight, are spoken of as current coins. ( Matthew 22:15-21 ; Luke 20:19-25 ) They were worth about 15 cents. Of copper coins the farthing and its half, the mite , are spoken of, and these probably formed the chief native currency. (The Roman farthing ( quadrans ) was a brass coin worth .375 of a cent. The Greek farthing (as or assarion) was worth four Roman farthings, i.e. about one cent and a half. A mite was half a farthing, and therefore was worth about two-tenths of a cent if the half of the Roman farthing, and about 2 cents if the half of the Greek farthing. See table of Jewish weights and measures. --ED.)
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Money
Was anciently weighed, and did not at first exist in the form of coins. The most ancient commerce was conducted by barter, or exchanging one sort of merchandise for another. One man gave what he could spare to another, who gave him in return part of his superabundance. Afterwards, the more precious metals were used in traffic, as a value more generally known and stated, and the amount agreed upon was paid over by weight, Genesis 23:16 43:21 Exodus 30:24 . Lastly they gave this metal, a certain weight, and a certain degree of alloy, to fix its value, and to save buyers and sellers the trouble of weighing and examining the coins. The first regular coinage among the Jews is supposed to have been in the time of Simon Maccabaeus, less than a century and a half before Christ. The coins were the shekel, and a half, a third, and a quarter of a shekel. The Jewish coins bore an almond rod and a vase of manna, but no image of any man was allowed. Compare Matthew 22:16-22 . Many Greek and Roman coins circulated in Judea in New Testament times. See MITE , PENNY , SHEKEL .
Volney says, "The practice of weighing money is general in Syria, Egypt, and all Turkey. No piece, however effaced, is refused there: the merchant draws out his scales and weighs it, as in the days of Abraham, when he purchased his sepulchre. In considerable payments, an agent of exchange is sent for, who counts paras by thousands, rejects pieces of false money, and weighs all the sequins, either separately or together." This may serve to illustrate the phrase, "current money with the merchant," Genesis 23:16 ; and the references to "divers weights" a large one to weigh the money received, and a small one for that paid out; and to "wicked balances," Deuteronomy 25:13 Amos 8:5 Micah 6:11 . Our Savior alludes to a class of "exchangers," who appear to have taken money on deposit, and so used it that the owner might afterwards receive his own with interest, Matthew 25:27 . There were also money brokers who had stands in the outer court of the temple, probably to exchange foreign for Jewish coins; and to accommodate those who wished to pay the yearly half-shekel tax, Exodus 30:15 , or to present an offering. They were expelled by the Lord of the temple, not only for obtruding a secular business within the house of prayer, but also for pursuing it dishonestly, Mark 11:15-17 .
In 1 Timothy 6:10 , Paul speaks of the "love of money" as a root of all evils; censuring not money itself, but the love of ita prevailing form of human selfishness and covetousness. This passion, to which so many crimes are chargeable, may infest the heart of a poor man as well as that of the rich; for the one may have as much of "the love of money" as the other.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Money-Changers
(Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ) According to (Exodus 30:13-15 ) every Israelite who had reached or passed the age of twenty must pay into the sacred treasury, whenever the nation was numbered, a half-shekel as an offering to Jehovah. The money-changers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the world who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom money in the Hebrew coin.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Money-Changer, Changer of Money
* For MONEY-CHANGER, CHANGER OF MONEY, see CHANGER
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Money
1: ἀργύριον (Strong's #694 — Noun Neuter — argurion — ar-goo'-ree-on ) properly, "a piece of silver," denotes (a) "silver," e.g., Acts 3:6 ; (b) a "silver coin," often in the plural, "pieces of silver," e.g., Matthew 26:15 ; so Matthew 28:12 , where the meaning is "many, (hikanos) pieces of silver;" (c) "money;" it has this meaning in Matthew 25:18,27 ; 28:15 ; Mark 14:11 ; Luke 9:3 ; 19:15,23 ; 22:5 ; Acts 8:20 (here the RV has "silver").
Note: In Acts 7:16 , for the AV, "(a sum of) money," the RV has "(a price in) silver." See SILVER.
2: χρῆμα (Strong's #5536 — Noun Neuter — chrema — khray'-mah ) lit., "a thing that one uses" (akin to chraomai, "to use"), hence, (a) "wealth, riches," Mark 10:23,24 ; Luke 18:24 ; (b) "money," Acts 4:37 , singular number, "a sum of money;" plural in 8:18,20; 24:26. See RICHES.
3: χαλκός (Strong's #5475 — Noun Masculine — chalkos — khal-kos' ) "copper," is used, by metonymy, of "copper coin," translated "money," in Mark 6:8 ; 12:41 . See BRASS.
4: κέρμα (Strong's #2772 — Noun Neuter — kerma — ker'-mah ) primarily "a slice" (akin to keiro, "to cut short"), hence, "a small coin, change," is used in the plural in John 2:15 , "the changers' money," probably considerable heaps of small coins.
5: νόμισμα (Strong's #3546 — Noun Neuter — nomisma — nom'-is-mah ) primarily "that which is established by custom" (nomos, "a custom, law"), hence, "the current coin of a state, currency," is found in Matthew 22:19 , "(tribute) money." In the Sept., Nehemiah 7:71 .
Note: In Matthew 17:27 , AV, stater ("a coin," estimated at a little over three shillings, equivalent to four drachmae, the temple-tax for two persons), is translated "piece of money" (RV, "shekel"). See SHEKEL.

Sentence search

Moneyed - ) Supplied with Money; having Money; wealthy; as, Moneyey men. ) Converted into Money; coined. ) Consisting in, or composed of, Money
Money-Maker - ) One who coins or prints Money; also, a counterfeiter of Money. ) One who accumulates Money or wealth; specifically, one who makes Money-getting his governing motive
Usurer - ) One who lends Money and takes interest for it; a Money lender. ) One who lends Money at a rate of interest beyond that established by law; one who exacts an exorbitant rate of interest for the use of Money
Money-Making - ) The act or process of making Money; the acquisition and accumulation of wealth. ) Affording profitable returns; lucrative; as, a Money-making business. ) Sussessful in gaining Money, and devoted to that aim; as, a Money-making man
Money-Changer, Changer of Money - * For Money-CHANGER, CHANGER OF Money, see CHANGER ...
Chanukah gelt - "Chanukah Money"); Money gifts given on Chanukah ...
Monetary - ) Of or pertaining to Money, or consisting of Money; pecuniary
Arles - ) An earnest; earnest Money; Money paid to bind a bargain
Prest - ) Ready Money; a loan of Money. ) A duty in Money formerly paid by the sheriff on his account in the exchequer, or for Money left or remaining in his hands
Scutage - ) Shield Money; commutation of service for a sum of Money
Stater - Greek word rendered "piece of Money" (Matthew 17:27 , A. It was equal to two didrachmas ("tribute Money," 17:24), or four drachmas, and to about 2s. of our Money
Blood Money - (1):...
Money obtained as the price, or at the cost, of another's life; - said of a reward for supporting a capital charge, of Money obtained for betraying a fugitive or for committing murder, or of Money obtained from the sale of that which will destroy the purchaser. ...
(2):...
Money paid to the next of kin of a person who has been killed by another
Monetize - ) To convert into Money; to adopt as current Money; as, to monetize silver
Money - Mention is made of Money as early as Genesis 17:12,13 , where persons are said to be 'bought with Money;' and from Genesis to Zechariah it is spoken of as being not counted, but weighed, which would give the true value of the precious metals in the form of rings or in odd pieces of gold or silver. The names Gerah, Bekah, Shekel, Maneh, and Talent, being used for weights as well as Money, the two are better considered together. 536, Persian Money was used by them. This would be followed by Greek Money when they were under the dominion of the Greeks. 140, granted permission to Simon Maccabeus to coin Jewish Money. Under the Romans, Roman Money was used
Cash - ) A place where Money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a Money box. ) Ready Money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into Money...
(5):...
(n. ) To pay, or to receive, cash for; to exchange for Money; as, cash a note or an order
Moneyer - ) An authorized coiner of Money. ) A person who deals in Money; banker or broker
Monetization - ) The act or process of converting into Money, or of adopting as Money; as, the monetization of silver
Money Changers - Persons whose profession was to sell or exchange Roman or other Moneys for Jewish Money acceptable in the Temple worship. In New Testament times regions and cities issued their own Money. This caused Jews of the Dispersion, those who lived outside of Judea, to bring many kinds of Money to Jerusalem. To help visitors change Money into that acceptable in Jerusalem, Money changers set up tables in the Temple court of the Gentiles. Syrian silver coins were the Money of Jerusalem then, and worshipers used them to pay their Temple tax of a half shekel and to buy sacrifices for the altar. ...
Three words are translated “moneychangers”: kollubiston ( Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ) of Semitic origin referred to the exchange rate or commission; kermatistas ( John 2:14 ) referred to a dealer in small change; and trapetzitais ( Matthew 25:27 ) which Luke used in a slightly different form (trapetzan , Matthew 19:23 , or shulhanim in Hebrew) referred to a Money agent who sat at a table. ...
Money changers were in the area with vendors who sold animals, birds, and other items used in Temple worship and sacrifices. Such transactions were numerous and required the service of brokers who knew the value of foreign Money. Some exchangers profited greatly and loaned their Money along with that others invested with them. ...
In anger at this corruption of the purpose of the Temple, Jesus turned over the tables of the Money changers and drove them and the sellers of animals out of the Temple court (Matthew 21:12 )
Boodle - ) Money given in payment for votes or political influence; bribe Money; swag
Money-Changers - Money-CHANGERS . How indispensable were the services of the ‘money-changers’ ( Matthew 21:12 , Mark 11:15 ), ‘changers of Money’ ( John 2:14 ), ‘changers’ ( John 2:15 ), and ‘exchangers’ ( Matthew 25:27 AV
The Money-changers had constantly to be on their guard against false Money. This gives point to the frequently quoted unwritten saying ( agraphon ) of our Lord to His disciples: ‘Be ye expert Money-changers’ be skilful in distinguishing true doctrine from false
Bank - The table of a Money-changer or banker, see Money-changers
Capitalist - ) One who has capital; one who has Money for investment, or Money invested; esp
Legal Interest - (Latin: inter, between; esse, to be) ...
The price or rate of premium per unit of time that is paid by a borrower for the use of what he borrows; specifically, a rate per cent of Money paid for the use of Money; also the Money so paid
Interest, Legal - (Latin: inter, between; esse, to be) ...
The price or rate of premium per unit of time that is paid by a borrower for the use of what he borrows; specifically, a rate per cent of Money paid for the use of Money; also the Money so paid
Kesitah - "pieces of Money," marg. , "lambs;" Joshua 24:32 , "pieces of silver;" Job 42:11 , "piece of Money"). The kesitah was probably a piece of Money of a particular weight, cast in the form of a lamb
Driblet - ) A small piece or part; a small sum; a small quantity of Money in making up a sum; as, the Money was paid in dribblets
Coiner - ) One who makes or stamps coin; a maker of Money; - usually, a maker of counterfeit Money
Penurious - ) Excessively sparing in the use of Money; sordid; stingy; miserly. ) Destitute of Money; suffering extreme want
Money - The Bible recognizes the possession and use of Money as a legitimate part of life in human society. (Concerning the kinds of Money in use in Bible times see COINS. ) But the benefits that Money brings are temporary, and those who become over-concerned with increasing their wealth eventually bring trouble upon themselves (Matthew 6:19-23; 1 Timothy 6:9-10; see WEALTH). ...
Poverty is not desirable either, and people should use their Money to help those who are in need (Deuteronomy 15:7-10; James 2:15-16; see POOR). Christians have a responsibility to give their Money generously, both as an offering to God and as a service to his work in the world (2 Corinthians 9:6-13; see GIVING)
Didrachma, m - ]'>[2] has ‘tribute Money ,’ RV Pound - ...
...
A sum of Money; the Gr. of our Money. (See Money
Defalcate - ) To commit defalcation; to embezzle Money held in trust. ) To cut off; to take away or deduct a part of; - used chiefly of Money, accounts, rents, income, etc
Milreis - ) A Portuguese Money of account rated in the treasury department of the United States at one dollar and eight cents; also, a Brazilian Money of account rated at fifty-four cents and six mills
Potter's Field - The field was bought with the Money paid for betraying Jesus (Acts 1:18 ). Matthew 27:3-10 records that the priests bought the field with the Money Judas returned. Their reasoning was that the Money had been used to bring about bloodshed and could not be returned to the Temple treasury
Mint - ) A place where Money is coined by public authority. ) To make by stamping, as Money; to coin; to make and stamp into Money
Usurer - Formerly, a person who lent Money and took interest for it. In present usage, one who lends Money at a rate of interest beyond the rate established by law
Money - ) To supply with Money. , which is payable in standard coined Money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling. ) In general, wealth; property; as, he has much Money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, Money
Money - ) To supply with Money. , which is payable in standard coined Money and is lawfully current in lieu of it; in a comprehensive sense, any currency usually and lawfully employed in buying and selling. ) In general, wealth; property; as, he has much Money in land, or in stocks; to make, or lose, Money
Casiphia - Money; covetousness
Mite - See Money
Talent (2) - —See Money
Coins - See Money
Mina - —See Money
Mite - —See Money
Shilling - —See Money
Silver - —See Money
Stater - —See Money
Coins - —See Money
Denarius - —See Money
Farthing - —See Money
Maundy Coins - of Money...
Moneys - ) of Money...
Shitrai - Gatherer of Money
Penny (2) - —See Money
Silver - —See Money
Lavish - ) Expending or bestowing profusely; profuse; prodigal; as, lavish of Money; lavish of praise. ) To expend or bestow with profusion; to use with prodigality; to squander; as, to lavish Money or praise
Blackmail - ) A certain rate of Money, corn, cattle, or other thing, anciently paid, in the north of England and south of Scotland, to certain men who were allied to robbers, or moss troopers, to be by them protected from pillage. ) Payment of Money exacted by means of intimidation; also, extortion of Money from a person by threats of public accusation, exposure, or censure. ) To extort Money from by exciting fears of injury other than bodily harm, as injury to reputation, distress of mind, etc
Collybist - ) A Money changer
Stater - See Money, § 7
Exchanger - See Money-Changer
Money - Money, n. Moneys. We sometimes give the name of Money to other coined metals,and to any other material which rude nations use a medium of trade. Gold and silver, containing great value in small compass, and being therefore of easy conveyance, and being also durable and little liable to diminution by use, are the most convenient metals for coin or Money, which is the representative of commodities of all kinds, of lands, and of every thing that is capable of being transferred in commerce. Bank notes or bills of credit issued by authority, and exchangeable for coin or redeemable, are also called Money as such notes in modern times represent coin, and are used as a substitute for it. If a man pays in hand for goods in bank notes which are current, he is said to pay in ready Money. Money can neither open new avenues to pleasure, nor block up the passages of anguish
Money - , Matthew 26:15 ; so Matthew 28:12 , where the meaning is "many, (hikanos) pieces of silver;" (c) "money;" it has this meaning in Matthew 25:18,27 ; 28:15 ; Mark 14:11 ; Luke 9:3 ; 19:15,23 ; 22:5 ; Acts 8:20 (here the RV has "silver"). ...
Note: In Acts 7:16 , for the AV, "(a sum of) Money," the RV has "(a price in) silver. , "a thing that one uses" (akin to chraomai, "to use"), hence, (a) "wealth, riches," Mark 10:23,24 ; Luke 18:24 ; (b) "money," Acts 4:37 , singular number, "a sum of Money;" plural in 8:18,20; 24:26. ...
3: χαλκός (Strong's #5475 — Noun Masculine — chalkos — khal-kos' ) "copper," is used, by metonymy, of "copper coin," translated "money," in Mark 6:8 ; 12:41 . ...
4: κέρμα (Strong's #2772 — Noun Neuter — kerma — ker'-mah ) primarily "a slice" (akin to keiro, "to cut short"), hence, "a small coin, change," is used in the plural in John 2:15 , "the changers' Money," probably considerable heaps of small coins. ...
5: νόμισμα (Strong's #3546 — Noun Neuter — nomisma — nom'-is-mah ) primarily "that which is established by custom" (nomos, "a custom, law"), hence, "the current coin of a state, currency," is found in Matthew 22:19 , "(tribute) Money. ...
Note: In Matthew 17:27 , AV, stater ("a coin," estimated at a little over three shillings, equivalent to four drachmae, the temple-tax for two persons), is translated "piece of Money" (RV, "shekel")
Farthing - See Money, § 7
Mite - See Money, § 7
Disburser - ) One who disburses Money
Daric - DARIC See Money, § 3
Usury - ) Interest in excess of a legal rate charged to a borrower for the use of Money. ) A premium or increase paid, or stipulated to be paid, for a loan, as of Money; interest
Talent - See Money, Weights and Measures
Penniless - ) Destitute of Money; impecunious; poor
Earles Penny - Earnest Money
Pecunious - ) Abounding in Money; wealthy; rich
Unmoneyed - ) Destitute of Money; not rich
Rhino - ) Gold and silver, or Money
Moneyless - ) Destitute of Money; penniless; impecunious
Rhino - ) Gold and silver, or Money
Drachm - See Dram; Money, §§ 4, 7
Banker - ) A Money changer. ) One who conducts the business of banking; one who, individually, or as a member of a company, keeps an establishment for the deposit or loan of Money, or for traffic in Money, bills of exchange, etc
Superscription - See Title, and Money, § 6
Stater - (See Money
Shroff - ) A banker, or changer of Money
Lickpenny - ) A devourer or absorber of Money
Denarius - See Money, §§ 6 , 7
Penny - See Money, §§ 6, 7
Piece of Silver - —See Money, p
Purse - ) A sum of Money offered as a prize, or collected as a present; as, to win the purse; to make up a purse. ) A small bag or pouch, the opening of which is made to draw together closely, used to carry Money in; by extension, any receptacle for Money carried on the person; a wallet; a pocketbook; a portemonnaie. ) A specific sum of Money...
Wedge - See Money, p
Silverless - ) Having no silcver; hence, without Money; impecunious
Pecuniarily - ) In a pecuniary manner; as regards Money
Coinage - ) The act or process of converting metal into Money. ) The cost or expense of coining Money
Bottomry - ) A contract in the nature of a mortgage, by which the owner of a ship, or the master as his agent, hypothecates and binds the ship (and sometimes the accruing freight) as security for the repayment of Money advanced or lent for the use of the ship, if she terminates her voyage successfully. If the ship is lost by perils of the sea, the lender loses the Money; but if the ship arrives safe, he is to receive the Money lent, with the interest or premium stipulated, although it may, and usually does, exceed the legal rate of interest
Money-Changers - MONEY-CHANGERS
Pickpurse - ) One who steals purses, or Money from purses
Purse - But Hebrews also had a bag which was used to hold Money. The first fold in a girdle had an opening, closed with a leathern strap, where the Money was carried
Fundholder - ) One who has Money invested in the public funds
et-Penny - ) Something which gets or gains Money; a successful affair
Waterage - ) Money paid for transportation of goods, etc
Thriftless - ) Without thrift; not prudent or prosperous in Money affairs
Pound - See Money, § 7 ; Weights and Measures, § III
Tiller - A Money box in a shop a drawer
Avarice - (Latin: avere, to crave) ...
(covetousness) The inordinate love of temporal goods usually estimable in terms of Money. This love of Money becomes inordinate when it makes a man hard-hearted, causes him to be niggardly in spending it, too eager and absorbed in acquiring and preserving it, or prepared to do what is wrong in order to obtain it
Redeemable - ) Capable of being redeemed; subject to repurchase; held under conditions permitting redemption; as, a pledge securing the payment of Money is redeemable. , redeemabble in gold, or in current Money, or four months after date
Easterling - ) Relating to the Money of the Easterlings, or Baltic traders. ) A piece of Money coined in the east by Richard II
Prodigal - ) One who expends Money extravagantly, viciously, or without necessity; one that is profuse or lavish in any expenditure; a waster; a spendthrift. ) Given to extravagant expenditure; expending Money or other things without necessity; recklessly or viciously profuse; lavish; wasteful; not frugal or economical; as, a prodigal man; the prodigal son; prodigal giving; prodigal expenses
Borrow - 1: δανείζω (Strong's #1155 — Verb — daneizo — dan-ide'-zo ) in the Active Voice, signifies "to lend Money," as in Luke 6:34,35 ; in the Middle Voice, "to have Money lent to oneself, to borrow," Matthew 5:42
Propertied - ) Possessing property; holding real estate, or other investments of Money
Bailor - ) One who delivers goods or Money to another in trust
Fenerate - ) To put Money to usury; to lend on interest
Fullage - ) The Money or price paid for fulling or cleansing cloth
Coins - In the days before people used Money in buying and selling, they usually paid for goods by exchanging other goods, such as farm produce, animals or jewellery. Merchants were sometimes dishonest and used extra heavy weights when weighing the buyer’s Money (Leviticus 19:36; Proverbs 11:1; Amos 8:5; Micah 6:11; see WEIGHTS). ...
When coin Money came into use, the practice of weighing Money gradually died out (Ezra 2:69; Ezra 8:27). ...
Money of various kinds was in use in Palestine during the New Testament era. There was official Roman Money, local Jewish Money, and old Greek Money from the days of the former Greek Empire. The Jewish temple authorities accepted only certain kinds of Money, which resulted in the practice of Money-changers setting up business in the temple (Matthew 21:12). The talent was not a coin, but a unit used in counting large amounts of Money
Appropriation - ) The act of setting apart or assigning to a particular use or person, or of taking to one's self, in exclusion of all others; application to a special use or purpose, as of a piece of ground for a park, or of Money to carry out some object. ) Anything, especially Money, thus set apart. ) The application of payment of Money by a debtor to his creditor, to one of several debts which are due from the former to the latter
Shekel - שקל , signifies weight, Money, shekel, siclus, a Hebrew weight and Money, Exodus 30:23-24 ; 2 Samuel 14:26 . sterling Money: but the golden shekel was worth 1 l . English Money
Chievance - ) An unlawful bargain; traffic in which Money is exported as discount
Blackmailer - ) One who extorts, or endeavors to extort, Money, by black mailing
Erogate - ) To lay out, as Money; to deal out; to expend
Shufflecap - ) A play performed by shaking Money in a hat or cap
Scrapepenny - ) One who gathers and hoards Money in trifling sums; a miser
Pecuniary - ) Relating to Money; monetary; as, a pecuniary penalty; a pecuniary reward
Poorbox - ) A receptacle in which Money given for the poor is placed
Rupee - ) A silver coin, and Money of account, in the East Indies
Remonetize - ) To restore to use as Money; as, to remonetize silver
Unowed - ) Not owed; as, to pay Money unowed
Treasure - ) Wealth accumulated; especially, a stock, or store of Money in reserve. ) To collect and deposit, as Money or other valuable things, for future use; to lay up; to hoard; usually with up; as, to treasure up gold
Me - ) The person speaking, regarded as an object; myself; a pronoun of the first person used as the objective and dative case of the pronoum I; as, he struck me; he gave me the Money, or he gave the Money to me; he got me a hat, or he got a hat for me
Treasury - A place or building in which stores of wealth are reposited particularly, a place where the public revenues are deposited and kept, and where Money is disbursed to defray the expenses of government. A building appropriated for keeping public Money
Averpenny - ) Money paid by a tenant in lieu of the service of average
Mortgaged - Conveyed in fee as security for the payment of Money
Lucre - ) Gain in Money or goods; profit; riches; - often in an ill sense
Mint Sauce - (1):...
Money
Barbacanage - ) Money paid for the support of a barbican
Didrachma - A piece of Money, the fourth of an ounce of silver
Rei - ) A portuguese Money of account, in value about one tenth of a cent
Coin - ) To acquire rapidly, as Money; to make. ) To manufacture counterfeit Money. ) A piece of metal on which certain characters are stamped by government authority, making it legally current as Money; - much used in a collective sense
Bank, Bankers - placed on "a table," Acts 6:2 ; 16:34 ; (c) "a feast, a banquet," 1 Corinthians 10:21 ; (d) "the table or stand" of a Money-changer, where he exchanged Money for a fee, or dealt with loans and deposits, Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; Luke 19:23 ; John 2:15 . ...
2: τραπεζίτης (Strong's #5133 — Noun Masculine — trapezites — trap-ed-zee'-tace ) a "money-changer, broker, banker;" translated "bankers" in Matthew 25:27 , RV (AV, "exchangers")
Banking - in the Bible was the function designed to provide for the custody, loan, and exchange of Money. ...
Origins The first Money was bits of metal; later coins were struck. The prototype of paper Money may have been leather strips studded with precious metal as a legal medium of exchange. ...
Bankers loaned Money with land or persons as collateral. Apparently wealthy individuals loaned Money to poor farmers with children, land, and crops put up as security (Nehemiah 5:2-3 ). They lent Money to let poor individuals have operating capital until they harvested their crops. ...
New Testament Banking is expressed by the Greek word for table, representing the table behind which a Money changer stood. A familiar table in the Temple at Jerusalem was that of the Money changers (John 2:15 ). They came to be known as “table-men,” Money changers, or bankers. It was necessary to change foreign Money into Jewish Money to pay the Temple tax
Banking - in the Bible was the function designed to provide for the custody, loan, and exchange of Money. ...
Origins The first Money was bits of metal; later coins were struck. The prototype of paper Money may have been leather strips studded with precious metal as a legal medium of exchange. ...
Bankers loaned Money with land or persons as collateral. Apparently wealthy individuals loaned Money to poor farmers with children, land, and crops put up as security (Nehemiah 5:2-3 ). They lent Money to let poor individuals have operating capital until they harvested their crops. ...
New Testament Banking is expressed by the Greek word for table, representing the table behind which a Money changer stood. A familiar table in the Temple at Jerusalem was that of the Money changers (John 2:15 ). They came to be known as “table-men,” Money changers, or bankers. It was necessary to change foreign Money into Jewish Money to pay the Temple tax
Dram - ]'>[1]8 , with questionable accuracy, has rendered ‘darics’ (see more fully under Money, § 4 ). ]'>[1]8 , for which see Money, § 7
Usury - (yooss' uh ree) A sum of Money charged for a loan. The Old Testament laws prohibited a Jew from charging another Jew usury but permitted it when Money was loaned to a Gentile (Deuteronomy 23:19-20 )
Aceldama - ” Evidently it was purchased with the Money that had been paid to Judas for betraying Jesus. According to Matthew 27:7 , the field purchased with this Money was used for the burial of strangers
Debt - ) An action at law to recover a certain specified sum of Money alleged to be due. ) That which is due from one person to another, whether Money, goods, or services; that which one person is bound to pay to another, or to perform for his benefit; thing owed; obligation; liability
Money - Money. Money also represents six Greek words in the New Testament: argurion, meaning "silver," Matthew 25:18; kerma, a small coin, John 2:15; nomisma, meaning possibly "legal coin," Matthew 22:19; chalkos, a copper coin, Mark 6:8; chrema, Acts 8:18, and stater, rendered "shekel"in the R. Coined Money, as now in use among civilized nations, was unknown in the world until about six hundred years before Christ. David and Solomon never saw any coined Money. Before the periods named, gold and silver were used as Money by weight; and are now so used in some eastern countries. The first mention of Money is in the touching story of Abraham's buying a burial place for his wife. The study of ancient coined Money is interesting, showing the rise of the arts and their fall during the dark ages of priestcraft, from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries; the coins of 400 years before Christ being superb, while those a thousand years after Christ are hardly discernible
Cashbook - ) A book in which is kept a register of Money received or paid out
Heter iska - "partnership clause"); a halachic convention that allows interest to be paid for Money deposited...
Arrha - ) Money or other valuable thing given to evidence a contract; a pledge or earnest
Prestation - ) A payment of Money; a toll or duty; also, the rendering of a service
Quadrin - ) A small piece of Money, in value about a farthing, or a half cent
Xeraphim - ) An old Money of account in Bombay, equal to three fifths of a rupee
Repayment - ) The Money or other thing repaid
Mammonish - ) Actuated or prompted by a devotion to Money getting or the service of Mammon
Lend - To grant a thing to be used, on the condition that its equivalent in kind shall be returned as, to lend a sum of Money, or a loaf of bread. Thus Money is lent on condition of receiving interest for the use, and of having the principal sum returned at the stipulated time. A lent his name to obtain Money from the bank. But in the United States, I believe, the word is never thus used, except in reference to Money. We lend Money upon interest, but never lend a coach or horse for a compensation
Discount - ) To lend Money upon, deducting the discount or allowance for interest; as, the banks discount notes and bills of exchange. ) A deduction made for interest, in advancing Money upon, or purchasing, a bill or note not due; payment in advance of interest upon Money. ) To lend, or make a practice of lending, Money, abating the discount; as, the discount for sixty or ninety days
Centime - ) The hundredth part of a franc; a small French copper coin and Money of account
Anna - ) An East Indian Money of account, the sixteenth of a rupee, or about 2/ cents
Depositor - ) One who makes a deposit, especially of Money in a bank; - the correlative of depository
Unpursed - ) Robbed of a purse, or of Money
Dowry - In eastern countries the bridegroom was required to pay the father of his betrothed a stipulated portion, in Money or other valuables, portion, in Money or other valuables, proportioned to the rank and station of the family to which she belonged; this was the dowry
Pardo - ) A Money of account in Goa, India, equivalent to about 2s
Crimpage - ) The act or practice of crimping; Money paid to a crimp for shipping or enlisting men
Parsimony - ) Closeness or sparingness in the expenditure of Money; - generally in a bad sense; excessive frugality; niggardliness
Reenbacker - ) One of those who supported greenback or paper Money, and opposed the resumption of specie payments
Prodigality - ) Extravagance in expenditure, particularly of Money; excessive liberality; profusion; waste; - opposed to frugality, economy, and parsimony
Oltschut - ) A silver ingot, used in Japan as Money
Money - Of uncoined Money the first notice we have is in the history of Abraham (Genesis 13:2 ; 20:16 ; 24:35 ). Next, this word is used in connection with the purchase of the cave of Machpelah (23:16), and again in connection with Jacob's purchase of a field at Shalem (Genesis 33:18,19 ) for "an hundred pieces of Money"=an hundred Hebrew kesitahs (q. , probably pieces of Money, as is supposed, bearing the figure of a lamb. The history of Joseph affords evidence of the constant use of Money, silver of a fixed weight. ...
Of the use of coined Money we have no early notice among the Hebrews. gave permission to Simon the Maccabee to coin Jewish Money
Dinar - ) A petty Money of accounts of Persia
Roat - ) Any small sum of Money
Alms - ...
Acts 10:4 (b) In this place the word is used in regard to gifts of Money given particularly for GOD's work and GOD's people. The angel carries the gift up to Heaven, presents it before the Lord, and before the rest of the heavenly group so that all will know that the Money placed in the collection and the Money sent to missions and the Money given to assist otherwise in GOD's work represents your interest in it. ...
Acts 24:17 (b) These alms refer to the sacrifices, the Money, the gifts and the dues which belong to the priestly service of Israel
Mortgage, to - On the return of the Jews from exile, there were many poor, and in order to get food they borrowed Money on their land, which gave the lender a claim on the property, even as mortgages are now negotiated. The Money was lent by rich Jews, and Nehemiah was very angry at their exacting usury and strongly condemned them
Hoard - ) A store, stock, or quantity of anything accumulated or laid up; a hidden supply; a treasure; as, a hoard of provisions; a hoard of Money. ) To lay up a store or hoard, as of Money
Creditor - A person to whom a sum of Money or other thing is due, by obligation, promise or in law properly, one who gives credit in commerce but in a general sense, one who has a just claim for Money correlative to debtor
Pound - [1] ...
A sum of Money put in the Old Testament, (1 Kings 10:17 ; Ezra 2:69 ; Nehemiah 7:71 ) for the Hebrew maneh , worth in silver about . In the parable of the ten pounds, ( Luke 19:12-27 ) the reference appears to be to a Greek pound, a weight used as a Money of account, of which sixty went to the talent
Seawant - ) The name used by the Algonquin Indians for the shell beads which passed among the Indians as Money
Shortage - ) Amount or extent of deficiency, as determined by some requirement or standard; as, a shortage in Money accounts
Peseta - ) A Spanish silver coin, and Money of account, equal to about nineteen cents, and divided into 100 centesimos
Pawnor - ) One who pawns or pledges anything as security for the payment of borrowed Money or of a debt
Badger Game - The method of blackmailing by decoying a person into a compromising situation and extorting Money by threats of exposure
Alms - ) Anything given gratuitously to relieve the poor, as Money, food, or clothing; a gift of charity
Pelf - ) Money; riches; lucre; gain; - generally conveying the idea of something ill-gotten or worthless
Maintainor - ) One who, not being interested, maintains a cause depending between others, by furnishing Money, etc
Misspend - ) To spend amiss or for wrong purposes; to aquander; to waste; as, to misspend time or Money
Moneylender - NIV term for one who loans Money at interest (Exodus 22:25 ; KJV, usurer; NAS and RSV, creditor)
Pocketbook - ) A small book or case for carrying papers, Money, etc
Silverlings - Found only in Isaiah 7:23 , and the Hebrew is the same as 'silver,' and 'pieces of silver,' as Money
Embracery - , corruptly, by promises, entreaties, Money, entertainments, threats, or other improper inducements
Untold - ) Not numbered or counted; as, untold Money
Expend - ) To lay out, apply, or employ in any way; to consume by use; to use up or distribute, either in payment or in donations; to spend; as, they expend Money for food or in charity; to expend time labor, and thought; to expend hay in feeding cattle, oil in a lamp, water in mechanical operations. ) To pay out or disburse Money
Columbella - Some species, as Columbella mercatoria, were formerly used as shell Money
Pawnbroker - ) One who makes a business of lending Money on the security of personal property pledged or deposited in his keeping
Savingness - ) The quality of being saving; carefulness not to expend Money uselessly; frugality; parsimony
Gerah, - See Money, 3 ; Weights And Measures, iii
Money - Scripture often speaks of gold, silver, brass, of certain sums of Money, of purchases made with Money, of current Money, of Money of a certain weight; but we do not observe coined or stamped Money till a late period; which makes it probable that the ancient Hebrews took gold and silver only by weight; that they only considered the purity of the metal, and not the stamp. When the Greeks first used Money, it was only little pieces of iron or copper, called oboli or spits, of which a handful was a drachma, says Plutarch. Herodotus thinks that the Lydians were the first that stamped Money of gold or silver, and introduced it into commerce. Among the Persians it is said Darius, son of Hystaspes, first coined golden Money. Lycurgus banished gold and silver from his commonwealth of Lacedaemon, and only allowed a rude sort of Money, made of iron. Janus, or rather the kings of Rome, made a kind of gross Money of copper, having on one side the double face of Janus, on the other the prow of a ship. We find nothing concerning the Money of the Egyptians, Phenicians, Arabians, or Syrians, before Alexander the Great. In China, to this day, they stamp no Money of gold or silver, but only of copper. Abraham weighed out four hundred shekels of silver, to purchase Sarah's tomb, Genesis 23:15-16 ; and Scripture observes that he paid this in "current Money with the merchant. The brethren of Joseph bring back with them into Egypt the Money they found in their sacks, in the same weight as before, Genesis 43:21 . Isaiah says, "Come, buy wine and milk without Money and without price. Wherefore do ye weigh Money for that which is not bread?" Amos 8:5 , represents the merchants as encouraging one another to make the ephah small, wherewith to sell, and the shekel great, wherewith to buy, and to falsify the balances by deceit. The metal, that is, gold or silver, and never copper, that not being used in traffic as Money. This shekel, therefore, and this talent, were not fixed and determined pieces of Money, but weights applied to things used in commerce. We also find there darics, (in Hebrew, darcmonim or adarcmonim, ) and mina, staterae, oboli; but this last kind of Money was foreign, and is put for other terms, which in the Hebrew only signifies the weight of the metal. The kesitah is not well known to us; some take it for a sheep or a lamb; others, for a kind of Money, having the impression of a lamb or a sheep; but it was more probably a purse of Money. The darcmonim or darics are Money of the kings of Persia; and it is agreed that Darius, son of Hystaspes, first coined golden Money. Ezekiel 45:12 , tells us that the mina makes fifty shekels: he reduces this foreign Money to the weight of the Hebrews. The mina might probably be a Persian Money originally, and adopted by the Greeks and by the Hebrews. But under the dominion of the Persians, the Hebrews were hardly at liberty to coin Money of their own, being in subjection to those princes, and very low in their own country. They were still less able under the Chaldeans, during the Babylonish captivity; or afterward under the Grecians, to whom they were subject till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, to whom Antiochus Sidetes, king of Syria, granted the privilege of coining Money in Judea, 1Ma_15:6 . And this is the first Hebrew Money, properly so called, that we know of. The denarius was one- fourth of a shekel, seven pence three farthings of our Money. The drachma was equal to a Roman denarius, or seven pence three farthings of our Money. The didrachma, or tribute Money, Matthew 17:24 , was equal to fifteen pence halfpenny. The stater, or piece of Money which Peter found in the fish's mouth, Matthew 17:27 , was two half shekels. ...
