What does Monastery mean in the Bible?

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1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Monastery
(Greek: monos, alone)
A dwelling place of religious who live in seclusion. The term applies principally to the houses of such religious as lead a contemplative life and recite the divine office in common. It is opposed to a convent or residence, terms used to indicate the houses of religious devoted principally to the active life. The term monastery, is used for houses of both male and female religious.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Monastery, Canonical Erection of
The general requirements for the canonical erection of a monastery, whether of regulars or moniales, apart from the requirements of the Order's constitutions, are:
(1) permission of the Holy See, i.e.,of the Congregation of Religious
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community
That this monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical. This general legislation does not affect the special privileges enjoyed by any religious order.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Canonical Erection of Monastery
The general requirements for the canonical erection of a monastery, whether of regulars or moniales, apart from the requirements of the Order's constitutions, are:
(1) permission of the Holy See, i.e.,of the Congregation of Religious
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community
That this monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical. This general legislation does not affect the special privileges enjoyed by any religious order.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Monastery
A convent or house built for the reception of religious; whether it be abbey, priory, nunnery, or the like. Monastery is only properly applied to the houses of monks, mendicant friars, and nuns: the rest are more properly called religious houses. For the origin of monasteries, see MONASTIC, and MONK. The houses belonging to the several religious orders which obtained in England and Wales, were catherdrals, colleges, abbeys, priories, preceptories, commandries, hospitals, friaries, hermitages, chantries, and free chapels.
These were under the direction and management of various officers. The dissolution of houses of this kind began so early as the year 1312, when the Templars were suppressed; and in 1323, their lands, churches, advowsons, and liberties, here in England, were given, by 17 Edw. II. stat. 3, to the prior and brethren of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. In the years 1390, 1437, 1441, 1459, 1497, 1505, 1508, and 1515, several other houses were dissolved, and their revenues settled on different colleges in Oxford and Cambridge. Soon after the last period, cardinal Wolsey, by licence of the king and pope, obtained a dissolution of above thirty religious houses for the founding and endowing his colleges at Oxford and Ipswich. About the same time a bull was granted by the same pope to cardinal Wolsey to suppress monasteries, where there were not above six monks, to the value of eight thousand ducats a year, for endowing. Windsor and King's College in Cambridge; and two other bulls were granted to cardinals Wolsey and Campeins, where there were less than twelve monks, and to annex them to the greater monasteries; and another bull to the same cardinals to inquire about abbeys to be suppressed in order to be made cathedrals.
Although nothing appears to have been done in consequence of these bulls, the motive which induced Wolsey and many others to suppress these houses was the desire of promoting learning; and arch-bishop Crammer engaged in it with a view of carrying on the reformation. There were other causes that concurred to bring on their ruin: many of the religious were loose and vicious; the monks were generally thought to be in their hearts attached to the pope's supremacy; their revenues were not employed according to the intent of the donors; many cheats in images, feigned miracles, and counterfeit relics, had been discovered, which brought the monks into disgrace; the observant friars had opposed the king's divorce from queen Catharine; and these circumstances operated, in concurrence with the king's want of a supply and the people's desire to save their money, to forward a motion in parliament, that, in order to support the king's state, and supply his wants, all the religious houses might be conferred upon the crown, which were not able to spend above 200 50: a year; and an act was passed for that purpose, 27 Hen. VIII. 100: 28. By this act about three hundred and eighty houses were dissolved, and a revenue of 30, 000 50: or 32, 000 50:a year came to the crown; besides about 100, 000 50: in plate and jewels.
The suppression of these houses occasioned discontent, and at length an open rebellion: when this was appeased, the king resolved to suppress the rest of the monasteries, and appointed a new visitation, which caused the greater abbeys to be surrendered apace: and it was enacted by 31 Henry VIII. 100: 13, that all monasteries which have been surrendered since the 4th of February, in the twenty-seventh year of his majesty's reign, and which hereafter shall be surrendered, shall be vested in the king. The knights of St. John of Jerusalem were also suppressed by the 32d Henry VIII. 100: 24. The suppression of these greater houses by these two acts produced a revenue to the king of above 100, 000 50: a year, besides a large sum in plate and jewels. The last act of dissolution in this king's reign was the act of 37 Hen. VIII. 100: 4, for dissolving, colleges, free chapels, chantries, &c. which act was farther enforced by I Edw. VI. 100: 14. By this act were suppressed 90 colleges, 110 hospitals, and 2374 chantries and free chapels. The number of houses and places suppressed from first to last, so far as any calculations appear to have been made, seems to be as follows:
Of lesser monasteries, of which we have the valuation
-374 Of greater monasteries
186 Belonging to the hospitallers
48 Colleges
-90 Hospitals
-110 Chantries and free chapels
-2374
Total 3182
Besides the friars' houses, and those suppressed by Wolsey, and many small houses of which we have no particular account. the sum total of the clear yearly revenue of the several houses at the time of their dissolution, of which we have any account, seems to be as follows:
Of the great monasteries
l. 104, 919 13 3 Of all those of the lesser monasteries of which we have the valuation 29, 702 1 10 Knights hospitallers, head house in London 2, 385 12 8 We have the valuation of only 28 of their houses in the country 26 9 5 Friars' houses of which we have the valuation 751 2 0 Total 50:140, 784 19 2
If proper allowances are made for the lesser monasteries and houses not included in this estimate, and for the plate, &c. which came into the hands of the king by the dissolution, and for the value of money at that time, which was at least six times, as much as at present, and also consider that the estimate of the lands was generally supposed to be much under the real worth, we must conclude their whole revenues to have been immense. It does not appear that any computation hath been of the number of persons contained in the religous houses.
Those of the lesser monasteries dissolved by 27 Hen. VIIi. were reckoned at about 10, 000 If we suppose the colleges and hospitals to have contained a proportionable number, these will make about 5, 347 If we reckon the number in the greater monasteries according to the proportion of their revenues, they will be about 35, 000; but as probably they had larger allowances in proportion to their number than those of the lesser monasteries, if we abate upon that account 5, 000, they will then be 30, 000 One for each chantry and free chapel 2, 374
Total 47, 721
But as there were probably more than one person to officiate in several of the free chapels, and there were other houses which are not included within this calculation, perhaps they may be computed in one general estimate at about 50, 000. As there were pensions paid to almost all those of the greater monasteries, the king did not immediately come into the full enjoyment of their whole revenues; however, by means of what he did receive, he founded six new bishoprics, viz. those of Westminster, (which was changed by queen Elizabeth into a deanery, with twelve prebends and a school, ) Peterborough, Chester, Gloucester, Bristol, and Oxford. And in eight other sees he founded deaneries and chapters, by converting the priors and monks into deans and prebendaries, viz. Canterbury, Winchester, Durham, Worcester, Rochester, Norwich, Ely, and Carlisle. He founded also the colleges of Christ Church in Oxford, and Trinity in Cambridge, and finished King's College there. He likewise founded professorships of divinity, law, physic, and of the Hebrew and Greek tongues in both the said Universities.
He gave the house of Grey Friars and St. Bartholomew's Hospital to the city of London, and a perpetual pension to the poor knights of Windsor, and laid out great sums in building and fortifying many ports in the channel. It is observable, upon the whole, that the dissolution of these houses was not an act of the church, but of the state, in the period preceding the reformation, by a king and parliament of the Roman Catholic commission in all points, except the king's supremacy; to which the pope himself, by his bulls and licences, had led the way. As to the merits of these institutions, authors are much divided. While some have considered them as beneficial to learning, piety, and benevolence, others have thought them very injurious. We may form some idea of them from the following remarks of Mr. Gilpin. He is speaking of Glastonbury Abbey, which possessed the amplest revenues of any religious house in England. "Its fraternity, " says he, "is said to have consisted of five hundred established monks, besides nearly as many retainers on the abbey. Above four hundred children were not only educated in it, but entirely maintained. Strangers from all parts of Europe were liberally received, classed according to their sex and nation, and might consider the hospitable roof under which they lodged as their own. Five hundred travellers, with their horses, have been lodged at once within its walls; while the poor from every side of the country, waiting the ringing of the alms bell; when they flocked in crowds, young and old, to the gate of the monastery, where they received, every morning, a plentiful pro-vision for themselves and their families:
all this appears great and noble. "On the other hand, when we consider five hundred persons bred up in indolence and lost to the commonwealth; when we consider that these houses were the great nurseries of superstition, bigotry, and ignorance; the stews of sloth, stupidity, and perhaps intemperance; when we consider that the education received in them had not the least tincture of useful learning, good manners, or true religion, but tended rather to vilify and disgrace the human mind; when we consider that the pilgrims and strangers who resorted thither were idle vagabonds, who got nothing abroad that was equivalent to the occupations they left at home; and when we consider, lastly, that indiscriminate alms-giving is not real charity, but an avocation from labour and industry, checking every idea of exertion, and filling the mind with abject notions, we are led to acquiesce in the fate of these foundations, and view their ruins, not only with a picturesque eye, but with moral and religious satisfaction."Gilpin's Observations on the Western Parts of England, p. 138, 139; Bigland's Letters on Hist. p. 313.
Webster's Dictionary - Monastery
(n.) A house of religious retirement, or of secusion from ordinary temporal concerns, especially for monks; - more rarely applied to such a house for females.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Bonaventure's Monastery And Ecclesiastical s
Allegany, New York. Founded in 1855. Conducted by the Franciscan Fathers. For seculars and Franciscans.
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Maurus, Saint, Founder of Glanfeuil Monastery
Maurus (2), St., founder and abbat of the Benedictine monastery of Glanfeuil or St. Maur-sur-Loire. He is better known, as Herzog says, to tradition than to history, but the primary authority is Gregorius Mag. ( Dial. ii. cc. 3 seq.). His Life, written by Faustus Cassinensis, and re-written with alterations by Odo or Eudes, at one time abbat of Glanfeuil, is given by Mabillon ( Acts SS. O. S. B. saec. i. 274 seq.) and the Bolland. ( Acta SS. Jan. i. 1039 seq.). [1]. St. Maurus, better known in France as St. Maur, was when 12 years old entrusted by his father Equitius, an Italian nobleman, to the charge of St. Benedict at Subiaco (or at Monte Cassino) and trained in monastic rule. By St. Benedict he was sent into Gaul c. 543, and established his monastery on the Loire by favour of King Theodebert. He introduced the Benedictine rule, and was the chief means of its acceptance in France, but the details of his work are not given. He died A. D. 584. His monastery, secularized in 16th cent., was in the middle ages one of great influence, and the "Congregation of St. Maur" has done much from the 17th cent. to elevate the tone of the monastic orders. The genuineness of his life in all its stages has been disputed. Ceillier, Sacr. Aut. xi. 157, 170, 610; Herzog, Real-Encycl. ix. 201; Cave, Lit. Hist. i. 574; Mosheim, Hist. Ch. Ch. cent. xvii. § 2, pt. i. c. 1.
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A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Petrus, Abbat of Saint Augustine's Monastery
Petrus (72), first abbat of the monastery of SS. Peter and Paul, commonly called St. Augustine's, Canterbury. He was probably one of the monks who accompanied Augustine on his first journey, and therefore probably a monk of the monastery of St. Andrew at Rome. He is first mentioned by Bede ( H. E. i. 25) as joined with Laurentius in the mission which Augustine after his consecration sent to Rome to announce that the Gospel had been accepted by the English, and that he had been made bishop, and to put before the pope the questions which drew forth the famous "Responsiones Sancti Gregorii." He must have returned some time before the death of Augustine and been appointed or designated by him and Ethelbert as the future head of the monastery, which at his request Ethelbert was building outside the walls of Canterbury. The building was not finished when Augustine died, but Laurentius, his successor, consecrated the new church and Peter became the first abbat. If the Canterbury computation be accepted, and on such a point it may not be baseless, Peter must have perished in the winter of 606 or of 607 at the latest. There is a notice of him in Mabillon's Acta SS. O.S.B. saec. i. pt. i. p. 1; and the Bollandist Acts, Jan. t. i. pp. 335, 336.
See Gotselinus, de Translatione Sti. Augustini , ap. Mab. Acta SS. O.S.B. t. ix. p. 760; Elmham, ed. Hardwick, pp. 92–126; Thorn, cc. 1761, 1766; Hardy, Catalogue of Materials ; etc. i. 206, 207; Monasticon Angl. i. 120.
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Sentence search

Abbey - ) A Monastery or society of persons of either sex, secluded from the world and devoted to religion and celibacy; also, the monastic building or buildings. ) The church of a Monastery
Melleray - Cistercian Monastery in Brittany, France, founded c. The original Monastery was erected in 1145 by Guitern, its first abbot. The dispersed monks finally settled at Lulworth, Dorsetshire, England, and their Monastery was created an abbey, but in 1817 they returned to Melleray
Archimandrite - (Greek: archos, chief; mandra, Monastery) ...
Superior of a Monastery in several of the Oriental Churches, including the Melchite or Uniat Greeks; also an honorary title of certain officials attached to the chanceries of the great Oriental patriarchates
Minster - ) A church of a Monastery. The name is often retained and applied to the church after the Monastery has ceased to exist (as Beverly Minster, Southwell Minster, etc
Monasteries - ) of Monastery...
Convent - See ABBEY, Monastery, MONK
Covent - ) A convent or Monastery
Frangipani, Lando Dei - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died Monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the Monastery of La Cava
Innocent Iii, Anti-Pope - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died Monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the Monastery of La Cava
Lando Dei Frangipani - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died Monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the Monastery of La Cava
Saints Vincent And Anastasius, Abbey of - A Cistercian Monastery near Rome. Three sanctuaries belong to the abbey: ...
the church of Saint Paul of Three Fountains, built on the site where Saint Paul was beheaded
Our Lady of Martyrs, erected over the relics of Saint Zeno and his legionaries
the church and Monastery of Saints Vincent and Anastasius, dating from 626, when it was given to the Benedictines
In the course of its history the Monastery has changed owners several times and was taken over by a community from La Grande Trappe, 1868
Monasterial - ) Of or pertaining to Monastery, or to monastic life
Llanthony Priory - A Monastery of Augustinian Canons, in the Black Mountains of South Wales. 1100,with William and Ernisius, two hermits living in a chapel once occupied by Saint David, for whom Hugh de Lacy founded a Monastery, 1107
Lamasery - ) A Monastery or convent of lamas, in Thibet, Mongolia, etc
Foalan, Saint - Leaving Ireland he became head of the Monastery of Cnobheresburg, Suffolk, England, founded by Saint Fursey. A little later he established a Monastery, under Irish discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles. Relics in Monastery at Fosses
Foelan, Saint - Leaving Ireland he became head of the Monastery of Cnobheresburg, Suffolk, England, founded by Saint Fursey. A little later he established a Monastery, under Irish discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles. Relics in Monastery at Fosses
Foillan, Saint - Leaving Ireland he became head of the Monastery of Cnobheresburg, Suffolk, England, founded by Saint Fursey. A little later he established a Monastery, under Irish discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles. Relics in Monastery at Fosses
Faelan, Saint - Leaving Ireland he became head of the Monastery of Cnobheresburg, Suffolk, England, founded by Saint Fursey. A little later he established a Monastery, under Irish discipline, at Fosses, Belgium, near the famous convent of Nivelles. Relics in Monastery at Fosses
Ceadda, Saint - He was educated at Lindisfarne under Saint Aidan and at the Monastery of Rathmelsige (Melfont), Ireland. He assisted his brother Saint Cedd in establishing the Monastery of Lastinghalil, Yorkshire and succeeded him as abbot, 664. For a short time Bishop of York, in 669 he was appointed Bishop of Mercia and established the seat of his diocese at Lichfield where he founded a church and Monastery
Chad, Saint - He was educated at Lindisfarne under Saint Aidan and at the Monastery of Rathmelsige (Melfont), Ireland. He assisted his brother Saint Cedd in establishing the Monastery of Lastinghalil, Yorkshire and succeeded him as abbot, 664. For a short time Bishop of York, in 669 he was appointed Bishop of Mercia and established the seat of his diocese at Lichfield where he founded a church and Monastery
Curtal Friar - A friar who acted as porter at the gate of a Monastery
Kevin, Saint - 498-618) Abbot, founder of the Monastery of Glendalough, Ireland. After founding his Monastery he retired into solitude, returning only at the urgent entreaties of his monks
Abbey of Saint Emmeram - A former Benedictine Monastery at Ratisbon, Germany, traditionally founded by Saint Emmeram, probably around 652, and enlarged and endowed by Charlemagne c800 The abbots ranked as princes of the Empire and had a seat in the imperial diets. Early in the 19th century the Monastery was confiscated and the buildings appropriated as a residence for the Prince of Thurn and Taxis
Saint Emmeram, Abbey of - A former Benedictine Monastery at Ratisbon, Germany, traditionally founded by Saint Emmeram, probably around 652, and enlarged and endowed by Charlemagne c800 The abbots ranked as princes of the Empire and had a seat in the imperial diets. Early in the 19th century the Monastery was confiscated and the buildings appropriated as a residence for the Prince of Thurn and Taxis
Guest-House - One of the component parts of a Monastery, used for the reception and entertainment of visitors
Refectory - (Latin: reficio, refresh) ...