Hug derives a satisfactory argument for the veracity of the Gospels from the different kinds of Money mentioned in them:—The admixture of foreign manners and constitutions proceeded through numberless circumstances of life
Money - ...
Volney says, "The practice of weighing Money is general in Syria, Egypt, and all Turkey. In considerable payments, an agent of exchange is sent for, who counts paras by thousands, rejects pieces of false Money, and weighs all the sequins, either separately or together. " This may serve to illustrate the phrase, "current Money with the merchant," Genesis 23:16 ; and the references to "divers weights" a large one to weigh the Money received, and a small one for that paid out; and to "wicked balances," Deuteronomy 25:13 Amos 8:5 Micah 6:11 . Our Savior alludes to a class of "exchangers," who appear to have taken Money on deposit, and so used it that the owner might afterwards receive his own with interest, Matthew 25:27 . There were also Money brokers who had stands in the outer court of the temple, probably to exchange foreign for Jewish coins; and to accommodate those who wished to pay the yearly half-shekel tax, Exodus 30:15 , or to present an offering. ...
In 1 Timothy 6:10 , Paul speaks of the "love of Money" as a root of all evils; censuring not Money itself, but the love of ita prevailing form of human selfishness and covetousness. This passion, to which so many crimes are chargeable, may infest the heart of a poor man as well as that of the rich; for the one may have as much of "the love of Money" as the other
Annuity - ) A sum of Money, payable yearly, to continue for a given number of years, for life, or forever; an annual allowance
Bondholder - ) A person who holds the bonds of a public or private corporation for the payment of Money at a certain time
Kaparot - "atonements"); atonement ceremony performed before Yom Kippur, traditionally while holding a fowl, fish or Money which is then given to charity ...
Wampum - ) Beads made of shells, used by the North American Indians as Money, and also wrought into belts, etc
Rep-Silver - ) Money anciently paid by servile tenants to their lord, in lieu of the customary service of reaping his corn or grain
Kiteflying - ) A mode of raising Money, or sustaining one's credit, by the use of paper which is merely nominal; - called also kiting
Misapply - ) To apply wrongly; to use for a wrong purpose; as, to misapply a name or title; to misapply public Money
Bag - The Money collected in the treasuries of eastern princes was reckoned up in certain equal sums, put into bags and sealed. The Money collected in the temple in the time of Joash, for its reparation, seems, in like manner, to have been told up in bags of equal value; and these were probably delivered sealed to those who paid the workmen, 2 Kings 12:10 . In the east, in the present day, a bag of Money passes, for some time at least, currently from hand to hand, under the authority of a banker's seal, without any examination of its contents
Money -
Uncointed Money. We have no evidence of the use of coined Money before the return from the Babylonian captivity; but silver was used for Money, in quantities determined by weight, at least as early as the time of Abraham; and its earliest mention is in the generic sense of the price paid for a slave. ...
Coined Money. --After the captivity we have the earliest mention of coined Money , in allusion, as might have been expected, to the Persian coinage, the gold daric (Authorized version dram ). Sidetes granted Simon Maccabaeus the license to coin Money, B. The abundant Money of Herod the Great, which is of a thoroughly Greek character, and of copper only, seems to have been a continuation of the copper coinage of the Maccabees, with some adaptation to the Roman standard. In the Money of the New Testament we see the native copper coinage side by side with the Graeco-Roman copper, silver and gold. (The first coined Money mentioned in the Bible refers to the Persian coinage, ( 1 Chronicles 29:7 ; Ezra 2:69 ) and translated dram . The coins mentioned by the evangelists, and first those of silver, are the following: The stater , ( Matthew 17:24-27 ) called piece of Money , was a Roman coin equal to four drachmas
Teller - ) An officer of a bank who receives and counts over Money paid in, and pays Money out on checks. ) One of four officers of the English Exchequer, formerly appointed to receive Moneys due to the king and to pay Moneys payable by the king
Simony - ) The crime of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferment; the corrupt presentation of any one to an ecclesiastical benefice for Money or reward
Expenditure - ) The act of expending; a laying out, as of Money; disbursement
Truckage - ) Money paid for the conveyance of goods on a truck; freight
Ora - ) A Money of account among the Anglo-Saxons, valued, in the Domesday Book, at twenty pence sterling
Lucrative - ) Yielding lucre; gainful; profitable; making increase of Money or goods; as, a lucrative business or office
Mortgage - Literally, a dead pledge the grant of an estate in fee as security for the payment of Money, and on the condition that if the Money shall be paid according to the contract, the grant shall be void, and the mortgagee shall re-convey the estate to the mortgager. Formerly the condition was,that if the mortgager should repay the Money at the day specified, he might then re-enter on the estate granted in pledge but the modern practice is for the mortgagee, on receiving payment, to reconvey the land to the mortgager. To grant an estate in fee as security for Money lent or contracted to be paid at a certain time, on condition that if the debt shall be discharged according to the contract, the grant shall be void, otherwise to remain in full force. It is customary to give a mortgage for securing the repayment of Money lent, or the payment of the purchase Money of an estate, or for any other debt
Cambist - ) A banker; a Money changer or broker; one who deals in bills of exchange, or who is skilled in the science of exchange
Silverlings, - a word used once only in the Authorized Version, (Isaiah 7:23 ) as a translation of the Hebrew word elsewhere rendered "silver" or "money
Potboiler - a painting, done simply for Money and the means of living
Dissipated - ) Wasteful of health, Money, etc
Shinplaster - ) Formerly, a jocose term for a bank note greatly depreciated in value; also, for paper Money of a denomination less than a dollar
Maravedi - ) A small copper coin of Spain, equal to three mils American Money, less than a farthing sterling
Gambling - Staking large sums of Money or valuable articles on games of pure chance, as for instance, dice, roulette. The practise is not wrong in itself, but it is commonly the occasion of wrong, of risking Money or property that does not belong to one, of staking beyond one's means, of losing what should justly go to one's family, of losing time, of distraction from one's business or other more worthy pursuits
Gaming - Staking large sums of Money or valuable articles on games of pure chance, as for instance, dice, roulette. The practise is not wrong in itself, but it is commonly the occasion of wrong, of risking Money or property that does not belong to one, of staking beyond one's means, of losing what should justly go to one's family, of losing time, of distraction from one's business or other more worthy pursuits
Filthy - ...
1 Timothy 3:3 (a) By this word we understand "tainted" Money. This refers to Money used for wrong purposes, or to obtain evil ends
Usury - Formerly, interest or a premium paid or stipulated to be paid for the use of Money. In present usage, illegal interest a premium or compensation paid or stipulated to be paid for the use of Money borrowed or retained, beyond the rate of interest established by law
Money - ...
Although the word "money" appears frequently throughout some translations of the Old Testament, the first coins were not produced in the ancient Near East until the seventh century b. Consequently, when one finds the word "money" in Bible versions used to translate the Hebrew term kesep [1] (lit. ...
The genius of Money is that it simplifies and facilitates the exchange of goods and services between humans. Greek Christians would not have been able to assist Christians in Judea had it not been for the existence of Money, which functioned as a substitute for their labor and was easily transported (Romans 15:26-27 ). However, collections of laws in the ancient Near East allowed payment of Money as a fine in cases of murder where the victim was from a lower social class. Sectors of the Old Testament echo the notion that Money might serve to ransom one's life when one was legally liable to be put to death as a punishment (Exodus 21:29-30 ; 2 Samuel 21:4 ; 1 Kings 20:39 ), but Numbers 35:31 clarifies Israel's distinctiveness: "Do not accept a ransom for the life of a murderer. ...
The ease with which Money could substitute for goods and services allowed it to be a ready means of replacing items lost or damaged in civil conflicts. Money appears not as a punitive measure in biblical legislation but as a compensation for commodities such as dead cattle (Exodus 21:33-36 ) and lost virginity (the price determined by the general dowry expected for a virgin Exodus 22:16-17 ; Deuteronomy 22:28-29 ). Money could function as a punishment when damages were less tangible (e. Should Money become a substitute for other punishments such as lex talionis or beatings, the law would become less fair in allowing the wealthy to be less affected by their misdeeds than the poor. ...
Although Money had beneficial results in simplifying the exchange of goods and services, these advantages could be turned to evil purposes. In the same way that Money facilitated the rewarding of work done well, it became equally easy to motivate individuals to do reprehensible crimes with bribes (Judges 16:5,18 ; Esther 3:9 ; 4:7 ; Matthew 28:12 ; Mark 14:11 ). ...
Money also could be used to affirm one's status as a subordinate who owed allegiance to another: it was humiliating for the kings of Israel and Judah to pay tribute to foreign monarchs (2 Kings 15:19-20 ; 18:14 ; 23:33,35 ), but it was a sign of Israel's high standing when other nations paid annual tribute to her (2 Chronicles 27:5 ). Of course, rulers could pay such Money only if they had taxed their own people (2 Kings 15:20 ), and hence taxes were (and still are) a sign of the individual's submission to the government. ...
Money is one of the least trustworthy and most deceptive elements of human existence. A shortage of certain commodities may drive up prices exorbitantly (2 Kings 6:25 ; Lamentations 5:4 ; Revelation 6:6 ), while the sudden availability of products may cause the value of Money to plunge (2 Kings 7:1,16,18 ). Hordes of coins found in archaeological excavations echo the frequency with which Money is described as buried in the Bible, for Money is so vulnerable that there is little else one can do to protect it. It is ironic that Money loses its ability to protect its owner (Ezekiel 45:12 ), who on the contrary is soon consumed with protecting the Money instead (Ecclesiastes 5:13 ). This is one reason why Jesus insists that his followers not accumulate Money (Matthew 10:9 ) and why members of the earliest Jerusalem church did not claim that anything belonging to them was their own (Acts 4:32 ). It is this confusion of market value with spiritual value that irritates Peter when Simon Magus offers to pay Money in return for the power of the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:18-24 ). One should not even consider any amount of Money in exchange for the most intense suffering for the sake of Jesus (1 Peter 1:7 ). It is for this reason that those who lead the church must have no fondness for Money (Acts 20:33 ; 1 Timothy 3:3,8 ; Titus 1:7,11 ; 1 Peter 5:2 ; contrast the Pharisees in Luke 16:14 ). There is no greater demonstrations of the contrary value system represented by Money than Paul's observation that the love of Money is the root of all evil (1 Timothy 6:10 ). ...
Money is also unreliable because people falsify the standards of measurement for personal gain, or, in the words of Amos 8:5 , "make the shekel bigger" (cf. ...
People tend to cling to Money, addicted to its false security. Because Money behaves like a spiritual narcotic, deadening one's sensitivity to real value, Jesus insists that one cannot be committed simultaneously to both God's values and "mammon" (an Aramaic word meaning Money, wealth, or property Matthew 6:24 ). Ananias and Sapphira tried to pursue both and proved the veracity of Jesus' words as well as the spiritual corruption that Money serves to catalyze (Acts 5:1-10 ). Money is therefore quite dangerous, prompting Jesus to advise his followers not to take any Money with them on their preaching tours (Mark 6:8 ; Luke 9:3 ) and to give away any Money that came from the sale of their estates (Luke 18:22 ; cf. ...
A further problem with Money surfaces when one uses it to earn more Money at the expense of others in need, specifically in the charging of interest for monetary loans. However, it was legally prohibited to use Money to make Money specifically at the expense of a poor Israelite (Exodus 22:25 ; Leviticus 25:35-37 ). The righteous person does not use his Money to make Money at anyone's expense (Psalm 15:5 ), for it is the wicked person who becomes wealthy by taking interest (Proverbs 28:8 ). In spite of such guidelines, the postexilic Jewish community monetarily enslaved poor Jews by loaning Money at interest so that they could pay their taxes, a travesty that angered Nehemiah and prompted a reform so that such loans became interest-free (Nehemiah 5:4-12 ). ...
The power of Money is no more dramatically confronted than when one uses Money to purchase another human being. When one paid Money for a human in the Old Testament, that purchase brought the slave into the sphere of the owner's household comparable to the status of one born in the house, eradicating the slave's former ethnic and social ties as far as cultic matters were concerned
Bag - 1: γλωσσόκομον (Strong's #1101 — Noun Neuter — glossokomon — gloce-sok'-om-on ) from glossa, "a tongue," and komeo, "to tend," was, firstly, "a case" in which to keep the mouthpiece of wind instruments; secondly, "a small box" for any purpose, but especially a "casket or purse," to keep Money in. ...
2: βαλλάντιον (Strong's #905 — Noun Neuter — ballantion — bal-an'-tee-on ) from ballo, "to cast," "a Money-box or purse," is found in Luke's Gospel, four times, Luke 10:4 ; 12:33 (AV, "bag"); 22:35,36. ...
Note: Zone, "a gridle or belt," also served as "a purse for Money," Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8
Silverling - Only Isaiah 7:23 , where the original reads ‘a thousand of silver,’ the denomination to be supplied being ‘shekels’ (See Money, p
Peag - ) A kind of aboriginal shell Money, or wampum, of the Atlantic coast of the United States; - originally applied only to polished white cylindrical beads
Mina - ) An ancient weight or denomination of Money, of varying value
Cash Register - A device for recording the amount of cash received, usually having an automatic adding machine and a Money drawer and exhibiting the amount of the sale
Shekel - ) A jocose term for Money
Scotale - ) The keeping of an alehouse by an officer of a forest, and drawing people to spend their Money for liquor, for fear of his displeasure
Earning - ) That which is earned; wages gained by work or services; Money earned; - used commonly in the plural
Polysyndeton - ) A figure by which the conjunction is often repeated, as in the sentence, "We have ships and men and Money and stores
Robber - ) One who robs; in law, one who feloniously takes goods or Money from the person of another by violence or by putting him in fear
Mucker - ) To scrape together, as Money, by mean labor or shifts
Potter's Field - the land that was bought with the Money for which Judas sold our Saviour, Matthew 27:7 ; Matthew 27:10 , and which he returned
Livre - ) A French Money of account, afterward a silver coin equal to 20 sous
Lender - One who makes a trade of putting Money to interest
Treasury - " "Nine chests were for the appointed Money-tribute and for the sacrifice-tribute, i. , Money-gifts instead of the sacrifices; four chests for freewill-offerings for wood, incense, temple decoration, and burnt-offerings" (Lightfoot's Hor
Shekel - One of its most frequent uses was in weighing Money. Since most Money was weighed in silver, the shekel of silver became also a common monetary unit (Genesis 23:16; Exodus 21:32; Exodus 30:13; 2 Samuel 24:24)
Shilling - ) A silver coin, and Money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency. ) In the United States, a denomination of Money, differing in value in different States
Creditor - ) One who gives credit in business matters; hence, one to whom Money is due; - correlative to debtor
Cranage - ) The Money or price paid for the use of a crane
Vendor's Lien - An implied lien (that is, one not created by mortgage or other express agreement) given in equity to a vendor of lands for the unpaid purchase Money
Tournois - ) A former French Money of account worth 20 sous, or a franc
Roschen - ) A small silver coin and Money of account of Germany, worth about two cents
Pieces - In Psalm 68:30 denotes "fragments," and not properly Money. ), supposed by some to have been a piece of Money bearing the figure of a lamb, but rather simply a certain amount. ...
...
The "piece of Money" mentioned in Matthew 17:27 is a stater=a Hebrew shekel, or four Greek drachmae; and that in Luke 15:8,9 , Acts 19:19 , a Greek drachma=a denarius
Talent - ) Among the ancient Greeks, a weight and a denomination of Money equal to 60 minae or 6,000 drachmae. avoirdupois; as a denomination of silver Money, its value was £243 15s. ) Among the Hebrews, a weight and denomination of Money
Twopence - ) A small coin, and Money of account, in England, equivalent to two pennies, - minted to a fixed annual amount, for almsgiving by the sovereign on Maundy Thursday
Covetousness - ) A strong or inordinate desire of obtaining and possessing some supposed good; excessive desire for riches or Money; - in a bad sense
Tael - ) A denomination of Money, in China, worth nearly six shillings sterling, or about a dollar and forty cents; also, a weight of one ounce and a third
Wealthy - ) Having wealth; having large possessions, or larger than most men, as lands, goods, Money, or securities; opulent; affluent; rich
Monometallism - ) The legalized use of one metal only, as gold, or silver, in the standard currency of a country, or as a standard of Money values
Blackmailing - ) The act or practice of extorting Money by exciting fears of injury other than bodily harm, as injury to reputation
Banian - ) A Hindoo trader, merchant, cashier, or Money changer
Funded - ) Invested in public funds; as, funded Money
Pound - ) A Greek pound; a Money of account; 60 in the talent; the weight depended on that of the talent
Toman - ) A Money of account in Persia, whose value varies greatly at different times and places
Mancus - The silver mancus was equal to about one shilling of modern English Money
Talent - (See Money
Agist - ) To take to graze or pasture, at a certain sum; - used originally of the feeding of cattle in the king's forests, and collecting the Money for the same
Riches - ) That which makes one rich; an abundance of land, goods, Money, or other property; wealth; opulence; affluence
Exchanger, - Public banker who pays interest on Money deposited and loans it out again at a profit
Antiochians - , offered a large sum of Money to Antiochus to induce the king to allow the inhabitants of Jerusalem ‘to be enrolled as Antiochians. ’ Antiochus acceded to the proposal, and shortly afterwards a party of ‘Antiochians’ from Jerusalem was sent by him with a contribution of Money for the festival of Heracles at Tyre
Usury - The law of Moses prohibited the Jews from taking any interest of each other for the loan of Money or of anything else, though they were allowed to take it of foreigners. The exchangers of Money were in the habit of receiving it at low interest and loaning it at high interest, taking the difference for their gain
Mass Penny - An Anglo-Saxon term signifying a Money offering of uncertain value commonly made, at the Offertory of the Mass all over the Western Church from the 12th to the 15th century
Covetous - Money); avaricious; - in a bad sense
Welsher - ) One who cheats at a horse race; one who bets, without a chance of being able to pay; one who receives Money to back certain horses and absconds with it
Peculation - ) The act or practice of peculating, or of defrauding the public by appropriating to one's own use the Money or goods intrusted to one's care for management or disbursement; embezzlement
Usurious - ) Practicing usury; taking illegal or exorbitant interest for the use of Money; as, a usurious person
Ruddock - ) A piece of gold Money; - probably because the gold of coins was often reddened by copper alloy
Porterage - ) Money charged or paid for the carriage of burdens or parcels by a porter
Tommy - ) A truck, or barter; the exchange of labor for goods, not Money
Bag - Eastern Money was often sealed up in bags containing a certain sum, for which they passed current while the seal remained unbroken, 2 Kings 12:10
Bleed - ) To draw Money from (one); to induce to pay; as, they bled him freely for this fund. ) To pay or lose Money; to have Money drawn or extorted; as, to bleed freely for a cause
Groat - Piece of Money mentioned by Our Lord in the parable of the woman who has ten groats and loses one (Luke 15); it is identical with the drachma, and has the same value
Venality - ) The quality or state of being venal, or purchasable; mercenariness; prostitution of talents, offices, or services, for Money or reward; as, the venality of a corrupt court; the venality of an official
Scrivener - ) One whose business is to place Money at interest; a broker
Lombar-House - ) A public institution for lending Money to the poor at a moderate interest, upon articles deposited and pledged; - called also mont de piete
Weighing - It is too well known to need my pointing out that in the article of Money among the Hebrews, their estimate of gold and silver, was by weight and not by any standard of coin. Thus Abraham when he bought ground of the sons of Heth, weighed the Money agreed upon, four hundred shekels of silver,"current Money with the merchant. " (Genesis 23:16) In like manner, when at the appointment of the Lord, Jeremiah bought the field of his uncle's son, he weighed him the Money, even seventeen shekels of silver. (Jeremiah 32:8-9) From hence it appears that the real value of Money was ascertained by weighing. What a sweet thought is it to the believer in Jesus that he is weighed only in person of his Lord, where can be found no lightness or deficiency! Jesus's righteousness is indeed "current Money with the merchant
Wealth And Materialism - Jesus' references to Money in the New Testament consist mainly of stories or parables which show the dangers of wealth. ...
Jesus viewed Money or wealth as a spiritual power (Matthew 6:24 ), identifying wealth as an object of worship, a rival to God. ...
Paul likewise warned against the power of Money. One of the qualifications of a church officer is to be free from the love of Money (1 Timothy 3:3 ). Deacons likewise must not be “greedy for Money” (1 Timothy 3:8 NRSV). The strongest warning is found in 1 Timothy 6:10 (NRSV): “For the love of Money is a root of all kinds of evil, and in their eagerness to be rich some have wandered away from the faith. ” Paul may be implying that people who love Money will resort to all kinds of things to get it. The desire for Money has a way of enslaving the person seeking it. ...
The answer to the wrong use of Money is to use it for kingdom purposes. Money can be used to enhance our relationship to God and bless others. ...
Hebrews encourages us to “Keep your lives free from the love of Money, and be content with what you have (Hebrews 13:5 NRSV). Christians are to recognize that God's kingdom is more important than Money (Matthew 6:33 ). ...
Christians are to learn to possess Money and not be possessed by it
Agio - ) The premium or percentage on a better sort of Money when it is given in exchange for an inferior sort
Talent - Large quantities of Money were usually weighed in talents, smaller quantities in shekels (1 Kings 10:10; 2 Kings 15:19; 2 Kings 18:14). ...
Silver was the metal most commonly used for Money
Money-Changers - Money-changers. The Moneychangers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice, and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the world who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom Money in the Hebrew coin
Pawn - ) To give or deposit in pledge, or as security for the payment of Money borrowed; to put in pawn; to pledge; as, to pawn one's watch. ) Anything delivered or deposited as security, as for the payment of Money borrowed, or of a debt; a pledge
Price - ) The sum or amount of Money at which a thing is valued, or the value which a seller sets on his goods in market; that for which something is bought or sold, or offered for sale; equivalent in Money or other means of exchange; current value or rate paid or demanded in market or in barter; cost
Handsel - ) A sale, gift, or delivery into the hand of another; especially, a sale, gift, delivery, or using which is the first of a series, and regarded as on omen for the rest; a first installment; an earnest; as the first Money received for the sale of goods in the morning, the first Money taken at a shop newly opened, the first present sent to a young woman on her wedding day, etc
Tribute - ) An annual or stated sum of Money or other valuable thing, paid by one ruler or nation to another, either as an acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace and protection, or by virtue of some treaty; as, the Romans made their conquered countries pay tribute. ) A personal contribution, as of Money, praise, service, etc
Money-Changers - The Money-changers whom Christ, for their impiety, avarice and fraudulent dealing, expelled from the temple were the dealers who supplied half-shekels, for such a premium as they might be able to exact, to the Jews from all parts of the world who assembled at Jerusalem during the great festivals, and were required to pay their tribute or ransom Money in the Hebrew coin
Purse, - a bag for Money. The Hebrews, when on a journey, were provided with a bag, in which they carried their Money, (Genesis 42:35 ; Proverbs 1:14 ; 7:20 ; Isaiah 46:6 ) and, if they were merchants, also their weights
Remittance - ) The act of transmitting Money, bills, or the like, esp
Hireling - Serving for wages venal mercenary employed for Money or other compensation
Bekah - A half-shekel; in weight, five pennyweights; in Money, about twenty- five cents
Deposit - , Money lodged with a bank or banker, subject to order; anything given as pledge or security. ) A bailment of Money or goods to be kept gratuitously for the bailor. ) Money lodged with a party as earnest or security for the performance of a duty assumed by the person depositing. , to place in a bank, as a sum of Money subject to order
Uncertainly - One wealthy man who lost a great deal of Money was asked, "Do you not worry about the Money you have lost?" He answered, "No, it was my Money that got me into trouble. " Misery and Money often go together
Fund - ) To place in a fund, as Money. ) An invested sum, whose income is devoted to a specific object; as, the fund of an ecclesiastical society; a fund for the maintenance of lectures or poor students; also, Money systematically collected to meet the expenses of some permanent object. ) The stock of a national debt; public securities; evidences (stocks or bonds) of Money lent to government, for which interest is paid at prescribed intervals; - called also public funds. ) A stock or capital; a sum of Money appropriated as the foundation of some commercial or other operation undertaken with a view to profit; that reserve by means of which expenses and credit are supported; as, the fund of a bank, commercial house, manufacturing corporation, etc
Blancher - , one who anneals and cleanses Money; also, a chemical preparation for this purpose
Arrestment - , a process by which Money or movables in the possession of a third party are attached
Feu - ) A free and gratuitous right to lands made to one for service to be performed by him; a tenure where the vassal, in place of military services, makes a return in grain or in Money
Faro - ) A gambling game at cardds, in whiich all the other players play against the dealer or banker, staking their Money upon the order in which the cards will lie and be dealt from the pack
Sesterce - ) A Roman coin or denomination of Money, in value the fourth part of a denarius, and originally containing two asses and a half, afterward four asses, - equal to about two pence sterling, or four cents
Muckworm - ) One who scrapes together Money by mean labor and devices; a miser
Mina - A weight or denomination of Money
Financier - ) One skilled in financial operations; one acquainted with Money matters
Economist - ) One who economizes, or manages domestic or other concerns with frugality; one who expends Money, time, or labor, judiciously, and without waste
Shroffage - ) A Money dealer's commission; also, more commonly, the examination of coins, and the separation of the good from the debased
Post-Obit Bond - A bond in which the obligor, in consideration of having received a certain sum of Money, binds himself to pay a larger sum, on unusual interest, on the death of some specified individual from whom he has expectations
Scot - ) A portion of Money assessed or paid; a tax or contribution; a mulct; a fine; a shot
Montes Pietatis - Charitable credit organizations from which the poor may borrow Money by depositing objects of nominal value as a security. Money is lent only to the needy cases to relieve immediate and pressing financial wants and as they are on a strictly non-profiteering basis the funds they receive are expended in maintaining the establishment and in the furtherance of charitable works. The institution was founded to combat the usurious exactions of the Jewish Money lenders and Lombard travelling bankers of the Middle Ages, and the first mons pietatis was established in Perugia, 1462, through the instrumentality of the Franciscans, Michele Carcano of Milan, and Barnabò da Terni and Fortunato Coppoli of Perugia
Silver - A — 1: ἀργύριον (Strong's #694 — Noun Neuter — argurion — ar-goo'-ree-on ) is rendered "silver" in Acts 3:6 ; 8:20 , RV (AV, "money"); 20:33; 1 Corinthians 3:12 (metaphorical); 1 Peter 1:18 . See Money , PIECE
Premium - ) Something offered or given for the loan of Money; bonus; - sometimes synonymous with interest, but generally signifying a sum in addition to the capital. ) A sum of Money paid to underwriters for insurance, or for undertaking to indemnify for losses of any kind
Doit - ) A small Dutch coin, worth about half a farthing; also, a similar small coin once used in Scotland; hence, any small piece of Money
Adarconim - אדרכונים , a sort of Money, mentioned 1 Chronicles 29:7 , and Ezra 8:27
Shekel - See Money, Measures and Weights
Mite - It was the smallest piece of Money and worth about one-fifth of a cent—two mites making a farthing
Bailment - ) A delivery of goods or Money by one person to another in trust, for some special purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that the trust shall be faithfully executed
Religion: Taken Upon Trust - It is a preposterous thing that men can venture their souls where they will not venture their Money; for they will take their religion upon trust, but would not trust a synod about the goodness of half-a-crown
Purse - Or "a bag for Money", and "for merchants' weights"
Venal - ) Capable of being bought or obtained for Money or other valuable consideration; made matter of trade or barter; held for sale; salable; mercenary; purchasable; hireling; as, venal services
Tical - ) A Money of account in China, reckoning at about $1
Interest - 1: τόκος (Strong's #5110 — Noun Masculine — tokos — tok'-os ) primarily "a bringing forth, birth" (from tikto, "to beget"), then, "an offspring," is used metaphorically of the produce of Money lent out, "interest," usury, Matthew 25:27 ; Luke 19:23
Wealth - Riches large possessions of Money, goods or land that abundance of worldly estate which exceeds the estate of the greater part of the community affluence opulence
Piece of Gold - Coined Money was unknown in Palestine till the Persian period
Worldliness - There is a poor creature at Aosta who does not know the value of Money, and only cares for eating, drinking, and sleeping
Beverage - ) A treat, or drink Money
Purse - A bag for Money or weights
Ambidexterity - ) A juror's taking of Money from the both parties for a verdict
Potters Field - The name given to the piece of ground which was afterwards bought with the Money that had been given to Judas
Payee - ) The person to whom Money is to be, or has been, paid; the person named in a bill or note, to whom, or to whose order, the amount is promised or directed to be paid
Pennyworth - ) Hence: The full value of one's penny expended; due return for Money laid out; a good bargain; a bargain
Arca - A box in which the Eucharist was kept by the primitive Christians in their homes; a chest for safe keeping of church Money offerings, such as endowment funds for churches, schools, and various pious uses, known as the arca seminarii, missionum, piorum operum
Covetous - Inordinately desirous excessively eager to obtain and possess directed to Money or goods, avaricious
Chink - ) To make a slight, sharp, metallic sound, as by the collision of little pieces of Money, or other small sonorous bodies. ) Money; cash
Mint - The place where Money is coined by public authority. MINT, To coin to make and stamp Money
Coffer - A chest or trunk and as a chest is customarily used for keeping Money, hence, 2. A chest of Money a treasure
Lover - " ...
4: φιλάργυρος (Strong's #5366 — Adjective — philarguros — fil-ar'-goo-ros ) "loving Money" (arguros, "silver"), translated "lovers of Money" in Luke 16:14 ; 2 Timothy 3:2 , RV (AV, "covetous"). For aphilarguros, "no lover of Money," 1 Timothy 3:3 , RV, and Hebrews 13:5 , RV, see COVETOUS
Money-Making: Nothing But Play - The first of all English games is making Money. Ask a great Money-maker what he wants to do with his Money: he never knows. And there's no use in the Money, but to have more of it than other people is the game
Defaulter - ) One who fails to perform a duty; a delinquent; particularly, one who fails to account for public Money intrusted to his care; a peculator; a defalcator
Bloodsucker - ) A hard and exacting master, landlord, or Money lender; an extortioner
Amortization - ) The extinction of a debt, usually by means of a sinking fund; also, the Money thus paid
Lucre - Gain in Money or goods profit usually in an sense, or with the sense of something base or unworthy
Accumulate - ) To heap up in a mass; to pile up; to collect or bring together; to amass; as, to accumulate a sum of Money
Resource - ) Pecuniary means; funds; Money, or any property that can be converted into supplies; available means or capabilities of any kind
Shekel - A weight used among the Israelites; supposed in silver to be worth somewhat about two shillings and three-pence farthing current coin of our English Money
Deplete - ) To reduce by destroying or consuming the vital powers of; to exhaust, as a country of its strength or resources, a treasury of Money, etc
Dowry - ) The Money, goods, or estate, which a woman brings to her husband in marriage; a bride's portion on her marriage
Embarrassment - ) Difficulty or perplexity arising from the want of Money to pay debts
Embezzle - ) To appropriate fraudulently to one's own use, as property intrusted to one's care; to apply to one's private uses by a breach of trust; as, to embezzle Money held in trust
Octroi - ) A tax levied in Money or kind at the gate of a French city on articles brought within the walls
Para - ) A piece of Turkish Money, usually copper, the fortieth part of a piaster, or about one ninth of a cent
Montem - ) A custom, formerly practiced by the scholars at Eton school, England, of going every third year, on Whittuesday, to a hillock near the Bath road, and exacting Money from all passers-by, to support at the university the senior scholar of the school
Para - ) A piece of Turkish Money, usually copper, the fortieth part of a piaster, or about one ninth of a cent
Wallet - ) A pocketbook for keeping Money about the person
Zabla - A procedure for convening a rabbinical court of law to hear a case involving a dispute over Money or property; each litigant chooses one judge or arbiter, and these two judges then designate the third judge...
Accrue - ) To come to by way of increase; to arise or spring as a growth or result; to be added as increase, profit, or damage, especially as the produce of Money lent
Bag - " Eastern Money was often sealed up in bags containing a certain sum, for which they passed current while the seal remained unbroken
Changer - , "clipped"), "a small coin or rate of change" (koloboo signifies "to cut off, to clip, shorten," Matthew 24:22 ), denotes "a Money-changer," lit. , Money-clipper, Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15
Advance - ) To furnish, as Money or other value, before it becomes due, or in aid of an enterprise; to supply beforehand; as, a merchant advances Money on a contract or on goods consigned to him. ) A furnishing of something before an equivalent is received (as Money or goods), towards a capital or stock, or on loan; payment beforehand; the Money or goods thus furnished; Money or value supplied beforehand
Judas Iscariot - Under the plea of the necessities of the poor he complained of Money being wasted when Mary anointed the Lord. Satan knew the covetousness of Judas and put it into his heart to betray the Lord for Money, which he did for thirty pieces of silver. ...
Judas probably thought that the Lord would escape from those who arrested Him, as He had escaped from previous dangers, while he would gain the Money. When the Lord was condemned, Judas was filled with remorse, confessed he had betrayed innocent blood, and cast the Money into the temple. He was a complete dupe of Satan, who first tempted him to gain the Money, and then would not let him keep it
Ambidexter - ) A juror who takes Money from both parties for giving his verdict
Chauffeur - ) Brigands in bands, who, about 1793, pillaged, burned, and killed in parts of France; - so called because they used to burn the feet of their victims to extort Money
Primage - ) A charge in addition to the freight; originally, a gratuity to the captain for his particular care of the goods (sometimes called hat Money), but now belonging to the owners or freighters of the vessel, unless by special agreement the whole or part is assigned to the captain
Reis - ) The word is used as a Portuguese designation of Money of account, one hundred reis being about equal in value to eleven cents
Defalcation - ) An abstraction of Money, etc
Pound - A weight and a sum of Money, put, in the Old Testament, 1 Kings 10:17 Ezra 2:69 Nehemiah 7:71 , for the Hebrew MANEH, which see; and in the New Testament, for the Attic MINA, which was equivalent to one hundred drachmae, or about fourteen dollars
Sell - To transfer property or the exclusive right of possession to another for an equivalent in Money. It is distinguished from exchange or barter, in which one commodity is given for another wheras in selling the consideration is Money, or its representative in current notes. To betray to deliver or surrender for Money or reward as, to sell one's country
Forgery - In canon law, forgery may be by word, as false testimony; or by writing, as falsifiication of a document; or by deed, as counterfeiting Money; and finally it is also the conscious utilization of such forgery
Napkin - But the word is used of a wrapper to fold Money in (Luke 19:20 ), and as an article of dress, a "handkerchief" worn on the head (Acts 19:12 )
Mite - In Scripture, a small piece of Money, the quarter of a denarius, or about seven English farthings
Skilling - ) A Money od account in Sweden, Norwey, Denmark, and North Germany, and also a coin
Bank, - In Matthew 25:27 a kindred word is translated 'exchangers:' both passages imply that there were in those days, as now, those who received and lent Money on interest
Argent - ) Silver, or Money
Purchaser - ) One who purchases; one who acquires property for a consideration, generally of Money; a buyer; a vendee
Treasure-Trove - ) Any Money, bullion, or the like, found in the earth, or otherwise hidden, the owner of which is not known
Legacy - of Money or personal property; a bequest
Aceldama - Pretending that it was not lawful to appropriate this Money to sacred uses, because it was the price of blood, they purchased with it the so- called potter's field, to be a burying-place for strangers. Judas is said, Acts 1:8 , to have purchased the field, because it was bought with his Money
Realize - ) To convert into actual Money; as, to realize assets. ) To convert any kind of property into Money, especially property representing investments, as shares in stock companies, bonds, etc
Treasure - Wealth accumulated particularly, a stock or store of Money in reserve. To hoard to collect and reposit, either Money or other things, for future use to lay up as, to treasure gold and silver usually with up
Penny - _ ‘Money’). _ ‘Money,’ 11
Change - ) Specifically: To give, or receive, smaller denominations of Money (technically called change) for; as, to change a gold coin or a bank bill. ) To give and take reciprocally; to exchange; - followed by with; as, to change place, or hats, or Money, with another. ) Small Money; the Money by means of which the larger coins and bank bills are made available in small dealings; hence, the balance returned when payment is tendered by a coin or note exceeding the sum due
Wages - Rate of (mention only in Matthew 20:2 ); to be punctually paid (Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14,15 ); judgements threatened against the withholding of (Jeremiah 22:13 ; Malachi 3:5 ; Compare James 5:4 ); paid in Money (Matthew 20:1-14 ); to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 )
Careful - ) Taking care; giving good heed; watchful; cautious; provident; not indifferent, heedless, or reckless; - often followed by of, for, or the infinitive; as, careful of Money; careful to do right
Agistor - ) Formerly, an officer of the king's forest, who had the care of cattle agisted, and collected the Money for the same; - hence called gisttaker, which in England is corrupted into guest-taker
Usance - ) Interest paid for Money; usury
Repay - ) To pay back; to refund; as, to repay Money borrowed or advanced
Maintenance - ) An officious or unlawful intermeddling in a cause depending between others, by assisting either party with Money or means to carry it on
Roture - ) A feudal tenure of lands by one who has no privileges of nobility, but is permitted to discharge all his obligations to his feudal lord or superior by a payment of rent in Money or kind and without rendering any personal services
Mite - A small piece of Money, two of which made a kodrantes, or the fourth part of the Roman as
Bank - the office of the Money-changers (Luke 19:23), who would have kept it safe, and also paid interest for it. ‘Bankers’ (τραπεζῖται) is used in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 of Matthew 25:27 for ‘money-changers’ of the Authorized Version. They changed coins, but also took Money on deposit, giving what would now seem very high interest (see articles ‘Money-Changers’ and ‘Usury’ in vols. ) gives it thus: γἰνεσθε τρατεζἰται δὀκιμοι, ‘Be ye tried Money-changers
Gerah - A bean, probably of the carob tree, the smallest weight, and also the smallest piece of Money, among the Hebrews, equal to the twentieth part of a shekel (Exodus 30:13 ; Leviticus 27:25 ; Numbers 3:47 )
Bonus - ) Money paid in addition to a stated compensation
Kesitah - (keh ssee' tah) Transliteration of Hebrew meaning, “part, measure, piece of Money
Dissipation - ) A dissolute course of life, in which health, Money, etc
Scudo - ) A silver coin, and Money of account, used in Italy and Sicily, varying in value, in different parts, but worth about 4 shillings sterling, or about 96 cents; also, a gold coin worth about the same
Testimonial - ) Something, as Money or plate, presented to a preson as a token of respect, or of obligation for services rendered
Mont de Piete - One of certain public pawnbroking establishments which originated in Italy in the 15th century, the object of which was to lend Money at a low rate of interest to poor people in need; - called also mount of piety
Shekel, Half Shekel - 1: στατήρ (Strong's #4715 — Noun Masculine — stater — stat-air' ) a teradrachmon or four drachmae, originally 224 grains, in Tyrian currency, but reduced in weight somewhat by the time recorded in Matthew 17:24 ; the value was about three shillings, and would pay the Temple tax for two persons, Matthew 17:27 , RV, "shekel" (AV, "a piece of Money"); in some mss. , Matthew 26:16 ; see Money , Note
Pump - ) Figuratively, to draw out or obtain, as secrets or Money, by persistent questioning or plying; to question or ply persistently in order to elicit something, as information, Money, etc
Extravagance - ) The state of being extravagant, wild, or prodigal beyond bounds of propriety or duty; want of moderation; excess; especially, undue expenditure of Money; vaid and superfluous expense; prodigality; as, extravagance of anger, love, expression, imagination, demands
Dowry - The Money, goods or estate which a woman brings to her husband in marriage the portion given with a wife
R. leib sarah's - One of the "hidden righteous," he spent his life wandering from place to place to raise Money for the ransoming of imprisoned Jews
Prudent - ) Frugal; economical; not extravagant; as, a prudent woman; prudent expenditure of Money
Parsonage - ) Money paid for the support of a parson
Prowl - ) To collect by plunder; as, to prowl Money
Ash (Tree) - It may be a great, solid, substantial business, in which a man's Money, fame and fortune leave him no time for GOD
Shekel - (See Money
Perquisite - ) Things gotten by a man's own industry, or purchased with his own Money, as opposed to things which come to him by descent
Deify - ) To praise or revere as a deity; to treat as an object of supreme regard; as, to deify Money
Lombard - ) A Money lender or banker; - so called because the business of banking was first carried on in London by Lombards
Quite - ...
He hath sold us and quite devoured also our Money
Wealthy - Rich having large possessions in lands, goods, Money or securities, or larger than the generality of men opulent affluent
Sepulchre - In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was "laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of Money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem. , our fathers]'>[1] were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of Money of the sons of Emmor [2] of Sychem
Usury, - (The word usury has come in modern English to mean excessive interest upon Money loaned, either formally illegal or at least oppressive. In the Scriptures, however the word did not bear this sense, but meant simply interest of any kind upon Money
Gold - Simon Maccabeus (1 Maccabees 15) was the first who coined Jewish Money. The Asiatics have always possessed more gold in ornaments than in Money
Tight - ) Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; - said of Money or the Money market
Receipt - ) To give a receipt, as for Money paid. ) A writing acknowledging the taking or receiving of goods delivered; an acknowledgment of Money paid
Remit - to a distance, as Money in payment of a demand, account, draft, etc. ) To send Money, as in payment
Brass, Brazen - , Money, Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8 ; 12:41 , or a sounding instrument, 1 Corinthians 13:1 , figurative of a person destitute of love. See Money
Minor - It is the second proposition of a regular syllogism, as in the following: Every act of injustice partakes of meanness; to take Money from another by gaming is an act of injustice; therefore, the taking of Money from another by gaming partakes of meanness
Bag - ( 2 Kings 5:23 ) They were long cone-like bags of the size to hold a precise amount of Money, and tied or sealed for that amount, as we stamp the value on a coin. (Zechariah 11:15 ; 16:5 ) ...
Tschar , properly a "bundle," ( Genesis 42:35 ) appears to have been used by travellers for carrying Money during a long journey
Tender - In law, an offer, either of Money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture which would be incurred by non-payment or non-performance as the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note or bond with interest. To constitute a legal tender, such Money must be offered as the law prescribes the offer of bank notes is not a legal tender. This Money is not a legal tender
Vest - To clothe with another form to convert into another substance or species of property as, to vest Money in goods to vest Money in land or houses to vest Money in bank stock, or in six per cent stock to vest all one's property in the public funds
Tribute, Toll, Taxing - Both were direct Imperial taxes payable by the Jews as Roman subjects; the former in kind, the latter in Roman Money. For the ‘tribute Money’ of Matthew 22:19 see Money, § 7 ( b ). See Money, § 7 ( d )
Farthing - , a small As , which was a Roman coin equal to a tenth of a denarius or drachma, nearly equal to a halfpenny of our Money
Money-Changers - These were persons who supplied those who came from a distance to Jerusalem, to pay the regular tax to the temple, with a half-shekel, in exchange for any Money they might possess
Propine - , drink Money
Drawback - ) Money paid back or remitted; especially, a certain amount of duties or customs, sometimes the whole, and sometimes only a part, remitted or paid back by the government, on the exportation of the commodities on which they were levied
Were - ) A fine for slaying a man; the Money value set upon a man's life; weregild
Tuition - ) The Money paid for instruction; the price or payment for instruction
Muck - ) Money; - in contempt
Napkin - In Luke 19:20 the reference may be to a towel or any kind of linen cloth or even a sort of head-dress, any of which might be used for concealing Money
Treasurer - ) One who has the care of a treasure or treasure or treasury; an officer who receives the public Money arising from taxes and duties, or other sources of revenue, takes charge of the same, and disburses it upon orders made by the proper authority; one who has charge of collected funds; as, the treasurer of a society or corporation
Repay - To pay back to refund as, to repay Money borrowed or advanced
Silver - ...
Keseph (כֶּסֶף, Strong's #3701), “silver; Money; price; property. ” Silver pieces (not coins) were used as Money: “Then Joseph commanded to fill their sacks with corn, and to restore every man’s Money into his sack …” ( Money” ( Money (2) - MONEY. —We propose to treat first of Money in general as referred to in the Gospels, and afterwards of the definite sums or coins which are there named. Money in General. —In the Authorized Version six Greek words are rendered ‘money,’ ‘tribute Money,’ or ‘piece of Money. This word originally means silver, hence silver Money (also translation ‘pieces of silver,’ Matthew 27:3; 1618420668_15; Matthew 27:9; see below, under ‘Stater’); finally, as silver was the chief medium of exchange in the ancient world, Money in general (cf. This word originally means brass, hence coins of brass (or copper), and, as copper Money circulated largely among the common people, Money in general. It is appropriately used in this passage for the stock-in-trade of the Money-changers, a part of whose business it was to supply change for larger sums. It means, accordingly, Money in the sense of lawful coin. The νόμισμα τοῦ κήνσου, or tribute Money, was the currency in which the Roman tribute had to be paid, that is, the denarius. τὰ δίδραχμα (Matthew 17:24 Authorized Version ‘tribute Money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 the half-shekel’). As is rightly indicated by the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , this word is the name of a definite sum of Money which was levied for the maintenance of the Temple (see below, under ‘Didrachm’). στατήρ (Matthew 17:27 Authorized Version ‘piece of Money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘shekel’). ...
To the above words used for Money in general (though under slightly different aspects) may be added the comprehensive description of Money in Matthew 10:9 in terms of the three metals used as specie—gold, silver, and brass (or copper). 36) holds that from the time of Pompey the Phœnician cities lost the power of issuing silver Money, and points out that the extant Phœnician tetradrachms never bear the names of Emperors or any other indication of Roman sway. 379–383) and others for dating these coins rather in the time of the revolt under Nero; and the opinion seems to he making headway that at the time of our Lord, and previously, the Jews were dependent for their silver Money upon foreign sources. ‘Money,’ § 5). ...
On the other hand, the supply of copper Money must have been almost, if not quite, exclusively of native production. Unlike the foreign silver Money, they have, in deference to Jewish feeling, no Imperial effigy or the likeness of any living thing; even those of the procurators have only the name of the reigning Emperor, and innocent ears of corn, palm-trees, lilies, and the like. The extant coins contain no indication of value, nor can any safe inference be drawn from their weight, seeing that, where a silver standard prevails, the copper coinage must always be very much of the nature of token Money. For convenience of reference the average value in sterling Money is put opposite the larger sums. Definite sums of Money and coins mentioned in the gospels. —These may most conveniently be treated of under three heads: Money of account, silver coins, and copper coins. ) Money of account. —Two sums of Money, to which no actual coin corresponded, receive a special name in the Gospels. Talent (τάλαντον, Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15-16; Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24-25; Matthew 25:28) is originally the name of the highest weight in the various systems of antiquity, hence the sum of Money represented by that weight in gold or silver. In the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:23-35) the one servant owes the king 10,000 talents, or nearly two-and-a-half millions of our Money—an enormous sum, of which the 100 denarii (= £4) owed him by his fellow-servant represents but an insignificant fraction (1/6000). The ‘piece of Money’ of the Authorized Version in Matthew 17:27 is the stater, the ‘pieces of silver’ in Luke 15:8 are drachms, while the ‘pieces of silver’ in Matthew 26:15 are probably staters, and are discussed under that heading. (There is no probability in the suggestion that this figure was named as the amount of Money then in ‘the bag. The denarius was ‘the Money of the tribute’ (Matthew 22:19), all Imperial taxes being payable in terms of it in accordance with a rescript of Germanicus (c. of our Money. Didrachm (δίδραχμον, Matthew 17:24 Authorized Version ‘tribute Money,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘half-shekel’). Stater (στατήρ, Matthew 17:27 Authorized Version piece of Money, Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 shekel). of our Money
Wall Street - It is the chief financial center of the United States, hence the name is often used for the Money market and the financial interests of the country
Dowry - , price paid for a wife, Genesis 34:12 ; Exodus 22:17 ; 1 Samuel 18:25 ), a nuptial present; some gift, as a sum of Money, which the bridegroom offers to the father of his bride as a satisfaction before he can receive her
Money Changers - Κollubistes and kermatistes , both denoting dealers in small coin (kollubos and kerma the profit Money, 1 1/2d
Asper - ) A Turkish Money of account (formerly a coin), of little value; the 120th part of a piaster
Arnishee - ) One who is garnished; a person upon whom garnishment has been served in a suit by a creditor against a debtor, such person holding property belonging to the debtor, or owing him Money
Purse - The folds of such waistbands were frequently used for storing Money
Shovelboard - ) A board on which a game is played, by pushing or driving pieces of metal or Money to reach certain marks; also, the game itself
Dividend - ) A sum of Money to be divided and distributed; the share of a sum divided that falls to each individual; a distribute sum, share, or percentage; - applied to the profits as appropriated among shareholders, and to assets as apportioned among creditors; as, the dividend of a bank, a railway corporation, or a bankrupt estate
Pillage - ) To strip of Money or goods by open violence; to plunder; to spoil; to lay waste; as, to pillage the camp of an enemy
Extortion - The act of extorting the act or practice of wresting any thing from a person by force,duress, menaces, authority,or by any undue exercise of power illegal exaction illegal compulsion to pay Money, or to do some other act
Procuration - ) A sum of Money paid formerly to the bishop or archdeacon, now to the ecclesiastical commissioners, by an incumbent, as a commutation for entertainment at the time of visitation; - called also proxy
Sale - ) The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in Money
Gehazi - 889-887); accepted Money and garments from Naaman; was smitten with leprosy, and was dismissed from the prophet's service, 2 Kings 5:1-27
Scarce - We say, water is scarce, wheat, rye, barley is scarce, Money is scarce, when the quantity is not fully adequate to the demand
Bag - ...
...
The word rendered in the Authorized Version "bags," in which the priests bound up the Money contributed for the restoration of the temple ( 2 Kings 12:10 ), is also rendered "bundle" (Genesis 42:35 ; 1 Samuel 25:29 ). It denotes bags used by travellers for carrying Money during a journey (Proverbs 7:20 ; Haggai 1:6 )
Shekel - When it became a coined piece of Money, the shekel of gold was equivalent to about 2 pound of our Money
Mammon - The Greek form of a Syriac or Aramaic word for “money,” “riches,” “property,” “worldly goods,” or “profit. The undivided concentration of mind to Money-getting is incompatible with wholehearted devotion to God and to His service (Colossians 3:5 )
Kite - ) To raise Money by "kites;" as, kiting transactions. ) Fictitious commercial paper used for raising Money or to sustain credit, as a check which represents no deposit in bank, or a bill of exchange not sanctioned by sale of goods; an accommodation check or bill
Chamberlain - ) A treasurer or receiver of public Money; as, the chamberlain of London, of North Wales, etc
Arnishment - ) Warning to a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached, not to pay the Money or deliver the goods to the defendant, but to appear in court and give information as garnishee
Champerty - ) The prosecution or defense of a suit, whether by furnishing Money or personal services, by one who has no legitimate concern therein, in consideration of an agreement that he shall receive, in the event of success, a share of the matter in suit; maintenance with the addition of an agreement to divide the thing in suit
Drams - Αdarconim , the Persian daric , from dara "a king," a gold coin circulated among the Jews during their subjection to Medo-Persia; the earliest coined Money used by the Jews, and the oldest gold coin of which specimens are extant; a crowned archer is impressed on it; heavier than an English guinea; or 25 shillings
Fairy - ) Given by fairies; as, fairy Money
Bundle - A bundle of Money is spoken of in Genesis 42:35 , of myrrh in Song of Solomon 1:13 , of life in 1 Samuel 25:29 (on wh
Advancement - ) An advance of Money or value; payment in advance
Embark - ) To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, Money, etc
Winning - ) The Money, etc
Wealth - ) In the private sense, all pooperty which has a Money value
Vast - ) Very great in numbers, quantity, or amount; as, a vast army; a vast sum of Money
Transmit - ) To cause to pass over or through; to communicate by sending; to send from one person or place to another; to pass on or down as by inheritance; as, to transmit a memorial; to transmit dispatches; to transmit Money, or bills of exchange, from one country to another
Manilla - ) A piece of copper of the shape of a horseshoe, used as Money by certain tribes of the west coast of Africa
Marc - ) A German coin and Money of account
Unruly - The owner of the unruly ox paid a sum of Money, as a penalty for the ransom of his life
Vale - Vales, Money given to servants
Tribute (2) - The tribute-money (δίδραχμον, Matthew 17:24 ff. It was collected in the month Adar, and was paid in Money of the early Hebrew standard. The ‘piece of Money’ (στατήρ) of Matthew 17:27 was equal to a shekel (about 2 Samuel 9 d
Bank - By analogy, a collection or stock of Money, deposited, by a number of persons, for a particular use that is, an aggregate of particulars, or a fund as, to establish a bank, that is a joint fund. The place where a collection of Money is deposited a common repository of the Money of individuals or of companies also a house used for a bank
Purchase - ) The acquisition of title to, or properly in, anything for a price; buying for Money or its equivalent. ) That which is obtained for a price in Money or its equivalent. ) To obtain by paying Money or its equivalent; to buy for a price; as, to purchase land, or a house
Buy - To acquire the property, right or title to any thing, by paying a consideration or an equivalent in Money. It differs from barter only in this, that in barter the consideration or equivalent is some species of commodity in purchase,the consideration is Money paid or promised. ...
To buy the refusal, is to give Money for the right of purchasing at a fixed price at a future time
Continental - ) Of or pertaining to the confederated colonies collectively, in the time of the Revolutionary War; as, Continental Money
Counterfoil - ) That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king Money on the account; - called also counterstock
Usury - The sum paid for the use of Money, hence interest; not, as in the modern sense, exorbitant interest
Napkin - The cloth in which the unprofitable servant wrapped the Money of his lord ( Luke 19:20 ); used to bind the face of the dead ( John 11:44 ; John 20:7 ); carried, possibly as indicated by the name (Lat
Factorize - ) To give warning to; - said of a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached, the warning being to the effect that he shall not pay the Money or deliver the property of the defendant in his hands to him, but appear and answer the suit of the plaintiff
Queer - ) Counterfeit Money
Pew - ) Any structure shaped like a church pew, as a stall, formerly used by Money lenders, etc
Seigniorage - ) Something claimed or taken by virtue of sovereign prerogative; specifically, a charge or toll deducted from bullion brought to a mint to be coined; the difference between the cost of a mass of bullion and the value as Money of the pieces coined from it
Acel'Dama - (the field of blood ) ( Akeldama in the Revised Version), the name given by the Jews of Jerusalem to a field near Jerusalem purchased by Judas with the Money which he received for the betrayal of Christ, and so called from his violent death therein
Bag - Large bags in which large amounts of Money could be carried (2 Kings 5:23 ; Isaiah 3:22 , KJV has “crisping pins”). A small bag (purse) used to carry a merchant's weights (Deuteronomy 25:13 ; Proverbs 16:11 ; Micah 6:11 ) or smaller sums of Money (Proverbs 1:14 ; Isaiah 46:6 ). This type of bag was used to hold Money (Genesis 42:35 ; Proverbs 7:20 ; Haggai 1:6 ; see 2 Kings 12:10 where the verb form, “to tie up in bags,” is used) or something loose such as myrrh (Song of Song of Solomon 1:13 ). The glossokomon was actually a Money box. See Money Box
Weights And Measures - Money was weighed. 141, was the first to coin Jewish Money, though there existed doubtless from of old pieces of silver of known value, which passed from hand to hand without being always weighed. Herod the Great coined Money with his name on it; and Herod Agrippa had some coins; but after that the coins in Palestine were Roman. ...
Money. ...
If the weights in the foregoing list be approximately correct, and silver be taken at ??? per ounce, and gold at £ ??? per ounce Troy, the Money value will be about...
£...
Gerah (1/20 of a shekel)………………. ...
NOTE the above is a / "chart"/ but it should be OK to insert whatever values you decide under ??? without upsetting the layout...
With respect to 'Piece of Money' (Genesis 33:19 ; Job 42:11 ) and 'Piece of silver' (Joshua 24:32 ) qesitah, Gesenius compares Genesis 33:19 with Genesis 23:16 and supposes the weight to equal 4 shekels. ...
Tribute Money, δίδραχμον…………………. ...
Piece of Money, στατήρ……………………. ...
Money, ἀργύριον ……………………………. ...
The Greek word ἀργύριον is the common word for 'silver,' and 'money,' as l'argent in French
Wages - The earliest mention of wages is of a recompense, not in Money, but in kind, to Jacob from Laban. (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 ) In Egypt Money payments by way of wages were in use, but the terms cannot now be ascertained
Silver - Silver was also the common specie of commerce, 'pieces of silver' being weighed long before Money was coined. , in the tabernacle, the Money paid for the redemption of the Israelites being applied to this purpose
Loan - In this sense, loan is generally applied to Money. LOAN, ...
To lend to deliver to another for temporary use, on condition that the thing shall be returned, as a book or to deliver for use, on condition that an equivalent in kind shall be returned, as bread or to deliver for temporary use, on condition that an equivalent in kind shall be returned, with a compensation for the use, as in the case of Money at interest
Corban - Jesus referred to some persons who mistakenly and deliberately avoided giving needed care to their parents by declaring as “corban” any Money or goods that could otherwise be used to provide such care
Extortion - ) The offense committed by an officer who corruptly claims and takes, as his fee, Money, or other thing of value, that is not due, or more than is due, or before it is due
Temptation - But we can be tempted by our lusts (James 1:13-15), Money (1 Timothy 6:9), lack of self examination (Galatians 6:1), and the boastful pride of life (1 John 2:16), to name a few
Drawer - He who draws a bill of exchange or an order for the payment of Money
Tontine - Thus, an annuity is shared among a number, on the principle that the share of each, at his death, is enjoyed by the survivors, until at last the whole goes to the last survivor, or to the last two or three, according to the terms on which the Money is advanced
Bestow - ) To expend, as Money
Mite, - (Mark 12:41-44 ; Luke 21:1-4 ) It seems in Palestine to have been the smallest piece of Money (worth about one-fifth of a cent), being the half of the farthing, which was a coin of very low value
Change - To give one kind of Money for another to alter the form or kind of Money, by receiving the value in a different kind, as to change bank notes for silver or to give pieces of a larger denomination for an equivalent in pieces of smaller denomination, as to change an eagle for dollars, or a sovereign for sixpences, or to change a dollar into cents or on the other hand, to change dollars for or into eagles, giving Money of smaller denomination for larger. Small coins of Money, which may be given for larger pieces. The balance of Money paid beyond the price of goods purchased
Covet, Covetous, Covetousness - A — 1: ἐπιθυμέω (Strong's #1937 — Verb — epithumeo — ep-ee-thoo-meh'-o ) "to fix the desire upon" (epi, "upon," used intensively, thumos, "passion"), whether things good or bad; hence, "to long for, lust after, covet," is used with the meaning "to covet evilly" in Acts 20:33 , of "coveting Money and apparel;" so in Romans 7:7 ; 13:9 . , "money-loving," is rendered "covetous" in the AV of Luke 16:14 ; 2 Timothy 3:2 ; RV, "lovers of Money," the wider and due significance. 2, with negative prefix, is translated "without covetousness" in Hebrews 13:5 , AV; RV, "free from the love of Money. " In 1 Timothy 3:3 , the AV has "not covetous," the RV, "no lover of Money
Price of Blood - —An expression used by the priests of the Temple in reference to the Money Judas Iscariot had received for the betrayal of his Master. The thirty pieces of silver were the price of a traitor’s service, and so ultimately the price of a man’s head; and though the priests were willing to take advantage of the dastardly deed by putting the betrayed Man to death, they still regarded with feelings of disgust and abhorrence the Money paid for His betrayal. If the Money was soiled, who was responsible, if not those who had taken it (perhaps directly from the Temple-treasury) and sent it on its dastardly mission? Why should they, who had paid the price of blood, scruple about taking it back? ‘If it was sinful to put back the price of blood in the sacred treasury, how was it any more permissible to take it out?’ (Calvin, NT Com. The priests might believe the Money was well spent on their part, though ill gotten on his. It was hallowed by the sacrifice associated with it, just as the blood-money in Judas’ hands was tainted and defiled by a betrayal equivalent to murder
Set - ‘Set at’ is valued at , as 2 Kings 12:4 ‘The Money that every man is set at
Aceldama - , in Aramaic, to the field which was purchased with the Money which had been given to the betrayer of our Lord
Circulate - ) To pass from place to place, from person to person, or from hand to hand; to be diffused; as, Money circulates; a story circulates
Kesitah - word rendered ‘ piece of Money ’ in the three passages Genesis 33:19 , Joshua 24:32 , and Job 42:11
Endow - ) To furnish with Money or its equivalent, as a permanent fund for support; to make pecuniary provision for; to settle an income upon; especially, to furnish with dower; as, to endow a wife; to endow a public institution
Shiner - ) A bright piece of Money
Replace - ) To refund; to repay; to restore; as, to replace a sum of Money borrowed
Angle - Fishing was very common in Egypt, not only with the net, but with the line and hook, Isaiah 19:8 ; and the same were used by the Israelites, for nets are often referred to, and the fish that had the piece of Money in its mouth was caught with a hook
Receiver - An officer appointed to receive public Money a treasurer
Geha'zi - 889-887); obtained fraudulently Money and garments from Naaman, was miraculously smitten with incurable leprosy, and was dismissed from the prophet's service
Capital - Capital stock, is the sum of Money or stock which a merchant, banker or manufacturer employs in his business either the original stock, or that stock augmented. Also, the sum of Money or stock which each partner contributes to the joint fund or stock of the partnership also, the common fund or stock of the company, whether incorporated or not. A stock in trade, in manufactures, or in any business requiring the expenditure of Money with a view to profit
Alabaster - , denarii, each of the value of sevenpence halfpenny of our Money, and therefore worth about 10 pounds. But if we take the denarius as the day's wage of a labourer (Matthew 20:2 ), say two shillings of our Money, then the whole would be worth about 30 pounds, so costly was Mary's offering
Coin - Before the Exile the Jews had no regularly stamped Money. The "piece of Money" mentioned in Job 42:11 ; Genesis 33:19 (marg
Pocket - ) A bag or pouch; especially; a small bag inserted in a garment for carrying small articles, particularly Money; hence, figuratively, Money; wealth
Publicans - These then farmed out smaller portions to others, or engaged them to collect the Money. Zacchaeus would appear to have been a just and liberal man; he speaks of restoring Money taken 'by false accusation': being 'the chief among the publicans,' he remedied such things as were under his control
Tithes - If, however, the Jew could not with convenience carry his tithe thither, he was permitted to sell it and to take the Money, adding one-fifth of the amount-that is, if he sold the tithe for a dollar, he should bring, in Money, a dollar and twenty cents—and to purchase therewith what was required at the feast after he came to the sanctuary
Remit - To transmit Money, bills or other thing in payment for goods received. American merchants remit Money, bills of exchange or some species of stock, in payment for British goods
Shekel - In such cases the word shekel is often omitted in the Hebrew, as in Genesis 20:16 37:28 , where our translators have supplied the word "pieces," but improperly, because coined Money was not then known. See Money
Daric - ), and possibly the earliest coined Money used by the Jews who became acquainted with it during the Exile
Careless - Not regarding with care unmoved by unconcerned for as, careless of Money careless of consequences
Handkerchief - The same Greek term is used for a cloth in which Money was buried (Luke 19:20 ) and for the cloth used to cover the face of the dead (John 11:44 ; John 20:7 )
Exact - 1: πράσσω (Strong's #4238 — Verb — prasso — pras'-so ) "to do, to practice," also has the meaning of "transacting," or "managing in the matter of payment, to exact, to get Money from a person," Luke 3:13 (RV, "extort")
Regium Donum Money - Money allowed by government to the Dissenters
Silversmith - Silver was used for Money and religious images (Judges 17:4 )
Trifle - ) To spend in vanity; to fritter away; to waste; as, to trifle away Money
Aceldama - But it having been afterward bought with the Money by which the high priest and ruler of the Jews purchased the blood of Jesus, it was called Aceldama, or the Field of Blood
Silver - See SHEKEL , and Money
Rheims, France, Archdiocese of - From the 10th century, the archbishops enjoyed the title of count and the privilege of coining Money, and levying arms
Reims, France, Archdiocese of - From the 10th century, the archbishops enjoyed the title of count and the privilege of coining Money, and levying arms
Handkerchief - Sudarium means:...
(1) a wrapper to fold up Money in, Luke 19:20;...
(2) a cloth about a corpse's head (John 11:44, Lazarus; John 20:7, our Lord), brought from the crown under the chin;...
(3) a handkerchief worn on the head, as the Bedouin's keffieh (Acts 19:12)
Contribute - ) To give or grant i common with others; to give to a common stock or for a common purpose; to furnish or suply in part; to give (money or other aid) for a specified object; as, to contribute food or fuel for the poor
Barter - ) To traffic or trade, by exchanging one commodity for another, in distinction from a sale and purchase, in which Money is paid for the commodities transferred; to truck
Broker - ) A dealer in Money, notes, bills of exchange, etc
Sew - ) To inclose by sewing; - sometimes with up; as, to sew Money in a bag
Zaccheus - As a result of his newfound faith, he restored with interest the Money he had taken illegally
Bill - ‘writing’), an acknowledgment of goods or Money received written and signed by the debtor himself ( Baba bathra X
Officer - It is used for the officer appointed to exact the Money adjudicated by the judge
Recoupe - ) To get an equivalent or compensation for; as, to recoup Money lost at the gaming table; to recoup one's losses in the share market
Garnish - Pensiuncula carceraria a fee an acknowledgment in Money when first a prisoner goes to jail
Remission - ) Act of sending in payment, as Money; remittance
Vail - ) Money given to servants by visitors; a gratuity; - usually in the plural
Treasury - ) A place or building in which stores of wealth are deposited; especially, a place where public revenues are deposited and kept, and where Money is disbursed to defray the expenses of government; hence, also, the place of deposit and disbursement of any collected funds
Tribute - An annual or stated sum of Money or other valuable thing, paid by one prince or nation to another, either as an acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace and protection, or by virtue of some treaty
Expectation - A sum of Money in expectation, when an event happens, has a determinate value before that event happens. If the chances of receiving or not receiving a hundred dollars, when an event arrives, are equal then, before the arrival of the event, the expectation is worth half the Money
Loan - (Nehemiah 5:1,13 ) The Money-changers, who had seats and tables in the temple, where traders whose profits arose chiefly from the exchange of Money with those who came to pay their annual half-shekel
Alms - That charity does not consist in giving Money, but in benevolence, love to all mankind, &c. That giving Money encourages idleness; ...
12. That we have too many objects of charity at home, O the love of Money how fruitful is it in apologies for a contracted mercenary spirit! ...
In giving of alms, however, the following rules should be observed: ...
1
Tables of Measures Weights And Money in the Bible - Madden (Jewish Coinage and Money), Whitehouse and Bissell. SILVER Money...
(According to Bissell's Bib. GOLD Money (Troy oz. ROMAN COPPER Money...
(New Testament period, coins were:)...
1 lepton = 1 mite,...
about 1/8 ct. SILVER GREEK AND ROMAN Money...