A room for eating; usually the dining-room of a Monastery or convent
Beverley, John of, Saint - He joined the Benedictine Order, lived for some time in the Monastery at Whitby, and was consecrated Bishop of Hexham, 687. He founded a Monastery at Inderawood (later Beverley), which became an important ecclesiastical center, and there he spent the last years of his life
John of Beverley, Saint - He joined the Benedictine Order, lived for some time in the Monastery at Whitby, and was consecrated Bishop of Hexham, 687. He founded a Monastery at Inderawood (later Beverley), which became an important ecclesiastical center, and there he spent the last years of his life
Folkestone Abbey - Kent, England, originally a Monastery of Benedictine nuns, founded in 630 by Saint Eanswith, grand-daughter of Saint Ethelbert, first Christian king in England. Destroyed by the Danes, a Monastery of Benedictine monks was erected on the same site
Folkestone Priory - Kent, England, originally a Monastery of Benedictine nuns, founded in 630 by Saint Eanswith, grand-daughter of Saint Ethelbert, first Christian king in England. Destroyed by the Danes, a Monastery of Benedictine monks was erected on the same site
Abbey, Folkestone - Kent, England, originally a Monastery of Benedictine nuns, founded in 630 by Saint Eanswith, grand-daughter of Saint Ethelbert, first Christian king in England. Destroyed by the Danes, a Monastery of Benedictine monks was erected on the same site
Mochuda, Saint - He spent his youth as a swineherd near Castlemaine, entered a neighboring Monastery, studied under Saint Carthage the Elder, and was ordained. He founded the Monastery of Rahan in Offaly County, c. Expelled from Rahan, 635, with 800 of his community, he established a Monastery which later became the famous school of Lismore
Carthage, Saint - He spent his youth as a swineherd near Castlemaine, entered a neighboring Monastery, studied under Saint Carthage the Elder, and was ordained. He founded the Monastery of Rahan in Offaly County, c. Expelled from Rahan, 635, with 800 of his community, he established a Monastery which later became the famous school of Lismore
Slype - ) A narrow passage between two buildings, as between the transept and chapter house of a Monastery
New Melleray Abbey - Trappist Monastery, Peosta, Iowa
Abbey, New Melleray - Trappist Monastery, Peosta, Iowa
Locutorium - (Latin: a place for conversation, from loqui, to speak) ...
A parlor or reception room in a Monastery or convent
Sabas, Saint - At the age of eight he entered a Basilian Monastery. A basilica and Monastery on the Aventine were named in his honor. Represented holding the rule of his Monastery in his hand, seated on the edge of a precipice, or praying in a cavern, nearby a lion
Sabbas, Saint - At the age of eight he entered a Basilian Monastery. A basilica and Monastery on the Aventine were named in his honor. Represented holding the rule of his Monastery in his hand, seated on the edge of a precipice, or praying in a cavern, nearby a lion
Cellarer - ) A steward or butler of a Monastery or chapter; one who has charge of procuring and keeping the provisions
Caedmon - According to Saint Bede, he was attached as a laborer to the double Monastery of Whitby founded by Saint Hilda, 657, and was commanded in a vision to glorify God in hymns. He was thereupon urged by Hilda to take the Columban habit and entered the Monastery as a lay brother
Cedmon - According to Saint Bede, he was attached as a laborer to the double Monastery of Whitby founded by Saint Hilda, 657, and was commanded in a vision to glorify God in hymns. He was thereupon urged by Hilda to take the Columban habit and entered the Monastery as a lay brother
Minster - Church of a Monastery; one which originated in a monastic settlement; now applied to a church of considerable size or importance
Charterhouse - ) A well known public school and charitable foundation in the building once used as a Carthusian Monastery (Chartreuse) in London
Scriptorium - ) In an abbey or Monastery, the room set apart for writing or copying manuscripts; in general, a room devoted to writing
Gertrude the Great, Saint - At the age of five she entered the Monastery of Helfta, where she lived for the rest of her life, devoting herself to study and to writing. She was buried at the Monastery of Helfta where doubtless her body still lies. Relics in the old Monastery at Helfta
Great, Gertrude the, Saint - At the age of five she entered the Monastery of Helfta, where she lived for the rest of her life, devoting herself to study and to writing. She was buried at the Monastery of Helfta where doubtless her body still lies. Relics in the old Monastery at Helfta
Newbattle Abbey - A part of the Monastery was again destroyed by the Earl of Hartford. The Monastery was converted into a secular house
Abbey, Newbattle - A part of the Monastery was again destroyed by the Earl of Hartford. The Monastery was converted into a secular house
Alexander, Saint - In the desert he converted 30 robbers and changed their den into a Monastery. He also founded a Monastery on the Euphrates
Aedh of Kildare, Saint - He resigned his throne to enter the Monastery of Kildare, where he became abbot and bishop
Chequer - (Latin: scaccarium, chess-board, from the early custom of keeping accounts on a checkered cloth) Private room wherein the officials of a Monastery transacted their business
Menthon, Bernard of, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Novara; head in the Monastery of Mont-joye, Aosta
Bernard of Menthon, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Novara; head in the Monastery of Mont-joye, Aosta
Fleury, Abbo of - He entered the Benedictine Monastery at Fleury, and was appointed director of the school at Ramsey Abbey, England, 985-987, and Abbot of Fleury, 988. To restore discipline in the Monastery of La Réole, Gascony, he transferred thither several monks of Fleury
Cell - Small Monastery or nunnery dependent on a larger house. The inhabitants of these cells were obliged to contribute annually a definite amount of their incomes to the Monastery to which they belonged and to appear personally on certain occasions
Abbo of Fleury, Saint - He entered the Benedictine Monastery at Fleury, and was appointed director of the school at Ramsey Abbey, England, 985-987, and Abbot of Fleury, 988. To restore discipline in the Monastery of La Réole, Gascony, he transferred thither several monks of Fleury
Franciska Poslaniec sw - A monthly magazine published in the Polish language in Pulaski, Wisconsin, at the Franciscan Monastery, for the members of the Third Order of Saint Francis; founded 1915
Abbey, Saint Augustine - Benedictine Monastery founded outside the city of Canterbury, England in 605, dedicated anew to Saints Peter, Paul, and Augustine by Saint Dunstan in 978
Saint Augustine Abbey - Benedictine Monastery founded outside the city of Canterbury, England in 605, dedicated anew to Saints Peter, Paul, and Augustine by Saint Dunstan in 978
Friary - ) A Monastery; a convent of friars
Domonic of Silos, Saint - He entered the Benedictine Order, was prior of San Millan de Cogolla, reformed the Monastery of Canas, and was prior of Caldas, 1034. In 1041 he was made prior of the Monastery of Silos which he reformed and restored
Damian, Peter, Saint - Having entered the Monastery of Fonte Avellana, he was elected prior in 1043, and devoted himself to the reform of the Monastery and the abolition of simony, incontinence, and other abuses
Silos, Domonic of, Saint - He entered the Benedictine Order, was prior of San Millan de Cogolla, reformed the Monastery of Canas, and was prior of Caldas, 1034. In 1041 he was made prior of the Monastery of Silos which he reformed and restored
Aebbercurnig - Linlithgowshire, Scotland, ancient bishopric of the Southern Picts, with seat at the Benedictine Monastery now in ruins, whose sculptured remains are visible in the Presbyterian church
Abercorn - Linlithgowshire, Scotland, ancient bishopric of the Southern Picts, with seat at the Benedictine Monastery now in ruins, whose sculptured remains are visible in the Presbyterian church
Laura - (Greek: a passage, alley, avenue, or street; later a set of shops along a street, hence a bazaar) ...
In the ecclesiastical sense, a series of streets of hermitages clustered around a Monastery and the type of life lived by the monks in a laura. Later the term was applied to the section or quarter of a town in the immediate vicinity of a church or Monastery. The monk lived in his own cell and reported at the Monastery at stated times for certain community duties
Bursary - ) The treasury of a college or Monastery
Charterhouse School - One of the great English public schools, founded in London, 1611, on the site of a Carthusian Monastery
Chartreuse - ) A Carthusian Monastery; esp
Archimandrite - ) A chief of a Monastery, corresponding to abbot in the Roman Catholic church
Oblati - ) A class of persons, especially in the Middle Ages, who offered themselves and their property to a Monastery
School, Charterhouse - One of the great English public schools, founded in London, 1611, on the site of a Carthusian Monastery
Kenneth, Saint - In 545 he was ordained priest in the Monastery of Llancarvan, Glamorganshire, and went to Rome for the papal blessing. In 550 he was again at Glengiven and in 565 went to Scotland where he built cells, an oratory and a Monastery, and is known as Saint Kenneth
Kenny, Saint - In 545 he was ordained priest in the Monastery of Llancarvan, Glamorganshire, and went to Rome for the papal blessing. In 550 he was again at Glengiven and in 565 went to Scotland where he built cells, an oratory and a Monastery, and is known as Saint Kenneth
Monastery, Canonical Erection of - The general requirements for the canonical erection of a Monastery, whether of regulars or moniales, apart from the requirements of the Order's constitutions, are: ...
(1) permission of the Holy See, i. ,of the Congregation of Religious ...
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place ...
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community ...
That this Monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical
Canice, Saint - In 545 he was ordained priest in the Monastery of Llancarvan, Glamorganshire, and went to Rome for the papal blessing. In 550 he was again at Glengiven and in 565 went to Scotland where he built cells, an oratory and a Monastery, and is known as Saint Kenneth
Canonical Erection of Monastery - The general requirements for the canonical erection of a Monastery, whether of regulars or moniales, apart from the requirements of the Order's constitutions, are: ...
(1) permission of the Holy See, i. ,of the Congregation of Religious ...
(2) permission in writing of the Ordinary of the place ...
(3) sufficient provision for the housing and sustenance of the community ...
That this Monastery be a domus formata, it is required that at least six members of the community be professed, of whom four at least must be priests, if the Order is clerical
Assumption Abbey - Benedictine abbey of the Swiss American Congregation, founded as the Monastery of Saint Mary by Vincent Wehrle, O
School of Cork - In 1174 the Monastery and school of Cork were refounded by Cormac MacCarthy, King of Munster
Sabas, Saint - When 8 years old he entered a neighbouring Monastery, and at 18 went a pilgrimage to the holy places at Jerusalem, where he entered the Monastery of St. Several persons joining him, he laid the foundations of his Monastery on a rock on the Kidron river, where it still remains. In 493 the Monastery had increased so much that he built another at a short distance
Abbey, Peterborough - Benedictine Monastery, Northamptonshire, England; known at first as Medeshamstede; founded 654 by Peada, king of Mercia
Ely, England, Diocese of - Ancient diocese, established 1108 around the Monastery (later the cathedral), founded by Saint Etheldreda or Audrey in 673
Bursar - ) A treasurer, or cash keeper; a purser; as, the bursar of a college, or of a Monastery
Ebba the Younger, Saint - Virgin, martyr, Abbess of Coldingham, died c870 During the Danish invasion she and her nuns mutilated their faces to preserve their chastity, and were burned alive, when the barbarians set fire to the Monastery
Younger, Ebba the, Saint - Virgin, martyr, Abbess of Coldingham, died c870 During the Danish invasion she and her nuns mutilated their faces to preserve their chastity, and were burned alive, when the barbarians set fire to the Monastery
Dolbeau, Jean - He celebrated the first Mass said in Quebec and built the first Recollect Monastery there
Malmesbury, England - The Monastery was surrendered, 1589, and only a small part of the ruins are standing
Jean Dolbeau - He celebrated the first Mass said in Quebec and built the first Recollect Monastery there
Athenry, Galway, Ireland - The Dominican Monastery, erected 1261, was revived 400 years later
Xenodochium - ) In the Middle Ages, a room in a Monastery for the reception and entertainment of strangers and pilgrims, and for the relief of paupers
Cell - ) A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a Monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit. ) A small religious house attached to a Monastery or convent
Asceteby - (Latin: asceteria, hermitage) ...
A Monastery or home for monks; a house of retreats, place of retirement for following spiritual exercises, especially those of Saint Ignatius; name given to the first of such houses erected at Milan by Saint Charles Borromeo
Asceterion - (Latin: asceteria, hermitage) ...
A Monastery or home for monks; a house of retreats, place of retirement for following spiritual exercises, especially those of Saint Ignatius; name given to the first of such houses erected at Milan by Saint Charles Borromeo
Oblate - (Latin: oblutus, offered) ...
A person who unites with some religious order in order to do certain actions in accordance with its rules and thus share in its merits and spiritual benefits, though remaining a layman and living outside of the Monastery or convent
Montepulciano, Agnes of, Saint - She entered a Monastery at nine, became prioress at fifteen, and founded a Dominican convent at Montepulciano, which she governed until her death
Agnes of Montepulciano, Saint - She entered a Monastery at nine, became prioress at fifteen, and founded a Dominican convent at Montepulciano, which she governed until her death
Iona - Monastery formerly occupying a small island of the Inner Hebrides, west of Scotland; founded in 563, by Saint Columba. Early in the 13th century the old Celtic Monastery was replaced by Benedictine monasteries for men and for women; these were confiscated, 1561, by order of the Convention of Estates
Saint Malo, France - In the 6th century a Monastery on the island sheltered Malo, a Cambrian priest from Wales, afterwards Bishop of Aleth (Saint Servan). The Monastery of Saint Malo founded at the same time passed over to the French (Maurist) Congregation in 1672
Feuillants - (Latin: folium, leaf) ...
A reform of the Order of Citeaux, founded by Jean de La Barriere, 1573, at Les Feuillans, a Monastery so called from its location in a shady valley. Sixtus V summoned them to Rome, 1587, and gave them the church of Saint Pudentiana, while Henry III of France erected the Monastery of Saint Bernard for them in Paris. They acquired a second Monastery in Rome, 1598
John Boyce - A boy chosen from the Monastery school or cathedral choir to preside as bishop between Saint Nicholas's Day, December 6, and the feast of Holy Innocents, December 28,
Abbey, Rufford - Cistercian Monastery, Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire, England, founded c
Friars, Austin - Monastery of Hermits of Saint Augustine in the heart of the City of London; founded, 1253, by Bohun, Earl of Hereford
Cerne Abbey - A Benedictine Monastery in Dorsetshire, England, founded in 987 by Aylmar, Duke of Cornwall
Bartholomites - In the church of the Monastery of this order at Geneva is preserved the image, which, it is pretended, Christ sent to king Abgarus
Recluse - Among the Papists, a person shut up in a small cell of an hermitage or Monastery, and cut off not only from all conversation with the world, but even with the house
Abbey, Cerne - A Benedictine Monastery in Dorsetshire, England, founded in 987 by Aylmar, Duke of Cornwall
Atilanus, Saint - He founded, together with Saint Froilan II of Leon, the Monastery of Moreruela, on the banks of the Esla
Attilanus, Saint - He founded, together with Saint Froilan II of Leon, the Monastery of Moreruela, on the banks of the Esla
Austin Friars - Monastery of Hermits of Saint Augustine in the heart of the City of London; founded, 1253, by Bohun, Earl of Hereford
Actor Ecclesire - (Latin: agent of the Church) ...
Medieval designation for an official deputed to defend the rights and revenues of a church or Monastery, often confounded with Advocatus ecclesire
Rufford Abbey - Cistercian Monastery, Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire, England, founded c
Fulgentius, Fabius Claudius Gordianus, Saint - He was appointed provincial fiscal procurator, but soon entered a Monastery, was ordained, and became superior. He was sent back to Sardinia where he erected a Monastery, and wrote many fine treatises, sermons, and letters
Fabius Claudius Gordianus Fulgentius, Saint - He was appointed provincial fiscal procurator, but soon entered a Monastery, was ordained, and became superior. He was sent back to Sardinia where he erected a Monastery, and wrote many fine treatises, sermons, and letters
Scriptorium - A large room in a Monastery reserved for the use of the scribes or copyists of the community. Often the scriptorium of a Monastery developed some peculiarities of writing which were perpetuated and are of great value in ascertaining the source from which a manuscript comes
Thais - Her fame reached to Paphnutius's Monastery, whereupon he determined to make a great effort to convert her, though she was evidently a nominal Christian. Recognizing his true character, she cast herself at his feet, destroyed all her precious dresses, and entered a female Monastery, where Paphnutius shut her up in a cell, sealing the door, and leaving only a small window, through which to receive food
Melchus, Saint - He labored in Ireland with Saint Patrick, was consecrated bishop and erected a Monastery at Ardagh
Mel, Saint - He labored in Ireland with Saint Patrick, was consecrated bishop and erected a Monastery at Ardagh
Andrew the Scot, Saint - Archdeacon of Fiesole, born Ireland; died Italy, c877 He was a brother of Saint Bridget the Younger, and accompanied Donatus to Italy, becoming Archdeacon of Fiesole, where he restored the church of Saint Martin and founded a Monastery
Convent - A house for persons devoted to religion an abbey a Monastery a nunnery
Scot, Andrew the, Saint - Archdeacon of Fiesole, born Ireland; died Italy, c877 He was a brother of Saint Bridget the Younger, and accompanied Donatus to Italy, becoming Archdeacon of Fiesole, where he restored the church of Saint Martin and founded a Monastery
Oblates, Orders of - With the introduction of lay brethren into monasteries in the 11th century, oblates were the workmen or servants who voluntarily subjected themselves while in the service of the Monastery, to religious obedience and observance. Afterward the oblate made a vow of obedience to the abbot, gave himself and his goods to the Monastery, and wore a sober secular dress. During the Middle Ages the title oblate was granted to anyone who, for his generosity or special service to the Monastery, received the privilege of lay membership with a share in the prayers and good works of the brethren
Orders of Oblates - With the introduction of lay brethren into monasteries in the 11th century, oblates were the workmen or servants who voluntarily subjected themselves while in the service of the Monastery, to religious obedience and observance. Afterward the oblate made a vow of obedience to the abbot, gave himself and his goods to the Monastery, and wore a sober secular dress. During the Middle Ages the title oblate was granted to anyone who, for his generosity or special service to the Monastery, received the privilege of lay membership with a share in the prayers and good works of the brethren
Ardchattan, Prioy of - It is the only ancient Monastery in Scotland part of which remains in actual use
Trappist - ) A monk belonging to a branch of the Cistercian Order, which was established by Armand de Rance in 1660 at the Monastery of La Trappe in Normandy
Adrian Iii, Pope - When on his way to an imperial diet he died and was buried in the Monastery of Nonantula
Baithen Mor - Of noble Irish family, he became a disciple of Saint Columba, by whom he was appointed abbot of the Monastery founded by Saint Comgall on Tiree island, Scotland
Baithen, Saint - Of noble Irish family, he became a disciple of Saint Columba, by whom he was appointed abbot of the Monastery founded by Saint Comgall on Tiree island, Scotland
Catherine of Alexandria, Saint - She was beheaded and an angel carried her body to Mount Sinai where a church and Monastery were dedicated to her. Relics in Monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Alexandria, Catherine of, Saint - She was beheaded and an angel carried her body to Mount Sinai where a church and Monastery were dedicated to her. Relics in Monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Othmar, Saint - He is one of the founders of the Abbey of Saint Gall, where he built the Monastery and introduced the Benedictine rule, and is one of the most popular saints in Switzerland
Calefactory - ) An apartment in a Monastery, warmed and used as a sitting room
Fulcran, Saint - He rebuilt many churches and convents, and founded the Monastery of Saint Sauveur
John, Antipope - He broke into the Lateran palace but was seized by the Roman nobles, who were escorting the lawful pope to his residence, and thrust into a Monastery
Oblati - Secular persons who devoted themselves and their estates to some Monastery, into which they were admitted as a kind of lay-brothers
Fountains Abbey - A Benedictine Monastery of the Cistercian Reform, about 21 miles from Ripon, Yorkshire, England, on the Skell River, established by monks from Saint Mary's Abbey, York, 1132. Hugh, Dean of York, and two wealthy canons, entered the Monastery and brought money and property to the needy community
Abbey of Grottaferrata - A Basilian Monastery 2. Opposing factions brought much trouble to the Monastery between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries
Abbey, Fountains - A Benedictine Monastery of the Cistercian Reform, about 21 miles from Ripon, Yorkshire, England, on the Skell River, established by monks from Saint Mary's Abbey, York, 1132. Hugh, Dean of York, and two wealthy canons, entered the Monastery and brought money and property to the needy community
Kells, Book of - It is known also as the Book of Columba, probably because it was written in the Monastery of Iona in honor of the saint
Abbey, Faversham - A former Benedictine Monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Faversham Abbey - A former Benedictine Monastery of the Cluniac Congregation near Canterbury, founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda
Lay Abbot - The estate of the Monastery was thus placed in the charge of the lay abbot, who received part of its income
John ii, Pope - Little is known of his pontificate except that he caused Contumeliosus, Bishop of Riez, to be confined in a Monastery for his crimes
Religious - It is also used for a person engaged by solemn vows to the monastic life; or a person shut up in a Monastery, to lead a life of devotion and austerity under some rule or institution
Nicephorus Blemmida - Ordained at Nicaea about 1223, he subsequently entered a Monastery which he had founded at Ephesus
Abbey, Boyle - Cistercian Monastery near Elphin, Roscommon, Ireland, founded by Maurice O'Duffy, 1161
Antigonish, Canada, Diocese of - Early missionaries: Father Angus MacEachern; Abbe Lejamtel; Fathers Alexander McDonell, William Chisholm, Colin Grant, James Grant; Father Vincent, founder of former Trappist Monastery at Tracadie
Aengus, Saint - He collaborated with Saint Maelruain in writing a martyrology of Irish saints, and wrote the "Felire," a poetical work on the same subject, which he concluded after he had left the Monastery and resumed his hermit's life
Aleric - After a mock election at Saint Peter's, 1102, he was dragged to the Lateran to the lawful pope, Paschal II, who imprisoned him and then sent him to Saint Lawrence's Monastery at Aversa, where he died
Abbot, Lay - The estate of the Monastery was thus placed in the charge of the lay abbot, who received part of its income
Monk - See also, ...
monasteries, double
monasteries, suppression of
monastery
monastery, canonical erection of
monasticism
patron saints index
Fontenelle, Abbey of - A Benedictine Monastery in Normandy (Seine-Inférieure), near Caudebec-en-Caux, founded by Saint Wandrille (died 667). The Monastery was famed for its library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Guido d' Arezzo - Educated by the Benedictines at Paris, he became a monk there, removing later to the Monastery of Pomposa, near Ferrara, and thence to Arezzo, where he probably died as prior of the neighboring Monastery of Santa Croce
Abbey of Fontenelle - A Benedictine Monastery in Normandy (Seine-Inférieure), near Caudebec-en-Caux, founded by Saint Wandrille (died 667). The Monastery was famed for its library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Abbey of Saint Wandrille - A Benedictine Monastery in Normandy (Seine-Inférieure), near Caudebec-en-Caux, founded by Saint Wandrille (died 667). The Monastery was famed for its library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Abbey, Solesmes - A Benedictine Monastery near Sable, France, founded in 1010 by Geoffrey, seigneur of Sable, as a priory dependent on the Abbey of Saint-Pierre de la Couture at Le Mans. In 1791 the Monastery was suppressed
Saint Wandrille, Abbey of - A Benedictine Monastery in Normandy (Seine-Inférieure), near Caudebec-en-Caux, founded by Saint Wandrille (died 667). The Monastery was famed for its library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Solesmes Abbey - A Benedictine Monastery near Sable, France, founded in 1010 by Geoffrey, seigneur of Sable, as a priory dependent on the Abbey of Saint-Pierre de la Couture at Le Mans. In 1791 the Monastery was suppressed
Maurus, Saint, Founder of Glanfeuil Monastery - , founder and abbat of the Benedictine Monastery of Glanfeuil or St. 543, and established his Monastery on the Loire by favour of King Theodebert. His Monastery, secularized in 16th cent
Petrus, Abbat of Saint Augustine's Monastery - Petrus (72), first abbat of the Monastery of SS. He was probably one of the monks who accompanied Augustine on his first journey, and therefore probably a monk of the Monastery of St. " He must have returned some time before the death of Augustine and been appointed or designated by him and Ethelbert as the future head of the Monastery, which at his request Ethelbert was building outside the walls of Canterbury
Berard of Carbio, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Coimbra
Newminster, Robert of, Saint - He studied at the University of Paris, served as parish priest at Gargrave, joined the Benedictines at Whitby, and later entered the Cistercian Monastery at Fountains
Carbio, Berard of, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Coimbra
Honoratus, Saint - Returning to Gaul through Italy, he founded the celebrated Monastery of Lérins, and in 426 was appointed Archbishop of Arles
Agnes of Bohemia, Blessed - She became a Poor Clare in the Monastery of Saint Saviour, Prague, which she had erected, and of which she became abbess
Agnes of Prague, Blessed - She became a Poor Clare in the Monastery of Saint Saviour, Prague, which she had erected, and of which she became abbess
Ebba the Elder, Saint - She founded the convent of Ebchester, and the Monastery for men and women at Coldingham, Berwickshire, where, as abbess, she became the spiritual guide of Saint Etheldreda
Robert of Newminster, Saint - He studied at the University of Paris, served as parish priest at Gargrave, joined the Benedictines at Whitby, and later entered the Cistercian Monastery at Fountains
Saint Christopher - The island was evangelized by French Capuchins who built a Monastery here in 1626
Elder, Ebba the, Saint - She founded the convent of Ebchester, and the Monastery for men and women at Coldingham, Berwickshire, where, as abbess, she became the spiritual guide of Saint Etheldreda
Tabbs, Saint - She founded the convent of Ebchester, and the Monastery for men and women at Coldingham, Berwickshire, where, as abbess, she became the spiritual guide of Saint Etheldreda
Saint Abb's Head - She founded the convent of Ebchester, and the Monastery for men and women at Coldingham, Berwickshire, where, as abbess, she became the spiritual guide of Saint Etheldreda
Dunod, Saint - He was a North British chieftain, driven into Wales, where he embraced the religious life, and founded the Monastery of Bangor on the Dee
Disibod, Saint - He settled on the continent near Bingen, and founded the Monastery of Mount Disibod, from which the name Disenberg is derived
Calefactory - (Latin: calefacere, to warm) ...
1) The heated room in an English Monastery where the monks retired occasionally to warm themselves, especially after Matins
Jedburgh Abbey - The Monastery has practically disappeared, but the church is entire
Mendel, Gregor Johann - In 1886 he relinquished his educational labors to become abbot of Saint Thomas's Monastery, Brünn
Gregor Mendel - In 1886 he relinquished his educational labors to become abbot of Saint Thomas's Monastery, Brünn
Abbey, Jedburgh - The Monastery has practically disappeared, but the church is entire
Hegumenos - (Greek: ago, lead) ...
Title applied in Asia Minor and among the Greeks, to the superior of a coenobium or conventual Monastery
Raphoe, Ireland, Diocese of - Saint Colomba founded a Monastery there in the 6th century
Bentivoglio, Annetta - ...
Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ...
Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact...
Monastery of Saint Clare...
509 South Kentucky Avenue...
Evansville, IN 47714, USA ...
Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana...
Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska...
Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada...
Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ...
- Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Maria Magdalena Bentivoglio - ...
Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ...
Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact...
Monastery of Saint Clare...
509 South Kentucky Avenue...
Evansville, IN 47714, USA ...
Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana...
Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska...
Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada...
Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ...
- Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Mary Magdalena Bentivoglio - ...
Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ...
Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact...
Monastery of Saint Clare...
509 South Kentucky Avenue...
Evansville, IN 47714, USA ...
Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana...
Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska...
Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada...
Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ...
- Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Mary Magdalen of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ...
Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact...
Monastery of Saint Clare...
509 South Kentucky Avenue...
Evansville, IN 47714, USA ...
Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana...
Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska...
Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada...
Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ...
- Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Monastic - Oddo first began to retrieve it in the Monastery of Cluny: that Monastery, by the conditions of its erection, was put under the immediate protection of the holy see; with a prohibition to all powers, both secular and ecclesiastical, to disturb the monks in the possession of their effects or the election of their abbot. Till then, each Monastery was independent, and subject to the bishop
Annetta Bentivoglio - ...
Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ...
Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ...
Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact...
Monastery of Saint Clare...
509 South Kentucky Avenue...
Evansville, IN 47714, USA ...
Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana...
Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska...
Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada...
Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ...
- Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Downside Abbey - In 1611 a Monastery was erected by Philippe de Coverel, Abbot of Saint Vaast at Arras, who is hence regarded as the founder. The abbey grounds contain the Monastery, school-buildings, guest-house, and abbey-church, one of the handsomest modern Gothic buildings in England
Martin of Tours, Saint - There he organized a community of monks, erected the Monastery of Liguge, and in 371 became Bishop of Tours. Later he founded the Monastery of Marmoutier and resided there
Glastonbury Abbey - Benedictine Monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A. In the 8th century, Ina, King of the West Saxons, founded the church of the Apostles Saints Peter and Paul and endowed the Monastery
Abbey, Glastonbury - Benedictine Monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A. In the 8th century, Ina, King of the West Saxons, founded the church of the Apostles Saints Peter and Paul and endowed the Monastery
Abbey, Downside - In 1611 a Monastery was erected by Philippe de Coverel, Abbot of Saint Vaast at Arras, who is hence regarded as the founder. The abbey grounds contain the Monastery, school-buildings, guest-house, and abbey-church, one of the handsomest modern Gothic buildings in England
Caprasius Presbyter at Lerins - There Honoratus built a Monastery, into which he received many monks from the neighbouring countries. Hilarius describes their new Monastery as being distinguished for chastity, faith, wisdom, justice, truth
Tours, Martin of, Saint - There he organized a community of monks, erected the Monastery of Liguge, and in 371 became Bishop of Tours. Later he founded the Monastery of Marmoutier and resided there
Monastery - The term Monastery, is used for houses of both male and female religious
Julitta, Saint - Relics at Nevers, and in the Monastery of Saint-Amand, Tournai
Quiricus, Saint - Relics at Nevers, and in the Monastery of Saint-Amand, Tournai
Mellifont, Abbey of - Near Drogheda, the first Cistercian Monastery in Ireland
Abbey of Mellifont - Near Drogheda, the first Cistercian Monastery in Ireland
Convent - ) A house occupied by a community of religious recluses; a Monastery or nunnery
Maurice Bourdin - Later, he was forced to flee to Sutri, where Callistus II captured him and imprisoned him in a Monastery
Dustan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the Monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many miracles were attributed to him
Drostan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the Monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many miracles were attributed to him
Dowdall, George - He was prior of the Monastery of Crutched Friars at Ardee at the time of its suppression, 1519, was pensioned, and became the schismatical Archbishop of Armagh
de Profundis - Saint Columba founded a Monastery there between 546,562
Derry, Ireland, Diocese of - Saint Columba founded a Monastery there between 546,562
Out of the Depths - Saint Columba founded a Monastery there between 546,562
Doctor, Ecstatic - After studying at Zwolle and Cologne, he entered the Carthusian Monastery of Roermond, where he acquired a reputation for great sanctity
Denys the Carthusian - After studying at Zwolle and Cologne, he entered the Carthusian Monastery of Roermond, where he acquired a reputation for great sanctity
Denys Van Leeuwen - After studying at Zwolle and Cologne, he entered the Carthusian Monastery of Roermond, where he acquired a reputation for great sanctity
Catherine of Bologna, Saint - Relics in chapel of her Monastery, Bologna
Carthusian, Denys the - After studying at Zwolle and Cologne, he entered the Carthusian Monastery of Roermond, where he acquired a reputation for great sanctity
Gregory Viii - Anti-Pope - Later, he was forced to flee to Sutri, where Callistus II captured him and imprisoned him in a Monastery
Arbroath - There remain extensive ruins of a 13th-century church and other buildings of the Monastery
Gildas the Wise, Saint - He retired to the isle of Houat, and subsequently founded a Monastery at Rhuys on the mainland
Patmos - On the hill to the south is a Monastery called 'John the Divine
Andrew of Wyntoun - He was a canon regular of the Priory of Saint Andrews, and before 1395 prior of the Monastery of Lochleven
Eunan, Saint - He entered the Monastery of Iona, 650, and was elected abbot in 679
Adamnan, Saint - He entered the Monastery of Iona, 650, and was elected abbot in 679
Ecstatic Doctor - After studying at Zwolle and Cologne, he entered the Carthusian Monastery of Roermond, where he acquired a reputation for great sanctity
Wise, Gildas the, Saint - He retired to the isle of Houat, and subsequently founded a Monastery at Rhuys on the mainland
George Dowdall - He was prior of the Monastery of Crutched Friars at Ardee at the time of its suppression, 1519, was pensioned, and became the schismatical Archbishop of Armagh
Throstan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the Monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many miracles were attributed to him
Paulinianus - He was modest, only desiring to help his brother in the Monastery. John of Jerusalem, took him to the Monastery which he had founded at Ad, and there, against the protests and even resistance of Paulinian, ordained him priest
Bermondsey - A hospital and relief house of Saint Thomas in Southwark, founded by the prior, 1213, was attached to the Monastery for over 200 years
Amand, Saint - Confessor, apostle of Flanders, born Nantes, France, 594; died Monastery of Elnon (now Saint Amand), 684
Jerusalem, Cosmas of - He was foster-brother of Saint John of Damascus and entered with him the Monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem
Beuron - It was destroyed in the l0th century; reestablished as an Augustinian Monastery, 1077; and suppressed, 1802
Drogheda, Ireland - There are ruins of the Dominican Monastery (1224), and of the Augustinian abbey (1206)
Benedict of Aniane, Saint - After a short military career he entered the Monastery of Saint Sequanus and later established a Benedictine house at Aniane, which became the model and center of the monastic reform in France under Louis the Pious
Ludger, Saint - He was consecrated Bishop of Mimigernaford, 804, and from the Monastery he erected there, the present city, Munster, derives its name
Hospital Sisters of the Mercy of Jesus - Each Monastery is independent and has its own novitiate
Hagiopolltes - He was foster-brother of Saint John of Damascus and entered with him the Monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem
Aniane, Benedict of, Saint - After a short military career he entered the Monastery of Saint Sequanus and later established a Benedictine house at Aniane, which became the model and center of the monastic reform in France under Louis the Pious
Ansegisus, Saint - Becoming Abbot of Fontenelle he made this Monastery famous for learning, discipline, and its library
Augustins - This rule was to have all things in common; the rich who enter among them to sell their possessions, and give them to the poor; to employ the first part of the morning in labouring with their hands, and the rest in reading: when they go abroad, to go always two in company; never to eat but in their Monastery, &c
Matilda Von Hackeborn-Wippra, Saint - 1240;died in the Monastery of Helfta, 1298
Mechtilde, Saint - 1240;died in the Monastery of Helfta, 1298
Tishbite - Paine identifies Tishbite with Listib overhung by the Monastery Mar Ilyas (Elijah)
Groote, Gerard - He taught theology at Cologne and after spending some years in solitude and prayer in Munnikhuizen Monastery was ordained a deacon and preached at Utrecht
Euphrosyne, Saint - According to legend she was the daughter of a wealthy citizen of Alexandria, who, in order to keep her vow of chastity, retired in male attire to a Monastery of men near Alexandria where, under the name of Smaragdus, she lived for over 30 years, only making known her identity when she was dying
Enclosure - Present canon law requires every convent or Monastery of regulars, on its completion, to be encloistered
Saint Paul's Outside the Walls - Pope Martin V entrusted the Monastery to the monks of the Congregation of Monte Cassino in 1425
Gerard Groote - He taught theology at Cologne and after spending some years in solitude and prayer in Munnikhuizen Monastery was ordained a deacon and preached at Utrecht
Homines, Boni - Their oldest Monastery, erected at Vincennes by Louis VII, 1164, passed in the 16th century to the Minims who also received the name of Bonshommes. Their Monastery at Ashridge was seized by Henry VIII and granted to the Egertons, afterwards earls and dukes of Bridgewater
Joannes (509), Monk - of Jacobus the founder of the Monastery of Bêth-Haba. Joannes was for some time in the Monastery of Bêth-Rabbân, which was subject to the same abbat as Bêth-Haba
Lulworth Castle - When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian Monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany
Matilda, Saint - Buried in the Monastery at Quedlinburg
Indicopleustes, Cosmas - On retiring from his travels he entered the Monastery of Raithu on the Peninsula of Sinai
Castle, Lulworth - When the Trappists were driven out of France during the Revolution they were received, 1794, in Lulworth Castle, which was built on the site of a former Cistercian Monastery confiscated by Henry VIII, and remained there for some years until the foundation of Mount Melleray in Brittany
Chartreuse, la Grande - After losing most of its land in the French Revolution the Monastery supported itself largely by manufacturiug the famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain
Cambridge Manuscript - Beza found it in the Monastery of Irenxus, at Lyons, in 1562, and gave it to the university of Cambridge in 1582
Norbert, Saint - He joined the Benedictines of Siegburg, received Holy Orders, and founded a Monastery at Premontre, near Laon
Premonstrantes - Their first Monastery, called New-house, was erected in Lincolnshire, by Peter de Saulia, and dedicated to St
Grande Chartreuse, la - After losing most of its land in the French Revolution the Monastery supported itself largely by manufacturiug the famous cordial, now made at Tarragona, Spain
Germain of Paris, Saint - The Monastery erected close by, Saint Germain-des-Pres, was famous for centuries
Little, Bartholomew the - At the head of a band of Dominican missionaries, he was sent by Pope John XXII to Armenia to keep the Catholic Armenians united at Rome, and to convert schismatics, and met with great success, particularly in the conversion of the superior and monks of the Monastery at Kherna
Berno - He was a member of the Cistercian Monastery of Amelungsborn when appointed Bishop of Mecklenburg, 1155
Dungal - He is supposed to have died at the Monastery of Bobbio, to which he bequeathed his books
Order of the Annunziata - On the cession of Bugey to France the Order of the Annunziata transferred its chapters to the Camaldolese Monastery near Turin (1627)
Dervel the Mighty, Saint - He fought in the battle of Camlan, 537, and later entered the Monastery of Llantwit, devoting the remainder of his life to missionary labors
Mighty, Dervel the - He fought in the battle of Camlan, 537, and later entered the Monastery of Llantwit, devoting the remainder of his life to missionary labors
Derfel Gadarn, Saint - He fought in the battle of Camlan, 537, and later entered the Monastery of Llantwit, devoting the remainder of his life to missionary labors
Finnian, Saint - Returning from a pilgrimage to Rome, he founded the Monastery of Druim Fionn, and the school of Moville, and composed a rule and penitential code for his monks
Joseph of Cupertino, Saint - In 1620 he became a lay brother in the Capuchin Monastery near Tarento; was later admitted as an oblate at the Franciscan convent near Cupertino, and was ordained priest, 1628
Cedda, Saint - He founded the Monastery of Lastingham in Yorkshire and became its first abbot
Cedd, Saint - He founded the Monastery of Lastingham in Yorkshire and became its first abbot
John Gualbert, Saint - Abbot, founder of the Monastery of Vallombrosa, born Florence, Italy, c
Gualbert, John, Saint - Abbot, founder of the Monastery of Vallombrosa, born Florence, Italy, c
Gadarn, Derfel - He fought in the battle of Camlan, 537, and later entered the Monastery of Llantwit, devoting the remainder of his life to missionary labors
Abbey of Crowland - Monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, founded in the 8th century by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, in honor of Saint Guthlac
Abbey of Croyland - Monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, founded in the 8th century by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, in honor of Saint Guthlac
Abbey of Bury Saint Edmunds - Early in the 11th century the secular canons were replaced by Benedictines, who built a magnificent church and extensive Monastery buildings
Ampleforth, Abbey of - The present house was founded as the Monastery of Saint Lawrence, 1802, and erected into an abbey, 1890
Abbey of Ampleforth - The present house was founded as the Monastery of Saint Lawrence, 1802, and erected into an abbey, 1890
Bartholomew - At the head of a band of Dominican missionaries, he was sent by Pope John XXII to Armenia to keep the Catholic Armenians united at Rome, and to convert schismatics, and met with great success, particularly in the conversion of the superior and monks of the Monastery at Kherna
Bartholomew Parvus - At the head of a band of Dominican missionaries, he was sent by Pope John XXII to Armenia to keep the Catholic Armenians united at Rome, and to convert schismatics, and met with great success, particularly in the conversion of the superior and monks of the Monastery at Kherna
Bartholomew the Little - At the head of a band of Dominican missionaries, he was sent by Pope John XXII to Armenia to keep the Catholic Armenians united at Rome, and to convert schismatics, and met with great success, particularly in the conversion of the superior and monks of the Monastery at Kherna
Annunziata, Order of the - On the cession of Bugey to France the Order of the Annunziata transferred its chapters to the Camaldolese Monastery near Turin (1627)
Range - ) A farmhouse of a Monastery, where the rents and tithes, paid in grain, were deposited
Paradise - ) An open space within a Monastery or adjoining a church, as the space within a cloister, the open court before a basilica, etc
Abbey, Saint-Denis - King Louis XVI confiscated the abbacy and united the Monastery to the house of Saint-Cyr
Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus - About 568 he went to Poitiers whither he was attracted by the renown of Saint Radegunde and her Monastery, and where, shortly before his death, he became bishop
Radbertus, Paschasius - Confessor, Benedictine theologian; born Soissons, France, 786; died Corbie, France, c860 He was a monk at Corbie under Saint Adalard, whom he assisted in founding the Monastery at Corbie, 822
Romuald, Saint - Horrified at his father's sin of murdering a relative, Romuald retired to the Benedictine Monastery of San Apollinare, near Ravenna, where he became abbot from 996 to 999
Cyrillus (13), Hagiologist - On leaving his Monastery to visit Jerusalem and the holy places, his mother bid him put himself under the instruction of John the Silentiary, by whom he was commended to Leontius, abbat of the Monastery of St
Emilianus (8), Solitary - His birthplace and the site of his oratory have caused much controversy, Castile claiming him as born at Berceo, close to the existing Monastery of San Millan, while Aragon urges Verdeyo, near Calatayud. For 40 years he lived a hermit's life there, mostly on or near the peak of La Cogolla (according to the tradition of the Monastery; there is no mention of the Cogolla of St. Braulio's life), whence the after-name of the Monastery which commemorated him—San Millan de la Cogolla
Beuno, Saint - He studied in the Monastery of Bangor, North Wales, where he was ordained priest, and became active in missionary work
Dionysius Exiguus - Much of his life was spent in Rome, where he was abbot of a Monastery
Dionysius the Little - Much of his life was spent in Rome, where he was abbot of a Monastery
Little, Dionysius the - Much of his life was spent in Rome, where he was abbot of a Monastery
John of Sabina - He attended the synod of Sutri, convened by Emperor Henry III, 1046, was deprived of all sacerdotal rank and condemned to be shut up in a Monastery for life
Joseph, Hermann, Blessed - Entering the Monastery of the Premonstratensian Canons at Steinfeld (1162) he was ordained and appointed chaplain of the Cistercian nuns at Hoven
Oswald, Saint - Administering both sees, together with Saint Ethelwold and Saint Dunstan, he restored ecclesiastical discipline in England, and founded Ramsey Monastery
Kerry, Ireland, Diocese of - Saint Finan Cam, the first to build a church at Aghadoe, also established the Monastery and school of Innisfallen
John de Feckenham - On her accession he refused to save his Monastery by apostasy, and spent 23 years in jail, where he died from privation, a striking example of Elizabeth's ingratitude
Marcellinus, Saint - The relics were later transported to Selgenstadt by Einhard, Charlemagne's secretary, who built in their honor a church and Monastery, of which he became abbot
Chapter House - A building attached to a Monastery or cathedral in which the meetings of the chapter are held
Canons Regular of Saint Augustine - Since the 12th century the Abbey Nullius of Saint Maurice of Agaunum, the oldest Monastery in the world, has been under the care of the canons regular, who engage in teaching and parochial duties
Callo, Saint - After his death a church was erected in his honor which later grew into a Monastery, c613Represented in art with a bear, as there is a legend that a bear once brought wood to feed his fire; also holding a cross, and book
Chelleh, Saint - After his death a church was erected in his honor which later grew into a Monastery, c613Represented in art with a bear, as there is a legend that a bear once brought wood to feed his fire; also holding a cross, and book
John Howman - On her accession he refused to save his Monastery by apostasy, and spent 23 years in jail, where he died from privation, a striking example of Elizabeth's ingratitude
Howman, John - On her accession he refused to save his Monastery by apostasy, and spent 23 years in jail, where he died from privation, a striking example of Elizabeth's ingratitude
Gilianus, Saint - After his death a church was erected in his honor which later grew into a Monastery, c613Represented in art with a bear, as there is a legend that a bear once brought wood to feed his fire; also holding a cross, and book
Gall, Saint - After his death a church was erected in his honor which later grew into a Monastery, c613Represented in art with a bear, as there is a legend that a bear once brought wood to feed his fire; also holding a cross, and book
Hermann Joseph, Blessed - Entering the Monastery of the Premonstratensian Canons at Steinfeld (1162) he was ordained and appointed chaplain of the Cistercian nuns at Hoven
Obedience - ) A cell (or offshoot of a larger Monastery) governed by a prior
Exiguus, Dionysius - Much of his life was spent in Rome, where he was abbot of a Monastery
Sylvester Iii, Antipope - He attended the synod of Sutri, convened by Emperor Henry III, 1046, was deprived of all sacerdotal rank and condemned to be shut up in a Monastery for life
Sabina, John of - He attended the synod of Sutri, convened by Emperor Henry III, 1046, was deprived of all sacerdotal rank and condemned to be shut up in a Monastery for life
Sarpi, Paolo - He taught philosophy in his Monastery, was made provincial for the Venetian Republic in 1579, pro-curator general from 1585 to 1588, and became hostile to Rome when three times rejected as nominee for a episcopal see
Fontevrault, Abbey of - The Monastery of Fontevrault was founded by Blessed Robert of Arbrissel, at the close of the 11th century, on the confines of Anjou, Tours, and Poitou. It was a double Monastery for monks and nuns, following a rule supplementary to that of Saint Benedict, and governed by an abbess
Fontevrault, Order of - The Monastery of Fontevrault was founded by Blessed Robert of Arbrissel, at the close of the 11th century, on the confines of Anjou, Tours, and Poitou. It was a double Monastery for monks and nuns, following a rule supplementary to that of Saint Benedict, and governed by an abbess
Order of Fontevrault - The Monastery of Fontevrault was founded by Blessed Robert of Arbrissel, at the close of the 11th century, on the confines of Anjou, Tours, and Poitou. It was a double Monastery for monks and nuns, following a rule supplementary to that of Saint Benedict, and governed by an abbess
Abbey of Fontevrault - The Monastery of Fontevrault was founded by Blessed Robert of Arbrissel, at the close of the 11th century, on the confines of Anjou, Tours, and Poitou. It was a double Monastery for monks and nuns, following a rule supplementary to that of Saint Benedict, and governed by an abbess
Epternach, Abbey of - A Benedictine Monastery in the town of that name, in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg
Oetinga - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine Monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Oettingen - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine Monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Kentigern, Saint - He established the Monastery at Llanelwy, and, returning to Scotland, 573, founded his see at Hoddam, near Dumfries, evangelizing the districts of Galloway and Cumberland