(According to Madden and Whitehouse
Collection - ) A gathering of Money for charitable or other purposes, as by passing a contribution box for freewill offerings
John of Sabina - He was Bishop of Sabina, and the Roman faction which had expelled Pope Benedict IX, elected him in opposition to the lawful pope after John had given them a large sum of Money
Bewray - bewrayer in Malachi 4:1 Malachi 4:1 ‘a bewrayer of the Money, and of his country
Money-Making: no Time For - 'I have not time to make Money
Shin - ) To run about borrowing Money hastily and temporarily, as for the payment of one's notes at the bank
Penny - ) Money, in general; as, to turn an honest penny
Commutation - a substitution of one form of payment for another, or one payment for many, or a specific sum of Money for conditional payments or allowances; as, commutation of tithes; commutation of fares; commutation of copyright; commutation of rations
Brag - ) To talk about one's self, or things pertaining to one's self, in a manner intended to excite admiration, envy, or wonder; to talk boastfully; to boast; - often followed by of; as, to brag of one's exploits, courage, or Money, or of the great things one intends to do
Fleece - ) To strip of Money or other property unjustly, especially by trickery or fraud; to bring to straits by oppressions and exactions
Embarrass - ) To involve in difficulties concerning Money matters; to incumber with debt; to beset with urgent claims or demands; - said of a person or his affairs; as, a man or his business is embarrassed when he can not meet his pecuniary engagements
Idol, Idolatry - It can be anything that takes the place of God: a car, a job, Money, a person, a desire, etc
Traffic - ) To pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or Money; to buy or sell goods; to barter; to trade
Lend - ) To allow the possession and use of, on condition of the return of an equivalent in kind; as, to lend Money or some article of food
Gemariah - The son of Hilkiah, sent to Babylon by King Hezekiah with tribute Money for Nebuchadnezzar
Sylvester Iii, Antipope - He was Bishop of Sabina, and the Roman faction which had expelled Pope Benedict IX, elected him in opposition to the lawful pope after John had given them a large sum of Money
Sabina, John of - He was Bishop of Sabina, and the Roman faction which had expelled Pope Benedict IX, elected him in opposition to the lawful pope after John had given them a large sum of Money
Lavish - To waste to expend without necessity or use to squander as, to lavish Money on vices and amusements
Money-Changers - In our Lord's time they had established themselves in the court of the temple; a profanation which had probably grown up with the influence of Roman manners, which allowed the argentarii [1] to establish their usurious mensas, tables, by the statues of the gods, even at the feet of Janus, in the most holy places, in porticibus Basilicarum, or in the temples, pone aedem Castoris. It was, indeed, a living picture of what we might believe the temple at Jerusalem to have been, when those who sold oxen, and sheep, and doves, and the changers of Money sitting there, were driven out by Jesus, with a scourge of cords, and their tables overturned
Money - No coined Money is mentioned in the Bible before Ezra'a time , when other evidence also exists of its having been current in Palestine. Money was originally weighed; in the form of rings, as represented on Egyptian monuments. The "thousand pieces of silver" which Abimelech gave Abraham (Genesis 20:16) were of this kind; so the 400 shekels "weighed" by Abraham to Ephron (Genesis 23:3; Genesis 23:9; Genesis 23:16), "current (money) with the merchant"; implying that the silver was in some conventional shapes, with a rude sign to mark its weight. ...
Joseph's brethren received their Money "in full weight" (Genesis 43:21). Silver Money alone was used, the standard shekel weight being kept in the sanctuary under charge of the priests, from whence arose the phrase "the shekel of the sanctuary" (Exodus 30:18). The wedge or tongue of gold that Achan took was not Money probably, as the 200 shekels of silver were, but an article of value used for costly ornamentation. In Isaiah 46:6, however, gold seems to mean uncoined Money, "they lavish gold out of the purse ('bag'), and weigh silver in the balance. ...
Antiochus VII granted Simon the Maccabee permission to coin Money with his own stamp, the first recorded coining of Jewish Money (1 Maccabees 15:6; 140 B. The Palestinian currency was mainly of copper, from whence Mark (Mark 6:8) uses "copper" or brass for "money" (margin, compare Matthew 10:9)
Wages - Hence the compound ὀψώνιον (ὠνέομαι, “to buy”) = (1) provision Money, ration Money, or the rations in kind given to troops. The denarius was equivalent in Money value to 9½d. ‘Money,’ § 8, and Piece - ...
5: ἀργύριον (Strong's #694 — Noun Neuter — argurion — ar-goo'-ree-on ) which frequently denotes "money," also represents "a silver coin," of the value of a shekel or tetradrachmon (four times the drachme, see No. See Money , SILVER. 5, above), is translated "a piece of Money
Fine - ) A sum of Money paid as the settlement of a claim, or by way of terminating a matter in dispute; especially, a payment of Money imposed upon a party as a punishment for an offense; a mulct. ) A sum of Money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease
Chose - Thus, Money due on a bond or note is a chose in action a recompense for damage done is a chose in action the former proceeding from an express, the latter from an implied contract
Damian, Saint - Martyrs, born Arabia; died Ægea (now Ayass), Cilicia, c303They were twin brothers, physicians, and practised at Ægea; they accepted no Money from the poor, and, being Christians, their good example brought many to the Faith
Money-Changer - There was a class of men, who frequented the temple courts, who exchanged at a certain premium foreign Moneys for these half-shekels to the Jews who came up to Jerusalem from all parts of the world. ) When our Lord drove the traffickers out of the temple, these Money-changers fared worst
Earnest - 1: ἀρραβών (Strong's #728 — Noun Masculine — arrabon — ar-hrab-ohn' ) originally, "earnest-money" deposited by the purchaser and forfeited if the purchase was not completed, was probably a Phoenician word, introduced into Greece
Pound - ...
2: μνᾶ (Strong's #3414 — Noun Feminine — mna — mnah ) a Semitic word, both "a weight" and "a sum of Money," 100 shekels (cp
Bible: Judged by Its Fruits - Since he began to read the Bible, he works with industry, goes no longer to the tavern, no longer touches cards, brings home Money to his poor old mother, and our life at home is quiet and delightful
Bridgetins - The Brigittins profess great mortification, poverty, and self-denial; and they are not to possess any thing they can call their own, not so much as an halfpenny; nor even to touch Money on any account
Tribute - The tribute (money) mentioned in (Matthew 17:24,25 ) was the half shekel (worth from 25 to 27 cents) applied to defray the general expenses of the temple
Bearer - ) One who holds a check, note, draft, or other order for the payment of Money; as, pay to bearer
Soldier - John the Baptist indicated that the average Roman soldier extorted Money from civilians by threatening them (Luke 3:14 )
Divert - To turn off from any course, direction or intended application to turn aside as, to divert a river from its usual channel to divert commerce from its usual course to divert appropriated Money to other objects to divert a man from his purpose
Accommodation - ) A loan of Money
Idol - It may be Money, fame, pleasure, companionship, or even a religious activity
Scrip - In New Testament, the leather "wallet" (fra ) slung on the shoulder for carrying food for a journey; distinct from the "purse" (zone , literally, "girdle"; balantion , "small bag for Money"): Matthew 10:9-10; Luke 10:4; Luke 12:33
Economical - ) Managed with frugality; not marked with waste or extravagance; frugal; - said of acts; saving; as, an economical use of Money or of time
Old - ) Money; riches; wealth
Reward - ) Compensation or remuneration for services; a sum of Money paid or taken for doing, or forbearing to do, some act
Old - ) Money; riches; wealth
Daric - At these times there was no large issue of gold Money except by the Persian kings
Hoshea - When, with Egypt’s help, he rebelled against Assyria by refusing to pay any further Money, Assyria attacked Samaria (Israel’s capital) and imprisoned Hoshea
Mammon - But Jesus had rich people among His adherents, and besides it is not the rich alone who are tempted to make a god of their Money. ’...
The Lukan setting is as apt in its own way, placing the same logion amid a cluster of characteristic (see Theophilus) sayings and parables on the dangers and abuse of Money (cf. Weiss, Wernle, and Jülicher, all five verses are regarded as editorial glosses, the solution becomes fairly simple, the original parable having nothing to do with the use of Money at all, as Christ meant it. Money given in alms makes friends for him in heaven, just as it lays up a treasure for him there (Luke 11:41, Matthew 12:23 etc. Luke 16:11, especially, indicates the right use of Money (as in the parable of the Talents): Use it faithfully, i. Honesty in Money matters (Luke 16:10) is vital to the Christian. Thus the use of mammon brings out two elements in the teaching of Jesus upon Money—(a) the need of administering it wisely, and (b) the essentially inferior and even irrelevant position of Money in the religious life. The latter is brought out by the epithet unrighteous (almost equal to ‘secular’ here); Money is less by far than a Christian’s other interests (Luke 16:10), alien (Luke 16:12), and unreal (Luke 16:11), even when it is not allowed to be a positive rival to God (Luke 16:13). Christians are trusted with Money, as the steward was. Faithfulness in dealing with Money means giving it away. ...
On this interpretation ‘the mammon of unrighteousness’ does not mean Money or worldly advantages wrongfully gained, as though the point of the parable were that wealth, dishonestly come by, should be disbursed in charity (so Strauss, and O. ‘The mammon of unrighteousness’ means Money as essentially secular and unchristian (cf
Contentment - John 14:8-94 summarizes the teaching in advising believers to be free of the love of Money and to depend on God's promise not to forsake His people
Daric - It weighed about 128 grains troy, and was of the value of about one guinea or rather more of our Money
Gemariah - ...
...
The son of Hilkiah, who accompanied Shaphan with the tribute-money from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and was the bearer at the same time of a letter from Jeremiah to the Jewish captives at Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3,4 )
Currency - , government or bank notes circulating as a substitute for metallic Money
Blunt - ) Money
Surety - A person who is legally responsible for the debt of another or the Money or thing of value put down to guarantee the debt
Plunk - ) A large sum of Money
Dollar - ) The value of a dollar; the unit commonly employed in the United States in reckoning Money values
Alms - ...
Any thing given gratuitously to relieve the poor, as Money, food, or clothing, otherwise called charity
Apron - No amount of self-righteous religion, church attendance, giving of Money, or religious acts is sufficient to hide the sins of the heart from the face of GOD
Fleece - To strip of Money or property to take from, by severe exactions, under color of law or justice, or pretext of necessity, or by virtue of authority
Real - ) A small Spanish silver coin; also, a denomination of Money of account, formerly the unit of the Spanish monetary system
Tin - ) Money
Wager - ) A contract by which two parties or more agree that a certain sum of Money, or other thing, shall be paid or delivered to one of them, on the happening or not happening of an uncertain event
Large - ...
2: ἱκανός (Strong's #2425 — Adjective — hikanos — hik-an-os' ) of persons, denotes "sufficient, competent, fit;" of things, "sufficient, enough, much, many (so of time);" it is translated "large" in Matthew 28:12 , of Money
Reckon - The priest shall reckon to him the Money, according to the years that remain, even to the year of jubilee, and it shall be abated
Usury - The Jews might require interest of foreigners, Deuteronomy 23:19-20 , but were forbidden to receive it from each other, Exodus 22:25 Psalm 15:5 ; being instructed to lend Money, etc
Pay - ) To discharge, as a debt, demand, or obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required; to deliver the amount or value of to the person to whom it is owing; to discharge a debt by delivering (money owed). ) An equivalent or return for Money due, goods purchased, or services performed; salary or wages for work or service; compensation; recompense; payment; hire; as, the pay of a clerk; the pay of a soldier
Coins - ...
Before Money was invented, a man might trade or swap with a neighbor something he owned for something he wanted. The first mention of Money in the Bible appears in Ezra 2:69 , describing funds collected for rebuilding the Temple. ...
Another reference to silver Money occurs in Matthew 26:15 in the agreement between the high priest and Judas for betraying Jesus. It is possible also that the “large Money” (KJV) paid to the soldiers guarding Jesus' tomb (Matthew 28:12 ) referred to large silver coins or shekels. ...
Some readers might wonder why Jesus found “changers of Money sitting” in the Temple (John 2:14 ). ...
From two parables told by Jesus we get the impression that the word “talent” had come in New Testament times to represent a large sum of Money instead of just a measure of weight. At the reckoning time he rebuked the one who had merely hidden his talent by saying that at least he could have deposited the Money to let it earn interest (Matthew 25:27 )
Whore - It offers its followers pleasure and protection from GOD's wrath while taking from them their Money, their persons, their possessions, and their souls
John Gratian - He was archpriest of Saint John's when Benedict IX offered to surrender the papacy for a large sum of Money
Convoy - ) A vessel or fleet, or a train or trains of wagons, employed in the transportation of munitions of war, Money, subsistence, clothing, etc
Maintenance - In law, an officious intermeddling in a suit in which the person has no interest, by assisting either party with Money or means to prosecute or defend it
Ministration - The ‘ministration’ or ‘serving tables’ is the distribution of food at the common meals: tables of exchange for Money cannot be meant
Ransom - ) The Money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner, or for goods captured by an enemy; payment for freedom from restraint, penalty, or forfeit
Pension - ) A certain sum of Money paid to a clergyman in lieu of tithes
Plank - ) To lay down, as on a plank or table; to stake or pay cash; as, to plank Money in a wager
Bare - ...
It is often followed by of as, the country is bare of Money
Gratian, John - He was archpriest of Saint John's when Benedict IX offered to surrender the papacy for a large sum of Money
Gregory vi, Pope - He was archpriest of Saint John's when Benedict IX offered to surrender the papacy for a large sum of Money
Appropriate - ) To set apart for, or assign to, a particular person or use, in exclusion of all others; - with to or for; as, a spot of ground is appropriated for a garden; to appropriate Money for the increase of the navy
Win - ) To gain by superiority in competition or contest; to obtain by victory over competitors or rivals; as, to win the prize in a gate; to win Money; to win a battle, or to win a country
Loss - privation, as the loss of property loss of Money by gaming loss of health or reputation
Sale - The act of selling the exchange of a commodity for Money of equivalent value
Traffick - To trade to pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or Money to barter to buy and sell wares to carry on commerce
Due - Money is due at the expiration of the credit given, or at the period promised. The Money that I contract to pay to another is his due the service which I covenant to perform to another is his due reverence to the creator is his due
Counter - ) Money; coin; - used in contempt. ) A table or board on which Money is counted and over which business is transacted; a long, narrow table or bench, on which goods are laid for examination by purchasers, or on which they are weighed or measured
Reward - Rewards may consist of Money, goods or any return of kindness or happiness. A sum of Money offered for taking or detecting a criminal, or for recovery of any thing lost
Money - Money...
1. The predominance of silver as the metal currency for everyday transactions is further shown by the constant use in Hebrew literature of the word for ‘silver’ ( keseph ) in the sense of ‘money. ’...
As there can be no question of the existence of coined Money in Palestine until the Persian period, the first step in the study of the Money of OT is to master the system of weights adopted for the weighing of the precious metals. Money might indeed be ‘told’ or counted, but the accuracy of the ‘tale’ had to be tested by means of the balance; or rather, as we see from such passages as 2 Kings 12:10-11 (RV [1] ), Money was told by being weighed . Of course the purchasing power of both in Bible times, which is the real test of the value of Money, was many times greater than their equivalents in sterling Money at the present day. Money in the pre-exilic period . Throughout the whole of this period, as has already been emphasized, in every transaction involving the payment of sums of considerable value, the Money was reckoned by weight. Accordingly, when Abraham bought the field and cave of Machpelah he ‘weighed to Ephron the silver … four hundred shekels of silver, current Money with the merchant’ ( Genesis 23:15 ). Money in the Persian period: introduction of coins . In this period the Money of the small Jewish community was still, as before the Exile, chiefly ingots and bars of the precious metals, without official mark of any kind. Coined Money is usually regarded as the invention of the Lydians early in the 7th cent. But there are valid reasons (see ‘Money’ in Hastings’ DB [1]3 ‘tribute Money,’ RV
There remain the two larger denominations, the talent and the pound or mina, neither of which was any longer, as in the earlier period, a specific weight of bullion, but a definite sum of Money
Betting - The backing of an affirmation or forecast by offering to forfeit, in case of an adverse issue, a sum of Money or some article to one who, by accepting, maintains the opposite with a corresponding stipulation
Talent - The reference is to weight, and not to Money
Bags - " Κis , bags for carrying weights (Deuteronomy 25:13) or Money (Proverbs 1:14)
Wages - of our Money; compare Tobit 5:14, "a drachm
Box - For Judas’ Money-box ( John 12:6 ; John 13:29 AV Pouch - ) A small bag; usually, a leathern bag; as, a pouch for Money; a shot pouch; a mail pouch, etc
Partnership - ) A contract between two or more competent persons for joining together their Money, goods, labor, and skill, or any or all of them, under an understanding that there shall be a communion of profit between them, and for the purpose of carrying on a legal trade, business, or adventure
Coffer - ) A casket, chest, or trunk; especially, one used for keeping Money or other valuables
Espy - As one of them opened his sack, he espied his Money
Farthing - It is becoming obsolete, with the old denominations of Money
Hardness - Scarcity penury difficulty of obtaining Money as the hardness of the times
Joakim - A priest, son of Hilkiah, to whom the captives are said to have sent Money for the purchase of offerings and Incense ( Bar 1:7 )
Sell - ) To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for Money
Mace - ) A Money of account in China equal to one tenth of a tael; also, a weight of 57
Felix - Paul was remanded to prison, and kept there two years in hopes of extorting Money from him
Threaten - To menace to terrify or attempt to terrify by menaces as for extorting Money
Treasurer - One who has the care of a treasure or treasury an officer who receives the public Money arising from taxes and duties or other sources of revenue, takes charge of the same, and disburses it upon orders drawn by the proper authority
Jehoiada - " Joash ordered "the Money of the dedicated things" to be applied to the repair of the temple, namely,...
(1) "the Money of every one that passeth" the census (not "the account), half a shekel, Exodus 30:13;...
(2) "the Money that every man is set (valued) at," namely, the valuation in redeeming the firstborn (Numbers 18:15-16), or in payment for a vow;...
(3) "all the Money that cometh into any man's heart to bring into the house of Jehovah," freewill offerings. ...
When, in the 23rd year of Jonah's reign, the temple was still not repaired, through the Levites' and priests' dilatoriness, he took the Money and the repairs out of their hands; "the priests consented to receive no more Money of the people (i. , were made with the Money, until the repairs were first completed (2 Kings 12:13, compare the complementary, not contradictory, statement 2 Chronicles 24:14). The trespass Money and freewill gifts to the priest, for his trouble in offering the sin offerings, the priests retained; this Money did not go to the repairs
Trade - The act or business of exchanging commodities by barter or the business of buying and selling for Money commerce traffic barter. Trade comprehends every species of exchange or dealing, either in the produce of land, in manufactures, in bills or Money. To act merely for Money
Confederate - ) Of or pertaining to the government of the eleven Southern States of the United States which (1860-1865) attempted to establish an independent nation styled the Confederate States of America; as, the Confederate congress; Confederate Money
Dust - ) Coined Money; cash
Foundations, Pious - The Money is to be invested and it pertains to the bishop to see that the obligations are fulfilled
Magus, Simon - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them Money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter
Morning - There is plenty of Money available
Price - A — 1: τιμή (Strong's #5092 — Noun Feminine — time — tee-may' ) denotes "a valuing," hence, objectively, (a) "price paid or received," Matthew 27:6,9 ; Acts 4:34 (plural); 5:2,3; 7:16, RV, "price (in silver)," AV, "sum (of Money);" Acts 19:19 (plural); 1 Corinthians 6:20 ; 7:23 ; (b) "value, honor, preciousness
Estimate - ) To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data, - either the extrinsic (money), or intrinsic (moral), value; to fix the worth of roughly or in a general way; as, to estimate the value of goods or land; to estimate the worth or talents of a person
Furnish - To supply with any thing wanted or necessary as, to furnish a family with provisions to furnish arms for defense to furnish a table to furnish a library to furnish one with Money or implements
Storehouse - There is no Scripture at all, nor suggestion, that all the Money which is given by GOD's people should be put into one basket to be spent by others
Safe - , or a closet or vault of brickwork) for containing Money, valuable papers, or the like
Lend, Lender - ...
B — 1: δανειστής (Strong's #1157 — Noun Masculine — danistes | daneistes — dan-ice-tace' ) denotes a Money-lender (akin to A, No
Aceldama - A field said to have been intended for the burial of strangers, which the chief priests bought with the Money returned by Judas, as the price of the Saviour's blood
Lost - Ruined destroyed wasted or squandered employed to no good purpose as lost Money lost time
Simonans - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them Money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter
Simon Magus - When the Apostles Peter and John came to give the Holy Ghost to the believers, Simon offered them Money for the power of bestowing the Holy Spirit and was severely rebuked by Saint Peter
Penny - In reading the Scripture passage in which this word, occurs, we should consider that the real value of Money, to purchase labor or commodities, was far greater then that now; and also that even the nominal value of the drachma would be better expressed by "shilling," or "franc," than by "penny
Riches - Wealth opulence affluence possessions of land, good or Money in abundance
Gold - (Genesis 24:22 ) Coined Money was not known to the ancients till a comparatively late period; and on the Egyptian tombs gold is represented as being weighed in rings for commercial purposes
Table - Money tables The Money changers' tables were likely small trays on stands (Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 )
Best - To make the best of, to carry to its greatest perfection to improve to the utmost as, to make the best of a sum of Money, or a piece of land. With most profit or success as, Money is best employed in manufactures this medicine will answer best in the present case
Wealth: Involves Danger - Is it one of the advantages of wealth to have one's abode polished till all comfort vanishes, and the very floor is as smooth and dangerous as a sheet of ice, or is this merely an accidental circumstance typical of the dangers of abundance? Observation shows us that there is a fascination in wealth which renders it extremely difficult for the possessors of it to maintain their equilibrium; and this is more especially the case where Money is suddenly acquired; then, unless grace prevent, pride, affectation, and other mean vices stupify the brain with their sickening fumes, and he who was respectable in poverty. Flatterers haunt not cottages: the poor may hear an honest word from his neighbor, but etiquette forbids that the rich man should enjoy the like privilege; for is it not a maxim in Babylon, that rich men have no faults, or only such as their Money, like charity, covereth with a mantle? What man can help slipping when every body is intent upon greasing his ways, so that the smallest chance of standing may be denied him? The world's proverb is, 'God help the poor, for the rich can help themselves;' but to our mind, it is just the rich who have most need of heaven's help
Loans - —There are frequent references to Money, and many illustrations suggested by financial obligations, in the teaching of Jesus. verb (ὀφείλω) is variously rendered in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘owed,’ ‘owest,’ ‘that was due’ (Matthew 18:28; Matthew 18:30; Matthew 18:34, Luke 7:41; Luke 16:5; Luke 16:7 of financial obligation); ‘debtor’ (Matthew 23:16; Matthew 23:18 [1]), ‘duty’ (Luke 17:10), ‘ought’ (John 13:14; John 19:7), ‘indebted’ (Luke 11:4; all of moral obligation); and the noun (ὀφειλέτης) is translated ‘owed’ (Matthew 18:24 of Money debt), ‘debtors’ (Matthew 6:12 of moral debts), ‘offenders’ (Luke 13:4 [2] of guilt before God). ...
The very naturalness of these illustrative uses of Money values and financial relations makes it obviously wrong to press them into the support of economic theories, e. the justification of commercial loans from ‘Thou oughtest therefore to have put my Money to the bankers, and then at my coming I should have received back mine own with interest’ (Matthew 25:27 = Luke 19:23)
Choice - ) Preserving or using with care, as valuable; frugal; - used with of; as, to be choice of time, or of Money
Fountains Abbey - Hugh, Dean of York, and two wealthy canons, entered the monastery and brought Money and property to the needy community
Hypocrites: Seeking Their Own Advantage - I have read of one that offered his prince a great sum of Money to have leave once or twice a-day to come into his presence, and only say, 'God save your Majesty!' The prince wondering at this large offer for so small a favor, asked him, 'What advantage would this afford him?' 'O sire,' saith he, 'this, though I have nothing else at your hands, will get me a name in the country for one who is a great favorite at court, and such an opinion will help me to more at the year's end, than it costs me for the purchase
Doorkeeper - The doorkeepers collected Money from the people (2 Kings 22:4 )
Purpose: Unity of - Of course he made Money, for he gave himself wholly to it; and we ought not to forget that the same single-mindedness and self-denial would make Christians rich towards God
Bankrupt - ) Depleted of Money; not having the means of meeting pecuniary liabilities; as, a bankrupt treasury
Rant - ) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, au appropriation or conveyance made by the government; as, a grant of land or of Money; also, the deed or writing by which the transfer is made
Abbey, Fountains - Hugh, Dean of York, and two wealthy canons, entered the monastery and brought Money and property to the needy community
Gold - Money
Shaphan - Sent by king Josiah, With the governor of the city and the recorder, to Hilkiah to take account of the Money collected for repairing the temple
Rant - ) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, au appropriation or conveyance made by the government; as, a grant of land or of Money; also, the deed or writing by which the transfer is made
Talent - See Money
Lot - ) A large quantity or number; a great deal; as, to spend a lot of Money; lots of people think so
Levy - The act of collecting Money for public use by tax or other imposition
fe'Lix - He was remanded to prison, and kept there two years in hopes of extorting Money from him
Usury, Interest, Increase - ]'>[3] rendered ‘usury’ ( neshek ) and ‘increase’ ( tarbîth ), the former, to judge from Leviticus 25:37 , denotes interest on loans of Money, the latter interest on other advances, such as food stuffs, seed-corn, and the like, which was paid in kind. Our Lord twice introduces with approbation the investment of Money with ‘the bankers ,’ so as to yield a proper ‘interest’ ( Matthew 25:27 , Luke 19:23 both RV Bank - ) The sum of Money or the checks which the dealer or banker has as a fund, from which to draw his stakes and pay his losses. ) To deposit Money in a bank; to have an account with a banker. ) An establishment for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue, of Money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds by drafts or bills of exchange; an institution incorporated for performing one or more of such functions, or the stockholders (or their representatives, the directors), acting in their corporate capacity
Ift - ...
Proverbs 18:16 (a) This gift may refer to Money. The giving of Money obtains a hearing among great people of the earth and the wealthy are given places of honor which are not granted to the poor. Money is also called a gift. ...
THE GIFT OF MONEY2Co1:11; 2 Corinthians 8:4; Philippians 4:17
Dowry - A definite sum of Money, or its equivalent, the income of which is to be used to support a religious woman who, by her profession, has become a member of her community
Felix of Valois, Saint - They raised vast sums of Money by parading in public as the people threw down to them their gold and precious stones
Laborers in the Vineyard, Parable of the - One of the parables of Christ (Matthew 20), in which the householder hiring men at different hours of the day even up to the eleventh, or last, gives each of them the same wage, "a penny" meaning a piece of Money, as if the one hour laborer was entitled to as much as the full day laborer
Rizpah - When David inquired what expiation he should make, the Gibeonites refused Money compensation, but demanded descendants of Saul to expose before Jehovah
Tribute - The "tribute Money" shown to our Lord (Matthew 22:19 ) was the denarius, bearing Caesar's superscription
Simony - Is the corrupt presentation of any one to an ecclesiastical benefice, for Money, gift, or reward
Brief - ) A letter patent, from proper authority, authorizing a collection or charitable contribution of Money in churches, for any public or private purpose
Suffering: True Service - She visited the sick; out of her own poverty she gave to those who were still poorer; collected a little Money from others when she could give none of her own, and told many a one of the love of the Saviour
Partridge - It also means, as given by Moffatt, "like a partridge hatching eggs it never laid, so is the man who makes Money unfairly; it leaves him ere his life is over, and in the end he proves himself a fool
Citizenship - The right of citizenship under the Roman government was granted by the emperor to individuals, and sometimes to provinces, as a favour or as a recompense for services rendered to the state, or for a sum of Money (Acts 22:28 )
Property - ) That to which a person has a legal title, whether in his possession or not; thing owned; an estate, whether in lands, goods, or Money; as, a man of large property, or small property
Fool - ) To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his Money
Bag - ...
Haggai 1:6 (b) This represents a business that failed, stocks and bonds that lose their value, barrenness in the fields caused by crop failure, the loss of sheep and cattle - generally speaking, the failure of those enterprises into which GOD's people put their Money instead of giving it to Him
Duty - ) Tax, toll, impost, or customs; excise; any sum of Money required by government to be paid on the importation, exportation, or consumption of goods
Shuffle - ) To shove one way and the other; to push from one to another; as, to shuffle Money from hand to hand
Ticket - ) A certificate or token of a share in a lottery or other scheme for distributing Money, goods, or the like
Aceldama - The field was bought with the Money paid to Judas for betraying his Lord but which he in despair could not keep
Treasure - Joseph acquainted his brethren, when they found their Money returned in their sacks, that God had given them treasures, Genesis 43:23
King - ) One who, or that which, holds a supreme position or rank; a chief among competitors; as, a railroad king; a Money king; the king of the lobby; the king of beasts
Brass - Copper was used for many purposes about the temple, Leviticus 6:28 Numbers 16:39 2 Chronicles 4:16 ; for filters, Judges 16:21 2 Kings 25:7 ; for armor, 1 Samuel 17:5,6,38 ; for musical instruments, 1 Chronicles 15:19 ; and for Money, Matthew 10:9
Valois, Felix of, Saint - They raised vast sums of Money by parading in public as the people threw down to them their gold and precious stones
Weights - The shekel, the half shekel, the manch, the talent, are not only denominations of Money, of certain values in gold and silver, but also of certain weights
Tale - Indies also, a Money of account
Win - To gain by success in competition or contest as, to win the prize in a game to win Money to win a battle, or to win a country
Silvanus, Bishop of Cirta - 320, at which it was proved, by ample evidence, that Silvanus was guilty of this charge, and also that with others he had appropriated plate and ornaments from the heathen temple of Serapis; and after he became a bishop received as a bribe for ordaining Victor, a fuller, to be a presbyter, Money which ought to have been given to the poor
Treasure - The Money that we send to the Lord, and give for His service is also included in the treasure, and this is recorded in Heaven. The Money we give, as well as the time and talents we expend for our Lord, reveal the attitude of our hearts
Tender - ) An offer, either of Money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture, which would be incurred by nonpayment or nonperformance; as, the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note, with interest. ) The thing offered; especially, Money offered in payment of an obligation
Resolve - ) To express, as an opinion or determination, by resolution and vote; to declare or decide by a formal vote; - followed by a clause; as, the house resolved (or, it was resolved by the house) that no Money should be apropriated (or, to appropriate no Money)
Rent - ...
A sum of Money, or a certain amount of other valuable thing, issuing yearly from lands or tenements a compensation or return, in the nature of an acknowledgment, for the possession of a corporeal inheritance. Rent-service is when some corporal service is incident to it, as by fealty and a sum of Money rent-charge is when the owner of the rent has no future interest or reversion expectant in the land, but the rent is reserved in the deed by a clause of distress for rent in arrear rent-seek, dry rent, is rent reserved by deed, but without any clause of distress
Pay - To discharge a debt to deliver to a creditor the value of the debt, either in Money or goods, to his acceptance or satisfaction, by which the obligation of the debtor is discharged. Compensation recompense an equivalent given for Money due, goods purchased or services performed salary or wages for services hire
Poor - In addition, people were to give Money, food and goods to help the poor (Exodus 22:25; Leviticus 25:35-38; Deuteronomy 15:7-8; Deuteronomy 16:9-12; Deuteronomy 26:12; Esther 9:22; Job 29:16). (Concerning regulations designed to prevent Money-lenders from exploiting the poor see LENDING. )...
New Testament teaching also requires those with Money and possessions to help those who lack them
Judas - It later became evident that he had been stealing some of the Money for himself (John 12:5-6; John 13:29). Instead he committed suicide; though first he tried to ease his conscience by returning the Money that the priests had given him (Matthew 27:3-5). When his body was found, the priests took the betrayal Money Judas had returned and with it bought the field in his name
Lending - They could lend Money or goods to the poor, but were not to charge interest (Exodus 22:25; Leviticus 25:35-38; Amos 2:6-8; Ezekiel 18:10-13). People could get themselves into trouble by agreeing to be financial guarantors for friends (or strangers) if they did not have enough Money to honour their promise. What the laws condemned was the exploitation of the disadvantaged, not the investment of Money to set up or expand business, such as one might find in a more commercially developed society. He did not, however, approve of investment and trading where people were so concerned with making Money that they neglected the needy (Matthew 25:42-45; Luke 6:24-25; Luke 16:19-25; cf
Maintenance, Church - In the British Isles and the United States the Money is usually raised by pew rents or charges for seats, together with special collections; but admission to the church must be free
Ransom - No woman, no man, no church, no religion, no good works, no Money, no prayers can avail for this purpose
Debt - daneizo, "to lend," and daneistes, "a Money-lender, a creditor
Flee, Fled - ), besides its literal significance, is used metaphorically, (a) transitively, of "fleeing" fornication, 1 Corinthians 6:18 ; idolatry, 1 Corinthians 10:14 ; evil doctrine, questionings, disputes of words, envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings, wranglings, and the love of Money, 1 Timothy 6:11 ; youthful lusts, 2 Timothy 2:22 ; (b) intransitively, of the "flight" of physical matter, Revelation 16:20 ; 20:11 ; of death, Revelation 9:6
Debt - The poor can easily be exploited, and for this reason Israelite law aimed at protecting them from greedy Money-lenders
Taxes - Mention is made of the tax (telos) on merchandise and travellers (Matthew 17:25 ); the annual tax (phoros) on property (Luke 20:22 ; 23:2 ); the poll-tax (kensos, "tribute," Matthew 17:25 ; 22:17 ; Mark 12:14 ); and the temple-tax ("tribute Money" = two drachmas = half shekel, Matthew 17:24-27 ; Compare Exodus 30:13 )
Temperance - It is a kind of regimen into which every man may put himself without interruption to business, expense of Money, or loss of time
Bag - ) A sack or pouch, used for holding anything; as, a bag of meal or of Money
Prosperity: Evils of - A Christian making Money fast is just a man in a cloud of dust, it will fill his eyes if he be not careful
Mark (2) - Mark introduces several Latin terms; he even substitutes Roman Money for Greek, 12:42, which Luke does not, and notices that Simon of Cyrene was the father of Alexander and Rufus, 15:21, who probably were Christians in Rome
Ephron - Ephron received 400 shekels’ weight of silver (23:15): coined Money apparently did not exist at that time
Market - Sale the exchange of provisions or goods for Money purchase or rate of purchase and sale
Mill - A Money of account of the United States, value the tenth of a cent, or the thousandth of a dollar
Oods - It refers also to the temporal possessions, such as Money, the hospitality of the home, and other such things, which also should be invested for the glory of GOD
Borrow - To take from another by request and consent, with a view to use the thing taken for a time, and return it, or if the thing taken is to be consumed or transferred in the use, then to return an equivalent in kind as, to borrow a book, a sum of Money,or a loaf of bread
Wolf - ...
Matthew 7:15 (a) This animal represents religious leaders of the present day, who pretend to be GOD's servants, but who rob the people of their faith, their peace, and their Money
Arnish - He participates in the activities and gives of his Money
Hire - ) To procure (any chattel or estate) from another person, for temporary use, for a compensation or equivalent; to purchase the use or enjoyment of for a limited time; as, to hire a farm for a year; to hire Money
Easy - ) Not straitened as to Money matters; as, the market is easy; - opposed to tight
Akeldama - The name of the ‘potter’s field’ ( Acts 1:19 ), purchased for the burial of strangers with the blood-money returned by Judas ( Matthew 27:3 )
Guilt - Guilt renders a person a debtor to the law, as it binds him to pay a penalty in Money or suffering
Hire - To procure from another person and for temporary use, at a certain price, or for a stipulated or reasonable equivalent as, to hire a farm for a year to hire a horse for a day to hire Money at legal interest
Phoebe - a genuine disciple: as becometh saints to receive saints; and to assist her in whatever she needed their help; for "she had been a succourer (by her Money and her efforts) of many and of Paul himself
Requisition - ) A formal application by one officer to another for things needed in the public service; as, a requisition for clothing, troops, or Money
Tell - ) To mention one by one, or piece by piece; to recount; to enumerate; to reckon; to number; to count; as, to tell Money
Milk - Milk is regarded as such a necessary article of sustenance that it is associated with wine to prefigure that which grace now supplies, without Money and without price, and which will be supplied to Israel in a future day
Salzburg, Austria, City of - The diocese became an archbishopric in 798, and this period marks the beginning of the temporal sovereignty of the archbishops who obtained possession of an extensive territory and many secular privileges, including the coining of Money
Talent - A — 1: τάλαντον (Strong's #5007 — Noun Neuter — talanton — tal'-an-ton ) originally "a balance," then, "a talent in weight," was hence "a sum of Money" in gold or silver equivalent to a "talent
Cornelius - He was one of the people known as God-fearers, who attended synagogue services, kept certain Jewish laws, prayed to God and gave Money to the needy
Wallet - * Fell - Good works, religious observances, church activities, gifts of Money, and all other such activities, if depended on for salvation, will be like the sinking sand, and the sinner will not be able to endure the storm of GOD's judgment if he depends upon these. The world takes from its followers their Money, their health, their time, and oftentimes their lives
Silver - Abraham paid Ephron for the cave of Machpelah "400 shekels of silver, current Money with the merchant" (Genesis 23:16). (See Money
Fool - To cheat as, to fool one out of his Money. To spend for things of no value or use to expend improvidently as, to fool away Money
Relief - Rest gives relief to the body when weary an anodyne gives relief from pain the sympathy of friends affords some relief to the distressed a loan of Money to a man embarrassed may afford him a temporary relief medicines which will not cure a disease, sometimes give a partial relief. This relief consisted of horses, arms, Money and the like, the amount of which was originally arbitrary, but afterwards fixed at a certain rate by law
Want - The want of Money is a common want. To be destitute to be deficient in not to have a word of general application as, to want knowledge to want judgment to want learning to want food and clothing to want Money
Exchange - To sell is to alienate for Money to exchange is to alienate one commodity for another as, to exchange horses to exchange oxen for corn. The form of exchanging one debt or credit for another or the receiving or paying of Money in one place, for an equal sum in another, by order, draft or bill of exchange. In mercantile language, a bill drawn for Money is called exchange, instead of a bill of exchange
Debtors, the Two - Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the parable of the two debtors, who owed to a Money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude
Silver - (Acts 19:24 ) But its chief use was as a medium of exchange, and throughout the Old Testament we find "silver" used for Money, like the French argent
Fishing, the Art of - It was in the mouth of a fish that the tribute-money was found (Matthew 17:27 )
Root - A — 1: ῥίζα (Strong's #4491 — Noun Feminine — rhiza — hrid'-zah ) is used (a) in the natural sense, Matthew 3:10 ; 13:6,21 ; Mark 4:6,17 ; 11:20 ; Luke 3:9 ; 8:13 ; (b) metaphorically (1) of "cause, origin, source," said of persons, ancestors, Romans 11:16-18 (twice); of things, evils, 1 Timothy 6:10 , RV, of the love of Money as a "root" of all "kinds of evil" (marg
Church Building Fund - In order to hold property and carry on the workof loaning Money on mortgage in a safe and legal manner, it wasnecessary to organize a corporation and this was done under thelaws of the State of New York, the title of the organization beingthat given above
Hypocrisy: Easy But Dangerous - molten lead, the mould, and there is your Money, sir, without troubling Peru, Potosi, California, or the Mint
Nail - On the nail, in hand immediately without delay or time of credit as, to pay Money on the nail
Apply - To use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case as, to apply a sum of Money to the payment of a debt
Fly - ...
Proverbs 23:5 (a) Here is a very fine picture of the way that our Money and other assets disappear
Balances - They were needful also in early days for weighing the Money: when Abraham bought a burying place he "weighed to Ephron the silver
Greatness - Largeness of bulk, dimensions, number or quantity as the greatness of a mountain, of an edifice, of a multitude, or of a sum of Money
Ready - ) Ready Money; cash; - commonly with the; as, he was well supplied with the ready
Half - 21:35: “… Then they shall sell the live ox, and divide the Money of it
Limit - ) To apply a limit to, or set a limit for; to terminate, circumscribe, or restrict, by a limit or limits; as, to limit the acreage of a crop; to limit the issue of paper Money; to limit one's ambitions or aspirations; to limit the meaning of a word
Two Debtors, the - Answering the thought of the Pharisee, Jesus proposes the parable of the two debtors, who owed to a Money lender, the one 500 denarii (approximately $100), the other 50, but to whom the creditor graciously remits the amount; the former, receiving a greater favor, is naturally bound to greater gratitude
Redemption - Deliverance from bondage, distress, or from liability to any evil or forfeiture, either by Money, labor or other means
Kind - Natural state produce or commodity, as distinguished from Money as taxes paid in kind
Languish - Commerce, agriculture, manufactures languish, not for want of Money, but for want of good markets
Talent - In the New Testament, a talent is a denomination of Money, which was anciently reckoned by weight
Token - In coinage, tokens were coins struck in the reign of Elizabeth in the cities of Bristol, Oxford and Worcester, and also by private persons, which were put into circulation, and upon being returned,the issuer gave the value of them in current Money
Vail - Vails, Money given to servants
Hiram - He lent Solomon Money, in payment of which Solomon offered to give him a large section of Israel’s northern territory (which bordered Lebanon) (1 Kings 9:10-14)
Judas - The Money, which could not be returned to the treasury because it was blood Money, was used to buy a potter's field in Judas' name (Matthew 27:3-10 ; compare Acts 1:18-19 )
Tribute - ) The use of the word in the Old Testament is in reference to the almost universal custom whereby the conquering nation (whether Egyptian, Assyrian, or Roman) levied large and in many cases recurring sums of Money from the nations subjugated by them; and the monuments erected by the conquerors naturally present this subject very frequently. (See Money; JESUS CHRIST; PETER
Gehazi - Gehazi presumptuously stifled conscience with the plea that a "Syrian" pagan ought not to have been" spared," as his master had "spared this Naaman," and even dared to invoke Jehovah's name, as though his obtaining Money by false pretenses from him would be a meritorious act: "as the Lord liveth, I will take somewhat of him. " Elisha sternly answered, "Went not mine heart with thee, when the man turned again, (compare Psalm 139)? Is it a time to receive Money," etc
Answer - "Money answereth all things," noting, primarily, return. To be accountable, liable or responsible followed by to before the person, and for before the thing for which one is liable as, the man must answer to his employer for the Money entrusted to his care we can not answer to God for our offenses
Alabaster - If we bear in mind that a denarius was a day’s wage for ordinary labour, it would represent about four shillings of our Money. ’ We have here the warrant for the expenditure of Money on everything that makes for the higher life of man
Ready - He makes ready payment he pays ready Money for every thing he buys. For ready Money
Responsibility - Before a man went on a journey, he entrusted Money to his servants. When he returned, each servant had to give an answer for what he had done with the Money assigned to him. To those who doubled their Money, the master exclaimed, "Well done!" However, the one who hid the Money in the ground was severely judged for his irresponsibility (Matthew 25:14-30 ; see also Luke 19:11-27 )
Root - Root indicates source as when the unrighteous are pictured as a root bearing bitter and poisonous fruit (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Hebrews 12:15 ) or when the love of Money is described as the root of all kinds of evil (1 Timothy 6:10 )
Earnest - Money given by a purchaser as a pledge for the full payment of the sum promised
Policy - ) A ticket or warrant for Money in the public funds
Rich - ) Having an abundance of material possessions; possessed of a large amount of property; well supplied with land, goods, or Money; wealthy; opulent; affluent; - opposed to poor
Cool - ) Applied facetiously, in a vague sense, to a sum of Money, commonly as if to give emphasis to the largeness of the amount
Yield - ) To give in return for labor expended; to produce, as payment or interest on what is expended or invested; to pay; as, Money at interest yields six or seven per cent
Pound - ) A British denomination of Money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4
Duty - Tax, toll, impost, or customs excise any sum of Money required by government to be paid on the importation, exportation, or consumption of goods
Glad - Her conversation ...
More glad to me than to a miser Money is
Till - ) A Money drawer in a shop or store
Tax - ) To subject to the payment of a tax or taxes; to impose a tax upon; to lay a burden upon; especially, to exact Money from for the support of government
Skin - ) To strip of Money or property; to cheat
Produce - ) To yield or furnish; to gain; as, Money at interest produces an income; capital produces profit
Mail - ) A small piece of Money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V
Policy - ) A ticket or warrant for Money in the public funds
Horse-Leech - Thus Plautus makes one say, speaking of the determination to get Money, "I will turn myself into a horse-leech, and suck out their blood;" and Cicero, in one of his letters to Atticus, calls the common people of Rome horse-leeches of the treasury
Smart - ) Smart Money (see below)
Seat - Christ--overthrew the tables of the Money changers and the seats of them that sold doves
Table - 1: τράπεζα (Strong's #5132 — Noun Feminine — trapeza — trap'-ed-zah ) is used of (a) "a dining table," Matthew 15:27 ; Mark 7:28 ; Luke 16:21 ; 22:21,30 ; (b) "the table of shewbread," Hebrews 9:2 ; (c) by metonymy, of "what is provided on the table" (the word being used of that with which it is associated), Acts 16:34 ; Romans 11:9 (figurative of the special privileges granted to Israel and centering in Christ); 1 Corinthians 10:21 (twice), "the Lord's table," denoting all that is provided for believers in Christ on the ground of His death (and thus expressing something more comprehensive than the Lord's Supper); "the table of demons," denoting all that is partaken of by idolaters as the result of the influence of demons in connection with their sacrifices; (d) "a Moneychanger's table," Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; John 2:15 ; (e) "a bank," Luke 19:23 (cp. trapezites: see BANKERS); (f) by metonymy for "the distribution of Money," Acts 6:2
Woman's Auxiliary, the - Besides systematic efforts to raise Money forthe work of missions, the members prepare boxes of clothing andhousehold necessities for the families of missionaries
Tax Taxing Taxation - Three branches are enumerated, from which, however, the priests and sacred classes were specially exempted, "toll, tribute, and custom," Ezra 4:13; Ezra 7:24, probably implying direct Money payments, excise, and tolls by travellers at bridges, fords, etc. The Jews had also to defray the charges of the governor by supplying his table, and by a Money payment
Talents - He does not give them any instructions, since they ought to understand that such large sums of Money are not intended to lie idle, but should be used in increasing their master’s possessions. As soon as his master has departed, the first servant goes at once and trades with his lord’s Money. The third servant, however, while he does not squander the Money entrusted to him, buries it in the earth, and keeps it safe for his master’s return. He was therefore afraid to trade with the Money lest misfortune should overtake him, and he lose some or all of the capital entrusted to him. The master, without deigning to justify himself from the harsh character thus given to him, points out that were the slave right in his estimate, he ought at least to have taken the trouble to see that the Money was entrusted to the bankers. It would, of course, be possible to suppose that, while nobly born, he is in indigent circumstances, and has little Money to spare; but this is probably not the real reason why the sum entrusted is so small. In the parable of the Talents we have apparently to do with a merchant whose object is to make Money. He therefore entrusts his servants with a large capital in order that they may have ample opportunity for gaining large sums of Money. That accounts for the difference in distribution, and for the absence of any command that they should trade with the Money. Accordingly he assigns to each an equal sum of Money, that all may have equal advantages and be differentiated according to their zeal and capacity. And inasmuch as his object is not to make Money, for he will have ample opportunities of doing that when he receives his kingdom, he does not entrust them with a large but with a slender capital. Ten slaves are, it is true, selected, because there are several offices in the State to be filled, whereas in the case of the merchant only three are chosen, because the capital is more profitably distributed into few than into many hands if the purpose is to make Money
Brass - For Money, Matthew 10:9
Capital - ) Money, property, or stock employed in trade, manufactures, etc
Divine - The prophets thereof divine for Money
Finger - The covetous man delights to finger Money
Pinch - ) Figuratively: To cramp; to straiten; to oppress; to starve; to distress; as, to be pinched for Money
Woman - Their object in life was to make Money, gain power, and rise to places of distinction
Baruch - It relates that the Jews in Babylon sent a deputation to Jerusalem with Money for sacrifices, and requested that prayers might be offered for Nebuchadnezzar and his son Belshazzar
Silver - ) Coin made of silver; silver Money
Apply - ) To put to use; to use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case; to appropriate; to devote; as, to apply Money to the payment of a debt
Receive - ) To take, as something that is offered, given, committed, sent, paid, or the like; to accept; as, to receive Money offered in payment of a debt; to receive a gift, a message, or a letter
Candlestick, - With its various appurtenances it required a talent of "pure gold;" and it was not moulded, but "of beaten work," and has been estimated to have been worth in our Money over ,000
Notable, of Note - , of Money, "stamped, coined," (from epi, "upon," and sema, "a mark, a sign;" cp
Levy - ) To gather or exact; as, to levy Money
Occasion - ...
My occasions have found time to use them toward a supply of Money
Rage - Extreme eagerness or passion directed to some object as the rage for Money
Satisfy - The demands of hunger may be easily satisfied but who can satisfy the passion for Money or honor? 2
Candlestick, - With its various appurtenances it required a talent of "pure gold;" and it was not moulded, but "of beaten work," and has been estimated to have been worth in our Money over ,000
Achaia - Paul revisited the area during his third missionary journey (Acts 19:21; Acts 20:1-3), when he collected Money that the churches of Achaia, like other churches, had put aside to help the poor Christians in Judea (Romans 15:26; 2 Corinthians 9:1-2)
Plate - ) A piece of Money, usually silver Money
Aceldama - He did not pay the Money (Matthew 27:5), but had agreed to pay it, with a view of securing "a habitation" to himself and his wife and children (Psalms 109:9; Psalms 69:25). What was bought with his Money Peter speaks of as bought by him
Felix - ...
Felix could hardly have hoped for Money from so poor looking a prisoner as Paul (which is implied in Lysias' surprise, presuming Paul had like himself bought Roman citizenship, Acts 22:27-28), had he not heard Paul stating in the former interview, "after many years I came to bring alms to my nation and offerings. " He doubtless hoped they would supply the Money wherewith to buy his deliverance, an undesigned coincidence and so a mark of the truth of the history
Den - It was the feast of the Passover, and the Temple courts were crowded by those who sold sheep, oxen, and pigeons, while the Moneychangers also carried on their trade. It has been calculated that the annual income derived from Money-changing can hardly have been less than £8000–£9000, while the sale of pigeons is specially referred to as furnishing alone a large annual income. ‘Ye gather together here Money and animals, as robbers collect their booty in their den’ (Fritzsche, quoted by Lange)
Tithe - A person might pay this tax in Money, adding one-fifth to its estimated value. , changing it first into Money, if on account of his remoteness he chose to do so, Deuteronomy 12:17-19,22-29 14:22-27
Barnabas - ...
One who encourages others...
In the early days of the Jerusalem church, Barnabas demonstrated his sacrificial spirit when he sold a field that he owned and gave the Money to the apostles to help the poor Christians (Acts 4:36-37). Their first trip together was to Jerusalem, where they helped the church by taking an offering of goods and Money from the Christians in Antioch (Acts 11:27-30; Galatians 2:1)
Taxes - Under the judges, according to the theocratic government contemplated by the law, the only payments incumbent upon the people as of permanent obligation were the Tithes, the Firstfruits, the Redemption-money of the first-born, and other offerings as belonging to special occasions. The payment by each Israelite of the half-shekel as "atonement-money," for the service of the tabernacle, on taking the census of the people, (Exodus 30:13 ) does not appear to have had the character of a recurring tax, but to have been supplementary to the freewill offerings of (Exodus 25:1-7 ) levied for the one purpose of the construction of the sacred tent. In Judea, as in other provinces, the inhabitants had to provide in kind for the maintenance of the governor's household, besides a Money payment of forty shekels a day
Indulgences - Peter, and to his successors, the popes, who may open it at pleasure; and, by transferring a portion of this superabundant merit to any particular person for a sum of Money, may convey to him either the pardon of his own sins, or a release for any one in whom he is interested from the pains of purgatory. They were afterwards granted to those who hired a soldier for that purpose; and in process of time were bestowed on such as gave Money for accomplishing any pious work enjoined by the pope. Peter's, at Rome, published indulgences, and a plenary remission to all such as should contribute Money towards it. The souls confined in purgatory, for whose redemption indulgences are purchased, as soon as the Money tinkles in the chest, instantly escape from that place of torment, and ascend into heaven
the Widow With the Two Mites - ...
In every department of merely secular finance Money is just Money. " And, as our Lord sat over against the thirteen chests in the temple that day, and all thirteen for the temple upkeep in one way or another, it was not the Money so much as the mind of the contributors that He watched and weighed. It is ourselves first; and then, after ourselves, it is our time, and our Money, and our work. Two mites of mind and intention outweigh out of sight a million of mere Money in the balances of the sanctuary. And thus it was that He sat so near the treasury enjoying the sight of the liberality of those who had both the willing mind and Money also. He had no Money. And as they cast in their Money, He again cast in Himself
Iowa - The latter gathered Money to build a church there but died of cholera, as his predecessor had, before he could go on with it
Brass - It was used for fetters (Judges 16:21 ; 2 Kings 25:7 ), for pieces of armour (1 Samuel 17:5,6 ), for musical instruments (1 Chronicles 15:19 ; 1 Corinthians 13:1 ), and for Money (Matthew 10:9 )
Corruptions: Seen Even in Solitude - ' ...
'If one offered him food, he would take it, but if Money was offered him, he would be angry
Interest - Sum of Money a borrower pays for use of loaned capital
Tax Collector - ...
All these tax collectors had to collect enough Money to send to Rome the amount required, yet have enough left over as wages for themselves
Theft - the robbing of ourselves and families, by neglecting our callings, or imprudent management thereof; lending larger sums of Money than our circumstances will bear, when there is no prospect of payment; by being profuse and excessive in our expenses; indulging unlawful pleasures, and thereby reducing our families to poverty; or even, on the other hand, by laying up a great deal for the time to come, while our families are left to starve, or reduced to the greatest inconvenience and distress
Dowry - The amount of the dowry depended on customs of the specific tribes or clans and upon the economic and social class of the parties involved (1 Samuel 18:23-27 , a passage also showing that service could be substituted for Money; compare Genesis 29:15-30 ; Joshua 15:16-17 )
Silver - See Coins ; Gold ; Money
Draft - An order from one man to another directing the payment of Money a bill of exchange
Find - ) To provide for; to supply; to furnish; as, to find food for workemen; he finds his nephew in Money
Draff - ) An order from one person or party to another, directing the payment of Money; a bill of exchange
Thief - ...
John 10:1 (b) By this picture we see a symbol of the wicked, religious leaders of the world who would take away from GOD's people their peace, their faith, their time and their Money by false teachings
Raft - ) Acquisition of Money, position, etc
Vest - ) To invest; to put; as, to vest Money in goods, land, or houses
Truck - ) The practice of paying wages in goods instead of Money; - called also truck system
Raft - ) Acquisition of Money, position, etc
Obtain - We obtain loans of Money on application we obtain answers to letters we obtain spirit from liquors by distillation and salts by evaporation
na'Both - ) It thus became an object of desire to the king, who offered an equivalent in Money or another vineyard
Barnabas, Feast of Saint - ) He stands out in the New Testament Scriptures as onewho is ever helpful, which may have suggested his new name; thushe sold his land, giving the Money to the Apostles in order thatthe necessities of the infant Church might be met
Jubilee - If people needed Money they could sell their land, but as soon as possible either they or their close relatives had to buy it back (Leviticus 25:25-28)
Bond - But usually a condition is added, that, if the obligor shall do a certain act, appear at a certain place, conform to certain rules, faithfully perform certain duties, or pay a certain sum of Money, on or before a time specified, the obligation shall be void; otherwise it shall remain in full force. ) An instrument (of the nature of the ordinary legal bond) made by a government or a corporation for purpose of borrowing Money; as, a government, city, or railway bond
Taxes - ) Each Israelite paid a half shekel as "atonement Money" for the service of the tabernacle, the morning and evening sacrifice, the incense, wood, shewbread, red heifers, scape-goat, etc. They mortgaged their lands to buy grain, and borrowed Money at one per cent per month, i
Interest - Now neshekh is rightly rendered ‘usury,’ the reference being to the interest, often exorbitant, charged by Money-lenders in the ancient East. The statement of Suetonius, that Augustus branded some people with infamy (notavit) because they borrowed at low interest and invested at high (Octavius, 39), may hint how the bankers made Money out of the funds entrusted to their care
Redemption - Therefore, the parents had to redeem their firstborn by a payment of Money to the sanctuary (Exodus 13:2; Exodus 13:13; Numbers 18:15-16; see FIRSTBORN). ...
If Israelites vowed to give God their children, animals, houses or land, they could redeem those things, again by a payment of Money to the sanctuary (Leviticus 27:1-25; see VOWS). If a farmer was under the death sentence because his ox had killed someone, his relatives could redeem him (since the death was accidental) by a payment of Money to the dead person’s relatives (Exodus 21:28-30)
Contribution For the Saints - ...
When the offering was completed among the churches, the Money was sent to Jerusalem
Point, Points - " ...
A — 1: κεφάλαιον (Strong's #2774 — Noun Neuter — kephalaion — kef-al'-ah-yon ) the neuter of the adjective kephalaios, "of the head," is used as a noun, signifying (a) "a sum, amount, of Money," Acts 22:28 ; (b) "a chief point," Hebrews 8:1 , not the summing up of the subject, as the AV suggests, for the subject was far from being finished in the Epistle; on the contrary, in all that was being set forth by the writer "the chief point" consisted in the fact that believers have "a High Priest" of the character already described
Self-Seeking - Self-seeking evidences itself by parsimoniousness, oppression, neglect, and contempt of others, rebellion, sedition, egotism, immoderate attempts to gain fame, power, pleasure, Money, and frequently by gross acts of lying and injustice
Harlot - Her payment might be in Money, or it could be in jewelry (Ezekiel 23:42 ) or other items of value (Genesis 38:15-18 ; compare Luke 15:30 )
Torment (2) - It has not been an infrequent occurrence that cruelties have been inflicted on prisoners with a view to inducing their friends to raise the sum of Money demanded for their release
Waste - It was put to a use which did not commend itself to him, and this seemed to the man in whose heart the love of a once accepted Master had now been usurped by the Money with which he had been entrusted, a loss of something like ‘three hundred pence’ (Mark 14:5)
Covetousness - This conjunction of sensual sin and love of Money probably rests upon the authority of Jesus ( Mark 7:21-22 )
Cart - In raising Money for the church, or in providing amusements for the young, or in carrying on our services, or in our method and manner of using the house of GOD, we must not resort to the ways of the ungodly, the plans and programs of those who are strangers to GOD, for GOD will not add His blessing to it
Ripe - Money, with a gripe or as with a gripe
Receiver - ) A person appointed, ordinarily by a court, to receive, and hold in trust, Money or other property which is the subject of litigation, pending the suit; a person appointed to take charge of the estate and effects of a corporation, and to do other acts necessary to winding up its affairs, in certain cases
Ananias - Husband of Sapphira, who with her had agreed to sell their possession, keep back part of the Money, and present the remainder to the church as though it were the whole
Ripe - Money, with a gripe or as with a gripe
Philippi - Paul's imprisonment at Rome, with their accustomed zeal, sent Epaphroditus to assure him of the continuance of their regard, and to offer him a supply of Money
Alms - Of Money collected in the synagogue chest every sabbath for the poor of the city, "the alms of the chest. Of food and Money received in a dish, "alms of the dish
Bill - Against the theory of a simple debt is the fact that the amount of the obligation is stated in kind—wheat and oil—and not in Money; and the probability of the story is heightened if we are to understand that the remissions authorized by the steward—amounting in Money value, according to Edersheim, to the not very considerable sums of £5 and £25 respectively—affected not a single but an annual payment
Joash - Then this prince directed chests to be placed at the entrance of the temple, and an account to be given him of what Money was received from them, that it might be faithfully employed in repairing the house of God. Joash, to redeem himself from the difficulties of a siege, and from the danger of being plundered, took what Money he could find in the temple, which had been consecrated by Ahaziah his father, Jehoram his grandfather, and himself, and gave the whole to Hazael
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - As soon as the twelve were recognized as a body, travelling hither and thither with their Master, receiving Money and other offerings, and redistributing what they received to the poor, it became necessary that some one should act as the steward and almoner of the small society, and this fell to Judas. (John 12:6 ; 13:29 ) The Galilean or Judean peasant found himself entrusted with larger sums of Money than before, and with this there came covetousness, unfaithfulness, embezzlement. " (3) The Money was used to buy a burial-field for poor strangers
Lazarus And the Rich Man - " The parable is a lesson on the enormity of injustice, the evils of inequality in the distribution of this world's goods, the heartlessness that too often develops from the acquisition of wealth, and the assumption of the rich man that Money can command anything, even a special revelation if necessary
Ame - ) To play for a stake or prize; to use cards, dice, billiards, or other instruments, according to certain rules, with a view to win Money or other thing waged upon the issue of the contest; to gamble
Draught - An order for the payment of Money a bill of exchange
Balances - Money came in weighted units of gold and silver
Poverty - Want seems rather to arise by accident, implies a scarcity of provision rather than a lack of Money, and is opposed to abundance
Bound - A limit by which any excursion is restrained the limit of indulgence or desire as, the love of Money knows no bounds
Enough - But in elegant discourse or composition, it always follows the noun, to which it refers as, bread enough Money enough
Consumed, To Be - Thus, Money that is all spent is “finished” or “exhausted” ( Colluthus, Presbyter And Sect Founder - A phrase used by Alexander ( Χριστεμπορεία ) has been understood by Valesius to charge Colluthus with taking Money for conferring orders
Pearl - In the case of coined Money such as talents or pounds, the side of religion emphasized is the active life of good works, and the lesson conveyed is that of duty
Issue - A sending out as the issue of an order from a commanding officer or from a court the issue of Money from a treasury
Pearl - In the case of coined Money such as talents or pounds, the side of religion emphasized is the active life of good works, and the lesson conveyed is that of duty
Matthew - MATTHEW loved Money. Matthew, like Judas, must have Money. With clean hands if he could; but, clean hands or unclean, Matthew must have Money. Now, the surest way and the shortest way for Matthew to make Money in the Galilee of that day was to take sides with Cæsar and to become one of Cæsar's tax-gatherers. And just as the publicans were ever on the outlook for more Money; and just as the sinners were ever on the outlook for another supper and another dance; so the Pharisees were ever on the outlook for a fresh scandal, and for something to find fault with in their neighbours. The bag would have been safe, and it would have been kept well filled, in Matthew's Money-managing hands, but Matthew had far more important matters than the most sacred Money matters to attend to
Giving - ...
But while it is ever true that ‘money values are not the standard of gifts in the Kingdom of God,’ this must not be pressed so as to minimize gifts of Money. ’ The frequent references to Money in the Gospels show the importance which Jesus attached to this factor in life. The giving of Money by men who know its value, and whose keenest activities are directed to get it, is a searching test of their self-denial and devotion
Promise - ) To engage to do, give, make, or to refrain from doing, giving, or making, or the like; to covenant; to engage; as, to promise a visit; to promise a cessation of hostilities; to promise the payment of Money
Convert - ) To exchange for some specified equivalent; as, to convert goods into Money
Pour - ...
3: ἐκχέω (Strong's #1632 — Verb — ekcheo — ek-kheh'-o, ek-khoo'-no ) "to pour out" (ek, "out"), is used (a) of Christ's act as to the changers' Money, John 2:15 ; (b) of the Holy Spirit, Acts 2:17,18,33 , RV, "He hath poured forth" (AV, "
Menahem - " By exacting 50 shekels a head from 60,000 wealthy men of Israel, Menahem raised the Money
Security - The security demanded might be in the form either of Money or of sponsors for good behaviour
Box - ) A chest or any receptacle for the deposit of Money; as, a poor box; a contribution box
Settlement - ) That which is bestowed formally and permanently; the sum secured to a person; especially, a jointure made to a woman at her marriage; also, in the United States, a sum of Money or other property formerly granted to a pastor in additional to his salary
Account - ) To render or receive an account or relation of particulars; as, an officer must account with or to the treasurer for Money received
Principal - ) A capital sum of Money, placed out at interest, due as a debt or used as a fund; - so called in distinction from interest or profit
Bond - But usually a condition is added, that if the obligor shall do a certain act, or pay a certain sum of Money, on or before a time specified, the obligation shall be void otherwise it shall remain in full force
Box - A Money chest
First-Begotten, First-Born, - The first-born of Israel were redeemed by the sons of Levi, as far as they went, and the remainder were redeemed with Money
Earnest - Hence earnest or earnest-money is a first payment or deposit giving promise or assurance of full payment
Fare - The price of conveyance over the ocean is now usually called the passage, or passage Money
Tribute - Various Hebrew words are thus represented, but the signification in general is that which one nation or people paid to another, either in Money or kind (2 Kings 3:4 ), in order to be left in peaceable possession
Abstract - ) To take secretly or dishonestly; to purloin; as, to abstract goods from a parcel, or Money from a till
Ecclesiastical Property - All temporal goods which pertain to the universal Church, to the Apostolic See, or to any moral person in the church, as real estate, Money, edifices, and sacred vessels
Murder - Money could not redeem his life: he was dragged away from the altar, if he had there taken refuge
Ransom - The Money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner or slave, or for goods captured by an enemy that which procures the release of a prisoner or captive, or of captured property, and restores the one to liberty and the other to the original owner
Saint Bartholomew's Day - In 1572Coligny, with Money given to him by Charles IX, unknown to Catherine, sent 4000 men to the relief of Mons, which was at the time besieged by the Duke of Alva
Gird, Girdle - The girdle, moreover, answered the purpose of a purse or pouch, to carry Money and other things; see Matthew 10:9 Mark 6:8 , where the word purse in the English is put for girdle according to the original Greek
Talk - I hear a talk up and down of raising Money
Void - It had become a practice - to void the security given for Money borrowed
Piece of Silver - The shekel, be it remembered, was the common weight for Money, and therefore most likely to be understood in an elliptical phrase
Cross - ) A piece of Money stamped with the figure of a cross, also, that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, Money in general
Find - Who will find the Money or provisions for this expedition? We will find ourselves with provisions and clothing. ...
He finds his nephew in Money, victuals and clothes
Fine - A sum of Money paid to the lord by his tenant, for permission to alienate or transfer his lands to another. A sum of Money paid to the king or state by way of penalty for an offense a mulet a pecuniary punishment
Cross - Money or coin stamped with the figure of a cross. Cross and pile, a play with Money, at which it is put to chance whether a coin shall fall with that side up, which bears the cross, or the other which is called pile or reverse
Return - ) To repay; as, to return borrowed Money. ) The act of returning (transitive), or sending back to the same place or condition; restitution; repayment; requital; retribution; as, the return of anything borrowed, as a book or Money; a good return in tennis
Girdle - The ancient Romans, in this, as in many other things, imitated the orientals; for their soldiers, and probably all classes of the citizens, used to carry their Money in their girdles. Gracthus is introduced, saying, "Those girdles which I carried out full of Money when I went from Rome, I have, at my return from the province, brought again empty
Lay - 1: τίθημι (Strong's #5087 — Verb — tithemi — tith'-ay-mee ) "to put, place, set," frequently signifies "to lay," and is used of (a) "laying" a corpse in a tomb, Matthew 27:60 ; Mark 6:29 ; 15:47 ; 16:6 ; Luke 23:53,55 ; John 11:34 ; 19:41,42 ; 20:2,13,15 ; Acts 7:16 ; 13:29 ; Revelation 11:9 , RV, "to be laid" (AV, "to be put"); in an upper chamber, Acts 9:37 ; (b) "laying" the sick in a place, Mark 6:56 ; Luke 5:18 ; Acts 3:2 ; 5:15 ; (c) "laying" Money at the Apostles' feet, Acts 4:35,37 ; 5:2 ; (d) Christ's "laying" His hands upon children Mark 10:16 , RV, "laying" (AV, "put"); upon John, Revelation 1:17 (in the best mss. ); (e) "laying" down one's life, (1) of Christ, John 10:11 , RV, "layeth down" (AV, "giveth"); Kohn 10:17,18 (twice); 1 John 3:16 ; (2) of Peter for Christ's sake, John 13:37,38 ; (3) of Christ's followers, on behalf of others, 1 John 3:16 ; (4) of anyone, for his friends, John 15:13 ; (f) "laying" up sayings in one's heart, Luke 1:66 (Middle Voice, in the sense of "for themselves"); in Luke 9:44 , of letting Christ's words "sink" (Middle Voice, in the sense of "for oneself;" AV, "sink down") into the ears; (g) "laying" a foundation (1) literally, Luke 6:48 ; 14:29 ; (2) metaphorically, of Christ in relation to an assembly, 1 Corinthians 3:10,11 ; (h) in "laying" Christ as a "stone of stumbling" for Israel, Romans 9:33 ; (i) Christ's "laying" aside His garments, John 13:4 ; (j) Christians, in "laying" Money in store for the help of the needy, 1 Corinthians 16:2 (lit. , "let him put"); (k) "depositing" Money, Luke 19:21,22 . ...
16: ἀπόκειμαι (Strong's #606 — Verb — apokeimai — ap-ok'-i-mahee ) "to be laid away, or up," is used of Money in a napkin, Luke 19:20 ; metaphorically, of a hope, Colossians 1:5 ; the crown of righteousness, 2 Timothy 4:8 . ...