Josaphat Kuncevyc, Saint - He entered the Basilian Monastery of the Trinity at Vilna, was ordained priest, 1609, and subsequently became superior in several monasteries, Bishop of Vitebsk (1617), and Archbishop of Polotsk (1618)
Kunceyyc, Josaphat, Saint - He entered the Basilian Monastery of the Trinity at Vilna, was ordained priest, 1609, and subsequently became superior in several monasteries, Bishop of Vitebsk (1617), and Archbishop of Polotsk (1618)
Karl Huysmans - After 1895 he made open profession of the Catholic faith and became an Oblate in the Benedictine Monastery of Liguge
Bridgetins - In England we read of but one Monastery of Brigittins, and this built by Henry V
Mungo, Saint - He established the Monastery at Llanelwy, and, returning to Scotland, 573, founded his see at Hoddam, near Dumfries, evangelizing the districts of Galloway and Cumberland
Illuminator, Gregory the - Relics in his Monastery at Naples
Menas, Saint - An expedition in 1905 revealed ruins of the grave, well, basilica, Monastery, etc
Mennas, Saint - An expedition in 1905 revealed ruins of the grave, well, basilica, Monastery, etc
Huysmans, Karl - After 1895 he made open profession of the Catholic faith and became an Oblate in the Benedictine Monastery of Liguge
Giovanni Bona - Having entered the Cistercian Monastery at Pignerola, and labored at Turin, Asti, and Mondovi, he was called to Rome (1651) to preside over the whole Cistercian congregation
Abbey of Echternach - A Benedictine Monastery in the town of that name, in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg
Abbey of Epternach - A Benedictine Monastery in the town of that name, in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg
Altotting - Royal palace in Upper Bavaria, near which King Karlmann erected a Benedictine Monastery, 876, and built the abbey church of Saint Philip the Apostle
Gregory the Illuminator, Saint - Relics in his Monastery at Naples
Abbey of Melrose - The earliest Cistercian Monastery of Scotland, at Melrose, Roxburghshire
Echternach, Abbey of - A Benedictine Monastery in the town of that name, in the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg
Redemptoristines - A second Monastery was founded, at Saint Agatha of the Goths, by Saint Alphonsus Liguori
Rupert, Saint - He received from the duke the territory of Juvavum (Salzburg), where he founded the Benedictine Monastery of Saint Peter, of which he became the first abbot, and a convent of Benedictine nuns
Pat'Mos, - On the hill to the south, crowning a commanding height, is the celebrated Monastery which bears the name of "John the Divine
Deer - In 1219 the Earl of Buchan divided the abbey lands between a parochial church and New Deer, a newly founded Cistercian Monastery which remained in existence until the Reformation
Deir - In 1219 the Earl of Buchan divided the abbey lands between a parochial church and New Deer, a newly founded Cistercian Monastery which remained in existence until the Reformation
Hermit, Peter the - Returning to Europe, he founded the Monastery of Neufmoustier
Kilmacduagh, Ireland, Diocese of - Saint Colman founded a Monastery at Kilmacduagh (610) and subsequently became bishop there
Limerick, Ireland, Diocese of - Early missionaries: Saint Patrick, Saint Senan, and Saint Munchin, who established the celebrated Monastery and school of Mungret
Parlor - ) The apartment in a Monastery or nunnery where the inmates are permitted to meet and converse with each other, or with visitors and friends from without
Galway, Ireland, Diocese of - Saint Colman founded a Monastery at Kilmacduagh (610) and subsequently became bishop there
Monk - ) A man who retires from the ordinary temporal concerns of the world, and devotes himself to religion; one of a religious community of men inhabiting a Monastery, and bound by vows to a life of chastity, obedience, and poverty
Penitents - This Monastery is divided into three quarters: one for professed religious; another for novices; a third for those who are under correction. The Monastery he built was at first designed for the reception of poor girls abandoned by their parents, and in danger of losing their virtue. In 1662, it was erected into a Monastery, for the reception of such as having abandoned themselves to impurity, were willing to take up, and consecrate themselves to God by solemn vows
Leo Iii, Pope Saint - Seriously injured he fled to the Monastery of Saint Erasmus, where he recovered in a miraculous manner. Escaping from the Monastery he went to Germany
Comgall - After teaching for some years he founded in 558 his great Monastery at Bangor, in the Ards of Ulster and co. ]'>[1] After ruling the Monastery of Bangor and its dependencies for "10 days, 3 months and 50 years," as the calendars say, but about 44 years according to computation, St
Monophysites - Some early Monophysites, prominent among whom was Eutyches, archimandrite of a Monastery near Constantinople, endeavored to save the unity of the Word Incarnate by suppressing the human nature
Monophysitism - Some early Monophysites, prominent among whom was Eutyches, archimandrite of a Monastery near Constantinople, endeavored to save the unity of the Word Incarnate by suppressing the human nature
Monasteries, Scoto-Hibernian - Deer Monastery survived the others for 50 years but was extinguished like the rest
Mendel Medal - An award, given annually by the Augustinian College of Saint Thomas of Villanova, Villanova, Pennsylvania, to honor the memory of Gregor Mendel, the Augustinian friar and Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Thomas the Apostle, in Brünn, Moravia, the discoverer and first exponent of the principles of heredity known now as the Mendelian Law
Medal, Mendel - An award, given annually by the Augustinian College of Saint Thomas of Villanova, Villanova, Pennsylvania, to honor the memory of Gregor Mendel, the Augustinian friar and Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Thomas the Apostle, in Brünn, Moravia, the discoverer and first exponent of the principles of heredity known now as the Mendelian Law
Medal of Saint Benedict - Devotional medal made at the great Monastery of the Benedictine Order at Monte Cassino, Italy
Cassiodorus - He was quaestor, consul, and minister under Theodoric and praetorian prefect under Amalaswintha, at whose death he withdrew to his estate where he erected the Monastery of Vivarium
Jacobins - Political club of French Revolution, originating in the Club Breton at Versailles in 1789, named Jacobins because their meetings were held in the refectory and library of the Dominican Monastery, rue Saint Honore, Paris, which they rented
John Gratian - A synod at Sutri sent John to a Monastery, declared that Benedict IX had forfeited his rights, and claimed that the action of Gregory VI was simoniacal
Gilbertines - The founder of this order erected a double Monastery, or rather two different ones, contiguous to each other; the one for men, the other for women, but parted by a very high wall
Ignatius of Constantinople, Saint - Leo the Armenian imprisoned him in a Monastery in 813, and while there he embraced the religious life, adopting the name Ignatius
Benedict, Medal of Saint - Devotional medal made at the great Monastery of the Benedictine Order at Monte Cassino, Italy
Abbey of Saint Gall - The 13th century saw a period of decline at the Monastery, and the abbots became princes of the empire
Abbey of Einsiedeln - Benedictine Monastery, Canton of Schwyz, Switzerland, founded c
Abbey - Monastery canonically erected and independent, ruled by an abbot, if occupied by monks, and if by nuns, by an abbess
Gratian, John - A synod at Sutri sent John to a Monastery, declared that Benedict IX had forfeited his rights, and claimed that the action of Gregory VI was simoniacal
Gregory vi, Pope - A synod at Sutri sent John to a Monastery, declared that Benedict IX had forfeited his rights, and claimed that the action of Gregory VI was simoniacal
Saint Gall, Abbey of - The 13th century saw a period of decline at the Monastery, and the abbots became princes of the empire
Einsiedeln, Abbey of - Benedictine Monastery, Canton of Schwyz, Switzerland, founded c
Scoto-Hibernian Monasteries - Deer Monastery survived the others for 50 years but was extinguished like the rest
Monophysites - Some early Monophysites, prominent among whom was Eutyches, archimandrite of a Monastery near Constantinople, endeavored to save the unity of the Word Incarnate by suppressing the human nature
Monophysitism - Some early Monophysites, prominent among whom was Eutyches, archimandrite of a Monastery near Constantinople, endeavored to save the unity of the Word Incarnate by suppressing the human nature
Sergius, a Monophysite Priest - The syncellus was finally sent to the Monastery of Beth-Rabula, where he was kindly treated, the monks there "having no love for the council of Chalcedon nor even proclaiming it in their worship" (John of Eph
Abbey - A Monastery, governed by a superior under the title of Abbot or Abbess. ...
See Monastery
Germanus, Bishop of Paris - He was next made abbat of the Monastery of St. Among his writings is also generally counted the privilege which he granted to his Monastery exempting it from all episcopal jurisdiction ( c. 747, 805, 867, 869; and, for the Monastery, the Dissertatio of Ruinartius, in Bouquet, ii
Gordianus, Father of Pope Gregory the Great - Andrew's Monastery, where they had been placed by St. Gregory himself, the founder of the Monastery. Gregory himself, in his portrait in the same Monastery described by John the deacon, wears precisely the same dress, even to the colour of the planeta, only having the pallium over it, to mark his ecclesiastical rank
Furness Abbey - A Benedictine Monastery in northern Lancashire, England, about 5 miles from Ulverston
Maurus, Rabanus, Blessed - In 814 he was ordained and in 822 was made abbot of the Monastery
Didacus, Saint - Received as a lay-brother of the Franciscan Order he was sent, in 1445, with a priest of the order to the Canary islands, and was made warden of the Fortaventura Monastery
Damascene, John, Saint - He vigorously opposed the Iconoclast persecution propagated by Leo the Isaurian, and retired to the Monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem, where he was ordained priest by John V, Patriarch of Jerusalem
John Damascene, Saint - He vigorously opposed the Iconoclast persecution propagated by Leo the Isaurian, and retired to the Monastery of Saint Sabas, near Jerusalem, where he was ordained priest by John V, Patriarch of Jerusalem
Benedict of Nursia, Saint - Driven by persecution from Subiaco, 529, he settled at Monte Cassino, erected a large Monastery and established his famous rule, combining manual labor and ascetic practises; he later founded a second house at Terracina
de Lisle, Ambrose Lisle March Phillipps - He founded a Trappist Monastery and established several missions
Maximilian the Great - He re-established the Catholic Church and made Catholicity the only religion in Bavaria; he organized the Catholic League, 1609, founded five Jesuit colleges, a Monastery for the Minims, one for the Carmelites, nine for the Franciscans, and fourteen for the Capuchins
Jean Besse - In 1895 he was appointed professor of history and director of the Apostolic school at the Monastery in Silos, Spain
Nursia, Benedict of, Saint - Driven by persecution from Subiaco, 529, he settled at Monte Cassino, erected a large Monastery and established his famous rule, combining manual labor and ascetic practises; he later founded a second house at Terracina
Nicholas Pieck, Saint - He evangelized the principal towns of Belgium and Holland, and was appointed superior of the Monastery at Gorkum
Ephraem, Saint - Tomb in Armenian Monastery, Der Serkis, west of Edessa
Abbey, Furness - A Benedictine Monastery in northern Lancashire, England, about 5 miles from Ulverston
Ambrose Lisle March Phillipps de Lisle - He founded a Trappist Monastery and established several missions
Hagustald Abbey - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Abbey, Hagustald - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Abbey, Hexham - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Abbey, Hextold - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Hexham Abbey - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Hextold Abbey - After the Danish invasions, the Monastery was rebuilt in 1113 and transformed into a priory for Austin Canons which flourished until its dissolution under Henry VIII when the last prior was hanged at Tyburn
Patmos - On a hill in the southern half of the island is the Monastery of John the divine, and the traditional grotto of his receiving the Apocalypse
Regensburg, Germany, City of - 710,who founded a Monastery, and Saint Erhard, 720
Ratisbon, Germany - 710,who founded a Monastery, and Saint Erhard, 720
Rabanus Maurus, Blessed - In 814 he was ordained and in 822 was made abbot of the Monastery
Patmos - The chief remaining interest of the island is the Monastery of St
Padua, Italy, Diocese of - Among its famous buildings are the mixed Romanesque and Byzantine basilica of Saint Anthony, begun, 1232, and containing numerous art treasures, and the Monastery of the Benedictines dating from the 9th century
Basilian Monks - Basil, in the fourth century, who, having retired into a desert in the province of Pontus, founded a Monastery, and drew up rules, to the amount of some hundreds, for his disciples
Mary of the Gael - She established a second Monastery there for men, under Bishop Saint Conleth, and also a school of art, needlework, and illumination
Holywell - The parish church is built over the remains of Basingwerk Abbey, used as a Monastery before 1119
Goliards - Two collections exist: the Carmina Burana from the Monastery of Benedictbeuren, and another among the so-called Harleian manuscripts, both containing songs on wine, women, nature, pious hymns of enthusiasm for the Crusades, or coarse lampoons on the clergy
Golias - Two collections exist: the Carmina Burana from the Monastery of Benedictbeuren, and another among the so-called Harleian manuscripts, both containing songs on wine, women, nature, pious hymns of enthusiasm for the Crusades, or coarse lampoons on the clergy
Columba (1) Columcille - Columba founded his Monastery, the centre from which he and his followers evangelized the Picts and taught more carefully the Scots, who were already Christians at least in name. We gather, however, that in his Monastery he was indefatigable in prayer, teaching, study, and transcription of the Scriptures; people came to him from all quarters, some for bodily aid, but most for spiritual needs; and soon smaller societies had to be formed, as at Hinba (one of the Garveloch Islands), Tyree, etc. , for the requirements of the Monastery. He visited king Bruide at Craig-Phadrick, beside Inverness, and established the Monastery of Deer in the N. As the time approached, and the infirmities of age were weighing upon him, he made all preparations for his departure, blessing his Monastery, visiting the old scenes, and taking his farewell of even the brute beasts about the Monastery. Columba, written by Adamnan, ninth Abbat of that Monastery , by W
Hubert, Saint - Relics elevated at Liege, transferred to Amdain Monastery, dispersed by the Huguenots, 1568
Hugh of Lincoln, Saint - He entered the Augustinian Monastery at Villard-Benoit near Grenoble and, c
Lincoln, Hugh of, Saint - He entered the Augustinian Monastery at Villard-Benoit near Grenoble and, c
John Capistran, Saint - Relics in Orthodox Monastery of Bistritz, Rumania
Francis of Paula, Saint - In 1454 he assembled his followers at the Monastery which he built near Paula; they were first known as "Hermits of Saint Francis" but later were called Minims by Pope Alexander VI who gave formal approbation to the order
Padilla, Juan de - Chaplain for the expedition to Nueva Galicia, under Nullo de Guzman, 1529-1531, from 1531-1540 he engaged in missionary labors among the Indians and built the convent at Tzapoltan and the Monastery at Tulantcingo
Juan de Padilla - Chaplain for the expedition to Nueva Galicia, under Nullo de Guzman, 1529-1531, from 1531-1540 he engaged in missionary labors among the Indians and built the convent at Tzapoltan and the Monastery at Tulantcingo
Capistran, John, Saint - Relics in Orthodox Monastery of Bistritz, Rumania
Coenobite - Cassian makes this difference between a convent and a Monastery, that the latter may be applied to the residence of a single religious or recluse; whereas the convent implies coenobites, or numbers of religious living in common
Giles, Saint - Here he built a Monastery, which he placed under the Rule of Saint Benedict
Basil the Great, Saint - Influenced by his sister Macrina, he founded a Monastery in Pontus near Annesi
Abbot - (from Aramaic: abba, father) ...
Title definitely fixed by Saint Benedict and given to the superior of a Monastery of monks having the nature of a private family and settle location, as the several branches of the Order of Saint Benedict, including the Black Monks of Saint Benedict, the Cistercians of the Three Observances, the Camaldolese, Vallumbrosans; Silvestrians; Olivetans, some houses of Canons Regular, of the Antonians, of the Armenian Benedictines, and of the Basilians, and the Premonstratensians
Escorial - Famous building, Spain; about 27 miles northwest of Madrid, known as El real Monasterio de San Lorenzo del Escorial, comprising a Monastery, church, mausoleum, palace, college, library, and art-galleries
Egbert - Eadbert resigned his throne to enter the Monastery, and the two men spent their last years in retirement and prayer
Religious Congregations - (Latin: congregure, to collect together) ...
Originally, a religious community dwelling in a Monastery, as that instituted by Saint Pachomius, c318 The regular organization of religious congregations began with the Rule of Saint Benedict in the 6th century
Lay Brothers - (Greek: laikos, of or from the peopIe) ...
Religious occupied solely with the secular affairs of a Monastery or friary, as distinct from the choir monks or brothers
Italo-Greeks - The Italo-Greeks have a famous Monastery near Rome (Grottaferrata), and colonies in France, Malta, and Africa
Lanfranc - After a liberal education in England, he went to Normandy and entered the Monastery at Bec, where he opened a famous school
Maximus of Constantinople, Saint - Of noble parentage, he became secretary to Emperor Heraclius, but left the world, 630, to enter the Monastery at Chrysopolis, where he was later elected abbot
Jerome, Saint - After visiting Rome, and journeying through the Holy Land, he retired to a Monastery in Bethlehem
Felix of Valois, Saint - Saint Felix labored in France, where he established the Monastery of Cerfroi and looked after the interests of the congregation
John of the Cross, Saint - Saint Teresa persuaded him to remain in the order and assist her in establishing a Monastery of friars, carrying out the primitive rule
Lawrence, Saint - Probably a native of Spain, he became one of the seven deacons of the Roman Church, and distributed alms from the Monastery of Saint Cyriaca
Canonesses Regular of the Holy Sepulcher - The earliest date on record, however, is that of the foundation of the Saragossa Monastery, 1276
Canterbury, Augustine of, Saint - From the Monastery of Saint Andrew, in Rome, Pope Gregory I, learning that the pagans in Britain were disposed to embrace the Faith, sent Augustine and his Benedictine brethren to instruct them
Penitentiary - ) A small building in a Monastery where penitents confessed
Bath Abbey - The Monastery was suppressed, 1539, and the present church occupies only the nave of the Norman structure begun, 1500, to replace John of Villula's church
Augustine of Canterbury, Saint - From the Monastery of Saint Andrew, in Rome, Pope Gregory I, learning that the pagans in Britain were disposed to embrace the Faith, sent Augustine and his Benedictine brethren to instruct them
Bacon, Roger - Jerome de Ascoli, the General of the Franciscans, condemned the writings of Roger Bacon in 1278, and ordered him confined in a Monastery
Valois, Felix of, Saint - Saint Felix labored in France, where he established the Monastery of Cerfroi and looked after the interests of the congregation
Joannes (504), Abbat of mt. Sinai - At the age of 16 he entered the Monastery of Mount Sinai, subsequently became an anchoret, and at 75 abbat of Mount
Zoaras - A Monastery in the suburb of Sykas was assigned as a residence to him and his followers by the emperor, where he lived quietly, exercising great liberality. According to the biography in Land, however, Justinian assigned him a Monastery in Thrace, named Dokos, 30 miles away
Monachism - Greek monasticism received impetus from Saint Basil, who founded a Monastery at Neo-Cresarea, in Pontus, c. The vow of stability which he introduced bound a monk for life to a particular Monastery, a development of great importance which furthered the family life of the individual Monastery, which Benedict sought
Monasticism - Greek monasticism received impetus from Saint Basil, who founded a Monastery at Neo-Cresarea, in Pontus, c. The vow of stability which he introduced bound a monk for life to a particular Monastery, a development of great importance which furthered the family life of the individual Monastery, which Benedict sought
Cambridge, England, University of - ...