17: θησαυρίζω (Strong's #2343 — Verb — thesaurizo — thay-sow-rid'-zo ) "to lay up, store up" (akin to thesauros, "a treasury, a storehouse, a treasure"), is used of "laying" up treasures, on earth, Matthew 6:19 ; in Heaven, Matthew 6:20 ; in the last days, James 5:3 , RV, "ye have laid up your treasure" (AV, "ye have heaped treasure together"); in Luke 12:21 , "that layeth up treasure (for himself);" in 1 Corinthians 16:2 , of Money for needy ones (here the present participle is translated "in store," lit
Slave - (Exodus 22:1,3 ) The thief was bound to work out the value of his restitution Money in the service of him on whom the theft had been committed. by the arrival of the year of jubilee, or by the repayment to the master of the purchase Money paid for the servant, after deducting a sum for the value of his services proportioned to the length of his servitude. (Exodus 21:7-9 ) It diminishes the apparent harshness of this proceeding if we look on the purchase Money as in the light of a dowry given, as was not unusual, to the parents of the bride; still more, if we accept the rabbinical view that the consent of the maid was required before the marriage could take place. (2) Should he not wish to marry her, he should call upon her friends to procure her release by the repayment of the purchase Money
Akeldama - The salient features of the Matthaean tradition are—(a) Judas stricken with remorse returned the Money paid to him as the price of his treachery; (b) he hanged himself in despair, nothing being said as to the scene of his suicide; (c) the priests bought with the Money a field known as ‘the Potter’s Field,’ which (d) thenceforth was called ἀγρὸς αἳματος, the allusion being to the blood of Christ, shed through the treachery of Judas; (e) the field was devoted to the purpose of a cemetery for foreigners. In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the Money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew
Akeldama - The salient features of the Matthaean tradition are—(a) Judas stricken with remorse returned the Money paid to him as the price of his treachery; (b) he hanged himself in despair, nothing being said as to the scene of his suicide; (c) the priests bought with the Money a field known as ‘the Potter’s Field,’ which (d) thenceforth was called ἀγρὸς αἳματος, the allusion being to the blood of Christ, shed through the treachery of Judas; (e) the field was devoted to the purpose of a cemetery for foreigners. In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the Money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew
Perish - ...
Notes: (1) In Acts 8:20 , "(thy Money) perish" is a translation of a phrase, lit, "be unto destruction," apoleia; see DESTRUCTION , B, (II), No
Debtor - 1: ὀφειλέτης (Strong's #3781 — Noun Masculine — opheiletes — of-i-let'-ace ) "one who owes anything to another," primarily in regard to Money; in Matthew 18:24 , "who owed" (lit
Boldness (Holy): Congruous With the Gospel - Certain Money-loving traders agreed to all this, and ate dust as readily as reptiles; but, when England sent her ambassadors abroad, the daring islanders stood bolt-upright
Value - ) Worth estimated by any standard of purchasing power, especially by the market price, or the amount of Money agreed upon as an equivalent to the utility and cost of anything
Exchange - ) The process of setting accounts or debts between parties residing at a distance from each other, without the intervention of Money, by exchanging orders or drafts, called bills of exchange
Asa - To stop this Asa paid a large sum of Money to Benhadad king of Syria to invade Israel
Anthimus, Bishop of Tyana - He was even bold enough to attack Basil on a journey, and plunder a train of mules laden with supplies of Money and provisions for the bp
Brass - χαλκός occurs also in Mark 6:8; Mark 12:41, where it is translation ‘money,’ marg
Sight - ) A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of Money
Cost - The word is equally applicable to the price in Money or commodities as the cost of a suit of clothes the cost of a house or farm
Token - ...
Mark 14:44 (c) This may be taken as a type of the false provision and the vain conversation of hypocrites who enter the fold of the church for the sake of making Money
Pool - ) A combination of persons contributing Money to be used for the purpose of increasing or depressing the market price of stocks, grain, or other commodities; also, the aggregate of the sums so contributed; as, the pool took all the wheat offered below the limit; he put $10,000 into the pool
Rent - ) A certain periodical profit, whether in Money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in payment for the use; commonly, a certain pecuniary sum agreed upon between a tenant and his landlord, paid at fixed intervals by the lessee to the lessor, for the use of land or its appendages; as, rent for a farm, a house, a park, etc
Scrape - ) To collect by, or as by, a process of scraping; to gather in small portions by laborious effort; hence, to acquire avariciously and save penuriously; - often followed by together or up; as, to scrape Money together
Warrant - ) A writing which authorizes a person to receive Money or other thing
Gomer - Contracts for marriages, it is said, were never formed without giving with the woman a certain measure of corn, as well as Money, for a marriage portion
Collection For the Poor Saints - This Money was collected by Paul from the Gentile churches which he administered
Bag, Purse, Wallet - ( d ) The favourite bag for Money and valuables hence the beautiful figure 1 Samuel 25:29 , where ‘the hundle of life’ = life’s jewel-case was one which could he tied with a string ( 2 Kings 12:10 , Proverbs 7:20 , also Genesis 42:35 EV Upon - Noting security as, to borrow Money upon lands, or upon mortgage
Murder (2) - Matthew 5:38), a free man dying for a free, a slave for a slave; or the relatives of the slain may accept a Money payment, which in practice does not exceed £500 (Koran, ii
Profit - With this we may compare Plato’s words: ‘What will anyone be profited if under the influence of honour or Money or power, aye, or under the excitement of poetry, he neglect justice and virtue?’ (see Jowett’s Plato, iii
Wisdom: to Win Souls - When a Cheap-Jack has a little knot of people round his van, he eyes them all, and feels sure that the man who is standing over there is a butcher, and that yonder young lad has more Money than brains, and that the girl near him is out with her sweetheart and is soon to be married; now, mark, he will hold up the exact articles which afe likely to attract these customers, and in his harangue, he will have jokes and telling sentences which will turn butcher, and lad, and lass into purchasers
Redeemer - Thus when Abraham made a purchase of a burying-place from the sons of Heth, it is said that he weighed and gave "four hundred shekels of silver, current Money of the merchant. He gave what might be called current Money, that is a full and rich equivalent: yea, more than an equivalent, when for the sins and transgressions of his people he paid for it with the price of his blood
Symmachus, Bishop of Rome - ) to have built, restored, and enriched with ornaments many Roman churches, to have spent Money in redeeming captives, to have furnished yearly Money and clothing to exiled orthodox bishops, and to have ordered the "Gloria in excelsis" to be sung on all Sundays and Saints' days
Short - ) Insufficiently provided; inadequately supplied; scantily furnished; lacking; not coming up to a resonable, or the ordinary, standard; - usually with of; as, to be short of Money
Raphael - he directs Tobias to take the heart, liver, and gall of a fish, manages the marriage, binds the demon, fetches Money from Rages, and heals Tob 12:12-20 gives his description of himself, a passage which probably became the groundwork of later speculations
French Revolution - As the need of Money to carry on the Revolution became acute, it seemed advisable to the Assembly to stop the allowance for the salaries of the clergy and the upkeep of the clergy and to seize on Church property and convert much of it to the support of the new regime
Simon - But he was still a sorcerer at heart, and thought that by paying the right amount of Money, he could receive the Holy Spirit’s power and so perform wonders
Blank - ) A kind of base silver Money, first coined in England by Henry V
Mount - Formerly, a bank or fund of Money
Wages - ...
In a mixed economy of agriculture and pastoralism without coined Money, wages often included little more than meals and a place of employment (Compare Job 7:2 ; John 10:12 )
Perish - The Money is saved instead of being squandered
Account - A computation or mode of reckoning applied to other things, than Money or trade as the Julian account of time
Simon - Subsequently he offered Money to the apostles that he might purchase the power of imparting the gift of the Holy Spirit (from which has arisen the word 'simony'); but he was denounced by Peter
Farm - Rents were formerly pain in provisions, or the produce of land but now they are generally paid in Money
Gather - Isaiah 62 ...
He must gather up Money by degrees
Offer - He offered me a sum of Money
Office - - This office of quarter-master-general not to have the disposal of public Money, except small occasional sums
Check - An order for Money, drawn on a banker or on the cashier of a bank, payable to the bearer
Revolution, French - As the need of Money to carry on the Revolution became acute, it seemed advisable to the Assembly to stop the allowance for the salaries of the clergy and the upkeep of the clergy and to seize on Church property and convert much of it to the support of the new regime
Worth - The worth of a days labor may be estimated in Money, or in wheat
Publican - They overcharged whenever they had an opportunity, ( Luke 3:13 ) they brought false charges of smuggling in the hope of extorting hush-money (Luke 19:8 ) they detained and opened letters on mere suspicion
Macarius, Presbyter of Athanasius - Macarius and the three Meletians were still there when Athanasius arrived (331) on a summons from Constantine; the Meletians brought against the archbishop the fresh charge of supplying Money to Philumenus and Macarius was charged with the breaking of the chalice (Hefele, ii
Phocas, of Sinope - He was the favourite saint of the Greek sailors, who were in the habit of making him a sharer at their meals, the portion set apart for him daily being purchased by some one, and the Money put aside and distributed to the poor on their arrival at port
Wages - ; see Money, §§ 6 , 7 ( b )). It was customary to give a sum, probably a shekel, as earnest-money, the remainder being paid at stipulated intervals, daily or monthly, or in a lump sum at the expiry of the engagement
Adoption - … There were also no less than five witnesses; and an anomalous personage, the libripens , who brought with him a pair of scales to weigh the uncoined copper Money of Rome. The (purchaser) simulated the payment of a price by striking the scales with a piece of Money, and the (vendor) ratified what had been done in a set form of words’ (Maine, Ancient Law , vi
Marriage - ...
After the actual dowry is recited, the sum being specified in shekels, the rights of the children which may hereafter come from the marriage, as well as the payment of the mother's pin-money, are secured by the following clause: "thy pocket Money for one year is besides thy toilet Money which I give thee each year, and it is your right to exact the payment of thy toilet Money and thy pocket Money, which are to be placed to my account, which I give thee
Judas - Afterwards he owned his sin with "an exceeding bitter cry," and cast the Money he had received as the wages of his iniquity down on the floor of the sanctuary, and "departed and went and hanged himself" (Matthew 27:5 )
Insurrection - ) suggests, it may have arisen on account of the aqueduct which Pilate had built with Money taken from the Temple treasury (Josephus, BJ ii
Check - ) A written order directing a bank or banker to pay Money as therein stated
Place - ) To put out at interest; to invest; to loan; as, to place Money in a bank
Fee - From the use of cattle in transferring property, or from barter and payments in cattle, the word came to signify Money it signified also goods, substance in general
Hamor - ...
There is a curious fusion of traditions in Acts 7:10 , where Jacob ‘and our fathers’ are said to have been ‘laid in the tomb which Abraham bought for a Money price from the sons of Emmor in Sychem
Pottery - In Matthew and Zechariah alike, the Lord's representative, Israel's Shepherd, has a paltry price set upon Him by the people; the transaction is done deliberately by men connected with the house of Jehovah; the Money is given to the potter, marking the perpetrators' baseness, guilt, and doom, and the hand of the Lord overrules it all, the Jewish rulers while following their own aims unconsciously fulfilling Jehovah's "appointment
Use - ) The premium paid for the possession and employment of borrowed Money; interest; usury
Divine, Practice Divination - He accepted Money for his services and probably was not beyond adjusting the message to please his clients
Lock - ) To fasten in or out, or to make secure by means of, or as with, locks; to confine, or to shut in or out - often with up; as, to lock one's self in a room; to lock up the prisoners; to lock up one's silver; to lock intruders out of the house; to lock Money into a vault; to lock a child in one's arms; to lock a secret in one's breast
Artaxerxes - ...
When Baasha, king of Israel, seized a border town and built a fort just north of Jerusalem, Asa paid Money to Syria to break its treaty with Israel and attack her
Bethany - On the morrow, in coming from Bethany, He cursed the figtree (Mark 11:12-13), cast out the Money-changers from the temple, and at "even" "went out of the city" (Mark 11:19), lodging at Bethany for the third time, according to Mark. " Jesus therefore in the day could clear the temple of the Money-changers, but at night He was exposed to stratagem; so the very first night that He did not retire to Bethany, but remained in Jerusalem, He was seized
Tithes - ...
If people so desired, they could offer Money instead of their produce or animals. If the offerers lived so far from the tabernacle (or later the temple) that transporting their goods was a problem, they could sell their tithes locally and take the Money instead (Deuteronomy 14:22-27)
Get - We constantly hear it said, I have got no corn, I have got no Money, she has got a fair complexion, when the person means only, I have no corn, I have no Money, she has a fair complexion
Pass Over - ‛Âbar is used in business affairs with silver or Money in the sense of reckoning Money according to the “going” (passing) rate ( Wealth - They boast in their wealth (Hosea 12:8 ), revel in their affluence (Amos 4:1 ; Habakkuk 2:16-17 ), and cannot wait for the Sabbath to end so they can make more Money (Amos 8:5 ). ...
The right use of Money thus forms a crucial part of Jesus' teaching on discipleship. Perhaps the most famous teaching of Jesus on Money is his call to the rich young ruler to sell all he had, give it to the poor, and follow him (Mark 10:21 ; cf. In the second, repentant Zaccheus gives up only half of his possessions; in the third, the faithful servants invest their master's Money for kingdom priorities. But remuneration must never be a motive for ministry (1 Timothy 3:8 ; Titus 1:8 ) and "the love of Money is a root of all kinds of evil" (1 Timothy 6:10 ; cf. ...
Peter too knows false teachers who are "experts in greed" (2 Peter 2:14 ) and commands elders not to be eager for Money but for service (1 Peter 5:2 )
Oates, Titus - In 1667 he was entered as a sizar at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, but soon migrated to Saint John's, where Dr Watson wrote of him: "He was a great dunce, ran into debt, and, being sent away for want of Money, never took a degree
Simon - The term "Simony," as denoting the purchase for Money of spiritual offices, is derived from him
Fat - ...
Leviticus 3:16 (c) This may be taken as a type of the rich blessings of life, health, Money, gifts and talents which may be the portion of a Christian
Deacon, Deaconess - The qualities required in them (1 Timothy 3:8-12) agree with this: ‘not greedy of sordid gain,’ and ‘faithful in all things,’ point to the care of Money
Demas - No doubt the busy commercial centre of Thessalonica offered many opportunities for success in business, and love of Money may have been the besetting sin of this professing Christian
Draught - ) An order for the payment of Money; - in this sense almost always written draft
Sufficiency - ” Other passages use this word of Money ( Eraclius, Deacon of the Church of Hippo - Augustine, fearing that the absolute acceptance of such a gift from so young a man might be the subject of future reproval or regret, caused Eraclius first to invest the Money in land, which might be given back to him should any unforeseen reason for restitution arise
Hazael - But Joash, conscious of his inferiority, bribed him at the price of all the Money he could raise, to evacuate Judea, with which he for the moment complied; yet, in the following year, the army of Hazael returned, entered the territories of Judah, and the city of Jerusalem, slew all the princes of the people, and sent a valuable booty to their royal master, 2 Kings 13:22 ; 2 Chronicles 24:23
Titus Oates - In 1667 he was entered as a sizar at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, but soon migrated to Saint John's, where Dr Watson wrote of him: "He was a great dunce, ran into debt, and, being sent away for want of Money, never took a degree
Servant - In Scripture, a slave a bondman one purchased for Money, and who was compelled to serve till the year of jubilee also, one purchased for a term of years
Rich - Wealthy opulent possessing a large portion of land, goods or Money, or a larger portion than is common to other men or to men of like rank
Firstborn - In the case of people, the parents ceremonially presented their firstborn to God, and then bought the child back by a payment of Money (Numbers 18:15-16; Luke 2:7; Luke 2:23)
Theonas, Bishop of Alexandria - The Christian chamberlains were not to take Money for procuring audience, must be clear of all avarice, duplicity, and scurrility, acting in all things with modesty, courtesy, affability, and justice, must discharge their several duties in the fear of God, with love for their prince and with exact diligence, regarding all his orders which did not clash with God's as coming from God Himself, and taking care in their ministrations to put away all gloom or bad temper, and to refresh his weariness by a cheerful manner and glad obedience
Hilkiah - In the 18th year of Josiah's reign the king directed him to have the Lord's house repaired out of the Money contributed by the people. So faith, fully did the workmen execute their task that no reckoning was made with them of the Money entrusted to them
Raise - Government raises Money by taxes, excise and imposts. Private persons and companies raise Money for their enterprises
Pound - , the mina (Authorized Version ‘pound’), which was 100 of these, was = £4 in our Money. Money and Weights and Measures
Ananias And Sapphira - What do you throw? What do you do? Or is Satan in on you, and are you in his hands and at his service, in Money matters, and what not, before you know where you are? "Ah, sir, you are there again, are you? But my heart is as full today as it can hold of Another," calls out my stairhead friend by reason of her exercised senses. Then the Christian child will be brought up to tithe his pocket-money of sixpence a week for Jesus his Saviour's sake. And, then, all we shall have to do, without straining our hearts or souring our tempers, will be calmly, and at our leisure, to exercise our best discretion as to the proportion and the destination of the stewardship-money we have had intrusted to us. And, when that Apostolic day dawns, our successors in the churches and charities of the land will look back with amazement at our poverty-stricken ways of collecting church Money, leaning on State endowments, and all such like un-Pentecostal expedients. And all because our eyes had, somehow, not been opened to Scriptural wisdom, and to Scriptural love, and to Scriptural liberality, in this whole matter of our Lord's Money
Sabbatical Year - They were to consider themselves one big family, where those who had Money helped those who were in need
Titus - Paul was collecting Money among the Gentile churches of Asia Minor and Greece to take to the needy Jewish Christians in Jerusalem (2 Corinthians 8:1-6; 2 Corinthians 8:16-24)
Much - If you borrow Money, return as much as you receive
Answer - ) To render account, or to be responsible; to be accountable; to make amends; as, the man must answer to his employer for the Money intrusted to his care
Power - ) Ability to act, regarded as latent or inherent; the faculty of doing or performing something; capacity for action or performance; capability of producing an effect, whether physical or moral: potency; might; as, a man of great power; the power of capillary attraction; Money gives power
Do - / auxiliary) To cash or to advance Money for, as a bill or note
Barnabas - We first read of him as one who sold his land and laid the Money at the apostles' feet
Covenant - When Abraham bought the field of Ephron in Machpelah, he paid the Money "in the audience of the sons of Heth" as witnesses, and it was thus made sure unto him
Fish - He paid the tribute with a stateer ("piece of Money") from a fish taken with a hook (Matthew 17:27)
Free - ) Not close or parsimonious; liberal; open-handed; lavish; as, free with his Money
Condition - Terms given, or provided, as the ground of something else that which is established, or to be done, or to happen, as requisite to another act as, I will pay a sum of Money, on condition you will engage to refund it
Gain - Money at interest may gain five, six, or seven per cent
Noble - 11:13); there it modifies the value of an amount of Money
Gold - ...
Gold was used as Money, being exchanged in various weights and values (according to its weight): “And he made three hundred shields of beaten gold; three pound of gold went to one shield …” (1 Kings 10:17; cf
Mill - ) A Money of account of the United States, having the value of the tenth of a cent, or the thousandth of a dollar
Judas - He was accustomed, however, even at this time, to appropriate part of their common stock to his own use, John 12:6 ; and at length sealed his infamy by betraying his Lord to the Jews for Money
Lose - To forfeit by unsuccessful contest as, to lose Money in gaming
Draw - ) To make a draft or written demand for payment of Money deposited or due; - usually with on or upon. ) To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, or the like; as, to draw Money from a bank
Ransom (2) - So at the taking of a census (Exodus 30:12), each Israelite above twenty years had to pay half a shekel—‘atonement-money’ (Exodus 30:15 f. ...
In the above cases in the Law, the ransom is a sum of Money; in the case of the firstborn, though the word כֹּפֶר is not used, it is a sacrifice—a life for a life (cf. Exodus 30:12 above), and in 2 Samuel 21:3-7 the idea, if not the word, is connected with the propitiatory delivering up of Saul’s seven sons to the Gibeonites (after refusal of a Money-satisfaction, 2 Samuel 21:4). Paul’s mind is not troubled by the monetary analogy: it is not of a Money price he is thinking, but of a great ethical reparation rendered to God’s broken law of righteousness
Mark - A weight of certain commodities, but particularly of gold and silver, used in several states of Europe in Great Britain, a Money of account, equal to thirteen shillings and four pence
Bishop - In 1 Timothy 3:1-7 qualifications were given for a “bishop”: reputation, marital status, character traits, hospitality, teaching ability, non-drunkenness, attitude toward Money, responsible parenthood, and length of time as a Christian
Close - ) Difficult to obtain; as, Money is close
Wealth - ...
Christians have to be alert constantly to the dangers associated with Money, as the desire for it can lead to spiritual ruin (Proverbs 11:28; 1 Timothy 6:9-10)
Zerubbabel - For about sixteen years no work was done, though the people still had time and Money to build costly houses for themselves
Balaam - Balaam was a Money hungry false prophet who had a close encounter with the God of Israel, but not close enough
Die - A stamp used in coining Money, in founderies, &c
Soldiers - They must be careful, he says, henceforth not to do violence or extort Money by false accusations, and to be content with their pay
Image - It may also have been very much battered, as Money often is, yet that would not have interfered with its being the image of Caesar: it represented him, and no one else
Servant - Some were bought with Money and some were taken in war: cf
Wine - The Money realized from the sale of a tithe of all their harvest was to be spent “for whatsoever thy soul lusteth after, for oxen, or for sheep, or for wine, or for strong drink, or for whatsoever thy soul desireth: and thou shalt eat there before the Lord thy God, and thou shalt rejoice …” ( Over - ) From one person or place to another regarded as on the opposite side of a space or barrier; - used with verbs of motion; as, to sail over to England; to hand over the Money; to go over to the enemy
Fo - These priests pretend to know into what bodies the dead are transmigrated; and seldom fail of representing their case to the surviving friends as miserable, or uncomfortable; that they may extort Money from them to procure for the deceased a passage into a better state, or pray them out of purgatory, which forms a part of their system
Redemption - ' God having smitten the firstborn of the Egyptians, claimed all the firstborn of Israel, and received the Levites instead of them; but there not being an equivalent number of the Levites, the residue of the firstborn were redeemed by Money: they were thus set free
Can - A nation cannot prosecute a war, without Money or credit
Procurator (2) - This upper servant acted for his master, in the absence of the latter, in all matters connected with Money, and it may safely be said that only a small estate amongst the Romans would be without one
Jehoiakim - ...
In order to raise the large amount of Money that Pharaoh Necho demanded each year from Judah, Jehoiakim taxed his people heavily (2 Kings 23:35)
Love - ...
Note: For philarguria, "love of Money," 1 Timothy 6:10 , see Money (love of)
Simon Magus - The love of Money, and the still more intoxicating love of notoriety, had taken such absolute possession of Simon Magus that he simply could not live out of the eyes of men. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of Money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your miracles like you, I have plenty of Money, and I know where there is plenty more. "Thy Money perish with thee, for I perceive thou art still in the gall of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity!"...
"Giving out that himself was some great one. ...
Simon Magus put the thought of his heart into the form of a Money-proposal to Peter
Passover - Stalls to change foreign Money into the shekel of the temple, which alone could be paid to the priests, were numerous, the whole confusion making the sanctuary like a noisy market" (Geikie's Life of Christ)
Tribute - Levies on the products of the soil were paid partly in kind and partly in Money, and the poll-tax was paid in Imperial coinage (Luke 20:24)
Town-Clerk - This had happened in the case of Branchidae, and only the intervention of a prominent citizen, who took the journey to Rome and doubtless spent a large sum of Money, was able to recover their old rights for the populace
Wealth - The desire for wealth is dangerous to men, and ‘the love of Money is a root of all kinds of evil’ (1 Timothy 6:9-10); the wealthy are warned not to be high-minded, or to put their trust in riches, but to use their wealth in good works (1 Timothy 6:17-19)
Year of Jubilee - Purchase of property was actually tantamount to assuming a lease for a maximum of forty-nine years, and the seller always retained the right to cancel the purchase by settling with the buyer on the amount of Money that was still payable, taking into account the number of years that the buyer had made use of the property
Gold - Indeed, it was just because Money, clothing, and the wayfarer’s staff were the often-proved necessaries of ordinary travel, that the omission of them in their case would impart to their message about the Kingdom a meaning of instantaneousness and urgency
Double - ) To increase by adding an equal number, quantity, length, value, or the like; multiply by two; to double a sum of Money; to double a number, or length
Ransom - Suppose some generous prince, out of compassion to any of his captive subjects, were to abridge his pleasures, and give large sums of Money to bring them out of captivity—how would the deed be applauded, and his name be idolized to all gene rations! But supposing this generous prince was to give himself for them, and exchange their persons in slavery by voluntarily surrendering up himself to such a state—what would be said of this? And yet the Lord Jesus hath done this, and infinitely more, not for friends, but enemies, not for those who loved him, but those who hated him; and not only by slavery, but by death
Alms, Almsgiving - ‘An alms’ ( Acts 3:3 ) is something freely given, in Money or in kind, to the needy, from motives of love and pity for the recipient, and of gratitude to the Giver of all
Fail - Money failed in the land of Egypt
Raise - ) To bring together; to collect; to levy; to get together or obtain for use or service; as, to raise Money, troops, and the like
Make - ) To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make Money
Mark - 8 cents of United States Money; the equivalent of one hundred pfennigs
Gold - Indeed, it was just because Money, clothing, and the wayfarer’s staff were the often-proved necessaries of ordinary travel, that the omission of them in their case would impart to their message about the Kingdom a meaning of instantaneousness and urgency
Corinth - And therefore it was also on account of these women that the city was crowded with people and grew rich; for instance, the ship-captains freely squandered their Money, and hence the proverb, “Not for every man is the voyage to Corinth. While their ships were being carried across the isthmus, sailors came to the city to spend their Money on the pleasures of Corinth
Antiochus - ...
Antiochus had great difficulty in raising the Money, and on attempting to rob a temple ...
at Elymais he was killed. His principal work was the raising of Money to...
pay the war-tax to Rome
Land, Ground - ...
Ground or Land as property During the severe famine in Egypt, the Egyptians used all their Money and sold all their cattle to Joseph for food (Genesis 47:13-17 ). The next year, when they needed more food but had no more Money or cattle, they sold themselves and their lands to Joseph
Goel - Farther, to guard the life of man, and prevent the perpetration of murder, Moses positively prohibited the receiving of a sum of Money from a murderer in the way of compensation, Numbers 35:31 . It is alike legal for him to forgive him, to accept a sum of Money as the price of blood, or to put him to death
jo'Seph - ( Genesis 41:54-57 ) [1] After the famine had lasted for a time, apparently two years, Joseph gathered up all the Money that was found in the land of Egypt and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they brought, and brought it into Pharaoh's house, (Genesis 47:13,14 ) and when the Money was exhausted, all the cattle, and finally all the land except that of the priests, and apparently, as a consequence, the Egyptians themselves
Tithe - ...
But in case of distance, permission is given to convert the produce into Money, which is to be taken to the appointed place, and there laid out in the purchase of food for a festal celebration, in which the Levite is, by special command, to be included
Tower - 222) suggests that the tower may have been connected with the building of the aqueduct constructed by Pilate with Money taken from the temple treasury (Josephus Ant
Servant, Service - Paul regarded the collection of Money for the church in Jerusalem as a "service" (2 Corinthians 8:4 ; 9:11-13 ), along with preaching and ministering in spiritual things
Back - Again in return as, give back the Money
Hard - Not plentiful not prosperous pressing distressing as hard times, when markets are bad, and Money of course scarce
Bag - was the receptacle for the Money of Jesus and the disciples; it contained, no doubt, the proceeds of the sale of their goods, and gave the idea later of the common fund (Acts 4:32 f
Dove - So we find in the temple courts them that sold doves (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:14; John 2:16),—no doubt for such sacrifices,—whom Christ drove out, along with the Money-changers
Order - ) Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay Money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like; as, orders for blankets are large
Dorotheus (10), Bishop of Thessalonica - John and the presbyter Epiphanius, who had remained at Thessalonica in his absence, wrote in alarm to the remaining legates at Constantinople lest Dorotheus and others should re-establish themselves in their sees by liberal use of Money
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - His confidants were Lucius the archdeacon, who was said to take Money for ordinations (i
Claudius - Paul being brought to Cesarea, where Felix usually resided, was well treated by this governor, who permitted his friends to see him, and render him services, hoping the Apostle would procure his redemption by a sum of Money
Throw - To throw away, to lose by neglect or folly to spend in vain as, to throw away time to throw away Money
Use - Interest the premium paid for the possession and employment of borrowed Money
Publican - ...
Whether in the service of the hated Roman Emperor or of Herod Antipas, who was in complete subservience to him, the tax-gatherer was most unpopular with the Jews; for, apart from the obvious liability of the method to abuse, the mere fact of the Money being thus raised for an alien power was detestable in their eyes
Wages - Micah laments that Judah's "leaders judge for a bribe, her priests teach for a price, and her prophets tell fortunes for Money" (3:11). When Jesus commissions the twelve disciples to preach throughout Israel, they are urged not to take Money with them; it is expected that they will be paid by those to whom they minister, for "the worker is worth his keep" (Matthew 10:10 ). The poor are richly rewarded because they can now be members of God's kingdom even though they have no Money. Dempster...
See also Money ; Reward ; Wealth ; Work ...
Bibliography
Wealth - When our Lord dispatched the Twelve on a special tour for preaching and healing, and when He sent the Seventy on a similar errand, He commanded them to take with them neither Money nor food ( Matthew 10:10 , Luke 10:4 ); but these were special instructions on special occasions, and doubtless on their return to Him the former system of a common purse was reverted to (cf. Further, in the parables of the Pounds and the Talents ( Luke 19:12 , Matthew 25:14 ) He teaches, under the symbolism of Money, that men are not owners but stewards of all they possess; while in the parable of the Unjust Steward He points out one of the true uses of wealth namely, to relieve the poor, and so to insure a welcome from them when the eternal tabernacles are entered ( Luke 16:9 )
Blood - Among the Bedouin Arabs the thar, or law of blood, comes into effect if the offer of Money satisfaction be refused. So among the Anglo-Saxons the wer-gild, or Money satisfaction for homicide, varying in amount according to the rank, was customary
Freedom - They were allowed to conduct their own personal affairs, earn and save Money for themselves, own property, and even own their own slaves. They also had the opportunity to buy their freedom if they could save or borrow the Money their owner charged for freeing them
Priest - (14:28; 26:12) ...
Of the redemption Money, paid at the fixed rate of five shekels a head, for the first-born of man or beast. (Numbers 18:14-19 ) ...
Of the redemption Money paid in like manner for men or things specially dedicated to the Lord
Debt, Debtor (2) - ...
In the Gospels we have suggestions of the Money-customs of the day at Matthew 21:12-13, Mark 11:15-18, Luke 19:45-48, and John 2:13-17. The Sadducees, whose love of Money was whetted by enjoyment of the Temple dues, were not the men to show mercy to a debtor, nor were the Pharisees behind them, more Puritanic in zeal, and rigidly enforcing the letter of their writs. In the spirit of the Golden Rule (Matthew 7:12, Luke 6:31-36) merciful dealings will show themselves in undefined ways; and the love of brothermen should counteract the love of Money which prompts to stem exactions in every case alike
Trade And Commerce - There is in the OT no allusion to the practice of coining metal, and where sums of Money are mentioned they are given in silver; the effect, however, of the quantities of gold brought into Palestine in Solomon’s time was not, according to the historian, to appreciate silver, as might have been expected, but to depreciate it, and render it unfashionable. The Money-lender appears at the very commencement of the history of the Israelitish kingdom, where we are told that David’s followers were to some extent insolvent debtors; and the Jewish law allowed the taking of pledges, but not (it would seem) the taking of interest, except from foreigners. To the institution of banking there is a familiar reference in the NT ( Matthew 25:27 ); the persons there referred to like the bankers of modern times undertook the charge of deposits for the use of which they paid some interest; the Money-changers ( Matthew 21:12 etc. Those who hoarded Money more often put it ‘under the stone’ ( Sir 29:10 ) than entrusted it to bankers; and this is still probably the favourite practice all over the nearer East. Another common practice was to deposit Money with trustworthy persons, to which there is a reference in Tobit ( Tob 4:20 etc
House - The poor had neither the space nor Money for furniture
Burial - The first commercial transaction recorded is that of the purchase of a burial-place, for which Abraham weighed to Ephron "four hundred shekels of silver current Money with the merchants
Rich, Riches, Richly, Rich Man - ...
C — 2: χρῆμα (Strong's #5536 — Noun Neuter — chrema — khray'-mah ) "what one uses or needs" (chraomai, "to use"), "a matter, business," hence denotes "riches," Mark 10:23,24 ; Luke 18:24 ; see Money , No
Metals - Silver was used for commerce, as "money" (Genesis 23:16; Genesis 17:12; Genesis 20:16), gold for ornament
Micah, Book of - The wealthy lent them Money at interest rates so high that the farmers found it impossible to pay their debts
Back - ) In concealment or reserve; in one's own possession; as, to keep back the truth; to keep back part of the Money due to another
Epaphroditus - Paul’s earlier imprisonment with a substantial ‘gift’ (presumably of Money) from the Philippian Christians to the Apostle, of whose impoverishment they had heard
Debt - The metaphor of the Money payment has ceased to be prominent, except where it is implied by the context
Wing - ...
Proverbs 23:5 (a) Wealth, Money and riches certainly do disappear, sometimes gradually, and sometimes suddenly
Sepulchre - They who have made again of relics, and got Money by shewing spots and places, do, no doubt to this hour, pretend to shew the tomb where Jesus lay, and numberless circumstances connected with the history
Ark - ...
During the reign of Joash (or Jehoash), when the temple was repaired, Money for the work was deposited in a "chest" with a hole in its lid
Dorcas - ’ One feature or her benevolent activity was the making of garments which she distributed among the poor, a circumstance which is regarded as indicating special goodness, as a woman with means adequate to provide such benefactions might have been content with merely giving her Money
Table - ) To lay or place on a table, as Money
Indulgences - They could not but perceive that if they could persuade men they had the power of granting pardon for sin, it would give them a complete influence over their consciences; and if they could at the same time prevail upon them to purchase these pardons for Money, it must add greatly to the wealth of the Roman see
Reserve - In the United States the reserve of a national bank consists of the amount of lawful Money it holds on hand against deposits, which is required by law to be not less than 15 per cent (U
Love - ...
We speak of the love of amusements, the love of books, the love of Money, and the love of whatever contributes to our pleasure or supposed profit
Fellowship - They share in the gospel by helping those who preach it (Philippians 1:5; Philippians 4:14-18), and share in the financial support of poor Christians by giving Money to help them (Romans 15:27; 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:11)
Lord's Day, the - In 1Corinthians 16:1-3Paul exhorts the church at Corinth to set aside a sum of Money "on the first day of every week" for the church at Jerusalem, as the Galatian churches were already doing. Alternately, Paul's comments to the Corinthians concerning the laying aside of Money on the first day of the week do not indicate whether this action was connected with a formal gathering of the church (1 Corinthians 16:13 )
Debt, Debtor - Paul delicately refers to Money or valuables stolen from Philemon by Onesimus. ἀρραβών (Ephesians 1:14) presents the idea of pledge (mortgage), earnest Money to guarantee the full payment (Deissmann, op
Betrothal - At the same time it is clear that when a woman was designated (ועד Exodus 21:8-9) by the head of her family as the future wife of another man, there was paid over by the prospective bridegroom a certain sum of Money (or service, as in the case of Jacob), and a contract which was inviolable was then entered into (Genesis 34:12, Exodus 22:17). The Money payment belonged originally to the family of the woman, but gradually came to belong in part or wholly to the woman herself
Lay - To lay out, to expend as, to lay out Money, or sums of Money
Joseph - ) Joseph bartered grain successively for the Egyptian Money (the Money was in the form of rings not coined but weighed), cattle and land, of which he retained only a fifth of the produce for Pharaoh and took nothing from the priests. He filled their sacks (Hebrew, "vessels") and restored their Money (Luke 6:34-35). The discovery of their Money alarmed both the brothers and Jacob; "all these things are against me," but see Romans 8:31. So with double Money and a present of balm (balsam gum), honey (else grape juice boiled down to syrup, dibs ), spices (storax ), myrrh (ladanum ), and nuts (pistachio nuts), they brought Benjamin. Tremblingly they told the steward as to their Money, for they feared on being brought into the house they should be imprisoned there
Chariot - In the following verse a chariot from Musri is said to have cost 600 shekels of silver (see Money), and a horse 150, hut the Gr
Vows - Money that should have gone to the support of aged parents was pronounced to be ‘Corban,’ the son felt himself relieved of all further responsibility regarding his parents, and took honour to himself for having piously dedicated his substance to God (see Matthew 15:5 , Mark 7:9 ff
Burial - With the Money paid to Judas the chief priests purchased a field to use as a burial place for foreigners (Matthew 27:5-7 )
Laban (2) - ...
His daughters felt they had no longer inheritance or interest in their father's house, as Laban had sold them, as if strangers, to Jacob for his service, and took all the profit of that service to himself, virtually, said they, "devouring our Money" (Genesis 31:14-16), i
Break - ) To exchange for other Money or currency of smaller denomination; as, to break a five dollar bill
Circoncelliones - ...
Sometimes they gave Money to those whom they met, and threatened to murder them if they did not make them martyrs
Spies - ’ The putting of the question about the tribute Money, which immediately follows, was a cunning plot, in which the Pharisees and the Herodians, two mutually hostile parties, joined (cf
Judas - Judas maintained a fair character among his fellow-apostles, and was entrusted with the custody of their Money, John 12:6; John 13:29; nor do they seem to have suspected him even when our Lord was distinctly warning them that one of their number would betray him
Deliverer - In the Koine the word λύτρον usually meant the purchase-money for the manumission of slaves (A
Fierceness - ...
Of recorded deeds the incident of the driving out of the vendors and Money-changers from the temple precincts (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:15) is the most notable: but it is in the vigour of His language that the possibilities of fierceness in Him are most revealed
Tithes - On coming into the land a second tenth of all produce was to be taken to Jerusalem, or, if the distance was too great, it could be turned into Money, and when the offerer arrived at Jerusalem he could purchase any thing that he desired, which was to be eaten there by himself, his children, his servants, and any Levites that might be there at the time
Slip - ) A counterfeit piece of Money, being brass covered with silver
Carry - If a man carries it off, there is so much Money saved
Tadmor - The riches of India, thus brought into Judea, were from thence disseminated over those countries of the north and west at that time inhabited or known; while the same country, Judea, became, for a season, like Tyre, the point of return and exchange of the Money and the commodities of those countries, the centre of communication between the east and the west
Publican - They often let out their provinces in smaller parcels to the socii: so called, because they were admitted to a share in the contract perhaps for the sake of more easily raising the purchase Money; at least to assist in collecting the tribute
Offer, Offering - , Matthew 8:4 ; Mark 1:44 ; Acts 7:42 ; 21:26 ; Hebrews 5:1,3 ; 8:3 ; 9:7,9 ; 10:1,2,8,11 ; (c) of "offerings" previous to the Law, Hebrews 11:4,17 (of Isaac by Abraham); (d) of gifts "offered" to Christ, Matthew 2:11 , RV, "offered" (AV, "presented unto"); (e) of prayers "offered" by Christ, Hebrews 5:7 ; (f) of the vinegar "offered" to Him in mockery by the soldiers at the cross, Luke 23:36 ; (g) of the slaughter of disciples by persecutors, who think they are "offering" service to God, John 16:2 , RV (AV, "doeth"); (h) of Money "offered" by Simon the sorcerer, Acts 8:18
Reach - The law reached the intention of the promoters, and this act fixed the natural price of Money
Waste - Consumption loss useless expense any loss or destruction which is neither necessary nor promotive of a good end a loss for which there is no equivalent as a waste of goods or Money a waste of time a waste of labor a waste of words
Ecclesiastes - The writer gives advice about religion, Money and other matters (5:1-7:14), and suggests that the way to contentment is to practise moderation (7:15-8:17)
Lot - You all take of Lot who marry, and build, and borrow Money on the strength of this rich man's old age, and that ageing woman's childlessness. Lot was fast becoming the father of all hard-faced, hard-hearted, close-fisted, Money-loving men. The ministry, teaching, law, medicine, the army, political life, newspaper life, trade of all kinds, the Money-market of all kinds, and so on. He had invested Money, and he had embarked himself and his household in the land round Sodom, in the produce of Sodom, and in her splendid profits. But to come out of that manufacture, that import, that export; to refund with usury those Moneys; to rise up at the loss of thousands and thousands, nay, possibly at the loss of every penny a man possesses; to leave a splendidly paying business merely at the twinge of a secretly tortured conscience,-no man ever does it
Go - If our exports are of less value than our imports, our Money must go to pay the balance. Money goes farther now than it did during the war
Make - To raise, as, profit to gain to collect as, to make Money in trade or by husbandry to make an estate by steady industry. He promised to pay, but was not able to make out the Money or the whole sum
Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer - If, however, the father of the slain person offered to accept an amount of Money, the owner could pay the redemption price and live ( Exodus 21:29-30 ; compare Exodus 21:32 )
si'Mon - Subsequently he witnessed the effect produced by the imposition of hands, as practiced by the apostles Peter and John, and, being desirous of acquiring a similar power for himself, he offered a sum of Money for it
Parents - So, among the great, permitting their children to spend their time and their Money as they please, indulging them in perpetual public diversion, and setting before them awful examples of gambling, indolence, blasphemy, drinking, and almost every other vice; what is this but ruining their children, and "bequeathing to posterity a nuisance?" But, while we would call upon parents to exercise their authority, it must not be understood that children are to be entirely at their disposal under all circumstances, especially when they begin to think for themselves
Treasury - Now, we know that there were special treasure-chambers within the inner court, in which not only the precious vessels of the sacrificial service and the costly garments of the priests, but vast sums of Money and various other valuables were kept, and that these treasure-chambers, which were under the charge of officers known as γαζοφύλακες, were called γαζοφυλάκια (Nehemiah 10:37 LXX Septuagint ; Josephus BJ vi
Kin - Exodus 21:30 ) of any legal provision for compounding with the relatives of the murdered man by means of a Money payment, the poinç of the Greeks (see Butcher and Lang’s tr
Firstborn - Still, to mark the consecration of Israel to Jehovah, the redemption Money was exacted for every firstborn (Numbers 18:15)
Line - ) To put something in the inside of; to fill; to supply, as a purse with Money
Porphyrius, Bishop of Gaza - By Porphyry's desire Mark visited Thessalonica, and turned the proceeds of Porphyry's share of his paternal property into Money, the whole of which, on his return, Porphyry distributed to the poor and to various monasteries, supporting himself by manual labour
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - Money is greatly coveted because it gives its possessor the entrance into the best society of the day. Money brings troops of friends also, so long as it lasts. Now you may have your shoes put on and taken off for Money, but you cannot have them tied with heart-strings, as Polycarp's shoes were tied that day
Parable - THE LOST PIECE OF Money. The piece of Money was lost in the house, even as many persons in God's sight were lost in the outward profession of being Abraham's children (as many indeed are lost now in Christendom). The LOST SHEEP; the LOST PIECE OF Money; and the PRODIGAL SON
Apocrypha - Tobit had left a large sum of Money with a man in Media. When he became blind, he sent his son to collect the Money. Raphael collected the Money that was left in Media, and the blindness of Tobit was cured by means of the fish's gall
Amphilochius, Archbishop of Iconium - ...
It is not improbable that trouble in regard to Money matters about 369 weaned Amphilochius from his worldly pursuits and turned his thoughts inward. Amphilochius the purchase-money of an estate at Canotala ( ib
Funeral, Rites - " The Greeks used to put a piece of Money in the mouth of the deceased, which was thought to be the fare over the infernal river: they abstained from banquets; tore, cut, or shaved their hair: sometimes throwing themselves on the ground, and rolling in the dust; beating their breasts, and even tearing their flesh with their nails
Rich (And Forms) - It repudiates such things as rituals, sacraments, masses, prayers, penance, religious activities, Money, time, tears and ecclesiastical powers
Crowd - 4) was 900 talents, nearly £400,000 of our Money
Economics - ...
The development of capital injected new subjects into the study of economics, chiefly that of usury, first of the justice of requiring any interest at all for borrowed Money and then of excessive interest
Gifts - In later times, when false prophets, in order to obtain Money, prophesied without truth and without authority, the true prophets, for the purpose of keeping the line of distinction as broad as possible, rejected every thing that looked like reward
Accusation, Accuse - , "sycophant") means (a) "to accuse wrongfully;" Luke 3:14 (AV and RV, margin); RV, "exact wrongfully;" (b) "to exact Money wrongfully, to take anything by false accusation," Luke 19:8 , and the RV text of Luke 3:14
Charge - That which constitutes debt, in commercial transactions an entry of Money or the price of goods, on the debit side of an account
Hezekiah - Even when the Assyrians had forced Hezekiah to pay them large amounts of Money, they did not retreat
Monastery - There were other causes that concurred to bring on their ruin: many of the religious were loose and vicious; the monks were generally thought to be in their hearts attached to the pope's supremacy; their revenues were not employed according to the intent of the donors; many cheats in images, feigned miracles, and counterfeit relics, had been discovered, which brought the monks into disgrace; the observant friars had opposed the king's divorce from queen Catharine; and these circumstances operated, in concurrence with the king's want of a supply and the people's desire to save their Money, to forward a motion in parliament, that, in order to support the king's state, and supply his wants, all the religious houses might be conferred upon the crown, which were not able to spend above 200 50: a year; and an act was passed for that purpose, 27 Hen. which came into the hands of the king by the dissolution, and for the value of Money at that time, which was at least six times, as much as at present, and also consider that the estimate of the lands was generally supposed to be much under the real worth, we must conclude their whole revenues to have been immense
Redeem - 14:45 indicates that Money is not intrinsic in the word; Saul is determined to execute Jonathan for his involuntary transgression, but “… the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not. However, the Israelite males still had to be “redeemed” (pâdâh) from this service by payment of specified “redemption Money” ( Turn - To change to transform as,to turn evil to good to turn goods into Money. To keep passing and changing in the course of trade as, to turn Money or stock two or three times in the year
Poverty (2) - That Christ had the true Israelite contempt for Money and commercial prosperity is at least hinted in the story of the Temptation (Matthew 4:10, Luke 4:8), and shown quite plainly in the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard: ‘It is my will to give unto this last even as unto thee,’ Matthew 20:15,—a principle which, as Ruskin saw (Unto this Last), is a defiance of political economy as ordinarily understood. Christ demanded the surrender not of Money in itself, but of everything that could interfere with the interests of the Kingdom of heaven; in this sense the verb ἀφίημι, ‘to give up, leave’ (Matthew 19:29, Mark 10:28, Matthew 4:20, Mark 1:18; cf
the Prodigal Son - 'A young man with a little Money,' he had been told, 'can command anything he likes in the great city. A young man who has never been from home can have no idea of the pleasures that are provided in the city for young men whose fathers have Money. The games, the shows, the theatres, the circuses, the feasts, the dances, the freedom of all kinds; there is absolutely nothing that a young man's heart can desire that is not open to him who brings a good purse of Money to the city with him
the Ten Virgins - He may pay his oil bill, and yet have plenty of Money left wherewith to buy wine and milk for himself and for his family. There are some places of sale, bazaars and such like, where a great income is made just by the entry-money. To get your Money ready takes time
Simon Magus - " We are further told that he was so impressed by the miracles wrought by Philip that he asked and obtained admission to Christian baptism; but that he subsequently betrayed the hollowness of his conversion by offering Money to Peter to obtain the power of conferring the gift of the Holy Ghost. When therefore Simon offered Money for the power of conferring the Holy Ghost it was really to obtain the rank of apostle. We are therefore asked to detect here a covert account of the refusal of the elder apostles to admit Paul's claim to rank with them backed though it was by a gift of Money for the poor saints in Jerusalem
Contribution - When one realizes that such giving came on top of Money set aside for tithes to maintain the temple and priesthood, it is clear that such contributions represented a reaching out to those in need with unconditional mercy
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - " During his confinement here, two messengers arrived with Money and assurances of goodwill from the churches of Vercelli and neighbourhood
Measures - The talent, 2 Samuel 12:30, 3000 shekels, 30 maneh, 1500 ounces, equal to 93 pounds 12 ounces avoirdupois, see Money
Firstborn - 2 Kings 3:27 , Micah 6:7 ), but the practice would soon grow up of ‘redeeming’ them by Money or payments in kind
Dry Dried Drieth - Their constant conversation is about Money, society, pleasure and health, but no desire for GOD
Heritage - As we have sold ourselves for nought, so are we redeemed without Money
Agriculture - With regard to occupancy, a tenant might pay a fixed Money rent, ( Song of Solomon 8:11 ) or a stipulated share of the fruits
Tithes - Of those nine parts that remained to the proprietors, after the tithe was paid to the Levites, they took still another tenth part, which was either sent to Jerusalem in kind, or, if it was too far, they sent the value in Money; adding to it a fifth from the whole as the rabbins inform us
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - ...
B — 1: κεφάλαιον (Strong's #2774 — Noun Neuter — kephalaion — kef-al'-ah-yon ) akin to the adjective kephalaios, "belonging to the head," and kephale, "the head," denotes the chief point or principal thing in a subject, Hebrews 8:1 , "the chief point is this" (AV, "the sum"); elsewhere in Acts 22:28 (of principal, as to Money), "(a great) sum
Proverb - Instances resembling Proverbs 30:15-31 are common among the modern Arabs and Jews in Syria, as when it is said: ‘There are three chief voices in the world, that of running water, of the Torah, and of Money
Call - ...
To call in, to collect, as to call in debts or Money or to draw from circulation, as to call in clipped coin or to summon together to invite to come together as, to call in neighbors or friends
Sennacherib - The three hundred talents of silver mentioned in Scripture may have been all that was given in Money, and the five hundred additional claimed in the Ninevite record may include the temple and palace treasures, given by Hezekiah as the price of peace
Nerva - The Money for this special purpose seems to have been derived from land
Reward - For example, some may spend a great deal of time and Money on personal hobbies that have no eternal worth. They are not evil, unless undue amounts of time and Money are spent on them; but they may not be of any eternal profit either
Moral Aspects of Monopoly - This just remuneration comprises: ...
a living wage to all laborers, and something more to those:
who possess exceptional ability or skill
who put forth unusual efforts
who perform disagreeable tasks
who turn out unusually large products
fair profits for the business man on account of his activities as director of industries
a fair rate of interest on the actual amount of Money invested in the business, which rate will be determined by the rate prevailing in competitive businesses subject to the same amount of risk
This is the commonly accepted norm
Monopoly - This just remuneration comprises: ...
a living wage to all laborers, and something more to those:
who possess exceptional ability or skill
who put forth unusual efforts
who perform disagreeable tasks
who turn out unusually large products
fair profits for the business man on account of his activities as director of industries
a fair rate of interest on the actual amount of Money invested in the business, which rate will be determined by the rate prevailing in competitive businesses subject to the same amount of risk
This is the commonly accepted norm
Monopoly, Moral Aspects of - This just remuneration comprises: ...
a living wage to all laborers, and something more to those:
who possess exceptional ability or skill
who put forth unusual efforts
who perform disagreeable tasks
who turn out unusually large products
fair profits for the business man on account of his activities as director of industries
a fair rate of interest on the actual amount of Money invested in the business, which rate will be determined by the rate prevailing in competitive businesses subject to the same amount of risk
This is the commonly accepted norm
Deliver - " The Hebrew word, natan [ 2 Chronicles 34:15 ), Money (2 Kings 12:15 ), horses (2 Kings 18:23 ), and goods (Esther 6:9 )
Deborah - "...
"The kings of Canaan took no gain of Money," i
Slave/Servant - Industrious slaves could make and save Money and purchase their own freedom
Pass - ) To put in circulation; to give currency to; as, to pass counterfeit Money
Judas Iscariot - Stung to the quick at their refusal to take back the Money, while they condemned himself, he went to the temple, cast down the whole sum in the treasury, or place for receiving the offerings of the people; and, after he had thus returned the wages of iniquity, he retired to some lonely place, not far, perhaps, from the scene of Peter's repentance; and, in the frenzy of despair, and at the instigation of the devil, hanged himself; crowning with suicide the murder of his master and his friend; rejecting his compassionate Saviour, and plunging his own soul into perdition! In another place it is said that, ‘falling headlong, he burst asunder, and all his bowels gushed out,' Acts 1:18
Look - To seek to search as, to look for lost Money, or lost cattle
Bride - In some parts of the east, a measure of corn is formally mentioned in contracts for their concubines, or temporary wives, beside the sum of Money which is stipulated by way of dowry. The espousals by Money, or a written instrument, were performed by the man and woman under a tent or canopy erected for that purpose. After the benedictions, the bride is conducted with great pomp to the house of her husband: this is usually done in the evening; and as the procession moved along, Money, sweetmeats, flowers, and other articles, were thrown among the populace, which they caught in cloths made for such occasions, stretched in a particular manner upon frames
Violence - —In Luke 3:14 part of the advice given by John the Baptist to the soldiers was, ‘Do violence to no man’ (μηδένα διασείσητε), the verb meaning, ‘like concutio in juridical Latin, to extort from one by intimidation Money or other property’ (Grimm-Thayer). According to him, it is applied in opposition to the Pharisees, who despised the admonition as to the right use of Money
Servant of the Lord, the - Isaiah 54:1 shows the outreach of the Servant's work, and Isaiah 55:1 gives the glorious call to receive the salvation won by the Servant's redemptive work, “without Money and without price” ( Isaiah 55:1 )
Tithe, Tithing - If it was too far, the offerer was told that the goods could be sold locally and the Money used near the sanctuary to buy "anything you wish" including oxen, sheep, wine, or strong drink (Deuteronomy 14:22-26 )
Ananias - ANANIAS, one of the first Christians of Jerusalem, who being converted, with his wife Sapphira, sold his estate; (as did the other Christians at Jerusalem, under a temporary regulation that they were to have all things in common;) but privately reserved a part of the purchase Money to himself
Synagogue - Lightfoot believes them to have possessed a civil power, and to have constituted the lowest civil tribunal, commonly known as "the council of three," whose office it was to judge minor offences against religion, and also to decide the differences that arose between any members of the synagogue, as to Money matters, thefts, losses, etc
Marcus, a Gnostic - He abused the influence he thus acquired over silly women to draw much Money from them and it is said even to gain from them more shameful compliances
Wandering Stars - It was not that our Lord preached submission to Rome, though no doubt the decision as to the tribute Money was capable of being represented in that light-it was that He raised a spirit which moved in another plane than that of resistance or submission to imperial power. from extorting Money by violence‡ and making false charges; they were also to be content with their pay (Luke 3:14). If extorting Money by threats is pot covered by διασείσητε, it is embraced by συκοφαντήσητε, which also could connote rough treatment, as is plain from the Passio S. The soldiers bullied the prisoners, in order to get Money from them for certain privileges and slight relaxations of the prison regime
Paul as a Pastor - ...
We do not at first sight see exactly why Paul should be so sore, and so sensitive, and so full of such scrupulosity, about Money matters. He is collecting Money, they said, from all his so-called Churches, and is stealthily laying up a fortune for himself and for his family in Tarsus and Jerusalem. At the same time, though considerations of Money had nothing at all to do with it, some other matters undoubtedly had to do with it
Joseph - His method was to sell corn first for Money (rings of gold, whose weight was certified by special officials), and when all this was exhausted ( Genesis 47:15 ), corn was given in exchange for cattle of every kind, and finally for the land. ]'>[2] ) on the way, the discovery of their Money in their sacks increased their anxiety, and for a time their father positively refused to consent to further dealings with Egypt. They set out homewards in high spirits, unaware that Joseph had directed that each man’s Money should be placed in his sack, and his own divining-cup of silver ( Genesis 44:5 ; the method of divination was hydromancy an article was thrown into a vessel of water, and the movements of the water were thought to reveal the unknown) in that of Benjamin
Wealth (2) - This is implied in such parables as those of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-8), all of which deal with the uses of Money, without any disapprobation of its possession being indicated. It is implied in His parting injunctions to His disciples (Luke 22:35-36), and in the saying, ‘Make to yourselves friends by means of the mammon of unrighteousness’ (Luke 16:9), which also involve the possession and use of Money
Census - The earlier numbering for collecting atonement Money from every male of 20 or upward (Exodus 30:11-16; Exodus 38:25-26) gave the same number, 603,550, as that nine months later (Numbers 1:1-3-46; Exodus 40:17), in the second month of the second year, four weeks after the rearing of the tabernacle. The reason is, because the former census for gathering the atonement head Money was taken as the basis for mustering all fit for war nine months later
Atonement - It views the sin as toward God, and is ransom, when not used literally for sums of Money; and kapporeth is the mercy seat. ' So in Exodus 21:30 a kopher (translated 'sum of Money') is laid upon a man to save his life where his ox had killed his neighbour; but in Numbers 35:31 no kopher was to be taken for the life of a murderer; for (ver
Versions of the Scripture, English - On one occasion his enemies purchased a large portion of an edition to destroy it, and the Money thus obtained furnished the funds for bringing out a revised issue. which books, albeit that they neither can be there printed without great cost, nor here sold without great adventure and peril: yet cease they not with Money sent from hence, to print them there, and send them hither, by the whole vatts-full at once
Damascus - Instead, Ahaz sent Money to Tiglath-pileser, asking him to rescue Judah from Israel and Damascus
Sacraments - in two senses: ( a ) passively, as a legal term, to denote a sum of Money deposited by the parties to a suit, which was forfeited by the loser and appropriated to sacred uses; ( b ) actively, as a military term, to denote the oath taken by newly enlisted soldiers
Unwritten Sayings - , speaks of ‘the commandment of Jesus which saith, Prove yourselves trustworthy Money changers
Reconcile, Reconciliation - A — 1: καταλλάσσω (Strong's #2644 — Verb — katallasso — kat-al-las'-so ) properly denotes "to change, exchange" (especially of Money); hence, of persons, "to change from enmity to friendship, to reconcile
Slave - This was particularly so among corrupt officials and ruthless Money-lenders (2 Kings 4:1; Nehemiah 5:5; Amos 2:6; see LENDING)
Sabbath - Some were annoyed because it interrupted their Money-making activities (Amos 8:5), and others used the day for their own pleasure, without concern for God (Isaiah 58:13-14; Jeremiah 17:21-23)
Persia - The use of minted coins and the development of a Money economy aided this identification with a larger world
Covenant, Book of the - The position of women is that the daughter is the property of her father, who receives Money for her when he gives her in marriage, and also exacts from any who should dishonour her the price she would have brought as a bride; the injury is thought of as being done not to the daughter, who is only a chattel, but to the father
Redeem, Redemption - Money was sometimes paid to deliver a person from death (Exodus 21:30 ; Numbers 3:46-51 ; 18:16 ; cf
Goodness - So the goodness of Christ is not lessened by His fierce handling of the Money-changers and traders within the Temple (Matthew 21:12 ff
Look - ‘He beheld (ἐθεώρει) how the people cast Money into the treasury’ (Mark 12:41)—appreciating not only the matter of their gift, but the manner of it
Steward, Stewardship - ; (b) pursue our calling, whatever it may be, in the interest of God’s Kingdom, whether our work be that of the labourer, the farmer, the merchant, the lawyer, physician, statesman, teacher, preacher, or any other; (c) utilize time, influence, opportunities, Money, in the wisest way; (d) urge and help others to do the same
Zerubbabel - In the second year of their coming, in the second month, having by Cyrus' decree timber, (including cedars from Lebanon brought by sea to Joppa,) and stone for the building, and Money for the builders (Ezra 6:4), they laid the temple foundations with sounding of trumpets by the priests, and of cymbals by the Levites, and mingled shouts of joy and of noise of weeping in remembrance of the past (Ezra 3:7-13)
Fellowship - taking part in the Apostle’s missionary work by personal activity, prayers, and contributions of Money
Mouth - 42:27 uses peh to refer to an orifice, or the area within the edges of a sack’s opening: “… He espied his Money; for, behold, it was in his sack’s mouth
Pilate - He is represented, both by Philo and Josephus, as a man of an impetuous and obstinate temper, and, as a judge, one who used to sell justice, and, for Money, to pronounce any sentence that was desired
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Money (shekel) in the fish
Wells And Springs - Still stronger is the expression in Lamentations 5:4 : "We have drunk our own water for Money:" that is, we bought it of our foreign rulers, though we are the natural proprietors of the wells that furnished it
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - In regards to the doctrine of sin, Paul refers to the first sin of Adam and Eve as the origin of all kinds of sinning, from the love of Money to the sin of apostasy, which he particularly stresses in 1,2Timothy. ...
In a context in which the apostle is speaking about godliness with contentment as great gain and about the fact that we cannot take anything out of this world with us when we die, he declares that "the love of Money is a root of all kinds of evil" and that some have even apostatized from the faith by longing for Money (1 Timothy 6:10 )
Trial-at-Law - But compensation might be made for unpremeditated crimes by their price in cattle or Money. In times of social disorder, as the prophets lament so frequently, justice could be bought and sold for Money (cf. 1); proof is required of every claim, however slight a bearing it may have on the main issue; the evidence of relatives and other interested persons, also of gamblers, usurers, and those ‘vicious in Money matters’ (though not necessarily ‘in heavenly matters’), is disallowed; and judgment must be given for the defendant if the case fails of proof (iv. Issue being thus joined, both took the sacramentum (now secularized into a mere staking of Money against defeat), and the case was referred to a special iudex or arbiter, before whom proceedings passed in iudicium
Atonement - Ransom Money can provide atonement for the lives of the people; God commands at least one census to be made of the people at which each participant pays the same amount to buy his life and the lives of his family from God, who promises no plague will harm them when they do pay (Exodus 30:11-16 ). Significantly, the Money is to be used to support the services of the Tent of Meeting, hence tying it to the sacrifice of blood for atonement, if only in a tangential way
Refuge, Cities of - He could not appease the avenger by Money
Romans, Letter to the - He wanted to deliver to the poor Christians in Jerusalem a gift of Money that he had been collecting among the Gentile churches of Greece and Asia Minor (Acts 19:21; Romans 15:23-27)
Roman Empire - procurators of Judaea; the "tetrarchs" Herod, Philip, and Lysanias (Luke 3:1); "king Agrippa" (Acts 25:13); Roman soldiers, legions, centurions, publicans; "tribute Money" (Matthew 22:19); the "taxing of the whole world" (Luke 2:1); Italian and Augustan cohorts (Acts 10:1; Acts 27:1); an "appeal to Caesar" (Acts 25:11)
Ephesus - at first incurred no opposition from the devotees of the goddess, because new foreign religions did not lessen the influence of the native goddess; but when his teaching proved prejudicial to the Money interests of the people who made a living out of the worship, he was at once bitterly attacked
Lamb, Lamb of God - Jesus, the Lamb of God, entered the temple courts at the time for the Passover (2:13,23), made a whip out of cords, drove out the sheep and cattle, scattered the coins of the Money changers, and announced, "Destroy this temple, and I will raise it again in three days" (2:19)
Stephen - Greek-speaking Jews) who considered themselves overlooked in the daily distribution from the common fund of food or Money
Gospels, the - In this gospel only we have the parable of the good Samaritan, teaching that grace does not ask the question, "who is my neighbour?" for all men are neighbours; and here only we get the parable of the lost sheep, the lost piece of Money, and the prodigal son: it is God seeking the lost
Field - So, in the absence of safety vaults and the like, owners of treasure who feared robbery or thievery (Matthew 25:25), or who were setting off on a journey to a distant country, would bury their Money, jewellery, etc
Feasts - Every poor sinner, captive to Satan, sin, and hell, who heard the sound, heard it in the sweet voice, "Ye have sold yourselves for nought, and ye shall be redeemed without Money, saith the Lord
Messiah - He chose a forerunner, raised an army, was anointed king, coined Money inscribed with his own name, and proclaimed himself messiah and prince of the Jewish nation
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - He gives us a charming account of this group: Macedonius, the father and life of the whole; Ursinus, the reverent priest spending his life in the service of the King of Heaven; Laurence, the wise and gentle, who has spent all his Money on the poor; Gallicanus, another priest, not learned, but a model of goodness and loyalty to church rule; Ursicinus, combining the wisdom of age with the brightness of youth; the deaconess Syncletica, of noble birth and nobler life, a worthy temple of God, purified by fasting, prayer, and charity, learned and liberal; and lastly Perpetua, the young pure matron, perpetual in fame and purity as in name
Law of Moses - -- (1) Census-money , a poll-tax (of a half shekel), to be paid for the service of the tabernacle. ( Numbers 18:12,13 ; 26:1-15) Firstlings of clean beasts; the redemption Money (five shekels) of man and (half shekel, or one shekel) of unclean beasts to be given to the priests after sacrifice. (c) First-fruits and redemption Money
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - Their religious law forbade the lending of Money for interest. In the New Testament, these bankers were the infamous “money changers” of the Temple
Enoch - I have the whole Bible in my hands, all written, he says to himself, by men all of whom so walked, but let me get all the books of all such men, before I have either time or Money for any other manner of man or any other kind of book. But unless you are a Bible scholar, and are able to get good out of a book that returns but a far-off echo of your Bible, you will spend your time and your Money far better than by spending either on The Book of Enoch
Barnabas - ...
"Barnabas, a Levite, of the country of Cyprus, having land, sold it, and brought the Money, and laid it at the apostles' feet. " And three times he publicly proved that; first, when he sold his estate in Cyprus and brought the Money, and laid it at the apostles' feet
Ireland - About the middle of the 18th century the Catholics showed such loyalty in supporting Grattan in his fight for legislative independence, and subscribing Money to equip a volunteer force to protect Ireland against invasion, that religious toleration was favored and penal legislation ceased
Mining And Metals - words for silver are often rendered ‘money’ in EV Spiritual Gifts - powers of administration); mercy and almsgiving; Money, as affording opportunity for service and hospitality; 1 Corinthians 7:7 adds the gift of continence, and Galatians 5:22 gives a list of the fruits of the Spirit, as shown in the Christian character
Destroy, Destroyer, Destruction, Destructive - 1, and likewise indicating "loss of well-being, not of being," is used (a) of things, signifying their waste, or ruin; of ointment, Matthew 26:8 ; Mark 14:4 ; of Money, Acts 8:20 ("perish"); (b) of persons, signifying their spiritual and eternal perdition, Matthew 7:13 ; John 17:12 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:3 , where "son of perdition" signifies the proper destiny of the person mentioned; metaphorically of men persistent in evil, Romans 9:22 , where "fitted" is in the Middle Voice, indicating that the vessels of wrath fitted themselves for "destruction;" of the adversaries of the Lord's people, Philippians 1:28 ("perdition"); of professing Christians, really enemies of the cross of Christ, Philippians 3:19 (RV, "perdition"); of those who are subjects of foolish and hurtful lusts, 1 Timothy 6:9 (for the preceding word "destruction" see No
Timothy - He seems to have grown languid in the performance of his duties (1 Timothy 1:18; 1 Timothy 4:14-16; 1618420668_64), to have yielded to the love of Money (1 Timothy 6:11), to temper (1 Timothy 5:1), and to an ill-considered asceticism (1 Timothy 5:23)
Paul - At the end of the year, Paul and Barnabas took a gift of Money from Antioch to Jerusalem to help the poor Christians there (Acts 11:29-30; Galatians 2:1)
Work - This applies not just to work that earns Money, but to unpaid work such as household and community tasks (Ecclesiastes 2:24; Ecclesiastes 9:10; cf
Jehoiakim - So "Jehoiakim valued ('taxed') the land to give the Money to Pharaoh
Laodicea - ), forbade the Jews to send contributions of Money to Jerusalem, he seized as contraband twenty pounds weight in gold in the district of which Laodicea was the capital (Cicero, pro Flacco, 28)
Jew - The Rothschild family with its immense wealth has controlled the Money market
Caesar - As it was in Jerusalem that the question as to the tribute Money was raised, our subject in this article has to do only with Archelaus
For - He writes for Money, or for fame that is, towards meeting, or to have in return, as a reward
Iconoclastes - ...
The controversy concerning the sanctity of images was again revived by Leo, bishop of Chalcedon: in the 11th century, on occasion of the emperor Alexius's converting the figures of silver that adorned the portals of the churches into Money, in order to supply the exigencies of the state
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - In its first biblical occurrence the ‘ani is guaranteed (if men obey God’s law) his outer garment for warmth at night even though that garment might be held as collateral during the day: “If thou lend Money to any of my people that is poor by thee, thou shall not be to him as a usurer, neither shalt thou lay upon him usury” ( Decius, Emperor - The magistrates were not above accepting bribes and for a reasonable Money payment would give a certificate (libellus) that sacrifice had been duly offered without making the actual performance of the rite compulsory
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - A still more interesting proof of this is furnished by the letter to the Roman church, which would seem to be one of thanks for a gift of Money, and in which he speaks of it as a custom of that church from the earliest times to send supplies to churches in every city to relieve poverty, and to support the brethren condemned to work in the mines, "a custom not only preserved, but increased by the blessed bp
Gather - Second Kings 22:4 refers not to a process of going out and getting something together, but to standing still as someone brings Money to one
Marriage - " In other places they mingle pieces of Money with the wheat, which are gathered up by the poor
Food - Cereals were so valuable that people at times used them instead of Money when trading (Hosea 3:2)
Petrus, Saint, Archbaptist of Alexandria - (12) Those who paid for indemnity are not to be censured ; they shewed their disregard for Money; and Act_17:9 is here quoted
Elisha - At the same time he sent much gold, silver, and the rich raiments (lebush , robe of ceremony) of Damascus; as though "God's gift may be purchased with Money" (Acts 8:20). " By lying he gains two talents and two changes of raiment from Naaman; but lying is of no avail before Elisha: "went not my heart with thee, when the man turned again from his chariot to meet thee? is it a time to receive Money?" etc. If Gehazi must have Naaman's Money he shall have also Naaman's leprosy, and that for ever
Pilate - Admission to this class could be obtained only by those who possessed 400,000 sesterces (equivalent to about £3000 of our Money, but with much greater purchasing power). On another occasion he used Money from the Temple-treasury for the building of an aqueduct, and broke up the riot which threatened by introducing disguised soldiers into the crowd (Ant
Jewels, Jewelry - Jewels functioned as a medium of exchange in the Ancient Near East before the invention of Money
Theophilus (2) - 1792), is specially concerned with the hindrances thrown up by Money and rank in the path of a consistent Christian character
Aquila And Priscilla - ’ Ramsay strongly urges this theory, and it explains much in the story-their social position, their command of Money, their influence in Rome, their freedom from Jewish prejudices, etc
Firstborn - ’§ Advocate - All he undertakes is altogether free, "without Money and without price
je'Sus Christ - Roman soldiers, laws, Money, every reminded them of their subjection, when they ought to be free and themselves the rulers of the world
Gods - They also adored the gods Health, Fever, Fear, Love, Pain, Indignation, Shame, Impudence, Opinion, Renown, Prudence, Science, Art, Fidelity,...