Emmanuel, founded 1584 on the site of a Dominican Monastery, by Sir William Mildmay, chancellor of the exchequer under Queen Elizabeth; for centuries a stronghold of Puritanism. ...
Peterhouse or Saint Peter's, founded 1284, by Hugh de Balsham, prior of the Benedictine Monastery of Ely, and Bishop of Ely; modelled on Merton College, Oxford; the scholars were housed in Saint John's Hospital. ...
Sidney Sussex, founded 1595, by Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex, on the site of a Franciscan Monastery
University of Cambridge, England - ...
Emmanuel, founded 1584 on the site of a Dominican Monastery, by Sir William Mildmay, chancellor of the exchequer under Queen Elizabeth; for centuries a stronghold of Puritanism. ...
Peterhouse or Saint Peter's, founded 1284, by Hugh de Balsham, prior of the Benedictine Monastery of Ely, and Bishop of Ely; modelled on Merton College, Oxford; the scholars were housed in Saint John's Hospital. ...
Sidney Sussex, founded 1595, by Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex, on the site of a Franciscan Monastery
Dinooth, Dinothus, Abbat of Bangor Iscoed - Like many other British chieftains who lost their lands in the Saxon conquest (Rees, Welsh Saints , 207), Dinooth embraced a life of religion, and, under Cyngen, founded, in conjunction with his sons, Deiniol, Cynwyl, and Gwarthan, the Monastery of Bangor on the Dee, of which he was the first abbat. ...
We know less about Dinooth than about his famous Monastery upon the right bank of the Dee, 10 or 12 miles from Chester. The name of Bangor ys y coed (Bangor under the wood) distinguishes it from other Bangors, especially that of Carnarvonshire, where Deiniol, the son of Dinooth, founded another Monastery, which was soon afterwards made the seat of a bishopric. It thus rivalled the Irish Bangor [1], and, from the learned men mentioned by Bede as residing there, must have been as much a college as a Monastery. It was a disastrous blow to Bangor, and was naturally handed down as a fulfilment of Augustine's words; but we do not hear that the Monastery itself was attacked
Naples, Italy, City of - Its famous churches, among which are the Gothic Cathedral of Saint Januarius, begun in 1272, which shelters the martyr's relics, the baroque church of Saint Philip Neri, the Church of Saint Clare and the Monastery of San Domenico Maggiore (1255), containing the cell of Saint Thomas Aquinas, are rich in art treasures, and the secular buildings, including the royal palace and the museum have interesting archmological collections
Double Monasteries - The idea spread to Belgium, Germany, and Spain, and came into favor in England with the Monastery of Saint Hilda at Whitby in the 7th century
Monasteries, Double - The idea spread to Belgium, Germany, and Spain, and came into favor in England with the Monastery of Saint Hilda at Whitby in the 7th century
Friar - The friar's exercise of the sacred ministry outside the Monastery distinguished him essentially from the monk, undisturbed in his cloistered retirement
Dionysius, Saint - Saint Denis is patron of France; invoked as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, against headache, and rabies; relics at the Monastery of Saint Denis
Denis, Saint - Saint Denis is patron of France; invoked as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, against headache, and rabies; relics at the Monastery of Saint Denis
Ingeborg - As she refused to go, she was 'shut up' in a Monastery and some courtier bishops declared her marriage invalid, under pretext of a distant relationship with Philip's first wife
Anthony, Saint - He again retired to the desert lying between the Nile and the Red Sea and lived for 45 years on the mountain where stands the Monastery named for him, Der Mar Antonios
Akeldama - The skulls and bones which once thickly strewed the floor of this charnel-house have all been removed to a modern Greek Monastery adjacent
Hippolytus of Rome, Saint - Most of his writings have been lost but his "Philosophumena" (Refutation of all Heresies) was discovered in a Monastery at Mount Athos in 1842
Bury - To withdraw or conceal in retirement as, to bury one's self in a Monastery or in solitude
Eleutherius, Saint - Saint Denis is patron of France; invoked as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, against headache, and rabies; relics at the Monastery of Saint Denis
Rusticus, Saint - Saint Denis is patron of France; invoked as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, against headache, and rabies; relics at the Monastery of Saint Denis
Patmos - Its principal port is a deep bay on the northeast side; the town lying on a high and steep hill, the summit of which is crowned by the old and castle-like Monastery of St
Joshua (1) Stylites, a Syrian Monk - Joshua (1) Stylites, a Syrian monk; a native of Edessa, entered the Monastery of Zuenin near Amida in Mesopotamia
Gregorius Theopolitanus, Bishop of Antioch - In his earliest youth he devoted himself to a monastic life, and became so celebrated for his austerities that when scarcely past boyhood he was chosen superior of the Syrian laura of Pharon or Pharan (Moschus), called by Evagrius the Monastery of the Byzantines. Sergius the Armenian in the Monastery of the Eunuchs near the Jordan was earnestly importuned by Gregory to conduct him to his venerable master, another Sergius, dwelling by the Dead Sea. to preside over the Monastery of Mount Sinai (Evagr. 206) makes his promotion take place from the Syrian Monastery
Methodius, Saint - These two brothers renounced secular honors, entered a Monastery on the Bosporus, and became priests
Eutychians - Ancient heretics, who denied the duplicity of natures in Christ; thus denominated from Eutyches, the archimandrite or abbot of a Monastery, at Constantinople, who began to propagate his opinion about A
Humiliati - In 1134 their first Monastery was founded at Milan; some years later they adopted the Rule of Saint Benedict
Anthony of Padua, Saint - He later won a reputation as a preacher and teacher of theology and received the praise of Saint Francis; made numerous converts and performed many miracles; and was made provincial of the Monastery at Limousin, France, 1226
Anselm, Saint - He entered the Monastery at Bec, studied under Lanfranc, and was made prior, 1063, and abbot, 1078
Walter Scott, Sir - He was Presbyterian, but loved the noble past, the ages of Faith, and, little as he understood her, his sympathetic attitude towards the Catholic Church, especially in The Monastery and The Abbot did much to lay the dust of anti-Catholic prejudice, and helped pave the way for Catholic Emancipation
Scott, Sir Walter - He was Presbyterian, but loved the noble past, the ages of Faith, and, little as he understood her, his sympathetic attitude towards the Catholic Church, especially in The Monastery and The Abbot did much to lay the dust of anti-Catholic prejudice, and helped pave the way for Catholic Emancipation
Paulus, the Black - He was induced to leave the Monastery of the Acoemetae in Constantinople for the patriarch's palace, whither the three others were also brought, under pretence of conferring on the unity of the church. Thus they "fell into communion" with the deceitful "synodite," and on their loading him with reproaches the severity of their treatment was increased and they were thrown into prison in the Monastery of Beth Abraham in Constantinople, where their sufferings continued
Sinai - Beside the little fountain at the top of Sinai, there is another at the foot of Horeb, which supplies the Monastery of St. ...
"Sinai," says Sandys, "has three tops of a marvellous height; that on the west side, where God appeared to Moses in a bush, fruitful in pasturage, far lower than the middlemost, and shadowed when the sun riseth thereon; which is that whereon God gave the law to Moses, and which is now called the Mount of Moses, at the foot of which stands the Monastery called St. The Monastery of St
Military Order of Calatrava - At first it was composed of lay brothers of the Monastery of Fitero and subject to Morimond, in Burgundy
Calatrava, Military Order of - At first it was composed of lay brothers of the Monastery of Fitero and subject to Morimond, in Burgundy
Birgitta, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Vadstena
Hugh the Great, Saint - Entering the Monastery of Cluny at 14, he was ordained priest at 20, and in 1049 was elected abbot
Great, Hugh the, Saint - Entering the Monastery of Cluny at 14, he was ordained priest at 20, and in 1049 was elected abbot
Gaul - Saint Martin established a Monastery near Tours for conversion of rural districts
George, Saint - " His existence is established by inscriptions of ruined churches in Syria, Egypt, and Mesopotamia, by his church at Thessalonica, dating from the 4th century, and by the Monastery at Baralle built by Clovis in honor of Saint George, c512During the Crusades his cult became widespread
Edward vi - "Grammar schools" imputed to Edward's foundation, were but the partial restoration of the chantry and Monastery schools disbanded under Henry; the necessity for "temperance" and "poor" laws was the result of the disappearance of the moral and material influence of the old religious order
Sweden, Bridget of, Saint - Relics in the Monastery at Vadstena
Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint - With his father and brother and 30 noblemen, Bernard entered the Benedictine Monastery at Citeaux, in 1113
Barsumas, Syrian Archimandrite - Barsumas (the Eutychian), an archimandrite of a Syrian Monastery, who warmly espoused the cause of Eutyches
Ravignan, Gustave FrançOis Xavier Delacroix de - Entering a Sulpician Monastery, and later joining the Society of Jesus, he was ordained in 1828, and after several years as professor and retreat preacher at Montrouge, he went to Notre Dame, where his logic, serenity, and zeal won souls by the hundreds
Martyrius, Bishop of Jerusalem - of the laura, which became the site of a considerable Monastery ( ib
Cassinese Congregation - A Benedictine reform instituted at the Monastery of Saint Justina, Padua, 1409, by Abbot Ludovico Barbo, received the title of "Cassinese Congregation" in 1504
Abbot - The chief ruler of a Monastery or abbey
Severinus, Monk of Noricum - He was assisted by EUGIPPIUS, who afterwards presided over a Monastery dedicated to his memory, and there wrote his Life c
Theodorus of Tabenna - 314, of noble parents in the Upper Thebaid, he forsook, at an early age, his worldly prospects, and found asylum with Palaemon the anchorite, and then in the Monastery at Tabenna with Pachomius, under whom he became oeconomus
Scotland - 402,and founded at Candida Casa, now Whithorn, a Monastery and the first stone church in Scotland. In 563 he settled in the Monastery of Iona which held preeminence over all the monasteries of the Picts. The first apostle in the east was Saint Cuthbert, who entered the Monastery of Melrose in 650 and became bishop of Lindisfarne in 684. The reign of Malcolm III and his queen, Saint Margaret, during which the Church of Scotland was brought into unity with the rest of Catholic Christendom, saw the restoration of the Monastery of Iona, the building of numerous churches, and the spread of the faith into the islands north and west of Scotland
Germany - In the cathedral of Trier is preserved the Holy Coat of Christ, which according to tradition was given to the Church of Trier by Saint Helena, and in the Benedictine Monastery of Trier is the grave of Saint Matthias, the only grave of an Apostle in Germany. Boniface dealt a death blow to paganism, symbolized in cutting down the sacred oak of Geismar, founded the Monastery of Fulda, and opened the first convents for women in Germany. During these centuries of turmoil there appeared also great saints, including the two Gertrudes and the two Mechtildes, all of the Cistercian Monastery of Helfta, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, and Saint Bruno and Saint Norbert, who together founded the Grand Chartreuse in France
león, Spain - In the 4th century a Monastery was built on the site of the death of Claudius and his brothers
Bachiarius, Monk. - He also wrote ad Januarium Liber de Reparatione Lapsi in behalf of a monk whom Januarius had expelled from the Monastery of which he was the head for immorality with a nun
San Marino - Franciscans established themselves here in 1361, the Poor Clares built a Monastery in 1609, and the first Capuchin house dates from the 18th century
Samson, a Welsh Saint - Peirio or Piro's Monastery on an island near Llantwit; some say at Llantwit
Devotion to the Sacred Heart - Though this devotion was practised by saintly souls before 1675, it is due to the apparitions of our Lord to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in the Visitation Monastery at Paray-le-Monial that the feast of the Sacred Heart is now kept on the day assigned by Our Lord
Jean de Gerson - After John's death he retired to Lyons where he spent the last ten years of his life in a Monastery in which his own brother was prior
Codex - It was discovered accidentally in 1844 by a Russian scholar in a Monastery at the foot of Mount Sinai
Sacred Heart, Devotion to the - Though this devotion was practised by saintly souls before 1675, it is due to the apparitions of our Lord to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in the Visitation Monastery at Paray-le-Monial that the feast of the Sacred Heart is now kept on the day assigned by Our Lord
Gerson, Jean Charlier de - After John's death he retired to Lyons where he spent the last ten years of his life in a Monastery in which his own brother was prior
Malchus, a Hermit in Syria - Finding the abbat of his Monastery dead Malchus took up his abode in the hamlet of Maronia, near Antioch, his reputed wife living with the virgins near
Convert - ) A lay friar or brother, permitted to enter a Monastery for the service of the house, but without orders, and not allowed to sing in the choir
Milan, Italy - The city is rich in works of art which include the magnificent cathedral begun in 1386 by Giovanni Galeazzo, the famous Last Supper of Leonardo da Vinci in the Monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie, and numerous treasures by Bramante and Amadeo
Montmartre - In 1095 the two churches became the property of a Monastery, first occupied by the monks of Saint-Martin-des-Champs, and later by the Benedictines
Desiderius Erasmus - In 1486 Erasmus was forced through poverty to enter the Monastery of Canons Regular at Emaus near Gouda, a step for which he felt no vocation
Order of Reformed Cistercians of Our Lady of la tr - Each Monastery maintains independently its own novitiate, there being no provincial divisions
Charles v, Emperor - Having transferred the government of the Netherlands and the Spanish Crown to his son Philip, in 1556 he abdicated the imperial throne in favor of his brother Ferdinand and retired to the Monastery of Yuste
Penitence - Louis, duke of Orleans, gave them his house for a Monastery; or rather, as appears by their constitution, Charles VIII
Hierotheus, a Writer - 290, 291) that Stephen Bar-Sudaili, abbat of a Monastery at Edessa, published a book under the name of Hierotheus to support his own mystic doctrines
Basilians - The Monastery of Rossano founded by Saint Nilus the Younger, and those of San Salvatore of Otranto, San Salvatore of Messina, and Grottaferrata deserve mention
Emperor Charles v - Having transferred the government of the Netherlands and the Spanish Crown to his son Philip, in 1556 he abdicated the imperial throne in favor of his brother Ferdinand and retired to the Monastery of Yuste
Erasmus, Desiderius - In 1486 Erasmus was forced through poverty to enter the Monastery of Canons Regular at Emaus near Gouda, a step for which he felt no vocation
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - In 455 Chrysippus was made the superior of the Monastery of Laura, and subsequently of the church of the Resurrection, by the patriarch Juvenal
Radegundis, Saint - Here she founded her Monastery within a mile or two of the city; finally, with the consent of Clotaire, clerks were sent to the East for wood of the true cross to sanctify it, and the rule of SS
Valerius - After Augustine's appointment, Valerius gave him a piece of land for his Monastery (Aug
Petrus, Bishop of Sebaste - For some years his brother Basil was his near neighbour on the other side of the Iris, where he had established a Monastery for male ascetics, in the presidency of which Peter succeeded him when in 365 he was finally recalled to Caesarea by bp. He continued to reside in his Monastery till after Basil and Macrina died in 379
Augustinus, Archbaptist of Canterbury - ...