Felicity, Calumny, Liberty, Money, War, Peace, Victory, Triumph, &c
Lion - The other Jews do not let their brethren remain longer than a night among the lions, as they might otherwise become too hungry; but ransom them with Money, which is, in fact, the king's object
Josiah - The repairing of the temple recorded 2 Kings 22:3-7, in a period by itself, subordinate to the discovery of the law, in the 18th year of Josiah's reign, must have been chronologically before that date, since in that year the builders were already repairing and the Money for the work had been collected by the Levites who kept the door
Collection - ...
The next instance of a systematic collection of Money for the purpose or relieving distress in Judaea and Jerusalem is found in the history of the Church of Antioch (Acts 11:27 ff. It also appears in a compound form in Jewish literature (κατʼ ἀνδρολογεῖον, 2 Maccabees 12:43) where the question of the collection of Money-supplies is alluded to
Priest - ...
(3) The redemption Money, five shekels a head for the firstborn of man and beast (Genesis 37:3). ...
(4) Redemption Money for men or things dedicated to Jehovah (Leviticus 27)
Esau - And, if any one would but teach us; if any great writer or great preacher, if any wise father or loving mother could and would but take us early in hand, and tell us, and let us see, that all this life is not to make what is called Money, or to attain what is called success, or to fill our belly with what is called pleasure, but that God Himself has set us here so to live, and so to choose, and so to act as to put off every day this profane mind, and to put on a sacred, a spiritual, a divine, a heavenly mind-if any one with authority and with influence would but tell and teach us that! For, like Esau, to begin with, we have no imagination. Ye have sold yourselves for nought, but ye shall be redeemed without Money
Joseph - Thus "Joseph gathered up all the Money that was in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they bought
Priest, Christ as - Entering the temple he cleansed it of the merchants and Money changers (Matthew 21:12-13 ; Luke 19:45-46 ; cf
Liberty (2) - The disciple must hold himself entirely at liberty from the things of the world for the world’s sake; he must stand ‘with loins girded about and lamp burning’ (Luke 12:35), unhindered by multitudinous possessions (Luke 12:15), not anxious as to the lesser matters of clothing, food, and shelter (Matthew 6:25, Luke 12:22), taking ‘no bread, no wallet, no Money,’ whereon he may come to depend too much (Luke 9:3; Luke 10:4, Matthew 10:9, Mark 6:8)
Marriage (i.) - Besides, it frequently happened that an interval of time was needed in order that the bridegroom might render the stipulated service, or acquire the sum of Money agreed upon as the present to be given to the father and brothers of the bride
Septuagint - And though they preserved their religious connexion with Jerusalem by payments of Money and by frequent attendance at the three annual festivals (see art
Jesus Christ - His first work was the cleansing of the temple from traffickers and Money-changers—which he repeated near the close of his ministry
Persia - In Scripture we read of 127 provinces (Esther 1:1) with satraps (Esther 3:12; Esther 8:9; Xerxes in boasting enlarged the list; 60 are the nations in his armament according to Herodotus) maintained from the palace (Ezra 4:14), having charge of the revenue, paid partly in Money partly in kind (Ezra 7:21-22)
Philistia - Their wealth in Money was great (Judges 16:5; Judges 16:18)
Joseph - ...
Some writers have considered Joseph as a type of Christ; and it requires not much ingenuity to find out some resemblances, as his being hated by his brethren, sold for Money, plunged into deep affliction, and then raised to power and honour, &c; but as we have no intimation in any part of Scripture that Joseph was constituted a figure of our Lord, and that this was one design of recording his history at length, all such applications want authority, and cannot safely be indulged
Maximus Magnus, Christian Emperor in the West - Western writers, Sulpicius Severus and Orosius, though treating Maximus as a usurper, give him, on the whole, a good character, Sulpicius making exception on the score of his persecution of the Priscillianists and his love of Money (Sulp
Joseph (2) - 590), took Money from suppliants, secured what was craved
Roman Law - The private penalty consisted of a sum of Money paid to the person wronged as a substitute for private retaliation
Elder - The pastoral character of this task of oversight is also indicated when Peter writes: "To the elders among you, I appeal as a fellow elder Be shepherds of God's flock that is under your care, serving as overseers—not because you must, but because you are willing, as God wants you to be; not greedy for Money, but eager to serve; not lording it over those entrusted to you, but being examples to the flock
Draw - To receive or take, as from a fund as, to draw Money from a bank or from stock in trade
Claim - Thus He refers to purchasers of property, Money-lenders and interest, employers of labour and the rights of the labourer
Domitian - Domitian was recognized as victor, peace was made between the combatants, and large sums of Money were sent by Domitian to the Decebalus
Serve - A “servant” may be bought with Money ( Temple - Along the ramparts of the temple hill ran double cloisters or arcades, and there the Money changers sat Matthew 21:12
Jonathan - Micah began with robbery of his own mother; her curses extorted restitution; she as a meritorious act consecrated the Money for a "graven image" (pecel ) and the "molten pedestal" (massecah ) on which it stood like Aaron's calf (Exodus 32:4), to be a representation of Jehovah; it was the forerunner of Jeroboam's calves long after and idol
Simon Magus - Seeing this, Simon offered the apostles Money, saying, ‘Give me also this power, that on whomscever I lay my hands, he may receive the Holy Ghost. But Peter said unto him, Thy silver perish with thee, because thou hast thought to obtain the gift of God with Money. Thus, Peter’s refusal to give Simon Magus the power of the Holy Spirit is a covert account of the refusal of the elder Apostle to admit Paul’s claims to rank with them, backed though the claim was by a gift of Money for the poor saints in Jerusalem
Clementine Literature - Clement, though desirous to accompany him for further instruction, is detained by the necessity of collecting Money due to him; but sails shortly after for Palestine, and after a fifteen days' voyage arrives at Caesarea. Thereupon the father sent his wife and children with suitable provision of Money and attendance to Athens, in order to educate them there. On the one hand, the account that Clement is delayed from following Barnabas by the necessity of collecting Money due to him is perfectly in place if the scene is laid at Rome, but not so if Clement is a stranger driven by stress of weather to Alexandria
Neology - Professor Paulus gravely explains the miracle of the tribute Money thus: That Christ only meant to give a moral lesson, that is, that we are not, if we can avoid it by trifling sacrifices, to give offence to our brethren; that he probably reasoned thus with St. Peter was not to stay longer at his work this time than to gain the required Money: πρωτος , often refers not to number but to time; and ιχθυν may undoubtedly be taken as a collective. " When such a word is used of saleable articles, like fish, and in a connection which requires the getting a piece of Money, it is clear that getting by sale and not by finding is referred to
Temple (2) - , Luke 19:45; Exodus 13:1-16 John 2:13-17; the Money-changers‡ Marriage - ( a ) The parents provided for her, perhaps originally giving her a portion of the purchase Money ( Genesis 24:61 ; Genesis 29:24 ). According to the Mishna, the later ceremony of betrothal consisted in payment of a piece of Money, or a gift, or the conveyance of a writing, in presence of two witnesses
Metaphor - The owner comes with the slave to the temple, sells him there to the god, and receives the purchase Money from the temple treasury, the slave having previously paid it in there out of his savings. … But when anybody heard the Greek word λύτρον, “ransom,” in the first century, it was natural for him to think of the purchase-money for manumitting slaves’ (p
Asceticism (2) - Philo says that they were indifferent to Money, pleasure, and worldly position. Hence to those who were in danger of falling beneath the tyranny of Money and material things He had but one word to say: ‘Go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor … and come, follow me’ (Matthew 19:21, Mark 10:21, Luke 18:22)
Thecla - Observing Demas and Hermogenes among those going in and out he questioned them invited them to a rich banquet at his house and offered them Money for information concerning the preacher. As they entered Antioch her beauty caught the eye of Alexander the Syriarch (this seems to prove that the city here meant is the capital of Syria) who sought to obtain possession of her by offering Money to Paul
Tradition - As an illustration, note that Mark says of the woman who had been plagued by the issue of blood that she had spent all her Money on physicians yet had steadily gotten worse (Mark 5:25-26 )
Apostles - They taught Simon, one of the Samaritans, that apostolic power could not be purchased with Money (Acts 8:20 )
Slave, Slavery - In the earliest code (Book of the Covenant [2]) he is called his master’s Money ( Exodus 21:21 )
Tarsus - Paul, is a place about which much more might be known than is known if only the necessary Money were forthcoming to excavate the ancient city in the way that Pompeii, Olympia, Pergamum, and other cities have been excavated
Sol'Omon - (1 Kings 9:28 ) All the kings and princes of the subject provinces paid tribute in the form of gifts, in Money and in kind, "at a fixed rate year by year
Weights And Measures - In the New Testament, the talent and mina were large sums of Money (Matthew 25:15-28 ; compare Luke 19:13-25 ), and the pound of precious ointment (John 12:3 ) is probably the Roman standard of twelve ounces
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - Such equity is illustrated by the collection of ransom Money from rich and poor alike (Exodus 30:15 )
Pope - ...
The cardinal chamberlain has during the vacancy of the holy see, great authority; he coins Money with his own arms on it, lodges in the pope's apartments, and is attended by the body guards
City - The gates of the city were places of public resort; the Money-changers facilitated trade; and the various guilds of artisans had special districts allotted to them
Shepherds - The patriarchal shepherds, rich in flocks and herds, in silver and gold, and attended by a numerous train of servants purchased with their Money, or hired from the neighbouring towns and villages, acknowledge no civil superior; they held the rank, and exercised the rights, of sovereign princes; they concluded alliances with the kings in whose territories they tended their flocks; they made peace or war with the surrounding states; and, in fine, they wanted nothing of sovereign authority but the name
Commerce - ...
The parables of the pounds and the talents suggest the existence of a sophisticated banking and investment community, which lent out sums for commercial enterprises and garnered profits for those who left their Money with them
Proselyte - At last the proselyte took the decisive step: he received the rite of circumcision, took the hath of purity …, and offered, doubtless in Money, the sacrifice which signalized his definitive entrance into the bosom of Israel
Nationality - Although He allowed the rights of Caesar (Matthew 22:21), and authorized His disciples to pay the tribute-money that was due, He reserved the right to consider it an unrighteous infliction (Matthew 17:26)
Judas Iscariot (2) - In this context the statement that Judas carried the Money put into the bag which was in his possession seems singularly tame, if it is not mere repetition. It is true in a sense that ‘he may have been a thief long before he began to steal,’ but this exposition involves the unlikely assumption that the betrayal of Jesus was the ‘first act by which he converted his spirit of greed into actual Money profit
Atonement - ), of the half-shekel of ransom-money ( Exodus 30:15-16 ), of the intercession of Moses ( Matthew 10:1-42 ), of the zeal of Phinehas ( Numbers 25:13 ), etc. It is to be noted generally that the animal sacrifices were of four kinds the burnt-offering, the sin-offering, the guilt-offering (a species of sin-offering which included a Money-compensation to the person injured), the peace-offering
Hammurabi - Much is stated about loans of either Money or seeds against future crops
Mark, the Gospel According to - Other scenes to Peter's honor omitted are Luke 5:1-11, his walking on the sea (Matthew 14:28-31), his commission to get, the tribute Money from the fish (Matthew 17:24-27), Jesus' special intercession for him (Mark 7:18), his being one of the two sent to prepare the Passover (Luke 22:8)
Atonement - Such offerings, including both live and dead animals, incense, and Money, were required to remove the bad effects of human sin
Simeon - ...
Peter said "thy Money perish with thee" (1 Corinthians 6:13; Colossians 2:22), undesignedly in coincidence with Peter's language in the independent epistle (1 Peter 1:7); so "thou hast neither part, nor lot," etc
Fall - They fell to raising Money, under pretense of the relief of Ireland
Miracles - ...
Tribute Money in mouth of fish - Matthew 17:24-27
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - Peregrinus being made a prisoner on their account, they collected Money for him, and he made a very pretty revenue of it
Slave, Slavery - Many slaves were permitted by their masters to accumulate savings and purchase their freedom with the Money. The slave first paid the purchase Money which he had saved into the treasury of some temple: then owner and slave went together to the temple, and the latter was supposed to be sold to the god, the price being duly paid to the master
Terah - We have drunken our water for Money; our wood is sold to us. But Abram's heart was less and less in his cattle pens and in his Money bags; and more and more his heart was in those promises that are never received in this life, but are kept for us in that city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God
Work - Jesus condemns this in unequivocal terms with such statements as, "You cannot serve both God and Money" (Matthew 6:24 ). Dempster...
See also Money ; Reward ; Wages ; Wealth ...
Bibliography
Timothy, Epistles to - 167), who says: ‘The love of Money is the beginning of all trouble, knowing … that we brought nothing into the world, neither can carry anything out’ (cf
Nehemiah, Theology of - He did not domineer the people but rather paid for the expenses of his table from his own Money (5:15-18)
Liberty - Paul is able to say quite simply (yet with a touch of pride), ‘But I am a Roman born,’ and Claudius, the captain, turns out to be but a parvenu who had had to spend a lot of Money, somehow or other, to acquire the citizenship
Weights And Measures - ]'>[1] (talent, Matthew 18:24; Matthew 25:15-28) occur, but not as the names of weights; they are the designations of coins (see Money)
Crimes And Punishments - Compensation by a Money payment was admitted for loss of time through bodily injury (BC 21:19), for loss of property (vv
Micah, Theology of - Unlike the false prophets, for whom Money speaks louder than God (3:5,11), Micah, filled with the power of the Lord's Spirit, preaches justice (3:8)
Proverbs, Theology of - Parents are armed by Solomon with all his rhetorical skill in robust man-to-man talk to outduel the temptation to easy Money, offered by apostate men (1:10-19; 2:12-15), and to easy sex, offered by unfaithful women (2:16-19; 5:1-23; 6:20-35; 7:1-27; 9:13-18)
Minister Ministry - διακονία is used often of the sending of Money to help the poor brethren in Judaea (Acts 11:29; Acts 12:25, 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1; 2 Corinthians 9:12-13, Romans 15:31)
Invitation - The central idea of hospitality is that one gives freely what the many receive and enjoy ‘without Money and without price
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - And if there was any book of palace etiquette and court ceremonial to be had for love or Money, you would sit up all night over it; you would set your very Bible aside night after night in order to give all your mind to the Court Guide
Arts - ) was built upon the practice of such arts as have here been passed in review, giving a livelihood to merchants, Money-lenders, and also tax-collectors
Nimrod - 'Words are wise men's counters; wise men do but reckon by them; but they are the Money of fools. ' To prove that and to illustrate that, I had collected and arranged a table of wise men's counters and fools' Moneys, and had intended to take in that table here
Devil - The vulgar, however, sometimes attempt to extort Money from them
Jephthah - The נדר , or vow in general, included either persons, beasts, or things, dedicated to the Lord for pious uses; which, if it was a simple vow, was redeemable at certain prices, if the person repented of his vow, and wished to commute it for Money, according to the age and sex of the person, Leviticus 27:1-8
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - , asking for Money, ordering a table Presentation - ...
The act of presenting Him would be performed by Joseph (Exodus 13:15) as the putative father, at once the shield of Mary and the protector of her child (Luke 3:23); not by the Virgin, as Cornelius à Lapide assumes, although there is some beauty in his interpretation of the five shekels, which constituted the redemption Money, as ‘symbolizing the Five Wounds at the price whereof Christ redeemed the race of man’ (Com
Profaning, Profanity - ...
The presence of the stall-keepers and cattle-drovers and Money-changers was strictly within the letter of the Law, since it was in the Court of the Gentiles that this market was held, i
Nero - This was a serious blow, as the exchange value of the copper always exceeded the value of the metal, and the Senate could thus coin credit-money to any amount
Ethics (2) - ), and tribute-money (Mark 12:13-17). He gives as an example the gross case of one who evades the plain human duty of supporting his parents by the manœuvre of dedicating to the Temple the Money he might have spared for them: once the fateful word ‘Corban’ is spoken, then every penny so consecrated belongs to God, and is, as sacred property, interdicted from all secular uses, and so from that of the parents
Corinth - Even then, while the majority at Corinth repented and excommunicated, at Paul's command, the incestuous person, and contributed to the Jerusalem poor fund, a minority still accused him of personal objects in the collection, though he had guarded against possibility of suspicion by having others beside himself to take charge of the Money (2 Corinthians 8:18-28)
Rome And the Roman Empire - The poor had neither the time, the Money, nor the need for an education that was designed to prepare the upper classes for positions of public service
Disciples - The shaliach , for example, had a function that was more legal than religious (to serve documents, collect Money, carry information), was applied generally to human representation (whether individuals or groups), and lasted for only a limited period
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of Money, boastful, proud" (2 Timothy 3:1 )
Kenosis - Some of these: the getting of the ass (Matthew 21:2), and of the upper room (Matthew 26:17-19), the finding of the Money in the fish’s mouth (Matthew 17:27), are only apparent, and allow another explanation
Mockery - It is not easy to see any real parallel between this and the overturning of the Money-changers’ tables and driving out of their sheep and oxen from the Temple by Jesus
Paul as Sold Under Sin - That is not the man for my hard-earned Money
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - For the redemption of captives he earned Money by tilling the earth and planting vines,
Church Government - He leaves it to the congregation to punish and pardon offenders, to manage the collection of Money, and to decide who shall take charge of the fund
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - ...
This servant who hid his lord's Money was the father also of all those ministers among us who will not do their ordained work because they have so little to do
the Merchant Man Who Sold All That he Had And Bought the Pearl of Great Price - Who, then, on the spot will sell all that he has, and will be for ever after the wisest of merchant men? Nay, who will take away with him tonight God's greatest Pearl as God's free gift, without Money and without price? For the gift of God is eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord
the Importunate Widow - Are you a banker? say to yourself, Thou wicked and slothful servant, thou oughtest to have put my Money to the exchangers, and then at my coming I should have received mine own with usury
Euchites - ...
The next Messalian leader of whom we read (in Timotheus) is Marcian, a Money-changer, who lived in the middle of the 6th cent
Jeroboam - All who inflame and perpetuate such divisions lest they should lose their stake of Money, or of influence, or of occupation, or of pure ill-will; all able men who prostitute their talents to write or speak about men on the other side, as they would not like themselves to be spoken or written about-let them lay it to heart in whose lot they shall surely stand when every man shall give an account of himself to God
Alexander the Coppersmith - Sometimes a man is to be had for Money, and he will write letters or make speeches for you as long as you pay him best
Simon Maccabaeus - Peter rebuked him for thinking that the gift of God might be purchased for Money, Acts 8:20 ; but I would observe that some of those persons who insist upon the fact that Simon was not a Christian appear to have forgotten that he was actually baptized
Take - To buy or borrow as, to take up goods to a large amount to take up Money at the bank
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - He has no longer any Money to relieve the poor; the only offering he can make to God is his poetry (Epil
Rome - It was flanked by all sorts of shops, those of the Money-changers or bankers included. Julius Caesar, after crossing the Rubicon and thus declaring civil war, forced his way in and seized £300,000 of coined Money, as well as 15,000 gold and 30,000 silver ingots
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - The Christians of Asia Minor sent messengers and Money to him according to their usual custom when persons were imprisoned for their faith. The numberless libelli pacis , written by martyrs in prison, and the celebrations of the holy mysteries there with their friends, shew that the liberty given Ignatius was not extraordinary; especially as the word εὐεργετούμενοι which he applies to his guard points, doubtless, to Money given them by the Christians
Croisade, or Crusade - The infirm and aged contributed to the expedition by presents and Money, and many of them attended it in person; being determined, if possible to breathe their last in sight of that city where their Saviour died for them. For this reason they permitted an undisciplined multitude, computed at 300, 000 men, to go before them under the command of Peter the hermit, and Gautier or Walter, surnamed the Moneyless, from his being a soldier of fortune
Sadducees - It began when Jesus interfered with the prerogatives of the Sanhedrin by expelling the Money-changers from the Temple-court
Corinthians, Second Epistle to - The majority of the Church had obeyed his orders and punished the offender ( 2 Corinthians 2:6-11 ), but the Judaizers had grown stronger in opposition to the Apostle, charging him with inconsistency, false Apostleship, boasting, and Money-making
House - Thus ‘table’ in the Bible does not usually denote an article of furniture, except in the case of the Money-changers in Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:15, where a house is not being spoken of
Metaphors - § Paul as the Chief of Sinners - And thus it comes about that the authors who are classical to me now are not the ephemerids in religion or in literature that I used to waste my time and my Money upon when I was a neophyte: my true classics now are those masterly men who look into their own hearts and then write for my heart
the Ethiopian Eunuch - Like the Scotch and English of our own day, the Jews of our Lord's day compassed sea and land to make Money; but, almost more, to make converts to Moses and Aaron
Sin - The love of Money, with its attendant evils of injustice, and robbery of the poor by the wealthy, is inveighed against by both Amos and Hosea as deserving of the wrath of God (cf
Seceders - they never accept a sum of Money as a commutation for the offence
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - Among those who voted for it were Eustathius of Berytus and Photius of Tyre, who had previously acquitted him on the same evidence The sentence was that he should be deposed from the episcopate and priesthood, deprived even of lay communion, and compelled to restore the Money of which it was pretended he had robbed the poor
Economic Life - ...
Since this was an economy without coined Money until about 550 B
Rome, Romans - He had to borrow Money, which in many cases he was unable to repay
Man (2) - They had made the Temple (which was to Jesus His Father’s house) a den of robbers (Matthew 8:5-13), and they had forgotten that mercy was better than sacrifice (Matthew 9:13); and Jesus, in the strength of His moral indignation, upset the tables of the Money-changers, and drove those who sat there out of the Temple
Friendship - The material comforts of fellowship are gained by a clever distribution of Money favours apart from all sympathy of heart or mind; and though Christ neither commends nor condemns, He indirectly reveals His mind in the remark, ‘The children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light’ (v
Miriam - Was she glad in her heart when she heard of Miriam's leprosy? Did she laugh behind the door like Sarah? Did she say, Let her rot in the wilderness, for she deserves it? Was she sad all the eighth day and night after Miriam had been healed? Or, did she go up to the court of the Ethiopians, and there importune her brother Aaron to importune his God on behalf of his sister? Did she look out at the gate many times every day all that week, but could never see or hear Miriam for weeping? Did she buy the two birds for the cleansing of a leper with her own Money, and did she have them all ready with her own hands for days before Aaron could as yet take Miriam back? I do not know
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - (53 223) Money passing from hand to hand—"usu ipso multiplicatur unde dicitur usura ab usu," or (7 53) where an explanation is suggested why at the call of the apostles Peter and his brother are described as "mittentes retia," John and his brother "retia componentes," "quia Petrus praedicavit evangelium et non composuit sed Marcus ab eo praedicata composuit; Joannes autem et praedicavit evangelium et ipse composuit
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Matthew 17: Christ's paying the tribute with Money from a fish
Luke, Gospel According to - The insertion deals largely with the Peræan ministry and the journeys towards Jerusalem, and contains many parables peculiar to Lk (the Good Samaritan, the Importunate Friend, the Rich Fool, the Barren Fig-tree, the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, the Prodigal Son, the Unjust Steward, the Rich Man and Lazarus, the Ten Lepers, the Unjust Judge, the Pharisee and the Publican), and also several incidents and sayings peculiar to Lk
Number - Again, in Numbers 3:39 the census gives 22,000 Levites, which one would naturally understand as a round number; but in Numbers 3:43-51 it is taken as an exact number, inasmuch as it is ordained that because the 22,273 firstborn exceed the Levites by 273, redemption-money shall be paid for the surplus
War, Holy War - If he later grew tired of her, he could not abuse her or sell her for Money (Deuteronomy 21:10-14 )
Individual - The parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Piece of Money, and above all of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15), speak of God’s unwillingness to let anything so precious as an individual be lost
Justice (2) - In John 9:2-3 τὸ δίκαιον refers to what is due by masters to their slaves; and in Matthew 20:4 to a Money payment for work done
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - She received almost unlimited supplies of Money from her son and spent it in royal charities to the poor and bounties to the soldiery; as well as using her power to free prisoners and criminals condemned to the mines and to recall persons from exile ( ib
Dress (2) - In the girdle is carried, as in NT days (Matthew 10:8, Mark 6:8), the Money, often knotted into a corner of a handkerchief, and also the pen and ink of the learned or the dagger of the fighter
Jonath - The runaway prophet parted with far more than his proper passage-money that day
Temple - This outer court being assigned to the Gentile proselytes, the Jews, who did not worship in it themselves, conceived that it might lawfully be put to profane uses: for here we find that the buyers and sellers of animals for sacrifices, and also the Money-changers, had stationed themselves; until Jesus Christ, awing them into submission by the grandeur and dignity of his person and behaviour, expelled them; telling them that it was the house of prayer for all nations, and was not to be profaned, Matthew 21:12-13 ; Mark 11:15-17
Preaching - 8); he must practise what he preaches, and not ask for Money (xi
Unity (2) - It is presented under similes which convey the idea of unity: it is one building on one foundation (Matthew 16:18), one enclosed vineyard (Matthew 20:1-11), one shoal taken in a single net (Matthew 13:47-48), one company of watchers (Matthew 25:1-13), or of guests at one feast (Luke 14:7-24); it is a perfect century of sheep, a complete sum of Money, and the breaking of its completeness is intolerable (Luke 15:4; Luk_15:8)
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - , as the ten virgins, the woman with the lost piece of Money, the man who planted a vineyard, and the like
Antiochus - He confirmed the privileges which the king of Syria had granted to Simon, permitted him to coin Money with his own stamp, declared Jerusalem and the temple exempt from royal jurisdiction, and promised other favours as soon as he should obtain peaceable possession of the kingdom which had belonged to his ancestors
Trade And Commerce - must certainly have conduced to the quicker circulation of Money and the expansion of trade
Conscience - The ‘weak’ conscience is the natural accompaniment of the weak and narrow mind (1 Corinthians 8:7); a selfish and impure heart usually compounds with its conscience for the sins to which it is inclined, and a conscience that accepts hush-money is apt to grow dumb until contact with another conscience stronger and purer than itself makes it vocal once more (Acts 24:25)
Fall (2) - ), and the corresponding parables of the Lost Sheep and the Lost Piece of Money in the same chapter
Priests And Levites - The priests were supported ( a ) partly by the tithe of the tithe which they received from the Levites ( Numbers 18:26 ); ( b ) partly by the first-fruits and firstlings, including the redemption Money for men and unclean beasts ( Numbers 18:12-18 , Leviticus 7:30-34 ); ( c ) partly by sacrificial dues of various kinds
Peter, First Epistle of - ; the lesson of the tribute Money may underlie 1 Peter 2:13-14 ; and Christ’s utterance of doom on apostate Israel, especially the parable of Mark 12:1-12 , probably suggested the thought of Mark 2:5-10
Philippians Epistle to the - As we shall see, one main cause of writing the letter was to thank the Philippians for monetary help, and it is not inappropriate to regard these persons as being instrumental in the collecting and dispatching of this Money
Preaching - The doctrines they preached, they supported entirely by evidence; and neither had nor required such assistance as human laws or worldly policy, the eloquoence of the schools or the terror of arms, the charm of Money or the tricks of tradesmen, could afford them
Lord's Prayer (ii) - But most solemn of all is the thought that sin makes us debtors before God, debtors who have wasted our Lord’s Money and are called to render account
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - 408) crossed the Alps on pretence of a large claim of Money
Oracle - He alleges, that Cicero, speaking of the Delphic oracle, the most revered of any in the Heathen world, declares, that nothing was become more contemptible, not only in his days, but long before him; that Demosthenes, who lived about three hundred years earlier, affirmed of the same oracle, in a public speech to the people of Athens, that it was gained to the interests of King Philip, an enemy to that city; that the Greek historians, tell us, how, on several other occasions, it had been corrupted by Money, to serve the views of particular persons and parties, and the prophetess sometimes had been deposed for bribery and lewdness; that there were some great sects of philosophers, who, on principle, disavowed the authority of all oracles; agreeably to all which Strabo tells us, that divination in general and oracles had been in high credit among the ancients, but in his days were treated with much contempt; lastly, that Eusebius also, the great historian of the primitive church, declares, that there were six hundred writers among the Heathens themselves who had publicly written against the reality of them
Liberius, Bishop of Rome - Eusebius the eunuch also offered him Money, to whom he said, "Thou hast pillaged the churches of the whole world, and dost thou now bring alms to me as a condemned pauper? Depart first, and become thyself a Christian
Ideas (Leading) - God so cares for even the most sinful among His children, that He is compared to the shepherd seeking the lost sheep, to the woman searching for her lost piece of Money
Persecution - The troopers, soldiers, and dragoons, went into the Protestants' houses, where they marred and defaced their household stuff; broke their looking- glasses and other utensils; threw about their corn and wine; sold what they could not destroy; and thus, in four or five days, the Protestants were stripped of above a million of Money
Sexuality, Human - Because the girl's marriageability had been severely compromised, the Money was probably designed to provide for the girl's livelihood in her father's house
Paul the Apostle - Paul clearly had Money at his command
Trade And Commerce - must certainly have conduced to the quicker circulation of Money and the expansion of trade
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - Determined to renounce the world, he parted with a large portion of his property and his wife's, spending some of the Money in redeeming captives, releasing debtors, and the like
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - He warns against the love of Money and gazing on women: they harm soul and body, and hinder the service of God
Egypt - -The kings seem to have been absolute; but the priests exercised a controlling influence so great that the Pharaoh of Joseph's time durst not take their lands even for Money
Gospels, Apocryphal - According to Epiphanius, the work contained the saying of Jesus, ‘Be approved Money-changers
Mental Characteristics - What could be finer than His appeal to the image and superscription of the tribute-money when plied with the insidious question, ‘Shall we give, or shall we not give?’ (Mark 12:14); or than His rejoinder to the challenge of His own authority, ‘The baptism of John, was it from heaven, or from men? answer me’ (Mark 11:30),—a rejoinder which not only silenced objectors, but went to the root of the question they raised as to the criterion of ‘authority’? His dialectic skill sometimes passed into biting sarcasm, as when He pointed out how the scribes and Pharisees witnessed to themselves that they were the sons of them that slew the prophets, by the way they garnished their tombs (Matthew 23:29-31)
Socialism - It is sufficient to allude to the Beatitudes, and to point out how much of the teaching in the rest of the Sermon is still regarded as Utopian, as that about love of enemies (Luke 6:27), oaths, non-resistance, litigation and property, free giving (Matthew 5:33-48), lending without interest (Luke 6:34-35, Money-making (Matthew 6:19), worrying about the future (Matthew 6:24-34)
Messiah - He chose a forerunner, raised an army, was anointed king, coined Money inscribed with his own name, and proclaimed himself Messiah and prince of the Jewish nation
Moses - Men practice deceit for Money, for pleasure, or for glory
Paul - Upon the prospect of this calamity, the Christians of Antioch made a contribution for their brethren in Judea, and sent the Money to the elders at Jerusalem by St
Paul - These were sent on by sea, and probably the Money with them, to Troas, where they were to await Paul
Tatianus - He denounces them as tuft-hunters and gluttons, to whom philosophy was simply a means of getting Money
Law (2) - Not only did He as a boy of twelve years recognize it as His Father’s house (Luke 2:49), but, after He had entered on His ministry, He cleansed it by driving out the Money-changers, and overturning the stalls of the traders (Matthew 21:12 ff
Ambrosius of Milan - As a member of a wealthy family he appears to have possessed both Money and lands
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Gregory forbade all to approach the offender, even in the agonies of death, and after death caused his body to be thrown on a dunghill with the pieces of gold, the monks crying aloud, "Thy Money perish with thee" (Greg Dial
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - According to a deacon, Ischyrion, Dioscorus had laid waste property, inflicted fines and exile, bought up and sold at a high price the wheat sent by the government to Libya, appropriated and grossly misspent Money left by a lady named Peristeria for religious and charitable purposes, received women of notorious character into his house, persecuted Ischyrion as a favourite of Cyril's, ruined the little estate which was his only support, sent a "phalanx of ecclesiastics, or rather of ruffians," to put him to death, and, after his escape, again sought to murder him in a hospital; in proof, Ischyrion appealed to six persons, one of whom was bath-keeper to Dioscorus ( ib
Donatus And Donatism - 340) an edict requiring the Donatists to return to the church, urging that "unity must now exist, because Christ was a lover of unity," and instructed his commissioners Ursacius (probably not the Ursacius already mentioned) and Leontius to distribute Money, as alms, in Donatist as well as in Catholic churches
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - The false apostle is said to betray himself if he asks for Money or for a larger supply of travelling provisions than will provide for his next stage
Justinianus i, Emperor - He spent enormous sums not only on his wars but in the erection of churches, fortresses, and public buildings of every kind (a list will be found in the de Aedificiis of Procopius), and was therefore always in want of Money
Nestorius And Nestorianism - To attain this end, there is evidence extant—though Canon Bright has failed to notice it—(in a letter from Epiphanius, Cyril's archdeacon and syncellus, to the patriarch Maximian, see below), that he made a lavish use of Money and presents of other kinds
Palestine - It is probable that no words ever uttered showed such consummate diplomatic skill as those in which He answered the question about the tribute Money (Matthew 22:17 etc
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - On the monthly day appointed each gives to the chest what he likes; the Money is disbursed not in feasting and drinking, but in supporting and burying the poor, in providing for destitute orphan boys and girls, in supporting the aged, the infirm, and the shipwrecked, and in succouring those sent to the mines or incarcerated in prisons ex causa Dei sectae
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - They said: ‘Cure the king and we will give you much Money