His mission to England was due to the circumstance of Gregory the Great, a monk in the Monastery of St. Pancras, in memory, probably, of the young Roman martyr on the tombs of whose family the Monastery on the Caelian Mount at Rome had been built. Round this building now rose another Monastery, at the head of which Augustine placed one of his companions, Peter, as its first abbot. Seven British bishops met on this occasion, together with Dinoth, abbot of the great Monastery of Bangor in Flintshire. Andrew, in memory of the Monastery dedicated to that Apostle on the Caelian Hill at Rome, whence the missionaries had started
Columbanus, Abbat of Luxeuil And Bobbio - His life, written with great care and minuteness by Jonas, of Susa in Piedmont, a monk of his Monastery at Bobbio, in the time of Attala and Eustace, his immediate successors, is now pub. His chief training was in the Monastery of Bangor, on the coast of Down, under the eye of St. For several years he traversed the country, teaching the faith, but apparently without building any Monastery, till, coming to Burgundy at the solicitations of Gontran the king, he took up his abode in a deserted part of the Vosges mountains. 590 or 591, to the ruins of the ancient Luxovium, about 8 miles from Annegray, and established his celebrated Monastery of Luxeuil, on the confines of Burgundy and Austrasia. Agilulf, in 613, presented Columbanus with a district in the wild gorges of the Apennines, between Genoa and Milan, not far from the Trebbia, and there he built his celebrated Monastery of Bobbio, and there, Nov
Michelangelo Buonarroti - He afterwards studied anatomy at first hand by dissecting bodies, in a cell allotted for his use, in the Monastery of San Spirito
Porch - stoa , was extended to signify a roofed colonnade running round a public building such as a temple, or enclosing an open space, like the cloisters of a mediæval Monastery
Paulus of Asia - The historian describes him as an honest and simple-minded old man, dwelling quietly in his Monastery in Caria, when the patriarch had him brought to Constantinople and imprisoned in his own palace, until, overcome by harsh treatment, he was compelled to receive the communion at his hands, besides signing an act of submission, which he was not allowed to read (given by the historian), to the effect that he accepted the decrees of Chalcedon and the jurisdiction of the patriarch of Constantinople
Salvius, Bishop of Alby - After his conversion he entered a Monastery to embrace a new life of poverty, austerity, and worship
Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - They turned the cavern into a church, and built a Monastery on the side of the ravine. In 428 the church of his laura was consecrated by Juvenal, the first patriarch of Jerusalem, accompanied by the presbyter Hesychius and the celebrated Passarion, governor of a Monastery in Jerusalem
Bertha, Wife of Ethelbert, King of Kent - 110) says she took part in founding the Monastery of St
Phocas, of Sinope - A Monastery was subsequently built on the spot, in which his relics were deposited, the abbats of which are often mentioned in early times (Du Cange, Constant
Theodosius, a Monophysite Monk - Having been expelled from his Monastery for some crime, he repaired to Alexandria, where he stirred up strife, was scourged, and paraded round the city on camelback as a seditious person (Evagr
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - ...
Upon the triumph of Belisarius and the downfall of the Ostrogoths, Cassiodorus, now 70 years of age, withdrew to his native province and founded the Monastery of Viviers at the foot of Mount Moscius, which he describes (xii. He endowed the Monastery with his extensive Roman library (Div. Such time as he himself could spare from the composition of sacred or scientific treatises he employed in constructing self-acting lamps, sundials, and water-clocks for the use of the Monastery
Apollinaris, Saint And Mart - This most interesting basilica, with the vacant Monastery adjoining, is now the only remnant of the town of Classis
Civil - Civil death, in law, is that which cuts off a man from society, or its rights and benefits, as banishment, outlawry, excommunication, entering into a Monastery, &c
Irish Martyrs - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P
Martyrs, Irish - ...
Archbishops ...
Dermot O'Hurley, Cashel
Edmond MacGauran, Armagh
Malachy O'Quealy, Tuam
Richard Creagh, Armagh
Bishops ...
Boetius Egan, Ross
Cornelius O'Devany, Down and Connor
Edmund Dungan, Down and Connor
Eugene MacEgan (bishop-designate), Ross
Heber MacMahon, Clogher
Maurice O'Brien, Emly
Oliver Plunket, Saint
Patrick O'Healy, Mayo
Redmond Gallagher, Derry
Terrance Albert O'Brian, Emly
William Walsh, Meath
Secular Priests ...
AEneas Penny
Andrew Stritch
Bernard Fitzpatrick
Bernard Moriarty
Bernard O'Carolan
Brian Murchertagh
Daniel Delaney
Daniel O'Brien
Daniel O'Moloney
Donatus MacCried
Donough O'Cronin
Donough O'Falvey
Edward Stapleton
Eugene Cronin
George Power
Henry White
Hugh Carrigi
James Murchu
James O'Hegarty
John Lune
John O'Grady
John O'Kelley
John Stephens
John Walsh
Laurence O'Moore
Louis O'Laverty
Maurice O'Kenraghty
Nicholas Young
Patrick O'Derry
Patrick O'Loughran
Philip Cleary
Richard French
Roger Ormilius
Theobald Stapleton
Thomas Bath
Thomas Morrissey
Walter Ternan
Order of Premonstratensians ...
John Kieran (or Mulcheran)
Order of Cistercians ...
Bernard O'Trevir
Edmund Mulligan
Eugene O'Gallagher
Gelasius O'Cullenan
James Eustace
Luke Bergin
Malachy O'Connor
Malachy Shiel
Nicholas Fitzgerald
Patrick O'Connor
the Abbot and Monks of the Monastery of Magia
the Prior and the members of the Abbey of Saint Saviour
Order of Preachers ...
32 religious of the Monastery of Londonderry
Ambrose AEneas O'Cahill
Bernard O'Ferral
Bernard O'Kelly
Clement O'Callaghan
Cormac MacEgan
Daniel MacDonnel
David Fox
David Roche
Dominic MacEgan
Dominick Dillon
Donald O'Meaghten
Donatus Niger
Edmund O'Beirne
Felix MacDonnel
Felix O'Connor
Gerald Fitzgerald
Hugh MacGoill
James Moran
James O'Reilly
James Woulf
John Keating
John O'Cullen
John O'Flaverty
John O'Luin
Lawrence O'Ferral
Myler McGrath
P
Possidius, Bishop of Calama - His own account represents him as a convert from paganism, becoming on his conversion an inmate of the Monastery at Hippo, probably c. He seems to have established a Monastery there, and, probably early in his episcopate, consulted Augustine on ( a ) the ornaments to be used by men and women, and especially earrings used as amulets; (b ) the ordination of some one who had received Donatist baptism (Aug
Senuti, an Anchorite - He attached himself to the Monastery of Panopolis near Athrebi in Upper Egypt, where he soon attained such fame for sanctity and orthodoxy that Cyril would only set out for the council of Ephesus if he had the company of Senuti and Victor, archimandrite of Tabenna
Monophysites - ...
The Monophysites are divided into two sects or parties, the one African and the other Asiatic; at the head of the latter is the patriarch of Antioch, who resides for the most part in the Monastery of St
Melania the Younger, Daughter of Publicola - Pinianus became the head of a Monastery and Melania entered a convent
Sigismundus, Saint - 89, 91) refounded the Monastery of St
Helladius, Bishop of Tarsus - 412) he presided over the Monastery he had founded near Rhosus in Cilicia. He wrote to Alexander that, wearied by the struggle and sick at heart at the defection of his fellow-combatants, he longed to retire to a Monastery, and was only restrained by his care for his flock ( ib
Olives - About half way up the ascent is a ruined Monastery, built, as the monks tell us, on the spot where our Saviour wept over Jerusalem. At a short distance from the summit is shown the supposed print of our Saviour's left foot; Chateaubriand says the mark of the right was once visible, and Bernard de Breidenbach saw it in 1483! This is the spot fixed upon by the mother of Constantine, as that from which our Lord ascended, and over which she accordingly erected a church and Monastery, the ruins of which still remain
Ireland - Saint Columba, who founded the Monastery of Iona, Scotland, and numerous other missionaries were natives of Ireland who went to Scotland to spread the true faith. About 590 Saint Columbanus with twelve companions went to France, where they established the Monastery of Luxeuil, later labored at Bregenz, Switzerland, and finally built the Monastery of Bobbio, long the most prominent in northern Italy
Caesarius, Bishop of Arles - (4) The Regula ad Monachos and Regula ad Virgines, drawn up by him for a Monastery and a convent of his own foundation (ed. At the age of thirteen he betook himself to the famous Monastery of Lerins ( Lerinum ), where he rapidly became master of all which the learning and discipline of the place could impart. For three years he presided over a Monastery in Arles; but of this building no vestige is now left
Cassianus (11) Johannes, Founder of Western Monachism - 1), sent him to be educated in a Monastery at Bethlehem; and there he would have frequent intercourse with pilgrims from the West. This cannot have been, as some have thought, the Monastery of St. As Cassian is addressed in the Epistola Castoris as "abbas," "dominus," and "pater" it is argued, but not with certainty, that he presided over his new Monastery
Forty Martyrs, the - Basil obtained some for their Monastery near the village of Annesi in Pontus, where already a church had been built in their honour (Greg
Gallus (11), Abbat, the Apostle of Switzerland - His collection of rude huts determined the site of the town and Monastery of St
Dioscorus, the Monk - 401, Theophilus personally headed a night attack on their Monastery, which was burnt and pillaged, and Dioscorus himself treated with violence and indignity ( ib
Elias i, Bishop of Jerusalem - His residence became the nucleus of a collection of cells of ascetics, which developed into a Monastery adjacent to the church of the Anastasis (Cyril
Eutychius - 1729), when soldiers broke into the patriarchal residence, entered the church, and carried the patriarch away, first to a Monastery called Choracudis, and the next day to that of St. Condemned by default, he was sent to an island in the Propontis named Principus, and afterwards to his old Monastery at Amasea, where he spent 12 years and 5 months
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - In pursuance of a vow of his parents, James, when two years old, was placed in that Monastery under the care of abbat Eustathius, and trained in Greek and Syriac literature and in the strictest asceticism (Land, Anecdot. James was with much difficulty induced to leave his Monastery for the imperial city. Conon and Eugenius, whom he had ordained at Alexandria—the former for the Isaurian Seleucia, the latter for Tarsus—who became the founders of the obscure and short-lived sect of the "Cononites," or, from the Monastery at Constantinople to which a section of them belonged, "Condobandites" (John of Ephesus, H. On the arrival of his party, including several bishops, at the Monastery of Cassianus or Mar-Romanus on the Egyptian frontier, a deadly sickness attacked them, and James himself fell a victim to it, July 30, 578
Bibles, Chained - The earliest document to refer to chained books is the catalogue of the library of Saint Peter's Monastery at Weissenberg, Alsace (1040)
Chained Bibles - The earliest document to refer to chained books is the catalogue of the library of Saint Peter's Monastery at Weissenberg, Alsace (1040)
Music, Ecclesiastical - The historic validity of the Medicean edition was attacked, a thorough examination of manuscripts was instituted in the Benedictine Monastery of Solesmes, France, and after over 20 years of research, the "Liber Gradualis" was published
House - A Monastery a college as a religious house
Ecclesiastical Music - The historic validity of the Medicean edition was attacked, a thorough examination of manuscripts was instituted in the Benedictine Monastery of Solesmes, France, and after over 20 years of research, the "Liber Gradualis" was published
Dalmatius, Monk And Abbat - Isaac at his death made him Hegumenus, superior of the Monastery, under the patriarch Atticus
Joannes, Silentiarius, Bishop of Colonia - John consecrated himself to God when 18 years old, built a church at Nicopolis in honour of the Virgin Mary, and taking ten brethren set up a Monastery
Maximinus, Saint, Bishop of Treves - For the early history of his famous Monastery see Gall
Pachomius, Saint - His reputation for holiness soon drew to him many who desired to embrace the monastic life, and without, apparently, collecting them into one Monastery, he provided for their organization
Tabor (1) - The Franciscans and the Greek Church have each erected a Monastery-hospice on the summit, and extensive excavations have been made, particularly by members of the former order
Uz - Wetzstein found a Monastery of Job, a tomb and fountain and stone of Job, and small round stones called ‘worms of Job
Chromatius, Bishop of Aquileia - ...
Chromatius was also an early friend of Rufinus, who, whilst an inmate of the Monastery at Aquileia, received baptism at his hands c
Succoth - name; for Deir is a Syriac and Arabic word (common in names of places) meaning ‘monastery,’ which there is no reason whatever for seeing in the Tar or Dar (without the yod ) of the Talm
Beth-Shemesh - ) under Nebuchadrezzar, the city was largely unoccupied, except for remnants of the Roman/Byzantine city at Ain Shems (monastery on the corner of the tell)
Martyrology - Martyrology is also used in the Romish church for a roll or register kept in the vestry of each church, containing the names of all the saints and martyrs both of the universal church, and of the particular ones of that city or Monastery
Isaacus Antiochenus, a Priest of Antioch in Syria - The Chronicle of Edessa speaks of him as an archimandrite, without specifying his Monastery, which was at Gabala in Phoenicia
Timotheus Salofaciolus - When Timotheus Aelurus returned in 476 and took possession of the archbishopric, Salofaciolus was allowed to reside in the Monastery of the monks of Tabennesus, situated in a suburb of Alexandria called Canopus (see Le Quien, Or
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - The cave, the well-known "il Sagro Speco," is shewn about three miles of very steep ascent above the town of Subiaco, and the traditionary spot marked by a Monastery, once famous for its library and for the first printing press in Italy, where the youthful anchoret rolled naked in the thorn-bushes to overcome sensual temptations (Mab. The fame of his sanctity spreading abroad, Benedict was invited, his youth notwithstanding, by the monks of a neighbouring Monastery (at Vicovarro) to preside over them, and very reluctantly consented. Here Benedict commenced the Monastery destined to a world-wide reputation
Monk - Those who are now called monks, are coenobites, who live together in a convent or Monastery, who make vows of living according to a certain rule established by the founder, and wear a habit which distinguishes their order. Cloistered monks are those who actually reside in the house: in opposition to extra monks, who have benefices depending on the Monastery
David, Welsh Saint - In course of time David became head of a society of his own, founding or restoring a Monastery or college at a spot which Giraldus calls Vallis Rosina (derived, as is generally supposed, from a confusion between Rhos , a swamp, and Rhosyn , a rose), near Hen-Meneu, and this institution was subsequently named, out of respect to his memory, Ty Dewi, House of David, or St. David established a see and Monastery at Menevia early in the 7th cent
Monk - Those who are now called monks are coenobites, who live together in a convent or Monastery, who make vows of living according to a certain rule established by the founder, and wear a habit which distinguishes their order. Cloistered monks, are those who actually reside in the house, in opposition to extra monks, who have benefices depending on the Monastery
Bethlehem - The most conspicuous object is the Monastery erected over the supposed "Cave of the Nativity;" its walls and battlements have the air of a large fortress. The present edifice is represented by Chateaubriand as of undoubtedly high antiquity; yet Doubdan, an old traveller, says that the Monastery was destroyed in the year 1263 by the Moslems; and in its present state, at all events, it cannot lay claim to a higher date. The town appeared covering the ridge of a hill on the southern side of a deep and extensive valley, and reaching from east to west; the most conspicuous object being the Monastery, erected over the cave of the nativity, in the suburbs, and upon the eastern side
Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - Tradition says that he resided at the Monastery of Mar Mattai, near Mosul, and was bishop in that province
Ashtaroth - of Sa dîyeh at el-Merkez , another grave (modern) of Job is shown, and a Der (‘monastery’) Ayyûb , according to tradition built by the Ghassanide Amr I
Joannes ii, Mercurius, Bishop of Rome - of Riez in Gaul, wrote to Caesarius, to the bishops of Gaul, and to the clergy of Riez, directing the guilty bishop to be confined in a Monastery
Eutyches And Eutychianism - Eutyches was archimandrite of a Monastery near Constantinople. The monks round the door of the Monastery had affirmed the archimandrite to be ill; one Eleusinius had presented himself as representing Eutyches; and it was only on the assurance that the letter, of which they were the bearers, contained neither hard nor secret messages that they at last procured an audience. To the letter Eutyches replied that nothing but death should make him leave his Monastery, and that the archbishop and the synod might do what they pleased. During the session, information was brought to Flavian that certain monks and deacons, friends of Eutyches, and Abraham, archimandrite of a neighbouring Monastery, requested an audience. Therefore we, lamenting his perverseness, have decreed, through our Lord Jesus Christ, blasphemed by him, that he be excluded from all priestly functions, from our communion, and from his primacy in his Monastery. For a similar reason he urged the emperor's wife, Pulcheria, to cause the removal of Eutyches from the neighbourhood of Constantinople, and to place an orthodox abbat at the head of his Monastery. It was an impassioned appeal to the emperor to prevent an outbreak of schism, to summon a council, and meanwhile forbid the expulsion of any man from his church, Monastery, or martyry. 136, 141, 142) it would seem that Carosus and Dorotheus persisted in their views and were ejected by Marcian from their Monastery
Martinus, Bishop of Dumium - from an unknown Greek source by a deacon Paschasius in the Monastery of Dumium, with a preface by Martin, at whose command the work had been undertaken (Rosweyd, Vitae Patrum , lib. Fructuosus, drew up a monastic rule for his Monastery of Compludo, which was mainly an abbreviation of the Benedictine rule, but contained also provisions not found in that rule
Pelagians - He was educated in the Monastery of Banchor, in Wales, of which he became a monk, and afterwards an abbot
Anglo-Saxon Church - He founded the Monastery of Lindisfarne, from whence came the brothers Saints Cedd and Chad, who were the apostles of Essex and Mercia respectively, Saint Cuthbert, who labored in the north, and Saint Wilfrid, who converted Sussex and reconciled Northumbria to the Roman Easter
Isaacus Ninivita, Anchorite And Bishop - An anonymous Life prefixed to his works states that he was by birth a Syrian, and, with his brother who became abbat, entered the great Monastery of St
Simeon Stylites - 14) a visit he paid to the Monastery and pillar of Simeon
Dominicans - Just before his death, Dominic sent Gilbert de Fresney, with twelve of the brethren, into England, where they founded their first Monastery at Oxford, in the year 1221, and soon after another at London. Upon this the impostor told him, that nothing but the most extraordinary mortifications, such as the discipline of the whip, performed during eight days by the whole Monastery, and Jetzer's lying prostrate in the form of one crucified in the chapel during mass, could contribute to his deliverance. One day they sent him a loaf prepared with some spices, which, growing green in a day or two, he threw a piece of it to a wolf's whelps that were in the Monastery, and it killed them immediately
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - After 11 years in his Monastery, his reputation led to his election to the see of Tours. It required what is called a pious fraud to entice him from his Monastery; a leading citizen of Tours, having pretended that his wife was ill, begged Martin to come and visit her. He built a Monastery two miles from the city, where 80 scholars, some of them noble, pursued a severe discipline
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - When twenty years old he returned home and built a Monastery near Besanduke, of which he undertook the direction. of Constantia, the ancient Salamis, in Cyprus, where for 36 years he discharged the episcopal office with the zeal he had shewn in his Monastery. With the monks of Palestine, and especially of his own Monastery at Eleutheropolis, he continued as bishop to hold uninterrupted communication. Epiphanius went back to Jerusalem the same evening, but immediately regretting the step, and without so much as speaking to the bishop, left Jerusalem again at midnight for his old Monastery of Eleutheropolis
Severus, Patriarch of Antioch - On embracing Monophysite doctrines he entered a Monastery apparently belonging to that sect between Gaza and its port Majuma. We next hear of him in an Egyptian Monastery, of which one Nephalius was abbat, who, having been formerly a Monophysite, had embraced the faith of Chalcedon
Order of Saint Benedict - Pope Gregory the Great established the Benedictine rule in his Monastery of Saint Andrew on the Coelian Hill, and probably in six others which he founded, and introduced the order into England, whence its missionaries spread over Europe
Gate - Agreeably to this account, the Abbe Mariti, speaking of his admission into a Monastery near Jerusalem, says, "The passage is so low, that it will scarcely admit a horse; and it is shut by a gate of iron, strongly secured in the inside
Benedictine Order - Pope Gregory the Great established the Benedictine rule in his Monastery of Saint Andrew on the Coelian Hill, and probably in six others which he founded, and introduced the order into England, whence its missionaries spread over Europe
Benedictines - Pope Gregory the Great established the Benedictine rule in his Monastery of Saint Andrew on the Coelian Hill, and probably in six others which he founded, and introduced the order into England, whence its missionaries spread over Europe
Flavianus (16), Bishop of Antioch - of Antioch, 458-512, previously a monk in the Monastery of Tilmognon, in Coelesyria (Evagr
Patmos - It clusters about the Monastery of St
Joannes Talaia, Bishop of Nola - From having been a presbyter in the Monastery of the Tabennesians at Canopus near Alexandria, he was known as Tabennesiotes (Pagi, Critic
Monastery - Monastery is only properly applied to the houses of monks, mendicant friars, and nuns: the rest are more properly called religious houses. Five hundred travellers, with their horses, have been lodged at once within its walls; while the poor from every side of the country, waiting the ringing of the alms bell; when they flocked in crowds, young and old, to the gate of the Monastery, where they received, every morning, a plentiful pro-vision for themselves and their families:...
all this appears great and noble
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Recalled by Pelagius to Rome, he was allowed to return to his Monastery, but was still employed as the pope's secretary. He issued the following regulations for the restoration of monastic discipline: no monk should be received under 18 years of age, nor any husband without his wife's consent (in one case he orders a husband who had entered a Monastery to be restored to his wife [2]); two years of probation should always be required, and three in the case of soldiers; a professed monk leaving his order should be immured for life; no monk, though an abbat, should leave the precincts of his Monastery, except on urgent occasions; under no pretext should any monk leave his Monastery alone, on the ground that "Qui sine teste ambulat non rectè vivit. " He provided for the more complete separation of the monastic and clerical orders, forbidding any monk to remain in his Monastery after ordination, and any priest to enter a Monastery except to exercise clerical functions, or to become a monk without giving up his clerical office; and further exempting some monasteries from the jurisdiction of bishops
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - 113), taking up his abode in a Monastery, one of two founded in a large village called Nicerte, 3 miles from Apamea, and about 75 from Antioch ( Ep. ...
After some 7 years in the Apamean Monastery, he was drawn to assume the cares of the episcopate. His life as bishop differed as little as possible from that he had lived in his Monastery. He was allowed to retire to his Monastery near Apamea (Ep. Though now at liberty to go where he pleased, Theodoret preferred to remain in his Monastery (Ep. It is not even certain whether he returned to his episcopal duties at Cyrrhus or remained in the quiet Apamean Monastery, devoting himself to literary labours
Art, Christian - For centuries art was devoted almost exclusively to the decoration of church, or Monastery, or commemorative chapel
Christian Art - For centuries art was devoted almost exclusively to the decoration of church, or Monastery, or commemorative chapel
Painting, Religious - The cloister offered an ideal atmosphere of peace and leisure for fostering artistic talent, and the illumination of Bible or missal led naturally, in the case of the gifted, to the decoration of church or Monastery walls
Eucherius, Saint, Bishop of Lyons - Their two sons, Salonius and Veranius, received an ecclesiastical education in the Monastery of Lerinum under St
Religious Painting - The cloister offered an ideal atmosphere of peace and leisure for fostering artistic talent, and the illumination of Bible or missal led naturally, in the case of the gifted, to the decoration of church or Monastery walls
Sculpture - For centuries art was devoted almost exclusively to the decoration of church, or Monastery, or commemorative chapel
Paula, a Roman Lady - They then founded a Monastery for men, and a convent of three degrees for women, who lived separately, though having the same dress, and met for the services
Paulinus, Missionary to Northumbria - He is said to have been a benefactor to the Monastery of Glastonbury, rebuilding the church and covering it with lead, and to have spent some time within its walls
Petrus, Surnamed Fullo - During the interval Peter dwelt at Constantinople, in retirement in the Monastery of the Acoimetae, his residence there being connived at on a pledge that he would not create further disturbances (Labbe, iv
Germanus, Saint, Bishop of Auxerre - He founded a Monastery outside Auxerre, on the opposite bank of the Yonne, often crossing in a boat to visit the abbat and brethren
Acacius, Bishop of Beroea - He was apparently a Syrian by birth, and in his early youth adopted the ascetic life in the Monastery of Gindarus near Antioch, then governed by Asterius (Theod
Maronites - The Maronites have a patriarch who resides in the Monastery of Cannubin, on Mount Libanus, and assumes the title of patriarch of Antioch, and the name of Peter, as if he seemed desirous of being considered as the successor of that apostle
Beda, Historian - From his admission to the joint Monastery to his death he remained there employed in study and devotional exercises, and there is no evidence that he ever wandered further than to York, which he visited shortly before his death. Some monks of the Monastery went to Rome in 701 (Bede, de Temporum Ratione , c. His own Monastery offered rest and welcome to learned strangers like abbot Adamnan (Bede, H
Ethelbert, King of Kent - He assisted Augustine in converting an old Roman-built church into "the cathedral church of the Holy Saviour," and also built, "after exhortation," a Monastery outside the E
Text of the New Testament - Forty-three leaves of the OT were discovered by Tischendorf in the Monastery of St. Codex Bezae , in the University Library at Cambridge, to which it was presented in 1581 by Theodore Beza, who obtained it in 1562 from the Monastery of St. The MS was in the Monastery of Clermont, whence it was acquired by Beza, who was also owner of D Augustinus, Aurelius - Paul's Epistles he went on to talk to his friends of the wonderful history of the hermit Anthony whose ascetic life had begun from hearing in church a passage of the gospel (Mat_19:21) on which he had promptly acted; he then described the spread of the monastic movement and informed his astonished hearers that even at Milan there was a Monastery in existence. The tendency to a monastic ideal was there, and as time went on, Augustine determined to sell his property, and find a home more suitable for a Monastery. Among other places, he came to Hippo (Bona ), where he knew of a young official whom he hoped to enlist for his Monastery ("juvenis veni ad istam civitatem, quaerebam ubi constituerem monasterium . He assembled in his Monastery a number of brethren like-minded, each with nothing of his own and all things common; above all, the common aim, "commune nobis ut esset magnum et uberrinum praedium ipse Deus. His Monastery, the first in Africa (see below, § 15), became a training-school for clergy
Sermon on the Mount - During the Roman Catholic church's history in the Middle Ages, only those living within the Monastery were held responsible for keeping the ethics of the sermon; everyone else was bound only to keep the Ten Commandments
Faustus (11), Sometimes Called the Breton - 426 or a little later) he entered the famous Monastery of Lerins, then presided over by St
Macrina, the Younger - She was buried by her brother in the grave of her parents in the chapel of the "Forty Martyrs," about a mile from her Monastery
Theodosius ii., Emperor - His palace was so regulated that it differed little from a Monastery; for he, together with his sisters, rose early in the morning and recited responsive hymns in praise of the Deity
Timotheus, Called Aelurus - When he reached Alexandria, the kindly and popular Salofaciolus was allowed to retire to his Monastery at the suburb called Canopus
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - of the Monastery of Corbey adds, but without mention of authority, that he was sent by him on a similar errand into Campania to oppose Julian of Eclanum. in the library of the Monastery of St
Version - The fourth, D, or the manuscript of Beza, was so called because it belonged to the reformer Beza, who found it in the Monastery of St
Muratorian Fragment - had come from the Irish Monastery of Bobbio, and the fragment seems to have been a copy of a loose leaf or two of a lost volume
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - His wife, daughters, and all the females of his household embraced the religious life, and Rabbûlas retired to the Monastery of St
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - A Monastery and a convent were built, over which Jerome and Paula respectively presided (Ep. ), in or close to the Monastery, surrounded by his library, to which he continually added, as is shewn by his constant reference to a great variety of authors, sacred and profane, and by his account of obtaining a copy of the Hexapla from the library at Caesarea (Comm. ) of the Monastery and by the crowds of monks and pilgrims who flocked to the hospice (lxvi. He expounded the Scriptures daily to the brethren in the Monastery
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - His chief Monastery, Darira, rose upon the site of a famous temple which he had demolished. By another imprisonment Eutychius wrung from him the resignation of a property which Callinicus, a chief officer of the court, had bestowed, and which John had largely improved and converted into a Monastery
Library - These were originally from the library of the Essene Monastery
England - Saint Aidan, founder of the Monastery of Lindisfarne, spread the Faith in the north; and from Lindisfarne came Saint Cedd and Saint Chad who labored as missionaries in Essex and Mercia, Saint Cuthbert who strengthened Christianity in the north, and Saint Wilfrid, who besides converting the South Saxons, reconciled the Christians of Northumberland to the Roman Easter and other institutions sanctioned by the Holy See
Joannes (520), Monk And Author - ...
Photius states that Moschus commenced the recluse life in the Monastery of St
Manuscripts - Sinai, Monastery of St. Sinai, Monastery of St. Sinai, Monastery of St
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - He retired to a Monastery in Pontus, almost certainly that on the river Iris presided over by his brother Basil, and in close vicinity to Annesi, where was the female convent of which his sister Macrina was the superior. On his way back to his diocese, Gregory visited the Monastery at Annesi, over which his sister Macrina presided. The emperor put a public chariot at his disposal, which served him and his retinue "both for a Monastery and a church," fasting, psalmody, and the hours of prayer being regularly observed all through the journey (t
Culdees - According to Bede, having converted the northern Picts, he received from Brudi, their king, the island of Hii in possession, for the purpose of erecting a Monastery
Vigilantius - He was an inmate of Jerome's Monastery on the occasion of a tremendous storm with earthquake and eclipse ( cont
Eusebius, Bishop of Dorylaeum - 15) Eusebius found that Eutyches had refused to come, alleging a determination never to quit his Monastery, and saying that Eusebius had been for some time ( πάλαι ) his enemy
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - But if out of filial regard he abstained from deserting his home for a Monastery, he would make a Monastery of his home. of Mopsuestia, adopted the ascetic life under the superintendence of Diodorus and Carterius, who presided over a Monastery in or near Antioch
Silence - It was in the Monastery of Erfurt that the Reformation was wrought out
Vincentius Lirinensis - of Troyes (LUPUS (2)], involved in the turmoils of worldly life before his retirement into a Monastery near a small town, remote from the stir of cities
New Testament - It was brought from Greece to the Monastery of Irenaeus at Lyons; at the sack of Lyons Beza found it in 1562. Tattam from the Natrian Monastery, Lower Egypt, now in the British Museum
Monophysitism - By this means he secured a safe return to his Monastery, but his adversaries continued to attack him, and to charge him with calling Christ's Body God's Body, and with asserting that It was not ὁμοούσιον with other bodies. Theodoret was exiled to the Monastery in which he had been brought up
Bible, Texts And Versions - They represent the remains of a library of a group of separatist Jews who lived in the caves in the area and worked in a type of Monastery
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - of Cotrona lived not far from the Monastery in Bruttium (monasterium Vivariense) to which Cassiodorius had retired after his active life as a statesman
Vulgate - He was subsequently made titular abbot of Tours, and in 796 he obtained leave to retire to that Monastery, where he spent the nine remaining years of his life ( d . The library and scriptorium of this Monastery (many of the inmates of which were English or Irish monks) first became notable under abbot Gozbert (816 836), and perhaps reached the height of their importance under abbot Hartmut (872 883)
Pelagianism And Pelagius - In Palestine he was introduced to Jerome in his Monastery at Bethlehem. Jerome was regarded as a chief mover in the prosecution of Pelagius and apparently by way of vengeance a violent and outrageous assault was made upon his Monastery at Bethlehem which was ascribed to some of the Pelagian party with what justice it is not easy to ascertain
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - His early manhood was probably passed in a Monastery, where he could pursue the studies which afterwards made him famous
Joannes, Bishop of Antioch - Nestorius, generally abandoned by his supporters, was permitted to retire to his former Monastery of St
Thecla - The Monastery that marked her place of retreat and bore her name which as we learn from Gregory of Nazianzum (Orat
Rufinus of Aquileia - Rufinus went to the Monastery of Pinetum near Terracina, of which his friend Ursacius or Urseius was the abbat, and there stayed probably for a year, from early spring 397 till after Lent 398
Bible - the Curetonian, edited by Cureton, and the Sinaitic, found in a MS at the Monastery of St
Book - Sometimes a book was given to a Monastery, on condition that the donor should have the use of it for his life; and sometimes to a private person, with the reservation that he who receives it should pray for the soul of his benefactor
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - His mode of life was monastic in the fullest sense, and he calls his house a Monastery ( Ep
Mss - Some liturgical directions inserted in it show that it was copied from a MS written in Naples, no doubt one brought to England by Hadrian, abbot of a Monastery near Naples, who came to England with Archbishop Theodore in 669
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - The deacon ascertained that Arsenius was concealed in a Monastery at Ptemencyrcis, on the eastern side of the Nile
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - His love of retirement was now, as all through life, a powerful influence, and towards the end of 375 he disappeared suddenly, and found refuge for 3 years at Seleucia in Isauria, at a Monastery devoted to the virgin Thecla (Carm